Town Topics Newspaper, August 10, 2022

Page 1

Volume LXXVI, Number 32

Children’s Book by Local Artist Marks 50th Anniversary . . . . . 5 Municipality Enlists Homeowners to Help Keep Drivers’ Sightlines Clear . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Princeton Public Schools Welcome New Spaces, Faces in Fall Term . . . 11 Life in the Sunshine with Three Heroic Single Mothers . . . . . . . . . . 13 Choral Concert Recalls Legacy of Eminent Composer . . . . . . . . . 14 Former PU Women’s Hoops Star Meyers Helps U.S. Win Gold at Maccabiah Games . . . 22 Sparked by Larranaga’s Clutch Play, Majeski Foundation Wins Summer Hoops Title . . . . . . . . 26

Piper Dubow Helps CP Bluefish Win PASDA Championship . . . . . . 25 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Better Living. . . . . . 16, 17 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 19 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . 29 Luxury Living . . . . . . . . 2 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 12 New To Us . . . . . . . . . 20 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 28 Performing Arts . . . . . 15 Police Blotter . . . . . . . 10 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 29 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

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Five-Year Program Proposed For Collection Of Waste and Organics At a meeting Monday evening, Princeton Council heard a presentation on a new town-wide, cart-based, pick-up program for landfill waste and organics. The proposal, which is for residents, aims to reduce fees paid at landfills while lowering the town’s carbon footprint. Council also approved measures allowing developers to proceed with obtaining financing for two inclusionary housing projects at Princeton Shopping Center. Consultant Wayne DeFeo, who has been advising the municipality on trash and recycling issues, spoke, as did Sustainable Princeton’s executive director Christine Symington. DeFeo said the proposed five-year waste removal program would not replace the current system of every-other-week recycling pickup. But the weekly collection of trash would be more efficient. Residents would be issued a 64-gallon standardized can, or 32-gallon if requested. These standardized containers can be picked up mechanically, allowing for automated or semi-automated collections and lower labor costs. Thanks to the increased volume of residential trash because of the pandemic, and a shrinking labor pool, costs for waste pickup have soared in recent years. “More volume at the curb means more people are needed to pick it up, more trucks, and higher costs,” DeFeo said. “Labor is a nightmare in the solid waste industry right now.” In New Jersey, costs have risen to about 40 to 150 percent higher than what they were, DeFeo added. “In a recent bid in Atlantic City, they were thrilled to only receive a 45 percent increase,” he said. “They took measures to contain the increase in price, and that’s what is being suggested here.” In one option, residents would make a reservation for the collection of bulk waste. In surveys done in other towns, DeFeo said, it was determined that a relatively low percentage of households put out bulk waste each week. Collecting bulk waste from households that have scheduled them, rather than going down every block past every residence, would make the operation much more efficient. Another option would include a component for town-wide organics collection, which would be once a week. The town’s Continued on Page 10

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Wednesday, August 10, 2022

Monkeypox Has Arrived in Mercer County The first confirmed case of monkeypox in New Jersey was reported on June 18, and since then the Princeton Health Department has received more than 300 calls and emails, and has responded to residents’ concerns about how the virus is spread, reviewed possible exposures to identify risk, and answered questions about vaccination sites and eligibility. As of Tuesday, August 9, the New Jersey Department of Health had reported 264 confirmed cases of monkeypox in the state, mostly in northern counties. There were just seven cases in Mercer County. Last Thursday, the White House declared the outbreak a national health emergency, following the World Health Organization’s declaration in July of monkeypox as a global health emergency. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported 8,934 cases in the United States as of Monday, August 8, with New York reporting the highest total at 1,960 cases. The U.S. has the highest number of monkeypox infections in the world. “Although the risk of monkeypox in

Princeton is thought to be low, we are continuing to urge everyone to be knowledgeable about the disease and how it is spread,” wrote Princeton Deputy Administrator for Health and Human Services Jeff Grosser in an August 9 email. When asked whether any cases have been reported in Princeton, Grosser stated that, due to the limited number of cases, municipalities do not report case numbers out of concern for protecting individuals’ health and private health information.

“Monkeypox spreads in different ways,” Grosser wrote. “It can spread from person to person through direct contact with rash, scabs, or bodily fluids. It can also spread by face-to-face contact through respiratory droplets, or during close contact such as kissing, cuddling, or sex.” Grosser went on to point out that scabs are much less infectious than respiratory secretions, and that monkeypox can also be spread through items like clothes, towels, and bed linens that have been in Continued on Page 10

Joint Effort Safe Streets 2022 Honors The Ancestors of Witherspoon-Jackson At last Friday’s opening reception for 2022 Joint Effort Safe Streets, Princeton Councilman Leighton Newlin was remembering Romus Broadway, photographer, historian, and one of the “ancestors” to whom the nine-day Joint Effort celebration is dedicated. “He is resting in peace, and he must have a big smile on his face to know that he has brought all of us together tonight to look at his work and to celebrate

ourselves and the town of Princeton,” said Newlin, referring to Broadway and his collection of photo montages depicting many of the residents of the neighborhood. Eighteen two-by-four-foot vinyl banners, digital depictions of Broadway’s collages, were mounted on poles in the Witherspoon-Jackson (W-J) neighborhood on Friday, August 5 as the culmination of a project by the Arts Council of Continued on Page 8

FUN WITH BUBBLES: A Bubble Show was among the many activities at The Watershed Institute’s Butterfly Festival on Saturday. Participants share what they learned at the event in this week’s Town Talk on page 6. (Photo by Sarah Teo)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022 • 2

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3 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022

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SUNDAY EVENING WALK: Kingston Greenways Association invites the public to join them Sunday, August 21 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. for a walk through Heathcote Meadows. The late summer grasses, goldenrods, and butterflies will be on view at the meadow, which is bordered by forest. The walk starts from the paved parking lot at the end of Monroe Court in South Brunswick. The trails are flat, but a hat, bug spray, water, and closed-toed shoes are recommended. For more information, visit kingstongreenways.org.

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Thanks to a grant from Y WCA USA and Google, YWCA Princeton will offer a free workforce development program called Y W Strive in fall 2022. The 12week program will be held in person, with emphasis on computer literacy skills, and familiarity with Google suite and other programs. After the initial cohort in the fall, Y WCA Princeton will look to expand Y W Strive to serve other communities across Mercer County, including Hamilton and Trenton.

Finding the right solution for you in

Family Law

Services are provided in the following areas: • • • • • • •

Divorce Custody and Parenting Time Marital Settlement Agreements Prenuptial Agreements Domestic Violence Child Relocation Issues Civil Unions and Domestic Partnerships

John A. Hartmann, III Chairman

Lydia Fabbro Keephart

Nicole Huckerby

be expanded to serve teen girls and college-age women through mentorship, a speaker series, professional development workshops, internships, and more. Registration is open now, and the course schedule will be announced in the coming weeks. Prospective participants or partners of the program may contact Brigitte Jean-Louis at bjeanlouis @ ywcaprinceton.org or (609) 285-8340. For more information, visit ywcaprinceton. org.

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ing financial independence,” said Brigitte Jean-Louis, YWCA Princeton’s new advocacy and economic empowerment manager. “Our program aims to empower community members with competitive skillsets to earn jobs that align with their interests, passions, and career goals.” YWCA Princeton will look to collaborate with other organ i z at ions and busi nesses to prepare program participants with comprehensive support in securing job interviews at the

A Community Bulletin

• Claims of Unmarried Cohabitants/Palimony • Post Judgment Enforcement and Modification • Mediation • Appeals • Adoption • Surrogacy

Jennifer Haythorn

“Professional develop - completion of YW Strive. In YWCA Princeton to Offer Free ment is a means to attain- addition, the program may Workforce Development Program

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Conserve Water: Due to the heatwave, New Jersey American Water is asking customers throughout central Jersey to adopt an even/odd outdoor watering schedule. Visit newjerseyamwater.com for details. Rosedale Road Closure: The Rosedale Road construction to install a roundabout at General Johnson Drive/Greenway Meadows is underway. The roadway is now open to local traffic only. The project is expected to last through the summer. Volunteer to be a Land Steward: Friends of Princeton Open Space (FOPOS) will hold half-day volunteer sessions on a variety of conservation projects at the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve on August 13. Sessions are 9 a.m.-12 p.m. or 1-4 p.m. Individuals, families, students, and corporate groups are welcome. Fopos.org. Trash Collection Delays: Due to the nationwide truck driver shortage, which has affected Princeton’s hauler (Interstate Waste Services), the delays are expected to continue as the company works on hiring more drivers. In the meantime, trash will be collected within 48 hours of the scheduled collection. COVID-19 Care Kits for Princeton Families: Low/moderate income families in Princeton can get these kits, which include tests and materials to respond to COVID-19, such as one-use thermometers, an oximeter, and extra household items. They are available for pickup at Princeton Human Services by calling (609) 688-2055. Certain eligibility requirements apply. Free Vision and Dental Services for Low Income Residents: The municipality is offering these services for low-income Princeton residents impacted by the pandemic. For application information, visit Princetonnj.gov. Volunteers Needed for CASA: Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) for Children of Mercer & Burlington Counties — Mercer County location needs volunteers. The organization recruits, trains, and supervises community volunteers who speak up in Family Court for the best interests of Mercer County children that have been removed from their families due to abuse and/or neglect and placed in the foster care system. A virtual information session is on August 11 at 11 a.m. Visit casamb.org.


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MARKING A MILESTONE: Local artist Anita Benarde, shown in her garage-turned-studio at Canal Pointe, fondly recalls “The Pumpkin Smasher,” the much-loved children’s book she wrote and illustrated 50 years ago while her children were growing up in Princeton. (Photo by Bob Harris)

Classic Children’s Book by Local Artist Is Celebrating its Golden Anniversary

When artist Anita Benarde came up with the children’s book The Pumpkin Smasher back in 1972, she was working from experience. Benarde didn’t have to look further than her family’s Cuyler Road neighborhood to come up with the story and illustrations about

a nocturnal mischief-maker who destroys all of the Halloween pumpkins in town. The town in the book is Cranbury, but the inspiration was clearly Princeton. “There was an actual pumpkin smasher,” said Benarde, who sounds much younger than her 96 years in a telephone interview. “It’s true. We never found out who it was. We thought it was a boy who had walked around the neighborhood on crutches, but we never did anything about it.”

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The book was a hit — so much so that Benarde’s original illustrations, proofs, editor’s notes, and correspondence she had with readers landed in the collection of the Cotsen Children’s Library at Princeton University. A smaller paperback version of the book is currently available from Amazon.com, and hardcover editions have become collectors’ items. In the preface to the paperback, which was published a decade ago, Benarde wrote that she decided to reissue the book after her grandson had done a Google search. “W hat he found amazed him,” she wrote. “For so many people, The Pumpkin Smasher was a precious childhood memory ‘big time’ and they wanted it for their children. Zach’s search also showed that many across the country had grown up reading it with their parents, or had heard a teacher read it to them. After hearing about the interest, I was shocked. I had to reissue it.” Benarde grew up in Brooklyn. “My family was very musical, very theaterconscious and artistic,” she said. “When we first moved to Princeton, I was very conscious of McCarter Theatre and the programs they had there, especially for kids. That was fantastic. Also, I was a member of the Princeton Artist Alliance.” With her husband, 99-year-old retired epidemiologist and author Melvin Benarde, Benarde now lives in Canal Pointe. Despite some physical infirmities, she remains as active as she can. She is still represented by New York’s RoGallery.

After listing the many places Benarde’s artworks have been displayed, the gallery website concludes, “It is safe to say that Princeton has provided an air of inspiration, imagination, and encouragement that kickstarted 60 years of creativity that hasn’t ceased, even now in her 90s. The volume, breadth, and depth of her creations in oils, acrylic, watercolors, pen and ink, woodcuts, monotypes, handmade paper, and book covers and illustrations are her homage to art.” Benarde set The Pumpkin Smashers in Cranbury rather than Princeton “because Princeton sounded a little bit too intellectual,” Continued on Next Page

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5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022

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Classic Children’s Book Continued from Preceding Page

she said. “It made an impression on me that Cranbury was nearby. I thought it was more poetic.” The book was “ just an idea I had,” Benarde said. “I had t hree s cho ol - age ch ildren, all involved in H a l l owe e n. J u s t l i ke i n the book, I painted a rock to look li ke a pu mpk in. There were t wo children who lived next door who put ghosts in t he t rees. And like in the book, we had a bully, and a person of color.” A f te r s e c u r i n g a p u b l i s h e r, B e n a r d e w or ke d with children’s book author and editor Margery Cuyler, who happened to live in Princeton. “It turned out that we worked together at the oldest building in Princeton, the Barracks,” she recalled. “It was a diffe re nt t i m e, of f u n a n d friendships and going out and greeting people face to face.” But Benarde is not one to dwell in the past. The paperback version of The Pumpkin Smashers is dedicated to her grandchildren Zach, Erica, Jacob, Hillary, Michael, and Shirah. “It’s so exciting that people are still interested in the book,” she said. “I’m so glad it is still important today. It would be wonderful to sell a lot of copies. My grandchildren certainly could all use the cash.” —Anne Levin

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What did you learn here today?”

(Asked Saturday at The Watershed Institute’s Butterfly Festival) (Photos by Sarah Teo)

Alaia: “Only some people are allergic to tarantula venom.” —Alaia Samonov and Nina Mongendre, Hopewell

Lillian: “The milk snake eats mice and hamsters!” —Lillian and Lauren Kozicki, Flemington

Jewish Family and Children’s Service To Hold Second Wheels for Meals

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COMING SOON!

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Jew ish Fam ily & Children’s Service of Greater Mercer County (JFCS) will hold their Second Annual Wheels for Meals bike ride to fight hunger on Sunday m or n i ng, O c tob er 9, at Mercer County Community College. Event proceeds will benefit all JFCS food programs, including their on-site and mobile food pantries and senior nutrition programs. C ol le c t ively, J FC S fo o d programs benefit over 32,000 individuals across the greater Mercer region each year. “The inflation rates we are seeing are impacting ever yone in our community,” said Michelle Napell, JFCS executive director. “We are seeing increased need at our food pantr y and greater demand at our mobile pantry distributions throughout greater Mercer County. JFCS is proud to provide for those who are food insecure, but we can’t do it alone. That is why our Wheels For Meals fundraiser is so important — proceeds from this event go directly toward our many food programs serving the diverse populations of our community.“ This year, routes will be offered for all riding abilities — a 50-mile route for more experienced riders ; 10- and 25-mile routes for intermediate riders; and a 3-mile route for novice riders — all of which start at the Mercer County Community College West Windsor campus. T he event also of fers mu lt iple levels of sponsorship for businesses or groups looking to create teams and support at a higher level. Find all event details at JFCSWheels4Meals.org.

Samantha: “It’s important to respect animals in their natural habitat, enjoy them from a distance, and let them be.” Calauralee: “Turtles snap!” —Samantha and Calauralee Awadallah, Howell

Matt: “The amount of microplastics we all eat in a day, which is around the equivalent of a hockey puck in six months’ time.” —Ayami Yamamichi, Allana and Matt Spewak, Lawrenceville

Kaushik: “That we’re afraid of spiders!” Swara: “[Monarch] butterflies only eat one type of plant: milkweed.” Vichika: “Monarchs can fly up to 5,000 miles — if they don’t ‘refuel’ along the way that’s kind of scary, so we’re going to plant the [milkweed] seeds we got here today.” —Kaushik Lakkaraju, Swara Lakkaraju, and Vichika Iragavarapu, Pennington


September 17 - October 16

“Thrilling! ... keeps you on the edge of your seat!” Meet nine young women from a competitive high school soccer team. It’s just a few weeks until nationals and the pressure is on. Relatable and resilient, this pack of adolescent warriors will push and train for their games, while also navigating a growing understanding of their complicated world. The Wolves is about life, love, and loss on and off the Astroturf.

Visit mccarter.org/wolves to learn more.

7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022

Don’t Miss the First Play of the Season!


