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Volume LXXIII, Number 33

Special Needs Spotlight Pages 20-22 Flood of 1955 is Subject of Flemington Talk . . . . . . . 5 Thomas Sweet Opens New Location . . . . . . . . 8 Looking for Toni Morrison in This Week’s Book Review . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Princeton Summer Theater Closes Season with Topdog/Underdog . . . . 14 Former PU Men’s Hockey Star Teves Looking to Make Canucks . . . . . . . 23 PHS Grad Lis Primed for Season with Georgetown Women’s Soccer . . . . . 25

Steven Gubser, PU Theoretical Physicist, Dies . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .18, 19 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 17 Classified Ads . . . . . . 30 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Music/Theater . . . . . . 15 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 28 Police Blotter . . . . . . . . 4 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 30 School Matters . . . . . . 11 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

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W-J Safe Streets Program Culminates With History, Athletics A week of activities sponsored by the Joint Effort Princeton Witherspoon-Jackson Safe Streets Program was more than a Witherspoon-Jackson (W-J) neighborhood celebration. “If we lift up Witherspoon-Jackson, we lift up Princeton,” said John Bailey, program coordinator. “If we lift up the community, we make it a better place to live, work, play, and to do business.” Bailey, who stressed that this was a community effort, noted that what started more than 10 years ago with a picnic and small program has evolved to include educational, arts, and historical events including, last Saturday, the dedication of Heritage Tour plaques at four historic black churches in the W-J Historic District. The walking tour to commemorate the dedication of the plaques included ceremonies at the Morning Star Church of God in Christ, established in 1941, 431 Birch Avenue; Mt. Pisgah AME Methodist Church, established in 1832, 170 Witherspoon Street; Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church, established in 1840 as the First Presbyterian Church of Colour, 112 Witherspoon Street; and First Baptist Church of Princeton, established in 1885 as Bright Hope Baptist Church, 30 Green Street. At each church congregants and community members heard a brief congregation history from a church representative, and applauded the unveiling of a new Heritage Tour plaque. At Witherspoon, the Rev. Lukata A. Mjumbe said it was appropriate that the new plaque was next to one honoring Elizabeth “Betsey” Stockton, born a slave, who started a Sabbath school at Witherspoon. He also noted that activist, scholar, athlete, and singer Paul Robeson grew up at the church where his father, the Rev. William Robeson, was pastor. “The name Witherspoon Street connects us to the community,” he said. “It connects us to all who lived along this street.” Shirley Satterfield, president of the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical & Cultural Society, and a member of the Joint Effort Safe Streets Host Committee, arranged the tour and acted as a guide. Satterfield said that the churches are the first of 29 designated W-J Historic District sites to get plaques, and explained that the plaque program serves to “research, Continued on Page 11

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Opposition Grows to Relocation of Westminster A letter sent to the Rider University community by University President Gregory Dell’Omo on August 7 urged members of the faculty, staff, and students to join “working groups” to assist in “the historic move of Westminster Choir College to Lawrenceville.” But several members of the faculty have declined the invitation, saying the move from Westminster’s Princeton campus to Rider, projected to be completed in time for the fall 2020 semester, would mean the end of the prestigious music school, which has been located since 1932 on Walnut Lane. Westminster also encompasses the Westminster Conservatory of Music, a community music school. Two days after the letter went out, Bruce Afran, attorney for the Westminster Foundation, filed an amended complaint with the Superior Court of New Jersey’s Chancery Division. The amended document adds 13 tenured faculty members to a complaint which seeks to prevent the move. The facilities that accommodate

Westminster’s specialized conservatory training — private studios and practice rooms, specially constructed organs, and acoustically designed facilities for choral instruction and performance — do not exist at Rider’s campus, and no plans to build or replicate them have been announced, opponents of the move contend. Westminster’s Talbot Library, which houses special collections and rare editions of musical literature and sound recordings, would be relocated to the base-

ment of Rider’s Moore Library, according to the complaint. Rider, which merged with Westminster in 1991, announced at the end of 2016 that it was seeking to sell the music school to make up for a projected deficit. A Chinese company was identified last year as the buyer, but the $40 million deal was halted two months ago. Two ongoing lawsuits contend that Rider has no legal right to sell the school. The Continued on Page 7

Local Woodstock Tribute Concert Features Community-Minded Musicians

The musicians at the Woodstock 50th Anniversary Tribute Concert this Saturday have played for countless Princeton area residents who enjoy the locally-produced music at events like Saturday’s upcoming show at the Community Park North Amphitheater. But what many don’t know is that members of the Einstein Alley Musicians Collaborative (EAMC) volunteer their time

all year, supporting organizations like the Elks-run Camp Moore for youths with special needs, and at nursing homes, rehabilitation centers, the Menlo Park Veterans Memorial Home, and libraries, where music is always welcome. The August 17, 5 p.m. Woodstock tribute event, held on the weekend of the original festival, is co-sponsored by the Continued on Page 9

JERSEY FRESH: The summer season is in full swing at the Trenton Farmers Market on Spruce Street in Lawrence Township . Now under new management, it is New Jersey’s oldest continually running farmers market . Shoppers identify their favorite New Jersey produce in this week’s Town Talk on page 6 . (Photo by Erica M. Cardenas)


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LIFE ON THE FARM: Howell Living History Farm on Valley Road, Hopewell Township, is accepting applications for its fall parent-child enrollment program, the Hatchery. Pre-schoolers learn about collecting eggs, feeding animals, and exploring the farm. The program starts September 11 and runs Wednesday and Friday mornings. Kids must be 3-5 years old. Visit cmadzy@howellfarm.org for more information. a resident of Bainbridge time between 5:30 and 7:30 Street reported that, on Au- p.m. someone entered their gust 5, someone altered a opened garage and stole a check they had written and Specialized Langster bike deposited $925.24 into an valued at $1,000. unauthorized account. Unless otherwise noted, On August 8, at 8:23 p.m., individuals arrested were On August 10, at 3:56 a resident of Springdale later released. p.m., a victim reported that, Road reported that someon August 9, at 6 p.m., someone stole $50 and an American Express card from their wallet. The theft occurred in A Community Bulletin an unsecured study room at the public library. Video surveillance depicts the suspect Harrison Street Detour: PSE&G is doing gas main as a black female in her early and services replacement on Harrison Street between twenties. Hartley Avenue and Nassau Street, and traffic is deOn August 10, at 9:41 toured. The work is projected to take one more week. p.m., an 18-year-old female Old Smart Cards: To spend down remaining balfrom Washington Crossing ances, cardholders can continue to use old cards to pay was charged with possession for parking in the Spring Street garage indefinitely, of under 50 grams of susuntil the equipment fails. Cardholders can also have pected marijuana and drug their old Smart Card balances transferred to the Park paraphernalia, subsequent Princeton mobile app. Visit princetonnj.gov. to a motor vehicle stop on Quaker Road for speeding. Summer Tours at Princeton Airport: Free tours of the airport during August every Tuesday morning On August 9, at 4:29 p.m., starting at 10:30 a.m. www.princetonairport.com. a caller reported that the operator of a green Acura MDX Womanspace Seeks Volunteers: Womanspace, with NJ license plates had Inc., a nonprofit agency that provides services to just left after failing to pay people impacted by domestic and sexual violence, is for $33.94 worth of gas they currently accepting volunteer applications for the Doreceived on Nassau Street. mestic Violence and Sexual Assault Victim Response The suspect is described as a Teams. The fall training will begin in September. Apwhite male in his fifties, with plications will be accepted until August 16. Contact gray hair and wearing a light Heidi Mueller at dvvrt@womanspace.org or (609) blue shirt and khaki pants. 394-0136. On August 9, at 9:42 p.m., Trip to Barnes Foundation Museum: Princeton a 25-year-old male from EwSenior Citizens Club is sponsoring a trip on Wednesing was charged with under day, September 4, to Philadelphia’s Barnes Founda50 grams of suspected marition Museum. The bus will leave Princeton Shopping juana and drug paraphernaCenter, near the Rite-Aid parking lot, at 8:30 a.m., and lia, subsequent to a motor return at 4:30 p.m. Tickets, not including lunch, are vehicle stop on Witherspoon $70. Call Rosetta Bruce at (609) 647-4164 or Minnie Street for driving without Craig at (609) 921-9522 to reserve a spot. headlights. On August 8, at 9:59 a.m., Blood Donors Needed: For a drive at Quaker a victim reported witnessing Bridge Mall, near Lord & Taylor, on Thursday, August an unknown male enter their 22, 2-8 p.m. Each donor gets a $10 Starbucks card. unlocked vehicle parked on Singers Wanted: LaShir, the Jewish Community Nassau Street at 8:4 a.m. Choir of Princeton, is actively seeking experienced The victim’s cell phone and singers for its 2019-2020 season. Rehearsals take wallet had been stolen. The place on Thursday evenings from 7:30-9:15 p.m. at suspect is described as a The Jewish Center in Princeton. For more information, black male, 40 years old, contact Marsha at (347) 782-2746 or LaShirDirector@ with a thin build and 5’8 tall. gmail.com. On August 8, at 3:31 p.m.,

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Author of Book on 1955 Flood To Speak at Flemington Event

A trio of storms that sent flood waters rushing over the banks of the Delaware River in 2004, 2005, and 2006 caused significant property damage in communities along both sides of the water. But they were nothing compared to the flood

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of 1955, which destroyed bridges, wiped out homes and summer camps, and killed nearly 100 people. “It’s definitely the record holder, which is hard to believe because 2006 is the big one for most people alive now,” said Mary Shafer, a Bucks County, Pa., resident and the author of Devastation on the Delaware : Stories and Images of the Deadly Flood of 1955. Shafer will speak about the 1955 flood on Sunday, August 18 at 10 a.m. at the Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers Market in Flemington. The talk is part of the Historic Delaware River Series sponsored by the National Park Service’s Lower Delaware Wild and Scenic program, which aims to protect the natural, cultural, and historic value of the Delaware River.

“At the time, we were in the middle of worst drought we’d had since dustbowl era,” said Shafer. “Farmers were glad to have rain, but it was a ‘watch what you pray for’ situation. The entire Eastern Seaboard was devastated by these storms. They weren’t so much windy storms, but they were rainy storms, just sucking water out to beat the band.” Below Trenton, the Delaware River is wider and deeper than it is further north. So while the damage there was extensive, it wasn’t as devastating as it was in places like Analomink, where 37 people at a summer camp were killed Continued on Next Page

www.princetonmagazinestore.com

TOPICS Of the Town Shafer’s book chronicles the experiences of survivors and eyewitnesses, and includes several rare images of the chaos caused by the flood. A self-described “weather weenie,” she was living near Doylestown, Pa., when she found a book at a flea market that had been published soon after the flood. “I couldn’t believe what I was reading, and that I had never heard anything about it,” she said. “I was weirded out. Because it was a really big deal.” At the time, Shafer was w r iting a column called “Bucks Back Then” for the Bucks County Herald. In recognition of the 50th anniversary of the flood in 2005, she decided to write the book. “I had no idea what I was getting into,” she said. “But it has been the coolest project ever. And it changed my life in many ways. I have met a lot of people in the process who have become very good friends.” The August, 1955 flood was c aus e d by back-to back hurricanes known as Connie and Diane. After slamming into the Carolinas, they charged north. By the time they hit the Hunterdon County area, they had weakened to tropical storms. But they dumped heavy rains all through the Delaware Valley.

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5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019

Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton

DEADLY DELUGE: During the flood of 1955, cars were stranded where they pulled up on the approach to the Yardley-Wilburtha Bridge across the Delaware River to escape the water invading the Ewing Township, New Jersey side. Before the day was out, the bridge was half gone. (Photo courtesy of the Trentonia Collection)


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1955 Flood Continued from Preceding Page

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by a 30-foot wall of water. Three young girls who had snuck out of the camp before the storm hit were the only survivors. Shafer has interviewed two of them. Further south, water breached the deck of the Washington Crossing Bridge. “It’s almost unfathomable,” said Shafer. “This was a flood of almost biblical proportions.” It took Shafer three years to w r ite t he book. She started by putting ads in local newspapers and tacking up posters in communities along the river, from Morrisville to Milford on the Pennsylvania side; Trenton to Port Jervis in New Jersey. “I had a lot of people writing me letters, and sending me huge packages of newspapers from that time,” she said. “I had people send me diaries, and call me. I interviewed over 100 people.” The first edition of the book came out in 2005. Since then, Shafer has updated it a few times with more interviews. “The sad thing is that it’s going to happen again,” she said. “And there are so many more people in the flood plain now.” T he Histor ic Delaware River Series concludes on S eptember 8 at 3 p.m., when journalist Rick Ep stein leads a walking tour of historic Frenchtown. For i nfor mat ion on S hafer’s talk or Epstein’s tour, call (908 ) 237-4582. All programs are free. —Anne Levin

Wine & Food Festival At Unionville Vineyards

Vintage North Jersey, a collaboration of northern New Jersey wineries announces its sixth annual Wine & Food Festival on the weekend of August 2425 at Unionville Vineyards, 9 Rocktown Road, Ringoes. The event is held from 12-5 p.m. both days. Wineries representing Sussex, Warren, Hunterdon, and Mercer counties will offer their most premium wines. Food trucks, specialty food vendors, craft vendors, and musicians will be on hand. Guests are encouraged to bring picnic blankets and lawn chairs to enjoy the 89 acres of preserved farmland. Each ticket includes admission, a souvenir glass for tastings, sampling of six wines from each winery, and live music. Winer ies include Four Sisters Winery, Villa Milagro Vineyards, Old York Cellars Winery, Hopewell Valley Vineyards, Terhune Orchards, and Unionville Vineyards. Foods will be available for purchase from Jammin’ Crepes, Local Harvest Pizza, Ms. Fu’s Yummy Food Truck, AMA Gelato, Baker’s Bounty, and others. On Saturday, the Fat Boi’s Brass Band, a nine piece New Orleans style brass band, will play. Sunday’s band is Go HAM, which plays music from yesterday and today. Advance tickets are $15 for one day and $25 for two days. At the gate on the day of the event, tickets are $20 for one day; $35 for two days. Non-drinking attendee tickets are $10 in advance or at the gate. For more information, call Unionville Vineyards at (908) 788-0400.

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What’s your favorite New Jersey produce?” (Asked Saturday at the Trenton Farmers Market) (Photographs by Erica M. Cardenas)

“New Jersey tomatoes, because when you slice into them they are vibrant in color, no white inside. They are very delicious. I eat them mostly as tomato sandwiches. Very simple — slice them, toast the bread, and add mayo!” —Margaret Corretjer, Bordentown

“My favorite produce is New Jersey corn. They are very sweet and fresh. I boil them in water, move them to the grill, then add a little cheese on top.” —Sery Viteri, Yardley, Pa.

“I like cucumbers, avocados, and red onions mixed together. I add some spices and create a salad. It’s so good.” —Ayanna Raheem, Trenton

“I like tomatoes, and I prefer them on a BLT with black ground pepper.” —Brett Gallagher, Lawrence

Sandy: “Tomatoes, I just eat them sliced and make a mozzarella salad.” Chester: “New Jersey corn. I eat it right off the cob.” —Sandy and Chester Curaney, Pennington


continued from page one

Westminster Foundation, made up of alumni, faculty, and supporters of the choir college, will soon seek an injunction to prevent the move, which Afran said “is just another version of the old plan. They want to sell.” Dell’Omo’s letter to the Rider community says the move affords “the opportunity to establish a new vision for Rider University’s Westminster College of the Arts. This move from one campus to another is not just simply a logistical change in geography but rather a starting point for something new and very exciting.” Rider launched the Westminster College of the Arts on the Lawrenceville campus in 2007. Dell’Omo’s letter says that the Westminster College of the Arts has resulted in “several important successes.” But “the simple truth is that the geographic and programmatic separation proved too strong to result in the desired connections. By moving Westminster Choir College programs to Lawrenceville, and a renewed focus on the branding and promotion of the Westminster College of the Arts as a whole, we believe that the long-desired collaboration and outcomes finally will be achieved.” The amended complaint reads, “Rider’s association with Westminster also enabled Rider to make use of the ‘Westminster’ trademark in creating a new school known as the Westminster College of the Arts that accepts as majors each year approximately 300 students who are not a part of Westminster Choir

College, but whose majors in music theatre and art are offered under the ‘Westminster’ trademark: Rider receives on average $27,000 in actual payments for each such student, meaning that each year Rider University receives tuition in the average amount of $8.1 million through its use of the Westminster trademark on Rider’s campus.” In a response to Dell’Omo’s letter, Westminster Foundation president Constance Fee wrote, “The enthusiastic rhetoric of today’s message from the Office of the President concerning plans currently underway for an ‘exciting’ and ‘historic transition’ sends a very clear message: a move to the Lawrenceville campus would lead directly to the elimination of Westminster Choir College.” Several students, alumni, and faculty members have been voicing opinions on social media. Westminster voice professor Elem Eley wrote on Facebook, specifically targeting Dell’Omo and the board of trustees, “There has never been such a case of institutional lunacy, mismanagement, and clownish bumbling. To quote our attorney, Bruce Afran, this maneuver is ‘farcical at best and incompetent at worst.’ ” Joel Phillips, Westminster professor of composition and music theory, said he would not lend his name “to an endeavor that enables the administration to construct the mere appearance of collaboration in the complete absence of the bona fide item. Their unilateral decision to move Westminster to Lawrenceville by 2020 was announced as a fait accompli and involved no meaningful input.”

Joel Feldman, president of Rider’s chapter of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), said he would not join “this committee or any other committee involved with the campus consolidation plan under the current circumstances,” adding, “I cannot participate in a process which begins with secrecy and dishonesty.” Both Feldman and Rider professor Jeff Halpern said they are not completely opposed to consolidating the two campuses. But the current plan would be devastating to the choir college, they said, so they cannot support it. “The first priority must be to maintain Westminster’s world-class quality,” wrote Halpern. “What is the point of meeting an arbitrary deadline if the consequences damage or destroy the college?” Afran said Tuesday that Rider’s plan “is the path of destruction for Westminster Choir College. They have absolutely no facilities to house the school, which needs specialized studios and performance spaces. No students will agree to attend” if the move takes place, he said. “So we will be going to court to block this plan, and have Westminster taken away from the control of Rider.” Afran said the Westminster Foundation is in touch with an unnamed liberal arts college “at a high level” that is interested in merging with Westminster, and “two others have expressed interest.” There is still hope that Rider will abandon the plan. ‘We’re willing to work with them, as we have said many times, to make Westminster independent again,” Afran said. —Anne Levin

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019 • 8

Newest Thomas Sweet Store Has More Than Just Ice Cream At the newest Thomas Sweet location on Princeton Hightstown Road, homemade ice cream is still the star. But it shares billing with soups, sandwiches, fresh baked goods, and other items that may not be familiar to patrons of the ice cream parlor that opened at 183 Nassau Street four decades ago. “We have multiple products,” said Marco Cucchi, who bought the business from its original owners in 2005. “We added some items when we opened a cafe in Skillman a few years ago, but I wanted to take it even further with this one.” The new Thomas Sweet in Windsor Plaza, which opened in June, is just in time for the company’s 40th anniversary year. Founded in 1979 by two Toms — Tom Grimm and Tom Block — the original store quickly

gained a following for its homemade ice creams and blend-ins, a novelty at the time. Cucchi, a Princeton native, scooped ice cream at the store all through Princeton High School, from which he graduated in 1986. After earning a master’s degree in business at Fordha m Un iver s it y, Cu cch i worked at Price Waterhouse Coopers, IBM, and Mastercard. But ice cream was always in the back of his mind. “I got tired of the corporate world,” he said. “I was doing a lot of traveling. And I had this entrepreneurial spirit. I was living in Connecticut at the time, and I wanted to open an ice cream store.” Alerted that Block and Grimm were ready to leave Thomas Sweet, Cucchi got in touch, bought the business, and came back to Princeton.

I SCREAM, YOU SCREAM: Marco Cucchi, owner of the Thomas Sweet ice cream stores, has been involved with the business since his Princeton High School days. (Photo by Matt Altaro)

The company now has locations in Princeton (ice cream on Nassau Street; chocolates on Palmer Square), Skillman, New Brunswick, Washington, West Windsor, and New Hope, Pa. After a venture that would have opened some 200 stores in China eight years ago, Cucchi decided to focus closer to home. “We opened five or six in China, but closed them after a time,” Cucchi said. “It was a fleeting deal — exciting for awhile.” Trends i n f rozen de s serts come and go, but ice cream remains strong. “Yogurt tends to go in cycles,” said Cucchi. “We’re coming to the waning part of that second generations of yogurt customers. But here in Princeton, there are so many great options for food today. There are so many choices, and probably that has led to a little softening of the business. But we have a loyal customer base.” The Thomas Sweet chocolate shop on Palmer Square has recently been renovated, with new cases and a more modern look. Some celebratory events and promotions will be held at the stores to celebrate the 40th anniversary. At the newest location, which is near Princeton Junction train station, the store is offering self-service cof fe e a nd g rab - a nd - go items to serve commuters. Ice cream remains the main attraction, but Cucchi clearly has his eye on broadening the product base. “We’ve been sampling out a lot of different things, so we’re beginning to develop a morning and afternoon business as well as later in the day, when people want ice cream,” he said. “The community here has been fantastic, so we’re really pleased.” —Anne Levin

FAMILY FUN: A classic car show is among the attractions at the annual Franklin Day Festival on Saturday, September 28, from 12-5 p.m. at Colonial Park in Somerset. Music, food, dancers, artwork, and a Black Hawk military helicopter are also planned. Visit www.franklintwpnj.org/ franklinday or call (732) 873-2500 x 6428 for more information.

