Town Topics Newspaper, August 3, 2022

Page 1

Volume LXXVI, Number 31

Westminster Alumni Return to Campus to Perform Concert Honoring Late Composer . . . . . . 5 Plotting Chess Strategies In the Park While Fostering Friendship, Community . . . . . . . . 7 Not In Our Town Recognizes Students with Unity Awards for 25th Year . . . . . . . . . . 8 PU Alum Currier Helps Canada Win World Sixes Lacrosse Gold Medal . . 21 PHS Grad Lis Primed to Start Career with Lehigh Women’s Soccer. . . . . 23

A New York Lunch with Novelist Dawn Powell . . 12 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 19 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . 28 Education & Recreation . . 3 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 11 New To Us . . . . . . . . . 20 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 26 Performing Arts . . . . . 13 Readers’ Choice Awards . .15 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 28 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

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Massive Fire Guts Rosedale Home of Tea Parlor Owners About 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, July 23, Doria and Calavino Donati were busy with customers at Tipple & Rose, their popular 210 Nassau Street tea parlor, when they got a call from a neighbor saying dark smoke was pouring out of their Rosedale Road home. Calavino rushed to the property while her wife, Doria, stayed behind at the shop. “I was hoping it was something small,” Doria Donati said this week. “When I finally got through to her, I said, ‘Please tell me everything is okay.’ She said, ‘I can’t do that.’” The back of their 1950s house was engulfed in flames. The top of the building was sheared off. According to Lawrence Township Fire Marshal Edward C. Tencza, the cause of the fire remains undetermined and is still under investigation. Because there was no fire hydrant near the house, hoses had to be threaded together to reach a hydrant down the street. In the 20-plus minutes it took for the firefighters from Lawrence Township, Princeton, Hopewell, Ewing, Pennington Borough, West Windsor, Plainsboro, and Trenton to start working on the blaze, much of the building was obliterated. “It’s devastating,” Doria said. “We’ve gone back every day trying to find anything we can salvage. It’s just overwhelming.” Lylah Alphonse, a friend of Doria from her student days at Princeton Day School, quickly organized a GoFundMe fundraiser for the couple. As of Tuesday afternoon, $22,264 had been contributed. The Donatis do not currently have homeowners insurance, so the money is key to them getting back on their feet. The family includes two recently acquired puppies, who escaped the fire because they were in an attached apartment when the blaze broke out. The family has been alternating bunking with friends and staying at hotels. “We’re cobbling housing together and looking for something more permanent,” Doria said. “You go through all the whatifs — what if we had been there, could we have stopped it? But we were told it was very hot and very fast, and we might not have been able to get out.” Since the fire, Tipple & Rose has been operating as usual. “We had some high teas on the books, so we had to come Continued on Page 10

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Joint Effort Safe Streets 2022 Begins Aug. 5 Starting with its Community Kick-Off Reception on Friday evening, August 5, at Studio Hillier on Witherspoon Street and continuing through Sunday, August 14, Joint Effort Safe Streets has something for everybody — with its hub in the Witherspoon-Jackson community and its impact throughout Princeton. “It’s always good when Joint Effort Safe Streets comes around, because it gives the community a chance to come together for good discussion and camaraderie,” said Princeton Councilman and Witherspoon-Jackson resident Leighton Newlin. “Joint Effort started with the kids and the basketball camp. The recreational part of Safe Streets brings our youth together with fun things to do. Joint Effort has since morphed into discussions and dialogue over critical issues here in Princeton. These forums open up the dialogue. They put topics on the table that are seldom discussed in Princeton with the same kind of focus.” Highlights of the Joint Effort Witherspoon-Jackson Community Princeton Safe Streets Summer 2022 Programs, which are “Dedicated to the Memory of Our Ancestors,” include reflections on the past of the community and the presentation of awards to individuals, families, churches, and other institutions that have contributed to the rich history of the

neighborhood. Also in the spotlight will be commentary from civic leaders and others; a gospel fest, meet and greet gatherings, a community block festival, and other entertainments; a free basketball clinic and the Pete Young Memorial Basketball Games for all ages; and, perhaps most importantly, a series of three discussions on important current concerns, featuring commentators and panelists, leaders in local government, politics, business, public safety, and education.

Joint Effort Safe Streets Founder and Event Coordinator John Bailey emphasized the significance of the Hot Topics discussions, particularly those focusing on the issue of race in Princeton. “It’s important to me that we’re having a conversation about race,” he said. “A lot of people don’t want to have those conversations, but there is a need for us to think deeply about what we’re trying to do.” He continued, “We’ve had some issues Continued on Page 9

Princeton University Graduate Students Continue Volunteer Fire Service Tradition With degrees in chemical engineering, and graduate study at Princeton University’s Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Maximillian Nguyen thought that becoming a volunteer firefighter was out of his “normal wheelhouse.” But he considers himself “a resident of the town of Princeton and not just a University student,” so he decided to give back to the community in appreciation for enjoying what Princeton has to offer. Nguyen is one of four Princeton University graduate students who recently became members of the Princeton Fire Department, and who continue a longstanding cooperative effort that has

helped the municipal department supplement its ranks through the University’s staff and students’ desire to serve the community. The four are the largest group of graduate students to join at one time, according to Princeton University. In addition to Nguyen, Johana De la Cruz, Jonathan Lowry, and Shua-Kym McLean, all graduate students in the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, are among the 11 new members of the Princeton Fire Department who were sworn in on May 25. Nguyen is assigned to Princeton Engine Company No. 1; Continued on Page 10

MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Ess Gees performed on Saturday afternoon as part of the Palmer Square Summer Music Series, which continues every Saturday from 12 to 2 p.m. through August. Attendees share their favorite things to do in Princeton in this week’s Town Talk on page 6. (Photo by Sarah Teo)


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Conserve Water: Due to the heat wave, New Jersey American Water is asking customers throughout central Jersey to adopt an even/odd outdoor watering schedule. Visit newjerseyamwater.com for details. Chambers Street Closure: Through Friday evening, August 5, the street is closed from Nassau Street through the work zone from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. so PSE&G can install electric infrastructure for the Graduate Hotel. Access to businesses from Hulfish Street up to No. 16 and the Chambers Street Garage will continue to be available. Rosedale Road Closure: The Rosedale Road construction to install a roundabout at General Johnson Drive/Greenway Meadows is underway. The roadway is now open to local traffic only. The project is expected to last through the summer. “Tell Us What You Want” Survey: As part of the new Master Plan process, the municipality invites consumers to share opinions and preferences about dining, shopping, and life in Princeton. It takes less than 10 minutes to complete at PrincetonSurvey.org. Trash Collection Delays: Due to the nationwide truck driver shortage, which has affected Princeton’s hauler (Interstate Waste Services), the delays are expected to continue as the company works on hiring more drivers. In the meantime, trash will be collected within 48 hours of the scheduled collection. COVID-19 Care Kits for Princeton Families: Low/moderate income families in Princeton can get these kits, which include tests and materials to respond to COVID-19, such as one-use thermometers, an oximeter, and extra household items. They are available for pickup at Princeton Human Services by calling (609) 688-2055. Certain eligibility requirements apply. Volunteer to Be a Land Steward: Friends of Princeton Open Space (FOPOS) holds half-day volunteer sessions on a variety of conservation projects at the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Individuals, families, students, and corporate groups are welcome on August 13 for a morning (9 a.m. -12 p.m.) or afternoon (1-4 p.m.). Fopos.org. Backpack and School Supplies Drive: The deadline is Friday, August 5 to donate book bags and school supplies for Princeton Public School students from kindergarten through sixth grade. Drop off at Princeton Human Services, 1 Monument Drive, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Humanservices@princetonnj.gov. Free Vision and Dental Services for Low Income Residents: The municipality is offering these services for low-income Princeton residents impacted by the pandemic. For application information, visit Princetonnj.gov. Volunteers Needed for CASA: Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) for Children of Mercer & Burlington Counties — Mercer County location needs volunteers. The organization recruits, trains, and supervises community volunteers who speak up in Family Court for the best interests of Mercer County children that have been removed from their families due to abuse and/or neglect and placed in the foster care system. A virtual information session is on August 11 at 11 a.m. Visit casamb.org.


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COMING HOME: The Same Stream, a choir of alumni from Westminster Choir College, will perform on the Princeton campus in honor of late composer Roger Ames, premiering his final compositions. The choir is pictured here at Oxford University.

Westminster Alumni Return to Campus To Perform Concert Honoring Late Composer

For alumni of Westminster Choir College, Bristol Chapel is home. So it makes sense that The Same Stream, a choir made up of Westminster graduates from a range of years, has chosen the stately building at the former home of the famed choral academy as

the culminating venue of a three-concert series. Members of the Philadelphia-based choir, all of whom sung at Westminster under conductor and professor James Jordan, will perform a concert led by Jordan on Saturday, August 6. ROGER AMES: A Legacy Concert Series is in honor of composer Roger Ames, who died last January from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS ). A portion of the proceeds from the Princeton concert, which follows appearances in Philadelphia and on Long Island, will be donated to the ALS Association.

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“It’s going to be really nostalgic for ever yone,” said Alex Meakem, executive director of the choir and a 2018 Westminster graduate. “We’ve all sung in Bristol Chapel on multiple occasions. It will be great to be back in a place that feels like home, and the fact that we are premiering a piece by Roger Ames makes it really special.” T he choir was for med seven years ago “out of a feeling of wanting to sing together again,” said Meakem. “The idea was that no matter what year you graduated, if you had sung with James Jordan, you could all come together again. And it works, because we all understand his language. We understand how he works. It is really musical magic.” The Grammy-nominated Jordan conducts Westminster Schola Cantorum and the Westminster Choir. He is also director of the Westminster Conducting Institute and co-director of the Choral Institute at Oxford. Through recordings and performances, The Same Stream showcases music of living composers. In addition to Ames, the list includes Paul Mealor, Patrick Hawes, and Thomas LaVoy. There are five recordings available now on major streaming platforms. A Time for Healing: The Music of Roger Ames will be released next month. Members of the choir span several years; even generations. “We have one father and son who have come

all the way from Florida for this. It’s that special,” said Meakem. “There are people who sang in James Jordan’s first chapel choir, and people from more recent classes.” “The whole point of this concert series is to honor Roger Ames, who was a great friend of James Jordan,” said Meakem. “He had written quite a few pieces for different ensembles at Westminster. Last year, he was diagnosed with ALS. The two of them had been plot ting a recording for some time, and realized they didn’t have much time. So, they bumped it up and got it done last summer.”

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Westminster Concert Continued from Preceding Page

The piece is “poetry written about the pandemic, during the pandemic,” Meakem continued. “It speaks to everything that his style stands for. It is simply beautiful, even in this dark time. Despite the pain and suffering that people were, and are still, feeling, this set of songs offers a really nice message of hope, community, and love.” The Westminster campus has been relatively quiet since most operations were moved to Rider University in Lawrence Township in the fall of 2020 (Rider and Westminster merged in 1992; Rider has been trying to sell the Princeton campus since 2017. Lawsuits challenging the move are not yet resolved). Returning to Bristol Chapel is bittersweet for members of the choir. “The whole situation is upsetting to hear about, of course,” said Meakem. “But I would say that we are doing our best to remain hopeful. Dr. Jordan is still teaching there. The fact that we are able to come together as a choir, performing and doing recordings, is testament to the power of the Westminster community. The way the alumni are able to continue the mission of the school, and hold their own students to a high standard, is really what Westminster is about.” The Same Stream performs Saturday, August 6 at 7 p.m. in Bristol Chapel on the Westminster campus, 101 Walnut Lane. Tickets are $20 ($10 for students and seniors). Purchase at thesamestreamchoir.com. —Anne Levin

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What is your favorite thing to do in Princeton?” (Asked Saturday at Palmer Square) (Photos by Sarah Teo)

“So far, it’s tied between the live music on a beautiful day and looking around the campus at all the beautiful buildings.” —Annalise VanHouten with Rosie, Philadelphia

“Sitting around in the park, listening to music, and seeing new activity. And this place is so nice and clean!” —Nurdan Dumenci, New York, N.Y.

Town Topics Readers’ Choice Awards — Vote Now

Town Topics’ popular Readers’ Choice Awards contest is back for 2022! Let us know which area businesses and services deserve to be recognized as outstanding in our community. This year’s new categories include Best Appetizers, Best Artisanal Market, Best Pasta, Best Physical Therapy, Best Men’s Shop, Best Women’s Boutique, and more. The voting starts now. See the ballot in today’s newspaper, or share your favorites online at towntopics.com. The deadline for entries is September 28. The winners in all Town Topics 2022 Readers’ Choice categories will be announced in the October 19 and October 26 issues. Don’t miss your chance to vote for your favorites!

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Applications for the 2022 Bunbury Fund Cycle 2 grants, from Princeton Area Community Foundation, are now available through September 12. The fund awards one-year capacity building grants of up to $50,000. Proposals may include requests for multi-year grants focused on developing organizational effectiveness over a period of up to three years, totaling up to $150,000. Fund advisors will also consider awarding a planning grant of up to $10,000 to help an organization evaluate the resources required to undertake a more comprehensive capacity building project. For more information, visit pacf.org.

“Visiting Princeton [University] — it’s my first time. I like this town, it’s a friendly neighborhood with kind people.” —Yasemin Altin Barlas, Rutherford

“We like to come to the concerts — all year round!” —John and Marie Piepszak, Eldridge Park

“I think it’s the bent spoon! We used to come when I was pregnant, and this is our son’s first time. He’s a big fan of the ice cream.” —Sreenath Somanath, Avyaan Nair, and Arundhati Mohankumar, Horsham, Pa.


When Eric Wu, founder of the nonprofit Impact Chess, planned the first “Chess in the Park” event last month at Turning Basin Park, he wasn’t sure how many people would show up. To his delight, some 25 players of all ages and skill levels arrived on the scene. They were challenged by a single player — National Master Winston Ni — who took them on in 19 simultaneous games. “It was a huge success,” said Wu. “My main goal is to inspire younger kids to pursue chess more, to give them an experience that makes them associate chess with community and friendship. It was our first-ever in-person event, and I think we did that. You could see 19 kids huddled over 19 boards, and you could see the

dedication. It was a sight you don’t usually see anymore — focused and quiet.” “Chess in the Park” returns to Turning Basin Park off Alexander Street on Sunday, August 7, from 2-6 p.m. Wu, a Princeton resident for the past nine years, is expecting an even larger crowd this time. As a rising junior at Phillips Exeter Academy and former student at Princeton Day School (PDS), he isn’t much older than the young chess players he works to inspire. As a small child in China, Wu played the Chinese game Go. After moving to the U.S. with his family the summer before second grade, he began learning about chess. “I went to chess camp at Princeton Academy, and I really enjoyed it,” said Wu. “I’ve been

playing since then. PDS had a pretty big chess program, too, with coaches and team events.” One night last December, Wu was chatting by phone with a friend from Princeton, about his life and the direction in which it was going. “I realized that the good things I had in my life, the good decisions I had made, were because of what chess had taught me,” he said. “I have the tactical mentality to evaluate situations. It has taught me creativity, critical thinking, calmness under pressure, and defeat with grace. I started thinking, maybe everyone could use a little chess in their lives. And that’s how I founded Impact Chess.” The nonprofit is registered as a 501(c)(3). While Wu has two more years at his

boarding school in New Hampshire, he plans to run the venture online. “We have been making events and recruiting new people,” he said. “The main location is the greater Princeton area, but we also have spots in California, Michigan, and Massachusetts.” With his father, Wu has often played chess with senior citizens at a senior center in Ewing Township. His mission “is to spread the game for younger students and senior citizens,” he said. “We want to bridge the gap by having the kids and seniors together. We’ve already done it once, and it was a success.” The website impactchess. org lists the nonprofit’s activities and plans for the future. Wu is looking for student volunteers and donations. “If anyone is interested in chess or community service or leadership, reach out,” he said. “We have so many opportunities and we need members. Our team is what drives us.” —Anne Levin

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Atomic Bombings Anniversary To Be Commemorated Aug. 9

The Coalition for Peace Action (CFPA) is sponsoring a commemoration of the 77th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on Tuesday, August 9 from 7 to 8 p.m. at Hinds Plaza, adjacent to the Princeton Public Library at 65 Witherspoon Street. The program will feature Princeton University physicists Frank von Hippel and Rob Goldston. They will address nuclear weapon issues including restoring the Iran Nuclear Agreement, the nuclear danger in the Ukraine War, and the Nuclear Ban and Nonproliferation Treaties, which are having Review Conferences this summer. The program w ill also include music from T he Solidarity Singers of the New Jersey State Industrial Union Council as well as origami crane folding with instruction for children, and will close with a candlelight ceremony as darkness arrives around 8:30 p.m. “For me, this meeting will have three aspects,” said von Hippel. “First, commemorating the one to two hundred thousand lives lost in Hiroshima and Nagasaki 77 years ago, including those of at least a dozen U.S. prisoners of war. Second, celebrating that, since Nagasaki, not one additional nuclear weapon has been used in war. This is in part due to the educational efforts of activists like us, including, locally, Albert Einstein. Third, recommitting to the mission of abolishing

nuclear weapons and to educating another generation of activists committed to that mission.” “I will speak specifically about what the U.S. can do now to ameliorate the current crises in Ukraine and with Iran,” said Goldston. “We can make peace in Ukraine more feasible by proposing steps towards strategic stability between NATO and Russia that will greatly benefit both sides. We can show more flexibility with Iran on the issues that are blocking return to the original nuclear deal and /or we can propose confidence-building steps to reduce the risk in the near future of both Iran’s building a nuclear weapon and of military attack.” “The Coalition for Peace Action has held commemorations of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki b ombings every year since our founding in 1980,” said the Rev. Robert Moore, CFPA executive director. “The purpose is not to look back with 20-20 hindsight to question whether the atomic bombings in 1945 were justified. What’s done is done. Rather, our reason for having these commemorations is to remember the absolute horror that nuclear weapons represent and face the real and growing threat they present today. On this 77th Anniversary, we re-commit ourselves to working for the global abolition of nuclear weapons so such total destruction can never again be inflicted.”

