Town Topics Newspaper, July 13, 2022

Page 1

Volume LXXVI, Number 28

Film Shows Impact on Families Who Raise a Child with Autism . . . . 5 PDS Student Brings Chess Camp to Area Youngsters . . 8 New Plaque Marks Site Of Historic Reading in Trenton . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Looking for Ernest Hemingway . . . . . . . 14 PU Summer Chamber Concerts Continues Series With Manhattan Chamber Players . . . . 15 PHS Alum Goldsmith Playing For U.S. Men’s Soccer Team In Maccabiah Games . . . . 26 PFC Barcelona Wins Boys’ 16U Soccer National Title . . . . . . 27

Former PU Men’s Soccer Star O’Toole Looking to Make Impact in MLS . .24 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 22 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . 33 Luxury Living . . . . . . . . 2 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 13 New To Us . . . . . . . . . 23 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 30 Performing Arts . . . . . 16 Police Blotter . . . . . . . . 9 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 33 Religion . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Summer Senior Options. . .17 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

www.towntopics.com

Three Incumbents Set To Run For PPS Board of Education Three incumbents — Debbie Bronfeld, Susan Kanter, and Dafna Kendal — will be running in the November 8 election to keep their seats on the Princeton Public Schools (PPS) Board of Education (BOE) for another three years. As of Tuesday morning, July 12, no additional candidates had stepped up to challenge them. The deadline for candidates to file with the Mercer County Clerk is July 25, less than two weeks away. Bronfeld, who has lived in Princeton for more than 20 years and has two sons who graduated from Princeton High School (PHS), will be running for her third term on the Board. “My goals are to continue supporting the superintendent in not only keeping our schools clean, safe, and open for our students and staff, but to ensure every student reaches their full potential while attending PPS,” she wrote in an email. Bronfeld looks forward to continuing her work on the BOE Operations and Student Achievement committees and as chair of the Personnel Committee and co-chair of the Equity Committee. “In my next term I will also continue overseeing improvements in our departments and programs, creative ways to balance the budget, and creating more opportunities for our students to participate in all academic and extracurricular programs,” she added. Kanter, with three children who have graduated from PHS and more than 20 years in Princeton, wrote, “I am seeking a second BOE term for the opportunity to use my 20 years of experience in business, multiple community volunteer roles, and recent Board service to ensure continued excellence and meaningful changes in our district.” She continued, “Within 60 days of beginning my first term, our district pivoted to meet the unexpected challenges of COVID, which dominated our focus throughout much of my term. I look forward in a second term to supporting fiscally sustainable solutions that better serve the academic needs and wellness of all our students, sustainability initiatives, and participating in district planning so that we can successfully serve the needs of the PPS community in years to come.” Kanter has been a member of the Continued on Page 8

75¢ at newsstands

Wednesday, July 13, 2022

Council Adopts Prospect Avenue Historic District At a meeting Monday night, Princeton Council voted to adopt an ordinance establishing the Prospect Avenue Historic District, designating the street that is home to Princeton University’s eating clubs as the 21st such district in the town. The unanimous vote brings to an official end a long, controversial process related to the University’s June 2021 proposal to demolish three Queen Anne Victorian houses on the north side of Prospect Avenue and move the 91 Prospect former Court Clubhouse across the street into their place, to make room for a Theorist Pavilion and entrance into the new Environmental Studies and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (ES+SEAS) complex. Extensive protests from members of the local community and alumni, hearings in front of the Historic Preservation Commission and the Planning Board, and encouragement from Council led the University to revise the proposal. The three houses will be preserved. The house at 110 Prospect will be moved to a space behind the other two, which are at numbers 114 and 116. The Court Club building will be moved to the space where 110 currently stands. During public comment on the ordinance, Sandy Harrison, who chairs the board of the Princeton Prospect

Foundation, said both the University and the eating clubs supported the designation of the historic district. The Princeton Prospect Foundation and the Graduate Interclub Council “met with the board chairs of the clubs to make sure they understood what it means to be a historic district,” he said. Author/historian Clifford Zink, who wrote a book about the eating clubs and often leads tours of the iconic buildings, spoke in support of the ordinance.

“Adoption will be a very positive outcome of well over a year of work by so many people to come up with a compromise solution on Prospect Avenue to maintain the quality of the historic character of the street, and also allow the University to do some very important and needed changes in a way that respects the historic character,” he said. Zink was among those to thank several people who worked on the compromise, Continued on Page 10

Scientific Advances, Programs Proliferate At Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

A National Academy of Sciences panel chaired by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) Senior Physicist Richard Hawryluk has recommended that the U.S. move quickly to accelerate the development of fusion energy. According to PPPL, the panel presented the recommendation to the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, the sole body of non-governmental advisors charged with making science, technology, and innovation policy recommendations to the president and the White House. PPPL is rapidly advancing in support of this recommendation, which calls for collaborating with private industry.

Jon Menard, deputy director for research at PPPL in Plainsboro, said that fusion energy is the way of the future. A potential game changer in terms of providing clean, efficient, and environmentally-sound energy, fusion energy is something that the White House is currently focusing on. This form of energy has the potential to counteract climate change and become a self-sustaining energy source. So, what exactly is fusion energy? Menard explained, “All the energy from the sun that you see every day, that lights up our solar system and heats our Continued on Page 12

BLUEBERRIES APLENTY: Pick-your-own in Terhune Orchard’s two-acre blueberry patch was one of the many activities at the farm’s annual Blueberry Bash last weekend. Participants share their favorite ways to eat blueberries in this week’s Town Talk on page 6. (Photo by Weronika A. Plohn)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 2

Luxury living

Town Topics

Serving Bucks, Somerset, Hunterdon and Mercer Counties Serving Bucks, Somerset, Hunterdon andHunterdon Mercer Counties Serving Bucks, Somerset, and MercerCounties Counties Serving Bucks, Somerset, Hunterdon and Mercer Serving Bucks, Somerset, Hunterdon and Mercer Counties


NEWLY PRICED NEWLY PRICED

PRESENTING

NEWLY PRICED

218 Mount Airy Harbourton Road, West Amwell Twp. • $1,295,000 1234 Street Ave., Anytown 1234 Street Ave., Anytown Marketed by: Michelle Needham Marketed by: Agent Name Marketed by: Agent Name foxroach.com/NJHT2000948 $000,000

1234 Street$000,000 Ave., Anytown Marketed by: Agent Name $000,000 PRESENTING

24 Abbington Lane, WestAve., Windsor Twp. • $1,150,000 1234 Street Anytown 1234 Street Ave., Anytown Marketed by: Chihlan “Lana” Marketed by: Agent NameChan Marketed by: Agent Name foxroach.com/NJME2017622 $000,000

1234 Street Ave., Anytown $000,000 Marketed by: Agent Name $000,000 PRESENTING

OPEN HOUSE • SUNDAY 11/7 • 1-3PM

1234 Street Ave., Anytown 2 Old Mill Road, Hopewell Twp. • $899,000 1234 Street Ave., Anytown Marketed by: Agent NameGrant Marketed by: Christina by: Anytown AgentElvina Name 1234Marketed Street$000,000 Ave., foxroach.com/NJME2018772 $000,000

1234 Street Ave., Anytown 8 Greenfield Drive S, West Windsor Twp. • $775,000 1234 Street Ave., Anytown Marketed by: Agent Name Marketed by: Teresa Cunningham Marketed by: Agent Name 1234 Street Ave., Anytown $000,000 foxroach.com/NJME2019424 $000,000

NEWLY PRICED

PRESENTING

Marketed by: Agent Name $000,000 PRESENTING

PRESENTING

House Sun 1/30 1-4 pm1-4pm OpenOpen House Sunday 7/17 Open House Sun 1/30 1-4 pm

1234 Street Ave., Anytown

Marketed by: Agent Name $000,000

1234Street StreetAve., Ave.,Anytown Anytown 1234

1234 Street Ave., Anytown 29 Winthrop Road, Lawrence Twp. • $620,000 Marketed by: Anytown Agent Name 1234 Street Ave., Marketed Marketed by: Heidi Joseph $000,000 Marketed by: Agent Name foxroach.com/NJME207300 $000,000

4 Ironwood Road, Montgomery Twp. • $600,000 Marketed by:Agent AgentName Name 1234 Street Ave.,by: Anytown Marketed Marketed by: Terebey Relocation $000,000 Marketed by: $000,000 Agent Name Team/John Terebey, Jr. foxroach.com/NJSO2001426 $000,000

NEWLY PRICED

NEWLY PRICED PRICED NEWLY

1234 Street Ave., Anytown 1234 Street Anytown 1234 Street Ave.,Ave., Anytown

12 Valley Court, Southby: Brunswick Twp. • $475,000 Marketed by: Agent Name Marketed Agent Name Marketed by: Agent Name Marketed by: Nicole Wolf $000,000 $000,000 $000,000 foxroach.com/NJMX2002568

1234 Ave., 1234Street Street Ave.,Anytown Anytown 1234 Street Ave., Anytown

Marketed by: Agent 68 Clover Hill Twp. • $450,000 Marketed by:Raritan AgentName Name Marketed by:Road, Agent Name $000,000 Marketed by: Rocco D’Armiento $000,000 $000,000 foxroach.com/NJHT2001084

Street | Princeton, 253253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 253Nassau Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ NJ O:O:609-924-1600 | foxroach.com 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com O: 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com ©2022 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH LLC. Affiliates, LLC. Hathaway Berkshire Hathaway ©2022 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire HathawayHathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, Berkshire ® ® HomeServices andBerkshire Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.Housing Equal Housing Opportunity. Information verified or ©2022 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary ofthe HomeServices ofHomeServices America, Inc.,symbol a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and aoffranchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the HomeServices and the Hathaway are registered service marks HomeServices of America, Inc. Equal Opportunity. Information not Berkshire verifiednot orHathaway guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation ® If your home isofcurrently listed a Broker, thisOpportunity. is not intendedInformation as a solicitation Equal Housing not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation HomeServices symbol are registered serviceguaranteed. marks of HomeServices America, Inc.with

3 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

Featured Listings Featured Listings Featured Listings


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 4

TOWN TOPICS

EVERYONE WILL NOTICE, BUT NO ONE WILL KNOW.

®

Princeton’s Weekly Community Newspaper Since 1946

DONALD C. STUART, 1946-1981 DAN D. COYLE, 1946-1973 Founding Editors/Publishers DONALD C. STUART III, Editor/Publisher, 1981-2001 LYNN ADAMS SMITH Publisher

LAURIE PELLICHERO, Editor BILL ALDEN, Sports Editor

MELISSA BILYEU Operations Director

DONALD GILPIN, WENDY GREENBERG, ANNE LEVIN, STUART MITCHNER, NANCY PLUM, DONALD H. SANBORN III, JEAN STRATTON, WILLIAM UHL Contributing Editors

CHARLES R. PLOHN Advertising Director JENNIFER COVILL Sales and Marketing Manager

FRANK WOJCIECHOWSKI, CHARLES R. PLOHN, WERONIKA A. PLOHN Photographers

JOANN CELLA Senior Account Manager, Marketing Coordinator

USPS #635-500, Published Weekly Subscription Rates: $60/yr (Princeton area); $65/yr (NJ, NY & PA); $68/yr (all other areas) Single Issues $5.00 First Class Mail per copy; 75¢ at newsstands For additional information, please write or call:

SARAH TEO Classified Ad Manager

Princeton’s Premier Facial Plastic Surgeon

JEFFREY EDWARD TRYON Art Director

Witherspoon Media Group 4438 Route 27, P.O. Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528 tel: 609-924-2200 www.towntopics.com fax: 609-924-8818

VAUGHAN BURTON Senior Graphic Designer

Periodicals Postage Paid in Princeton, NJ USPS #635-500 Postmaster, please send address changes to: P.O. Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528

(ISSN 0191-7056)

Eugenie Brunner, MD, FACS

Surgical Enhancements • Laser Skin Rejuvenation • Injectable Treatments

Facelift and Neck Lift

VariLite™ for Sun Damage

Restylane® and Botox® Cosmetic

A Surgeon’s Hands, An Artist’s Eye, A Woman’s Touch

FLYING HIGH: More than 20 amusement rides are offered at the annual Hillsborough Rotary Fair, which begins on August 16.

256 Bunn Drive, Suite 4, Princeton, NJ 08540 | 609.921.9497 BrunnerMD.com |

@EugenieBrunnerMD

Rides, Games, Fireworks the newly inducted president ture a cashless payment sysof the Rotary Club of Hillsbor- tem for all rides. Patrons can At Annual Rotary Fair

Beginning Tuesday, August 16, the annual Hillsborough Rotary Fair and Business Expo will turn the Hillsborough Promenade, 315 Route 206, into a classic carnival with a colorful midway, over 20 amusement rides, games of chance, fireworks, food vendors, and an exposition of local businesses. The fair runs through August 20. “We are very proud to host this annual Hillsborough family tradition,” said Ashley Rose,

ough. “The fair not only offers our community a fun summer event, but it raises the funds that enable our Rotary Club to help support numerous important community service initiatives.” In addition to rides, food vendors, games of chance, and an exposition of local businesses, Interstate Fireworks will hold a display on Friday, August 19, at approximately 10 p.m. (rain date is Saturday, August 20). The fair will once again fea-

purchase a special wristband at the centrally located kiosk station. A new digital map will allow patrons to scan a QR code with their phones, and other fair information will be displayed. For more information on the fair or how to participate as a vendor, call Ken Genco at (908) 229-5045, kgenco@att. net, or Abed Medawar, (908) 256 -5349, mobileabed @ gmail.com.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin

Robbinsville

Princeton

Kingston

Robbinsville

Princeton

Kingston

West Windsor

West Windsor

Ewing

Lawrenceville location coming soon! Formerly Michael’s Diner. Lawrenceville Lawrenceville location coming soon! Diner. Formerly Michael’s

Ewing

Lawrenceville

Crosswicks • Pennington

P RO C AC C I N I

Pizzeria and Forneria Crosswicks • Pennington

Crosswicks • Pennington

P RO C AC C I N I

Crosswicks • Pennington

P RO C AC C I N I

P RO C AC C I N I

getforky.com getforky.com

getforky.com PJs.indd 1

5/16/22 11:34 AM

“Tell Us What You Want” Survey: For the next month, as part of the new Master Plan process, the municipality invites consumers to share opinions and preferences about dining, shopping, and life in Princeton. It takes less than 10 minutes to complete at PrincetonSurvey.org. Rosedale Road Closure: The Rosedale Road construction to install a roundabout at General Johnson Drive/Greenway Meadows has begun. The roadway is now open to local traffic only. The project is expected to last through the summer. Trash Collection Delays: Due to the nationwide truck driver shortage, which has affected Princeton’s hauler (Interstate Waste Services), the delays are expected to continue as the company works on hiring more drivers. In the meantime, trash will be collected within 48 hours of the scheduled collection. COVID-19 Care Kits for Princeton Families: Low/moderate income families in Princeton can get these kits, which include tests and materials to respond to COVID-19, such as one-use thermometers, an oximeter, and extra household items. They are available for pickup at Princeton Human Services by calling (609) 6882055. Certain eligibility requirements apply. Volunteer to Be a Land Steward: Friends of Princeton Open Space (FOPOS) holds half-day volunteer sessions on a variety of conservation projects at the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Individuals, families, students, and corporate groups are welcome on July 16 or July 30 for a morning (9 a.m. -12 p.m.) or afternoon (1-4 p.m.). Fopos.org. Backpack and School Supplies Drive: Donate book bags and school supplies for Princeton Public School students from kindergarten through sixth grade. The deadline is Friday, August 5. Drop off at Princeton Human Services, 1 Monument Drive, weekdays between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Humanservices@princetonnj.gov. Free Vision and Dental Services for Low Income Residents: The municipality is offering these services for low-income Princeton residents impacted by the pandemic. For application information, visit Princetonnj.gov. Volunteers Needed for CASA: Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) for Children of Mercer and Burlington Counties — Mercer County location needs volunteers. The organization recruits, trains, and supervises community volunteers who speak up in Family Court for the best interests of Mercer County children that have been removed from their families due to abuse and/or neglect and placed in the foster care system. A virtual information session is August 11 at 11 a.m. Visit casamb.org.


IN PRINT. ONLINE. AT HOME. Subscription Information: 609.924.5400 ext. 30 or subscriptions@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

princetonmagazine.com

“LOVE AND COMMUNICATION”: Filmmaker Jim Christy is shown at the Arizona International Film Festival, where his film, a fictionalized account of how having a child with autism impacts family relationships, had its premiere in May. (Photo courtesy of Jim Christy).

Film Shows Impact on Families Who Raise a Child with Autism

Jim Christy wants you to know that he is just like any other parent who wants the best for his child. But as the father of a son with autism, his parenting experience presented him with additional challenges and decisions that can put family relationships at risk. Christy, of Princeton, an award-winning playwright, director, producer, and actor, makes that point in his

that she asked their son to say “please” for a toy, something he had done many times, but he began turning away. That gave her pause and she began to sense that something was amiss. In both the movie and in their life, neither parent thought the school districtAsk around or check our reviews on Google, assigned classroom was r ight for their son. The and you’ll learn that our practice is the teaching was not specific to autism and there was inregion’s #1 choice for expert, carefree dentistry. sufficient staffing. Christy and Phillipuk knew from From general family dentistry to implants their own research that the and total smile renewal, this is the dental classroom would not give Jimmy the skills he needed. practice people enjoy talking about. Instead they paid for a private school, as well as lawCall today to schedule your visit. yers to get funded. Although they had just moved into Kirk D. Huckel DMD, FAGD 609-924-1414 their house, they moved to The film is “generating Somerset County and were Kiersten Huckel DMD www.PrincetonDentist.com some energy” as more peo- successful in getting a better Shanni Reine-Mutch DDS 11 Chambers St., Princeton ple hear about it, Christy program. Continued on Next Page says, because “people feel like these kinds of stories are not being told, stories about the impact on the family.” While the events in the film are fictionalized, the premise is real. “When you want the best for your kid, raising a child with autism, it can be so hard on a family,” said Christy. “For my wife and I, it brought us closer together. For the couple in the film, like so many in real life, it pushes their marriage to the breaking point.” A well-received play by Christy on which the film is based was produced at the Passage Theatre in Trenton in 2010. Why a film? ”To open the world up a little Services are provided in the following areas: bit,” said Christy. “Expand the story, get a wider audience.” The film was shot in • Divorce • Claims of Unmarried 2018 but was delayed during • Custody and Parenting Time Cohabitants/Palimony the pandemic. • Marital Settlement Agreements • Post Judgment Enforcement Autism is a developmen• Prenuptial Agreements and Modification tal disability which often • Domestic Violence • Mediation doesn’t present itself until a • Child Relocation Issues • Appeals child is 2 or 3 years old, and • Civil Unions and • Adoption is characterized by differDomestic Partnerships • Surrogacy ences in behavior, communication, sensory processing, social interaction and learning. The functioning level varies widely. The Love and Communication story parallels life with son Jimmy, who is James Christy III, although he is Samuel Holden in the Nicole Jillian John A. Jennifer Lydia film. Christy and his wife Huckerby Frost Hartmann, III Haythorn Fabbro lived in Hudson County at Kalyan Chairman Keephart the time of their son’s diagnosis. “Right away, you want to get the best services,” he said on a June 30 Autism 609-520-0900 * Radio podcast. Christy notes www.pralaw.com that in a typical scenario, a parent may sense issues with 989 Lenox Drive, Suite 101 their child before a doctor Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 does, and that is what hap*Pellettieri Rabstein & Altman was selected to The Best Lawyers Best Law Firms list. The Best Law Firms list is issued by U.S. News & World Report. pened. Phillipuk describes, A description of the selection methodologies can be found at https://bestlawfirms.usnews.com/methodology.aspx. No aspect of this advertisement in an informational video, has been approved by the Supreme Court of New Jersey. film, Love and Communication, which will have its East Coast premiere at the New Hope Film Festival on July 23. (It was shown in the Arizona International Film Festival in May.) Christy, and his wife, artist Mary Phillipuk, have stood up to school leadership, done their own research, looked into myriad healing and educational techniques, and spent out of pocket to help their son try to reach his potential and live as independently as possible.

Word of mouth.

TOPICS

Of the Town

Finding the right solution for you in

Family Law

Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton NEW PRODUCTS ADDED WEEKLY!

www.princetonmagazinestore.com

®

5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

One-Year Subscription: $10 Two-Year Subscription: $15

Our best referral?