September Book Sale At Lawrence Library

The Friends of the Lawrence Library September Book Sale begins Saturday, September 21, from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The sale ends Sunday, September 29 at 4:30 p.m. The Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System is at 2751 Brunswick Pike in Lawrence Township. Preview Night is Friday, September 20, from 6-8:30 p.m., during which time the library will be closed for normal operations. Admission to the Preview Night is free for current members of the Friends of the Lawrence Library. New memberships can be purchased during the Preview Night. Admission is $5 for the general public. Booksellers will be charged $20 and will only be allowed to use scanning devices during the Preview Night. Beginning Saturday, September 21, entry to the sale is free and open during the library’s regular hours. No scanning devices will be allowed.

The Princeton Pharmacy 36 University Place Princeton, NJ 08540 (609) 924-4545 The Princeton Pharmacy at 36 University Place, Princeton, will be closing its doors as of August 24th, 2019. All records and prescriptions will be transferred to their sister pharmacy, The McGrath Pharmacy at 1251 Lawrence Road, Lawrenceville, NJ. Their phone number is (609) 882-7777. You may still pick up prescriptions at the Princeton location until 4pm on the 24th.

Book donations for the Friends of the Library Book Sale are always accepted at the Lawrence Headquarters Branch. Proceeds from the book sale fund programs and other library services that benefit library patrons of all ages. For more information call (609) 883-8294 or visit www.mcl.org.

Event Vendor Showcase At Princeton Academy

On Sunday, September 22 from 1-4 p.m., Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart will host Mimosas at the Manor, an event venue and vendor showcase. Mimosas at the Manor will feature styled and staged event spaces including the house areas, ceremony site, and tented gardens, with specially- designed event vignettes. Guests will also have the chance to connect with event vendors from the Princeton area. Among those participating are L & A Tents, Adam’s Rentals, Party Rental Ltd., World Class Parking, Emily’s Cafe and Catering, Fenwick Catering, Chez Alice Catering, Chambers Walk Catering, Princeton Floral Design, Viburnum Designs, The Pinup Girls, Milk and Cookies, Pierre’s Chocolates, Janet Makrancy Weddings and Parties, Coco’s

Cakery, Greystone Designs, The Big Cookie Company, Ivy on Main Floral Design by Angela Nicole Design, Anita Dybala Events, Capital Corn & Confections, Ambient DJ Service, The Shaded Maple, Kyo Morishima Photography, JDKProPhoto, Shoprite Liquors of Pennington, Dahlia Florals, and Annie Hosfeld Photography. The Manor House at Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart was originally the home of Helen and Thomas Dignan. Constructed in 1930, it was the largest and most elegant house designed by architect Rolf Bauhan, one of the most prolific architects in Princeton in the early and mid20th century. At the time the house was built, Bauhan was at the height of his career. He designed numerous buildings in Princeton, and renovated and designed additions for at many buildings in the Princeton area. The Tudor Revival manor house retains its original wood paneling, plaster ceilings, stained glass, and the original landscaping and site are well preserved. Admission is complimentary for the event, but registration is required. Those attending must be 21 or over. Register online at princetonacademy.org/mimosas.

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started in 2011 when Steven Georges and Kathy Haynie started a small group to bring area musicians together to collaborate, said O’Shea, who joined in 2012. As the group grew, said board member Paul Bejgrowicz, a guitarist and vocalist, an early regular open mic event was with the Princeton Elks, which introduced the musicians to Camp Moore in Haskell. And, eventually, some musicians created their own bands with others they met in the group. “The group includes beginners to semi-professionals,” said Bejgrowicz, “It’s all about sharing and learning from each other.” Garry Pearsall, Robert Freeman, and Drew Turock round out the board with Bejgrowicz and O’Shea.

Members of the group were enthused about Camp Moore, where they play every summer for the campers, said Bejgrowicz. A fifth annual Music for Moore will be held at the Princeton Elks Lodge October 19 at 5 p.m., said O’Shea, who produces that event. To date, she said, “we have supported between seven and nine children per year at a cost of $500 for each child with one-on-one care at Camp Moore.” Proceeds from a Pete Seeger tribute went to the Sourland Conservancy and Hopewell Watershed Institute. Meanwhile, Bejgrowicz has established open mic nights at Hopewell United Methodist Church, on the first Friday of each month, from 7 to 10 p.m. The group has added a coffeehouse at Hopewell

United Methodist Church, on the second Sunday, of continued from page one each month from 2 to 5 p.m., Princeton Public Library, hosted by O’Shea and featurPrinceton Record Exchange, ing an artist each month. and the Princeton Recreation “The church has been supDepartment. (In case of rain, portive, providing some muthe event will be held in the sic equipment and lighting, library’s Community Room.) and members have provided In addition to playing torefreshments,” Bejgrowicz gether, EAMC musicians are said. learning from each other. Bejgrowicz started playing The membership is made up just five years ago. His job as of music lovers and performdirector, HR project manageers of all ages and levels, ment and operations at New said board member Helen York Presbyterian Hospital, O’Shea, a vocalist with the honed his organizational group. “We create a safe skills, and the music gave space for all performers to him “an avenue to pursue my try out new material in front artistic side. It’s a great outof a supportive audience,” let,” he said. “There are all she said. “We organize both types of people in the group, regular events and special people who want to be muevents throughout the year.” sicians and people who will The collective, which has not be professionals but are more than 500 members, just enjoying it.” Moving from Montreal to Princeton with her family in 2011, Dr. Helen McNamara left her “day job” at McGill University Medical School and took a break from working to help the family settle into their new home. Her husband, Paul O’Shea, encouraged her to revisit her love of singing. She credits her vocal coaches with reigniting the passion of her youth. In June 2012, she walked into the Arts Council of Princeton, sang a couple of songs a capella, and joined the Einstein Alley Musicians Collaborative. She began performing with Jeff Friedman, Ed Hermann, Dennis Nobile, Pearsall, and Turock in various bands. She now has two bands that play locally: Shenanigans (songs of Ireland) and Helen O’Shea and The Shanakees, which she describes as Americana MUSIC FOR A CAUSE: Einstein Alley Musicians Collaborative board of directors members (from left) Paul with a Celtic twist. Bejgrowicz, Helen O’Shea, Robert Freeman, Garry Pearsall, and Drew Turock perform at last year’s Music Pearson, an original memfor Moore concert, which raises money for the Elks-run Camp Moore in Haskell, a camp for youths with ber and board member, had special needs. This year’s concert is October 19 at 5 p.m. at the Elks Lodge in Blawenburg.  sung and played rock music

in the 1970s and 1980s. Then, he said, “I took about 30 years off.” After he had more time in his life, (although he runs a contracting business), “the urge to play again was building.” He said he did a simple search on a meet-up website for “acoustic music in the Princeton area” and found the collaborative. He liked that people were having a good time. Pearsall produced the Million Dollar Quartet tribute show w ith Pr inceton Library, when the show, Million Dollar Quartet, came to McCarter Theatre. According to Janie Hermann, library adult programming manager, “the library has supported and worked with the musicians in the collaborative from the very early days. We hosted some of t h e i r or i g i n a l m e e t i n g s when they were in the organizing phase as well as some of their early open mic nights. One of the original bands to develop from the EAMC was Pi Fight, and for several years the library hosted them as part of the annual Pi Day in town and for our summer reading party. The collaborative did a really fun live trivia music trivia night for us back in 2012 on the theme of ‘One Hit Wonders.’” M or e r e c e n t l y, E A M C

musicians created an original show called Songs of Protest, Songs of Peace as part of the library’s programming to coincide with screening Ken Burns’ documentary of Vietnam well as a Motown Tribute that packed the plaza last fall for McCarter’s production of Detroit 67. Group musicians have performed as part of the “Listen Local” series, Hermann noted. For the Woodstock show, three bands have put together a showcase, each led by an EAMC leader. The bands include So It Goes — with Garry Pearsall, Lisa Theodore, John Mazzeo, Laura Manfredi, Eric Heller, and Kathy Haynie; Crown Electric — with Paul Bejgrowicz, Barry Schoendorf, Cecilia Hetzer, Gary Appleby, and Jay Greenfield ; and The Beagles — with Rob Freeman, Laura Manfredi, Steve Wolpert, David Ross, Vanessa Visconti, and Joy Okoye. All bands and guest musicians will participate in the finale, “A Little Help from My Friends.” And this fall, EAMC musicians will participate in the library’s “Here Be Dragons” on October 27 at 3 p.m., a live multimedia experience which will include music, poetry, and film. —Wendy Greenberg

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Community Remembers PU Theoretical Physicist Steven Gubser

ters, Gubser was known in the community for unicycling around town with his t wo you nger daughter s, The Princeton University academic whose research Theory, published in 2010, as well as at the annual and greater Princeton com- was impactful and influen- and The Little Book of alumni P-rade at University munities are mourning the tial, but he shared his pas- Black Holes, published in Reunions and the Princdeath of Steven Scott Gub- sion for science with every- 2017 in collaboration with eton Memorial Day Parade. ser, and remembering the one, and was an innovative Professor Frans Pretorius. He was an accomplished beloved professor of phys- teacher who impressed stu- Both books were published pianist and regularly perics and highly accomplished dents with his wit and depth by P r i nce ton Un iver s it y for med at the Princeton scholar of string theory and of knowledge, according to Press, and they have suc- Physics Department’s anposts by students on the c e s s f u l ly com m u n i c ate d nual recital, most recently black holes. accompanying and singing abstract theoretical ideas Gubser, 47, died as a re- University website. with his oldest daughter, to general audiences, parBesides being a prolific sult of a rock-climbing acciwho sings in an a cappella dent on Saturday, August 3, scientist, Gubser used his ticularly in a poignant letter group at Princeton High in Chamonix, France, where talents to communicate sci- to Albert Einstein at the end School. he was on vacation with his ence to the general public. of The Little Book of Black It was at the physics reAmong Gubser’s books are Holes. family. cital in 2000 where he met The father of three daughNot only was Gubser an The Little Book of String his wife, Laura Landweber, a biology professor at Columbia University in New WE•BRING•YOU•THE•BEST•OF•THE York City, who was on the Princeton University faculty until 2016. She said that at any event with 1940s big band jazz, she and her husband would be dancing the Lindy Hop, which they learned while on leave at California Institute of Technology (Caltech). Gubser was the valedictor ia n of t he P r i nce ton Class of 1994. For his senior thesis he was awarded the L eRoy Apker Award of the American Physical Society, its highest distincWhole Earth carries a wide selection of locally grown produce from tion for undergraduate rethe Garden State’s finest organic growers. During the summer, search. After completing a we get daily deliveries of local organic produce. one-year master’s program Stop in to sample the bounty of New Jersey’s organic farms. in a Fulbright fellowship at Cambridge University, Gubser returned to Princeton in 1995 as a gradu360 NASSAU STREET ate student, and earned his (AT HARRISON) PRINCETON Ph.D. in 1998, according to information provided by B:10” Princeton University. T:10” P R I N C E T O N ’ S N AT U R A L F O O D S G R O C E RY F O R 4 9 Y E A R S His g raduate res earch

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during that period included original and influential papers on exact relations between string theory and quantum field theory, which have continued to reverberate for over 20 years since their publication. After two years as a junior fellow of the Harvard Society of Fellows, Gubser returned to Princeton as a faculty member. He was also a professor at Caltech in 2001 while on leave from Princeton. He was granted tenure at Princeton in 2001 and promoted to full professor in 2005. G ubs er’s re s e arch has b r o ke n n e w g r o u n d o n the connections between theoretical models of black holes and the real-world many body systems, such as the quark-gluon plasma produced at the heavy-ion colliders. His work has also shed new light on the mysterious aspects of superconductors with high critical temperature. In 2016 Gubser pioneered a new version of the AdS/CFT correspondence that applied techniques from number theory to quantum field theory. Gubser has received a number of awards and honors for his research. They include a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Blavatnik Award for Young Scientists, a Gribov Medal of the European Physical Society, and most recently a Simons Investigator Award. Gubser was one of the founding members of the Princeton Gravity Initiative. He also served as associate chair for undergraduate affairs in the physics department.

“This is such a loss for ever yone,” said Her man Verlinde, the Class of 1909 Professor of Physics and department chair, through P r inceton Un iversit y. “I have known Steve for over 25 years, first as a stellar student and then as an equally stellar faculty colleague and scholar. He truly loved physics and was amazingly good at it. He deeply cared about teaching and sharing his enthusiasm for physics with his students. His energet ic pres ence, disarming humor, and cool style made him into one of our most popular teachers a nd m entor s. P r i nce ton was his home and he contributed to the University in many ways. We will dearly miss him.” Gubser was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on May 4, 1972. Soon after, his family relocated to Aspen, Colorado. Gubser attended secondary schools in Aspen and in Denver, and established himself as a star student of physics and mathematics. As a member of the U.S. team at the 1989 International Physics Oly mpiad held in Warsaw, Poland, Gubser achieved the top individual score. In addition to his wife, L aura L andweber, he is survived by their daughters, Cecily, Heidi, and Lillian. A celebration of Gubser’s life and work is planned for September 14. Donations in Gubser’s memor y may be made to the Princeton Department of Physics. —Wendy Greenberg

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preserve, and share.” Other sites destined to get plaques in the future include the former Grigg’s store and the current Agricola building, which was formerly a newspaper office, among other sites. Each plaque shows a photograph of the church (some from Satterfield’s family archives), some church history, and the names of the families who donated the plaques. An August 3 community tribute to Laura Mitnaul Wooten, hosted by the Wooten family at the Arts Council of Princeton Paul Robeson Center, launched the week-long program. Wooten was the longest-serving election poll worker in the U.S. – serving for 79 consecutive years. Other activities included a critical issues discussion on the future of Princeton which featured a perspective on the future of Princeton by Princeton Future Chairperson and Princeton Design Guild architect Kevin Wilkes, followed by a response panel discussion. Also, Mjumbe delivered t h e s e con d a n nu a l J i m Floyd Memorial Community Lecture at the Arts Council of Princeton, speaking on “Social Justice in the Current Landscape.” The lecture was preceded by a community reception and the Cynthia “Chip” Fisher Memorial Art Exhibit, with paintings by Aaron Fisher and Tracey J. Hill and photo collages by Romus Broadway. The exhibit runs through September 5 at the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts. T he Jim F loyd Memo rial Lifetime Achievement Awards, the Mildred Trotman Communit y Ser vice Awards, and the Join Effort Book Scholarships were presented during the week. The Jim Floyd Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Frances Broadway Craig, and to Fisher, posthumously. John Broadway, Ida Belle Dixon, Cecelia B. Hodges, Wooten (posthumously), Mamie Oldham, Bob and Barbara Hillier (Town Topics shareholders), and Minnie and Eric Craig received the 2019 Paul Robeson Spirit Awards. Leighton Newlin and Lance Liverman were honored as the 2019 With-

erspoon-Jackson Citizens of the Year. The events also included a reception for the community and sponsors held at Hillier Studios, a gospel festival, and the Pete Young Memorial Games, a series of basketball games for youths and young adults. Bailey said the wide-ranging program was a Renaissance approach that included athletics, arts, and history, and that it was reminiscent of Robeson himself, who was “a Renaissance man,” he said. “But he is but one of the many personalities important to this town.” The program was started by Bailey and Satterfield to celebrate the history of the neighborhood and the African Americans who helped build Princeton and call it home. —Wendy Greenberg

YWCA Raises Funds For Breast Cancer Center

O n A u g u s t 5, Y WC A Princeton hosted the 6th annual Dr. Sandra Gatt Memorial Golf Outing at Forsgate Country Club in Monroe Township. All proceeds from the fundraiser benefit the Breast Cancer Resource Center transportation program at YWCA Princeton. The transportation program was established in honor of Dr. Gatt, a renowned surgeon and breast cancer patient who, while undergoing her own breast cancer treatment, saw a need for companionship and help with transportation. This year, the golf outing raised over $69,000 for the transportation program, which serves an average of 70 women annually, and is a critical part of the Breast Cancer Resource Center. Other services provided by the Breast Cancer Resource Center that support breast cancer patients and survivors include distribution of

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MARKING HISTORY: This Heritage Tour plaque at the Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church was one of four dedicated on Saturday at historic black churches in the WitherspoonJackson Historic District of Princeton. (Photo by Wendy Greenberg)

wigs, bras, and prosthetics; individual and group counseling; fitness and nutrition classes; and integrative arts therapy. “The funds raised from the Gatt Memorial Golf Outing are absolutely essential to our transportation program and we appreciate the community’s support,” said YWCA Princeton CEO Judy Hutton. “No woman should go without treatment due to lack of transportation or financial means, and this is something Dr. Sandra Gatt truly believed in. Our program brings women to their breast cancer appointments, but they don’t arrive alone — they are matched with a companion who is a breast cancer survivor herself.”

School Matters YingHua School Hosts STARTALK Program The YingHua International School (YHIS) in Kingston recently hosted the 2019 YingHua STARTALK Teacher and Student Program, sponsored by the National Security Language Initiative, a federal program seeking to expand the teaching of strategically important languages. YingHua was selected by STARTALK to share their strength in Chinese academics and methodology. Languages taught under the STARTALK Program include Arabic, Chinese, Dari, Hindi, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Swahili, Turkish, and Urdu. YHIS Director of Administration Michelle Tan and Director of Academics Wen-Lin Su created the program to address various experiences and levels of students, with the program beginning online June 17 for one week and then in person for the following three weeks. The 48 participating students from third to ninth grade joined the program from various public and private schools throughout the New York-New Jersey metropolitan area.

Hopewell Valley Grads Win Scholarships

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Four Hopewell Valley Central High School 2019 graduates have been awarded scholarships from the Hopewell Valley Education Foundation (HVEF) in recognition of their outstanding academic achievement, extracurricular achievement, and community contributions. Raaga Singireddy won HVEF’s $1,000 Claude A.R. Kagan Memorial Scholarship, while Sarah Cleveland, Isaac Osborn, and Will Titus also won $1,000 scholarships to support their ongoing higher education. “Receiving this scholarship from the Hopewell Valley Education Foundation was truly an honor,” said Singireddy, who will be attending Carnegie Mellon University as a chemical and biomedical engineering major. “Not only did it aid me monetarily, but it gave me confidence for continuing my educational journey through college.”

Check the Classified Section of this Newspaper.

Princeton High School senior Faith Carver was accepted to participate in the 2019 Urban Teacher Academy sponsored by The Center for Future Educators at TCNJ and the NJEA. The intensive, two-week summer program is designed to attract future teachers to high poverty schools and high shortage subject areas through exposure to a curriculum and practicum experiences that focus on teaching.

