Town Topics Newspaper, August 17, 2022

Page 1

Volume LXXVI, Number 33

It’s Prime Time for Produce at Local Farmers Markets . . . . . 5 Coalition Supporters Gather to Commemorate Anniversary of Hiroshima, Nagasaki Bombings . . . 8 Bayard Rustin Center Ramps Up Programming . . . . . . 10 Full Season of Performances Planned by Local Arts Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 PHS Alum Ettin Helps Coach U.S. Men’s Hoops to Maccabiah Gold . . . . . .22 Lyons Taking the Helm of Stuart Country Day School Athletics . . . . . . . . . . 24

Donald Trump’s Signature Looms Large in This Week’s Book Review . . 12 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 18 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . 28 Pennington/Hopewell . . 16,17 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 11 New To Us . . . . . . . . . 20 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 26 Performing Arts . . . . . 13 Police Blotter . . . . . . . . 4 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 28 Shop & Dine Local . . . 2, 3 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

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Black Bear Sightings Are on the Rise In Mercer County With multiple black bears seen roaming areas of Princeton and other parts of Mercer County, the municipality is advising residents to be cautious, but not panic. No sightings were reported in Princeton on Monday. But on Tuesday morning, a bear was spotted in the area of Mercer Meadows and Yeger Road, Lawrence Township. The Lawrence Township Police Department issued an advisory urging that children and pets be brought indoors. In Princeton, the animals have recently been spotted near Herrontown Woods; around Tyson Lane and Poe Road; Longview Drive and Hartley Avenue; and Riverside School. The bears are most active just before sunrise and after sunset. According to information posted on the municipal website, “Do not run from it; running may trigger a chase response. If you encounter a bear that is feeding, do not approach it and slowly back away. A bear on a food source will aggressively defend it.” The website also recommends making a bear aware of your presence by speaking in an assertive voice, singing, clapping, or making other noises. Make sure a bear has an escape route, especially if it makes its way into your home or garage. Prop the doors open. Bears can usually be kept at a distance if residents follow certain safety recommendations. “The biggest thing we’re saying to people is to not have any kind of inadvertent attractants around,” said James Ferry, Princeton’s animal control officer. “Take bird feeders down, and secure trash cans; even bring them into the house for the next couple of weeks while this goes on. The good news is that we’re getting a little closer to hibernation season.” According to the website of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, New Jersey Fish and Wildlife, black bears are the largest land mammal in the state, “an integral part of the state’s natural heritage and a vital component of healthy ecosystems. Since the 1980s the Garden State’s black bear population has been increasing and expanding its range both southward and eastward from the forested areas of northwestern New Jersey.” The municipal website advises Continued on Page 9

75¢ at newsstands

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Legendary PU Hoops Coach Carril Dies at 92 One of the most legendary and colorful figures in in Princeton University sports history, Hall of Fame men’s basketball coach Pete Carril, died on Monday, August 15 at age 92. The Carril family issued a statement on Monday posted on the Princeton University Athletics website indicating that Carril “passed away peacefully this morning.” He died at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital, where he was recuperating from a stroke. Carril, a native of Bethlehem, Pa., who played college basketball for Lafayette College, took the head coaching job at Princeton for the 1967-68 season and guided the Tigers for the next 29 seasons. During his storied tenure, Carril posted a 514-261 record, leading the Tigers to 13 Ivy League championships, 11 NCAA Tournament appearances, and the 1975 NIT title. Prior to coming to Princeton, Carril started his coaching career as an assistant at Easton Area High (Pa.) in 1954 and then became a head coach at Reading High in 1958 where he guided Gary Walters, a future Princeton star and director of athletics at his alma mater. He served as the head coach at Lehigh University for one year before taking the Princeton job.

The hallmarks of the style that Carril perfected at Princeton included a deliberate offensive game that featured constant motion, crisp passing, and quick cuts to the basket. That disciplined approach was complemented by a stifling defense which had the Tigers among the national leaders in fewest points allowed per game on a yearly basis. Princeton led the country in scoring defense 14 times from 1975 to 1996, including eight in a row from 1988 to 1996.

That method of play, which became known as the “Princeton Offense,” has left a lasting influence on the game as teams from high school to the Golden State Warriors of the NBA have employed that style to spread the floor and wear foes down before getting open looks from the perimeter or in the paint. While orchestrating that precise and confounding brand of the game, Carril himself made a rumpled appearance. He wore sweaters on the sidelines and Continued on Page 7

Sarah Steward Will Lead HomeFront, Succeeding Founding CEO Connie Mercer Sarah Steward, chief operating officer at HomeFront since 2016, will take over as chief executive officer on October 1, succeeding HomeFront founder Connie Mercer, who announced earlier this year that she will be stepping down after 31 years of leading the Lawrenceville-based nonprofit that seeks to eradicate homelessness in central New Jersey. Eager to carry on Mercer’s legacy, Steward does not see big changes on the horizon for the organization. “We have always grown and changed and adapted to whatever the current needs are,” she said

in an August 15 phone conversation. “But the heart of the organization has always remained the same, which is actually what is incredibly powerful about HomeFront. Even as the day-to-day services change and the needs of the clients we’re serving change, we have stayed laser-light focused on what our families need the most.” She continued, ”I see that as a big part of Connie’s legacy here at HomeFront, and I hope I can live up to that. We have an amazing team of people around us, Continued on Page 9

COMMUNITY BLOCK FESTIVAL: Youths enjoy a game at the Joint Effort Witherspoon-Jackson Community Princeton Safe Streets gathering at the Princeton YMCA on Saturday. The event was one of many that took place August 5 through August 14. Participants share their favorite things about Joint Effort Safe Streets in this week’s Town Talk on page 6. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022 • 2

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022 • 4

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DONATING AN HEIRLOOM: Pennington resident Lisa Thorndike, left, recently donated the “Thorndike sword” to Washington Crossing Historic Park. She is shown with John Godzeiba, president of the Friends of Washington Crossing Park and the reenactor who portrays General Washington.

American Small Sword Given Washington Crossing Park To Washington Crossing Park to preser ve and present

On July 4, 2022, Lisa Thorndike of Pennington, and her sons Alden and Michael Thorndike, presented an American small sword to Washington Crossing Historic Park. Named the “Thorndike sword,” the blade had been in the Thorndike family since the Revolutionary War and dates to between 1730 and 1760. “It’s the continuing miss i o n of t h e Fr i e n d s of

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Police Blotter On August 13, at 11:12 a.m., a Heather Lane resident reported that an unknown individual obtained his personal information and used it to open two cellular accounts and purchase two Apple iPhones without his authorization. The purchase totaled $2,199.98. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On August 10, at 1:51 p.m., an unk now n male entered a store on North Harrison Street and stole a necklace valued at $230. The Detective Bureau is investigating.

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Revolutionary War history to our visitors and guests,” said John Godzieba, president of the Friends of Washington Crossing Park and the reenactor who portrays General Washington. “Artifacts, such as this sword, are tangible connections to this country’s struggles during the Revolutionary War and conserving these valuable objects for future generations is an important responsibility. We’re honored that the Thorndike family has chosen us to take possession of their family’s heirloom for a future exhibit. We also extend our gratitude to Lisa Thorndike for her continued support of our organization as a member and a donor.”

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Conserve Water: Due to the warm weather, New Jersey American Water is asking customers throughout central Jersey to adopt an even/odd outdoor watering schedule. Visit newjerseyamwater.com for details. Rosedale Road Closure: The Rosedale Road construction to install a roundabout at General Johnson Drive/Greenway Meadows is underway. The roadway is now open to local traffic only. The project is expected to last through the summer. COVID-19 Care Kits for Princeton Families: Low/moderate income families in Princeton can get these kits, which include tests and materials to respond to COVID-19, such as one-use thermometers, an oximeter, and extra household items. They are available for pickup at Princeton Human Services by calling (609) 688-2055. Certain eligibility requirements apply. Free Vision and Dental Services for Low Income Residents: The municipality is offering these services for low-income Princeton residents impacted by the pandemic. For application information, visit Princetonnj.gov. Volunteers Needed for CASA: Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) for Children of Mercer & Burlington Counties — Mercer County location needs volunteers. The organization recruits, trains, and supervises community volunteers who speak up in Family Court for the best interests of Mercer County children that have been removed from their families due to abuse and/or neglect and placed in the foster care system. A virtual information session is September 8 at 11 a.m. Visit casamb.org.


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5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022

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RIPE AND READY: Heirloom tomatoes are among the fruits and vegetables currently at their best in area farmers markets.

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This is Prime Time for Produce At Local Farmers Markets

Despite the low levels of rainfall this summer in central New Jersey, the tomatoes, corn, zucchini, and other locally grown crops are doing just fine. Last week, which was National Farmers Market Week, tables at area farmers markets were piled high with pro-

duce. The bounty continues through fall, but peak time is now. “T he lack of rain has significantly helped some crops,” said Chris Cirkus, manager of the West Windsor Communit y Far mers Market, held Saturdays in the Vaughn Drive lot of Princeton Junction train station. “And mid-August is when every single thing is in season. It is the best time of the year.”

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T h e 19 - ye a r - ol d We s t Windsor market is among several in the area. It is open, rain or shine, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays through November 19. “Each market is different,” said Cirkus, who previously managed the Trenton Farmers Market. “Every one has its own feel. This is a oncea-week market, a 501(c)(3) whose mission is to support farmers, create a community space, and foster health and wellness. It’s the real thing.” According to the website findjerseyfresh.com, studies show that fresh produce loses nutrients quickly. Locally grown food purchased soon after harvest retains its nutrients and tastes better. Eating local is better for the environment. “When your food doesn’t travel long distances, you’re promoting better air quality and reducing pollution,” the site reads. Local food also preserves open space. “Open farming lands will survive only as long as farms are financially viable. When you buy locally grown food, you are doing something proactive about preserving the agricultural landscape.” The parking lot at the Dinky train station hosts the Princeton Farmers Market on Thursdays, rain or shine, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. through November 17. Originally at Hinds Plaza outside Princeton Public Library, then moved to the Franklin Avenue parking lot during the pandemic before being relocated to the train station, the market sells produce from such area farms as Terhune Orchards, Cherry Grove Organic Farm, and Chickadee Creek Farm. Additional stands sell specialty mushrooms, soups, pickles,

Mediterranean delicacies, artisan breads, flowers, granola, specialty olive oil, and more. Easily recognized by “Dvoor Bros.” painted on the roof of a horse barn at the Flemington traffic circle (111 Mine Street), the Hunterdon Land Trust’s Dvoor Farm market is held on Sundays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., through November 20. Organic produce, meats, b r e a d s, c h e e s e, h o n e y, baked goods, and eggs are among the offerings. The market also holds programs exploring Hunterdon County history, and yoga at 9 a.m. in the wagon house. Continued on Next Page

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022 • 6

Farmers Markets Continued from Preceding Page

The Trenton Farmers Market could be considered the granddaddy of them all. A farmer-owned cooperative since 1939, it has been on Spruce Street in Lawrence Township since 1948. The market is open WednesdaysSaturdays, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. during the summer months. Saturdays draw the most vendors and the biggest crowds. The seven farms selling produce are t he main draw, but the market is also known for its Polish deli, barbecue stand, Amish market, baked goods, specialty tea shop, and various clothing, jewelry, soaps, and other items. “For anybody who hasn’t been to a farmers market this season, right now is the perfect opportunity to check one out, because everything is in,” said Cirkus. Of the West Windsor site, she added, “It’s not just a market. It’s an event. It’s where people spend their Saturday mornings because of the energy around it.” —Anne Levin

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What is the best thing about Joint Effort Safe Streets?

(Asked Saturday at the Joint Effort Safe Streets Community Block Festival at the Princeton YMCA) (Photos by Charles R. Plohn)

“The sense of community. It’s good to see people that I haven’t seen in a long time and to play basketball with some new and some old faces.” —Jaden Hall, Princeton

Morven Gets $500K Grant From National Park Service

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Morven Museum and Garden has been awarded funds that will be used to apply a historically accurate treatment of white wash to the home-turned-museum from t h e S e m i q u i n c e nte n n i a l Grant Program funded by the Historic Preservation Fund as administered by the National Park Service (NPS), Department of Interior. Testing of treatment methods will begin immediately to determine the safest and best application to the entire building next summer. The funds will also support an upgrade to Morven’s elevator to ensure ADA compliance and to help begin addre s s i ng s ite light i ng needs in advance of the anniversary year’s anticipated increase in attendance, as the national spotlight turns to important American Revolutionary sites like Morven. Mor ven received the full amount of its funding request, and is among three New Jersey sites to get the award. “We are delighted to receive t he National Park S er v ice f unding to help prepare Mor ven for t he 250th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence,” said Morven Executive Director Jill Barry. “This builds on the recently awarded NPS Save America’s Treasures grant, allowing us to address maintenance issues and provide an exceptional visitor experience at the only extant New Jersey home of a signer open to the public.” Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, is open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit Morven.org for more information.

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“The community and the old Princeton coming together like always.” —Richard Wilson, Princeton

Jace: “Playing basketball.” Mayki: “Having a great day and playing basketball.” —Jace Johnson, Hopewell, with Mayki Davila, Princeton

Iiazesl: “Everybody coming out!” D’Andre: “The music and everything.” Jay: “Music, and basketball games.” —Iiazesl King Pittman, Rochester, N.Y., with D’Andre Kelsey and Jay Vaughn, both of Princeton

Ramu: “I was born in Princeton, and ever since I was a kid Joint Effort has been a staple in the community. It creates a good vibe every year for people to remember the time and to come back and to see how we are looking for the future. It’s about the legacy part of it and making sure there are no generational gaps in this community.” Anthony: “Joint Effort allows for members of the WitherspoonJackson community to come back and feel that sort of nuance of euphoria that exists in between the reality of the past and good vibes of the future to come. It’s about sports, education, and social evolution.” —Ramu Bailey, Denver, Colo., with Anthony White, Princeton


continued from page one

with tousled gray hair often flying, he commanded his players in a raspy voice while waving a rolled up program. Off the court, he had a fondness for cigars and was known for spending long nights at Conte’s breaking down games over pizza and beer. He was also a regular at Andy’s Tavern. With his blue collar background in Pennsylvania as the son of a steelworker, Carril often dispensed his wisdom with ample doses of profanity. He penned a book with Dan White, The Smart Take from the Strong, in 1997, detailing his basketball philosophy which included hundreds of nuggets explaining his tough-minded, no-nonsense approach to the game. In the introduction to the book, coaching great Bob Knight, who guided Indiana to three NCAA titles, said that Carril has “been a tremendous asset to the game of basketball and a great credit to it.” Knight added that “I can think of no better compliment that a basketball coach could ever receive than to be told, ‘You know, your teams play a little bit like Pete Carril’s Princeton teams used to play.’ ” Under Carril’s guidance, the Tigers dominated the Ivy League along with archrival Penn. From 1964 to 2007,

either Princeton or Penn won or shared the title in all but two seasons. Carril ended his career as the winningest coach in Ivy history. Under Carril’s guidance, Princeton made an impact on the national stage as well. Carril coached Princeton to wins over teams coached by such legends as Knight, Dean Smith, Mike Krzyzewski, Digger Phelps, Lefty Driesell, and Frank McGuire. In 1975, Carril guided Princeton to a stirring run to the NIT title where it beat Providence 80-69 in the final. Some 14 years later, the Tigers almost pulled off one of the great upsets in college hoops history as the 16thseeded Tigers fell 50-49 to top-seeded Georgetown in the opening round of the NCAA tournament. In 1996, Carril’s final year at the helm of the Tigers, Pr inceton achieved t hat breakthrough upset. The 13th-seeded Tigers stunned fourth-seeded UCLA, the defending national champions, 43-41 in the first round of the NCAA tourney with the winning points coming on a backdoor layup by Gabe Lewullis. After stepping down from Princeton, Carril went on to serve as an assistant coach of the Sacramento Kings in the NBA from 1996 to 2006. He was a 1997 inductee to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

His legacy includes a special coaching tree. Every Princeton head coach since Carril’s retirement either played for him or coached with him, as he was succeeded by longtime assistant Bill Carmody and then former players John Thompson III, Joe Scott, Sydney Johnson, and Mitch Henderson. Henderson, the current Tiger head coach, put Carril’s influence on his players and the game in perspective in a statement posted on the Princeton Athletics website. “It is difficult for me to put into words the impact that Coach Carril has had on my life and on the lives of the hundreds of others who were fortunate enough to have crossed paths with him,” said Henderson’98, who played under Carril at Princeton. “While his impact on the game of basketball is immeasurable and his long lasting ‘Princeton offense’ will live on beyond him, it is how he touched so many people on a personal level that will be his greatest legacy. Coach taught me that keys in life were to be unselfish, to value the team over the individual, to understand that there is no substitute for hard work and to never limit yourself in what you think you can accomplish. I speak for everyone who has ever been associated with Princeton basketball when I say that we love Coach, we learned

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lessons from him that we use every day and we will never forget him.” To recognize that impact on a permanent basis, the main floor in Jadwin Gym was renamed Carril Court in February 2009 in honor of the famed coach. “I would like to think that he understood that this is as much about the legacy of Princeton basketball and the guys who played for him,” asserted Walters in remarks that night. “It is greater than him and that’s the way he would want it. I personally believe he made Princeton basketball a brand name which burnished the academic reputation of this University. It is the smart taking from the strong, we were the Davids beating the Goliaths.” Upon taking the mike at the ceremony and graciously thanking the University and his players, Carril evoked the humor and perceptiveness that was a major part of his legend. Noting the Carril Court label on the floor and a lifesized banner of the coach unfurled from the gym’s rafters, he quipped, “It’s bad enough people are going to step all over me when they play on this court, now they’ve decided to hang me.” Over the last decade, Carril continued to hang around Jadwin, occasionally coming to practices to dispense his wit and wisdom to players and coaches and also watching games from a spot in the upper deck of the arena. With Carril’s passing, there will be a huge void at Jadwin and in the hoops world. —Bill Alden

7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022

Coach Carril Dies

HOLDING COURT: Former Princeton University men’s basketball head coach Pete Carril addresses the crowd in February 2009 after the main court at Jadwin Gym was officially renamed “Carril Court” in his honor. Legendary Hall of Famer Carril passed away at age 92 on Monday, August 15.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022 • 8

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Coalition Supporters Gather to Commemorate Anniversary of Hiroshima, Nagasaki Bombings

The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki took place on August 6 and 9, 1945, and last week, on the 77th anniversary of the Nagasaki bombing, about 40 supporters of the Princetonbased Coalition for Peace Action (CFPA) gathered at the Arts Council of Princeton to commemorate the events and to consider the current threat of nuclear arms.

