Town Topics Newspaper, July 20, 2022

Page 1

Volume LXXVI, Number 29

“In Lunch With Love” Shows Work of Local Artist . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Residents Can Participate In Mileage-Based Pilot Program . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Jane Austen and John Keats: Once Upon a Time In Winchester . . . . . . 12 PU Alumna Hompe Helped England Earn Bronze at Women’s World Lax . . . . . . . . . 21 Former PDS Star Franzoni Produced Huge Season For Xavier Baseball . . 23

Local Author Deanie Yasner’s Childhood is Basis For Youth Novel . 7 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 20 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . 28 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 10 New To Us . . . . . . . . . 18 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 27 Performing Arts . . . . . 13 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 28 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Summer Health . . . . . . 15 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

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Pandemic Not Over Yet, Despite Appearance Of Normality in Town The COVID-19 virus, in its current predominant BA.5 variant, is “still evolving rapidly,” warned White House COVID-19 Response Coordinator Dr. Ashish Jha in a July 17 interview. But around town in Princeton it looks like the pandemic is over, with most people behaving normally, showing little hesitation to go out and few masks in evidence. Infection rates seem to have leveled off locally, but nationwide they’re rising. Is Princeton prepared for the fall flu and back-to-school season, with cooler weather and activities moving indoors? Princeton Board of Health Chair George DiFerdinando noted that we’re still not out of the woods, and he emphasized some essential guidance based on lessons learned from the pandemic so far. “While it’s clear that many people have moved on from mask wearing and social distancing, there are still clear benefits to both those non-pharmaceutical interventions,” he wrote in an email Tuesday. “BA.5 is the most infectious variant yet, with its impact on severe disease being ‘softened’ by the high rates of vaccination in New Jersey in general and Princeton in particular.” He continued, “We do know that BA.5 can cause infection and disease even if you’re fully vaccinated and boosted. If you have other health conditions that might make a case of COVID worse, if you’re older, or if you’re planning to attend a large event that you really don’t want to miss, mask wearing, keeping your distance, and shopping or dining during ‘off hours’ still make sense.” The BA.5 subvariant has been described by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as “a variant of concern,” which accounted for about 65 percent of all new infections last week. New Jersey reported a COVID-19 transmission rate of 1.11 on Monday, up from 1.10 over the weekend, with any number above 1 indicating that the outbreak is expanding, with each new case leading to more than one additional new case. Mercer County is considered in the medium risk category for COVID-19 transmission, along with Hunterdon, Salem, and Cumberland counties. Continued on Page 8

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Summer Construction Projects Underway All Over Town The decision by Mercer County to build a roundabout on Rosedale Road this summer came as welcome news to area residents, who had lobbied for years for traffic calming at General Johnson Drive and Greenway Meadows. Construction began a few weeks ago. But due to the behavior of some motorists — ignoring road closure signs and moving barricades — the site, where a pedestrian was killed last August, continues to be dangerous. “Access to Johnson Park Elementary School and the park is only from the west side. You cannot go through the construction zone to get from one side to the other, but people are doing that,” said Jim Purcell, Princeton’s assistant municipal engineer, on Tuesday. “I was out there this morning with a police officer, and we actually turned three cars away. And this was while the contractors were out there doing work. It is truly a construction zone, and there are open trenches, equipment, and materials they cannot get through. I’m pleading with the public to please pay attention. Driving through a construction zone is unsafe. And so is moving barricades.” The Rosedale Road roundabout is just one of several sites throughout Princeton where some sort of construction is in progress. In and around downtown, and on the Princeton University campus,

workers are in the process of demolishing, blasting, and building. At the Graduate Hotel project, which has closed Chambers Street in one direction as demolition has been completed along the street, things are going more smoothly than expected. The hotel is to be located in the former office building at 20 Nassau Street, with new construction along Chambers Street where a row of shops stood until recently. “I haven’t heard complaints from any of

the neighbors on Bank Street,” said Purcell. “We do hear from people who work on Chambers Street about the traffic pattern. It’s difficult for them, but we knew it would be. We respond to their concerns as soon as we hear from them.” Workers are currently hauling away debris as cleanup is being completed. The next phase will be to bring in a crane that will be set up in the excavation area. The Graduate, which is part of a chain of Continued on Page 8

A New Form of Public Art to Be Displayed by Arts Council The Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) has been sponsoring a lot of public art in recent months, mostly in the form of murals. Thanks to a resolution passed by Princeton Council last week, the ACP is planning to add 20 4-by-2-foot banners to the mix, on poles along Paul Robeson Place, John Street, Birch Avenue, and Witherspoon Street. These vinyl banners are digital depictions of collages made by photographer and historian Romus Broadway, a beloved figure in the Witherspoon-Jackson community who died two years ago. Broadway was known for the collages he made of numerous events in Princeton, particularly

involving people in the WitherspoonJackson neighborhood. They come from a collection acquired from his family by Princeton University, which gave the ACP 20 of the collages in digital format that were used to create the banners. “We’ve been displaying his collages here in our gallery every summer for the past eight years or so,” said Adam Welch, ACP executive director, “generally during the annual Joint Effort Safe Streets Program. Me being relatively new to the neighborhood and trying to get involved [Welch joined the ACP in September 2020], this was something that really interested me.” Continued on Page 8

EVENING CHORES: Youngsters helped farmers feed and water the animals, collect eggs in the henhouse, grind corn in the barn, scrub and fill water tubs, clean the horses’ stalls, and more on Saturday evening at Howell Living History Farm in Hopewell Township. Participants share what they learned at the event in this week’s Town Talk on page 6. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)


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The Trent House Association presents a talk by the lead researchers on findings from recent archaeological work on the grounds of the William Trent House Museum, with special attention to excavation of a 1742 kitchen building, at a free program on Sunday, July 24 at 2 p.m. both via Zoom and in person at the Trent House Visitor Center. In 1742, when he was appointed gover nor of the colony of New Jersey, Lewis Morris was looking to lease suitable housing in Trenton. Owned by the governor of Pennsylvania, the Trent House, then known as Kingsbury, was his choice with one condition: that a separate kitchen building be constructed for use in place of the kitchen in the basement of the house, and that it be large enough to accommodate his enslaved servants. While the existence of the kitchen building has long been known, no trace of it remains above ground. In 2014 Hunter Research was commissioned by the Trent House Association, w ith funding from NJM Insurance Group, to conduct a preliminary excavation, which successfully uncovered evidence

WHERE A KITCHEN ONCE STOOD: Evidence of a kitchen is among the buried treasures found under the ground at the Trent House Museum in Trenton. of the building’s foundation. Since then, with continued support from NJM and additional funding from the New Jersey Historic Trust, additional structures and artifacts have been discovered. Co-investigators Richard Hunter and Jim Lee of Hunter Research and Richard Veit of Monmouth University will bring the findings together and discuss ways that this

historic treasure can inform understanding of the lives of all those living and working on the plantation at the Falls of the Delaware in the 18th century. Space at the Visitor Center is limited and free registration for in-person attendees is required at https:// tinyurl.com/RegisterJuly24. The link for the Zoom is at https://tinyurl.com/ THTalkJuly24.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin

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Rosedale Road Closure: The Rosedale Road construction to install a roundabout at General Johnson Drive/Greenway Meadows is underway. The roadway is now open to local traffic only. The project is expected to last through the summer. “Tell Us What You Want” Survey: As part of the new Master Plan process, the municipality invites consumers to share opinions and preferences about dining, shopping, and life in Princeton. It takes less than 10 minutes to complete at PrincetonSurvey.org. Trash Collection Delays: Due to the nationwide truck driver shortage, which has affected Princeton’s hauler (Interstate Waste Services), the delays are expected to continue as the company works on hiring more drivers. In the meantime, trash will be collected within 48 hours of the scheduled collection. COVID-19 Care Kits for Princeton Families: Low/moderate income families in Princeton can get these kits, which include tests and materials to respond to COVID-19, such as one-use thermometers, an oximeter, and extra household items. They are available for pickup at Princeton Human Services by calling (609) 688-2055. Certain eligibility requirements apply. Volunteer to Be a Land Steward: Friends of Princeton Open Space (FOPOS) holds half-day volunteer sessions on a variety of conservation projects at the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Individuals, families, students, and corporate groups are welcome on July 30 for a morning (9 a.m. -12 p.m.) or afternoon (1-4 p.m.). Fopos.org. Backpack and School Supplies Drive: Donate book bags and school supplies for Princeton Public School students from kindergarten through sixth grade. The deadline is Friday, August 5. Drop off at Princeton Human Services, 1 Monument Drive, weekdays between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Humanservices@princetonnj.gov. Free Vision and Dental Services for Low Income Residents: The municipality is offering these services for low-income Princeton residents impacted by the pandemic. For application information, visit Princetonnj.gov. Volunteers Needed for CASA: Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) for Children of Mercer and Burlington Counties — Mercer County location needs volunteers. The organization recruits, trains, and supervises community volunteers who speak up in Family Court for the best interests of Mercer County children that have been removed from their families due to abuse and/or neglect and placed in the foster care system. A virtual information session is August 11 at 11 a.m. Visit casamb.org.


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DOCUMENTING A FAMILY: The Post-it notes that artist Karen Stolper tucked into her daughters’ lunch boxes every day as they attended Princeton public schools became an art project that is currently on view at Princeton Public Library.

“In Lunch With Love” Exhibit Shows Work of Local Artist Back when Karen Stolper and her husband lived in Manhattan, he received a lifetime supply of Post-it notes after making a donation to a charitable foundation. As an artist and admitted saver, Stolper made sure the Post-it notes came with them when they moved to Princeton, where they raised two daughters and put them through the public school system. Those 3-inch-by-3-inch squares of paper soon be-

came the basis of an art project. Every day for 12 years, Stolper tucked tiny scenes of everyday life into her daughters’ lunch boxes. And every day, her daughters (now in college), brought the notes home again. Some 700 of these compact works of art make up “In Lunch with Love,” a series on view at Princeton Public Library’s second floor Reading Room through August 28. Some 2,300 more are part of Stolper’s collection at her home.

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In her artist’s statement, Stolper said, “This project is about all the big days and many little things that make a family, and make a life. ‘In Lunch with Love’ is a reminder that our children have the most important place in our hearts, souls, and funny bones, no matter where they are.” “They were about universal things, but also things just between us,” Stolper said in an interview. “They were about things as small as when we had ants in the kitchen, and as big as a birthday party. They started to show themselves as a story of what it’s like to grow up. They became a document of our family.” A graduate of the Parsons School of Design, Stolper works in acrylic paint and pen-and-ink. Her illustrations have appeared in newspapers, magazines, book covers, greeting cards, art stamps, and paper goods. In addition to her illustration work, Stolper’s skyscapes and architectural paintings have been exhibited nationally in juried, solo, and group shows. “As the field evolved, I did too,” she said. “I got into licensing, greeting cards, paper goods, and rubber stamps. I started working on some children’s books, too.” With her artist’s eye, Stolper sees possibilities when others might not. “I struggle

with getting rid of paper goods and art supplies,” she admitted. “The Post-it notes were there, and the project kind of evolved.” Stolper was a co-founder of the Princeton Artist Directory for local artists. The group came to the attention of the library’s Adult Programming Manager Janie Hermann, who has arranged shows by members over the years — including paintings by Stolper. “I wasn’t sure that the Post-it notes were art, but I started to talk to Janie about it,” Stolper said. “That’s how this show came together. She has been hugely supportive, encouraging, and helpful.” Putting the project together “was not fun,” Stolper said. “And I’m concerned with what I’ll do with them afterward. But I have to say, it is very rewarding to see them exhibited like this.”

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“In Lunch With Love” Continued from Preceding Page

Also on view at the library is “Our Inner Ocean: Paintings by Minako Ota,” in the second f loor Technology Center through August 30. For more information, visit princetonlibrary.org. —Anne Levin

Jewish Community Foundation Announces New Leadership

With the start of a new fiscal year, a new board of trustees is now in place at the Jewish Community Foundation of Greater Mercer. The trustees will help to raise the Foundation’s visibility as a local resource on charitable giving and the investment of nonprofit reserve funds. The executive committee now includes Chip Loeb, president; Harvey Fram, vice president for investment; Joanne Snow, vice president for development; Michael Feldstein, vice president at large; Joyce Kalstein, treasurer; Tiffany Willner, secretary; Brenda Zlatin and Wally Yosafat, members at large; and Scott Schaefer, immediate past president. New members are technology executive Ronald Berg of Newtown, Pa.; retired Spanish teacher Stephanie Koren of Bridgewater; attorney Steven Lieberman of Somerville; real estate agent Oliver Pimley of New York City, N.Y.; and physician Jill Schwartz-Chevlin of West Windsor. The Jewish Community Foundation of Greater Mercer works closely with individuals and families to direct their personal philanthropy and guides institutions on the importance of legacy giving to build reserves for a more secure future. For more information, foundationjewish.org.

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The Municipality of Princeton has launched an anonymous online survey that asks consumers to share their opinions and preferences about dining, shopping, and life in Princeton. The planning firm Clarke Caton Hintz is preparing the “Tell Us What You Want” survey as part of a new Master Plan that will help inform future community and business decisions. While there will be additional surveys and opportunities for public input in the future, this survey focuses specifically on Princeton’s opportunities for economic growth — where and what kinds of businesses the municipality wants to attract, how it can build and keep a thriving retail and restaurant district, and how it can optimize both resident and visitor economic activity. “It is vital that we understand not just the current state of Princeton’s downtown economy, but also where our various interest groups see opportunity for growth and improvement,” said Mayor Mark Freda. “This survey will help us begin to uncover how people think about those questions. Whether you are a resident of Princeton, someone whose job is in Princeton, or a visitor to Princeton, we invite you to spend a few minutes sharing your thoughts.” The survey takes less than 10 minutes to complete and is completely confidential. It is available online now and will be open for about a month at PrincetonSurvey.org.

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What did you learn here this evening?” (Asked Saturday at Howell Living History Farm) (Photos by Charles R. Plohn)

“I learned that there are a lot of things that you wouldn’t expect to have to do at a farm. I thought it was mostly just putting seeds into the ground and feeding the animals. But it turns out there’s more like what I am doing now, which is getting the kernels off the dried corn to make fertilizer for the fields.” —Lukas Tadych, Princeton

“I’ve learned quite a lot about broom making at one event here. There’s also been some very interesting lessons on horseshoeing in the past. I thought the process was very cool.” —Lucious Rufo, Princeton

Rumaisah: “I liked the animals and the tractor ride.” Hashir: “I liked the tractor buggy ride.” —Rumaisah and Hashir Saad, Princeton

Rowan: “I learned how to shave the corn and wash the pigs.” —Rowan Brady, right, Washington Crossing, Pa., with Leslie Brady, Hamilton


When Deanie Yasner was growing up she felt alone, left out, and out of place. Now a retired Princeton resident, Yasner’s childhood in a small town in Mississippi has inspired her middle grade novel, the story of a young girl who challenges the rules of segregation in the summer of 1953. The book is Essie Rose’s Revelation Summer, publ i s h e d by G old e n A l le y Press in Emmaus, Pa. As Yasner puts it in her note to readers: “I was an Old Soul child growing up in the deep South in the 1950s, a member of the only Jewish family in a town where there were so many things I did not understand; for instance, the Jim Crow laws that keep people separated by their skin tone.” She hopes the book will help youths to discover “the power of courage, that they too, can make a difference,” she said, “One can overcome many obstacles in life with courage, perseverance, and love.” The story is narrated by 10 - ye a r - ol d E s s i e Ro s e Ginsberg, “writer, loner and all-time worrier,” according to the book jacket. She “is hoping for a carefree summer,” but when the family’s beloved housekeeper is suddenly called away, Essie Rose must figure out how to navigate on her own. The character of Essie Rose is comforted by the book Charlotte’s Web, E.B. White’s tale which is also about loss and friendship. Yasner’s fictionalized story is “based on memories that I have from growing up,” she said. “My childhood, as how I experienced it. I always felt set apart, there was very little to confirm my identity.” On a page at the beginning of the book she quotes e.e. cummings : “It takes courage to grow up and become who you really are.” The story and its lessons transcend grades and ages. Online reviews show that many adults are moved by the story. “It takes them back, and brings back childhood memories,” said Yasner. “Educators like it because children can learn from and be inspired by the struggles, whether they are Jewish or not. These are universal themes.” Yasner noted that “the book has been read by readers 8 to 80 with positive feedback from all ages.” Yasner’s own childhood was spent in a town on which she based the fictional Tipton, Miss. Her father owned a store, and she spent most of high school there. “I was so unhappy and out of place I went to summer school to get enough credits to graduate early,” she said. She ended up far from home, on Long Island, at Adelphi University, where she earned an undergraduate degree in English literature. “I’ve always loved words,” she said. “I’ve always been an observer, and always enjoyed writing.” She has also loved children. Yasner’s professional career was as a Bucks County, Pa., behavioral specialist working with families and children experiencing developmental and behavioral issues including autism and