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Sourland Conservancy Advancing Its Mission With Mountain Festival and Bicycle Rally

To the Editor: The Sourland Conservancy recently held its 16th Annual Sourland Mountain Festival and will hold its 8th annual Sourland Spectacular bicycle rally on September 7. Through these events, plus free guided trail hikes and the popular Hopewell Borough Train Station Series of Sourland-centric talks and presentations, the Conservancy advances its mission of advocating for the protection of the region, educating the public on its nature and history, and providing resources to encourage stewardship of our natural world. I encourage residents of the Sourland region and those who live nearby to visit the Conservancy’s website (www.sourland.org) and Facebook page to learn more about the valuable work being done, how you can help, or simply enjoy what the Conservancy has to offer! DANIEL PACE, TRUSTEE Sourland Conservancy

Suggesting All-Way Walk Signal At Crosswalk Site of Recent Fatality

To the Editor: Pedestrians are becoming bold, and they should be. They are boldly speaking out at Council meetings and planning board sessions, demanding more and safer pedestrian crossings. They are, in some cases, joining forces with bicyclists to advocate for bike lanes that will give cyclists a safe alternative to sidewalks. Bold is good. But there is one place where being bold is not good for pedestrians. That’s inside those zebra-striped walkways that mark designated pedestrian crossings. Inside those crossings, the ones often marked by signs proclaiming that motorists must yield to pedestrians, bold is not good. As they approach and enter those crossings pedestrians should be tentative, defensive, and wary. The law says motorists must yield, but it doesn’t say they will yield. On July 30 that point was demonstrated once again in Princeton when a 68-year-old man was struck in the marked crosswalk leading from the Princeton University campus across Washington Road to Prospect Avenue by a pickup truck turning left onto Washington from Prospect. The pedestrian died of his injuries on August 1. The accident was the fifth serious accident involving pedestrians in less than five years, the second fatality in less than two

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years. All of these occurred within those carefully marked pedestrian crossings, where motorists must — supposedly — yield to pedestrians. What can be done to stop these senseless attacks on the pedestrians of Princeton? At the site of the most recent fatality, an immediate improvement would be the installation of an all-way walk signal. Since Prospect Avenue meets Washington Road in a T intersection, there are only two phases of lights needed for motorists. A third phase could be added, halting all traffic on both roads and allowing pedestrians to cross either road, or go diagonally across the intersection. Pedestrians, particularly college students coming from all directions and heading toward their eating clubs on Prospect, might welcome the chance to cross diagonally. What about those familiar black-and-white zebra stripes on the pavement? After this most recent fatality, Buzz Stenn suggested in a letter to Town Topics [“Offering Suggestions on Making Pedestrian Crossings Safer,” Mailbox, August 7] that “white stripes on a black street background camouflage the walker. For the driver a vertically-lined strip, as well as the associated median, gutter, and turn lines, obfuscate to some degree any figure upon it and this loss of discrimination is especially difficult in poor light. To be immediately alerted to whatever is on the intersection the pedestrian strip background must be uniform — not patterned — and it must be colored light to bright, white or yellow, better yet chartreuse since it is the color theme Princeton uses at pedestrian crosswalks already.” The idea deserves consideration. But I worry that even more graphic crosswalks will lead to an even greater sense of security — false security — to pedestrians. I suggest that pedestrians put down their cell phones and look both ways before they enter a crosswalk; that they wait until they can see the whites of an approaching motorist’s eyes before they conclude that the driver is really stopping for them; and that, when they are safely through the intersection, they look back at the driver and offer a thumbs up or — if they want to be bold — a big smile. RICHARD K. REIN Park Place

Producer of “Positive Energy” Says PCTV Assisted In Covering Pride Parade

To the Editor: As the producer of Positive Energy, a local program produced through Princeton TV, I recently interviewed and covered the Princeton Pride Parade on Saturday, June 22, 2019. This event was historic as the first of its kind held in the heart of Princeton. As far as I know, I was the only television media to cover this event. The show is currently airing and the archived version will be housed on Vimeo and YouTube forever for all to enjoy. The Princeton Pride Parade brought together local nonprofits, organizations, vendors, government officials, and other influencers to celebrate diversity and inclusion. This type of event needs and deserves as much publicity as it can get. According to Mayor Lempert, “there are now ample ways for video producers to easily share their work that do not incur cost to taxpayers.” This might be true; however, I was only able to produce this show because of the skillful assistance and expertise provided by Princeton Community Television. Without Princeton TV, I might have made a video but it would not have been as professional and impactful as it turned out to be. Also through Princeton TV, I am able to reach a local audience as well as potentially a wider national audience with such ground-breaking content. As a business owner and resident in the Princeton area for over 16 years, the services I receive through Princeton Television have allowed me to play a larger role in the growth of our community as well as develop my business which contributes to the local economy. I am pleased to be able to “stay local” and support a nonprofit that is independent and free from commercial/corporate money. Without Princeton TV I would have never been able to make the impact I have made through hosting and producing my show. Princeton TV allows Princeton to shine through a creative spotlight on our residents, business owners, organizations and more. As they say at Princeton TV, let’s keep the “community in community television.” MICHELE GRANBERG Executive Producer and Host of Positive Energy TV

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Looking for Toni Morrison (1931-2019): The Library Always Gives Me What I Need life I started rereading a novel the same to eye at a time when paranoia about the of female comradery.” It’s as if by vanishYou can’t always get what you ing, the woman has taken with her “my Other is driving the news cycle. want, but if you try sometimes, you day I finished it. just might find, you get what you As Ta-Nehisi Coates points out in the good opinion of myself, which, of course, Other to Other is unforgivable,” leading to the thought, need. I found several ways to approach Be- volume’s foreword, these lectures were —The Rolling Stones loved in The Origin of Others. In the lec- given as Barack Obama was entering the “And isn’t that the kind of thing that we last year of his two-term presidency, and fear strangers will do? Disturb. Betray. fter last week’s news of Toni Mor- ture titled “Configurations of Blackness,” while the book’s publication a year later Prove they are not like us....Why should we rison’s death, I put aside plans for a the author describes her encounter with “is not directly concerned with the rise want to know a stranger when it is easier column on Woodstock and went to an art project at the Vienna Biennale: of Donald Trump,” it is “impossible to to estrange another? Why should we want the Princeton Public Library looking for “I was asked to enter a dark room and read [Morrison’s] thoughts on belonging, to close the distance when we can close one of her novels, preferably Beloved, face a mirror. In a few seconds, a figon who fits under the umbrella of society the gate?” Ultimately, Morrison admits which I’d never read. My better-late-than- ure appeared, slowly taking shape and and who does not, without considering our that her “claims on that fisherwoman” never mission was delusional because moving toward me. A woman. When she were “unreasonable,” that “I was longing current moment.” there was no way I could do right by a (rather, her image) was close to me, same for and missing some aspect of myself, That was in 2017. novel of that magnitude in a matter of height, she placed her palm on the glass and that there are no strangers ... only The Vanishing Fisherwoman days, and in any case, the shelves had and I was instructed to do the same. We versions of ourselves.” been cleared of her fiction, no surprise stood there face to face, unspeaking, Another anecdote from life that Toni Finding an Opening given the PU Professor Emerita’s literary looking into the eyes of the other. Slowly Morrison expands on concerns the time Reading the lecture titled “Narrating the stature and the town’s pride in a former t h e f ig u re fade d when she was livOther,” which includes a lengthy quotation resident. Aside from audio books, the only and shrank before ing in Grand-Viewfrom Beloved, I felt once again as if I were work of hers available was The Origin of d i s ap p e a r i n g a l on-Hudson and enlooking into my metaphorical version of Others (Harvard Univ. Press 2017), which together. Another countered a black draws on the six Norton Lectures the No- woman appeared. woman fishing from the mirror where Toni Morrison had seen bel laureate delivered at Harvard in spring We repeated t he a sea wall at the a succession of strangers, intimate, silent, 2016. That this little book was still there gesture of touchedge of a neighbor’s knowing, accepting one to one, while I’d reinforces my semi-superstitious belief that ing our palms togarden. Intrigued seen nothing but a “spiteful” number and the shadow of something I was unable or I can always count on the library to give gether and looking and amused by the unwilling to comprehend. Now it was as me what I need even when it’s not what I into the eyes of the way the woman was though she’d anticipated my failure to find other. This went on think I want. d r e s s e d ( “m e n’s my way in the first paragraph and was shoes, a man’s hat, What I needed, among other things, was for some time. Each offering me, or any similarly estranged woman differed in a well-worn colora way to make sense of my inability to reader or listener, another view of the novage, body shape, less sweater worn literally get into Morrison’s best-known el by way of its ending, which “of course, over a long black and most acclaimed novel. My problem color, dress.” was not the final word. That would have dress” ), Morrison Mor r ison found was that the opening of Beloved seemed to belong to the Other, the prime motivaengages her in conto be a contradiction in terms. The first “this intimacy with tor, the reason for the novel’s existence, versation about fish paragraph simply didn’t open for me. I a stranger” extraorBeloved herself.” re cip e s, we at h er couldn’t get in the door. I know I should d i n a r y. “ S i l e n t , hether or not the lengthy passage and children. The have made more of an effort, but all I knowing. Accepting from the novel she quotes at this stranger is “witty each other — one saw was an enigmatic number: “124 was point is intended as a display of and full of wisdom” spiteful. Full of a baby’s venom.” What fol- to one.” the power of her style for readers like myand goes by a name lows — about a grandmother named Baby I found the anecTo: ___________________________ the novelist hears self looking for an opening, or as a reprise Suggs suspended “between the nastiness dote subtly suggesof its music for readers who know and love asDate “Mother Someof life and the meanness of the dead, who tive, first by instincFrom: _________________________ & Time: ______________________ it, what followed moved me with a sample t h i n g .” L o o k i n g couldn’t get interested in leaving life or t i v e l y a s s u m i n g Here is a proof of your ad, scheduled to run ___________________. forward to further of what I’d been missing, one sentence in living it” — left me in the dark. If I’d read Morrison’s point of particular: “Sometimes the photograph conversations, farther, I’d have learned that 124 was the view, except that Please check it thoroughly and pay special attention to theMorfollowing: I rison imagines “a of a close friend or relative — looked at street number for what was, in effect, a imagined the figure (Your check mark will tell us it’s okay) friendship, casual, too long — shifts, and something more haunted house. But I didn’t read farther. of the woman and effortless, delightful.” The next day the familiar than the dear face itself moves I was reminded of my experience with forms of women fading, shrinking, disapthere. TheyDate can touch it if they like, but � Phone number � Fax number � Address � Expiration the opening of William Faulkner’s The pearing like phantoms as manifestations woman is not there, nor the next nor the don’t, because they know things will never next nor any day that summer. Asking her Sound and the Fury when I first ran of the author and her characters. I also be the same if they do.” And so, as the headlong into it as a college sophomore: saw it as a parable of the relationship neighbor if she knows what may have hap- Other outside her art, I was redirected to pened, Morrison is told that no old woman “Through the fence, between the curling between an author and a reader standing the novel’s first words, able now to make flower spaces, I could see them hitting. outside the mirror of her art. If Beloved ever fished from her wall “and none had sense of the haunted home where “footThey were coming toward where the flag was the Other, so was I. We were not one permission to do so.” prints come and go, come and go.” It’s all Feeling “cheated, puzzled, but also too easy to say, but she’s put me in touch was and I went along the fence. Luster was to one but Other to Other. At the same hunting in the grass by the flower tree.” time, the anecdote gave personal narra- amused,” Morrison reads the experience with the spirit of the book, I’ve crossed the What flag? Who was hitting what? Who tive force to the theme of a book that asks as an illustration of “how vulnerable we border, I’m there, in the silent, knowing, was Luster? Of course once I learned that “Why does the presence of Others make are to distancing ourselves and forcing our accepting moment, one to one, ready to I was seeing with the eyes of a deaf mute us so afraid?” Besides reading the “con- own images onto strangers as well as be- finally read Beloved all the way through. at a golf course, I was at least through the figurations of blackness” as a stranger to coming the stranger we may abhor.” After —Stuart Mitchner door and into a world so many-leveled and Beloved, I was responding to the image of obsessing on the situation at length, she strangers silently, knowingly staring eye regrets the loss of “the implied promises many-voiced that for the first time in my

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13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019

BOOK REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019 • 14

Topdog/Underdog

THEATER REVIEW

“Topdog/Underdog” Depicts an Uneasy Relationship Between Two Brothers; Princeton Summer Theater Succeeds with the Pulitzer Prize-Winning Drama

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rinceton Summer Theater is concluding its 2019 season with a gripping production of Topdog /Underdog. This edgy, character-driven drama, which depicts the relationship between two African American brothers, is an apt fit for a season whose mission has been to “explore love in all its forms.” Topdog/Underdog played on Broadway in 2002. It earned playwright Suzan-Lori Parks the Pulitzer Prize, as well as the Outer Critics Circle Award. Lincoln is a former three-card monte hustler who now earns money at a carnival arcade by impersonating the famous president for whom he is named. This entails wearing whiteface and pretending to be shot. Booth — the younger brother — has not given up three-card monte, and aspires to emulate his brother’s former success at the game. In his apartment he ceaselessly practices dealing cards, and luring potential victims with smooth chatter, although we will discover that in the past there was a crucial moment in which his skill drastically fell short of his ambition. He persists in attempting to persuade Lincoln to abandon his current occupation and join him. We learn that Lincoln and Booth were given their names by their father, as “a joke.” Topdog/Underdog examines the issue of identities — particularly those that have been given to us — and the extent to which we accept them, or work to change them. In a key moment, Lincoln offers to help Booth find a job; Booth retorts that he is not going to pretend to be something he is not. Booth is eager to change his identity, which he plans to do by changing his name. In a contrasting scene, Lincoln puts on the fake beard that he wears for his job, and wearily regards himself in a mirror. The program notes include a preface in which Parks details Topdog/Underdog’s origins in one of her previous works, The America Play. In the earlier show an African American man “sits in an arcade impersonating Abraham Lincoln and letting people come and play at shooting him dead,” says the playwright. “Another black Lincoln impersonator, unrelated to the first guy, came to mind: a new character for a new play. This time I would just focus on his home life.” Parks adds that her interest in threecard monte stems from the fact that her husband occasionally played it in between sets, when he performed in the Muddy Waters Blues Band. Three-card monte is a confidence game in which victims are tricked into betting on their ability to find a “money card” among three playing cards that are facing down. Lincoln has moved in with Booth after being thrown out by his ex-wife. Booth often reminds him that this living arrangement is supposed to be temporary, although Lincoln is the sole breadwinner. Booth is obsessed with courting a wom-

an named Grace. We get a sense of the brothers’ impoverishment when Booth carefully budgets a meager amount of cash, allotting himself a bit of money to spend on a date. His incessant boasts about successful trysts with Grace are dubious, given that we never actually see her. When the brothers were teenagers they were abandoned by both of their parents. Each parent left one brother an “inheritance” of $500 in cash. Lincoln already has spent his money, while Booth has saved his. In the heat of a climactic argument Booth challenges Lincoln to threecard monte, and Lincoln goads Booth into betting his inheritance on the outcome of the game. Travis Raeburn brings swagger and slick panache to the role of Booth. His delivery of the character’s monologues is charismatic and almost musical, particularly when Booth challenges unseen onlookers — members of the audience? — to a game of three-card monte. He also brings seemingly limitless energy; Booth almost always is in motion, and his rapid movements suggest a tightly-coiled spring. Nathaniel J. Ryan provides the required contrast to this, in his portrayal of Lincoln. His demeanor is more reserved, especially in the early scenes. Where Booth almost always is in motion, Lincoln tends to be static, and more deliberate in his use of movement. This gives his performance room to change when a plot turn causes the character to evolve; when Lincoln’s circumstances lead him to regain his interest

in three-card monte, Ryan’s performance echoes that of Raeburn. Director Lori Elizabeth Parquet is strategic in her use of space. Lincoln and Booth are weary of each other, and early in the show Parquet accentuates this by placing them at opposite ends of the stage. Throughout the show Booth often intrudes on Lincoln’s personal space, and is rebuffed, a concept that is reversed during a climactic argument between the brothers. This makes room for a significant contrast when the characters draw closer to each other — emotionally and physically. But there is a late scene, in which they are physically close, which forms one of the tensest segments in the play. The sparring brothers are destined to collide, in every sense, and the staging underlines that fact. A program note acknowledges that artist Kehinde Wiley’s work has been “a significant influence on the production design … particularly in the set’s distinctive floral wallpaper.” Wiley is “perhaps most famous for his portrait of Barack Obama for the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C.” The set by Rakesh Potluri does indeed draw on Wiley’s work, but it also echoes the duality between the brothers by flanking the stage with two walls covered with differently colored paper. The furniture includes a bed and a reclining chair. Booth generally takes the bed while Lincoln is given the chair; this is switched in a subtle, but crucial, shift in power dynamics. If the scenery evokes Wiley’s paintings,

so do Tramaine Gray’s costumes, which use a color palette — largely black and white — consistent with the outfit worn by Obama in Wiley’s portrait. In keeping with the focus on changing identities, the costumes are often in flux, as the brothers constantly change clothes. There is frequent juxtaposition of jackets and slacks against casual, loose-fitting outfits. Music — particularly that of the hiphop duo Outkast — is integral to the play. Booth exuberantly sings and dances to it as he prepares for a date with Grace. Music also provides one of the first significant moments of connection between the brothers, as Lincoln sings while Booth percussively stamps his feet. The sound design by Naveen Bhatia heightens the dramatic tension, particularly toward the end. There is a plot turn that audiences may anticipate, but it is largely to Bhatia’s credit that the sequence still comes as a shock, and has considerable power. Megan Berry’s lighting is effective in illustrating the passage of time, in an attractive sequence in which nighttime transitions into morning. It is a rare moment of peace in a play that is characterized by tension. ith Topdog/Underdog Princeton Summer Theater ends its season on a high note, thanks to outstanding performances by both of its actors, as well as a distinct unity of script and production. —Donald H. Sanborn III

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“TOPDOG/UNDERDOG”: Performances are underway for Princeton Summer Theater’s production of “Topdog/Underdog.” Directed by Lori Elizabeth Parquet, the play runs through August 18 at Princeton University’s Hamilton Murray Theater. Brothers Lincoln (Nathaniel J. Ryan, left) and Booth (Travis Raeburn, right) stare each other down during a game of three-card monte. (Photo by Kirsten Traudt) Topdog/Underdog will play at the Hamilton Murray Theater in Murray Dodge Hall, Princeton University, through August 18. For tickets, show times, and further information call (732) 997-0205 or visit www.princetonsummertheater.org/topdogunderdog.

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Music Fest Princeton Returns to Palmer Square

BROADWAY FAVORITES: Talented local teens taking part in “Music Through the Decades” are, top row: Anishka Praveen, Skyler Frankel, and Neha Tengshe; and bottom row: Alexander Fisher, Ellen Renee (director), and Mahika Goel.

Show Tunes and More At Nassau Park Pavilion

The West Windsor Arts Council’s Out of This World Performance Troupe, composed of local teenagers, performs “Music Through the Decades,” a revue of favorite show tunes, on Saturday, August 24, at the Nassau Park Pavilion [between Target and Panera], Route 1 South. The performance is from 7 to 8 p.m. “T he goal of t he pro -

gram is to strengthen our young performers’ Broadway repertoire and guide them through staging and choreography. We are looking forward to putting on a great show that gives everyone a chance to shine,” said director Ellen Renee. Under her tutelage, many of Renee’s students have gone on to professional careers on stage, in print, and on television. The production will fea-

ture professional sound and lights as well as a special guest appearance by Kyle Alexxander, who has been performing since a young age under Renee’s training and coaching. Alexxander’s credits include Walt Disney World, supporting the ensemble of Broadway’s Mary Poppins Main Street USA televised Christmas Day Pa ra d e B r o a dw ay, a n d singing pop punk tunes on the main stage of the Sea-

With two stages, six bands, Music Fest Princeton returns to Palmer Square on Sunday, September 15. The festival pays homage to famed musical acts from the Garden State. T he show’s he ad liner, The B Street Band, pays tribute to Asbur y Park ’s Bruce Springsteen and The E Street Band. Also scheduled is a tribute to the songs of Hoboken native Frank Sinatra by Swingadelic, a jazz swing band from New York City. The family-friendly festival will have two stages, food and beverage vendors, retail offerings, and activity tables from around Palmer Square. Music Fest debuted in 2018, replacing the long standing JazzFeast. “We hoped to build upon the successes of the event as we broadened the musical offerings and opened Music Fest to fans who enjoy all types of live music,” said Jamie Volkert, director of marketing for Palmer Square. “As a nod to our deep-seated roots, we’ll open the show with a jazz ensemble.” Some Assembly Required, a local favorite, will play the midday set on the main stage featuring an eclectic mix of music by the Fugees, Spin Doctors, Blues Traveler, Fountains of Wayne, Whitney Houston, and others. Formerly known as Backstreets, the B Street Band

was the first band to do a unique tribute to a live performer. Since 1980, the band has played over 6,000 shows around the country and has shared the stage with several members of the E Street band. The band has played many national venues, opening for Bruce Springsteen concerts and even playing tribute to him at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame exhibit, “The Life and Music of Bruce Springsteen.” JB Rocks will warm up the crowd with a strolling ensemble in the street prior to the main stage opening, and the side stage will feature a Paul Simon Tribute with Aleo Music, and a Bon Jovi Tribute with Slippery When Wet. For a complete lineup and updates, visit palmersquare. com/events.

Crossroads Plans Season At New Headquarters

Crossroads Theatre Company has announced its upcoming season of plays at its new artistic home, the New Brunswick Performing Arts Center. Crossroads is a resident member of the new complex on Livingston Avenue. T he company’s season begins September 5 with Paul Robeson by Philip Hayes Dean, continuing through September 15. A world premiere of an original play, Freedom Riders, conceived and directed by Ricardo Khan, is also on the schedule April 9-19, along with the classic A Christmas Carol December 5-15. The Genesis Festival of New Plays is in February.

Crossroads, which won a Tony Award in 1999, is in its fourth decade of being a gateway for black theatre. Since opening in 1978, the company has built a rich history celebrating the culture, history, spirit, and voices of the African Diaspora. For ticket information and details, visit www.crossroadstheatrecompany.org.

Seventies Tribute Band Comes to Monroe Township

Decade, the New Jerseybased Neil Young and ’70s tribute band, performs Sunday, September 22 at 4 p.m. at the Richard P. Marasco Center for the Performing A r t s, 1629 Pe r r i n e v i l le Road, Monroe Township. Tickets are $25 for patrons, $30 for adults, and free for students with ID. The band performs the best of Neil Young’s music as well as some lesser known “deep cuts,” recreating the studio versions of many songs. Decade is led by front man John Hathaway, performing as Young. Joining him are veteran Jersey Shore musicians including Gordon Bunker Strout on guitar, John Dickson on bass, Tom Stevenson backing vocals and banjo, Bob Giunco on drums and percussion, Dave O’Brien on pedal steel, Pam McCoy backing vocals, Jeff Levine on keyboard, and James Doyle on horn. Call (800) 514-3849 or (732) 521-4400, or buy tickets at the door.