Frank von Hippel (Photo by David Kelly Crow)

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Warning of an accidental nuclear war, with the United States and Russia ready to launch about one thousand nuclear warheads and the Chinese preparing to deploy hundreds of new intercontinental ballistic missiles, Princeton University Professor Emeritus Frank von Hippel urged the audience “to remobilize against the nuclear arms race.” “Either we get rid of these weapons, or they will get rid of us,” he told the audience. Von Hippel, a senior research physicist and professor of public and international affairs emeritus with Princeton’s Program on Science and Global Security (which he co-founded), presented a history of the expansion of nuclear weapons, the grow th of the CFPA, born in the early 1980s, and the movement to ban nuclear weapons. He described a number of dangerous situations since 1945, and said, “It is time for us to light a new fire to reverse the new nuclear arms race that now involves China as well as ourselves and Russia. We need to focus on measures that will reduce the danger of nuclear war.” Those measures, he said, would include adopting a no-first-nuclear-use policy and getting rid of the 400 intercontinental ballistic missiles that we have in underground silos in the northern Great Plains, ready to be launched on only 10 minutes notice. The place to start, he told

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T h e i naug u ra l “B ar t’s Challenge” at the Princeton YMCA, Paul Robeson Place, is scheduled to take place under the new pavilion on Friday, September 23 from 4-7 p.m., and Saturday, September 24 from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Registration is now open. The event will feature six timed exercises. Par ticipants can compete against themselves or others by completing the exercises in the shortest amount of time. For adults and youth 13 years old and up, the divisions include individual, pairs, and teams of four and eight. There is a noncompetitive option as well. Bart Talloen is a senior executive at Johnson & Johnson and fitness enthusiast who, as part of his efforts to achieve fitness world records, has raised more than $120,000 for the YMCA since 2018. This year’s event is designed to inspire people to set goals of their own, individually or with others, and to promote and celebrate healthy living as a community. Talloen’s personal motto is “Belief in the power of dreaming big, setting a goal and going for it, and never giving up.” Registration fees are $20 for individual or non-competitive; $40 for pairs; $60 for teams of four; and $80 for teams of eight. For more information and registration, visit gscymca.org.

Registration Open For Conference for Women

Alicia Menendez, author and MSNBC host, will deliver the afternoon keynote speech at the New Jersey Conference for Women on October 28 at The Westin Princeton, Forrestal Village. Menendez anchors MSNBC’s American Voices with Alicia Menendez on Saturday and Sunday nights. She is also the author of The Likeability Trap and host of the “Latina to Latina” podcast. Menendez joined MSNBC in October 2019. Prior to joining the network, she served as a correspondent on Amanpour & Company on PBS and formerly hosted a nightly news and pop culture show on Fusion called Alicia Menendez Tonight. Her reporting and interviews have appeared on ABC News, Bustle, FusionTV, PBS, and Vice News. Copies of Menendez’s book will be available for purchase on site the day of the conference. The event provides women an opportunity to network with their peers and make connections with other women in the business community. Focused on professional development and growth, the program is a collaboration among business leaders, community leaders, and advocates for women’s issues. Register at njconference forwomen.com.

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t he Pr inceton audience, would be with reaching out to our U.S. senators and representatives. “We must educate members of Congress that our nuclear posture is dangerous and must be changed,” he said. Von Hippel concluded in calling for nuclear weapons to be outlawed “in the same way as we outlawed biological and chemical weapons.” The new International Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, already ratified by one-third of the members of the United Nations, gives the rationale, he said: “the catastrophic humanitarian consequences that would result from any use of nuclear weapons.” Rob Goldston, Princeton University astrophysics professor and board member of the Council for a Livable World, followed up with his “Nuclear Tale of Two Cities” (Tehran and Moscow). He urged the necessity of diplomacy, “applied early and consistently,” and warned that both Iran’s nuclear ambitions and Russia’s expansionist policy are serious threats to their neighbors. Criticizing the failure of former President Trump’s “maximum pressure” campaign against Iran and the expansion of Iran’s nuclear program since Trump took the U.S. out of the Iran Deal (The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action) in 2018, Goldston said, “We should make every effort to return to the Deal.” He also called for a number of “strategic stability measures” — nuclear agreements and policies — “that should have been pursued with Russia, rather than letting them fall by the wayside, and should be actively pursued now,” though he pointed out that NATO accession is the right of sovereign countries in resisting threats from their neighbors. In an August 3 op - ed, CFPA Executive Director the Rev. Robert Moore quoted U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres, who warned in an August 1 address to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty Review Conference, “Humanity is just one misunderstanding, one miscalculation away from nuclear annihilation.” Citing a number of “close calls” over t he past 77 years, 45 of which he has spent organizing full time for the abolition of nuclear weapons, Moore pointed out, “Dozens of times political leaders around the world have considered using nuclear weapons, including Putin’s recent threats against Ukraine. This is not something remote. We’re close to the cliff and at any moment, as Secretary Guterres said, a miscalculation or misunderstanding could push us over the edge.” —Donald Gilpin

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continued from page one

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avoiding direct eye contact with the animals. “To scare the bear away, make loud noises by yelling banging pots and pans or using an airhorn,” it reads. “Make yourself look as big as possible by waving your arms. If you are with someone else, stand close together with your arms raised above your head. The bear may utter a series of huffs, make popping jaw sounds by snapping its jaws, and swat the ground. These are warning signs that you are too close. Slowly back away. “If a bear stands on its hind legs and moves closer, it may be trying to get a better view or detect scents in the air. It is usually not a threatening behavior. Black bears will sometimes ‘bluff charge’ when cor nered, threatened or attempting to steal food. Stand your ground, avoid eye contact, then slowly back away and do not run.” Black bear attacks are extremely rare. “If a bear does attack, fight back,” reads the website. “Aim for the snout and/or eyes. Use anything at hand (knife, sticks, rocks, binoculars, backpack, or kick the bear), and immediately call police. Families who live in areas frequented by black bears should have a ‘bear plan’ in place for children, with an escape route and planned use of whistles and horns.” Black bear damage and nuisance behavior should be reported to the DEP’s 24hour hotline at (877) 9276337. —Anne Levin

and so I’m confident that we will keep that heart and that focus on our mission.” A HomeFront press release describes Steward as “a visionary leader who, alongside Connie, guided the agency during extremely challenging times.” It continues, “Sarah advanced critical programs and services to aid our community’s most vulnerable neighbors. Her passion for helping others has already transformed the lives of thousands of families experiencing homelessness.”

Sarah Steward (Courtesy of HomeFront)

HomeFront Board President Ruth Scott noted that Steward’s unanimous selection by the board was the culmination of a nationwide CEO search. “She brings a vast array of skills and experience to this role,” said Scott, adding that the search provided “confirmation that Sarah is the right person for the job. We are incredibly fortunate to have a leader like her to ensure that we continue our critical work in the community.” Steward received her B.A. in government and psychology from Franklin and Marshall

College and a masters of public administration from Rutgers University. She worked with U.S. Congressman Rush Holt for 12 years, serving part of that time as his deputy chief of staff and district director. She has been involved in government in Mercer County for several years and is currently president of the Ewing Township Council. Steward discussed the challenges ahead for HomeFront in the current environment of economic uncertainty and a lingering pandemic. “I count myself among the many people who want to move on from COVID and never think about it again, but for the families we serve it’s been incredibly disruptive,” she said. She described long lines at the HomeFront food pantry, a 40 to 50 percent increase in clients at the pantry in the past six months. “You and I can go to the grocery store and notice that we leave a couple of dollars lighter, but for our families that’s the difference between feeding their kids tonight or not,” said Steward. “That’s a long effect of COVID.” She noted the troubled economy, inflation, and housing shortages as early, continuing effects of COVID-19. “There’s nothing all of us want to do more than to stop thinking about this pandemic and its impacts,” she said. “But I don’t think our clients have that luxury, so I don’t think HomeFront has that luxury.” Steward emphasized two points in particular: that “the challenges are real and present” even in affluent Mercer County; and that this community can make the choice and change the outcomes for vulnerable local families.

“We have an ambitious mission, which is trying to end homelessness here in our community,” she said. “That is no small task, and we have not accomplished it yet.” She continued, “I think some of the magic of HomeFront is that we have always been flexible and creative about what are today’s solutions to get us closer to that goal. Whether it’s helping support additional affordable homes or job training or children’s programming or all the other things we do, we must remain adaptive to what the current challenges are.” Pointing out difficulties in confronting the realities of poverty and homelessness in the community, Steward noted, “When I came to HomeFront I understood the challenges intellectually, or at least I thought I did. What’s easy to forget is that this is a challenge that families in our neighborhood are facing every single day, and it’s a byproduct of the fact that so many families are living so close to the edge even in our community, which is relatively affluent and privileged in a lot of ways.” She continued, “This is not a challenge that affects some other group of people. These are families that are going to school with your kids, families that are working in the same companies that you’re working in. I thought when I first came to HomeFront that I would hear the most fantastic and extreme stories about house fires or violence or on and on — and certainly we do work with families that are affected by those incredible challenges, but much more common is the everyday pressure of families living so close to the edge.”

Steward went on to note that many Americans have so little in emergency funds that “one car accident or one medical emergency or one COVID diagnosis or one week out of work can really upset the whole applecart.” She added, “There is no sense of ‘us’ and ‘them’ because it’s all of us. It could easily be me or my sister or my husband, so it’s a reality. Here in Mercer County, a community of incredible wealth, on any given night HomeFront is still putting a roof over the heads of 450 people, and two-thirds of them are kids. It’s not a problem that’s removed or distant from us. It’s in our community.” Perhaps the most important lesson that Steward has learned from Connie Mercer, she said, is that “there

is hope. There is something we can do. We can feed and clothe and make sure people have a roof over their heads, but we can also change the situation long-term. We can have a different outcome for specific families, but also system-wide.” Mercer commented on her successor. “When Sarah walked into my office seven years ago to interview for the COO position, I knew that I had found the perfect addition to the HomeFront family,” she said. “Today, after working with her since that time, I am proud to hand over the leadership for HomeFront to this intelligent, talented, and caring woman. I know she will lead HomeFront forward with wisdom, skill, and grace.” —Donald Gilpin

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Bayard Rustin Center Ramps Up Programming; Out-of-the-Closet Clothing Giveaway August 20 The Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice (BRCSJ), in its new headquar ters at 12 Stockton Street, is branching out and moving forward on multiple different avenues in the coming weeks and months. Described by its Chief Activist Robt Seda-Schreiber as “a community activist center, educational bridge, and safe space for our LGBTQIA youth, intersectional families, and all our beautifully diverse communities,” the BRCSJ has continued its programming and welcoming activities — sometimes v ir t ually and sometimes in -person — t hroughout the pandemic, and has announced a full slate of activities for the end of summer and start of the fall season. “Out of t he Closet — Queer Icons Frank and Chet Present the Great Clothing Giveaway!” will take place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, August 20. Frank Mahood, founder of Princeton’s first gay rights organization, Gay People Princeton, almost 50 years ago, and his partner Chet Kabara will be in attendance. The BRCSJ Facebook site descr ibes t he event as “a unique opportunity to own a piece of fabulous LGBTQIA history, as our favorite couple share both new and oh-so-slightly used clothes from their various appearances and adventures at Pride events over the years.” T h e B RC S J p r o m i s e s there w ill be ever y thing “from rainbow slacks to sequined blazers and also for the more fashionably-timid there are bins full of more sedate sweaters, pants, hats, footwear, and all sorts of other stylish pieces to add to your wardrobe.” All items are free of charge, though

the organization asks patrons to consider a donation to support the BRCSJ. “It’s a taste of the fabulous, but it’s also a taste of the everyday,” said Seda-Schreiber. “People can come and get clothes they need or want, and it’s also an opportunity to hear from Frank and Chet — the history, their stories, and to have them be recognized, to celebrate them for all they’ve done.” On August 27, the Center will be hosting artist, photographer, and BRCSJ board member emer it us Walter Naegle, sur viving partner of Bayard Rustin, and commemorating the anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington that Rustin organized and led. Rustin, who was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2013 by Barack Obama, “was not given the recognition he deserved in his lifetime because of who he was and who he loved and the life he lived,” said Seda-Schreiber. He went on to note that Naegle’s visit is “a wonderful moment for our community in understanding history, especially now that more and more history is being erased, more and more books are being banned, more and more people are trying to stop stories from being told.” In addition to partnering with several other organizations in leading a Day of Action and Rally to Protect Our Democracy on the afternoon of September 17 in Hinds Plaza, the BRCSJ will be hosting two high-profile events in September. On September 18, the s t a r t of B a n n e d B o ok s Week, celebrated Nor t h

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Hunterdon librarian Martha Hickson, who recently received the Lemony Snicket Prize for Noble Librarians Faced with Adversity, will visit the BRCSJ to speak on “How to Stop Book Banning in Libraries, Schools, and the Greater Community.” Seda-Schreiber noted that Hickson will present a “dedicated action program for librarians, teachers, students, activists, and other community members to fight back to make sure that books will not be banned in their community.” Then on Saturday, September 24, the BRCSJ will host a benefit concert featuring Jill Sobule, singersongwriter of “I Kissed a Girl,” “Supermodel,” and many more socially- conscious hits over the past 32 years. Programming in October will include visits from acclaimed New Yorker staff writer Adam Gopnik and graphic artist, journalist, and The Nation’s magazine illustrator Steve Brodner. Seda-Schreiber emphasized that most events at the BRCSJ are free, and most are available to the general public, with a few events being benefits where donations will be requested but not required. “The Center is first and foremost a community center,’ he said. “Anybody from the community who wants to attend any of our events will always be welcome.” The BRCSJ opened its doors at its Stockton Street headquarters in March this year, after losing its original home on Wiggins Street at the start of the pandemic and carrying on virtually for two years. Expressing appreciation

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Citizens Bank to Open First Branch in Princeton

Citizens Bank officially opens its first branch in Princeton, at 182 Nassau Street, with a ribbon-cutting on Thursday, August 18 at 12 p.m. The event, which is to be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., will also feature presentation of a donation to Princeton Area Community Foundation, an ice cream r e c e pt i on, m u s i c, fac e painting, and visits from the Phillie Phanatic and Princeton Tiger. Mayor Mark Freda will be on hand for the ribboncutting. Following the completion of its acquisition of Investors Bank in April, Citizens now has a total of 113 branches throughout New Jersey. Citizens is the official bank of the New York Giants, as well as presenting partner and official bank of the New Jersey Devils and its home arena, Prudential Center, in Newark.

QUEER YOUTH BRIGADE: The Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice in its new home on Stockton Street is following up on its successful June Pride Parade with a variety of events for the end of summer and beginning of fall. Launched just last month, the Queer Youth Brigade has taken the lead in planning programming for the LGBTQIA safe space and community activist center. (Photo courtesy of Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice) to Princeton Alumni Corps, which is located on the second floor of the building, as great partners and landlords, Seda-Schreiber praised all the “incredible volunteers who have come in and in a short time helped us make the space as extraordinary as it deserves to be.” Momentum at the BRCSJ continued to build throughout the spring as it returned to in-person gatherings and prepared for Pride month and a June 18 Pride Parade t hat brought more than 3,000 people into the streets of Princeton to celebrate. The BRCSJ has expanded its social justice library, which now contains more than 1,000 books. Featured titles in the library include works by authors who were featured in the Center’s Social Justice Power Hour, live broadcast ing wh ich took place every weeknight throughout the first two years of the pandemic, more than 600 episodes in total, all of which are available on the BRCSJ Facebook archive for interested viewers. The BRCSJ has continued its relationships with writers, artists, activists, and the celebrities who appeared on the Power Hour, said SedaSchreiber, and has recently established programs on birth justice to serve and empower women dur ing pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpar tum process ; free and confidential HIV testing; and a popular Queer Youth Brigade. Seda-Schreiber, citing the spreading monkeypox virus as a major concern both nationally and locally and “right now very impactful to our LGBTQIA community especially,” noted that the BRCSJ has been in communication with the governor’s

office and the New Jersey Department of Health. “We are trying to work with Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center to become a dedicated vaccination site for the community,” he added. “We want to be able to provide the medical assistance and psychological-emotional support so that our community feels safe and comfortable. We’re working hard to make that happen.” Launched about a month ago, the Queer Youth Brigade includes “young folks from across the spectrum, representing intersectionality in every way you could imagine, across the rainbow,” said Seda-Schreiber, “And they gather together at least once a week.” He continued, “They also create programming. It’s always better to have the community speak directly to us and tell us what they want, what they need, what would serve them best. They create the programming that they want to be a part of, that would be most impactful, most meaningful, and most enjoyable to them.” BRCSJ Queer Youth Brigadier Rose Mascoll said, “The BRCSJ Queer Youth Brigade is such a wonderful thing for both me personally as a trans femme navigating my personal journey, but also to tell all our LGBTQIA youth who are looking for a safe space to share their stories and to move forward together. I invite everyone to join us.” S eda- Schreiber added, “It’s important that individuals in the community know that the Center is somewhere where they are finally part of a larger community, part of a larger idea, part of a larger network where they can feel recognized, respected, heard, and loved.” —Donald Gilpin

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11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022

Mailbox PCH Expresses Gratitude for the Life of the Late Rev. David McAlpin

To the Editor: Princeton Community Housing (PCH) honors the life of the Rev. David McAlpin, community leader, and housing and social justice advocate, who passed away on August 5, 2022. After graduating from Union Seminary in 1953, Rev. McAlpin met with Benjamin Anderson, the minister of Witherspoon Presbyterian Church, who invited Rev. McAlpin to assist him. Rev. McAlpin later became the associate pastor. In this role, he became aware of discriminatory housing practices. Rev. McAlpin helped to establish two local integrated housing developments — Maplecrest at Dempsey Avenue and Walnut Lane in Princeton and Glen Acres in West Windsor Township off Alexander Road. In 1970, Rev. McAlpin moved to Detroit where he served as a pastor, advocated for civil rights, and established affordable housing organizations. He returned to Princeton in the 1980s and helped found the Trenton chapter of Habitat for Humanity. Like so many of our neighbors, we are grateful for Rev. McAlpin’s leadership, passion, generosity, and advocacy. He will continue to inspire us to work for an inclusive community that is accessible to all. ALICE K. SMALL President, DC Board President Princeton Community Housing, on behalf of the Board of Trustees

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Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

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Telling About the Vikings, T.S. Eliot, and The Signature Instructions for living a life: Pay attention. Be astonished. Tell about it. —Mary Oliver (1935-2019) hen I saw Mary Oliver’s “Instructions” chalked on a stone bench in Princeton’s Marquand Park the other day, I was thinking about the signed copy of Donald Trump’s The Art of the Deal (1987) offered for sale at next month’s Friends of the Princeton Public Library Book Sale. What could be less astonishing than a 35-year-old ghostwritten bestseller by the former president? The only thing really worth paying attention to and telling about is that copies in the same or lesser condition as the library’s are selling online for $18,000 to $45,000. But when you think of it, isn’t the lure of large library book sales the possibility of being astonished? You go in hoping that the book of your wildest dreams will turn up, and sometimes it does. Or, better still, you find a treasure you didn’t even know you were looking for, which happened to me when I embarked on this column about a book I have no interest in. Rather than devote an entire article to The Art of the Deal, I thought of something my wife and I have been binging on, an astonishing television series about the Vikings, where I discovered, incredibly enough, a book of poetry by T.S. Eliot. A Viking Summer It’s been a Viking summer in our house. Along with the Saxons, the Northmen have given us some fascinating television in The Last Kingdom (2015-2022) and Vikings (2013-2020), which we have yet to finish, although it’s hard to imagine the series surpassing the 14th episode of Season 4, “In the Uncertain Hour Before the Morning.” If that seems an unlikely title for a show about the blood and thunder pagans of the north, it’s because the line comes from Eliot’s poem “Little Gidding.” Series creator Michael Hirst has admitted “sneaking” passages from Four Quartets into Vikings “because the lines are about time. Eliot thought the time past and time future are both contained within time present. I thought that that was really what I was talking about within the show — connecting past, present and future.” As the episode’s title suggests, the endgame conversation between the captive King of the Vikings Ragnar (Travis Fimmel) and King of the Saxons Ecbert

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(Linus Roache) takes place in a subdued hour-before-morning communal spell “in the intersection of the timeless moment” the two characters are sharing; it’s an extraordinary reunion since Ragnar has cause to put Ecbert to death on the spot while Ecbert has no choice but to find a politically expedient way to have Ragnar executed. The intensity of the looks and words exchanged, the pauses, the nuances, reveal a unique fellowship based on the love both men feel for Athelstan (George Blagden), the young Anglo-Saxon Christian monk captured by Ragnar in the first season and arguably the most sympathetic character in the series. Once you learn that the episode t a ke s it s t it le from Four Quartets, it’s p os sible to imagine that Hirst had the actors readi n g a l o u d to gether from the poetry prior to the filming; the mood the poem manifests is that immersive. It helps that Eliot is, says Hirst, a favorite poet of Roache’s. So compelling, so true to the character, is Roache’s Ecbert, that when he s p e a k s E l i ot’s lines on “time present and time past” you never doubt that words from a book published in 1943 are his personal musings, and now, thanks to a television series set in the 9th century (“Near the ending of interminable night / At the recurrent end of the unending”), you find yourself reading Four Quartets aloud. As I was reading I was startled by some lines in “The Dry Salvages” that seemed to speak to the subject I began with — a signed book of little value in itself, being sold for large sums because it’s signed by a twice impeached former president who is the subject of multiple criminal investigations: “Observe disease in signatures, evoke / Biography from the wrinkles of the palm / And tragedy from the fingers...”