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AT PRINCETON SHOPPING CENTER 301 N Harrison Street | Princeton, NJ the librarian remembered her mother. “Writing takes you on a journey you can’t predict when you start,” she said. She res earched clot h ing, brands, and even how much a stamp cost and who was on it, for a scene during which Essie Rose mails an envelope and licks “the stamp with George Washington’s face on it.” While some readers have requested a sequel, Yasner is now writing text for a picture book for younger ages. In this book the main character is the imaginary friend who has to say goodbye to the real friend. “It is how we can remember someone when there is a loss,” she said. The story of Essie Rose “will be in my heart forever,” she said. It has been used in public schools and in synagogues as a basis for discussing the issues children are facing today. Yasner hopes it provides comfort to youths who are bullied, who are different, and who feel out of place. “Kids have a lot to cope with,” she said. “There is so much hate and divisiveness in the world. My hope is, they will be inspired.” Essie Rose’s Revelation Summer is available on Amazon.com. —Wendy Greenberg

attention deficit disorders. Previously she had been a special education teacher in upstate New York. She saw, serendipitously, in a New York newspaper box, an ad for the New York Writer’s Workshop and took an online course, where she was encouraged by a mentor who told her that “people who take leaps of faith have angels at the other end.” That was what she needed to hear. Yasner studied the craft of writing and penned articles and short stories, publishing in Highlights for Children and other magazines geared to youths. “I had never written for children until in my 60s,” she said. “I felt like this book was always inside me. I always knew that my childhood made me so sensitive — I wanted to find a way to find a meaning out of my childhood.” Essie Rose’s Revelation Summer was a si x-year process. Writing for middle grades is different than writing young adult novels. Protagonists are typically between the ages of 10 and 13 and deal with characters’ relationships to their family and friends, she explained. The biggest challenge, she said, was staying in the voice of the lead character. “I had to become a 10-yearold again, with 10-year-old language and 10-year-old feelings, and I had to keep that voice from start to finish.” Yasner dove deep into historical research, even calling the library in the town where she grew up to confirm library policies of the time, and was touched that

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Local Author’s Childhood is Basis For Well-Received Youth Novel


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022 • 8

Summer Construction continued from page one

hotels in college towns, is projected for completion around the fall of 2023. Along Witherspoon Street, work is continuing to replace the sanitary sewer, projected for the beginning of August. On Monday, August 8, according to the current schedule, a portion of the east side of the roadway, from Nassau Street to Spring Street, will be closed off to allow demolition of the existing sidewalk and pavement to be replaced with new pavers. Pedestrian access to the local businesses will be maintained. “It should take about six weeks. Then, sometime in September, we move to the west side of the street,” said Purcell. “And we will be unveiling the new pavers and widened sidewalks on the east side, so people will get an idea of what it will look like.” Construction continues at the former U.S. Post Office in Palmer Square, where

Triumph Brewing Company is planned to move. The project has been stalled multiple times, but is now underway. “We’re bringing in the second of the large brewing tanks today,” said P urcell. “ We’re using a crane to lift them and put them in the basement.” Across town at the Princeton Shopping Center, the first phase of a project to build a new site for the Walgreens store in the southwest corner of the center is underway. Walgreens is being moved to make way for an inclusionary housing development that will include 200 new homes and 40 affordable units. “This will be three or four months of construction,” said Purcell. “The housing will expand over to where Walgreens currently exists, and that part will be demolished. The Verizon store will remain in place.” T h e cont r ove r s ia l d e molition of t hree buildings on the Tennent-Rober ts -W hiteley campus at

Princeton Theological Seminary, designed in part by noted architect Rolf Bauhan, is to begin soon, “we think,” said Purcell. Despite lobbying by members of the Princeton Coalition for Responsible Development, the project is going through. The tear-downs along Stockton Street at Hibben Road are to be replaced with multifamily housing, including affordable units, by developer Jamie Herring. A mong the many construction projects at Princeton University are the facilities of the Lake Campus, including graduate housing, a parking garage, softball stadium, racquet center, and more. A new health center along Washington Road is in the beginning stages of construction. A parking garage for the new ES & SEAS (Environmental Sciences and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences ) is scheduled to open in the fall, along with a new soccer stadium. —Anne Levin

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COVID-19

New Form of Public Art

walk around, view and think about art, and come togethcontinued from page one continued from page one er as a community. People All 17 other New Jersey Last month, the ACP held can look up at these great counties are now consid- a “Naming Party” to help collages and see the old ered high risk according to ident if y f r iends, fam ily, pictures and funny, dated the CDC. and neighbors pictured in clothes; the old rituals like DiFerdinando, an internist Broadway’s collages. The the Tom Thumb weddings; and longtime public health event was co -sponsored identify people they recogprogram director, went on by the Joint Effor t Safe nize; and reminisce.” to urge residents to stay up Streets Program, the WithWelch, ACP Artistic Directo date with COVID-19 vac- erspoon-Jackson Historical tor Maria Evans, and others cines and boosters. “Not all and Cultural Society, and reached out to Shirley Satwho are eligible for boosters the Witherspoon-Jackson terfield, John Bailey, Lance or even for initial vaccina- Neighborhood Association. Liverman, Leighton Newlin, tion are fully vaccinated,” “We invited the neighbors “and other dignitaries in he wrote. “I never want to in,” said Welch. “We saw the community, including judge why any individual is this real sense of pride and the Broadway family,” said not vaccinated, but I can say honor, and we wanted to be Welch, in creating the banthere is a demonstrated ben- able to uplift everyone, not ners. “There was this wonefit to you, your family, and just the people who came to derful back-and-forth,” he the community that being the event. We wanted a pub- said. “You could see how fully vaccinated and boosted lic art piece that highlighted deeply meaningful these the art, but also brought the collages were to the comgives you.” munity. They are the record Last week the Food and community together.” Welch stressed that the of a neighborhood that has Drug Administration authorized Novavax’s COVID-19 collages are not just snap- drastically changed over the vaccine for emergency use, shots glued to paper. Broad- decades, and year by year. making it the fourth CO- way manipulated, cut out, So there is sense of nosVID-19 vaccine available in and arranged them, with talgia, but also a sense of an eye to the history of the memory and bringing peothe United States. Keeping Princeton area neighborhood. “We view ple together in the present.” The project still requires residents up to date on vac- them not only as works of cines has been a constant art, but also as a kind of final approval from Verizon effort for local physicians, documentation of the on- and PSE&G, which own the nurses, and public health going history and conver- poles. Once permission is sation with the residents obtained, the banners will professionals, DiFerdinando STORE BEST APPLIANCE • BEST ART CLASSES • BEST ART GALsaid, adding, “The Princeton of the neighborhood,” he be up for six months, “unsaid. “There are all kinds • BESTunder ARTISANAL CHEESE • BEST BEST lessAUTO there isSHOP a mad • rush to HealthLERY Department, of playful connections one keep them up,” Welch said. the leadership of Jeff GrossBAKERY • BEST BIKE SHOP • BEST CAMERA SHOP • BEST CAer, continues to offer conve- might make in these colHe is especially pleased lages. You’ll see Malcolm TERER • events.” BEST COCKTAIL • BEST COFFEE HOUSE BEST with DAY nient vaccination that the ACP•worked X, James Brown, and othother local organizations to DiFerdinando raised fur-• BEST SPA • BEST DELI DENTALclippings, GROUP • BEST DENTIST • BEST ers in newspaper ther concerns about individu- along with images of local make this happen. “It’s great to be able STORE to do something als’ neglect of other• vaccines FLORIST BEST FURNITURE STORE • BEST GIFT • BEST residents.” together that is both artisand essential health meaHavingGYM art displayed on ticSALON STORE • BEST • BEST HAIR • BEST HAPPY and a point of community sures GROCERY during the pandemic. banners “is a highly visible pride,” he said. “We hope to “ThereHOUR are reports that oth• BEST HVAC • BEST HOAGIE • BEST ICE CREAM SHOP • er vaccinations —those of way to do it, and a way that create more partnerships, so lead people on aLIQUOR path. weSTORE LANDSCAPE SERVICE • BEST • BEST MEN’S have all of these organischoolBEST age children, those will We have been encouraging zations helping one another for adults (pneumonia, fl u, SHOP • BEST MUSIC STORE • BEST OPTOMETRIST • BEST OPtetanus, whooping cough) outdoor exploration,” said to make it possible. That’s “We want to lead what it’s about.” are lagging,” he said. “All Welch. TOMETRY GROUP • BESToutside, ORTHODONTIST • BEST ORTHODONpeople have them preventive health services —Anne Levin that were being done before the pandemic need to get back ‘online,’ like vac3x3 cinations, cancer screenings, routine check-ups. It’s a pain to play catch-up, but we need to encourage others and ourselves to take care of ourselves.” The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and t he W HO repor ted las t week that approximately 25 million children worldwide missed routine vaccinations in 2021, the fi rst time the average global childhood immunization rate for 11 diseases, including measles, has dropped in more than 30 years. Mercer County is hosting a COVID-19 vaccine clinic for children from 6 months to 5 years old on Thursday, July 28 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at CURE Arena, 81 Hamilton Avenue in Trenton. Also on July 28, the Princeton Health Department will he holding a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in the Princeton Shopping Center courtyard from 6 to 8 p.m. DiFerdinando said that “we can’t vaccinate our way out of this particular pandemic, due to the amazing mutation ability that the SARS-CoV-2 virus continues to show,” but 3x4 he re-emphasized the value of vaccines along with cautionary health measures. “To really beat this pandemic we need a sustained period of low transmission to ‘control the fire,’” he said. ART AND COMMUNITY: Collages like this one, by late photog“Only continued hand washing, cough covering, keeping rapher Romus Broadway, will soon fly from banners on streets your distance if infected, and near the Arts Council of Princeton. appropriate mask wearing can do that. Vaccinations help control spread and prevent disability and deaths; our other actions have to defeat the pandemic.” —Donald Gilpin

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Area Residents Can Participate In Mileage-Based Pilot Program

9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022

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Patrick Kennedy

SEPTEMBER 2018

SUMMER 2018

On Wednesday, July 27 from 7:30-9:45 a.m., the Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber hosts an event titled “The Changing Garden State: Urban and Suburban Farming” at Trenton Country Club, 201 Sullivan Way, West Trenton. The focus will be on new uses of real estate encompassing the growth of urban and suburban farming, which includes hydroponics, cannabis, and a new way of thinking about architecture. The speakers are Jennifer Mazawey, partner at Genova Burns LLC; Desmond Hayes, founder of Geogreens; and Edward Salzman, co-founder of Smooth Roots. They will cover vertical farming, urban farming, transportation costs, space requirements, food deserts, and cannabis. Visit princetonmercerchamber.org for more information.

is at home in New Jersey

SPRING 2018

“The Changing Garden State” Is Topic of Chamber Event

FEBRUARY 2018

vehicle health information, a carbon footprint calculator, safe zone notifications, and more. Drivers will receive monthly statements to show how many miles they have driven, and will be shown the cost differential between a traditional fuel tax and a mileage-based user fee. A T E TC press release from earlier this year noted that New Jersey was part of a passenger vehicle pilot with nearly 400 participants from New Jersey, Delaware, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania. A related survey noted that while maintaining the existing transportation infrastructure was a top priority of a majority of respondents, the general public doesn’t realize the transportation system faces a funding challenge. A preliminary report stated that since the introduction of the fuel tax, vehicle fuel efficiency has changed dramatically, with vehicles going farther on less fuel. More electric vehicles are on the road, and the report noted that while this is economical for consumers, and better for the environment, “it has presented a challenge for the transportation system that depends on these funds.” One side issue is that as refineries produce less gasoline, there is a reduction in manufacturing the asphalt material for the roads. New materials and recycling of road asphalt is being looked at, said Purcell. T he Pr inceton municipal newsletter and website princetonnj.gov include information on the pilot program. More information can be obtained from NewJersey@MBUFpilot.org. Enrollment in the pilot program is open through the end of July. The pilot is funded by a U.S. Departm e nt of Tr a n sp or t at ion grant program. —Wendy Greenberg

On Saturday, July 30, a pie-eating contest will be held during the Monmouth County Fair in Freehold. Using pies provided by Wemrock Orchards, children 12 and under will compete at 1 p.m. Ages 13 and up get their chance to win the title at 1:15 p.m. On-site registration for both contests begins 11 a.m. at the Main Stage. Space is limited. All participants receive a T-shirt to wear during the competition. Winners take home a trophy. Held at East Freehold S h o w g r o u n d s , Koz l o s k i Road, Freehold, from July 27-31, the fair also offers 4-H OLD-FASHIONED FUN: Children can participate in a pie-eating contest on Saturday, July 30 at shows and exhibits, rides, the Monmouth County Fair. The fair will be held at the East Freehold Showgrounds, Kozloski entertainment, home and Road, Freehold, from July 27-31. garden competitions, opening night fireworks (weather permitting), and more. Fair hours are 4-11 p.m. on Wednesday-Friday, July 2729; 11 a.m.-11 p.m. on Saturday, July 30; and 11 a.m.-6 p.m. on Sunday, July 31. General admission to the Monmouth County Fair is $8 per adult; children 17 and under are admitted free. On Sunday, seniors 65 and older and active military with card are free. Visit MonmouthCountyFair. com or call (732) 842-4000 for more information. PRINCETON MAGAZINE

A fuel tax paid at the gas pump has subsidized the national transportation system. But what happens as less fuel is being sold, and subsequently, there is less money to fund road repairs and maintain the transportation infrastructure? Vehicles are going farther on less fuel, points out The Eastern Transportation Coalition (TETC), a partnership of 17 states and Washington, D.C., including New Jersey. The coalition is asking for input on an alternative approach called a Mileage-Based User Fee, which is based on drivers paying for the mileage they drive instead of the fuel they buy. Princeton area residents can join a pilot program and offer input. There is no fee to participate, and there are privacy protection measures to safeguard location data. Jim Purcell, assistant municipal engineer, says he has been a mileage-based user fee advocate for 15 years. “Cars are more efficient,” he said. He plans on signing up for the pilot program. “I don’t see a downside” to enrolling in the pilot plan, he said. In fact, he added, he proposed such a mileagebased fee to the state legislature some years ago. Drivers can enroll by going to the website NewJerseyMBUFpilot.com and enrolling through a private company, Azuga Insight, which will ask your vehicle identifi cation number and odometer reading. Participants can choose to record mileage with a plug-in device with GPS, a plug-in device without GPS, a manual odometer entry, or in-vehicle telematics. The plug-in device arrives in the mail and is plugged into the vehicle to record mileage. The program asks for the device to be mailed back after a few months. Those who select a GPS device may be eligible for other dashboard features such as trip logs,

Pie-Eating Contest Planned For Monmouth County Fair

TERESA AZARIO MOMO: CAPTURING A MOTHER’S LOVE THROUGH FOOD U.S. AIR FORCE RESERVE TURNS 70 SETTING THE TABLE WITH MOTTAHEDEH AND WILDFLOWERS THE ORIGINAL QUAKER SETTLEMENT IN PRINCETON A MONUMENT TO GOLF VACATION HOMES BIKE, HIKE, AND RAFT THE LEHIGH GORGE

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022 • 10

Mailbox PCRD Launches Princeton-Wide Survey Regarding Redevelopment Projects in Town

To the Editor: Last week the Princeton Coalition for Responsible Development (PCRD) launched a Princeton-wide survey about redevelopment “to understand views on not only the projects being proposed but also how decisions are being taken on behalf of Princeton.” The goal was to provide robust objective data where there is presently none and to help inform the debate around a number of the development projects in town. It is part of our contribution to what should be collaborative development initiatives as mandated by Princeton Council including PCRD as part of the process and provides a quantitative comparison to the invitation-only anonymous focus groups currently being conducted by a developer’s PR company with respect to one Princeton property currently slated for development. To our surprise and disappointment, the mere existence of the survey appeared to generate an unexpected negative reaction from certain members of the pro-developer Princeton community. This ranged from questioning the legitimacy of such a survey and specific questions to a coordinated attempt to distort the results of the survey. One specific action by an individual even went as far as posting a link to the

REFINED INTERIORS

survey under his pseudonym on Twitter, together with samples of his response to certain questions, suggesting that his followers sign up and respond in the same way he had, in an attempt to skew the results. In the interests of getting responses from all sides, his submission will be included as part of the survey report. We don’t understand the motives behind these actions but feel that they are not in the spirit of unbiased input and open debate on these important topics. We continue to believe that the results, when released, will add a much-needed healthy perspective on how Princeton residents would like to see redevelopment managed. The results of the survey will be released and shared with the community the week commencing July 25. MIKE HEAD Hibben Road

Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

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Jacob M. Grumbach will discusses his new book, Laboratories against Democracy: How National Parties Transformed State Politics (Princeton University Press) with Princeton University political scientist Corrine McConnaughy on Thursday, July 21 from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. This virtual event will be held via Zoom webinar. Register at Princetonlibrary.org. From the publisher: “Over the past generation, the Democratic and Republican parties have each become nationally-coordinated political teams. American political institutions, on the other hand, remain highly decentralized. Laboratories against Democracy shows how national political confl icts are increasingly flowing through the subnational institutions of state politics — with profound consequences for public policy and American democracy.” According to Publishers Weekly, Grumbach “contends in this lucid analysis that the nationalization of America’s major political parties threatens democracy. . . . Grumbach’s claims are persuasive and timely. This is a pinpoint diagnosis of a troubling political trend.” Grumbach is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Washington and a faculty associate with the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies. Previously, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for the Study

of Democratic Politics at Princeton University. McConnaughy, is a research scholar and lecturer in the Department of Politics at Princeton University. The author of The Woman Suffrage Movement in America: A Reassessment (Cambridge, 2013), she has provided commentary on politics for a range of media, including PBS, the New York Times, CNN, NPR, and Vox.