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022 • 8

Municipality Enlists Homeowners to Help Keep Drivers’ Sightlines Clear

“I often feel when I pull up to an intersection that I cannot proceed safely because I can’t see beyond the bushes By this time each summer, letter. “Also in accordance or shrubs.” bushes and shrubs tend to with section 22-7 [of the Jim Purcell, Princeton’s be at their fullest. While Princeton Code], if Princeassistant municipal engithese lush landscapes are ton performs this work you neer, said the Engineering aesthetically pleasing, those as the owner will be billed Department works on the located at street corners for the cost of such work and premise that streets should and intersections can cre- will be required to reimburse be safe for all users, and ate blind spots for motorists the municipality within 60 that includes pedestrians on that cause serious or fatal days of its completion and sidewalks. “While we can’t accidents. receipt of such bill.” engineer personal behavior, To combat the problem, Keeping sightlines clear we can work to minimize the P r i nce ton’s E ng i ne er i ng is one goal of the Vision conflicts between pedestriDepartment is asking some Zero Task Force, which was ans, bicyclists, and motorhomeowners to trim back formed two years ago to ists, and this is one way we the bushes and hedges on work on specific improve- are trying to do that,” he their properties. The mu- ments to roadway design said. nicipality recently sent a standards, traffic signal poliClearing obstructions will letter to property owners cies, street lighting policies, help reduce crashes, includwhose corner locations are and other ways to eliminate ing those where bicyclists encroaching into the mu- the pedestrian deaths and have run into cars, or cars nicipal right-of-way and ob- serious injuries caused by have struck bicyclists or pestructing sight lines. Those traffic accidents. Princeton destrians. “So, if you receive who receive the letter have is the third community in a letter from the municipal seven days to trim back or New Jersey to have a Vision engineer, please know that remove the hedges that are Zero program. your compliance may save causing the problem. “All of us residents who a life or reduce an injury to If they don’t comply, “then drive around town are aware a minor bump instead of a the Princeton Department of that this is a problem,” said broken leg,” Purcell said. Public Works will remove or Councilman David Cohen, “Letters have already been trim the hedge,” reads the who chairs the task force. sent to many homeowners, and Princeton thanks those Available for who’ve done the right thing Lunch & Dinner by trimming their landscapMmm..Take-Out ing. More letters will be Events • Parties • Catering going out over the coming 41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton weeks until we reach every www.tortugasmv.com (609) 924-5143 homeowner with a corner lot that needs trimming.” According to Cohen, the current effort to get propFun Ornaments & Holiday Decor erty owners to trim hedges Best Selling Nautical 3-D Wood Maps & Princeton Decor or shrubs blocking views is NJ Local Cookbooks & Made To Order Baskets an enforcement of existing Adorable BabyZero & Kid Gifts Vision policy. “We’re Handmade Pottery & Candles all drivers,” he said. “While Holiday Masks, Soaps & Hand Sanitizers ownwe’re not all property And Much, Muchof More. ers, many us are. Let’s put two and two together and • • make it safe for everybody.” 609.688.0777 | homesteadprinceton.com —Anne Levin

Witherspoon-Jackson continued from page one

Princeton (ACP), in collaboration with Princeton University, the WitherspoonJack s on H i s tor i c a l a n d Cultural Society (WJHCS), and the Witherspoon-Jackson Neighborhood Association. Many other W-J ancestors, along with contemporary organizations and individuals, were honored at Friday’s opening ceremonies at Studio Hillier on Witherspoon Street, with special recognition for WJHCS co-founder and neighborhood historian Shirley Satterfield. “It takes one person who cares, one person who stood up, one person who said, ‘My history, our history, this community’s history is important,’” said Joint Effort Founder a n d Ev e n t C o or d i n ator John Bailey in honoring Satterfield. That rich history of W-J, Princeton’s 20th Historic Distr ict, along w ith the present and future of the neighborhood, is being spotlighted far beyond the photo montage banners. On the morning of August 6, Satterfield led a “community self-guided tour” featuring historic sites designated by 29 Heritage Tour plaques, recently installed under the leadership of Satterfield and the WJHCS. As the program continues through Sunday, August 14, Joint Effort events include the Wednesday, August 10 Arts, Culture, Scholarships Awards and Recognition starting at 5:30 p.m. at the ACP, with presentations and remarks at 6 p.m. and the Jim Floyd Memorial Lecture by Princeton University Professor Jennifer Garcon, librarian for Modern and Contemporary Special Collections, at 7 p.m.; Hot Topics discussions on race relations on Thursday, August 11 at 5:30 p.m. at the Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church, and on education, development, public safety, marijuana, the neighborhood, and a candidates forum on Saturday August 13 at 10 a.m. at the First Baptist Church of Princeton; a community block festival from 1 to 7 p.m. on Saturday at the Princeton YMCA field; and a youth basketball clinic at 10 a.m. Saturday followed on Sunday by the Pete Young Memorial Basketball Games for all ages, beginning at 10 a.m. at the Community Park basketball courts. A gospel fest and Black family recognition celebration took place on Sunday, August 7, at the First Baptist Church of Princeton, and the first Hot Topics discussion, on reparations in New Jersey and Princeton, was held at the Princeton Public Library at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday August 9. At the Friday kickoff reception Newlin discussed Broadway’s work. “Romus was brilliant,’ he said. “He wasn’t just a photographer. He was a storyteller. He knew exactly what he was doing. He was leaving a legacy of love. He was chronicling and documenting for us who we were, what we were, and what we meant for the greater good of the community.” Newlin continued, “For over 50 years Romus took pictures of everyday people, African Americans and

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“THE MEMORY OF OUR ANCESTORS”: On August 5, the opening day of the Joint Effort Safe Streets celebrations, 18 vinyl banners, depictions of Romus Broadway’s photo collages of the people of the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood, were mounted on utility poles around the community. Joint Effort Safe Streets continues through Sunday, August 14 with a variety of events. (Photo courtesy of the Arts Council of Princeton)

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Italian Americans doing everyday things. He used his camera to tell a story of a neighborhood of people who lived on an eight-block island that he loved.” Going on to note the contributions of many different community partners, Newlin added, “To make these banners happen the University had to understand the value of these pictures but also the value of Black people and Italian people who lived here. Then there was the municipality and the Engineering Department who went through hoops to coordinate with Verizon to make sure these banners could go up, and the Arts Council who put this whole project together.” Bailey mentioned that he had encountered many familiar faces in the photos on the banners. “I saw my mother on a sign,” he said. “I saw family members I grew up with. I saw my brother. I saw some of you on signs as I walked up and down the street, and that says a lot about what Romus did.” In the final presentation of the two-hour event, kickoff host Bob Hillier, architect and principal of Studio Hillier and a Town Topics shareholder, set forth a plan for the future of Witherspoon Street. “Tell us from your perspective what you think is getting ready to happen on Witherspoon Street?” said Bailey. “What is the vision?” “Our plan is simply to restore this street,” said Hillier. “We’re going to restore it back to what it was architecturally when it was first built.” Noting that Witherspoon is the second most important street in Princeton, Hillier pointed out

par ticular buildings displayed in a collage picture of the neighborhood. Hillier, whose firm owns much of the property on the west side of Witherspoon Street north of Paul Robeson Place, described his vision as an “anti-gentrification” plan, with new micro housing to be built behind existing housing, with significant proportions of affordable housing and “Princeton preference” housing available for longtime neighborhood residents. “We have to respect this neighborhood,” he said, and, in the spirit of the occasion, he noted that many of t he renovated Witherspoon Street buildings would be named after distinguished neighborhood ancestors and more recent local dignitaries. Bailey applauded the “sensitivity and purposefulness” of Hillier’s design. In addition to Satterfield, other honorees at Friday’s community kickoff included Mayor Mark Freda and Princeton Council members representing the town of Princeton; Bob Hillier and Studio Hillier; retiring Mercer County Commissioner Andrew Koontz; and Princeton Police Chief Christopher Morgan, who will be retiring on October 31. Other speakers at the event included Freda, State Sen. Andrew Zwicker, and Mercer County Commissioners Sam Frisby and Nina Melker. —Donald Gilpin

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Five-Year Program continued from page one

previous organics program, which had 1,000 subscribers at its peak, was terminated three years ago because the facility used at the time could no longer accept the materials. But the industry has grown, and there are many more facilities in operation today. A problem with the previous organics program was contamination. Some participants put the wrong materials in the wrong receptacles. “That is worrisome,” said Mayor Mark Freda. “Are we going to enforce what goes in the solid waste bucket? We need to be up front about that.” Assistant Municipal Engineer Jim Purcell said a compliance officer would be monitoring the program, teaching the public how to follow the requirements of proper disposal. Councilwoman Eve Niedergang acknowledged that the changes would be substantial. “We are not underestimating how much we’re asking of our residents,” she said. “As with the sustainable landscaping program, no one wants to be punitive. We want to educate people and have them do the right thing. We know people with best intentions will make mistakes.” Councilwoman Mia Sacks, who chaired the Infrastructure and Operations Committee that worked with Sustainable Princeton to develop the proposed program, said she originally had concerns about rolling out the program now because of the amount of growth and construction currently going on in town. “But when we considered everything on balance, especially the costs, and the fact that so many residents have been asking us to bring back the organics program, that made a difference,” she said. “And now we’re bringing it back with the full confidence that the materials will be responsibly composted.” Symington of Sustainable Princeton also expressed confidence in the proposal. “Our team here is ready to support

the education, and how this is an environmentally successful thing to do,” she said. “Contamination will need to be managed, and everybody’s going to that with their eyes wide open. The town has a good chance of success.” Purcell said outreach and public education would begin soon, and a new contract could be in place by February 2023. Aspects of the program will begin going out to bid this week. Following a second presentation focused on the two inclusionary development projects at Princeton Shopping Center, Council voted in favor of two resolutions and four ordinances, the final steps allowing WinnDevelopment and AvalonBay Communities to obtain financing and proceed with the two projects. Both were previously approved by the Planning Board. One project, known as The Alice, is at the corner of North Harrison Street and Terhune Road. The AvalonBay project is located on the site of a previously under-utilized parking lot in the shopping center. Twenty percent of the units in both complexes are designated for affordable housing, part of the court-ordered affordable housing settlement agreement for the municipality. The Alice, which will have 125 units on four floors, will include a portion of land to be given to Princeton to be used as public space. The agreement for the 200-unit, fourstory AvalonBay development provides for the developer to give cash to the town for improvements at Grover Park, which borders the shopping center. Council members praised the projects. “If you looked up ‘affordable housing done right’ in the dictionary, this is what you would see,” said Councilman Leighton Newlin. Financial details, which are included in the 753-page agenda packet available on princetonnj.gov, will be discussed in a public hearing at the next Council meeting Monday, August 22. —Anne Levin

Monkeypox continued from page one

contact with the rash or bodily fluids. The CDC states that monkeypox does not spread easily to people without close contact. The monkeypox virus can cause flu-like symptoms, swollen lymph nodes, and a rash that often begins on the face and spreads to other parts of the body. Monkeypox is rarely fatal — no deaths have been reported in the United States — but it can be very painful, according to the New York Times. “Local health departments are currently tasked with case investigations into suspected or confirmed monkeypox cases,” Grosser wrote. Health departments are also responsible for vaccinating confirmed contacts, individuals who have been exposed to a confirmed case of monkeypox. Grosser reported that Public Health Nurse Kathy Korwin has been working with nearby health care providers to ensure they have up-to-date information on proper procedures when evaluating suspected or confirmed monkeypox cases. The Princeton municipal newsletter has announced that there is now expanded eligibility for the monkeypox vaccine, which is available to high-risk New Jerseyans and those who think they may have been exposed to the virus. Information on vaccine appointments is available on the New Jersey Department of Health website at nj.gov/health. Grosser noted, “In the current outbreak, data suggests that some groups may be at increased risk and should use increased caution. This includes gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men.” A recent New York Times article reported that “more than 99 percent of people infected with the monkeypox in this country are men who have sex with men, which has posed a delicate task for public health officials communicating with the public about the threat. They do not want to stigmatize gay people as happened in the early days of the

HIV/AIDS epidemic, but neither do they want to downplay their particular risk.” Grosser warned that “although certain subgroups may be at greater risk, no group is completely risk free of any disease.” Health officials note that anyone who has had confirmed contact with monkeypox should contact the Princeton Health Department by emailing the health officer (jgrosser@princetonnj.gov) and the public health nurse (kkorwin@princetonnj.gov). COVID-19 News Meanwhile, though the country officially remains in a state of emergency over the COVID-19 pandemic, anxiety levels, along with mask-wearing and other precautionary measures, seem to be diminishing, approaching a level of normalcy, or at least a “new normal.” Case numbers are declining, or at least leveling off, and the New Jersey transmission rate continues to drop, at a rate at 0.92 on August 9, with any number below 1 indicating a waning outbreak with each new case leading to less than one additional case. Mercer County is in the “medium risk” category, though fourteen of New Jersey’s 21 counties are designated by the CDC as “high risk.” “Heading into the fall, the best thing to remember is previous guidance like staying home when sick, keeping up on COVID-19 vaccinations/ boosters, and washing your hands or using hand sanitizer frequently to continue to reduce serious risks of infection,” said Grosser. Health officials continue to monitor COVID-19 variants and will adjust public health precautions accordingly, he noted, adding that, since vaccination and booster rates in Princeton are high, gatherings, even if most people do not wear masks, are usually safe. “Those who may be at higher risk for COVID-19 may consider wearing masks for additional protection when around large groups,” he said. —Donald Gilpin

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partner with David Nirenberg at the outset of his directorship,” said Ackley-Ortiz. “I look forward to working closely with the entire IAS community to help advance On August 4, at 12:09 the mission of this extraordip.m., subsequent to an in- nary institution.” vestigation of a motor vehicle crash on Princeton Brandywine Living Serenade Kingston Road, the 22-year- Welcomes First Residents old male driver from PrinceBrandywine Living Serton was found to have driven enade at Princeton, located the vehicle while under the at 775 Mount Lucas Road, influence of alcohol. He was officially opened its doors placed under arrest, trans- and welcomed residents on ported to headquarters and July 26. Serenade, Brandycharged accordingly, and re- wine’s highest level of luxury, leased to a sober adult. includes dedicated butlers, On August 3, at 5 :31 luxury décor, and concierge p.m., subsequent to a report service. These luxury ameniof two males entering the ties are in addition to BrandyCommunity Park Pool with- wine’s 24/7 on-site licensed out paying admission, the nurses, wellness care, and intwo were found to be in pos- tegrated approach for holistic session of CDS (controlled, senior living. dangerous substance) and The 80 newly remodeled drug paraphernalia. The suites joined Brandywine 45-year-old and 42-year- Living as an acquisition in old, both from Trenton, 2020. Over the past year the were arrested, charged ac- location has undergone renocordingly, and transported vations to adhere to Brandyto the Mercer County Cor- wine’s standards of luxury rectional Facility. living, and dedication to proUnless otherwise noted, viding a vibrant lifestyle. individuals arrested were New common areas for later released. residents to explore include Jack’s Place (tap room), movNew Chief Development Officer ie theater, beauty salon, bisAt Institute for Advanced Study tro, and a variety of relaxing The Institute for Advanced lounges. Featured outdoor Study (IAS) has appointed spaces include a scenic patio Stephen Ackley-Ortiz as its with a Venetian-style fountain new chief development of- and koi pond. ficer. Ackley-Ortiz was most In addition to offering serecently director of develop- nior living, the community ment at Yale Law School, includes a secure memory where he oversaw all individ- care community called Reual giving programs. Since flections that combines Ser2004, he has held several enade’s luxury lifestyle with leadership positions in the the supportive care of INschool’s office of develop- VEST programming. INVEST ment, from planned and focuses on ensuring that resiprincipal giving to alumni dents and their families are engagement. He began at actively engaged, connected, IAS on August 8. and thriving through a variety of dedicated daily and special monthly programs. “We are both excited and honored to bring our signature Serenade services to the seniors of Mercer County and beyond,” said Brandywine Living President and CEO Brenda J. Bacon. “We look forward to continuing to be an involved member of the wonderful local community and helping families take care of their loved ones in a vibrant, luxury residence.” For more information or to Stephen Ackley-Ortiz schedule a tour, call (609) “Stephen is a versatile 430-4000 or visit brandyleader and an attentive men- care.com.

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tor with a remarkable track record of success in development,” said David Nirenberg, IAS director and Leon Levy Professor. “He has deep and broad expertise in many aspects of engagement and campaign planning, and is in addition a warm colleague and interlocutor. I am delighted that Stephen is joining our community in its collective stewardship of the Institute, and look forward to nourishing together the Institute’s growth into its second century.” Throughout his 18 years of experience, Ackley-Ortiz has been instrumental in improving development operations, recruiting and mentoring new staff members, and exceeding fundraising goals. At IAS, he will lead the advancement team and enact a comprehensive program to support its mission to expand fundamental knowledge and foster global collaboration across disciplines. “I am deeply honored to be joining the Institute for Advanced Study, and excited to have the opportunity to

Princeton Future Shares Topics for 2022-23 Meetings

P r i n ce ton Fut u re, t h e nonpartisan group that advocates for the betterment of local residents’ health, diverse housing opportunities, and business prosperity, has announced its meetings for the rest of 2022. The open meetings take place in the Community Room of Princeton Public Library. Three more meetings in the “Community Input” series will be held this fall. On September 17, the results of participants’ mapping of “Areas Susceptible to Change,” which was held April 30, is the topic. On October 22, “Our Hopes for our Climate, our Open Spaces, and our Public Lands” is the title. Those taking part are asked to have read John Doerr’s book Speed & Scale. On December 3, “Mobility: Our Hopes for Pedestrians, Bicycles, Buses, and the Dinky” is the topic. For more information, visit princetonfuture.org.


As students and teachers return to school for the start of the fall term next month, there will be a new supervisor of elementary education in a new budget-neutral position, a number of administrators in new roles, and new classroom and collaborative learning areas — built with funds from the 2018 referendum — just completed at Princeton High School (PHS). Board of Education President Dafna Kendal described some of the advantages of the four classrooms and the collaborative learning space, which is on schedule to welcome students in the fall as soon as furniture shipments arrive. “It’s beautiful,” she said. “Everything is on target and the design is timeless, with a lot of light. My favorite part is the windows. There’s so much light in the rooms, and I think that’s important.” The collaborative space is a response to requests from teachers and students for more gathering places. “This will enable large groups to get together, whether it’s to work on a project or hold a discussion or listen to a speaker,” said Kendal. “And we didn’t have to add to the footprint of the high school. We just built this over the gym. It’s a new space, but it’s cost effective in how we added those rooms.” The new space, with a capacity of 100 to 120 students, is likely to serve a variety of purposes for many different parts of the PHS community. “They’re calling it a dance studio, but it’s also going to be used for yoga and meditation and things like that,” said Kendal. “Another thing that came out is that we need more space for athletic teams to practice and get together.” T he new cons t r u c t ion provides versatile flooring and space, Kendal said, to accommodate dance, a practice area for the fencing team, and a wellness studio. With renovation funds from the referendum PHS was able to complete other projects last year, including the Tiger Cafe and the revamping and expansion of the guidance area. Kendal emphasized the importance of improvements that will address social-emotional needs at PHS. She added that, elsewhere in the district, the completion of the new roof at Littlebrook Elementary School has been a welcome accomplishment. New Elementary Supervisor Taking on the new role as supervisor of elementary education will be Sarah Moore, who will coordinate curriculum, instruction, and professional development at the four elementary schools. Moore comes to Princeton Public Schools (PPS) from the Robbinsville school district, where she was curr icu lu m and ins t r uc t ion supervisor specializing in literacy and intervention. She has also worked as an educational supervisor and teacher of the deaf and hard of hearing. Moore holds two master’s degrees in education from The College of New Jersey with areas of expertise in multi-tiered systems of support, English language arts, reading, special education,

and teacher professional development. She has worked with the New Jers ey Consor t iu m on Deaf-Blindness and has served as a National Helen Keller Fellow. She has written numerous journal articles on literacy, and her first book, Dyslexia has Dyslexia, is scheduled for release next year.