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“Be a Little Wild” I’m wondering if last week’s FBI search of Mar-a-Lago has impacted the already inflated market value of a signed first edition of The Art of the Deal. To see where the value lies, observe the signature on the marbled endpaper, which is directly across from the quote atop the jacket copy: “I like thinking big. I always have. To me it’s very simple: if you’re going to be thinking anyway, you might as well think big.” “Be astonished, pay attention, tell about it,” from Mary Oliver’s poem “Sometimes,” could have been my mantra during the Trump years. Writing here on May 11, 2016, after he won the Republican nomination, my way of “telling about” the moment was to bring in Shakespeare and The Marx Brothers, Coriolanus and Duck Soup. When the president kept outdoing himself, it was an excuse to reread Kaf ka’s Metamorphosis, Ibsen’s Enemy of the People, or to revisit Dr. Strangelove and The Twilight Zone, improvising on the connections, the wilder the bet ter. As the Donald says in The Art of the Deal: “Sometimes it pays to be a little wild.” The Signature The signature on the Friend’s book sale copy of the first edition is classic, a bold and brazen statement apparently accomplished with a blue felt-tip marker, evidence that it was signed at the time of publication. Take a closer look and it’s more than a statement, it’s a monument in miniature. Or a trap. Or the skyline of Trump City. Some have found it “terrifying.” It’s been compared to a failed polygraph, a barbed-wire wall, a cry for help. The signature on the copy for sale is a no-way-in no-way-out nightmare. Zoom too close and it’s like putting your head in the mouth of a shark. Say what you will, it’s worth looking at and thinking about,

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it’s a creation. Of the American presidents since Roosevelt, Obama’s is the only signature of comparable size, and it’s as open and free as Trump’s is shut and scary. The Nuclear Codes According to Jane Mayer’s July 2016 New Yorker article about Trump’s ghostwriter Tony Schwartz, The Art of the Deal “expanded Trump’s renown far beyond New York City, making him an emblem of the successful tycoon.” Mayer quotes Schwartz saying, before the 2016 election, “I feel a deep sense of remorse that I contributed to presenting Trump in a way that brought him wider attention and made him more appealing than he is. I genuinely believe that if Trump wins and gets the nuclear codes there is an excellent possibility it will lead to the end of civilization.” In The Art of the Deal French President François Mitterrand “turned out to be a dangerous man. What can you say about a guy who goes around selling nuclear technology to the highest bidder. It’s the lowest anyone can stoop.” The American Dream And just now I noticed the blurb on the front of the Ballantine Books paperback, from The New York Times: “Trump makes one believe for a moment in the American dream again.” urious to see the rest of the paragraph, which appeared in the print edition of the December 7, 1987 Times, I found the sentences preceding the “American dream” — “Jay Gatsby lives, without romance and without the usual tragic flaws. The secret really seems to be hard work, thorough preparation, detailed knowledge, careful planning, tight organization, strong leadership, dogged persistence, controlled energy, good instincts and the genetic ability to deal.” The last line of Christopher Lehman Haupt’s review: “It’s like a fairy tale.” As Jake Barnes says at the end of The Sun Also Rises, “Isn’t it pretty to think so?” —Stuart Mitchner ——— I found the quote from Michael Hirst in a November 2016 interview on creative screenwriting.com. The Friends of the Library Book Sale will be September 1618. I’ll be writing more about it closer to the event. Other signed volumes will include In the Arena by Richard Nixon, The Path to Power by Margaret Thatcher, My Life by Bill Clinton, and What Happened by Hillary Rodham Clinton.

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BOOK REVIEW


13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022

Performing Arts Full Season of Performances Planned By Local Arts Groups for 2022-23

More than two years after the pandemic paralyzed orchestras, dance companies, and theaters, the 2022-23 season appears to be back on track. Local companies have announced full rosters of inperson performances. Other than the now-expected health and safety advisories, things seem to be back to normal. Following are some of the events planned for fall, winter, and spring. The season begins on September 10 and 11 when the Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) returns to Richardson Auditorium with a program including Fandango by Mexican composer Arturo Márquez. Violinist Anne Akiko Meyers is soloist and Music Director Rossen Milanov conducts. The PSO season continues with its fall fundraiser on October 2, “Britten and Elgar” on October 15 and 16, Holiday POPS December 17, and additional programs including the world premiere of Seven Decisions of Gandhi by William Harvey on May 11 and 12. Visit princetonsymphony.org. McCarter Theatre is back with a full season of theater, dance, music, and more, starting September 17-October 6 with Sarah DeLappe’s play The Wolves. Other highlights of the season include David Sedaris, the native American and Canadian dance company Indigenous

Liberation, The Hot Sardines jazz band, three National Geographic programs, violinist Randall Goosby, and the return of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, adapted and directed by Lauren Keating. Visit mccarter.org. American Repertory Ballet returns to the New Jersey Performing Arts Center September 23-25 with “Kaleidoscope,” which includes a collaboration between choreographer Da’ Von Doane and visual artist Grace Lynne Haynes. The season continues with The Nutcracker at McCarter Theatre, Trenton’s Patriots Theatre at the War Memorial, and New Brunswick’s State Theatre New Jersey, in November and December; the classic Giselle co-choreographed by Ethan Stiefel and Johan Kobborg, in New Brunswick in March; and a performance at New York City’s Kaye Playhouse, also in March. Visit arballet.org. The eclectic Princeton University Concerts (PUC) series returns to Richardson Auditorium on September 29 with “Healing with Music,” featuring writer/broadcaster/musician Clemency Burton Hill, who will talk about her recovery from a massive brain aneurysm; neurosurgeon Christopher Kellner; and violinist Alexi Kenney. Writer Maria Popova is moderator. In addition to “Healing with Music,” the PUC season includes

additional events in the “All in the Family,” “At the Movies, “Concert Classics,” and “Performances Up Close” series. Visit concerts.princeton.edu. Trenton’s Passage Theatre Company has one production listed so far for its coming season. Blues in My Soul: The Legend and Legacy of Lonnie Johnson, by David Robson, is at Mill Hill Playhouse October 15-30. The season’s theme is “Foundations for Our Future.” The company’s website reads, “All of the shows are about building on the past in order to create a new future. As we move forward from two very difficult years, we want to acknowledge and reflect on how the lessons we learned from the past will help to shape what’s to come.” Visit passagetheatre.org. The Capital Philharmonic of New Jersey, led by Daniel Spalding, returns to Patriots Theatre at the War Memorial with Beethoven’s Ode to Joy (Symphony No. 9) on October 22. Soloists are Alex Meakem, Amber Johnson, Stephen Ng, and Mark Hightower. The Somerset Hills Chorus and The Lotus Project also participate. Additional concerts include the traditional New Year’s Eve event, a tribute to Ella Fitzgerald; Vivaldi’s “The Seasons” on March 18, and “Latin American Rhythms” on April 15. Visit capitalphilharmonic.org. —Anne Levin

THREE NEW WORKS: American Repertory Ballet dancer Aldeir Monteiro is among those appearing in “Kaleidoscope,” the company’s fall program beginning September 23 at New Brunswick Performing Arts Center. (Photo by Harald Schrader)

Doylestown Arts Festival Set for September 10-11

In A Leg Up, written by multiple disciplines. For a full schedule and locations, Ken Kaissar, Charles’ future The Doylestown Arts Fes- visit dtownartsfestival.com. rests on the new XR3000, an intelligent prosthetic tival will include music, inFree Staged Reading leg designed for the U.S. teractive art displays, and senator who is running for By Passage Theatre activities for all ages. The Passage Theatre Company president. Unfortunately, festival is September 10 and 11 from 10 a.m. to 5 will hold a staged reading of his mistress announces she’s p.m. at various stages in the new musical Clean Slate pregnant, his business partat 6 p.m. on Friday, August ner has her eye on his wife, Doylestown, Pa. 19 in the Mill Hill Park Am- and the senator is having an This year’s music lineup phitheater in Trenton. The affair with the leg designer, features ar tists from all show is appropriate for all and it’s not even lunchtime across Bucks County, the ages (recommended for ages yet. Initially slated for its greater Philadelphia region, 10 and up due to length). world premiere in 2019/20, and beyond, in a range of A Leg Up was developed Admission is free. musical styles. Among the Clean Slate is a new musi- through BRT’s new play deperformers are Borderline, velopment program Amerithe Dirk Quinn Band, Eric cal by David Lee White and ca Rising. Kate Brennan. It tells the Mi ntel, S cho ol of Ro ck The season’s second show story of a group of disaffectDoylestown, Andrea Carlso will be familiar to fans of ed high school students who and the Love Police, Hay Sugar, Dale Ciccarelli, and are sent to a rehabilitation the board game-turned-cult camp that may, or may not, classic film, Clue, based on several others. also be haunted by the souls the screenplay by Jonathan The festival also includes of former campers who have Lynn and written by Sandy an outdoor art marketplace, gone missing. When the new Rustin. In this murder mysalong with such activities as owners of the Clean Slate tery adaptation, the guests, face-painting, sand art, and camp beg in to inst it ute under different aliases, are wet plate photography. rules and regulations that invited to an unusual dinner Founded in 1991 by a threaten the freedom of the party at Boddy Manor, only small volunteer group of ON AREA STAGES: Violinist Anne Akiko Meyers is a guest artist with the Princeton Symphony businesses and residents, students, they are forced to to discover that the host is dead upon their arrival. Orchestra at Princeton University’s Richardson Auditorium next month. The program is the first t he festival w ill include band together and enter a cursed forest in order to find In Cabaret, characters of the season’s offerings by local music, theater, and dance organizations. (Photo by David Zentz) more than 150 artists from their way out. Clean Slate must adapt quickly as the is a story of radical empa- world around them falls thy about the mistakes we into chaos. The story follows make when we try to “heal” Cliff Bradshaw, an American young people and the need writer who arrives in 1929 to remember who we used to Berlin looking for inspirabe in order to move forward. tion for his novel and inAudience members are stead falls in love with a star encouraged to bring a blan- performer, Sally Bowles, at ket or cushion. The 1911 the sleazy Kit Kat Club. The S mokehou s e B B Q Fo o d decadent nightlife they have Truck will be onsite from fallen into quickly comes 5-8 p.m., and 10 percent of under threat, however, as the proceeds will go directly the nascent rise of the Nazi Party continues to grow in back to Passage Theatre. To reserve tickets, visit strength by the day. BRT’s final show of the passagetheatre.org. season will be the PhiladelBristol Riverside Theater phia premiere of Chicken & Announces Coming Season Biscuits, written by Douglas The 2022-23 season of Lyons. Rivaling sisters BaBristol Riverside Theater neatta and Beverley are bury(BRT) will include one world ing their father, but it’s the premiere and one Philadel- non-stop family drama that phia premiere. The lineup might be the death of them. fe at u re s pro du c t ions i n For more information and which characters seem to season details, visit br tthrive on chaos. stage.org.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022 • 14

Art

“AUTUMN ONSET: This painting by Bill Jersey is featured in “Along the Road,” his joint exhibit with Michael Schweigart, on view September 8 through October 2 at Artists’ Gallery in Lambertville. An opening reception will be held on September 10 from 5 to 8 p.m. “SISTERS”: Artist Mel Leipzig will give a talk on his exhibit, “Brilliant Muses: New Works by Mel Leipzig,” on Saturday, August 20 at 4 p.m. at Trenton Social, located at 449 South Broad Street in Trenton. The exhibit is on view through August 30. images combined to paint and accuracy were essential “Along the Road” Joint specific places, naturalisti- art piece can be found on team painted their first mu- to see the artwork in this Exhibit at Artists’ Gallery to capturing stories. “Retired from filmmaking, cally. Bill Jersey and Michael the side of Village Silver on ral in this location, Stron- space change frequently. It’s Going from place to place Spring Street. Schweigart bring together I picked up a paintbrush in ger Together, as a message like a ‘mural gallery,’ which two different approaches to place of the camera. In plein provides him with a variety Rainbow is a New Jersey- of support and solidarity. is so fun!” painting the landscape in air or studio settings I can of scenic views that often based artist who grew up Since then, the rotating apLive For Today is the lat“Along the Road,” on view quietly observe and record include early architecture. in Trenton. He creatively proach has allowed the ACP est of the Arts Council’s September 8 to October 2 with perspective beyond The character and customs combines graffiti, street to showcase local artists, growing public art presence at Artists’ Gallery in Lam- motion picture storytelling. associated with a particular a r t , a n d ot h e r a r t i s t i c making Spring Street a new around Princeton. Also on bertville. Jersey’s bold im- I can imagine and paint the region are what he enjoys forms into innovative proj- destination to enjoy colorful view are Continuum by Ilpressionistic color harmo- summer’s dance of a tree or painting. His finished works ects and events. Rainbow public art. lia Barger at Terra Momo nies and broad brushwork the stately elegance of an display rich texture and at- learned how to do simple “This mural location be- Bread Company, Journey excite the senses, and his aging barn next to a tree mosphere, with a presence block letters from an early gan as an idea bet ween by Marlon 7oveChild Dacolor and light patterns cre- blooming with new life. Re- of man and a sense of place. age and has been drawing myself and my colleague vila on the corner of John ate complex compositions. cording with brush and paint Schweigart has been ex- and creating art ever since. Melissa Kuscin during that Street and Leigh Avenue, While Schweigart s palette has become my poetry and hibiting his paintings for By building on his work, he awful time at the start of the and the Bring on the Joy, is subtle with natural colors obsession. most of his adult life in gal- realizes his art can channel pandemic. We knew had to LOVE, and Kindness mublending light and shadow “At 94, I can say that I leries from New York City to a deeper expression, reach- do something – anything – rals at Princeton Shopping that build texture and devel- have been truly privileged South Jersey, Philadelphia, ing a wide variety of people. to give people a boost and Center. The Arts Council op detail. “Along the Road” to have spent a lifetime in and the Capitol Rotunda in Leon Rainbow is also the that something was art. Art coordinates installations in brings together the best of the arts — beginning with Washington, D.C. His paint- creator of the Jersey Fresh on a big scale,” recalls ACP Dohm Alley and the popular both styles with scenes of my first job out of USC Film ings have won awards and Jam. View more of his work Artistic Director Maria Ev- Princeton Parklet, a “street their time and places. School, art director of The are included in many public at @aerosoleon or jersey- ans. “It is so exciting to see seat” designed for commuAn opening reception will Blob — to the current time and private collections. graf.com. this mural continue now nity gathering. be held on Saturday, Sep- of reflection and creativity. Artists’ Gallery, located This is the ACP’s seventh through the work of othRainbow’s work will be on tember 10 from 5 to 8 p.m. At my last show at Stover at 18 Bridge Street in Lam- rotating mural on Spring ers, and I’m so proud that view on Spring Street until In reflecting on his life in Mill I sold a record of 47 bertville, is open Thursday Street. In July of 2020, the ACP can provide this October 2022, when a new through Sunday from 11 when most of town was shut level of support for artists mural will take its place. the arts, Jersey said, “My paintings.” Schweigart can find inspi- a.m. to 6 p.m. For more in- down due to COVID-19 reg- in downtown Princeton. The life has been blessed with For more information, visit opportunities of engage- ration just about anywhere formation, visit lambertvil- ulations, the Arts Council community gets so excited artscouncilofprinceton.org. ment with an array of people he goes. He has a deep ap- learts.com. and places — from farmers preciation for nature and dein the Georgian Republic to lights in taking the road less Arts Council of Princeton the Contras of Nicaragua to traveled whenever possible. Unveils New Community Mural The Arts Council of Princyoungsters on the streets Scenes of coastal Maine and of Harlem. I spent my film- parts of Pennsylvania and eton (ACP) has unveiled a making career documenting New Jersey make up the new community mural in the stories of people in their bulk of his work. Schwei- downtown Princeton titled unique settings. Through gart’s studio work is often Live For Today. Designed the lens of my 16mm cam- a composite of recollection, and painted by artist Leon era, light and composition field sketches, and camera Rainbow, this colorful public

“LIVE FOR TODAY”: The Arts Council of Princeton adds to their public art presence with a new community mural on the corner of Spring and Witherspoon streets. Designed and painted by artist Leon Rainbow, it is an energetic example of his signature graffiti-style artwork. You can now purchase a copy of

Town Topics

“LONG LOOK”: This work by Michael Schweigart is part of “Along the Road,” his dual exhibit with Bill Jersey, running September 8 to October 2 at Artists’ Gallery in Lambertville.

for 75 cents in front of our previous office, 4 Mercer Street, or our new location, 4438 Routh 27 North in Kingston, from our coin-operated newspaper boxes, 24 hours a day/ 7 days a week.