7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022

Plotting Chess Strategies in the Park While Fostering Friendship, Community

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Not In Our Town Recognizes Students With Unity Awards for 25th Year

Hispanic Heritage Month program. He also began a campaign for a social justice award for athletes on PHS The racial justice group NIOT is a multi-racial, international organization, sports teams, and was acNot In Our Town Princeton multi-faith group of indi- the Asian Youth Act, a stu- tive in organizing the Day (NIOT) has recognized nine viduals “who stand together dent organization that seeks of Dialogue at PHS and was m iddle school and high for racial justice and inclu- to empower and educate active in an effort to bring school students with Unity sive communities, focused students of Asian American together all the social justice Awards for their anti-racism on promoting the equitable heritage. As part of her ac- organizations at PHS. He work that ranged from host- treatment of all, and uncov- tivities for that group, she has served as an advocate ing a “Day of Dialogue,” to ering and confronting white organized a social media for ESL students at PHS and creating a series of pod- supremacy — the system campaign that drew more in the community. Jealyn Vega-Ramos, a riscasts featuring interviews that facilitates the prefer- than 12.5 million views and with African American staff ence, privilege, and power 12,000 followers. She col- ing PHS senior, is involved at Princeton High School of white people at the ex- laborated with Make Us Vis- in numerous anti-racism (PHS). pense of non-white people ible on the recent successful projects. She is a leader of In its 25th year, the Unity and pits racial and ethnic campaign for a New Jersey both Latinos Unidos, where Awards honored si x ju - groups against each other by Asian American Pacific Is- she is the president, and niors and one senior from upholding hierarchies based lander curriculum. She cre- the Princeton Girl Up GenPHS and one eighth-grader on proximity to whiteness,” ated the SHELL program eration 1 (Gen1) Club, for each from Princeton Middle according to the organiza- at PHS, in which students which she received a grant lead study groups for Eng- to educate the Princeton LaSchool (PMS) and Princeton tion. Charter School, in June at A well-known NIOT event lish language learners. Ngan tino community about COthe Unitarian Universalist is Continuing Conversa- has been an advocate for the VID-19 and vaccinations. Congregation of Princeton. tions. In 2009, said Board ESL program at PHS where She also helped organize Also recognized were PHS Member Linda Oppenheim, she has advocated for ESL the Latinos Unidos Hispanteachers Joy Barnes-John- 90 people participated in students to receive counsel- ic Heritage Month activities son and Patricia Manhart for “Engaging Together to Ex- ing and tutoring in their own at PHS, which included a school-w ide assembly in creating the Racial Literacy plore White Privilege,” a languages. and Justice course at PHS. four-session consciousnessHan Li, a rising senior at which she helped showcase raising series on the topic of PHS, is the founder of the Latino videos, music, and The group also honored dance highlighting Latino Shirley Satterfield, a former white privilege and racism. Princeton Civics Project, culture. Ack nowledg ing requests an online platform for civic guidance counselor at PHS, Simran (Simi) Rath, who who has a long history with for further meetings, the engagement and community recently graduated from the awards. A Princeton his- first meeting of “Continu- participation that promotes Princeton Charter School, ing Conversations on Race events and programs aimed torian, Satterfield recalled that the awards were begun and White Privilege,” was at racial justice. Han writes was a peer leader who adat three area churches, and held November, 2009, and blog posts for the website dressed issues of racial jusshe got involved because of continues to the present, the and is one of two students tice and equity through her her work with Pride, Unity, first non-holiday Monday of who maintain it. He is also interactions with younger Leadership, Sisterhood and every month, in partnership a leader of the New Jersey children. She helped eduEsteem ( PULSE ) at PHS, with the Princeton Public Li- Civics Coalition. He has en- cate students through a which involved young wom- brary (currently on Zoom). couraged friends from his school-wide presentation, en in academic enrichment Students who won the church and PHS to become “Be Kind Online,” for the programs. Unity Awards are as follows: more involved in community school’s Week of Respect. Ida Sidik, a rising senior Satterfield selected the Vihaan Jain, a recent groups through this group first recipient, Alison Wel- eighth-grader at PMS, is a and advocated for the New at PHS, is a member of the ski, in 1998, who now is a student leader for the Asian Jersey State Legislature’s Black Student Union and the public health professional, American Pacific islander successful passage of the Black History 365 Commitand she was happily sur- (AAPI) Club at PMS, which A API curriculum in New tee, which seeks to incorporate programming at the prised by Welski’s appear- he founded and helped de- Jersey schools. Benjamin (Jamin) Nuland, high school regarding the ance at the recent awards velop. The group discussed ceremony. var ious is sues af fect ing a rising PHS senior, has history and contributions of Black and African AmeriThe awards have evolved Asian Americans, and pro- pursued several anti-racist cans to American history. initiatives with various PHS a nd expa nde d over t he moted social justice issues As part of that committee, years, she said. A selection and inclusivity at the middle groups. He has been ac- Ida co-hosted a podcast that tive in Latinos Unidos and committee carefully goes school. featured interviews of Black over applications and recNgan Le, a rising senior at helped organize the Hispan- PHS staff members.” ommendations. PHS, is the co-leader of an ic Heritage Month Assembly and served as emcee for the Eli Tenenbaum, a 2022 graduate of PHS, was coorganizer of the Day of Dialogue, a day-long event at PHS in which students from various minority cultures, ethnic groups, and others staffed booths to educate their fellow students on equity, diversity, and inclusion topics, including topics in the news such as Muslim misrepresentation in American media, bias and stereotypes of the Hispanic community, racial profiling experienced by African Americans at the hands of police, LGBTQ+ labels, and the meaning and events of Ramadan, and Latino and Indian dancing. Sarah Villamil, a rising senior, is also a leader of the Latinos Unidas Club at PHS. She helped organize the first Hispanic Heritage Assembly COMBATING RACISM: Nine students (eight pictured) received 2022 Unity Awards from Not In Our for the school and collaboTown Princeton for their work toward racial justice. Two Princeton High School teachers were rated with Latino and ESL recognized, as was Shirley Satterfield for her history with the awards program. students, as well as the PHS Band on that event. She and her co-leaders helped organize Latino Unidos activities We replace for the Day of Dialogue. She is a member of the Gen1 “FOGGY” Insulated Glass Club, which recently won a 741 Alexander Rd, Princeton • 924-2880 grant from Poder en Salud, an organization supported by the CDC to support organizations that provide inFun Ornaments & Holiday Decor formation and resources on Best Selling Nautical 3-D Wood Maps & Princeton Decor COVID-19 and vaccinations NJ Local Cookbooks & Made To Order Baskets to the Latino community. still matters.” Adorable“Where Baby &quality Kid Gifts She and her co-leaders are 4621 Route 27 Handmade Pottery & Candles planning an in-person event Holiday Masks, Soaps &Kingston, Hand Sanitizers NJ with that goal in mind. And Much, Much More. More information on Not 609-924-0147 In Our Town Princeton can • • riderfurniture.com be found at niotprinceton. 609.688.0777 | homesteadprinceton.com org. Mon-Fri 10-6; 300 Witherspoon Street | Princeton Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5 —Wendy Greenberg

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Looking to pick a tasty summer treat while helping to restore the habitat of native wildlife? “Wineberry is an invasive shrub in the same family as raspberries and blackberries and forms spiny thickets that crowd out native plants,” said Anna Corichi, director of natural resources and stewardship for Friends of Princeton Open Space (FOPOS). “You’ll find it growing in many wooded areas, even in your own backyard, and the berries should be ripe and ready for picking just about now. Harvest the berries, uproot the plants, and you’ll be helping to remove an invasive while rewarding yourself with tart, juicy berries that can be used in virtually any recipe that calls for raspberries.” To find out more about identifying, harvesting, and using the fruit of the wineberry to make concoctions such as wineberry sorbet, wineberry pie, and wineberry parfait, visit Central New Jersey resident Sara Maniez’ blog, Life’s Little Sweets at lifeslittlesweets. com/wineberry-recipescollection.

also partnering with Princeton University for the second year in a row. Because of COVID-19, the Princeton-Blairstown Center has adapted its award-winning Summer Bridge Program to a hybrid model which will primarily take place at a local school or park in the communities where students live, with a daytrip to visit PBC’s Blairstown Campus each Friday. On the days Summer Bridge takes place in the local communit y, Princeton University will be donating healthy lunches for students participating in the program. Each day, extra meals will be sent home with students to share with their families.

Colonists on British Side Topic of Trent House Talk

The Trent House Association presents a talk by Todd Braisted on the colonists who joined the British in their fight against their fellow Americans during the Revolutionary War. This free program will be held on Sunday, August 7 at 2 p.m., both in person at the Trent House Visitor Center and via Zoom. Lieutenant General James Robertson, one of Britain’s most senior generals in America and the last royal governor of New York, famously stated it was always his intention to subdue the bad Americans with the “Good Americans.” Who was he speaking of? During the period of the war, perhaps some 50,000 Americans, both Black and white, served King George in a variety of roles, often shoulder to shoulder with His Majesty’s Regulars. Braisted, past president of the Bergen County Historical Society, has written numerous articles and books on the American Revolution, with a particular focus on Loyalists. His website, royalprovincial. com, is a leading source for Loyalist studies. His presentation will serve as a guide to understand the roles and makeups of those American corps in British pay: the establishments, personnel, logistics. raising, disciplining, and history of those who served then, and who are portrayed today, on the battlefields of America. Space at the Visitor Center of the Trent House, 15 Market Street in Trenton, is limited. Registration for inperson attendees is required. Pay-as-you-wish donations can be made. Visit williamtrenthouse.org.

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The meal kit company HelloFresh and Princeton University are partnering with the Princeton-Blairstown Center (PBC) this summer to help fight food insecurity. Students who receive free or reduced-price meals at school, including many who participate in the Center’s programs, do not always have the same access to nutritious meals on a daily basis during the summer months. HelloFresh’s Beyond the Box program advances the company’s mission to change the way people eat forever by ensuring that fresh food is available and accessible to those experiencing food insecurity. Through this program, HelloFresh will be providing meal kits for students participating in programming at the Princeton-Blairstown Center. PBC’s Chef w ill teach students how to prepare the meal provided by HelloFresh. Then, each participant will receive a meal kit from HelloFresh with the same ingredients to take home to share what they learned with their family. In addition to the partnership with HelloFresh, PBC is

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continued from page one

about race over the past couple of years. This is a great opportunity to continue the conversation and put it to rest — no, we won’t be able to put it to rest, but it’s an opportunity to continue the conversation. With all the confusion and chaos currently going on in our society, there’s no way to get around it. I’m hoping a lot of folks in Princeton care enough that they’ll come and be authentic about the conversation.” The first Hot Topics discussion on the Joint Effort Safe Streets schedule will address the question of “Reparations in New Jersey and Princeton” on Tuesday, August 9 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Princeton Public Librar y; the second w ill feature “Real Talk on Race Relations in America, New Jersey, and Princeton” on Thursday, August 11 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church; and the third will confront an array of timely issues, with “Updates on Education, Development, Public Safety, Marijuana, the Neighborhood” and a Candidates Forum on Saturday, August 13 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at First Baptist Church. Caroline Clark, an attorney and chair of Not In Our Town, will make a presentation on reparations in New Jersey at the first Hot Topic session, followed by a panel discussion featuring attorney and former Princeton Councilman Dwaine Williamson, Newlin, Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and Cultural Society Founder and Director Shirley Satterfield, and Grace McEwen Kimbrough. Leading the panel discussion on race at the second Hot Topics discussion will

be the Rev. Lukata Mjumbe of the Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church, Ted Deutsch of Taft Communications, Kevin Wilkes of the Princeton Design Guild, Tommy Parker of the Princeton Civil Rights Commission, attorney Eric Broadway, and educator Jason Carter. The third Hot Topics session will include remarks and a fireside chat with Newlin and Princeton Mayor Mark Freda; Hot Topics updates on education in Princeton with Princeton Public S cho ols S up er i nte n de nt Carol Kelley and Board of Education President Dafna Kendal discussing “How are we doing with student achievement for students of color? ”; development in Princeton with Councilwomen Mia Sacks and Michelle Pirone Lambros discussing “Slow growth, fast growth, measured growth: What’s the deal? ”; affordable housing in Princeton led by Newlin; and public safety and civil rights with Parker presiding over the deliberations; followed by a forum featuring candidates in the upcoming November elections for Mercer County Commission, Princeton Council, and the Princeton Board of Education. In a July 29 phone conversation Newlin also drew special attention to the August 5 recognition of Shirley Satterfield and her contributions to the community in her work with the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and Cultural Society. He pointed out that on Saturday morning, August 6, at 10 a.m. she’ll be leading a self-guided tour of the community starting at 30 Quarry Street. Newlin added that part of the tour will provide the opportunity for participants to view pictures of options for

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the future of Witherspoon Street between Paul Robeson Place and Franklin Avenue. Historic Preservation Commission member Freda Howard has helped to provide photos and templates of possibilities for the future of the district, so that the Witherspoon-Jackson community has input into these plans. O t h er 2022 Joi nt E ffort Safe Streets highlights will include an August 10 Arts, Culture, Scholarships, Awards, and Recognition event from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at the Arts Council of Princeton with the presentation of numerous awards and scholarships and the keynote address, the Jim Floyd Memorial Lecture, presented by Jennifer Garcon, Princeton University librarian for Modern and Contemporary Special Collections. Mayor Freda, who will be a featured speaker at several of the Joint Effort events, emphasized the value of the program for the town of Princeton. “At its core it is meant to promote community activities and events to bring our residents together,” he wrote in an email. “The basketball clinics and tournaments have long been an important part of this program. A number of this year’s events also acknowledge the contributions of neighborhood residents to the community.” For more on times, places, and other information about Joint Effort Safe Streets 2022 and its many events from August 5 to 14, see the Town Topics Calendar; the Pr inceton Municipal Newslet ter, available at princetonnj.gov; or email johnbailey062@gmail.com. —Donald Gilpin

Bryan Brothers are Guests At 28th Annual Tennis Gala

On Sunday, September 25 from 12:30 to 6:30 p.m., NJTL of Trenton will hold its annual gala at Mercer County Tennis Center and The Boat House at Mercer Lake, West Windsor. Returning special guests are the Br yan Brothers, world champion doubles team, who won all four Grand Slams, all nine Masters 1000s, the ATP finals, and the Olympics. The event will honor longtime NJTL suppor ters Paul Decker, CEO of Mathematica; and Bill Whyte, head of Janssen Pharmaceuticals North America Strategic Partnerships. NJTL creates opportunities for success by enriching the lives of under-resourced youth through tennis, education, and mentoring programs. Proceeds directly benefit the organization, which prepares student athletes for college admission and career placement. Andrew Lieu is chairing the gala, and honorary cochairs are Ginny Mason, Albert Stark, and Jeff Perlman. For tickets, visit njtloftrenton.org/galas.

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9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022

Joint Effort Safe Streets


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022 • 10

Massive Fire continued from page one

the house, survived in every room. “But our own family pictures are gone,” Doria said. “Things like furniture can be replaced, but we don’t have things that are replaceable. We’re mourning and grieving those things that meant so much to us.” The fundraising campaign is continuing. “If you’re in the Princeton area, please shop at Tipple & Rose so

they can continue to pay their staff, keep the business alive, and generate and income,” it reads. “The online store isn’t open just now — they don’t have the staff to fulfill orders or the space to warehouse additional merchandise, but everything is available in the shop on Nassau Street.” Visit gofundme.com for information. —Anne Levin

Volunteer Fire Service continued from page one

the others are assigned to Mercer Engine Company No. 3. Deputy Chief Alex Ridings explained that a more formal associate member program allows University employees to volunteer from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. workdays, responding to emergencies on and off campus. (Employees can also join the Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad.) Additionally, there has long been a volunteer base among undergraduate and graduate students. This was a challenge for the department during the pandemic when students left campus, Ridings noted, but the department is recruiting and rebuilding. “Princeton University has taken an active approach to public safety by creating an environment that drives serAFTERMATH OF A BLAZE: Where their Christmas tree once stood, the first-floor living room of vice from staff and students alike,” he said. “As a result, Doria and Calavino Donati, who own Tipple & Rose, is a scene of devastation. the Princeton Fire Department has benefited greatly from the contributions of the University population as they’ve volunteered their We replace time, energy, and expertise “FOGGY” Insulated Glass in responding to emergenis 741 Alexander Rd, Princeton • 924-2880 cies in Princeton.” R idings cited a “ huge printed decline” in volunteerism throughout the countr y. Day t i m e volu nte er s are A Legacy of entirely scarce in Princeton, where Craft For Our many commute elsewhere to work, he noted. “We strugon Community gle at all times,” he said. Since 1985 Nguyen, originally from recycled Augusta, Ga., said he happened upon the fire depart609.683.1034 ment’s call for volunteers. paper. PDGUILD.COM “It was actually just good advertising placement by the fire department,” he said.

back to work. And we are grateful for that,” Doria said. “We really needed a reason to get up in the morning.” Back at the house, the couple have managed to salvage their dining room table, and the light fixture that hung above it. Remarkably, art work by employees, which hung on the walls of

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“I had seen one of these lawn advertisement signs over on Mercer Road by the Graduate College. It was inviting people to come learn about becoming a volunteer firefighter for the tow n, which sounded like an amazing opportunity, so I ended up following up on it.” He had never thought about volunteering as a firefighter before. “I didn’t even know that you could volunteer as a firefighter,” he said. “I did not personally know any firefighters growing up, so I had always assumed the job was strictly career paid positions.” Volunteers, who must be over age 18, must complete a 200-hour, state-mandated fire training. Nguyen said he learned a lot in the training, “from different types of fires you might have, different tools and equipment you might use, different strategies you might take to solve the problem. And then there’s all the things related to learning how to work together and cohesively as a unit in order to get jobs accomplished effectively.” The volunteers are also trained in issues relating to CPR, bloodborne pathogens, and hazardous materials. “Constantly learning new things is actually just a general part of the job,” he said. “Ideally, you want to be practicing skills and techniques you’ve already been introduced too. But on top of that the department is constantly offering

training in different specialties and new skills that you can learn.” As a Ph.D. student, Nguyen will spend at least half a decade living in Princeton, “which is enough time to say that being a Princeton resident is a significant part of my identity,” he said. “I even have a New Jersey driver’s license to show it in writing.” That is why, he said, he wants to serve the community. In addition to 35 volunteers and 31 associate members, the department has six career firefighters hired in 2020. According to the National Fire Protection Association, the number of volunteer firefighters in the United States has been decreasing. The Princeton Fire Department, which was organized in 1788, is seeking candidates to join its Class of 2023 training program. No prior experience is necessary. Volunteer opportunities are designed to adapt to one’s busy schedule with minimal disruption. According to the department, “Now is the perfect time to join the Princeton Fire Department, receive free training, and be prepared to help protect your community.” For more infor mation, visit bit.ly/PrincetonFireDept or email PFDrecruit@ princetonnj.gov. —Wendy Greenberg

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Arguing That Princeton Survey Has No Real Value; Community Deserves Better

To the Editor: In a desire to make my contribution to the community I have called home for 25 years, I completed the questionnaire at princetonsurvey.org and concluded that the survey has no real value. My reasons are as follows: First, there is no control over the number of times anyone can take the survey. I was able to take the survey multiple times without leaving my home. One can imagine how easy it would be for an individual or group to use multiple responses to manipulate the survey in order to obtain a desired result. Second, the majority of the questions are trivial, subjective, and vague. Does the future of Princeton really depend on the fact that I purchase my groceries at McCaffrey’s? At best, the survey is a cheap “feel good” for anyone who takes the time to complete it. At worst, it provides a flow of unreliable numbers to be used and/or manipulated in planning Princeton’s future. Our community deserves better. MARYANN WITALEC KEYES Franklin Avenue

NJDEP Has Issued Alert About Harmful Algal Bloom in Lake

To the Editor: Residents who use the D&R Canal State Park pathways along Lake Carnegie in Princeton should know that last week the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) issued an alert that a harmful algal bloom (HAB) that had been identified in the lake. The alert is at the “advisory” level which recommends that people and pets do not make direct contact with the water. The alert was prompted by a local resident who contacted The Watershed Institute to report her concerns about the lake. We advised her to upload photographs of the water that she had taken to NJDEP’s online HAB reporting tool, which triggered testing of the lake and the subsequent issuance of an alert. Our StreamWatch volunteers also detected the presence of bacteria as part of the weekly sampling they do in waterways across our region. HABs are commonly caused by phytoplankton known as cyanobacteria that use sunlight to create food. A combination of hot weather, nutrients from fertilizers, pet waste and other sources create conditions where cyanobacteria grow too rapidly, producing toxins that are harmful to people and pets. HABs could become a chronic problem without better controls on the use of lawn fertilizers, septic leaks, polluted stormwater runoff, and other contaminants flowing into the waterways. While we cannot immediately change the rising global temperatures that fuel the bloom growth, we can reduce the polluted stormwater runoff that carries bloom-inducing contaminants. If you live along a stream, you can help by planting a buffer of native plants along the edge to filter out pollutants. Reduce or eliminate the use of fertilizers on your lawn. Add a rain garden or plant trees to reduce the amount of stormwater flowing directly into our waterways. If you would like to learn more, visit the “Exploring Green Infrastructure” section on The Watershed Institute’s website (thewatershed.org). If you would like to learn more about HABs and track current alerts, visit nj.gov/dep/hab. SOPHIE GLOVIER Assistant Policy Director The Watershed Institute

