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Volume LXXV, Number 36

www.towntopics.com

Cannabis Task Force Prepares to Propose Ordinance for Dispensaries

Hunterdon Land Trust Marks 50 Years Preserving Local Land . . . . . . . . . . 5 Sukkah Village Princeton Uses Design to Highlight Social Crises . . . . . . . . . 8 Rummage Sale at Trinity Church . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 The Haunted Yearbook: A Back to School Reverie . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Freshman Yeager Makes Impressive Debut for PU Field Hockey . . . . . . . . 28 Despite Graduation Losses, PHS Boys’ Soccer Looking Formidable . . . . . . . . . 30

Olivia Weir and PHS Field Hockey Primed for Big Season . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .20, 21 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 22 Classified Ads . . . . . . 35 New to Us. . . . . . . . . . 23 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 34 Performing Arts . . . . . 16 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 35 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

Princeton’s Cannabis Task Force (CTF) is preparing to recommend an ordinance for Princeton Council permitting three cannabis dispensaries in town. The CTF is seeking input at two public meetings in the next 10 days, on Thursday, September 9 at 7 p.m. on Zoom (link available on the municipal website at princetonnj.gov) and Saturday, September 18 at 10 a.m. in person, location to be determined, or on Zoom depending on weather and COVID-19. “The purpose of these meetings is to get people to weigh in on the proposed recommendations of the CTF to allow three retail establishments in town,” said Councilwoman and CTF Chair Eve Niedergang in a September 6 phone interview. “We’re reaching out to the public. We want people to be aware of this and the earlier we get input from the public the earlier we can take advantage of that input.” The 23-member CTF, appointed by the municipality of Princeton, chose to opt out on the state’s August 21 deadline for passing ordinances for the cannabis industry in town. Their goal is to prepare an ordinance to opt in at some point this fall. The CTF felt that the community needed more time to solicit community input and develop plans and requirements that fit Princeton’s values and needs. Niedergang explained that the CTF has been considering which of the town’s seven commercial zones might be the most appropriate locations for cannabis dispensaries. The discussion has been lively, she said, but the members seem to be in agreement on moving ahead with public meetings followed by an October recommendation to Council, if possible. The Princeton zones under consideration include the central business district, the northern portion of Witherspoon Street, Jugtown near the intersection of Nassau and Harrison streets, the Alexander Street/Road area, the Princeton Shopping Center, and two areas on Route 206: one south of the Municipal Building near Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad and another near Bottle King. The CTF plans to recommend that cannabis dispensaries follow the same rules that currently regulate liquor stores regarding location (not within a certain Continued on Page 13

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Wednesday, September 8, 2021

Commemorating 9/11, 20 Years Later Saturday marks 20 years since some 3,000 lives were lost when two hijacked airplanes hit the World Trade Center in New York City, another struck the Pentagon, and one crashed in a field in Shanksville, Pa. Nine of the dead were from Princeton and 17 others were from Mercer County. Several area memorial observances are planned, including events in Princeton, at Rider University, and in Hopewell and Montgomery townships. In Princeton, the Princeton 9/11 Memorial Committee will dedicate a permanent memorial at noon on Saturday, September 11. A ceremony will be held outside the Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad headquarters at 2 Mount Lucas Road (inside with COVID-19 protocol in case of rain). The outdoor memorial is comprised of a nine-foot steel beam from the World Trade Center, as well as plaques describing the events of the day, and mileage to the World Trade Center, Pentagon, and Shanksville plane crash sites. “We felt that 100 years from now, this will tell the story and have impact,” said Committee Chair William Shields. During the ceremony, the names of the nine Princeton residents who died will be read, and first responders will be honored, said Shields, who explained that the names were culled from various

sources. The fire bell will ring once after each of the nine names; and will sound again for the New York Police Department, Port Authority, Fire Department of New York, and members of the U.S. Intelligence communities. The last bell would be for all who died or suffered as a result of the attacks in the weeks or months following September 11, Shields said. The event will feature speakers, prayer, music, and the police honor guard will post colors. “We think the town will be proud of this,”

said Shields. “We are not closing a chapter but opening it up so others can read it.” The steel beam used in the memorial arrived in Princeton on March 24, 2012, with a safety officers’ vehicle escort, through efforts by past Fire Department Chief Roy James. The beam, which weighs 745 pounds, was placed in storage waiting for an appropriate home, said Shields, until the piece was brought to Princeton Engine Co. No. 1 Firehouse on Chestnut Continued on Page 12

2020 Census Shows Princeton, Mercer Co., NJ, US All Growing in Size and Diversity The population of Princeton is 30,681, in an area of about 18 square miles, with a population density of 1,729 per square mile, according to the United States Census Bureau 2020 results reported last month. The consolidated Princeton population (the municipality was established in its current form with the merging of the Borough and the Township in 2013) grew by about 7.4 percent over the past 10 years, making Princeton the 26th largest town in the state. The racial composition of Princeton is 72.5 percent white, 16.9 percent Asian, 7.5 percent Hispanic or Latino, 5.7

percent Black or African American, and 3.7 percent two or more races. The median house value in Princeton is $866,200, and the median age in Princeton is 33.8 years, 30.7 for males and 39.4 for females. Females make up 49.2 percent of the Princeton population, males 50.8 percent. The population in Mercer County grew by 5.7 percent from 2010 to 2020, with Robbinsville seeing the biggest increase of 13.4 percent to 15,476, followed by East Windsor 10.5 percent to 30,045, West Windsor 8.7 percent to 29,518, Pennington 8.4 percent to 2,802, Continued on Page 13

THE WRATH OF IDA: The remnants of Hurricane Ida caused major flooding and destruction throughout the area last week, and the cleanup continues. People share how they were affected by the flooding in this week’s Town Talk on page 6. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

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HOME GROWN: The annual native plant sale held by D&R Greenway is a popular event held in front of the nursery. Wear masks to this year’s sale. as needed. pawpaw, serviceberry, and D&R Greenway to Hold beach plum; as well as buttonThe nursery has over 50 vaAutumn Native Plant Sale

D&R Greenway Land Trust will hold the autumnal native plant sale, open to the public on Thursday, September 16, from 5 to 6:30 p.m.; Friday, September 17, from 5 to 6:30 p.m.; and Saturday, September 18, from 9 to 11 a.m. Fall is an ideal time for planting shrubs and new trees, as they establish strong root systems before winter, well ahead of the stress of summer heat. Significantly, local plants require less maintenance in terms of fertilizer, water, and pesticides. The land trust’s Native Plant Nursery specimens are grown from locally sourced starter plants free of nicotinoid insecticides which harm pollinators. Local plants are conditioned to survive regional stresses. Planting natives that evolved locally turns home gardens into habitat. The sale is held in front of the nursery on the property. Visitors selecting their plants must wear masks and maintain social distancing. As in earlier COVIDaffected events, the D&R Greenway staff monitors “entrance”

rieties of plants of the region. They are selected for health, for beauty, and to provide shelter and food for regional birds, insects, and butterflies. Their trees, shrubs, perennial wildflowers, grasses, sedges, and ferns are grown either on-site or purchased from reputable nearby native plant growers. Their flora not only support New Jersey’s unique environment, but also D&R Greenway’s preservation and stewardship mission. Tina Notas, director of land stewardship for D&R Greenway, said, “We are delighted to open our native plant nursery to the public, so that local gardeners may safely choose our vibrant native flora. Our broad array of plants summons specific creatures dependent upon our unique local ecosystem, in both breeding and migratory seasons.” An up-to-date inventory is at D&R Greenway’s Native Plant Nursery’s website at drgreenway.org/shop/native-plants. Available trees and shrubs include oaks and ironwood; local fruiting trees including

bush, red buckeye, spicebush (earliest spring flowerlets and home of spicebush swallowtail butterfly), witch hazel (which blooms in winter), dogwood, and bayberry. Among their native flowers are blue flag iris, mountain mint, goldenrod (this important pollinator plant does not generate allergies; it bears heavy pollen which falls to the ground instead of traveling by air), subtle foxglove beardtongue, towering Joe Pye weed, and blue lobelia. The Johnson Education Center’s ca. 1900 barn is not open to the public at this time, though the land trust’s popular preserves and trails remain open for public enjoyment. The land trust has been careful to put practices in place that safeguard purchasers and staff, yet enabling gardeners to enjoy the spring planting tradition. The Native Plant Nursery is on the grounds of D&R Greenway at the Johnson Education Center, One Preservation Place, off Rosedale Road. For more information, call (609) 578-7470 or visit drgreenway.org.

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Pop-Up Vaccine Clinics: Princeton University’s Jadwin Gym will administer vaccines on Wednesdays in September from 1-4 p.m. Donate a Tree: To Princeton’s Shade Tree Commission. There are two tax-deductible ways to support the mission of increasing the municipal shade tree canopy. Visit princetonnj.gov. Cannabis Task Force Public Meeting: Virtually, on Thursday, September 9, at 7 p.m. If needed, a second will be held Saturday, September 18, at a time to be determined. Princetonnj.gov. Deadline Extended: For the “Furry Friends of SAVE” 2022 calendar. Include your pet for $25. Proceeds benefit the cats and dogs of SAVE, A Friend to Homeless Animals, in Skillman. To participate, visit Savehomelessanimals.org. Register for HiTOPS Princeton Half Marathon: It’s not until November 14, but the annual event is already 70 percent full with over 800 participants. There is also a virtual alternative. All proceeds benefit HiTOPS sex education and support for all youth. For more information, visit hitops.org.


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FARMLAND PRESERVED: As Hunterdon Land Trust celebrates 25 years of preserving farmland and open space, it offers events such as a tour of the barns at Dvoor Farm, its headquarters in Flemington, on September 12 at 10:30 a.m. The farm tells the story of the region’s farm culture and architecture from the mid-18th to mid-20th centuries through its buildings and barns, like this horse barn built in the 1930s.

Hunterdon Land Trust Marks 25 Years Preserving Local Land Hu nterdon L and Tr ust ( H LT ) is celebrat ing 25 years of protecting open space, but Patricia Ruby is looking forward as well. “We are constantly working on new land preserva-

tion projects,” said Ruby, who has served as HLT executive director since 2012. “But one of the big stories is that this year we closed more projects than ever before.” The goal, she said, was to have 10,000 acres preserved by 2020, “and we have blown through that milestone, and now we are at 10,350 acres,” she said. “We closed recently on 70 acres, and this year there have been nine closings compared to the t ypical two to five.” (Two additional closings were expected shortly.)

TOPICS

benefit pollinator meadows and wetlands, streams, and stormwater management. HLT has raised more than $2 million toward the Dvoor Farm project, which Ruby called “vital to linking the past, present, and future for all we ser ve,” to ensure that the farm remains a “place for families and friends to gather to remember the past and forge new memories; and allow more people to enjoy an array of educational and recreational opportunities that honors Hunterdon County’s agricultural, cultural, and natural heritage; all while boosting the local economy.”

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Of the Town

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To celebrate both past and current achievements, a virtual Celebration and Fundraiser on September 19 at 5 p.m. will mark HLT’s 25year anniversary, and also look ahead. In addition to workshops, the organization will honor Board Secretary Larry LaFevre, along with Ralph Celebre and Susan Haase, owners of Basil Bandwagon Natural Market. The nationally accredited nonprofit HLT will host several events this fall, including a free tour of the historic barns at Dvoor Farm in Flemington, which serves as its headquarters, on Sunday, September 12 at 10:30 a.m. On the tour, Christopher Pickell of Pickell Architecture in Flemington will discuss the history of the property’s barns and wagon house, which date from around 1800 to the 1930s. For the first time, participants can see how the buildings were constructed and what makes them unique. Space is limited, and registration is required. To sign up, email Director of Outreach Dave Harding at dave@hunterdonlandtrust.org. HLT’s plans for Dvoor Farm call for a “sensitive rehabilitation” of the barns, so they can be used for children’s camps, corporate retreats, life celebrations, and educational programming. I n f r a s t r u c t u r e i m pr ove ments to provide public restrooms are on the agenda, as well as improved traffic flow and parking, and natural resource restorations to

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Hunterdon Land Trust Continued from Preceding Page

COLD SOIL ROAD PRINCETON, NJ 08540

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HLT operates a “producers’ only” Farmers Market at Dvoor Farm on Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The market, which started in 2007, has about 25 local farmers and vendors. The protected open space in Hunterdon County is tied to the history of the land trust. Twenty-five years ago, Hunterdon County, home to family farms, open fields, and woodlands, was vulnerable to increasing sprawl. A few local residents, who wanted to prevent the sprawl and what comes with it, formed a volunteer group in 1996 originally known as the Hunterdon Land Trust Alliance, which evolved into the land trust. Delaware Township resident Roger Harris spearheaded the group and connected with other environmental groups, and residents from Kingwood, Readington and East Amwell. Bylaws were drafted and Harris became the land trust’s first president. Currently HLT has 21 preservation projects in the works in several townships including Readington, Kingwood, Bethlehem, Franklin, Raritan, Lambertville, and Holland. It recently helped facilitate the preservation of 28.7 acres of open space at the Fitzgerald tract and 106 acres of farmland and open space at the Saums property, both in Readington; the 135-acre Silva Farm in Holland Township; and 104 acres of open space at the Maritan property in Kingwood. Fulfilling its mission to preserve rural landscapes in the Hunterdon County region, HLT also has included the preservation of the Dondero farm in West Amwell. The farm, dating back to the 1750s, was successfully preserved, working with D&R Greenway Land Trust and the New Jersey Green Acres Program, according to HLT. HLT partners with municipal, county, and state governments and other nonprofit organizations, working with landowners who wish to permanently protect the ecological, agricultural, scenic, historic, or recreational qualities of their land, according to the organization. It also works to help landowners identify the best options to meet their conservation goals and financial needs, assisting them through the preservation process. Protecting space is especially timely. New Jersey is supposed to be completely built out by 2050, said Ruby, “so we feel a clock ticking, and will continue to work as best we can. We have a strategic plan to help identify the priority projects.” The future holds some challenges such as limited dollars for stewardship, balancing spending on protecting land use, and on land acquisition. “How do you devote your resources? It’s a challenge,” she said. This fall, however, said Ruby, “we are pausing to reflect and celebrate our past achievements and thank the many supporters who worked during this past quarter-century to protect what’s truly special about Hunterdon County. But by no means are we resting on our laurels. Though we have accomplished a great deal, there’s so much more work that remains to be done.” For more information on Hunterdon Land Trust and the anniversary events, visit hunterdonlandtrust.org. —Wendy Greenberg

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“How were you affected by the flooding from the remnants of Hurricane Ida?” (Photos by Weronika A. Plohn)

“We escaped by the skin of our teeth, because I needed to pick up my son as the rain was picking up. But I was able to get him and return home safely. We managed to make it through the storm without any flooding or damage to our home and my family is safe, so we feel very fortunate.” —Rajiv Hande, Edison

“My basement flooded pretty early on during the storm. There was about six to seven inches of water on the basement floor that we had push out into the sump pump. Here at the Princeton Canoe Rental it was really bad. We lost a couple of boats into the water because the chains broke. The docks were completely underwater, and the surge had pushed rocks and debris over the area, which took a lot of work to remove. But we are open and back in business already, which is a great thing.” —Gabe Silverstein, Princeton

Maria: “We had some water in the basement, and my workplace was affected. I work on the campus of Rutgers University, and we were told to work remotely on Thursday and Friday due to the impact of the flooding there. Other than that, we know people who needed to be evacuated. ” —Maria Heidkamp with Isabella Kopits, both of Princeton

Kathryn: “We had been traveling and came home Thursday to find eight inches of water in the basement, so we have been working very hard to pump it out and clean up the downstairs. There’s been a lot of lugging items and furniture up the steps and out to the yard to dry out. Fortunately it is warm weather, because our water heater and furnace drowned and will need to be replaced. But no one was hurt, so that is what matters most to us.” Peter: “Our marriage survived, too.” —Kathryn Weidener with Peter Szego, both of Princeton


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DEADINE FOR ENTRIES IS OCTOBER 27 The winners will be announced in the November 17 and 24 issues of Town Topics Newspaper. Don’t miss your chance to vote for your favorite businesses or services! The Readers’ Choice Awards is open for online voting now at towntopics.com, or mail to 4438 Route 27, P.O. Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528. NO PHOTOCOPIES ACCEPTED. Must be on original newsprint.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021 • 8

Sukkah Village Princeton Uses Design To Highlight Social Crises of Today

Some three years ago Princeton architect Joshua Zinder viewed the fi lm Sukkah City, the story of a New York City competition based on the creative design of a sukkah, a hut-like shelter made for the Jewish fall festival of Sukkot. The event was a means to draw attention to such issues as housing insecurity, homelessness, and hunger. When Zinder brought the movie to The Jewish Center Princeton, it ignited the enthusiasm to hold a similar event in town. But fall 2019 was a busy time for the synagogue, celebrating its 75th anniversary, and by March 2020, COVID-19 canceled the plans. “I’m not one who gives up so easily,” said Zinder, who is president of the AIA of New Jersey and managing partner of the Princeton integrated architecture and design firm JZA+D. “So this year we reinvigorated it.” Sukkah Village Princeton 2021 is finally happening. The interfaith community program involves some 20 Princeton area religious and cultural groups bringing attention to affordable housing, hunger, homelessness, sustainability, and refugees, via architecture. Princeton’s Sukkah Village opens September 19 at noon and closes September 29 at 9 a.m. “Even though Sukkot is a Jewish holiday,” said Zinder, “everyone can celebrate it. It brings awareness to critical issues in New Jersey.” Su k kot is a week long

Jewish holiday that celebrates the gathering of the harvest and commemorates the sheltering of the Israelites wandering for 40 years in the desert following the exodus from Egypt. The observance is marked by spending time in a sukkah, a recreation of the hut-like structures that housed the ancient Jews. As a temporary dwelling, Zinder explained, the sukkah symbolizes the fragility of human existence. The public is welcome to tour 11 sukkahs on public sites around downtown Princeton. The structures are designed by prominent architecture and design firms and New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) student winners of an architecture school competition. Event sponsors are the Jewish Federation of Princeton Mercer Bucks, the Arts Council of Princeton, AIA NJ, Princeton Hillel, and The Jewish Center Princeton. With the main Sukkah Village at The Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street, other display sites will be at YWCA Princeton, 59 Paul Robeson Place; Palmer Square at Hulfish Street; the Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street; Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street; and Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street. Each sukkah has a not-forprofit partner, so visitors to the sukkah will be learning about that nonprofit. The sukkahs will be auctioned off to raise money for an assigned charity, which will

be displayed at the site. The auction will open September 19 on the Sukkah Village website at sukkahvillage. com. Profi ts will be evenly divided among all the nonprofit partners. Some are demountable for use next year, Zinder noted. “In my offi ce we asked how do you create one that you can store on a couple of shelves?” Participating architecture and design firms, in addition to two teams from NJIT, include Joshua Zinder Architecture and Design; KSS; Mills and Schnoering Architects, LLC; Michael Graves Architecture and Design; Michael Landau; Studio Hillier; HDR Inc.; and Seth A. Leeb, Architect. To design and build their sukkah each team had to follow a rigorous set of guidelines, some set forth in the Bible, and some reflecting modern requirements for public safety. Special programming throughout the 10-day event will include panel discussions, family-friendly arts and crafts, discussions, and walking tours. September 19 is the kick-off evening, at the Arts Council of Princeton, with designers and event partners and sponsors. It will also feature a screening of the short documentary Sukkah City, plus an interactive discussion. Registration is through the website. Additional events include an informal walking tour on September 20; a talk on affordable housing on September 22; a talk on

sustainability and climate change on September 23; a lunch and learn on food insecurity scheduled for September 24; and a “sukkah hop” and family activities on September 26. More details are listed on the Sukkah Village Facebook page, Sukkah Village Princeton 2021, or at sukkahvllage.com. Community partners in Sukkah Village include Jewish Federation of Princeton, Mercer Bucks; HomeFront NJ; Arts Council of Princeton; Trenton Area Soup K itchen ; United Way of Greater Mercer County; Rescue Mission of Trenton; Send Hunger Packing; Princeton Community Housing; Arm In Arm; YWCA; Sustainable Princeton; The Jewish Center Princeton; Board of Rabbis, Princeton Mercer Bucks; Trinity Church; Nassau Presbyterian Church; Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton; Jewish Family & Children’s Services; Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton; Jewish Community Foundation; Princeton Senior Resource Center; Princeton Housing Author it y ; WitherspoonJackson Historical and Cultural Society; and TJC Interfaith Refugee Resettlement Committee. The organizers hope Sukkah Village will show the power of design to address humanitarian issues that resonate thematically with the festival. One message, said Zinder, is that “design matters. You can create something that looks beautiful, that can also offer a message.” The main message, said Zinder, is that the holiday of Sukkot speaks “to the

fragility of shelter. We are able to have roofs over our heads, but we need to think about those who don’t. We were all once refugees wandering in the desert. There are so many in crisis, we can bring attention to them. “Sukkah Village 2021 is a celebration of the power of design — and the power of each of us — to contribute to solutions to the challenges that face us.” —Wendy Greenberg

Annual Rummage Sale At Hopewell Presbyterian

The annual rummage sale at Hopewell Presbyterian Church, 80 West Broad Street, Hopewell, will be held on September 16 and 17 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and September 18 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. On the final day, customers can fill a bag for $5. On offer will be gently used housewares, china, furniture, linens, jewelry, clothes, small appliances, books, toys, seasonal items, and more. Proceeds from the sale are used to support local and worldwide mission projects. Donated items can dropped off at the church beginning at 3 p.m. Sunday, September 12 through 12 p.m. Wednesday, September 15. Items that will not be accepted are shoes, plastic cups or bottles with advertising, magazines, textbooks, upholstered furniture, encyclopedias, computers, typewriters, mattresses, or large appliances. For questions about a donation, call (609) 577-8819. Visit hopewellpresbyterian.org for more information.