Summer Reading Soiree Presents Jennifer Weiner

The Summer Reading Soirée returns for a special midsummer evening with Jennifer Weiner on the grounds of the Historical Society of Princeton on Tuesday, July 26 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Weiner will discuss and sign copies of her new book, The Summer Place, at the Historical Society of Princeton’s Updike Farmstead. Tickets are $30 and include a copy of the novel, plus sparkling beverages, sorbet, and other sweets. Tickets are limited to 125 and went on sale June 15. The event is co-sponsored by the Historical Society of Princeton. For further information, visit Princetonlibrary.org. The New York Times describes The Summer Place as “a meditation on mothers and daughters ... Weiner’s latest novel also explores class conflicts, identity issues, and real estate dramas.” Weiner is the No. 1 New York Times best-selling author of 19 books, including In Her Shoes, Good in Bed, and a memoir in essays, Hungry Heart. She has appeared on Today and Good Morning America. A graduate of Princeton University, she lives with her family in Philadelphia. Visit her online at JenniferWeiner.com.

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11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022


Jane Austen and John Keats: Once Upon a Time in Winchester Like Shakespeare, Austen invented us. Because we are Austen’s children, we behold and confront our own anguish and our own fantasies in her novels. –Harold Bloom (1930-2019) ointing out how “the strong selves” of Jane Austen’s heroines attest to her “reserves of power,” Bloom imagines that “had she not died so soon, she would have been capable of creating a Shakespearean diversity of persons, despite her narrowly limited social range of representation.” Austen (1775-1817) died in Winchester 205 years ago Monday, July 18. Two years later, in August 1819, John Keats (17951821) arrived in that “exceeding pleasant town,” where he took daily walks, admired “the beauty of the season,” took advantage of the library, and composed “To Autumn,” his “perfect poem,” according to Harold Bloom, and the “most perfect shorter poem in the English language.” In the introduction to Bloom’s updated Modern Critical Views edition of Keats (Chelsea House, 2007), he fi nds the poem’s “defi nitive vision” all the more “remarkable for the faint presence of the shadows of the poet’s hell that the poem tries to exclude.” American Shadows Regarding the “shadows” in “To Autumn,” Bloom quotes from “Lines to Fanny,” a poem written some weeks later in London in which Keats attempts to “banish thoughts of that most hateful land, ... that wicked strand,” that “monstrous region” whose “winds, all zephyrless, hold scourging rods / Iced in the great lakes, to afflict mankind....” Yes, he’s talking about America’s great lakes. Time to take a few giant steps back to the ninth century when Winchester was “Wintanceaster,” and Alfred was King of Wessex, and I was in the clutches of a Netflix series called The Last Kingdom (2015-2022), five seasons of sheer excitement, of crashing shields and swords, and warriors and beautiful witches and Saxons and Danes on a rampage. Such was my subject, such were my heroes — Alfred, the conflicted Christian king and Uhtred, his pagan nemesis and savior — until I slipped through a hole in the fabric of the ages, landing in Winchester on a beautiful September day in 1970. From there, where else could a literary tourist invented by Jane Austen go but back to 1819 and the true heroes of the moment, the authors of Pride and Prejudice and “Ode On a Grecian Urn.”

P

Now, instead of comparing The Last Kingdom to Game of Thrones, with its dragons and white walkers, beheadings and red weddings, I’m turning a corner online and suddenly the late Harold Bloom’s showing me a poem Keats wrote to his love Fanny Brawne, a broadside aimed at America, where his brother George and sister-in-law Georgiana were defrauded “and live a wrecked life.” My plan had been to escape from a country gone off the rails into a dream of Winchester, where Keats found autumn and my wife and I enjoyed a day-long walk through the Itchen River valley (now branded for tourists the “Keats Walk”). No sooner do I imagine myself free of the unprecedented heat and toxic haze of July 2022, in a temperate clime where “the air is worth sixpence a pint,” here comes Keats from 200 years ago envisioning the “rank-grown forests, frosted, black, and blind” of America, where “flowers have no scent, birds no sweet song, / And great unerring Nature once seems wrong.” W hat Bloom reads as Keats’s “fanciful depiction of an unknown America” feels more like a wake-up call from an unwitting climate change prophet. The Beautiful Season Keats biographer Robert Gittings sets the scene : “In the soft Autumn days at Winchester Keats looked back over his whole life ... as the familiar shapes of field and tree restored his broken calm. He went for a daily walk, strolling down by the west front of the Cathedral, past the clergy building, down College Street where Jane Austen had died two years before, ‘along a country alley of gardens’ to the monastery of St. Cross, set in its beautiful water-meadows.... It was one of those magical times in Keats’s life when, against all odds, his surroundings, his reading, and his own inner resources seemed to give him all he needed for the greatest poetry. ‘I am surprized myself at the pleasure I live alone in,’ he commented. And it was in this mood, on Sunday 19 September, that he wrote “To Autumn.” Two days later in a letter, to J.H. Reynolds, Keats describes the weather

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surrounding the poem’s conception: “How beautiful the season is now — How fine the air. A temperate sharpness about it. ... I never like stubble fields so much as now — Aye better than the chilly green of the spring. Somehow a stubble plain looks warm — in the same way that some pictures look warm — this struck me so much in my Sunday’s walk that I composed upon it.” “Persuasion” Is Looming Possibly the last recorded reference Jane Austen makes to her work is in a letter from 23 March 1817, to her spirited niece Fanny Knight, which is also the liveliest passage I could find in her last letters: “You are the oddest Creature! — Nervous enough in some respects, but in others perfectly without nerves! — Quite unrepulsible, hardened & impudent.” Apparently the situation under discussion centered on a gentleman of doubtful literary judgment. “He and I should not in the least agree of course, in our ideas of Novels and Heroines; — pictures of perfection as you know make me sick & wicked.... And he deser ves better treatment than to be obliged to read any more of my Works.” At this point she hints at hav ing anot her book “ready for publication. You will not like it, so you need not be impatient. You may perhaps like the Heroine as she is almost too good for me...” The novel referred to will be published later that year as Persuasion, a title chosen by Jane’s brother Henry after her death. Since she spoke of the novel as The Elliots, according to family tradition, some critics believe that’s probably the title she planned for it. Henry Austen’s subsequent “Biographical Notice” of his sister at last revealed her identity to the world; she was no longer an anonymous author. But the burial slab in Winchester Cathedral contained only her name and dates at the time, so that when Keats explored the “fine Cathedrall which to me is always a source of amusement, part of it built 1400 years ago,” he would have most likely walked past her last resting place without a thought.

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Austen and “To Autumn” Rereading “To Autumn,” I’ve been trying to imagine what Jane Austen, whose favorite poet was William Cowper, might find to admire in it. She would surely appreciate the directness of the style, the sense of unforced observation. In the context of nature, “conspiring” is a word likely to get the attention of the creator of Emma, who might also have been responsive to lines like “Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind” or “Drowsed with the fume of poppies.” But surely when she came to the last stanza, she’d cross from reading to experience, watching “While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day, / And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue” and hearing, “Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn / Among the river sallows, borne aloft / Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies.” And is the “wailful choir” where Bloom imagines shadows of “the poet’s hell?” Or is it “the last oozings, hours by hours” of “the cider-press”? A Sort of Hush If you come to Jane Austen’s death bed in the “neat little drawing-room with a bow window” overlooking a Winchester garden directly from the sound and fury of The Last Kingdom’s ancient Wintanceaster, there’s a residual hush as you read Cassandra’s letter, of how her sister “was seized again with the same faintness, which was followed by the sufferings she could not describe.” After the doctor “had applied something to give her ease, she was in a state of quiet insensibility” and “from that time till half-past four, when she ceased to breathe, she scarcely moved a limb... A slight motion of the head with every breath remained till almost the last.” “All in a Mist” Could Austen, Bloom’s “inventor” of us all, have invented Keats? No, not even a Shakespeare could have invented Keats. Only the poet himself has access to the requisite “Negative Capability.” In his letter to Reynolds, with its reference to the composition of “To Autumn,” Keats inadvertently echoes the ode’s first line, “Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness”: “Tonight I am all in a mist; I scarcely know what’s what.” hus the image of Winchester in a season of mists shown here, from the cover of Tom Beaumont James’s Pictorial History. —Stuart Mitchner

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022 • 12

BOOK REVIEW


I and You stars Madison Langhorne Players Presents Russell as Caroline and FaNew Play by Lauren Gunderson

L a n g h or n e Pl aye r s i n New tow n, Pa., pres ents Lauren Gunderson’s comedic drama I and You from July 22 through August 6. Performances are at the Spring Garden Mill at Tyler State Park, 1440 NewtownRichboro Road in Newtown.

vian Harris as Anthony. Performances run July 22-24, 28-31, and August 3-6. A talk-back with the cast and crew will follow the Wednesday, August 3 performance. Tickets are $22 at langhorneplayers.org. Use code BOGO online for buy-oneget-one tickets to the August 5 show.

Submissions Now Accepted For Emerging Playwright Competition

Madison Russell “This was one of the rare plays where as soon as our entire board read it, we knew we had to stage it,” said producer Jack Bathke. “The themes of connection and how art brings us together were a perfect fit for our first season back after two summers in lockdown.”

Favian Harris I and You is about a single, fateful afternoon in the lives of two teenagers: sardonic and chronically ill Caroline, and overachieving athlete Anthony. Over just a few hours, Caroline and Anthony open up in surprising ways, realizing they are more similar than they’d initially thought.

The Phillips’ Mill Community Association is accepting submissions for the Fifth Annual Juried Emerging Playwright Competition (EPC). The submission period is open now through August 31. The competition is open to all aspiring playwrights 18 and older as well as seasoned writers who have new short plays to present. These works must not have been previously performed except in workshops or in educational settings. Three jurists will read up to 50 blind submissions and choose six of the best to be read on stage by actors for a live audience at Phillips’ Mill on River Road in New Hope, Pa. on November 19. Winning playwrights will also receive a $100 prize. After the readings, the playwrights will accept questions and comments from the audience. Twenty-four new works have been read so far in front of audiences in the history of the competition. A total of six rotating jurors have chosen these winning plays. Playwrights have ranged from novice writers to seasoned playwrights with new work ready to bring to the stage. Winning playwright Dominique Cieri said, “The plays were complex and wonderful, the performances more than honored each play. I loved hearing all the playwrights speak about their processes and plays.” The competition is funded by donations from sponsors who encourage budding artists to create new work for the stage and provide the opportunity to put it before the audience. Visit phillipsmill.org for more information.

West Windsor Arts presents three concerts at the Nassau Park Pavilion, U.S. Route 1 in West Windsor, on July 30, August 13, and August 27. Each show will feature a musical performance by local and regional talent, as well as art activities for all ages. All shows and activities are free, and take place from 5-7:30 p.m. The series includes Latin jazz, blues, samba, R&B, funk, bluegrass, folk, and classical. The first concert is Saturday, July 30, featuring bandleader/saxophonist Uncle Ho 2.0 with cellist Dan Kassel. The rain date is July 31. Kassel, who is organizing the event in collaboration with West Windsor Arts, will be opening the first and third shows with his cello loops.

EVENING MUSIC: From left, Dave Homan (Uncle Ho 2.0), Justin Nawn and Bronwyn Bird, and Sophie Coran will entertain at the space behind Panera Bread at three events presented by West Windsor Arts this summer. Next on August 13 are husband-and-wife duo Justin and Bronwyn, performing Swedish, Appalachian, oldtime and bluegrass music. Bird specializes in playing a bowed, 16-string Scandinavian instrument called the nyckelharpa. Her husband accompanies her on a 6- or 12-string guitar. “The August 13 concert

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singer/songwriter Sophie Coran. The rain date is August 28. The genre in which Coran feels at home is her signature “Noir & B” style, a blend of R&B, jazz, and classical composition. Nassau Park Pavilion is located behind Panera Bread on Route. 1. Visit westwindsorarts.org for more information.

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will be more family-oriented and geared toward children,” said Aylin Green, executive director of West Windsor Arts. “We will have more art projects and a flow performer who will get everyone moving with hoops and ribbon wands.” The final event is Saturday, August 25, when Kassel returns to perform with

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022 • 14

has been to work with the Princeton Shopping Center to launch their public art series,” said Adam Welch, executive director of the Arts Council of Princeton. “These three murals bring so much color and ‘love’ to the visitor’s experience, and this 36+ year partnership with the Princeton Shopping Center has embodied the notion of ‘kindness’ captured in this final mural.” For more information, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org and princetonshoppingcenter.com.

Art

“Witness / Rose B. Simpson” Exhibition at Art@Bainbridge

“LEAD WITH KINDNESS”: The Arts Council of Princeton and EDENS have completed their collaborative work on a third mural at the Princeton Shopping Center. The new public art piece is located on McCaffrey’s courtyard wall. (Photo by Laura Dominick/EDENS)

“Kindness” Mural Completed which owns and operates the Princeton community, At Princeton Shopping Center Princeton Shopping Center. celebrating public art’s abil-

The Arts Council of Princeton and EDENS have completed a collaboration on a new mural located on the courtyard-facing wall at the Princeton Shopping Center, 301 North Harrison Street. Lead with Kindness, the third in a series of murals painted by the Arts Council in Princeton Shopping Center’s public art initiative, speaks to the notion of kindness and compassion as a mindset-first message to the community. The original design was created by Laura Dominick, lead design and media manager at EDENS,

Dominick said she sees this message as a part of a movement. “Art catalyzes and enriches communities,” said Dominick. “Our final mural with the Arts Council is a vivid reminder to live each day with more empathy and thoughtfulness.” In the spring of 2021, the Arts Council of Princeton and Princeton Shopping Center announced a new partnership that would produce a series of three murals designed for exterior spaces at Princeton Shopping Center. Each mural would highlight a positive message to

ity to uplift and delight. Last June, the Bring on the Joy mural was completed on the interior courtyard wall between Princeton Mattress and Smith’s ACE Hardware, and earlier this year ACP artists completed work on the second mural, LOVE, located next to Bella Boutique facing Harrison Street. Both pieces have enjoyed positive feedback from the community as welcome additions to Princeton’s public art scene. “Completing this third and final mural allows us time to reflect on what a ‘joy’ it

annual picnic

and family movie night

Thursday, July 28, 6 p.m. Celebrate summer with barbecue fare, live music, and a sunset screening of Disney’s Fantasia (1940).

Alexander Beach, behind Alexander Hall

Cosponsored by the Princeton YMCA

LATE THURSDAYS! This event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970. Additional support for this program has been provided by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Curtis W. McGraw Foundation.

A selection of sculptural figures by mixed-media artist Rose B. Simpson invites visitors to reflect on the fundamental aspects of being human. “Witness / Rose B. Simpson” will be on view July 23 through September 11 at the Princeton University Art Museum’s Art@ Bainbridge gallery on Nassau Street. An opening celebration will be held on Saturday, July 23 at the gallery from 1 to 4 p.m. “Simpson’s materially and texturally rich sculptures inv ite us into dialog ue, seeking an empathetic response that can pull us out of ourselves,” said James Steward, Nancy A. Nasher– David J. Haemisegger, Class of 1976, director. “They look back at us, demanding introspection and acknowledgment of our actions.” Simpson’s work interrogates the human condition as an accumulation of lived experiences, distilling specific aspects of such moments in her own life into each sculpture. Through her work, Simpson seeks the tools to heal the damages she has experienced as a human being — issues such as objectification, stereotyping and, the disempowering detachment of our creative selves through modern technology. Simpson holds a master of fine arts in ceramics from the Rhode Island School of Design and a master of fine arts in creative nonfiction from the Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe. She is based in Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico. The exhibition is curated by Br yan R. Just, the Princeton Universit y Ar t Museum’s Peter Jay Sharp, Class of 1952, curator and lecturer in the art of the ancient Americas. “When viewing my work, I want visitors to find parts of themselves that may not be easily accessed or that our common culture has not fostered in them,” said Simpson. “I want them to release their stereotypes and their judgments and begin to see their objectification so that they can start to access with a different emotional lens.” S i m p s o n’s s c u l p t u r e s will be exhibited at Art@ Bainbridge, in what was a home built in 1766, during the early American colonial period. According to Simpson, “I want my works to go into the hardest of places; they’re intended to infiltrate. And those pieces are watching the viewers. Witnessing happens both ways. Viewers might be looking at the sculpture, but that work is also watching them. That’s very intentional.”