Princeton Community Housing Virtual Event Focuses on Affordable Housing

Princeton Master Plan Committee Is Headed Down the Wrong Path

To the Editor: I had great hope that Princeton’s Master Plan would be created by Princetonians for Princetonians, taking our varied wants and needs into account to generate a master plan that works for everyone. We are a diverse group that includes suburban residents, downtown residents, owners, renters, landlords (residential and commercial), merchants, non-retail businesses, parents, seniors, walkers, drivers, bikers, visitors, University students, employees, etc. Though I know that committee members work hard and have good intentions, after seeing the first survey, I have strong concerns that their process won’t get us what we need. The first survey’s questions are slanted towards visitors and merchants. While I welcome all visitors to Princeton and consider them important to our town, most visit sporadically, while Princetonians are here every day. I am convinced that if we build a town that works for the residents, taxpayers, and workers of Princeton, it will continue to be attractive to visitors. If we attract and support merchants that attract and support Princetonians, the merchants will be happy, the residents and workers will be happy and the visitors will be happy. This survey doesn’t get us there. I shared my concerns with the Committee, and it seems that others too were alarmed by the survey’s narrow focus, its visitor slant, and the fact that some questions were constructed in a way that does not allow a valid or useful response, thus generating data that is either incorrect or subject to misinterpretation — or both. I was told that this survey is to inform the Economic Plan. When I think of an economic plan, I don’t think about shopping. I think about balancing our tax base, and activities that affect the town’s economics. Further, I find it odd to start with the Economic Plan, which should logically flow from and support the more important decisions about what kind of town we want to live in and how we make that a reality. The survey asks about parking. As the recent parking study made clear, there is adequate parking in Princeton. Princeton should focus on helping people find that parking rather than building more parking that will sit empty more than it will be full — which would be a waste of resources, space and opportunity. This issue has been addressed and does not belong in the Master Plan. If this merchant-centric survey is indicative of the Master Plan Committee’s thinking, then I am concerned. The website shows a “Community Visioning” survey scheduled for September, but it is hard to have confidence that this survey will do a better job asking the right questions in the right way, and thus generating meaningful data that is not subject to

mis-interpretation and mis-direction. Surveys are designed to answer specific questions. I am not convinced that the correct questions are being asked, and I am not convinced that the committee can know which questions to ask without involving Princetonians beforehand, in an informed and collaborative way. LAUREN BENDER Michelle Mews

Town Gas Leaf Blower Ordinance Is Improvement All Can Appreciate

To the Editor: We feel compelled to write in enthusiastic endorsement of last week’s letter in Town Topics: “Princeton Has Been Quieter with Gas Leaf Blower Ordinance in Place” [Mailbox, July 27] Our neighborhood has been noticeably quieter this summer thanks to the absence of gas leaf blowers. The difference is dramatic and welcome. We are also writing to thank the letter writer and her husband, Phyllis Teitelbaum and Tony Lunn, for initiating the campaign to restrict gas leaf blowers many years ago and their tireless advocacy for all these years. Even a proposal as simple as addressing the universal complaint of noise- and air-polluting gas leaf blowers at the community level is instructive in how “it takes a village.” Phyllis and Tony’s cause was taken up by many. Most importantly, the community’s call for change was acted upon by our elected officials, with the expert guidance of the Princeton Environmental Commission, Sustainable Princeton, the municipal staff, and many others. Compliance has been improving thanks to the municipality’s follow-through and the proactive outreach to the professional landscaping community by Sustainable Princeton. This is an improvement in our town that we can all appreciate and be thankful for. SCOTT SILLARS MARGARET GRIFFIN Patton Avenue

Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

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OF OF ALISANDRA B.B. CARNEVALE, LLC OF ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC ALISANDRA CARNEVALE, LLC ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC • Family Family Law • •Family Law Law FamilyLaw Law • Family •• Family Law • Divorce • Divorce • •Family Divorce Law TRANSACTIONS Law •Family REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS Law REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS Divorce •• •Family REAL ESTATE •• Divorce • Divorce • Wills/Living Wills/POA • Wills/Living Wills/POA • Real EstateWills/POA Transactions • Wills/Living Wills/Living • Divorce Divorce •Divorce Wills/POA •• Wills/Living Wills/POA • WILLS/LIVING WILLS/POA • WILLS/LIVING WILLS/POA • Wills/Living Wills/POA WILLS/LIVING WILLS/POA (Buyer/Seller) •• Municipal Municipal Court/ Traffic •••Municipal Court/ Traffic • Court/ Traffic Wills/Living Wills/POA Wills/Living Wills/POA • Municipal Court/ Traffic Wills/Living Wills/POA • Municipal Court/ Traffic Violations • Municipal Court/ Traffic & Criminal Violations •& MUNICIPAL COURT/ •Criminal Last Will & Testament • MUNICIPAL COURT/ & Criminal Violations • MUNICIPAL COURT/ Criminal Violations • Criminal Municipal Court/Traffic Traffic Violations •Criminal Court/ Traffic &• && Violations Municipal Court/ • Municipal Expungements TRAFFIC AND CRIMINAL • Expungements TRAFFIC AND CRIMINAL • Living Will & Criminal Criminal Violations Expungements & Violations TRAFFIC AND CRIMINAL •• Expungements Expungements • & Criminal Violations VIOLATIONS • Expungements (Healthcare Proxy Directive) ••• Real Real Estate Transactions VIOLATIONS Estate Transactions Expungements • Expungements VIOLATIONS • Real Estate Transactions Real Estate Transactions Transactions •• Real Estate Expungements •Estate Power ofTransactions Attorney • Real Real Estate Estate Transactions •• Real Transactions 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3683 Phone • Real Estate Transactions 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3687 fax

To the Editor: On Thursday, July 21, Princeton Community Housing (PCH) was honored to host their virtual event, A Place to Call Home — an informational discussion on affordable housing. Panelists at this event included President and CEO of the National Low Income Housing Coalition Diane Yentel, Director of Racial Justice Policy at Fair Share Housing Center James Williams, and Social Service Coordinator at Princeton Community Housing Jordan Goodwin. These experts spoke about the national and local landscape of affordable housing and how we can make progress in providing affordable, safe, and well-maintained homes. “To afford a one-bedroom apartment making minimum wage in the state of New Jersey, you would have to work six full-time jobs,” stated Williams. In addition to speaking about the particularly high cost of housing in New Jersey, Williams reminded us of the additional economic fax Phone inequalities had by those working multiple jobs and how Phone fax Phone faxfax alisandracarnevale@gmail.com alisandracarnevale@gmail.com these families were disproportionately impacted by the Phone AlisandraB. B.Carnevale, Carnevale,Esq. Esq. alisandracarnevale@gmail.com fax Alisandra COVID-19 pandemic. alisandracarnevale@gmail.com fax www.abcarnevalelaw.com alisandracarnevale@gmail.com fax www.abcarnevalelaw.com Alisandra B. Carnevale, Esq. In addition, Yentel shared that one of the best and most Alisandra Member NewJersey Jersey Bar Alisandra B.Carnevale, Carnevale, Esq. Member ofofNew Bar www.abcarnevalelaw.com B. Esq. alisandracarnevale@gmail.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com alisandracarnevale@gmail.com fax alisandracarnevale@gmail.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com effective ways we can improve the housing crisis is to build Member ofNew New Jersey Bar Esq. Member of New Jersey Bar Alisandra B. Carnevale, Esq. Alisandra B. Carnevale, Member of Jersey Bar Alisandra B. Carnevale, Esq. more affordable homes — an effort that PCH is currently www.abcarnevalelaw.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com outh ain ain treet treet ennington alisandracarnevale@gmail.com outh ennington taking part in. The proceeds from this event benefited Member of Member of New Jersey Bar New Jersey Bar Member of New Jersey Bar outh Esq. ain treet ennington outh ain PCH’s Home Means Hope Campaign. This campaign is Alisandra B. Carnevale, www.abcarnevalelaw.com outh ain treet treet ennington ennington raising funds to build 25 new affordable homes and make Member of New Jersey Bar outh ain treet ennington ennington outh outh ain ain treettreetennington neighborhood improvements at Princeton Community Village — a community originally developed by PCH in 1975. outh ain treet ennington To lear n more about PCH’s Home Means Hope

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Campaign, including a recording of this event, photos of construction of the new homes, and information on how you can help combat the affordable housing crisis by supporting this campaign, visit pchhomes.org/homemeanshope. ED TRUSCELLI Executive Director Princeton Community Housing, on behalf of the Board of Trustees

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Dawn Powell’s New York — An Invitation to Lunch ...nothing will cut New York but a diamond. It should be crystal in quality, sharp as the skyline and relentlessly true. —Dawn Powell (1897-1965), from The Diaries hen Dawn Powell invited me to lunch, I had no idea that she was the author of a dozen novels. All I knew was that she’d just reviewed my first book in the New York Post under the head “Young But Not Beat.” I was 20. She was around 60. It wasn’t until the 1990s that her work would be revived by Tim Page, a heroic, obsessively devoted enthusiast, with help from Gore Vidal, Edmund Wilson, and, eventually, The Library of America. At lunch that day, the real novelist at the table never said a word about herself or her work. She was wise, witty, and fun. We were dining in what was to me an intimidatingly classy French restaurant in midtown called L’Aiglon. I’d already been interviewed at the Algonquin and the Russian Tea Room, but this wasn’t an interview, this was a lunch date, and my experience with dates at French restaurants had not been happy. On both occasions, one in Paris the previous summer, I’d taken girls who knew more about wine and French cuisine than I did. There were embarrassing moments. In Tim Page’s edition of The Diaries of Dawn Powell 1931-1965 (Steerforth Press 1995), where our luncheon is briefly noted, I’m “a bright, alert lad” who “knew Classic Comics by heart at age of 10.” Such was my contribution to the conversation. Nothing of my excitement about the novel I was writing in a top-floor room at the Players Club or about my Midwesterner’s love for New York, which, as it turns out, I shared with her. I could have talked about how, despite my heavyhanded trashing of the Beats, I loved On the Road, but I was tongue-tied. She’d actually liked my travesties of Ginsberg, my “excellent beat poems are fresh and vivid.” I already knew paragraphs of her review by heart, like the one about how the peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, wild orgies on beer, and romantic dreams “would be almost too juvenile” except for the way I grew up with my novel “until at the end you see a young, rich talent come into bloom.” I was “a young man of feeling with an eagerness for experience” — and the best I could do was talk about knowing Classic Comics by heart when I was 10? August 3 Publication day for this column coincides with the August 3 pub date of my novel Let Me Be Awake. For the first two steamy weeks of August 1959, when I wasn’t at the typewriter from morning to long after midnight working on my second novel, I was ducking in and out of the stifling heat for meals or running around midtown

being interviewed or haunting stores like Scribners and Doubleday, hoping to see my book displayed in the windows — no such luck. Most of the attention I was getting had to do with the fact that the novel had won Crowell’s College Novel prize, which led to notices like the one in the Times Book Review declaring that “a college novel contest is going to produce a college novel.” Other reviews were kinder. The head in the Herald-Tribune said I was “An Intensely Aware Young Man.” The Saturday Review quoted Picasso (“It takes a very long time to become young”). Then, wonderfully, there was Dawn Powell. I still haven’t mentioned her last paragraph, the one I should have talked about at lunch but didn’t, for obvious reasons, I suppose, since she singled out a scene bet ween “his father and mother,” clearly my actual parents, “revealing their basically miserable marriage,” in which “the young author shows how much his own perceptions have sharpened in the three years it took him to write the book.” I wanted to tell her that the scene she admired was the very one my editor (and the publisher) strenuously objected to and wanted me to remove in its entirety because “nothing prepares the reader for it. It comes out of nowhere.” I kept it in, every word, with my parents backing me up. To this day, I regret not telling Dawn Powell how heroic I thought that gesture was, how much I appreciated it, how much it said about my parents, not to mention what it said about the literary intelligence of my editor, who would eventually turn down the novel I was slaving over at the Players Club, where he was a member (it was thanks to him that I had two weeks in that little room, the only air-conditioned exception among my nine New York summers). Laughter The haunted-looking woman in the close-up cover photo on Diaries, taken around the time of our meeting, is hard to match with my image of the jolly lady who took me to lunch. Fagan, the cat in the photo, makes a dramatic appearance in a long February 1954 entry about a visit from a novelist who, she writes, “has tousled Fagan, who in turn has clawed his face and hair, drawing blood which I mop up with whiskey.” That’s vintage Dawn Powell, in life and in art, mopping up freshly spilled blood with whiskey. The diaries soon make it clear that above all she loved to laugh. That’s what made the world go round — laughter. And yet on

the cover she seems to be looking over her shoulder for a menacing intruder. She had more than her share of grief, raising a son afflicted from birth with cerebral palsy and schizophrenia, who sometimes attacked her, once so severely that it put her in the hospital for two weeks. According to her Wikipedia page, her son would “today likely be diagnosed with autism.” “60 Cents” I was stunned to read that less than two months before our lunch at L’Aiglon, she and her husband have “about 60 cents between us and Post check doesn’t come.” Less than a month later she refers to the tension “of never knowing when any money is coming in — of the terrifying importance of getting novel in shape. Two months to go. What then? ” Next month, just before our lunch, thankfully, the gift of a trust fund from a close friend “saves us all,” bringing Powell, her husband, and disabled child “their first financial security in years,” according to Page. New York, New York All through the diaries there are indelible references to the city she came to after graduating from Lake Erie College in 1918, starting life in Greenwich Village, “where all night long typewriters click, people sing in the streets, hurdy gurdies go all day and the laundry boy reads Turgenev.” In another early entry, August 4, 1930, “Took studio — marvelous — at 21 E. 14th. I think I can write a New York novel here on my favorite street .... Hotter than hell.” Jump ahead to July 6, 1953: “There is really one city for everyone just as there is one major love. New York is my city because I have an investment I can always draw on — a bottomless investment of 21 years ... of building up an idea of New York — so no matter what happens here I have the rock of my dreams of it that nothing can destroy.” From August 7, 1957: “Hungover, but after Scotch and orange juice, began novel at 2:30 and flew up to page five with great glee. How wonderful if New York could be bottled while it still bubbles — fast and furious and true.” Wishful Thinking Reading such entries, I wish I could revisit our conversation at the restaurant. I’d be talking about New York, the way her thoughts and feelings about the city remind me of my own, where 30 E. 14th is a significant address, the artist’s studio, once Reginald Marsh’s, where my surrogate father the painter Edward Laning hosted our wedding reception. Now I could

tell her about the book I was writing, a novel about New York and five characters working in an office during a desperately hot summer in the Flatiron district. I’d tell her how I knew what she meant when she “flew up to page five” because I was on my way up to beyond page 500, pulling it all together in two weeks in a little room overlooking Gramercy Park. Most of all, I’d tell her how it felt to look up from the typewriter now and then and see the Metropolitan Life Tower, all aglow at night, and how it seemed the most beautiful building in the city, grand and graceful company when you’re dizzy from so many hours bent over a hot keyboard. And she’d tell me how she used to meet her husband in the lobby of the Met Tower, and how they once lived in the neighborhood, on 26th Street, and how she remembers leaning out the window to see the East River at the end of 26th, and in the diary how it felt to be surrounded by the insurance company’s “great stone skyscrapers and at strange daybreak, the sun, muffled in soot, fog, neons, mottled the fringes of these hard cold gray buildings with salmon outlines, white chalky underlines, sharp yellow lines so definitely colored” that she was “convinced they had been painted those curious clown colors in the night. Clown skyscrapers.” The Saddest Man In this dream conversation, I’d do what I’d been unable to do at lunch, I’d tell her about the characters in the novel I was writing, the Englishman who thought the world was ending; the sneering, wretched Irishman who never tired of brutally baiting the saddest man I ever knew, whose real-life litany of misery I’d listened to on the subway home from Bay Ridge every day, who lived in a dumpy little hotel on East 12th where the elevator was a glorified dumbwaiter. Then along comes a pretty girl from the Midwest, a theatre student who knew the world was a play and so played them all, making the sad man into a schoolboy in love with her, humoring the Englishman’s madness, subtly driving the Irishman into a lustful frenzy, and totally disarming a handsome Italian detective who’d never met a woman he couldn’t conquer, until this little actress who knew life was a child’s game and they were nothing but children. Too Young nd finally, I’d tell her how much I regretted being so young, so new to the world that I was still calling adults like my editor “Mr P.” and my agent “Mr. B.,” and how to this day I regret listening to them when they told me to put aside my second novel, the one I’d finished in that small room on the top floor of the Players Club. —Stuart Mitchner

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13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022

Performing Arts

TAKING IT OUTSIDE: A recent performer at the Story & Verse outdoor summer series, sponsored by the Arts Council of Princeton and African American Cultural Collaborative of Mercer County at Pettoranello Gardens. The next and final event in the series is Friday, August 19.

Story & Verse Series SING OUT: David McConnell will conduct Voices Chorale’s “New Jersey Summer Open Sing” on In Community Park August 22 at Music Together in Hopewell.

All Singers are Invited to Vaughan Williams’ musical Trenton Film Festival Voices Chorale NJ Event character: his lifelong love Resumes Live Screenings

On Monday, August 22 at for English folksongs and 7:30 p.m., Voices Chorale folk carols and his strong New Jersey (VCNJ) invites all support for amateur musicsingers to join an open sum- making. The cantata feamer sing at Music Together tures 16 varied folk song Worldwide Headquarters at settings, bound together in 225 Pennington-Hopewell seasonal groupings that take the listener on a journey Road, Hopewell. through the four seasons. Featured will be excerpts Those interested in joinfrom Folk Songs of the Four Seasons by Ralph Vaughan ing Voices Chorale NJ may Williams in an arrangement audition that evening by by the contemporary English contacting Paula Mirabile composer John Whittaker. at paulamirabile @verizon. David McConnell, artistic net. All voice parts are weldirector of VCNJ, will con- come to audition, but tenors duct. music and08/03/2022 re- and bass/baritones are esTownSheet Topics Ad — freshments will be provided. pecially encouraged. Visit half page color ad10.333"voiceschorale.org wide X 8" high for $400 for more The work brings togethinformation. er two vital elements of

The Trenton Film Festival returns to Mill Hill Playhouse in Trenton Friday-Sunday, August 26-28. This year’s series features 40 films from 11 countries. Included are documentaries, narrative films, experimental films, and animation. Filmmakers come from as close as Trenton and as far away as Iran, Spain, and Lesotho. Individual tickets are $8 ($5 students), and all-access passes are available for $25 ($15 students). Mill Hill Playhouse is located at 205 East Front Street. For a full listing of film times and titles, visit trentonfilmsociety.org.

enter tainment. T his AuI nte r e s te d p e r for m e r s gust, performers are invit- should arrive by 5:45 p.m. The Arts Council of Princ- ed to present original work Pettoranello Gardens is at eton (ACP ) and A f r ican inspired by this month’s 20 Mountain Avenue. Visit artscouncilofprinceton.org. American Cultural Collab- theme, “Circle of Life.” orative of Mercer County Available for (AACCMC) will present their Lunch & Dinner monthly Story & Verse on Mmm..Take-Out Friday, August 19 at Pettoranello Gardens starting at Events • Parties • Catering 41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton 6 p.m. www.tortugasmv.com (609) 924-5143 This free poetic and storytelling outdoor open-mic is the last outdoor event this R summer before the event moves back indoors to the ACP’s Solley Theater. Story & Verse was established in February 2020, and has continued monthly since Residential Cleaning Serving the Princeton area for over 25 years, fully insured. then. The series welcomes local and regional talent to Renata Z. Yunque, owner/manager perform original works inFor immediate attention, call the Princeton Renata for all your cleaning needs. spired by a monthly theme, 609• .203 203 . •0741 providing attendees with 609 0741 free, communit y- created cleanhousehappyhouse@gmail.com

Support Older Adults in Our Community by Joining Us for the 2022 Princeton Senior Resource Center Fall Benefit

Celebrate With Us Thursday, September 15 6:00 p.m.

101 Poor Farm Road, Princeton

Cocktails – Dinner – Entertainment 2022 Leadership Awards: Individual Honoree — Norman Klath Corporate Honoree — Stark & Stark Attorneys at Law RSVP by September 1, 2022 For ticket and event sponsorship information, visit princetonsenior.org/2022fallbenefit Questions? Contact Lisa Adler at ladler@princetonsenior.org or call 609.751.9699, ext 103.