Town Topics Readers’ Choice Awards — Vote Now

Town Topics’ popular Readers’ Choice Awards is back for 2021! Let us know which area businesses and services deserve to be recognized as outstanding in our community. This year’s new categories include Best Dog Park, Best New Business, Best Lunch Break, Best Gluten Free Option, Best Equestrian Center, and more. The voting starts now. See the ballot in today’s newspaper, or share your favorites online at towntopics.com. The deadline for entries is October 27. The winners in all Town Topics 2021 Readers’ Choice categories will be announced in the November 17 and November 24 issues. Don’t miss your chance to vote for your favorites!

Tammy Murphy to Attend Trenton Soup Kitchen Event

The Trenton Area Soup Kitchen and Hunger Free New Jersey will hold Hunger Action Day on Friday, September 17, to focus on food insecurity in New Jersey and how this pervasive issue can be addressed. The program, which will take place from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Soup Kitchen, 32 Escher Street, Trenton, will feature stories from people impacted by hunger, as well as remarks by New Jersey First Lady Tammy Murphy, New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Doug Fisher, Trenton Mayor Reed Gusciora, Congresswoman Bonnie Watson Coleman, Mercer County Executive Brian Hughes, and Assemblyman Craig Coughlin. This will be a tented, outdoor event. For further details, call (609) 697-6164.

Join us for a fall afternoon of hands-on fun! The main event: the inaugural ACP Pottery Throwdown where you can watch as ceramic artists compete in various challenges on the pottery wheel! Take a tour of our studios, watch classes in action, and make your mark on a Paul Robeson Center for the Arts community fence mural. 102 Witherspoon Street,Princeton, NJ 609.924.8777 artscouncilofprinceton.org For more information, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org


The School Bell is Ringing -

Stay Safe Be Good to Your Teachers Help Your Friends Study Hard Always Do Your Best

Congratulations to all the teachers, the staff, the School Board, the parents and all the students!

WE ARE WITH YOU the youngest to the PhD *Message brought to you by a group of caring Princeton Families.

9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021

WELCOME BACK


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021 • 10

Grand Finale (?) Rummage Sale at Trinity Church Is September 23-25 It started in 1971 with just one table for each sales category — used clothing, toys, jewelry, white elephants. A few “better things” (now known as “The Boutique”) were sold on the tiny stage, all in the old Pierce Hall at Trinity Church on Mercer Street. The idea originated in the “jumble sales” in Victorian England, where the Anglican church raised money for itself and for causes worldwide. Fifty years later the Trinity Church Rummage Sale, with hundreds of thousands of dollars of sales over the years to support the church’s outreach efforts, is preparing for its possible grand finale on September 23, 24, and 25. Thousands of items — clothing, art, antiques, housewares, linens, books, and much more — will fill five or six large rooms at the church. Dozens of volunteers will be working long hours, with many hundreds of shoppers anticipated. Thursday, September 23 is sale preview day from 1 to 5 p.m., with a $10 entry fee and a long waiting line expected before the 1 p.m. opening. On Friday, September 24, the sale runs from noon to 5 p.m., and on Saturday, September 25, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. (no entry fee on regular sale days). In preparation for that first sale in 1971, a few volunteers sorted and priced items in front of the Pierce Hall stage, and the items were stored on the stage and in two small rooms. The treasurer’s report from 1971

lists a total of $2,585.77 in sales of accessor ies, children’s clothes, fun and games, household jewelry, bric-a-brac, and men’s and women’s clothes. “The volume of the sale grew almost exponentially,” according to a 1987 Trinity Church report titled “Come, Celebrate Rummage at Trinity: A Serious Enterprise.” The previous year the Boutique and Better Dresses sections had produced “an astounding $18,000 in six hours of non-stop action,” with the one-day event earning $25,000. A 1985 lead volunteer reported, “The donations have been wonderful. You really can’t imagine the variety of items we receive and the pleasure, joy, and sometimes amazement they give to others. We had a beautiful wedding gown in 1983 and it fit the girl who bought it down to the last stitch. The next year she came back with her wedding picture and her new husband to meet us!” S h e c o n t i n u e d , “A n d we can’t forget the locked steamer trunk! We hoped it contained a vast treasure, but what it did contain was 57 towels (from a New York hotel), 10 pounds of sugar (from 1942), and a couple of cans of sardines that had burst over everything! We w as h e d t h e towels, scrubbed the trunk, and sold both.” Since then sales in many years have surpassed $40,000 with all the procee ds going not to t he

church itself but to t he church’s outreach efforts serving Central New Jersey and beyond. Organizations receiving support through the Trinity Rummage Sale include Chorus Foundation, Housing Initiatives of Princeton, Episcopal Relief and Development, Gaia Global AIDS Interfaith Alliance, Urban Promise, Foundation Cristosal, Rescue Mission of Trenton, Trenton Area Soup Kitchen, Habitat for Humanity, and Big Brothers Big Sisters. A 1985 statement from the Trinity Church Vestry described the purpose of the Rummage Sale “to support Trinity’s outreach to Princeton, Trenton, and the world at large.” The vestry statement went on to emphasize the “circular exercise in Christian stewardship,” with significant benefits to donors and beneficiaries alike. “Good humor, good will, firmness, and above all fairness are essential in the inevitable excitement and scramble for bargains,” the statement concluded. Rummage Sale Department Chair for Ar t and Antiquities Connie Escher, who, w it h her daughter alongside in a playpen, began volunteering with the Rummage Sale in 1974, described how the Trinity Rummage Sale has become “a venerable Princetitution” over the years. “It draws a huge throng,” she said. “From one table to a church full of ‘shops’ with departments specializing in

“A PRINCETITUTION”: The Trinity Church Rummage Sale, in operation since 1971, is scheduled for September 23, 24, and 25 at the Trinity Church on Mercer Street. Trinity Librarian Rob Fraser and Department Chair for Art and Antiquities Connie Escher display some of the thousands of items to be sold to support the church’s outreach efforts in what might be the end of a tradition after 50 years. different categories, selling necessities, as well as the unusual and collectibles. Vo l u n t e e r p a r i s h i o n e r s have signed on for years in the same spot, for decades in the same department, growing in knowledge of the merchandise in their departments. Children of workers have signed on. ‘Raised on rummage’ is a favorite saying.” She noted that this year’s sale might be the biggest ever, with the pent-up demand for sale items and huge quantities of merchandise stored up, after sales canceled because of COVID-19 in 2020 and spring 2021. “The team of devoted volunteers, mostly seniors, who put in thousands of hours have always been supported by those volunteers who could lend a hand in the

final days before the sale, and as willing salespeople during the sale itself,” said Escher. Over the years, sorting, polishing, cleaning, and pricing—“the most challenging work”—have been done year-round in the undercroft of the 188-year-old church. Hamilton Jewelers, David Rago of Rago Auctions, and others have helped to evaluate and sell valuable items in the past. Escher recalls the most expensive articles ever sold by the Trinity Rummage Sale, two art works for nearly $50,000 auctioned by Rago Auctions several years ago. A f ter t his year’s sale, Trinity Church will decide whether to continue with a rummage sale in the coming years. If it continues it would probably be in a diminished

fashion that would require less storage space and a smaller-scale organization. “The excitement of the sale for t he hunter and gatherer in all of us, both workers and shoppers, will be missed if this is the grand finale rummage sale,” said Escher. “But the special planning and disr upting of on-going church activities and spaces, will not be missed.” She went on, “I believe our shoppers love to come to Princeton and meet the Trinity parishioners in a unique setting. Many of them return as old friends to their favorite departments. The repetition of a warm welcome to all shoppers is another form of stewardship and outreach for Trinity, beyond the cash proceeds of the sale.” —Donald Gilpin

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© 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, LLC.. All rights reserved. Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. www.imagineadv.com. Although every precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specs may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors.

© 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, LLC.. All rights reserved. Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. www.imagineadv.com. Although every precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specs may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors.

© 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, LLC.. All rights reserved. Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. www.imagineadv.com. Although every precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specs may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021 • 12

Commemorating 9/11 continued from page one

Street in 2015, blanketed by an American Flag, under a single light around the clock until 2021. A few months ago it was mounted, funded by donations. I n 2 019, P r i n c e t o n First Aid & Rescue Squad President Mark Freda, now mayor of Princeton, sought a permanent memorial on the grounds of the Squad’s new headquarters. Many of the contractors working on the Squad’s facilities, along with other local contractors, donated services or funds to ma ke t he P r inceton September 11 Memorial a reality. ( Donations are still being accepted at c/o PACF, 15 Princess Road, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648). “To me,” s aid Freda, “this is a very important event in our community. It marks 20 years since the day that changed life here in the United States forever. And now that we have an actual memorial in place in Princeton, we should remember the sacrifice of so many that day by taking some time on September 11 to acknowledge those that died then; and all those that have died since due to what happened that day.” “It is hard to believe that so much time has gone by,” he continued, “and that so many in this country today were not born yet. But for those of us in New York City or Washington, D.C. or Shanksville that day, and those of us that watched this all unfold, it is a memory we will hold forever.” Freda added a special thanks to all involved in the memorial event, noting that “this is an effort over many years involving many people.” T he commit tee asks attendees to park in the Community Park lot, located across the Princeton Fire Department on Witherspoon Street. Accessible parking will be available across from the Memorial site, at the lower parking lot of the Municipal Building, accessed from Valley Road. Other Princeton Events T h e P r i n c e to n P u b i c Library will host a staged reading and dis cus sion on Thursday, September 9. After the Dust Settles explores three stories of unresolved grief, healing, and renewal following the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center. The ensemble drama by New Jer s ey play w r ight Jason Immordino will be read from 6 to 8 p.m. in the library Community Room, presented by Magic Lantern Productions, and followed by a moderated discussion with the playwright, director Maureen Heffernan, and the cast. The reading is presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The librar y poster

ex h ibit ion, “S epte mb er 11, 2001: The Day that Changed the World,” is on view at the library until September 18, and a new on l i n e r e s ou rc e g u i d e, Understanding 9/11, can be viewed at princetonlibrary. org/understanding-11. New York’s 9/11 Memorial a n d M u s e u m pro d u c e d the poster exhibition that presents the event’s histor y, its origins, and its ongoing implications. Madeline Rosenberg, public humanities specialist, who previously worked at the 9/11 Memorial and Museum, is coordinating the exhibition and resource guide. “T he librar y sees the 20th anniversary of 9/11 a s a n op p or t u n i t y for learning, critical thinking, and reflection,” Rosenberg said in an email. “In that spirit, we are offering varied methods for understanding 9/11 in all of its complexity. This is especially important for members of younger generations, who have no direct memor ies of the attacks but have grown up in a world shaped by them,” T he Pr inceton S enior Resource Center offers a 9/11 Memorial and Tribute on Thursday, September 9, at 11 a.m. with registration required. The event includes a virtual tour of the 9/11 Me m or ia l a n d Mu s e u m in New York City, and a discussion about 9/11 hosted by Donald Benjamin, PSRC board member. Participants will have the opportunity to share their memories, t h o u g ht s, a n d fe e l i n g s about the attacks and their aftermath. A Tour of Flight 93 National Memorial, Shanksville, Pa., is the September 21 event, with registration required. Register at princetonsenior. link/go9 for either event. Princeton University An interfaith service to remember the Princetonians who perished in the September 11 attacks will b e h e l d o n S a t u r d a y, September 11 at 10 a.m. at the 9/11 Memorial Garden located between Nassau Hall and Chancellor Green. In addition to prayers offered by University religious leaders, President Christopher L. Eisgruber ’83 will speak at the service. All are welcome to attend. The event will also be live-streamed and available for viewing on Monday, September 13 on mediacentral.princeton.edu. A Zoom panel will be held on September 9, from 4:30 to 5 :30 p.m. The program, “9/11, 20 Years L ater: A World Forever Changed,” will feature Gen. John Rut her ford A llen, USMC ( Ret.), president, the Brookings Institution, for mer commander of the NATO International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) and U.S. Forces in Afghanistan; Razia Iqbal, anchor, NewsHour, BBC World Service; Amb. Daniel Ku r t zer, t he S. Da n iel

Historical Society Hosts “Night Under the Stars”

WE REMEMBER: The 9/11 Memorial at the Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad headquarters will be dedicated Saturday to those who lost their lives, and to the responders who helped with the aftermath, in 2001. A steel beam from the World Trade Center is shown as part of the memorial. (Photo courtesy of William Shields) A b r a h a m P r o fe s s o r o f Middle East Policy Studies at the School, and former U.S. ambassador to Israel and Egypt; and Jacob Shapiro, a professor of politics and i nter nat iona l af fair s at Princeton, and director of the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project. Register at the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, Center for International Security Studies website at spia.princeton.edu. Rider University Rider University’s September 11 commemoration w ill feature alumnus and former Pennsylvania Gov. Mark Schweiker, a 1983 Rider graduate, who led Pennsylvania’s response to the attack on United Flight 93 in Shanksville. “An Evening with Governor Mark Schweiker” is set for Thursday at 5:30 p.m. in the Mercer Room in Daly Dining Hall, 2083 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville. The R e b o v i c h I n s t i t u te fo r New Jersey Politics and Rider University’s Office of Veterans and Military Affairs will host the event. He plans to address the enduring implications on hom ela nd s e cu r it y a nd counterterrorism, according to the university. Schweiker b e c a m e Pe n n s y l v a n i a’s governor when then-Gov. To m R i d g e j o i n e d t h e Bush administration as the first director of Homeland Security. Ridge is currently the executive-in-residence of Rider’s Homeland Security Studies program. Hopewell Township H o p e w e l l To w n s h i p is planning a ceremony at 11 a.m. Saturday in Woolsey Park planned by the Emergency Ser vices Memorial Committee. In 2019, a World Trade Center piece of steel, which was obtained by the Hopewell Township Fire District in 2011, was moved to the Bank of America. This year the steel will move to the high school on September 10. (It was not moved last year during the pandemic.) Fire Commissioner Michael Chipowsky, who is the chair of the Hopewell Va l l e y S e p t e m b e r 11 Committee and Emergency Services Memorial said, “We hope by displaying a piece of the steel recovered from the World Trade Center following the 2001 attacks at

various locations in our town we can remind people of the terror that we faced at the time and hope that we will always remember the nearly 3,000 people lost that day.” Montgomery Township Three public events w i l l m a rk M ontg om e r y Township’s commemoration of 9/11. T hree p eople with ties to Montgomery Township were lost in the terrorist attack at the World Trade Center. The events on Saturday will begin with a 10 a.m. Remembrance Ser vice organized by the Montgomery Township Volunteer Fire Department #2 in Skillman. The ceremony will honor the fallen New York City firefighters, police officers, and first responders, as well as all the lives lost and forever changed by the events that occurred 20 years ago. This event will be held at the Fire Company’s 9/11 Memorial at the firehouse at 529 Route 518, Skillman. The memorial was built by fire department members, using steel from the World Trade Center. The Montgomery Open Space Commit tee has organized a 9/11 Serving the Community event with tree planting and environmental stewardship from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hobler Park in Skillman, 1645 Great Road (Route 601). Residents are invited to participate by signing up in advance and selecting a one-hour service time to spread out volunteers for COVID-19 safety. To pre-register, email Open Space Coordinator Lauren Wasilauski at LWasilauski@ twp.montgomery.nj.us or call (908) 533-9302. Registrants will receive a link to an instructional video on how to plant a tree. The last event of the day will be a 4 p.m. wreathlay ing by Mayor Dev ra Keenan and members of the Montgomery Township Commit tee at the 9/11 Memorial at Montgomery Veteran’s Park, Harlingen Road, Belle Mead. “The spirit of service is alive and well in Montgomery Township,” said Keenan. “I hope many of our residents will join with me in thanking the first responders who protect us today, while remembering those who gave their lives on that horrible day 20 years ago.” — Wendy Greenberg

The Historical Society of Princeton (HSP) will host the “Night Under the Stars” fundraiser event on Saturday, September 25, from 6:30 to 10 p.m. at Updike Farmstead. The event is an evolution of the Historical Society’s annual “Concert Under the Stars,” featuring its “boots and blue jeans” flair. The evening will begin with craft cocktails mixed with Sourland Mountain Spirits. Bill Flemer’s Stony Brook Bluegrass Band will entertain from the farmhouse porch as guests explore the farmstead grounds and enjoy a variety of casual lawn games. Afterwards, guests will settle under strings of vintage lights to dine on a family-style, multi-course, seasonal meal prepared by Harvest Catering and Events. Local craft beers and a selection of wines will be available throughout the evening. After dessert, local musician (and HSP board president) Paul Pessutti will entertain guests with an array of acoustic favorites for dancing and singing along. All festivities will be outdoors amidst the beauty of Updike Farmstead, a unique historic setting surrounded by nearly 200 acres of farmland. “We’re so excited to offer this reimagined version of our always-fabulous annual event,” said Izzy Kasdin, the Historical Society’s executive director. “T he ‘Night Under the Stars’ will offer guests a relaxed and elevated experience, amidst a true celebration of local food, drink, and talent. This event is absolutely unique to Updike Farmstead, HSP, and the gem of New Jersey’s preserved agricultural landscapes – you don’t want to miss it!” Baxter Constr uction, Charles Schwab, Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty, Bryn Mawr Trust, PNC Private Bank, MacLean Agency, and McCaffrey’s Markets are all major event sponsors. The Historical Society is monitoring conditions created by COVID-19 and will be taking all necessary precautions to ensure a safe and fun outdoor event for all. Net proceeds from the “Night Under the Stars” support the Society’s mission of history education, provided via stewardship of historical collections, exhibitions, public programs, and co-curricular support for schools in the Princeton community and beyond. In so doing, HSP brings the past to life and explores its enduring relevance. Tickets to this special benefit event are available online at princetonhistory.org, or by phone at (609) 9216748 x106. Guests must be 21 or over. The event will be held, rain or shine.

Applications are Open For Bronfman Fellowship

Applications are now open for the 36 th cohort of the Bronfman Fellowship, which selects 26 outstanding North American teenagers for an intellectually challenging year of programming. It begins with a free summer in Israel between the fellows’ junior and senior years of high school, followed by monthly virtual experiences

and two seminars in the U.S. The program educates and inspires exceptional young Jews from diverse backgrounds to have a significant impact on the world as community builders, deep thinkers, moral voices, and cultural creators. The nonprofit fellowship was founded by Edgar M. Bronfman, formerly CEO of the Seagram Company Ltd. For 36 years, Bronfman fellows had the opportunity to see the world through a lens broader than their own. Taught by a faculty of rabbis and educators, Fellows explore a wide range of Jewish texts, from classic religious work s to c onte m p or a r y poetry and philosophy, using these sources to spark conversations, engage with existential questions, and achieve a deeper understanding of themselves and one another. Fellows also have the opportunity to engage with intellectuals, artists, and religious and cultural leaders. Past speakers have included journalist Matti Friedman, author Nicole Krauss, musician and Yiddish scholar Anthony Russell, and Torah scholar Dr. Avivah Zornberg. Fellows also interact with a group of Israeli peers who were chosen through a parallel selection process by the Israeli branch of the fellowship, Amitei Bronfman. Additionally, they have the opportunity to participate in the fellowship’s arts tracks: workshops in areas including poetry, dance, drama, visual narrative, and music, taught by innovators in the field of Jewish art. Upon returning home from the summer in Israel, Fellows also explore major themes in North American Jewish life. “My father, Edgar M. Bronfman, placed enormous faith in young people’s ability to see the world not just as it is, but as it ought to be,” said Adam R. Bronfman, president of The Samuel Bronfman Foundation. “He believed that young people energized by their Judaism were best equipped to both shape a Jewish ‘Renaissance’ and improve the world.” There are now over 1,300 Bronfman Fellowship alumni across North America and Israel. Among them are seven Rhodes Scholars, four former Supreme Court clerks, 19 Fulbright Scholars, 37 Wexner Fellows, and 27 Dorot Fellows. Leaders of note among fellowship alumni include Daniel Handler, a.k.a. Lemony Snicket, author of the best-selling Series of Unfortunate Events children’s books; Jonathan Safran Foer, author of Everything Is Illuminated; and Rabbi Angela Warnick Buchdahl, the first woman to be named senior rabbi at New York’s Central Synagogue and the first Asian American person to be ordained as a rabbi and cantor. Applications for the 2022 fellowship are due December 8, 2021, and are available online at bronfman.org. High school students in the United States and Canada who self-identify as Jewish and who will be in 11th grade in the fall of 2021 are eligible to apply. The fellowship is a pluralistic program for Jews of all backgrounds; prior Jewish education is not required.


continued from page one

Hightstown 7.4 percent to 5,900, Trenton 7 percent to 90,871, Hamilton 4.3 percent to 92,297, Ewing 4.1 percent to 37,264, and Hopewell Township up 1.1 percent to 17,491. Hopewell Borough saw a .2 percent decline to 1,918, and Lawrence Township a 1.2 percent decline to 33,077. In Mercer Cou nt y t he white population was 63.3 percent, Black or African A mer ican 21.5 percent, Hispanic or Latino 18.5 percent, Asian 11.9 percent, and two or more races 2.5 percent. Over the past 10 years t h e p op u lat i on of N e w Jersey, defying predictions of a mass exodus from the state, increased by about 5.7 percent to almost 9.3 million. Many New Jersey cities, including Newark, J e r s e y C i t y, P a t e r s o n , Tr e nton, a n d E l i z ab e t h increased in population, with Newark at 311,549 remaining the largest city in the state. Nationwide, the population of urban areas grew by 9 percent over the past decade, with 86 percent of the population now living in metropolitan r e g i o n s . A l t h o u g h 312 of the 384 metropolitan areas in the country gained population over the past decade, the Census Bureau reported that the U.S. is growing more slowly than it used to with about 52 percent of U.S. counties seeing population declines between 2010 and 2020. The number of people identifying themselves as white fell to 57.8 percent of the U.S. population, down from 64 percent in 2010. The population of Asians was up about 36 percent, Hispanics and Latinos up about 23 percent, Blacks up about 6 percent, and those identifying as more than one race increased more than 100 percent, to about 13.5 million from about 6 million. —Donald Gilpin