The eighth annual “Points of View Art Show and Sale,” featuring six local artists, will be presented during the weekend of September 9. This year, the show will be located at New Hope Arts Center at 2 Stockton Avenue in New Hope, Pa. The show opens with a reception on Friday, September 9 from 6 to 9 p.m., and continues Saturday, September 10 and Sunday, September 11 from 12 to 5 p.m. Showcasing their art will b e B ob B ar is h, Je a n n e Chesterton, Florence Moonan, Susan Roseman, Ilene Rubin, and Dora Siemel. All art is for sale. Chesterton and Rubin have been creating the “Points of View Art Show” in the Bucks County area since 2014 and are pleased to be hosting this year’s show in the heart of New Hope. Along with a who’s who list of local artists, they have found that joining talent with location to exhibit and sell art has been quite the successful endeavor. T h e ex h ibitor s at t h e “Point of View Art Show” are all well-known, awardwinning artists who bring a unique voice and interpretation to the visual world around them. At the same time, each offers an impressive body of work, each professionally created and available for one weekend only. There is something for everyone with little to no overlap of style or range. Each has amassed their own

in the Bucks County region. It’s a unique blend with a wide price range, so that anyone who is a collector will certainly have a diverse choice, while a casual tourist will easily find a treasure at the New Hope Arts Center. Rubin is a self-taught artist who has lived in Elkins Park; Thousand Oaks, Calif.; Boulder, Colo.; and now calls Doylestown, Pa., home. She received the Ty Hodanish award for Oil Painting in the Artsbridge 2021 Member Show in March 2021 and in the 34th Annual Bucks Fever Juried Art Exhibition “Celebrating Bucks County Artists.” She is a published author of two novels. She was a participating artist in the ongoing virtual 2021 Bucks County Chamber of Commerce Bucks Fever Virtual Studio Artist Tour and was the Featured Artist in Bucks County Magazine in June 2021. She is a member of most Bucks County Art organizations and previously served as vice president of the New Hope Art League. She is currently the chair of the ongoing Art Show at the Lower Bucks Hospital for The Artists of Bristol on the Delaware. Chesterton is an awardwinning Bucks County artist known for her realistic still life paintings. Choice of subject may range from t he for mal and delicate to the ordinary and worn, depending upon the voice within. The beauty marks of age and wear as seen in tarnished metal ware and m el lowe d cera m ic w are

of the ancient world and her sic in Archaic and Classiunderstanding of the com- cal Greek Art: Seeing the plexities of cultural prop- Songs of the Gods, is unerty stewardship make her der contract with Cambridge a truly exciting addition to University Press. the Museum team at a time “I am honored to join of dramatic growth,” said Princeton’s team during this James Steward, Nancy A. exciting time of growth and Nasher–David J. Haemiseg- evolution,” said Laferrière. ger, Class of 1976, Director. “The opportunity to shape Prior to her work at the new gallery spaces at a muUniversity of Southern Cali- seum with such a deep and PU Art Museum Appoints fornia, Laferrière served as rich history is exceptionLaferrière as Assistant Curator a postdoctoral associate in ally rare, and I’m especially The Princeton University ancient and premodern cul- thrilled for the opportunity Art Museum has named Caro- tures and civilizations with to reframe how we interrolyn M. Laferrière as assistant ARCHAIA, Yale Universi- gate ancient works of art in curator of ancient Mediter- ty’s Program for the Study Sir David’s galleries.” ranean art. Laferrière joins of Ancient and Premodern Visit the Museum’s webPrinceton from the Center for Cultures and Civilizations, site, artmuseum.princeton. the Premodern World and the as well as a lecturer in Yale’s edu, for more information, Department of Classics at the Depar t ments of Histor y digital access to the collecUniversity of Southern Cali- of Art and Classics. While tions, and a calendar of live fornia, where she served as there, she curated the exhi- and on-demand programs. a postdoctoral scholar and bition “Sights and Sounds of teaching fellow. She will be- Ancient Ritual” for the Yale gin her appointment at Princ- University Art Gallery. eton on August 1. Laferrière earned a Ph.D. At Princeton, Laferrière from Yale University in the will curate the Museum’s ex- history of art, specializing traordinary collections from in Greek art and archaeolCheck websites for inaround the ancient Mediter- ogy. She received a master ranean world, including its of arts in classical and Near formation on safety proholdings of ancient Greek, Eastern archaeology from tocols. Ar t @ Bainbr idge, 158 Roman, Egyptian, and Near the University of British Eastern art. Laferrière’s ap- Columbia and a bachelor’s Nassau Street, has “Witness pointment comes at a vital degree from Carleton Uni- / Rose Simpson” through time for the Museum, which versity, with a double major September 11. artmuseum. last year began construc- in art history and classics princeton.edu. tion on a new building de- and religion. A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 signed by Sir David Adjaye, Laferrière specializes in Br idge Street, L amber tscheduled to open in late archaic and classical Greek ville, has “Light & Shad2024. Laferrière will lead art and architecture, with ow” through September 4. the planning for new galler- a particular emphasis on Gallery hours are Thursday ies as well as develop temTown — 08/10/22 & 8/17/22 through Sunday, 11 a.m. theTopics visualAd representation porary exhibitions, conduct of music, art, and religious to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts. 1/4 page color ad 5.125" wide X 8" high for $220 each research, initiate scholarly ritual as well as funerary art, com. and public programs, grow ancient aesthetics, and senArt on Hulfish, 11 Hulthe collections in her areas, sory studies. She has written fish Street, has “Time’s and cultivate collectors and numerous articles and book Relentless Melt” August 20 supporters. chapters, contributed to ex- through November 6. arthibition publications, and museum.princeton.edu. delivered invited talks and Ellarslie, Trenton’s City

over 250 shows, and her paintings can be found in the permanent collection of the Trenton City Museum as well as many private collections throughout the United States. For more infor mation, c ont ac t J e a n n e C h e s te r ton @ gmail.com or Ilene @ IleneRubin.com.

Area Exhibits

“Ellarslie Open 39” through October 2. ellarslie.org. G ourgaud G a l ler y, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, has “As You Like It” through August 31. cranburyartscouncil.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and Innovator’s Gallery,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. Museum hours are Thursday through Sunday, 12 to 4 p.m. princetonhistory.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey” through March 2023 and the online exhibits “Slavery at Morven,” “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898,” and others. morven.org. T he N a ssau Cl ub, 6 Mercer Street, has “The Glit ter ing Outdoors” through October 2. helenemazurart.com. P r inc eton P ubl ic L i b ra r y, 65 Wit her sp o on Street, has “In Lunch with Love” through August 28 and “Our Inner Oceans : Paintings by Minako Ota” through August 30. princetonlibrary.org. Small World Cof fee, 254 Nassau St reet, has “Naneen Art” through September 6. smallworldcoffee. com. We s t W i n d s o r A r t s C e n te r, 952 A lexander Road, West Windsor, has “By the Light of Day: Plein Air Show” through August 27. westwindsorarts.org.

Learning Never Ends

SUNSET SPECTACULAR”: This painting by Ilene Rubin is featured in the eighth annual “Points of View Art Show and Sale,” coming to the New Hope Arts Center in New Hope, Pa., September 9 to 11.

JOIN US THIS FALL FOR EVERGREEN FORUM COURSES Evergreen Forum Registration Opens on August 23 at 9:30 a.m. Choose from twenty-one stimulating courses. For full course descriptions and registration information, visit princetonsenior.org, or call 609.751.9699.

princetonsenior.org “ORNATELY ORANGE”: This oil painting by Jeanne Chesterton will be part of the eighth annual “Points of View Art Show and Sale,” featuring the work of six local artists, on exhibit September 9 to 11 at the New Hope Arts Center in New Hope, Pa.

Princeton Senior Resource Center 609.751.9699

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022

“Points of View Art Show” following and niche in an remain a constant lure. She “C a r o l y n’s b o u n d a r y - conference presentations. M u s e u m i n C a d w a l a d e r At New Hope Arts Center otherwise crowded art field has exhibited her work in crossing work with the art Her first book, Divine Mu- Park, Parkside Avenue, has


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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022 • 18

Mark Your Calendar Town Topics Wednesday, August 17 8-11 p.m.: Central Jersey Dance Society presents the No Name Dance at Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. Hustle lesson taught by Donna Boyle from 7- 8 p.m. $10 - $15. Centraljerseydance.org. Thursday, August 18 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 10 a.m.: Cook Talks: Tiramisu and Affogato. Learn to make these desserts at the Lawrence Headquarters Branch of Mercer County Librar y, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrence Township. Registration required. (609) 883-8293. 2 p.m.: Princeton University Library hosts a talk by Claudia Goldin about her book Career & Family : Wome n’s Ce ntur y - L ong Journey Toward Equity. At the Julius Romo Rabinowitz building, 399 Ruehl Family Room. Registration required. Libcal.princeton. edu/event/9483113. 6-8 p.m.: Green Knuckle Material performs at Princeton Shopping Center as part of the Summer Nights series. Free. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. 6:30 p.m.: Historian Linda Barth shares highlights and details about the Delaware and Raritan Canal, in a hybrid event at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Morven.org. Friday, August 19 5-8 p.m.: Mark Miklos performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards.com. 7 p.m.: Story & Verse series at Pettoranello Gardens, 20 Mountain Avenue. Open mic, free, sponsored by the

Arts Council of Princeton and the African American Cultural Collaborative of Mercer County. The theme is “Circle of Life.” Artscouncilofprinceton.org. Saturday, August 20 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. WWcfm.org. Yes We CAN Fresh/ Stable Food Drive to Benefit Arm in Arm; music by This Old House. 9-10 a.m.: Mid-Day Toastmasters meet via Zoom. Toastmastersclubs.org. 1-4 p.m.: Brian Bortnick performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Light fare and wine available. Terhuneorchards.com. Sunday, August 21 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 1 p.m.: “Cast in Bronze: The Tower Show” is the title of the carillon concert from Graduate Tower on Princeton University’s graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. Free. (609) 258-7989. 1- 4 p.m. : R ich S einer Duo performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Light fare and wine available. Terhuneorchards. com. 1 p.m.: Tour of Princeton B at t lef ield, 50 0 Mercer Road, led by historical interpreter. Learn about the Battle of Princeton, soldier and civilian experience. $5 donation; children under 16 and veterans free. Register at Pbs1777.org/battlefieldtours. Monday, August 22

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7:30 p.m.: Voices Chorale New Jersey holds “New Jersey Summer Open Sing,” open to all singers, at Music Together, 225 PenningtonHopewell Road, Pennington. Voiceschorale.org. Tuesday, August 23 9:30 and 11 a.m.: Read & Pick Program: Pears, at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. For parents and kids from preschool age to 8. $12 including container of pears. Register in advance. Terhuneorchards.com. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Mid-Day Toastmasters meet v ia Z oom. Toas t mas tersclubs.org. Thursday, August 25 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 6:30 p.m.: “Reflections on 1781 Princeton: Exploring the Road to Yorktown” with Dr. Robert Selig, at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. $10$15. Morven.org. 8 p.m.: The Indigo Girls perform at the William Penn Bank Summer Music Fest, Bristol Township Amphitheater, Bristol, Pa. $35-$75. Brtstage.org. Friday, August 26 5-8 p.m.: Catmoondaddy per for ms at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards. com. 8 p.m.: “’70s Flashback” concert at the William Penn Bank Summer Music Fest, Bristol Township Amphitheater, Bristol, Pa. $35-$75. Brtstage.org. Saturday, August 27 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. Wwcfm. org. West Windsor Bicycle and Pedestrian Alliance is on hand; music by Magnolias. 1-4 p.m.: Acoustic Douver performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Light fare and wine available. Terhuneorchards. com. 5 -7: 3 0 p.m . : S i n g e r / songwriter Sophie Coran performs at Nassau Pavil-

AUGUSTSEPTEMBER ion, behind Panera Bread, Nassau Park, West Windsor. Free. Westwindsorarts.org. Sunday, August 28 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 1 p.m.: Members of the Princeton Carillon Studio p er for m f rom G r ad u ate Tower on Princeton University’s graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. Free. (609) 2587989. 1-4 p.m.: Audio Pilot Duo performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Light fare and wine available. Terhuneorchards.com. Monday, August 29 Recycling Tuesday, August 30 9:30 and 11 a.m.: Read & Pick Program: Apples. For parents and kids from preschool age to 8. $12 including container of apples. Register online. Terhuneorchards.com. Thursday, September 1 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. Friday, September 2 5-8 p.m.: Kindred Spirit Duo performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards. com. Saturday, September 3 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. Wwfm.org. Yes We CAN Fresh/Stable Food Drive to Benefit Arm in Arm; music by Stibol students. Sunday, September 4 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 1 p.m.: Robin Austin is soloist in the carillon concert from Graduate Tower

on Princeton University’s graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. Free. (609) 2587989. Wednesday, September 7 4 p.m.: “The Mind in Exile: Thomas Mann in Princeton,” with Princeton University emeritus professor Stanley Corngold, virtual lecture via Zoom. Free. Libcal.princeton.edu. Thursday, September 8 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 5-8 p.m.: Nassau Street Sampler, at Dillon Gym, Princeton University. Food and drink, art-making activities, music, raffles, prizes. 6:45 p.m.: “Learn Public Speaking with Mercer’s Best Toastmasters Club,” Lawrence Community Center, 295 Eggert Crossing Road, Lawrence Township. Mercersbest.toastmastersclubs.org. Friday, September 9 5 - 8 p.m.: L aundr ymen performs at Terhune Orc h a r d s , 33 0 C o l d S o i l Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards. com. 8 p.m.: Herman’s Hermits starring Peter Noone performs at the William Penn Bank Summer Music Fest, Bristol Township Amphitheater, Bristol, Pa. $35-$75. Brtstage.org. Saturday, September 10 8 a.m.-2 p.m.: Household hazardous waste collection and electronics recycling, at Dempster Fire School, 350 Lawrence Station Road. For Mercer County residents. Visit www.mcianj.org for list of accepted materials. 1 p.m.: “Buttons Go to Work” is the topic for the New Jersey State Button Society Show and Competition, at Union Fire Company, 3926 River Road, Titusville. Free. NewJerseyStateButtonSociety.com. 8 p.m.: Herman’s Hermits starring Peter Noone performs at the William Penn Bank Summer Music Fest, Bristol Township Amphitheater, Bristol, Pa. $35-$75. Brtstage.org. Sunday, September 11 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 1 p.m.: Tour of Princeton B at t lef ield, 50 0 Mercer Road, led by historical interpreter. Learn about the Battle of Princeton, soldier and civilian experience. $5 donation; children under 16 and veterans free. Register at Pbs1777.org/battlefieldtours. 2 p.m.: “9/11 Day of Remembrance : The Histor y of the American Flag,” at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Free talk by flag historian J. Richard Pierce. Morven.org.

Monday, September 12 7 p.m.: Hopewell Public Library Book Club meets over Zoom. www.redlibrary. org. Wednesday, September 14 8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Mercer Reg ional Cham ber presents the Regional Healthcare Symposium at Mercer Oaks Catering, 725 Village Road West, Princeton Junction. Princetonmercer.org. 7 p.m.: “Rediscovering Joseph Bonaparte’s Point Breeze Estate in Bordentown,” virtual program presented by Mercer County Library System. Monmouth University Professor Richard Veit is the speaker. Email hopeprogs@mcl.org to register. Thursday, September 15 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 11 a.m.-2 p.m.: First look at Friends of the Ewing Library Book Sale and Flea Market, 61 Scotch Road, Ewing. Free. Friday, September 16 9 : 30 a.m.- 4 : 30 p.m. : Friends of the Ewing Library Book Sale and Flea Market, 61 Scotch Road, Ewing. Free. Saturday, September 17 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.: Bag day at Friends of the Ewing Library Book Sale and Flea Market, 61 Scotch Road, Ewing. Free. Sunday, September 18 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. Tuesday, September 20 9 a.m.-12 p.m.: At the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen, 72 ½ Escher Street, Trenton, Young Professionals “Give Back” in event sponsored by Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber. Assist with duties; must be fully vaccinated and masked. To register, visit princetonmercerchamber.org. 7 p.m.: Princeton Ski and Sail Club holds its general meeting at the Rocky Hill Inn, 137 Washington Street, Rocky Hill. Filmmaker Sam Russell will present video of three previous club events. Free. Programs@princetonskiandsail.org. Wednesday, September 21 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meet either in the Library’s Community Room or via Zoom. Princetonlibrary.org. 7 p.m. : “Fr ida Kahlo : Dreams, Demons, and Devotion,” virtual lecture presented by Mercer County Library System. Janet Mandel is the speaker. Email hopeprogs@msl.org to register. Thursday, September 22 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket.com.


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19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022

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VOTE NOW FOR YOUR FAVORITES! What’s your favorite area restaurant? Do you have a landscaper that you love? Town Topics Newspaper is happy to announce that its 2022 Readers’ Choice Awards is now open for VOTING FOR THE BEST: DINING

HEALTH & WELLNESS

KIDS

Al Fresco —————————————————————————————

Barber Shop ———————————————————————————

Child Care/Preschool ——————————————————————

Appetizers ————————————————————————————

Dentist ——————————————————————————————

Children’s Gym ——————————————————————————

Artisanal Market —————————————————————————

Dermatologist ——————————————————————————

Children’s Dance Lessons ————————————————————

Bagel ———————————————————————————————

ENT ————————————————————————————————

Children’s Party Place ——————————————————————

Bakery ——————————————————————————————

Hospital

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Pediatric Group —————————————————————————

Bar —————————————————————————————————

Ob/Gyn ——————————————————————————————

Toy Store —————————————————————————————

Burger ——————————————————————————————

Optometrist/Opthalmologist ——————————————————

RETAIL

Breakfast Nook ——————————————————————————

Orthopedist ———————————————————————————

Artistic Experience ———————————————————————

Caterer ——————————————————————————————

Plastic Surgeon ——————————————————————————

Florist ———————————————————————————————

Deli ————————————————————————————————

Podiatrist —————————————————————————————

Bike Shop —————————————————————————————

Gluten-Free Option ———————————————————————

Salon/Spa —————————————————————————————

Men’s Shop ————————————————————————————

Happy Hour ————————————————————————————

Senior Care ————————————————————————————

Pet Supply ————————————————————————————

Ice Cream

Speciality Medicine ———————————————————————

Speciality/Gift Store ———————————————————————

Lunch Break ———————————————————————————

HOME & REAL ESTATE

Women’s Boutique ————————————————————————

Pasta ———————————————————————————————

Furniture Store ——————————————————————————

SERVICES

Pizza ———————————————————————————————

Home Remodeler/Design ————————————————————

Auto Shop ————————————————————————————

Restaurant ————————————————————————————

HVAC ———————————————————————————————

Animal Boarding/Daycare ————————————————————

Seafood Market —————————————————————————

Interior Designer —————————————————————————

Cleaners——————————————————————————————

Takeout Meals ——————————————————————————

Kitchen/Bath Designer —————————————————————

Financial Advisor/Planner ————————————————————

Vegetarian Restaurant ——————————————————————

Landscape Designer ———————————————————————

Grocery Store ——————————————————————————

FITNESS

Nursery/Garden Center —————————————————————

Pet Groomer ———————————————————————————

Gym ————————————————————————————————

Outdoor Furnishing Store ————————————————————

Pet Training ————————————————————————————

Physical Therapy —————————————————————————

Realtor ——————————————————————————————

Veterinarian ———————————————————————————

Pilates ———————————————————————————————

Roofing ——————————————————————————————

MISC.