Join us for a celebration under the stars — A fundraiser in support of PSRC


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022 • 14

Exploring the Landscape at Grounds For Sculpture — Sunday, September 18, 3 to 4:30 p.m.: Join Grounds For Sculpture Horticulturist Janis Napoli on a tour of the grounds and learn about the wide variety of native and exotic trees and plants that grace the 42-acre sculpture park and museum. Tickets are $45. ART OF Play — Saturday, October 1, 10 to 11 a.m.: This event will engage children to develop and expand their imagination; dexterity; and physical, cognitive, and emotional strengths. Preschool teacher Bentley Drezner will host a fun and collaborative workshop for children and their caregivers. A light coffee and bagel breakfast will follow. Free. ART OF Wine: Spain vs. France – Sunday, October 9, 5 to 6:30 p.m.: Join Terra Momo’s Carlo Momo and wine expert Lionel de Ravel as they battle to determine which country, Spain or France, offers superior wines. Enjoy light refreshments and wine-related banter. Tickets are $125. ART OF Karima Muyaes — Saturday, October 22, 6 to 9 p.m. Celebrate the work of internationally renowned Mexican artist Karima Muyaes. A ART OF SERIES: Horticulture is just one of the interests celebrated in the Arts Council’s ART hosted dinner at Michelle and OF series. Led by local leaders in art, wine, and more, ART OF events are designed to push George Lambros’ art-filled Princeton home will feature attendees’ perceptions of creativity. an artist talk from Karima, ART OF events partner with art initiatives, and year-long whose work in on view in the Arts Council Presents local leaders in their respec- community events and proj- Arts Council’s Solley Lobby ART OF Events Series Gallery. Tickets are $125. The Arts Council of Princ- tive fields, making for a social ects. Tickets are available outing that will leave particinow at artscouncilofprincART OF People & Stoeton introduces ART OF, a pants inspired. eton.org. ries / Gente y Cuentos — series of free and ticketed Every dollar raised from While new events will be Wednesday, October 26, events curated to introduce attendees to the endless cre- ticketed ART OF events will added regularly, the current 6-7:30 p.m.: Mexican author ativity and innovation in the benefit the Arts Council’s ART OF lineup is as follows: A n g e l e s M a s t r e t t a w i l l Princeton community. From longstanding communit y A RT OF Hor ticulture : join the Arts Council to read aloud from her colcollecting art to tasting wine, outreach programs, public lection, Women with Big Eyes, followed by a directed

Art

discussion in both English and Spanish. Learn about People & Stories/ Gente y Cuentos, a local nonprofit, and enjoy Mexican refreshments. Tickets are $25. ART OF Festive Florals with Moonshot Farm — Thursday, December 1, 6-7:30 p.m.: Join Rebecca Kutzer-Rice, owner of Moonshot Farm, in creating the perfect holiday wreath or centerpiece to help kick off the season. All Moonshot wreaths are wire/ plastic-free and made of fully compostable materials. While gaining new creative skills, you will also learn why Moonshot classes and events are a community favorite. Tickets are $100. “Over the past few years, arts have helped our community to stay connected and to heal,” said Adam Welch, executive director of the Arts Council of Princeton. “Our goal for the ART OF series is to add to our list of accessible opportunities for everyone in our community to celebrate the talent and innovation that surrounds us.” To reserve tickets and learn more, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org. If the ticket price is prohibitive, contact Emma Stephens at estephens @ artscouncilofprinceton.org to learn about the Buy One, Give One ticket option.

West Windsor Arts Hosts Sculpture Design Contest

It was nearly 85 years ago when Orson Welles’ infamous “The War of the Worlds” radio broadcast declared that aliens from Mars had landed in West Windsor, which caused a national stir. To celebrate this upcoming anniversary, West Windsor Arts, in collaboration with the Historical Society of West Windsor, is hosting “The mARTian

Project,” a sculpture design contest. People of all ages and skill levels are encouraged to imagine what these interstellar beings would look like as they transition to their new home in West Windsor. Entries are encouraged to take inspiration from the audio description given by Orson Welles, but also give an original and friendly spin to how these Martians are depicted. Designs will be collected until September 9, and then a public vote will be held to determine which design will be sculpted as the official mascot across town. The winning design will be used to create blank, fiberglass sculptures, which will be given to local artists to decorate as part of a separate design contest that will be released in the spring of 2023. The winning sculpture designer will receive a cash prize of $500. Details and full parameters of the contest can be found at WestWindsorArts.org. The unveiling of the winning design will be held during a fundraiser cocktail reception on October 30 at the historic Schenck Farmstead in West Windsor. The event will also feature a talk by A. Brad Schwartz, author of Broadcast Hysteria, as well as farm tours, a bonfire, and food and libations. West Windsor Arts is also looking for more community members to join the planning committee for “The mARTian Project.” Volunteers will help in all aspects including event planning, logistics, fundraising, site selection, and more. Contact info @ westwindsorarts.org for more information. Continued on Page 18

“SCOUTSHIP”: West Windsor Arts, in collaboration with the Historical Society of West Windsor, is hosting a sculpture design contest to commemorate the 85th anniversary of “The War of the Worlds” radio broadcast. This piece is by Eric Schultz.

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17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022 • 18

Art Continued from Page 14

“AFRICAN SKY”: This oil painting by James Wilson Edwards will be included in “Retrieving the Life and Art of James Wilson Edwards and a Circle of Black Artists,” on view at the Arts Council of Princeton October 14 through December 3.

“Retrieving the Life” Exhibit and vibrant regional arts on equal terms — usually, community largely unknown the only such places in those Coming to ACP This Fall The Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) will present “Retrieving the Life and Art of James Wilson Edwards and a Circle of Black Artists” this October. The exhibition reveals how Black artist/teachers were integral and inf luential members in a predominantly white regional community in the last quar ter of the 20th century. While there have been significant exhibitions of a few contemporary Black artists during recent efforts by museums and galleries to become more diverse, this is one of the first exhibitions to explore the historical context from which these artists emerged. This exhibition focuses on five late 20th-century master artists who lived and worked within 25 miles of each other in the geographic region from Princeton to New Hope, Pa.: James Wilson Edwards, Rex Goreleigh, Hughie Lee-Smith, Selma Hortense Burke, and Wendell T. Brooks. These Black artists represent a diverse

in contemporary American art history. G orele ig h, L e e - S m it h, and Burke began their careers working for the Works Progress Administration/ Federal Art Project (FAP) created during the Great Depression of the 1930s to provide employment for artists. Remarkably for the time, the FAP included both Black and women artists. Its heady mix of art and politics gave Black artists a sense of racial pride, confidence that they could become successful as artists, and a belief that they, too, could help create a better society. The careers of these three artists reflect the principles learned in their early years. They, like other Black artists who came out of the FAP era, communicated these principles to others, thus shaping the careers of younger artists including Edwards and Brooks. They were successful in their artistic work and used the arts to create educational institutions where whites and Blacks mingled

communities. Their impact on their communities has not been generally acknowledged until this exhibition. Nearly all of the works in this exhibition come from private collections, highlighting the importance of collectors of color in restoring Black and Brown artists to American art history and how their collecting sheds light on the systemic racism of the American art world. Recent attention to diversity in museum collections has revealed that only 1.2 percent of the holdings are by African American artists. If it weren’t for collectors of color, work by many Black and Brown ar tists might have disappeared into obscurity. Co - curators Jud it h K . B r o d s k y, D i s t i n g u i s h e d Professor Emerita, Department of Visual Arts, Rutgers University, and Rhinold Ponder, artist, activist, writer, lawyer, and founder of Art Against Racism, said, “This has been a magnificent voyage of discovery about the

lives and roles in art history of Black artists who have largely been forgotten or ignored as well as a reminder of the significance of Black collectors in preserving and promoting the history of Black artists and ensuring that they are eventually remembered for their contributions. We trust that our efforts here encourage others to restore Black artists and arts communities to their rightful places in American national and regional histories.” “Retrieving the Life and Art of James Wilson Edwards and a Circle of Black Artists” will be on view in the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery October 14 through December 3. A panel discussion — Art Collecting as an Act of Love, Resistance, and Preservation of History — will take place on Friday, October 14 at 4 p.m., featuring lenders to the exhibition as guest speakers. An opening reception will immediately follow from 5 to 7 p.m. A full schedule of programming w ill accompany t he r un of the show; view a list of free events at artscouncilof princeton.org. The exhibition was made possible by a Grants for Arts Projects award from the National Endowment for the Arts, and additional support from Lynne & Joe Kossow, Mercer County Cultural and Heritage Commission, Dr. Ferris Olin, Princeton University Humanities Council, Princeton University Art Museum, Petrucci Family Foundation, and Ryan Lilienthal & Rachel Stark. Arts Council of Princeton is located at 102 Witherspoon Street. For more information, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org or call (609) 924-8777.

Call For Art: Juried Show at Phillips’ Mill

The 93rd “Juried Art Show at Phillips’ Mill,” Bucks County’s historic art exhibition in New Hope, Pa., is accepting submissions through August 31 via online registration. Open to artists from within a 25-mile radius of the landmark mill, the Phillips’ Mill Community Association ( PMCA) welcomes

and encourages artists of all backgrounds, styles, and interests to submit their work. This year’s exhibition will be held live at the Mill as well as online, with all works for sale in both venues. The juried show continues the legacy of William Lathrop, founder of the Phillips’ Mill Community Association who, along with artist friends including Daniel Garber, Fern Coppedge, and Edward Redfield, was devoted to exhibiting the art of their time, just as today’s juried show is committed to showing the art of our time. The Art Show Committee is excited that jurying will once again take place in person at the Mill. This has been a longtime tradition at Phillips’ Mill, interrupted the past two years by the pandemic. “Having the jurors on site to see the submitted works in person, to view the artwork in real light from ever y angle, to experience texture, brushwork, color, is something special in this day of online jurying,” said Mary Flamer, chair of the Ar t Committee. “We are thrilled to be able to offer this to our submitting artists once again.” Artists should note that all registration must be done online prior to dropping their work off for jurying at the Mill on receiving days, September 9 and September 10. The high-res images required for registration will facilitate the production of the show’s online component. An all-new panel of judges will curate the show. Jurors of the Framed Painting and Graphics category will be Lauren Whearty, Peter Van Dyck and Douglas Martenson. Sculptors Syd Carpenter and Margherita Hagan will jury the Sculpture and Portfolio categories. Information and links to their websites can be found on the Phillips’ Mill website. The Phillips’ Mill Art Committee prides itself on inviting a new panel of jurors each year, assuring that each exhibition presents a unique personality. The jurors are accomplished artists themselves, distinguished in their fields and diverse in their interests. Sometimes they are also curators, art historians, or come from an academic background. Always, they work together to select from the hundreds of submissions received each year to produce a show representative of the creative spirit of our local community. Details and instructions on how to submit to the show can be found in the Artists’ Prospectus available at phillipsmill.org/prospectus. The one-time registration fee of $35 covers submissions to all three categories. Members of Phillips’ Mill Community Association receive a 50 percent discount. (Artists can join PMCA on the website prior to registering to take advantage of the member discount). All artists who submit to the show, accepted or not, will receive an invitation to the opening night reception for patrons and artists, a gathering beneath lights and a tent on the Mill’s back lawn each September. To learn more about the art show, or to become a supporter, visit phillipsmill. org/art/juried-art-show.

Area Exhibits Check websites for information on safety protocols. Ar t @ Bainbr idge, 158 Nassau Street, has “Witness / Rose Simpson” through September 11. artmuseum. princeton.edu. A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Light & Shadow” August 4 through September 4. An opening reception is on Saturday, August 6 from 5 to 8 p.m. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Art on Hulfish, 11 Hulfish Street, has “Screen T ime : Photog raphy and Video Art in the Internet Age” through August 7. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Mu s e u m i n C ad w a lad e r Park, Parkside Avenue, has “Ellarslie Open 39” through October 2. ellarslie.org. Gourgaud Gallery, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, has “As You Like It” August 7 through August 31. On opening reception is on Sunday, August 7 from 1 to 3 p.m. cranburyartscouncil.org. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “What’s in the Garden? ” through August 1, “Roberto Lugo: The Village Potter” through January 8, 2023, and “Fragile: Earth” through January 8, 2023, among other exhibits. Hours are Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Friday through Sunday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Timed tickets required. groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and Innovator’s Gallery,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. Museum hours are Thursday through Sunday, 12 to 4 p.m. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “(re)Frame: Community Perspectives on the Michener A r t Collect ion” t hrough March 5, 2023. michenerartmuseum.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey” through March 2023 and the online exhibits “Slavery at Morven,” “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898,” and others. morven.org. The Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, has “The Glittering Outdoors” through October 2. helenemazurart.com. Pr inceton P ubl ic Lib ra r y, 65 Wit herspoon Street, has “In Lunch with Love” through August 28 and “Our Inner Oceans : Paintings by Minako Ota” through August 30. princetonlibrary.org. Small World Coffee, 254 Nassau Street, has “Naneen Art” through September 6. smallworldcoffee. com. We s t W i n d s o r A r t s C e n te r, 952 A lexander Road, West Windsor, has “By the Light of Day: Plein Air Show” through August 27. westwindsorarts.org.


Wednesday, August 3 6:30 p.m.: 2022 Princeton Student Film Festival, at Princeton Public library. Ten short works by high school and college students from the local area and throughout the U.S. Princetonlibrary.org. Thursday, August 4 8:30-9:30 a.m.: Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber presents Business Before Business, with speed network i ng. Vir t u a l e ve nt. Princetonmercer.org. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 6-8 p.m.: John Gilbride and Fr iends per for m at Princeton Shopping Center as part of the Summer Nights series. Free. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. 6:30 p.m.: Historian Melissa Ziobro gives a talk on the “Hello Girls,” switchb o ard op er ator s d u r i ng World War II, at Morven, 55 Stockton Street, in conjunction with the exhibit “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey.” In person and virtual. Morven.org. 8 p.m. (sundown): The film La La Land is screened as part of the Princeton University Art Museum’s outdoor film series, at Alexander Beach, behind Alexander Hall. Bring chairs or blankets; popcorn is provided. Friday, August 5 5 - 8 p.m. : Dark W h is key performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards. com. 5:30-7:30 p.m.: Kickoff of annual Joint Effort Safe Streets Program at Studio Hillier, 190 Witherspoon Street. Remarks by local government officials and community members, presentations of special prints, tribute to Shirley Satterfield, and talk by architect Bob Hillier on his vision for Witherspoon Street. 7-10 p.m.: Dancing Under the Stars at Hinds Plaza, weather permitting, or Princeton Public Library’s Community Room. Led by members of Central Jersey Dance. Free. Saturday, August 6 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. Wwcf m.org. T he H is tor ic a l Society of West Windsor, Yes We CAN Fresh/Stable Food Drive to Benefit Arm in Arm, and High School South’s Instrument Drive for HomeFront will be on hand; music by Blue Jersey Band. 10 a.m.: WitherspoonJackson community selfguided tour, starting at 30 Quarry Street. Part of the Joint Effort State Streets Program. At 1 p.m., a meetand-greet fish fry will be held at the Witherspoon Elks Lodge, 124 Birch Avenue.

10-11:30 a.m.: Mid-Day Toastmasters meet at the Library, 42 Robbinsville Allentown Road, Robbinsville. Toastmastersclubs.org. 10 a .m .- 5 p.m . : J u s t Peachy Festival at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Pony rides, barnyard tractors, rubber duck races, live music, “Eyes of the Wild” traveling zoo, food tent, wine tasting, and more. $12-$15. Live music from 1-4 p.m. Terhuneorchards. com. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Butterfly Festival at The Watershed Institute. Tour the Butterfly House and Insect Zoo, play games, and enjoy programs. $10 per person /$25 per carload. Register at thewatershed.org. 7 p.m.: The Same Stream conducted by James Jordan presents “ROGER AMES: A Legacy Concert Series,” at Westminster Choir College’s Bristol Chapel, 101 Walnut L a n e. $10 - $ 20. T h e s a mestreamchoir.com. 8-11 p.m.: Central Jersey Dance Society presents a Salsa Sensation Dance at Suzanne Pat terson Center, 45 Stockton Street. No partner needed. Salsa lesson from 7-8 p.m. taught by Jose Luis Maldonado. $15. Centraljerseydance.org. Sunday, August 7 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morn-

AUGUST

ing yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 10 a .m .- 5 p.m . : J u s t Peachy Festival at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Pony rides, barnyard tractors, rubber duck races, live music, “Eyes of the Wild” traveling zoo, food tent, wine tasting, and more. Live music from 1-4 p.m. $12-$15. Terhuneorchards. com. 1 p.m.: Claire Janezic is soloist in the carillon concert from Graduate Tower on Princeton University’s graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. Free. (609) 2587989. 1 p.m.: Tour of Princeton B at t lef ield, 50 0 Mercer Road, led by historical interpreter. Learn about the Battle of Princeton and the experiences of soldiers and civilians. $5 donation; children under 16 and veterans free. Register at Pbs1777. org/battlefield-tours. 2 p.m.: “The Good Americans: His Majesty’s Loyal American Troops,” talk by Todd Braisted at the Trent House, 15 Market Street, Trenton. ; also available online. Free. Williamtrenthouse.org. 5-7 p.m.: Gospel Fest and Black Family Recognition at the First Baptist Church, 30 Green Street, part of the Joint Effort Safe Streets Program. Tuesday, August 9 9:30 and 11 a.m.: Read & Pick Program: Tractors,

at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Parents and young children aged preschool to 8 read books and take a tractor-drawn wagon ride. $12 per child, purchased online. Terhuneorchards.com. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Mid-Day Toastmasters meet v ia Z oom. Toas t mas tersclubs.org. 5:30-7:30 p.m.: Discussion on “Reparations in New Jersey and Princeton,” presentation and community panel, part of Joint Effort Safe Streets celebration. At Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. 7-8:30 p.m.: At Hinds Plaza, the Coalition for Peace Action holds a commemoration of the 77th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Princeton University professors Frank von Hippel and Rob Goldston speak. Music by The Solidarity Singers of the New Jersey State Industrial Union Council. Crane-folding and a candlelight ceremony as darkness arrives. Peacecoalition.org. Wednesday, August 10 5:30-8 p.m.: At the Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, the Joint Effort Safe Streets Program continues with a community reception, art ex h ibit, pres entat ion of awards, scholarships, and the Jim Floyd Memor ial Lecture. Thursday, August 11 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton

330 COLD SOIL ROAD PRINCETON, NJ 08540

Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 5:30-7:30 p.m.: Discussion, “Real Talk on Race Relations in America, New Jersey, and Princeton,” with panel discussion, at Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church, 124 Witherspoon Street. 6-8 p.m.: Princeton Public Library’s Summer Reading Wrap-Up Party, at Princeton Shopping Center. Free. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. Friday, August 12 5-8 p.m.: Jerry Steele performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards.com. 7 p.m.: Black Princeton High School alumni reception, at Witherspoon Elks Lodge, 124 Birch Avenue. Part of the Joint Effort Safe Streets Program. Saturday, August 13 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. Wwcfm. org. Special tomato tasting. The West Windsor Bicycle and Pedestrian Alliance will be on hand; music by This Old House. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. and 1-4 p.m.: Call for volunteer land stewards to join Friends of P r i n c e to n O p e n S p a c e to help with a variety of

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022

Mark Your Calendar Town Topics

conservation projects at Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Fopos.org. 10 a.m.: Pam Mount’s annual “Freezing, Canning, and Preser ving” class at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Free but registration necessary. Terhuneorchards.com. 10 a.m.-12 p.m.: Discussion, “Updates on Education, Development, Pub lic Safety, Marijuana, the Neighborhood,” and candidates’ forum, at First Baptist Church, 30 Green Street. Part of the Joint Effort Safe Streets Program. Remarks, acknowledgements, award presentations. Also, free Youth Basketball Clinic with Bailey Basketball Academy at Community Park basketball courts. At 7 p.m., Meet and Greet at the Witherspoon Elks Lodge, 124 Birch Avenue. 1-7 p.m . : C o m m u n i t y Block Festival, part of the Joint Effort Safe Streets celebration, at Princeton YMCA field. Music, food, and entertainment. 1-4 p.m.: Bill O’Neal and Andy Koontz perform at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Light fare and wine available. Terhuneorchards.com. 2 p.m.: Curated tour of the exhibit “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey” and view of the TelStar 1 satellite up close on its final weekend at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Morven. org.