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Cannabis Task Force

locations, the number of can- and belonging (DEI&B) into re-imagine how their or- Saturday, September 18 nabis establishments, and the their organization’s DNA. ganization currently “does f r o m 10 a . m .-12 p . m . continued from page one perennial Princeton issues of This is a highly interactive business” related to DEI; Tickets are $20 and must be distance of a school), hours traffic and parking. program limited to 26 peo- learn strategies that en- purchased in advance. of operation, and other conThe tour is co-sponsored —Donald Gilpin ple. It is recommended that hance DEI&B thinking and straints. organizations send teams decision-making; discover by the Historical Society of of one board member and where their organizations Princeton and the Princeton Municipalities are permitted to impose a 2 percent NonProfitConnect Hosts one decision-making staff are positioned for incorpo- P r o s p e c t F o u n d a t i o n . member. rating DEI&B concepts on Participants will meet at tax on cannabis operations, Sessions on Diversity but the CTF has not yet “Diversity, Equity, IncluMurr y is the president several developmental lev- Colonial Club, 40 Prospect made any decisions about sion & Belonging” is the title and CEO of YRM Consult- els; and develop a working Avenue. Zink will focus on how that revenue would of a series of workshops be- ing Group, LLC. She has plan for integrating DEI&B the architecture, origins, be spent. “We want to get ing presented by NonProfit- over 30 years of experience activities into their organi- and development of the 16 started talking about this Connect, led by consultant providing training, C-suite zations. Classical and Gothic-style with the public,” Niedergang Yvette R. Murry, for non- executive coaching, and Sessions are Thursdays clubhouses, which date from said. “The CTF is very fo- profit board and staff lead- consultation service to or- from 12-1:30 p.m. Visit 1895 to 1928. Copies of cused on using that money ers over five sessions from ganizations who put their nonprofitconnectnj.org to Zink’s book will be available to address the ills of the war September 23 to January people first. for sale at a discounted price sign up. on drugs, to address issues 13. The format is virtual. at the tour. Over the course of the Clifford Zink to Lead of social justice and equiThe purpose of the series seminar series, participants Space is limited to 20 party. What the shape of that is to prepare and support will explore how their life Tour of Eating Clubs ticipants. Given this is an would be is a conversation transformational nonprofit experiences influence their Clifford Zink, author of the outdoor tour and does not that’s just beginning.” 2017 book The Princeton go inside the eating clubs, in their journey to expand decision-making and imThe ordinance proposal that their capacity to integrate pact organizational culture Eating Clubs, will lead a masks are optional. To regthe CTF hopes to present to diversity, equity, inclusion, and policy development; walking tour of the buildings ister, visit princetonhistory. on P rosp ec t Avenue on org. Council in October will not include a recommendation as to how the revenue from cannabis should be used. Up to this point the CTF has been concentrating on the particulars of its initial ordinance and has just started to hold discussions on the question of how Princeton can best seek to make amends for some of the harm caused by the war on drugs. A CTF meeting during the day on Thursday, September 9, before the Thursday evening public meeting, will feature presentations by the Rev. Charles Boyer, a leader in social justice issues and in the campaign to abolish the drug war and the criminalization of Black people, and Princeton University Professor Udi Ofer, an ACLU civil rights lawyer and CTF member. “We hope these discussions will continue in public meetings and beyond,” said Niedergang. In addition to pushing ahead to resolve the details of a retail cannabis ordinance recommendation and related social justice issues, the CTF will also be considering, with public input, whether to broaden the scope of cannabis recommendations into the area of manufacturing, testing, cultivation, and other industry possibilities. Niedergang noted that the New Jersey Cannabis Regulatory Commission (CRC) last month issued its 160 pages of regulations for the state’s cannabis industry. She was pleased to see both the social equity emphasis and the amount of discretion granted to the individual municipalities to decide what businesses can open in their towns. In order to apply for the required state license to open a dispensary, a business must first have zoning approval and a resolution from the governing authority in the local municipality. “That is very encouraging As part of one of the nation’s largest property and casualty insurance brokers, from my perspective, “said Niedergang. “The CRC is givCBIZ Borden Perlman combines national resources with local, personalized service. ing towns a lot of discretion about what businesses can Licensed in 50 states, we work tirelessly to insure what’s important to you. open there.” “We all have concerns,” said Niedergang, as much of the CBIZ BORDEN PERLMAN SERVICES: discussion in CTF meetings so far has centered around the Personal Insurance | Commercial Insurance | Specialty Insurance particulars of opening dispensaries in town, with debates about different neighborhood

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13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021 • 14

Humans Must Rapidly Intensify Efforts To Prevent Further Global Warming

Mailbox Town Must Defend Master Plan, Deny PU’s Variance Request for Prospect

To the Editor: This past April, Princeton University’s Environmental Studies Department hosted a thoughtful seminar, entitled “Environmental Justice Symposium: Meaningful Engagement between Communities and Institutions of Higher Education.” Anyone committed to sustainability knows that community engagement and support are essential to create positive environmental change. But meaningful engagement with the community is not a model that Princeton University seems interested in following in Princeton, as they seek to destroy three historic homes and impose their 666,000-square-foot engineering and environmental studies complex on the neighbors of Fitzrandolph, Murray, and Prospect. They have not heard the community’s pleas to save the homes by modifying a tiny fraction (2 percent) of a proposed complex that dwarfs most projects on Route 1. At the June meeting of the Princeton Planning Board, the University’s representatives alleged they had done everything right, and that, at the last hour, the rules were being changed on them. This is false and disingenuous. From the outset, the University chose to design without regard for national historic district guidelines or for the town’s zoning and master plan. That is why the University needs a variance from the town. Rather than follow the zoning, or engaging the community, the University has preferred to lawyer up and force their will on their neighbors. They are only shocked that someone dares to say “no.” The University’s position is clear: they allege there is “no controlling authority” to stop them from demolishing all four historic buildings, and the community is powerless. The University is offering a stark choice. Either the town can uphold its zoning and master plan, in which case the University says they’ll destroy the historic Court Clubhouse and leave the three historic Victorians (for now); or the town can let the University violate the zoning and master plan, and the University will save (for now) but displace the Court Clubhouse and destroy the three Victorians. It is a horrible choice, reflecting a gross disregard for the community’s desires and the town’s master plan. All so that a “theorists’ pavilion” can have more “natural light,” and, I suppose, host conferences on justice and meaningful community engagement in 666,000-square-feet of splendor, and not an inch less. Given this Hobson’s choice, where the only option offered is submission to the will of the University and destruction of the community’s history, the town must defend its master plan and its governing authority to zone and plan. The only hope the town has of convincing the University to meaningfully engage is to deny their variance request. If the town compromises its zoning for a compromised neighborhood, the precedent is set, and the gates open for the University to disregard the community and master plan again and again. Please attend the Zoom meeting (bit.ly/prospect-planning) on September 23 at 7 p.m. and urge the Planning Board to (1) deny the University’s variance application, and (2) approve their overall site plan only on condition that these historic buildings be preserved. LOUIS HAMILTON Murray Place

To the Editor: Until recently, instead of referring to benign sounding “climate change,” I had been using “climate crisis.” However, the two hurricanes that battered our region with severe flash flooding, tornados, and high winds just in the past month, have opened my eyes to how drastically the situation has worsened. So now I call it the “climate catastrophe.” We see this catastrophe unfolding here, nationwide, and globally, and worsening far faster and more severely than almost anyone expected. Massive fires, extreme heat, flash floods, and droughts are all afflicting the world in unprecedented ways. The organization that I lead, the Coalition for Peace Action (CFPA), began a campaign called No Wars, No Warming in conjunction with the People’s Climate March attended by over 400,000 in September 2015. This campaign seeks to educate the public on the connections between militarism and the climate catastrophe. The climate catastrophe is an existential threat in the same category as global nuclear holocaust. If anybody doubts that, just look around at events like those above. We must rapidly intensify efforts to prevent further global warming, or we face the danger of planetary extinction. Readers wanting to join CFPA in this effort are encouraged to visit peacecoalition.org. THE REV. ROBERT MOORE Witherspoon Street The writer is executive director of the Princeton-based Coalition for Peace Action.

To the Editor: Rosedale Road was considerably damaged during the floods following Hurricane Ida. The sidewalk near Johnson Park school has bucked and stretches have been washed out. The road and bridge are potholed. In addition, two weeks ago a man was tragically killed by a car near the school intersection. This is a dangerous stretch of road and sidewalk that has fallen into disrepair. Johnson Park and Greenway Meadows get a lot of use by children, sports teams, and walkers. They need to be able to safely navigate the sidewalks and cross the street. A pedestrian activated crosswalk with a light that signals to cars that to stop is urgently needed, and the sidewalks need to be repaired. BENEDICTE CALLAN, PH.D. Brookstone Drive

Books

Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

PHS ClaSS of 1968 SCHolarSHiP fund SUPPORT A FIRST-GENERATION SENIOR! The Princeton High School Class of 1968 annually awards a scholarship to a first-generation PHS graduating senior to continue their education. The senior is selected by the PHS administration and the scholarship is administered by the Princeton Area Community Foundation. Please send your tax-deductible donation to:

Trisha Volk Princeton Area Community Foundation PO Box 825454 Philadelphia, PA 19182-5454 Checks payable to:

Princeton Area Community Foundation Please note on the check — PHS Class of 1968 Scholarship Fund

We have raised $70,000 from our Classmates. Currently about 4% is distributed annually. We are pleased to announce that three awards have already been granted. Won’t you join with the Class of ’68 and support a qualifying senior? Learn to Live and Live to Learn.

Donate online – visit www.pacf.org • In the upper, right-hand corner of the screen, click ‘Donate Now’ • Click ‘support a specific fund’

Dangerous Stretch of Road and Sidewalk On Rosedale Road Needs to Be Repaired

• Enter amount of gift • Click on ‘specify a fund’ (just below ‘make this a monthly gift’)

• Enter PHS Class • Enter credit card and billing information • Click Donate Now

Washington Crossing Historic Park Hosts Author of “Travels with George”

New York Times bestselling author Nathaniel Philbrick will appear at Washington Crossing Historic Park (Pa.) on Wednesday, September 15 at 7 p.m. for a lecture, Q&A, and signing of his new book, Travels with George: In Search of Washington and His Legacy, which will be released the day before his appearance. In Travels with George, Philbrick makes an argument for Washington’s contribution to the forging of America by retracing his journey as a new president through all 13 former colonies, which were a united but unsure nation. The book marks a new, first-person voice for Philbrick, weaving history and personal reflection into a single narrative. According to a starred review in Booklist, “Philbrick moves from one century’s point of view to another’s, perceptively observing what has changed and what has not. He particularly notes the past and current legacy of slaveholding, whether in North or South. This provides highly personal reflection and unique perspective on both the history and the often-contradictory lives of present-day Americans.” Philbrick is the author of numerous bestselling books, including In the Heart of the Sea, winner of the National Book Award for nonfiction; Sea of Glory, winner

of the Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt Naval History Prize; and Mayflower, finalist for both the 2007 Pulitzer Prize in History and the Los Angeles Times Book Award. Philbrick last visited Washington Crossing Historic Park in 2019 to lecture on his book In the Hurricane’s Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown. Tickets to this special event are limited and available online only at WashingtonCrossingPark.org/ events. Ticket price is paywhat-you-w ish w ith pro ceeds benefiting the nonprofit Friends of Washington Crossing Park. Suggested minimum donation is $15 per person. Tickets do not include the new book, which can be purchased on the ticket page for an additional $30. At the request of the publisher, the author will only sign books purchased through the reading. For more information about this event, call the park at (215) 493-4076.

well loved and well read since 1946


15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021

BOOK REVIEW

Lost and Found: A Back to School Reverie A little bit of courage is all we lack So catch me if you can, I’m goin’ back... —Carole King, from “Goin Back” ooking ahead to Thursday, Princeton’s first day of the new school year, I’ve been going back to school, way way back to my first, McCalla Elementary, which was named for Bloomington Indiana’s first female school superintendent and was an easy two-block walk from home. Otherwise, all my schooling, K-12, took place in the same building, with one notable exception (ninth grade in New York City). The country school where I spent grades four through six is a lesser exception since getting there involved a long school bus ride through hills and valleys and woods to a two-room red-brick schoolhouse called Poplar Grove. That humble building still stands and so does the two-story Classical Revival structure that housed McCalla, which is currently used by the Indiana University School of Fine Arts for sculpture classes. Lost and Found After a too-hasty online search, I actually began to fear that the university had demolished the Art Deco building I’d entered as a kindergartner and left as a graduating senior. I was aware that the interior had been gutted long ago because I have a small, neatly cut and polished chunk of the wooden banister with a small plaque attached: University School 19371964. On the opening page of my senior yearbook there’s a two-page photograph of U-School’s Indiana limestone facade next to which a “lamentful” sophomore friend has drawn a ballpoint arrow and the words, “Stu, if you’re smart, boy, you’ll stay the hell out of here.” And so I did for decades, until a classmate and I wandered inside on a June day in 1989. As soon as I walked down the hallway where my locker had been, I realized that I’d been there before in my dreams. I don’t mean nightmares, just dreams of the sort that take you down long, strange, vaguely familiar hallways and stairways and landings, while you try to fulfill enigmatic missions at the urging of various ghostly teachers whose names you’ve forgotten or would prefer not to remember. In these dreams I sometimes end up on the ground floor outside the boy’s locker room, the scene of an ugly, real-life fistfight between a senior class officer and a tough country kid. The class officer was getting the worst of it, his nose bleeding all over his powder blue cashmere sweater. Here were two societal extremes, the elite city kid and the country boy who was

L

never invited to parties of the in-crowd, even if he happened to be a hero on the field. My friend and I were in there no longer than the time it took to hear the spooky quavering of our voices echoing in the hallway. We’d been kidding around, like old times, two bored-to-death seniors, and the sounds we were making came back at us like something on the soundtrack of low-grade horror movie. The Haunted Yearbook It st ill sur pr ises m e, how b eref t I felt during the brief time when I thought t hat a ll t race s of t hat bu i ld i ng had been erased. Looking just now at the h a l l s a n d lo cke r s and classrooms in my yearbook, the idea became even more inconceivable. There we are, our little society in words and pictures, a small scale democracy, where the person elected student body president was t he one who actually got the most votes, even the year a longhaired, trombone-playing nonentity ran against the elite shoo-in candidate whose father was an administrator at the university. Whether it was for Student Council or Senior Council, all the votes counted, fair and square. And even though our various teams were as often as not on the losing side, no one was ever crazy enough to deny the reality of the final score. Whatever that fight outside the locker room had been about, both fighters were starters on the football team, country boy in the line, city boy in the backfield, and soon enough they made up, they were teammates, the fight cleared the air.

Redefining

W hat innocents we were ! With yearbook headings like “We Study, Plan and Work So We Will Belong,” “We Strive to Fulfill Our Responsibilities,” “Yesterday the Classroom, Tomorrow the World!” But here’s a picture that lights up the page. It shows that year’s homecoming queen, not a senior but a sophomore, smiling so sweetly, so absolutely naturally and nicely, eyes closed, e ve n as ou r ot h er w ise for midably grim and glowering middle-aged principal plants a big kiss on her cheek. When I showed my w ife the photo, she said: “He’d be in trouble if he did that today.” Sad but true, and sad but true the story behind the photograph on the next page, two indisputably attractive females, the valedictorian and salutatorian, winners of Nat ional Mer it scholarships, both branded as “Brains” in our lit tle society because no one could see beyond the stereotype. The Haunted Hallway The yearbook photo that really gets me is the one spread across the top of a page show ing the most familiar of all school scenes, the classic crowded hallway shot of kids of all shapes and sizes coming and going, from seniors to seventh graders. The caption reads: “Traffic jams are frequent happenings in the overcrowded halls between classes.” Tell me about it. I’ve just been there. I’m thinking of the TV schools I’ve attended, of kids coming and going in the halls of Twin Peaks High (“Who killed Laura Palmer? ”), Dillon High in Texas (Friday Night Lights), Hawkins Elementary and High in Indiana (Stranger Things,

Design Redefining Design

Redefining

Design

built adjacent to the Upside-Down), Sunnydale High (built over The Hellmouth to keep Buffy the Vampire Slayer busy), and, most recently, the nameless high school that haunts Charlie Kaufman’s I’m Thinking of Ending Things. Saved for Music I must have spent an hour Monday morning trying to find evidence that U-School was still there. What a relief to finally locate an image of the building on the corner of Third and Jordan, a view from 2019. Once I found out what actually became of it, I felt even better. My old school now houses one of the largest academic music libraries in the world, with numerous special collections, among them one containing clothing, furniture, recordings, books, and awards from Leonard Bernstein’s composition studio. Now I hear from another classmate that he and his wife recently enjoyed a summer concert “in the old UHS building, where there’s a performance space on the second floor.” Ninth Grade in New York Walking through the Boy’s Entrance at McBurney School on West 63rd Street was not something a freshman from the Midwest ever took for granted. According to a “Streetscapes” piece in the June 16, 2002, New York Times, the 14-story West Side YMCA building occupied by the school resembles a “castellated Italian hill town, with towers, battlements and balconies rising in irregular sympathy, culminating in a huge, central tower with an octagonal roof.” New York 1930 (Rizzoli 1987) refers to the building’s “delightful lightness ... a feeling further enhanced through the extensive use of polychromed terra-cotta.” hen McBurney closed in 1988, there was an auction of its contents. A story in the New York Times describes buyers looking for old yearbooks containing photos of future celebrities. While J.D. Salinger remains the most illustrious McBurneyan, two of television’s favorite high school students went there: John Boy of The Waltons (Richard Thomas) and the Fonz from Happy Days ( Henry Winkler). Although McBurney had other noteworthy alumni, including Felix Rohatyn, chair of the Municipal Assistance Corporation, and Ted Koppel of Nightline, it “may be best remembered,” according to the Wikipedia entry, “as the destination of Holden Caulfield when he left all the equipment of the Pencey PrepOF DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS fencing team on the subway.” WOODS, FINISHES STYLES —StuartAND Mitchner

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INSPIRING CUSTOM DESIGNS DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES

FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION

INSPIRING CUSTOM DESIGNS

PROJECT MANAGEMENT FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION

DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES INSPIRING CUSTOM DESIGNS PROJECT MANAGEMENT FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION

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48 West Broad Street • Hopewell, NJ 08525 • p: 609.466.1445 • tobiasdesignllc.com 48 West Broad Street • Hopewell, NJ 08525 • p: 609.466.1445 • tobiasdesignllc.com


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021 • 16

Performing Arts

NEW YORK NUTCRACKER: Fingers crossed, New York City Ballet’s production of “George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker” will be back on the stage of the David Koch Theatre at Lincoln Center from November 26 through January 2. There are 47 performances of the holiday classic, which Balanchine created in 1954. Single tickets go on sale October 11. There are certain SO PERCUSSION: The ensemble will perform in a free (ticketed) concert in Princeton Univer- protocols in place involving COVID testing for unvaccinated children, and other requirements. sity’s Richardson Auditorium on Saturday, September 18. The event marks the University De- Visit nycballet.com for details and online purchases. partment of Music’s first in-person campus concert since the pandemic. performance by Cotton. a free gift, courtesy of the The theater has taken the Free Concert at Richardson Talifero, Jason Treuting, and children will not be permit- “Happy to be a part of artist and Hopewell Theater. necessary precautions for the safety of its patrons, By So Percussion Ensemble Julia Wolfe, including Dess- ted entry. Free tickets are the official reopening of my staff, and artists, including So Percussion will present ner’s Music for Wood and required, and will become hometown theater post COVHVAC upgrades, thorough a free (ticketed) concert on Strings, a work commis- available on Monday, Sep- ID lockdown,” says Cotton, a cleaning and sanitation beSaturday, September 18, at sioned by Carnegie Hall for tember 13 at 12 p.m. (ET) rock singer-songwriter born fore and after shows, and 7:30 p.m. in Richardson Au- which the composer worked online at music.princeton. and raised in Hopewell. “It is w it h ins t r u ment bu ilder edu. Remaining tickets will requiring all patrons, talent, my honor to once again perditorium, on the campus of Aron Sanchez of the Blue be available at the door. and staff to wear a mask form in this small but mighty Princeton University. Man Group to develop new when in the building. theater that has become a This marks the University dulcimer-like instruments Hopewell Theater Reopens With true gem in the town I grew Tickets for the reopening Department of Music’s first for the ensemble. Dessner Performance by Danielia Cotton up in.” celebration are for sale for in-person campus concert has become a familiar voice After a year and a half pan$30-35 ($36 on day of show) During the pre-show celesince the pandemic. The on campus, with a new work demic shutdown, Hopewell bration, patrons are invited and can be purchased at tickUniversity’s Edward T. Cone co-commissioned by Princ- Theater is reopening its to enjoy light gourmet reets.hopewelltheater.com. Performers-in-Residence Danielia Cotton eton University Concerts to doors on Friday, September freshments, and sip to toast Following the reopening will be joined by guest artist be performed by the Takács 10 at 8 p.m. — the date of the grand reopening. There “We are relived to be re- celebration, the theater will Shodekeh Talifero, a beatString Quartet in February. the Theater’s four-year an- will also be activities such as opening and grateful to our reopen at full capacity with boxer, vocal percussionist, In accordance with Princ- niversary — with a grand a photo booth and prize give- patrons for their support an eclectic lineup of fall proand breath artist who pusheton University policy, all reopening show featuring aways. Patrons can enter to during this long shutdown,” grams. es the boundaries of the huconcert attendees are re- international recording art- win giveaways such as Dan- says Scully. “We cannot wait man voice. Hopewell Theater is locatquired to be fully vaccinat- ist Danielia Cotton. ielia Cotton merchandise and to see everyone together ed at 5 South Greenwood AvThe program will feature ed against COVID-19 and The event begins with a pre- a dual membership to the again in out theater at our enue in Hopewell. For more works by Bryce Dessner, to wear a mask inside the show party at 6:30 p.m., fol- theater. Additionally, all at- reopening celebration, Sep- information, visit HopewellNathalie Joachim, Shodekeh concert venue. Unvaccinated lowed by the 8 p.m. live music tending patrons will receive tember 10.” Theater.com.