“OLD MASTERS”: This work by Rose B. Simpson is featured in “Witness / Rose B. Simpson,” on view July 23 through September 11 at the Princeton University Art Museum’s Art@Bainbridge gallery on Nassau Street. An opening celebration is on Saturday, July 23 from 1 to 4 p.m.

Shop loca schedule p before On August 11, the Museum will host a moderated discussion related to a short reading that explores themes developed in “Witness / Rose B. Simpson” related to Indigenous storytelling. The session, led by Curator of Academic Programs Janna Israel, will include a viewing of the exhibition. Space is limited and reservations are required. Art@Bainbridge is made possible through the suppor t of the Virginia and Bagley Wr ight, Class of 1946, Program Fund for Moder n and Contempo rary Art; the Kathleen C. Sher rerd Prog ram Fu nd for American Art; Joshua R. Slocum, Class of 1998, and Sara Slocum; Barbara and Gerald Essig; and Rachelle Belfer Malkin, Class

of 1986, and Anthony E. Malkin. Additional support is provided by Sueyun and Gene Locks, Class of 1959; the Humanities Council; and the Native American and Indigenous Studies Initiative at Princeton (NAISIP). Art@Bainbridge is located in downtown Princeton at 158 Nassau Street. Hours are Tuesday and Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; and Sunday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Art on Hulfish, the Museum’s photo-focused gallery located at 11 Hulfish Street in Palmer Square, also in downtown Princeton, is open daily. Admission to both galleries is free. For more information, visit artmuseum.princeton.edu. Continued on Page 19

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Wide Variety of Holistic Therapies Highlights 4 Elements Wellness Center

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Silvia Fedorcikova, founder and owner of 4 Elements Wellness Center, is passionate about her work. “I love holistic and natural therapy,” she explains, “and I have done research about innovative treatments.” Four elements — earth, air, fire, and water — form the underlying concept of the wellness center/spa, and as she points out, “I wanted to expand our wellness center into the concept of these four elements. Our treatments help boost energy, appearance, and mood. Every treatment we offer represents one of the elements, and they help you feel and look good.” Perfect Representation Fedorcikova likes to share a story about naming the business, which came about with the help of her son Martin. “We were at the dinner table going over the names we thought would be appropriate for our new wellness center, but none of them seemed right. My son, who was 12 at that time, was listening, and five minutes later, asked, ‘What are the treatments you are planning

to have?’ We explained the treatments, and he just said: ‘4 Elements!’ We loved the name, and thought what a perfect representation of our treatments.” Originally from Slovakia, Fedorcikova has lived in the U.S. for more than 25 years. She and her husband Stan have owned Galaxy Tile of Princeton for several years, and before that Silvia worked at Massage Therapy in Hillsborough, eventually becoming manager. Realizing how important it is to stay balanced, healthy, and energized, she became immersed in the study and practice of alternative medicine and holistic treatments. During visits to Europe, she experimented with a number of specialized therapies, not widespread in the U.S., and she decided to provide some of these treatments based on ancient remedies to an American audience. Her goal became to create a wellness center with a relaxing atmosphere, offering the latest in innovative therapies for the mind and body. “We have taken the core of ancient treatments and married that with the latest in innovative technologies,” she repor ts. “The practices and techniques at 4 Elements have been used for hundreds of years in Europe, and shown significant success. Services like those at 4 Elements are offered at medical offices, spas, and wellness centers all over the world.” Endless Benefits “The benefits of our treatments are endless,” she continues. “Reduction of

inflammation, detoxification, boost of immunity, boost of metabolism, muscle recovery, pain reduction, boost of collagen for younger looking skin, weight loss, and more. Our latest addition, the Welnamis table, is absolutely the best in helping people coping with anxiety, depression, PTSD, or stress.” During the five years 4 Elements has been located at the Princeton Shopping Center, many clients have become regulars, having treatments at least once a week or more often, adds Fedorcikova. They are all ages, including men, women, and teens, and they come from all over the Princeton area and beyond. “Our clients come for very specific reasons,” she points out. “Some are coming for prevention, some to heal themselves, or to improve t h e ir app e ar a n ce. E ach treatment is personalized to their needs. You can come in for a quick three-minute whole body cryotherapy or stay for five hours and have multiple treatments.” One of the most popular treatments is cryotherapy, the use of extremely cold temperatures to reduce inflammation, offer pain relief, improve mobility, and hasten recovery from injury. She explains that the process naturally stimulates blood circulation as the body’s hormone, immune, and nervous systems are activated. Whole body or localized (neck, shoulders, hands, etc.) cr yotherapy treatments are available. In addition, cryo facial therapy uses pressurized

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HEALTH AND HAPPINESS: “With a commitment to positivity, 4 Elements prides itself on treating the body and mind to strengthen the whole person,” explains Silvia Fedorcikova, founder and owner of 4 Elements Wellness Center. She is shown with her children Rebecca and Martin, who have been willing and able helpers at the family wellness/spa. liquid nitrogen vapors which are applied to the face and neck to stimulate the production of collagen and decrease pore size. Cryo facials have even used to diminish blemishes and scars, speed healing, and improve skin conditions such as rosacea and dermatitis. The skin can become tightened and more even-toned. Another treatment is salt therapy. While similar to spending time in the salt air at the beach, it offers numerous revitalizing benefits including relief from many respiratory and skin conditions. “Must-Have” A “must-have” therapy at 4 Elements is the Clear Light infrared sauna, says Fedorcikova. “Its radiant heat penetrates deeply into the joints, muscles, and tissues, accelerating oxygen flow and increasing circulation.” Celluma is a low light level therapy (LLT) device, designed to manage a variety of pain and skin conditions. As Fedorcikova points out, “Cleared by the FDA for pain management and skin care, its research has shown that LLT can increase circulation, speed tissue repair, kill acne bacteria, decrease inflammation, and improve skin tone, texture, and clarity, as well as ease muscle and joint pain, stiffness, and arthritis.” Other 4 Elements treatments include Star Lymphatic Presso-Therapy, Fit Body Wrap, InShape Body

Shaping, and Cryo T-Shock Fat and Cellulite Reduction, among other services. The attractive and spacious wellness center includes several rooms, each designated for a different service, and focused on reinforcing the clients’ comfort and well-being. Assorted retail products are also popular with customers, and include organic soaps, bath salts, and hydrogen infused water, among other items. Hydrogen-infused water is believed to provide anti-inflammatory and antioxidant help, relieve fatigue, boost energy, and other benefits. Six month membership programs are available, which offer special pricing packages, including one complimentary session of the client’s choice each month. “We have member and non-member prices, and they range from $10 to $400, depending on the service,” notes Fedorcikova. “We also offer gift cards.” The latter are a very nice introduction to 4 Elements, especially for someone who is new to this particular wellness/spa concept, she adds. Fully-Staffed Like so many businesses, 4 Elements closed for a time during the height of COVID-19, and that was a difficult challenge, both for Fedorcikova and for her clients. A s s h e s ays, “COV I D

closing was not easy, and reopening was even harder. We had scared people who were uncertain about returning, and in addition, a shortage of employees. It took us a long time to come back, but now, I am happy to say we are back and fully staffed, and our clients are with us. “I want to add that we are unique in what we offer here. We are not a franchise, but a small family-owned business. We are constantly looking to grow and expand, improve our existing services, and add new ones by bringing the latest modality and technology to help clients improve their health, body, mind, and spirit. I want to educate people about the impor tance of self-care, illness prevention, and self-healing.” The lotus blossom represents rebirth and renewal,” she continues. “We use this as our brand’s logo to reflect the impact each one of our services offers you; that is, the opportunity to renew yourself and immerse yourself in a one-of-a-kind experience. Each petal expresses one of the four elements represented by our services.” Elements is open Monday through Friday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (609) 285-3115. Website: 4elementswellnesscenter. com. —Jean Stratton

4

Princeton Shopping Center 301 N. Harrison Street Princeton NJ

609-285-3115 www.4elementswellnesscenter.com

SALT THERAPY: The Himalayan Salt Room at 4 Elements Wellness Center in the Princeton Shopping Center offers revitalizing benefits, including relief from many respiratory and skin conditions. Known as Halotherapy/Himalayan Salt Therapy or Dry Salt Therapy, it provides a relaxing experience with its heated floor covered with salt crystals (a wonderful foot massage), and a chance to sit on a meditation cushion, in a canvas sling chair, or hammock hanging chair.


Continued from Page 14

“BOARDWALK FUN”: This work by Padma Aleti is featured in “Summer Nights,” on view through August 20 at the Gallery at the Thompson Park Creative Arts Center, Lincroft. Aleti will participate in an artist talk on Wednesday, August 10 from 1-4 p.m., along with artists Ann Marie Fitzsimmons and Marie Maber.

Monmouth County Park System to Host Artist Talks

The Monmouth County Park System has announced upcoming artist talks for its current art exhibit “Summer Nights.” Held in the Gallery at the Thompson Park Creative Arts Center, Lincroft, these talks feature several participating artists discussing their creative process and favorite inspirations. The first talk will be held from 1-4 p.m. on Wednesday, August 10 and features artists Ann Marie Fitzsimmons, Padma Aleti, and Marie Maber. An additional talk is planned from 12:303:30 p.m. on Wednesday, August 17 with artists Joe Valencia, Laura Mandile, and Konstantin Zingerman. Featuring a selection of traditional and non-traditional art mediums inspired by the long days and short nights of the summer, the “Summer Nights” exhibit runs through August 20. Exhibit hours are 12-4 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday. Admission and parking for the artist talks and the exhibit are free.

To learn more about these talks, the “Summer Nights” exhibit, or the Thompson Park Creative Arts Center, v isit MonmouthCount yParks.com or call (732) 8424000.

Hightstown Hosts Plein Air Painting Competition, Exhibit

T h e H i g h t s to w n C u l tural Arts Commission is sponsor ing “Hightstow n Plein Air – Paint the Town” from Thursday, August 25 through Saturday, August 27. En plein air, or plein air, painting is the act of painting outdoors. Artists are invited to capture Peddie Lake and the surrounding area, the Borough’s historic buildings, churches, parks, and other points of interest throughout Hightstown over three days. Artists must paint within the boundaries of Hightstown Borough to qualify. A map will be posted on hightstownborough.com, along with suggested painting locations. The mediums of oil, watercolor, gouache, pastel, charcoal, pencil, pen and ink, and acrylics will be accepted. Photography is not accepted.

Registration and stamping of canvases or paper will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. August 25-27 at Four Seasons Deli, (117 Ward Street). Submitted work will be judged on Saturday, August 27 at 6 p.m. by Noreen Scott Garrity, associate education director of Rutgers Camden Center for the Arts. Prize-winning work and a limited selection of submissions will be featured in an exhibit at Old Hights Brewing Company on Ward Street through September 16, with an opening reception on Wednesday, August 31 at 6 p.m. Awards include Best in Show (first place) of $500; Second Place, $250; and Third Place, $150. Local sponsors include Four Seasons Deli, Silver Br ush Limited, and Old Hights Brew ing Company. For more information, visit the competition prospectus at https://bit.ly/ HightstownPleinAir.

and public programs. Volunteering as a docent at Morven in 2013 after graduating with a BA in history from Gettysburg College, Luce’s time at Mor ven sparked her interest in public histor y and inspired her to pursue a graduate degree in museum studies. Upon earning an MA in history museum studies from the Cooperstown Graduate Program, Luce returned to the Garden State and started as communications officer, later chief communications officer, with the New Jersey Historical Commission, a division of the New Jersey Department of State. In her role as chief communications officer, Luce managed the Commission’s communications outlets, developing content and implementing strategies for public outreach. She served as project manager for several statewide programmatic efforts including the 2020 NJ Women Vote: The 19th A mendment at 100 and 2021 Indigenous History initiatives. She led planning for the annual New Jersey History Conference in 2018, 2019, and 2021. Prior to the Historical Commission, Luce held positions in programs and development at the Mid-Atlantic Association of Museums, Student Partner Alliance, Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, and Visiting Nurse Association of Northern New Jersey. Luce enjoys collaborating with partners and communities to create public programs that make histor y accessible and relevant to a wide audience. She said she’s thrilled to return to Morven and contribute to

the organization’s ongoing work telling a full and authentic story of the site and its inhabitants. “Greer beginning her museum career as a docent at Morven in 2013 before going to graduate school, makes her return to lead our Education and Public Programs charge feel like a homecoming,” said Morven Executive Director Jill M. Barry. “Her enthusiasm for our mission and connections throughout the mid-Atlantic and the state will help expand the reach of our efforts.” Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, is open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, visit morven.org.

Area Exhibits Check websites for information on safety protocols. Ar t @ Bainbr idge, 158 Nassau Street, has “Witness / Rose Simpson” July 23 through September 11. artmuseum.princeton.edu. A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Car Par ts” through July 31. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Art on Hulfish, 11 Hulfish Street, has “Screen T i m e : Photo g r aphy a n d Video Art in the Internet Age” t hrough Aug ust 7. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street,

has the ongoing exhibit “Interwoven Stories: The Final Chapter.” artscouncilofprinceton.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Pa rk, Pa rk s i d e Ave n u e, has “Ellarslie Open 39” t h r o u g h O c tob e r 2. e l larslie.org. G ourgaud G a l ler y, 23-A Nor th Main Street, Cranbur y, has “Su m mer Exhibit” through July 28. cranburyartscouncil.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey” through March 2023 and the online exhibits “Slavery at Morven,” “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898,” and others. morven.org. T h e N a s s a u Cl ub, 6 Mercer Street, has “The Glit ter ing Outdoors” through October 2. helenemazurart.com. P r i nc eton P ubl ic L i b ra r y, 65 Wit h er sp o on Street, has “In Lunch with Love” through August 28 and “Our Inner Oceans : Paintings by Minako Ota” through August 30. princetonlibrary.org. Small World Cof fee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has “CRTV” through August 2. A collection of artwork by Karin Jervit is at the 254 Nassau Street location through August 2. smallworldcoffee.com. We s t W i n d s o r A r t s C e n te r, 952 A lexa nder Road, West Windsor, has “By The Light of Day: Plein Air Show” through August 27. westwindsorarts.org.

Morven Names New Curator Of Education, Public Programs

Morven Museum & Garden has named Greer Luce as its new curator of education

SPECIALIZING IN THE SALE & PURCHASE OF FINE JEWELRY, DIAMONDS, WATCHES AND COLLECTIBLES Appointments Encouraged oakgem.com

“IN THE GARDEN”: This painting by Joelle Hofbauer is featured in “By the Light of Day — a Plein Air Exhibition,” on view through August 27 at the West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor. For more information, visit westwindsorarts.org.