609-924-2310 www.terhuneorchards.com

Just Peachy FARM FESTIVAL

Saturday & & Sunday Sunday~-August August36&&4,7,10am 10am–-5pm 5pm Rain or Shine

• Summer ScavengerAdmission: Hunt • Junior Mechanic Shop $10, ages 3 and up. PonyScavenger Rides &Hunt Duck Races • Little Tots Farm Store Eat a•Peach · Pony Rides · Wagon Rides · Children’s Games · Farm Fresh Food • Discovery Barn • Pedal & Play Tractors • SATURDAY: Swingin' Dixie, 12-4pm • Children’s Games

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11 a.m. Pam Mount's Canning & Freezing Class

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Sat 10:30 and 12 • Sun 12 and 1:30

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Ice Cream Social Tent Everything AdmissionPam's $12 Online/$15 atFood gate, Tent ages 3 and up. Wine Online Tickets Peach www.terhuneorchards.com Peach Slushies

Tickets required for winery, farm store & festival

Free admission to Farm Store and Winery Tasting Room and free on-site parking.

August Hours: Daily 9am-7pm • Winery Fri., 12-8pm, Sat. & Sun., 12-6pm


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022 • 20

Authentic Pasture-To-Table Fine Dining Is the Hallmark of Brick Farm Tavern

D

iners who come to Brick Farm Tavern not only have the chance to enjoy special pasture-totable cuisine, but also the choice of several different dining settings, both indoors and outdoors.

IT’S NEW To Us

These separate enclaves offer an inviting ambiance, whether one opts for the Library, the Living Room, the Wine Cellar, or the Tavern indoors, or the charming outdoor patio. The informal Dog Run Bar, with a series of picnic tables and umbrellas, and where well-behaved dogs are welcome, is still another option. A large tented area is also available for private events. There certainly is something for everyone’s taste at this historic, meticulously restored 1820s farmhouse with its spacious grounds, including nearby working barns and fields. Truly farmto-table! Located at 130 Hopewell Rocky Hill Road ( Route 518 ) , it was op ened in 2015 by Robin and Jon McConaughy, who also own Double Brook Farm and are founders and partners of the Brick Farm Market

in Hopewell. The Tavern is now under the guidance of operation directors Otto and Maria Zizak. Good Food Formerly owners of the popular Ottoburger restaurant in Hopewell, the Zizaks have long experience in the food business. Natives of what was once Czechoslovakia, they both came from families for whom good food with healthy ingredients was emphasized. Otto moved to the U.S. when he was 14, and Maria followed later, after graduating from college with an M.B. in economics. They were married, and became involved in five restaurants, including two in Brooklyn, N.Y. T heir cu is i ne was ac claimed by customers and critics alike, and their popular Korso Burger t wice earned the “Best Burger in New York” award. Their restaurants also received wide coverage in numerous publications. Despite their continuing success in the Big Apple, Otto and Maria and their three children wanted a c h a n g e. “ We h a d b e e n looking for a farm so that we could grow our own vegetables and provide farm-totable service for our customers,” explains Otto Zizak. “A few years ago, we found a farm here in Hopewell with

53 acres, where we grow beets, beans, potatoes, and carrots, and we plan to add fruit crops. Big Success “We had been drawn to the culture, values, and agricultural riches of central New Jersey,” he continues. “We especially liked Hopewell. It has the feeling of a country town, and a bit of European flavor, with friendly people walking around and interacting. A community with an actual downtown.” Ottoburger became a big success despite its opening during the height of the pandemic, and the Zizaks formed a relationship with Robin and Jon McConaughy. “We have neighbor ing farms,” says Otto. “We grow organic alfalfa to sell to their Double Brook Farm for the cattle, and we used their beef and pork for our menus at Ottoburger.” Then, last April, a new opportunity presented itself, when the Zizaks joined the McConaughys at Brick Farm Tavern as operations directors. Otto is also operations director at Brick Farm Market, and Maria is the manager. “We began to outgrow the space at Ottoburger, and we were thinking of how to blend the farm and retail in the most efficient way,” explains Otto. “The way Brick Farm Tavern blends within

DISTINCTIVE DINING: “Our focus is pasture-to-table, rustic cooking with European influences, and we offer an exceptional location,” explain Maria and Otto Zizak, operation directors at Brick Farm Tavern in Hopewell. They are enjoying the restaurant’s patio, very popular for outdoor dining.

the natural landscape and environment is important to us. We are part of the surroundings, and we try to be respectful of the surroundings. I especially like to see the connection between the farm and the food, as it is cooked into the entrees. It is truly farm-to-table. We use the meat, chickens, and heritage turkeys from Double Brook Farm, and we grow the produce on our own nearby farm.” Founding Mission The McConaughys look forward to this association withFOR the Zizaks. TAKE OUT MENU | ORDER ONLINE PICKUP “From the time Otto and 52 East Broad Street, Hopewell, NJ 08525 52 East Broad Street, Maria moved 609.466.3333 | antimositaliankitchen.com to Hopewell, and opened Ottoburger in Hopewell, NJ 08525 facebook.com/antimositaliankitchen the middle of the pandemantimositaliankitchen@gmail.com 609.466.3333 ic, we have partnered with Antimo’s Italian Kitchen Family owned and operated them in their search for the best beef and pork for their Appetizers Marsala w chicken – 21 / or Soup Du Jour Cold Subs Pizza restaurant,” says Robin McItalian Antipasto – 17 veal 24 seasonal, served with bread ½ subs and whole subs available Plain Thin Crust –11 small/ Conaughy. “Since they have soppressata, prosciutto, mozzarella, chicken, mushrooms, marsala pint 5 / quart 9 served with lettuce, tomato, onions 15.5 large taken over operations of the roasted peppers, provolone, olives Parmigiana w chicken – 21/ Italian – 9 / 15 White Thin Crust –12 small Brick Farm Tavern and Brick Bufala Caprese – 13 or eggplant 17 / or shrimp 24 / Homemade Sauce ham, salami, cappicola, provolone, /18 large Farm Market, Jon and I have Calamari Fritti – 12 or veal 24 Sauce – pint 5 / quart 9 oil, vinegar White Clam –24 been thrilled to see the exShrimp Scampi – 15 mozzarella, tomato sauce alfredo, vodka, marinara, tomato Napoletana – 10 / 16 Vegan Veggie –21 tension of our own founding Eggplant Rollatini –14 Picatta with chicken–21 / or Bolognese – pint 7 / quart 11 prosciutto, roasted red peppers, fresh mission — to offer the best Meatballs (3pcs) tomato, veal 24 mozzarella Toppings food in the most sustainable ricotta –13 capers, artichokes, lemon, white Dessert olive oil, balsamic Veggie – 1.5 small / 2.5 large way possible — reflected in Mussels-12 Clams –13 / wine Large Cannoli – 3 Ham & Cheese – 8 / 14 slices of fresh tomato, green peppers, their approach from day one. mixed 14 Scarpariello w chicken – 25 / Ice cream Truffle – 5 Turkey & Cheese – 8 / 14 roasted red peppers, banana pep“Farmers in their own marinara or bianco or veal 28 Tiramisu – 4 Panino Rustico – 12 / 17 pers, jalapeno peppers, mushrooms, right, and for Sausage & Broccoli Rabe – 12 family Antimo’s offers casual, friendly sausage, roasted red peppers, mushonions,restaurateurs fresh, garlic, spinach, broccoli, decades,artichokes, they bring the perdining with Southern favorites, Chicken Fingers & Fries –Italian 9.5 familyrooms, in a marinara sauce Kiddie Corner Hot Subs black olives, green olives, homemade pasta, thin crust pizza, and more. fect experience and Onion Rings or Jalapeno PopAlfredo – 18 Pasta with Sauce – 7 ½ subs and whole subs available kalamata olives, ricotta,drive pineapple,to Antimo’s Italian Kitchen, located in Hopewell our original Borough,pers NJ, –5 is aptly self-labeled as both a Arrabbiata – 16 Spaghetti or Penne – 9 Meatball or Sausage –further 9 / 16 extra cheesemission, Trattoria and Pizzeria. 40 seat andorto continue developing Mozzarella Sticks – 8 Antimo’s marinara, garlic, red chili pepper with meatball and sauce Meatball; Sausage; Chicken Meat – 2.5 small / 3.5 large dining room is causal and family friendly. businesses withpepperoni, their bacon, own Pizzaenjoy Stripspersonalized –5 Guests service from angus beef – 19 Bolognese Cheese Ravioli (3) – 13 Eggplant Parmigiana –the 9.5 / 16 crumbled sausage, an experienced imprint. We could not have Garlic Knots (4) – 3.5 waitstaff. Broccoli Rabe – 17 Tortellini Alfredo – 13 Cheesesteak – 9/ 16 sliced ham 52 East Broad Street Eggplant Rollatini 18 Chicken Fingers with Fries – 9 Chicken Cheesesteak –asked 9 / 16 for better Premium –partners.” 4 small / 7 large Hopewell, NJ 08525 Salads609.466.3333 now Garlic & Oil –14 Kids Pizza with 1 Topping – 9.5 Buffalo Chicken Indeed,grilled chicken,overseeing breaded chicken, served withAntimositaliankitchen.com homemade bread the operations atbroccoli therabe, TavLasagna – 18 Cheesesteak – 9/16 prosciutto, meatball, fried Caprese Salad – 12 ern, the Zizaks bring their Primavera veggies in blush Antimo’s Favorites Chicken Primavera – 9 / 16 eggplant, arugula • • Catering Wood Fired Oven Party Family Style Party Extra Sauce Antipasto – 10 / 13 long and– 1.5 skill to sauce – 18 Fig Crostini – 14 roasted red peppers, provolone, basilexperience Special – 18 / 24 • Buffet • Private mixed greens, tomatoes, red onions, ofCrust the business, Parties Dining Artisan Pasta Puttanesca –18 Sunday Sauce with HM Room Chicken Cutlet – 9 /all 16 aspectsThin peppers, onions, olives, ham, salami, provolone includingsausage, thepepperoni, menu. olives, capers, chili pepper, plum pasta – 26 Hot Grinder – 9 / 16 mushrooms Arugula Salad – 12 Lu nch and din ner are tomato, basil Creamy Garlic Toscana Salmon hot ham, salami, provolone Prosciutto – 18 / 29 Greek Salad – 12 ser ved, Arugula and &diners have Tomato or Marinara –14 HM pasta – 26 lettuce, tomato, hot peppers European – 15 / 26 Caesar Salad – 5/ 9 opportunities to try many Vodka – 16 Pan Seared Scallops Pancetta pepperoni, spinach, mushrooms, fresh Apple Salad 13 options, with Gnocchi with Vodka- 20 HM pasta – 27 Homemade Wrapsfarm-to-table mozzarella Strawberry Salad - small 8 e ve r y t h i n g pr e p a r e d to Cavatelli with Broccoli- 19 Shrimp Scampi HM pasta – 24 Grilled Chicken, Spinach

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Grilled Veggie or Chef Salad – 13 Mixed Greens Salad – 4 / 9 Italian Chicken Salad – 14 olives, red onions, fresh mozzarella, roasted peppers, balsamic add chicken 5 / calamari 6 / shrimp 8 / salmon 8 Homemade Pasta house salad & homemade bread Agnolotti – 24 Three Cheese Ravioli – 19 vodka or tomato sauce Spinach Ravioli – 22 alfredo or tomato sauce Porcini & Sausage Ravioli – 24 sun dried tomato, portobello mushroom, cream sauce Black Squid Ink Ravioli – 26 black pasta, clams, scallops, crab, in an arrabbiata sauce Lobster Ravioli – 26 pink cream sauce Tortellini – 22

add chicken 5 / sausage 6 / meatballs 6 / pancetta or prosciutto 5 / shrimp 8 / salmon 8 all entrees are served with pasta gluten free pasta add 5 homemade pasta add 5

Marechiara Mixed Seafood HM pasta –32

& Roasted Peppers – 9 Chicken Caesar – 9 Chicken Finger – 9

Mediterrana – 17 / 28 artichokes, prosciutto, kalamata olives, basil, fresh mozzarella Sicilian – 20 Sicilian Special – 26

order. Customers have their favorites, of course, but many people like to sample a variety of the choices, including both vegetarian and vegan dishes. Among the signature entrees are the Double Brook Far m Half Chicken, t he Braised Wood L ot Pork Shank, and the Berkshire Pork Schnitzel. Also, the 100 percent grass-fed Devon Beef Burger is always a favorite. Popular salads include t he Rolling Hills G reen Salad with heirloom mixed greens, baby carrots, cherry tomatoes, raisins, toasted almonds, corn bread crumble, and mustard vinaigrette. This is meant to be shared. Lunch Choices Assorted small plates are also offered. Among them are Poutine Pierogi, Crispy Berkshire Pork Belly, and Double Brook Steak Tartare. Popular lunch choices include Pulled Pork Hash, Chicken Fried Steak, Croque Madame Sandwich, and Truffl e Pesto Mushroom Wrap, among many others, including handmade empanadas, an artisanal cheese plate, and chicken and waffles. Desserts are a specialty, and most customers never turn down an opportunity to tease their sweet tooth. Favorites include seasonal Galette, with vanilla creme anglaise, graham cracker crumb, and vanilla ice cream; Chocolate Mousse, with caramel, peanut butter brittle, and chocolate feuilletine and gold leaf; and Lavender Creme Brulée with macerated st rawber r ies. These are just a sampling of mouthwatering favorites. Coffee, including espresso, cappuccino, and latte, and teas are available, as

Family Packages for 4 served with Bread and Cannoli Paninis (more online) Package #1–70 Grilled Chicken – 9 Specialty Pizza Penne Vodka, Chicken Parmigiano, eggplant, fresh mozzarella for small pizza, add gluten free 5 Caesar Salad Neapolitan Seafood Italiano – 10 Margherita – 13 small / 18.5 large Package #2 – 100 house salad & homemade bread prosciutto, fresh mozzarella, roasted Trenton Tomato –12 small / 17 large 3 cheese Ravioli tomato sauce, Bianco garlic, basil, tomato, red peppers, balsamic Trenton Tomato with Sausage – Sausage & Broccoli Rabe, white wine HM Sausage Broccoli Rabe – 12 14.5 small / 20.5 large REFINED INTERIORS Mixed Green Salad Fra Diavolo spicy marinara Buffalo or BBQ Chicken – 18 / 23 Package #3 – 160 Marinara plum tomatoes, Angus Burgers Cheesesteak – 18 small / 23 Shrimp Scampi HM pasta, Ribeye served with lettuce, tomato, onion, garlic, basil peppers, onions, american cheese, mayo and french fries or salad Steak mussels 18 / clams 19 /antimositaliankitchen.com mozzarella Hamburger – 11 Arugula Salad calamari 18 / shrimp 24 / Penne Vodka – 18 small / 22 Cheeseburger – 12 facebook.com/antimositaliankitchen scallops 28 / mixed seafood 29 White or Red Veggie – 18 small / 23 Mushroom & Swiss – 12 Soda Shrimp Scampi withantimositaliankitchen@gmail.com homemade Chicken Bacon Ranch – 18 small /23 Bacon Cheeseburger – 13 2 Liter Soda 3.75 pasta 24 Princeton | 609 921-2827 | eastridgedesign.com Family owned and operated Jumbo Wings coke / diet coke / sprite Brooklyn Pizza Buffalo ,BBQ, Garlic Parm or Sweet Brooklyn Plain – 20 all seafood is served with pasta Red chili - all served with dressing Catering & Parties Brooklyn Tomato – 19 with homemade pasta add 5 6 Wings – 8 View full catering menu on web site: Brooklyn with Sausage – 24 with gluten free pasta add 5 12 Wings – 16 antimositaliankitchen.com/catering plum tomato sauce From The Grill 18 Wings – 24

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is a selection of soft drinks, featuring Boylan’s Real Sugar Sodas. In addition, beer, wine, a n d s p i r it s a r e of fe r e d — w ith the ver y popular award-winning Troon beers from the Troon Brewing facility located on the Tavern grounds — wines from area vineyards, and every possible cocktail imaginable. Spirits include selections from the nearby Sourland Mountain Spirits Distillery. All in all, a visit to Brick Farm Tavern will not only please the palate, but provide a charming setting in which to enjoy lunch or dinner. High Standards “We are a destination restaurant in an historic building,” point out the Zizaks. “We have high standards, and we believe that good, high quality food should be accessible to everyone, and we find that people are so happy to be able to eat out and come together again after having been confined during COVID. “We have many regular customers from Princeton and the area, as well as from Bucks County, Philadelphia, and New York. They appreciate that, as our mission, we present our local sourcing not as a concept but as delicious food on your plate. All aspects of a meal at the Tavern start on our farm. We are responsible for our animals, our plants, our soil, our environment.” Seating is available for 130 diners inside and 50 outside. There is also Chef’s Seating where diners can watch meals prepared in the kitchen. The Zizaks look forward to a happy future at Brick Farm Tavern and within the community. “The community has been very welcoming to us, and our customers are very involved. It’s like a conversation. We welcome their ideas and requests. We like to see people enjoying themselves, relaxing, and having a good lunch or dinner. Come and join us!” inner is served Tuesday through Sunday from 5 to 9 p.m.; lunch Friday, Saturday, and Sunday from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Reservations are strongly recommended. (609) 333-9200. Website: brickfarmtavern.com. — Jean Stratton

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21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022