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15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019

Music and Theater

side Heights Music Festival. Admission is free. For more infor mation, call (609) 716-1931 or visit westwindsorarts.org.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019 • 16

Leith-Ross made drawings as finished works and used them as studies for his larger oil paintings. He manipulated black conté crayon to achieve a variety of textures, dramatic contrasts, and bright highlights. A few drawings even include the artist’s handwritten color notes to guide him when executing paintings in his studio. Leith-Ross also excelled in the watercolor medium, and his vibrant compositions were admired by critics and sought by collectors. Depicting Holland, Scotland, Nova Scotia, New Hope, and Doylestown, among other locations, the works in this exhibition map his extensive travels and encapsulate an intimate vision of everyday life in rural and small town settings. The Michener Art Museum is located at 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa. For more information, call (215) 340 -9800 or visit w w w. “CHAPLIN’S MEADOWS” This watercolor by Harry Leith-Ross (1886-1973) is featured in “Harry michenerartmuseum.org. Leith-Ross: Scenes from Country Life,” on view at the Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, NJ Photo Forum Pa., through February 2020. The works in the exhibit depict locations in Holland, Scotland, Exhibit at Ellarslie Nova Scotia, New Hope, and Doylestown, among others. The Trenton Museum Socess and skilled draftsman- and began exhibiting in New ciety will present “New Jer“Scenes from Country sey Photography Forum — A Life” at Michener Museum ship of the painter Harry York and Philadelphia. He settled permanently 25-Year Retrospective” from The Michener Art Museum L eith-Ross (1886 -1973 ) . in Doylestown, Pa., presents Born in the former British in New Hope, Pa., in 1935 September 15 to November “Harry Leith-Ross: Scenes colony of Mauritius, Leith- and became an integral part 10 in the Trenton City Muf rom C ou nt r y L ife,” on Ross grew up in Scotland of the local community. He seum at Ellarslie Mansion. view in the Pfundt Gallery and England before mov- won awards from the Penn- The museum is located in ing to the United States in sylvania Academy of Fine Cadwalader Park at 299 through February 2020. 1903. After working as a Arts, Phillips’ Mill, National Parkside Avenue, Trenton. Featuring drawings and commercial artist and study- Academy of Design, Ameri- Admission is free, with dowatercolors primarily from ing painting in Paris, he en- can Watercolor S ociet y, nations welcome. the Museum’s permanent rolled in the Art Students and the Salmagundi Club, The exhibit’s nearly 100 collection, the exhibition League’s summer school at among others. works range from film and illuminates the artistic proWoodstock, N.Y., in 1913 digital imagery to alternative processes such as cyanotype, glass fusion, and hand coloring, and will represent the 25 years since the New Jersey Photography Forum’s (NJPF’s) 1994 founding. At the opening reception on Sunday, September 15, 2 to 4 p.m., 37 artists will be on hand to talk about their work with attendees. The closing reception Sunday, November 10, from 1-4 p.m., will feature a talk by NJPF founder and director Nancy Ori, who curated the exhibit. The NJPF advances the interests of professional and serious photographers living or working in the New Jersey area. Over the past 25 years it has become New Jersey’s largest, most recognized group of fine art exhibiting photographers and produces annually more than a dozen “BY THE SEA”: This photo by Heidi Sussman is featured “New Jersey Photography Forum — A exhibits at various venues 25-Year Retrospective,” on view September 15 to November 10 in the Trenton City Museum around the state. at Ellarslie Mansion in Cadwalader Park. The exhibit will feature nearly 100 works ranging The Trenton City Museum from film and digital imagery to alternative processes such as cyanotype, glass fusion, and at Ellarslie Mansion houses a hand coloring.

Art

UNRESERVED AUCTION WEEKEND August 24+25

Saturday, August 24 @ 10am Early 20th c. Fine Art. Estate goods. Scandinavian Modern. Garden. Sunday, August 25 @ 10am 20th/21st c. American & European Design. Post War & Contemporary Art.

Catalogue Online | ragoarts.com Karel Appel

“SOUTHERN FOLK LIFE, 1970S”: Tennessean Ira Johnson posed with his handmade baskets for Cranbury photographer Jerry Pevahouse in this photo taken in the 1970s. It is among 40 on display at the Cranbury Museum through November 10, part of an exhibit from Pevahouse’s collections of rare blues recordings, folk art, quilts, and historical artifacts. The museum is a 4 Park Place East, Cranbury and is open Sundays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Free admission. collection of fine art and historical displays that illuminate New Jersey’s historical, industrial, and cultural past and present. The first-floor galleries host revolving exhibitions of contemporary art in all media. The museum, in an Italianate villa built in 1848, also hosts an array of special events, musical programs, and classes. The mansion is the centerpiece of Cadwalader Park, which was designed by famed landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, whose most famous work is New York City’s Central Park. For m or e i n for m at ion about the exhibit, email tms @ ellarslie.org or call (609) 989-3632. Also visit the New Jersey Photography Forum at www.njphotoforum.com and the museum at www.ellarslie.org.

Area Exhibits Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Dreaming in Color” through September 1. www.lambertvillearts. com. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Our Universe — From Here to Infinity” and “Luminous Matter” at the Princeton Public Library through September 6. www. artscouncilofprinceton.org. Artworks, 19 Everett Alley, Trenton, has “American Steel Forever” through August 31. www.artworkstrenton.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, has “Ren & Stimpy in A Day at the Museum,” “Writer Janet Purcell Artist,” and “Our Town — Works by Mel Leipzig” through September 8. www.ellarslie.org. Gourgaud Gallery, 23 North Main Street, Cranbury, has “Celebration” through August 30. www.

cranburyartscouncil.com. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Interference Fringe | Tallur L.N.” through January, “Rebirth: Kang Muxiang” through May, and other exhibits. www.groundsforsculpture. org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “A Morning at the Updike Farmstead,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. $4 admission Wednesday-Sunday, 12-4 p.m. Thursday extended hours till 7 p.m. and free admission 4-7 p.m. www. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “The Color of the Moon” through September 8 and “The Poetry of Sculpture: Raymond Granville Barger (1906–2001)” through October 20. www.michenerartmuseum.org. Mor ven Museum & G arden, 55 Stockton Street, has “New Jersey Baseball: From the Cradle to the Major Leagues, 1855– 1915” through October 27. www.morven.org. New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, has “Many Inspired Steps” through November 10. www.statemuseum.nj.gov. Princeton University Art Museum has “Legacy: Selections from the Gillet G. Griffin Collection” through October 6 and “Helen Frankenthaler Prints: Seven Types of Ambiguity” through October 30. www.artmuseum. princeton.edu. West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, has “HomeFront: Expressions of ArtSpace Exhibition” through September 6. www.westwindsorarts.org. William Trent House M u s e u m , 15 Marke t Street, Trenton, has “The Immigrant Experience” through November 3.


Wednesday, August 14 8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Country Dancers holds a Contra Dance at the Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive. Bob and Desiree w ith PUB. $10. (908) 359-4837. 4-8 p.m.: Hopewell Farmers Market, 62 East Broad St reet, Hopewell. L ocal vendors, in the courtyard between Antimo’s Italian Kitchen and PNC Bank. Thursday, August 15 10 a.m.-3 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza. 6 - 8 p.m. : Pr inceton School of Rock performs at Princeton Shopping Center, 301 North Harrison Street. Free. 6-9 p.m.: The Blue Jersey Band plays at Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 46 Yard Road, Pennington. 6 p.m.: Ed Goldberg and the Odessa Klezmer Band at Open Grove Gazebo on the Lake, Thompson Park, Monroe Township. w w w. monroetownshipculturalarts.com. Friday, August 16 5 - 8 p.m.: Sunset Sips & Sounds at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Music by Mark Mikios. www. terhuneorchards.com. 6:30 p.m.: Shabbat under the Stars at The Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street. Followed by a dairy potluck dinner; bring a side or dessert. Open to the community. info@thejewishcenter. org. Saturday, August 17 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Communit y Far mers Market, Vaughan Lot, Princeton Junction train station, West Windsor. Music by Dark Whiskey; Yes We Can food drive, more. 12-7 p.m.: Jersey Fresh Jam at Terracycle, 1 Terra Cycle Way, Trenton. Graffiti, hip hop, music, art, food. Free. www.jerseyfreshjam.com. Sunday, August 18 8 a.m.: Kids’ Splash ’n Dash Aquathon at Community Park South and Community Park Pool. Open to kids 7-14; run /swim /run event. Register at (609) 9219480 or visit princetonrecreation.com. 9 a.m.-2 p.m.: Hopewell Farmers Market in the courtyard between Antimo’s Italian Kitchen and PNC Bank, 62 E a s t B r o a d S t r e e t , Hopewell. Live music and local vendors. 12-6 p.m.: Winery Sunday at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Music by Acoustic DuoVer. terhuneorchards.com. 4 -10 p.m. : Woodstock Tribute at Mercer County Park Festival Grounds, West Windsor. With Home Again, Kiss the Sky, and Groovin’ on Tour. Free. www.mercercountyparks.org. Monday, August 19 Recycling 8 -10 p.m . : P r i n c e to n Country Dancers presents ScandiDance NJ at the Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive. $10. (908) 359-4837. Tuesday, August 20 9:30 and 11 a.m.: At Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road, Read & Pick Pears. terhuneorchards.com.

3-6 p.m. and 8-11 p.m. Princeton Country Dancers has Double Contra Dance at Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive. Janine Smith with Coracree; Alan Carr, Sarah Gowan, Bill Quern, and Jane Rothfield. (908) 359-4837. 7 p.m.: An Evening of Broadway Favorites presented by West Windsor Arts Council’s Out of This World Performance Troupe, at Nassau Park Pavilion, between Panera and Target, Nassau Park, Route 1. Free. Sunday, August 25 9 a.m.-2 p.m.: Hopewell Farmers Market in the courtyard between Antimo’s Italian Kitchen and PNC Bank, 62 E a s t B r o a d S t r e e t , Hopewell. Live music and local vendors. 12-5 p.m.: Vintage North Jersey Food & Wine Festival at Unionville Vineyards, 9 Rocktown Road, Ringoes. Music, food, wine and more. unionvillevineyards.com. 12-6 p.m.: Winery Sunday Music at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Music by Jerry Steele. www.terhuneorchards.com. Tuesday, August 27 11:30 a.m.: Toastmasters meeting at Mercer County Library, 42 Robbinsville-Allentown Road, Robbinsville. 4139toastmastersclubs.org. Wednesday, August 28 4-8 p.m.: Hopewell Farmers Market, 62 East Broad St reet, Hopewell. L ocal vendors, in the courtyard between Antimo’s Italian Kitchen and PNC Bank. Thursday, August 29 6-8 p.m. Amazin' Grace and the GLB Band perform at Princeton Shopping Center, 301 Nor th Harrison Street. Free. Friday, August 30 5 - 8 p.m.: Sunset Sips & Sounds at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Music by Party of Three. terhuneorchards.com. Saturday, August 31 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Communit y Far mers Market, Vaughan Lot, Princeton Junction train station. Music by Mike Aucott, Yes We Can fresh food drive, cooking demo. Sunday, September 1 9 a.m.-2 p.m.: Hopewell Farmers Market in the courtyard between Antimo’s Italian Kitchen and PNC Bank, 62 E a s t B r o a d S t r e e t , Hopewell. Live music and local vendors. Wednesday, September 4 8:30 a.m.: Princeton Senior Citizens Club trip to the

Fri. 08/16/19 to Thurs. 08/22/19

Whered You Go, Bernadette

Fri-Thurs: 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45 (PG-13)

Blinded By The Light

Fri-Thurs: 2:00, 4:40, 7:20, 10:00 (PG-13)

David Crosby: Remember My Name

Fri-Thurs: 2:30, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15 (R)

Once Upon A Time In Hollywood Fri-Thurs: 2:35, 6:00, 9:25 (R)

The Farewell

Fri-Thurs: 2:00, 2:45, 5:10, 7:35,10:05 (PG)

Yesterday

Fri-Thurs: 4:25, 4:35, 7:05, 9:45 (PG-13)

Barnes Foundation Museum in Philadelphia. Leaves from Princeton Shopping Center, near Rite-Aid. Includes private tour by docents, lunch at Golden Corral buffet. $70 not including lunch. Call Rosetta Bruce at (609) 647-4164 or Minnie Craig at (609) 921-9522 to reserve. 4-8 p.m.: Hopewell Farmers Market, 62 East Broad St reet, Hopewell. L ocal vendors, in the courtyard between Antimo’s Italian Kitchen and PNC Bank. 7 p.m.: “Getting to Know the Sky,” at Hopewell Theater, 5 South Greenwood Ave nu e, Hop ewel l. Fol lowed by skywatch with telescopes, weather permitting, in the fields above Hopewell Borough Park. Free. www. redlibrary.org. Friday, September 6 5-8 p.m.: Sunset Sips & Sounds at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Music by L aundr ymen. terhuneorchards.com. 7-8:15 p.m.: Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study Meeting. A fellowship of men and women whose common purpose is to develop healthy relationships, at the 24 Club at The 1860 House, 2nd floor, 124 Montgomery Road, Skillman, entrance at rear of building. fridayeveningcoda@gmail.com.

Saturday, September 7 7 a.m.-1 p.m.: Sourland Spectacular. Routes for serious cyclists and more casual bikers, beginning at Otto Kaufman Community Center, 356 Skillman Road. $25 kids, $50 adults including gourmet lunch, snacks, ice cream. Benefits Sourland Conservancy. sourlandspectacular.com. 9 a . m .-1 p. m . : We s t Windsor Farmers Market, Vau g h a n lot, P r i n c e ton Junction train station. Music by Tritones, car safety seat checks, more. 8 p.m. : Dan ielia Cotton performs at Hopewell Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell. For tickets, visit http :// ow.ly/8ccE30p1e2s. Wednesday, September 11 1 p.m.: Boheme Opera Lecture Performance Series talk, “That Touch of Genius,” by Jerry Kalstein, at Monroe Township Public Library, 4 Municipal Plaza, Monroe Township. Free. Friday, September 13 7-8:15 p.m.: Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study Meeting. A fellowship of men and women whose common purpose is to develop healthy relationships. At the 24 Club at The 1860 House, 2nd

floor, 124 Montgomery Road, Skillman, entrance at rear of building.fridayeveningcoda@ gmail.com. Saturday, September 14 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Communit y Far mers Market, Vaughan lot, Princeton Junction train station, West Windsor. Music by Ballycastle Band, Yes We Can food drive, Friends of Windsor Open Space, Electric Cars at the Market, more. Monday, September 16 1 p.m.: At a meeting of the Women’s College Club of Princeton, Jim Hecht, interim library director at Princeton Public Library, will speak on "The Public Library: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.” At All Saints' Episcopal Church on Terhune Road. 7 p.m.: The Southside Wanderers perform a mix of Motown, oldies, doo-wop, and classic rock at Lawrence Library, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrence Township. Free. Wednesday, September 18 7-8:30 p.m. at Hopewell Train Station: Environmentalist Maya von Rossum discusses her book The Green Amendment: Securing Our Right to a Healthy Environment, followed by Q&A and signing. www.sourland.org.

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Shopping Center present

6.27 7.4

Blawenberg Band Brass/Americana Big Country and the Finger Pickin’Good Band Country

7.11

Essie Rock/Blues

7.18

The Blue Meanies Beatles Tribute

7.25

Alborada Spanish Dance Theatre Spanish Music & Flamenco Dance

8.1

Lauren Marsh Singer/Songwriter Indie Pop

8.8

T.S. Project Motown

8.15

Princeton School of Rock Classic Rock

8.22

Taina Asili Afro-Latin Jazz/Reggae

8.29

Amazin Grace and the GLB Band R&B/Gospel

Continuing The Farewell (PG) Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (R)

Don’t forget to bring a blanket or lawnchair! Rain or shine.

National Theatre Live

Princeton Shopping Center 301 North Harrison Street

The Audience Sun, Aug 18 at 12:30

Special Program Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am Mon, Aug 19 at 7:30

Hollywood Summer Nights Gilda (1946) Wed, Aug 21 at 7:30PM Showtimes change daily Visit for showtimes. PrincetonGardenTheatre.org

For more information, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org or princetonshoppingcenter.com. #artscouncilofprinceton #princetonshoppingcenter

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019

Calendar

7:30 -9:30 p.m.: Princeton Folkdance Group does international folk dance at the YWCA, 59 Paul Robeson Place. Lesson followed by dance. Beginners welcome, no par tner needed. $ 5. (609) 921-1702. Wednesday, August 21 1- 2 p . m . F u l f i l l m e n t Through Volunteering, at Princeton Fitness & Wellness Center, 1225 State Road. Free. princetonhcs. org/calendar. 4-8 p.m.: Hopewell Farmers Market, 62 East Broad St reet, Hopewell. L ocal vendors, in the courtyard between Antimo’s Italian Kitchen and PNC Bank. Thursday, August 22 10 a.m.-3 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza. Hard-to-recycle items will be collected; visit sustainableprinceton.org/farmers-market for a list of what is acceptable. 6-8 p.m.: Taina Asilj performs at Princeton Shopping Center, 301 North Harrison Street. Free. 7-8 p.m.: Putting Sleep Disorders to Rest: Recent Advances in Treat ment, at Mercer County Library, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrence. Free. princetonhcs. org/calendar. Friday, August 23 9:30 a.m.: Challah Bake program for k ids 12-26 months and their caregivers at The Jewish Center of Princeton, 435 Nassau Street. Make dough to take home to bake for Shabbat dinner; songs, stories. Free, RSVP to sdiamondstein @ thejewishcenter.org. 5 - 8 p.m.: Sunset Sips & Sounds at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Music by Darla & Rich. terhuneorchards.com. Saturday, August 24 9 a.m.-1 p.m. West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Drive Parking Lot, Princeton Junction Station. Free health screenings by Penn Medicine Princeton Health staff, music by Jeff Griesemer. 9:30 and 11 a.m.: Read & Pick Program: Apples. At Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. terhuneorchards.com. 10 : 3 0 a . m . : “A n n u a l Plants” talk and demonstration by Mercer County Master Gardeners, 431A Federal City Road, Pennington. Free. mgofmc.org. 12-5 p.m.: Vintage North Jersey Food & Wine Festival at Unionville Vineyards, 9 Rocktown Road, Ringoes. Music, food, wine, and more. unionvillevineyards.com.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019 • 18

PRESENTING

NEWLY PRICED

98 Ashford Drive, Plainsboro Twp Marketed by: Annabella “Ann” Santos $429,900

1 W Cartwright Drive, West Windsor Twp Marketed by: Lisa Candella-Hulbert $660,000

PRESENTING

Open House Sunday 8/18 1-4pm 75 Crestview Drive, Princeton Marketed by: Deborah “Debbie” Lang $1,190,000

4 Haines Drive, Robbinsville Twp Marketed by: Rocco D’Armiento $759,900

NEWLY PRICED

Open House Sunday 8/18 1-4pm 51 Ketcham Road, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Ivy Wen & Blanche Paul $665,000

28 Todd Ridge Road, Hopewell Twp Marketed by: Christina “Elvina” Grant $759,000

NEWLY PRICED

NEWLY PRICED

From Princeton, We Reach the World.

16 Wallingford Drive, West Windsor Twp Marketed by: Deborah “Debbie” Lang | $559,000

21 Waters Lane, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Terebey Relocation Team/AnnMarie Monteiro | $634,900

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 foxroach.com

© BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

From Princeton, the World. From Princeton,We We Reach Reach the World. From Princeton, We Reach the World. Princeton OfficePrinceton 253 Nassau 609-924-1600 foxroach.com OfficeStreet | 253 Nassau Street

| | foxroach.com Princeton Office || 253| Nassau Street ||| 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street 609-924-1600 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway

symbol are registeredsubsidiary service marks HomeServices ofof America, Inc. ®Inc., EqualaHousing Opportunity. Information notand verified or guaranteed. If yourAffiliates, home is currently listed with Hathaway a Broker, thisHomeServices is not intended asand a solicitation. © BHH Affiliates, LLC.HomeServices An independently operated ofofHomeServices America, Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, a franchisee of BHH LLC. Berkshire the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation. © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.