39 Bridge Street Lambertville, NJ 08530 609.300.6900

4 via Sunset Palm Beach, FL 33480 877.355.9500

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022

Art


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022 • 20

Mark Your Calendar Town Topics Wednesday, July 20 3 p.m.: Puppet Show at Princeton Public Library, Finnie’s Ocean Treasure. Original musical play about a young fish who yearns for adventure. Princetonlibrary. org. 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meet either in the Library’s Community Room or via Zoom. Princetonlibrary.org. Thursday, July 21 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 6-8 p.m.: Essie and Nap perform at Princeton Shopping Center as part of the Summer Nights series. Free. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. 7:30 p.m.: The Zodiac Trio performs at Richardson Auditorium. Works by Stravinsky, Benny Goodman, William Grant Still, Gershwin, Bartok, and others. Free. Tickets.princeton.edu. 7:30 p.m.: Author Jacob M. G r u mbach d is cus s e s his new book Laboratories against Democracy: How National Parties Trans formed State Politics with Princeton University political scientist Corrine McConnaughy via Zoom. Register at Princetonlibrary.org. Friday, July 22 5-8 p.m.: Josh Blume & Friends perform at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards. com. 7-10 p.m.: Dancing Under the Stars at Hinds Plaza. Free. Musical mix. Centraljerseydance.org. Saturday, July 23 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. Wwcfm.org. 1-4 p.m.: The Barbara Lin Band performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards. com. 3-6 p.m.: Lisa Greenleaf and Raise the Roof, presented by Princeton Country Dancers. Special afternoon dance for experienced dancers, followed by a potluck for everybody from 6-7:30 p.m.; introduction to basics at 7:30 p.m.; contra dance for all from 8-11 p.m. At Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. Princetoncountrydancers.org. 3 - 8 :30 p.m.: Sourland Mountain Festival at Unionville Vineyards, 9 Rocktown Road, Ringoes. Live music, local food, craft beer, wine, local artisans, and more. Rain or shine. SourlandMoutainFest.com. 5 p.m.: Evening Animal Chores at Howell Living Histor y Farm, 70 Woodens Lane, Hopewell Township. Help feed the animals, bring in the sheep from the

pasture, collect eggs in the henhouse, and more. Howellfarm.org. 6:30 p.m.: Summer Solstice Celebration fundraiser to benefit New Jersey Conservation Foundation, a t B r i c k Fa r m Tav e r n , Hopewell. Food, drinks, entertainment, auction. Solstice2022.givesmart.com. Sunday, July 24 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 1 p.m.: Hunter Chase is soloist in the carillon concert from Graduate Tower on Princeton University’s graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. Free. (609) 2587989. 1-4 p.m.: Allan Wilkcockson performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards.com. 2 p.m.: “Governor Morris’ 1742 Kitchen and Other Findings from Archaeology at the Trent House,” in person and via Zoom. Richard Hunter, president of Hunter Research, will lead the discussion at the Trent House, 15 Market Street, Trenton. Williamtrenthouse.org. Tuesday, July 26 9:30 and 11 a.m.: Read & Pick program: Flowers; for children ages preschool to 8 years. At Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. $12 including container of flowers. Register at terhuneorchards. com. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Mid-day Toastmasters meet v ia Z oom. Toas t mas tersclubs.org. 6:30 p.m.: Author Jennifer Weiner discusses and signs her new book, The Summer Place, at the ticketed Summer Reading Soiree, held at the Historical Society of Princeton’s Updike Farmstead. Purchase tickets at Princetonlibrary.org. Wednesday, July 27 7: 30 -9 : 45 a.m. : “T he Changing Garden State: Urban and Suburban Farming.” Presented by the Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber at Trenton Country Club, 201 Sullivan Way, West Trenton. Princetonmercer.org. Thursday, July 28 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 5-7 p.m.: Princeton Mercer Chamber hosts Business After Business at SETS Hybrid Training, 406 Marketplace Boulevard, Hamilton. Princetonmercerchamber. org. 6 p.m.: The Diablo Sandwich Band plays rock ‘n roll, funk, rhy thm and blues, disco, alternative music, and top hits at Princeton Shopping Center. Part of the Summer Nights series.

6 :30 p.m.: An evening with AT&T’s corporate historian Sheldon Hochheiser at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. In conjunction with the exhibit “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention.” Morven.org. Friday, July 29 5-8 p.m.: Kindred Spirit Duo performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards.com. 8 p.m.: Singer/songwriter Jonah Tolchin performs at Hopewell T heater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell. Hopewelltheater. com. Saturday, July 30 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. WWcfm.org. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. or 1- 4 p.m.; help Friends of Princeton Open Space with a variety of conservation projects at Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Fopos.org. 10 a.m.-8 p.m.: Mercer County 4-H Fair and Wheat Threshing, at Howell Living History Farm, 70 Woodens Lane, Hopewell Township. Animal shows and exhibits, homemade ice cream, hay rides, pony rides, music, magic shows, farm tours. Free. Howellfarm.org. 1-4 p.m.: Brian Bortnick performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards.com. 5 p.m.: Uncle Ho 2.0 and Dan Kassel, cellist; at Nassau Park Pav ilion, West Windsor. Free and familyfriendly. Westwindsorarts. org. 7:30 p.m.: Ali Ryerson/ Peter Levin Quintet performs at Pettoranello Gardens, Route 206 and Mountain Avenue. Free. Info @ bluecurtain.org. Sunday, July 31 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 10 a.m.- 4 p.m.: Mercer County 4-H Fair and Wheat Threshing, at Howell Living History Farm, 70 Woodens Lane, Hopewell Township. Animal shows and exhibits, homemade ice cream, hay rides, pony rides, music, magic shows, farm tours. Free. Howellfarm.org. 1 p.m.: Anna Kasprzycka is soloist in the carillon concert from Graduate Tower on Princeton University’s graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. Free. (609) 2587989. 1-4 p.m.: Acoustic Douver performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards.com. 6 p.m.: Much Ado About

JULY-AUGUST

Nothing is presented by the Hudson Shakespeare Company at the Community Park Amphitheater. In the event or rain, the play is at Princeton Public Library’s Community Room, 65 Witherspoon Street. Monday, August 1 Recycling Thursday, August 4 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 6-8 p.m.: John Gilbride and Fr iends per for m at Princeton Shopping Center as part of the Summer Nights series. Free. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. 6:30 p.m.: Historian Melissa Ziobro gives a talk on the “Hello Girls,” switchb o ard op er ator s d u r i ng World War II, at Morven, 55 Stockton Street, in conjunction with the exhibit “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey.” In person and virtual. Morven.org. 8 p.m. (sundown): The film La La Land is screened as part of the Princeton University Art Museum’s outdoor film series, at Alexander Beach, behind Alexander Hall. Bring chairs or blankets; popcorn is provided. Friday, August 5 5 - 8 p.m. : Dark W h is key performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards. com. Saturday, August 6 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. Wwcfm.org. 10-11:30 a.m.: Mid-Day Toastmasters meet at the Library, 42 Robbinsville Allentown Road, Robbinsville. Toastmastersclubs.org. 10 a .m .- 5 p.m . : J u s t Peachy Festival at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Pony Rides, barnyard tractors, rubber duck races, live music, “Eyes of the Wild” traveling zoo, food tent, wine tasting, and more. $12-$15. Live music from 1-4 p.m. Terhuneorchards. com. Sunday, August 7 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 10 a .m .- 5 p.m . : J u s t Peachy Festival at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Pony Rides, barnyard tractors, rubber duck races, live music, “Eyes of the Wild” traveling zoo, food tent, wine tasting, and more. Live music from 1-4 p.m. $12-$15. Terhuneorchards. com. 1 p.m.: Claire Janezic is soloist in the carillon concert from Graduate Tower on Princeton University’s

graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. Free. (609) 2587989. Tuesday, August 9 9:30 and 11 a.m.: Read & Pick Program: Tractors, at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Parents and young children aged preschool to 8 read books and take a tractor-drawn wagon ride. $12 per child, purchased online. Terhuneorchards.com. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Mid-Day Toastmasters meet v ia Z oom. Toas t mas tersclubs.org. Thursday, August 11 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 6-8 p.m.: Princeton Public Library’s Summer Reading Wrap-Up Party, at Princeton Shopping Center. Free. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. Friday, August 12 5-8 p.m.: Jerry Steele performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards.com. Saturday, August 13 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. Wwcfm.org. 10 a.m.: Pam Mount’s annual “Freezing, Canning, and Preser ving” class at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Free but registration necessary. Terhuneorchards.com. 1-4 p.m.: Bill O’Neal and Andy Koontz perform at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Light fare and wine available. Terhuneorchards.com. 2 p.m.: Curated tour of the exhibit “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey” and view of the TelStar 1 satellite up close on its final weekend at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Morven.org. 5-7:30 p.m.: Bronwyn Bird and Justin Nawn perform at Nassau Pavilion behind Panera Bread at Nassau Park, West Windsor. With family-friendly activities. Free. Westwindsorarts.org. Sunday, August 14 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 1 p.m.: The Teblemakers, Lisa Lonie and Janet Tebbel, are soloists in the carillon concert from Graduate Tower on Princeton University’s graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. Free. (609) 2587989. 1-4 p.m.: Mike & Laura per for m at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Light fare and wine available. Terhuneorchards.com.

Monday, August 15 Recycling Wednesday, August 17 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meet either in the Library’s Community Room or via Zoom. Princetonlibrary.org. Thursday, August 18 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 10 a.m.: Cook Talks: Tiramisu and Affogato. Learn to make these desserts at the Lawrence Headquarter Branch of Mercer County Librar y, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrence Township. Registration required. (609) 883-8293. 6-8 p.m.: Green Knuckle Material performs at Princeton Shopping Center as part of the Summer Nights series. Free. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. 6:30 p.m.: Historian Linda Barth shares highlights and details about the Delaware and Raritan Canal, in a hybrid event at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Morven.org. Friday, August 19 5-8 p.m.: Mark Miklos performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards.com. 7 p.m.: Story & Verse series at Pettoranello Gardens, 20 Mountain Avenue. Open mic, free, sponsored by the Arts Council of Princeton and the African American Cultural Collaborative of Mercer County. The theme is “Circle of Life.” Artscouncilofprinceton.org. Saturday, August 20 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. WWcfm.org. 9-10 a.m.: Mid-Day Toastmasters meet via Zoom. Toastmastersclubs.org. 1-4 p.m.: Brian Bortnick performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Light fare and wine available. Terhuneorchards.com. Sunday, August 21 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 1 p.m.: “Cast in Bronze: The Tower Show” is the title of the carillon concert from Graduate Tower on Princeton University’s graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. Free. (609) 258-7989. 1- 4 p.m. : R ich S einer Duo performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Light fare and wine available. Terhuneorchards. com.

Get the scoop from


21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022

S ports

PU Grad Hompe Came Through Dramatic OT Goal As England Took Bronze at Women’s Lacrosse Worlds

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livia Hompe will take some time to finalize her future, but she may have played her last lacrosse game. If so, the 2017 Princeton University graduate did so memorably. Star attacker Hompe ripped a free position shot to give England an 8-7 win over Australia in triple overtime of the bronze medal game at the Women’s World Championship on July 10. “It would be a great way to go out even having fallen short of silver,” said Hompe, a native of New Canaan, Conn., who holds a British passport because her mother is a citizen of England. “I’m really proud of the team and how we rallied in that game and persevered throughout the whole tournament and through a mix of adversity. I think we really rose to the occasion on the final day. It would be a pretty great last shot in my career.” Hompe finished with four goals and an assist in England’s third-place game. Hompe was among the c h a m p i o n s h i p ’s l e a d i n g scorers with 29 points on 21 goals and eight assists in eight games. She, Aurora Cordingley and goalie Brittany Read were the lone members of England to be named to the All-World Team. Hompe also played for England when it won bronze in 2017, but this year’s version was a much improved group that gave Canada an 11-9 challenge in the championship semifinals. It was a sign of the team’s growth in five years. “Our talent definitely rose,” said Hompe. “Our defense throughout the entire World Cup was just phenomenal, and our goalie, obviously MVP of the bronze medal game with 13 saves, played amazing. We really have narrowed the gap with Canada. Our semifinal game — 11-9 — was one of the closest games of the tournament other than the bronze medal game. I think even though it’s disappointing not to come up with silver, we still walked away with a medal and a big win and ended on a high note. For us being in that top bracket now — when people talk about the U.S. and Canada, England is also in that top tier of teams vying for gold and silver.” Plenty has changed for Hompe since 2017. After completing her schooling at Princeton, she went to work for the U.S. Department of Defense in Washington, D.C. She also volunteers as an assistant coach for the Potomac School girls’ lacrosse team since playing experiences are harder to find. “That helped me stay around it,” said Hompe. “In the past five years, I’ve done a lot more coaching. I’ve tried to still play as much as I could. But coaching helps as far as leading the attack and explaining things. A lot of the players who grew up in the British system don’t always speak the exact same lacrosse language, and we

want to get everyone on the same page and make sure everyone understands how we want to run the plays and the timing. Having more exposure to coaching better prepared me to take on a leadership role in the attack. It’s definitely tough having stepped away in large part from lacrosse compared to in 2017.” Hompe felt coming out of college in 2017 was a big advantage to being physically ready to compete in the world competition that year. With that prior World Championship experience, Hompe understood better the mental side of the intense tournament challenges, and the years between allowed her to connect more with teammates. “I feel like I was pretty much thrown into the last one coming off a college season,” said Hompe. “I had played with the girls for like a year at that point. Now I’m really close with a lot of girls on the team. My relationships with other girls, it really felt like that final game we wanted to win it for each other and we came out firing and working together.” Although she is one of England’s most talented players, Hompe had to work her way back into playing condition for this year’s World Championships. She had a torn labrum repaired in April 2021, and a bone spur on her femur shaved down. Rehabbing after those surgeries presented an additional challenge in her return to world-class level, but she credited her surgeon, physical therapist, and England’s medical team for helping her show up ready to go. “I felt my age a bit more and felt I had personally worked and put a lot into being ready for this World Cup,” said Hompe, 27. “In the last one, I was lucky enough to be coming off four years of college lacrosse and training, conditioning, running, lifting. It was all built in for me. For this one, it was much more of me, disciplining myself and getting in my rehab and training and my body and stick to where I could compete again. I think that was a personal point of pride for me that I was able to get my body where it needed to be to run around with the fastest girls in the world.” Over and over, Hompe proved her abilities, including a highlight goal in England’s quarterfinals win over Israel. She was cutting to her left with her back to the goal when she took a feed in midair, turned and flicked it into the top corner of the cage while still floating in the air. “Thank god it went in,” said Hompe. “It was a great feed from one our defenders who had sprinted the ball down the field past everyone. As a cutter, you have to credit the feeders. I played with amazing feeders in college. I was very lucky. When I was young, Erin Slifer and Erin McMunn were two years above me, then my junior year and senior year, I had Colby Chanenchuk. Playing

with players that keep their eyes up is so important in lacrosse. That’s what makes those beautiful goals happen is having the people that are willing to loft that ball up.” After defeating Israel 135, England fell to Canada in the semifinals. The 11-9 loss was a closer contest than their 13-8 defeat in pool play earlier in the tournament. The squad defeated Australia for the second time in the tournament for the bronze medal, similarly to beating them for the bronze in double overtime in 2017 in another tense game. “It was tough initially,” said Hompe. “We really wanted to strive to get in that gold medal match. I think losing in the semifinals to Canada definitely took the wind out of our sails and it took a full day for us to recover and refocus on getting the bronze. The Australians really showed up. They played really hard. We had to fight tooth and nail into triple overtime to win it. It was definitely one of the more dramatic endings I’ve played in a sports game. It was a great way for the team to go out.” The dramatic ending closed a five-year stretch of ups and downs for Hompe. She dealt with travel restrictions that made it difficult for her to join her teammates at times in England for preparation, and then her surgeries set back her training. But she was determined to bring her experience to the team. “It’s pretty unique to play the volume that they play in the World Cup,” said Hompe. “Being ready for the pace and trying to learn from all the games as you go, and learn from the opponents without getting too wrapped up around the axle about one game because there are a lot of games, a lot of time, a lot of opportunities. Just not being afraid to make mistakes and trying to learn and get better every game.” Hompe had plenty of support from her former Princeton team. Now retired Princeton head coach Chris Sailer texted Hompe encouragement regularly through the tournament and attended one game. Hompe missed Sailer’s send-off ceremony in the spring, but could not be more appreciative of how much Princeton and Sailer helped her develop. “The more time I spend in and around the sport now, it makes me really grateful for her as a coach,” said Hompe, who scored 285 points in her Princeton career on 198 goals and 87 assists, getting named as the Ivy League Attacker of the Year as a senior and earning first-team All-American honors. “I think she was such a phenomenal coach and I don’t think I realized it because I was so immersed in the Chris Sailer Universe. You have to go away to realize what a fantastic job she did, even with little things and setting culture and leading the team in such a fantastic way. Princeton will

HOMPE DAY: Former Princeton University women’s lacrosse star Olivia Hompe ’17 celebrates after scoring the winning goal to give England an 8-7 victory over Australia in triple overtime of the bronze medal game at the Women’s World Championship earlier this month. Hompe, who ripped a free position shot on the winning tally, scored 29 points on 21 goals and eight assists in the tournament. It was the second bronze for Hompe at the Worlds as she helped England take third in the 2017 tourney. (Photo by England Lacrosse, provided courtesy of Princeton Athletics) sorely miss her, but I’m excited for Jenn (Cook) to take the helm and I’m sure the program will continue being just great.” Hompe will be considering her own lacrosse future over the next weeks and months. After getting herself in condition to perform at an AllWorld Team level, she has to decide if she will remain in the mix for Team England as they look ahead to the 2025 World Championships. Hompe could still coach, but playing is a tougher choice. “Sports has been such a huge part of life since

I was a little,” said Hompe. “That’s something my parents passed on to us. Both my mom and my dad loved sports, grew up playing sports, and that’s something they passed along to me and all my siblings. It’s hard to imagine letting go of it. There are also a lot of other experiences in life that I would enjoy doing.