Trainer ——————————————————————————————

Senior Living ———————————————————————————

New Business ———————————————————————————

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Yoga ————————————————————————————————

Night Out —————————————————————————————

DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS SEPTEMBER 28 The winners will be announced in the October 19 and 26 editions of Town Topics Newspaper. Don’t miss your chance to vote for your favorite businesses or services! The Readers’ Choice Awards is open for online voting now at towntopics.com, or mail to 4438 Route 27, P.O. Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528. NO PHOTOCOPIES ACCEPTED. Must be on original newsprint.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022 • 20

Socialization, Exercise and Quality Care Are Available at All Good Dogs Daycare

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arole Lini loves her work. As owner of All Good Dogs Daycare for more than 20 years, she has been providing dogs with a safe, supervised, and socialized home away from home.

IT’S NEW To Us

But even before, she knew that caring for dogs was her passion. As a young girl, she played with her own pets, and as she grew up, she took on dog-walking projects. “I always knew that I wanted to work with animals,” she reports. “I started as a veterinarian technician, then worked as a pet sitter, walking dogs and caring for cats. I realized that even with three or four visits a day, the dogs were still not getting enough attention, and were lonely. We needed to find another way.” That led her to open All G o o d D o g s D ayc a r e i n Kingston in 2000, with a focus on giving dogs a safe, friendly, supervised environment providing exercise and socialization. Best Environment “We pride ourselves on giving the dogs the best environment and experience,” she points out. “We are available for people who are not comfortable with the typical kennel situation, where the animals are in a more confined area.” With the popularity of her doggie day care program increasing, Lini found she needed even more space to accommodate the growing number of daily visitors. “We moved to 113 Schalks Crossing Road in South Brunswick 20 years ago, and this is a wonderful location. We have more than two

acres and room to expand, so the dogs can have plenty of exercise and stimulation and also relaxing times inside too.” After many years of renting the property, she was able to purchase it this year, and has already restored the slate roof of the 80-year-old brick house, and added attractive new landscaping to complement the 100- yearold towering oak and beech trees that distinguish the property. It is a very handsome setting, “I am super excited about owning the property,” says Lini. “It is a special place. There is really nothing quite like this around here, and this is such a truly worthy project.” Overseeing such a large operation is extremely timeconsuming, especially since she also owns another All Good Dogs Daycare center on 160 Basin Road in Lawrence, as well as Whisker Watchers: Happy Tails, a pet sitting and dog walking business. Cage-Free In addition to day care, the Lawrence facility offers overnight boarding. “We are really pioneers of this concept in our area, especially the concept of cagefree boarding 24/7,” reports Lini. She is extremely proud of the staff she has assembled at both locations, and attributes much of the business’s success to the staff’s dedication and skill. “They are just outstanding. It really does take a village! Everyone here loves animals, and is knowledgeable about their care and needs. The staff has ongoing training. They have to know how to introduce themselves to the dog, and how to handle multiple dogs.” Typically, 20 to 35 dogs are in the spotlessly clean

S ch a l k s Cr o s s i n g fac i l ity five days a week. Many dogs come every day, others three or four days. Both half and full days are available. When owners first consider sending their dogs to All Good Dogs, they initially fill out a questionnaire, explains Lini, “Then, we’ll do a lengthy evaluation of the dog. We want to see how it interacts and mingles with the other dogs, and how the dog acts without its owner. We want to see if the dog will be a good match here. They must mix well with the other dogs; we don’t accept dogs with aggressive behavior. Also, they must be spayed or neutered, and all vaccinations must be up-todate.” Four months to 14 or 15 years old is the typical age range at All Good Dogs, with the upper limit dependent on the dog’s health. Chihuahuas to Great Danes have been clients, with all sizes and breeds in between. More Mellow “We group dogs according to age, size, temperament, and activity level,” points out Lini. “We put dogs who are a little more mellow together, and we find that the dogs often form friendships with each other. They are usually very well behaved. Also, as you observe each dog’s personality, you can anticipate their behavior.” Generally, clients bring their dog’s own food, but the facility will provide food, if necessary. In addition, the staff will give medication, if needed, and a veterinarian is on call. When dogs board overnight at the Lawrence center, they stay anywhere from one or two nights, to a week or more. There is always a s taf f memb er available, notes Lini. Many owners are so devoted to their canines that

HOME AWAY FROM HOME: “We are so pleased to have this wonderful facility for our dogs,” says Carole Lini, owner of All Good Dogs Daycare. “I am now the owner of the Schalks Crossing property, and I look forward to new opportunities and further renovation. I am so lucky to have a wonderful dedicated staff to help me provide the best care for our canine clients.” Staff members at 113 Schalks Crossing Road are shown in front of the handsome brick house, now home to 20 to 35 dogs five days a week. they will even call to speak to them on the phone. Lini adds that other clients sometimes have unusual requests. “As an in-home pet sitter, I was asked to sing a special song to a cat!” Ongoing Relationship She happily complied, as she is always eager to do all she can to create a congenial environment for any pet. It can also be an ongoing relationship, she adds. “A lot of our dogs come to us when they are puppies, and continue to come as they get older. They develop a relationship with the staff and with their dog playmates. “This is a labor of love for all of us,” she continues, “and again, I couldn’t do it without my great staff. They are loyal, compassionate employees. “As I step back a bit from the day-to-day running of this 24/7 business, I know it is in the capable hands of my South Brunswick managers Jessica Winter and Tori Borelli and Lawrence managers Adam Miller and Jack Flynn.” After being closed for several months in 2020 due to COVID-19, All Good Dogs is doing better than ever, says Lini. Increasing numbers of people have pets, and they want the best environment and experience for them. “Our service is really helpful for people in condos, tow n hous e s, and apar tments, and for people who may have trouble walking their dogs” points out Lini. “We also offer grooming and bathing services. “We are set apart as an independently-owned business. We are not a franchise, but boutique dog care, focusing on special attention. We have also always had excellent support from the local community, and in addition, we work with the SoCo Southern Comfort rescue organization, which brings abandoned dogs north from down south.” Hard Work Day and overnight boarding prices vary, with different pricing packages available, including club cards.

Discounts are offered to the military, older adults, and essential workers. “We are really here to help, and I enjoy seeing the dogs happy and the pleasure of the clients when they know their dogs are safe and cared for,” says Lini. “It means a lot to me to see our day care, cage-free concept come to fruition after all the years of hard work.” Indeed, Carole Lini is very proud of having turned her love of and concern for animals into a thriving business, but in some ways, she believes it is still a work in progress.

“There are more things to accomplish, and I am excited about my plans for new ventures and opportunities now that I actually own the property. Stay tuned!” ll Good Dogs Daycare at 113 Schalks Crossing Road and at 160 Basin Road in Lawrence are open Monday through Friday 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Overnight boarding is available at the Lawrence center. Schalks Crossing Road: ( 6 0 9 ) 275 -7177. B a s i n Road : ( 609 ) 587- 3535. Website: allgooddogscagefree.com. —Jean Stratton

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PET PALS: “We have big yards — really parklike yards — with outdoor play furniture, even a little pool for them to cool off in, so they can have fun and exercise,” says Carole Lini, founder and owner of All Good Dogs Daycare. Shown here are four canine companions enjoying play time at the All Good Dogs Schalks Crossing Road day care facility.

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21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022

S ports

After Helping U.S. Squad Earn Gold at Maccabiah Games, Peters Primed for Big Sophomore Year with PU Men’s Hoops

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lake Peters returned from the 2002 Maccabiah Games in late July with a gold medal and renewed confidence. Peters, who will be a sophomore guard for the Princeton University men’s basketball team in the 202223 season, had 10 points, three rebounds, and a pair of steals to help the United States rally to win the title game, 81-70, over France. Princeton assistant coach Skye Ettin celebrated alongside Peters as part of the U.S. coaching staff. “It was a really humbling experience,” said the 6’1, 190-pound Peters, a native of Evanston, Ill. “I’m not obviously ever going to have the opportunity to play for the Olympic team so this was the closest thing I could get to that. I have a lot of pride in my country and where I’m from. And I have a lot of pride in my identity as a Jewish basketball player. So to be playing there and representing a whole bunch of groups of people was just an awesome experience. And I did it with my assistant coach at Princeton, Skye Ettin, and a great group of guys. I just thought we represented the country well and the Jewish community well, and it was an incredible experience.” The gold medal experience — Peters’ first time playing internationally — gives him a boost of confidence as he returns to Princeton after playing sparingly in his first year. Peters and the Tigers’ rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors will head to Spain for an overseas trip in August to kick off this year. “I’m already familiar with how international basketball is played, and how physical it is, especially off the ball,” said Peters. “I don’t think you have an appreciation for it until you play international basketball. It’s grown man strength. It’s very different than college strength, that’s something I noticed immediately. I have high aspirations for the season. I didn’t play much last year. We had a great team. This year I’m definitely looking to be more of a significant piece. Just getting back to competing and making winning plays on Maccabiah, getting back into the rhythm of playing is important. Once I get back to Princeton, it’s going to be very fun.” Peters appeared in 14 games last year for the Tigers totaling 18 points and 12 rebounds after setting the all-time scoring record (1,585 points) at Evanston Township High. He played a total of 64 minutes with games highs of five points and five rebounds. “It’s never fun being on the bench,” said Peters. “Playing is definitely more fun. But you learn a lot. Through my experience of playing at Princeton last year and actually getting back on the court with Maccabiah is really going to be pay dividends this year.” Peters helped the Tigers win the Ivy League regular season title outright with his

behind-the-scenes work. In practice, he was a key part of the scout team that prepared Princeton’s main rotation of players for Ivy opponents. It also helped raise Peters’ game. “I was guarding Jaelin Llewellyn frequently and Ethan Wright,” said Peters. “These are high major basketball players that will be pros one day. So especially on the defensive end, being familiar guarding very high level basketball players helped me translate into Maccabiah. There was not one player that was better or came close to being as high caliber players like Jaelin and Ethan.” In Israel, Peters consistently scored in double digits for the U.S. in the Maccabiah Games. He had 11 points and three rebounds in an opening tournament win over Argentina. In the Americans’ first meeting with France in Stage 1 pool play, Peters had 18 points and six rebounds. Against host Israel, Peters made seven 3-pointers on his way to a game-high 24 points. He also scored 10 points in a decisive win over Canada. The U.S. did not panic when it trailed France, 37-35, at halftime of the gold medal game before turning up its defense to pull out the win. “We had beat France in the group phase,” said Peters. “They’re an awesome team. Most of them are pros probably between 2530 years old, so obviously they’re very experienced. That championship game, in the first half, they just wanted it a little more. At halftime, we got in the locker room and talked about what we needed to do on the defensive end. The whole tournament, that’s what was winning us games. Our goal was to keep teams below .75 points per possession. We do similar stat trackings like that at Princeton. So that’s basically they’re scoring once every three or four possessions. Once we locked in on defense, got in help position more, had a little more ball pressure, I think we ended up pressing them a little more in the second half and we sped them up a lot so that definitely helped.” Peters seamlessly transitioned into the U.S. defense that was orchestrated by Ettin, who used Princeton principles and strategy. The offensive end was less like Princeton’s style, and more like what Peters played in high school. “In 2021, I didn’t even know Skye was coaching Maccabiah,” said Peters. “I was already planning on going to Duke to try out. It just so happened I went to Princeton for Elite Camp and Skye was talking to me, and we both learned we were both doing Maccabiah. I went to Duke and tried out, and I think six months later roughly, the team was finalized.” Peters was on the Maccabiah radar after connecting with U16 national coach Michael Weinstein, another Evanston product. Peters was scheduled to play

Maccabiah in 2021 but the COVID-19 pandemic pushed the Games back one year and forced Peters up to the open team level. The team assembled for a three-day minicamp at Kean University before departing for Israel. “Once we got to Israel, the first week was essentially another training camp,” said Peters. “We would wake up really early in the morning, go to practice at 6:30. We scrimmaged the Israeli U19 national team at one point. We scrimmaged our U18 Maccabiah team. We actually had a decent amount of prep. A lot of those days were also spent team bonding just around the hotel to get to know each other a little better.” It was all part of an experience that he won’t forget. In addition to playing in his first international tournament, he was also making his first trip to Israel. “I think they do a good job of connecting you to Israel and Judaism and everything that’s involved on a deeper level,” said Peters. “But you’re also there to win a gold medal so there’s a good balance between the two.” It has been a whirlwind summer for Peters. He was home for less than a week after finishing his first year of classes at Princeton when he headed to New York City for a seven-week internship. “I didn’t really have any trainers there,” said Peters. “It was really on me to be working out by myself and doing my lifts, so that whole experience has taught me a lot about myself and playing adult for a couple months.” It led up to his final preparation and trip to the Maccabiah Games before a couple of weeks back at home and then the Princeton team trip to Spain. Peters has been trying to take advantage of every chance he has to play and hone his skills. It starts at the defensive end, where he hopes to spearhead a lockdown mentality. He’s been able to improve each year at the defensive end. “That’s something I’ve always needed to focus on,” said Peters. “By the time I was a senior in high school, I was guarding the best player on the other team every game, something I took a lot of pride in. Last year, guarding Jaelin and Ethan every day, that was a tough task originally — they may have a different opinion — but I thought I got better as the year went on.” At the offensive end, Peters also benefited immensely from his first year at Princeton. And as he showed in the Maccabiah Games, he is capable of shooting as well as anyone while running an offense. Playing with the Tigers helped him become a tougher player to guard. “On the offensive side, the biggest thing is in high school it’s very stagnant, and you don’t play with a shot clock so the game is much quicker in college,” said Peters. “I got really good at cutting and really using my foot speed to get to my spots. I’m

STRIKING GOLD: Princeton University men’s basketball player Blake Peters, left, and Tiger assistant coach Skye Ettin celebrate after helping the U.S. win the open men’s basketball gold medal last month at the 2022 Maccabiah Games in Israel. Sophomore guard Peters had a strong tournament, ending the event by scoring 10 points with three rebounds two steals as the U.S. rallied to defeat France 81-70 in the gold medal game. (Photo provided by Skye Ettin) not going to be taking five or six dribbles and breaking people down. That’s insanely hard to do in college with the high level guards and the defense people play. It’s really perfecting my shot and being able to fake people out on cuts for layups and playing with a lot of poise and being a solid point guard. Those are all skills I’ve developed working out by myself this summer and

during the season last year and playing with Maccabiah too. As I get on the court next year, hopefully people will be able to see that.” This week, Peters will be getting his next chance to play and develop his game. Princeton will be repeating a trip to Spain that it last took in 2012, leaving on August 18 with stops in Madrid, Valencia, and Barcelona. Schools are permitted one

overseas trip out of season every four years, and Peters has confidence from winning Maccabiah gold and is looking forward to playing with Princeton’s returning players. “We’ll treat the week and a half before we leave as a mini training camp almost and get back in the flow of things,” said Peters. “Hopefully that’ll set us off on the right path. It’ll be fun.” —Justin Feil

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022 • 22

Tiger Men’s Hoops Assistant Ettin Grew as a Coach, Serving on Staff for U.S. Team that Won Maccabiah Gold

Skye Ettin first traveled to Israel in 2013 for his Birthright trip to get immersed in the cultural heritage and traditions of the country. This summer, Ettin, a former Princeton High and The College of New Jersey basketball standout and current Princeton University men’s hoops assistant coach, went on a return trip to Israel and made some history in the process. Serving as the assistant coach for the U.S. open men’s team at the 2022 Maccabiah Games, Et tin helped guide the squad to a gold medal. For Ettin, taking part in the Maccabiah Games was a career goal. “I have wanted to be involved for a while, I had never played or coached in it,” said Ettin. “Howard L e v y ( for m er P r i n ce ton men’s basketball standout and longtime head coach of the Mercer County Community College men’s hoops program) is really heavily involved. He had told me a lot about it. I had heard really good things about it. It seemed like an amazing opportunity so this time, I wanted to get involved.” Ettin reached out to Josh Schachter, the chair of the U.S. open men’s basketball team, to get in the mix for the coaching staff which was originally going to be headed by Duke assistant Jon Scheyer. “I went through an interview process and interviewed with both of them a

couple of times,” said Ettin, noting that former Princeton star and American associate head coach Scott Greenman was slated to be an assistant coach for the team. “I just got lucky enough to get it as an assistant.” When Scheyer and Greenman had to bow out as the former became the head coach at Duke and the latter moved to a new job at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Doug Gottlieb, a former Oklahoma State standout point guard and longtime hoops broadcaster, stepped in as head coach. “I obviously knew who Doug was but I didn’t know him personally,” said Gottlieb, who guided the U.S. men’s open squad to a gold medal at the 2017 Maccabiah Games. “I wanted to stay on, no matter who the coach was because I was really looking forward to the experience. It worked out great.” In order to put the squad together, the coaches held a camp in the summer of 2021. “We did our tryouts at Duke because we had already booked it in advance,” said Ettin. “Duke was gracious enough to let us stay there. We had kids from all over, we had 80-100 kids come and try out for the 12 spots on the roster.” Once the squad was finalized, Ettin liked what he saw. “I thought we had a really good mix of talent, we had a mix of diverse skill

sets,” said Ettin, noting that the team consisted mainly of Division I players with three from the D-III ranks. One of the D-I players to make the team was Blake Peters, a sophomore guard at Princeton. “It was the best, you don’t get an opportunity in the Ivy League to coach your guys during the summer,” said Ettin. “There is no summer school so just the chance to be around him and spend a whole month with him and coach him was something you will never forget. I think it was a really good experience for me and him.” Prior to heading over to Israel, the team held an intense three-day training camp at Kean University in late June. “I t w a s g o o d , i t w a s unique,” said Ettin, reflecting on the camp. “For one, you have to evaluate what you have got and then you have to put in your defense and your offense pret t y quickly. Doug has a spirit of playing, he wants the guys to learn quickly on the move by playing. We went pretty hard for those three days with two-a-days. We learned pretty quickly about what we had and started to build a rotation and work on the defense from there.” Ettin’s work focused on the defensive end. “I was responsible for defense,” said Ettin, noting that the coaching staff also included Matt Kittner from TCNJ and Ronny Levy, who is based in Israel. “I put in the de-

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There are many broad similarities between the funds: the top ten holdings for each is Reference Guideinformation for 401(k)technology Plans stocks account for about 30% of each; the top nearly identical; 401(k) plans can be established to allowtechnology, for pre-tax contributions, after-tax Roth contributions, four sectors for each are information health care, consumer discretionary and safe harbor matching contributions, and additional profit sharing contributions. financials; and utilities, materials and real estatediscretionary are among the lowest represented sectors A financial andare Third Party Administrator can work with the funds employer to Tesla of each. advisor But there some differences. The (TPA) iShares and Vanguard include develop a plan that best fits the employer’s goals and budget. Well designed plans can while the SPDR fund does not. And because of a broader exclusion for fossil fuel, the help owners and key personnel maximize retirement contributions as well as attract and Vanguard ESG fund contains virtually no energy exposure while the energy sector makes retain talented employees. Employer contributions to the plan and any other costs are up approximately 3.83% of the iShares fund and 4.16% of the SPDR fund (both of which deductible business expenses. are close to the energy sector allocation for the S&P 500) and each contains ExxonMobil With a 45-year in theOne Princeton area, Petrone Associates offers wealth management, in its top 20history holdings. approach is not necessarily betterthoughtful than another but there are insurance and retirement planning services to individuals businesses. We work closely with each differences that investors should be aware of and and weigh in their investment decisions. of our clients to help them reach their financial goals.