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 6

Film on Autism Continued from Preceding Page

Pizzeria and Forneria

243 NORTH UNION STREET

LAMBERTVILLE, NJ 08530

COMING SOON!

getforky.com

In the movie, the best school has no openings and a long waiting list, but the father in the movie pursues a placement for his son. The father favors the applied behavior analysis technique of teaching although Christy admits the reliance on data can feel rigid. Meanwhile, the mother in the film is intrigued by a relationship-based program offered through expensive DVDs and promises that Christy says sometimes seem like scams. But the possibility of creating a bond with a distant child was worth pursuing. In the play, the young child was unseen. An actor working with the child turned to the audience. “The child was in the audience,” explained Christy. “It made a connection, but we knew that wouldn’t work in a film.” In the movie young Sammy is played by twin youngsters from Princeton. The tone of the film is a little more raw, said Christy, as the story is told visually, not verbally. The movie takes us through some antagonistic Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings, and some new characters are introduced, such as a therapist who has a nephew with autism. “That story is important to me,” said Christy, because while his own family was able to choose a better program, “many people don’t have a choice” — and he wanted to reflect that in the movie. The film was shot in various locations around New Jersey, but mostly in Princeton. Scenes with the main couple were shot in the Christy home on Leigh Avenue, and an important scene was shot in a neighbors’ home. “In general, the community was overwhelmingly supportive,” said Christy. Tony from Local Greek learned that we were shooting on our block and volunteered to make a great meal for the entire crew one night.” Christy, 51, grew up in theater as his dad, James Christy Sr., was an area director and theater professor at Villanova University. In fact, an actress he met at a Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival play directed by his father, Ellen Adair, is in the film and plans to attend the New Hope film premiere. She had a part in the television series Homeland. Lev Gorn, who was in The Americans on television, plays a charismatic purveyor on the online relationship-based technique. Christy himself, was “the nerdy, sniffling kid” in the movie, The Dead Poets Society. Christy’s goal for Love and Communication is to show what parents of children diagnosed with autism are dealt. “People talk about parents of special needs kids being heroes. And they mean well by it, but people need to know we’re just like anyone else. We didn’t choose this. This is about people who are doing the best they can.” He wants to keep telling the story, and keep screening the film. His goals for his son Jimmy, now age 19, have evolved. “They are not the same goals as when he was 3,” Christy says. “We are not going to find the great cure. He will always need care. His school has been amazing, and we want him to grow as much as he can. We want him to be happy.” For more information, or to purchase tickets for the New Hope Film Festival, visit loveandcommunication.com. —Wendy Greenberg

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What is your favorite way to eat blueberries?” (Asked Sunday at Terhune Orchards’ Blueberry Bash) (Photos by Weronika A. Plohn)

Brooke: “I like blueberry muffins. I will bake them with my mommy.” Jamie: “I am planning on making some blueberry pancakes with my daughter and we will also puree some blueberries for my baby to try. She has never tried blueberries before, so it is pretty exciting!” —Brooke and Jamie Miller, Scotch Plains

Evelyn: “I like big blueberry muffins with some plain sprinkles on top.” Eleanor: “I like blueberry pie with some whipped cream and some lemonade.” Leo: “I like to eat them off the bush. I had three blueberries when we were picking them today at the farm.” —Evelyn Rodenbough, Pen Argyl, Pa., with Eleanor and Leo Onisick, Levittown, Pa.

Patricia: “My favorite is blueberry pie with sweet condensed milk and graham cracker crust.” Jamie: “Blueberry pie with vanilla ice cream.” —Patricia Arbitell, Ewing with Jamie Secula, Titusville

Anish: “My daughter just picks the blueberries off the bush and eats them. I like blueberry muffins; sometimes we add them to the pancakes. We most likely will use the blueberries that we picked today to make some smoothies at home.” —Ojasvi and Anish Bhatt, New Providence

Lucy: “I like my dad’s blueberry pancakes a lot!” Diane: “I like blueberry pie with vanilla ice cream.” Colin: “I like to eat them in muffins and pancakes. I just like to eat them plain with some ice cream too.” —Lucy, Diane, and Colin Gold, Cranford


7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

Sale Now through Sunday July 17th!!


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 8

BOE Election continued from page one

B o a r d ’s E q u i t y, Po l i c y, Long-Term Planning, and Student Achievement committees, and co-chair of the Operations Committee. Kendal has served as BOE president since Januar y 2022. A Princeton resident since 2011, she has a son who graduated from PHS and a daughter who is currently a PHS 10th grader. She will be running for her third term on the BOE. “It has been a privilege to ser ve the community, especially given the unprecedented challenges during the pandemic,” she wrote. “I am grateful for the trust our community has placed in me, and believe the deep knowledge and experience I have acquired through two terms on the Board will continue to assist the district in navigating challenges and ensure all students benefit from the educational excellence in our district.”

In addition to her role as president, Kendal serves on the Equity, Personnel, and Student Achievement committees and is an alternate on the Board’s Long-Term Planning Committee. The BOE, according to the PPS website, “ is an elected, unpaid group of 10 citizens who act as a single body to set policy and make decisions on educational, financial, and personal matters for Princeton Public Schools on behalf of all residents.” The most important functions of the Board include s et t ing and maintain ing p olicie s t hat def i ne t he distr ict’s values and expectations; approving the annual school budget; representing the community’s e du c at iona l ph i los ophy ; hiring and annual evaluation of the superintendent; and supporting and implementing the district’s Strategic Plan. —Donald Gilpin

REFINED INTERIORS

Princeton | 609 921-2827 | eastridgedesign.com

Princeton Health Establishes Nursing Excellence Institute

Penn Medicine Princeton Health has launched an Institute for Nursing Excellence to foster highly skilled and empowered nurses who will help lead the way in delivering high-quality clinical care across Princeton Health and in the community. The institute will build on Princeton Health’s tradition of nurse-led quality initiatives and research that directly translates to better care at the bedside. T he inst it ute contains three centers: Professional Development and Recognition; Clinical Practice; and Innovation and Research. Programs will be developed to give nurses opportunities to enhance their clinical skills, pursue career and educational goals, and participate in research and innovation. The institute is led by a team that includes Princeton Health’s chief nursing officer, direct care nurses, nurse administrators, patients, physicians, and representatives from the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Nursing. Experienced nurse leaders will support innovation from concept through implementation, provide access to grant funding and scholarships, connect to industry experts, and mentor nurses along their career path. “Our vision for the Institute for Nursing Excellence is to accelerate transformation and innovation in nursing and healthcare,” said Sheila Kempf, vice president, patient care services and chief nursing officer at Princeton Health.

witness R O S E B. S I M P S O N

opening celebration Saturday, July 23, 1–4 p.m.

Discover how witnessing happens both ways.

FREE ADMISSION

11 Hulfish Street

Art@Bainbridge is made possible through the generous support of the Virginia and Bagley Wright, Class of 1946, Program Fund for Modern and Contemporary Art; the Kathleen C. Sherrerd Program Fund for American Art; Joshua R. Slocum, Class of 1998, and Sara Slocum; Barbara and Gerald Essig; and Rachelle Belfer Malkin, Class of 1986, and Anthony E. Malkin. Additional support is provided by Sueyun and Gene Locks, Class of 1959; the Humanities Council; and the Native American and Indigenous Studies Initiative at Princeton (NAISIP). Rose B. Simpson, Tusked 1 (detail), 2019. Collection of Steve Corkin and Dan Maddalena. © Rose B. Simpson / courtesy of the artist and Jessica Silverman, San Francisco / photo: John Wilson White

Princeton Day School Student Brings Chess Camp to Area Youngsters When Arjun Kumar was in fifth grade, he learned to play chess and became a competitive player. Recently, the Princeton Day School (PDS) rising senior decided he would put his passion for chess to use serving the community. Arjun, 16, and two friends set up a program that is not for competitive players, but introduces the game to youngsters, most of whom had never played it before. It went over well. Most of the youths in the Joy, Hopes and Dreams program at HomeFront had never moved pieces across a chess board before. But now many have a new interest, said Arjun. T he program nur t ures children from birth through teenage years by providing homework help, mentoring, and cultural enrichment. It provides after-school programs on weekdays and educational and recreational programs on weekends, according to the HomeFront website. HomeFront offers housing and other services to help families break the cycle of poverty. Arjun conducted the camp, along with classmates Jinu Ryu and Winston Ni, at the Lawrence Community Center in Lawrenceville the week of June 20 through Ju ne 24. T he nonprof it organ i z at ion t hat A r ju n started last fall received a grant award, the Serve This Summer Challenge, through America’s Promise Alliance. A total of 375 grants were given to summer ser vice projects, to young adults serving their communities. The $300 grant was used to purchase chess sets. T he prog ram was not without challenges. “When we came there were 20-30 kids each time and a variety of ages,” said Arjun in a telephone interview. “So we were trying to teach everyone to play chess, despite the difference in ages. But

after one week, a lot of kids were developing a passion for it.” Community service is not new to Arjun, who started his own nonprofit, Helping Hands of Princeton. “Helping Hands is a volunteer initiative. We have organized food drives for HomeFront and Trenton A rea S oup Kitchen (TASK), a diaper drive, and a personal hygiene drive. We help local communities,” he said. Other Helping Hands projects have included a personal care drive for Arm in Arm of Trenton, a book fair at Barnes and Noble for the benefit of the children’s library at HomeFront, and other programs. Helping Hands was developed as a bridge to the communit y. “Dur ing the pandemic, I felt like I was in a bubble, disconnected, and I wanted to do community service to better connect with the community,” said Arjun. “My hope is to teach everyone to play chess,” he said. “It can teach critical thinking skills, and the club is social as well.” Arjun is president of his school debate club, and a SIMS (Success in Math and Science) center mentor at PDS. He is an avid chess player and was part of his school team that has placed in tournaments. The youths of the Joy, Hopes and Dreams pro gram “enjoyed what we did,” he said. “It was a new experience but they were engaged.” Arjun, who is spending the summer as an intern in a clinical research lab at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia studying T-cells in asthma, hopes to continue the chess programs at HomeFront, with classmates Jinu and Winston. They hope to develop a love for chess among the participants, and also hope they have fun. —Wendy Greenberg

Family Movie Night Planned Behind Alexander Hall

The Princeton University Art Museum’s Annual Picnic and Family Film Night is Thursday, July 28 at 6 p.m., on Alexander Beach, behind Alexander Hall on the campus. The picnic will include live music, barbecue, and family-friendly activities. It is co-sponsored by the Princeton YMCA. The movie Fantasia will begin at sunset, approximately 8 p.m. Released in 1940, the film “represented Walt Disney’s boldest experiment to date, bringing to life his vision of blending whimsical animations with classical music,” reads a statement from the museum. Participants are advised to bring a blanket or chair. Popcorn will be provided. In the event of rain, the picnic will be held in Frist Campus Center multipurpose rooms, and the film will be shown on August 2 on Alexander Beach. Visit ar tmuseum.princeton.edu for more information.

Lorraine Goodman Joins Big Brothers Big Sisters

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mercer County (BBBS) has appointed Lorraine Goodman, former interim executive director at the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund (LALDEF), as the agency’s new director of advancement.

Lorraine Goodman

A graduate of Princeton University and New York University, Goodman has worked in nonprofits for nearly 15 years. Her professional fundraising experience ranges from helping The Red Hot Organization, which produces record albums and then donates the proceeds to AIDS -related charities, earn its first grant from the National Endowment for the Arts; to acting as Princeton AlumniCorps’ Development Officer and leading L ALDEF through the height of the pandemic. Her volunteer experience includes chairing Princeton Women’s Network of New York City, raising money for Broadway Cares/Equity Fights Aids, narrating onair for the InTouch Radio Network for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and performing in hospitals with Broadway singers for Hearts & Voices. She is currently chairing Princeton’s Theatre HELPING HANDS: Three friends who ran a chess program at Home- Intime’s 100th and PrinceFront’s Joy, Hopes and Dreams after-school program taught the ton Summer Theater’s 50th game to youths who had never played the game before. They Anniversary weekend-long celebration, which will be are, from left, Jinu Ryu, Winston Ni, and Arjun Kumar. held on campus in November 2022. “I am excited to join BBBS R of Mercer County as we emerge from the pandemic,” Goodman said. “The young people of Mercer County – and indeed around the world – need our programs more than ever. Our mission to support children through one-to-one mentoring relationships has never been 609 . 203 . 0741 more critical.”


Monday, July 8, 1776 was a historic day in Trenton. The city — then part of Hunterdon County — was among three sites (Easton and Philadelphia were the others) where the Declaration of Independence was read aloud for the first time. Last year, 245 years to the day of that historic reading on the steps of the courthouse on Warren Street, the Kiwanis Club of Trenton revived the tradition where the building once stood. Among those reciting a portion of the document aloud was Bernard McMullan, president of the Trenton Council of Civic Associations. He got an idea. “I knew that the first reading had taken place across the street. A plaque that had been there on a granite pedestal was gone — probably ripped off and never replaced 30 or 40 years ago,” he said. “I thought, wouldn’t it be great to restore the plaque?” McMullan invited the Kiwanis Club to collaborate with him on an effort to find funding for a new plaque. They secured grants and support from the Mercer County Cultural and Historical Commission, and Trenton’s Department of Parks, Recreation, and Culture. Local graphic artist John Gummere was recruited to create the design. “We consulted with the Trenton Histor ical Society, and [author/historian] Larry Kidder made sure it was historically accurate,” McMullan said. “Someone

from the Old Barracks sent a photo from an old map that showed a hand drawing of what the courthouse would have looked like, so we were able to incorporate that.” Last Friday, July 8, the plaque was formally unveiled as part of the Kiwanis Club’s public reading of the Declaration by 19 volunteers. A mural across the street depicts the original event. The plaque sits on property recently purchased by the Communications Workers of America, who agreed to let it be placed there. In addition to Gummere’s desig n show ing t he old courthouse, the marker has a feature that speaks to contemporary life — a QR code that links to audio recordings of the document being read by current residents of Trenton, in both English and Spanish. “Each one said the names of three of the signers of the Declaration,” said McMullan, “They were collected into audio files and complied in the right order, and put up on the website. So you click on the code in the plaque itself, and it takes you to the website where you can listen to the recording.” Having readers in English and Spanish was part of an effort to reflect the current population of the city. Since McMullan runs the annual Taste Trenton weekend, he is familiar with many of the people who run Latino restaurants. “I told them I needed readers, and they lined them up for me. One of my co-conspirators in

Police Blotter Attempted Bank Robbery Now Under Investigation

REVIVING A TRADITION: This plaque has been re-installed on South Warren Street in Trenton, where the Declaration of Independence was read for the first time in 1776. Taste Trenton went out of her way to find people from a variety of Latin American countries,” he said. “We also focused on some of the people who had read in the prior year. We stayed away from politicians, other than [Trenton] Mayor Reed Gusciora.” Wording on the plaque refers to the city’s central role in the war for independence. The two Battles of Trenton “demonstrated the resolve of the colonists to successfully achieve the independence from Great Britain

that they had declared,” it reads. Last week’s reading was held as a part of Liberty Weekend in Trenton. McMullan hopes it will become an annual event. “It would be great if we could organize a weekend or a week in summer to commemorate the role of Trenton in the revolutionary period and beyond,” he said. “Liberty weekend went well. Now, we’ll sit down with people and see what we can come up with for the future.” —Anne Levin

On July 6, at 3:19 p.m., the Princeton Police Department ( PPD) responded to a report of an armed robbery at TD Bank, 883 State Road. A police investigation revealed that a male entered TD Bank and approached the teller counter, where there was no teller present, and the suspect twice unsuccessfully attempted to jump over the counter. He exited TD Bank and fled on a black motorcycle toward Princeton Avenue, and was last seen stopped at the intersection of Princeton Avenue and Route 206. According to the PPD, the suspect did not brandish a weapon, did not make any threats, and nothing was stolen from the bank. Police describe the suspect as male, approximately 5’4-5’5, wearing green pants, a black shirt, black gloves, gray New Balance sneakers, a chest harness with a GoPro style camera attached to it, a black half shell motorcycle helmet, and a gas mask. The PPD asks anyone who may have witnessed the incident, or who has additional information, to contact Det. Robert Allie at (609) 9212100, extension 2123. On July 9, at 8:26 p.m., a Librar y Place resident reported that two people entered her rental vehicle at 6:09 p.m. while it was parked and unlocked in her driveway. The individuals

did not steal any property from the vehicle, and fled in a gray sedan. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On July 6, at 10:01 p.m., an individual reported that her Apple Watch was taken from her place of employment on Nor th Harrison Street between 5 p.m. on June 3 and 10 p.m. on June 4. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On July 6, at 12:20 p.m., a Philip Drive resident repor ted t hat his vehicle, which was parked in his driveway, unlocked with the keys inside, was stolen between 6 p.m. on July 5, and 8 a.m. on July 6. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On July 5, at 7:57 p.m., subsequent to a call about a vehicle being driven erratically on North Stanworth Drive, a 31-year-old female from Hamilton was arrested after it was determined she was driving while intoxicated and was in possession of drug paraphernalia. She was charged accordingly, processed, and released. On July 5, at 7:46 p.m., a Clay Street resident reported that someone stole a bicycle, which was kept unsecured in the backyard of the residence, sometime between 5 p.m. on July 4, and 7:15 p.m. on July 5. The Detective Bureau is investigating. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

Unveiling of a New Plaque Marks Site of Historic Reading in Trenton

Think Global Buy Local

We’re excited to welcome 5 new team members to the Glenmede Princeton office Our Princeton office welcomed five new top-tier professionals who are familiar with the needs of our clients and prospects in the area: Elizabeth Protage Walsh, Business Development Director; Kimberly Kingsland, Wealth Advisor; Paul Gaudio, CFP ®, ChFC®, Wealth Planner; and Christine Soltis and Deborah Monigan, Client Service Associates. Collectively they bring a wealth of experience and knowledge, and will play a key role in providing the high level of client service that distinguishes Glenmede. We’re confident they’ll add value to our highly personalized and tailored approach to goals-based wealth and investment management.

To learn more, visit www.glenmede.com


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 10

Prospect Avenue continued from page one

including KyuJung Whang, the University’s vice president for facilities; former Municipal Planner Michael La Place; Councilwoman Mia Sacks; and Harrison. “The purpose of the designation is not to freeze Prospect the way it is today, but rather to manage any future changes that the clubs or the University would like to make, in a way that balances the property owners’ needs with the meaning and significance Prospect Avenue has for people in the town,” said Zink. Princeton resident Kip Cherry urged Council to adopt the ordinance. “Historic districts create a context for change,” she said. “To put Prospect into context, this area represents a major period of change and evolution for the town and the University as well as the country as a whole.” In addition to the unique architecture of the eating clubs, Cherry cited the employment of formerly segregated residents, and the fight to allow women to join the clubs as important milestones in their history. Former Princeton Borough Mayor Yina Moore, a University alumnus whose grandfather worked on “the avenue,” as Prospect was often referred to by members of the African American community, said the history of that community’s involvement with the eating clubs is important and needs to be further documented. Resident John Heilner, also an alumnus, singled out Whang and University President Christopher L. Eisgruber “for moving the University off

its original ‘we just can’t do it any other way’ stance. I hope this excellent compromise marks a turning point in town/gown relations when it comes to other development projects that might alter the historic streetscapes for which Princeton is famous,” he said. Councilman Leighton Newlin commented that members of the African American community, specifically from the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood, worked not only on building the eating clubs, but many other buildings in and around the campus as well. “I just want to let the public know that the imprint of the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood was felt on the avenue — that’s for sure — but was also felt throughout the bricks and mortar of the University and the infrastructure of Princeton,” he said. Also at the meeting, Council discussed how and when to return to in-person and hybrid gatherings. The Zoom meetings that have been in place since the beginning of the pandemic have resulted in increased participation by the public, some members noted. “Going back to in-person does not mean in any way we are interested in having a small number of people participate in our meetings,” said Sacks. Deputy Administrator for Health and Community Services Jeffrey Grosser and Municipal Attorney Trishka Cecil were consulted about details. Council plans to revisit the idea and possibly adopt a resolution to hold in-person meetings starting September 12, at its next gathering, which is July 25. —Anne Levin

YWCA Princeton Welcomes welcomed by YWCA Princeton stakeholders and staff Five New Board Members

YWCA Princeton is beginning its new fiscal year by welcoming five new members to its Board of Directors. As members of the YW board, they will help steer the organization towards a sustainable future by adopting sound, ethical, and legal governance and financial management policies, as well as by making sure it has adequate resources to advance its mission to eliminate racism and empower women. Longtime Y WCA Princeton supporter, former program participant, and board member Leslie Straut Ward also moves into her new role as board president. YWCA Princeton’s Board of Directors — a uniquely all-female board at this time — offers a variety of professional experiences and networks. Critically, they work collaboratively to strengthen connections and partnerships in the community to advance the organization’s reach and deepen its impact. YWCA Princeton welcomes Reina Fleury, vice president of human resources at Penn Medicine Princeton Health; Nikki Etheridge Jones, head of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, and People Ops at Healt hcare Business woman’s Association; Kendra Lee, deputy director of programs of Mercer County One-Stop Career Center and Workforce Develop ment Board; Sheila Nall, principal, director of interior design at KSS Architects; and Leena Shah, executive director of oncology/tumor strategies at Bristol Myers Squibb. New members were

at the Annual Membership Meeting in May and participated more recently in an orientation in the last week of June. Ward said, “I’m honored to lead YWCA Princeton’s Board of Directors during its centennial year serving the community. My fellow board members will support the YW’s staff to ensure we are meeting the ever-changing needs of women and families while advancing our mission.” For more information, visit ywcaprinceton.org.