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Utilizing his Versatility to Earn Another Lax Title, PU Alum Currier Helps Canada to World Sixes Gold player. He was named a PLL all-star this summer, the fifth time in five seasons that he has been named an all-star at the professional outdoor level. He remains a standout this year for the Waterdogs, who selected him with their first pick in 2020, three years after his pro career began. “I feel like I just graduated last year, and then I turn around this past summer and I’m at my fifth reunion,” said Currier. “It’s pretty crazy that it’s been that long since I’ve been at Princeton. I was fortunate to have a great coaching staff and a great, great group of guys that I was able to play with four years. I still feel support from those guys when I play in the pro level, even though there’s only a couple of us that have made the jump.” Currier followed Princeton’s run to the NCAA men’s lax Final Four last spring. He was pleased to be on hand at Shuart Stadium in Hempstead, N.Y. to witness the Tigers’ win over Yale to reach the national semifinals. “I was in the stands for that one,” said Currier. “It was pretty awesome to see them on that stage, back to where Princeton lacrosse belongs. I wish I could have been there in my time, but unfortunately we weren’t. I still feel like a part of it a bit. Coach [Matt] Madalon was head coach for his first year my senior year.” Currier continues to set the bar high among Princeton products. He ranked sixth in the PLL in ground balls with 28 halfway through the season. He had eight ground balls along with a goal and two assists in the Waterdogs’ 15-14 win over the Cannons last Sunday as they improved to 4-3. “I see a lot of potential,” said Currier, who has another former Princeton player, Michael Sowers ’20, as a Waterdogs teammate. “I think we’ve taken a lot of time to try to build the chemistry among our team. Last year, we were struggling at the start and then we figured it out and were a second-half team. We’re really hopeful we can do the same sort of thing this year.” Currier is a veteran who brings experience, passion and talent to his teams. His two-way skills make him valuable to any of his teams. His game made him perfectly crafted for the Sixes version of the sport. “I thought it is really tailored toward the fast-paced, two-way players,” said Currier. “Fortunately I fall into that category so it did suit my game pretty well. The fact that all of Canadians grew up playing box lacrosse where we’re on both sides of the ball playing offense and defense and at least learning the basic principles before we go and specialize in field lacrosse or in junior when we go on offense and defense. So, we at least know the basics. I think that part really helped us.” Having grown up in Ontar-

io, Currier idolized another Peterborough product – John Grant Jr. Now he finds himself, like Grant Jr., playing and winning for their hometown Peterborough Lakers, the Mann Cup box lacrosse champions. He’s found his roots benefiting him at each level. In the Sixes gold medal game, he got Canada off to a strong start with a pair of breakaway goals to begin the game. “That was more of box lacrosse instincts,” said Currier. “I’m covering a guy and I know once he shoots, the ball is either going in the net which is our ball, it’s a save which is our ball, or it’s going wide which is our ball. So, I’m kind of reacting. I was covering a guy up top, and as soon as I see that shot get taken, I know I’m getting up the field and the ball is coming to me or I’m dragging somebody with me and it creates an easier breakout for us.” Canada never looked back. They dominated for SIX SHOOTER: Zach Currier heads upfield against Yale in 2017 during his senior season for the the championship. Currier Princeton University men’s lacrosse team. Star midfielder Currier helped Canada take gold last credited the coaching staff month at the World Lacrosse Sixes tournament at The World Games in Birmingham, Ala. Currier with selecting good person- tallied five goals in the gold medal final as Canada defeated the U.S. 23-9. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) nel for their Sixes roster and making adjustments through Thursday it’s on you if you’re 2023 World Lacrosse Cham- Lakers fan and a Team Canthe World Games. Canada getting to a field and getting pionships in San Diego, Ca- ada fan. And I didn’t know became a bit more selective your workouts in.” lif., next summer. He looks too much about the NLL or with their shooting, and the Currier is working to re- forward to each chance to the MLL. To be able to put results made them almost main at the top of his game. play professionally and for on both of those jerseys and unstoppable. win championships is a pretHe is hopeful that he will be his country. “From the first game to a part of Team Canada field “It’s really cool,” said Cur- ty special thing.” the fifth game our style pret- lacrosse roster again for the rier. “Growing up, I was a —Justin Feil ty well completely changed,” said Currier. “In the first game, you’re stepping over the midline and thinking, I can shoot this ball. In field lacrosse, you’re probably going to shoot it. The only issue is if you miss, it’s a turnover. We were taking those shots in Game 1, and we weren’t as the tournament went on. I think our shooting percentage was around 75 percent in that last game, which is a pretty ridiculous stat.” Playing in the Sixes in the midst of the PLL season took some adjusting. In addition to the shot selection being vastly different in the two disciplines, and the heat of Alabama, the teams had to adjust to a new mix of players playing a new version of the sport together. Currier has proven able to make adSince [1950] Conte’s has become justments well to a variety of a Princeton destination; a great levels of lacrosse, and that old-school bar that also happens to has kept him playing at the serve some of New Jersey’s best top of the sport after graduating from Princeton. pizza, thin-crusted and bubbly. The restaurant hasn’t changed “It feels really similar, it’s just with a different group much since then; even the tables of guys,” said Currier. “In are the same. It’s a simple, terms of the on-field stuff, no-frills space, but if you visit everyone is so dialed in and during peak times, be prepared to so good that it kind of forcwait well over an hour for a table. es you to up your compete We could not have reached this accomplishment level. It’s the same thing at school, but it’s brought to without our dedicated employees and customers. We could not have reached these another level when it’s the accomplishment without dedicated We could not haveyou reached this accomplishment pros because you’re not on Thank fromour the owners of Conte’s employees and customers. the field five days a week without ourThank dedicated employees customers. you from the owners of Conte’s with your team pushing you.the Princeton Serving community for over 80and years, and we will continue to serve It’s all on you and you see Serving the you Princeton forofover thecommunity owners Conte’s another 80 years and more. each other on Friday, Satur-Thank you from 80 years, and we will continue to serve day, and then you go home Serving the Princeton community for 80 over 80and years, you another years more.and we will continue to serve Sunday and then Monday to

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ach Currier has been adding lacrosse titles each year since graduating from Princeton University in 2017. Indoor. Outdoor. Major League Lacrosse. National Lacrosse League. And the Mann Cup for senior men’s box lacrosse in Canada. Last month, the former All-America midfielder for the Tiger men’s lacrosse program added another championship in the newest version of the sport. Currier scored five goals to pace Canada to a 23-9 win over the United States, which included former Princeton star Tom Schreiber ’14, in the gold medal game of the inaugural World Lacrosse Sixes at The World Games in Birmingham, Ala., on July 12. “I was pretty happy with the win,” said Currier, a native of Peterborough, Ontario. “I know it’s been perceived as a bit of a funky format for most native lacrosse fans, but I also think at the same time it’s the way that the Olympic committee thought we had to go to make the game more acceptable to the countries that it might not be more common on.” The Sixes discipline was created to interest Olympic organizers by modifying the traditional game of lacrosse. Sixes is played on a smaller field, six-on-six, with a shorter shot clock and modification designed to speed up the pace of play. World Lacrosse would like to see the Sixes version in the 2028 Olympics in Los Angeles. “It was cool to be in the first event and be a part of Team Canada,” said Currier. “Hopefully in 50 years when this is in the Olympics, people can look back and see my name on that roster and that would be a pretty cool thing.” Currier’s name on a championship roster is nothing new. His name has become a significant force in the sport that he is deeply entrenched in from a variety of angles. He is working on a new collective bargaining agreement as president of the NLL Players Association, a position he has held since 2020. When he isn’t playing, that job takes up a lot of his time and energy. He also still works in product design for Warrior Lacrosse. And he works at building his skills and developing his game with no plans of exiting the game any time soon. “I would like to play this game until I’m 40 years old,” said the 6’0, 180-pound Currier, who is competing for the Waterdogs of the Premier Lacrosse League this summer. “I hope that I’ve not peaked. There are things in my game that can be improved all over the place, whether that’s my shooting, my passing, my dodging, and even on the mental side of things, I’ve always been a guy who’s struggled to control my emotions. It’s taken me 28 years to figure out how I can redirect those emotions and save some energy, and I think it’s been very helpful for me.” Currier’s maturation has only made him a stronger

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Mon – 11:30-9 · Tues-Fri – 11:30-10:30 · Sat – 4-10:30 · Sun – 4-9 Now serving gluten-free pizza, pasta, beer & vodka! 339 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ 08540 339 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ 08540 ONLINE Mon –could 11:30-9 · Tues-Fri – 11:30-10:30 ·•Sat – 4-10:30 · Sun – 4-9 (609) 921-8041 • www.contespizzaandbar.com We not have reached this accomplishment (609) 921-8041 www.contespizzaandbar.com www.towntopics.com 339 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ and 08540customers. without our dedicated employees (609) 921-8041 • www.contespizzaandbar.com


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022 • 22

consecutive Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) grand finals including a fourth-place finish in 2021. She helped Sy racuse in all areas of team management, recruiting, practice Princeton Women’s Tennis implementation, and general Names Jackson as Head Coach boathouse maintenance. Jamea Jackson has been B e for e S y r a c u s e , s h e named the head coach of spent a season with PrincPrinceton University wometon men’s lightweight team, en’s tennis team, Princeton working with the walk-on Director of Athletics John rowing team and the fourth Mack ’00 announced last varsity crew. week. Another stop in her colleJackson is the ninth head giate coaching journey was coach in program history. at UMass, where she spent She succeeds Laura Granthree seasons, coaching all ville, who guided the Tigers varsity boats. While there, to six Ivy League titles, and she created workouts, drills, a program-high ranking of and a training plan for the No. 12 in 2020. winter and spring. “I am delighted to join the The Smith College graduPrinceton family,” said Jackate also coached at the son. “I look forward to helpCraf tsbur y Outdoor and ing the student-athletes beDee Campbell Centers in come the best they can be in addition to the Northampton the classroom as well as on Community Rowing and Old the tennis court. I relish the Dominion Clubs. opportunity to carry on the Some of Carlisle’s rowing winning legacy of Princeton accolades while at Smith inWomen’s Tennis and to furcluded earning second team ther the tradition of excellence All-American honors twice, – not only in the Ivy League ECAC All-Star awards, the but at the national level – esschool’s Golden Oar and tablished by the amazing head Coaches’ Awards, along with coaches and players who have a New England Women’s and come before me.” Men’s Athletic Conference A for mer profes sional (NEWMAC) First-Team Allplayer, Jackson comes to Conference selection. Her Princeton w ith coaching academic honors include experience at both the col- Men’s Heavyweight Rowing four-time school Scholar Adds Carlisle-Reske to Staff legiate and national levels. Emma Carlisle-Reske has Athlete, Dean Lists and Most recently, she coached with the United States Ten- been added to the Prince- NEWMAC Scholar Athlete n i s A s s o c iat ion ( U S TA ) ton University men’s heavy- distinctions. She also collectwhere she has served as a weight team as an assistant ed College Rowing Coaches’ National Coach since 2013. coach, the program an- Association Scholar Athlete honors twice. Jackson’s role with the nounced recently. Carlisle graduated from Carlisle-Reske has spent USTA was to recruit the top Smith with a bachelor’s dethe last two seasons with American talent to Orlando, Fla., for training weeks, Syracuse men’s rowing as gree in elementary educacamps, and trips and she an assistant. During her tion and liberal studies and earned her master’s in ye a r s,ART t h eCLASSES O r a n g e later assisted in all aspects of t wo BEST APPLIANCE STORE • BEST • BEST ART GALdeveloping the nation’s best had its varsity eight reach exercise science and coaching.

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junior and pro tennis players, including current professionals Hailey Baptiste and Katie Volynets, along with 2022 Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) National Rookie of the Year Connie Ma. While with the USTA, she captained the United States U16 team to the Jr. Billie Jean King Cup Team Championship in 2019. From 2009 to 2013, Jackson served as an assistant coach of the women’s tennis team at Oklahoma State University. She helped take the Cowgirls from unranked to No. 37 in the ITA rankings, recruited the No. 4 recruiting class in the country in 2011, managed team travel, ran team practices, and performed budgetary duties. Before entering the coaching ranks, Jackson played full time on the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) Tour from March 2003 until August 2009 and achieved a career-high ranking of No. 43 in 2006. Along with playing in all four Grand Slams, she represented the United States in Fed Cup Competition in 2006, and notched wins over Maria Sharapova, Marion Bartoli, Amy Frazier, Maria Kirilenko, and Jelena Jankovic, all former top-20 players.

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Princeton Rowers Excel At U19/U23 Worlds

Princeton University rowers came away with a big medal haul last weekend at the 2022 World Rowing Under19/Under 23 Championships in Varese, Italy. As for the U23 competition, incoming Tiger men’s heavyweight freshman Theo Long helped the Great Britain’s men’s eight win gold in 5:51.71 on the 2,000-meter course, 2.6 seconds in front of runner-up United States. Sophomore men’s heav yweight Pat Long rowed for the Australia men’s eight t hat e ar ne d t he bron ze medal. A trio of men’s heav yweight rowers — senior Erik Spinka, sophomore Zach Vachal, and senior Nathan Phelps — helped the U23 U.S. coxed four earn a

silver medal behind Great Britain. The U.S. boat came in at 6:06.13 with the Great Britain crew posting a winning time of 6:02.90. As for the Princeton women’s crew, senior open rower Camille Vandermeer helped the United States U23 women’s eight win the gold medal in 6:23.03, more than three seconds better than runnerup Great Br itain, which included Princeton teammates, sophomores Katharine Kalap and Zoe Scheske. T iger women’s s opho more open rower Katherine George and teammate Vwaire Obukohwo of Great Britain’s U23 double sculls secured the bronze (7:05.18) behind Romania (7:02.61) and Canada (7:04.70). W o m e n’s l i g h t w e i g h t sophomore rower Cecilia Sommerfeld earned a bronze

medal with Germany U23 women’s pair, crossing the finish line at 7:22.10 behind Italy and Peru. It marked her second straight medal at the championships after collecting a silver last year. In the U19 competition, incom ing women’s open freshman Annalisa Janss Lafond helped Great Britain’s U19 women’s eight to a silver medal (6:14.57), trailing only the United States (6:12.16), giving the Princeton women’s open rowing squad five medals overall. I n com i ng m e n’s l ig htweight freshman Adam Casler competed for the United States U19 men’s eight that earned the bronze, giving the Princeton men’s lightweight team its first individual medal this year at the World Rowing Championships.

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Sophia Lis reached new heights last fall in her senior season for the Princeton High girls’ soccer team, scoring a program-record 38 goals as the Tigers went 21-3 and advanced to the state Group 3 final for the first time. In reflecting on her dream season, Lis credited her teammates with helping to inspire her heroics. “It is all about the positive team environment around you, just knowing that everyone on the team was doing the best they can, preventing goals,” said Lis, whose goal output marked the second highest single-season total in CVC history behind the 65 scored by Steinert’s Lisa Gmitter in 1982. “Watching our defenders work so hard, it motivated me to try and take leadership, knowing that all we needed to win the game could be one goal. I tried to have that in mind, that all it takes is one goal and have the confidence that it can be the game changer, I knew I had a good support system behind me.” The week, Lis will be taking her game to higher level as she starts preseason practice for the Lehigh University women’s soccer team. “I hope I can fit in and play a good amount and just have fun with the team,” said Lis, who will be hitting the field for the Mountain Hawks on August 6. “A lot of my club team friends are committed to go to other Patriot League teams and I am excited to play against them and the whole environment. I am getting

more excited as I get close to the season. I was nervous when I first received the 60page fitness packet from the coaches. I was like, these girls are going to be so much stronger than me and so much faster. I have been practicing what I am supposed to know.” Over the summer, Lis joined the Real Central New Jersey team in the Women’s Premier Soccer League to help her get up to speed for the challenges of college soccer. “I would say it is a quicker pace, the girls are much more physical,” said Lis of the league which includes players from the collegiate, post-collegiate, international, and prep ranks. “They are all older and have that maturity with the game. It was really cool to experience that and get to know different players and their different styles of play. I think the oldest player on my team was 23 or 24. It is pretty much college students coming home for the summer.” After RCNJ ended the regular season at 6-1-1, Lis helped the club reach the league’s Eastern Conference semifinals where it lost on penalty kicks to the VT Fusion after the foes tied 2-2 through regulation and overtime. “We still did get two goals in, we worked really hard,” said Lis, who converted one of the penalty kicks in the defeat. “I am really proud of the effort that we put in.” Following in the footsteps of her older sister, Devon, a former PHS and Georgetown standout who has previously played for RCNJ, Lis was

proud of the progress she made competing in the WPSL. “I think it helped my confidence a lot; in the beginning I was definitely nervous,” said Lis, who had played for her Player Development Academy (PDA) club team over the fall and spring before joining RCNJ. “It is meeting new players and learning their style of play and their mentality. Everyone was so supportive of me coming in as a newcomer. It is a whole different thing. They are stronger, they are college athletes who do weightlifting and stuff that I haven’t necessarily participated in. It definitely did make me excited to play at this quicker tempo with different coaches. It is definitely going to help me in my college career, it is going to give me more confidence on the field, just knowing that I can battle against more mature, older players. It is going to help in the skills aspect of it, playing in a new team environment always helps.” As Lis heads into the college environment at Lehigh this week, she is primed to make a quick start. “There are two mandatory fitness tests, there are also some technical tests, juggling shooting,” said Lis. “It is a good variety of things.” Over the last few months, Lis has been bonding with her future teammates through Zoom sessions. “We have talking about what classes to take, we have been talking about fitness stuff we have been doing,” said Lis. “Everyone had been

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022

After Starring for PHS, Real Central New Jersey, Lis Primed to Make Debut for Lehigh Women’s Soccer

SO READY: Sophia Lis, right, controls the ball in action last fall during her senior season for the Princeton High girls’ soccer team. This week, Lis will be starting preseason practice for the Lehigh University women’s soccer team as she gets ready to make her college debut. Over the summer, Lis played for Real Central New Jersey of the Women’s Premier Soccer League and helped the club advance to the league’s Eastern Conference semifinals. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) so helpful. The upperclassmen have been reaching out and just making sure that we know everything that we should be doing.” In addition, Lis has been getting advice from her sister on what she needs to do to make an impact for the Mountain Hawks. “Devon said the No 1 thing I could do right now is to come

in as fit as possible,” said Lis. “So even if you don’t get the playing time, you can work on your foot skills. As long as you can physically work on yourself and do everything in your power to pass the testing, the coaches know that you are taking it seriously.” While Lis isn’t sure how much playing time she is going to get as a freshman, she

is determined to contribute in any way possible. “My goal is to improve as a player and as a teammate,” said Lis. “I want to offer the team all that I can positively, even if it is just on the bench. I want to make a positive impact on the team around me and just make good friends.” —Bill Alden

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Gaining Confidence in First Season for Williams Men’s Lax, Former PDS Standout Caputo Emerged as Scoring Threat For Cal Caputo, making his debut for the Williams College men’s lacrosse team in early March proved to be worth the wait. After his senior season for the Princeton Day School boys’ lacrosse team in 2020 was canceled due the pandemic and he was at home for his freshman spring semester at Williams studying remotely, Caputo didn’t wait to make an impact as he hit the field against Trinity College on March 5 for his first taste of college game action. The 5’8, 150-pound sophomore attacker tallied two goals in the first half and ended up with a hat trick as Williams prevailed 9-5. “It was awesome, I was really nervous,” said Caputo. “It had been two years since I had played a game, it really meant something for me. I was shaking. I think I had to get hit once and settle in and see one go in. I got a few that game which was good. At the end of the day, you can never really complain about a hat trick, but it is one of those games where I could have had another two or three goals.” Caputo’s performance in the opener proved to be a harbinger of things to come this spring as he ended up tally ing 40 points on a team-high 36 goals and four assists. “I think the speed and physicalit y stand out to anyone, but I also think the level of how players are scouted and how teams prepare,” said Caputo, reflecting on the transition to college lacrosse. “In high school, I feel like I could score a million goals with Coby (former PDS teammate and current Christopher Newport star Coby Auslander) dodging and someone sliding off and there being no two slides. But college teams figure out pretty quickly what you are good at on offense. They spend all week preparing on how to shut you down and how to take away your strengths. After that first game, it was pretty obvious that I was a catch and shoot guy in the crease and you have to have a two slide ready to go. There aren’t any easy goals at the college level.” Displaying his strength, Caputo scored four goals in a 19-10 win over Colby College on March 21 and then tallied four goals again five days later in a 12-7 victory over Connecticut College. “I came in with the impression that Williams was a powerhouse in the conference,” said Caputo. “But I learned pretty quickly that everyone playing New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) ball is good. There is no easy conference game. Any time

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you put up numbers against a team in conference, it is huge for the confidence and team morale in general. Those were great to have, and they were both at home, so it always means a little more when parents and friends are there.” As the season went on, Caputo kept learning and developing. “I was getting more confident with the ball, getting strong is something I have put a lot of time into,” said Caputo. “Being confident as an assist-maker, not just an off-ball game, is important for me. It is also not being afraid to test my range. I started shooting from a little deeper. I didn’t have a great shooting percentage this year but at the end of the day, I needed to let the ball fly a little more. I am more confident doing everything and more confident in my role on the team. My game definitely grew towards the end of the year; I was less predictable.” Displaying that growth, Caputo tallied 10 goals and two assists in the final three games of the season, including a five-goal outburst in a 17-13 win over Wesleyan on April 24. “It is a blend of confidence from solid individual stats where I thought I started playing my best ball at the end of the season,” said Caputo, reflecting on his late surge. “I didn’t feel like the new guy on the block anymore; I was a freshman on the team lacrosse-wise at the beginning. By the end of the year, it goes to show the confidence I gained. It is good that I got hot, I would have liked the games to mean a little more. It is frustrating that it didn’t go the way we wanted as a team.” Wit h Wi l l ia m s e n d i n g the 2022 campaign at 7-9 overall and 5-5 NESCAC, Caputo and his teammates rued what might have been. “We all know we could have done better,” said Caputo. “We have a ton of talent. It was a bunch of little things that added up this year. We would have liked to keep our season going. Losing a few games at the end adds fuel to the fire for the offseason. It isn’t the worst thing in the world.” Over the summer, Caputo has been undergoing some rigorous offseason work, concentrating on getting stronger and bigger along with honing his stick skills. “I am looking to put on some weight and get a little stronger that will translate big time to shooting and dodging,” said Caputo, who has been doing workouts with former Lawrenceville star Drew Friedman and PDS alum Gibson Linnehan, along with recent Princeton High grad and incoming Wil-

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liams freshman Will Doran. “I have put on 10 pounds, which I definitely happy with. It is a lot of protein shakes and a lot of lifting. Drew is at Yale and Gibson is going to Brown this upcoming year and I am doing a lot of dodging work with them. I am also shooting with Will.” Looking ahead, Caputo believes the offseason fire will result in a big 2023 campaign for Williams. “We couldn’t be more motivated, you ask around the locker room and we didn’t lose confidence,” said Caputo.