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Securities products/services andPetrone advisory are services are offered offered through Park Park Avenue Avenue Securities LLC (PAS), (PAS), registered broker/dealer and investment investment Securities products/services and advisory services are through Securities LLC aa registered and Michael Petrone and Andrew Registered Representatives and Financial Advisors of Park Avenuebroker/dealer Securities LLC (PAS). Securities advisor. Financial Financial Representative, The Guardian Guardian Life Insurance Company ofSIPC. America, New York, York, NY (Guardian). (Guardian).ofPAS PAS isGuardian an indirect indirectLife wholly owned Company advisor. Representative, The Insurance Company America, New NY an wholly owned products and advisory services offered throughLife PAS, member FINRA,of Financial Representatives Theis Insurance subsidiary of Guardian. Petrone Associates, Inc. is not an affiliate or subsidiary of PAS or Guardian. PAS is a member FINRA, SIPC. subsidiary of Guardian. Petrone Associates, Inc. isisnot an affiliate or subsidiary of of PAS or Guardian. PAS isAssociates, a member FINRA, of America® (Guardian), New York, NY. PAS a wholly owned subsidiary Guardian. Petrone Inc. is SIPC. not an affiliate or subsidiary Material discussed discussed is is meant meant for for general general informational informational purposes purposes only only and and is is not not to to be be construed construed as as tax, tax, legal, legal, or or investment investment advice. advice. Guardian, Guardian, its its subsidiaries, subsidiaries, Material of PAS or Petrone CA Insurance License #0F35094, Insurance License #0I22797, AR individual Insurance License agents, andGuardian. employeesMichael do not not provide provide tax, legal, or accounting accounting advice. ConsultAndrew your tax, tax,Petrone legal, or or CA accounting professional regarding your your situation. agents, and employees do tax, legal, or advice. Consult your legal, accounting professional regarding individual situation. #1354685. discussed is meant for general Associates, informational purposes and is not to be construed as tax, legal, or investment advice. 2019-73179Material Exp 01/21 01/21 *Not practicing practicing law for for Petrone Petrone Guardian or its itsonly subsidiaries or affiliates. affiliates. 2019-73179 Exp *Not law Associates, Guardian or subsidiaries or Although the information has been gathered from sources believed to be reliable, please note that individual situations can vary. Therefore, the information should be relied upon only when coordinated with individual professional advice. The opinions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily those of Guardian or its subsidiaries. Investors should consider the investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses of ETF’s carefully before investing. Indices are unmanaged, and one cannot invest directly in an index. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. References to specific securities, asset classes and financial markets are for illustrative purposes only and do not constitute a solicitation, offer, or recommendation to purchase or sell a security. 2022-141106 EXP 07/24 *Not practicing law for Petrone Associates, Guardian or its subsidiaries or affiliates.

SKYE HIGH: Princeton University men’s basketball assistant coach Skye Ettin, right, and Doug Gottlieb enjoy the moment after they guided the U.S. open men’s team to the gold medal at the 2022 Maccabiah Games last month in Israel. Ettin, a former Princeton High and The College of New Jersey basketball standout, served as an assistant coach for the squad, focusing on the team’s defense. Gottlieb, a former Oklahoma State standout point guard and longtime hoops broadcaster, was the team’s head coach. (Photo provided by Skye Ettin) fense. I got it implemented, I called the coverages. I did the game plan and all of that stuff, it was great for me.” Based in a suburb of Tel Aviv, the U.S. squad soaked in the atmosphere of the international competition that brings together 10,000 athletes from 85 countries taking part in 45 sports. “It was amazing, it really had an Olympic feeling,” said Ettin. “You have all of these different teams, all of these different countries and all the different sports. They had everything from like basketball to handball. It was pretty amazing.” The opening ceremony reinforced that Olympic feeling. “It was really, really special,” said Ettin. “We are marching into the stadium with the whole U.S. delegation. There were tens of thousands of people there, it was packed. To make it even more special, we were one of the five or six teams that got to meet President Biden before the ceremony because he was out there which was pretty amazing.” In getting ready for the competition, the team combined practices with participating in the Israel Connect, a program designed to immerse Maccabi athletes and coaches with the Jewish culture of Israel. “It was spending so much time with this group and really getting to know them,” said Ettin. “You are waking up together really early. You practice from 7 to 9 in the morning and you are touring from 10 to 6. You are with everybody the whole day, especially that first week and a half. You are with the whole U.S. delegation, we shared a bus with women’s soccer. You met people from different sports as you did the touring activities. It was really neat.” Playing in Stage 1 pool play, the U.S. went 5-0 and gained momentum as it went along. “We were just trying to figure it out a little bit more together as a group, how to come together, how to play and what each individual’s

strengths were,” said Ettin. “As you start to get a little bit closer to medal play where there is really an opportunity to win gold, you start to be a little bit more selfless. You start to think a little more about the team because there is something that everyone is fighting for together.” Et tin credited Got tlieb with helping the team come together. “Doug is fiery, he has a load of passion,” said Ettin. “On a trip like this, he is so good at bringing the group together with his passion because he cares so much, because he has pushed you so hard. What I really commend Doug on is he had three goals. One was to make this an experience of a lifetime for everyone, and two was for individual guys to get better. We did skill development every day, he cared about the growth of the players. Three was obviously to win gold. He held true to all of three things consistently and that was a big part of our success.” Facing France in the gold medal game, the U.S. trailed 37-35 at halftime before earning an 81-70 win. “We knew it was going to be a good game, the first game was a good game (a 90-77 win for the U.S.) and we were able to pull away at the end,” said Ettin. “In the championship game, we were down two at half and we were struggling a little bit to get a couple of stops. They had done a really good job of preparing and changing up play calls and some different stuff. I think what we did really well in the second half is we went a little bit smaller and we pressured a little bit more. We just grinded out some more stops defensively and that led to some offense.” In the waning seconds of the contest, Ettin felt a sense of satisfaction and elation. “It was a long trip, we were there for 23, 24 days,” said Ettin. “As the clock is ticking down, you feel such a rewarding process, going through so much with this group of guys. We put a lot of

sweat equity in and time in. Everyone is away from family and friends but it was all worth it. You had a chance to represent your country on that type of stage, it was just a surreal moment. It means so much, there are not many people that get an opportunity in any form or fashion to represent their country. For me, just to play a small part in that and just be lucky enough to have an opportunity to represent the country in the game that I love with one of our Princeton players was a special moment.” The emotions flowed at the subsequent medal ceremony. “It was awesome,” recalled Ettin. “That is when you start to get a little tearyeyed. It is emotional.” For Ettin, who became an assistant coach for Princeton in June 2016 after serving for one season as the program’s director of basketball operations, the Maccabiah experience helped him hone his coaching skills. “It is the first chance that I have had to try to build a team in a month,” said Ettin. “It is just like a summer course, you have to squeeze a lot in. It helped me be a little more efficient because on the staff at Princeton we have three different assistants and a director of ops. You have different support roles. Here it was us two and the other guys who came and helped, Matt and Ronny. I think it helped me continue to grow my voice and focus purely on defense. I think that was really good growth for me in general and hopefully I can bring back some of the things I learned.” This week, Ettin will be working on building the Princeton men’s squad for the upcoming campaign as it heads to Europe for a preseason trip. “I am really excited for the season, we are going to Spain in August for a foreign tour,” said Ettin. “We start in Madrid, work our way to Valencia and then Barcelona.” —Bill Alden


Former PU Football Star Leech Named President of Denver Broncos

The Pan American Cup will impact the U.S. men’s Fédération Internationale de Volleyball (FIVB) ranking. Rankings will play a big role in which teams qualify for the 2024 Olympic Games in Paris. The U.S. men are ranked fifth in the world after placing second in the 2022 Volleyball Nations League. The U.S. men will compete in Pool A with Chile, Cuba, and Dominican Republic. Pool B will include Brazil, Canada, Mexico, and Puerto Rico.

Former Princeton University football standout Damani Leech, ’98, a three-time first-team All-Ivy defensive back as a football player with the Tigers, has been named president of the Denver Broncos, the franchise announced last week. Leech will lead the busiPU Women’s Hoops Grad Meyers ness operations of the team Earns Schayes Achievement Award and Stadium Management Recently graduated PrincCo., which operates Emeton Universit y women’s power Field at Mile High. basketball star Abby MeyWith 25 years of sports ers will be receiving the business leadership to his 2022 Dolph Schayes Outc re d it, L e e ch j oi n s t h e standing Achievement by Broncos after most recently a Jew ish Athlete Award working in the NFL’s league presented by Jewish Sports office. From 2019 through Heritage Association. this year, he was chief opMeyers, a 6’0 guard from erating officer of NFL InPotom ac, M d., re ce nt ly ternational. Before that, he helped the United States served as vice president of win the open women’s gold football strategy and busimedal at the 2022 Maccaness development for the biah Games in Israel. MeyNF L from 2015 -19. T he ers averaged 18.4 points per previous 17 years of his contest in the tournament athletics career were spent and was named the MVP of working at the NCAA in Inthe competition. dianapolis. The former Tiger was the “Greg ( Penner) and the unanimous Ivy League Playother partners are visionary er of the Year in the 2021leaders, and the trust they 22 season as the Tigers have shown in me is deepwent 25-5 overall and 14-0 ly humbling,” said Leech. Ivy, advancing to the second “I’m thrilled to support our round of the NCAA tournaworld-class ownership, leadment. Meyers averaged 17.9 ership team and staff on this points and 5.8 rebounds a journey to drive innovation game last winter, earning and growth throughout evAP Honorable Mention Allery area of the Denver BronAmerica status, making her cos.” just the third Tiger to earn In addition to his three All-American honors. All-Ivy selections in the secDolph Schayes, a legendondary, Leech was a recipiary forward for the Syracuse ent of Princeton Football’s Nationals of the NBA, is a Dr. Harry Roemer Award basketball Hall of Famer and — presented annually to was voted one of the greata member of the football est 75 players in the history squad who has demonstratof the NBA this year. ed the qualities of durabilThe award is given annuality and fortitude — in 1997. ly to a person who achieved He also was presented with something above and bePrinceton Football’s Harland yond in the world of sports. “Pink ” Baker ’22 Award In 2020 the recipients were which is presented annu- Men’s Volleyball Star Omene ally to the team’s defensive Makes Squad for Pan Am Cup the Yeshiva University Men’s Nyherowo Omene of the Basketball Team and in 2021 rookie of the year. Princeton University men’s the recipient was endurance PU Men’s Soccer Star Gen volleyball team competed cyclist Leah Goldstein (this Named Defender to Watch for the U.S. men’s national is the third year the award Princeton University men’s team that earned the bronze will be presented). soccer senior captain Lucas medal at the Pan American The Jewish Sports HeriGen has been named a “De- Cup last Sunday in Gatintage Association is a notfender To Watch” coming eau, Quebec, Canada. for-profit education organiinto the 2022 season by The U.S. defeated Chile zation whose mission is to United Soccer Coaches. 3-1 (25-16, 25-15, 22-25, educate the public about the O n e of 24 d e fe n d e r s 25-21) in the bronze medal role Jewish men and women across the country — and contest as Omene had two have played, and continue to the only Ivy League defend- blocks and two service aces. play, in the world of sports, er — selected for inclusion, Cuba won the gold medal at an area of Jewish accomG en was a second-team the event, topping Canada plishment often overlooked. United Soccer Coaches All- 3-0 in the final. Region selection last season Omene, a 6’7 native of as the Tigers won an outSouth Holland, Ill., enjoyed right Ivy League championwell loved ship and advanced to the a big freshman season for Princeton this past spring, and NCAA Tournament. leading the Tigers in blocks well read Gen, a 6’1, 170-pound na- with 64 and ranking third in tive of Sacramento, Calif., ap- kills with 171. since 1946 peared in all 18 matches for the Tigers last season, makPERSONAL PAPERWORK ing 16 starts at center back SOLUTIONS...AND MORE, INC. and playing 1,469 minutes. In addition to helping PrincDuring these challenging times we are actively supporting our clients eton limit opponents to 0.89 providing the following services as “your virtual home office.” goals-per-game, Gen contribwww.ppsmore.com uted two goals of his own. Our expert services include: Women’s Golf Recruit Rao • Personal accounting

Makes U.S. Amateur Quarters

Princeton University incoming freshman women’s golfer Catherine Rao fell in the quarterfinals at the U.S. Women’s Amateur at Chambers Bay in University Place, Wash., last Friday after winning twice on Thursday to make it three match-play wins in t wo days at the event.

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PU Sports Roundup

In the quarterfinal match, Rao, a native of Camarillo, Calif., lost 3-and-1 against UCLA senior Annabel Wilson. In a tight match, Wilson’s lead was never more than one hole through the first 15. A strong close delivered Wilson the win, taking 16 and 17 to clinch, 3-and-1. In Thursday’s round of 16, Rao defeated Clemson rising junior Annabelle Pancake 4-and-3, closing the match with wins on three straight holes, 13 through 15, after Pancake had narrowed Rao’s lead to one hole with six to play. E arlier T hurs day, R ao defeated Sara Im 2-and-1 in the round of 32, leading wire to wire after winning the first hole and building a lead as large as three holes. Standing 1-up w it h t wo holes to play, Rao won the 17th hole by making par in three while Im bogeyed what became the final hole of the match. On Wednesday, Rao defeated round-of-64 opponent Izzy Pellot, an incoming freshman at Mississippi State, breaking a tie at the turn by winning three of the next four holes while splitting the other in that stretch to stand three up with five holes to play. Pellot responded with three wins over the next four holes to pull even heading into 18, but Rao birdied the final hole to take the match. Rao made the match-play portion of the event after finishing at -6 through the two-round stroke play to tie for seventh in the 156-player field, cutting six strokes off her first-round score to turn in a 67 in Tuesday’s second round. Rao was one of two Tigers competing in the field, with rising senior Tiffany Kong shooting an 81 and a 77 across the two strokeplay rounds to end at +12. All players at +4 ended up making a playoff for the final match-play spots.

IRISH MUSIC: Alex Slusher heads to goal this spring during his junior season for the Princeton University men’s lacrosse team. Slusher is currently competing for the U.S. in the World Under-21 Men’s Lacrosse Championships in Limerick, Ireland. Standout attackman Slusher has tallied seven goals and three assists as the U.S. has gone 4-0 in Group A pool play. Slusher’s teammate and classmate Sam English is playing for Canada in the tournament. Star midfielder English had two goals and two assists in four games as Canada has gone 3-1 in Group A with its only setback being a 7-5 loss to the U.S. The quarterfinals of the competition start on August 17 with the gold medal and bronze medal games slated for August 20. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Aiming to Build on Culture of Excellence, Support, Lyons Takes the Helm of Stuart Country Day Athletics After producing a superb senior season for the Brooklyn College women’s basketball team in 2009-10, Frances Lyons was looking to play pro ball overseas. But when potential opportunities in Poland and Puerto Rico fell through, Lyons decided to take another path. “I kept training and signed with an agent,” said Lyons. “But if I was not going to go in normally and know that something is guaranteed, I would rather just stop and go into what I wanted to do which is coaching and teaching.” Lyons, a Brooklyn native who was an All-New York City performer for James Madison High, started substitute teaching in New York City schools and got a job coaching basketball with the Asphalt Green program, a nonprofit sports, swim, and fitness organization in the city. While working with Asphalt Green, she also star ted coaching middle school hoops at The Chapin School, an all-girls school in New York City. Having taken on some administrative duties at Asphalt Green, Lyons went to The Brearley School, another all-girls school in NYC in 2019, where she served as the associate director of athletics. Last month, Lyons came south to New Jersey, becoming the director of athletics at Stuart Country Day School, succeeding Justin Leith, who is now serving as the AD at the Bullis School in Maryland. Lyons found a natural fit at the all-girls environment of Stuart.