Area Nonprofits Receive Funds Raised by Sukkah Village Event

Sukkah Village, an event spearheaded by architect Joshua Zinder and his firm JZA+D — aimed at raising awareness of homelessness, hunger, and refugeeism, and the power of design to make a difference — has culminated in funds raised being presented to nonprofit participants. The 10 -day event took place last September in several locations throughout Princeton, concurrently with the Jewish festival holiday Sukkot. It featured public displays of sukkahs, the hut-like shelters that figure prominently in the observance of the holiday. Designed by area architects and student design teams, the one-of-a-kind sukkahs were sold through an online auction as part of Sukkah Village 2021-related fundraising efforts, to benefit 19 nonprofit organizations that participated in and supported the event. Recently the more than $20,000 raised was presented by Zinder along with Mark Merkovitz, president of Jewish Federation of Princeton Mercer Bucks, to leaders of recipient groups Arts Council of Princeton, WitherspoonJackson Historic and Cultural Society, Trenton Area Soup Kitchen, TJC Interfaith Refugee Resettlement Committee, and many others. According to Zinder, the goal of Sukkah Village was to present Sukkot as an opportunity for communities

MAKE WAY FOR TURTLES: July is peak nesting season for the eastern painted turtle and other females of the species searching for higher ground to lay their eggs. The Friends of Princeton Open Space (FOPOS) urge drivers to be on the lookout for them as they cross busy roadways. (Photo by Anna Corichi, FOPOS) to come together in celebration, and to learn about and address issues that relate thematically to the Jewish festival holiday commemorating the plight of the Israelites as they sought shelter in the wilderness. “Thanks to the dedication and inspiration of our event partners and sponsors, and to the talent and labor of some of New Jersey’s best architects, we were able to connect our spiritual, communal, and charitable efforts to promote the power of design and creativity in addressing some of the critical issues facing New Jersey, and the world more broadly,” he said. In addition to the public displays of sukkahs and the fundraising auction last September, the multi-day Sukkah Village happenings included walking tours, a film screening, panel discussions, a family-oriented crafts event, and a “Sukkah Hop” in which visitors had the chance to hear directly from design teams and the nonprofit community organizations.

Monthly Storytelling Series Continues in Outdoor Setting

The Arts Council of Princeton and African American Cultural Collaborative of Mercer County (AACCMC) will present their monthly Story & Verse on Friday, July 15, 7 p.m. at Pettoranello Gardens, 20 Mountain Avenue. This poetic and storytelling outdoor open mic is free and open to all. Story & Verse was established in February 2020, and has continued monthly since. Taking place in the Arts Council’s Solley Theater throughout the year, the series welcomes local and regional talent to perform original works inspired by a monthly theme, with a goal of providing free, community-created entertainment. The Summer Series marks the return to Pettoranello Gardens. Per for mers are inv ited to present original work inspired by this month’s theme, “Spark in the Dark.” Interested performers should arrive by 6:45 p.m. For more information, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org.

SPECIALIZING IN THE SALE & PURCHASE OF FINE JEWELRY, DIAMONDS, WATCHES AND COLLECTIBLES Appointments Encouraged oakgem.com 39 Bridge Street Lambertville, NJ 08530 609.300.6900

4 via Sunset Palm Beach, FL 33480 877.355.9500

FUNDING THE COMMUNITY: Sukkah Village organizers Joshua Zinder, left, and Mark Merkovitz, right, present a check to Shirley Satterfield and Julian Edgren of the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and Cultural Society. (Photo courtesy JZA+D)

Town Topics a Princeton tradition! ®

est. 1946


rive | Lawrenceville NJ 08648 ns@morrishall.org | www.morrishall.org

A Refreshing, Contemporary Approach To Nursing Home Living

Our focus is on a meaningful life and a real home with highly trained caregivers. Six strategically designed single-level homes with ten private bed-and-bath suites and an open floor plan.

Our focus is on a meaningful life and a real home with highly M Ostrategically V E I N Sdesigned P E C I single-level AL trained caregivers. Six homes with First Month Free! ten private bed-and-bath suites and an open floor plan within the model of THE GREEN HOUSE®. Morris Hall Circle Drive | Lawrenceville NJ 08648 609-712-1016 | mhadmissions@morrishall.org | www.morrishall.org

11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

gful life and a real home with highly gically designed single-level homes with ites and an open floor plan within the HE GREEN HOUSE®.


continued from page one

planet, comes from fusion. In the case of the sun it’s hydrogen or hydrogen fusion. As gravitational forces push the nuclei together and they fuse, that process releases energy.” “T h e f u s ion re ac t ions themselves must reach enough heat to make the process self-sustaining,” continued Menard. “Burning plasma processes are estimated to be on course to viability in the 2030s.” PPPL, which is managed by Princeton University for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science, is a highly collaborative and inter national communit y of scientists where people from around the world share ideas and questions. Princeton University has been a

longtime leader and pioneer in the field of plasma phys ic s re s e arch. PPPL also works with private fusion companies, many of them startups, to address the scientific and technical issues that they face. PPPL is also engaged in exploring all design, engineering, and fabrication issues required to bring a pilot plant into operation. Regarding PPPL’s educational offerings, Menard said, “We’re very active at the undergraduate and graduate levels. We do outreach at the high school level as well. Princeton has a program in graduate physics and I’m a product of that. In plasma physics, especially, we’re a leader. Another thing we’re doing more of is our apprenticeship program. Having a Ph.D. in plasma physics, not everyone has

one of those, but we have a need for people who are technically able to offer assistance in the lab. Our lab, in collaboration with other universities around the world runs, a Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI).” Applications for SULI are accepted annually for three separate internship periods, all of which last 10 weeks. In this program, students work under the guidance of laboratory staff, scientists, and engineers. Another program is the Young Women’s Conference, held every spring for girls in seventh through 10th grade. Due to COVID-19, the event has been online, but there is hope that it will return onsite to Princeton University’s Frick Laboratory. The conference includes speakers, demonstrations, and panels

FUSION PILOT PLANT: Shown here is PPPL’s National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U). The spherical device is shaped like a cored apple and can produce high-pressure plasmas — a necessity for fusion reactions — with relatively low and cost-effective magnetic fields. Temperatures of the plasma encircling the central core of the machine can exceed 10 million degrees Celsius. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications)

from all over the country. K-12 students are eligible to compete in the New Jersey Regional Science Bowl, hosted by PPPL , where teams of students answer questions related to all fields of math and science. There are also a limited number of semester-long internships at PPPL for high school students. These are offered in the fall, spring, and / or summer. And, although COVID-19 has reduced the number of classroom tours to PPPL, traditionally the lab has always opened its doors to young, curious students and teachers. One can read more about PPPL’s s cient if ic bre a kthroughs in their annual research magazine, Quest, just released for 2022 and available online at pppl.gov. As L ab Director Steve Cowley stated in the latest issue of Quest, “PPPL is the only national laboratory devoted to reproducing on Earth the fusion energy that powers the sun and the stars.” The lab has also recently expanded its studies into the fields of quantum microelectronics and new areas of computer science, which seem to complement PPPL’s central goal of cutting-edge COUNTING THE INSECTS THAT COUNT: Casey Burton, one of seven interns working with Friends of Princeton Open Space plasma science. (FOPOS), checks a hanging insect trap. The trap is part of a —Taylor Smith count of beneficial insects that will help determine the effectiveness of ongoing habitat restoration projects at the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Preserve in Princeton. Visit fopos. org for more information. (Photo by Anna Corichi, FOPOS)

Available for Lunch & Dinner Mmm..Take-Out

ONLINE www.towntopics.com

41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton www.tortugasmv.com

Events • Parties • Catering (609) 924-5143

Summer Square on the

Best Pizzeria Thank you to our customers for voting us

Best Pizza Best Pizza

Thank you to our customers for voting us

Events

Movies on the Green

Dueling Piano Nights

Summer Music Series

Thursdays, 6pm-8pm

July & August Every Saturday 12pm-2pm

Summer Music Series Movies Start at Dusk July 15th: Encanto August 5: The Princess Diaries

“Best Pizza Since [1950] Conte’s has become a Princeton destination; a great old-school bar that also happens to serve some of New Jersey’s best pizza, thin-crusted and bubbly. The restaurant hasn’t changed much since then; even the tables are the same. It’s a simple, no-frills space, but if you visit during peak times, be prepared to wait well over an hour for a table.

Thank you to our customers for voting us

First Fridays

June-August First Friday of each month 6pm-8pm

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 12

Scientific Advances

July & August Every Saturday 12pm-2pm

We could not have reached this accomplishment withoutWeour employees and customers. coulddedicated not have reached these accomplishment without dedicated We could not haveyou reached this accomplishment Thank fromour the owners of Conte’s employees and customers. without ourThank dedicated employees customers. you from the owners of Conte’s Serving the Princeton community for over 80and years, and we will continue to serve Serving Princeton forofover Thank youthefrom thecommunity owners Conte’s you another 80 years and more. 80 years, and we will continue to serve

Serving the Princeton community for 80 over 80and years, you another years more.and we will continue to serve Now serving gluten-free pizza, pasta, beer & vodka! you– another 80 years–and more. Mon 11:30-9 · Tues-Fri 11:30-10:30

– 4-10:30 · Sun – 4-9 For more information, please visit palmersquare.com/events Mon – 11:30-9Sat · Tues-Fri – 11:30-10:30 · Sat – 4-10:30 · Sun – 4-9 Now serving gluten-free pizza, pasta, beer & vodka! & download the Palmer Square App!

339 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ 08540 339 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ 08540 Mon –could 11:30-9 · Tues-Fri – 11:30-10:30 ·•Sat – 4-10:30 · Sun – 4-9 (609) 921-8041 • www.contespizzaandbar.com We not have reached this accomplishment (609) 921-8041 www.contespizzaandbar.com 339 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ and 08540customers. without our dedicated employees (609) 921-8041 • www.contespizzaandbar.com


Mailbox

West Windsor Warehouse Project is Regional Public Health, Safety Threat

Preserving Princeton’s Unique Historic Character is a Priority All Can Embrace

2012 Princeton Master Plan lists over three dozen “Suggested Historic Districts and Sites,” only two of which — Witherspoon-Jackson and now Prospect Avenue — have been designated. As town officials develop the new Master Plan with consultants and community input, the suggested historic districts and sites should be prioritized with a timeline for detailed consideration and possible designation. As development pressures continue to grow in Princeton over the coming decades, preserving our town’s unique historic character is a priority we all can embrace, for ourselves and for future generations. CLIFFORD ZINK Aiken Avenue

Books

13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

each employed at NJDEP and as a Princeton University researcher. This is a regional public health and safety threat which requires input action of neighboring municipalities and Mercer County officials, as well as the state NJDEP and NJDOT. I hope you will raise this with relevant officials at the municipal, county, and state levels in your official capacities and give input at this stage of the project when it is most effective rather than later. To the Editor: This is directed to elected and other officials, in reaction Thanks for your usual diligence. to the article on page 1 in Town Topics, July 6, 2022, reGRACE SINDEN garding West Windsor’s (WW) plans for a huge (ultimately Ridgeview Circle 5.5 million square feet) warehouse development on Route 1 at Clarksville Road. This includes the WW Planning Board’s approval of 3 million square feet for three warehouses encompassing 461 loading docks and 507 trailer parking spaces. This is only the first phase of the warehouse To the Editor: development. The second phase proposes another four Princeton Council’s unanimous vote on Monday evening warehouses, not yet approved by the WW Planning Board. to adopt the ordinance establishing the Prospect Avenue There have been several areas of concern raised, in- Historic District is a notable community accomplishment. cluding by two dissenting members of the WW Planning One year ago, a small portion of the University’s ES-SEAS Board and WW residents. However, there has not been development plan imperiled the unique architectural and as much attention as necessary to air quality degradation cultural heritage of Prospect Avenue. Concerned resifrom diesel fumes of the expected number of trucks. Air dents and alumni formed the Save Prospect Coalition, pollution (as well as increased stormwater) does not respect one member started a petition eventually signed by over municipal boundaries. 1,700 people, and others proposed alternative plans to I write not only as a resident, but also as a former long- the University. Multiple people wrote letters of support time member of both the Princeton Board of Health and and testified at Historic Preservation Commission and Princeton Environmental Commission, as well as a decade Planning Board hearings, where the members and staff provided everyone ample opportunity and time to express their concerns. Of particular note, HPC and PB members Letters to the Editor Policy and Witherspoon-Jackson residents expressed the strong connections between Princeton’s historic African American Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably neighborhood to Prospect Avenue, where many African on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a Americans were the backbone of the eating club operations valid street address (only the street name will be printed over many decades. with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters With encouragement from Council, University officials that are received for publication no later than Monday ultimately listened to the community and comments from noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. the Historic Preservation Commission, and agreed to a sigLetters must be no longer than 500 words and have nificant compromise: to preserve the three historic houses no more than four signatures. on the north side of Prospect and restore their exteriors All letters are subject to editing and to available following National Park Service Guidelines for the Treatspace. ment of Historic Properties; to adjust the landscaping plan At least a month’s time must pass before another in front of the proposed Theorist Pavilion to be compatible letter from the same writer can be considered for pubwith the historic streetscape; to support the designation lication. of the Prospect Avenue Historic District; and to submit an Letters are welcome with views about actions, application to the N.J. State Historic Preservation Office policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, to expand the National Register Princeton Historic District etc. However, we will not publish letters that include to the north side of Prospect Avenue to include the relocontent that is, or may be perceived as, negative tocated Court Clubhouse, the three houses, and the Ferris wards local figures, politicians, or political candidates Thompson Wall and Gate designed by McKim, Mead and as individuals. White. All the many people that contributed to this positive When necessary, letters with negative content may outcome are too numerous to mention here, but sincerely be shared with the person/group in question in order deserve our collective gratitude. to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the unThe purpose of historic designations like the new Prosderstanding that the communications end there. pect Avenue Historic District is not to freeze buildings Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably Residential & and streetscapes in one particular time, but rather to balResidential & Commercial Commercial by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town ance the needs of property owners for maintenance and Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters ELECTRICAL upgrades with the district’s CONTRACTOR or site’s historic significance ELECTRICAL submitted via mail must have a valid signature. Residential &CONTRACTOR Commercial to the community and the broader common heritage. The

CIFELLI CIFELLI CIFELLI CIFELLI CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC. CIFELLI CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. CIFELLI CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC. CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC. CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC.

Residential & & Commercial Residential Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential &CONTRACTOR Commercial ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL Residential & Commercial Residential & Commercial Morven Hosts Conversation Residential & Commercial Residential Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR With Author of Stockton Book ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential & Commercial www.cifellielectrical.com ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential & & Commercial Author/historian Gregory available for purchase in ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential Commercial Residential & Commercial Nobles ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR www.cifellielectrical.com his lat- Morven’s Museum Shop with Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR est bookwillThediscuss www.cifellielectrical.com ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Education of the opportunity for author www.cifellielectrical.com ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR www.cifellielectrical.com Renovations ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Betsey Stockton: An Odys- signing following the prowww.cifellielectrical.com ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR www.cifellielectrical.com sey of Slavery and Free- gram. www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com Renovations Renovations www.cifellielectrical.com dom (University of Chicago According to Martha A. Renovations Service Panel Upgrades www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com Press) in conversation with Sandweiss, founding diRenovations Renovations Morven’s Curator of Exhibi- rector of The Princeton & Renovations Service PanelFans Upgrades www.cifellielectrical.com Renovations Service Panel Upgrades Service Panel Upgrades Paddle ELECTRICAL INC. tions and Collections and Slavery Project, “Nobles rewww.cifellielectrical.com Renovations Renovations Renovations Service Panel Upgrades Deputy Director Elizabeth veals Stockton as a woman Renovations Service Panel Upgrades Residential & Commercial Paddle Fans Service Panel Upgrades Paddle Fans ELECTRICAL INC. Allan. The event will take of bravery and persistence, Service Panel Upgrades Paddle Fans Residential &CONTRACTOR Commercial place on Thursday, July 14. intellect and faith. Long a Residential & Commercial Paddle Fans ELECTRICAL Renovations Service Panel Upgrades Service Panel Upgrades Paddle Fans Fans Renovations Service Panel Upgrades Service Panel Upgrades Doors open for the in-person figure of local renown, she Residential & Commercial Paddle Cifelli Electrical Inc. ELECTRICAL INC. Residential &CONTRACTOR Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Paddle Fans event featuring Nobles at 6 here claims her place in the ELECTRICAL Residential & Commercial Residential Commercial Cifelli Electrical Inc. Cifelli Electrical Inc. Fans p.m. with light refreshments broader story of remarkable Paddle Fans WE’RE OPEN Paddle Residential &CONTRACTOR Commercial Service Panel Upgrades ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ELECTRICAL Service Upgrades Paddle Fans Fans in the Stockton Education women who emerged from Cifelli Electrical Inc. Cifelli Electrical Inc. WE’RE OPEN Residential Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR RECEIVE A 10% DISCOUNT Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Center at Morven. A Q&A enslavement to become civic Authorized dealer for Cifelli Electrical Inc. Authorized dealer forsales, sales, Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Cifelli Electrical Inc. Residential Commercial Cifelli Electrical Inc. RECEIVE A 10% DISCOUNT for both live and virtual at- leaders who reshaped Black when you mention this ad Paddle Fans Authorized dealer for sales, Fans Cifelli Electrical Inc. Authorized dealer for sales, installation and startup ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR installation andfor startup Authorized dealer sales, Authorized dealer for sales, when youElectrical mention this ad tendees follows the lecture. community life.” Cifelli Electrical Inc. installation and startup Cifelli Inc. Cifelli Electrical Inc. installation and startup Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer for sales, WE’RE OPEN WE’RE OPEN installation and startup Residential Commercial Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR installation and startup The virtual program waitP rofe s s or e m er it u s of installation and installation andstartup startup Authorized dealer for sales, Cifelli Electrical Inc. Cifelli Electrical Inc. Authorized dealer for sales, ing room opens at 6 p.m. histor y at Georgia Tech, RECEIVE 10% DISCOUNT RECEIVE A 10% DISCOUNT 609-921-3238 Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer for Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer for and the live and virtual pro- Nobles is also the author of Authorized dealer for sales, ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 609-921-3238 ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR installation and startup installation andstartup startup Authorized dealer for sales, when mention this ad 609-921-3238 Authorized dealer for sales, when youElectrical mention this ad Renovations installation and Cifelli Inc. gram begins at 6:30 p.m.

ELECTRICAL INC.

Celebrating 50 Years CUSTOM MADE50 FURNITURE Celebrating Years Celebrating 50SHOWROOM Years Celebrating Over 54 Years ENJOY SHOPPING OUR FULL

ENJOY SHOPPING OUR SHOWROOM FULL ENJOY SHOPPING OUR SHOWROOM FULL Celebrating 50 Years OF HANDCRAFTED HANDCRAFTED REPRODUCTIONS OF REPRODUCTIONS OF HANDCRAFTED REPRODUCTIONS OF ENJOY SHOPPING OUR SHOWROOM FULL OF HANDCRAFTED REPRODUCTIONS EARLY AMERICAN, COLONIAL ANDOF EARLY AMERICAN EARLY AMERICAN, COLONIAL AND OF HANDCRAFTED REPRODUCTIONS EARLY AMERICAN, COLONIAL ANDOF SHAKER FURNITURE AS WELL PRINTS, COLONIAL SHAKER WELL PRINTS, EARLYFURNITURE AMERICAN, AS COLONIAL AND SHAKER FURNITURE WELL JONATHAN CHARLESAS AND D.RPRINTS, DIMES SHAKER FURNITURE AS WELL PRINTS, SHAKER JONATHAN CHARLES AND D.R JONATHAN D.R DIMES DIMES FURNITURE,CHARLES WINDSORAND CHAIRS, UNIQUE JONATHAN CHARLES AND D.R DIMES FURNITURE, WINDSOR UNIQUE JONATHAN CHARLES FURNITURE FURNITURE, WINDSOR CHAIRS, UNIQUE GIFTS, AND CHAIRS, MORE FURNITURE, WINDSOR CHAIRS, UNIQUE GIFTS, MORE GIFTS, AND AND MORE PRINTS, UNIQUE GIFTS AND MORE!