“We know have what it takes. When we put it together, we beat a really good Wesleyan team by four goals on senior day. We beat RPI which was the only team to beat RIT (the two-time NCAA Division III national champions). They were a tournament team as well. We had some quality wins, we just felt like we didn’t consistently put together four good quarters. We are still as confident as we were coming into last year, but we just know that nothing is handed to us. We were good in the past but that doesn’t mean anything now. We just have to be hungry to earn it this year.” —Bill Alden

HIGH CAL: Cal Caputo, right, heads to goal this spring for the Williams College men’s lacrosse team. Former Princeton Day School star attacker Caputo tallied 40 points on 36 goals and four assists in his debut campaign for the Ephs. (Photo provided courtesy of Williams College Athletics)

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As Athletic Engineering Institute advanced to the best-of-three championship series in the Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League this year, Jalen Parham has sparked the squad. Former Hillsborough High and Montclair State standout Parham led the league in scoring at 20.6 points per game and was named as the regular season MVP. But when third-seeded AEI hit the Community Park courts last Monday night to face ninth-seeded Majeski Foundation in game one of the title series, Parham was missing, away on vacation. While AEI’s Justin Kovacevich acknowledged that not having Parham on court was a challenge, he and his teammates were unfazed. “He has definitely been carrying the scoring load for us throughout the season, but we knew we could step up and move the ball around,” said Kovacevich of Parham. “Everybody played their part tonight.” Bruising 6’5 forward Kovacevich played a big part

for AEI, scoring 13 points in the first half as it trailed Majeski, which is comprised of players from The College of New Jersey men’s hoops squad, 27-24. “I was trying to be a little more aggressive inside,” said former Montgomer y High star Kovacevich in assessing his first half effort. “I knew I had a little strength advantage on the guys and that someone was going to have to pick up the scoring.” In the second half, AEI picked it up, rallying from a 31-25 deficit to go on a 22-6 run and pull away to a 50-41 win. “I think we just settled in and played a little smarter,” said Kovacevich, reflecting on the victory which improved AEI to 9-2. “We locked up on defense and we were getting rebounds.” Featuring some battletested players f rom t he Montgomery-Hillsborough area, AEI utilized its maturity to outlast the Majeski squad. “I think maybe that comes from a little experience,”

said Kovacevich, who ended up with a game-high 20 points and added five rebounds and one blocked shot in the v ictor y w ith Nigel Herbert chipping in 12 points and two rebounds and Kevin Johnson contributing eight points, seven rebounds, and two assists. “Also, we are not playing basketball every day so every time we come out here, we are pretty hungry to play. A lot of us played with each other or against each other in high school and then just reconnected.” With game t wo of the championship series scheduled for August 3 at the Community Park courts and game three, if necessary, slated for August 5, Kovacevich is confident that AEI can close the deal. “They are going to come out aggressive and play physical on Wednesday,” said Kovacevich. “I think maybe we surprised them a little bit with that tonight. If we play our same game, I think it is going to go the same way.” —Bill Alden

Games are free and open to the public. The rain site for both programs is the Princeton Unified Middle School. For more information on Joint Effort Safe Streets Joint Effort Safe Streets Program clinic or games, call (720) 629-0964 or email johnbaiHolding Hoops Clinic, Games ley062@gmail.com. The Joint Effort Princeton Helene Cody 5k Race Safe Streets Summer ProSet for September 10 gram, in conjunction with The 14th annual Helene the Princeton Recreation Department, Princeton Po- Cody 5-kilometer race and lice Department, Princeton 1-mile fun run is taking Public Schools, Bailey Bas- place on September 10 with ketball Academy, and PBA the start and finish line at #130, is sponsoring a free Heritage Park in Cranbury. youth basketball clinic on The fun run begins at 8:15 August 13 from 10 a.m. to a.m. and the 5K starts at 12 p.m. at the Community 9:00 a.m. The 5K is chipPark basketball courts. timed and USATF-certified This program is a player with water stations throughdevelopment skills clinic out the course. for boys and girls ages 8 Trophies will be awarded and up. All clinic attendees to the top 3 male and female should bring their own ball. finishers overall and in each The clinic will be directed age group for the 5k. Every by Kamau Bailey, the direc- fun run finisher will receive tor of the Bailey Basketball a medal and trophies will be Academy, a Philadelphia awarded to the top 3 boys 76ers camp clinician and and girls. The Cranbury Day former head coach of the celebration will begin imPrinceton Day School girls’ mediately after the race on basketball team. It will be Main Street. staffed by community volAdditional race informaunteers and members of the tion and on-line registration Princeton Police Depart- is available at http://www. ment. helenecody.com/5k-andIn addition, on August 14, 1-mile-runwalk.html. the Joint Effort Safe Streets This event is the main funwill sponsor the Pete Young draiser for the Helene Cody Sr. Memorial Games for Foundation, whose mission Princeton and area youth. is to inspire youth to volunThese annual games are held teer, to better their commueach year in the memory of nities and themselves. Prior Pete Young Sr., a Princeton to her death in 2008, Helene businessman, community Cody, a Princeton High stuadvocate, sports enthusiast, dent, planned to revive the and supporter of youth and Cranbury Day 5K, a comcommunity programs who munity event that had been was beloved in the Wither- discontinued in 2006, as a spoon-Jackson Community. way to combine her love of The nine games start at 10 distance running and coma.m. and end at 7:30 p.m. munity service for her Girl and will include contests Scout gold award project. featuring youth players, high When she passed away, school boys and girls, and a classmate organized the unlimited men. first Helene Cody Cranbury The Joint Effort Clinic and 5K in memory of Helene for

Local Sports

his Eagle Scout project. Every year since, the Helene Cody Foundation has used the event to bring the community together and use the proceeds to sponsor youth service projects and provide scholarships. All proceeds go directly to the Helene Cody Foundation, a 501(c) (3) charity.

Princeton Athletic Club Holding Trail Run September 17

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022

Sparked By Kovacevich’s Aggressive Inside Play, AEI Defeats Majeski in Championship Series Opener

The Princeton Athletic Club (PAC) is holding a trail run and walk at the Mountain L akes Preser ve, 57 Mountain Ave, Princeton, on September 17. The event, which is benefiting the Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad, will start at 9:00 a.m. and consists of a 5-kilometer-plus trail run and walk. The course is comprised of about 10 percent mile paved park trail, 30 percent unimproved service right-ofways and 60 percent single track including moderately technical rocks, roots, logs, and whatever else nature has wrought in the woods. Due to the technical nature of the trail, parents should consider whether this event is appropriate for young children. The race is limited to 150 participants. Online registration and full details regarding the event are available at www. princetonac.org. The entry fee is $35 until August 16, including a T-shirt. The fee from August 27 - September 14 is $40 with a T-shirt on an as-available basis. Sign up at the event will be $50 and is credit card only, subject to availability. The PAC is a nonprofit, all-volunteer running club for the community that promotes running for the fun and health of it and stages several running events each year.

BIG BLUE: Community Park Bluefish swimmer Nathan Ricciardi displays his form in a recent meet. Last week, Ricciardi helped the Bluefish take first in Division 1 at the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet. The Bluefish piled up 4,441 points as Hopewell took second with 1,999. Ricciardi was named as the 10-and- Under Boys MVP at the meet, finishing first in both the 25-yard butterfly and backstroke and helping the 100 medley relay take first and the 100 free relay place second. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Furniture JUSTIN TIME: Justin Kovacevich of Athlete Engineering Institute goes up for a shot last week in playoff action in the Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. Last Monday, Kovacevich tallied a game-high 20 points to help third-seeded AEI defeat ninth-seeded Majeski Foundation 50-41 in the first game of the league’s best-of-three championship series. Game two is scheduled for August 3 at the Community Park courts with game three, if necessary, slated for August 5. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Obituaries

Gabrielle Aline Pittet-Borel June 2, 1922 – July 8, 2022

Gaby Borel, 100 years old, left us peacefully early on the morning of July 8, 2022 at her home of 65 years in Princeton. Born in Bière, Switzerland, a farm village with a military base, in the French part of Switzerland, on June 2, 1922, her father, Auguste Pittet, was a Major in the Swiss army and an avid alpinist. Gaby’s mother, Odette Gillieron-Pittet, skilled in the artisanal arts, ran an efficient household. Her brother, Edouard, was born the following year. Gaby’s father, after postings in various parts of Switzerland, settled with his family in Payerne, where Gaby spent the rest of her growing up years. She often referred with heady enthusiasm to her youth in Payerne as “ma belle jeunesse!” Those years covered pre and early WWII years which included the standard curfews, rationing, and schooling without heat (which she ascertained resulted in children never being sick rather than the opposite). There, she formed what were to be lifelong friendships, attended dances, town balls, and made mischief. Gaby’s spirit and unquenchable appetite for life was countered by a father who, though caring, was a strict disciplinarian. He signed her on for a short stint in the Swiss army’s complementary female division because she had waved at some soldiers on a departing train, and sent her to perfect her German at the Iseltwald girls boarding school run by no-nonsense nuns on Lake Brienz. As was her nature, she

managed to have fun there regardless and to master German while making more lifelong friends. Gaby was then able to follow her true calling, painting and drawing, at the Lausanne School of Beaux Arts. Upon completion, she was hired by the meteorological institute in Zurich to draw weather maps, and it was in Zurich that she met and fell in love with her future husband, Armand Borel, who was doing his graduate work at the Zurich Polytechnic Institute (ETH). In 1947, while Armand was securing his doctorate in Paris, Gaby went to London to learn English where she helped make ends meet by working and initially living in the Moral-Armament center. In her spare time, she drew sketches of a sadly bombed out cityscape and continued to meet more fascinating people. She and Armand then both reconnected in Geneva, where he taught at the University of Geneva, and in 1952, following an offer from the Institute for Advanced Study, Armand proposed, they married, and then sailed to America, where their daughter Dominique was born two years later. After Princeton, an exhilarating trip to Mexico, and a turn in Chicago, they returned to Switzerland, where Armand was then teaching at ETH in Zurich, and a second daughter Anne was born. Finally, with a tenure offer from the Institute for Advanced Study, in 1957 Gaby and Armand made their permanent residence Princeton, NJ. Gaby and Armand were

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passionate travelers and nature lovers. Luckily Armand’s work brought them opportunities to not only travel but to spend extended periods of time abroad. Their trips were well researched and they always found the hidden treasures in the less accessible venues of the places they visited. Gaby was gifted with a keen aesthetic eye: museums, art, fossils, geology, and archeology were among her many interests and she always was on the lookout for an as yet undiscovered arrowhead, fossil, or archeological relic whether it was on site or hiding in the local flea markets and auctions. And she found them. Aside from annual visits to Switzerland, there were three-month stays in Hong Kong three years running and numerous trips to India, the first one having been in 1960, and well as many other countries. In the early years, there were also summer respites in Canada or Maine where Gaby, sometimes cooking over a wood stove, would fry up chanterelles found in the woods or try to serve less identifiable mushrooms to her amused but understandably reluctant husband. To her small daughters, begging for yet another tale to be read and with no book on hand, she would sometimes grab a piece of toast, fold it in two and “read” them a story. Gaby Borel was the indefatigable social conduit of her marriage. She loved meeting new people and the more of an international and intercultural mix the better. The range of her friends was wide and without barriers. She could connect with someone who was 20 just as well as someone who was in their 90s. Not someone who functioned in a club or not for profit group network mode, Gaby helped many others and did good deeds for innumerable people. Whether it was bumping into a new Princeton arrival on Palmer Square, helping them locate a crib and leaving her homemade pie on their doorstep that same evening, or whether it was being there, when no one else was, for a family dealing with isolation and mental illness, she responded with compassion and alacrity to those in need. Her pies and immense generosity were renowned and enjoyed by many over the years. After her husband died in 2003, Gaby continued to travel, mostly to Switzerland, where she would stay for lengthy periods of time, initially on her own, and then with her daughters. Together they also traveled to Panama, Cuba, Costa Rica, and more. Until nearly her last breath, Gaby was still wanting to plan more trips. She talked of Brazil, Guatemala, Mexico, and wanting to go back to India. Pre-deceased by her husband Armand and her brother Edouard, she is survived by her daughters Dominique and Anne as well as her cousins, niece, nephews, grand and great-grandnieces and nephews, her godchild Alexis, caregiver Floridalma, and friends all over the world. Gaby Borel and her zestful generous spirit will be dearly missed by all who knew and loved her. A celebration in honor of Gaby will be announced at a future time. Donations may be made in her name to TASK in Trenton and The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust: Haven for Elephants.

Kathryn M. Yoder Kathryn Louise Mulhollen Yoder passed away at her home in the early morning hours of July 25. It was as she wanted it. Family and friends visited her bedside to serenade her, read to her, and wish her well on her journey. She was happy! Kathryn was all about giving to others and making sure she left a bit of herself on Earth — in paintings, needlepoint, poems, collages, and in many words of wisdom. She was always the teacher and philosopher! Trained as a home economics teacher, Kay went on to become a substitute teacher at Princeton High S chool — on too many subjects to mention. She became a full-time English teacher there later in life. She passed on that love for education to her older daughter who became an English teacher. W hen Kay retired, she devoted herself to painting, pottery, collages, and poetry. Even later in her life, she was a frequent guest at her younger daughter’s writing retreats where she thoroughly enjoyed offering opinions and tips to aspiring authors. She was an author herself, writing for children’s magazines and authoring a poetry book, Portraying My Life in Paint and Poetry. Kay was born unexpectedly in Lebanon, Pennsylvania, in her grandmother’s bed when her mother was home for her mother’s funeral. She was raised in Portage, Pennsylvania, and moved at a young age to Johnstown. She had a Little Women type of childhood with four sisters, Belle, Mae, Gladys, and Marjorie, and a loving mother and father, Lillie and Victor. She played the French horn in orchestra and band, survived the 1936 Johnstown Flood, starred as Elizabeth Bennet in her school play, and danced with Gene Kelly (she loved to tell people that). It was during the summer of 1942, while attending summer school at Penn State, that she met Wayne Yoder when she asked him to join her bridge party (she loved playing bridge!). A tennis date followed, which is ironic, since they never really played again. They were married two years later and remained married for 64 years — living in Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Princeton, Savannah, and then back to Pennsylvania and Princeton. Their lives included three children —Charlotte, Thom, and Carolyn. They loved to travel and attend plays, musicals, and the symphony. And they continued to play lots of bridge. Grams to her grandchildren and great-grandchildren, she was known to play badminton, whiffle ball, and golf and also enjoyed traveling to her son’s home for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners.

At the age of 88, Kay moved to Stonebridge where she lived independently and continued to paint. She took up collage, pottery, and poetry, and found peace sitting on her porch surrounded by her flowering begonias and listening to the birds. She is survived by her children and their spouses, Louis Longo and Jean Schluter Yoder; grandchildren Tim Sherwood and his wife, Arleen; Scott Sherwood and his wife, Renee; and Margaret and Elizabeth Yoder; and great- grandchildren Sam and Ben Sherwood and Abigail and Owen Sherwood. Donations can be made to the Kay Yoder Scholarship (she had such an impact that they created a scholarship in her honor!) at highlightsfoundation.org/kay-yoderscholarship. A memorial service will be held at the Foundation’s Barn in Boyds Mills, PA, in late August.

Mary V. Laity Mary Vicchi Laity passed away peacefully on July 24 at her home in Princeton Windrows with family members by her side. She was 92. Mary was born on July 9, 1930, in a charity hospital on Welfare (now Roosevelt) Island in New York City. Her parents were immigrants from Italy with very little formal education, but Mary benefited from the excellent educational opportunities offered by the New York public schools, first at P.S. 59 in Manhattan, where she gave the Farewell Address (valedictorian’s speech) at her eighth-grade graduation, then at Hunter High School, where she obtained a firstrate liberal arts education. She matriculated at Hunter College, then one of the top women’s colleges in the state, before moving with her family to Miami. She graduated magna cum laude from the University of Miami. W hile at Miami, Mar y worked over the summers at the Monmouth Hotel in Spring Lake, New Jersey, where she met her future husband of 42 years, Richard Laity, a graduate of Haverford College who was going on to graduate school; Mary and Richard were married in 1951. They spent the first few years of their marriage in Ames, Iowa, where Richard earned a Ph.D. in chemistry from Iowa State University and Mary taught fourth grade. In 1955 Mary and Richard moved to Princeton, New Jersey, where

Richard was a member of the Chemistry Department at Princeton University, later becoming professor of chemistry at Rutgers, and Mary reared their five children. When the children were older, Mary returned to school, earning an M.A. and M.Phil. in English from Rutgers University. A gifted educator, she taught literature at the University College adult school of Rutgers while a graduate student, tutored children through the volunteer organization College Bound, and taught a wide variety of literature classes, from Charles Dickens to Henry James to Virginia Woolf and others, in the Evergreen Forum, where she had a devoted following of students eager to take whatever course she was teaching. A lifelong avid reader with an interest in the arts, Mary wrote reviews for the local papers on art, music, and history. She belonged to two reading groups and for 22 years was a member of the Travellers Club — an organization of women who would research and write a paper each year on an eclectic variety of topics; Mary’s numerous papers included studies on Magna Carta and English law, fiction of the Great Depression, and the lost world of Byzantium. She later expanded many of these for the Forum at Windrows, an independent living community to which she moved in 2016. Mary was active in the Princeton community in other ways, as a member of the League of Women Voters and the Women’s College Club of Princeton (of which she was for many years the historian and publicity chair). Mary’s professional life included jobs as a proofreader at Peterson’s Guides, fundraiser for Preservation New Jersey, and supervisor for many years of the proofing department at Caliper Corporation. Mary loved New York City, not only for its cultural offerings, but because she believed that during the Depression and the 1940s, it was good to its poor people, offering them excellent educational and other opportunities. A wonderful and beloved mother, throughout her long life Mary was always ready to listen to and support her five children, providing for each whatever help or encouragement he or she most needed. And she passed on to them her love of literature and art, her sense of fairness and support for the underprivileged, her patriotism and commitment to citizens’ rights and responsibilities (she never missed a vote), and her unwavering faith in her family. As both mother and grandmother, she treated each child as a unique, special individual. She was a delightful traveling companion, a wonderful cook, a staunch companion in joy and sorrow, and a friend. Mary is survived by her children and their spouses, James Laity and Mary Anne Festa, Susan Laity, Katherine and Earl Walker, William Laity, and John Laity and Linda Feng, and her grandchildren Richard Laity-Festa, Rachel Laity, Gretchen Laity, Enzo Feng-Laity, and Metta FengLaity. A memorial service will be held in the fall at Trinity Episcopal Church. Extend condolences and share m emor ie s at T he KimbleFuneralHome.com.