Sarah Moore (Courtesy of PPS)

Also coming to Princeton from the Robbinsville district, Kimberly Tew took over as PPS assistant superintendent for curriculum and instruction on June 1. Former PHS chemistry and racial literacy educator Joy Barnes-Johnson recently assumed the role of 6-12 science supervisor; Keisha Smith-Carrington, former K-6 humanities supervisor is taking over as 6-12 humanities supervisor; and Stephenie Tidwell will continue as math and business education supervisor with emphasis on grades 6-12. PPS Superintendent Carol Kelley emphasized the significance of restructuring “to further the highest level of performance with our students” while “fi nding the most efficient way to use the resources we have.” She praised Moore, who will be joining the administrative team in the new position later this month. “The district will continue to provide the support to our staff and students at the elementary level, but the support will be more targeted to elementary students’ needs with more hands-on support and more collaboration, with supervisors as well as with building principals,” Kelley said. She continued, “One of our primary aims is to bring online more support to our students, not just those who need additional support to get up to grade level, but also to those students who have already reached grade level and need further enrichment.” Kelley reflected on some of her priorities for the 2022-23 school year. “Looking ahead, my personal goal is to get to know the community as well as I can, to be visible in our schools with our staff and students,” she said. “We will be focusing this upcoming school year not just on the academics, but also on providing any of the emotional support that our students or staff might need. “Our focus will be on student engagement and making sure that every student is known and valued, as well as making sure that they’re reaching their full potential academically. We’re looking forward to working with everyone to make sure we are fulfilling the dreams and promises of our town. There’s no place better than Princeton because of the amount of support and the resources here.” —Donald Gilpin

Eden Autism Names Four New Trustees

Eden Autism has announced the appointment of Anthony Cancro, Rajiv Devulapalli, Nancy Fishman, and Kishore Yalamanchili to its board of trustees. These individuals were nominated and elected based on their dedication to advancing Eden’s mission to improve the lives of individuals with autism. They join 17 other board members to provide leadership and strategic counsel. “It is an honor to welcome Anthony, Rajiv, Nancy, and Kishore to our board of trustees,” said Eden Autism President and CEO Michael Decker. “T heir passion, knowledge, and commitment to our mission will provide invaluable guidance to the entire Eden community.” Cancro is the township administrator for the Township of Plainsboro where he is responsible for the day-to-day operations and overall management of the township’s workforce and operating and capital budget. He has held similar roles in Springfield and Edison and has held senior executive roles with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, and the New Jersey Department of Energy. He has also served on the boards of Sustainable Jersey and HomeFront. Devulapalli is the senior manager, Enterprise Architecture - Data and Analytics at Johnson & Johnson. The Plainsboro resident has an MBA from the University of Miami, a certificate in neuroscience from Harvard University, a certificate in genomics from the University of Maryland, and is currently pursuing a master’s in biotechnology through Harvard University. He participates in the Eden Autism 5K and has volunteered to represent the organization at Johnson & Johnson to engage his colleagues in Eden events and fundraising efforts. His son has attended the Eden School since 2013. Fishman is a retired senior program officer in research, evaluation, and learning at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. There she designed, developed, funded, and managed research and evaluations grants in the areas of hospital and community integration for population health, strengthening community capacity, health profession workforce with a special emphasis on nursing and primary care, and innovative programs for community-based long-term care. Yalamanchili is the managing director/consultant at New Oak Capital. Prior to this, he was investment senior vice president, Portfolio Strateg y Group, at Prudential Financial. His experience in the investment industr y includes Karya Capital Management, BlackRock Financial Management, and State Street Research & Management. He also participates in the Eden 5K and participated in other Eden fundraising events. His child currently attends the Eden School. In addition to welcoming the new members, Eden would also like to thank Mark Berkowsky, Maribeth Edmunds, Norman Greenberg, and Charlie Banta for their service on Eden’s board as their terms have ended.

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11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022

Princeton Public Schools Welcome New Spaces and Faces in Fall Term


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022 • 12

Momo Brothers Should Consider Design Change for New Building on Witherspoon

Mailbox Noting That the Power of Words Can Be Good and Bad

To the Editor: The power of words was much in evidence in the August 3 issue of Town Topics. Stuart Mitchner’s meditation on his lunch with Dawn Powell [“Dawn Powell’s New York — An Invitation to Lunch,” Book Review, page 12] was, I think, one of his most moving columns (and that’s saying a lot). How brilliant Stuart is at weaving together the strands of his own and Powell’s lives — the triumphs and disappointments — and how achingly familiar is his wistful wish to revise the past. I shared his anger at the shortsighted editor who would have cut a key passage from his first book, and was more appalled to learn of the editors who discouraged him from publishing his second. The power of words was also in evidence in that issue’s Mailbox. Maryann Witalec Keyes’ and Lauren Bender’s letters describing the inadequacies of princetonsurvey. org questionnaire (that will supposedly inform Princeton’s coming Master Plan) were thoughtful and fact-based. The short-sighted questionnaire and much of the rhetoric surrounding it are not. The “power of words” can be good and bad: there’s honesty, and there’s double-speak. Take your choice. ELLEN GILBERT Stuart Road East

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To the Editor: I was dismayed to read about the Momo brothers’ plan to raze two historic buildings on Witherspoon Street and construct instead the modern building illustrated in Town Topics [July 27, page 1]. Although the present historic buildings may be beyond repair, do we really want to replace them with a vanilla-looking structure more in keeping with an urban setting? What makes Princeton so delightful is its visual texture, walkable scale, and welcoming vibe. The Momos’ present restaurants have contributed to this look and feel by offering spaces that welcome and embrace. This seems their brand. Mediterra’s facade, for example, fits into our historic square yet has both a modern as well as earthy feel. Although also more than two stories, its mixed use design incorporates a mixture of materials, setbacks, awnings, balconies, and greenery that provide a human scale. Witherspoon Street, itself, faces a visual identity crisis now that its beautiful trees have been chopped down. A historic plaque marking “what was” won’t suffice if the street’s sense of place is erased. Traditional or modern buildings can work if they are unique, imaginative, and help make the street seem “alive” again. Not because they have to, but because they want to — the Momo brothers should consider creating a more inviting building that’s just as flavorful, textured, and delicious as the food they serve. TOBY ISRAEL, PH.D. Walnut Lane The writer is the author of Some Place Like Home: Using Design Psychology to Create Ideal Places.

Steering Committee Will Ensure All Voices Are Heard in Master Planning Process

To the Editor: We write to thank everyone who has taken the time to respond to the Princeton Consumer Survey, the first of several opportunities for public participation in the Princeton Community Master Plan. With more than 3,500 responses, threequarters of which have come from residents, participation has exceeded the expectations of our consultants and of the Master Planning Steering Committee, a volunteer group of Princeton residents, and the Master Plan Subcommittee of the Planning Board. The survey will be live through next week at princetonsurvey.org. To be clear, this survey was designed to be consumer-focused and its results will inform a broader analysis about how residents, visitors, employees, students, and others spend in Princeton and how they would like to spend. As such, the survey does not touch on public fiscal policy matters, which are the purview of our elected officials, both municipal and schools.

Although work on the Economic Development Element of the Master Plan proceeded first, that work will not necessarily influence work on other elements of the plan, which include Land Use, Open Space and Recreation/Conservation, Mobility, Utility Services, Community Facilities, and Historic Preservation. (The Housing and Green Building and Sustainability elements adopted in 2020 will be included and incorporated into all elements of the plan.) Creating the Princeton Community Master Plan is not a sequential process; the elements are discreet yet interconnected. Each element of this new plan will be the subject of robust public engagement utilizing a variety of communications tools. When the Steering Committee reconvenes later this month, it will review strategies to ensure that all voices are heard in the master planning process. These strategies include an online engagement hub, in person and virtual public meetings, “tabling” at community events, and additional surveys. We look forward to the next phases of this crucial public process. LOUISE CURREY WILSON Chair, Princeton Planning Board TIM QUINN Vice Chair, Princeton Planning Board Chair, Master Plan Subcommittee

Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

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Life in the Sunshine with Three Heroic Single Mothers When I think about the people who have questioned my mother’s choice to have me the way she did, or the people who have asked me if I was ever angry with her, it’s easier than ever to answer no, rejecting the antiquated assumption that a real father is a necessary element in a real family. —Nabil Ayers, from My Life in the Sunshine oday I’m writing about three admirable single mothers I found in the memoirs of a president and two musicians. If you look online for novels or stories with a single mother as heroine, you’ll find depressing results, with cover images often featuring men out of Harlequin Romance fantasies. I tried upping the word-choice ante to single mother protagonists in classic literature and came up with the likes of Medea and Mrs. Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility. Without doing any research on the subject, my first thought is of Eliza fleeing across the icy river with her infant son in Uncle Tom’s Cabin — which seems a fitting analogy for women dealing with a post Roe v. Wade reality. Ann In Dreams from My Father (1995), Barack Obama recalls going with his mother Ann and half-sister Maya to the film Black Orpheus, which Ann saw when she was 16, her first foreign movie and, as she told her children, “the most beautiful thing” she’d ever seen. Obama found the film patronizing, with its “black and brown Brazilians” singing and dancing “like carefree birds in colorful plumage,” but when he looked over at his mother, he was touched by the sight of her wistful face “lit by the blue glow of the screen.” In that moment he felt as if he were “being given a window into her heart, the unreflective heart of her youth,” a white middle-class girl from Kansas waking to the promise of another world: “warm, sensual, exotic, different” -— where she would meet, marry, and bear the child of an exchange student from Kenya. The former president celebrated his 61st birthday last week by naming a new installation at the Obama Presidential Center in Chicago the Ann Dunham Water Garden. In a release, he pictures his mother, who died in 1995, “sitting on one of the benches on a nice summer afternoon, smiling and watching a bunch of kids running through the fountain,” which he thought “would capture who she was as well as just about anything else.” Elizabeth “Porcelain” is the title of one of the most affecting compositions from Moby’s 1999 international breakthrough album Play. In his 2016 memoir, also titled Porcelain, he describes a song about being in love with someone you shouldn’t be with. The music, which is for a “really, really wonderful woman,” was composed when he was grieving for his mother, who died in 1998. Although he never says as much, Elizabeth is the soul of the song and the book. She appears in the

“its diversity, creative energy, and volatility,” mentioning how on long walks through the city, “she’d often stop to watch children play in the parks.” It was during those walks that she made up her mind to become “a young, single mother.” It sounds like the stuff of dreams. Instead of imagining life as a dancer (she studied ballet for 12 years), a young woman simply decides to be a single mother, because the relationship she truly desired was with a child: “while she was young she wanted a friend to love who would love her back, someone she could shower with attention and who would never feel as lonely as she did growing up.” Although she wasn’t actively looking for the father of her imaginary companion, “the moment she met Roy Ayers she believed she’d found him.” And when he made it clear from the outset that if she did have a child, she would be on her own — “his career was on the rise he had no interest in a serious relationship” — it at least agreed with her single-mother dream. On the night of April 27, 1971, Louise suggested to her brother Alan, also a jazz musician, that they visit Roy’s apartment. Although she and Ayers had been out together only three times in the course of a year, this was to be the night. After she bluntly told Roy her intentions, and he repeated his refusal of responsibility, they conceived a child, even as her brother was sleeping in the next room. As Nabil discreetly puts it, while his mother appeared to remember every detail surrounding the act, “no amount of prodding gleaned any information about her “conversation” with Roy on that night — “the conversation that led to me. My mother insists that it was that brief — that easy.” His uncle (and eventually part-time father) summed up the situation: “It was New York City in the early seventies.” Missing Her I missed Nabil’s mother when she got married and moved away, as the narrative shifted to her son’s evolving career in the music business and the challenge he shared with Barack Obama, that of a mixed-race person identifying as Black, and the risks and issues involved. Although Nabil presents his mother as a loving, sometimes doting presence, he’s painfully aware of the mixed blessing she’d created for him, not only the dilemma of growing up fatherless, but the racial conundrum, further complicated by the fact that he was Jewish. From Kiss to Journey As the parent of a son who also grew up in the music of the 1980s, I enjoyed following the evolution of Nabil’s interests and his

career as a drummer, record store owner, and music label executive, not to mention his discovery of a family in orbit around the distant planet of his father. One of the book’s most captivating moments comes when his mother takes the 7-year-old Nabil to a Kiss concert at Madison Square Garden. It was “a life-changing experience,” full of “all the bombast and spectacle of arena rock,” where he felt “simultaneously overwhelmed, frightened, and ecstatic,” but “more than anything else that night,” he focused on the drummer Peter Criss, “feeling more strongly than ever” that he “wanted to do” what Peter did. You see the single mother in her glory when she helps Nabil remove the mattress from his wooden bed frame and replace it with his drum set, “converting the frame into a drum riser,” and again when she paints his face like Peter’s, applying “a layer of white face paint” and “green-and-black eye makeup.” When she finished his red lips, “I put on my Kiss T-shirt, sat at my drums, and blasted Destroyer,” [the first album he ever bought, at 5]. “ ‘You look just like Peter Criss!’ my mother exclaimed proudly.” When life in Greenwich Village became “unsustainable,” mother and son moved to Salt Lake City, “an extremely white place” where “most people were blond” but where his mother had a tempting job offer with American Express. On the last night of an exploratory visit, Louise took them to a Journey concert in the Salt Palace arena. Nabil was 10: “To this day, whenever I hear that song [the Journey anthem “Don’t Stop Believin’ “], I flash back to the moment when my mother and I stood anonymously among twelve thousand people, singing along euphorically to a song that at that moment meant everything to everyone present .... It meant a less stressful life for my mother and a more musical life for me. During the song’s four-minute build, my mother and I felt a connection to the band, to everyone in the room, and we looked at each other, bouncing as we belted out the songs’ uplifting chorus.” Singing Together ereading this passage, I thought of the scene where Moby was driving somewhere with his “hippie mother” when he was 8 and “More Than a Woman” by the Bee Gees came on, and she started singing along, and he sang along, too. I have no doubt Obama sang songs with his mother, who may have given him the transcendental maternal nudge he needed to begin singing “Amazing Grace” at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston. Quoted on the hill.com, Obama talks about “the notion of grace as a recognition that we are fundamentally flawed and weak and confused. So, we don’t deserve grace, but we get it sometimes.” And I think of three brave women taking charge of their own lives against all of the odds, and of the young black mother running for her life across an icy river. —Stuart Mitchner

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opening paragraph “wearing blue jeans and a brown winter jacket that she’d bought at the Salvation Army for five dollars.” She’s standing at the “cracked linoleum counter” of a laundromat in a mall in Stratford, Connecticut, smoking a cigarette and folding clothes belonging to neighbors who paid her to wash and fold their laundry. Richard Melville Hall, a descendant of Herman Melville by way of his father, who died in a car accident when Moby was 2, has said that “all my mother wanted was for me to spend my life being creative. She would have been profoundly disappointed had I become a lawyer or a doctor. From an early age I was just encouraged to make music and take pictures and draw and write.” Louise I thought of Obama’s Ann and Moby’s Elizabeth while I was reading Nabil Ayers’s My Life in the Sunshine (Viking 2022). The title refers to the most famous song by the author’s father, Roy Ayers. As the first 120 pages of Nabil’s book make clear, however, the source of the “sunshine” he lives and thrives in is his mother Louise. Describing the song’s impact while he was in the theatre watching the film Straight Outa Compton, he writes, “The music is so loud that I physically feel it .... The lyrics offer the first voices in the scene. ‘My life, my life, my life … in the sunshine’ blasts from the modern theatre speakers.” Although you’d expect the intensity of the moment to center on Nabil’s pride in this connection with a famous father, it only heightens his disappointment, just as the song, which is ubiquitous (Roy’s signature 1971 album is called Ubiquity), having been covered and sampled so often that it’s become “a perennial, persistent reminder” of his father’s absence. The Stuff of Dreams In the course of Nabil’s life in music and his quest for his father’s recognition, there are, as in Moby’s life, lots of DJs, agents, managers, musicians, friends, ravers, and relatives, but the true life force, the most powerful and determined and determinative person in the book is his “tall, perfect-postured dancer mother” with her “wavy, golden-brown hair” and “striking blue eyes.” So Nabil pictures her from photographs taken at the time she met the “charming and charismatic” Roy Ayers at a jazz club in the Village and “felt an instant chemistry.” Finding that he “didn’t drink, smoke, or do drugs, and that he ate health food like she did,” she was already telling herself that this is the person she’s “going to have a baby with.” I connected with Nabil’s mother as he described her love for New York City, with

13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022

BOOK REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022 • 14

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Learning Never Ends

Choral Concert Recalls Legacy of Eminent Composer

emembrance seemed to be the order of the day this past weekend at a concert paying tribute to both a renowned composer and the choral tradition of Westminster Choir College. Comprised of Westminster alumni and conducted by Westminster professor and conductor James Jordan, the professional vocal ensemble The Same Stream Choir returned to Princeton last Saturday night to present a concert honoring the legacy of composer and longtime Choir College friend Roger Ames. The ensemble was to perform at Bristol Chapel on the former Westminster campus; when the Chapel’s air conditioning system chose not to cooperate, the concert was relocated to All Saints’ Church in Princeton, an acoustically perfect venue for the chorus. The 20 members of The Same Stream ensemble sang a number of choral pieces and opera excerpts by Ames, as well other works which fit the evening’s theme of healing and hope. Although Saturday’s concert focused on Roger Ames, the performance began with another piece in the same vein of faith and optimistic prayer. Latvian composer Peteris Vasks’ 2013 The Fruit of Silence, based on “the voice of Mother Teresa,” immediately set the choral tone for the evening. James Jordan’s choruses exemplify everything Westminster Choir College stands for in musical excellence — precise tuning, well-blended harmonies, and careful attention to text, and The Same Stream Choir sang Vasks’ chordal meditation as a clean and well-tuned expanse of sound, with the text well phrased and articulated. Same Stream Associate Conductor Corey Everly provided sensitive and adept piano accompaniment throughout the evening, beginning with this piece. In a century when music can come across as overcomplicated and inaccessible, the simple melodic lyricism of Roger Ames’ compositional style seems to take audiences to a new comfort zone. Nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in Music for one of his extended choral pieces, Ames had a long history of drawing audiences into an ethereal and reassuring listening space through works based on imaginative and inspirational themes or by setting meaningful texts in a thought-provoking way. His text choices ranged from narrations of the Amistad slave ship to the coal mining communities of Wales to a September 11 tribute. Ames passed away in January of this year, and Jordan and The Same Stream Choir took the opportunity last Saturday night at All Saints’ to honor both the composer and his music. The Ames music performed ranged from a piece commissioned by the Choir College two decades ago to a world premiere. Awakenings, a four-movement

setting of the poetry of American writer Kitty O’Meara, grew out of the pandemic, and gave the singers of the chorus plenty of provocative text to communicate. The music showed a clear attention to the words, full comprehension of the sung voice, and particular simplicity in the unisons of the first movement. The Same Stream singers well handled the dissonances of the work, with the harmonic shifts well placed to accentuate text. Pianist Everly effectively conveyed the expressive piano part, as conductor Jordan led the ensemble through the reassuring poetry. Vocally, the chorus demonstrated a solid choral blend, with the sopranos providing a straight and laser-like tone. These were youthful and energetic voices who fit well into the acoustic of All Saints’ Church. One of Ames’ most poignant works is the Choral Reflections on Amazing Grace, commissioned by James Jordan after 9/11 and dedicated to the children of those who died in the terrorist attacks. Combining a simple harmonization of the familiar tune with Greek text from the Mass for the Dead, this piece was sung by the chorus with sensitivity, aided by the solo singing of Holly Scovell and Alex Meakem. The ensemble also well conveyed the easy musical flow and undefinable longing for homeland of Hiraeth, a setting of a Welsh poem. The soprano choral lines were especially pure in this piece, with the rest of the ensemble providing a well-blended core of sound. The historic Welsh choral tradition continued in an excerpt from Ames’ opera How Green was My Valley, with a libretto by Elizabeth Bassine. The music evoked the expansive Welsh countryside and landscapes, with soloists soprano Joslyn Thomas and tenor Jesse Borower providing light and clear solo lines. Welsh music is renowned for its hymns, and the chorus sang the “Once to Every Man and Nation” tune within the opera excerpt with effective intensity, invoking Welsh fortitude against the odds. lways t he pedagog ue, Jordan turned over the podium to Associate Conductor Everly for two of the closing works on the program. Everly drew the same smoothly-blended sound out of the chorus in works by Thomas LaVoy and Patrick Hawes, with soloists Camille Watson and Meakem providing vocal clarity in Hawes’ setting of Little Lamb and a unified choral sound echoing well in the space of the church chancel. Combined with two pieces by Dan Forrest which concluded the program, the music on Saturday’s concert demonstrated that simplicity is often most effective, especially with works created out of very emotional experiences. — Nancy Plum

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15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022

Performing Arts

THE BLUES: Blue Man Group is among the offerings at the Kimmel Cultural Campus in the coming season.