DoMORE you have that GIFTS, AND Do you perfect piecethat of Do you have have that Do you have that perfect piece of furniture in mind perfect piece of perfect piece of furniture in mind but can’t find it? furniture mind furniture ininmind but can’t find it? but can’tfind findit? it? but can’t

Talk to us! Talk us! We specialize Talkintoto tous! us! Talk

custom made furniture We in We specialize in We specialize specialize in Call Now to Order Your and will make it for you. custom made furniture custom made made furniture custom furniture Custom Hours: Fri. & Sat. Made 10-5; Sun. it 1-5 and by appointment and will make itFurniture for you. and will make for you. and will make for you. Visit our showroom today!

Hours: Sun. 1-5 and by appointment Hours:Fri. Fri.& Sat.10-5; 10-5;is 1-5 Where Rosemont? Hours: Fri. &&Sat. Sat. 10-5; Sun. 1-5 and andby byappointment appointment

Only 20 miles from Princeton! Where is Rosemont? Rosemont? Where is 6 miles from New Hope 10 miles from Flemington Where is Rosemont? Only 20 miles from Rte.Only 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5Princeton! miles N. of Stockton) 20 miles from Princeton! Only from Princeton! 6 miles from 20 New•miles Hope 10 miles from Flemington 609-397-0606 www.canefarmfurniture.com

6 miles from New Hope 10 miles from Flemington 6 miles from New Hope NJ (1.5 10 miles from Flemington Rte.519, 519,Rosemont, Rosemont, N. Rte. NJ (1.5 miles N.ofofStockton) Stockton) Rte. 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5 miles miles N. of Stockton) 609-397-0606 • www.canefarmfurniture.com

609-397-0606 609-397-0606 •• www.canefarmfurniture.com www.canefarmfurniture.com

CIFELLI CIFELLI CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC. CIFELLI CIFELLI CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC. CIFELLI CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC.

ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC.

Cifelli Electrical Inc. installation and startup Authorized dealer for sales, installation and startup 609-921-3238 Authorized dealer for sales, installation and startup Renovations installation and startup Authorized dealer sales, installation andfor startup Authorized for sales, Authorized dealer for Authorized dealer for sales, installation and startup Licdealer #11509A Renovations installation and startup installation and startup Lic #11509A Renovations installation and startup installation and startup Service Panel installation and startup installation and startup Lic #11509A Bonded and Insured installation and startup Service Panel Lic #11509A Bonded and Insured Service Panel Authorized dealer for Bonded and Insured Authorized dealer for sales, Upgrades Authorized dealer for Service Panel Authorized dealer forsales, sales, Bonded and Insured Upgrades Upgrades Upgrades installation and startup Renovations installation and startup Authorized dealer for sales, Renovations installation and startup Authorized dealer for Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Renovations installation and startup Authorized for sales, Paddle Fans Serving Princetondealer and surrounding areas Authorized dealer for sales, Paddle Fans Renovations Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Lic Renovations Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Lic #11509A #11509A Paddle Fans Renovations Paddle Fans installation and startup Lic #11509A Renovations installation and startup installation and startup Lic #11509A Renovations Service Panel installation and startup Service Panel Lic Lic #11509A #11509A Bonded and Insured Bonded Insured Service Panel Interior and Interior and Lic #11509A Bonded and Insured Service Panel Lic #11509A Interior and Interior and Service Panel Bonded and Insured Service Panel Bonded Insured Bonded and Insured Service Panel Upgrades Upgrades Bonded and Insured Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting Upgrades Service Panel Exterior Lighting Bonded and Insured Exterior Lighting Upgrades Upgrades Upgrades Upgrades

609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238

609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 Renovations Upgrades Serving Princeton and and surrounding surrounding areas Paddle Fans Serving Princeton surrounding areas 609-921-3238 Serving Princeton areas Paddle Fans Renovations Paddle Fans Serving Princeton and surrounding surrounding areas Serving Princeton and surroundingareas areas Paddle Fans Serving Princeton surrounding areas Serving Princeton and Lic #11509A Paddle Fans Renovations Paddle Fans Paddle Fans

Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Lic #11509A Renovations Paddle Fans Service Panel Interior and Lic #11509A Bonded and Insured Interior and Interior and Service Panel Interior and Lic #11509A Interior and Bonded and Insured 609-921-3238 Interior and Service Panel Interior and 609-921-3238 Bonded and Insured Exterior Lighting 609-921-3238 Upgrades 609-921-3238 Exterior Lighting Interior and Service Panel Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting Bonded and Insured Exterior Lighting Upgrades Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting Upgrades www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com Exterior Lighting www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com Upgrades Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Paddle Fans Lic #11509A #11509A Lic Serving Princeton and surrounding Serving Princeton and surroundingareas areas Paddle Fans Paddle Fans Lic #11509A #11509A Lic Bonded and and Insured ServingFans Princeton and surrounding areas Bonded Insured Paddle Bonded and and Insured Interior and Bonded Insured Interior and Serving Princeton and and surrounding areas 609-921-3238 Interior and Serving Princeton surrounding areas Exterior Lighting Serving Princeton and surrounding Interior and Serving609-921-3238 Princeton and surroundingareas areas Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com Exterior Lighting www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com Lic #11509A

609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238

Lic #11509A Lic #11509A #11509A Lic Lic #11509A Lic #11509A Bonded and Insured Insured Lic #11509A Bonded and Insured Bonded Lic #11509A Bonded and Insured Bonded and Insured Bonded and Insured Bonded and Insured Bonded and and surrounding Insured Princeton areas

609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238

ServingPrinceton and surrounding areas Serving Serving Princeton and surrounding areas ServingPrinceton Princeton and surrounding Serving surrounding areas Serving Princeton surroundingareas areas www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com

www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com Lic #11509A #11509A Lic

This part of the evening will be hybrid, both live and online. A Zoom link will be shared the day of the program for virtual ticket holders. Books will be available for purchase and signing following the program. For further information, contact info@morven. This program is being held with the collaboration of the Princeton Theological Seminary’s Betsey Stockton Center for Black Church Studies and is hosted by local historian Shirley Satterfield, president of the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and Cultural Society. The museum will be open from 5 to 6:15 p.m. when visitors may tour the galleries. Docents will be on hand to answer questions. Copies of The Education of Betsey Stockton will be

John James Audubon: The Nature of the American Woodsman (University of Pennsylvania Press 2017).

Library Book Group Discusses Ida Wells

The Princeton Public Librar y book group Black Voices will discuss Ida: A Sword Among Lions: Ida B. Wells and the Campaign Against Lynching (Amistad) by Paula Giddings at 7:15 p.m., July 14, via Google Meet. Register at Princetonlibrary.org. O magazine calls Ida “A groundbreaking biography gives this warrior her due.” Giddings is the Elizabeth A. Woodson 1922 Professor in Afro-American Studies at Smith College and the author of When and Where I Enter and In Search of Sisterhood.


“Things of the Night” — Looking for Ernest Hemingway

H

alf a year into his presidency, on July 2, 1961, John F. Kennedy released a statement on the death of Ernest Hemingway. After mentioning the Nobel Prize-winning author’s “impact on the emotions and attitudes of the American people” and how he had “almost singlehandedly transformed the literature and the ways of thought of men and women in every country in the world,” Kennedy declared that Hemingway “ended his life as he began it — in the heartland of America to which he brought renown and from which he drew his art.” The connection between Hemingway and Kennedy is sealed not only by the presence of the writer’s papers and effects at the Kennedy Presidential Library but by the fact that both men died of gun shots to the head, the writer by his own hand, the president less than three years later by the hand of an assassin. Why This Image? The first time I saw the cover of Ernest Hemingway: Artifacts from a Life (Scribner 2018), I wanted to put it aside, out of sight. It troubled me, made me uneasy, the underlying question being not what did this man create but what happened to him? Instead of a more characteristic photograph that makes you think of his best work, you’re met with a strikingly uncharacteristic, undated, uncredited photograph that appears to come from the 1930s when he was actually on his way to fame and fortune, having already produced the first stories, The Sun Also Rises, and A Farewell to Arms. Given what you know and value of Hemingway at his best, the more you see of this deeply unhappy face, the more it moves you. What is he trying to say? What is he afraid of? Who or what is he mourning? That baleful stare won’t let you go, there’s no denying it, no looking away. Round and round you go asking yourself unanswerable questions until you feel like Nick Adams at the end of “The Killers,” fretting over the impending fate of a doomed man and being told “You better not think about it.” Look Behind Him Think about it anyway. Think about the design of the cover. The names in bold are the John F. Kennedy Library, the editor Michael Katakis, the authors of the foreword and afterword, Hemingway’s son Patrick and grandson Seán. Now look closely at the backdrop of the photograph, the faint words on the magnified typescript framing the author’s unhappy face.

You need to have the book in your hands, the cover image up close in order to make out the typed words “lonely ... explained ... night ... courage ... kill them ... breaks everyone ...” Even then, however well you know Hemingway’s work, the passage may not make sense. It’s like puzzling out a cryptogram in which the key words are “kill” and “breaks.” In fact, the passage obscured by Hemingway’s face can be found in a long paragraph near the end of the 34th chapter of A Farewell to Arms that includes the sentences F. Scott Fitzgerald admired when he read the manuscript, telling Hemingway it was “one of the most beautiful pages in all English literature” and urging him to save it for the end of the novel, several chapters later. There and Gone Hemingway rewrote the ending of A Farewell to Arms more than 30 times, perhaps at least once with Fitzgerald’s suggestion in mind, until he knew that the passage had to stay where it was even though it came and went so suddenly, there and gone at an unlikely moment in the narration, when the lovers Frederic and Catherine “were never lonely and never afraid when we were together. I know that the night is not the same as the day: that all things are different, that the things of the night cannot be explained in the day, because they do not then exist, and the night can be a dreadful time for lonely people once their loneliness has started. But with Catherine there was almost no difference in the night except that it was an even better time. If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.” Reading over the sentences Fitzgerald admired, which I put in italics, you can understand the choice Hemingway makes at the end. Catherine has died giving birth and the baby is dead. Rather than lamenting a world that breaks and kills, better

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co. We now carry SOLAR WINDOW FILM to protect your furniture. •

924-2880

to remain tight-lipped and hard-boiled: “It was like saying good-by to a statue. After a while I went out and left the hospital and walked back to the hotel in the rain.” “Things of the Night” Hemingway finished A Farewell to Arms in January 1929 in Key West, where he wrote again about “the things of the night” in “A Clean Well-Lighted Place,” one of the works Hemingway biographer Carlos Baker is referring to when he observes, “The return to Key West once more released Ernest’s literary energy.” I wanted to write more about Hemingway after last week’s column on Bob Dylan and Key West, this being the month of his birth, July 21, and death, July 2. The sadly diminished image of him on the cover of Artifacts from a Life is hard to match that with a writer who could be as funny as Hemingway, and as full of life and spirit, and whose dialogue often has a comic verve, whether at its darkest in “The Killers,” or in the back and forth between the two waiters in “A Clean We l l - L i g hte d Pl ac e” when the subject is the old man who “tried to com m it s u icid e las t week” and never wants to go home. “He stays up because he likes it.” “He’s lonely. I’m not lonely. I have a wife waiting in bed for me.” “He had a wife once too.” “A wife would be no good to him now.” “His niece looks after him.” “I know. You said she cut him down.” “I wouldn’t want to be that old. An old man is a nasty thing.” “Not always. This old man is clean. He drinks without spilling. Even now, drunk. Look at him.” After the younger waiter finally shoos the old man out of the bar (they watch him “go down the street, a very old man walking unsteadily but with dignity”), the two are back at it on the question of why the younger waiter didn’t let the old man stay and drink; when he says the old man can “buy a bottle and drink it at home,” the older waiter says, “It’s not the same.” “‘No it’s not,’” agreed the waiter with a wife. He did not wish to be unjust. He was only in a hurry.

Available for Lunch & Dinner Mmm..Take-Out 41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton www.tortugasmv.com

“‘And you? You have no fear of going home before your usual hour?’” “‘Are you trying to insult me?’” “‘No, hombre, only to make a joke.’” The story ends in a region similar to the one Fitzgerald singled out in A Farewell to Arms, the place James Joyce may have had in mind when he said Hemingway “has reduced the veil between literature and life, which is what every writer strives to do.” After saying good night to the waiter with a wife, the older waiter “continued the conversation with himself. It is the light of course but it is necessary that the place be clean and pleasant .... What did he fear? It was not fear or dread. It was a nothing that he knew too well. It was all a nothing and a man was nothing too. It was only that and light was all it needed and a certain cleanness and order.” The story ends in the waiter’s mind: “Now, without thinking further, he would go home to his room. He would lie in the bed and finally, with daylight, he would go to sleep. After all, he said to himself, it is probably only insomnia. Many must have it.” Of “A Clean, Well-Lighted Place,” Joyce said, “It is masterly. Indeed, it is one of the best short stories ever written.” When you first read the story, at 19, it leaves you in a happy-sad daze, thinking how good Hemingway must have felt when he finished it, and how sad inside he must have been to know what he had to know to write it. Nothing Can Hurt You In Writers at Work (Viking Compass 1969 ), when G eorge Plimpton asks Hemingway what he’d consider “the best intellectual training for the would-be writer,” he says that if the writer found “writing well ... impossibly difficult,” he “should go out and hang himself,” after which “he should be cut down without mercy and forced by his own self to write as well as he can for the rest of his life.” n the same interview, Hemingway talks about the life-sustaining virtue of working well: “You have started at six in the morning, say, and may go on until noon or be through before that. When you stop you are as empty, and at the same time never empty but filling, as when you have made love to someone you love. Nothing can hurt you, nothing can happen, nothing means anything until the next day when you do it again. It is the wait until the next day that is hard to get through.” —Stuart Mitchner

I

ONLINE

www.towntopics.com

Events • Parties • Catering (609) 924-5143

The Official School of American Repertory Ballet Aydmara Cabrera School Director

ENROLL FOR FALL TODAY call 609.921.7758

and visit arballet.org Locations:

Princeton / New Brunswick / Cranbury Extensive Performance Opportunities Outstanding Faculty Live Music

PBS photo: Eduardo Patino, NYC | ARB photo: Harald Schrader | Company Dancer: Clara Pevel

pre s

cho

ol t h

rou g

h pr

ofe s

s i on

a l an

d ev

er y

le ve

l alo

ng t

he w

ay

741 Alexander Rd, Princeton

Fr o m

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 14

BOOK REVIEW


PU Summer Chamber Concerts Continues Series with Manhattan Chamber Players

T

he piano quartet is an unusual form of music. Leaving out the second violin part of the string quartet, piano quartets create opportunities for unusual combinations of musical colors and timbres from violin, viola, cello, and keyboard. The performance collective known as Manhattan Chamber Players sent a “subset” of its musical roster to Richardson Auditorium last Friday night to present two piano quartets demonstrating the quick evolution and popularity of the form. As Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was reaching his compositional peak in the 1780s, the piano was in its infancy — mostly appearing in concerti and salon pieces. There was lit tle use of the instrument in chamber music, and when Mozart was commissioned to write a set of piano quartets, the first was deemed “too difficult” by the publisher. Little did the composer know that the form would take off in the 19th century, and the two quartets not successful in his lifetime would later become quite popular. T he ens emble of musicians f rom Manhattan Chamber Players presented the second of Mozart’s two piano quartets Friday night. Violinist Brendan Speltz, violist Luke Fleming, cellist Brook Speltz, and pianist David Fung performed Piano Quartet in E-flat Major with all the grace and elegance one would expect from Mozart, expertly mastering the virtuosity which apparently rendered the work too challenging for the average 18th-century instrumentalist. The Manhattan Chamber Players began Mozart’s Quartet with ensemble refinement from the outset, aided by especially fluid keyboard passages from Fung. Violin and piano had a number of well-played duets, with subtle accompaniment from viola and cello. Brendan Speltz and Fleming played well-tuned intervals between violin and viola in the first movement, while the second movement Larghetto was marked by clarity from the piano. The string instruments played a bit of musical tag in the closing movement, while Fung skillfully maneuvered fiendish piano lines. Throughout this movement, the piano dared the strings to supply elegant answers to its musical “questions.” By the time of Robert Schumann’s 1842 Piano Quartet in E-flat Major, the genre was complex and fully formed. Schumann tended to compose in one repertoire category at a time; he spent an extended period composing primarily for the piano, and then a year writing songs. The year 1842

was his “year of chamber music,” and this second of Schumann’s piano quartets was a solid representation of the composer’s lush Romantic instrumental writing. The Chamber Players opened Schumann’s Quartet with immediate richness, playing the sprightly “Allegro” with spirit and joy. The players shifted well between hymn-like and animated sections, effectively bringing out the 19th-century drama. Pianist Fung and cellist Brook Speltz were well tested with quick passages in the second movement “Scherzo,” as Fung consistently ended phrases gracefully. A lush cello melody from Brook Speltz marked the third movement “Andante,” as all players emphasized the cantabile aspects of the songlike movement. Violist Fleming also had a chance to show off pastoral melodic lines in duet passages with violinist Brendan Speltz. Sandwiched between the two piano quartets was a rarely-heard chamber work of 20th-century Hungarian composer Ernst von Dohnányi. A brilliant pianist and child prodigy, Dohnányi was a towering figure in Hungarian classical music in the years before World War II but stayed away from the folk traditions that influenced his contemporaries. Dohnányi’s multi-movement Serenade in C Major for string trio gave the Chamber Players an opportunity to explore different musical textures within an intimate combination of chamber instruments. Whereas Mozart’s Quartet centered the most technically difficult writing around the piano, Dohnányi spread virtuosic writing throughout all the players’ parts in the Serenade. rom the first movement Marcia, violinist Brendan Speltz, violist Fleming, and cellist Brook Speltz paid great attention to variety in dynamics, even with quick-moving lines. Fleming played an especially elegant melody in the second movement Romanza against delicate pizzicati from the other two instruments. Dohnányi’s piece showed progressive harmonies which were effectively brought out by the players, with changes in musical character well handled. An ode to Beethoven’s string trios with 20th-century harmonic twists, this work was a successful bridge between the two piano quartets, allowing the audience to settle back into the 19th-century as the rich writing of Schumann closed the concert. —Nancy Plum

F

PR I N C ETO N S H O P P I N G CE N T E R A N D PR I N C ETO N P U B LI C LI B RA RY P R E S E N T

AT PRINCETON SHOPPING CENTER 301 N Harrison Street | Princeton, NJ

JULY 7 - AUGUST 18 6: 0 0 P M - 8:0 0 P M An outdoor community experience in a beautiful courtyard setting

FREE AND OPEN TO ALL BRING A LAWN CHAIR OR BLANKET

JULY 7 Grace Little Band TOMORROW NIGHT!

Princeton University Summer Chamber Concerts concludes is 2022 season on Thursday, July 21 with a performance by the Zodiac Trio at 7:30 p.m. in Richardson Auditorium. This program will include music by Piazzolla, Stravinsky, and Gershwin, among other composers. Tickets are free and are available a week before the performance at tickets.princeton.edu.

WE•BRING•YOU•THE•BEST•OF•THE

Organic Garden State

Whole Earth carries a wide selection of locally grown produce from the Garden State’s finest organic growers. During the summer, we get daily deliveries of local organic produce. Stop in to sample the bounty of New Jersey’s organic farms.