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Performing September 9 Eric Plutz, Princeton University Organist Performing September 16 Marvin Mills, St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, Kensington, MD This performance is open to the public for those fully vaccinated against Covid-19. Registration required for all events on campus at the door or in advance. To register in advance for this performance, use the QR code or visit our website chapel.princeton.edu.


Art

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021

In addition to the new appointees, three board members were successfully voted to renew their terms at the annual member meeting on June 10. Those members are Ryan Stark Lilienthal, John Thompson, and Amrit Walia. For a complete list of the board of trustees, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Arts Council of Princeton Hosts Fall Open House

“CROSSWORLDS”: This work by Jeff McConnell is part of a pinhole photography exhibit, featuring photographs by seven local artists, on view at Small World Coffee on Nassau Street September 9 through October 5. A reception is Sunday, September 12 from 12-3 p.m.

Pinhole Photography Exhibit of trustees, replaces Sarah Ghani also has an InstaCollum Hatfield as board gram blog with over 13,000 At Small World on Nassau

Small World Coffee, 254 Nassau Street will host an exhibit by seven local artists working with the historical photography process of pinhole photography. On view T hu r s day, S eptemb er 9 through October 5., the exhibit will be open daily during business hours. A reception with the artists will be held on Sunday, September 12 from 12 to 3 p.m. Pinhole photography requires the artist to use a rudimentary lens-less camera, oftentimes homemade from recycled materials, to capture an image through a small pin-sized hole. This type of camera lends itself to creating photographs with long exposures with almost infinite depth of field, possible light leaks, and warped perspectives. The unique aesthetic is a charming characteristic of pinhole photography that can also be described as magical and otherworldly. You can glimpse that magic in Sharon Harris’s surreal portraiture, or the landscape photographs that Maurice Fitzpatrick creates in his homemade cigar box camera and lomography cameras, or in the photographs of sun trails that Jeff McConnell and Heather Palecek create with their pinhole cameras. Marissa Bunting will exhibit her wildly abstract “solar trails” photographs, and you can also expect to see work from the talented Gul Cevikoglu and Chris Marinari. These seven artists are members of the New Jersey Pinhole Club, founded in 2021 by Heather Palecek. This is their first group exhibit.

Arts Council Appoints Four to Board of Trustees

The Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) has announced the appointment of four new members to its board of trustees. In addition to serving as a legal entity, board members represent diverse segments of the community through their occupations, geographic locations, experience, and backgrounds. Members of the Arts Council’s board are stewards of the organization’s mission, goals, policies and finances. Joining the board of trustees are Phillip Clippinger, Samira Ghani, Kathy Herring, and Tina Motto. This summer also marked the transition of board president, as Joe Kossow, past vice president of the board

president. “ T h e A r t s C ou n c i l of Princeton has benefited for many years from the guidance and energy of a caring and committed board.” said Kossow. “Together with our new board members, we are looking forward to helping the Arts Council experience a period of sustained growth in our educational, artistic, and outreach programs, and to expanding the many ways that we fulfill our mission of “building community through the arts.” Clippinger has spent the majority of his career in private banking. He has worked for J.P. Morgan, Mer r ill Lynch, and Morgan Stanley, where he is currently a senior vice president. Clippinger has been a keen observer and supporter of the evolving arts community in Princeton for many years. He has given back in the form of volunteering and serving on various boards over the years as a trustee of the Trinity Counseling Service, the Princeton Symphony Orchestra, the Foundation Fighting Blindness, and the Princeton Day School Alumni Board and Development Committee. He has also given his time and energy to other organizations such as HomeFront and the Center for Sup portive Schools, and has coached youth lacrosse and soccer in the community for many years. Clippinger graduated from Princeton Day School and went on to obtain a B.A. from Hobart College and an M.B.A. from the Yale School of Management. Ghani is the mother of three daughters. The arts have always been something close to her and her family’s hear ts. She was on the board of the Princeton Girlchoir and helped the organization thrive for four years. She is also on the board of Montgomery Charity Foundation and the co-leader of her own chapter of the Sisterhood of Salam Shalom. In the past Ghani has been a part of organizations such as Muslims Against Hunger and the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen. She formerly worked as a jewelry designer and gemologist, and managed several stores. She is an amazing fundraiser, and recently raised thousands of dollars for local mosques and hunger during the pandemic.

followers where she tries to bring people together through another one of her passions, food. Her ethnicity holds a deep part of her personality and she hopes that by joining the Arts Council of Princeton’s board she can use her unique perspective to help the organization. Herring began her career in New York City working in marketing and public relations. Shortly after she moved to Princeton in 1997, she and a business partner started a frozen chicken pot pie company called Twin Hens, which reached national distribution and food industry awards. After 16 years, Herring decided to devote her time to working with nonprofit organizations and served on boards including Young Audiences, Crawford House, and the Friends Executive Board of IAS. For the past four years she has worked as a volunteer and executive board member for C-Change Conversations, a nonprofit educational program about climate change. She has three grown daughters, and enjoys tennis, swimming, hiking, gardening, and travel. Her husband is Jamie Herring, a local Princeton real estate developer. Motto has over 20 years of human resource experience across multiple industries including pharmaceuticals, financial services, and consumer manufacturing (both union and non-union). She has worked as both a generalist and a specialist and has most recently focused on team effectiveness, talent management, and executive coaching. She holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Illinois and a master’s degree in industrial and labor relations from Cornell University. Motto also volunteers for the Housing Initiatives of Princeton — she has hosted fundraiser events and also provided ongoing job search and career coaching to program participants. She has lived in Princeton with her husband, Dan and their three children for the last 18 years. During this time, they have enjoyed active and broad participation in various APC offerings including classes, summer camps, thought leader series, dance parties, gallery exhibitions, and various fundraisers. In addition to enjoying community art events, they are also avid art collectors.

The Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) invites the community to a Fall Open House on Saturday, September 18 from 3 to 5 p.m. Free and open to the public, the Fall Open House will feature the inaugural ACP Pottery Throwdown, where attendees can watch ceramic artists in friendly competition while competing in various challenges on the potter’s wheel. In addition, each studio will be filled with opportunities to watch artists at work and discover the variety of classes and workshops the Arts Council has to offer, including painting and drawing, dance, textile art, clay, and more. In celebration of the Arts Council’s increasing public art presence in Princeton, attendees of all ages will be invited to make their mark on a community fence mural that will be on permanent display outside of the Arts Council’s Paul Robeson Center for the Arts. They can also take part in giveaways to win complimentary memberships, ACP “swag,” and additional prizes. Attendees will also have the opportunity to take advantage of a one-day-only rate on individual and family

“THE CHICKENS ARE IN THE ROAD AGAIN #2”: The Nassau Club of Princeton, 6 Mercer Street, will present an Artist’s Reception with Charles David Viera on Sunday, September 12 from 3 to 5 p.m. Viera will discuss his current exhibition, “Reality Revisited: Paintings by Charles David Viera,” on display at The Nassau Club through September 26. The reception is free and open to the public but due to COVID restrictions, no refreshments will be served, and visitors are encouraged to wear masks. For more about the artist, visit charlesdavidviera.com. memberships, granting access to discounts on classes, camps, and at favorite local businesses across town. “When we are out in the community painting murals, passersby always comment, ‘That looks like so much fun!’ So here is your chance to stop by and participate in some hands-on art making and also see all the classes, workshops, and events we have to offer,” said Maria

14

Evans, ACP artistic director. “Stop in, see what makes us such a special place, and who knows — after taking a ceramic class, you may just be the star of our next Pottery Throwdown!” The Arts Council of Princeton is located at 102 Witherspoon Street. For more information, visit artscouncil ofprinceton.org. Continued on Next Page

TH ANNUAL

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 25TH 10:00AM - 5:00PM SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 26TH 11:00AM - 4:00PM

TOUR LOCAL ARTISTS’ STUDIOS IN & AROUND HOPEWELL BOROUGH Start at the Hopewell Train Station: pick up maps to Artists’ Studios, Several Artist’s are exhibiting in the Station and Freight Shed.

Cecile Bruck

Rob Harvey

Greg Merkle

Ric Stang

Guy Ciarcia

Robin Hepburn

Thom Montanari

Sally Stang

James Dashcund

James Jansma

Morpeth Contemporary Alan Taback

Eric Dougherty

Beth Ann Judge

Jody Olcott

Mayfield Williams

Lynn Ebeling

Joy Kreves

Grant Peterson

Ellie Wyeth

Gallery 14

Susan MacQueen

Erika Rachel

Ivia Sky Yavelow

Colin Goedecke

Karen McLean

Robin Resch

Scott Grossman

Charles McCollough Eric Schultz

Chris Harford

Sean Mannix

Armando Sosa

hopewell_tour_des_arts

WWW.HOPEWELLTOURDESAR TS.COM

MORPETH CONTEMPORARY

Thanks to the support of All the Artists, and our sponsors that make this event happen.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021 • 18

Art Continued from Preceding Page

HOPEWELL TOUR DES ARTS: For 14 years, the Hopewell Tour Des Arts has connected artists with the local community. At this year’s tour — on Saturday, September 25 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, September 26 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. — visitors can meet local artists, visit their studios, and purchase one-of-a-kind artwork. The event also includes music, poetry, sculpture, painting, drawing, photography, and more. Free admission. For more information, visit hopewelltourdesarts.com

Art All Day/Trenton Ciclovia Returns on September 18

Warren Street downtown Trenton, St. Joe’s Avenue in East Trenton, the Roebling Wire Works building, and Artworks’ main galleries will be bursting with art and activities as a combined Art All Day/Ciclovia returns on Saturday, September 18 from noon to 6 p.m. Mindful of the continuing threat of COVID-19, organizers are again planning an event where safety is a priority, featuring outdoor activities and multiple safety protocols for indoor sites. Highlights include the Freedom Skate Park and Trenton Circus Squad at the Roebling Wire Works, live mural painting outdoors and artist open studios and two special exhibits inside at Artworks, plus an activated open Warren Street downtown in partnership with the Trenton Downtown Association, and another open street on St. Joe’s Avenue at Breunig Avenue Park in partnership with the East Trenton Collaborative.

Children’s activities, local food attractions, and multiple walking and bike tours are planned —with the two open streets accessible via the Circuit Trails. The Art All Day trolleys are set to return this year too, with tours of multiple sites participating in the event. “We are hoping, like last year, that after continuing uncertainty and anxiety in the face of coronavirus, Art All Day/Ciclovia will be a breath of fresh air for Trenton, a chance to get outside, reconnect, and rejoice at all we have here,” said Artworks Executive Director Lauren Otis. “Activating streets for people is what Ciclovia is all about, particularly in these isolating times,” said Sonia Szczesna, director of active transportation, Tri-State Transportation Campaign. “We can’t wait to bring people out into the streets of Trenton together for another year in partnership with Art All Day,” she said. Visitors can park at Artworks or the Lafayette Yard Parking

Garage, pick up a map/program and explore for themselves or take a guided tour. A mobile site map and information on the event, schedules, participants and sites, will be available at artworkstrenton.org/artallday and on the Art All Day/Ciclovia Facebook event page. Continued on Next Page

Rider

From the shore to the city, wood stain artist Sean Carney brings new life to familiar New Jersey landscapes. Visit princetonmagazinestore.com to purchase.

Furniture “Where quality still matters.”

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

gathering together

Adama Delphine Fawundu On view through October 24 reopening celebration sunday, september 12, 1–4 pm Music, family activities, and curatorial tours  meet the artist saturday, september 25, 1–4 pm Adama Delphine Fawundu speaks about her work artmuseum.princeton.edu

FREE ADMISSION

New Original Artwork by Sean Carney at A Store by Princeton Magazine

158 Nassau Street

Adama Delphine Fawundu (born 1971, Brooklyn, NY; active New York, NY). Top: Black Like Blue in Argentina, 2018. Courtesy of the artist and Hesse Flatow. Bottom: Aligned with Sopdet, 2017. Museum purchase, Fowler McCormick, Class of 1921, Fund (2021-90)

www.princetonmagazinestore.com


Continued from Preceding Page

“THE LOOK”: This mixed media mosaic by Helene Plank was featured on the cover of the National Button Bulletin, and will be on display at the New Jersey State Button Society’s Fall Show September 11 at the Union Fire Company in Titusville. Measuring 25 by 31 inches, it uses buttons, sequins, and beads made from glass, plastic, metal, wood, and ceramics, and it took 118 hours to complete.

Button Society Returns For Annual Fall Show

Celebrating its 80th birthday, the New Jersey State But ton S ociet y ( NJSB S ) will open its Fall Show and Competition to the public, for free, on Saturday, September 11 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Union Fire Company and Rescue Squad hall, 1396 River Road in Titusville. “We’re offering special activities for those new to button collecting, says Barbara Figge Fox, NJSBS president. “Safety is our first priority. Masks, available at the door, will be required at all times.” Members of the NJSBS share an interest in studying, collecting, and preserving clothing buttons, both old and new. Sewers, knitters, quilters, costume designers, and re-enactors will be able to choose from thousands of clothing buttons offered by dealers from the eastern seaboard. Button displays will celebrate its birthday, and Frank Sinatra song hits from 1941 (“Oh Look at Me Now”) will signal the hourly drawing of door prizes. On view will be button art by Helene Plank, who has created more than 20 prize-winning button mosaics, each using from 1,700 to 1,900 buttons, sewn onto the canvas. For information on “Together Again,” the first inperson button show in the tri-state area since COVID, go to NewJerseyStateButtonSociety.com, email ButtonsInNewJersey@gmail. com, or call ( 609 ) 7594804.

IS ON

Area Exhibits Check websites for information on safety protocols. Ar t @ Bainbr idge, 158 Nassau Street, has “Gathering Together / Adama Delphine Fawundu” through October 24. A reopening event will be held on Sunday, September 12 from 1 to 4 p.m. artmuseum.princeton.edu. A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Variations” September 9 through October 3. Galler y hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Arts Council of Prince to n , 102 Wit herspoon Street, has “Constant Repeating Themes” September 11 through October 9. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, September 11 from 3 to 5 p.m. artscouncilofprinceton.org.

D & R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place, has “Recovery,” the 51st annual juried exhibition of the Garden State Watercolor Society, through October 17. By appointment only, call (609) 558-0207. drgreenway.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Mu s e u m i n C ad w a lad e r Park, Park s ide Avenu e, Trenton, has “Ellarslie Open 37/38” through October 1. Visit ellarslie.org for museum hours and timed entry tickets. Gallery 14 Fine Photography, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “Members Welcome Back Exhibit” September 18 through October 24. gallery 14.org. Gourgaud Gallery, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, has “Color Wheel” t h r ou g h S e pte mb e r 27. cranburyartscouncil.org. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Rebirth: Kang Muxiang,” “Bruce Beasley: Sixty Year Retrospective,

TOWN TOPICS is printed entirely on recycled paper.

1960-2020,” and other exhibits. Hours are Thursday through Monday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Timed tickets required. groundsforsculpture. org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Princeton and Women’s Suffrage” and other online exhibits, as well as the “Histor y @ Home” series. The museum is currently closed to the public. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “It’s Personal: The Art of Robert Beck” through January 2. michenerartmuseum.org. Mercer Museum, 84 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Measurement Rules” and “Magn i f i c e nt M e a s u r e s ! T h e Hausman-Hill Collection of Calculating Instruments” through September 6. mercermuseum.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “In Nature’s Realm : The Art of Gerard Rutgers Hardenberg” through January 9 and the online exhibit “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898.” Open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. morven.org. Plainsboro Public Library Art Gallery, 9 Van Doren Street, Plainsboro, has “Life Before the Pandemic : Will It Ret ur n? ” through October 27. plainsborolibrary.org. Pr inceton P ubl ic Libra r y, 65 Wit herspoon Street, has “Letter Love” t h roug h S epte mb er 30. princetonlibrary.org.

Pr inceton Universit y Art Museum has the online exhibits “Looking at 17th -Century Dutch Painting,” “Life Magazine and the Power of Photography,” “The Eclectic Eye: A Tribute to Duane Wilder,” and more, along w it h many online events. The museum is currently closed to the public. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Small World Coffee, 254 Nassau Street, has a pinhole photography exhib-

COLD SOIL ROAD PRINCETON, NJ 08540

it featuring photographs by seven local artists, September 9 through October 5. A reception is Sunday, September 12 from 12-3 p.m. smallworldcoffe.com. West Windsor Arts Center, 953 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “Well-Being Ourselves: Refl ect, Reimagine, Connect” through October 23. An opening reception is Sunday, September 12, from 4 to 6 p.m. westwindsorarts.org.

An evening celebrating the Department of Music’s first live performance since the pandemic!

Edward T. Cone Performers-in-Residence

RICHARDSON AUDITORIUM IN ALEXANDER HALL

SAT

18

SEP

2021

7:30PM

with guest beatboxer and vocal percussionist SHODEKEH TALIFERO

FREE, tickets required Tickets released online September 13 at Noon Attendees must be fully vaccinated and masked at all times.

TRENTON FARMERS MKT SPRUCE STREET

Back to School

APPLE IN EVERY LUNCH BOX

APPLES - APPLES - APPLES Pick Your Own apples at our 13 Van Kirk Road orchard. 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. every day

FALL FAMILY FUN WEEKENDS

HALO PUB From 11 am

Espresso

9 Hulfish Street, Palmer Square

HALO PUB Ice Cream To 11 pm

September 18 - October 31

Online Tickets www.terhuneorchards.com $11 discounted online, $14 at gate as capacity allows *admission area includes winery & farm store

Farm Store Open Daily from 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. 609-924-2310 • www.terhuneorchards.com

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021

Art


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021 • 20

ART RECEPTION WITH

BHHS FOX & ROACH PRINCETON 253 NASSAU STREET

PRINCETON, NJ 08540

IFAT SHATZKY

A PORTION OF SALES WILL GO DIRECTLY TO HOMEFRONT

September 23rd, 5PM – 7PM

ENJOY WINE FROM HOPEWELL VINEYARDS AND LITE AFFAIRS BITES

www.ifatshatzky.com

10 Bayard Lane, Princeton Marketed by: Roberta Parker $985,000

24 Belmont Circle, Mansfield Twp. Marketed by: Terebey Relocation Team/Suneel “Sunny” Sharad $949,900

51 Columbia Avenue, Hopewell Boro Marketed by: Alison Covello $468,000

3 Dickens Drive, West Windsor Twp Marketed by: Eva Petruzziello $849,000

28 Elm Ridge Road, Hopewell Twp Marketed by: Michelle Needham $695,000

408 Franklin Avenue, Princeton Marketed by: Cathay Rizzi $693,000

From Princeton, We Reach the World From Princeton, We Reach the World © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway

© BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway


sm

sm

of P R I N C E T O N of P R I N C E T O N PRESENTING

6 Gulick Road, Princeton Marketed by: Robin L. Wallack $999,000

2 Horseshoe Court, Franklin Twp Marketed by: Teresa Cunningham $725,000

PRESENTING

67 Jefferson Road, Princeton Marketed by: Robin L. Wallack $600,000

184 Mansgrove Road, Princeton Marketed by: Yuen Li “Ivy” Huang $1,599,000

PRESENTING

17 Piedmont Drive, West Windsor Twp Marketed by: Terebey Relocation Team/John A. Terebey $529,999

7 Saucon Valley Court, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Anne Nosnitsky $1,350,000

PRESENTING

37 Stonewall Circle, Princeton Marketed by: Anne Nosnitsky $875,000

45 Westwinds Drive, West Windsor Marketed by: Linda Pecsi $534,999

253 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 253Nassau Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 253 Street | 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com 609-924-1600 Princeton, NJ | foxroach.com

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021

FEATURED LISTINGS


Thursday, September 9 10-10:30 a.m.: Outdoor Storytime at Princeton Shopping Center. Books, songs, rhymes, and movement for kids 18 months and older, accompanied by an adult. Bring a blanket. Princetonlibrary.org. 10 a.m.: Virtual Princeton Business Forum, sponsored by the Princeton Merchants Association. Updates from Mayor Mark Fre da and Health Officer Jeff Grosser; also “Real Estate 2021: Current Residential, Office, and Retail Activity in Princeton.” Open to all business and community members. Princetonmerchants.org. 11 a.m.: 9/11 Memorial and Tribute, a virtual tour of the 9/11 Memorial & Museum held by Princeton Senior Resource Center. Donald Benjamin is host. Participants can share thoughts, memories, and feelings about the attack and aftermath. Register at princetonsenior. link/go9. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.: Princeton Regional Chamber’s monthly membership luncheon, Princeton Marriott at Forrestal, 100 College Road East. Speaker is Rutgers University professor James W. Hughes. Princetonmercer.org. 5:30 p.m.: 9/11 Commemoration event at Rider University, featuring former Pennsylvania Governor Mark Schweiker. A discussion of his role in leading the state’s response to the attack on United Flight 93 and its enduring implications. Free. Rider.edu. 5:30-6:30 p.m.: Openair photographer talk with Robin Resch, Arts Council of Princeton artist-in-residence,

at Dohm Alley, next to Starbucks on Nassau Street. Free. Artscouncilofprinceton.org. 6-8 p.m.: Staged reading of After the Dust Settles, by New Jersey playwright Jason Immordino, at Princeton Public Library. Followed by a moderated discussion with playwright, director, and cast, from Magic Lantern Productions. Free. Princetonlibrary.org. 7-9 p.m.: Discussion: Chinese Book Group. Led by Jenny Guo entirely in Chinese, sponsored by Princeton Public Library. Princetonlibrary.org. 7:15-9 p.m.: Black Voices Book Group. Continuing discussion of Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom by David Blight. Sponsored by Princeton Public Library. Princetonlibrary.org. Friday, September 10 11:45 a.m.: “Auto Insurance: What You Need to Know Before You Buy,” presented by Princeton Senior Resource Center with attorney Robert Bratman. Free virtual event. Princetonsenior.org. 2:30 p.m.: Sudoku for Beginners, outdoors at Hickory Corner branch of Mercer County Library, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Registration required. (609) 448-0957. 5-8 p.m.: Sunset Sips & Sounds at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. terhuneorchards.com. 6:30 p.m.: Family Fun, followed by the movie Soul at 7:15 p.m. at Princeton Shopping Center. Free, bring lawn chairs or blanket. To be rescheduled if it rains. 7 p.m.: Screening of Batman at Rosedale Park. No outside food or beverages

Cloudspotting SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2021 @ 7:00 PM Glen Oaks Farm in Solebury, PA Free Open Rehearsal - Friday, September 17 from 3:00 - 4:30 PM Limited seating. Please purchase your tickets early. Please see our website for our latest Covid safety policy.