READY TO DANCE: The Grupo de Danza Folklórica La Sagrada Familia is among the attractions at the New Brunswick HEART Festival this weekend.

Music, Dance, Crafts At New Brunswick Event

State Theatre New Jersey, New Brunswick Cultural Center, New Brunswick Per for m ing A r t s Center (NBPAC ), and Above Art Studios present the New Brunswick HEART Festival on Saturday, August 13, from 3-6 p.m. in downtown New Br unsw ick ’s Monu ment Square, 2 Livingston Avenue. The family-friendly festival celebrates the arts and history of New Brunswick and Middlesex County with

live music and dance performances, dance classes for kids and adults, craft vendors, and more. New this year is the addition of a block party in front of Above Art Studios at 55 Morris Street, with live music, food, vendors, a spades tournament, live painting, and a community chalk art mural. This year’s lineup on the outdoor stage on Livingston Avenue includes hip-hop, reggae, and pop performe r Fy ü tch ; N e w B r u n s w ick L atin band Sonido Latino; tap dancer Omar

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Edwards ; a salsa dance class party with Elvis Ruiz; a dance performance by Grupo de Danza Folklórica La Sagrada Familia; the New Brunswick Brass Band; and a dance performance by InSpira Performing Arts & Cultural Center. Other events and activities include tours of the New Brunswick Performing Arts Center (NBPAC) and State Theatre New Jersey, a health and wellness tent with Garden of Healing, free balloon animals, button-making with the New Brunswick

Free Public Librar y, and Japanese black ink drawing with the Highland Park Arts Commission. Additional activities include dance classes for kids and teenagers hosted by American Repertory Ballet and Princeton Ballet School; pipe cleaner architecture with Zimmerli Art Museum, a history corner featuring two historical interpreters — a printer and a surgeon who talk about what it was like during the 1700s in Middlesex County — and love letter readings by local troupe Thinkery & Verse. The festival begins Friday, August 12 from 7-9 p.m. with a Live Art Battle at Above Art Studios. Featuring seven contestants, three timed rounds, and one cash prize, the Art Battle will take place at the studio and live-streamed on Above Art Studio’s Instagram account @AboveArtStudios. For more information, visit stnj.org.

Shows include Les Miserables November 2-13, Annie October 11-16, Tina — The Tina Turner Musical November 22-December 4, Blue Man Group December 27-31, and Dear Evan Hansen August 16-28. Visit KimmelCulturalCampus.org for further information.

Tickets for touring Broadway shows are currently offered on presale by the Kimmel Cultural Campus in Philadelphia, which includes the Kimmel Center, the Academy of Music, and the Merriam Theatre.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022 • 18

Art

“GREEN RELIEF”: This work by Karen Titus Smith is part of “Women on the Wall,” her joint sculpture exhibition with Wendy Gordon, on view at the Arts Council of Princeton September 10 through October 8. The public is invited to an opening reception on Saturday, September 17 from 3 to 5 p.m. “I have done and consid- important artists of the past ACP to Present “Women on The Wall” Sculpture Exhibit ered the same moving into six decades — Emma Amos, The Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) will show “Women on the Wall,” an exhibition of free form and unique sculpture by New Jerseybased artists Wendy Gordon and Karen Titus Smith in the Taplin Gallery September 10 through October 8. The public is invited to an opening reception on Saturday, September 17 from 3 to 5 p.m. Gordon’s sculpture consists of repeated, organic forms that hang or lean up against the wall, or are freestanding. They look somehow familiar, as if forms from nature, such as seed pods or cocoons or are reminiscent of ancient utensils, such as cups or scoops. But even though they are similar in size, color and form, each element is subtly unique and when presented together they form a cohesive whole. “I believe that my work communicates on several different levels,” said Gordon. “I am making a statement on nature and the structures it sometimes utilizes to become stronger and thus survive. Look at a compound leaf, the eye of a fly or the tentacles of a jellyfish and you find multiple forms that work together towards one achievement: survival.” Gordon is inspired by elements of repetition such as quilting, needlepoint, knitting, and weaving. This duplication of elements is intrinsic to the structure of the entire object, and it is this use of multiples to create a cohesive whole that interests the artist. Smith’s work is the result of an evolution of process and history. Form, or the illusion of form in abstract two-dimensional work, has been an important element in her process as a painter. Smith ’s t wo - dimensional works are deconstructionist, image related — breaking down forms and rethinking them.

t hree d imensions,” s aid Smith. “The images are inspired by my surroundings, nature, events, an article read. A ny thing that im pacts my thoughts, inspires a form, shape, or idea is then explored in a visual format. New or original art or ideas are presented. We question, critique, contemplate, ruminate, and finally things either stay with us or they don’t. The images that affect us stay with us, enrich us, with thought, wonder, awe, sometimes shock, sometimes joy. “I leave the response and interpretation of these pieces to the viewer. Concept is not strict, set or predetermined. Please free associate.” The Arts Council of Princeton is located at 102 Witherspoon St reet. G aller y hours are Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, visit ar tscouncil ofprinceton.org.

Dawoud Bey, Chakaia Booker, Mel Edwards, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, and others — which, when combined with our stellar American art collection, provides a more comprehensive picture of American art and society.” The Zimmerli in 2018 expanded the scope of its Art of the Americas holdings by accepting the collection from the Jersey City Museum, which closed in 2012. This exhibition is an introduction to more than 80

artists from that collection. One of the most poignant works is Luis Cruz Azaceta’s 1992 print Lotto: The American Dream, foreshadowing today’s daily headlines about income inequality and the precarious financial conditions of so many Americans. Other works in the exhibition include a selection of prints made at the workshop of the Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña during the 1960s and 1970s; Big Daddy Draped (1971), a classic feminist and anti-war painting from the Big Daddy series by May Stevens; David Wojnarowicz’s Untitled (red head on world map), a 1982 painting that is a vivid meditation on the individual’s relation and responsibility to a global community; and Juan Sanchez’s 1992 print Para Don Pedro, which associates the image of Pedro Albizu Campos, the hero of the Puerto Rican independence movement, with traditional religious imagery of martyrdom. In addition, the exhibition includes a re-creation o f S h e i l a Pe p e’s Tu n nel (2005), an installation of shoelaces and nautical rope that references the mostly immigrant laborers who dug the tunnels between New Jersey and New York, as well as those who commuted through them to work in the city’s factories. On October 13, from 5 to 6:30 p.m., the public is invited to a conversation between Pepe and Reilly as they discuss the artist’s work and the exhibition. “American Stories” also presents an oppor tunit y for the Zimmerli to collaborate with the Public History Program in the history department at Rutgers–New Brunswick. Undergraduate st udents researched t he artists and composed exhibition labels, which will be in English and Spanish throughout the galleries. In addition, the Zimmerli features t wo exhibitions

drawn from the historical aspect of the newly acquired collection: “Picturing Jersey City: NineteenthCentury Views by August Will” and “Beauty Among the Ordinary Things: The Photog raphs of William Armbruster.” Both Will (1834-1910) and Ar mbr uster (1865 -1955) were important in the formative years of the Jersey City Museum. They documented the city as it rapidly developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Will chronicled the changing landscape of his adopted hometown and visually traced its transformation into an urban center, while Armbruster captured the region’s disappearing pastoral landscapes, nostalgically envisioning a pre-industrial life. The Zimmerli Art Museum is located at 71 Hamilton Street (at George Street) on the College Avenue Campus of Rutgers University in New Brunswick. Admission is free. It is open Wednesday and Friday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Saturday and Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m. The museum is closed Monday and Tuesday, as well as major holidays and the month of August. For more infor mation, visit zimmerli.rutgers.edu.

Area Exhibits Check websites for information on safety protocols. Ar t@ Bainbridge, 158 Nassau Street, has “Witness / Rose Simpson” through September 11. artmuseum. princeton.edu. Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Light & Shadow” through September 4. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com.

“LOTTO: THE AMERICAN DREAM”: This work by Luis Cruz Azaceta is featured in “American Stories: Gifts from the Jersey City Museum Collection,” on view September 1 through December 30 at the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University in New Brunswick. An opening celebration will be held on Thursday, September 8 from 4:30 to 8 p.m.

Zimmerli to Debut Jersey City Museum Collection

This fall, the Zimmerli A r t Mus eu m at Rutgers University-New Brunswick debuts a major addition to its permanent collection that offers a variety of perspectives on American art and life through a regional lens. “American Stories: Gifts from the Jersey City Museum Collection,” on view from September 1 to December 30, features nearly 100 paintings, prints, photographs, and sculptures. The public is invited to a free opening celebration at SparkNight on September 8 from 4:30 to 8 p.m. “We are honored to have the opportunity to share this collection with the public,” said Maura Reilly, director of the Zimmerli. “It includes work by some of the most

Art on Hulfish, 11 Hulfish Street, has “Time’s Relentless Melt” August 20 through November 6. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Mus eu m i n C adwa lader Park, Parkside Avenue, has “Ellarslie Open 39” through October 2. ellarslie.org. Gourgaud Gallery, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, has “As You Like It” through August 31. cranburyartscouncil.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and Innovator’s Gallery,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. Museum hours are Thursday through Sunday, 12 to 4 p.m. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “(re)Frame: Community Perspectives on the Michener Art Collection” through March 5, 2023. michenerartmuseum. org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey” through March 2023 and the online exhibits “Slavery at Morven,” “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761– 1898,” and others. morven. org. The Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, has “The Glittering Outdoors” through October 2. helenemazurart.com. Pr inceton Public Libra r y, 65 Wit herspoon Street, has “In Lunch with Love” through August 28 and “Our Inner Oceans: Paintings by Minako Ota” through August 30. princetonlibrary.org. Small World Coffee, 254 Nassau Street, has “Naneen Art” through September 6. smallworldcoffee.com. West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “By the Light of Day: Plein Air Show” through August 27. westwindsorarts.org.

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Wednesday, August 10 5:30-8 p.m.: At the Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, the Joint Effort Safe Streets Program continues with a community reception, art ex h ibit, pres entat ion of awards, scholarships, and the Jim Floyd Memor ial Lecture. Thursday, August 11 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 5:30-7:30 p.m.: Discussion, “Real Talk on Race Relations in America, New Jersey, and Princeton,” with panel discussion, at Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church, 124 Witherspoon Street. Part of the Joint Effort Safe Streets Program. 6-8 p.m.: Princeton Public Library’s Summer Reading Wrap-Up Party, at Princeton Shopping Center. Free. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. 7:15 - 8 : 30 p.m. B lack Voices Book Group meets virtually to discuss Ida: A Sword Among Lions by Paula J. Giddings. Register at Princetonlibrary.org. Friday, August 12 9:45 a.m.-12 p.m.: Job Seekers: Advice from the Other Side of the Table. Recruiter Mike Carr offers a practical guide of what not to do as a job seeker, and how to leverage online presence to help obtain a position. At Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org. 5-8 p.m.: Jerry Steele performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards.com. 7 p.m.: Black Princeton High School alumni reception, at Witherspoon Elks Lodge, 124 Birch Avenue. Part of the Joint Effort Safe Streets Program. Saturday, August 13 8 -11 a.m.: Communit y Science Day at Rogers Refuge, West Drive. Guided nature walks; help collect data to support Princeton’s Environmental Resource Inventory. Princetonlibrary.org. 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. Wwcfm. org. Special tomato tasting. The West Windsor Bicycle and Pedestrian Alliance will be on hand; music by This Old House. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. and 1-4 p.m.: Volunteer as a land steward w ith Fr iends of Princeton Open Space to help with a variety of conservation projects at Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Fopos.org. 10 a.m.: Pam Mount’s annual “Freezing, Canning, and Preser ving” class at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Free but registration necessary. Terhuneorchards.com.

10 a.m.-12 p.m.: Discussion, “Updates on Education, Development, Pub lic Safety, Marijuana, the Neighborhood,” and candidates’ forum, at First Baptist Church, 30 Green Street. Part of the Joint Effort Safe Streets Program. Remarks, acknowledgements, award presentations. Also, free Youth Basketball Clinic with Bailey Basketball Academy at Community Park basketball courts. At 7 p.m., Meet and Greet at the Witherspoon Elks Lodge, 124 Birch Avenue. 1-7 p.m . : C o m m u n i t y Block Festival, part of the Joint Effort Safe Streets Program, at Pr inceton YMCA field. Music, food, and entertainment. 1-4 p.m.: Bill O’Neal and Andy Koontz perform at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Light fare and wine available. Terhuneorchards.com. 2 p.m.: Curated tour of the exhibit “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey” and view of the TelStar 1 satellite up close on its final weekend at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Morven. org. 5 -7: 30 p.m. : Bronw y n Bird and Justin Nawn perform at Nassau Pavilion behind Panera Bread at Nassau Park, West Windsor. With family-friendly activities. Free. Westwindsorarts. org. Sunday, August 14 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 10 a.m.-7 p.m.: Pete Young Memorial Basketball Games, Community Park basketball courts. Part of the Joint Effort Safe Streets Program. Also, at 7 p.m., the program’s final Meet and Greet is held at Witherspoon Elks Lodge, 124 Birch Avenue. 1 p.m.: The Teblemakers, Lisa Lonie and Janet Tebbel, are soloists in the carillon concert from Graduate Tower on Princeton University’s graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. Free. (609) 2587989. 1-4 p.m.: Mike & Laura per for m at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Light fare and wine available. Terhuneorchards.com. 3 p.m.: Loose Bricks performs classic rock at Hinds Plaza outside Princeton Public Library as part of the Listen Local Series. Monday, August 15 Recycling Tuesday, August 16 6 p.m.: The Rob Tait Band performs at Princeton Shopping Center as part of the Summer Nights Series. Thursday, August 18 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket.com.

AUGUST-SEPTEMBER

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022

Mark Your Calendar TOWN TOPICS

10 a.m.: Cook Talks: Ti- Hopewell Road, Pennington. 8 p.m.: “’70s Flashback” from outside t he tower. ramisu and Affogato. Learn Voiceschorale.org. concert at the William Penn Free. (609) 258-7989. to make these desserts at Bank Summer Music Fest, Tuesday, August 23 1-4 p.m.: Audio Pilot Duo the Lawrence Headquarters 9:30 and 11 a.m.: Read Bristol Township Amphithe- performs at Terhune OrBranch of Mercer County & Pick Program: Pears, at ater, Bristol, Pa. $35-$75. chards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Librar y, 2751 Brunswick Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Brtstage.org. Light fare and wine availPike, Lawrence Township. Soil Road. For parents and able. Terhuneorchards.com. Saturday, August 27 Registration required. (609) kids from preschool age to Monday, August 29 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Wind883-8293. 8. $12 including container of sor Farmers Market, Vaughn Recycling 6-8 p.m.: Green Knuckle pears. Register in advance. Lot of Princeton Junction Tuesday, August 30 Material performs at Princ- Terhuneorchards.com. train station. Enter from 877 9:30 and 11 a.m.: Read eton Shopping Center as 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Alexander Road. Wwcfm. part of the Summer Nights Mid-Day Toastmasters meet org. West Windsor Bicycle & Pick Program: Apples. series. Free. Bring a lawn v ia Z oom. Toas t mas ter- and Pedestrian Alliance is on For parents and kids from chair or blanket. hand; music by Magnolias. preschool age to 8. $12 insclubs.org. cluding container of apples. 6:30 p.m.: Historian Lin1-4 p.m.: Acoustic Dou- Register online. TerhuneorThursday, August 25 da Barth shares highlights 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton ver performs at Terhune Or- chards.com. and details about the DelaFarmers’ Market is at the Din- chards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Thursday, September 1 ware and Raritan Canal, in Light fare and wine available. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton a hybrid event at Morven, ky train station parking lot, Terhuneorchards.com. across from the Wawa. PrincFarmers’ Market is at the Din55 Stockton Street. Mor5 -7: 3 0 p.m . : S i n g e r / etonfarmersmarket.com. ky train station parking lot, ven.org. 6:30 p.m.: “Reflections on songwriter Sophie Coran across from the Wawa. PrincFriday, August 19 1781 Princeton: Exploring performs at Nassau Pavil5-8 p.m.: Mark Miklos per- the Road to Yorktown” with ion, behind Panera Bread, etonfarmersmarket.com. Friday, September 2 forms at Terhune Orchards, Dr. Robert Selig, at Morven, Nassau Park, West Windsor. 5-8 p.m.: Kindred Spirit 330 Cold Soil Road. Part 55 Stockton Street. $10- Free. Westwindsorarts.org. Duo performs at Terhune Orof Sunset Sips & Sounds $15. Morven.org. Sunday, August 28 chards, 330 Cold Soil Road. series. Wine, music, light 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon 8 p.m.: The Indigo Girls Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds bites. Terhuneorchards.com. perform at the William Penn Land Trust Farmers’ Market 7 p.m.: Story & Verse se- Bank Summer Music Fest, at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine series. Wine, music, light ries at Pettoranello Gardens, Bristol Township Amphithe- Street, Flemington. Fresh, bites. Terhuneorchards.com. 20 Mountain Avenue. Open ater, Bristol, Pa. $35-$75. organic offerings from 20 Saturday, September 3 mic, free, sponsored by the Brtstage.org. 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor farmers and vendors. MornArts Council of Princeton Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot ing yoga; music. HunterdonFriday, August 26 and the African American of Princeton Junction train landtrust.org. 5-8 p.m.: CatmoondadCultural Collaborative of 1 p.m.: Members of the station. Enter from 877 AlexMercer County. The theme dy per for ms at Terhune P r i nce ton C ar i l lon S t u - ander Road. Wwfm.org. Yes is “Circle of Life.” Artscoun- Orchards, 330 Cold Soil dio perform from Gradu- We CAN Fresh/Stable Food Road. Part of Sunset Sips & cilofprinceton.org. Drive to Benefit Arm in Arm; Sounds series. Wine, music, ate Tower on Pr inceton music by Stibol students. Saturday, August 20 University’s graduate camlight bites. Terhuneorchards. 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Wind- com. pus, rain or shine. Listen sor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. wwcfm.org. Yes We CAN Fresh/ Stable Food Drive to Benefit Arm in Arm; music by This Old House. 9-10 a.m.: Mid-Day Toastmasters meet via Zoom. Toastmastersclubs.org. 1-4 p.m.: Brian Bortnick performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Light fare and wine available. Terhuneorchards.com. Sunday, August 21 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 1 p.m.: “Cast in Bronze: The Tower Show” is the title of the carillon concert from *Sale is based upon a 3 pair purchase, special orders will receive 10% off. Discounts will re-apply if customer buys more than 3 pair. Graduate Tower on PrincNot valid on previous purchases or diabetic shoes. Expires 9/30/2019* eton University’s graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. 2019 FALL TRUNK SHOWS Sept 19 Free. (609) 258-7989. 1- 4 p.m. : R ich S einer Sept 7 Sept 20 Duo performs at Terhune *Sale is based upon a 3 pair purchase, special orders will receive 10% off. Discounts will re-apply if customer buys more than 3 pair. Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Not valid on previous purchases or diabetic shoes. Expires 9/30/2019* Sept 13 Sept 21 Road. Light fare and wine 2019 FALL TRUNK SHOWS Sept 19 available. Terhuneorchards. Sept 18 Sept 7 *Sale Sept 26 Sept com. *Sale is based upon is based upon aa3320 pair specialorders orderswill will receive off.a 3 pair purchase, spec *Sale is based upon pairpurchase, purchase, special receive 10%10% off. Discounts will re-apply if customer b Sept 13 Discounts will ifif customer buysmore morethan than 3 pair. Discounts willre-apply re-apply customer buys 3 pair. 1 p.m.: Tour of Princeton Sept 21 Not valid on previous purchases or diabe valid onon previous diabeticshoes. shoes.Expires Expires 9/30/2019* valid previouspurchases purchases or diabetic 9/30/2019* B at t lef ield, 50 0 Mercer Sept 18 NotNot Sept 26 Road, led by a historical in2019 FALL TRUNK SHOWS Sep terpreter. Learn about the 2019 FALL TRUNK SHOWS 2019 FALL TRUNK SHOWS Sept 19 Sept 19 Sept 7SEPTEMBER Battle of Princeton, soldier Sep 9/18: Beautifeel 9/9: ARA and civilian experience. $5 Sept Sept7 7 Sept 13 Sept 20 Sept9/13: 20 9/19: Arche SAS Sep donation; children under 16 9/20: Naot 9/14: Customer and veterans free. Register Sept 18 Sept 13 Sep Sept 21 SeptAppreciation 21 Day at Pbs1777.org/battlefield- Sept 13 9/21: Revere tours. 9/26: Mephisto Sept1818 Sept Sept Monday, August 22 Sept 26 26 7:30 p.m.: Voices Cho- Boots rale New Jersey holds “New Walking Shoes Jersey Summer Open Sing,” Dress Shoes open to all singers, at Music Orthotics Together, 225 Pennington-