422 Wendover Drive, Princeton OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4 Warm and Welcoming home with incredible value features 5 Bedroom, 3 full and one 1/2 baths. This home is ideal for entertaining with the over-sized deck with beautiful views of woodlands! Private and Serene. Walking and Hiking Trails a few steps away leading to Ettl Farms development as well as other trails. This home embraces you and your guests......inside with the beautiful rooms and outside on the very spacious deck. Tucked away on a private treed property this wonderful home with side entry 3 car garage...provides a beautiful front door entrance opening to the very large formal living room with fireplace, and the formal dining room and the straight ahead entrance to the warm and cozy all so spacious family room with fireplace. Views of the open yard from all the large windows provides gorgeous sun and bright light. Offered at: $1,150,000

754 Great Road, Princeton OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4 754 Great Road is an exceptional home in the Western Section of Princeton. Important to share...This wonderful home now included is a finished basement and finished 3rd level to be decided by the new homeowner... Now enjoy understanding about this incredible home .Complimenting the lush private property is the gorgeous entire solid brick exterior and a valuable inclusion is the 3 car side entry garage. Beautifully set back with long driveway to gorgeous all brick home...The dramatic 2 story center hall provides you as you enter with the most beautiful views of the open floor plan with enormous floor to ceiling windows viewing straight ahead the very spacious backyard with patio and awaiting a pool if desired.The open floor plan provides high ceilings in all the rooms. Enter the tall front door to the large foyer with curved staircase. The open floor plan is wonderful with the formal dining room, formal living room and wide open family room that are all over-sized and bright and perfect for family enjoyment or large parties. Offered at: $2,800,000

364 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4 Custom built home ready for the fussiest buyers. New construction! Set beautifully on this 1.52 wooded acre property, this new construction contemporary style home features 4/5 bedrooms and 5 full baths and a finished full basement with daylight windows and ceiling height of 9.5 feet. Location, location, location...a very short distance right into town. If you~re a jogger then the open Jogging Trail (almost 1/2 mile around) will be the finishing touch to this very special incredible home. This custom home abuts 300 acres of Witherspoon Woods. The long driveway to the beautiful over-sized 2 car garage with mud room and beautiful entrance provides privacy as it sits sideways in the trees. This home offers a fabulous wide open floor plan. Offered at: $1,758,000

6 Banyan Rd, Montgomery Twp. - Skillman OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4 Beautiful Bright 2 story entry with split staircase welcomes you to this sun filled Cherry Valley expanded Brittany Model. Move right in, beautiful. Hardwood floors throughout. Beautiful Moldings, chair rail, crown, dental, shadow boxes, wainscoting & tray ceiling. Throughout Light and Bright. Located minutes from downtown Princeton and located also just minutes as well to the wonderful Montgomery Schools. 6 Banyan is located off of Country Club Drive and a minute to the Country Club, the Golf Course, the Tennis Courts, the pool and the play ground. Shopping nearby as well. This home is location, location, location. Visit the home to view the beautiful open spacious white kitchen with granite and tile counter tops, pantry, bar area and breakfast room that is open to the 2 story family room with fireplace and mantel. Both the white kitchen and family room are open great rooms, with windows and sliding door to the rear beautiful private backyard with gorgeous landscaping and brick patio and pergola. Offered at: $748,000

Roberta Parker

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ 08540 | 609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

Sales Associate 609-915-0206 Mobile roberta.parker@foxroach.com robertasellsprinceton.com

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019

Roberta Sells Princeton


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019 • 20

Town Topics

Special Needs Spotlight Fox Trail Memory Care Living

Fox Trail Memory Care Living is working with Peregrine Senior Living in revolutionizing expectations of the aging process at Princeton and Chester through a unique approach to memory care we call The Peregrine Way®. This exclusive approach follows three fundamental principles: We focus on long-term memories our residents still recall. We nurture each resident’s long-term memories to promote mental stimulation as well as a sense of comfort and calm. We help families cope with their loved one’s memory loss. We encourage family members to participate in every aspect of their loved one’s life to keep relationships strong. We train our staff to treat each resident like family. Constant staff education and training ensure each resident receives the best care possible. Fox Trail Memory Care Living of Chester and Princeton offers exceptional care, medication management, engaging programming, fall prevention, and ongoing education. We proudly utilize CarePredict© senior health care monitoring technology

as safety is paramount at Fox Trail. This technology provides insights for care staff and management, and peace of mind for seniors and their loved ones. Each resident has his/her own individual care plan overseen by medical personnel. With suites available for just 16 residents, our care team is truly able to get to know and connect with your loved one.

Freeman Law Offices, LLC

Watching family members with disabilities struggle through life is difficult. You want to help them succeed, but you are not sure how you can help. You reach out to your local school district for support, only to be told that everything is fine in school. You reach out to state agencies for other supports, but do not get a response. You name your family member as a beneficiary of a retirement account or life insurance policy, but you are then advised that was not right either. Almost exclusively in advocating for individuals with disabilities, Freeman Law Offices, LLC is able to rely on personal and professional expertise to provide a onestop shop to assist you in navigating this process at every stage of life. We do the work for you so you can

spend more time enjoying each other instead of trying to make sense of it all. We utilize a holistic approach to help your family member succeed: advocating for services from school districts, insurance companies, and state agencies. We are committed to serving our clients with understanding and compassion. Knowledge is power, and we provide the knowledge needed to advocate for your family member. Schedule a consultation today by calling (609) 4545609 or visit one of our office locations nearest you.

as the game of ice hockey. During each week’s practice, the rink is divided to accommodate for beginner, intermediate, and advanced skill levels. All registered players can participate in weekly practices and home and away games, as well as several special events throughout the season. The Bulldogs’ coaching staff is comprised of adult

coaches and volunteers. Our junior coaches are high school-age players who play in traditional hockey programs. These junior coaches assist the coaching staff onice, enabling a low player-tocoach ratio and fostering an environment in which hockey players come together to learn and form meaningful relationships. To learn more about the program, visit

www.mercerspecialhockey. com or contact Jackie at (609 ) 915-0458 or jackiezohn@gmail.com.

Movement with Joy

Joy Vrooman Sayen is a board-certified dance movement therapist and nationally certified counselor. Joy works with children dealing with a wide range of Continued on Page 22

Mercer Bulldogs Special Hockey

Founded by a group of parents and volunteers, the Mercer Special Hockey program works to provide a fun and safe opportunity for individuals with developmental disabilities to participate in the sport of ice hockey in a specially-adapted learning environment. Mercer Special Hockey is comprised of over 30 developmentally disabled players (ages 5-adult) across a wide range of abilities — from learn-to-skate to advanced — who participate in a brand of the sport known as Special Hockey. Players learn the importance of teamwork and good sportsmanship, as well

MOVEMENT WITH JOY

THERAPY FOR CHILDREN Joy Vrooman Sayen, mfa, ms, bc-dmt, ncc movementwithjoy@gmail.com | 609-844-0151

s u p p ort t h at l e a d s to sPlay u& Movement ccTherapy ess Using Dynamic

To Help Children, and Their Parents, with Emotional, Behavioral, and Learning Challenges.

e s u d p s uo po t p ort r o th t at et a sat h to sto u a cc c t e ss se e l s e sa u p pp ort t h at lls e adu d sc u cc es sa s d l el a s d u s p ps t o rt s t u h c c l e a s d s s ts o t s

at

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Mercer MercerBulldogs Bulldogs SpecialNeeds NeedsHockey Learn to Special & Skate Learn Program to Skate Program

Mercer Bulldogs Special Hockey & Learn to Skate Program is designed to teach special needs individuals TWO FREE SKILLS CLINICS about teamwork, achieving their goals, and the benefits of staying fit and active through the sport of hockey

This is your opportunity to try out ice skating and hockey, as well as ask any questions you may have! This is open to new and returning players. Attend FREE SKILLS CLINIC both clinics. Sunday, September 15 (9-10 am)

Saturday, September (10:30-11:30 Mercer Bulldogs Special Hockey & Learn to21 Skate program is am) designed to te special needs individuals about teamwork, achieving their goals, and the be At the Loucks Ice Center at The Lawrenceville School of staying fit and active through the sport of hockey. There are no age Lewisville Road/2500 Main Street Route 206 North, requirements and you don't haveLawrenceville to live in Mercer County or in New Jersey NJ 08648 participate. All ages are welcome. Helmets are mandatory.

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www.facebook.com/mercerbulldogs Coach Jackie Zohn: 609-915-0458


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019 • 22

who practice in this area of law. RLG is one such firm with the expertise to assist you in setting up the right type of trust for you and your family. The focus of Rao Legal Group is to give each client’s file the due attention it deserves, and to treat every client with respect and compassion. For fur ther

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Special Needs Spotlight Continued from Page 20

challenges affecting their learning, behavior, social, and emotional well-being. In her private practice the creative and in-the-present aspects of play and movement provide a natural therapeutic modality particularly appropriate for helping children work through their challenges. Located at 416 Route 518, Blawenburg. ( 609 ) 844.0151; movementwithjoy@gmail.com.

The Newgrange School/ The Laurel School

The Newgrange School in Hamilton and The Laurel School in Princeton are sister schools with over 70 years of experience in addition to the commitment and expertise that non-traditional learners need to reach their full educational and social potential — and to love coming to school each day. The Newgrange School stands out among schools for students with languagebased and nonverbal learning differences, including autism spectrum disorder. Newgrange incorporates the teaching and practice of social skills into our academic curriculum, in addition to a formal transition program, in order to prepare students for life after high school. Using proven research-based methodologies, our nurturing

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23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019

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After Stint With Vancouver Canucks Last Winter, PU Grad Teves Hungry to Earn NHL Roster Spot

Josh Teves would have been fine with delaying the start of his professional ice hockey career, but now he’s grateful for the experience gained at the end of last winter. Three days after the defending ECAC Hockey champion Princeton University men’s ice hockey team lost 6-5 in triple overtime to Brown on March 9 to fall in an ECACH first round series, star defenseman Teves signed with the Vancouver Canucks. On March 26, he made his NHL debut for the Canucks in a 5-4 loss to the Anaheim Ducks. “It was a crazy experience,” said Teves, a 6’0, 180-pound native of Calgary, Alberta, reflecting on his first taste of NHL action. “I don’t know how to put it into words. The guys were all super supportive and everyone’s really excited for you. Obviously they’ve all been in that position before and know how important it is in your career and it’s something you’ve been working for. And then to have some family in the crowd as well was pretty special. The guys just said to try to take it all in and enjoy it. You only get one first game so I was just trying to enjoy it. That first shift, for sure, there’s a lot of nerves and my first game overall there’s a lot of nerves so it is just trying to settle in and take it all in. Playing in front of the home crowd there in Vancouver and the Canadian market and a historic team was pretty special.” Now Teves is trying to take his brief NHL stint at the end of the year and use it to stick with the Canucks, who signed him to a two-year, two-way deal that makes it likely he’ll spend time this winter with their American Hockey League (AHL) affiliate, the Utica Comets. “I went to Vancouver for about three weeks and played in one game and went on a couple of road trips and just had the experience of seeing what pro hockey and, specifically at the NHL level, is all about,” said Teves. “I saw how players and the staff conduct themselves and the amount of work that goes into it, the professionalism that goes into it. It was an eye-opening experience and something that I hope to take into next year and some years down the road. It was a really exciting time and pretty special. Not a lot of guys get to go play professional after college, let alone in the midst of also finishing up a college semester. I called it a little vacation of pro hockey away from school.” Teves wasn’t looking to jump into the pro game last year as he had hoped the Tigers would make another run to the ECACH title. “I wasn’t that mentally prepared for it, the way that ended in triple overtime” said Teves, who served as Princeton’s team captain last winter. “The next day we got back to campus pretty late at 5:00

or 6:00 in the morning after the game. I had to get up on Sunday and start really thinking about the process and talk to my adviser at the time and we started doing some calls and looking at option. It was kind of a quick turnover from fighting for a championship to starting to think about where I’d be going and signing and preparing to move on to pro hockey. So definitely a bit of a whirlwind and the next few days were kind of nervewracking and stressful as we were just trying to figure out where I was going to land at the next step.” Having earned All-Ivy League, All-ECACH, and AllAmerican honors during his Princeton career, Teves put together the resume to earn an early shot at the NHL. The 24-year-old had four years of college experience and a year of junior hockey; that age and experience got him on the ice for the Canucks. “I think I was more mature and my game was a bit more mature as well from what the organization and the scouts had told me,” said Teves. “I felt and they felt that I was kind of ready to step in and then it’s more of a learning experience too. The position the team was in it, they weren’t probably going to make the playoffs, so it was an opportunity to go there and learn and kind of take it all in and try to be a sponge and prepare myself for next season and professional hockey as a whole. It was more of an experience to see what it’s all about and get a little taste of it, and know how to better prepare this summer, and what I need to work on and what it takes to be as prepared as I can be this fall.” Looking back on his time at Princeton, Teves believes the experience prepared him well for the jump to the pro level. Last winter, Teves led Princeton defensemen in scoring with 20 points. In his junior season, he led all NCAA defensemen in points per game at 1.06 and assists per game at 0.79. He had 85 points in his four years at Princeton. “Obviously there are a lot of lessons I learned in my time at Princeton,” said Teves, who piled up 69 assists in his career, the most ever for a Princeton defenseman. “I really enjoyed it, and not only the hockey side of it, but the academic side. There’s a lot of things you can take from how difficult some of the course work was and the time management and goal setting and hard work you’ve got to put in to do well at school. I think you can take those lessons and apply them to sports as well. Obviously the hockey side of things was great at Princeton and I can’t say enough about how much they’ve helped me. Just the school as a whole and my time there helped shape me and helped push me towards reaching my goals with my hockey career.” Teves is one of four Princ-

eton products who was in an NHL development camp this summer with classmates Ryan Kuffner and Max Veronneau along with incoming freshman Liam Gorman. In addition, Tiger alums Taylor Fedun ’11 and Eric Robinson ’18 signed NHL deals this summer with goalie Mike Condon ’13 getting traded to the Tampa Bay Lightning after stints with Montreal, Pittsburgh, and Ottawa. “It’s an amazing opportunity and a testament to the program that we’ve got,” said Teves. “We have a handful of guys now breaking in or that have played in the league as well. I’m just super proud to be another one of those names of guys that have had a taste and hopefully will be full-timer in the NHL. It’s a neat little brotherhood we have there. When I was up, Taylor Fedun came to play in Vancouver, so I had an opportunity to meet with him and have a chat. Eric Robinson who I know really well from my years at Princeton, he’s playing at Columbus, and was in town as well. It was a cool opportunity to catch up with him and then Max and Ryan. That’s pretty special that all three of us could have a chance at the end of the season. There’s definitely a lot of pride to be representing Princeton in the National Hockey League. It’s definitely nice that I can have some other close friends that I can bounce ideas off and kind of talk through things with.” With Vancouver’s training camp slated to start on September 13, Teves has shifted his focus fully to his professional career. Having cheered for his hometown Calgary Flames growing up, he had to put aside the rivalry between the Canucks and the Flames. “Some buddies were giving me a bit of a hard time about that, but it’s a great organization,” said Teves. “I spent two years living in British Columbia playing junior hockey, so I got to watch all the Canucks games when I was in that area. I kind of know the history of the organization from players like [Mark] Messier to [Markus] Naslund and [Henrik] Sedin that have gone through it. It’s kind of great to know the history a little bit and be in a Canadian market. It’s not too far from home. I’ve had a little taste of it and probably more times than not been cheering against Vancouver, but it was an easy transition to make for sure.” Currently, Teves is back home in Calgary working out in preparation for camp after attending some Canucks camps earlier this summer. “There was a bit of a mini-camp for some of the new guys early in the spring with their development staff and skills coach and skating coach and athletic trainers as well,” said Teves. “That was earlier in May and then the team had their annual development camp in June where they bring in all their young draft picks

CAN DO: Josh Teves, left, helps goalie Austin Shaw hold the fort in a game last winter for the Princeton University men’s hockey team. Star defenseman and team captain Teves ended up signing with the Vancouver Canucks after wrapping up his Princeton career. Teves made his NHL debut on March 26 in a 5-4 loss to the Anaheim Ducks. Next month, Teves heads to training camp where he will look to earn a spot on the Canucks roster. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) and new signings. That was in Vancouver. I had gone to that camp the year before as a free agent invite, so I knew kind of what to expect. That was a week in June on the ice and we got to experience the organization a bit more and they got their hands on you a little and give you some tips.” Some of the tips they couldn’t teach were ones that Teves picked up in his time up with Vancouver as being around the NHL team and on the ice stuck with him. “Some of the lessons I learned and some of the things I’ll take forward are the strength and the speed of the game and the details,” said Teves. “The execution is just at a really high level and a huge jump from college. Just the

focus level you need and attention to detail every practice, every workout, and every game is something. You can’t take a second off. The players are so good, so talented, and so hard working that you really have to be on your A-game. The speed increases, the strength increases, everyone is at the top of their game. It’s the best league in the world for a reason so you have got to be ready to go. Just having that experience for a couple weeks of taking it in and seeing what it takes has helped a lot this summer to prepare. I’m trying to get myself as prepared as I can and be as ready as I can this fall to try to make a career out of it and to be a full timer in the NHL.” Teves is hopeful that his

hard work will pay off with a roster spot with the Canucks. He is looking for the chance to gain experience and prove that he can play in the NHL. “You have to go in with that mindset that you will go in and take somebody’s job,” said Teves. “It’s a business now so it’s every man for himself but to even have an opportunity to crack an NHL roster is just amazing and I feel really lucky to be in this position. It’s definitely time to crank up the effort and the discipline and the work ethic that goes into it. I’m just really excited for the opportunity and excited to put the work in and hopefully turn some heads and make a roster spot this year.” —Justin Feil

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before posting wins over second-place finish at the Mexico 45-37 in the semis 2017 U-19 FIBA World Cup. and the Dominican Republic A lar ie and t he United 45-31 in the finals. States went undefeated in Ending the competition pool play, defeating Argenwith the team epee, Holmes tina 70-62, the U.S. Virgin and Nixon helped the U.S. Islands 103-55 and ColumPrinceton Fencers defeat Peru 45-30 in the bia 75-63. In the semifinal, Strike Gold at Pan Am quar ter finals, Venezuela Striking gold, Princeton 45-26 in the semifinals, and the U.S. edged Puerto Rico 62-59 surviving as a threeUniversity women’s fencers, Cuba 45-29 in the final. pointer at the end of regulacurrent and former, came tion that could have tied the PU Water Polo Great Johnson up big at the fencing competition at the Pan Ameri- Helps US Take Gold at Pan Am game didn’t fall as Alarie’s Hav ing star red as t he squad came up with a 62-59 can Games in Lima, Peru U. S . w o m e n’s n a t i o n a l victory. last week. In the gold medal final, Saber Eliza Stone ‘13, team won the FINA World Brazil came up with some Championship earlier this épée Katharine Holmes ‘17, rising senior épée Kasia Nix- summer, Princeton Univer- clutch free throw shooting, on, and rising sophomore sit y women’s water polo hitting 7-of-8 from the charsaber Chloe Fox-Gitomer great Ashleigh Johnson ’17 ity stripe in one stretch late all earned gold medals, with achieved more internation- in the contest, to rally for Stone and Holmes winning al success last week as she the win over the the U.S. Alarie’s best game of the their respective individual helped the U.S. win the gold weapon competitions, Stone medal at the Pan American competition came against Columbia, where she conand Fox-Gitomer helping Games. The U.S. squad was hardly tributed seven points, seven U.S. to the team saber title, and Holmes and Nixon threatened during the tour- rebounds, two blocks, and helping the U.S. to the team nament, going undefeated two steals. In five games (6-0) and outscoring its op- overall, the two-time Iv y épée title. Stone, the 2013 NCAA sa- ponents 142-24 in earning League Player of the Year ber champ, went undefeated the program’s fifth consecu- averaged 6.6 points, 5.6 rein individual saber, winning tive Pan American Games bounds, and 1.6 steals. PU Field Hockey Alumna all five of her pool-round title. In group play, the U.S. Medal at Pan Am Games five-touch bouts before getting a bye into the direct- defeated Puerto Rico 23-3, Two for m er P r i nceton elimination quarterfinals. Brazil 20-4, and Venezuela Un i ve r s it y f i e l d h o cke y She beat Argentina’s Maria 23-3. In the quarterfinals, stars, Kat Sharkey ’13 and Alicia Perroni 15-5 in the the U.S. team routed Peru Elise Wong ’19, are coming quarterfinals before defeat- 21-3 and then rolled past home with medals from the ing Canada’s Gabriella Charl Cuba 31-7 in the semifinals. 2019 Pan American Games Page 15-10 in the semis. In the gold medal match, the in Lima, Peru. Stone went on to defeat U.S. posted another lopsidWong and Team Canada Maria Belen Perez Maurice ed win, defeating Canada earned the silver medal, 15-13 in the final to secure 24-4. falling to Argentina, 5-1, the gold. PU Hoops’ Star Alarie in the final. It was the first In the individual épée com- Earns Pan Am Silver time that Canada had made petition, Holmes went 4-1 in Princeton University wom- the Pan American Games Fipool bouts, earning a bye to en’s basketball star Bella nal since 1991. It got there the quarterfinals where she Alarie and the United States by posting a 2-0 win over defeated Yamika Ramirez women’s basketball team Sharkey and the United Quesada of Cuba 15-12. earned the silver medal af- States in the semis. The only Holmes then beat Nathalie ter falling to Brazil, 79-73, two matches that Canada Moellhausen of Brazil 15-9 in the 2019 Pan American dropped in the tournament in the semis and Venezuela’s Games gold medal final last was to Argentina, ranked Patrizia Piovesan Silva 14- Saturday in Lima, Peru. No. 3 in the world. This is 10 in the finals. This marked the second Wong’s first international In team saber, Stone and silver medal for rising se- medal with Canada. Fox- G itomer helped t he nior Alarie, a 6’4 native Rebounding quickly from Americans roll past Peru of Bethesda, Md., as she in the semis, Sharkey helped Family Owned Operated 45-15 in the quarterfinals helped the U.S. squad to a the U.S.and cruise to a 5-1 win

PU Sports Roundup

POLL POSITION: Members of the Princeton University football team celebrate after the Tigers defeated Penn 42-14 last November to culminate a 10-0 season, the program’s first undefeated campaign since 1964. Coming off that historic fall, Princeton is ranked 24th in the STATS FCS (Football Championship Subdivision) preseason poll released last week. Princeton finished 2018 ranked ninth in the final FCS poll, the best finish by an Ivy League team since 1986. In addition, the Tigers were picked third in the 2019 Ivy League preseason media poll last week with Yale tabbed to place first and Dartmouth to come in second. Princeton opens the upcoming season by hosting Butler on September 21. This campaign marks the 150th anniversary season for the sport of football, dating back to Princeton’s game against Rutgers on November 6, 1869. As part of the season-long celebration, the Tigers will be playing Dartmouth at Yankee Stadium on November 9. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) been named to the Canadian National Women’s Development Team. C o n n o r s , F i l l i e r, a n d Thompson made the 23-player roster after spending a week at the Team C a n ad a S u m m e r S h ow case camp in Calgary. The team will now prepare for a three-game series against the United States on August 14-17 in Lake Placid, N.Y. Connors and Fillier are two of 11 players who were on last year’s team that competed against the US in

over Chile to secure the bronze. This marked Sharkey’s sixth medal in international competition with the U.S. National team. Both teams will look to qualify for the 2020 Olympics in events later this year.