360 NASSAU STREET (AT HARRISON) PRINCETON

P R I N C E T O N ’ S N AT U R A L F O O D S G R O C E RY F O R 5 2 Y E A R S

JULY 14 Kindred Spirit JULY 21 Essie + Nap JULY 28 Diablo Sandwich AUGUST 4 John Gilbride + Friends AUGUST 11 Princeton Public Library’s Summer Reading Wrap-Up Party AUGUST 18 Green Knuckle Material *In the case of rain, events will be rescheduled*

princetonshoppingcenter.com @princetonshoppingcenter

princetonlibrary.org @princetonpl

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

MUSIC REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 16

Aitken Davies, Ronald S. Ward, and Girgus. “Our new trustees bring a wealth of fresh energy, connections, and wisdom to our shared work in creating a McCarter that is at the intersection of arts and ideas — and at the center of national and local relevance; and we are deeply grateful for the loyal service of our outgoing trustees,” said Board President W. Rochelle Calhoun. “These talented leaders have had a significant impact on McCarter. Their strategic guidance and support is a gift of strength we cherish and intend to build upon.” A former finance executive, Bonetti is a storyteller, entrepreneur, finance executive, and yoga teacher who was born and raised in the Dominican Republic. In 2005, she started a foundation that raised over $1 million to give back to scientists researching her daughter’s rare disease “THE MIGHTY ZEP”: Get The Led Out brings the music of Led Zeppelin to the State Theatre New and treating other children Jersey in New Brunswick on August 6. (Photo by Lisa Schaffer) affected by the same disease. Ganeless was president Remembering Led Zeppelin “The American Led Zeppe- D›Agostino (bass, vocals). of Comedy Central from At New Brunswick Concert lin,” GTLO offers a strong The State Theatre New State Theatre New Jersey focus on the early years. Jersey is at 15 Livingston presents Get The Led Out: A T hey also touch on t he Avenue in New Brunswick. Celebration of “The Mighty deeper cuts that were sel- Visit stnj.org for tickets. Zep” on Saturday, August 6 dom, if ever heard in conat 8 p.m. Tickets range from cert. GTLO also includes New McCarter Trustees a special acoustic set with $25-$65. Zep favorites such as “Tan- Expand Scope of Leadership Get The Led Out (GTLO) McCarter Theatre Center gerine” and “Hey Hey What captures the essence of the has announced its new board Can I Do.” recorded music of Led Zepmembers for 2022, welcomThe group features Paul ing Claudina Bonetti, Michele pelin and brings it to the concert stage. The Philadel- Sinclair (lead vocals, har- Ganeless, Pamela Pruitt, and phia-based group consists of monica), Paul Hammond Kim Swann. Joan Girgus “Where quality still matters.” six veteran musicians intent (electric and acoustic gui- was named as an honorary 4621 Route 27 on delivering Led Zeppelin tars, mandolin, theremin), trustee. Kingston, NJ Tommy Marchiano (electric live, as never heard before. In naming its new board GTLO re-create the songs and acoustic guitars, vocals), members, McCarter extends 609-924-0147 with the studio overdubs Eddie Kurek ( keyboards, gratitude to outgoing trustriderfurniture.com that Zeppelin themselves guitar, vocals, percussion), ees, including Kathleen NoAda m Fer r a iol i ( dr u m s, Mon-Fri 10-6; never performed. p e r c u s s i o n ) , a n d P h i l lan, Robert Caruso, Ashley Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5 Dubbed by the media as

Performing Arts

Rider

2004-2016. She has also held leadership roles at USA Network and MTV. At Comedy Central, she oversaw the growth of the Comedy Central brand and franchises including The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, The Colbert Report, South Park, Inside Amy Schumer, and Key & Peele. She is currently developing projects primarily in the young adult and comedy genres. Ganeless sits on board of directors for Comic Relief, Inc., which is dedicated to ending child poverty around the world, and on the advisory board of Northwestern University’s School of Communications. Pruitt is the executive director of the Center for Diversity and Inclusion at Rider University. She currently serves as the chair of the Northeast Tri-State Chapter of the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education. Pruitt is also the president of The Next Level Consulting, LLC and provides consultation to organizations for development, marketing,

and public relations strategies, which includes diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging facilitation. She is a community leader in Trenton, and serves on boards and committees for local and national organizations. Swann is an entertainment industry veteran who produced the documentary Time Out: The Truth About HIV and You. As an executive producer, Swann has contributed to programs for ABC Studios, TNT Studios, Nickelodeon TV, and others. She is a mentor in the Women in Media Mentorship Program at Rutgers University. Girgus is a Professor of Ps ycholo g y E m er it u s at Princeton University. During her 40 years at Princeton, she also served as dean of the college, chair of the Psychology Department, and special assistant to the dean of the faculty. Prior to coming to Princeton, she served as a faculty member and dean at the City College of the City University of New York.

American Furniture Exchange

Furniture

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area


17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

Summer Senior Options TOWN TOPICS

Akin Care Senior Services travel, whether it is to visit your loved one will remem- ready to take that step but c are er s, mar r iage, f ir s t member who said, “When I

family or friends or discover a new destination. But if you will be traveling with a senior, you’ll want to make sure you consider the following tips from Maplewood Senior Living, especially if it’s someone managing Alzheimer’s disease, which affects more than 6.2 million Americans. Planning: Research your travel destination ahead of time. Avoid large crowds, disruptive or loud noises, and environments where you could become separated from your loved one. Realistic E xpectations : Even if your loved one is functioning well at home, changes to the environment can cause confusion, frustration, and stress. Understanding this will give you the patience to help them adjust to the new environment, making your trip more enjoyable. Go at their Pace: Plan to keep your itinerary light and easy. Don’t overload your schedule. This will cause fatigue that may lead to more confusion and frustration. Identification: Make sure you have an updated photo of your loved one and conMaplewood Senior Living sider creating an ID bracelet It’s summer travel season! with your contact informaWarmer weather and longer tion in case you become days may have you longing to separated. Don’t assume E sp ecially in t imes of uncertainty, it’s the team that works together that is best able to be nimble a n d c o n t i n u e to g r o w. Akin Care has an unparalleled team of caregivers and office co-workers. The average amount of time a caregiver has been w ith us is 4.3 years. We don’t have a “revolving door” of caregivers, but a seasoned team in whom we invest. Nearly 25 percent of our careg ivers are Cer t if ied Dementia Practitioners, a prestigious cer tification, and that number is growing. We know and appreciate our caregivers which enables us to prov ide a good fit between caregiver and client. Our goal is to be matchmakers, not simply schedulers trying to fit client and caregiver schedules together. We are happy to speak with you and your family anytime. We are a home care company and a community resource. Feel free to call and ask us your questions. We are here for you. We’ve got you covered. (609) 994-5320.

ber how to reach you. Medication : Be sure to pack medication and plan to be in a convenient location to give them at regularly scheduled times. Stay Together: Don’t leave a loved one with dementia on their own, even in a hotel room. Your absence and the new environment may cause fear and confusion and could lead them to venture on their own in search of help. Be Prepared : Before heading out for the day, make sure you pack a special travel bag that you can easily transport containing medications, a change of clothing, water, and other essential items. Sometimes travel will be too over whelming or exhausting for those living with dementia. If that’s the case for your loved one, it’s best not to push them beyond their limits. This doesn’t mean you can’t travel though. It’s likely you may need the break and could benefit greatly from getting some time away. To allow you some much needed rest and relaxation, consider arranging a short respite stay for your loved one at Maplewood at Princeton. If you are not quite

interested in learning more about how Maplewood at Princeton can support you, call ( 609 ) 285 -5427 to schedule a personal visit.

Town Square Princeton

The very design of Town Square sets the stage for putting members at ease a nd spark i ng m em or ie s of t h e pas t. W h e n you step inside the expansive 12,000-square-foot space, y o u i m m e d i ate l y t r av e l back to a 1950s small town. Throughout the day, members move about to enter and interact in 13 different themed activity rooms, called storefronts, to experience reminiscing and enriching activities. Time at Town Square is designed to provide renewed purpose and a sense of belonging. This ground-breaking approach introduces a state-of-the-art and stimulating option for senior care for those experiencing the normal effects of aging and those living with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. Our members engage in favorite endeavors, revisit past interests, and explore new pursuits. Our focus on reminis cence therapy allows members to recall the milestone moments in their lives —

home, family. This is especially important for those with Alzheimer’s and dementia because those long-term memories are preserved longer. Revisiting those experiences provides calming and reassuring moments during the day. In addition, moving about throughout the day to different storefronts builds mobility, increases opportunities for variety in engagement, and decreases boredom. In short, members return home at the end of the day affirmed and more fulfilled due to these uniquely designed interactions. Some of our best testimonials include the spouse of a

drop my wife off, I don’t get to see what happens every day. But when I pick her up, she is a better person and happier, and that makes me a better person, and my job as a caregiver is easier.” And the daughter of a member said, “I cannot say enough wonderful things about Tow n Square. I’m always recommending it to people. Thank you and the staff for all your concern, kindness, and especially your amazing facility that gave my mom such great days and friendships.” For more infor mation, call (609) 375-0751 or visit townsquare.net/Princeton.

SENIOR TRAVEL: Sometimes travel will be too overwhelming or exhausting for those living with dementia. If that’s the case for your loved one, it’s best not to push them beyond their limits.

W

e will acquaint you with a revolutionary new option for senior care. Town Square Adult Day Enrichment Center is designed as a 1950’s-60’s small town that evokes strong memories of the past and is a perfect fit for our specialized reminiscence therapy. Town Square offers varied opportunities for members to be re-engaged in past interests and to try new pursuits in our 13 different themed activity rooms such as the Starlight Theater, the Learning Center, Rosie’s Diner, the Little Blue House, the Recreation Center, the Craft Corner and more.

Thoughtfully planned activities evoke a time when members were young adults and are designed to appeal to all seniors including those living with Alzheimer’s or Dementia. The behavioral approach, known as reminiscence therapy, YOUR TODAY 609.375.0751 uses SCHEDULE prompts such as TOUR movies, music, photographs, games, Town Square activities Adult Day Enrichment Centerlong-term is designed as a 1950’s-60’s small town and other to stimulate memories. evoking strong memories of the past--perfect for our specialized reminiscence therapy. Town Square offers a wide variety of opportunities for members to be reengaged in 13 different themed activity rooms. The showcase for our center is an actual 1959 Ford Thunderbird, parked in front of a retro service station.

Schedule Your Tour Today!

609.375.0751

ult Day Enrichment Center is designed as a 1950’s-60’s small town memories of the past--perfect for our specialized reminiscence quare offers a wide variety of opportunities for members to be refferent themed activity rooms. The showcase for our center is an

SCHEDULE YOUR TOUR TODAY

609.375.0751 www.townsquare.net/princeton

2 Hospital Drive | Plainsboro Township, New Jersey

609.375.0751

10307084-04

ULE YOUR TOUR TODAY

TOWN SQUARE PRINCETON


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 18

Town Topics

Summer Senior Options

Thank You! AKI

AKIN CARE SENIOR SERVICES

Plan for Your Princeton's Premiere Home Care Golden Years Akin Care Senior Services was begun ...with JFCS!

14 To Provide the 5 Very Best Care

W

We are privileged to be acknowledged

Our daughter, Mila, with her Grandmother, Olga

on based provider of in-home care ever you call homeGeriatric Care FAMILY OWNED AND where OPERATED Assessments & Management PRINCETON AKIN CAREBUSINESS Senior Services Help with aging safely in

Dedicated to keeping you Princeton www.AkinCare.com 145 Witherspoon Street your home.

Independent, In control and In the Home You Love

Help navigating long-term care options. Help planning for financial, medical and legal situations. And so much more...

Help, Hope & Healing for Your Golden Years Provider of In-Home Care Akin Care Senior Services 609-994-5320

303 Witherspoon Street Princeton www.AkinCare.com

Connect With Us 609-987-8100 jfcsonline.org/senior-services


19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

YOUR LIFE, YOUR WAY. We know there’s no such thing as one-size-fits-all. That’s why we focus on providing a senior living experience that’s truly personal, with concierge services, housekeeping, and assistance tailored to each resident’s lifestyle preferences and needs. Be as active or involved as you like. With endless avenues for enrichment and connection, each day at Maplewood brings new opportunities to thrive. SCHEDULE A PRIVATE TOUR AND COME SEE FOR YOURSELF.

INDEPENDENT LIVING. ASSISTED LIVING. MEMORY CARE.

One Hospital Drive, Plainsboro, New Jersey | 609.285.5427 | MaplewoodAtPrinceton.com Located on the Penn Medicine - Princeton Health campus


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 20

Art

“THRIVE”: Historic Walnford in Upper Freehold hosts an interdisciplinary art exhibit through July 7, 2023. An opening reception is on Thursday, July 14 from 5 to 9 p.m.

SAUCE FOR THE GOOSE: The Arts Council of Princeton is now accepting vendor applications for its annual Sauce for the Goose Outdoor Art Market. Artists and crafters are encouraged to apply to sell their wares at this pop-up market on Saturday, November 12 along Paul Robeson Place. The deadline for submissions is September 1.

Sauce for the Goose Vendor Council of Princeton’s Board Stage Theatre in New York, Applications Now Available of Trustees are stewards of and formerly served as the The Arts Council of Princeton is now accepting vendor applications for its annual Sauce for the Goose Outdoor Art Market. Artists and crafters are encouraged to apply to sell their wares at this pop-up market, now in its 29th year, on Saturday, November 12. Sauce for the Goose will return to its roots in downtown Princeton, this year taking place on Paul Robeson Place, just steps from the doors of the Arts Council. The market will run from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and will feature a myriad of creative vendors offering high-quality, handmade works in anticipation of the holiday season. The Arts Council looks forward to welcoming back returning vendors as well as introducing new talent to the sale. Artistic Director Maria Evans said, “Every year, we’re blown away by the diversity in offerings from Sauce for the Goose artisans. For this year’s market, we’re more excited than ever to hear from new and emerging vendors to continue to offer our area’s most impressive art market. We are really looking forward to working with returning vendors and meeting new artists.” Applications are available at artscouncilofprinceton.org. The deadline for submissions is Thursday, September 1 at 11:59 p.m.

Arts Council of Princeton Appoints New Board Members

The Arts Council of Princeton has announced the appointment of five new members to its board of trustees. In addition to serving as a legal entity, board members represent diverse segments of the community through their occupations, geographic locations, experience, and backgrounds. Members of the Arts

the organization’s mission, goals, policies and finances. Joining the board are Dozie Ibeh, Aaron Fisher, Lindsey Forden, Viridiana Martínez Weiss, and Alex Pimentel. “ T h e A r t s C ou n c i l of Princeton has benefited for many years from the guidance and energy of a caring and committed board,” said Joe Kossow, board president. “Together with our new board members, we are looking forward to helping the Arts Council continue to build on its tremendous momentum in our educational, ar tistic, and communit y outreach programs, and to expanding the many ways that we fulfill our mission of building community through the arts.” Ibeh, Princeton University’s associate vice president for capital projects, plays a lead role in the design and execution of largescale capital projects for Princeton University, which currently include facilities supporting the expansion of undergraduate student enrollment, new facilities for Environmental Studies and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, a new Lake Campus and East Campus, and the expansion and renovation of the Princeton University Art Museum. Fisher was a professional musician before becoming a portraitist working on canvas and wood using acrylic paint, inks, and colored pen. He grew up in and has deep roots and connections in the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood. While he lives in Franklin Park with his wife and daughter, Fisher still considers himself a Princeton resident, as Princeton remains his social and familial center of gravity. Forden is the director of development at Second

Thinking of selling your home? Call me! JUDITH BUDWIG

Sales Associate Cell: 609-933-7886 | Office: 609-921-2600 judith.budwig@foxroach.com

director of development at McCarter Theatre. Prior to her role at McCarter, Forden held a similar role at the Princeton Public Library. She has a demonstrated history of fundraising in various sectors including performing arts, public libraries, and education, and is skilled in strategic planning. She lives in Princeton with her husband Steve, a medical device consultant and avid cyclist. Both of their daughters are graduates of Princeton High School and work in New York. Martínez Weiss is a businesswoman and an entrepreneur. She and her family are the owners of La Lupita Mexican Groceries in Princeton’s Witherspoon-Jackson neighb orhoo d. Mar t í nez Weiss is also the founder of Sister Masks, where she designs handmade masks, bags, and other products. She is originally from Oaxaca, Mexico; she and her family immigrated to Princeton when she was 3, where she lives with her husband, son, and two daughters. Pimentel is the founder and owner of Peru Super Food, an organic Peruvian super food company. In addition to being a small business owner, Pimentel has extensive experience in web development, negotiation, relationship management, and large-scale event management. He has resided in Princeton with his two sons for the last 20 years.

should plan to spend some time exploring Historic Walnford. This historic district features a 19th centur y gristmill, the elegant Waln family home (1773), a carriage house, and an assortment of outbuildings. The site showcases over 200 years of social, techno logical, and environmental history through the Waln family and offers weekend mill demonstrations April through November. Admission and parking for both the exhibit and the site are free. For m or e i n for m at ion about the “Thrive” exhibit Historic Walnford To or Historic Walnford, visHost Art Exhibit The Monmouth County it MonmouthCountyParks. Park System now presents com or call (732) 842-4000. the interdisciplinary art ex“By the Light of Day” Exhibit hibit “Thrive” at Historic Walnford, 62 Walnford Road At West Windsor Arts Center West Windsor Arts Cenin Upper Freehold. ter, 952 Alexander Road, Exploring the cyclical naWest Windsor, presents “By ture of the world around us, The Light of Day: Plein Air this exhibit invites visitors to Show,” on view through experience the flow of life August 27. An opening rethrough the works of feaception is on Friday, July tured artists Alice Momm, 15 from 6 to 8 p.m. Free Maureen Bennett, Susan admission. Hoenig, and Katrina Bello. For this exhibition, West The intimate one-room exWindsor Arts invited arthibit is open daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through July ists to enter their en plein 7, 2023. An opening recep- air artwork; artwork done tion is on Thursday, July 14 ou td o or s. Ac c or d i n g to the organization, since the from 5 to 9 p.m. 1800s painting en plein Visitors to the ex hibit

air has allowed artists to capture the emotional and sensor y dimensions of a particular landscape at a particular moment in time. It expresses a spirit of spontaneity and truth to personal impulse within art. Impressionist artist Vincent van Gogh was notably a fan of plein air painting, or the practice of painting in the great outdoors. Other impressionist painters such as Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Alfred Sisley, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir advocated plein air painting, and much of their work was done outdoors in the diffuse light of a large white umbrella. Decisions have to be made quickly, therefore painting reactions are more intuitive. Exhibiting artists include Bob Barish, Larry Chestnut, Emily Chiles, Huchen Courouleau, Magda Dodd, Carlo Fiorentini, Michael Graham, Marzena Haupa, Joelle Hofbauer, Margaret Kalvar- Bush nell, Snehal Kumbhar, Lori Langsner, Yun Li, Patrick Lieg, Christopher Mac Kinnon, Mary Manahan, Denise McDaniel, Mark Oldland, Neelam Padte, Rupa Sanbui, Aurelle Sprout, David Terrar, Mary Lou Thomas, Maria Vasquez, and Lei Yua. For more information, visit westwindsorarts.org.

well loved and well read since 1946 JUNCTION BARBER SHOP

33 Princeton-Hightstown Rd Ellsworth’s Center (Near Train Station)

799-8554 253 Nassau St, Princeton NJ 08540

He has a passion for art, design, music, and dance, so through the years, he and his boys have enjoyed various classes, camps, fundraisers, and town events hosted by the Arts Council of Princeton. In addition to the new appointees, four board members were successfully voted to renew their terms. Those members are Jacqui Alexander, Stephen Kim, Joe Kossow, and Diana Moore. For a complete list of the board of trustees, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Tues-Fri: 10am-6pm; Sat 8:30am-3:30pm

OPEN AIR ART: This work by Bob Barish is featured in “By The Light of Day: Plein Air Show,” on view through August 27 at the West Windsor Arts Center. An opening reception will be held on July 15 from 6 to 8 p.m.


Carole Doerr Allen of Flemand Texas. Deborah Oliver “Ellarslie Open” Awards Prizes to 31 Exhibiting Artists oversaw the installation of the ington won the Doug Palmer

Thirty-one of 134 exhibiting artists received awards during last month’s artists’ reception for Ellarslie Open 39 at Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie Mansion. The annual juried exhibition showcases this year over 160 artworks by artists from greater Trenton and throughout New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and New York, as well as Massachusetts, Washington, D.C.,

diverse artwork that fills gallery and display areas throughout the museum. Most of the artwork is available for purchase. Before a crowd of 350 artists and guests, Trenton Museum Society’s Patricia Allen, juror Walter Wickiser, and Trenton Mayor Reed Gusciora gave welcoming remarks, with Mayor Gusciora then delivering the awards.

Award for Best in Show, Overall, for her painting Dark Horse; Storm Approaching. “If the exhibition offered unlimited space, I would have chosen all artists who entered,” said Wickiser of New York City’s Walter Wickiser Gallery. “All had something important to express and were worthy. My choices and awards were no easy task, as I felt for each and every artist and artwork.”