*Sale is based upon a 3 pair purchase, special orders wil receive 10% off. Discounts wil re-apply if customer buys more than 3 pair. Not valid on previous purchases or diabetic shoes. Expires 9/30/2019*

2019 FALL TRUNK SHOWS

Sept 7

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Sept 18

Sept 19

Sept 20

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Sept 26

FIRST EVER

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022 • 20

Top Quality Design, Installation, Maintenance Highlight Rock Bottom Landscaping & Fencing

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our home is your haven, and more and more often that extends to the surrounding landscape. Attractive plantings, handsome patios, and winding walkways all add to the pleasure of a welcoming home environment. Chris DeMato, owner of Rock Bottom Landscaping & Fencing, knows all about transforming tired landscapes into exciting new looks. For more than 30 years, he has been helping people select just the right landscape, hardscape, or fencing to enhance their property and increase their enjoyment.

IT’S NEW To Us

“It’s a great feeling when you can transform something that was overgrown or in disrepair, and turn it into something special,” says DeMato. “Old properties can often have overgrown plant material and that are not in good condition. We can put in new plants and trees, and it is very rewarding to see this transformation.” Landscape Design DeMato’s experience with landscaping began at an early age, when he cut grass and helped with yard work as a boy. “I got interested seeing the transformation that can result from good landscaping,” notes the Middlesex native. “I went to college, and

studied agricultural science, and then worked for different landscape companies in the area. I got really interested in landscape design, and started my own company when I was in my twenties. I also studied landscape design at Rutgers.” Often asked about the name of his company, “Rock Bottom,” he explains that it was appropriate on different levels, “We often did a lot of digging and removing rocks, and we also tried to offer really reasonable prices. It was just a name that seemed right.” Headquartered in Belle Mead, the company has evolved over time, and today, it is a full scale landscaping, hardscaping, and fencing operation. It covers everything from landscape and hardscape designs to installation and maintenance, including lawn care, pruning, trimming, spring and fall cleanup, and grass cutting. Rock Bottom handles projects of all sizes and styles, primarily residential but also some commercial, reports DeMato. Careful attention to customers’ lifestyle and expectations is a priority. Currently, plant design and hardscape design are especially in demand, he adds. “Each customer has their own individuality and style. The main thing is that they want to enhance their property, both for their private enjoyment and also for entertainment.” Backyards and Patios After COVID-19 entered everyone’s lives and mindset,

people were not traveling, he points out, so the home environment became even more important. “They wanted to make their yards and properties as nice as possible,” says DeMato. “They wanted to turn their backyards and patios into an entertainment area, with fire pits, pizza ovens, and outdoor kitchens.” This was also true for people who had moved into the area from the cities and wanted to create new landscapes and hardscapes. Landscape lighting has become increasingly popular, adds DeMato, and this is an important part of the business. Illuminating the scene after the sun sets is a very attractive option. Uplighting? Downlighting? There are many possibilities for a natural lighting setting. “It can certainly add a very nice look,” says DeMato, “and it also offers increased security. Lighting can be placed along walkways, near trees and plantings, and of course, on patios and terraces.” Styles and Materials Fencing is also important to many customers today, and this part of Rock Bottom’s business had expanded over the years. “We added fencing in the late’90s, and it has really grown over the years,” says DeMato. “Many customers want to keep deer away from the property or dogs from getting out. it is also a requirement if they have a swimming pool.”

License # 13VH04549200

ROCK BOTTOM LANDSCAPING & FENCING

WELCOME HOME! “This design has a lot of different plant varieties that will bloom at different times. When designing, we like to use a lot of different textures and color,” explains Chris DeMato, owner of Rock Bottom Landscaping & Fencing. Shown here is a recent Rock Bottom project, creating an eye-appealing design of contrast and color. “We included texture such as dwarf evergreens to contrast with the soft growth of ornamental grasses, which adds subtlety, and we also featured boulders which contributed texture, giving a natural look to the overall design.” A variety of styles and materials are available, and wood, metal, and vinyl, also ornamental aluminum and decorative fencing, are among the popular choices. Patio and poolscape designs and installations keep Rock Bottom crews busy, and many options are available, from simple to sophisticated. Paver patios, brick, and natural stone are all in demand, and are often seen on walkways as well. “Poolscapes today often have a sleeker, more modern look, with shades of gray and blue,” points out DeMato. “It’s not so much the rustic look as in the past.” When designing a landscape, many considerations must be addressed. Sun, shade, exposure, location all are important factors, and of course, individual choice and budget are always uppermost. ‘Weather is a factor too,” he notes. “Now we are in a drought, and this can certainly affect the plantings.” Likes and Dislikes When he meets with clients, he is eager to learn their likes and dislikes. Often, people are unsure of how to proceed, and he helps guide them into envisioning their hopes for the project. “I try to find out what they like and don’t like,” he says. “I’ll ask questions about what they may not like about their current landscape and what they are looking forward to seeing — what colors they like, if they want flowers blooming all summer into the fall, etc.” Other questions come up. Do they want flowering trees, such as cherry, dogwood? Bushes and shrubs, including azalea, hydrangea, rhododendron? Evergreen and shade trees?

Are durability and long-lasting plantings considerations? Do they like perennials that will bloom every year? Are they becoming interested in indigenous plants and also those that will attract bees and butterflies? These are all signifi cant factors in determining the direction of the landscape. At the top of the list for many customers are deer-resistant plants, and this is an ongoing challenge. There are some choices not attractive to the deer menu, but when they are very hungry, deer will eat almost anything. An assortment of deer and rabbit repellent products, including sprays, are also available. “There are some plant varieties that can also deter insects, including mosquitoes,” adds DeMato. Amazing Opportunities With the advances in today’s technology, amazing opportunities are available for customers to see ”before and after” pictures of both landscapes and hardscapes. “With computer imagery we can show customers what the new landscape or hardscape will look like,” explains DeMato. “This is a great way for them to know what they can expect.” Depending on its size and scope, a project can take from one day to six or eight weeks or longer, he notes. “Sometimes, a ‘grand plan’ project can be spread out over time, done in increments. This can help in planning and for budget considerations.” “We have a full-time crew of eight people on staff, and some have been with us for 17 years,” he continues. “They all have their specialties — landscaping, hardscaping, fencing. There will always be two or three guys

on a specific job, and I oversee everything. I’m involved in selling, delivery, and design. I’m a hands-on guy, and I work with the clients from the beginning to ensure that we achieve their goal.” New Division The company’s projects are primarily in Mercer, Middlesex, and Somerset counties, with many in Princeton, he adds, and he is also looking forward to completion of plans for a new division in Manasquan. “There is a big rise in the business there for us, and in fact, this is really true everywhere. It’s been amazing to see how big the industry has grown over the years.” DeMato is proud of the business he has built, and the reputation he has established. He is especially pleased that his sons are now involved in the operation too. “We are a company that people can count on,” he says. “We have very high standards, and our crews have extensive experience and skill. We offer personal service in a world that in constantly changing in terms of technology. Talking with someone face-to-face can make all the difference. “I enjoy the interaction with people, watching the transformation taking place on their property, and then seeing the customers’ excitement when the project is finished. We often exceed their expectations. It means a lot to me that I am helping to make a difference in people’s lives by transforming their landscapes.” or further information, call (732) 873-6780. Website: rockbottomlandscaping.net. —Jean Stratton

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21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022 • 22

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Building on Stellar Senior Season for PU Women’s Hoops, Meyers Stars as U.S. Squad Wins Gold at Maccabiah Games

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bby Meyers passed up the chance to play in the Maccabiah Games in 2017 in order to prepare to start her career for the Princeton University women’s basketball team. Now at the tail end of her college career, Meyers made the most of another opportunity to compete in the Maccabiah Games this summer as she joined the United States open female team for the event. Meyers averaged 18.4 points per game and was named Most Valuable Player while leading the U.S. open women’s team to the gold medal at the Maccabiah Games. “Just coming back and showing my family the medal, showing my grandmother the MVP trophy, it definitely is a very special thing to win gold representing Team USA and bring back the hardware,” said Meyers, a 6’0 guard who hails from Potomac, Md. “What I learned going to Israel in the first place though was I thought it was going to be all about basketball and winning that gold medal. It’s an important part, but ultimately it was a small part of the overall experience.” Meyers had not played overseas before competing in the Maccabiah Games and she had not yet visited Israel. The chance to combine the

two made for a remarkable experience. “What I most valued from it was getting to meet other Jewish athletes from all over the world, going to the Dead Sea, going to the Yad Vashem, which is the Holocaust Memorial site, and taking the whole experience in,” said Meyers of the competition which brings together 10,000 athletes from 85 countries taking part in 45 sports. “And I still happened to play basketball. It was awesome.” The U.S. squad looked awesome as it dominated the Maccabiah competition, which also included Israel and Australia, with wins by more than 28 points on average over their four games. Meyers posted a double-double with 16 points and 11 rebounds in the gold medal game in an 88-55 win over Israel. “Going into the Games, we know we’re better than them, we know we have more skill and more size and more talent than the Israeli and Australian teams that we were playing, but at the end of the day the goal was to prove that we’re just a really good basketball team,” said Meyers. “That’s how we beat them, not that they were bad teams. They were great teams. Our overall skill set, we found some really talented Jewish athletes

from the U.S. this year. It’s a credit to coach Sherry Levin. Hopefully we were able to prove that we’re a really good team playing another good team.” The Maccabiah Games served as a go-between for Meyers’ basketball career. She wrapped up her Princeton career as just the third All-American in program history, and has been preparing for one final graduate season at Maryland. In the final two days before departing for Israel, she had an unexpected final workout at Princeton’s Jadwin Gym with Team USA. “It definitely felt weird being back,” said Meyers, who finished her final season with the Tigers as the unanimous Ivy League Player of the Year after averaging 17.9 points a game and scoring a program-record 538 points on the year and leading Princeton to the Ivy League crown and a firstround NCAA tournament win over SEC tourney champion Kentucky. Since that triumphant finish to her Tiger career, Meyers has been busy. After graduating from Princeton, she and fellow grad Marge Donovan took a sightseeing trip to Europe for two weeks before Meyers began focusing on the next step in her basketball career. She spent two weeks working out at Maryland, where she had the

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GOLDEN GIRL: Former Princeton University women’s basketball player Abby Meyers displays the gold medal and MVP trophy she earned after helping the U.S. open female team to victory at the Maccabiah Games in Israel. Meyers posted a double-double with 16 points and 11 rebounds in the gold medal game in an 88-55 win over Israel and averaged 18.4 points a game at the tournament. Star guard Meyers, the Ivy Player of the Year in her senior season last winter, will be playing for the University of Maryland in the 2022-23 campaign as a graduate transfer. chance to meet future teammates, impress the coaches in person, and adjust to a new school. “It was back to business,” said Meyers. “I did training. I did lifts with the team. I did individual skills workout with them and got used to the Xfinity Center aura. From there, I went right to Princeton for the training camp for Maccabiah and then to Israel. It’s really exciting. It was definitely a busy month of basketball and I think it was a good little distraction before moving in next week.” The training camp at Princeton gave Team USA a chance to blend their talents together and work toward reaching their potential. They took advantage of their time together on and off the court to become a gold-medal unit. “We were able to get double workouts in and we practiced well in Israel,” said Meyers. “We had a great group of girls with amazing personalities and they all meshed well together. Because of that we were able to develop really great chemistry really fast. That helped us peak on the 24th for the gold medal match.” Meyers and her U.S. teammates had a unique chance upon arrival in Israel to absorb some of the cultural experiences before focusing on basketball again. A oneweek tour program called Israel Connects gave players from the U.S. Maccabiah Games delegation new sights every day. “It was just a time where we were able to enjoy these

amazing experiences with people all over just like us, our age, many of whom it was their first time in Israel or second or they’re Jewish Orthodox and they know way more than we do,” said Meyers. “It was a great opportunity to experience it with other Jewish athletes. Every day was a different place and different experience.” The team visited the Roman ruins of Caesarea, the Dead Sea, visited the solemn sight of Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, and went to Mount Masada. “All these places have significance and we had a tour guide for each one to talk us through it,” said Meyers. “Us and men’s soccer also volunteered at a five-yearold hospital just outside of Tel Aviv where we split into groups with young kids and the groups were created to educate them about vital signs and nutrition and what’s good to eat before workouts and what’s not. There was some physical activities involved, we played basketball and soccer with them. They really drained us the first week with a lot of activities.” Then came the Maccabiah Games, and winning the gold together added to the overall experience of Meyers and her team. Meyers is now preparing to make the move to nearby Maryland. “I feel like as a fifth-year I have more experience, I have that upper edge over some of the younger underclassmen that I can hopefully teach and mentor,” said Meyers. “I’m going into

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this whole last year of college basketball with an open mind and excited about the challenge. I know it’s going to be different. It’s not going to be the same experience as Princeton, so I’m going to have to be uncomfortable and embrace that. I’m excited for the higher level of basketball and it’s close to home for me and I’ll be with Marge and able to support her. I’m very excited for it.” Meyers will jump into the Big Ten and use her game to help the Terrapins. She is grateful for the experience gained over four-plus years at Princeton, with the first portion of her career under current North Carolina coach Courtney Banghart and the final two seasons under Carla Berube. “Princeton all in all is a high caliber school and athletic program,” said Meyers. “I think especially this past year Coach Berube really challenged us with a tough out of conference schedule. We played Texas. We played Rhode Island. We played Florida Gulf Coast. We played a lot of great teams. In terms of the actual talent, yeah there will be bigger girls in the Big Ten, a little bigger and a little faster, but I’ve definitely grown up playing against that caliber of players so I don’t think that is going to be what sets Princeton apart. What sets Princeton apart is the discipline and accountability and expectation that coaches and fellow players hold you to.” Meyers, who will pursue a master’s degree in business and management, joins a Maryland team with NCAA title aspirations. She is looking to step in as a leader in the same way that she did at the Maccabiah Games. She looks forward to the next step in her career after a successful run at Princeton navigating the rigors of academics and athletics. “It requires a higher level of motivation, and higher level of determination and discipline that Princeton I think has prepared me and taught me,” said Meyers.“ I don’t think any other program outside Princeton and the Ivy League could have prepared me for, and I think that is definitely going to help me.” —Justin Feil


canceled due to ongoing COVID-19 concerns. “One of my favorite parts was just getting to know my teammates a little better; it had been a while since we had seen each other,” said Donovan, reflecting on a season that marked the final campaign for legendary Hall of Fame Princeton head coach Sailer. “Our unofficial motto for the season was ‘we don’t have to, we get to,’ that drove a lot of what we did. We were appreciative but we were also competitors. It was great to compete again and fulfill our full potential as a team. It was a great season.” While Donovan appreciated the slew of honors she earned in her final campaign, she saw them as an outgrowth of collective excellence. “I am just grateful, it is not why any one of us plays lacrosse or anything like that,” said Donovan. “It feels nice to be recognized. I think that is a reflection of our team, it is a reflection of our defense as a group and it is a reflection of our draw team as a group. It was a reflection of all of the hard work that we put in.” In making her international debut, Donovan took a circuitous route. She originally tried out for the U.S. national team that went on to win the gold medal at the Women’s World Championship in early July but didn’t make the squad. “I put my name in the ring for the US national team; the tryout was supposed to be in October 2020 but it got pushed to June 2021,” said Donovan. “I went out and tried out for that. It was an incredible experience. I have never played with so many great players. I feel like I learned so much, just in the tr yout. I was surrounded by all-time greats.” With that door closed, Donovan got in the mix for the U.S. team that was playing in the inaugural World Sixes tournament. Donovan was fired up to try the new format, which is played on a smaller field, six-on-six, with a shorter shot clock