PU Women’s Hockey Has 3 on Canadian Squad

Three Princeton University women’s hockey players, rising sophomore forwards Maggie Connors and Sarah Fillier along w ith rising senior defenseman Cla ire T homp s on, have

a three-game series. Fillier is one of three on the roster that competed for Canada’s National Team at the 2018 Four Nations Cup in Saskatoon. Thompson, who earned her first invitation to a Hockey Canada camp this summer, makes the team on her first tryout. P r i nce ton h e ad coach Cara Morey and assistant coach Courtney BirchardKessel are assistant coaches with the National Development Team.

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When Devon Lis started preseason training last summer in her freshman season with the Georgetown University women’s soccer team, she sensed that the squad could do some special things. “What has always been clear to me is that we were really dedicated and willing to work very hard,” said former Princeton High standout Lis. “Every practice we gave it our all, there was no slacking off.” There was no slacking off for Lis as she adjusted to the rigors and quicker pace of the college game. “In high school, there are really talented players,” said Lis. “It is just a different level here that you don’t even see until you start practicing and then you realize, oh my goodness, this is a whole other level. I would say speed is definitely the biggest factor. It is a really exciting place to be.” Last fall ended up being very exciting for Lis and the Hoyas as they went 21-1-3, advancing to the NCAA College Cup Semifinals. Lis made her debut for Georgetown on August 26, coming off the bench against Yale in a 3-1 win. “It was incredible, being so young and so new to the team and with the success that we had, it was playing a different role than I was used to,” said midfielder Lis, who ended up making five appearances as a reserve in her debut campaign.

“Coming in, I figured for the majority of freshmen, that is their role - stepping in and being that person you can go to when you are winning in those games. It was awesome to be able to play and to make this small impact on the greater goal for our team. You can’t take any moment for granted so it was really special.” It took a while for Lis to get up to speed last fall. “You can try to train and get your touches up to pace with the people on your team but the real way you learn is by getting the game experience and scrimmaging against the people that are so good and just learning from them,” added Lis. “I was always in a position on my teams where I had a lot of speed and a lot of pace compared to my teammates. Coming to Georgetown, it was a huge growing experience.” A huge moment for Lis came in late November when the Hoyas faced the University of North Carolina in the national semis at Cary, N.C. “It was so special being part of that game and walking out on the field with all of the lights, knowing that my family and my friends were watching it on their TVs,” said Lis of the contest which saw Georgetown lose 1-0 to UNC in double overtime, suffering its only defeat of the season. “My sister [Taylor] was out and told the restaurant to play it on the screen so she

and all of her friends could see it. It is so special the support and love that you receive. It shows how much all of the work is worth it. The other freshmen and I were experiencing this in our first year; some people never will experience the Final 4 in their collegiate careers. It is incredible, I don’t know anything different right now, which is insane to me.” With Georgetown having started preseason practices on August 5, Lis worked hard over the summer to be in top shape. “A lot of my preparation has been running and making sure that I am fit and am ready for the season in ways that don’t even involve my teammates,” said Lis. “Being fit is something that is a foundation for any of the drills and any of the soccer that we want to achieve. I have also been playing locally with some girls who live in New Jersey. We all get together and play. It is just keeping up with touches and things like that.” As Lis looks ahead to her sophomore campaign, she is hoping to get more playing time for the Hoyas “Every year, the roles on the team change and you never really know what your

role on the team is going to be until you start preseason and you start the season and see how everything starts to click together,” said Lis. “I hope to continue to grow as a player and continue to learn from my teammates and from my coaches. I play a defensive center mid and that has been cool. I have had to learn how to turn and how to beat other center midfielders on these

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“It is a whole new season and all of these teams look at us and they are excited to play us because they really want to compete against us. So every game we have to put our best foot forward and know that no team is an easy win ever. With the high success comes that target on the back but it is a place where we want to be.” —Bill Alden

ON THE BALL: Devon Lis dribbles the ball up the field last fall in her debut season for the Georgetown University women’s soccer team. Former Princeton High star Lis helped Georgetown go 21-1-3 in 2018 on the way to the NCAA semifinals. Midfielder Lis is currently going through preseason training for the Hoyas, who are slated to open their 2019 season by playing at James Madison University on August 22. (Photo provided courtesy of Georgetown University Athletics Communications)

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other teams that are so technical and so skilled.” In the view of Lis, the Hoyas will keep showing growth as they start their 2019 regular season by playing at James Madison University on August 22. “One of the biggest things is to not get too complacent. Just because we had success last year doesn’t mean anything this year,” said Lis.

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019

After Helping Georgetown Soccer Make NCAA Semis, PHS Alumna Lis Primed for Big Sophomore Season

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019 • 26

Displaying Quality at PASDA Championships, Nassau Swim Club Features 4 MVPs at Meet Although the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings posted a pedestrian 2-2-1 record in Princeton-Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) dual meet competition this summer, Will Kinney was confident that the team would step up at the season-ending league championship meet. “We saw the quality of our individual swims in our dual meets,” said Lemmings head coach Will Kinney. “We felt pretty good going into champs.” Nassau displayed its quality at the PASDA championship meet held at the West Windsor Waterworks. Taking third in the Division 2 standings, four of the team’s boy swimmers earned MVP honors. The Lemmings scored 1,394 points in the two-day meet with the Ben Franklin Swim Team piling up 2,339 points to win the Division 2 title. One of the team’s youngest swimmers, Vaughn Rodricks, ended up as one of those MVPs, placing first in the 6-and-under 25-meter freestyle and 25 backstroke. “He is so fast, he is so big,” said Kinney of Rodricks. “If he gets going, he is dominant and fast.” Another dominant performer for the Lemmings was Stephen Baytin, the MVP in the 8-and-under group, who won the 100 individual medley, 25 free, and the 25 breaststroke. “He is very technical,” said Kinney. “He tied his older brother’s [Daniel] record in one of the events.” Two other Nassau swimmers, Garik Zlotchew and Sebastian Rodricks, also showed good technique in the 8-andunders. Zlotchew won the 25 backstroke and took second in the 100 IM and the 25 butterfly while Rodricks won the 25 fly and placed second in both the 25 free and the 25 breast. “Those guys swim together in club; they came in right away and knew what they were doing,” said Kinney. “They are a pleasure to coach.” Will Kovalick produced some good swims in the 10-and-unders, taking third in the 25 free and 25 fly. “He has been there for all of the years I have been coaching,” said Kinney. “He has just been so consistent.” As for the 12-and-under boys, Tyler Cenci showed versatility, taking fourth in the 50 free, the 50 breast, and 50 fly. In addition, Sawyer Kinney placed fifth in the 100 IM with

Aurav Singhal finishing sixth in the 50 back “We had a lot of 12-andunder boys age up from our 10 and under boys last year so they were doing 50s this year,” said Kinney. “They all performed really well.” Daniel Baytin performed extremely well in the 14-and-under category, winning the 100 IM, 50 free, and 50 breast and earning MVP honors. “Daniel has been a star since he walked in,” said Kinney.” “He has really been a good leader this year for the younger kids. I think that the younger kids really look up to him just because of how fast he swims. He is always helping them.” Oliver Gassmann gave the Lemmings a lot of help in the 18-and-under boys, winning the 50 fly, 50 back, and 50 free as he was also received MVP honors. “Oliver is also a club swimmer, he is a year-round swimmer,” said Kinney. “He is like Daniel in the sense that he is really good with helping with the younger kids. Everyone kind of looks up to him. Oliver was our main 18U boys’ swimmer.” The Nassau girls also showed strength in the younger divisions. Nava Brenner-Witten came big in the 8-and-under group, winning the 25 free, 25 back, and 25 fly. “She is very technical and very fast,” added Kinney. “She is just a pleasure to have.” Anna Terhaar and Julia Wei produced some fast swims in the 10-and-unders. Terhaar placed first in 25 back, second in the 25 free, and third in 100 IM while Wei took second in the 25 fly, fourth in the 25 free, and fifth in the 100 IM. “We look to them for their technique,” said Kinney of Terhaar and Wei. “We think they could swim forever and not stop, just because of how good their technique is. It is just so much fun to watch them swim.” In the 14-and-under girls, Sophia Burton and Kim Wei added to the fun on the deck for the team. Burton placed first in both the 50 back and 50 fly and second in the 50 breast with Wei took third in both the 100 IM and 50 back. “Sophia is kind of like the team mom, she is so helpful,” said Kinney. “She really is great with everyone; she could be the role model of Nassau. She has

grown up with the team. Kim is one of the people you can put in any stroke and know that she is going to produce something good.” Rachel Adlai-Gail produced in and out of the water this summer for the Lemmings. “She was one of assistant coaches this year, this was her first year coaching,” said Kinney of Adlai-Gail, who took fourth in the 100 IM and 50 fly and fifth in the 50 free at the championship meet. “She did an excellent job doing that and then was able to get into the pool and swim and get out and start coaching again. She was awesome this year and we are sad that it is her last year swimming. She is going to Bryn Mawr.” Kinney, for his part, enjoyed his second summer as the head coach of the program. “This season was really fun, I had a really good time coaching this group of kids,” said Kinney, a former star for the Princeton High boys team who is heading into his junior year at William and Mary. “I think it was really tightly knit.” The team’s tight bonds were on display in a meet this summer when one of the team’s younger swimmers stepped up to help out the oldest boys in a relay. “In t he meet agains t Hopewell Valley Tennis, one of our 17-year-old boy swimmers wasn’t feeling good and couldn’t swim the relay,” recalled Kinney. “So we were scrambling around and trying to figure out who we were going to put in there and one of our 6-andunder kids was like ‘yeah, I will do it.’ So we put him in that relay and every single person on our team was lining the deck, jumping up and down, going crazy. Everyone just supported everyone else. It was real cool to see that. It was the loudest I have heard the team.” Noting that the Lemmings boasted a strong corps of younger swimmers, Kinney believes the team can make noise in the future. “I think out 6-and-unders were a lot of fun to coach, over the course of the season, both the boys and the girls,” said Kinney. “Two of our boys, Connor Shea and Nicholas Weihe dropped a minute in both the 25 free and 25 back, which was fun. It is a good foundation moving forward.” —Bill Alden

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BACK IN THE FLOW: Stephen Baytin of the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings shows his backstroke form in a 2017 meet. Last month, Baytin starred at the Princeton-Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet, earning MVP honors for the Division 2 8-and-under boys. Baytin’s heroics helped the Lemmings place third in the Division 2 team standings at the meet. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Princeton Little League Holding Fall Ball Sign-Up

The Princeton Lit tle League ( PL L) is holding registration for its 2019 Fall Ball season, which goes from September 14 to November 2. The program will run on Saturday afternoons only with no weeknights. Player

Division A A: 8-10 year olds, 3 – 5 p.m. (kid/machine pitch); Division AAA: (50/70) 1013 year olds, 2:30 – 4:30 p.m. (kid pitch). For more information and to register, log onto www. princetonlittleleague.com

Rookies (ages 6-7); Juniors (ages 8-10 ); and Seniors ( ages 11-14 ) . T he PJ F L skills/drills sessions start on September 5 and the first games are slated for September 22. Those interested can log onto www.pjflnj.org for further details.

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FIELD OF DREAMS: Members of the Princeton Tigers 12U baseball team enjoy the moment as they competed last month in a national tournament at the Cooperstown Dreams Park in Cooperstown, N.Y., the home of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Princeton took 35th out of 104 teams in its age group, posting a 6-3 record. The Tigers played teams from California, Ohio, Maryland, Connecticut, Wisconsin, Missouri, Virginia and Canada. The team combined for 20 home runs, led by Alex Winters (4), and posted a .450 team batting average, led by Travis Petrone (.590), Bennett Siegel (.571), and Mike Prete (.545). Pictured in the front row, from left to right, are Anders Hedin, Alex Winter, Sam Lee, Travis Petrone, and Colton Simonds. In the back row, from left, are Ben Walden, coach Mike Walden, Mike Prete, Bennett Seigel, coach Jason Petrone, Carson Daniell, Luke Hann, coach David Lee, and Ed Kuczynski.

The 11th Annual Helene Cody 5-kilometer race and 1-Mile Fun Run is taking place on September 7, starting near the Cranbury Fire Department at 2 South Main Street in Cranbury. The fun run begins at 8:15 a.m. and the 5K starts at 9 a.m. The 5K is chip-timed and USATF-certified with water stations and musical

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17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2019

Recent Princeton High grad and Duke University crew commit Morgan Linsley helped the U.S. women’s four with coxswain take fourth in the grand final last week at the 2019 World Rowing Junior Championships in Tokyo, Japan. The U.S. boat was in medal position as it battled Italy, Germany, and China into the final 500 meters of the 2,000-meter race. Italy inched away in the final sprint to win gold in a 7:19.80 with China taking silver in 7:21.78 and Germany claiming the bronze in 7:24.74. The U.S. clocked a time of 7:26.45 in taking fourth. Linsley was joined on the U.S. boat by Carina Baxter ( El Dorado Hills, Calif.), Lindsey Rust (Roslyn, N.Y.), Alena Criss (Baldwinsville, N.Y.) and Aidan Wrenn-Walz (Arlington, Va.)

performers throughout the course. The post-race celebration at the Cranbury Fire Department features a DJ, drinks, bagels, fruit, and free massages. Trophies will be awarded to the top 3 male and female finishers overall and in each age group for the 5K. Every Fun Run finisher will receive a medal and trophies will be awarded to the top 3 boys and girls. The Cranbur y Day celebration will begin immediately after the race on Main Street. This event is the main fundraiser for the Helene Cody Foundation, whose mission is to inspire youth to volunteer, to better their communities and themselves. Prior to her death in 2008, Helene Cody, a Princeton High student, planned to

revive the Cranbur y Day 5K, a community event that had been discontinued in 2006, as a way to combine her love of distance running and community service for her Girl Scout gold award project. When she passed away, a classmate organized the first Helene Cody Cranbury 5K in memory of Helene for his Eagle Scout project. Every year since, the Helene Cody Foundation has used the event to bring the community together and use the proceeds to sponsor youth service projects and provide scholarships. All proceeds go directly to the Helene Cody Foundation, a 501(c)(3) charity. Additional race information and on-line registration is available at http://www. helenecody.com/5k-and1-mile-runwalk.html.

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27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019

Local Sports

Development is the primary focus of Fall Ball. Players will be organized by age division and by team. They w ill play games, but no standings will be kept, as the main goal is to work on skills and have fun. Players will also practice for 30-40 minutes before the start of each game. The divisions and schedules are as follows: Tee Ball: 4-6 year olds, 1:30 – 3 p.m.; Division A: 6-8 year olds, 1:30 – 3 p.m. (coach pitch);


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019 • 28

Obituaries

Herbert Windsor Hobler September 25, 1922 August 10, 2019 Herbert Windsor Hobler, age 96, died August 10, 2019 at Stonebridge at Montgomery in Skillman, New Jersey. Born in St. Louis in 1922, he was raised In Bronxville, NY, and Stamford, CT. His family moved to Princeton in 1941 when he was a student. Af ter graduating from the Hill School, he entered Princeton in the Class of

1944, where he was on the basketball and track teams. He thereafter served as class secretary for many years, and was President of the class for five years. A dedicated Tiger to the end, Herb showed his stripes when this year, he attended his 75th Princeton reunion; his 73rd reunion in a row. A trustee candidate of the University in 1969; he was honored in 2003 with the Princeton Alumni Service Award. He chaired many of the Class of 1944’s reunions. Herb likely also saw more Princeton basketball games (over 870) over 70 years than anyone else, in large part by being the color man on the WHWH radio broadcasts over a period of 18 years. During World War II, he was an Army Air Corps (now the Air Force) navigator on a B-29 flying missions over Japan, and in 1986, was President of the 9th Bomb Group Association, and continued for 14 years. A commuter to New York for 18 years, Herb was first in programming at Mutual Broadcasting Company, then joined the NBC-TV network the day it started in December 1949, where he sold his first spot on the “Today” and “Show of Shows.” After two years with the CBS network,

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he joined the start-up company, Teleprompter, for five years, helping to pioneer their prompting system. For four years he was head of production at Videotape Productions in NYC, where he supervised thousands of TV commercials and shows. After founding the Nassau Broadcast Company, he put WHWH Radio on the air in 1963. The station provided extensive community programming. A year later he bought WTOA-FM from the Times of Trenton changing the call letters to WPST. As principal owner and Chairman of Nassau Broadcasting Company, he also started six cable companies. Nassau Broadcasting Company was sold in 1986. In 1975, Herb was named National Broadcaster of the Year with the Abe Lincoln Award for editor ializing about government broadcasting restrictions. As a result, he served four years on the National Association of Broadcasters Board where he chaired the First Amendment Committee. Locally, he served on the boards of the YMCA, the Hun School, the United Fund, Princeton Savings and Loan, the Nassau Club, and Tiger Inn. A member of the Springdale Golf Club, a past active elder in the Nassau Presbyterian Church, Paul Harris Rotary Fellow, and Chairman of Princeton Township’s 150 th anniversary. Herb was honored as Princeton’s Man of the Year both by the Chamber of Commerce and the United Fund’s Lambert Award. In Princeton he was also a co-founder of Concerned Citizens of Princeton, and in 1999 created

the 20th Century Brick Walk in Palmer Square. He also helped create “the Spirit of Princeton,” a fund of the Princeton Area Community Foundation, of which he was a co-founder. Due to his fundraising, the fund was able to bring back the annual Princeton Memorial Day Parade. At the Nassau Club, over many years, as Chairman of the Speaker program, Herb was responsible for bringing over 1,000 speakers to the weekly luncheons. One of Herb’s great passions was the American Boychoir School. After becoming a board member in 1974, he was responsible for suggesting a name change to the school, The American Boychoir, which was accepted by the Board. Serving as Chairman of the Board for 22 years, Herb worked tirelessly on behalf of the Boychoir, helping them achieve national recognition for their academic and vocal excellence. Mr. Hobler is survived by his four children: Randolph of Norwalk, CT, Debbie of Santa Barbara, CA, Nancy of Germantown, MD, and Mary Hyson of Cheshire, CT. He leaves behind six grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. His wife of 73 years, Mary “Randy” Hobler, died in 2017. His parents were the late Atherton W. Hobler and Ruth W. Hobler of Princeton; and he was predeceased by his brothers, Edward and Wells, and sister, Virginia. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that contributions be made to the Princeton Area Community Foundation or a local charity in his name. A memorial service is planned at a future date.

and then the University Main Campus; he retired in 1998 as the Director of Facilities. During his time in Princeton he was active in the Aquinas Institute and the MIT Club of Princeton. He would often return to Princeton to visit friends and family and enjoy pizza at Conte’s. Bob and Betty moved from Dodds Lane to Wolfeboro, NH, for their retirement; they built a house and lived on Lake Wentworth. His joy in life was having his grandchildren visit and spending time with them on the lake. Bob was the President of the HoldRobert (Bob) en Shores Association for over Dalton Smart ten years. Wolfeboro, Lake Robert (Bob) Dalton Smart, Wentworth, and his commu83, died on August 4, 2019. nity of local friends held a special place in his heart. Bob, son to the late Dalton Bob is survived by Betty, his and Gertrude Smart and oldest of five children, grew up in loving wife of 61 years and North Quincy, MA. He gradu- his six children, 14 grandchilated from North Quincy High dren, and two great-grandSchool where he ran track and children: Donald and Andrea was an Eagle Scout. He gradu- Smart of West Windsor, NJ ated Phi Beta Kappa in Civil (Ryan, Tammy, Skylar, Gayle, Engineering from the Massa- Cathryn); Maureen and Brian chusetts Institute of Technol- McAloon of Agoura Hills, CA (Tim and Laura); Tom and ogy. Carolyn Smart of Naperville, Bob met the love of his life, IL (Britney, Isabella, Patrick); Elizabeth “Betty” Rodden of John and Jane Smart of HernSalem, MA, on a blind date to don, VA (William and Carothe Boston Pops with Arthur line); Jim and Joanne Smart Fiedler. They were married of Hopewell, NJ (Michael and and he commissioned to the Kenneth); Barbara and Tom United States Navy, Civil EnLinko of Princeton, NJ (Kevin, gineer Corps. During his 20Colleen, John). year Navy career he obtained A Funeral Mass will be held two graduate degrees from MIT, was a Deep Sea Diver, at St. Katharine Drexel Cathoserved in Vietnam, and was an lic Church in Alton, NH. BuriOcean Engineering Instruc- al will take place at Arlington tor at the United States Naval National Cemetery at a later Academy; he retired a Navy date. While in Princeton, Bob was inspired by Father Tom Commander. Hagan and his mission in Bob then moved to PrincHaiti; in lieu of flowers, doeton, NJ, in 1978 began ANand EPISCOPAL PARISH nations in his memory are apa 20-year career for Princeton preciated to Hands Together, Trinity University, working firstChurch atSunday the Holy Week handstogether.org. Plasma Physics Laboratory 8:00&a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I Easter Schedule 9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages March 23 10:00Wednesday, a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm

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Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer p.m. Holy Eucharist

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

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Worship Children’s Program 9:00 a.m.and Christian Education for All Ages Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and Wednesday, March 23 Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Sundays at Rite 10 II,AM Holy pm Eucharist, 12:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 – Mar. 25, 7:00 am p.m.5:00 Holy Eucharist Prayer p.m. Evensongwith withHealing Communion following Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Tenebrae Service, Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are 7:00 pm

Friday, March 25

Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

Princeton’s First Tradition EcumEnical christian worship sunday at 10am

Rev. DR. Alison l. BoDen Dean of Religious life and the Chapel

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Join us! All are welcome! Visit religiouslife.princeton.edu Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are always welcome to worship with us at:

Tuesday Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are er 3princeton.org Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service Good Friday, 7:00 am First Church offor Christ, 0 am Thursday March 24 Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist always welcome to worship with us at: – 1:00 pm Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm –pm1:00 pm ic The Prayer Book Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ Scientist, Princeton always welcome to worship with us at:

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First Church of Christ, Paul’s Catholic Church Scientist, Princeton Paul’s Catholic Church 216 Nassau Street, Princeton

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Stations 16 ofBayard the Cross, 1:00 with pm –Foot 2:00 pm and 10:00 a.m. Worship Service Lane, Princeton Holy Eucharist Washing 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton AN EPISCOPAL PARISH Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. and Youth Bible Study Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm – Mar. 25, 7:00 The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm amPrayer Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ are 5:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist with Healing Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church

Adult Bible Classes Trinity Church Holy Week (A multi-ethnic Sunday The. Rev. PaulPrinceton Jeanes III, Rector ¡Eres siempreStreet, bienvenido! 214 Nassau always welcome to worship with us at: congregation) 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 10:00 a.m. Worship Service Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music Friday, March 25 8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I & Easter Schedule 214 Nassau Street, Princeton 609-924-5801 –609-924-2277 www.csprinceton.org Saturday, March 26 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 178 Nassau Street, Princeton 33 Msgr. Mercer St.Walter Princeton www.trinityprinceton.org Nolan, Pastor 10:00 a.m.Church Children’s Sunday School Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. First of Christ, The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor witherspoonchurch.org 9:00Easter a.m.Service, Christian Education for AllatAges Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Sunday Sunday and Nursery Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor The Church Prayer Book Service forSchool Good Friday, 12:00 10:30 pm – a.m. 1:00 pm and Youth Bible Study Wednesday, March 23 ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. 10:00 a.m.of Holy Eucharist, Rite7:30 II p.m. The Great Vigil Easter, 7:00 pm Scientist, Princeton Wednesday Testimony Meeting Nursery Stations of the Cross, pm pm Holy Eucharist, Riteand II,1:00 12:00 pm–at2:00 Adult Bible Classes 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. Christian Science Reading Room Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! St. Paul’s Catholic Church (A multi-ethnic congregation) Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm 178 Nassau Street, Princeton Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and p.m. 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. Christian Science Reading Room5:00 St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216 Nassau Street, Princeton p.m. 214 Nassau Tuesday Holy Eucharist, Rite I,Street, 7:30 am Princeton • Fax 609-924-0365 Sunday609-924-1666 Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery from at 10:30 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday 10a.m. -4 178Thursday Nassau Street, Princeton in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. MassFestive March 24 214 Nassau Street, Princeton Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist Saturday, March 26

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St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES

9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages March 23 10:00Wednesday, a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm 5:00 Evensong withPrayers Communion following Holyp.m. Eucharist, Rite II with for Healing, 5:30 pm

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Friday, March 25

33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

Christian Science Reading Room

609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4

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Msgr. Walter Rosie, Nolan,Pastor Pastor Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. witherspoonchurch.org Msgr. Joseph Holy EucharistVigil with Foot Washing5:30 and p.m. ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Church Mother of God Orthodox Saturday Mass: The Great Vigil of Easter, 7:00 pm Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm 904 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. Christian Science Room Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, and 5:00 p.m. Wherever you are on your journey ofReading Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Keeping Watch, 8:00 10:00, pm –with Mar. 11:30 25, 7:00 am faith, you are 5:30 The. p.m. Holy Eucharist Healing Prayer 609-466-3058 V. Rev. Peter Baktis, Rector www.mogoca.org 178 Nassau Street, Princeton The Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass inThe.Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector always welcome worship us at: Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director ofWhittemore, Music Sunday, to 10:00 am: with Divine Liturgy Holy Eucharist, I, 7:30 am of Music Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Rite Director 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 Mass in609-924-2277 Spanish: Sunday Friday, March 25 at 7:00 p.m. 33 Mercer St. Princeton www.trinityprinceton.org Sunday, 9:15 am: Church School 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm 609-924-0919 – Eucharist, Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Festive Choral Rite II, 11:00 am Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor

The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm The. Rev. Paul III, Rector Evening Prayer, 2:00Jeanes pm – 3:00 pm The Rev. Nancy Hagner, Associate The Prayer Book Service forJ.Good Friday, 7:00 pm

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org

214 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, March 26

214 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, March 26 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Saturday 5:30pmp.m. The GreatVigil Vigil ofMass: Easter, 7:00 Vigil Mass: 5:30and p.m. Sunday:Saturday 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 5:00 p.m. Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 am MassFestive in Holy Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m.

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Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Princeton Quaker The Rev. NancyMeeting J. Hagner, Associate

Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

33 Mercer 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org Step out St.ofPrinceton time into the shared silence of a Quaker meeting in our historic Meeting House.

Meetings for Worship at 9 and 11

Child Care available at 11Presbyterian Church Witherspoon Street

124Road, Witherspoon 470 Quaker Princeton NJ Street, 08540 Princeton, www.princetonfriendsmeeting.org 10:00 a.m. Worship Service

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10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School and Youth Bible Study Adult Presbyterian Bible Classes Church Witherspoon Street (A multi-ethnic 124 Witherspoon Street, congregation) Princeton, NJ 10:00 a.m. Worship Service 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School witherspoonchurch.org and Youth Bible Study Adult Bible Classes (A multi-ethnic congregation) 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 witherspoonchurch.org

First Church of Christ, Saturday, 5:00 pm: Adult Education Classes Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ Saturday, 6:00 pm: Vespers Scientist, Princeton 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

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10:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School and Youth Bible Study


Thomas was born on November 13, 1934 to Peter and Alice (Lukens) McNally. He graduated from Bucknell University in 1958 and received his MDiv. from Andover Newton Theological Seminary in 1961. While at Bucknell, he met the love of his life and future wife, Beverly Jane Griner. Prior to her death in 2010 they celebrated 50 years of marriage. They raised two daughters, Dawn and Heather. Tom, a lifelong NJ resident, served in American Baptist churches in Trenton and Holmdel. He also had a long career as a civil servant in New Jersey State Government, retiring as a manager in the Budget Bureau. He was an active member of Christ Congregation for the past 50 years serving on many boards and committees. In addition, he served on several state boards for ABC-NJ. Throughout his life he volunteered for different organizations including Holmdel Volunteer Fire Department, Coalition for Peace Action, and Centurion Ministries, along with mentoring seminarian students. His passing leaves a hole in his family that will be impossible to fill. He was devoted to his family and fiercely loyal to his friends. He was a man with a strong moral compass. He enjoyed watercolor painting and in retirement became an avid golfer. He loved reading, especially historical biographies. His family will remember him for his quirky sense of humor and style which only made him more unique. No one could sport plaid and stripes together the way he did. The proudest moment of his life was when he married Beverly. For the next 50 years they fell in love a little bit more each day, and he has been lost the last nine years without her. We are comforted that they are together again. Thomas was preceded in

nephews Brian and Michael; and his nieces Casey, Leah, Shannon, and Megan. A memorial for Tom will be held at a later date.

Ann Johnson

Thomas J. Moran On Thursday, August 8, 2019, T homas J. Moran, p a s s e d aw ay at t h e ag e of 73. Tom was born on September 20, 1945 in Brooklyn, NY, to Tom and Dorothy (Weis) Moran. He received his engineering degree from Manhattan College in Bronx, NY, in 1967, after attending Regis H.S. in New York, NY, and he worked as a civil engineer for the Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, D.C., for 33 years. Tom was dedicated to serving his country and helping people. He served in the U.S. Navy for many years, in addition to his work with the EPA. After his retirement in 2010, Tom received an MBA from George Washington University, and then put his time and energy towards helping foreign national college students make their way in the U.S., both during and after their graduation, including helping them find employment. In this way, he helped hundreds get acclimated to their new environs, and gave specialized help to a lucky few – all on a volunteer basis. Tom was a kind, gentle, and brilliant man. Tom w as pre ce de d i n death by his father, Thomas, his mother, Dorothy, and his brothers Bob and Bill. He is survived by his brother Tim; his sisters-in-law Leslie, Johan, and Lynda; his

R. Ann Johnson, aged 81, passed away peacefully at her Princeton home on July 22, 2019. She was born on March 25, 1938 in Narberth, PA, to L. Sarle Brown Sr. and Doll Daisy Adams Brown. She is survived by her sons Richard and Lewis, her daughter-inlaw Kim, and her longtime partner Joseph Pinelli. The Brown family moved f r o m N a r b e r t h to Fo r t Worth, TX, in 1954, when Sarle Brow n accepted a faculty position at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. Ann graduated from Paschal High School in 1956 and married Larry Johnson that June. Then in 1958 the Johnson family left Texas for the Northeast, finally settling in Princeton in 1963. Ann finished her bachelor’s degree at Douglass College in 1964 and continued graduate work in biology at Rutgers. Ann started raising Golden Retrievers in 1970 and established what came to be know n as G old-Rush Kennels, an internationally recognized breeder of show dogs. After Ann and Larry divorced in 1982, Ann continued to live in Princeton and operated Gold-Rush in Wrightstown, NJ. Ann was an eclectic mix of matriarch, humanitarian, and scientist. While she held firm to her convictions, she never said “no” to anybody. Stay at the house? Glad to provide a roof over your head, for any amount of time. Take care of your dog for a day or month? No problem. Need to borrow some money? Just tell me you’ll eventually pay me back. Want to learn about breeding, whelping, showing, grooming, and caring for Golden Retrievers? Come to Princeton for an hour or a decade and I will assist. Need my time, mon-

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ey, scientific expertise, and abilities? This is what I live for. She dedicated herself to her boys and the joy, art, and science of breeding exceptional Golden Retrievers and sharing them with the world — starting with GoldRush Charlie, who broke all Golden Retriever show records and held them for 20 years. With the help and support of many friends in the Golden-loving community Gold-Rush produced over 200 titled show dogs. As a longtime friend put it, “She was a friend, she was a mentor. She brought happiness to countless people.” Over the past few years she faced the challenges of leukemia and its treatment, normal pressure hydrocephalus and subsequent surgery, and progressive dementia. She never once believed she was going to die, and lived her life to the final second knowing her legacy would continue. There will be a gathering to celebrate her life and love of life at her Princeton home the afternoon of September 8th. Call, text, or message Kim at (310) 804-8227 or kim@leftcoastfarm.com for details. It was Ann’s wish that, should friends desire, memorial contributions may be sent to the Golden Retriever Foundation Zeke Cancer Research Fund.

New Hope, PA, in 2003, and got married on Block Island in 2005. By that time, Kay had become the Director of Volunteer Services for the University Hospital at Princeton, NJ. There, she was responsible for managing the services of over 1,000 volunteers as well as the very popular Hospital Gift Shop. Kay and Karl took many interesting trips together to places like the Dominican Republic, Cuba, Mexico, and Martha’s Vineyard. However, in 2015, she began to suffer from liver and neurological disease that soon caused limited movement and the inability to speak. During this difficult time in her life, she was embraced by a very special caregiver, Pat Simpkins, who became her best friend and supporter for the last two years of her life. In spite of her failing health, Kay was able to maintain her friendships with very special friends, and find pleasures in life despite tremendous frustration. In the end, she displayed unexpected determination and overcame many obstacles to spend several of her last days with her husband, extended family, and friends on Block Island, the place she loved most. In addition to her husband and her children, she is survived by her five grandchildren Ty and Cory Souders, Ethan Feigles, Brock and Kadan Lichthardt; her two stepchildren Pauli Pettit (Craig) Rose, and Karl D. Pettit IV; and two step grandchildren Samuel and Bexley Rose. She will be greatly missed and always remembered by those whose lives she touched so deeply. Cremation services were private. A memorial service will be held in Allentown on August 25 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Saucon Valley Country Club. In lieu of flowers, a memorial gift to the Doylestown Hospice would be appreciated. Send condolences to www. Kay Frances Pettit varcoethomasfuneralhome. Kay Frances Pettit of New com. Hope, PA, passed away peacefully in her home on Wednesday, July 17, 2019 with her beloved husband Karl D. Pettit, III at her side. She was 76. Kay was born and raised in Allentown, PA, by her parents Florence (McNabb) and Willard Seng. In her early twenties she married her first husband, Arlyn Lichthardt, and moved to Oahu, Hawaii, where he taught English at the Punahou School for six years. While enjoying the island paradise, Kay taught nursery school and became the devoted mother to her Leslie Vought Kuenne three children Leilani SoudLeslie Vought Kuenne, 58, ers (Mark), Heidi Feigles of Princeton, NJ, and Shel(Neal), and Kurt Lichthardt burne, VT, died at home sur(Kanika). rounded by her loving family After spending brief pe- on August 12 after a fierce riods living in Minneapolis, and courageous year-long MN, New York, NY, and battle with ovarian cancer. Abington, PA, Kay and her Leslie was an engaged family settled back in Alchampion of the arts, most lentown. During this period recently serving as president and after her divorce, she of McCarter Theatre Center’s ultimately followed her pasBoard of Trustees. She was sion and took the position a gifted painter, sketch artof Coordinator and Chief ist, chef, and award-winning Food Stylist at Rodale Press photographer and gardener. of Emmaus, PA. Later in the Leslie was the loving wife early ’90s, Kay began a new of Christopher B. Kuenne, chapter in her life when she founder of Rosetta and Roseworked as the Director of the mark Capital, author, and Gift Shops and Volunteers at Princeton University lecturer Lehigh Valley Hospital. in entrepreneurship. She was Kay and Karl reacquaint- a devoted mother to three ed in 2000 and rekindled a sons, Peter, William, and friendship that had begun in Matthew, and the late Olivia the 1960s. They settled in

Michelle Kuenne. She was a beloved friend who made a tremendous impact on everyone she met. Leslie was born in Aspen, Colorado, on December 29, 1960, daughter of Barbara Vought Harbach, former president of the Society of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (where Leslie was treated), and Peter Vought, a noted artist and son of aviation pioneer and member of the Aviation Hall of Fame, Chance Vought. Leslie grew up in Aspen and Santa Barbara, painting, skiing, playing soccer, and helping to raise her little sister, Tori. She received her B.A. in Biology from the University of California San Diego, Revelle College, and an M.S. in Human Genetics from Sarah Lawrence College. She went on to work as a genetic counselor at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York, Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia, and Abington Hospital. Leslie was deeply dedicated to her community. In addition to her board leadership of McCarter, she served on the boards of the Arts Council of Princeton, the Vestry of Trinity Church, and as an officer of the Stony Brook Garden Club. She volunteered with Trinity Counseling Service, Planned Parenthood, D&R Greenway, The Lawrenceville School, and Princeton Day School. Leslie was also an avid photographer and an active member of the Princeton Photography Club, where she won numerous awards for her nature photographs. Her favorite place to spend time as a family was in and around Shelburne, Vermont, where she and Chris own a house on Lake Champlain and spent summers over the past 30 years. Leslie fought valiantly over the past 13 months against one of the most virulent forms of ovarian cancer. At each step along the way, she revealed a tenacity and grace that inspired all who knew her. She imbued her life with love, purpose, and impact. Leslie was an extraordinary and loving mother and wife who cared for and inspired the couple’s three sons and their daughter, Olivia, who died in 1997. She was devoted to her friends and applied her empathic listening and quiet leadership skills to her board work. Leslie achieved a life of impact through her compassion and kindness. In addition to her husband and sons, Leslie is survived by her sisters Victoria Vought of Southport, CT; Annie Vought of Oakland, CA; Pam Harley of Rochester, New Hampshire; and Lisa Setos of Los Angeles, CA; her mother-inlaw Janet Kuenne of Princeton; sister-in-law Carolyn Kuenne Jeppsen and husband David and daughters, Charlotte, Isabelle, and Mia of Washington, DC; as well as many beloved friends, cousins, and colleagues. Her funeral will be held on Saturday, August 17 at 4 p.m. at Trinity Church, Princeton. In lieu of flowers, please consider making a memorial gift to the Olivia and Leslie Rainbow Foundation, which is dedicated to providing young children with both instruction and access to the performing and visual arts. Please direct your gift to the foundation c/o Brown Brothers Harriman, PWM-5th Floor, 140 Broadway, NY, NY, 10005.

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019

death by his sisters, Ruth and Leona, his brother Peter, and his wife, Beverly Jane Griner. He is survived by his daughters Dawn McNally Cobb ( Randall) and Heather McNally; grandchildren Jacqueline, Juliet ( Patrick), and Benjamin ; his three great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held on Friday, August 16, 2019 at Christ Congregation on the corner of Walnut and Houghton in Princeton, NJ, Thomas Harvey McNally at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowOn Thursday, August 8, ers, donations may be made 2019, Rev. Thomas Harvey to the Pennington First Aid McNally passed away at age Squad, 110 Broemel Place, Pennington, NJ 08534. 84.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019 • 30

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Commercial, Residential & Custom Paint, Interior & Exterior, Drywall Repairs, Light Carpentry, Deck Staining, Green Paint options, Paper Removal, Power Washing, 15 Years of Experience. FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES. CALL: (609) 356-4378; perez@green-planetpainting.com 04-03-20 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 35 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-22-20

CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: For houses and small offices. Flexible, reliable, local. Excellent references. Please call Yola (609) 532-4383. 05-01/10-23

items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-29-19 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 05-01-20 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-31-20

Specialists

2nd & 3rd Generations

MFG., CO.

609-452-2630

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

MASON CONTRACTORS RESTORE-PRESERVE-ALL MASONRY

Mercer County's oldest, reliable, experienced firm. We serve you for all your masonry needs.

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

BRICK~STONE~STUCCO NEW~RESTORED

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

Simplest Repair to the Most Grandeur Project, our staff will accommodate your every need!

Call us as your past generations did for over 72 years!

Complete Masonry & Waterproofing Services

Paul G. Pennacchi, Sr., Historical Preservationist #5. Support your community businesses. Princeton business since 1947.

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

609-394-7354 paul@apennacchi.com

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $24.50 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $62.75 • 4 weeks: $80.25 • 6 weeks: $119.25 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019

Thundergust Farm: A circa 1790 Farmhouse on 109+ Acres 4BR/3.1BA Recent Additions Cook’s Kitchen Bank Barn No Restrictions/Conservation Easements Chris Preston: 215.262.9609 Frenchtown

Kurfiss.com/NJHT105280

Michael Richardson 609.647.4523

$2,245,000

1953 Mid-Century-Modern Stone and Cypress Architecture in a Dramatic Setting 3BR/3.1BA 2,847SF 8.82AC Complete Renovation Chef’s Kitchen Detached 2-Car Garage Private Bridge Over Paunacussing Creek Chris Preston: 215.262.9609 Solebury Township, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU473902

Kurfiss.com

|

$3,875,000

Artfully Uniting Extraordinary Homes With Extraordinary Lives

215.794.3227 New Hope Rittenhouse Square Chestnut Hill Bryn Mawr Each Office Is Independently Owned & Operated. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019 • 32

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

OUR BUDGET LINE

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-10-20 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS

tf WHY NOT HAVE A NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE? Make sure to advertise in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf PRINCETON MOVING SALE: 107 Library Place, Friday August 16 & Saturday August 17 from 9:30-3. Eclectic mix of old & new! Mid-century modern table & chairs, double pedestal banded DR table & chairs, art, upholstered furnishings, Italian leather sofa & chairs, decorative accessories, crystal chandelier from the estate of George Ball. Designer clothing including Chanel, ESCADA, TADASHI, Armani, Ferragamo, Prada bag. Troy generator. So many items! Photos can be seen on estatesales. net, MG Estate Services. 08-14

JUST THE RIGHT LINE

To fit your budget. 3 bedrooms, 1 full bath, on over an acre of property not far from Princeton in nearby Franklin Twp. Truly a bargain. $292,000 www.stockton-realtor.com

YARD SALE: Saturday, August 17, starting 9 am. 25 MacLean Street, (between Witherspoon & John). Furniture, artwork, frames, bikes, air conditioners, household products, collections of CD’s & record albums, clothing, shoes, etc. (609) 947-3009. 08-14

SUITES AVAILABLE:

MEDICAL OFFICE

08-14 NEW SCOOTER FOR SALE: Drive Medical Scout Compact Travel Power Scooter. Never been used. Cash only, you pick up. $1,000 negotiable. (609) 921-9522. 08-14 Leica V-Lux 3, with battery, charger, case with strap, includes manual & memory card. Lens DC VarioElmarit 1:2.8-5.2/4.5-108 ASPH. Everything in like-new condition, $450. (609) 947-5533. 08-14

Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

Lovely Ranch in nearby Lawrence Twp. 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, marvelous glassenclosed all season room. $449,000

For Sale. Please call & leave a message (609) 306-4841.