That includes work, travel, all sorts of opportunities that have maybe taken a back seat while I’ve gotten to run around playing at this level, which has been an incredible experience. I have to think hard about what I want these next couple years to look like.” —Justin Feil

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022 • 22

PU Sports Roundup

standout, Tom Schreiber ’14, who finished the tournament with seven goals and five assists, including two assists in the championship game.

annual All-UAA conference where team building seminar was conducted along with voting on legislation proposed by multiple NCAA teams.

PU Men’s Hoops Names Men’s Volleyball Star Omene Princeton Men’s Hoops Rowley as Assistant Coach Named to U21 Training Team Sending 3 to Maccabiah Games

As the 2022 Maccabiah Games starts this week in Israel, the U.S. open men’s basketball team will feature two coaches and one player with ties to the Princeton University men’s hoops program. Princeton assistant coach Skye Ettin will serve as an assistant for the U.S. while rising sophomore Blake Peters will be playing guard for the team. Former Princeton standout guard and current associate head coach at American University, Scott Greenman ’06, will serve as a head coach of the team along with Doug Gottlieb. First held in 1932 and now the third-largest sporting event in the world, the Maccabiah Games are an international Jewish and Israeli multi-sport event held quadrennially in Israel. The U.S. team USA will play five games in Stage One and one finals game.

Tiger Men’s Lax Alum Currier Helps Canada Win World 6s Tourney

Former Princeton University men’s lacrosse standout Zach Currier ’17 starred as Canada topped the U.S. 23-9 in the World Games Si xe s gold me dal game in Birmingham, Ala., last week. Star midfielder Currier, a native of Peterborough, Ontario, led Canada in the final with five goals on just six shots. Currier finished the tournament with 21 points in the six games. Considered one of the best two-way players in the world, Currier also made key contributions on defense and gathering in loose balls. The United State team featured another Princeton

The Princeton University men’s basketball team recently added Lawrence Rowley as an assistant coach for the program. Rowley joins the Tigers from The College of New Jersey, where he served as a graduate assistant men’s basketball coach in 202122. At TCNJ, Rowley was tasked with recruiting prospective athletes, scouting opponents, game planning a n d of fe n s ive t r ack i n g, player development of forwards and centers, film editing and breakdowns, along with managing study hall sessions and athlete’s academic progress. A 2021 graduate of Emory University, Rowley was the 2020 University Athletic Association (UAA) Defensive Player of the Year, and a Second Team All-UA A honoree in both 2020 and 2019. Despite losing his senior season due to COVID-19, Rowley ranks second on the school’s all-time field goal percentage ladder (.560, 298-for-532), his 6.2 rebounds per game average ranks 10th on Emory’s alltime list, and his 479 career rebounds rank No. 16 in program history. Along with his on-court accomplishments, Rowley made an impact off the cour t during his time at Emory. From fall 2018 until spring 2021, he served as the men’s basketball representative on the Emory University Student Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) where he worked with other student-athletes to improve student-athlete environment and athletic department, and served as one of four school representatives at

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Princeton University men’s volleyball player Nyherowo Omene has been named by USA Volleyball to its Men’s U21 National Training Team. Omene, along with the 20 other athletes, will participate in a training camp in Anaheim, Calif., from September 9-17. From that group, 12 players will be chosen to compete in Havana, Cuba, at the 2022 U21 Men’s Pan American Cup from September 18-26. Omene, a 6’7 native of South Holland, Ill., earned a spot on the Boys’ U19 National Training Team last year. In his freshman season at Princeton in 2022, Omene led the Tigers in blocks (64) and blocks per set (0.72). He also ranked second on the team in service aces (25), and third in kills (171).

women’s administrator since 2013, and has been an athletics administrator since 1995. In her role at Princeton, Rich was part of the senior leadership team and had supervision of 12 programs while also engaging in legal matters related to the department and providing oversight in all areas of the student-athlete experience. “I am grateful to have been able to work for my alma mater for almost nine years and work alongside extremely talented studentathletes, coaches, and staff,” said Rich. “Princeton is a special place w ith great people. It will always be a home to me and I will miss everyone. “I am looking forward to

this amazing opportunity with the University of New Hampshire.” In addition to her bachelor’s degree in history from Princeton, Rich earned a J.D. from Chicago-Kent College of Law, and an Ed.D. from the University of the Pacific. She is the president of the Sports Lawyers Association, an international nonprofit organization dedicated to the understanding, advancement, and ethical practice of sports law, and for which she has chaired multiple board committees including sponsorship, philanthropy, and the 2018 Annual Conference which attracted almost 900 attendees. She is also the vice chair

of the NCAA Division I Infractions Appeals Committee, and a member of the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics, the Women Leaders in College Sports, the National Sports Law Institute Board of Directors, the NCAA Division I Council Working Group on Enforcement, the Infractions Process, and Women’s Sports Foundation Sports Advocacy Network.

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Allison Rich ’91, who has served for the last nine years in senior administration with Princeton Athletics, has been named director of athletics at the University of New Hampshire. “A llison is a fantast ic leader, and an even better person,” said Princeton Director of Athletics John Mack ’00. “She is a smart and decisive problem solver, and an incredible relationship builder. New Hampshire Athletics could not be in better hands. While this is a big loss for Princeton, I am thrilled for Allison to have this well-deserved opportunity. We will miss her dearly, but Allison will always be a Tiger.” Rich has served her alma mater as senior associate director of athletics/senior

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SHOOTING FOR GOLD: Abby Meyers puts up a shot last winter in her senior season for the Princeton University women’s basketball team. This week, Meyers, a 6’0 guard from Potomac, Md., will be starting play for the United States women’s open team at the 2022 Maccabiah Games in Israel. The U.S. was slated to play Israel on July 18 before facing Australia on July 20 and 22. The gold medal game is scheduled for July 24. Meyers produced a superb final season for the Tigers in 2021-22, averaging 17.9 points a game and earning Ivy League Player of the Year honors as Princeton went 25-5, winning the league title and postseason tournament, and upsetting Kentucky in the first round of the NCAA tournament before falling to Indiana in the second round. Meyers will be playing for the University of Maryland next winter as a graduate transfer. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


In a harbinger of things to come, Franzoni sacked a lead-off homer in the season opener against Alabama. “It definitely felt good to start the season like that, I think it set the tone for the year,” said Franzoni. “It is funny because I don’t usually lead off. That was the only game of the whole season that I led off because our leadoff hitter was out for that game. I had to fill in that spot and my coach (Billy O’Conner) said before the game if you don’t swing first pitch, I am probably never leading you off again. He just wanted me to swing as hard as I could. It was definitely cool to open the season that way to get the team going.” In one stretch in May, Fran zoni homered eight times in nine games. “I definitely felt like I was in a zone, seeing pitches well,” said Franzoni. “I think we did a really good job, especially in conference. When we played teams multiple times and teams that returned a multitude of guys, we would scout and prepare specifically for their pitchers that we were going to face. We were watching video and stuff like that. That was a huge part of that. There is a different mindset and a different energy that comes with playing in conference games. I think specifically for me and a lot of the other guys on the team, those games are personal. Those games are huge, it affects being in the tournament.” In the BIG E AST tournament, Franzoni and his teammates exploded for a record-breaking performance as the Musketeers topped Creighton 27-8 to advance to the championship series against UConn. “That was probably the most crazy baseball game I have ever played in,” said Franzoni, who went 3-for-4 with three homers and 11 RBIs in the win, hitting a pair of grand slams. “Any time we play Creighton, it is usually a close game because they are a great team and are well-coached. It was a shock for some us, putting up so many runs. It seemed like everything was falling. We would have a guy hit a homer and then have a bloop hit and another bloop hit and then someone would smoke one. Everything was falling, it was one of those days.” The Musketeers ended up falling 7-2 to UConn in the BIG EAST final as its season came to an end. “It was definitely a pretty emotional loss,” said Franzoni. “T hey are a good team, we gave them all that we could.” Although Xavier fell short of its goal of making the NCA A tournament, there

were plenty of highlights to savor from this spring. “After the season came to an end, we had the whole team over for a bonfire and we were reflecting on the season and all of the special moments and memories,” said Franzoni. “Playing college baseball, you create a ton of relationships that can’t be replicated. It was really cool to reflect on that at the end of the season. There are personal accomplishments and team accomplishments, but I think those relationships with the guys on the team outweigh those things. It was just really special this year.” In reflecting on his special year, Franzoni was proud of what he accomplished. “It was definitely humbling to see the other people who have won those awards previously and the other people who were all-American this year,” said Franzoni. “To be in the same company as those guys was really cool to see. It is something I am going to be grateful about for years to come.” This summer, Franzoni is hanging with some fast company, playing for YarmouthDennis in the famed Cape Cod League. “It is great quality play, the pitching we face every day is pretty darn good,” said Franzoni, who was hitting .216 with two homers and eight RBIs in 15 games. “It is a lot of really talented players. You could be up or down seven runs and they are still running guys out of the bullpen who throw 95. It is another step that can help prepare me and a lot of other players to get better. It is definitely really cool to get to do this.” With the 2022 MLB draft going on this week, Franzoni is in the mix to be chosen. “I am eligible for the draft, we will see what happens,” said Franzoni. “I have been getting a little bit of feedback from teams. I would definitely want to play professional baseball. I would be ready to take that step if a team wants to grab me. It would be a really cool experience to play at the next level. This year and years before have definitely prepared me to do stuff.” If Franzoni doesn’t get picked, he will be ready for one last season at Xavier as he has one more year of eligibility remaining due to the 2020 season being halted by the pandemic. “We return a lot of guys so we will have another crack at it,” said Franzoni. “The mentality doesn’t change for anyone. We still go out every year trying to win a conference championship. That is the main goal for the entire team.” — Bill Alden

POWER SURGE: Luke Franzoni follows through on a swing this spring for the Xavier University baseball team. Former Princeton Day School standout Franzoni enjoyed a huge season for Xavier, batting .385 with school single-season record in homers (29) and RBIs (78). He was named the BIG EAST Co-Player of the Year and earned American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA)/Rawlings All-America Third Team honors as the Musketeers went 33-27 and advanced to the championship game of the conference tournament. (Photo provided courtesy of Xavier Athletics)

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When the pandemic halted the sports world in March 2020, Luke Franzoni headed home from the Xavier University baseball team and went to work. Along with his older brother Paul, a star catcher for NJIT, and younger brother Ian, a Brown University running back, they turned their garage in Robbinsville into a weight room. “We wanted to take it upon ourselves to just get stronger,” said Franzoni. “A bunch of our friends just donated any gym equipment that we had into our garage and everyone would come every day. It was a lot of lifting and lot of eating. Kudos to my parents for feeding all of us. They were probably only used to feeding Ian, who was the only one home at that point. For the summer they had me and Paul and the other guys, it was like feeding an entire village.” That work paid off as Franzoni packed on 20-25 pounds of muscle, going from 185 pounds to around 205, and enjoyed a superb 2021 junior season, batting .279 with nine homers and 28 RBIs as Xavier went 2826 and lost to UConn in the BIG EAST tournament final. “It was great to get a full season, we made a good run,” said Franzoni. “We were pretty young at that point. That year was a really good step in the right direction because a lot of guys matured.” Coming into the 2022 season, Franzoni followed a similar formula last fall along with his teammates. “Our coaches were really big in the fall, trying to get our entire team really strong,” said Franzoni. “We lifted like five days a week in the fall, they did a really good job. It was after we lost to UConn in the BIG EAST tournament our junior year where our coach said it was clear that they were a more physical team. They were bigger than us and that could contribute to why we lost. So that was a main focus.” Getting bigger as he came into this spring at 6’2, 220 pounds, Franzoni produced a huge year for the Musketeers. The first baseman/ outfielder batted .385 with school single-season records in homers (29) and RBIs (78 ). He was named the BIG EAST Co-Player of the Year and earned American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA)/Rawlings AllAmerica Third Team honors as the Musketeers went 33-27 and advanced to the championship game of the conference tournament. “I would have never guessed that number, me and my roommate would always joke around throw around numbers that we wanted to shoot for,” said Franzoni. “That was definitely something I didn’t really see or expect. It was definitely rewarding to see a lot of that just pay off in the games. The preparation was definitely there in the fall and in the summer. When you work so hard, you feel good to see stuff like that. It was definitely something cool to reflect on.”

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022

Former PDS Star Franzoni Makes History for Xavier Baseball, Setting Team Homer, RBI Records in All-American Campaign

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Enjoying Stunning Debut for Pomona-Pitzer Women’s Lax, PHS Grad Henderson Sets Assist Record As Team Goes 18-1 Shoshi Henderson wasn’t sure how much she would contribute in her freshman season t his spr ing w it h the Pomona-Pitzer College women’s lacrosse team. “My goal was to be on the field, I wanted some playing time,” said Henderson, a former Princeton High standout. “I wanted to fit in, I wanted to make a difference.” Henderson didn’t waste any time making a difference, tallying two goals in the first 2:11 of the season opener against ClaremontMudd- S cr ipps ( CMS ) on February 23, ending up with three goals and seven assists on the day as the Sagehens prevailed 15-7. “I was, this is my first college game, that is kind of crazy,” said 5’7 attacker Henderson. “I am pretty nervous about this, I am starting. All I want to do is just help in any way I can. I had two fast break goals right off the bat which is so fun. I had a hat trick in the first quarter. I was in shock. That game opened my eyes, like wow this could be a really good season, not only for me personally but for the team. We crushed CMS, which is unheard of.” It turned out to be a great season for both Henderson and the Sagehens as she tallied 132 points on 42 goals and 90 assists, helping the team go 18-1 and advance to the Sweet 16 of the 2022 NCAA Division III Tournament. In the process, Henderson broke the Sagehens’

single-season record for points and assists and broke the NCAA Division III record for assists in a season. While Pomona-Pitzer kept rolling after the opener, it wasn’t always a smooth ride. “We definitely had some ups and downs, we had a couple of injuries,” said Henderson. “I was the only attacker who never missed a game with injury so we had a lot of different players filling in spots all over the field. We had so much depth that it never really mattered too, too much. We definitely gained confidence.” For Henderson, a key confidence builder came when she tallied four goals and four assists in a 19-4 win at Colorado College in early March. “I was the most nervous I have been because I had been doing so well up to that point,” said Henderson. “First of all it was snowing, it was really cold. That was our first game against a team that was supposed to be really good and in the first quarter I was super nervous. In the second quarter, I had three goals and I was good to go. We ended up crushing them and I think for me personally and the team, that was another boost for us.” As the season went on, Henderson overcame her nerves, getting more and more comfortable with the college game. “It is much faster game, we have a shot clock so that leads to that,” said Henderson.

“It is also the amount of what you prepare for every game. We really focused on ourselves more than on other teams but having a scout for every single game and coming in having an offensive plan was something I had not had before. It was OK, we were going to this until there is 50 seconds left on the shot clock and then we are going to run this play. At 20 seconds you can start looking for other things. There was a lot of structure but there was freedom. I really, really enjoyed it.” While Henderson was initially torn between D-I and D-III programs when she looked at continuing her lax career at the next level, Pomona emerged as the top choice. “It ended up being that I just felt like Pomona was a really, really good fit,” said Henderson. “I emailed the coach (Sarah Queener) and she is probably one of the nicest people I have ever talked to. She is an amazing coach and she was super excited about me in the recruiting process. She showed a lot of interest which feels good. Right off the bat, just getting on campus immediately I loved everybody I met who was on the team. They became my best friends.” The Sagehens enjoyed an exciting playoff run, defeating rival CMS 15-11 in the Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference ( SCIAC ) postseason tournament championship

SHO TIME: Shoshi Henderson heads upfield in game this spring in her freshman season for the Pomona-Pitzer College women’s lacrosse team. Former Princeton High star Henderson came up big for the Sagehens in her debut campaign, tallying 132 points on 42 goals and 90 assists to help Pomona-Pitzer go 18-1 and advance to the Sweet 16 of the 2022 NCAA Division III Tournament. In the process, Henderson broke the Sagehens’ single-season record for points and assists and broke the NCAA Division III record for assists in a season. (Photo provided by Pomona-Pitzer College Athletics) game and then topping the Athenas again, 16-8, in the second round of the NCAA tournament. While Henderson and her teammates weren’t thrilled to see neighbor CMS, which is located adjacent to the Pomona-Pitzer campus, in the NCAA tournament, they took care of business. “We beat them three other times, what is one more, we can do it,” said Henderson. “We came into it more like think about how much they are dreading having to play us again because we have already beaten them three times. It was a really hot day and they had to play the first round the day before. They seemed deflated. We came out guns blazing, we wanted to go to Boston and play Tufts.” Suffering their only defeat of the season, the Sagehens fell 18-10 to the third-seeded Jumbos, digging an early 9-1 hole in the first quarter that proved to be too much to overcome. “We hadn’t really encountered a team like Tufts,” said Henderson. “We really held our own. It was really only the first quarter where they really beat us. We tied them in the second, third, and fourth quarters. Even though our season ended there, that was another major boost. If we just got our act together at the start of the game, we would have been right in there.” After the season, Henderson got some major boosts as she was named the Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC) Athlete of the Year and earned Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association (IWLCA) First Team All-West Region honors.