“There needs to be a sanctuary for girls,” said Lyons, 34. “I knew that is what type of school I wanted to be at. I want the girls to know that this place is for you, you are not competing with anybody. You have the space, the facilities are here for you, the support is here for you and it is here for you to develop as an athlete. That was important for me.” It was two guys, though, Lyons’ older brother and father, who got her into sports. “My brother was a big football player; he was always around sport and since I am the baby, I wanted to be around him,” said the affable Lyons with a laugh. “I would see him playing so I just picked it up. Sports came naturally. My father was a big time baseball player in Brooklyn as well. My mom thought I wanted to put on dresses and play with dolls but I said no, I want to go with them.” Under the influence of her brother and father, Lyons ultimately directed her energies to the basketball court. “I don’t get into organized basketball until I was about 11, that is when I started playing travel,” said Lyons. “I just started getting better, I started training with my uncle and dad. I ended up going to an AAU team in Harlem. Basketball was every day and I loved every minute of it.” Growing to 5’10, Lyns enjoyed a stellar career for the James Madison girls’ hoops program where she was First-Team All-City performer as a junior and senior. “I was a forward because of what we had on t he team,” said Lyons. “I am a

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small forward, I like to shoot the ball but I also like to get in there in the post and rebound. The highlight was the retirement of my jersey number, it is a big thing.” After high school, Lyons headed to Monroe Community College where she helped it win the Division I National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) national championship in 2006 and finish seventh the next season. Lyons then joined Hofstra’s Division I program but things didn’t work out and she took a break from the game. Lyons then came home to Brooklyn College, intending to focus on academics and not play for its hoops team. But af ter play ing some pickup games with team members, she got the bug to come back to hoops and joined the squad. She made the most of her one year with the program, averaging 15.9 points and 9.5 rebounds per game and earning 2010 All-Metropolitan Division III Third Team honors. “I went to the coach and said, ‘I think I am ready’ and he was like, “Are you sure, there is no pressure,’” said Lyons, who helped Brooklyn to a CUNY Athletic Conference (CUNYAC) South Division Championship and a second straight appearance in the ECAC Division III Metro Tournament. “We would love to have you and then I fell in love with it. I got back into it, I started training again. I was helping Brooklyn College build their program, now they are kind of a powerhouse, winning championships.” After deciding not to pursue a career in pro ball, Lyons began coaching middle schoolers at Asphalt Green and with The Chapin School while also working as a substitute teacher. “It became nat ural to teach; that is where I fell in love with the development of the player,” said Lyons. “Once you got to the level where you know you are good and you can play, I then passed that on. My focus came around with the development of the player as a whole in different aspects mentally, physically and giving them that confidence. That is where my strength came in. I saw it for myself because I actually had to do it myself.” Diversifying her involvement in athletics, Lyons started getting into the administrative end. “At Asphalt Green, I ended up taking a position in

LION-HEARTED: Frances Lyons is enjoying herself as she acclimates to the campus at Stuart Country Day School. Last month, Lyons took over as the new director of athletics at Stuart, succeeding Justin Leith, who is now serving as the AD at the Bullis School in Maryland. Lyons comes to Stuart from The Brearley School in New York City where she was the associate AD. (Photo provided courtesy of Stuart Country Day School) community programs,” said Lyons. “I would run sports leagues in underserved communities in the Harlem area, that is when the administrative side came in. I was running leagues in flag football, soccer, and basketball.” Lyons decided that she wanted to change her career path to focus on athletic administration. “The director of athletics at Brearley reached out to me and asked me if I would be interested in running their field house and being their JV basketball coach and coach the middle school girls volleyball,” said Lyons. “I said absolutely, this is what I want to do. I had the opportunity to learn from her. I jumped from field house manager to associate director of athletics. I was running all of the operations of athletics, from the hiring of coaches, posting jobs, scheduling all of the games and all of the practices and the transportation. I was involved in every aspect of athletics. I started going to the national athletic directors conferences. It is great networking, I met so many new people.” At the point, Lyons decided that she was ready to head a program. “Once I hit my third year at Brearley, I knew it was time,” said Lyons. “I am trained, I feel good, I feel confident and I knew that type of school, I wanted to be at. No matter what, I wanted … to be at an allgirls school.” Looking at opportunities, Lyons learned that Stuart was looking for a new AD and she did some research. “I went on the school website, and I said this is fantastic,” said Lyons. “You could see the care they have for

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athletics. They are into it and it is all girls. After that, I see the facilities and the manicured field that they have for themselves, the other fields that they have in the back and the two field houses.” Duly impressed, Lyons put her hat into the ring and applied for the job. After a Zoom meeting, she had an on-campus interview this spring. “Coming up to it and I make that turn, I see that field and am thinking this is amazing,” said Lyons. “Then I come in and everybody is so nice and welcoming. It was a day of interviewing. I am meeting parents, people from diversity and admissions At some point in the interview, I got to meet some girls and I am like they are way more into sports than they are at Brearley. The questions they had for me showed that they knew that they wanted someone in here who was going to care for the program, care for them, give them support, and was going to go to bat for them. The questions that they had were just great. I had to prove myself to them, it was fantastic.” Apparently proving herself, Lyons didn’t have to wait long to learn how the interview went. “I was just like wow — I felt it was good, I felt at home,” said Lyons. “I felt that this was place where I could see myself for a long time and a place I can build. They called me that night and offered me the job. I said, ‘yeah, this is it.’ I had the same feeling when I went to Brearley and saw their school. You know, there is just something there in the gut that you know it is right. When I heard, I was ecstatic.” As she takes the helm of the program, Lyons is looking to continue the progress Leith made in getting the school’s athletes to take a more serious approach to sports. “I want to continue a lot of things Justin was doing, building the culture,” said Lyons. “It is OK to win and be at an all-girls school and want to be a powerhouse. When people are looking at the school, I want them to go to Stuart because all of their facilities go to girls, they are a powerhouse, they take it seriously, they are competitive, they empower

each other and they are committed to what they are doing. That is the vision that I want to continue to put out there.” Work ing w it h school ’s coaching staff is at the top of Lyons’ to-do list. “I am starting to really hone in on our coaching development, getting to know the coaches and letting them know that I am here for them,” said Lyons. “I want to be giving them the support that they need but also work on the professional development with them and what do they need to feel better and make them feel more connected with our students.” Noting that Stuart is sending athletes to college programs on an annual basis, Lyons is looking to help with the recruiting process. “With my background, I have the strength on that side and can give parents that support,” said Lyons. “I can let them know what college coaches are looking for and what the process is. We are strong on the academic side which is great but then there is another side. It is what are you doing this summer, what camps are you attending, and who are you playing for during that offseason. All those things count for getting recognized.” Lyons is determined to get Stuart more recognition as it looks to expand its enrollment and athletics. “Stuart is committed as a school to getting that enrollment up, that is us really promoting our school, getting the word out there,” said Lyons, noting that Stuart is considering adding soccer and sof tball pro grams at some point. “It is me getting out there, going to tournaments and introducing myself. I want them to know what we offer here. There is that competition among schools. It is really showing off our facility and letting girls know, you have your space. That is what I want people to know about our athletics program and our culture. All of this is for you, you can develop as an athlete, you can develop as a person and develop as a leader and see where sports can take you as a woman.” While sports has certainly taken Lyons to many places, it looks like she has found a home at Stuart. —Bill Alden


While the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings team only had a crew of 40 this summer, it accomplished a lot. The squad went 5-1 in Division 2 dual meet action in the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) and then went on to place second in Division 2 in the PASDA championship meet in late July. “It was a really great season for us, the kids really got a confidence boost,” said Nassau co-head coach Rachel Adlai- Gail. “L ast year was a little bit hard on them. We still had fun but we did lose all of our meets. It was nice to see us winning something. One of the main things I noticed this summer is how much our kids have improved.” T he L emmings bat tled hard at the PASDA championship meet held at the Community Park Pool, piling up 1,319 points to take second in Division 2 with Penn Brook scoring 1,352.50 to win the title. “I think they definitely get energy from competing,” said Adlai-Gail, a longtime Lemming who is entering her senior season at Bryn Mawr and competes for its swim team. “We have a pretty competitive team, kids who like to win. I think this is an awesome setting for them to thrive. They definitely liked it, they were like, ‘We are competing against all of the teams.’ We said, ‘Yes, every team, but you have got this.’ They competed hard, they enjoyed it.”

Adlai-Gail pointed to a pair of 12-and-under boys, G abr iel Colon and A lex Ahlo, as rising to the occasion at the championship meet. Colon placed second in the 50 freestyle and third in both the 50 backstroke and 50 breaststroke while Ahlo took second in the 50 breast. “Gabriel and Alex both came in not knowing all of the strokes, swimming was pretty new to them,” said Adlai-Gail. “When they left, both were competitive and placing well at champs.” For Adlai-Gail, serving as a head coach made for a memorable summer. “I found my love for swimming through Nassau, I remember getting that special feeling of community,” said Adlai-Gail, who had previous served as an assistant coach for the program. “I always remember the older coaches being so nice to me. I would spend all day at the pool, it was definitely a highlight of my childhood. I wanted to continue that feeling for the younger generation of swimmers so that is what I have been doing in coaching.” Nassau co-head coach David Cooper, a former swimmer at Rider University who was in his first season with the Lemmings, relished seeing the progress from his swimmers across the board. “This summer we had a lot of kids who only swim during the summer,” said Cooper, who also coaches for the X-Cel club program.

“They came in and as you go through the summer, you see people getting faster, learning new skills. As they become more comfortable with each other, they become more competitive. It has been amazing to see; it is one thing that a lot of teams just don’t have and they took it and ran with it. The reason I loved coaching them this year is the amount of spirit and camaraderie that I see in the team. It is just a big family; that is one of my core values that I really emphasize and that any sports team should have. I think Nassau models it really well.” T h e Ya n o v s k y f a m i l y helped bolster the Nassau boys’ squad as Vladimir Yanovsky was the 6-and-under boys’ MVP at the PASDA championship meet while Daniel Yanovsky starred in the 10-and-under boys division and Vasily Yanovsky was the 14-and-under boys’ PASDA MVP. Vladimir placed first in the boys 6U 25-yard backstroke and in the 25 free and second in the 8U 25 breast while Daniel took first in the boys 10U 25 free, 25 butterfly, and 100 individual medley and Vasily placed first in the boys 14 U 50 breast, 50 free, and 100 IM. “Vladimir had an interest in swimming that really stood out,” said Cooper. “During our swim-a-thon which we have every year to raise money he swam for about an hour straight. You would expect maybe like 30 laps from a six-and-under,

YOUNG NASSAU: A group of some of the young stars for the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings are all smiles after competing at the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) MiniMeet earlier this summer at the Community Park Pool. Pictured, from left, are Uma Jain, Isabel Colón, Evelyn Colón, Elizabeth Colón, Liliana Brenner-Witten, Tatiana Yanovsky, Daniel Yanovsky, and Vladimir Yanovsky. That crew played a key role as the Lemmings went 5-1 in Division 2 dual meet action and placed second in Division 2 in the PASDA championship meet at CP in late July. (Photo provided by Rachel Adlai-Gail)

but Vladimir just takes off and swims more than a mile. Daniel would always come to practice, saying can we work on this can we do a hard kick drill. He was always asking for something hard or challenging.” Adlai-Gail, for her part, was impressed with Vasily’s competitive spirit. “In our meet at Bedens Brook, Vasily came up to me and said, ‘I know it won’t count, but can I also race in breaststroke unofficially? I just want to race against Daniel Baytin,’” recalled Adlai-Gail. “I said, “Oh yeah. of course, you can take this end lane, it is open.’ He swam and did awesome. He just loves swimming and he loves competing, you can tell. He wanted to do an extra race and that says a lot.” The Baytin brothers were another key family for the Lemmings. Stephen Baytin placed first in the boys 12U 50 breaststroke, 50 free and the 100 IM. Older brother Daniel, a Princeton High star, finished first in the 18U 50 breast and 100 IM and took second in the 50 free. “The Baytins both compete for X- Cel as well,” said Cooper. “T hey are very cooperative. They are always saying, ‘Can I help you here?’ It is a personality trait of the Baytins. They are for the team.” Sawyer Kinney was also a big help for the 14U boys, taking first in the 50 back and 50 fly. “Saw yer is definitely a longtime, loyal Lemming,” said Adlai-Gail. “He is always at practice, he has been doing it for a long time. He is one of our older guys, he sets an example for our younger kids. He brings a nice energy to our team.” As for the Nassau girls, the Yanovsky sisters brought a lot of energy. Tatiana Yanovsky took second in the girls 8-and-under 25 breast, 25 free and 100 IM while Julianna placed second in the girls 12U 50 breast and third in the 100 IM. “What both girls had in common was the way socially and physically, they kind of carry the team,” said Cooper. “Towards the end of practice when you start wearing down and everybody is getting tired, they would be super social and talk to people. They would say keep on going and we are going to have a fun time doing it.” Adlai-Gail liked the drive she saw from Tatiana. “Tatiana is only eight and she practices with our older group and totally kept up with the 14-and-unders,” said Adlai-Girl. “She is very motivated and always wants to be with the older kids, that was something really cool to see.” Uma Jain showed her motivation, placing first in the girls 10U back and third in the 25 free. “Uma fits in there with Juliana and Tatiana, she is hardworking,” said Cooper. “I love how coachable her and older sister Anoushka were, they were always very receptive to critiques during practice to make themselves better.” Juliet Wei and Allison Yu emerged as two of the better swimmers in the 14-andunder girls. Wei took first in the 50 breast, second in both the 50 fly and in the 100 IM while Yu placed first

in the 50 breast, 50 fly, and 100 IM. “Juliet has been a Lemming for as long as I can remember,” said Adlai-Gail, noting that Wei’s older sister, Kim, was a stalwart for the 18U girls this summer. “She is always a great asset to our team. She is pretty quiet. She definitely knows how to get out there and compete. She and her sister Kim live in New York but they come every summer and swim for Nassau and we love having them.” Newcomer Yu made quite a debut for the Lemmings. “She is definitely one of those competitive ones,” said Adlai-Gail, noting that Yu is her neighbor and she recruited her to join the squad. “She was great. She was new to the team and was out there making friends. I asked her how she liked it at the end of the season and she said she had a lot of fun. It was nice to bring in a new person.” For Adlai-Gail, introducing newcomers to the Lemmings tradition was a lot of fun. “T here is a def i n itely magic aspect to Nassau; I love it, I call it like a little wooded oasis,” said AdlaiGail. “One of the highlights of this summer for me was to see new families and faces experiencing that magic of Nassau. The new families that came here were saying why don’t more people know about this, Nassau is such a great place. Seeing that and having parents tell me at the end of the season that feel like their child found their sport was cool. Nassau is that place where you can fall in love with swimming.” Cooper felt that magic in his debut season with the Lemmings. “I am already planning on coming back next year; the team left a really good lasting impression on me with just the way the dynamic is,” said Cooper. “Not a lot of year-round teams have the dynamic that Nassau does, which is so important. It allows the kids to have a good balance of working hard but also having fun, building lifelong friendships. The bigger picture is what families should focus on, not just competing but having some fun in what you are doing. That is the part that really stood out.” —Bill Alden

Local Sports Helene Cody 5K Race Set for September 10

The 14th annual Helene Cody 5-kilometer race and 1-mile fun run is taking place on September 10 with the start and finish line at Heritage Park in Cranbury. The fun run begins at 8:15 a.m. and the 5K starts at 9 a.m. The 5K is chiptimed and USATF-certified with water stations throughout the course. Trophies will be awarded to the top three male and female finishers overall and in each age group for the 5K. Every fun run finisher will receive a medal and trophies will be awarded to the top three boys and girls. The Cranbury Day

celebration will begin immediately after the race on Main Street. Additional race information and on-line registration is available at helenecody. com/5k-and-1-mile-runwalk. html. This event is the main fundraiser for the Helene Cody Foundation, whose mission is to inspire youth to volunteer, to better their communities and themselves. Prior to her death in 2008, Helene Cody, a Princeton High student, planned to revive the Cranbury Day 5K, a community event that had been discontinued in 2006, as a way to combine her love of distance running and community service for her Girl Scout gold award project. When she passed away, a classmate organized the first Helene Cody Cranbury 5K in memory of Helene for his Eagle Scout project. Every year since, the Helene Cody Foundation has used the event to bring the community together and use the proceeds to sponsor youth service projects and provide scholarships. All proceeds go directly to the Helene Cody Foundation, a 501(c) (3) charity.

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022

Enjoying a Big Summer Despite Having a Small Crew, Nassau Swim Club Took 2nd in PASDA Division 2

Princeton Athletic Club Holding Trail Run Sept. 17

The Princeton Athletic Club (PAC) is holding a trail run and walk at the Mountain L akes Preser ve, 57 Mountain Avenue, Princeton, on September 17. The event, which is benefiting the Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad, will start at 9 a.m. and consists of a 5-kilometer-plus trail run and walk. The course is comprised of about 10 percent mile paved park trail, 30 percent unimproved service right-ofways, and 60 percent single track including moderately technical rocks, roots, logs, and whatever else nature has wrought in the woods. Due to the technical nature of the trail, parents should consider whether this event is appropriate for young children. The race is limited to 150 participants. Online registration and full details regarding the event are available at princetonac.org. The entry fee is $35 until August 16, including a T-shirt. The fee from August 27-September 14 is $40 with a T-shirt on an asavailable basis. Sign up at the event will be $50 and is credit card only, subject to availability. The PAC is a nonprofit, all-volunteer running club for the community that promotes running for the fun and health of it and stages several running events each year.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022 • 26

Obituaries

Peter J. Carril

Coach Peter J. C ar r il passed away peacefully at The University of Pennsylvania Hospital, on August 15, 2022, where he was recuperating from a stroke. He was 92 years old. Carril grew up on the southside of Bethlehem, Pa., where his father worked in the steel mills. The Bethlehem Boys Club helped the young Carril stay on track as he became a promising basketball player at Liberty High School, graduating in 1948. After high school, Carril went to nearby Lafayette College. He graduated in 1952 with a BA in Spanish and it is at Lafayette where he began his lifelong basketball friendship with the late Butch vanBredaKolff. Carril went on to coach at Easton Area High School for three years while earning his M.A. degree from Lehigh University. From 1958 to 1966 he coached at Reading High School where he had many winning seasons and trips to the state finals. After Reading, he made the move

into college coaching, going back to Lehigh for one year (1966 to1967) where he compiled the first winning record in basketball in 50 years, at a school where wrestling was the premiere sport. In 1967 vanBredaKolff was leaving Princeton and recommended his protégé Carril for the job of Head Basketball Coach. Carril accepted the job and stayed at Princeton, building a basketball dynasty with numerous accomplishments that would also earn him many honors. Car r il spent 29 years at Princeton, racking up 514 wins. His teams won 13 Ivy League titles, one NIT Championship (1975), and made 11 NCAA tournament appearances. Along with coaching the Olympic teams of Spain and Argentina, Carril made a name for himself by perfecting the Princeton offense and relying on his famous “backdoor play.” After Princeton, Carril spent time as an assistant coach with the Sacramento Kings, from 1994 to 2004.

He was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Hall of Fame in 1998. In t he words of Jer r y Price, Senior Communications Advisor/Historian for Princeton Athletics, Carril was “a very simple man, and the more the world around him grew complex, the simpler he became. Make shots. Guard your guy. Be honest with people. And above all, work hard. No shortcuts.” Carril is predeceased by his father, José Carril of Léon, Spain, his mother, Angelina Rodriguez Carril of Argentina, his sister, Anita Carril Amigo of Bethlehem, Pa., and his former wife,

Dolores L. “Dilly” Carril, of Bethlehem, Pa., and Princeton, NJ. He leaves behind a daughter, Lisa D. Carril, of Hopewell, NJ, and a son, Peter J. Carril of Princeton, NJ ; grandchildren, Peter B. Carril and Zoe Carril, of New York City; and two grand dogs, Rock and Dolores of Hopewell. There will be a private viewing for family and close friends only at Kimble Funeral Home in Princeton. A memorial service honoring the Coach will be held at Jadwin Gymnasium on Princeton University’s campus, at a date to be determined.