August 10, 2022 at 11 a.m. at Blawenburg Reformed Church, 424 Route 518, Skillman, NJ 08558 – (609) 466-1832. For those unable to attend the service, it will be streamed live on both the Blawenburg Reformed Church’s Facebook page or through Zoom at the following link: https:/zoom. us/j/97023890396 Passcode : church ; or phone : 1-646-558-8656; Meeting ID: 970 2389 0396. In Lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the American Cancer Society, designated to multiple myeloma, or Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey in remembrance of Frank.

joined the 82nd Airborne Division, where he trained in strategic reserve during the Korean War as a 1st Lieutenant Paratrooper, stationed in the South of France. Af ter the Korean War, Woody attended Harvard Business School, graduating with honors in the class of 1955. While at Harvard, Wo o d y m e t J a c q u e l i n e “Jacquie” Jean Overturf, and they married in February 1956. Together, Woody and Jacquie raised Melissa Jameson “Jamie” Phares and Craig Anthony Royer Phares in Princeton, N.J. The family spent years vacationing in Barbados, Bermuda, Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA, and Snowmass/Aspen, CO. Woody and Jacquie fostered a passion for travel throughout their 66-year marriage, with countless memories and anecdotes from travel exp er ience s arou nd t he globe. Wo o dy worke d i n t h e chemical engineering business for his entire career. Car y Company and Dart Industries, Inc. In 1979 he joined West/Penetone, Inc. (formerly West Chemical Products, Inc) as CEO and President, a position he held until retiring in 2016. Woody proudly took West from a publicly traded company to a privately owned “family company.” Wo o dy s er ve d on t h e boards of the University Medical Center of Princeton, Crawford House, and The Pingry School. Woody also made consistent charitable contributions to the Mc C ar te r T h e at re C e n ter, t he Pr inceton Sy m phony Orchestra, the Arts Council of Princeton, RPI,

Harvard Business School, the Harvard Radcliffe Institute, Princeton Day School, and S ave t he Ch ildren, among others. Woody was a member of the Harvard Club of New York City, the Coral Beach & Tennis Club of Bermuda; the Pretty Brook Tennis Club, the Nassau Club, and The Old Guard of Princeton. He was additionally a previous member of The River Club of New York, The Bedens Brook Club of Princeton, and the Racquet Club of Chicago. Woody was an avid skier, tennis, and squash player. He was an arts patron and regular theatergoer. Woody was fun, witty, and a sharp dresser. He loved to play Hearts on his many family trips and vacations. Woody will be remembered for his immense kindness, warmth, and charisma. Every January, he and Jacquie opened their doors on Rosedale Road to celebrate their multigenerational “12th Night” holiday party with the Princeton community. Woody was the life of the party; always smiling, laughing, and making sure all were well fed and hydrated. Woody is survived by his wife Jacquie; their children, Jamie and Craig (wife Katharine Herring Phares); and his five beloved grandchildren, Hadley, Austin, Didier, Charles, and Keene Phares. A family burial was held Tuesday, July 26 in the Princeton Cemetery. A memorial service and Celebration of Life will be held in the fall of 2022. Extend condolences and share m emor ie s at T he KimbleFuneralHome.com.

Elwood “Woody” Willis Phares II

Alexander Edwards Morris February 8, 1941 – July 25, 2022

Alexander E. Morris, a retired business executive, father, and grandfather, passed away on Monday, July 25, 2022. Alex (“Sandy” to family and childhood friends) was predeceased by Pegie Morris, his loving wife and companion of 57 years, in January. Alex is survived by his son Robert V. Morris, Robert’s wife Kendall L. Morris, their three grandchildren – Parker, Hayden, and Ellie (Richmond, VA), his son Garret E. Morris and his wife Joyce B. Morris (Towson, Maryland). Alex is also survived by his brother Dudley E. Morris ( Santa Barbara, CA). Alex was born and raised in Princeton, New Jersey. He attended The Lawrenceville School and later Princeton High School (Class of 1959). He went on to major in Business and graduated from Rider University (Lawrence, NJ). He enjoyed a successful career, working in multiple industries and roles, including Pharmaceuticals, Office Supplies, and Business Process Consulting.

Elwood “Woody” Willis Phares II passed away on Tuesday evening, July 19, 2022, at his home in Princeton, NJ, at the age of 92. With a radiant smile, bellowing laugh, and magnanimous charm, Woody was a generous husband, father, grandfather, brother, uncle, and friend. Woody was born on June 1, 1930, to Eugene and Ruth (Royer) Phares of Elizabeth, NJ. He attended The Pingry School, where he played on

IN PRINT. ONLINE. AT HOME.

Frank Tufano Sr. (August 1, 1934-July 27, 2022), a retired metallurgist, father, grandfather, uncle, friend, and mentor, passed away on Wednesday, July 27, 2022 at home surrounded by his loving family. Frank was predeceased by his son, Frank Tufano Jr., his father, Vincenzo Tufano, his mother, Anna Tufano (Cuomo), and siblings Cecelia Tufano, Joseph Tufano (Irene), Vincent Tufano (Julia), and John Tufano (Theresa). He is survived by his loving wife and companion of 66 years, Emma Tufano (Muentener), his daughter, Allison Clancy and husband Kevin, his granddaughter, Kaitlyn Clancy and fiancé Jarreau, his brother Richard Tufano and wife Kathleen, as well as many nieces and nephews. Frank was born and raised in Princeton, NJ, and anything Princeton was in his heart, especially the Princeton Tigers. He often told stories of hopping over the fences at Palmer Stadium and Dillon and Jadwin Gyms to watch the games, as well as playing in the war tunnels under Princeton. Frank proudly served his county in the U.S. Army and was a Marksman, stationed on the missile base in Leonardo, NJ. Frank was a Metallurgical Engineer and spent his 30-year career at Ingersoll Rand in Skillman, NJ, where he was the recipient of five (5) patents; one of which he developed was the process that reduced the corrosion on the silencer of the Navy submarine. He was a bright and creative man with many interests, particularly golf. At the age of 14, he caddied at Springdale Golf Course for well-known individuals, such as Jimmy Stewart, Mae West, William Bendix, and Don Knotts, all of whom participated in the University’s Triangle Club. Frank also loved spending time at their Pocono home on Lake Wallenpaupack, which he and Emma built themselves. He enjoyed waterskiing, boating on the lake, and snow skiing. Frank retired from Ingersoll Rand in 1994 and pursed his love of golf, and spent summers at their lake house in Pennsylvania. A celebration of life will be held on Wed nes day,

both the football and swimming teams, along with being a member of the 1947 Pingry Hall of Fame golf team. Summers grow ing up were spent at the beach in Bay Head and Sea Girt, NJ, along with many memorable years with his younger brother, Richard Royer Phares, as a camper and counselor at Camp Waganaki in East Waterford, ME. After graduating from Pingry in 1947, Woody majored in Management Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) of Troy, NY, graduating with honors in 1951. At RPI, Woody was selected to both the Phalanx Honor and White Key societies, as well as the Theta Xi and Tau Beta Pi fraternities. Woody served as the Vice President of his Junior Class and as Chairman of the Ring Committee during his Senior Year. A fierce athlete, Woody continued his athletic passion at R PI, play ing on both the football and lacrosse teams. Woody was co-captain of the 1951 lacrosse team under coach Ned Harkness, who recalled Woody as “one of the best centers I ever had the pleasure of coaching.” During the 1951 North/South AllStar game, Woody led the team to a 12-11 win, taking all 12 out of 12 face-offs. Woody was selected as an All-American, and named to UVA’s All-Opponent team comprised of players the rival university considered the very best they’d shared the field with. In 1993, Woody was inducted to RPI’s athletic Hall of Fame. Following his undergraduate ROTC training, Woody

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022

Frank Tufano August 1, 1934 – July 27, 2022

He was a bright and creative man with many interests. Alex loved history, p olit ic s, t he t rad it iona l catholic liturgy, and most of all spending time with family. He enjoyed good food, investing in real estate, reading, and tending to his recent collection of bonsai trees. Dogs were always special to Alex and his bulldog, Alistair, was by his side at the end. Alex strove to live his life in accordance with strong personal values. He taught his family the value of hard work, the impor tance of honesty and of personal responsibility. He also taught them to love and to appreciate the beauty of our physical world. A funeral mass will be celebrated in Alex’s honor in the chapel at St. Agnes C at h o l i c C h u r c h ( 7775 Vanderbilt B each Road, Naples, FL 34120) on Friday, August 5, 2022 at 11 a.m. Burial and an in-home reception to follow (28396 S ombrero Dr ive, Bonita Springs, FL 34135). In lieu of flowers, a donation to St. Mathew’s House Naples, FL, or to a charity of your choosing will be appreciated.

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HOME HEALTH AIDE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Live-in or live-out. Driver’s license. References available. Please call Inez, (609) 227-9873. 08-17

DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000.

ESTATE SALE, AUGUST 5 & 6, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 9:30-3:00 High End Furniture, Century, Wedgewood Mirror, Lenox, DR Table and Eight Chairs, Decorative Accessories, Antiques, Outdoor Furnishings, Weber Grill, Garage Items. Pictures at estatesales.net. MG Estate Sales.

tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860.

08-03 LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23 EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Experienced and reliable adult caregiver available weekday mornings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000.

tf HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection.

NJ certified and experienced. Livein or live-out. I also drive. References available. Call or text: 973-489-0032.

11-30

08-17

tf HOME CARE AIDE / COMPANION AVAILABLE:

Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732

tf ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23 HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06

We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10 circulation@towntopics.com PERSONAL ASSISTANT/CAREGIVER FOR YOUR LOVED ELDER

Years of experience. Trustworthy, reliable & highly competent. Female. Excellent references. 609-477-4671. 09-21

Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 977-9407. 08-10 DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000. tf

08-17

HOME HEALTH AIDE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Live-in or live-out. Driver’s license. References available. Please call Inez, (609) 227-9873. 08-17 ESTATE SALE, AUGUST 5 & 6, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 9:30-3:00 High End Furniture, Century, Wedgewood Mirror, Lenox, DR Table and Eight Chairs, Decorative Accessories, Antiques, Outdoor Furnishings, Weber Grill, Garage Items. Pictures at estatesales.net. MG Estate Sales. 08-03

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf

LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754.

LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf

Experienced and reliable adult caregiver available weekday mornings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000.

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 11-30

11-23 EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER

tf HOME CARE AIDE / COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Livein or live-out. I also drive. References available. Call or text: 973-489-0032. 08-17

The Top Spot for Real Estate Advertising Town Topics is the most comprehensive and preferred weekly Real Estate resource in the greater Central New Jersey and Bucks County areas.

Considering a kitchen or bath renovation project? Cranbury Design Center listens to your ideas and then uses color drawings of your space to help make your vision a reality. We assist with design decisions, cabinet, countertop and hardware selections, and finishing touches like backsplash tile and paint colors. Call us or visit us online to get started on your remodel. We look forward to meeting you!

(609) 448-5600 145 W. Ward Street, Hightstown www.cranburydesigncenter.com Custom Kitchens, Baths and Renovations

CDC_TT_BestofHouseHome_Half_Page_041421.indd 1

Every Wednesday, Town Topics reaches every home in Princeton and all high traffic business areas in town, as well as the communities of Lawrenceville, Pennington, Hopewell, Skilllman, Rocky Hill, and Montgomery. We ARE the area’s only community newspaper and most trusted resource since 1946! Call to reserve your space today! (609) 924-2200, ext 27

4/14/21 8:13 PM

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


YARD SALE +

5 WOODMERE WAY

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY

= GREAT WEEKEND!

AUGUST 5 & 6, 9:30 - 3:00

Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know!

House full of interesting items!! Chaise, sectional sofa, Pilates Reformer with Attachments, Outdoor table and chairs, decorative accessories, snowblower, etc. Please see pictures at estatesales.net. MG estate sales. 08-03 CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732 tf ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188.

Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 977-9407. DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000. HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396.

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240.

LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860.

10-06 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613.

Ask for Chris

THE PRINCETON WRITING COACH - a professional writer and university teacher - has guided many students on how to plan, write, and revise outstanding college application essays. These essays are the best opportunity for students to “speak” directly and convincingly to admissions committees. Your student can work with the Coach face-to-face or via Zoom. Call for a free consultation today. 908-420-1070. princetonwritingcoach@gmail.com. 08-17 HOME HEALTH AIDE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Live-in or live-out. Driver’s license. References available. Please call Inez, (609) 227-9873. 08-17 ESTATE SALE, AUGUST 5 & 6,

A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10 circulation@towntopics.com PERSONAL ASSISTANT/CAREGIVER FOR YOUR LOVED ELDER

Years of experience. Trustworthy, reliable & highly competent. Female. Excellent references. 609-477-4671. 09-21 SEEKING AFFORDABLE APT/ HOUSE SHARE Female, semi-retired music teacher seeks affordable room in apt. or house shared with good company, school year or longer, 9/1 or 10/1. Preferred location: Princeton & surrounding. Residing locally 25 years, references available. 609-706-2209, Jerseylea.tu3@gmail.com. 08-3

609-586-2130

Scott M. Moore of

MOORE’S CONSTUCTION HOME IMPROVEMENTS LLC carpenter • builder • cabinet maker complete home renovations • additions 609-924-6777 Family Serving Princeton 100 Years. Free Estimates

Erick Perez

Fully insured 15+ Years Experience Call for free estimate Best Prices

BLACKMAN

LANDSCAPING FRESH IDEAS

Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Stone Walls and Terraces FREE CONSULTATION

PRINCETON, NJ

609-683-4013

B BRIAN’S

FIREWOOD SPECIAL

TR BRIAN’S 609-466-6883

Seasoned Premium Hardwoods Split & Delivered $225 A cord / $425 2 cords

TREE SERVICE

Offer good while supplies last

Stacking available for an additional charge

60

BRIAN’S TREE TREESERVICE SERVICE Trees & Shrubs

609-466-6883 Trimmed, Pruned, and Removed Trees & Shrubs Stump Trimmed, Grinding &Removed Lot Clearing Pruned, and

609-466-6883 Stump Grinding & Lot Clearing

Owned & Operated for over 20 years! Trees & Shrubs Locally Owned &Locally Operated for over 20 years! Trimmed, Pruned, and Removed

Stump Grinding & Lot Clearing

Trimm Stum

Locally Owned & Operated for over 20 years!

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

609-466-2693

Locally Owned & Op

A Tradition of Quality

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 9:30-3:00 High End Furniture, Century, Wedgewood Mirror, Lenox, DR Table and Eight Chairs, Decorative Accessories, Antiques, Outdoor Furnishings, Weber Grill, Garage Items. Pictures at estatesales.net. MG Estate Sales.

HD

HOUSE PAINTING

08-03 LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23

tf WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

Home Repair Specialist

11-30

Experienced and reliable adult caregiver available weekday mornings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000.

(908) 359-8131

James E. Geisenhoner

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection.

EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER

Belle Mead Garage

Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

tf

06-28-23

WE BUY CARS

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC.

tf

04-06-23

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469.

A Town Topics Directory

08-10

tf

tf

AT YOUR SERVICE

& MORE

(609)737-2466

Serving the Princeton Area since 1963 Find us on Facebook and Instagram

House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish (Benjamin Moore Green promise products)

Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

HOME CARE AIDE / COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Livein or live-out. I also drive. References available. Call or text: 973-489-0032.

American Furniture Exchange

08-17 MOVING SALE IN PENNINGTON 5 WOODMERE WAY

30 Years of Experience!

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY AUGUST 5 & 6, 9:30 - 3:00

House full of interesting items!! Chaise, sectional sofa, Pilates Reformer with Attachments, Outdoor table and chairs, decorative accessories, snowblower, etc. Please see pictures at estatesales.net. MG estate sales. 08-03 CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732 tf

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022

MOVING SALE IN PENNINGTON

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

CALL 609-924-2200 TO PLACE YOUR AD HERE


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022 • 30

Rider

Furniture

宏宬宦宨宱家宨宧季宕宨室宯季守家宷室宷宨季宅宵宲宮宨宵

“Where quality still matters.”

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com

孶孷孷季宑室家家室宸季宖宷宵宨宨宷季宓宵宬宱宦宨宷宲宱孯季宑宍季-季孫孹孳孼孬季孶學孹-孻孹孶孳

Princeton Realty Resources 2x3.indd 1

Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

5/2/22 4:30 PM

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23 HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23

Summer Market Ending But Seller’s Market Remains

with Beatrice Bloom

As the summer market winds down, we’re seeing a slight shift in the real estate market in New Jersey, although the climate remains firmly a seller’s market. Housing inventories throughout markets in New Jersey remain very low when compared to previous, preͲpandemic years. In July, the number of homes on the market was down more than 20% from last year. Average national real estate prices are showing signs of dipping, but this hasn’t been the case in NJ. Locally, prices remain very strong, particularly in the most desirable locations. What has changed is the frenzied pace of the market, which has calmed since the beginning of the year. Buyers are still very motivated and interested. However, they have a few more choices, so they’re taking their time and considering more factors before jumping into a deal.

For instance, buyers are no longer willing to waive home inspections and are asking for more items from sellers. Now, more negotiations are taking place when it comes to contracts. This is a change from earlier in the year, when escalating bidding wars were the norm throughout the state.

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECOͲBroker Princeton Office 609Ͳ921Ͳ1900 | 609Ͳ577Ͳ2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23

Family Owned and Operated

FLESCH’S ROOFING For All Your Roofing, Flashing & Gutter Needs • Copper/Tin/Sheet Metal • Flat Roofs • Built-In Gutters

• Seamless Gutters & Downspouts • Gutter Cleaning • Roof Maintenance

609-394-2427

Free Estimates • Quality Service • Repair Work

CAREGIVERS/ELDER CARE COMPANIONS: Job is for 5 days a week, 5 hours per day. Salary is $20/hour. Clean record, good recommendations, mobile, with many skills. For more details about the position, email me at kerrifield147@gmail.com. 09-07 SR. COMP. SYSTS ENGRMS/equiv & 6 mos IT exp incl. C, C++, Java, MS Visual Studio, Linux, Activ Directry, ADCS, ADFS, Ping Federat, SiteMinder, Ping Access v4, IBM Tivoli Access Mngr, RSA, Tivoli Fedrated Identity Mngr, BMC Remedy, & Servic Now. Travel/reloc req’d. Send résumé to Silicon Staff IT Services, Inc., 500 Alexander Park Dr., Ste 102, Princeton, NJ 08540. 08-03

A Princeton tradition!

PT/FT Reception/Office Position Downtown Princeton Architectural Firm looking for a creative team player to run our front desk. Responsibilities include general administrative tasks and support to office staff such as but not limited to answering phones, filing, mailings, calendar scheduling, archiving, and correspondence. There is potential for growth within the company. The ideal candidate will be outgoing, and proficient in Microsoft Office and Outlook. We are seeking someone who possesses a positive attitude, takes initiative, has strong organizational skills, can multi-task, strong attention to detail, adaptability to changing daily demands, and the ability to work well with minimal supervision. Strong writing skills. Bachelor’s degree is preferred. Salary based on experience. This is a permanent position, and we are open to a full time or steady part time schedule. Recent grads or those returning to the workforce encouraged to apply. We are a family-friendly firm, and benefits include: • Health • Vision • Dental • 401k w/match • Parking • Continuing education opportunities and more

Witherspoon Media Group

Charlie has been serving the Princeton community for 25 years

• Residential & Commercial • Cedar Shake • Shingle & Slate Roofs

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

LIC#13VH02047300

Custom Design, Printing,

Please e-mail cover letter and resume to Publishing and Distribution jobs@joshuazinder.com with the subject line ‘Creative Office Position’

· Newsletters · Brochures

· Postcards ADVERTISING SALES Witherspoon Media Group is looking for · Books a part-time advertising Account Manager, · Catalogues based out of our Kingston, NJ office, to generate sales for Town Topics Newspaper · Annual Reports and Princeton Magazine The ideal candidate will:

• Establish new sales leads manage For additional infoand contact: existing sales accounts for both publications

melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com • Develop industry-based knowledge and understanding, including circulation, audience, readership, and more.

Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton NEW PRODUCTS ADDED WEEKLY!

• Collaborate with the advertising director and sales team to develop growth opportunities for both publications

Track record of developing successful sales strategies and knowledge of print and digital media is a plus. Fantastic benefits and a great work environment. Please submit cover letter and resume to: charles.plohn@witherspoonmediagroup.com

www.princetonmagazinestore.com

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400


rive | Lawrenceville NJ 08648 ns@morrishall.org | www.morrishall.org

A Refreshing, Contemporary Approach To Nursing Home Living

Our focus is on a meaningful life and a real home with highly trained caregivers. Six strategically designed single-level homes with ten private bed-and-bath suites and an open floor plan.

Our focus is on a meaningful life and a real home with highly M Ostrategically V E I N Sdesigned P E C I single-level AL trained caregivers. Six homes with First Month Free! ten private bed-and-bath suites and an open floor plan within the model of THE GREEN HOUSE®. Morris Hall Circle Drive | Lawrenceville NJ 08648 609-712-1016 | mhadmissions@morrishall.org | www.morrishall.org

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2022

gful life and a real home with highly gically designed single-level homes with ites and an open floor plan within the HE GREEN HOUSE®.


At Compass, we’re committed to helping everyone find their place in the world. Let our real estate agents help you find your next home in Princeton.

Start your search at compass.com

@compassnewjersey

Compass RE is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. Photos may be virtually staged or digitally enhanced and may not reflect actual property conditions.