Over the last few months, Marge Donovan has reached new heights in her lacrosse career. T h i s s pr i ng, D onov a n produced a superb senior season for the Princeton University women’s lacrosse team, getting named as the Ivy League Defender of the Year, the Most Outstanding Player in the Ivy postseason tournament, and as a third-team Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association ( IWLCA) AllAmerican. Along the way, Donovan set a program single-season record in draw controls (112) and a career record in draw controls with 214. Donovan’s heroics helped Princeton go 7-0 in Ivy play, win the league postseason tournament, and advance to the second round of the NCAA tournament on the way to a 15-4 record. In July, Donovan, a native of Catonsville, Md., competed for the U.S. team in the inaugural World Sixes tournament at the World Games in Birmingham, Ala. The athletic, rangy 5’10 Donovan helped the U.S. earn a silver medal at the competition. In reflecting on her lacrosse whirlwind, Dono van credited her Princeton experience with laying the groundwork for her to excel on the world stage. “I would say I owe much of who I am as a person and a lacrosse player to that program,” said Donovan. “I grew a lot. It is just a fantastic program. You have a coaching staff of Chris [Sailer], Jenn [Cook], and Kerrin [Maurer] that cares about you. Of course they care about your per formance on the field but what drives the coaching is that they are culture coaches. When you have people that are genuinely invested in you, you can grow on and off the field. You feel supported.” Donovan was excited to be on the field this spring for the Tigers after the 2020 season was halted after five games due to the pandemic and the 2021 campaign was

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and four 8-minute quarters designed to speed up the pace of play. “It was like a rolling tryout for like a year,” said Donovan. “They took some people who were younger and had promise in the next cycle. The Sixes format was created to get into the Olympics. The aim of that team was putting young players together who could potentially play, if it is approved, in the 2028 Olympics.” As Donovan went through the process, she found herself thriving in the Sixes format. “I was a big basketball player when I was younger and to me it is basically like basketball w ith lacrosse sticks,” said Donovan, who also starred in track in high school. “It is very much a similar game, 6-on-6. I am so excited for this format to catch on and for people to expand on it. There are a lot of things tactically that you could do with the format. People are honestly still figuring it out. You can play your team with five field players straight up who can play offense or defense or you can sub in a pure attacker on offense.” In April, Donovan found out that she had made the U.S. team, triggering some deep emotions. “I was even more shocked than when I won the award at the Ivy tournament,” said Donovan. “I was so honored. This is the stuff you dream about as a kid. It was just an incredible, incredible honor and I was very blessed.” Before heading down to Birmingham, the U.S. squad got things together with a camp in June. “We had a three-day training weekend, putting some plays together and working on chemistry on the field and off the field,” said Donovan. Upon arriving in Alabama, Donovan and her team mates soaked in the feeling of being at an international

competition which featured 30 official sports with 3,600 athletes from 110 countries. “Birmingham was awesome, the whole atmosphere was awesome,” said Donovan. “It was incredible.” It was awesome for Donovan to take the field for the opener against Australia on July 12. “Walking out of that locker room with the U.S. flag leading the way and walking next to my teammates, that is something I will never forget,” said Donovan reflecting on the game which saw the U.S. prevail 16-6. “I was just feeling so honored and blessed to be in that position. We were fired up in that first game, there were a lot of nerves because we are a little bit of a younger team. By the second half of that game we had gotten out all of the nerves and really started firing on all cylinders.” The U.S. squad kept clicking on all cylinders, going 3-0 in Group A play and then routing Great Britain 21-5 in a semifinal game to advance to the gold medal game against Canada. “It is so much faster, it is hard to describe,” said Donovan, who had an assist in the win over Great Britain. “If you do something good or you do something bad, you have .001 seconds to think about it. I think our semifinal game was our best performance.” As for her role on the team, Donovan focused on keeping the defense up to speed. “I would just go in on defense, we had a subbing pattern down on the fly,” said Donovan. “My role on defense was to organize and communicate and then if the opportunity presented itself, push in transition.” In the gold medal game on July 16, the U.S. squandered opportunity as it led Canada 11-10 going into the fourth quarter before falling 14-12. “It was disappointing because we didn’t play our best; we got a little caught up in the moment,” said Donovan, who assisted on a third quarter goal by Madison Ahern that gave the U.S. a 7-5 lead.

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022

After Memorable Final Campaign for Tiger Women’s Lax, Donovan Helped U.S. Earn Silver in World Sixes Tourney

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of something way bigger than ourselves.” While that loss stung, Donovan is proud to have earned a silver medal while being a trailblazer for the new format. “You are representing your country and you are on one of the biggest stages in the world,” said Donovan. “You are helping grow this incredible game.” In Donovan’s view, the prospects for the Sixes game

to be competitive.” With Donovan heading to the University of Maryland this fall to play as a graduate transfer for its high-powered women’s lax program and study aerospace engineering, she is looking to stay competitive for future involvement in the growth of Sixes. “Every chance, I am going to throw my name in the ring and do my best,” said Donovan. —Bill Alden

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022 • 24

PU Sports Roundup Princeton Football Picked 3rd in Ivy Poll

Coming off a superb campaign that saw it share the Ivy League title with Dartmouth, the Princeton University football team was picked to finish third in the league’s preseason Media Poll released last Monday. The Tigers garnered four of the 16 first place votes and 105 points overall in ranking third. Harvard (eight first place votes) and Dartmouth (four first place votes) were tied for first overall with 108 points. Yale was fourth, collecting 83 points. Columbia was picked to finish fifth, Penn sixth, Brown seventh, and Cornell eighth. Princeton, which went 9-1 overall and 6-1 Ivy in 2021, returns six All-Ivy selections from last season, led by firstteam All-Ivy honorees, offensive lineman Henry Byrd, tight end Carson Bobo, and punter Will Powers as well as receiver Andrei Iosivas (second team), defensive lineman Uche Ndukwe (second team) and receiver Dylan Classi (honorable mention). Senior star Iosivas was recently named a second-team Preseason All-American by Phil Steele while senior Powers was chosen as a thirdteam Preseason All-American by the same publication. The Tigers open their 2022 season by playing at Stetson on September 17 before returning to Princeton Stadium for the home opener against Lehigh on September 24.

Women’s Track Star Iheoma as the Tigers on the player Takes 4th in Discus at U20 roster, while the previously Princeton University women’s track star Siniru Iheoma ’25 earned a fourth-place finish in the discus at the World Athletics U20 Championships last week in Cali, Colombia. Iheoma’s best mark of 53.15 meters came on her first attempt, and stands as the No. 2 all-time mark in school history. It bests the previous No. 2 all-time mark of 50.89 meters, set by Kennedy O’Dell ’18 at the 2018 Texas Invite, and Iheoma’s previous PR of 50.36 meters, that stood as the No. 3 all-time mark on the Tigers’ all-time list. Along with her top-5 finish at the U20 World Championships, Iheoma, a native of Churchville, Pa., was also the USATF U20 Outdoor Champion in the discus, along with an NCAA Regional participant in the shot put in 2022. She was also the Ivy League indoor and outdoor champion in the shot put, along with the discus champion.

PU Women’s Hockey Program Has 5 at Hockey Canada Camp

Reigning Olympic gold medalists and International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) World Champions Sarah Fillier and Claire Thompson are among the five members of the Princeton University women’s hockey program who are taking part in Hockey Canada’s selection camp currently underway in Calgary. Fillier, a junior forward, and defender Thompson ‘20, join senior forward Maggie Connors sophomores Dominique Cormier, a defender, and Sarah Paul, a forward,

announced coaching staffs include Princeton assistant coach Courtney Kessel is leading the U-18s and Princeton head coach Cara Morey serving as a camp coach. The event will serve to guide selections as Canada looks to defend its title at the IIHF World Championship from August 24-September 4 in Denmark. Canada will have a game against Finland to wrap the camp on August 14 before expected games against the U.S. and Denmark in the run-up to the camp. Fillier and Thompson were part of Canada’s team when it won the most recent IIHF World Championship last summer in Calgary, and the two went on to be stars of the Olympic tournament as Canada returned to the top of the podium in Fillier’s and Thompson’s Olympic debuts. Fillier was second among all players at the tournament with eight goals and sixth with 11 points. Thompson led all defenders and was fifth overall with 13 points, coming on two goals and 11 assists, and led the tournament with a +23 plus-minus. Fillier, a two-time AllAmerica and two-time top10 finalist for the Patty Kazmaier Award, the top award in women’s college hockey, is already more than halfway to Princeton’s records for career points, with 114 and the record at 218, and assists, with 70 and the record at 122. Thompson graduated fifth in points among defenders in program history, with 87, capping a career that included three All-Ivy League honors and two All-ECAC

MAKING A SPLASH: Lizzie Bird coming through a water jump in a 3,000-meter steeplechase race during her career with the Princeton University women’s track team. Last week, Bird ’17, competing for Great Britain, took second in the women’s steeplechase at the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, England, setting a new personal best of 9:17.79. Bird’s classmate and former Tiger teammate, Julia Ratcliffe ’17, competing for New Zealand, took silver in the hammer throw with a best throw of 69.63 meters while Obiageri Amaechi ’21, competing for Nigeria, earned a bronze medal in the discus with a best mark of 56.99 meters. Ed Trippas ’22, racing for Australia, placed seventh in the mens’ steeplechase in a time of 8:37.42. (Photo provided by Princeton Athletics) recognitions. Heading into her final season with the program, Connors stands 14th on Princeton’s career goals list, with 61, and will aim to go 4-for4 in All-Ivy League honors while looking for a third AllECAC recognition. Cor mier played in 29 games as a freshman last winter, scoring three goals and adding nine assists. Paul missed much of the season due to injury but had two goals and three assists in seven early-season games.

Women’s Rugby Program Releases Schedule for First Varsity Season

H i s tor y w i l l b e m ad e this fall as the Princeton University women’s rugby team kicks off the inaugural

varsity season for the program. Four home matches highlight the eight-match slate as the Tigers begin their first season in the National Intercollegiate Rugby Association (NIRA). “There are so many exciting sports on Princeton’s campus, and we are thrilled to add to that list this fall,” said head coach Josie Ziluca. “Rugby is fast-paced, competitive, and engaging for fans. It is one of the fastestgrowing sports around the world, and we are excited to tackle, sprint and scrum in front of our fans this fall.” Princeton’s varsity debut will be on September 3 at Sacred Heart. After that,

the Tigers are home for their next two — including the program’s first-ever varsity home match on September 10 against Army West Point, which is also Alumni Appreciation Day. The next weekend, Princeton hosts its first Ivy opponent with a September 17 match against Brown. Three of the next four contests are on the road, with trips to Harvard (September 24), Mount St. Mary’s (October 15), and defending NIRA champion Dartmouth (October 22) sandwiched around a home date with Quinnipiac on October 8 on Youth Rugby Day. The inaugural season will conclude with Senior Day on November 6 against Long Island.


It was a record-breaking summer on many levels for the Community Park Bluefish swimming team. First, the venerable program, which celebrated its 50th anniversary last year, drew 280 swimmers and 60 divers for its 2022 campaign. “That is the most we have ever had, it blew away the most we had before,” said Bluefish co-head coach Mike Uchrin. “This is our first year back to normal season, 2021 was a transition. We weren’t really sure what to expect this year. As the year went along, I was talking to Kelsey (co-head coach Kelsey Schwimmer), saying these are really big numbers. A lot of families in the post-COVID times wanted to get their kids back into the water and back into a sport where they will have fun. It worked out great.” Featuring such depth, the Bluefish went 5-0 in dual meet competition in Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association ( PAS DA) Division 1 action and then dominated the PASDA championship meet in late July, taking first in Division 1 with 4,441 points, well ahead of runner-up Hopewell Valley, which had 1,999. “It is the most points we have ever had at the championships, we had the most PASDA MVPs (six) we have ever had,” said Uchr in, whose team has been undefeated since 2015 and hosted the PASDA championship meet. “We had multiple PASDA league records that we set. It wasn’t just our collective performance but we had a lot of great individual performances.” While proud of the team’s achievements, Uchr in is more focused on making sure that the swimmers have a great time. “It is not about the wins and losses, it is about the fun,” said Uchrin, noting that Friday practices are devoted to playing sharks and minnows and water polo rather than grinding out laps. “Summer league is not so much about that. Ultimately you get a situation where you get a lot of kids wanting to participate, having a good time and then the results are going to speak for themselves. It has happened organically that we have been on this win streak.” Co-head coach Schwimmer, a former Bluefish team member and 2014 Princeton High alumna, saw the fun atmosphere around the team fueling progress in the water. “I know that every group saw significant improvement, every coach would say that each kid dropped time,” said Schwimmer, who joined the Bluefish in 2012 and also competed for the PHS swim team and is now a kindergarten teacher in Dunellen. “We have our MVPs and our kids who we knew would come in where they would but the amount of depth we had down the line in each group was really spectacular. We had so many kids per group; we had 40 kids in the 10-and-under. It also shows

that they want to be there.” Uchrin credited Schwimmer with playing a key role in getting the most out of that depth. “I have k now n Kelsey since my very first club practice here, I am really proud of her,” said Uchrin. “I started off as her coach and then brought her on to coach with us. I mentored her along the way so it has been a lot of fun. I knew she was going to be great for it. Kelsey has been such a huge part of our team for so long. I took the lead a little more to focus on the 11-and-overs and Kelsey a little more on the 10-andunders. It worked out great as I knew it would.” Despite dealing with so many swimmers, Uchrin and Schwimmer made sure that each athlete got individual attention. “We are able to see progress because we have such a great facility that helps out,” said Uchrin, noting that the staff included nine assistant coaches. “We are able to go and spread out. Including the diving well, we are using over 20 lanes for practices. Essentially each group is able to operate and maintain pretty good numbers in their lanes and is able to work individually. With so many coaches and a great facility to make it work, I definitely do not feel that the quality of the program has changed at all with our numbers. We just have to be organized and stay on top of that for sure.” One of the top swimmers for the team was Rei-Jhe Lee, the PASDA championship meet MVP in the 8-and-under boys division. He took first in the 25-yard butterfly and the 100 individual medley. “Rei-Jhe worked so hard, he is the team jokester,” said Schwimmer. “He was always cracking jokes, having fun. He did fantastic.” The team’s 8U boys crew featured other standouts, including Thomas Loper, the winner of the 25 backstroke, Kian Martin, the first place finisher in the 25 breaststroke, and Lucas Julian, who won the 25 freestyle. “That was such a good group,” said Schwimmer. “It was a small group overall but they were so mighty.” In the 10U boys, Nathan Ricciardi had an amazing

meet, getting named MVP in the age group, winning the 25 back and the 25 butterfly. “Nathan was fantastic, he and his twin brother, Matthew, have been on the team for years now,” said Schwimmer. “They come to every practice, they show up for every meet. Nathan works so hard. He is so excited to come and swim and do his best. I am so proud of him.” Allen Ma led the way for the 12U boys, taking second in the 50 fly and second in the 100 IM while Natan Wysocki placed second in the 50 free and third in the 100 IM. “The 12-and-under boys overall was a huge group, they collectively were a really strong group for us,” said Uchrin. “The 12U boys and girls collectively were probably our strongest. We had a lot of them and had a lot of coaches assigned to them. They had a lot of fun this season, they were prob ably the most enthusiastic group.” David Brophy had a lot of fun at the PASDA meet, taking first in the boys 14U 50 fly and fourth in the 100 IM. “David was phenomenal this season, he set a new team record in the 50 free this season,” said Uchrin, noting Brophy broke a record prev iously held by Will Stange, a former PHS and Cornell standout. “He comes in and works hard. He is prepared, he gives 100 percent to every race.” The 14U boys featured several other standouts, including Braedyn Capone, who took third in the 50 breast with Shawn Ellwood placing sixth in 50 fly and eighth in the 50 free. The quintet of Andrew Lenkowsky, Paul Lacava, Julian Velazquez, Lucas Gold, and Kentaro Bauer were stalwarts for the 18U boys. Lenkowsky placed first in the 50 free and second in the 50 free while Lacava was second in the 50 free and third in the 50 back, Velazquez came in third in both the 50 fly and 50 free, Gold took second in both the 50 back and 100 IM and Bauer was first in the 50 breast and fourth in the 50 free. “Those five collectively were so strong for us,” said Uchrin. “If you look across

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022

CP Bluefish Produces Record-Breaking Summer, Utilizing Depth to Dominate PASDA Championships

PIPING UP: Community Park Bluefish swimmer Piper Dubow displays her butterfly form in a meet this summer. Dubow helped the Bluefish take first in Division 1 at the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet in late July. Dubow was named the 18-and-under girls MVP at the PASDA meet, taking first in both the 50-yard breaststroke and 100 individual medley. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) the league, many teams really struggled to get senior guys. Those guys have come up together and stuck together with the sport from different club teams and different areas. That speaks to what we do, that is what I am most proud of with the team. They were able to set team and PASDA league records in both relays (Gold, Vela zquez, L ac ava, a nd Lenkowsky with winning time of 1:32.33 in the 200 free relay and Gold, Bauer, Velazquez, and Lenkowsky with a time of 1:42.89 in the 200 medley relay).” As for the Bluefish girls, the Ben sisters, Alicia and Adalyn, set the pace for the younger girls. Alicia was 6-and-under girls PASDA MVP, placing first in both the 25 back and 25 free while Adalyn was named the 10-and-under girls MVP, winning the 25 free and 100 IM. “They were incredible, I can’t say enough about how amazing they are,” said Schwimmer. “Alicia was MVP in the 6-and-under and she also came in first in the 8-andunder butterf ly which is crazy, amazing. She was so dedicated, she was always there, working hard. Adalyn is also an amazing swimmer. She was just always up for anything. I could put her wherever I needed her and she was just always doing her best, getting better and better.” Another amazing swimmer for the team was Alexis Julian, who placed first in the girls 10U 25 free and second in the 25 breast. “Alexis has been with us for a while; what was so impressive about her is that

she is only nine so she will be back in the nines and 10s next year,” said Schwimmer. “She worked so hard and it showed, she was dropping time every race and getting better and better. She just kept outdoing herself.” In the 12U girls, Charlotte Flanagan outdid herself, placing first in the 50 back and 100 IM “Charlot te a long w it h t h o s e ot h e r g i r l s , t h at was one of our strongest groups,” said Uchrin. “I think statistically it was our largest group. We swept both relays.” The 14U girls group was paced by Annie Flanagan and Zoe Bitterman. Flanagan was the PASDA MVP, winning both the 50 back and 50 free while Bitterman placed first in the 50 fly and the 100 IM. “They are longtime Bluefish, committed to the program,” said Uchrin of Flanagan and Bitterman. “Zoe has been on the team since she was six. Annie is phenomenal, she is going to be at Princeton High next year. They were a dynamic duo. Beyond them, we had a great group of 14U girls.” The Bluefish 18U girls also did some great things. Piper Dubow was the PASDA MVP in that age group, taking first in the 50 breast and 100 IM. Sabine Ristad placed first in the 50 fly and second in the 50 back while Elena Nechay won the 50 free. “I love the 15-and-over girls group this year; they were so excellent and they were such a great combination of both rec swimmers and club swimmers from a variety of local teams,” said Uchrin. “Piper is a longtime