Area Exhibits Check websites for information on safety protocols. Ar t @ Bainbr idge, 158 Nassau Street, has “Witness / Rose Simpson” July 23 through September 11. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Car Parts” through July 31. An opening reception is on Saturday, July 16 from 2 to 5 p.m. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Art on Hulfish, 11 Hulfish Street, has “Screen Time: Photography and Video Art in the Internet Age” through August 7. artmuseum.princeton. edu. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has the ongoing exhibit “Interwoven Stories: The Final Chapter.” artscouncilofprinceton.org. Gallery 14 Fine Art Photography, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “A Different Look” through July 17. Open Saturday and Sunday from 12 to 5 p.m., or by appointment. gallery14.org. Gourgaud Gallery, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, has “Summer Exhibit” through July 28. cranburyartscouncil. org. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “What’s in the Garden?” through August 1, “Roberto Lugo: The Village Potter” through January 8, 2023, and “Fragile: Earth” through January 8, 2023, among other exhibits. Hours are Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. to 6

p.m. and Friday through Sunday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Timed tickets required. groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and Innovator’s Gallery,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. Museum hours are Thursday through Sunday, 12 to 4 p.m. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Keith Haring: A Radiant Legacy” through July 31 and “(re)Frame: Community Perspectives on the Michener Art Collection” through March 5, 2023. michenerartmuseum.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey” through March 2023 and the online exhibits “Slavery at Morven,” “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898,” and others. morven.org. The Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, has “The Glittering Outdoors” through October 2. helenemazurart.com. Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, has “Our Inner Oceans: Paintings by Minako Ota” through August 30. princetonlibrary.org. Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has “CRTV” through August 2. A collection of artwork by Karin Jervit is at the 254 Nassau Street location through August 2. smallworldcoffee.com. West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “By the Light of Day: Plein Air Show” through August 27. westwindsorarts.org.

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

“COSMOS AT PHILLIPS”: Ann Thomas of Stockton received the Curator’s Award for her painting in “Ellarslie Open 39,” on view through October 2 at the Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie Mansion in Cadwalader Park. Thirty-one of 134 exhibiting artists received awards in this year’s juried exhibition.

Category winners were Tasha Branham (digital), North Brunswick; Diane Greenberg (drawing), New Hope, Pa.; Caroline Feiveson (fiber arts), Princeton; David Gootnick (mixed media), Washington, D.C.; Kathleen Beausoleil (painting), Fair Haven; Alexandra Pietsch (pastel), Ewing; Jeffrey Weiser (photography), Bensalem, Pa.; Marc Schimsky (printmaking), Yardley, Pa.; Michael Pascucci (sculpture), Monroe Township; and Elizabeth Oberman (watercolor), Flemington. Janis Purcell of East Windsor received the President’s Award, Ann Thomas of Stockton received the Curator’s Award, and Yun Li of West Windsor received the Installation Award. Joan Perkes, president of the board of trustees of the Trenton Museum Society, said, “On my part there is no Trenton City Museum event that makes me more proud, and I am deeply indebted to the board and our volunteers for their unflagging support and loyalty to the work of the Museum and to the city of Trenton.” “Ellarslie Open 39” will remain on view through October 2, with related gallery talks and events to take place later in the summer and early fall. Trenton City Museum is housed in Ellarslie Mansion, located in the heart of Trenton’s Cadwalader Park. It is open Fridays and Saturdays, 12 to 4 p.m. and Sundays, 1 to 4 p.m. While there is no admission charge, donations in support of the museum’s mission and programs are appreciated. For more information, visit ellarslie.org or call (609) 989-1191.

Asian Works of Art Prices are soaring in the current auction market – now is the perfect time to sell. Our Specialists are collecting Porcelains, Jades, Bronzes and Paintings from China, Japan and throughout Asia for our fall auction season.

INFORMATION & APPOINTMENTS

Jill Bowers, VP New Jersey Regional Advisor Richard Cervantes, SVP Director, Asian Works of Art DoylePA@Doyle.com 212–427–4141, ext 225

DOYLE

AUCTIONEERS & APPRAISERS

NEW YORK

CALIFORNIA

CHICAGO

CONNECTICUT

FLORIDA

LONG ISLAND

MASSACHUSETTS

NEW JERSEY

NORTH CAROLINA

PENNSYLVANIA

WASHINGTON, DC


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 22

Mark Your Calendar Town Topics Thursday, July 14 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.: The Princeton Mercer Chamber’s monthly membership luncheon is held at Princeton Marriott at Forrestal, 100 College Road East. Harriet Stein of Big Toe in the Water speaks on “The Power of Leading with Awareness.” Princetonmercerchamber.org. 6 p.m.: Kindred Spirit per for ms favor ites f rom the 1960s through today at Princeton Shopping Center. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. Part of the Summer Night Series. 6:30 p.m.: Book launch of The Education of Betsey Stockton, with author/ historian Gregory Nobles, at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Morven.org. 7:15 p.m.: Black Voices Book Group discusses Ida: A Sword Among Lions: Ida B. Wells and the Campaign Against Lynching by Paula J. Giddings. Via Google Meet. Register at Princetonlibrary.org. 8 p.m. (sundown): The film Chicago is screened as part of the Princeton University Art Museum’s outdoor

film series, at Alexander Beach, behind Alexander Hall. Bring chairs or blankets; popcorn is provided. Friday, July 15 5-8 p.m.: Catmoondaddy per for ms at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards. com. 6 p.m.: “Dance Night: Epic Soul” is at Mercer County Park, West Windsor. 7 p.m.: Story & Verse series at Pettoranello Gardens, 20 Mountain Avenue, presents “Spark in the Dark.” Open mic poetic and storytelling presented by the Arts Council of Princeton and African American Cultural Collaborat ive of Mercer County. To perform, arrive by 6:45 p.m. Artscouncilofprinceton.org. 8 p.m.: The Commodores perform at the William Penn Bank Summer Music Fest, Bristol Township Amphitheater, Bristol, Pa. $35-$75. Brtstage.org. Saturday, July 16 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. Wwcfm.org. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. or 1- 4

330 COLD SOIL ROAD PRINCETON, NJ 08540

p.m.; help Friends of Princeton Open Space with a variety of conservation projects at Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Fopos.org. 10-11:30 a.m.: Mid-Day Toastmasters meet at the Library, 42 Robbinsville Allentown Road, Robbinsville. Toastmastersclubs.org. 12 p.m.: “Buildings of the Great Architect William A. Poland,” a walking tour of Poland’s Trenton buildings sponsored by Trenton City Museum, led by Karl Flesch. Ellarslie.org. 1-4 p.m.: Bill Flemer performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards.com. 3 p.m.: Moana is screened in the Community Room of Princeton Public Library. Princetonlibrary.org. 5 p.m.: Farmer’s Choice at Howell Living History Farm, 70 Woodens Lane, Hopewell To w n s h i p . B e h i n d - t h e scenes tour of the farm’s gardens, crop fields, and barnyard. Howellfarm.org. 7 p.m.: Russell Thompkins Jr. and The New Stylistics with Eddie Holman perform at the William Penn Bank Summer Music Fest, Bristol Township Amphitheater,

TRENTON FARMERS MKT SPRUCE STREET

SUMMER HARVEST!

FRESH PEACHES

Crops Harvested daily Squash • Herbs • Lettuce Beets • Cucumbers and much more!

Weekend Winery Music Fridays, Saturdays & Sunday Fridays winery open 12pm-8pm, Sat & Sunday 12pm-5pm

July 16 July 17

Bill Flemer Jerry Steele

www.terhuneorchards.com • (609) 924-2310

JULY-AUGUST

Bristol, Pa. $35-$75. Brtstage.org. 8 p.m.: Central Jersey Dance Society presents the No Name Dance at Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. Open dancing to California Mix, Swing, Hustle, and Latin dance music. Preceded by a West Coast Swing lesson from 7-8 p.m. $10 - $15. Cent raljers ey dance.org. Sunday, July 17 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 1 p.m.: Wade Fitzgerald is soloist in the carillon concert from Graduate Tower on Princeton University’s graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. Free. (609) 258-7989. 1-4 p.m.: Jerry Steele performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards.com. Monday, July 18 Recycling Tuesday, July 19 6 : 30 p.m. : R idgeley Hutchinson, president of Trueheart Productions, will speak via Zoom about the making of the documentary The Price of Silence: The Forgotten Story of New Jersey’s Enslaved People. Williamtrenthouse.org. 7 p.m.: Sö Percussion’s musicians and composers perform collaborative and original compositions developed under the Sö Percussion Summer Institute, at Princeton Public Library’s Community Room. Princetonlibrary.org. Wednesday, July 20 3 p.m.: Puppet Show at Princeton Public Library, Finnie’s Ocean Treasure. Original musical play about a young fish who yearns for adventure. Princetonlibrary.org. 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meet either in the Library’s Community Room or via Zoom. Princetonlibrary.org. Thursday, July 21 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 6-8 p.m.: Essie and Nap perform at Princeton Shopping Center as part of the Summer Nights series. Free. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. 6 :30 p.m.: “A Musical Summer Evening with the Ragtime Relics,” at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. $15. Bring your own blanket or chair. Morven.org. 7:30 p.m.: The Zodiac Trio performs at Richardson Auditorium. Works by Stravinsky, Benny Goodman, William Grant Still, Gershwin, Bartok, and others. Free. Tickets.princeton.edu. 7:30 p.m.: Author Jacob

M. G r u mbach d is cus s e s his new book Laboratories against Democracy: How National Parties Trans formed State Politics with Princeton University political scientist Corrine McConnaughy via Zoom. Register at Princetonlibrary.org. Friday, July 22 5-8 p.m.: Josh Blume & Friends perform at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards.com. Saturday, July 23 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. Wwcfm.org. 1-4 p.m.: The Barbara Lin Band performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards.com. 3-6 p.m.: Lisa Greenleaf and Raise the Roof, presented by Princeton Country Dancers. Special afternoon dance for experienced dancers, followed by a potluck for everybody from 6-7:30 p.m.; introduction to basics at 7:30 p.m.; and contra dance for all from 8-11 p.m. At Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. Princetoncountrydancers.org. 3 - 8 :30 p.m.: Sourland Mountain Festival at Unionville Vineyards, 9 Rocktown Road, Ringoes. Live music, local food, craft beer, wine, local artisans, and more. Rain or shine. SourlandMoutainFest.com. 5 p.m.: Evening Animal Chores at Howell Living Histor y Farm, 70 Woodens Lane, Hopewell Township. Help feed the animals, bring in the sheep from the pasture, collect eggs in the henhouse, and more. Howellfarm.org. 6:30 p.m.: Summer Solstice Celebration fundraiser to benefit New Jersey Conservation Foundation, a t B r i c k Fa r m Tav e r n , Hopewell. Food, drinks, entertainment, auction. Solstice2022.givesmart.com. Sunday, July 24 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 1 p.m.: Hunter Chase is soloist in the carillon concert from Graduate Tower on Princeton University’s graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. Free. (609) 2587989. 1-4 p.m.: Allan Wilkcockson performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards.com. 2 p.m.: “Governor Morris’ 1742 Kitchen and Other Findings from Archaeology at the Trent House,” in person and via Zoom. Richard Hunter, president of Hunter

Research, will lead the discussion at the Trent House, 15 Market Street, Trenton. Williamtrenthouse.org. Tuesday, July 26 9:30 and 11 a.m.: Read & Pick program: Flowers; for children ages preschool to 8 years. At Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. $12 including container of flowers. Register at terhuneorchards. com. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Mid-day Toastmasters meet v ia Z oom. Toas t mas tersclubs.org. 6:30 p.m.: Author Jennifer Weiner discusses and signs her new book, The Summer Place, at the ticketed Summer Reading Soiree, held at the Historical Society of Princeton’s Updike Farmstead. Purchase tickets at Princetonlibrary.org. Thursday, July 28 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 5-7 p.m.: Princeton Mercer Chamber hosts Business After Business at SETS Hybrid Training, 406 Marketplace Boulevard, Hamilton. Princetonmercerchamber.org. 6 p.m.: The Diablo Sandwich Band play rock ‘n roll, funk, rhy thm and blues, disco, alternative music, and top hits at Princeton Shopping Center. Part of the Summer Nights series. 6 :30 p.m.: An evening with AT&T’s corporate historian Sheldon Hochheiser at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. In conjunction with the exhibit “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention.” Morven.org. Friday, July 29 5-8 p.m.: Kindred Spirit Duo performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards.com. 8 p.m.: Singer/songwriter Jonah Tolchin performs at Hopewell Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell. Hopewelltheater.com. Saturday, July 30 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. WWcfm.org. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. or 1- 4 p.m.; help Friends of Princeton Open Space with a variety of conservation projects at Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Fopos.org. 10 a.m.: Mercer County 4-H Air and Wheat Threshing, at Howell Living History Farm, 70 Woodens Lane, Hopewell Township. Animal shows and exhibits, homemade ice cream, hay rides, pony rides, music, magic shows, farm tours. Free. Howellfarm.org. 1-4 p.m.: Brian Bortnick performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards.com.


R

espect for the land, the environment, and the animals has always been the priority of Cherry Grove Farm. Located on Lawrenceville Road (Route 206) in Lawrenceville, the farm has a long histor y, dating to pre-Revolutionary War days.

IT’S NEW To Us

In 1987, the three Hamill brothers, Oliver, Sam, and Bill inherited 400-plus acres of undeveloped land in the Lawrenceville/Princeton area. Their ancestors had actually farmed the land at one time, but over the years, the dairy operation was leased to various farmers, and the land suffered under more and more intensive conventional farming techniques, explains Oliver Hamill. “Land preservation and locally-grown food are family passions, and we decided to create something special — something that would give back to the community while keeping the land healthy and undeveloped for generations to come.” The Hamills, with their children, were determined to regenerate the land by embracing sustainable farming, using vintage pastoral techniques as a guide. The focus would be artisanal farmstead cheese, and everything done on the farm would support the making of a quality handcrafted product. Regenerative Farming “What we are doing here at Cherry Grove is actually more than sustainable or organic,” explains Tish Streeten, education, events, and community outreach director. “It’s what is known as regenerative farming. We are working to restore the ecosystem and create beneficial environmental outcomes for current and future generations. Our goal is to

continually increase biodiversity, enrich the soil, and improve ecosystem function which then provides higher yield and greater health and resilience for the soil, the plants, the animals, the people, and the community. “Everything on the farm is interconnected, inter-related, and works together,” she continues. “We practice rotational grazing, and we do not use any chemical fertilizers, herbicides, or pesticides. We do not use antibiotics, steroids, or growth hormones. This is much healthier for the animals, plants, and people.” The 120 dairy cows that live at the farm are milked twice a day. They include pure Jersey, with some mixes of Milking Short Horn, Friesian, Holstein, Guernsey, and Normande. “The cows’ milk reflects the changing grasses and pasture plants season by season,” notes Oliver Hamill, “and you can taste these seasonal shifts in the cheese varietals. We emphasize European-style cheesemaking, focusing on quality, not quantity,” As part of the farm’s sustainable ecosystem, the farm also raises a mix of chickens, including some heritage breed, a small number of heritage breed pigs, and beef cattle. In addition to providing different colored eggs (favorites of the customers), the chickens furnish another important service, explains Streeten. “The chickens range over the pastures when the cows have left, to eat any parasites which might adversely affect the cows when they come back to that pasture. Thus, everything and everyone works together to create good health.” No Waste Indeed, at Cherry Grove, everything is put to use, and nothing is wasted. As Streeten continues, “We are a dairy and cheesemaking farm. When you make cheese, the milk is separated into curds and whey. Cheese is made from the

curds, and the whey is a by-product which is usually discarded. We feed our whey to our heritage breed pigs, which provides them with an excellent source of protein, active beneficial bacteria, and it gives the pork an extra delicious flavor.” In addition, she continues, “Beef cattle are not our primary focus, but we do keep a small number of beef steer who graze with the dairy herd when they are young. Thus, although we raise cattle and pigs, and they do provide meat for our customers, their main purpose is to provide diversity and to create a healthy, interconnected farm with no waste.” Honey is also available from the farm’s beehives, as well as from some other local beekeepers. This is an expanding part of the farm’s operation and increasingly popular with customers. The cheesemaking process is a very precise endeavor, with milk flowing from the cows’ “parlor”/ barn into the temperature-controlled creamery, overseen by head cheesemaker Paul Lawler. Aw a r d - w i n n i n g c h e e s e s from raw cows’ milk, including Havilah, Toma, Rarebird, Abruzze Jawn, as well as pasteurized Buttercup Brie, are produced, notes Streeten. The Farm Store, administered by manager Maddy Weber, is open seven days in t he summer from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. This is a very popular stop for customers. Among the items are the farm’s special cheeses, eggs, meats, and honey. In addition, jams, chutney, soups, chili, sauces, and stew, eit her made f rom Cherry Grove products or other local producers, and soft drinks, including a particularly delicious lemonade, are all available. Fall Cow Parade Cheesemaker and chef Christine Shaw also creates soup, sauces, and pesto from the farm produce and local ingredients, which are sold in the store and at farm markets.

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

Environmentally-Friendly, Regenerative Farming Is Focus of Cherry Grove Dairy Farm and Creamery

FRIENDLY FARMING: “We practice rotational grazing, moving the cows to different pastures daily or every few days,” explains Tish Streeten, education, events, and community outreach director at Cherry Grove Farm. Shown is cow herd manager Anna Reinalda with her charges in one of the Cherry Grove pastures. Cherry Grove offers a variety of classes, workshops, and events for children and adults. Streeten organizes workshops and classes in cheesemaking, foraging, herbalism, and more, and events such as First Fridays With Flowers, farm tours, hay rides, birthday parties, the Fall Cow Parade, and farm-to-table dinners. Bookkeeper and class and event coordinator Helen Cull teaches the cheesemaking class, and oversees much of the farm’s operation. W hen people schedule a farm tour or guided pasture walk, they will see the cows up close, perhaps being milked (depending on the time), and if lucky, they may even see baby calves and piglets. Two goats, Vincent van Goat and Mr. Tumnus, as well as Leda, the sheep, are also on hand to welcome farm visitors. Customers may interact and feed them, but they are only allowed to eat carrots and apples. A Farm Film Festival may also be held this summer, adds Oliver Hamill. “Last summer, we set up a big screen and had outdoor movies, in conjunction with the Garden Theatre. This

was very popular with people, and we hope to try it again.” Special Place Students from K-12, college, Boy and Girl Scouts, and 4-H groups, as well as corporate team-building groups, adult community g roups, and ind iv iduals (adults and kids) all enjoy visiting the farm. Cher r y Grove Far m is unique, and learning about this special place is indeed a pleasure for all ages. It offers an opportunity to understand and experience a way of life that is making a significant difference to the land, to the animals, and ultimately to the people. Cherry Grove customers include many longtime regulars from all over the Princeton area and beyond, who appreciate the farm and its dedicated staff. As Streeten points out, “The people I work with at Cherry Grove are very special. We all really care for and believe in what we are doing. We all work well together, doing what we do best (be it cheesemaking, cow herding, sales, education, or events) playing our part in this interwoven farm

ecosystem. The people and the community are as much a part of a healthy ecosystem as the soil, plants, and animals. “I love getting people, especially children, excited about farming and caring for the land and animals. I love showing people how to make cheese, or how to use a certain weed to soothe a bug bite. The more people we can connect to nature and to our food and our food systems, the better our world will be.” “We are looking forward to engaging even more with our community,” she continues. “It is surprising that many do not know that there is a 400-plus acre diversified dairy farm and farm store just four miles from Palmer Square. We’d love to be a resource for reconnecting our neighbors, from toddlers to elders, to the land and to a source of their food. “I love being on this beautiful farm where the animals are so well-cared for. Who wouldn’t love coming to this idyllic spot every day?” or more information, call (609) 219-0053 ( farm store). Website: cherrygrovefarm.com. —Jean Stratton

F

Shop local in store, curbside schedule private shopping M before we open. Complim CHERRY GROVE FARM

CHEESEMAKING: Cherry Grove Farm produces high quality, handcrafted farmstead cheeses from grass-fed raw cows’ milk. Shown is one of head cheesemaker Paul Lawler’s interns at work.

BARBER SHOP

Fun Ornaments & Holiday Decor Best Selling Nautical 3-D Wood Maps & Princeton Decor NJ Local Cookbooks & Made To Order Baskets Adorable & Kid Gifts 33Baby Princeton-Hightstown Rd Handmade Pottery & Candles Ellsworth’s Center Holiday Masks, Soaps & Hand Sanitizers (Near Train Station) And Much, Much More.