American Haiku by Paul Wiancko for viola and cello

Concordia ChamberFest 2021

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021 • 22

Mark Your Calendar Town Topics

String Trio by Jean Cras A WORLD PREMIER CONCORDIA COMMISSION Clouds of Gill by Paul Wiancko Trio for clarinet, violin and cello ARTISTS: Jesse Mills - violin Romie deGuise-Langlois - clarinet Milena Pajaro-van de Stadt - viola Michelle Djokic - cello

Concordia Chamber Players TICKETS AT CONCORDIAPLAYERS.ORG OR AT DOOR • 215.486.6080 MICHELLE DJOKIC - ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

permitted. Vendors will be on site. Mercercountyparks.org. 8 p.m.: Danielia Cotton in concert at Hopewell Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell. $30-$36. Hopewelltheater.com. 8:30 p.m.: Hopewell Valley Arts Council’s Outdoor Art Film series screens Western Stars at Woolsey Park, Titusville. Hvartscouncil.org. Saturday, September 11 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Community Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot at Princeton Junction train station. Fresh produce and more. Music by Delta Noir. Wwcfm.org. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.: “Together Again,” New Jersey State Button Society Show and Competition, Union Fire Company, 1396 River Road, Titusville. Free. Garment button displays, dealers, door prizes. ButtonsInNewJersey@gmail.com. 10 a.m.: Historic Stony Brook walking tour, presented by the Historical Society of Princeton. Princetonhistory.org. 12 p.m.: 9/11 Remembrance Ceremony outside Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad headquarters, Mount Lucas Road near Route 206 and Valley Road, held by the Princeton September 11 Memorial Committee. Names of Princeton community members lost will be read and first responders will be honored. Park in Community Park lot. Sunday, September 12 10:30 a.m.: Dvoor Farm barn tour, sponsored by Hunterdon Land Trust. Led by Christopher Pickell of Pickett Architecture in Flemington. The farm is at the land trust’s farmer’s market in Flemington. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 12-4 p.m.: Young Patriots Day at Princeton Battlefield State Park. Talk to re-enactors with the New Jersey Greys, learn about spy craft in 1776, musket and cannon firing, marching and drilling, tours of the Battlefield and the Clarke House. Register at pbs1777.org. 1:30 p.m.: Delaware historian Kim Burdick presents a Zoom lecture, “Fever and Sickness in the Continental Army.” Free, sponsored by Washington Crossing Historic Park. Registration is required at WashingtonCrossingPark. org/events. Monday, September 13 Recycling 7- 8 :30 p.m.: Continuing Conversations on Race. The focus is on the escalation of hate crimes toward Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders and efforts to address them. Small group discussions follow the presentation, which is sponsored by Princeton Public Library. Princetonlibrary.org. Tuesday, September 14 1:30-3:30 p.m.: Princeton Sketchers meets at Princeton Shopping Center. Bring your own art supplies; no instruction provided. Weather permitting. Sponsored by Princeton Public Library. Princetonlibrary.org.

SEPTEMBER

Wednesday, September 15 9:30 a.m.: Read and Pick: Chickens at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Terhuneorchards.com. 7 p.m.: Car Seat Safety Checks, outdoors at the Hopewell Branch of Mercer County Library, 245 Pennington-Titusville Road. Call (609) 737-2610 to schedule an appointment.. 7 p.m.: Staying Active as We Age, online program presented by physical therapist Pritee Dalvi, sponsored by Mercer County Library. Register at hopeprogs@mcl.org. 7 p.m.: Author Nathaniel Philbrick lectures at Washington Crossing Historic Park, Pennsylvania side, and signs copies of his new book Travels with George: In Search of Washington and His Legacy. Tickets available online at WashingtonCrossingPark.org/events. Thursday, September 16 9 a.m.-6 p.m.: Annual giant rummage sale at Hopewell Presbyterian Church, 80 West Broad Street, Hopewell. Housewares, china, furniture, linens, jewelry, clothing, small appliances, books, toys, seasonal items, and more. Hopewellpresbyterian.org. 5-6:30 p.m.: D&R Greenway Autumn Native Plant Sale, 1 Preservation Place. Drgreenway.org. 5:30 p.m.: PSO Chamber Music at Morven Museum & Garden poolhouse lawn, featuring the Jasper String Quartet. $25. Princetonsymphony.org. Friday, September 17 9 a.m.-6 p.m.: Annual giant rummage sale at Hopewell Presbyterian Church, 80 West Broad Street, Hopewell. Housewares, china, furniture, linens, jewelry, clothing, small appliances, books, toys, seasonal items, and more. Hopewellpresbyterian.org. 5-6:30 p.m.: D&R Greenway Autumn Native Plant Sale, 1 Preservation Place. Drgreenway.org 7-9 p.m.: In-person adaptive dance and pizza party, for ages 13 and up, at the Community Park Pool complex. Sponsored by Princeton Special Sports and other agencies. Register at pssnj. org by September 15. 7:30-9 p.m.: Story & Verse: A Storytelling & Poetic Open Mic at the Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street. Free. Artscouncilofprinceton.org. Saturday, September 18 9 a.m.-12 p.m.: Bag Day at the annual giant rummage sale at Hopewell Presbyterian Church, 80 West Broad Street, Hopewell. Housewares, china, furniture, linens, jewelry, clothing, small appliances, books, toys, seasonal items, and more. Hopewellpresbyterian.org. 9-11 a.m.: D&R Greenway Autumn Native Plant Sale, 1 Preservation Place. Drgreenway.org 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Community Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot at Princeton Junction train station. Fresh

produce and more. Music by A Little Bit Off. Wwcfm.org. 10 a.m.: Princeton University Eating Clubs Walking Tour, presented by Clifford Zink and sponsored by the Historical Society of Princeton. $20. Princetonhistory. org. 11:45 a.m.: “What is the State of Your Affairs?” Virtual seminar presented by Linda Richter of Personal Paperwork Solutions. Sponsored by Princeton Senior Resource Center. Free. Princetonsenior.org. 12-5 p.m.: Open studio at Sunflower Glass Studio, 877 Sergeantsville Road, Stockton. Fused, beveled, and stained glass windows and gifts. SunflowerGlassStudio. com. 1-3 p.m.: Arts Council of Princeton open house. Hands-on activities including the Inaugural Pottery Throwdown. Free. Artscouncilofprinceton.org. 2-6 p.m.: Grand opening of Princeton Makes, new artists’ cooperative, in Princeton Shopping Center. Artist demonstrations, open studios, plein air painting, live music. Free. Princetonmakes.com. 3-5 p.m.: Princeton Festival Guild holds a fundraiser on the porch of The Castle in Hopewell $75 and up; reserve by September 10. Princetonfestival.com/partyagain. 6 p.m.: Earth, Wind & Fire tribute concert at Mercer County Park festival grounds, West Windsor. Bring lawn chairs and blankets. No outside food or alcohol, coolers or glass bottles. $5 parking fee. Mercercountyparks.org. 7 p.m.: Concordia Chamber Players “Cloudspotting” at Glen Oaks Farm, 6871 Upper York Road, Solebury, Pa. World premiere of Clouds of Gill by Paul Wiancko, for clarinet, violin, and cello. $75. Concordiaplayers.org. Sunday, September 19 11-11:45 a.m.: Adult adaptive basketball clinic, with Mitch Henderson, head coach of the Princeton University Men’s Basketball Team. $10. Register by September 16 at pssnj.org. 12-5 p.m.: Open studio at Sunflower Glass Studio, 877 Sergeantsville Road, Stockton. Fused, beveled, and stained glass windows and gifts. SunflowerGlassStudio. com. 5 p.m.: Virtual celebration of Hunterdon Land Trust’s 25th anniversary. Fundraiser with short video, discussion with honorees, silent and live auctions, and more. $150. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 6:30-8 p.m.: Screening of Sukkah City at the Arts Council of Princeton’s Solley Theater. Free. Artscouncilofprinceton.org. Monday, September 20 1 p.m.: The Women’s College Club of Princeton holds its monthly meeting at the Stockton Center at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Jill Barry, Morven executive director, speaks. Free. Wwwcp.org.

Wednesday, September 22 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meeting. Princetonlibrary. org. 6:30 p.m.: Understanding Reverse Mortgages, online program presented by Bill Greenfield of Wealth Bridge Advisory; sponsored by Mercer County Library. Register at hopeprogs@mcl.org. Thursday, September 23 8-10 a.m.: Virtual Volunteerism: Bringing Businesses and Nonprofits Together in New Ways. Presented by Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber, at Mercer Oaks Catering, 725 Village Road West, Princeton Junction. Princetonmercer.org. 5:30 p.m.: PSO Chamber Music at Morven Museum & Garden poolhouse lawn, featuring the Exponential Ensemble. $25. Princetonsymphony.org. Friday, September 24 7 p.m.: Bucks Count y Bookfest begins at Salem United Church of Christ, 186 E ast Cour t St reet, Doylestow n, Pa. Author Christina Baker Kline speaks. Bucksbookfest.org. Saturday, September 25 6 a.m.: The Golden Nugget Flea Market, 1850 River Road, Lambertville, hosts the Antique Model Train Show. Gnflea.com. 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Community Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot at Princeton Junction train station. Fresh produce and more. Music by Archana. Wwcfm.org. 10 a.m.: Canning Day at Howell Living History Farm, 70 Woodens Lane, Hopewell. Kim Daly of Howell Farm’s historic kitchen teaches how to “put up” food, with demonstrations outside the farmhouse throughout the day. Howellfarm.org. 12-4 p.m. Bucks County Bookfest, on the green at Mercer Museum, 84 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa. Bucksbookfest.org. Sunday, September 26 1:30 p.m.: Pole Farm History Walk at Reed Bryan Farm, Mercer Meadows. With historian Dennis Waters. $5. Mercercountyparks.org. 6 p.m.: National Junior Tennis & Learning of Trenton (NJTLT) 27th annual gala, at the Boathouse at Mercer Lake. Mike and Bob Bryan will conduct a clinic and exhibition at 2:30 for ticketholders and sponsors. Jeffrey Perlman is special honoree. Tickets are $300. Njtloftrenton.org/gala. Monday, September 27 Recycling 12 p.m.: Morven Moments: Myths & Memories of Helen Hamilton Shields Stockton. Virtual private tour with docent Kim Gallagher about Morven’s “Keeper of the Flame.” Followed by a Q&A. Morven.org. 6 p.m.: Wills, Probate, and Estate Planning, presented by Kenneth Vercammen online; sponsored by Mercer County Library. Register at hopeprogs@mcl.org.


F

or more than 60 years, the Knecht family has been sharing its dance expertise with students, audiences, and all those who love the dance in all its forms.

IT’S NEW To Us

Established in 1959 by Fred and Joanne Knecht, Danceworks (then known as Knecht Dance Academy) has been a dynamic force in dance instruction, and it is a true family operation. Their daughter Elise is now co-owner of the studio with her daughter Ashlee, who is the third generation to be actively involved. Both women also serve as instructors. After many years in Bucks County, Knecht’s Danceworks moved to the Pennington Square Shopping Center on Route 31 in Pennington last year. Formerly the location of Karen Martin’s Dance Works of Mercer County, the spacious setting offers two state-of-the-art dance studios, featuring sprung and Marley floors, which are easier on the legs and feet and overall body health, points out Elise Knecht. All the Time “Ashlee worked with Karen Martin, and we knew this location, and really liked Pennington,“ she says. “We thought it was a nice area, and would be a good location for us.” Many of their Pennsylvania clients have joined them in Pennington, she adds, and new ones are signing up all the time. Because of Danceworks’ widespread and varied experience, Elise believes her company offers a special set of opportunities for dance students. Not only do they provide high-level instruction, but the Knechts also have performed professionally in many settings. “Both my parents were educated in dance, and were professional dancers, says Elise. “My father taught master classes in the U.S. and abroad.” Fred and Joanne Knecht performed in nightclubs and on the stage. Joanne made her Broadway debut at the age of 18, and with Fred, she played every nightclub in the Philadelphia area, reports Elise. Before meeting Fred, she owned and operated Joanne Dubois’ School of Dance, and created the Tiny Tot program still used at Danceworks. Achievement Awards Fred is known as the “father of jazz dance,” and has received multiple lifetime achievement awards from national dance organizations across the country. As a member of Dance Masters of America, and certified in both Pennsylvania and New York City, he has judged, taught, and choreographed nationally and internationally. Elise followed in her parents’ footsteps (literally!), and has danced professionally in New York City, Atlantic City, Las Vegas, and

the Bahamas. She is also a member of Dance Masters of America, both in New York City and Pennsylvania, where she also served as vice president of the Pennsylvania Association of Dance Teachers. As a judge and choreographer, Elise has worked across the country for national dance competitions. She continues to teach and choreograph for Danceworks. “I’ve been dancing since I was 3 years old,” she says, “and it has been my passion. Now, I love the instruction, and I love working with the kids, and interacting with them, hearing all about what they are doing in school, and what they like. I love being able to share my knowledge with them and also with the teachers.” Ashlee Knecht has also been a competitive dancer, training with Mandy Moore, Jerr y Mitchell, and A nn Reinking. A graduate of Broadway Dance Center’s Professional Semester, she specializes in teaching ballet and lyrical dance at Danceworks in addition to her work as co-owner. She also cont inues to work for numerous dance competitions as an adjudicator, and has been a guest teacher for Dance Masters of Pittsburgh and Dance Masters of Michigan. At Danceworks, lessons are available in a variety of dance genres and for students of all ages and abilities. Ballet, jazz, tap, lyrical (a combination of jazz and ballet), hip-hop, and acrobatics are all offered, and both boys and girls participate. Age and Ability Classes are one hour and are generally categorized by age and ability. Students can start as young as 2 and 3 years old. The Someone Special and Me program is for a parent and child 18 months to 2 years old, and includes songs, coordination exercises, and socializing. Tiny Tots is designed for children, ages 3 to 5, and helps students develop coordination, listening skills, and musicality. The young dancers learn ballet, tap, and tumbling elements, using songs and games. Kinderdance is for ages 5 and 6, and focuses on a combination of jazz and hip-hop. The latter is a real opportunity for students to find their “groove’ while learning how to count and move to current music. They explore rhythm, coordination, and musicality, in a free flowing style. Ballet is the core of all dance training. Through the Knecht program, young dancers gain structure, improve posture, and work though proper body alignment, while learning grace and poise. They also strengthen their control, flexibility, and technique at the barre, and across the floor. They will learn proper ballet terminology and history. Pre-Pointe and Pointe are available to students as they progress. Jazz is very popular, and is an exhilarating style that combines attitude and technique and energy. Students ages 6 and up learn proper w a r m - u p, c o or d i n at i o n , flexibility, and musicality

exercises. As the class progresses, dancers will move on to technical elements, such as turns, leaps, kicks, and combinations. Knecht’s Tap program is very beneficial in helping students gain rhythm and coordination. Dancers learn basic ways to move and create “sounds” using their feet. As the levels progress, students will add intricate and difficult patterns while improving their timing, musicality, and strength. Perfect Opportunity The Lyrical program is a perfect opportunity for the dancer looking to improve technique and express their ability through fluidity and grace. It is a combination of jazz and ballet, and teaches dancers how to interpret age-appropriate music. Acrobatics is another favorite of the students. A combination of gymnastics and contortion elements, it integrates the fluidity and grace of ballet, jazz, and lyrical. Students improve their flexibility and strength, as they learn how to stretch and hold contortion moves. As levels progress, the class begins to introduce tumbling elements in a safe environment. Students ages 6 and up can take classes in any of the dance styles, and Elise Knecht emphasizes the importance of helping students learn the elements of the various dance forms while having fun. Classes are now in person too, and that has been a plus, she points out. “Coming here in person has been very positive for students. They welcome the socialization, especially when so much in their lives has been virtual, including school, etc. The parents are also so grateful that the kids can be here in person, and enjoy seeing them happy and enjoying dancing. “Also, it is so important to keep the students motivated. I try to help them set a goal, and focus on improving one thing, and this helps them build confidence, as they see improvement. They will be encouraged, and ready to do more. In addition, we try to emphasize not worrying about what other students are doing, and not comparing themselves to others.” The majority of students are ages 10 to 15, she reports, and of course, they vary in ability, motivation, and interest. There are serious students who hope to go forward with professional careers, as well as those who are just enjoying the opportunity to have fun and learn new skills. Community Events Recitals in which all of the students participate are held each year in June, and in addition, reports Elise, “We look forward to performing at community events and for organizations, such as assisted living and long-term care facilities, when the COVID regulations allow it. “We are also a member of the Pennington Small Business Association, and we want to be a real part of the community here.” Over the years, Knecht’s students have gone on to success in various areas

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021

Knecht’s Danceworks, Relocated in Pennington, Offers Complete Range of Dance Instruction

EXPERTISE AND EXPERIENCE: “In addition to instructing students and introducing them to all aspects of dance, a huge part of our program is building relationships. We’ve had some students since they were 3 years old, and who have continued to come over the years. We offer a wonderful program for students of all ages and levels of ability.” Elise Knecht, left, and her daughter Ashlee, co-owners of Knecht’s Danceworks, are enthusiastic about their current program, which is on site and in person. of the dance and performing arts. They have won more than 20 Miss Dance of A merica titles, a Mr. Dance of A mer ic a, and other awards. Hundreds of students have performed on Broadway, including the first “Annie” (Andrea McArdle). On screen, another Knecht’s student, Aileen Quinn, played “Annie,” and numerous “orphans” were portrayed by former Knecht students. “While many of our students graduate to careers in the performing arts, our goal is to lead and teach our students that they are capable of anything in many fields while growing and learning in a safe and positive environment,” explains Elise Knecht. Creating a safe environment is even more crucial while COVID is still a factor, and Knecht’s Danceworks

follows all the state regulations and safety precautions. All surfaces are wiped down between classes, and the floor is cleaned every night. Two waiting rooms are available, one for parents and one for the students. Class sizes are limited, and dancers are required to wear masks. Open House Adult classes are also offered in ballet and tap on Wednesday and Thursday evenings. Most of the adults have had prior dance experience, but it is not required, says Elise. “Many of them come for a fun way to have exercise and enjoyment.” Knecht’s Danceworks will hold Open Houses on September 8 and 9 from 5 to 8 p.m., when visitors can register and learn about the programs. Classes are held Monday

through Saturday, 5 to 9:30 p.m. Tiny Tots and Someone Special and Me classes are available Tuesday and Saturday mornings at 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Dance supplies, clothing, and accessories, including leotards and shoes, are also offered for purchase. lise Knecht is enthusiastic about introducing even more students to the joy of dancing. As she points out, “We are very happy in our new location, and we look forward to welcoming new students, and helping them discover our special programs and the longtime pleasure of dancing.” For more information, call ( 609 ) 737-7338 or (215) 869-2945; and visit the website at knechtdance.com. —Jean Stratton

E

Knecht Knecht’s Dancework Danceworks

Bethe a of part the legacy! Be aofpart of the legacy! Be aBe part of legacy! Still time to register a part the legacy! Still time to register Summer Camp registration open. Open FallSummer Registration Now Open Camp registration open. Fall Registration Now Tiny Tots – Kinderdance – Ballet – Pointe Tiny Tots – Kinderdance – Ballet – Pointe Jazz – Tap – Hip Hop – Acrobatics – Lyrical

Jazz – Tap – Hip Hop – Acrobatics – Lyrical

visit www.knechtdance.com visit www.knechtdance.com for information on classes and registration

for information on classes and registration 215-869-2945 | 609-737-7338 25 215-869-2945 Rt. 31 South | 609-737-7338 Pennington, NJ. 08534 25 Rt. 31 South

Pennington, NJ. 08534

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021 • 24

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021 • 26

S ports

Former PU Track Star Bird Exceeds Expectations, Placing 9th In Steeplechase at Tokyo Olympics

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izzie Bird felt that she could run better after graduating from Princeton University, but even she was surprised by the level of her recent success. The 2017 Princeton graduate and native of St. Albans Herts, England, set a new British national record of 9:19.68 and placed ninth in the women’s 3,000-meter steeplechase at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics in August. “I wouldn’t have expected this three or four years ago when I just graduated,” said Bird. “I feel like the progression since 2018 has been steady.” Bird closed her racing season by taking 12th place in the women’s steeple at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene, Ore., after the Olympics, and shifted attention to starting law school. Given her recent success, Bird has no plans to stop racing, but the build-up will look different while she studies and trains quite fortunately in the running mecca at the University of Colorado in Boulder. “I know not being fulltime, I won’t be able to train at the same rate,” said Bird. “I can’t do two-a-days. I think I still have a lot more in me. I think I can still improve. At the Olympics, just seeing I was third European, maybe I can be challenging for a medal at Europeans or Commonwealths and that can be a pretty cool thing for this year. I have to be realistic that by taking on law school at the same time it will be more challenging and I might not improve at the same rate; but this is a decision I made that I’m ready to do something else on the side that’s a little less of a selfish pursuit.” Bird put off law school to chase her Olympic dream that only began to feel more realistic after finding a new coach and starting to see development while staying healthier than she had been earlier in her career, including at Princeton.