Bluefish swimmer; this year she stepped up and coached as well. But beyond Piper, we had so many strong swimmers in that group. You don’t always get a lot of seniors that stay involved. You see drop-off around the teenage years and it is really a testament to see so many 15-and-over girls sticking with us.” The sense of community engendered by the Bluefish has led the thousands of swimmers to stick with the program over the years. “Summer in Princeton is Bluefish; you do barbecues and trips to the beach and then you go to a Bluefish meet,” said Uchrin. “We didn’t turn anyone away. Everyone who wanted to swim was able to come and swim. We were able to get a great sense of teamwork and a great sense of the energy in the community that we have built here. It speaks to our role in the community and the support we get from the community. It is so great.” Schwimmer, for her part, believes that the supportive atmosphere around the team has resulted in many developing a lifelong pursuit. “I just love how Bluefish is a place for kids to get excited about swimming and really fall in love with the sport,” said Schwimmer. “It is not as intense or competitive as club swimming. It is that perfect entry point to get as many people in the community involved as possible. You see kids go from not being able to swim or not really knowing how to race to just loving it. They can’t wait for next summer.” –Bill Alden


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022 • 26

Underdog Majeski Wins Summer Hoops Title Series As Clutch Play from Larranaga Makes the Difference With the Majeski Foundation trailing Athlete Engineering Institute 22-10 late in the first half last Friday night at the Communit y Park courts in the finale of best-of-three championship series of the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League, it was on the ropes. But displaying the resilience that fueled ninth-seeded Majeski’s unlikely run to the finals, it started to fight back, narrowing the gap to 26-18 at halftime and pulling ahead 29-28 five minutes into the second half. “We started to make a little progress at the end of the first half,” said Majeski star and team manager Jason Larranaga. “We came in at halftime and kept emphasizing the same things. We have got to get through this. When we started to make our run, we started believing in ourselves a little more. It was all about keep it going and upping the intensity more and more.” The fierce battle got more intense as the second half unfolded with the foes were knotted at 43-43 at the end of regulation. The Majeski squad, which is comprised of players from The College of New Jersey’s men’s hoops team, felt it had momentum heading into

overtime. “By the end, we had the second wind and the pressure was on them,” said Larranaga of the squad which had fought off pressure to get to game three, dropping the opener of the title series 50-41 on August 1 before topping AEI 45-36 last Wednesday in game two to stay alive in the series. “We came out energized and ready to go. They are a good team for sure, they play really hard. Those guys are strong too, they are grown men.” Both squads played hard defense in the extra session with the score remaining at 43-43 until Larranaga got loose on the baseline and dropped in a lay-up which proved to be the margin of victory in a 45-43 triumph. “I got a nice screen from Jackson [Rind] and I saw a guy leaning so I was able to get to the baseline and nobody helped over so I was able to finish,” said Larranaga, recalling the winning bucket. “It was all my guys on the perimeter all around so if I had to jump start and kick it out, I knew I had somebody to shoot it. They couldn’t come off my guys and I was able to get an open layup.” T he Majesk i g uys em ployed an underdog

mentality as they went 3-6 in regular season action and then caught fire in the playoffs to win their first summer league title since 2016. “We wanted to come out this summer and make constant improvement,” said L ar ranaga of t he squad which ended up with a final record of 8-7 and became the first ninth seed to win the summer hoops title. “We didn’t have the greatest regular season, we made a lot of strides. We just wanted to keep getting better so we kept emphasizing team defense, playing hard, moving the ball on offense, and playing as a unit. Things started to click a little better.” Things clicked for Larranaga down the stretch last Friday as he ended up with 16 points on the night, scoring 11 points in the second half and overtime, getting named as the Foreal Wooten Playoff MVP. Naysean Burch also had a big game for Majeski, contributing 13 points and two rebounds with Jose Estevez tallying seven points and Rind chipping in four points, five rebounds, and one assist. “I was dealing with some back stiffness in the first half,” said Larranaga, a 6’5, 190-pound guard from Montclair, who averaged

9.1 points and 4.7 rebounds a game for TCNJ last winter. “It loosened up for me in the second half, that was nice. The guys just kept pushing each other, staying positive.” Getting the summer league title was a big positive for the Majeski players. “We had a chip on our shoulder after the last New Jers ey At h let ic Conference (NJAC) season in the winter (when TCNJ went

10-14 overall, 6-12 NJAC) and last summer too,” said Larranaga, noting that Majeski fell to LoyalTees in the 2021 summer league championship series. “We wanted to come out and win this and prove to ourselves that we could do it and just prove that we can improve consistently. I think we did that.” In Larranaga’s view, coming through in the championship series should

result in improvement this winter. “We tried to make it so everybody could get some run this summer and we could really tr y to build some chemistry and improve together,” said L arranaga. “We also tried to come out and have a lot of fun together. I love playing with these guys. We are hoping to carry it over into the school year.” — Bill Alden

STRONG FOUNDATION: Majeski Foundation’s Jason Larranaga looks to make a pass in a June game in the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. Last Friday, Larranaga scored a game-high 16 points to help ninth-seeded Majeski defeat third-seeded Athlete Engineering Institute 45-43 in overtime at the Community Park courts in game three of the league’s best-of-three championship series. Larranaga was named as the Foreal Wooten Playoff MVP. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Hampered by a sore arm, Danny Bodine was sidelined for a couple of playoff games in late July as Majeski Foundation advanced to the best-of-three championship series in the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. But w it h nint h - seeded Majeski, which is comprised of players from the The College of New Jersey’s men’s hoops team, having lost 50-41 to third-seeded Athlete Engineering Institute in game one of the series on August 1, Bodine wasn’t about to sit out game three on Wednesday night at the Com mu n it y Park cour ts with his team on the brink of elimination. “It is a win or go home situation, that is all the motivation you need,” said Bodine, a 6’9, 190-pound native of Langhorne who was second on TCNJ in scoring (12.1) last winter and first in rebounding (7.3). “You just come out and punch them in the mouth early and keep that lead the whole time.” Shrugging off the pain from his sprained elbow, Bodine delivered some blows to AEI, tallying a game-high 14 points, including four 3-pointers as Majeski pulled out a 45-36 victory to stay alive in the series. “Our team was moving the ball, it was our team

getting good looks for us,” said Bodine, reflecting on h is per for mance. “I am confident in anyone shooting and they are confident in me shooting. Whatever shot we can get, I will take it.” Playing with their backs to the wall, Majeski produced a stifling defensive effort, building a 24-15 lead at halftime. “Last game we weren’t talking as much, we weren’t m ov i n g as m u ch,” s a i d Bodine in assessing the team’s defensive intensity. “This game we were really locked in, talking to each there. We knew where each other were so it was it nice.” In the second half, a gritty AEI squad drew to within 38-34 but Majeski was able to hold off that charge. “It is a good team so you have to expect that r un back,” said Bodine. “Basketball is a game of runs, I expect that. We had to meet that and then hit them back and that is what we did.” T he dept h of Maj e sk i which saw it subbing in four or five players at a time helped wear down AEI. “We are a young team so we can get up and down the floor a little bit,” said Bodine. “Having five in and five out definitely helps to get a blow and keep everyone fresh. We trust everyone

on the bench to come in and play their best.” One of the best moments of the evening for Bodine came when he jammed home a dunk with 2:30 left to put Majeski up 43-34. “It was nice; it was something to cap the game off,” said Bodine. Two days later, Majeski edged AEI 45-43 in overtime in game three to earn the title, their first in the summer league since 2016. While Bodine was hoping for a championship, just being on the court with his TCNJ teammates was a bonus. “I like this more for team camaraderie and togetherness more than anything,” said Bodine. “A chip would be huge for us but just playing with my guys in the summer is great. Seeing family faces two times a week is nice.” —Bill Alden

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Games are free and open to 5K in memory of Helene for the public. The rain site for his Eagle Scout project. Evboth programs is the Princ- ery year since, the Helene eton Unified Middle School. Cody Foundation has used For more information on the event to bring the comJoint Effor t Safe Streets munity together and use the clinic or games, call (720) proceeds to sponsor youth Joint Effort Safe Streets Program 629-0964 or email johnbai- service projects and provide Holding Hoops Clinic, Games scholarships. All proceeds ley062@gmail.com. The Joint Effort Princeton go directly to the Helene Helene Cody 5K Race Safe Streets Summer ProCody Foundation, a 501(c) gram, in conjunction with Set for September 10 (3) charity. The 14th annual Helene the Princeton Recreation Princeton Athletic Club Cody 5-kilometer race and Department, Princeton Po1-mile fun r un is taking Holding Trail Run Sept. 17 lice Department, Princeton The Princeton Athletic Public Schools, Bailey Bas- place on September 10 with ketball Academy and PBA the start and finish line at Club ( PAC ) is holding a #130, is sponsoring a free Heritage Park in Cranbury. trail run and walk at the The fun r un begins at Mountain Lakes Preserve, youth basketball clinic on 8:15 a.m. and the 5K starts 57 Mountain Avenue, PrincAugust 13. from 10 a.m.-12 p.m. at the Community Park at 9 a.m. The 5K is chip- eton, on September 17. The event, which is bentimed and USAT F- cer tibasketball courts. efiting the Princeton First fied w ith water stations This program is a player Aid and Rescue Squad, will development skills clinic throughout the course. Trophies will be awarded start at 9 a.m. and consists for boys and girls ages 8 to the top three male and of a 5-kilometer-plus trail and up. All clinic attendees should bring their own ball. female finishers overall and run and walk. The course is comprised The clinic will be directed in each age group for the by Kamau Bailey, the direc- 5K. Every fun run finisher of about 10 percent mile tor of the Bailey Basketball will receive a medal and paved park trail, 30 percent Academy, a Philadelphia trophies will be awarded unimproved service right-of76ers camp clinician and to the top three boys and ways, and 60 percent single former head coach of the girls. The Cranbur y Day track including moderately Princeton Day School girls’ celebration will begin im- technical rocks, roots, logs, basketball team. It will be mediately after the race on and whatever else nature has wrought in the woods. staffed by community vol- Main Street. unteers and members of the Additional race informa- Due to the technical nature Princeton Police Depar t- tion and on-line registration of the trail, parents should ment. is available at helenecody. consider whether this event is appropriate for young In addition, on August 14, com/5k-and-1-mile-runchildren. The race is limited the Joint Effort Safe Streets walk.html. will sponsor the Pete Young This event is the main fun- to 150 participants. Online registration and Sr. Memor ial Games for draiser for the Helene Cody Princeton and area youth. Foundation, whose mission full details regarding the These annual games are is to inspire youth to vol- event are available at princheld each year in the mem- unteer, to better their com- etonac.org. The entry fee is or y of Pete Young Sr., a munities and themselves. $35 until August 16, includP r i n c e ton bu s i n e s s m a n, Prior to her death in 2008, ing a T-shirt. The fee from community advocate, sports Helene Cody, a Princeton August 27-September 14 is enthusiast, and supporter High student, planned to $40 with a T-shirt on an asof youth and communit y revive the Cranbur y Day available basis. Sign up at programs who was beloved 5K, a community event that the event will be $50 and in the Witherspoon- Jack- had been discontinued in is credit card only, subject son Community. The nine 2006, as a way to combine to availability. games start at 10 a.m. and her love of distance running The PAC is a nonprofit, APPLIANCE • BEST ART • BESTrunning ART GALend BEST at 7:30 p.m. and willSTORE club and community serviceCLASSES for all-volunteer include contests featuring for the community that proher Girl Scout gold award LERY • BEST ARTISANAL CHEESE • BESTmotes AUTO SHOP • BEST youth players, high school project. running for the fun boysBAKERY and girls, •and unlimand stages BEST BIKEWhen SHOP BEST CAMERA SHOPof•itBEST CAshe• passed away, and health ited men. several running events each a classmate organized the TERER • BEST COCKTAIL • BEST COFFEE HOUSE • BEST DAY The Joint Effort Clinic and first Helene Cody Cranbury year.

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Bodine Shrugged Off Sore Arm to Come Up Big as Majeski Topped AEI to Stay Alive in Summer Hoops

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Obituaries

James Kerney Kuser II 1960 – 2022

James Kerney Kuser II, an estate lawyer in Princeton for over three and a half decades, passed away at home July 31, 2022, following a brief illness. Sixty-two years old, Kerney was born in Troy, Ohio, on February 15, 1960, the son of R. George Kuser Jr., a newspaper publisher, and Clare McHugh Kuser, a homemaker. He is survived by his partner, Jeremiah Edwin Obert; by three of his six siblings; by two uncles and one aunt; and by many nieces, nephews, and cousins. After four years at the Lawrenceville School, Kerney attended Kenyon College, g raduat ing w it h a bachelor of arts degree in 1982 before studying law at Seton Hall University. He was admitted to the New Jersey Bar in 1985. He was active in many civic and professional organizations. Kerney used his lawyering skills with a light touch and a sure hand, and was always available to help friends and family. In 1984 he donated a kidney to his older sister, Cricket, and the organ continued to function and support life until her death in 2014. He traveled around the world to support her when she competed in the World Transplant Games, including visits to Budapest in 1991 and Sydney, Australia, in 1997. When Cricket passed away in Vancouver, he was able to sell her home for the highest price possible and distribute the estate proceeds to her survivors. More recently, he helped the widow of an eminent scientist at the Institute for Advanced Study remain in her home for several years and later sell it for more than the family thought possible. An avid gardener, Kerney planted his oneacre property with thousands of flowers and dozens of ornamental trees, always with an eye to providing birdbaths and feeders as well as color throughout the long growing season. Kerney also had a knack for speaking to children as thoughtful people capable of making rational decisions. When his 7-year-old niece, Eylül Isabella Kuser, moved to the United States from Istanbul she planned on adopting her middle name as being easier for Americans to handle. Uncle Kerney told her that her new country was a land of immigrants, that she was a special person in her own right, and that she should make people deal with her on her own terms, including being known by her actual name. Eylül was persuaded

... and has lived to regret it as a teacher, fellow student, or coach is sure to mangle her name every day. His unique way with young people made a difference in the life of Errol McDowell, son of Kerney’s close friends, Rider and Victoria McDowell. Kerney and Errol hit it off right away when the boy was 8 years old, and maintained their special bond through a years-long ordeal for all when Errol was stricken with a type of brain cancer called medulloblastoma. Er rol passed away at the age of 18 in 2018, but conceived of a charity called Canceragogo, which is seeking $1 from every American to cure cancer through immunotherapy. According to the National Pediatric Cancer Foundation, only 4% of cancer research funding in the U.S. goes towards treating childhood cancer, a disparity which leads to few drugs having been developed for children with cancer while hundreds have been created for adults. The family encourages donations to Canceragogo. A celebration of life is being planned for late summer or early fall.

to be closer to family members. Mr. Dow passed away in 2018. Eileen was an avid reader, enjoyed swimming, and was an accomplished bowler, regularly scoring over 200 points and once nearing a perfect game. Her grandchildren fondly recall her penchant for chocolates. She always will be remembered as a devoted wife, mother, and friend. Her survivors include a daughter Susan (Dow) Connolly; sons Michael, Kenneth, Thomas, and David; son-in-law Peter Connolly; daughters-in-law Gianina, Catherine, Mae, and Colette; and eight grandchildren: Jacqueline Connolly, Thomas Connolly, Emily Dow, Melissa (Dow) Ortega, Charlotte Dow, Abigail Dow, Grace Dow and Harrison Dow. After a funeral mass at Queenship of Mary Catholic Church, Plainsboro NJ, interment was at Calverton National Cemetery, NY. Memorial contributions to Greenwood House Hospice at greenwoodhouse.org/giving/tributes are appreciated. Extend condolences and share memor ies at T he KimbleFuneralHome.com.

Rabbi Daniel Grossman Eileen A. Dow Eileen Anne (Maxim) Dow died peacefully of natural causes at home in Princeton, NJ, on August 7, 2022 surrounded by her loving family. Born in the Bay Ridge section of Brooklyn, NY, Eileen graduated with honors from Fort Hamilton High School and was working in Manhattan when she met her husband of 63 years, Kenneth Dow, then attending Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute on the GI bill. After their marriage in 1950, Mr. Dow was employed as an engineer by the JM Huber Company and the couple was stationed in Borger, Texas, and later in Macon, Georgia, where they welcomed the arrival of the first of their five children. Upon returning to New York in 1955, the young family soon moved into a new house in suburban Greenlawn, NY, on Long Island. For the next 25 years Eileen was a full-time homemaker. She was active in the PTA, the Girl Scouts, and other civic groups during this time, and she especially enjoyed the family’s annual camping trips throughout the Northeast. In the 1980s Mrs. Dow returned part-time to the workforce, holding an administrative job in an orthopedic surgery group. Later, after her husband’s retirement and the arrival of grandchildren, the couple moved to Hampton Bays, NY, where they enjoyed an active social life. During retirement they also traveled throughout the United States and the United Kingdom. In final years the couple moved to the Princeton Windrows community

We mourn the loss of Rabbi Daniel Grossman, beloved teacher, father and husband, who passed on August 2, 2022 at the age of 71. Rabbi Grossman is survived by his wife Dr. Elayne Robinson Grossman, his son Sam Grossman, daughter Rabbi Miriam Grossman, and sonin-law Jeremy Siegman and granddaughter Shayna. He is also survived by his brother Dr. Larry Grossman, sisterin-law Joanne Grossman, and a cherished extended family. Born July 24, 1951 to Jackie and Murray Grossman in Philadelphia, PA, he was an infant survivor of the RH factor. Rabbi Grossman was a lifelong lover of music, storytelling, and Jewish community. He graduated Temple University with a B.A. in religion in 1973 and was later ordained at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in 1978. He was a cherished leader in disability and deaf inclusion efforts within the Jewish community. Rabbi Grossman was a pulpit rabbi for over 40 years, the majority of them at Adath Israel in Lawrenceville, NJ, where he led the congregation for 25 years. As a rabbi his passions were adult education, disability inclusion, and serving families in times of loss. Rabbi Grossman will be missed by many. May his memory be for a blessing. Funeral services were held on August 3 at Adath Israel Congregation, with burial at Roosevelt Memorial Park in Trevose, PA. Memorial contributions may be made to : the American Kidney Fund,

Sharim v’Sharot, Adath Israel Congregation, and Congregation Kol Emet. Funeral arrangements are by Orland’s Ewing Memorial Chapel. To send condolences to the family please visit Rabbi Grossman’s obituary page at OrlandsMemorialChapel. com.