609.688.0777 | homesteadprinceton.com 300 Witherspoon Street | Princeton

Visit our Farm Store. Open every day 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Have a Picnic with the Cows!

609.688. homesteadprin 300 Witherspoon Str

HOLIDAYJUNCTION GIFT IDEAS!

Furniture • Gifts • Design

Farmstead Cheeses, Pastured Meats, Local Pantry, Local Food & Gift Items

799-8554

Tues-Fri: 10am-6pm; Sat 8:30am-3:30pm

Check our website for: Cheese Making Classes, Farm Tours, Hay Rides, Herbal Workshops & Other Events cherrygrovefarm.com

3200 Lawrenceville Road Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 609-219-0053 • cherrygrovefarm.com


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 24

S ports

After Producing Historic Career for PU Men’s Soccer, O’Toole Aiming to Make Impact at Pro Level for NYCFC

K

evin O’Toole got a jump start on his professional career. As his final semester at Princeton University approached this past January, the New York City Football Club (NYCFC) selected him with the 34th pick in the 2022 Major League Soccer (MLS) SuperDraft. “I was kind of thrust into my career while I was finishing up school, which was definitely a challenge to balance the two, especially with the senior thesis,” said O’Toole, who was officially inked in March to a contract for the 2022 season with options for 2023 and 2024.“That was the hardest thing to get done while doing both. It definitely kept me busy for full days.” O’Toole was one of two Ivy League players selected in this year’s draft along with Cornell’s Tyler Bagley. His selection and subsequent signing helped him fulfill a goal he had set upon entering Princeton. “I always wanted to play professional soccer,” said O’Toole, a 5’10, 165-pound midfielder/forward. “That was a goal of mine. I know a lot of guys come into Princeton and get obsessed with the academics and then have lucrative career paths awaiting them when they graduate. I never veered from the soccer course and continued on playing and working hard through the school seasons to make sure I was in shape and performing well enough to get looks from professional scouts. That was always my goal. Maybe I was a bit overconfident that would

happen because it is pretty rare for guys to make it out of the Ivy League. I was very fortunate to do it and very happy how it worked out.” O’Toole heard before the draft through his agent and through Princeton University men’s soccer head coach Jim Barlow that there was interest in him from four or five MLS teams. He was coming off a season in which he returned from a year off due to the COVID-19 pandemic to post seven goals and nine assists to claim his second Ivy League Offensive Player of the Year. The three-time first-team All-Ivy forward had family on hand at his home in Montclair, and they joined in a chorus of screams when his name popped up on the draft board. “I didn’t know that New York City was interested until the morning of the draft,” said O’Toole, a twotime Ivy Offensive Player of the Year who culminated his Princeton career by winning the Roper Trophy given to the school’s top senior male athlete. “I really had no clue they were in the picture until maybe a few hours before the draft and then when my name showed up next to the NYCFC logo, I knew it was real.” It got more real after just one day off when he met the team to begin training. The spring semester of school had not even begun yet, but O’Toole wasn’t passing up a dream to start his professional career close to school and home.

20

% OFF

ONE SINGLE ITEM OR 10% OFF APPLIANCES (HOUSEWARES DEPT ONLY)

Present this coupon to Housewares cashier. *SALE ITEMS & NON-DISCOUNTABLE ITEMS EXCLUDED Expires 7.31.22

“It definitely made it more special being so close to home and playing for a city that I identify with,” said O’Toole. “It also made finishing at Princeton a whole lot easier so I could commute to campus to attend classes when I had some time.” O’Toole was thrown immediately into his pro playing career. The semester was still a week away when he headed to Orlando, Fla., to NYCFC’s training camp, then returned to resume training 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. most days with schoolwork to catch up on after each training session. “I had a couple of great professors that I worked with and they were able to help me through their courses throughout the semester so in the event I missed a class or two, they were able to help me and meet with me over Zoom and assign me work so I was keeping up to speed with the class,” said O’Toole. “They were fantastic and really enabled me to have a good semester in the classroom and also pursue my dream and play for this team.” O’Toole has been adjusting to the new level of play. He has yet to appear in an MLS game, but has been logging heavy minutes for NYCFC’s second team. “The speed of play is a lot quicker,” said O’Toole. “I found that out pretty early into preseason. I knew that I wasn’t going to have my best day every single day in training and that was definitely an adjustment. The mental side of the game, you have to be sharp to make sure you’re putting your best foot forward on the field every day. After that, it’s just about proving yourself in training every day and trying to get more and more playing time.” O’Toole joined a club with high standards. NYCFC won the MLS Cup a year ago, but head coach Ronny Deila left the club in May and the Pigeons first team hasn’t won since then. Through 17 games, however, they sit in fourth place in the Eastern Conference with 29 points, the same number as Montreal and only a point behind second-place Philadelphia. O’Toole has been gaining experience and staying sharp in second-team action, but is waiting for his opportunity to contribute more. “My next goal is to play in my first MLS game,” said O’Toole. “I’ve played one game with the first team this year and that was in an Open Cup match. That was

NEW YORK STATE OF MIND: Kevin O’Toole controls the ball in game last fall during his senior season for the Princeton University men’s soccer team. O’Toole, who was named the Ivy League Offensive Player of the Year to help Princeton win the 2021 league crown, is currently playing for New York City Football Club (NYCFC) in Major League Soccer (MLS). Midfielder/forward O’Toole has yet to appear in an MLS game, but has been logging heavy minutes for NYCFC’s second team. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) like a separate tournament that the team partakes in, and all the MLS sides do. My next goal is to appear in an MLS game against another MLS team. Hopefully that happens before the season ends. There’s plenty of games to go so I’m hopeful. Long-term goal is to be a consistent contributor to the team in any way I can.” In making the transition to the pro game, O’Toole is dealing with the demands of the professional game. Practice and training, as expected, are more involved than in college. “There’s a lot of time off the field, taking care of your body, getting in early to do mobility sessions, activation before training and a lift before or after training,” said O’Toole. “You didn’t really have that time in college for all that because you’re coming from class or getting to class after training. I think the time spent off the field in the gym has taken a step up definitely and I think it’s a really important aspect of the game to make sure your body is ready to play for a nine-month season.”

HALO PUB From 11 am

Espresso Weekdays: Mon through Fri 8-7; Sat 8-6 and Sun 9-4

PRINCETON SHOPPING CENTER • 609-430-4388

COUPON

FROM: 12:00 every day

9 Hulfish Street, Palmer Square

HALO PUB Ice Cream To 11 pm

UNTIL: Sun -Thu 10:00, Fri-Sat 11:30

The time on the field practicing is not much different than what he was used to at Princeton, but O’Toole is working to improve his play to be able to contribute with the first team. He has to fine-tune his skills to fit the MLS style. “Playing as an attacking player in the MLS, I think it requires playing really quick on the ball and playing in one or two touches,” said O’Toole. “That’s something that my coaching staff has encouraged me to work on, showing up in small pockets of space and being able to get the ball to the next guy and string the attack along. I think that’s something I’ve tried to work on. I think I have really good fitness and that’s something that’s propelled me. That’s something the team likes in me. The faster I can start to play, the better I will acclimate to the MLS game.” O’Toole joins the MLS after a strong college career. He came to the Tigers from the Red Bulls Academy team (the Red Bulls’ first team currently leads the MLS Eastern Conference). He made adjustments in that transition as well, going from a left back with the Red Bulls to a forward or attacking midfielder with Princeton. “I took that challenge on and relished it,” said O’Toole, who tallied 15 goals and 18 assists during his Princeton career, dishing out the fourth-most assists in program history. “I’ve always seen myself as an attack-minded player and

HALO PUB

I think I grew a lot having some freedom in the attack to take players on and combine up the field.” The move pushed him to improve his attacking moves and opened a door to the pros. He finished in the top 20 in the country in assists as a senior and was a top threat for the Tigers. “I was able to develop skills on the dribble and playing in pockets of space at Princeton that I didn’t necessarily get in my youth career,” said O’Toole. “That helped me transition into the pro game – just finding my role and finding my strengths in the field on the attack.” O ’ To o l e c o n t i n u e s t o strive for ways to improve and to develop into a player that NYCFC needs to have on the field. He is working to earn his way onto the field and fulfill his next goal of playing in an MLS game. “Just finding little ways to stay motivated, and focusing on one or two things you can get better in training sessions to prove to the coaching staff that’s watching that you deserve more of a shot,” said O’Toole. “Staying mentally ready and taking every day as an opportunity to get better, and to show what you have is how I’ve tried to approach it in these last couple months as the season wanes on and guys go down with injury or opportunities arise to make sure I’m mentally ready and putting my best foot forward in training every day.” —Justin Feil


Princeton Men’s Hockey Releases 2022-23 Schedule

Laying out the itinerary for what is going to be milestone year at historic Hobey Baker Rink, the Princeton Universit y men’s hockey team has released its 202223 schedule. As the venerable rink celebrates its 100th year of operation, Princeton will be playing 14 home games beginning with the home opener against Cornell on November 4 and closing with the home regular season finale on February 18 against Yale. Throughout the season, Princeton hockey will commemorate the centennial year of its home rink. In addition to giveaways, a new center-ice logo, historical retrospectives and more surprises along the way, the men’s and women’s programs will gather as one Princeton hockey community the weekend of January 6-7 for a pair of doubleheaders as part of the official

Princeton Athletics Takes 18th in Directors Cup

Capping a memorable return to action after the pandemic led to the cancellation of most competition, Princeton University Athletics finished a school-record No. 18 in the final LEARFIELD Directors’ Cup standings for the 2021-22 school year. The LEARFIELD Directors’ Cup is an award given annually by the National Association of Collegiate

Directors of Athletics to the colleges and universities in the United States with the most success in collegiate athletics. Points for the Directors’ Cup are based on order of finish in various championships sponsored by the NCAA and the results were released after the conclusion of the final NCAA championship contested. Princeton also tallied a new high with 868.25 total points over the course of the season. Points are awarded based on each institution’s finish in NCAA Championships. Overall, 19 spor ts are counted in the final DI standings, four of which must be women’s volleyball and basketball and men’s basketball and baseball. The next highest (15 max.) sports scored for each institution, regardless of gender, are used in the standings. What makes Princeton’s overall result even more impressive is that the Tigers finished 18th while not scoring points in three of the four mandatory scoring sports and having to leave points on the table from four other programs who otherwise would have contributed to the total. Princeton programs which

contributed to the 18thplace finish include women’s open rowing, men’s lacrosse, women’s fencing, men’s indoor track and field, men’s water polo, men’s outdoor track and field, women’s lacrosse, wrestling, women’s basketball, women’s soccer, women’s tennis, men’s cross cou nt r y, wom en’s cros s country, men’s swimming & diving, women’s golf and men’s soccer. The softball, men’s volleyball, men’s tennis and women’s outdoor track and field programs all were also eligible to score points but were not included due to scoring regulations. Princeton’s No. 18 finish is not only a school record, it is also the highest-ever by an Ivy League school, surpassing Princeton’s own No. 21 finish in 2001-02. The Tigers also established a new Ivy-League high in points scored, exceeding their 736.0 points earned in 2001-02. Texas claimed the Directors’ Cup for the second year in a row with 1,449.50 points. After Princeton’s No. 18 finish, the next-highest finishing FCS program was Harvard which was No. 39. The teams Princeton finished ahead of in terms of overall Athletic Department success in 2021-22 include Georgia (No. 19), Ole Miss (No. 20), Duke (No. 21), Alabama (No. 22), Oklahoma State (No. 23), Wisconsin (No. 24) and Texas A&M (No. 25).

PU Women’s Lacrosse Adds Dougherty to Staff

The Princeton University women’s lacrosse team is adding Molly Dougherty to its coaching staff, the program announced last week.

Dougherty, a multi-time All-American goalkeeper at James Madison, was the starting goalie on JMU’s 2018 NCAA championship team and graduated from James Madison this May. After redshirting in 2017, Dougherty was the starter in net each of the next fi ve seasons and was a four-time Tewaaraton Award Watch List selection. A two-time Colonia Athletic Association (CAA) Goalkeeper of the Year, she was a threetime All-CAA selection and earned six combined AllAmerican honors from Inside Lacrosse Magazine and USA Lacrosse Magazine. An Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association (IWLCA) All-Region selection in 2022, she was chosen to play in the IWLCA Senior All-Star game at the conclusion of this past season. Off the field, Dougherty was twice named JMU Athletic Director’s Scholar-Athlete and was selected to the CAA Commissioner’s Honor Roll this past semester. Dougherty is originally from Alexandria, Va., and attended St. Stephen’s & St. Agnes where she was captain and won a state championship while also competing

at the 2015 World Championships in Scotland.

Women’s Rower Sommerfeld to Row for Germany at U-23 Worlds

Princeton University women’s lightweight rower Cecilia Sommerfeld has qualified for the German U-23 team that will race at the upcoming 2022 World Row ing U-23 World Championship regat ta in Varese, Italy, which is taking place from July 25-30. S o m m e r fe l d , a r i s i n g sophomore, w ill race in the coxless pair. “It is a very special feeling to represent one’s country in an international setting,” said Sommerfeld, a native of Korschenbroich, Germany. “It’s especially nice with a team that pushes and cheers for another.” She earned a silver medal at the 2021 U-23 championships in the coxless pair for Germany. The past spring, Sommerfeld competed for the women’s lightweight varsity 8 boat that went undefeated. The Tigers’ 1V won gold at Eastern Sprints and at the Intercollegiate Rowing Association ( IR A ) national championship regatta, earning the program’s second straight national title.

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years

License # 13VH04549200

ROCK BOTTOM LANDSCAPING & FENCING WORKING OVERTIME: Olivia Hompe looks for the ball in action for England in the 2017 Women’s Lacrosse World Cup. Last Saturday, former Princeton University women’s lax standout Hompe ’17 came up big to help England defeat Australia 9-8 in triple overtime in the third-place game at the 2022 World Lacrosse Women’s World Championship in Towson, Md. Star attacker Hompe tallied the game-winning goal on a free position shot to earn her second straight bronze in the competition. Hompe, who had four goals and an assist against Australia, totaled 29 points on 21 goals and eight assists in the tournament. (Photo from England Lacrosse, provided courtesy of Princeton Athletics)

LAWN CARE | OUTDOOR LIVING SPACES | LANDSCAPE DESIGN DRIVEWAYS | OUTDOOR KITCHENS | STONE WORK | RETAINING WALLS

BELLE MEAD, NJ | 732-873-6780 W W W. R O C K B O T T O M L A N D S C A P I N G . N E T

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

PU Sports Roundup

100 Years of Hobey Baker Rink celebration “O n e of t h e a m a z i n g t h i n g s ab o u t P r i n c e to n Hockey is its tradition,” said Princeton men’s hockey head coach Ron Fogarty. “This is one of the oldest programs in college hockey and we are for tunate to have Hobey Baker Rink as our home. The name Hobey Baker is synonymous with college hockey, and we strive to ‘Make Hobey Proud’ each time we take the ice in the rink that bears his name. There is a lot of excitement among our group about the upcoming season, we can’t wait to properly celebrate the deep-rooted tradition and histor y of Princeton Hockey.”


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 26

After Wrapping Up Superb Career for Vassar Men’s Soccer, PHS Alum Goldsmith Playing for U.S. in Maccabiah Games Last fall, Andrew Goldsmith enjoyed a superb senior season for the Vassar College men’s soccer team. T h e for m er P r i n ce ton High standout served as a team captain for the Brewers, helping the squad go 11- 4 -2, e a r n i n g Un ite d Soccer Coaches Division III All-Region third team and All-Liberty League Honorable Mention honors in the process. “It was my last season and it was definitely my favorite season; it was a combination of doing well record-wise but it was also the playing style,” said Goldsmith, a 6’0 defensive midfielder. “It is keeping the ball moving, the one and two touch approach that fit my playing style. I was able to help the rest of the guys and we were all able to mold to that system and win games by playing the right soccer. That is the best feeling of it all. I have never been one to care for accolades but I felt like I had my best season and getting honored as an all-regional player was a great feeling as well.” This month, Goldsmith is savoring another honor as he is playing for the U.S. open men’s team at the 21st Maccabiah Games in Israel to get his last taste of competitive soccer. “To be able to wear the USA jersey and compete against other countries is a dream come true,” said Goldsmith. “It is something I have aspired to do for a while now. One of the rea-

sons I chose Vassar was that I believed I would get a lot of playing time and be a leader right away. I got four years of playing soccer and I wanted to make the most of it. To be able to have this final encompassing soccer event is going to be an extremely incredible experience.” In reflecting on his initial soccer experience at Vassar, Goldsmith faced some challenges in getting up to speed at the college level. “I would say the biggest jump from high school or club to college is the physicality and athleticism of the competition,” said Goldsmith. “More so than that something I picked up on quickly is that technically your speed of play had to be very, very strong, especially if you are a player like myself who is not going to go out there and be the most athletic kid. I had to make up for that by being able to play extremely quickly with one and two touch technical ability. Also one of the main differences between the two levels is just being communicative with your teammates. Guys are keeping each other more accountable at the college level. You feel like there is more to play for when you are playing in that group.” Goldsmith views his sophomore season for the Brewers as transformative. “I grew into that role both as a player and as a leader,” said Goldsmith, who ended up serving as a team captain in both his junior and senior seasons. “I stepped

into a massive leadership role. Even the seniors on the team were looking to me for advice where to go in terms of playing style and communication. Sophomore year was a huge year for me in terms of that.” After taking leave from school in the fall of 2020, Goldsmith was fired up to return to the pitch last fall. “I was looking forward to my last college season which I thought was going to have a year prior to that so the excitement was only pushed back farther,” said Goldsmith, who started all 17 games at the midfield in 2021, leading the team with 1378 minutes played, helping the defense to a leaguelow 12 goals against (0.71 per game), and scoring his first career goal on a penalty shot in the 1-0 win over New Paltz. “Ever yone else on the team had that same buildup and excitement and hunger for a season. To make matters even more intense, the majority of our team at that point had never played a college game and never been through a full season. My buddy Austin Lukasik and I were the only fifth year seniors so it wasn’t like we had a huge fifth year senior class who can kind of lead it. There was a good group of seniors as well as the juniors.” While Goldsmith made a lot of progress as a player during his college career, he grew more as a leader. “I think throughout my

COLLECTIVE SOUL TODD RUNDGREN KANSAS LAURIE BERKNER

Experience The Magic

JULY 29-31, 2022

SOLBERG AIRPORT READINGTON, NEW JERSEY UP SAVE UP TO 33% SAVE TO 20% NOW THROUGH JUNE 15TH

JUNE 16th THROUGH JULY 27th

@NJBALLOONFEST

BALLOONFESTIVAL.COM

BUY

NOW

four years I realized that the best leaders are ones that can drive a team with their words, but also drive a team through their actions,” said Goldsmith. “It is being the first guy in the locker room, being the first guy in the weight room and being the last guy to leave. That was always something that I tried hard to do through my years there and really motivate guys. Whether it was in the classroom, or on or off the field, I always tried to be the best person and the best athlete for younger guys. I wanted them to be able to come to me for questions. I don’t think any college experience could be smooth sailing. You learn a lot and most about yourself when you go through the hurdles.” In order to make the U.S. open squad for the Maccabiah Games, Goldsmith had to jump through some hurdles. The program held tryout camps on the East and West Coast last summer. The East Coast tryout was held as Drew University and Goldsmith showed up, figuring it was worth a shot despite stiff competition. “It was definitely a very strenuous three days, the group was a wide array of D-I, D-II, and D-III players,” said Goldsmith, noting that there was one session on Friday night, two on Saturday, and two on Sunday.” “There was good competition there. I knew I was in the top handful of guys but I also knew that this open team is always strong. We are coming in at the No 1 overall seed and we have won the Maccabiah Games the previous two times in Israel. It usually has professional or soon to be professional guys. It is majority of D-I players.” In September, Goldsmith learned that he had made the squad. “I got the email and I was definitely extremely excited,” said Goldsmith, noting that he is only one of three D-III players on the squad which includes D-I performers from such programs as Yale, Stanford, Fairfield, and Lafayette. “I knew I had proven I was a good player but this is a notch up from Vassar I would say. Many years ago I had the dream to do this.” Over the last year, the U.S. squad has held Zoom meetings to bond and then held a training camp in Los Angeles last month to prepare for the Games, which are taking place from July 12-26. “That was the first time I had met everyone, there were only two or three guys from the East Coast tryout who made it so there were a lot of guys from the West Coast and also some guys who weren’t able to attend the other tryouts because they are really quality players,” said Goldsmith. “I was nervous leading up to the camp. When I got the camp, my nerves completely calmed. Sports is such a mental game. Once you can prove it to yourself, it is much easier to prove it to everyone around you. Just being in warmups and getting a few touches on the ball and passing with the other guys, my confidence just grew and grew throughout the week. To make matters even better. I really enjoyed being around everyone on the team. We