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The Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector, Must fully vaccinated against Covid-19 attend. Must be fully vaccinated against Covid-19 tototo attend. Must bebe fully vaccinated against Covid-19 attend. The Rev. Canon Dr. Kara Slade, Assoc. Rector,Must fully against Covid-19 to attend. Mustbe be fully vaccinated against Covid-19 toevents attend. Must be fully vaccinated against Covid-19 to attend. Must bevaccinated fully vaccinated against Covid-19 to attend. Must be fully vaccinated against Covid-19 to attend. Must be fully vaccinated against Covid-19 to attend. Must be fully vaccinated against Covid-19 to attend. Registration required for all on campus. Registration required for all events on campus. Registration required for all events on campus. Registration required for events on campus. Registration required forall all events on campus. Registration required for all events campus. Registration required for allvisit events onon campus. Registration required for all events on campus. Registration required for all events on campus. Registration required for all events on campus. For more information, chapel.princeton.edu For more information, visit chapel.princeton.edu For more information, visit chapel.princeton.edu The Rev. Joanne Epply-Schmidt, Assoc. Rector, For information, visit chapel.princeton.edu Formore more information, visit chapel.princeton.edu For more information, visit chapel.princeton.edu For more information, visit chapel.princeton.edu For more information, visit chapel.princeton.edu For more information, visit chapel.princeton.edu For more information, visit chapel.princeton.edu

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John Madison Cooper, 82, of Princeton, New Jersey, died on August 8, 2022, after a short illness. John was born in Memphis, Tennessee, on November 29, 1939, the second of seven children of Bernardine (Sheehan) and Armon Cooper. He left Memphis in 1953 when he was awarded a scholarship to attend Phillips Exeter Academy. It was at Exeter that he began his study of ancient Greek, earning the Haig-Ramage Classical Scholarship and graduating first in his class in 1957. He continued his studies at Harvard University (B.A., 1961, Ph.D., 1967) and was a Marshall Scholar at Corpus Christi College, O x ford ( B.Ph i l., 1963 ) . He taught at Harvard, the University of Pittsburgh, and Princeton, from which he retired in 2016. He was President of the Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association in 1999-2000 and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was predeceased by his parents, his sister, Stephanie Cooper,

and two brothers, Farrell Cooper and Jerome Cooper. He is survived by his beloved wife Marcia (Coleman), his daughters, Stephanie and Katherine, Katherine’s husband Bryan Foster, and his grandchildren Amos and Louisa. He is also survived by his brothers and sistersin-law Armon Cooper and Karen S choenberg, G ail Cooper, Richard and Charlotte Cooper, Robert and Sue Cooper, sister-in-law Dora (Coleman) DeGeorge, cousins Brainard Cooper and Sarah Forrest Schwartz, many nieces and nephews, and valued friends. J o h n w a s P r i n c e to n’s Henry Putnam University Professor of Philosophy emeritus and one of the world’s leading scholars of ancient Greek and Roman philosophy. On the basis of the John Locke Lectures, which he gave at Oxford in 2011, he wrote his final book, Pursuits of Wisdom, a historical and philosophical account of the Greeks’ views on the good life. His first book, Reason and Human Good in Aristotle, won

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022

John Madison Cooper

the American Philosophical Association’s Matchette Prize in 1977. His essays have appeared in two volumes, and he edited a selection of Seneca’s essays on moral philosophy. He edited the Complete Works of Plato (1997), now used as the standard throughout the English-speaking world. Although he dedicated a significant effort to his writings, he felt strongly that his most important responsibility was to his students, and in response was deeply appreciated by generations of them. A s er ud ite as he was sharp, John set a standard of intellectual rigor and honesty for colleagues and especially his students. He HOPEWELL • NJ HIGHTSTOWN • NJ was widely admired for his scholarship, his humanity, his generosity, and his wit. 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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022 • 28

to place an order:

“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS

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The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. YARD SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

HOME HEALTH AIDE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Live-in or live-out. Driver’s license. References available. Please call Inez, (609) 227-9873. 08-17

free items. No junk! We’re moving, everything must go. Saturday, Aug 20, 9-12, rain or shine. 08-17

ings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000. tf

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf

HOME CARE AIDE / COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Livein or live-out. I also drive. References available. Call or text: 973-489-0032. 08-17

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

GARAGE SALE, Friday,s 8/19 and Saturday, 8/20. 9-3. Clothes, bedding, furniture, knick-knacks and more! 458 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton. 08-17

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240.

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WE BUY CARS

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Irene Lee, Classified Manager ROSA’S

THE credit PRINCETON CLEANING SERVICE LLC • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must Belle be Mead pre-paid, Cash, card,WRITING or check. Garage COACH - a professional writer and Offering professional cleaning ser(908) 359-8131 university teacher - hasthan guided many • 25 words or less: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater 60 words in length. students on how to plan, write, and re- vices in the Princeton community Ask for Chris SERIOUS YARD SALE, 78 Jeffor more than 28 years! Weekly, bivise outstanding college application 3 West weeks: $40.00 • 4CAREGIVER weeks: $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. ferson Rd: household•(PB, Elm, EXPERIENCED essays. These essays are the best weekly, monthly, move-in/move-out Muji); clothes (J.Crew, Boden, BR), Experienced and reliable adult opportunity for students to “speak” services for houses, apartments, of• Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inchWHAT’S • all bold face $10.00/week A GREAT GIFTtype: FOR shoes, toys, luggage, books. Some caregiver available weekday morndirectly and convincingly to admis-

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LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23 DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000. tf

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 11-30 THE PRINCETON WRITING COACH - a professional writer and university teacher - has guided many students on how to plan, write, and revise outstanding college application essays. These essays are the best opportunity for students to “speak” directly and convincingly to admissions committees. Your student can work with the Coach face-to-face or via Zoom. Call for a free consultation today. 908-420-1070. princetonwritingcoach@gmail.com. 08-17

CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732 tf ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23

A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription!

tf I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23

Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10 circulation@towntopics.com YARD SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf SERIOUS YARD SALE, 78 Jefferson Rd: household (PB, West Elm, Muji); clothes (J.Crew, Boden, BR), shoes, toys, luggage, books. Some free items. No junk! We’re moving, everything must go. Saturday, Aug 20, 9-12, rain or shine. 08-17 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf

sions committees. Your student can work with the Coach face-to-face or via Zoom. Call for a free consultation today. 908-420-1070. princetonwritingcoach@gmail.com. 08-17 HOME HEALTH AIDE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Live-in or live-out. Driver’s license. References available. Please call Inez, (609) 227-9873. 08-17 GARAGE SALE, Friday,s 8/19 and Saturday, 8/20. 9-3. Clothes, bedding, furniture, knick-knacks and more! 458 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton. 08-17 EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Experienced and reliable adult caregiver available weekday mornings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000. tf HOME CARE AIDE / COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Livein or live-out. I also drive. References available. Call or text: 973-489-0032. 08-17 LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23 DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000. tf

fices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23

The Top Spot for Real Estate Advertising Town Topics is the most comprehensive and preferred weekly Real Estate resource in the greater Central New Jersey and Bucks County areas.

Considering a kitchen or bath renovation project? Cranbury Design Center listens to your ideas and then uses color drawings of your space to help make your vision a reality. We assist with design decisions, cabinet, countertop and hardware selections, and finishing touches like backsplash tile and paint colors. Call us or visit us online to get started on your remodel. We look forward to meeting you!

(609) 448-5600 145 W. Ward Street, Hightstown www.cranburydesigncenter.com Custom Kitchens, Baths and Renovations

Vote for us on

Don’t Forget to CDC_TT_BestofHouseHome_Half_Page_041421.indd 1

towntopics.com 4/14/21

8:13 PM

Every Wednesday, Town Topics reaches every home in Princeton and all high traffic business areas in town, as well as the communities of Lawrenceville, Pennington, Hopewell, Skilllman, Rocky Hill, and Montgomery. We ARE the area’s only community newspaper and most trusted resource since 1946! Call to reserve your space today! (609) 924-2200, ext 27

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23 PERSONAL ASSISTANT/CAREGIVER FOR YOUR LOVED ELDER

Years of experience. Trustworthy, reliable & highly competent. Female. Excellent references. 609-477-4671. 09-21

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23 DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000. tf CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732 tf

A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10 circulation@towntopics.com YARD SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf SERIOUS YARD SALE, 78 Jefferson Rd: household (PB, West Elm, Muji); clothes (J.Crew, Boden, BR), shoes, toys, luggage, books. Some free items. No junk! We’re moving, everything must go. Saturday, Aug 20, 9-12, rain or shine. 08-17 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 11-30 THE PRINCETON WRITING COACH - a professional writer and university teacher - has guided many students on how to plan, write, and revise outstanding college application essays. These essays are the best opportunity for students to “speak” directly and convincingly to admissions committees. Your student can work with the Coach face-to-face or via Zoom. Call for a free consultation today. 908-420-1070. princetonwritingcoach@gmail.com. 08-17 HOME HEALTH AIDE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Live-in or live-out. Driver’s license. References available. Please call Inez, (609) 227-9873. 08-17 GARAGE SALE, Friday,s 8/19 and Saturday, 8/20. 9-3. Clothes, bedding, furniture, knick-knacks and more! 458 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton. 08-17 EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Experienced and reliable adult caregiver available weekday mornings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000. tf HOME CARE AIDE / COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Livein or live-out. I also drive. References available. Call or text: 973-489-0032. 08-17

A Town Topics Directory

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner Home Repair Specialist

609-586-2130

Scott M. Moore of

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

AT YOUR SERVICE

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240.

MOORE’S CONSTUCTION HOME IMPROVEMENTS LLC carpenter • builder • cabinet maker complete home renovations • additions 609-924-6777 Family Serving Princeton 100 Years. Free Estimates

Erick Perez

Fully insured 15+ Years Experience Call for free estimate Best Prices

BLACKMAN

LANDSCAPING FRESH IDEAS

Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Stone Walls and Terraces FREE CONSULTATION

PRINCETON, NJ

609-683-4013

B BRIAN’S

FIREWOOD SPECIAL

TR BRIAN’S 609-466-6883

Seasoned Premium Hardwoods Split & Delivered $225 A cord / $425 2 cords

TREE SERVICE

Offer good while supplies last

Stacking available for an additional charge

10-06 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS!

60

BRIAN’S TREE TREESERVICE SERVICE Trees & Shrubs

609-466-6883 Trimmed, Pruned, and Removed Trees & Shrubs Stump Trimmed, Grinding &Removed Lot Clearing Pruned, and

609-466-6883 Stump Grinding & Lot Clearing

Owned & Operated for over 20 years! Trees & Shrubs Locally Owned &Locally Operated for over 20 years! Trimmed, Pruned, and Removed

Stump Grinding & Lot Clearing

Trimm Stum

Locally Owned & Operated for over 20 years!

tf I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469.

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

609-466-2693

Locally Owned & Op

A Tradition of Quality

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read.

HD

(609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23 PERSONAL ASSISTANT/CAREGIVER FOR YOUR LOVED ELDER

Years of experience. Trustworthy, reliable & highly competent. Female. Excellent references. 609-477-4671.

HOUSE PAINTING & MORE

(609)737-2466

Serving the Princeton Area since 1963 Find us on Facebook and Instagram

House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish (Benjamin Moore Green promise products)

Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

09-21

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage

American Furniture Exchange

(908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10 circulation@towntopics.com

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

YARD SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

CALL 609-924-2200 TO PLACE YOUR AD HERE


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022 • 30

Rider

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609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com

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Princeton Realty Resources 2x3.indd 1

Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

Kitchen Island Design Trends

The kitchen island has become one of the most highly requested and versatile features in kitchen remodeling projects, according to latest designer trends. Kitchen islands can provide the ideal multifunctional space, from an extra food prep area to a place for guests to gather while entertaining. Kitchen islands can be a simple dining space, but some are designed with plumbing and electrical to house extra sinks or appliances such as dishwasher drawers or wine cooler cabinets. Kitchen design professionals can help determine which is best for your space.

Islands can be styled to match the rest of the kitchen cabinetry or can be a contrasting focal point. A brightly colored island paired with white or neutral cabinets adds a pop of color. Butcher block or marble top islands are also trending and make an ideal baking or food prep space. If you have a smaller space but still want to add an island to your kitchen, consider a rolling kitchen island cart. A moveable island can provide extra storage space and prep space but can be moved out of the way when not it use.

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECOͲBroker Princeton Office 609Ͳ921Ͳ1900 | 609Ͳ577Ͳ2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf

THE PRINCETON WRITING COACH - a professional writer and university teacher - has guided many students on how to plan, write, and revise outstanding college application essays. These essays are the best opportunity for students to “speak” directly and convincingly to admissions committees. Your student can work with the Coach face-to-face or via Zoom. Call for a free consultation today. 908-420-1070. princetonwritingcoach@gmail.com. 08-17

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 11-30

5/2/22 4:30 PM

with Beatrice Bloom

SERIOUS YARD SALE, 78 Jefferson Rd: household (PB, West Elm, Muji); clothes (J.Crew, Boden, BR), shoes, toys, luggage, books. Some free items. No junk! We’re moving, everything must go. Saturday, Aug 20, 9-12, rain or shine. 08-17

HOME HEALTH AIDE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Live-in or live-out. Driver’s license. References available. Please call Inez, (609) 227-9873. 08-17

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area TECHNICAL LEAD in Princeton, NJ, and various unanticipated locations throughout the U.S. Travel/ relocation may be required. Please resume to akanksha@hanu.com or Hanu Software Solutions Inc at 4390 US Route 1, Ste 200, Princeton, NJ 08540. 08-17

Witherspoon Media Group

A Princeton ThinkCustom GlobalDesign, Printing, Publishing tradition! Buy Local and Distribution · Newsletters · Brochures · Postcards ADVERTISING SALES Witherspoon Media Group is looking for · Books a part-time advertising Account Manager, · Catalogues based out of our Kingston, NJ office, to generate sales for Town Topics Newspaper · Annual Reports and Princeton Magazine The ideal candidate will:

• Establish new sales leads manage For additional infoand contact: existing sales accounts for both publications

melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com • Develop industry-based knowledge and understanding, including circulation, audience, readership, and more.

• Collaborate with the advertising director and sales team to develop growth opportunities for both publications

GARAGE SALE, Friday,s 8/19 and Saturday, 8/20. 9-3. Clothes, bedding, furniture, knick-knacks and more! 458 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton. 08-17

Track record of developing successful sales strategies and knowledge of print and digital media is a plus.

EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Experienced and reliable adult caregiver available weekday mornings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000. tf

Fantastic benefits and a great work environment.

HOME CARE AIDE / COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Livein or live-out. I also drive. References available. Call or text: 973-489-0032. 08-17 LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23 DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000. tf

Witherspoon Media Group Please submit cover letter and resume to: charles.plohn@witherspoonmediagroup.com

Custom Design, Printing, 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 Publishing and Distribution 609-924-5400

· Newsletters · Brochures · Postcards

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WEEKLY INSERTS START AT ONLY 10¢ PER HOUSEHOLD. · Books

Weekly Inserts We only 10¢ per only house 10¢ CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732 tf

Get the best reach at the best rate!

· Catalogues

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• Postcards · Annual Reports • 8.5x11” flyers Witherspoon • Menus Media Group Booklets info contact: For• additional Custom Design, Printing, • Trifolds melissa.bilyeu@ Publishing and Distribution witherspoonmediagroup.com • Post its • We can accomodate • · Newsletters almost anything! · Brochures

Get the best reach Get at the be Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton NEW PRODUCTS ADDED WEEKLY!

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23 HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

www.princetonmagazinestore.com

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469.

Pos • 8.5″ • Flye Reach· Postcards over 15,000 homes in Princeton and beyond! · Books • Men F Town ·Topics puts you in front Catalogues • Boo of your target customer for less · Annual Reports than what it would cost to mail etc a postcard!

For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

We c alm

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

Reach 11,000 homes in Princeton Reach and 11,000 surroun hom 10-06

Town Topics puts you in front of Town your Topics targetputs custo y


AND YOU WILL, TOO. “I am proud and honored to serve as Greenwood House Hospice Medical Director and to work alongside some of the best nurses, social workers, chaplains and volunteers in the business. Our team provides intimate and comprehensive care for our terminally ill patients. We support not just those in their final months but also their families and loved ones.”

– DAVID R. BARILE, MD

Medical Director, Greenwood House Hospice

Hospice is about living the fullest life possible according to a patient’s capabilities within a life-limiting condition. In hospice, your choices guide the care we provide. Hospice care affirms quality of life. Our goal is to prevent and relieve pain, discomfort, anxiety and fear. We provide emotional and spiritual support to patients and their loved ones. Hospice care is provided wherever a patient feels most comfortable or where they call home. We help families and caregivers prepare for endof-life challenges and find creative ways to share in life review and legacy projects so that our patient’s wisdom and memories can be treasured for future generations.

Our Hospice Team consists of: • Hospice Medical Director, a board-certified hospice physician • Registered Nurses (RNs) monitoring pain, managing symptoms and guiding patient’s plan of care • Hospice Certified Home Health Aides (CHHAs) providing personal patient care and companionship • Social Workers supporting patients and families and connecting them with community resources

• Spiritual Counselors providing emotional support and personal counseling • Bereavement Services offering guidance and education concerning anticipatory grief to families throughout care and bereavement • Hospice Volunteers assisting with a variety of patient and family personalized support activities

Greenwood House Hospice is a nonprofit, mission-based organization rooted in cherished Jewish traditions and an industry leader in providing high-quality senior health care in the state of New Jersey. Seniors of all faiths are welcome.

Call us today: (609) 883-6026 Or email us at info@greenwoodhouse.org

greenwoodhouse.org @GreenwoodHouseNJ

Greenwood House is a beneficiary agency of the Jewish Federation of Princeton, Mercer, Bucks. *Greenwood House Hospice was established in memory of Renee Denmark Punia.

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2022

At Greenwood House Hospice, our families and caregivers LOVE HOW MUCH WE CARE!


PRINCETON LISTINGS 11 Governors Lane $1,100,000 Elegant living in this end-unit townhouse. Private courtyard patio, 3/4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths and a finished basement.

221 Shadybrook Lane $1,550,000 Expanded Littlebrook colonial-split with 5 bedrooms, 3 full baths, saltwater pool and walking distance to elementary school.

1873 Stuart Rd W $2,195,000 Pretty Brook on 2 acres, Kathy Knight/Baxter Construction addition, 5 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 2 family rooms and 3 car garage.

21 Morven Place $2,495,000 Western Section, walk-to-town beauty, 3 levels of living, 6 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, renovated kitchen and baths plus a 2 car detached garage.

85 Elm Road $1,535,000

Contract Pending

H H H

Western Section, walk-to-town midcentury modern with 4 bedrooms, 3 full baths, second floor study on a private lane. (Allison Road)

Heidi A. Hartmann Call / Text 609.658.3771 W: HeidiHartmannHomes.com E: HeidiHartmannHomes@gmail.com

10 Nassau St, Princeton - (609) 921 - 1411