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“It was really special, honestly I could not have imagined it,” said Henderson. “I was confident in my abilities. I wanted to be able to play and make an impact but I had no idea that it would be at the level that I did. It is so special to me to get those awards and these records. It is also because of how amazing the team was. Most of it is assisting and I could not have done that without how good the other players were.” In Henderson’s view, her success was definitely the product of a group effort. “At one point we were leading the country in assists per game so that is everybody,” said Henderson. “That was our team culture to play like that, to move the ball. Everybody scores, everybody is involved. There were so many people who could be productive. To have my name in the NCAA record books is pretty cool.”

Looking ahead, Henderson is confident that Pomona-Pitzer will keep producing. “We made so much progress and it is really motivating,” said Henderson. “Pomona is getting more and more attention. People want to come and we are getting better and better recruits. It is so exciting.” This summer, Henderson is focused on making progress on and off the field. “I want to work on driving to goal; it is fun to score but that is how you make the best opportunities for others,” said Henderson. “I want to work on just continuing to be a leader on this team and keeping the team culture really positive. We did well this year with that. We have some younger players coming in and we only lost four seniors. We are definitely very confident in our team next year.” —Bill Alden

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With the Princeton Post 218 American Legion baseball team looking to make its first-ever trip to the New Jersey District tournament, it wanted to clinch a spot by beating Allentown last week rather than relying on help from other teams. Allentown, though, posed a formidable obstacle to Post 218’s plan as it had already clinched a share of the Mercer County American Legion League (MCALL) regular season title. Undau nte d, a s crappy Post 218 team jumped out to an 11-2 lead over Allentown and held on for an 11-9 win to punch its ticket to the Districts. “It was huge, at the time they were 14-3,” said Post 218 manager Benito Gonzalez. “We played them well the first time, it was Rohan [ S het h ] s tar t ing in t hat game too. It was the fifth inning that was the issue the first time. The second time around was probably the best overall offensive effort that we put up the whole year.” The victor y epitomized the resilience that Post 218 displayed as it battled down the stretch. “Our last four, five games we responded by winning a bunch of ones that we had to,” said G onzalez. “We knew when we won against Allentown, we clinched it. We said guys, congratulations, you didn’t not let it go to fate.” The guys were proud to make history for Post 218. “They were excited, during the middle of the season the idea of playoffs can be a little abstract,” said Gonzalez. “As we started winning more towards the end, it started becoming more of a possibility and as we were playing during that game against Allentown, the guys got more excited. It was a solid 12-13 guys that got us there. They were the group that did that and we really tried to pump up the guys that had been there and tell them that they were the ones responsible for getting us in.” Hitting the field last Saturday in West Deptford to open District 4 action by playing South Harrison, the Princeton team was feeling some butterflies. “There was some excitement and there was some level of nervousness too,” said Gonzalez. “I wasn’t as worried about the Princeton High seniors because they have been that team for Princeton the last couple of years that got them to places they hadn’t been to and got some firsts. They were prepared. Some of our younger guys who just finished their sophomore year for different schools were definitely a little bit nervous.” Ru n n i n g i nto a tou g h pitcher in Gavin Cunard, Post 218 came up with just two hits as it lost 10-0. A day later, Princeton fell behind 5-1 to Washington Tow nship Post 521 and battled back to narrow the gap to 5-3 and loaded the bases in the final inning before falling by that score. “Things were much cleaner, they responded better,”

said G onzalez. “We lost in the end but we played much bet ter. We star ted Jon [Tao], he started one of those games last week and got a must-win for us. Without that, we would not have been there to begin with and that is why I trusted him to take the start. But when he got into trouble, we brought in Rohan and he kept them at zero for the rest of the game which really gave us a great shot.” Jaxon Petrone got a big shot for Post 218, blasting a homer as the team fought back against Washington. “Jaxon ended up hitting a home run late in the game,” said Gonzalez of recent PHS grad Petrone, who starred in football, basketball, and baseball in his senior year in high school. “It was top of the sixth, a no doubter to left center. Jaxon is somebody who definitely takes commitment seriously and he expects it from other people. I think that is a really important thing.” Post 218 showed commitment collectively as it didn’t throw in the towel despite the early deficit on Sunday. “They could have lost focus after falling behind 5-1 and thought there goes the season but you know what, they didn’t,” said Gonzalez, whose team ended the summer with an 8-12 record. “I credited Rohan for giving us a chance. I credited people with dealing with a pitcher who was pretty good. He had good breaking stuff and a good change, there were a lot of strikeouts early. I gave the team credit for scratching out a couple of runs the last few innings. In the last inning, it was bases loaded, one out.” W i t h P r i n c e to n g o i n g from four wins last year to eight this summer, Gonzalez is proud of the strides made by the program. “I t h i n k t h e pr o g r e s s was great, we doubled our wins but we had more injury issues,” said Gonzalez. “Pitching-w ise we didn’t have t he pitching dept h that I thought we were going to have going into the season. Offensively we did much better this season for sure. We did struggle to be consistent offensively last year and we did lose a lot of close games. I think a lot of that was because we didn’t put consistently good at-bats together. I can think of a couple of guys like Peter Hare and James Petrone who hit much better this summer compared to last summer. That is a huge difference. So having people like t hat combined w it h Alex Winters at the top of the lineup hitting .514 for the summer really helped.” While the losses last weekend st ung, the setbacks didn’t dim what Post 218 accomplished this summer. “We told that to the guys, ‘This is historic, this is a really significant and important thing that you have done,’” said Gonzalez. “I really tried to give them the credit the most. In the end, they are the players, they have to go out there and they are the ones that have to do it. Being able to do that and have us just guide them along the way,

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022

Post 218 Baseball Makes Districts for First Time, Battles to the End as it Gets Eliminated by Washington I really tried to emphasize that regardless of how it ended. I don’t like to lose, nobody does. To say at the very least, you should acknowledge that you were p a r t of s om e t h i n g t h at hadn’t happened before. That is something that nobody can take away.” In the view of Gonzalez, Princeton can build on the breakthrough campaign. “I think it is valuable ; there are a couple people that we are losing next year due to eligibility but there are a number of seniors who cou ld com e back,” said Gonzalez. “Kids like Alex can come back. We have a handful of players who got experience who could be potentially coming back in a stronger position because they were getting playing time and asked to do some difficult things this summer. Next year there is the potential. It is always easier once you have been there before; when you do something once, you know you can do it.” —Bill Alden

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HISTORIC DISTRICT: Princeton Post 218 American Legion baseball player Jaxon Petrone hits the ball in recent action. Last Sunday, recent Princeton High grad Petrone got two hits, including a homer, in a losing cause as Post 218 lost 5-3 to Washington Township Post 521 in an elimination game at the N.J. District 4 tournament at West Deptford. It makes the first-ever appearance in District play for Post 218, which finished the summer with an 8-12 record. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Freddy You ng Jr. was primed to make his debut for the Lincoln University men’s basketball team this past winter, but he was stopped in his tracks before he even played a game. “I hurt my foot in the first scrimmage,” said Young, a for mer Pr inceton Day School and Trenton Catholic standout guard. “I was running through a play and I happened to break my foot. It was really unlucky but I got to learn a lot.” W hile being sidelined, Young developed a better feel for the college game. “I got to hoop in college before I broke my foot so I was experiencing it,” said the 6’3, 180-pound Young. “I saw how fast it was when I was hooping. When I had to sit back and watch, I got to see how slow that game actually was. I got to slow down my mental approach. I am a more complete player because I can see what everybody can do and what I can do better.” Young did keep busy as he rehabbed his injury. “The team kept me with them throughout everything,” said Young of the squad which a ls o i nclu de s P r i nce ton

High alum Zahrion Blue and Princeton Day School grad Ethan Garita. “I went to every single practice, I went to every single lift. I still had to work out. I had to do everything that didn’t involve my left foot.” That work is paying off now as Young is starring for Homestead in the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. “I have known coach Phil my whole life, he has seen me play everywhere,” said Young, referring to Homestead team manager Phil Vigliano. “He saw that I wasn’t playing in the summer league and he called and wanted me to come hoop. I was happy to play with this team, I feel like we can really win.” Last Monday, Young tallied 12 points to help Homestead pull out a 69-68 win over Athlete Engineering Institute 69-68 as it improved to 6-2. “I definitely feel like I am at full strength,” said Young, reflecting on his effort. “I could get even stronger and even faster because I haven’t gotten to completely work

out as much as I want to yet. I am growing and growing every week.” Young has found a good fit with the Homestead squad. “I really like playing on this team, everybody can play, everybody wants to win,” said Young. “All the players make shots, it is easy to play with them. With this group, I am more of a point guard. I play defense, I do whatever I have to do to get everybody the ball and score. I do a little of everything.” In order to edge A E I, with made a late 20-6 run, Homestead had to play hard down the stretch. “We all came together, we all come from different places,” said Young of the team which got 15 points from Khalid Lewis in the victory with Steve Harris chipping in 14, Justin Carbone adding 11 and Quayson Lewis contributing 10. “I feel like we all have a good amount of confidence. We should be beating every team that we play against because at the end of the day, we are all hoopers. Everybody plays somewhere.” With the summer league playoffs starting next week, Young is conf ident t hat

Homestead can do some damage. “This is definitely a team that can make a run,” maintained Young. “We can fight with anybody, we can win against anybody. It all depends on the day. We have to play defense, we have to make shots.” —Bill Alden

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022 • 26

Rebounding After Injury Prevented College Debut, Young Starring for Homestead in Summer Hoops

Local Sports

For more infor mation, contact Kamau Bailey at (917) 626-5785 or at kamau.bailey@gmail.com.

West Windsor-Plainsboro Squad Goes 1-2 in Babe Ruth 15s Tourney

Bailey Basketball Academy Competing in the SouthOffering Summer Camp in July ern New Jersey Babe Ruth

T he B ailey B asketball Academy (BBA) is offering a week-long camp in late July. BBA is led by for mer Princeton Day School girls’ hoops coach and Philadelphia 76ers camp director and clinician Kamau Bailey. The camp is slated for July 25-July 29 at Stuart Country Day School. There are full day/half day and first hoops options available. The program will also include a small group training to help with transition to a higher school level. In addition, there is a multiple player/sibling discount. All players will be required to bring their own water, snacks, and/or lunch for the applicable programs.

15s tournament last week, the West Windsor-Plainsboro squad went 1-2 in the double-elimination event at Switlik Park in Hamilton. The team opened the tournament by defeating Cherry Hill 19-0 on July 8 and then fell 10-0 to host Hamilton/ Northern Burlington 10-0 last Wednesday and lost 11-3 to Hopewell / Ewing 11-3 a day later to end its run. The West Windsor team included Pr inceton residents Michael Prete, Travis Petrone, Ben Walden, and Roman Howe along with Cranbury residents Chase Hammerschlag, Jai Jus tice, James Schiavone, and Emiliano Sarceno who are attending Princeton High.

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YOUNG AT HEART: Freddy Young Jr., right, unloads the ball for Homestead in recent action in the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. Last Monday night, Young, a former Princeton Day School and Trenton Catholic standout, tallied 12 points to help Homestead edge Athlete Engineering Institute 69-68 as it improved to 6-2. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Raymond Woodfield

Surrounded by a family full of love, Raymond Woodfield died at home in Princeton, NJ, on July 9, 2022. Born in Lakewood, NJ, in 1929, Ray spent most of his life in Rockland County, NY. After serving in the military as a youth, he attended college on the GI bill and pursued a degree in Engineering. He worked on the original Tappan Zee Bridge, and went on to oversee bridge and road construction in many highprofile projects, including the NY Thruway and Berkshire Spur, World’s Fair in Queens, Robert Moses State Park, Saw Mill River Parkway, and Queens Zoo. In Princeton, he worked on the original construction of the Jasna Polana estate. In 2001, while working on Route 9A near the World Trade Center, he witnessed and survived the fall of the twin towers, barely managing to crawl through the dust cloud to safety. He then worked on the reconstruction of 9A for many years after. In retirement, Ray took up table tennis at the Princeton Senior Resource Center, making many new friends and winning medals at the NJ Senior Olympics. An avid bike rider, he biked 22 miles shortly before his cancer diagnosis at age 91. Ray was also well known for his beautiful whistle. He whistled in the morning when he woke up and many times during the day. He lived his life to the fullest, relishing every day, and with the help of his doctor and devoted family valiantly battled leukemia for 20 months. Ray is pre-deceased by wife and square- dancing partner Margaret ( Peggy) Haldeman and survived by daughters Karen Woodfield (Angus Eaton) and Kathleen Woodfield (Alfred Gibbs), stepsons Edward Dobkowski (Georgia Glovatsky) and Arul Karttikeya, grandchildren Dylan Gibbs and Tina, Juanita and Sara Eaton, and many beloved nephews, nieces, and cousins, along with many special friends who were like family to him. He touched many lives with his infectious smile and twinkling blue eyes, and will

be remembered for his love of life, love of people and love of food. Services for family and friends to celebrate Ray’s life are being planned around his birthday in October. For donations, please consider the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLC).

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022

Obituaries

financial officer and execu- surprised and touched to Wife, Mother, and tive vice president of United hear from other countries Grandmother Wholesale Mortgage (UWM), too, sometimes from people Flora’s proudest accomTim’s colleagues were also who had only met him in plishment was as a devoted family to him and have person once or twice and reand loving mother, as well been a constant support garded him as a dear friend. as a lifelong partner to her in good times and bad. We They wanted to know if they husband. Flora and Robare forever grateful for their could not travel for his meert Douglas Varrin ( Bob) thoughtfulness, presence, morial service, did we mind eloped dur ing his junior and friendship throughout if they gathered to remember year at Princeton University the years. and raise a glass to Tim. He to Elkton, Maryland, where Born in Marietta, Ohio, would have loved that. they were married on FebruTim moved with his family We invite those who can ary 26, 1955. They had first to the Pittsburgh area and join us in person to come met in seventh grade, but graduated from Peters Town- to his memorial service on did not reconnect until after Timothy James ship High School in 1985, Thursday, July 21, 2022, their high school graduation. where he was both a deco- from 2 to 7 p.m., with inforTogether, they raised a famForrester ily of three children — initialTimothy James Forrester, rated scholar and athlete. mal sharing and then a forly traveling across the U.S. of Bloomfield Hills, MI, died He continued his studies and mal service starting at 5:30 before settling in Newark, on July 10, 2022, after a bat- matriculated from Michigan p.m. The services will be at Delaware, where Bob worked tle with cancer; he is survived State University in 1990 with AJ Desmond & Sons, 32515 as a professor and associate by his wife, Brittany. First in a degree in accounting. Be- Woodward Avenue, in Royal provost at the University of his heart and thoughts were fore becoming CFO at UWM, Oak, MI 48073. We will host Delaware and Flora managed always his beloved children, he was a partner at Deloitte a social gathering after these the household. Blake, Macklin, Riley, and and Touché. He continued services at a nearby estabFlora is survived by Robert Claudia. They loved Sat- his passion for golf, baseball, lishment. In lieu of flowers, the family Douglas Varrin, her spouse urday morning breakfasts, basketball, and volleyball encourages you to contribute of 67 years, her children camping, swimming at the throughout his life. Wonderful remembrances in his honor to a fitting cause Diane Eshleman (Gregory) club, paddle boarding, and of Princeton, NJ, Mantolok- having Dad with them at and stories have been shared or nonprofit organization, ing, NJ, and Stockbridge, swimming meets, concerts, with the news of his death: including St Jude Children MA, Robert D. Varrin Jr. recitals, and dances. He also they ranged from trenchant Research Hospital, Gamof Reston, VA, and Middle- leaves behind their devoted and touching to ribald and ers Outreach, and Technoburg, VA, Susan Deland mothers: Kelley O’Rourke hilarious, a perfect reflection blades Sarcoma Foundation (Alexander) of Pelham, NY, and Brittany Forrester. Tim of Tim in all his complexity. of America. If you can find and New London, NH, and follows his parents, Frederic He was simultaneously pri- a golf tournament supportfour grandchildren, Douglas John Forrester and Marga- vate and sociable — disci- ing your charity, that seems Eshleman (Steven), Amanda ret Ann Forrester (nee Pi- plined and hardworking, yet particularly apt for Tim. D’Esterre (Alexander), Alex- tonyak), and his oldest sis- outrageously, ridiculously A singular light has gone ander Deland Jr., and Diane ter, Mary Ann Forrester, in fun. A common theme from out of this world but never younger professionals is that out of our hearts. Tim, we Deland. passing. He was the youngest of Tim’s mentoring or guidance love you, we mourn your Finnish Heritage are responsible for their sucFlora spoke fluent Finnish, nine children and leaves be- cessful career. He would in- passing, we remember you always. hind Eileen of Verona, PA; which she learned as a child sist that they were responRick (Linda) of Canonsburg. View obituary and share before lear ning English. sible, and he only had the She was strongly connect- PA; Joe (Adriana) of Ger- honor to pass on what he memories at AJDesmond. ed to her Finnish heritage mantown, MD; Betty (Bill had learned. We were a bit com. and dear family in Finland, Bar tos ) of Rockford, IL ; where she was proud to hold Dr. Patricia of Fenton, MI; citizenship. Indeed, she truly Kathleen (Daniel Plott) of had international creden- Tomball, TX; Tom (Paula) tials, as she was also a citi- of Cohasset, MA; countless zen of Switzerland through nieces, nephews, cousins; her husband’s family. Flora and many more extended 741 Alexander Rd, Princeton • 924-2880 and her husband enjoyed family members. As the chief travelling both domestically and internationally — with a special affinity for Finland and Switzerland. Her maiden name, Karhunen, derives from the Finnish word for bear: fitting, given the strength of her love and devotion to her family. Through Flora, the family came to appreciate the meaning of another Finnish word “sisu” — which roughly translates into determination, tenacity, and bravery. Princeton Connection Flora was a proud and active Princeton spouse, gathering often with her husband’s 1956 classmates and their spouses. 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Flora Ann Karhunen Varrin Flora Ann Karhunen Varrin — a gracious, loving, and beautiful wife, mother, and grandmother — died on July 16, 2022 following a short illness. She was at the time a resident of Stonebridge at Montgomery in Skillman, hav ing formerly lived in Princeton, New Jersey, and Newark, Delaware. Early Years Flora was born on November 21, 1934 in Newark, New Jersey, to Anna Kut vonen Karhunen and Armas Karhunen who were immigrants from the Savo region of Finland. She was raised by her mother in Kearny, New Jersey, following her father’s untimely death in 1938. As her mother worked full-time, Flora was truly a latch-key child, fueling her independence and resilience. A natural beauty, she won a Shirley Temple look-alike contest as a child. In 1952, Flora graduated from Kearny High School where she was a cheerleader captain and a scholar. Upon graduation, she received three out of the seven medals that were awarded for distinguished academic performance in various disciplines. She then worked in northern New Jersey as an executive assistant, initially at Fireman’s Insurance and then at Anheuser-Busch.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022 • 28

to place an order:

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CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

TT

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription!