Augustine F. Mosso June 7, 1931 – July 30, 2022

G u s M o s s o, o f C a p e May, NJ, and formerly of Princeton, NJ, passed away peacefully in the comfort of his home on July 30, 2022. Born in Brooklyn, New York, to Joseph and Mary Mosso, Gus was the youngest of six children, sisters Sadie Frances, Janet, Isabel, and brothers Pat and Frank. He excelled in school and was the first college graduate in his Italian immigrant family. He studied Pharmacy at St. John’s University in New York City and he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in 1952 and he maintained lifelong school friendships. Gus enlisted in the U.S. Navy and served as a Lieutenant during the Korean Conflict (1953-1956) and received an honorable discharge. He met the love of his life Mary Ann (nee Turano) and they married in 1960 and had four children by 1965! Gus earned his MBA in Marketing and Management from New York University in 1959 after he attended evening classes especially designed for the 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. business management employees located in the downtown Wall Street area. From 1960 to 2005 Gus’s very interesting work in a diverse and exceptional pharmaceutical career included positions of increased executive responsibility in sales, advertising, international marketing, and creative services. He was awarded the Squibb President’s Award for Outstanding Individual Performance in 1973. Gus later became Director of Worldwide Marketing and Creative Services and in 1985 his role included managing the Squibb Gallery in Lawrenceville, NJ. Gus was presented with the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Gold Medallion in 1989 for this work and for his role in promoting corporate support for arts education. Gus retired early and started his own medical conference planning firm, The Mosso Group Inc., from 1990-2005. As well as being an avid theater fan Gus turned his talents to producing plays for the Princeton Community Players. Gus and Mary Ann traveled the world and visited six continents. After 37 years in Princeton, he and Mary Ann relocated permanently to Cape May, NJ, where Gus served as President and later Vice President of the Village Greene Civic Association. He advocated

for reduced speed limits on local roads and other measures to protect walkers and bicycle riders. Gus and Mary Ann served as volunteers for the Mid-Atlantic Center for the Arts and supported local theater and many cultural events in Cape May. Gus was gifted in painting with acrylics and writing, especially poetry with rhyming couplets. His organizational and meeting planning skills for national and international medical educational symposia, and for several family reunions and celebrations, were extraordinary. Gus is survived by his loving wife Mary Ann of 62 years, his grateful children Rev. Lauren Mosso (Mark Duckworth with their children Arthur, Genevieve, and Mireille Duckworth), Lisa Woodford (Jonathan), Joseph Mosso (Brenda), and Christopher Mosso, together with nieces and nephews of several generations, and many friends, who remember Gus with love. There will be a funeral Mass in honor of Gus on Friday August 19, 2022, at 10 a.m. St. Paul Church, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton, N.J. Mass will be livestreamed and accessible by visiting this link, stpaulsofprinceton.org/ mass-streaming, that will be active at 9:50 a.m. In lieu of flowers please consider donations in Gus’s honor to benefit Cape May Lutheran Church, 509 Pittsburgh Avenue, Cape May, NJ 08204; Family Promise of Cape May County, 505 Town Bank Road, North Cape May, NJ 08204; or Cape May City Fire Department, 712 Franklin Street, Cape May, NJ 08204. Our family is forever grateful to Rev. Dr. Jeffrey Elliott for his love and support. For information and condolences, visit Spilker Funeral Home, Cape May at spilkerfuneralhome.com.

Frances Rizk Frances Rizk, a loving mother and grandmother, and a warm and generous person, died at home in Princeton on August 3, surrounded by her three children. She had recently celebrated her 90th birthday in style, her wit and sparkle intact until the very end. Born in Brooklyn, NY, to John Bolin and Mary O’Neill, Fran grew up surrounded by extended family who took care of her when she lost her mother at age 10. After graduating from St. Albans High School in Queens, she completed two years of study at Queens College. She worked for American Can Company then sought a more adventurous life by joining Colonial Airlines as a stewardess. This allowed her to travel to many fun destinations around the globe and began her love of travel. She met Edward Rizk, the Lebanese delegate to the Unit-

ed Nations, in New York and the two were married there in 1957 at the Greek Orthodox cathedral. Thus began a more than 40-year marriage that took them to many places around the world. After New York City, they moved to London, where Eddie was the Arab League Ambassador to the United Kingdom. Fran attended several teas at Buckingham Palace, watched tennis matches at Wimbledon, made many new friends and spent summers in the mountain village of Broummana, Lebanon surrounded by Eddie’s extended family. In 1966, the family moved to Lebanon and set tled down in Beirut. The next decade represented Lebanon’s “Golden Years” and they all lived full lives amidst friends and family, moving among the family’s several homes. Fran remained as active as ever: She was President of the American Women’s Club in Lebanon, Vice President of the country’s mental hospital, a board member of the local YMCA, and Vice Chair of an arts festival in the Bekaa Valley, all while raising her three children. In 1976, Lebanon became racked by civil war. Eddie foresaw that this would go on for a long time and urged the family to relocate to the U.S. to build their lives there. They first moved to Ithaca, NY, where their oldest daughter Nayla was accepted to Cornell. Fran was a big fan of Cornell Hockey and they held season tickets for the four years they lived there. In 1980, they moved to Manhattan. For the next two decades, Fran and Eddie enjoyed life on the Upper East Side combined with summers at their home in the hills above Cannes in the South of France. Everywhere they were, family and friends were welcomed with open arms. As Eddie, 19 years Fran’s senior, grew older, they moved to Princeton, NJ, to be closer to their son, Amin Rizk and his wife Kim. In 2000, Eddie passed away and Fran moved into a new addition built onto Amin and Kim’s house in Princeton. She spent the next 20 years living with them and helping them raise their family, while seeing her daughters and their families as often as she could. Fran’s life in Princeton was full. She was a docent at Drumthwacket, a member of the Present Day Club, and enjoyed many evenings at the McCarter Theatre. She also enjoyed going with friends to the Philadelphia Ballet and museums in NYC. Fran continued to travel with friends and family on trips to Asia (Japan, China, Vietnam), Egypt, England, Ireland (where her mother’s family came from), Italy, the Caribbean, and Ecuador and the Galapagos. She also traveled back to Lebanon. Fran is survived by her three children Nayla Rizk (Robert Tarjan), Aline Rizk, and Amin Rizk (Kim); her grandchildren Peter McCall (Lucy), Andrew McCall, Alexandra McCabe, Ens. Christiane McCabe, Natalie Rizk (John), and Katherine Rizk. She was also blessed with three great-grandchildren, Mary and Luke McCall and Wynona Rizk. Fran will be missed by her many relatives and good friends around the world. She will be laid to rest next to her husband, Edward, at the Princeton Cemetery. Services are private and under the direction of Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.


“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS

VISA

MasterCard

The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon

HOME HEALTH AIDE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Live-in or live-out. Driver’s license. References available. Please call Inez, (609) 227-9873.

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

08-17

LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754.

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240.

PERSONAL ASSISTANT/CAREGIVER FOR YOUR LOVED ELDER

Years of experience. Trustworthy, reliable & highly competent. Female. Excellent references. 609-477-4671. 09-21

LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf

CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732

Irene Lee, Classified Manager

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 11-30

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022

to place an order:

tf

CARS • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must WE beBUY pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. ROSA’S Belle Mead Garage • 25 words or less: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. CLEANING SERVICE LLC (908) 359-8131 Offering professional cleaning ser• 3 weeks: $40.00 • 4 weeks: $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6Askmonth and annual discount rates available. for Chris vices in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, bi• Ads with11-23 line spacing: $20.00/inch • all bold face type: $10.00/week

EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 977-9407. 08-10

EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Experienced and reliable adult caregiver available weekday mornings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000.

DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000. tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf

tf HOME CARE AIDE /

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 11-30 THE PRINCETON WRITING COACH - a professional writer and university teacher - has guided many students on how to plan, write, and revise outstanding college application essays. These essays are the best opportunity for students to “speak” directly and convincingly to admissions committees. Your student can work with the Coach face-to-face or via Zoom. Call for a free consultation today. 908-420-1070. princetonwritingcoach@gmail.com. 08-17

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06

COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Livein or live-out. I also drive. References available. Call or text: 973-489-0032. 08-17

LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf

tf

CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732 tf ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10;

Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188.

I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613.

04-06-23

06-28-23

classifieds@towntopics.com

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE:

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10 circulation@towntopics.com MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 977-9407. 08-10 DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000. tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf

THE PRINCETON WRITING COACH - a professional writer and university teacher - has guided many students on how to plan, write, and revise outstanding college application essays. These essays are the best opportunity for students to “speak” directly and convincingly to admissions committees. Your student can work with the Coach face-to-face or via Zoom. Call for a free consultation today. 908-420-1070. princetonwritingcoach@gmail.com. 08-17 HOME HEALTH AIDE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Live-in or live-out. Driver’s license. References available. Please call Inez, (609) 227-9873. 08-17 LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23 EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Experienced and reliable adult caregiver available weekday mornings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000. tf HOME CARE AIDE / COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Livein or live-out. I also drive. References available. Call or text: 973-489-0032. 08-17

weekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co.

Truly Frameless Shower Doors

741 Alexander Rd, Princeton • 924-2880

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years

American Furniture Exchange

30 Years of Experience!

Considering a kitchen or bath renovation project? Cranbury Design Center listens to your ideas and then uses color drawings of your space to help make your vision a reality. We assist with design decisions, cabinet, countertop and hardware selections, and finishing touches like backsplash tile and paint colors. Call us or visit us online to get started on your remodel. We look forward to meeting you!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items

(609) 448-5600 145 W. Ward Street, Hightstown www.cranburydesigncenter.com

I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

Custom Kitchens, Baths and Renovations

Vote for us on

Don’t Forget to CDC_TT_BestofHouseHome_Half_Page_041421.indd 1

towntopics.com 4/14/21

8:13 PM

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022 • 30

Rider

Furniture

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TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

“Where quality still matters.”

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com

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Princeton Realty Resources 2x3.indd 1

PERSONAL ASSISTANT/CAREGIVER FOR YOUR LOVED ELDER

Years of experience. Trustworthy, reliable & highly competent. Female. Excellent references. 609-477-4671. 09-21

Gardening Tips for Extreme Heat

WE BUY CARS

Another week of excessive heat continues in New Jersey. The region remains unusually dry because of the heat wave and lack of heavy rain over the last few weeks. Much of the area is under mandatory outdoor water restrictions, including odd/even days to ease the demand on water supplies.

Keeping up with lawns and gardening during the current extreme temperatures can be challenging. But following practical planting and maintenance tips can make it easier to garden during the heat.

*

*

*

I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23

Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

5/2/22 4:30 PM

with Beatrice Bloom

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE:

Check your local water utility or other online resources such at university agricultural extensions for additional landscaping and planting ideas to save water over time.

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECOͲBroker Princeton Office 609Ͳ921Ͳ1900 | 609Ͳ577Ͳ2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

Route 206 & Applegate Dr. | Princeton, NJ

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription!

Choose drought resistant plants for planting zones 6 and 7. A mix of annuals and perennials include dianthus, zinnia, cosmos, sweet potato vines, echinacea (coneflowers), sedum, begonia. Mulching underneath trees and shrubs and in garden beds retains moisture in the soil and saves on water. Plants tend to grow better with mulching, as the temperature of the soil stays more uniform. Reduce the size of your lawn by planting more trees, shrubs, gardens or ornamental grasses, which do not use as much water as a typical lawn.

MONTGOMERY COMMONS

Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10 circulation@towntopics.com MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 977-9407. 08-10

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area Witherspoon Media Group

CAREGIVERS/ELDER CARE COMPANIONS: Job is for 5 days a week, 5 hours per day. Salary is $20/hour. Clean record, good recommendations, mobile, with many skills. For more details about the position, email me at kerrifield147@gmail.com. 09-07

Custom Design, Printing, IS ON Publishing and Distribution

· Newsletters · Brochures

· Postcards ADVERTISING SALES Witherspoon Media Group is looking for · Books a part-time advertising Account Manager, · Catalogues based out of our Kingston, NJ office, to generate sales for Town Topics Newspaper · Annual Reports and Princeton Magazine The ideal candidate will:

• Establish new sales leads manage For additional infoand contact: existing sales accounts for both publications

melissa.bilyeu@

witherspoonmediagroup.com • Develop industry-based knowledge and understanding, including circulation, audience, readership, and more. • Collaborate with the advertising director and sales team to develop growth opportunities for both publications

Track record of developing successful sales strategies and knowledge of print and digital media is a plus. Fantastic benefits and a great work environment.

Witherspoon Media Group Please submit cover letter and resume to: charles.plohn@witherspoonmediagroup.com

Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

· Newsletters · Brochures

W SPACE · Postcards WEEKLY INSERTS START AT FOR ONLY 10¢ PER HOUSEHOLD. · Books Inserts We LEASEWeekly Get the best reach at the best rate! P · Catalogues

only 10¢ per only house 10¢ OFFICE &

• Postcards · Annual Reports • 8.5x11” flyers Witherspoon • Menus Media Group Booklets info contact: For• additional Custom Design, Printing, • Trifolds melissa.bilyeu@ Publishing and Distribution witherspoonmediagroup.com • Post its • We can accomodate • Pos · Newsletters almost anything! · Brochures

MEDICAL Get the best reachGet at the be

Verizon Fios & High speed internet access available

Suites Available 743, 830, 917, 1260 & 1660 SF (+/-)

219 Parking Spaces Available on-site with handicap accessibility

• Prestigious Princeton mailing address • Built to suit tenant spaces with private bathroom, kitchenette & separate utilities

4’-7”

• Premier Series suites with upgraded flooring, counter tops, cabinets & lighting

4’

12’-10”

OFFICE

BUILDING 7 | SUITE 721 | 830 SF (+/-) 15’

• 8.5″ Reach· Postcards over 15,000 homes in• Flye Princeton and beyond! · Books • Men F Town ·Topics puts you in front• Boo Catalogues of your target customer for less · Annual Reports than what it would cost to mail etc a postcard!

For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

We c alm

LarkenAssociates.com | 908.874.8686 Brokers Protected | Immediate Occupancy No warranty or representation, express or implied, is made to the accuracy of the information herein & same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of rental or other conditions, withdrawal without notice & to any special listing conditions, imposed by our principals & clients.

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

Reach 11,000 homes in Princeton Reach and 11,000 surroun hom


1st month discount 3rd month 10%30% discount

2nd month 20 % discount

Waived community fee for St. Mary & Grace Gardens 3rd-month 10% discount a $2,500 value.

Serving The Community – Together Campus Shared with St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center

Campus Shared with St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center **excluding **excluding Morris Morris Hall Hall Meadows** Meadows**

St. Mary’s Assisted Living

9704326-02

9704326-02 9704326-02

St. Mary’s Assisted Care LivingAssisted Living Garden Memory •Grace St. Garden Joseph’s Skilled Nursing Center Grace Memory Care Assisted Living St. Joseph’s Skilled Nursing • Morris Hall Meadows Skilled St. Joseph’s Skilled NursingNursing • Morris St. Mary’s Assisted Living, Morris Hall Meadows Skilled Nursing Hall Meadows Skilled Nursing • Grace Garden Memory Care • New Palliative Care Unit at St. Mary’s

9704326-02

Morris Hall Senior Care Communities includes:

Located in •• For more please visit us Located in Lawrenceville, Lawrenceville, NJ Formore more information, information, please visitvisit us at at us at Located in Lawrenceville, NJNJ • For information, please www.morrishall.org or contact us at mhadmissions@morrishall.org or 609-895-1937 www.morrishall.org or contact us at mhadmissions@morrishall.org or 609-895-1937 www.morrishall.org or contact us at mhadmissions@morrishall.org or 609-895-1937

Morris Hall Senior Care Communities • St. Joseph’s Skilled Nursing & Long Term Care • St. Mary’s Assisted Living • Grace Garden Assisted Living Memory Care • Morris Hall Meadows at Lawrenceville Skilled Nursing

Specialized Services • Short Term Rehabilitation • Respite Care • Palliative Care • Hospice Care

St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center Salutes our Nursing Staff! Thank you for your dedication, hard work and compassion every day and especially during the COVIC-19 pandemic.

2381 Lawrenceville Road | Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 609-896-9500 | www.slrc.org

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2022

**excluding Morris Hall Meadows** Waived Waived community community fee fee for for St. St. Mary Mary & & Grace Grace Gardens Gardens -- aa $2,500 $2,500 value. value.


Snowden Lane

Newly Priced: Beech Hollow Lane

Lake Drive

Princeton, NJ | $2,250,000

Princeton, NJ | $1,995,000

Princeton, NJ | $1,995,000

Denise L ‘Dee’ Shaughnessy: 609.575.2524

Sylmarie ‘Syl’ Trowbridge: 917.386.5880

Jane Henderson Kenyon: 609.828.1450

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2019442

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2018496

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2019464

Pardoe Road

Lafayette Road

Ridgeview Road

Princeton, NJ | $1,870,000

Princeton, NJ | $1,650,000

Princeton, NJ | $1,595,000

Linda Twining, Jessica Feng: 609.439.2282

Maura Mills: 609.947.5757

Linda Twining: 609.439.2282

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2018972

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2019812

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2015564

Introducing: Millstone River Road

Introducing: Westbury Court

Newly Priced: Victoria Mews

Hillsborough Township, NJ | $1,395,000

Montgomery Township, NJ | $1,300,000

Princeton, NJ | $1,289,000

Grant Wagner, David M Schure: 609.331.0573

Ira Lackey, Jr: 609.203.2099

Kathryn Baxter: 516.521.7771

callawayhenderson.com/NJSO2001634

callawayhenderson.com/3794776

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2016596

Introducing: Constitution Hill West

Introducing: Coventry Farm Lane

Introducing: Poe Road

Princeton, NJ | $1,050,000

Princeton, NJ | $975,000

Princeton, NJ | $859,000

Barbara Blackwell: 609.915.5000

Norman T ‘Pete’ Callaway: 609.558.5900

Susan L ‘Suzy’ DiMeglio: 609.915.5645

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2020644

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2020582

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2020500

callawayhenderson.com 609.921.1050 | 4 NASSAU STREET | PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08542 Each office is independently owned and operated. Subject to errors, omissions, prior sale or withdrawal without notice.