During her Princeton career, Bird was an honorable mention All-America steeplechaser in 2015 in her second year in the event, and was a regionals qualifier each season with the Tigers. She was Ivy League champion twice in the event. After graduation, she kept running. “I had a couple injuries my junior and senior years and I felt I hadn’t quite been able to fulfill my potential in college athletics and I wanted to keep doing it a little longer,” said Bird. “I think probably my goal was to qualify for European Championships or some major championship, but I never thought I could actually go to the Olympics.” Bird made serious breakthroughs under the direction of Pat McCurry, who began coaching her in 2018. McCurry’s original pitch was to get Bird, who has the second fastest steeplechase time in program history at 9:54.76, under 9:40 in the steeple. Her times dropped, and each achievement gave her more confidence to try for the Olympics, including a personal best 9:30.13 in the 2019 World Championships after battling back from a career-threatening stress fracture. “ A f t e r r u n n i n g Wo r l d Championships, which was something I didn’t think I’d be able to do but somehow managed to do, I decided to give full-time running a go for a year,” said Bird. “And when the Olympics were postponed, it became two years.” Finishing her master’s degree in international studies at the University of San Francisco, Bird was able to focus on training in the lead up to the Olympics. Her times got better and better right up to the Olympics. Bird reached the Olympic qualifying standards when she ran 9:26.73 at the Portland Track Festival in May. Then in July she set the new British national record with a 9:22.80

clocking at Monaco in a Diamond League event. “I struggled early in the season in April and May,” said Bird. “I went to a bunch of steeplechase races and at that point I was just trying to get the Olympic standard. It was a really hard mental block getting under 9:30, which is funny to say now because once I managed to do it everything went smoothly and I knocked off another 11 seconds. The season started a little slow, but once I got into the swing of things and hit my stride and got into some races and getting a little success, as the season came to a peak I was able to run a little faster.” Bird felt more confident than ever as she entered the Olympics. She became the first British female to qualify for an Olympic finals when she placed fifth in the semifinals in 9:24.24. She set a new personal best and lowered her own British record with a strong run in the finals. “I was really happy, my goal going into it was to make the final,” said Bird. “I didn’t really have any goals beyond that, other than to finish as high as I could and get the best time I could. I knew it was pretty tough to medal or be top five, but I thought top 10 would be a really achievable but difficult goal, and I finished ninth so I was pretty happy.” Bird has been encouraged by her progress in recent years. Being able to train full-time before advancing her education further helped. She found a perfect window to do so after graduating from Princeton and before entering law school “Training hasn’t changed a huge amount from Princeton,” said Bird. “It’s a little more intense. I don’t do very high mileage or really fast. But one thing my training full-time allowed me to do is to

BIRD IN FLIGHT: Lizzie Bird flies over a hurdle in a 3,000-meter steeplechase race during her career with the Princeton University women’s track team. Last month, Bird ’17, competing for Great Britain, took ninth in the women’s steeplechase in the Tokyo Olympics, setting a new British national record of 9:19.68 in the process. (Photo provided by Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications) recover between sessions, which between studying and working it never really let my body recover between runs. That was the main thing that changed from being at Princeton.” When Bird came to Princeton, she focused on being a 1,500-meter runner. It was something that thenhead coach Peter Farrell and some Tiger teammates encouraged. Bird had come in with strong times from the 800 to 3,000 meters but transitioned into the new event. “I never even thought of trying steeplechase until I went to Princeton,” said Bird. “As a freshman, Peter Farrell definitely pushed me into it. And our captain at the time, she was relentless to get me on board. I was a little skeptical. As soon as I tried it, I really enjoyed it.” Just as has happened when she began running professionally, seeing success in her event at Princeton encouraged her to put more energy into it. She had a fun introduction to it in her spring break trip with the track team, and she relished the extra training time it took to work at steeplechase. “I felt smooth going over the hurdles early on and always enjoyed the water jump,” said Bird.

“I did long jump as a kid. It feel like maybe that early introduction helped me get into it. I qualified for regionals freshman year and from then on I did pretty well in it and became a steepler.” Despite her emergence in the steeplechase, Bird remained a strong runner across the board for the Tigers. She holds Princeton’s indoor mile record of 4:39.32, and has a top-five time in the 3,000 as well as sharing in two top-five relay teams. Her time at Princeton kept her interested in competing beyond graduation. “I think Peter was a fantastic coach,” said Bird. “He focused on helping us develop as humans and students as well as athletes. I never felt I was pushed so hard that I was burned out. Even if I had a couple injuries I still had a love of the sport and that meant I wanted to keep doing it after Princeton. I give a lot of credit to Peter and Brad Hunt my final year and the whole team.” Her former Princeton teammates were some of the most supportive as she headed to the ultimate level in running. Their encouragement before the Olympics was some of the most heartwarming and meaningful to Bird. “The week before the Olympics, I got a video from one of my teammates who

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got my Princeton teammates to make a video,” said Bird. “They were all saying good luck. It was very nicely done. That was probably the best good luck message I have ever received, and it was a nice reminder of how great the Princeton track team was.” Going forward, Bird is hoping to give them more reason to cheer for her. Next summer, she has the potential to compete in a trio of huge meets at the end of the 2022 summer with the World Championships, Commonwealth Games, and European Championships all within a month beginning mid-July 2022. She won’t look beyond that as she continues to look to progress in steeplechase. “It’s a pretty packed summer,” said Bird. “And I think for law school you’re supposed to get an internship but I’m pretty set on just competing that first summer. I’m not sure how it will go with school and running. I did it at Princeton and I don’t think it’ll be harder than Princeton was. I think Princeton was pretty hard. I’m just going to try to find a balance — do training in the morning and do my reading in the afternoon. And school finishes in May so it’ll be good timing to then be able to compete and train fulltime through the summer.” —Justin Feil


Daniel Diaz-Bonilla and his teammates on the Princeton University men’s soccer team were bound to be a bit rusty as they hosted Rutgers last Friday night in their season opener. Princeton hadn’t played a game in nearly two years with the 2020 season having been canceled due to COVID-19 concerns and had a brief preseason in preparing to play a battle-tested Scarlet Knight squad. “This team has only been together for two weeks after two years off and that team had a season in the spring,” said junior forward DiazBonilla. “They have already had two games and a month together.” But with the shifty DiazBonilla displaying some dazzling footwork, the Tigers were able to put Rutgers on its heels several times outshooting the Scarlet Knights 8-7 in the first half as rivals played to a scoreless draw over the first 45 minutes of the contest.

The attacking unit of senior Kevin O’Toole, sophomore Walker Gillespie, senior Frankie DeRosa, and junior Ryan Clare along with Diaz-Bonilla was in sync despite the long hiatus from game action. “We trust each other,” said Diaz-Bonilla. “We are always fluid, we are moving, we are getting off each other. I could play on the right, Kevin can play on the left and Walker can drop down. It is super fluid. We have got Frankie coming off the bench and Ryan sometimes goes up for us. We have a lot of options.” Things were even more fluid in the second half as Princeton outshot Rutgers 12-5 only to lose 1-0 on an own goal with 34:19 remaining in regulation. “Eve n t h o u g h we g ot scored on in the second half, I actually thought we were getting better and better,” said Diaz-Bonilla. “The positive is that we created a lot of chances,

the negative is that we didn’t put them away. In the second half, I felt that we were going to score and send this into overtime.” Over the last 22 months, Diaz-Bonilla put in a lot of work to get ready for the return to competition. “It has literally just been two years of just grinding and waiting for this, lifting, working out, training on my own, watching film, doing what I can so I feel good,” said Diaz-Bonilla, a 5’11, 175-pound native of Vienna, Va., who tallied three goals and two assists as a freshman in 2019. “I feel stronger. I got fitter. I am excited for the season, I am excited for this team.” Princeton head coach Jim Barlow was excited to see his team back on the pitch for its first game since November 16, 2019 when the Tigers fell 2-1 to Yale. “It was great, it was a great environment, great fans, and great energy here; it is just frustrating that we

didn’t get the result,” said Barlow of the contest which drew a spirited crowd of 584 to Class of 1952 Stadium. “I thought we still struggled to really be efficient and clean in the final third. For the amount of time we spent up there, you got to get a goal. I give them credit, their keeper made an incredible save on Ryan Clare in the second half.” P r i n c e to n d i d d i s p l ay some flashes of brilliance at the offensive end of the field. “We definitely have some dangerous attacking guys and I thought they all put in a good effort today,” said Barlow. “They all had good games. Like I said at the end to our team, I don’t think anyone had a bad game. I think every guy that we played, played well. They made it hard to think about subbing because they didn’t look tired and they were playing well. The second half kept getting better and better.” Barlow credited Diaz-Bonilla with producing a good performance. “That is what we expect from him, to be able to break people down on the dribble and get chances,” said Barlow of Diaz-Bonilla, who had two shots against Rutgers. “He is doing better with h i s d efe n d i n g n ow a n d pressing. He picked them off a few times and got dangerous on counters. It was a good game for him.” The Princeton defense also got better over the latter stages of the contest. “We were shaky with the passing in the first half,” said Barlow.

“I think all four of them settled in as the game went on. I thought you could see some rust and some nerves in the first half. We gave them the ball in some dangerous spots that we can’t afford to do. Jack [Roberts] had to come up big a couple of times and Alex [Charles] had to save the day a couple of times.” As the Tigers hit the road for a game at Vermont on September 7 before heading to Colgate on September 12, Barlow believes his squad will break the ice offensively. “I think every game is going to be like this: tough, 100 miles per hour, and really competitive,” said Barlow. “You have just got be better in front of both goals. Hopefully the goals w ill

start coming; we have got to get that first one. We have two tough road trips now to Vermont and Colgate. Not only are they long trips but they are good teams and tough places to play. Vermont is doing really well so we have got to get back to work.” Diaz-Bonilla and his teammates are ready to keep working hard. “It is a quick turnaround, we have two days and we will be heading up there Monday night,” said DiazBonilla. “We are going to take a look at the film and make some adjustments. We will come out strong against Vermont and hopefully put away some goals.” —Bill Alden

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ON HIS TOES: Princeton University men’s soccer player Daniel Diaz-Bonilla, right, battles Nico Rosamilia of Rutgers for the ball last Friday night in Princeton’s season opener. Junior forward Diaz-Bonilla generated a number of chances for the Tigers in a losing cause as Princeton fell 1-0 to the Scarlet Knights. Princeton was slated to play at Vermont on September 7 before heading to Colgate on September 12. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021

Diaz-Bonilla Shows Progress in Return to Action As Tiger Men’s Soccer Falls to Rutgers in Opener


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021 • 28

Although Princeton Field Hockey Starts 0-2, Freshman Yeager Makes Immediate Impact It didn’t take long for Beth Yeager to make an impact for the Princeton University field hockey team last weekend in her collegiate debut. After the highly touted striker generated five shots on goal but was held scoreless in a 4-1 loss to topranked and three-time defending national champion North Carolina on Friday, Yeager tallied both goals for No. 13 Princeton in a 3-2 overtime loss to fifth-ranked Louisville two days later. While Yeager was disappointed by the defeat to the Cardinals, she saw positives coming out of the setback. “We were excited to come out today and work on a few things,” said Yeager. “Even though it was a disappointing result, there was a lot of progress that we made. It is a long season, there is lots to build on.” Yeager was excited to notch her first collegiate goal, which came on a penalty stroke midway through the first period to give the Tigers a 1-0 lead. “I was just aiming for the

spot, trying to keep calm, not focus on all of the noise around me and do my best,” recalled Yeager, a 5’7 native of Greenwich, Conn., who has competed for the U.S. U-17 and U-19 outdoor junior teams. “It is really exciting; I was just happy to contribute to the team in that moment and put it in.” After Louisville responded with two straight goals, Yeager found the back of the cage again, converting a penalty corner with 30 seconds left in the half to knot the contest at 2-2. “That is one of our key corners, I think we did a pretty good job of getting some good opportunities off of them,” said Yeager of the goal which was assisted on by Sam Davidson and Ali McCarthy. “It was good that we got one again.” Although Princeton outshot the Cardinals 9-5 in the second half, it didn’t score again on the day and fell in OT when Louisville tallied 4:47 into the extra session to get the win.

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“We had a lot of opportunities in the second half and some really, really close ones,” said Yeager. “We definitely won the second half I think even though the score didn’t reflect that but that is always a good thing.” Reflecting on the weekend overall, Yeager believes the Tigers made progress offensively. “I think both games it is just about finishing it,” added Yeager. “We are get t ing some good opportunities but we just need to put them in the back of the cage at the end of the day.” Yeager relished getting the chance to make her college debut. “It has been amazing,” said Yeager. “I think one of the biggest things is the speed of play, the game is so much faster. You don’t have time to think like you do in high school or club.” Princeton head coach Carla Tagliente saw some good things from her attacking unit against Louisville.

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FRESH APPROACH: Princeton University field hockey player Beth Yeager, center, races upfield past two North Carolina defenders last Friday in Princeton’s season opener. The 13th-ranked Tigers fell 4-1 to top-ranked UNC and then showed progress in losing 3-2 in overtime to No. 5 Louisville two days later. Freshman star Yeager notched her first college goals in the loss to the Cardinals, tallying both scores for Princeton in the defeat. In upcoming action, the Tigers host No. 12 Duke on September 11. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) “The offense is fine, you just hope we put a few more in,” said Tagliente, whose team outshot the Cardinals 17-11. “We had a bunch of 3-versus-1s in the circle and some open shots and rebounds. In reality, statistically you would think we would win by two or three goals. It is fine, you are going to have games like that. You have to put them away and we didn’t.” Tagliente was not surprised to see Yeager put two away against Louisville. “Beth is just a dominant player and is clearly one of the best players in NCAA hockey right now,” asserted Tagliente. “She brings a different presence on attack and on

defense. She has had a great start so far and she is only going to go up from here.” In assessing the weekend, Tagliente is looking for the Princeton defense to tighten up. “ We tal ked about our counter structure and how to close that off and just some soft turnovers out of our defensive end,” said Tagliente. “I think we did better with the soft turnovers. We just need to be a lot stronger in the back in terms of tackling further outside the circle, just being able to double and come up with clean tackles. We are just a little off right now.” With a young squad that has no seniors on its roster, Tagliente believes that the

Tigers can have a strong season even through there will be bumps in the road along the way. “I think the ceiling is high,” said Tagliente, whose squad is next in action when it hosts No. 12 Duke on September 11. “With a young team and a tough schedule, you have to keep your head in the game and be able to grind out and grow through these difficult moments.” Yeager, for her part, is confident that Princeton will grow into something special. “The team has been really great and welcoming; it is a great community to be part of,” said Yeager. “We have a bright future ahead definitely.” —Bill Alden

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29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021

On Sunday, the Tigers fell 11-9 to No. 3 California before routing Johns Hopkins 17-2 to wrap up the weekend. In upcoming action, the program will be hosting its PU Women’s Soccer annual Princeton Invite from Ties No. 8 Georgetown Jen Estes found the back September 10-12 at DeNunof the net as the Princeton zio Pool. University women’s soccer PU Football Alum Horsted team tied No. 8 Georgetown Makes Chicago Bears Roster 1-1 last Sunday in WashingDays after producing a ton, D.C. brilliant effort in his preSophomore Estes scored season finale for the Chicaon a header late in the 37th go Bears, former Princeton minute, converting a feed University football star Jesfrom senior Tatum Gee. per Horsted ’19 was named Georgetown answered back to the final 53-man roster with a goal in the 58th min- for the team. utes and neither team scored Horsted, a 6’3, 237-pound again through the rest of tight end, made five recepregulation and 20 minutes tions for 104 yards and of overtime. Tiger senior three touchdowns to help goalie Grace Barbara, a for- the Bears defeat the Tennesmer Princeton Day School see Titans 27-24 on August standout, made two saves 28 to finish the preseason. in the draw. On August 31, he learned In upcoming action, Princ- that he had surveyed the eton, now 3-0-1, plays at final cut to make the openNo. 16 Rutgers on Septem- ing day roster for the Bears. ber 9 before hosting Rhode Chicago kicks off 2021 regular season action by playIsland on September 12. ing at the Los Angeles Rams Princeton Men’s Water Polo on September 12. Goes 3-1 at Navy Invitational Now in his third year with Antonio Krez starred as the Bears, Horsted has eight the 14th-ranked Princeton career receptions and one University men’s water polo touchdown — against the team started its 2021 campaign by going 3-1 at the Lions on Thanksgiving Day Navy Invitational last week- 2019 — for his first two years, most of which has end in Annapolis, Md. been spent on the practice Junior goalie Krez tied squad. the program’s single-game At Pr inceton, Horsted record for saves with 22 ended up as the program’s in a 12-7 win over George all-time leader in receptions Washington on Saturday. His 22 stops tied Ryan Me- (196) and receiving touchlosini’s mark from a win over downs (28). He was an AllSalem International in Sep- American in his senior year tember, 2017. Earlier in the in 2018 as he helped the Tiday, Princeton defeated St. gers go 10-0. He was also Mary’s 21-10 in its season a first-team All-Ivy League baseball player as well. opener.

PU Sports Roundup

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WORLD-BEATERS: Princeton University women’s hockey players Sarah Fillier, left, and Claire Thompson’20 celebrate after helping Canada defeat the U.S. 3-2 in overtime in the title game of the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) Women’s World Championships on August 31 in Calgary, Alberta. Star forward Fillier, who completed her sophomore season at Princeton in 2019-20, had an assist in the final. The two Tigers combined for 10 points over seven games at the tourney, which Canada swept with four preliminary-round wins and then three victories in a row through the elimination bracket. Fillier had three goals and three assists while defenseman Thompson had four assists. It marked Canada’s first title at the competition since 2012. Thompson and Fillier are the first Princetonians to win an IIHF gold medal since Megan Van Beusekom’04 became a two-time champion with the U.S. in 2009. (Photos by Hockey Canada, provided courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

Princeton Cross Country Teams Excel at Lehigh Invitational

Matthew Farrell set the pace as the Princeton University men’s cross country team took first at the Lehigh Invitational last Friday. Sophomore Farrell, running in his first collegiate race, finished first individually, covering the 6,000-meter course in a time of 18:05.7. Tiger sophomore Joshua Zelek took second in the race, going stride for stride with Farrell, clocking the same time. Senior Kevin Barry came in third, by 0.2 seconds. The Princeton women’s runners also had a big day at the Lehigh event, taking second in the team standings. All five Tigers who scored crossed the line at the same time to give Princeton the 8-9-10-11-12 finishers. Abey Loveys, Margaret Liebich, Fiona Max, Angela Allen, and Lucca Fulkerson each recorded a finishing mark of 22:14.8 over the 6K course where the NCAA Mid-Atlantic Regional will be held in November. The Tiger cross country teams will next be in action when they host the HYP Meet on September 11 at their West Windsor Fields course.

PU Women’s Volleyball Goes 1-2 at Towson Event

Seeing its first action since 2019, the Princeton University women’s volleyball team went 1-2 last weekend at the Towson Tournament in Towson, Md. Princeton fell 3-0 (25-22, 25-22, 26 -24) to Loyola (Md.) on Friday in its season opener. A day later the Tigers defeated Morgan State 3-0 (25-21, 25-19, 25-11) before falling 3-0 (25-15, 25-23, 25-21) to host Towson. Junior Lindsey Kelly produced an outstanding performance on Saturday, totaling 75 assists and 19 digs in both matches to lead the Tigers in both categories. Junior Aver y Luoma led Princeton in kills as she tallied 24 in the day. Princeton returns to action this weekend when it heads north to compete in the Colgate Tour nament from September 10-11.