CAMERA FOR SALE

A Gift Subscription!

THE LINE LEADS TO OPEN HOUSE SUN. 8/18, 2-4 pm 157 CARTER ROAD

WARREN PLATNER ARM CHAIRS

CERTIFIED HOME HEALTH AIDE with 5+ years experience working in Princeton & Pennington. Available for full-time employment day or night. Call Gladys at (609) 775-3007. 08-07-2t BEAUTIFUL 2 BR APARTMENT: For rent in Princeton. Hardwood floors, large front porch, high ceilings, garage, laundry. $2,350. includes heat. Cats welcome. Non-smoking. Available 9/1/19, (609) 924-2399. 08-14

11’ 3”

T.R.

CL.

CONFERENCE ROOM

6’ 7”

Prestigious Princeton mailing address

10’ 6”

OFFICE 11’ 1”

GENERAL OFFICE 6’ 4” AREA 21’ 8” 15’7”

10’

OFFICE

OFFICE

10’ 3”

7’ 5” 17’

6’ 1”

10’6”

Building 1, Suite 111: 1,006 sf (+/-)

Medical/Office Suites Available: From 830 to 1,006 sf (+/-)

Built to suit tenant spaces with private bathroom, kitchenette & separate utilities Premier Series suites with upgraded flooring, counter tops, cabinets & lighting available 219 Parking spaces available on-site with handicap accessibility VERIZON FIOS AVAILABLE & high-speed internet access

(908) 874-8686 | LarkenAssociates.com Immediate Occupancy | Brokers Protected | Raider Realty is a Licensed Real Estate Broker No warranty or representation, express or implied, is made to the accuracy of the information herein and same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of rental or other conditions, withdrawal without notice and to any special listing conditions, imposed by our principals and clients.

08-07-4t

IT’S HOT HOT HOT with Pepper deTuro WOODWINDS ASSOCIATES

2 Bedrooms/2 Bathrooms Priced from $3,200 253Nassau.com Weinberg Management Text (609) 731-1630 WMC@collegetown.com tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf ONE DAY HAULING: We service all of your cleaning & removal needs. Attics, basements, yards, debris & demolition clean up, concrete, junk cars & more. The best for less! Call (609) 743-6065. 08-14 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396.

HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf

8’ 6”

Join other state-related orgs. and businesses in a classic building near the State House. 2-to-3 room suites and open office. Call Anne LaBate (609) 394-7557.

Luxury Apartments

tf

14’ 2”

ATTENTION LOBBYISTS, LAWYERS, STATE CONTRACTORS!

1 Bedroom Plus Den $2,700

Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000

SPACE • FOR • LEASE

CLEANING-EXTENSIVE GENERAL HOME & OFFICE: Move in, move out cleaning. Free estimates. Years of experience, references available. Call Candi Villegas, (609) 310-2048. 08-07-3t

Downtown Princeton

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER

Rt. 206 & Applegate Road | Princeton | NJ

OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com 07-31-4t

FOR RENT: 253 NASSAU

tf

Montgomery Commons

HOME FOR RENT: Cosy, bright, renovated home, downtown Princeton with detached studio with heat/ AC. Open floor plan, 2.5 BR, 1.5 bath. 2-car off-street parking, central air, laundry. Generous attic storage. Move-in ready. No pets; smoke free, $3,250. (609) 468-0727. 08-07-3t

PRINCETON MATH TUTOR: SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com tf PRINCETON-Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time for studio apartment on Princeton estate. Big windows with views over magnificent gardens, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, full bath with tub & shower. Separate entrance, parking. Possible use as an office or art studio. (609) 924-5245.

July ushered in a heat wave across most of the Northeast. Here are some summertime gardening tips that will keep your plants growing strong, and you nice and cool. The best way to survive the heat of the summer is to garden in the morning and late evenings to avoid the higher temperatures of midday. This schedule not only keeps you more comfortable, but is better for your plants. All watering should be done in the early morning, so that the plants have a chance to absorb the moisture prior to the scorching heat. If it is not possible to water in the morning, you can water in the late afternoon, but it is important to make sure that the leaves are dry prior to the sun going down. This will help prevent most common plant fungi and molds. Do not forget your container plants. Watering is crucial for container plants, which can quickly dry out during the course of a day. While you are working on protecting your plants and nourishing your landscape, you need to protect yourself from the heat and insects of summer as well. Wear light colored, loose-fitting clothing, and drink plenty of water to stay hydrated. Any exposed skin should be treated with an SPF 30 or higher sunscreen, and use insect repellent to keep ticks, fleas, flies, and mosquitoes away.

tf HOUSE FOR RENT One-of-a-kind spacious dairy barn conversion with Princeton address, on private estate. Open floor plan, 3 BR, 2 bath, breathtaking 2nd floor versatile room. Fireplace, 2-car garage, central air. Includes lawn maintenance & snow removal. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $3,400. (609) 731-6904. 08-07-3t ROOM FOR RENT: 3-4 days/week. Ideal for commuter. Pennington. (609) 306-4841. 08-14-2t

Call

WOODWINDS (609) 924-3500 or email treecare@woodwinds.biz to schedule an assessment of your garden.


HOUSECLEANING/ HOUSEKEEPING: Professional cleaning service. Experienced, references, honest & responsible. Reasonable price. Call Teresa (609) 235-6043 for free estimate. 07-24-6t HOUSE CLEANING: By an experienced Polish lady. Call Barbara (609) 273-4226. Weekly or biweekly. Honest & reliable. References available. 07-31-5t

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 35 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-22-20 CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: For houses and small offices. Flexible, reliable, local. Excellent references. Please call Yola (609) 532-4383. 05-01/10-23

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 08-07-4t

J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-14-20

WE CLEAN HOUSES & APARTMENTS: The quality of our service & the satisfaction of our customers is very important to us. Call Maggie for free quote: (609) 5407479 or email: mms.cleanup@gmail. com We will do the cleaning for you! 08-14-3t

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20

HOUSECLEANING AVAILABLE by Polish lady. Please call Monika for a free estimate. (609) 540-2874. 08-14-4t GREEN–PLANET PAINTING: Commercial, Residential & Custom Paint, Interior & Exterior, Drywall Repairs, Light Carpentry, Deck Staining, Green Paint options, Paper Removal, Power Washing, 15 Years of Experience. FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES. CALL: (609) 356-4378; perez@green-planetpainting.com 04-03-20 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-29-19 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 05-01-20

MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-31-20 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-10-20 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

“Always Professional, Always Personal” As a �er�er �o�n�y �o� Pro���er, � �a�e ��e �nowle��e an� e��er�ise �o �o�nsel �lien�s ��ro��� ��e �o�e ��yin� or sellin� �ro�ess an� �o �re�are ��e� for ��rren� �ar�e� �on�i�ions� � offer �y �lien�s ��e �i��es� le�el of ser�i�e �ossi�le� �� wo�l� �e �y �leas�re �o �el� yo��

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TERESA CUNNINGHAM Sales Associate, ABR®, SRES®

A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS

2013-2018 NJ REALTORS® CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SALES AWARD® Licensed in NJ and PA

�� �i��ers�oon ��ree� Prin�e�on, �� �����

Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf WHY NOT HAVE A NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE? Make sure to advertise in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

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PRINCETON MOVING SALE: 107 Library Place, Friday August 16 & Saturday August 17 from 9:30-3. Eclectic mix of old & new! Mid-century modern table & chairs, double pedestal banded DR table & chairs, art, upholstered furnishings, Italian leather sofa & chairs, decorative accessories, crystal chandelier from the estate of George Ball. Designer clothing including Chanel, ESCADA, TADASHI, Armani, Ferragamo, Prada bag. Troy generator. So many items! Photos can be seen on estatesales. net, MG Estate Services. 08-14

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

OUR SUMMER LINE

TOP OF THE LINE 11+ acres, 2 Houses, Tennis Court and Pool. Abuts both Cherry Valley and Bedens Brook Golf Courses in nearby Montgomery Twp. Truly a great value. $1, 195,000

Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton NEW PRODUCTS ADDED WEEKLY!

GET IN LINE

To tour this beautifully crafted Colonial in Princeton’s Riverside neighborhood. 4 bedrooms, 3 full baths, lovely patio. For sale and/or lease. . $1, 019,000

OPEN HOUSE SUN. 8/18, 2-4 pm 534 Spring Hill Rd. E. Amwell Twp.

www.princetonmagazinestore.com

Over 2.717 acres, dramatic passive-solar contemporary compliments the environment. Only 9.9 miles to the center of Princeton in the Sourland Mountain area of E. Amwell Twp. $459,000 www.stockton-realtor.com

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 07-10-8t


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019 • 34

YARD SALE: Saturday, August 17, starting 9 am. 25 MacLean Street, (between Witherspoon & John). Furniture, artwork, frames, bikes, air conditioners, household products, collections of CD’s & record albums, clothing, shoes, etc. (609) 947-3009. 08-14 WARREN PLATNER ARM CHAIRS For Sale. Please call & leave a message (609) 306-4841. 08-14 NEW SCOOTER FOR SALE: Drive Medical Scout Compact Travel Power Scooter. Never been used. Cash only, you pick up. $1,000 negotiable. (609) 921-9522. 08-14

08-07-2t

CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

BEAUTIFUL 2 BR APARTMENT: For rent in Princeton. Hardwood floors, large front porch, high ceilings, garage, laundry. $2,350. includes heat. Cats welcome. Non-smoking. Available 9/1/19, (609) 924-2399.

ONE DAY HAULING: We service all of your cleaning & removal needs. Attics, basements, yards, debris & demolition clean up, concrete, junk cars & more. The best for less! Call (609) 743-6065. 08-14

CERTIFIED HOME HEALTH AIDE with 5+ years experience working in Princeton & Pennington. Available for full-time employment day or night. Call Gladys at (609) 775-3007.

08-14 FOR RENT: 253 NASSAU Downtown Princeton Luxury Apartments 1 Bedroom Plus Den $2,700 2 Bedrooms/2 Bathrooms Priced from $3,200

CAMERA FOR SALE Leica V-Lux 3, with battery, charger, case with strap, includes manual & memory card. Lens DC VarioElmarit 1:2.8-5.2/4.5-108 ASPH. Everything in like-new condition, $450. (609) 947-5533. 08-14

253Nassau.com Weinberg Management Text (609) 731-1630 WMC@collegetown.com tf

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

BACK TO SCHOOL It’s time to face facts: the carefree days of summer are coming to an end, and it’s time to start thinking about the kids going back to school. Here are some tips to help ensure the transition in your home is a smooth one: • Set up a family calendar. Coordinating each member's individual schedules will help lessen the inevitably rocky transition back to a structured day. • Go through closets and drawers. Getting these spaces organized before tackling back-to-school shopping will help determine which items are high priority and which can be delayed until the weather gets cooler. • If you don’t have a mudroom, create a dedicated space (or personalized nook/cubby) near the door for each child’s school items. This will encourage kids to keep backpacks, outerwear and shoes organized to minimize that last -minute morning scramble. And - most importantly - don’t forget to try to savor every last drop of these leisurely, long days and evenings of summer!

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE, LLC

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

CURRENT RENTALS *********************************

OFFICE LISTINGS:

Princeton Office – $1,600/mo. Nassau Street, 2nd floor, reception area & 2 nice-sized offices. One has private powder room. Heat & 2 parking spaces are included. Princeton Office – $2,000/mo. 5-rooms with powder room. Front-toback on 1st floor. Available now. Princeton Office – $2,300/mo. Nassau Street. Conference room, reception room, 4 private offices + powder room. With parking. Available now.

RESIDENTIAL LISTINGS: Princeton – $125/mo. EACH 2 parking spaces-2 blocks from Nassau Street. Available 9/1/19. Princeton (Franklin Twp) $1,950/mo. Plus utilities. 3 BR, 1 bath, LR, DR, Kitchen. Large back yard. Unfinished basement. Bungalow style one-story. Vacant, available now. Princeton – $2,300/mo. Plus heat & hot water. 1 parking space included. 1 BR, Living room/ dining room combo, new kitchen, new bath, laundry. EVERYTHING IS BRAND NEW! Available now. Princeton – $5,800/mo. 4 BR, 3 full baths, LR, DR, Kitchen. Finished basement. For sale and/or lease. Available now.

We have customers waiting for houses!

STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE. We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com See our display ads for our available houses for sale.

32 CHAMBERS STREET PRINCETON, NJ 08542 (609) 924-1416 MARTHA F. STOCKTON, BROKER-OWNER

tf SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com

Serving the Princeton area for 25 years

609-921-2299

Fluency in a second language a plus. International company seeking fulltime assistant. Contact (609) 9212080. Please send resume to info@ inlinguaprinceton.com 08-14

Skillman H HFurniture Quality

Used Furniture Inexpensive

New Furniture

Like us on facebook 212 Alexander St, Princeton Mon-Fri 9:30-5, Sat 9:30-1

609.924.1881

TOWN TOPICS

is printed entirely on recycled paper.

Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

· Newsletters · Brochures · Books

tf

Free estimates! All work guaranteed in writing!

FRONT DESK ASSISTANT:

· Postcards

PRINCETON MATH TUTOR:

3 Gutter Protection Devices that Effectively Work!

for ETL Developers in Princeton, NJ. Develop & maintain ETL Architecture & data warehouse data structures. Responsible for designing & developing complex data integration systems as well as testing & troubleshooting it before it goes live. Responsible to provide end-to-end BI solutions and take visualization & data warehouse initiatives to the next level. Collaborate w/business/ technical teams & deliver solutions to business customers across Business Units. At least a bachelor’s or its equiv. in Engineering or rltd fld & at least 7 yrs of prior progressive work exp. as an ETL Developer. Must possess: at least 7 yrs of exp. w/SAP BO data services; at least 7 yrs of exp. w/ BOE, Crystal Reports, BI Dashboard, Information Steward, Data Quality & Metadata Manager; at least 5 yrs of exp. as a data warehouse/analytics system architect for large scale projects; at least 5 yrs of development exp. w/Informatica; at least 2 yrs exp. as a BI architect; & at least 2 yrs of exp. w/Spotfire data visualization. Send Resume with Cover Letter to: Michelle Obert, CRP, GMS, Sr. Manager, Global Mobility, Covance Inc., 206 Carnegie Center, Princeton, NJ 08540 8-14

HELP WANTED: Clerical/Administrative Assistant. PT. Filing/typing/computer skills. Small office. Flexible hours. Send resume Wendy@Klitzberg.com 07-31-3t

Witherspoon Media Group

HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com

Highest Quality Seamless Gutters. ☛GUTTER CLEANING ☛GUTTER REPAIRS ☛GUTTER PROTECTION!

COVANCE INC. HAS MULTIPLE OPENINGS

PRINCETON-Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time for studio apartment on Princeton estate. Big windows with views over magnificent gardens, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, full bath with tub & shower. Separate entrance, parking. Possible use as an office or art studio. (609) 924-5245. tf HOUSE FOR RENT One-of-a-kind spacious dairy barn conversion with Princeton address, on private estate. Open floor plan, 3 BR, 2 bath, breathtaking 2nd floor versatile room. Fireplace, 2-car garage, central air. Includes lawn maintenance & snow removal. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $3,400. (609) 731-6904.

· Catalogues · Annual Reports For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

08-07-3t ROOM FOR RENT: 3-4 days/week. Ideal for commuter. Pennington. (609) 306-4841. 08-14-2t

Family Owned and Operated Charlie has been serving the Princeton community for 25 years

FLESCH’S ROOFING For All Your Roofing, Flashing & Gutter Needs

• Residential & Commercial • Cedar Shake • Shingle & Slate Roofs

• Copper/Tin/Sheet Metal • Flat Roofs • Built-In Gutters

• Seamless Gutters & Downspouts • Gutter Cleaning • Roof Maintenance

609-394-2427

Free Estimates • Quality Service • Repair Work

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400 LIC#13VH02047300


35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019

HORTULUS FARM Comprising 100 acres, the property offers, within the 100 acres, a separate, fully operational nursery.The nursery has 60,000 sq. ft. of greenhouse space, an indoor facility and architecturally designed pergolas. The private area of Hortulus is filled with imposing specimen trees and shrubbery, 200,000 daffodils, internationally themed gardens. The main stone farmhouse is circa 1700’s and looks out across a stream and a lake filled with black swans and other water fowl. $5,650,000

RIVERFRONT

WYNFIELD HALL

RIVERSTAR

Wynfield Hall is an exceptional example of old world craftsmanship and details not found in comparably priced homes today. This Zaveta masterpiece was built with the concept of “green” construction and sophistication as a fusion of the best of both worlds. Sited on 3.8 Solebury acres,Wynfield Hall is over 7,000 square feet of luxurious living space that offers 4 bedrooms and 4.2 baths. $2,049,000

This home was elevated the owners according to FEMA guidelines. The house has a large living room with cathedral ceiling, wood burning fireplace and it is adjacent to the chef’s kitchen. The combination creates a true open design for casual living. The home offers a large entertainment deck with expansive views of the Delaware River. An elevator, that serves all floors also serves all age groups. This amazing property boasts a separate guest cottage perfect for guests or an Au Pair. $949,000

SKYEVIEW

BELLE TERRE

The exterior of SkyeView resembles the façade of a proper Bucks County stone farmhouse. However, the interior space reflects the sensibility that exudes the strategic use of materials for visual interest, texture and personality. Once you enter the front door, past the powder room, the expansive Great Room, with double height atrium, explodes in all directions. The large tile flooring, with radiant heat, makes the room feel even more majestic. $1,195,000

Belle Terre is a stunningly beautiful property hidden down a long private drive in the heart of Carversville. The 12.6 acre parcel with stream and lily pond is the setting for this magnificent Worthington built home.The property offers a 3-stall barn, guest house and heated salt water pool. Belle Terre, with its 4 bedrooms and 4.5 baths, is suitable for your family, friends and large-scale entertaining. $3,100,000

For property information contact Art Mazzei directly at 610.428.4885 550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • 215.862.5500 ADDISONWOLFE.COM


Laurie Madaus

Laurie.Madaus@gmail.com Office: 215.862.5500 | Cell: 203.948.5157

PAXSON RIDGE

Paxson Ridge’s original character and charm have been thoughtfully restored while incorporating handsome modern amenities, designer details and pristine hardwood floors throughout to create an open concept, sophisticated and inviting home. Entering the extensive family room one is met with a sense of ease and understanding that this is truly a turnkey property. This space is large enough for several seating areas and warmed by a stone fireplace with raised hearth. Connect with nature by exiting through the French doors out to the generous blue stone patio and heated gunite, salt water pool. The family room effortlessly flows into an expansive, openconcept kitchen and dining area perfect for both intimate and grand family gatherings. The spacious chef’s kitchen is equipped with a suite of Bosch appliances, designer lighting and an expansive Carrara marble island outfitted with a five burner gas cooktop and downdraft. Leathered granite countertops compliment additional custom cabinets surrounding the island. Step through the wide threshold of the dining area to a welcoming light filled living room complete with stone fireplace and built-ins. A spacious powder room completes the main level. An attractive staircase leads to the second floor landing. There you will find a master suite with vaulted, beamed ceiling, an exquisite Carrara marble bathroom with a luxurious soaking tub, an oversized, glass-enclosed stall shower, and a large deck overlooking the pool and property. Three additional guest rooms with generous closet space, Carrara marble bathroom with custom glass shower and a separate laundry room.This lovely property offers propane heat, circular driveway and 3 car garage with carriage doors. Great location! $1,250,000

RIVER CROSSING

This 4 bedroom 5.5 bath home offers exceptional living on its three finished levels. Dramatic two story foyer is flanked by a spacious formal dining on the left and to the right a formal living room, music room and spectacular conservatory with vaulted ceiling, limestone fireplace and walls of windows. The chef’s kitchen, with Bosch appliances and butler’s pantry is primed for entertaining as it adjoins an airy breakfast/sunroom, opening to an expansive deck, and generous family room with walls of windows and floor to ceiling gas fireplace. A powder room and laundry room complete this level. Upstairs you’ll discover a fabulous master suite with a large sitting room/office, huge walk in closet, luxurious master bath with oversize shower, classic free-standing tub and dual vanities.Three additional bright and airy, generously sized bedrooms all with private baths complete this level.The beautifully finished lower level features natural light, ample storage, additional rooms that can be utilized as gym, media, craft or bedrooms. A Jack and Jill full bath, wine cellar, collector’s garage and walk out to a private paver patio overlooking the beautifully landscaped rear yard complete this level. This property is in mint, move in, condition. Great commuter location! $1,195,000

For property information contact Laurie Madaus directly at 203.948.5157 550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • 215.862.5500 ADDISONWOLFE.COM

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Town Topics Newspaper, August 14  

Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper, August 14  

Witherspoon Media Group