HOME HEALTH AIDE AVAILABLE: CNA, CMA. Live-in or out. More than 20 years experience. Honest, dependable, excellent checkable references. (609) 532-8034.

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22

Irene Lee,07-27-8t Classified Manager

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ROSA’S Deadline: 2pm Tuesday •TOWN Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, creditandcard, check. Experienced reliableoradult DOG SITTER: Experienced, •lovCLEANING SERVICE LLC TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS caregiver available weekday morning, responsible and fun dog or sitterless: GET TOP RESULTS! Offering professional• cleaning ser• 25 words $15.00 each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE ings. Excellent references. Greater I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty with great references. In the Princ- vices in the Princeton community Whether it’s selling furniture, finding eton area. For small to•medium-sized Princeton discount area. Call or text 609- available. for your•loved one. Compassionate Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, 3 weeks:for$40.00 4 weeks: • having 6 weeks: $72.00 6 month and annual rates more than 28•years! Weekly, bi- $50.00 a lost pet, or a garage sale, dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000. costume jewelry, evening bags, fancaregiver will assist with personal 216-5000. weekly, monthly, move-in/move-out TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! • Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inchcare, • all bold meals, facedrive type: tf services for houses, medication, to $10.00/week apartments, oftf cy linens, paintings, small furniture, COLLEGE APPLICATION ADVISING Don’t miss out! Reserve your spot now before my client list fills up! After working in the Princeton University Admission Office, I know what attracts colleges to students. My process helps students write original, thoughtful essays that stand out. Visit www.collegeessayexcellence.net or contact caroline@ collegeessayexcellence.net/ (609) 356-2714. 07-20 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23-22

fices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

HOME HEALTH AIDE AVAILABLE: CNA, CMA. Live-in or out. More than 20 years experience. Honest, dependable, excellent checkable references. (609) 532-8034. 07-27-8t

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22

EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Experienced and reliable adult caregiver available weekday mornings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000. tf

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06-22

We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10;

08-10-12t

classifieds@towntopics.com

PERSONAL ASSISTANT/ CAREGIVER for your loved elder.Years of experience. Trustworthy, reliable & highly competent. Female. Excellent references. 609-477-4671’. 9-21 -10t

DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000. tf COLLEGE APPLICATION ADVISING

SEEKING AFFORDABLE APT/ HOUSE SHARE Female Semi-retired music teacher seeks affordable room in apt. or house shared with good company, school year or longer, for 9/1. Preferred locations: Princeton & surroundings. Residing locally 25plus years. 609 706 2209, Jerseylea.tu3@ gmail.com 8-3-3t

Don’t miss out! Reserve your spot now before my client list fills up!

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23

07-20

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

After working in the Princeton University Admission Office, I know what attracts colleges to students. My process helps students write original, thoughtful essays that stand out. Visit www.collegeessayexcellence.net or contact caroline@ collegeessayexcellence.net/ (609) 356-2714.

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732 TT ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188.

LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23-22

tf

tf

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

04-06-23 HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240.

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396.

etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06-22

PERSONAL ASSISTANT/ CAREGIVER for your loved elder.Years of experience. Trustworthy, reliable & highly competent. Female. Excellent references. 609-477-4671’. 9-21 -10t SEEKING AFFORDABLE APT/ HOUSE SHARE Female Semi-retired music teacher seeks affordable room in apt. or house shared with good company, school year or longer, for 9/1. Preferred locations: Princeton & surroundings. Residing locally 25plus years. 609 706 2209, Jerseylea.tu3@ gmail.com 8-3-3t

The Top Spot for Real Estate Advertising Town Topics is the most comprehensive and preferred weekly Real Estate resource in the greater Central New Jersey and Bucks County areas.

Considering a kitchen or bath renovation project? Cranbury Design Center listens to your ideas and then uses color drawings of your space to help make your vision a reality. We assist with design decisions, cabinet, countertop and hardware selections, and finishing touches like backsplash tile and paint colors. Call us or visit us online to get started on your remodel. We look forward to meeting you!

(609) 448-5600 145 W. Ward Street, Hightstown www.cranburydesigncenter.com Custom Kitchens, Baths and Renovations

CDC_TT_BestofHouseHome_Half_Page_041421.indd 1

4/14/21 8:13 PM

Every Wednesday, Town Topics reaches every home in Princeton and all high traffic business areas in town, as well as the communities of Lawrenceville, Pennington, Hopewell, Skilllman, Rocky Hill, and Montgomery. We ARE the area’s only community newspaper and most trusted resource since 1946! Call to reserve your space today! (609) 924-2200, ext 27

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06-22

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

circulation@towntopics.com

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23

EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS!

A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10

for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 977-9407. 08-10-12t DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000. tf COLLEGE APPLICATION ADVISING Don’t miss out! Reserve your spot now before my client list fills up! After working in the Princeton University Admission Office, I know what attracts colleges to students. My process helps students write original, thoughtful essays that stand out. Visit www.collegeessayexcellence.net or contact caroline@ collegeessayexcellence.net/ (609) 356-2714. 07-20 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23-22 HOME HEALTH AIDE AVAILABLE: CNA, CMA. Live-in or out. More than 20 years experience. Honest, dependable, excellent checkable references. (609) 532-8034. 07-27-8t EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Experienced and reliable adult caregiver available weekday mornings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000. tf CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732 TT ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23 HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

AT YOUR SERVICE A Town Topics Directory

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner Home Repair Specialist

609-586-2130

Scott M. Moore of

MOORE’S CONSTUCTION HOME IMPROVEMENTS LLC carpenter • builder • cabinet maker complete home renovations • additions 609-924-6777 Family Serving Princeton 100 Years. Free Estimates

PERSONAL ASSISTANT/ CAREGIVER for your loved elder.Years of experience. Trustworthy, reliable & highly competent. Female. Excellent references. 609-477-4671’. 9-21 -10t SEEKING AFFORDABLE APT/ HOUSE SHARE Female Semi-retired music teacher seeks affordable room in apt. or house shared with good company, school year or longer, for 9/1. Preferred locations: Princeton & surroundings. Residing locally 25plus years. 609 706 2209, Jerseylea.tu3@ gmail.com 8-3-3t ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

Erick Perez

Fully insured 15+ Years Experience Call for free estimate Best Prices

BLACKMAN

LANDSCAPING FRESH IDEAS

Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Stone Walls and Terraces FREE CONSULTATION

PRINCETON, NJ

609-683-4013

B BRIAN’S

FIREWOOD SPECIAL

TR BRIAN’S 609-466-6883

Seasoned Premium Hardwoods Split & Delivered $225 A cord / $425 2 cords

TREE SERVICE

Offer good while supplies last

Stacking available for an additional charge

60

BRIAN’S TREE TREESERVICE SERVICE Trees & Shrubs

609-466-6883 Trimmed, Pruned, and Removed Trees & Shrubs Stump Trimmed, Grinding &Removed Lot Clearing Pruned, and

609-466-6883 Stump Grinding & Lot Clearing

Owned & Operated for over 20 years! Trees & Shrubs Locally Owned &Locally Operated for over 20 years! Trimmed, Pruned, and Removed

Stump Grinding & Lot Clearing

Trimm Stum

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Specializing in the Unique & Unusual CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

609-466-2693

Locally Owned & Op

A Tradition of Quality

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10 circulation@towntopics.com EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 977-9407. 08-10-12t DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000. tf COLLEGE APPLICATION ADVISING Don’t miss out! Reserve your spot now before my client list fills up! After working in the Princeton University Admission Office, I know what attracts colleges to students. My process helps students write original, thoughtful essays that stand out. Visit www.collegeessayexcellence.net or contact caroline@ collegeessayexcellence.net/ (609) 356-2714. 07-20 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23-22

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE:

HD

HOUSE PAINTING & MORE

(609)737-2466

Serving the Princeton Area since 1963 Find us on Facebook and Instagram

House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish (Benjamin Moore Green promise products)

Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

JAMF PAINTING LLC. FULL INSURANCE

WE MAKE READY Call us today (609) 721-1392

American Furniture Exchange

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

CALL 609-924-2200 TO PLACE YOUR AD HERE


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022 • 30

Rider

Furniture

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“Where quality still matters.”

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com

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Princeton Realty Resources 2x3.indd 1

Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5 5/2/22 4:30 PM

Wallpaper Décor Trends in 2022

with Beatrice Bloom

Wallpaper is seeing renewed popularity as a décor trend, especially with the recent introduction of new, easyͲtoͲuse products.

HOME HEALTH AIDE AVAILABLE: CNA, CMA. Live-in or out. More than 20 years experience. Honest, dependable, excellent checkable references. (609) 532-8034. 07-27-8t EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Experienced and reliable adult caregiver available weekday mornings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000. tf CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732 TT ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23

Witherspoon Media Group

Today’s removable wallpaper makes it easy to change the look of a room. Many removable, peelͲandͲstick wallpapers can be removed and reapplied without damaging walls or paint underneath. PeelͲandͲstick wallpapers come in countless varieties of colors and styles, from traditional motifs to contemporary geometric designs.

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

Peel and stick wallpapers don’t require messy containers of wallpaper paste or trays of water. Although application does require some prep work and some tools (such as a level, a good scissors, a ruler or straight edge, and a wallpaper smoother), it is typically an easier process than handling traditional wallpaper.

· Newsletters

Wallpaper can transform a room or add a pop of color. Here are current wallpaper trends:

Powder room ͲͲ florals and foliage are some current favorites Accent wall ͲͲ wallpaper can be an alternative to a contrasting color accent wall Bedroom mural – create a focal point on the wall behind the bed Wallpaper and wainscoting – combine the two for a coastal look Laundry/Mudroom – Choose wide stripes for a farmhouse look

· Brochures

· PostcardsHOME REPAIR SPECIALIST:

WEEKLY INSERTS START AT Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, ONLY 10¢ PER HOUSEHOLD. · Books painting, deck work, sheet rock/

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area SR MANAGER, DCM, SAP (ref.# 2095). Req. Bach. (or for. equiv.) in CIS, CS or rel. + 5 yrs exp. Use exp. w/ SAP security in ABAP & JAVA systems, SAP HANA security, SAP Cloud Software as a service security to develop, design & maintain SAP security processes. Bristol-Myers Squibb Company. Princeton, NJ. F/T. Send CV to A. Wilson to resume.com@bms. com & ref. 2095. No calls/recruiters. 07-20

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SOFTWARE DEVELOPER LEAD (#6601): Bach deg (or forgn equiv) in Electrical & Electronics Engnrng, Software Systs, Comp Sci, Engnrng, Info Systs, or rel + 5 yrs exp. Provide technical & analytical leadership to software development teams, lead business analysis & software development activities, contribute subj matter expertise, & coordinate the administration of proj & task assignments. F/T. Educational Testing Service. Princeton, NJ. Send CV to: Ritu Sahai, ETS, 660 Rosedale Rd, MS10J, Princeton, NJ 08541 or etsrecruiting@ets.org. No calls/recruiters. 07-20

American Furniture Exchange

30 Years of Experience!

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609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

Witherspoon Media Group

Weekly Inserts Custom Design, Printing, only 10¢ per househ Get the best reach at the best rate! WEEKLY INSERTS START AT ONLY 10¢ PER HOUSEHOLD.

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list is best my specialty. 40 years Get the best reach Punch at the rate! experience. Licensed & insured. · Catalogues Call Creative Woodcraft

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4438 Route 27

teacher seeks affordable room in apt. or house shared with good company, school year or longer, for 9/1. Preferred locations: Princeton & surroundings. Residing locally 25plus years. 609NJ 706 08528-0125 2209, Jerseylea.tu3@ North, Kingston, gmail.com 609-924-5400 8-3-3t

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1873 stuart Road W. PRINCETON, NJ

Private setting on 2+ acres in pretty brook This Classic colonial wAS redesigned in 2009 by kathy knight, architect & BUILT BY baxter construction, creatING an atmosphere of comfort and style. 5 BEDROOMS, 4.5 BATHS, 2 FAMILY ROOMS,

3 FIREPLACES, 3 CAR GARAGE.

H H H

Cell/Text: 609-658-3771 E: HeidiHartmannHomes@gmail.com W: HeidiHartmannHomes.com Heidi A. Hartmann

$2,195,000

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2022

Coldwell banker realty


1st month discount 3rd month 10%30% discount

2nd month 20 % discount

Waived community fee for St. Mary & Grace Gardens 3rd-month 10% discount a $2,500 value.

**excluding Morris Hall Meadows** Waived Waived community community fee fee for for St. St. Mary Mary & & Grace Grace Gardens Gardens -- aa $2,500 $2,500 value. value.

Serving The Community – Together Campus Shared with St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center

Campus Shared with St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center **excluding **excluding Morris Morris Hall Hall Meadows** Meadows**

St. Mary’s Assisted Living

9704326-02

9704326-02 9704326-02

St. Mary’s Assisted Care LivingAssisted Living Garden Memory •Grace St. Garden Joseph’s Skilled Nursing Center Grace Memory Care Assisted Living St. Joseph’s Skilled Nursing • Morris Hall Meadows Skilled St. Joseph’s Skilled NursingNursing • Morris St. Mary’s Assisted Living, Morris Hall Meadows Skilled Nursing Hall Meadows Skilled Nursing • Grace Garden Memory Care • New Palliative Care Unit at St. Mary’s

9704326-02

Morris Hall Senior Care Communities includes:

Located in •• For more please visit us Located in Lawrenceville, Lawrenceville, NJ Formore more information, information, please visitvisit us at at us at Located in Lawrenceville, NJNJ • For information, please www.morrishall.org or contact us at mhadmissions@morrishall.org or 609-895-1937 www.morrishall.org or contact us at mhadmissions@morrishall.org or 609-895-1937 www.morrishall.org or contact us at mhadmissions@morrishall.org or 609-895-1937

Morris Hall Senior Care Communities • St. Joseph’s Skilled Nursing & Long Term Care • St. Mary’s Assisted Living • Grace Garden Assisted Living Memory Care • Morris Hall Meadows at Lawrenceville Skilled Nursing

Specialized Services • Short Term Rehabilitation • Respite Care • Palliative Care • Hospice Care

St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center Salutes our Nursing Staff! Thank you for your dedication, hard work and compassion every day and especially during the COVIC-19 pandemic.

2381 Lawrenceville Road | Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 609-896-9500 | www.slrc.org