PU Women’s Golfers 3rd at Penn State Event

With Victoria Liu making a strong collegiate debut, the Princeton University women’s golf team placed third

at Penn State’s Nittany Lion Invitational last weekend in State College, Pa. Freshman Liu tied for second individually, carding a seven-under 209 for the three round event. Tiger junior Tiffany Kong took 10th overall at -2. In the team standings, Princeton had a score of +5 in taking third with host Penn State winning at -13, 12 shots in front of runnerup Delaware (-1). The Tigers are next in action when they compete in the William and Mary Invitational at the Kingsmill Resort in Williamsburg, Va.

men’s lightweight rowing team has added David Burke to its staff as an assistant coach, the program announced last week. Burke comes to Princeton from Old Dominion, where he was the assistant coach/ recruiting coordinator for the women’s rowing program since 2019. Prior to that, Burke spent six seasons at Cornell, where he also had the same title for the men’s squad. While there, he helped the second varsity to eighth place at the 2016 Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) National Championships. The 2015 and 2016 Eastern Sprints produced PU Men’s Lightweight Rowing consecutive bronze medals Adds Burke to Coaching Staff for Cornell while Burke also The Princeton University coached two more top-five

finishes at Easterns. His previous stop before Cornell featured five years at Northeastern. In 2012, he was a part of the staff that led the team to a silver medal at Eastern Sprints and a bronze at IRAs. Other coaching stints include St. Joseph’s Collegiate Institute and the West Side Rowing Club. Burke attended Nor theastern where he majored in history and minored in secondary education. As a member of the rowing team, he earned the Charlie Smith and Jack Grinold Boathouse Awards while helping the 2V to fourth place at Eastern Sprints, sixth place at IRAs, and second at the Head of the Charles.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021 • 30

Despite Losing 14 Seniors to Graduation, PHS Boys’ Soccer Reloading, Not Rebuilding Over the years, the Princeton High boys’ soccer team has proven that it is one of those programs that doesn’t rebuild, it reloads. After losing 14 seniors from a squad that went 9-31 last year and advanced to the Central West Group 4 sectional final, the cupboard is far from bare as PHS opens its 2021 season by hosting Robbinsville on September 8. “We have a really good nucleus of senior players, five of whom have been on the team a while; this is their third year,” said PHS head coach Wayne Sutcliffe, who is in his 25th season at the helm of the program and guided the Tigers to 2009 and 2012 Group 3 state titles in addition to several sectional and county crowns and passing the 300-win milestone in 2016. “The preseason has been great. There is a sense of excitement at the prospect of some normalcy here.” PHS tested itself in the preseason, scr im mag ing such for midable foes as S cotch Pla i ns - Fa nwo o d, Christian Brothers Academy, and Gill St Bernard’s, among others. “We just kept getting better at everything which is encouraging,” said Sutcliffe. “That would be the primary observation, we got better every scrimmage.” Senior Nico Carusone and junior Richard Wegman have emerged as the primary offensive threats at forward for the Tigers. “They are finding some

understanding,” said Sutclif fe, who w ill also be looking at sophomore Felipe Matar Grandi Davis and senior Joe Borovoy up top. “It has been promising in terms of their performance in the preseason friendlies we have had which have been pretty demanding.” The PHS midfield boasts a number of promising players in senior Owen Deming, ju n ior E manuel Noyola, sophomore Nick Matese, sophomore Patrick Kenah, senior Cooper Ealy, and senior Drew Petrone. “We have a holding center mid, a third year player in Owen, he is a good lacrosse player too,” said Sutcliffe. “He is really good, he is a good player. He is experienced, he has been around l i ke N i c o a n d R i ch a r d. Emanuel has shown very well, he is really good. We have some other younger players like Nick, he has also shown very well. We have a plethora of midfielders with other guys who are really showing well like Patrick, Cooper, and Drew.” Along the back line, Sutcliffe is looking at senior Breno Azevedo, senior Charlie Novak, senior Reuben Breitman, junior Nat Tudor, junior Zhibo Huang, junior Erik Luijendijk, senior Alexander DeLuca, and junior Leo George. “Breno is back, he is very good,” said Sutcliffe. “Charlie Novak is an excellent player at left back. We have some good additional guys in Reuben and Nat at center back. Zhibo and Erik

are good players. Zander and Leo are also in the mix.” After taking a hiatus from soccer, senior Carl Birge is back with the program and has earned the starting spot at goalie. “Carl is the catcher on the baseball team, he played goalie early days so he has got a background,” said Sutcliffe, who has two backup goalies in junior Oleg Brennan and senior Troy Curran. “He did not play last fall, he last played as a freshman. He has been working all summer and is showing pretty well. He has got great agility and strong hands. He has a soft touch on the ball. He brings another dimension because he is an experienced, distinct varsity athlete in another sport already. He brings some confidence and is close with the other seniors. It takes a while but the athleticism lends itself and he is smart.” In order to continue the program’s winning tradition this season, PHS will need to play some smart soccer and maintain the intensity all fall. “The back four have to be really sharp and have a quick learning curve in front of a new goalkeeper,” said Sutcliffe. “The players have to keep competing with one another in order to enjoy their soccer and create a competitive environment in training, not just in the second week or the fourth week but in the sixth, eighth weeks when it matters most. We have been fortunate with that in the past, soccer is a big deal in the Princeton community.” —Bill Alden

Kosa Taking the Helm of PHS Girls’ Soccer, Determined to Maintain Program’s Winning Ways Dave Kosa has been exposed to a lot of outstanding high school girls’ soccer squads over the years. Growing up, Kosa sent a lot of time in the stands as his late father, Louis Kosa, enjoyed a legendary career coaching the East Brunswick High girls’ soccer team, guiding the program to a 527-63-22 record, capturing eight state championships, and a No. 1 ranking in the nation in 1992. Over the last six years, Kosa has served as an assistant coach for the successful Princeton High girls’ soccer program, also leading the JV squad in five of those seasons. This fall, Kosa will look to help PHS continue its winning ways, taking the helm of the program, succeeding Val Rodriguez, who stepped down last fall after coaching the Tigers to a 9-3-1 record in 2020. “I am really excited and happy to continue the tradition of the girls’ soccer program that Greg [Hand] had and passed on to Val,” said Kosa, who also serves as the head coach of the PHS girls’ basketball team. “It is a really good bunch. They are really good kids and good people; that is the most important thing. They have taken to working hard and just trying to get better. We want to play the best soccer at the end of the season. We have a lot of great talent. It is my job to mesh then and work them hard. We are really looking forward to that.” The Tigers boast some talented players at forward in senior co-captains Sophia Lis and Megan Rougas along with sophomore Holly Howes. “Sophia is going to Lehigh on a soccer scholarship; she is very talented and has shown that in the scrimmages that we have played so far,” said Kosa, whose team kicks off its 2021 campaign by playing at Robbinsville on September 8. “Megan is very fast, she is very tough. She has a knack for being around the ball.

We have Holly who can also play there. She is actually the fastest one of the bunch; she just sped past people in scrimmages.” In the midfield, the trio of sophomore Casey Serxner, senior Naomi Bazar, and sophomore Brielle Moran has been playing well. “Casey is such a competitor and she is also very tough,” said Kosa. “She will be one of our inside mids. The other inside mid is Naomi. On the outside, it will probably be Holly [Howes] and Brielle starting.” Sophomore Alysse Kiesewetter, senior Annie Kosa, junior Rowan Gilmore, and freshman Annabella Weidmann will look to provide some tough play along the back line for PHS. “Alysse played a lot of outside mid last year; in the first couple of scrimmages, she was going back and forth between midfield and defense,” said Kosa. “After that third scrimmage, I was thinking she looks really good back there so she is going to be playing our left outside back. My daughter, Annie, is our sweeper. She was a stopper as a freshman and then played sweeper as a sophomore on the JV team and did a great job back there. She is very familiar with that role. Rowan is going to be our stopper. We have a freshman, Annabella, who came in from Germany. I was penciling people in before the season and I realized I really need a right outside back and that is what she plays. She will have a lot to learn but she is really tough back there and has some soccer skill.” At goalie, senior Moji Ayodele is showing her skill as she aims to produce a big final campaign after being hampered a bit by injury as a junior. “Moji is looking really good, she is very athletic,” said Kosa. “Last year in the games that she played, we didn’t lose a game; we tied one

against Steinert with her playing.” In Kosa’s view, doing well in the first week of the season could set the tone for the Tigers this fall. “We are going to have to come together defensively, being that we have first-year starters back there,” said Kosa. “The scrimmages have given us really good experience; we have played some good competition to get us ready. I think we will score goals and having Moji in goal is going to help us. Our first two games are Robbinsville and Steinert so that is two good ones right off the bat. Coming out of the gate strong could really propel us but we will have to work really hard to earn those wins.” —Bill Alden

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KEY MAN: Princeton High boys’ soccer player Richard Wegman dribbles the ball in a contest last fall. Junior Wegman should be a key offensive threat this fall for PHS. The Tigers start their 2021 season by hosting Robbinsville on September 8. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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SO READY: Princeton High girls’ soccer player Sophia Lis boots the ball in a game last fall. Senior star forward Lis, who has committed to attend Lehigh University and play for its women’s soccer team, is primed for a big final campaign for PHS. The Tigers start the 2021 season by playing at Robbinsville on September 8. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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The players on the Princeton High field hockey team started laying the groundwork for a big 2021 season well before they hit the field for preseason practices in mid-August. “We have been playing all summer, we really never stopped so this is just another part of our season,” said PHS head coach Heather Serverson, noting that her players have played pickup at school two days a week and have also played pickup at Centercourt Sports in Lawrence and competed for various club programs. “They are such a closeknit group and we only graduated three people. It is kind of just like getting the band back together. One of the biggest plusses about this team is that they are all extremely familiar with playing with one another.” There will be plenty of familiar faces on the field for the Tigers as the squad boasts a stellar senior group. “We have seven seniors and they have been doing a great job, trying to set the standards in practices and at games,” said Serverson, whose team went 8-2 last year and begins its 2021 season by playing at Allentown on September 9. “They are great leaders in general, they really make an effort to reach out to the younger girls. They make sure that everyone feels included and welcome. It is great environment.” The forward line features a great player in senior Olivia Weir, who has committed to attend Rutgers University and play for its field hockey program.

“Olivia is looking good, she is healthy, she is happy,” said Serverson. “She is a creative player too. She is a good team player and that is why she helps make us look good as well as herself. She would rather someone else would have the goal almost than herself.” Serverson has other options at forward in addition to Weir. “Erin Cooke is a senior and she is in the mix,” added Serverson. “Sophomore Erin Liggio is a promising player who could produce some goals for us.” The Tiger midfield is a work in progress with sophomore Delaney Keegan in the mix along with senior Aleena Inayat and junior Gianna DiGioacchino. “Delaney is playing high mid for us right now,” said Serverson. “She was on varsity last year but she never got to play because she was injured. The midfield on both sides is up in the air. I am looking at Aleena or Gianna. They have both been playing well there down the center for us. We are just trying to figure out how we best fit together there.” Senior star Grace Rebak, who has verbally committed to attend Williams College and compete for its field hockey program, will spearhead the back line “Now that the other players are more seasoned, Grace feels more comfortable with going forward,” said Serverson, whose defensive unit will also include senior Stella Matsukawa

along with either Inayat or DiGioacchino. “She is awesome, I am really going to miss her. I think her decision-making and timing is spot on. She is just so calm and steady in making decisions at just the right moment. Her communication in the back keeps everyone else nice and steady and calm. It is a senior and junior defensive backfield.” Battle-tested senior Frankie deFaria gives PHS a steady presence at goalie. “Frankie is looking good; she is even better with the aerial shots now, we have been working on that,” said Serverson. “She is also a big communicator back there for us. Between her and Grace, they keep everybody calm and playing well. It is amazing.” In Serverson’s view, PHS has the potential to produce an amazing season this fall if it takes care of business on and off the field. “I think that the adjustment of going back to school is probably going to be a key to our success,” said Serverson. “It is all in-person this year; they are not used to getting up that early, so it is just that readjustment to getting back to normal. Other than that, this might be one of the most skilled teams I have ever coached at PHS. If we continue on the trajectory that I think we should be on, we should be doing some good things this season.” —Bill Alden

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021

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WEIR ON A TEAR: Princeton High field hockey player Olivia Weir, right, brings the ball up the field in a game last year. Senior star Weir, who has committed to attend Rutgers University and play for its field hockey program, has emerged as the go-to finisher for PHS. The Tigers begin their 2021 season by playing at Allentown on September 9. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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PDS Field Hockey Excited For a Busy Fall, Facing New Challenges in Joining NJSIAA After having an abbreviated season in 2020 due to COV ID -19 concerns, the Princeton Day School field hockey team is looking forward to being busy this fall. “There is a sense of excitement,” said PDS head coach Heather Farlow, who guided the Panthers to 5-41 record last season. “We have joined the other state association (the New Jersey State Interscholas-

tic Athletic Association ) so that means that we are averaging three games a week, which is a lot.” PDS boasts some exciting performers in the forward line in senior Ally Antonacci, senior Haley Sullivan, sophomore Tessa Caputo, senior Kacey Fisher, and senior Gabriella Thomas. “We have only had one scr immage against F lorence and we won 6-3,” said

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Farlow, whose team opens its 2021 campaign by hosting W W/P-North on September 8. “Ally, Haley, and Tessa have stood out, they are finishers.” In the midfield, the Panthers will rely on a quartet of standouts in junior Jadyn Huff, senior Maggie ZarishYas u n as, s e n ior Fr a n ny Gallagher, and freshman Charlotte Mullen. “They are experienced,” a d d e d Fa r l o w. “J a d y n , Franny, and Maggie are all returning veteran players and good athletes. Charlotte plays club at Princeton Field Hockey Club so she is adjusting to the speed of play.” T he Pant her back line features a mix of talented young players and veterans. “I have got Logan Harr is on a nd K at ie Z ar ish Yasunas returning in the back,” said Farlow of the two sophomore stars. “Kelly Christie is a sophomore and plays lacrosse as well. She is transitioning from being more of a midfielder to a back. She has

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got great speed, we are just working on the tackling. Lauren Frank is a senior and is transitioning from forward to back. She has got great speed as well. We have Rebecca Willner, she is a senior and is getting in there. I have a freshman Peyton Richardson who is also get ting used to the speed of play.” Frances Bobbit and Molly Hall will be handling the goalie duties this fall for PDS. “We have a senior, Frances, and Molly, who is a freshman, at goalie,” said Farlow. “They are competing for varsity time.” In Farlow’s view, being sharp around the goal will be the key to competing well as PDS deals with the challenges of starting NJSIAA play. “We are hoping to generate a strong offensive output; it is just strengthening our play in the 25 at both ends, offensive and defensive,” said Farlow. “We don’t know what to expect since we are in this new state association. We are taking on more public schools; I think that we will be competitive.” —Bill Alden

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HALE STORM: Princeton Day School field hockey player Haley Sullivan heads to goal in a game last fall. Senior star Sullivan figures to be a key weapon on the forward line for PDS this fall. The Panthers open their 2021 campaign by hosting WW/PNorth on September 8. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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With the Hun School boys’ soccer team boasting skill all over the field, its daily practice sessions have turned into a pitched battles. “From top to bottom, it is one of the most talented teams that I have had,” said Hun head coach Pat Quirk, whose team went 1-5 last fall in a season abbreviated by COVID-19 concerns and will start its 2021 campaign by playing at the Germantown Academy (Pa.) on September 10. “It is going to be tough, that is the culture that the kids want it to be. It needs to be competitive every day in practice, maybe even more competitive than when we get into games. If a kid is off one practice, we have kids who can fill the role.” A quartet of forwards, junior Mass Verduci, sophomore Joey Bucchere, junior Will Zeng, and senior Hector Suriel, should provide the firepower to keep Hun competitive. “Those are our main guys up top, we will mix and match them,” said Quirk. “We scored 11 goals in a scrimmage against Nottingham and we scored three goals against Hopewell in a scrimmage. I think we are going to see some goals. Those guys are going to be finishing but they are going to be set up by the midfield.” T h at m i d f i el d w i l l b e spearheaded by junior Tyler Stark, senior Ozzie Bayazitoglu, junior Adhityan Tamilselvan, and sophomore Michael D’Aulerio. “They are really good with the ball at their feet, they are really good at distributing,” said Quirk. “They are awesome at breaking lines and putting guys in; they just understand the game so well.” O n defens e, a bat t le -

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tested group of senior John Balian, senior A.J. Torres, senior Aden Spektor, and sophomore Conor Frykholm will be holding the fort. “John and A.J are definitely going to be leaders there as the outside backs,” said Quirk. “Aden s tar te d play i ng center back for us last year. Conor played center mid for us last year and we slid him back; he is a center back now. The four of them are a very strong, sturdy unit.” Quirk is looking for a strong season from senior goalie Ayden Isbirian. “Ayden is back; he put in a lot of work this summer and has been working with our goalie coach [Nick Savino],” said Quirk, whose backup keeper will be freshman Diego Pena. “It is his spot right now, he is doing well. He is working on his positioning and his vocal leadership in the back has been good. He has gotten stronger. The freshman goalie, Diego, is going to be good. He is going to push Ayden to play his best every day. That is a theme we have got with our team.” In Quirk ’s v iew, those daily battles should steel the Raiders for the challenges ahead. “We need to be competing in practice every day and not staying complacent,” said Quirk. “That has hurt us in the pas t, b ei ng happy w it h where we are rather than trying to get better each day. I think we saw the work ethic in the summer with guys getting together and going through preseason. They know that each day that we start is a new day, the previous day was the easiest day. We just have to keep going, we are looking strong.” —Bill Alden

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Local Sports Helene Cody 5K Race Set for September 11

The 13th Annual Helene Cody 5-kilometer race and 1-Mile Fun Run is taking place on September 11 on a new course with the start and finish line at Heritage Park in Cranbury. The fun run begins at 8:15 a.m. and the 5K starts at 9 a.m. The 5K is chip-timed and USATF-certified with water stations throughout the course. Trophies will be awarded to the top three male and female finishers overall and in each age group for the 5K. Every fun run finisher will receive a medal and trophies will be awarded to the top three boys and girls. The Cranbury Day celebration will begin immediately after the race on Main Street. Additional race information and online registration is available at helenecody.com/5kand-1-mile-runwalk.html. This event is the main fundraiser for the Helene Cody Foundation, whose mission is to inspire youth to volunteer, to better their communities and themselves. Prior to her death in 2008, Helene Cody, a Princeton High student, planned to revive the Cranbury Day 5K, a community event that had been discontinued in 2006, as a way to combine her love of distance running and community service for her Girl Scout gold award project. When she passed away, a classmate organized the first Helene Cody Cranbury 5K in memory of Helene for his Eagle Scout project. Every year since, the Helene Cody Foundation has used the event to bring the community together and use the proceeds to sponsor youth service projects and provide scholarships. All proceeds go directly to the Helene Cody Foundation, a 501(c)(3) charity.

play, individualized instruction, skills development, and fundamentals as well as league play through the offerings. The BBA is led by former PDS girls’ hoops coach and Philadelphia 76ers International Camps Clinician Kamau Bailey. The BBA fall program will include two competitive boys’ travel teams (third-fifth grade and sixth-eighth grade), weekly practices and Shot King Shooting Program, and Player Development Skill Sessions for elementary through high school players (boys and girls). BBA programs stress fundamentals and team play with emphasis on ball handling, shooting, passing, footwork, speed, agility, movement with and without the ball, one-onone moves, defense, and other basketball skills. There will be BBA meet and greet registration and practice for interested players and parents on September 10 in the Stuart Country Day School gym from 6-7:15 p.m. (thirdfifth grade) and 7:15-8:30 p.m. (sixth-eighth grade). Parents can sign up their players for hoop programs that evening. For more information, contact coach Bailey at (917) 626-5785 or kamau.bailey@ gmail.com.

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021

Emphasizing Competitive Fire on a Daily Basis, Talented Hun Boys’ Soccer Primed for Strong Season

OVERDRIVE: Princeton High football player Jaiden Johnson races up the field in a game last fall. On Saturday, Johnson and the PHS kicked off the 2021 campaign by falling 26-7 to Overbrook High. Senior receiver Johnson scored the Tiger touchdown in the game on a 27-yard reception from quarterback Jaxon Petrone. Johnson made nine catches for 140 yards in the contest with Petrone completing 14-of-35 passes for 189 yards. The Tigers will look to get on the winning track when they host Haddon Heights (1-0) on September 11 in their home opener. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Bailey Basketball Academy FEELING LIKE A MILLION: The Community Park Pool reached a milestone on August 31 as the 1 millionth visitor in the history of the new pool (2012 to present) passed through the gates. The Offering Fall Programs Maya family (Diego, Nicolas, Paloma, and Grace) were the visitors who put the pool over the The Bailey Basketball Academy (BBA) has set the schedule for its upcoming fall hoops programs. Players will have an opportunity for competitive travel

million mark and were presented with a certificate of recognition by the Princeton Recreation Department and will be awarded a free pool membership to CP Pool in 2022. Celebrating the achievement, from left, are Darius Young, the chairman of the Princeton Board of Parks and Recreation Commissioners; Vikki Caines, the Recreation Department administrative assistant/ customer service manager; Paloma, Grace, Nicolas, and Diego Maya; and Evan Moorhead, the Recreation Department executive director. (Photo provided courtesy of Princeton Recreation Department)

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Obituaries

Charles Joseph “Cal” Heitzmann Jr. 1940-2021

Charles Joseph Heitzmann Jr., 80, beloved husband of Marilyn Heitzmann, passed away on August 22, 2021 at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. Cal, as he was know n by his friends and family, was born in Weehawken, NJ, to Charles and Lula Heitzmann. Throughout his entire life, Cal was incredibly passionate about Weehawken. As an athlete, he excelled on the field lettering multiple years in soccer, basketball, and baseball. As a student, he graduated with honors. But there was nothing more special to him about Weehawken than the lifelong group of friends he made there, many of whom he stayed connected to for his entire life. C a l g r ad u ate d w it h a Bachelor of Science degree from St. Peter’s University with a major in American

History. He went on to receive a master’s degree from New Jersey City University. After receiving his bachelor’s degree, Cal married Ruth Steinmetz, who pre-deceased him. The two were happily married for 33 years. After a few years of travel, they had two children, son David and daughter Laura. They raised their family in Belle Mead, New Jersey. Cal’s love of sports also spilled over into coaching where he coached both his son and his daughter for many years in both basketball and baseball. He was particularly proud of one of his daughter’s teams winning the league championship in basketball. He also continued to play in both softball and basketball leagues well into his 50s with more wonderful friends that he made along the way. Cal was keenly interested in helping others and spent his entire 40-year career in the healthcare industry starting with the CDC as a field epidemiologist, spending the first five years of his career there. He spent most of his working life serving as the Executive Director of the Academy of Medicine of New Jersey. Here, Cal was instrumental in creating and developing the concept of an “Academy” to manage the business affairs for medical specialty and health related organizations. This concept has since been adopted by dozens of states and major cities across the country, all focused on sponsoring continuing medical education programs for physicians. Cal served on many Boards and Committees including the NJ Osteopathic Education Foundation Board of

Directors and the American Diabetes Association, NJ Affiliate Board of Directors. He was also a member of the American Association of Medical Society Executives. It was in Princeton where he met his devoted wife of more than 19 years, Marilyn Davies. The two made an instant connection at a Princeton Hockey game and the rest was history. Cal and Marilyn spent half their time in Naples, Florida, and the other half in Princeton / Skillman, New Jersey. Like newlywed kids, they enjoyed so much together including fine dining on the town and friendly competition on the golf course. Cal being an avid New York Yankee fan even got Marilyn to become one herself. They were each other’s greatest strength, and they treated each other’s families like their very own. Cal had a unique way of connecting with people on a personal level and making them feel great about themselves. He was also one of the kindest, loyal, and trustworthy people one could ever know. All of Cal’s family and friends will miss him dearly. Cal is survived by his wife, Mar ilyn Heitzmann ; t wo children (and spouses), David (Carol) Heitzmann and Laura ( Paul) Ulrich ; and four adoring grandchildren, Trevor, Paulie, Kelsey, and Charlie. He is also survived by four step-children (and sp ou s e s ) , Br u ce Dav ie s (Susan Marcantonio), Mark Davies ( Lidianny Barga), Eric Davies (Trevor Davies), and Nancy Davies ( Brad Schwar tz ); and six step grandchildren, Kyle, Lucas,

Nadia, Elliot, Sage, and Elle. He also leaves behind his sister Gail Hunt and his cousin Mary Bea Kingwill. A Memorial Service was held on August 26, 2021 at the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home in Princeton. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in memory of Cal Heitzmann to the Parkinson’s Foundation (parkinson.org) or St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital (st.jude.org).

playing golf with his sons, and spending time with his grandsons. His family was the most important to him. Predeceased by his parents William H. and Lucille (Culhane) Moore; two sisters Sharon Cassity and Maureen Joy; three brothers William Michael, Bobby ( Robert), and Joseph Earl; he is survived by his wife of 28 years Donna (Gordon) Moore; one daughter Courtney Moore of Jersey City; three sons and daughters-in-law Derek and Nicole Rasavage of Pittstown, Kyle Rasavage and

Natalie Rockhill of Bordentown, and Michael Moore of New York; three cherished grandsons Kyle, Mason, and Carter; and sister Jackie Morphew of Peru, Indiana. Visitation will be held on T hursday, S eptember 9, 2021 from 5-7:30 p.m. followed by a funeral service at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08542. Burial will be private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital at stjude.org.

Celebration of Life From the family of Paul J. Hill — A celebration of a life well-lived. Springdale Golf Club September 14, 2021 2-4 p.m. Dennis M. Moore Sr. Dennis M. Moore Sr., 70, of Seaside Park, NJ, passed away on Friday, September 3, 2021, at home surrounded by his loving family. He was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, and resided in Seaside Park. He graduated from Rider University with his master’s in business and continued to attend Stanford University’s executive business program. He was hired by Church and Dwight in 1980 where he served as Vice President in several capacities over the course of his career until he retired in 2006. He enjoyed jigsaw puzzles, sitting in his garage down at the shore,

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Trinity Church SundayHoly Week 8:00&a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I Easter Schedule

9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages March 23 10:00Wednesday, a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm

Tuesday March 24 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist SThursday undayS Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm

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Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 5:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist 10:00 am — Holy Eucharist II amPrayer

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

11:00 amFriday, — Coffee Hour March 25

33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am 5:00 —forCompline The Prayer Bookpm Service Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm All services are online. The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

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214 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, March 26 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Saturday 5:30pmp.m. The GreatVigil Vigil ofMass: Easter, 7:00 Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30and p.m. Sunday:The 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 5:00 p.m. Rev. Paul JeanesMarch III, Rector, Sunday, 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. TheMass Rev. Canon Dr.Eucharist, Kara Slade, Holy RiteAssoc. I, 7:30Rector, am in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am The Rev. Joanne Epply-Schmidt, Assoc. Rector, Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music The. Rev.St. Paul Jeanes III, Rector 33 Mercer Princeton The Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music 609-924-2277 • www.trinityprinceton.org

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Join us for worshipwitherspoonchurch.org on Facebook Live every Sunday at 10:00 a.m. Recorded and live stream sermons can also be found on our website - witherspoonchurch.org Join our mailing list to receive notices of our special services, bible study and virtual fellowship. During the COVID-19 crisis our church office is closed, however, please email witherspoon@verizon.net or leave a message at our church office and a staff member will get back to you. Church office: (609) 924-1666


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HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

Irene Lee, Classified Manager

09-30-21

Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com

06-30-22

Mike for viewing / appointments. (609) 688-0368.

• Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be Antiques, pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. BUYING: paintings, DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL ROSA’S Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, word 15 cents $15.00 for ads greater than 60tf words inof length. All phases home improvement. SERVICE LLC• Surcharge: MOVING• 25 SALEwords AFTER or 23less: $15.00 • each add’lCLEANING old toys, military, books, cameras, Serving the Princeton area for over YEARS! 6 bedroom home in Offering professional cleaning sersilver, costume & fi ne jewelry. Guitars • 3 weeks: $40.00 • 4 weeks: $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius Princeton’s Western Section. Call vices in the Princeton community & musical instruments. I buy single MOVING SALE AFTER 23 YEARS! 6 bedroom home in (609) 466-0732 Mike for viewing / appointments. forspacing: more than 28 years! Weekly, bi- items • Ads with line $20.00/inch • all bold face type: $10.00/week to entire estates. Free apprais(609) 688-0368. Princeton’s Western Section. Call

ANNA CLEANING SERVICE: Polish precision & detail. Residential & commercial. Very good references from long-term clients. Free estimates. Please call or text Anna, (609) 456-3583. 07-21-8t PRINCETON-GRACIOUS STUDIO APARTMENT on estate with magnificent gardens. Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time. Elegant furnishings, big windows, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, walk-in closet, kitchenette, large bath, AC, WI-Fi. Very private, separate entrance, parking. Great as an office, too. (609) 924-5245. 08-11-tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

HOUSECLEANING/ HOUSEKEEPING Professional cleaning service. Experienced, references, honest & responsible. Reasonable price. Call Ursula (609) 635-7054 for free estimate. 08-11-6t HEALTH CARE PROVIDER: CCMA (Licensed Clinical Medical Assistant). Licensed CHHA (Certified Home Health Aide). Over 10 years experience. References available. (609) 433-7031; fprotopapas1@ hotmail.com 09-01-4t KARINA’S HOUSECLEANING: Full service inside. Honest and reliable lady with references. Weekly, bi-weekly or monthly. I can work hourly. Call for estimate. (609) 858-8259. 09-01-4t 2 BEDROOM CONDO SHARE: Available Oct. 1. Master BR suite in 2 BR condo. Good for grad student or professional. Share w/female music teacher with 1 year lease or possible school year. $1,100/mo. plus utilities. Great location, 2 miles from PU. Public transportation, pool & tennis. Call (609) 706-2209. cldamerau@yahoo. com 09-08-3t

Local family owned business for over 40 years

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

MASON CONTRACTORS RESTORE-PRESERVE-ALL MASONRY

Mercer County's oldest, reliable, experienced firm. We serve you for all your masonry needs.

BRICK~STONE~STUCCO NEW~RESTORED Simplest Repair to the Most Grandeur Project, our staff will accommodate your every need!

Call us as your past generations did for over 72 years!

Complete Masonry & Waterproofing Services

Paul G. Pennacchi, Sr., Historical Preservationist #5. Support your community businesses. Princeton business since 1947.

609-394-7354 paul@apennacchi.com

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

W

Taking care of Princeton’s trees

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22

E

609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-09-22

N

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 873-3168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 09-08-8t

W

DISPLACED FAMILY SEEKS TEMP HOUSING: Professional family of 4(2 adults, 2 kids under 12 w/no pets), displaced by Hurricane Ida seeking temporary rental in Princeton (4-6 months). Please call (917) 705-0000. 09-08

E

NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE: Lakeview Avenue, Kingston. Several families. Household, garden, sporting goods, furniture, etc. Saturday & Sunday Sept. 11 & 12, from 9am-1pm. Please NO early arrivals. 09-08

weekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 09-01-5t

N

09-08

als. (609) 306-0613.

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read.

09-08 NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE: Lakeview Avenue, Kingston. Several families. Household, garden, sporting goods, furniture, etc. Saturday & Sunday Sept. 11 & 12, from 9am-1pm. Please NO early arrivals. 09-08

(609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

DISPLACED FAMILY SEEKS TEMP HOUSING: Professional family of 4(2 adults, 2 kids under 12 w/no pets), displaced by Hurricane Ida seeking temporary rental in Princeton (4-6 months). Please call (917) 705-0000. 09-08 ANNA CLEANING SERVICE: Polish precision & detail. Residential & commercial. Very good references from long-term clients. Free estimates. Please call or text Anna, (609) 456-3583. 07-21-8t

A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

PRINCETON-GRACIOUS STUDIO APARTMENT on estate with magnificent gardens. Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time. Elegant furnishings, big windows, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, walk-in closet, kitchenette, large bath, AC, WI-Fi. Very private, separate entrance, parking. Great as an office, too. (609) 924-5245. 08-11-tf

tf

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021

to place an order:

tf

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf HOUSECLEANING/ HOUSEKEEPING Professional cleaning service. Experienced, references, honest & responsible. Reasonable price. Call Ursula (609) 635-7054 for free estimate. 08-11-6t HEALTH CARE PROVIDER: CCMA (Licensed Clinical Medical Assistant). Licensed CHHA (Certified Home Health Aide). Over 10 years experience. References available. (609) 433-7031; fprotopapas1@ hotmail.com 09-01-4t KARINA’S HOUSECLEANING: Full service inside. Honest and reliable lady with references. Weekly, bi-weekly or monthly. I can work hourly. Call for estimate. (609) 858-8259. 09-01-4t

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

Love to Live on LINDEN LANE? Center of Princeton on one of the quiet “Tree” streets offers an opportunity for anyone wanting to walk everywhere. Colonial with 3 bedrooms 2 ½ baths, sits high off the street and backs up to a college campus. A one car detached garage sits at the top of the driveway. Living Room, Dining Room, Den, Breakfast Room, Kitchen and Powder Room complete the 1st floor. The 3rd floor has a light and bright office and a reading nook. Don’t miss this one!

$760,000

www.stockton-realtor.com Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021 • 36

2 BEDROOM CONDO SHARE: Available Oct. 1. Master BR suite in 2 BR condo. Good for grad student or professional. Share w/female music teacher with 1 year lease or possible school year. $1,100/mo. plus utilities. Great location, 2 miles from PU. Public transportation, pool & tennis. Call (609) 706-2209. cldamerau@yahoo. com

HOUSECLEANING:

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21

Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 873-3168. I have my own PPE for your protection.

Witherspoon Media Group

09-08-8t

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22

Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs

APPLYING TO COLLEGE? Don’t go it alone! By giving you expert advice, smart feedback, practical timeand-process guidance, and meaningful encouragement, the Princeton Writing Coach can help you get into your top choices. (908) 420-1070. PrincetonWritingCoach@gmail.com

Commercial/Residential

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com

Ask for Chris tf

YARD SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

· Postcards

Princeton References

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC

2nd & 3rd Generations

· Brochures

Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936

08-25-6t

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Specialists

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JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON

09-08-3t

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

WEEKLY INSERTS START AT ONLY 10¢ PER HOUSEHOLD. · Books

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Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 09-01-5t

HIC #13VH07549500

06-09-22

MOVING

SALE

AFTER

23

bedroom home in Get the best reachYEARS! at the6Western best rate! Princeton’s Section. Call

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST:

· Catalogues Mike for

Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22

viewing / appointments. (609) 688-0368. 09-08

Publishing and Distribution

Get the best reach at the best

• Postcards · Newsletters · Annual Reports NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE: • 8.5x11” flyers Lakeview Avenue, Kingston. Several families. Household, garden, sporting goods, furniture,Group etc. Saturday & Sun· Brochures Witherspoon • Menus Media day Sept. 11 & 12, from 9am-1pm. Please NO early arrivals. Booklets info contact:09-08 · Postcards For• additional DISPLACED FAMILY SEEKS Custom Design, Printing, • Trifolds TEMP HOUSING: melissa.bilyeu@ · Books Professional family of 4(2 adults, 2 Publishing and Distribution witherspoonmediagroup.com • Post its kids under 12 w/no pets), displaced by Hurricane Ida seeking temporary · Catalogues rental in Princeton (4-6 months). • We can accomodate · Newsletters • Postcards Please call (917) 705-0000. 09-08 almost anything! · Brochures

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F E B R UA RY 2 01 8

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White House photographer Amanda Lucidon documents Michelle Obama, PU Class of ’85

How Princeton played a role in Teach for America and Teach for All

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SEPTEMBER 2018

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TERESA AZARIO MOMO: CAPTURING A MOTHER’S LOVE THROUGH FOOD

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HOUSECLEANING/ HOUSEKEEPING Professional cleaning service. Experienced, references, honest & responsible. Reasonable price. Call Ursula (609) 635-7054 for free estimate. 08-11-6t HEALTH CARE PROVIDER: CCMA (Licensed Clinical Medical Assistant). Licensed CHHA (Certified Home Health Aide). Over 10 years experience. References available. (609) 433-7031; fprotopapas1@ hotmail.com 09-01-4t KARINA’S HOUSECLEANING: Full service inside. Honest and reliable lady with references. Weekly, bi-weekly or monthly. I can work hourly. Call for estimate. (609) 858-8259. 09-01-4t 2 BEDROOM CONDO SHARE: Available Oct. 1. Master BR suite in 2 BR condo. Good for grad student or professional. Share w/female music teacher with 1 year lease or possible school year. $1,100/mo. plus utilities. Great location, 2 miles from PU. Public transportation, pool & tennis. Call (609) 706-2209. cldamerau@yahoo. com 09-08-3t

37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf YARD SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

The Mercer Oak, set of 4, 35mm colored film prints, by John Rounds

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APPLYING TO COLLEGE? Don’t go it alone! By giving you expert advice, smart feedback, practical timeand-process guidance, and meaningful encouragement, the Princeton Writing Coach can help you get into your top choices. (908) 420-1070. PrincetonWritingCoach@gmail.com 08-25-6t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 09-01-5t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 873-3168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 09-08-8t JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-09-22 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22

weidel

Lawrence | $1,500,000

West Windsor | $700,000

Ewing | $374,900

This 8,400 square foot building is a mixed-use property consisting of 5 superior Apartment rental units, a fully equipped Barber Shop, a Cosmetic and Nail Salon, Beauty Salon, a 2 car Garage (15’x30’) or could function as a large storage unit and a vacant front street facing Retail or food store.

Well Maintained 6 Bedroom, 4 Bath Duplex home on tree lined street. Duplex, each side includes 3 generously sized bedrooms and 2 full baths with freshly painted eat in kitchen,lovely yard, sun porch off living rooms.

Custom built home in the highly desirable Shabakunk Hills with over 2700 sq. feet of living space situated on almost an acre! You will definitely be impressed with the 4 very spacious bedrooms, 2 Full bath & lots of closets.

UNDER CONTRACT

UNDER CONTRACT

Roebling | $144,500

Trenton | $275,000

West Windsor | $999,000

Come see this great two bedroom one bath townhome in historic Roebling. Home features architectural detail , cozy living room , eat in kitchen . Off of the kitchen includes first floor laundry, and access to the fenced in backyard w/ patio.

This beautiful center hall colonial on a quiet tree-lined street in the Glen Afton neighborhood combines old world style and character with today’s updated features and amenities.

In the popular Crown Pointe Development, Turnberry Model perfectly situated on a corner lot. Brick Front 5 bedroom, 4.5 baths, tastefully updated and freshly painted neutral cool tones.

Are you thinking about getting your Real Estate License and a career in Real Estate? Then Call Jospeh Marino at 732-570-8518. Princeton Office | 190 Nassau Street, Princeton NJ | O: 609.921.2700 

 



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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021 • 38

Rider

American Furniture Exchange

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE

Furniture 30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items

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4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

with Beatrice Bloom

**********

RESIDENTIAL LISTINGS No Pets & non-smoking tenants: . Princeton – $5100/mo. Riverside Neighborhood Plus utilities, 4 BR, 3 full baths, LR, DR, Eat-in Kitchen. Available now. Princeton – $2400/mo. Includes heat, water & 1 car parking on a Princeton Tree Street. 2 BR, 1 bath, LR, Den & Eat-in Kitchen. Available 9/8/2021. Lawrenceville – $1500/mo. Plus utilites & 1 parking space. 1st floor, 2 BR, LR, Dining area & full bath. Shared back yard. Close to bus line. Available now. S. Brunswick – $2600/mo. Princeton Walk Plus utilities.FULLY FURNISHED. 2 BR, 2½ bath. LR, Den, Eat-in Kitchen. Available now. STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE Email for more information: sre.marty@gmail.com We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com

32 CHAMBERS STREET PRINCETON, NJ 08542

PHONE (609) 924-1416 FAX (609) 228-5151 MARTHA F. STOCKTON, BROKER-OWNER

TOWN TOPICS

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area TERHUNE ORCHARDS

COURIER NEEDED:

Pellettieri Rabstein & Altman is seeking a reliable individual to serve as a courier for our Lawrenceville, NJ law firm located on Princeton Pike @ Lenox Drive. Responsibilities include: Pick up mail at local post office; Operate mail (stamp) machine; Make bank deposits; Light deliveries; Various other miscellaneous errands. Hours are negotiable from part to full time & benefits are available. Use of our company SUV included during work hours. A valid driver’s license & proof of COVID vaccination are required. Email resume to stesta@ pralaw.com 08-25-3t

is a family farm in Princeton, NJ. Join the APPLE CORPS TEAM, working in the farm store, Farmers Markets, winery & our Pick Your Own locations. Flexible schedules-Full, part-time or weekend only. Seeking energetic, customer service-oriented individuals. Winery Staff–love wine? Share your passion in Terhune Winery. Hiring part-time weekend wine staff. Contact tmount@ terhuneorchards.com 09-01-2t

CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Wednesday morning delivery. If interested, please contact Gina Hookey at classifieds@towntopics.com

is printed entirely on recycled paper.

Witherspoon Media Group Custom Design, Printing, Witherspoon Media Group Publishing and Distribution An Equal Opportunity Employer 4438 Route 27 Design, North, Kingston, NJ 08528 Custom Printing, 609-924-2200

· Newsletters Witherspoon Group Publishing andMedia Distribution

SPACE FOR LEASE

· Brochures · Newsletters Custom Design, Printing, · Brochures · Postcards Publishing and Distribution · Postcards · Books · Newsletters · Books · Catalogues · Catalogues · Brochures · Annual Reports · Annual Reports · Postcards

OFFICE & MEDICAL

Witherspoon Media Group

MONTGOMERY COMMONS

· Books For additional contact: For additional info info contact: Custom Design, Printing, melissa.bilyeu@ · Catalogues melissa.bilyeu@

Suites Available: 782, 830, 1660 & 2011 SF (+/-)

witherspoonmediagroup.com Publishing and Distribution witherspoonmediagroup.com

· Annual Reports · Newsletters

ATTIC STEP ACCESS

· Brochures

• Prestigious Princeton mailing address T-STAT

• Built to suit tenant spaces with private bathroom, kitchenette & separate utilities • Premier Series suites with upgraded flooring, counter tops, cabinets & lighting available • 219 Parking spaces available on-site with handicap accessibility • VERIZON FIOS AVAILABLE & high-speed internet access

15’

ELECTRICAL PANEL

For additional info contact:

CLOSET

· Postcards melissa.bilyeu@ · Books witherspoonmediagroup.com

15’ RECEPTION AREA

OFFICE

OFFICE

OFFICE

10’-8”

8’

9’-5”

9’-5”

11’

SUITE 221 | 830 SF (+/-)

Route 206 & Applegate Dr | Princeton, NJ

908.874.8686 | LarkenAssociates.com

· Catalogues · Annual Reports For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 witherspoonmediagroup.com 609-924-5400

Immediate Occupancy | Brokers Protected No warranty or representation, express or implied, is made to the accuracy of the information herein and same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of rental or other conditions, withdrawal without notice and to any special listing conditions, imposed by our principals and clients.

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400


39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2021

YOU’RE READY, WE’RE READY.

Welcome to Bucks County’s most exclusive gated community. Featuring open floor plans with elegant finishes, these exclusive homes span 3,600 square feet, offering all the privacy, space, and luxury you could want. COMMUNITY FEATURES • Full Basement

• Open, Contemporary Floorplans

• Two-Car Rear Garages

• Private Gated Community

• Maintenance-Free Lifestyle

• Private Elevators

Select move-in ready homes available with $300,000 in upgrades. Final Phase of Construction! In-person tours available by appointment. Starting at $1,575,000. 215.862.5800 | RabbitRunCreek.com Rte 202 (Lower York Road) & Rabbit Run Drive, New Hope, PA


What’s New in Hip and Knee Replacement? Date: Wednesday, September 22, 2021 Time: 6 p.m. Location: Zoom Meeting Arthritis can slow you down if you let it, but there are ways to stay active as you age. DR. ARJUN SAXENA, a fellowship trained and board certified orthopaedic surgeon and director of the Marjorie G. Ernest Center for Joint Replacement, will discuss hip and knee arthritis and the latest treatment options available. This event will be taking place virtually using Zoom. Register online at capitalhealth.org/events and be sure to include your email address. Zoom meeting details will be provided via email 2 – 3 days before the program date. Registration ends 24 hours before the program date.

@capitalhealthnj

CULTIVATING CALM: Anxiety Skills for Youth Ages 10 – 12 Date: Wednesday, September 29, 2021 Time: 6 p.m. Location: Zoom Meeting Does your child constantly worry or experience difficulty in social settings, panic attacks or irrational fears? For guidance, join TATYANA GRAY, a licensed clinical social worker with Capital Health – Behavioral Health Specialists, to learn how to manage stress and anxiety through a variety of relaxation and coping skills. This event will be taking place virtually using Zoom. Register online at capitalhealth.org/events and be sure to include your email address. Zoom meeting details will be provided via email 2 – 3 days before the program date. Registration ends 24 hours before the program date.

@capitalhealthnj

Profile for Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper, September 8, 2021  

The September 8, 2021 issue of the Town Topics Newspaper.

Town Topics Newspaper, September 8, 2021  

The September 8, 2021 issue of the Town Topics Newspaper.

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