GOING FOR GOLD: Andrew Goldsmith goes after the ball in a 2016 game during his senior season for the Princeton High boys’ soccer team. After wrapping up a superb career for the Vassar College men’s soccer team last fall, Goldsmith is currently in Israel playing for the U.S. open men’s soccer team in the Maccabiah Games. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) had team meals together.” Goldsmith has also enjoyed being around the U.S. team’s head coach, Michael Erush, who guides Cal State LA’s men’s soccer team. “His coaching style seems similar to my college coach in the sense that he is a very communicative guy,” said Goldsmith, who sees himself filling a defensive midfielder role for the U.S. squad. “He is going to be very honest with you and tell you what he needs you to do to get playing time and help the team. We have had open conversations throughout this past year which has only helped me compete for a spot and help the team compete for gold as well.” Competing in Maccabiah Games will also mark Goldsmith’s first trip to Israel and he is looking forward to the off-the-field activities, which features Israel Connect, a cultural and educational program for the athletes. “Everyone who has gone there has the most

incredible things to say,” said Goldsmith, noting that the U.S. team will be based in Jer usalem during the competition which brings together 10,000 athletes from 85 countries taking part in 45 sports. “I know what an incredible experience it is going to be. I am not going to take it for granted, I am extremely excited.” For Goldsmith, the journey to Israel is a natural outgrowth of his time at Vassar. “I have loved my experience at Vassar and how much I have learned,” said Goldsmith, who will be starting a job with management consulting firm, ZS Associates, in New York City upon his return from the Games. “I have grown a lot. I have grown in the sense that I am much more aware as a person. One of the reasons I wanted to go to Vassar was its diverse environment that would allow me to gain an ability of being aware of my surroundings and get to know people of different backgrounds.” —Bill Alden

HALO PUB From 11 am

Espresso

FROM: 12:00 every day

9 Hulfish Street, Palmer Square

HALO PUB To 11 pm

Ice Cream

UNTIL: Sun -Thu 10:00, Fri-Sat 11:30

HALO PUB Espresso From 1

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195

9Wellstree.com Hulfish Street, Palmer Squa

HALO PUB Ice Cream To 11 Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years


As the Princeton FC Barcelona 2006 faced Chicago KICS FC 2006 City MWC last Thursday to open play in the boys’ 16U bracket in the US Youth Soccer (USYS) National Presidents Cup tournament in Greensboro, N.C., it got off to a shaky start. PFC Barcelona trailed 1-0 at halftime and some doubts started to creep in. “We didn’t really know how it would go at the start, there were a lot of nerves,” said PFC Barcelona center back Nick Matese, a rising Princeton High junior. “It was a stage none of us had been on before. The coaches always say that the first game of the tournament is the most important because if you lose, you are basically out so you have to get a result. We went down in the first half so it was definitely worrying and there were thoughts, ‘Are we really up to this?’” PFC Barcelona proved to be up to the challenge, pulling out a 1-1 draw. “We knew we had to fight back to get the result,” said PFC midfielder Felipe Matar Grandi, also a rising PHS junior. “We got a tie, we got the job done. We learned a lot about them, it was a tough game.” Getting the job done in the rest of Bracket A action, PFC Barcelona topped 2-0 Tuzos Garfio 06 (Ariz.) and then edged Bayern Munich 2006 Boys White (Texas) 1-0. As a result, it finished tied for first in the bracket with Chicago KICS, setting up a rematch between the foes in the national final last Sunday at the Bryan Park – Truist Soccer Complex. Matar G rand i and h is teammates were primed for the second round with the Chicago side. “I think overall we just learned to stay focused,” said Matar Grandi. “We were focused the whole time. We didn’t want to let them score on any set piece. We had to make no mistakes.” The squad utilized some highlight footage to help build confidence heading into the rematch. “ We k n e w h o w t h e y played, we knew we could beat them,” said Matese. “People were making videos of the season. I made a video of the best goals. It was more than 10 games that it took us to get here. Every-

one was really energized.” PFC went on to edge Chicago 2-1 with Matese providing two goals to go along with energetic play on the back line. Heading into the final, Matese was ready to step up. “That whole day leading up to it, it was like this is your moment,” recalled Matese. “You have one chance to help yourself, this team, and everyone else you are representing here.” Matese’s first tally came on a free kick late in the first half as PFC Barcelona took a 1-0 lead. “You never really know before you kick it,” said Matese, recalling the goal. “I got the chance and took it.” In the second half, Matese combined with Matar Grandi to give PFC a 2-0 lead. “Felipe crossed it over; this whole season we have tried some improvised free kicks,” said Matese. “It is all situational but we have a really good connection. They were just a little sleepy on their marking. I was able to get free and he just passed it quick to me instead of taking a shot. I was able to tap it in.” But Chicago responded with a goal to make it a onegoal contest, setting up a nervy final 15 minutes. “We knew we couldn’t make any mistakes, they got pretty close but we held the result and got the win,” said Matar Grandi. “It was tough, we knew how much we wanted it. We played really hard to the last second.” Matese concentrated on keeping order on the back line. “We made a few mistakes that led to that goal and I was just trying to get everyone to calm down and stay composed,” said Matese, crediting fellow defenders Izayah Huynh, Connor Hewitt, Chris Lee, and Kyle Ingersoll with stepping up to hold off Chicago. “We realized we were 15 minutes away from winning this whole thing, I was just saying we have to play our game and we can do this. It was definitely nerve-wracking, they got some chances.” In the wake of the win, Matar Grandi is still coming to terms with the team’s achievement. “It was amazing, I get goosebumps just thinking about it,” said Matar Grandi. “It still doesn’t get in my

head that we are national champions. It is insane.” For Matese, the moment of triumph left an indelible memory. “A lot of people were hugging each other,” recalled Matese. “I just lied down on the field and had tears of joy. It was a very powerful emotional moment. It is something you actually dream about, it is beyond words.” In reflecting on the team’s success, Matese said it started with rigorous training sessions. “I think the competitiveness in practice is key,” said Matese. “We are always competing with each other. There is some good-natured trash talking. Our coach Milen [ Nikolov] shows us tough love and really pushes us but we know how much he cares.” Nikolov is proud of how the PFC Barcelona players have grown into national champions. “It has been 15 years since PFC was established and we already have two national champions,” said Nikolov. “What really matter for us coaches and what our Director of Programs Stoyan Pumpalov always insists on is to develop players. In this PFC Barcelona team there are eight Princeton High players and six players from Montgomery High and we’ve been working with them for many years. Some of those kids has been in the club since they were 5 years old. That’s what we are all about.” In the view of Matese, it took all of those players to win a national title. “The whole run was a group effort,” said Matese. “We had 10 different people contribute goals.” Matar Grandi, for his part, won’t soon forget the PFC Barcelona group. “This has been an amazing season and I am proud of everyone,” said Matar Grandi. “I am really glad we pulled it off.” —Bill Alden

Princeton Little League Team Displays Resilience, Taking 3rd in Section 3 Intermediate 50/70 Tournament After the Princeton Little League ( PLL) squad suffered a lopsided 22-0 defeat to powerhouse Toms River East last week to open the Section 3 Intermediate 50/70 tournament, its players could have thrown in the towel in the double-elimination competition. A s PL L manager Mat t Bellace addressed his players before they faced Old Bridge in a knock-out game last Wednesday in the division which utilizes a 50-foot pitching distance and 70foot base paths and is open to players ages 11-13, he challenged them to bounce back. “I was thinking about the moment for those guys and I talked about a book I wrote, Life is Disappointing and Other Inspiring Thoughts,” said Bellace. “The one conclusion I came to after writing that whole book is that sometimes after huge disappointments, the only thing you can do is ask yourself is what is this going to inspire. So here we are against Old Bridge; we have just gotten crushed by Toms River East and the question is what is this going to inspire. Does it inspire you guys to say we can play in another level. We can give it everything we have and not just say, ‘oh well, woe is me, we are not going to win the Section, who cares.’” PLL produced an inspired performance, defeating Old Bridge 11-3 to stay alive in the competition. “I really do think that clicked ultimately,” said Bellace, referring to his pregame message. “Old Bridge was more to our level age-wise and the speed of the game. We had

no errors on that game and we also hit the ball really, really well. We had 13 hits so it seemed like every inning we were getting guys on base.” Victor Espita and Noah Prete led the hit parade for Princeton as they each went 3-for-4 in the win with Brady Lee going 2-for-4. On the mound, Matthew Brophy stymied Old Bridge with some crafty work. “Matthew pitched a gem, he is so calm under pressure,” said Bellace. “He went six of seven innings. He lulls teams to sleep, he is consistent. They don’t know what to do, they are hitting pop -ups and grounders. They can’t figure him out. He is not trying to overpower anybody. He is throwing location at the right time with a little curveball and a little off speed. Hitters can’t sit back on it.” A day later, Pr inceton faced Middletown in another elimination game, hoping to pull a surprise as its foe was likely looking ahead to a possible rematch with Toms River East in the final round. “That was one where we were looking to play spoiler; this was a classic upset scenario, whoever they have left to pitch, they don’t want to use him against us,” said Bellace. “They put in a guy who was more hittable and the game was close in the bottom of the third. It was 6-3 Middletown. It was very much a game.” Things got away from PLL after that, however, as it ended up falling 15-4 to get eliminated from the tournament. “They overwhelmed us; we didn’t play great defense in the second half of the

game,” said Bellace. “These guys haven’t spent a lot of time just seeing shots and line drives and balls over their head.” While powerhouse Toms Rivers East went on to defeat Middletown 15-0 to win the title, Bellace believes that the PLL squad gained a lot from the tourney. “We are really hoping that this changes the culture of Princeton baseball, meaning that more kids are excited about being part of it, especially at the intermediate level and through the summer,” said Bellace, noting that the team will be playing in some weekend all-star tournaments in the area and will culminate the summer by traveling to Cooperstown, N.Y., the home of the Baseball Hall of Fame, in mid-August to play in a tournament at Dreams Park. “Toms River keeps kids in the program and they compete at a really high level. Jim Brophy (assistant coach) and I counted today, we will be up to 60 games that we have been a part of since the fall of last year with travel ball for 12U and travel ball in the spring. We are returning 10 of 14 kids next year, including three pitchers so 2023 could be a great summer for Princeton baseball.” For Bellace, it has been a great experience coaching the squad. “I said to these boys before we departed that I have coached in Princeton for years in various sports and we will be more bonded as a group than any other,” said Bellace. “It goes beyond this season. I told them any time you see me you have a friend, you have someone who believes in you. This group is special and I will never forget them.” —Bill Alden

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

Employing Total Team Effort to Make Dream Come True, PFC Barcelona Wins Boys’ 16U National Presidents Cup Title

ONLINE www.towntopics.com

SWINGING AWAY: Princeton Little League (PLL) player Brady Lee takes a swing in recent action. Lee helped PLL take third in the Section 3 Intermediate 50/70 tournament last week as it posted an 11-3 win over Old Bridge last Wednesday to go 1-2 in the double elimination competition won by Toms River East. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

NATIONAL STAGE: Members of the Princeton FC Barcelona 2006 squad show off the trophy and medals they earned for winning the boys’ 16U final in the US Youth Soccer (USYS) 2022 National Presidents Cup tournament. PFC Barcelona defeated Chicago KICS FC 2006 City MWC 2-1 in the national final last Sunday in Greensboro, N.C.

Town Topics a Princeton tradition! ®

est. 1946


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 28

Fueled by Hare’s Sizzling Hitting Down the Stretch, Post 218 Tops Trenton, Stays Alive for Spot in Districts Peter Hare was dragging a bit when he arrived at Smoyer Park last Sunday to play catcher for the Princeton Post 218 American Legion baseball team as it hosted Trenton Post 93/182. “Waking up this morning I was tired,” said Hare, who had reason to be fatigued as Post 218 had a marathon Saturday, falling 16-3 to Broad St. Park Post 313 and then losing 13-6 to Bordentown Post 26. “I think everyone else was too.” With Post 218 trailing Trenton 1-0 heading into the second inning on Sunday, Hare helped key a rally in improbable fashion, laying down a bunt with two runners aboard that was misplayed and found himself standing on third with two runs in. “I joked that I was going to hit for the cycle,” said Hare, reflecting on the sequence which gave Princeton a 2-1 lead. Hare kept hitting, smacking a two-run double in the bottom of the third to put Post 218 up 5-2 and added two singles as Princeton pulled away to a 9-2 victory. “I think it was two strikes and their right fielder was playing closer to the line,” said Hare, reflecting on his double. “I knew if I got it to right center there was some room so I just flared it out there and then he sort of bobbled it and I took second.” On Monday, Pr inceton took it to Trenton again, topping Post 93/182 9-5 to improve to 7-10 and stay alive in the race for a spot in the upcoming Legion State District Tournament. “We are right on the edge of making districts,” said Hare. “We are not sure whether they are going to take six or seven teams. We need the wins in the last couple of games.” After going through upand-down final campaign

for PHS this spring, Hare is enjoying his late surge for Post 218. “I was struggling to hit in the high school season,” said Hare. “So having this one last season to finish strong, it is good.” Post 218 manager Benito Gonzalez acknowledged that his club didn’t get off to a strong start on Sunday. “ We w e r e n o t h a p p y with them after the first inning,” said Gonzalez. “I think sometimes you go into game and you assume a result. You can’t do that to anybody because everybody has the potential to win and be good. It is not something you want. Thankfully from second inning on, we really righted the ship.” Hare’s bunt play in the second helped get Princeton going in the right direction. “I was definitely thinking that if we get first or second with nobody out we want to scratch a couple across,” said Gonzalez. “I am not the biggest bunter but when it is first and second nobody out towards the bottom of the lineup, give it a shot. He also gave himself a shot to be safe at first so he had a really nice play.” Post 218 has been getting some nice work overall from Hare down the stretch. “Peter did great, he has had a couple of games like that this summer,” said Gonzalez. “It has been really helpful. He has been working behind the plate, which isn’t easy. He got a little banged up today.” On the mound, Jon Tao did great for Post 218, pitching a complete game with seven strikeouts. “Jon did really well; in the first inning, it was sluggish for everybody and it is very easy after something like that to let it get to you mentally and affect you,” said Gonzalez of the rising PHS senior. “But he came out the rest

FOR PETE’S SAKE: Peter Hare makes contact in a recent game for the Princeton Post 218 American Legion baseball team. Last Sunday, recent Princeton High grad Hare had three hits and two RBIs to help Princeton defeat Trenton Post 93/182 9-2. On Monday, Post 218 defeated Trenton again, prevailing 9-5 to improve to 7-10 and stay alive in the race for a spot in the upcoming Legion State District Tournament. Princeton was slated to end regular season play by hosting Allentown on July 12. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

of the game and pumped strikes. He threw 60 strikes out of 99 pitches, it was a great ratio. He was really aggressive with his fastball today. He only ended up walking two people. I was really, really happy with him.” Gonzalez has been pleased with the way the Post 218 has been hitting this season. “Offensively this summer I have been pretty happy with what we have done,” said Gonzalez, who got two hits apiece from Alex Winters and James Petrone in the win in Sunday. “We have had plenty of games where we have scored six, seven, or eight plus runs before. A lot of different people have done it.” Leadoff hitter Winters, a rising PHS junior, also came through in the win on Monday, pounding out three hits with six RBIs. “A lex is absolutely on fire,” said Gonzalez. “I have coached him since he was in sixth grade and he was the only sixth grader that I had on the middle school team. I noticed he is an athlete and a good player. I think next year he is going to be really good.” With Princeton slated to end regular season play by hosting Allentown on July 12, Gonzalez is hoping his team can scratch out a spot in the state playoffs. “We are already in a position where we are letting other people control our fate a little bit,” said Gonzalez, whose team entered the last day of the season in a three-way tie for sixth place in the Mercer County American Legion League with the possibility of six or seven MCALL teams advancing to district play. “What we need to do is bank wins, no matter who it is against. The people we have here now are the people who have made a commitment and have really taken that seriously so I appreciate their efforts. I really appreciate the collective effort we are getting down the stretch, it has been seven or eight games in a row.” In dealing with that grueling stretch drive, Post 218 has displayed resilience. “We had a couple of bad losses yesterday and it is easy for a team to roll over and say I don’t want to do this or I don’t feel good or lose confidence,” said Gonzalez. “The one thing I can give this group is they haven’t let a loss affect what they do the next day. That is really commendable, I really appreciate that.” Hare, for his part, is looking to keep rolling to the final out, whenever it comes. “A lot of us are going to college next year,” said Hare, who is taking a gap year before he starts at Rutgers in 2023. “This is probably the last season for most of us, so we want to finish well.” —Bill Alden

JUNCTION BARBER SHOP

33 Princeton-Hightstown Rd Ellsworth’s Center (Near Train Station)

799-8554 Tues-Fri: 10am-6pm; Sat 8:30am-3:30pm

Sparked by Davidson’s Leadership, All-Around Play, LoyalTees Tops Princeton Supply, Gets Back In Sync With its sights set on earning a fourth straight title in the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League, the LoyalTees squad has hit some bumps in the road this season. The proud team lost 51-38 to Athlete Engineering Institute on June 24 and then fell 65-49 to Majeski Foundation last Friday evening. But as LoyalTees got ready to hit the Community Park courts last Monday to face Princeton Supply, one of its veteran stars, Nick Davidson, was unfazed by the recent setbacks. “Every loss we have had this season, we haven’t had our full roster or we have had guys coming late,” said Davidson. On Monday, LoyalTees was missing some key players in Zahrion Blue and Vince Anfield, leading Davidson to assume a playmaking role. “I tried to get the ball around and get everyone involved,” said Davidson. “I wanted TB (Terrance Bailey) to have a good game.

We need a lot out of TB and he played great for us.” LoyalTees also got a lot from Davidson as he scored 21 points to help the squad prevail 72-47 and improve to 5-2. “Here and there I was just trying to assert myself where I can,” said Davidson, assessing his performance. “I was just attacking where I know I can attack if we are having a little lull. It is just try to go in there and battle.” With LoyalTees up 41-21 at halftime, the squad built its lead to 27 points early in the second half and cruised from there. “I want to focus in second halves with us because we normally start off the game well,” said Davidson, reflecting on the victory which saw Bailey score 20 points and Arterio Williams chip in 18. “Against Majeski, we took the lead and then they went on a 11-0 run which was crazy and we were never able to come back from that. I just want to be able to add to our leads which is what we need to work on right now.

Basketball is a game of runs but we need to maintain our run too.” As a stalwar t for LoyalTees, Davidson is focused on doing whatever is needed for the squad to prevail. “It is crazy because I have been here so long so my role has advanced,” said Davidson, a 6’6, 220-pound for ward who s tar red at Bloomfield College where he scored 1,924 points and helped the Bears reach the NCAA Division II Sweet 16 in 2018 as a senior. “I just want to apply myself where I can. In close games, I have got to hit free throws. We are not really being disciplined on free throws. I am going to make them when it counts.” Davidson is confident that LoyalTees will come through when it counts at playoff time. “It is getting everybody in sync, getting everybody coming in and playing and then making our run like we always do,” said Davidson. “It is about going to the playoffs with a healthy roster. If we go in there with our full team, I feel like we can beat anybody.” —Bill Alden

TEEING IT UP: Nick Davidson unloads the ball in a game last year for LoyalTees in the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. Last Monday, Davidson tallied 21 points to help LoyalTees defeat Princeton Supply 72-47 as it improved to 5-2. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Town Topics a Princeton tradition! ®

est. 1946


Bailey Basketball Academy Offering Summer Camp in July

T he B ailey B asketball Academy (BBA) is offering a week-long camp in late July. BBA is led by former Princeton Day School girls’ hoops coach a nd Ph iladelph ia 76ers camp director and clinician Kamau Bailey. The camp is slated for July 25-July 29 at Stuart Country Day School. There are full day/half day and first hoops options

Stuart Sports Camps Still Have Openings

The Stuart Country Day School is holding three sports camps on its campus at 2100 Stuart Road in Princeton from July 18-22 and there

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co. We now carry SOLAR WINDOW FILM to protect your furniture.

741 Alexander Rd, Princeton

924-2880

are still openings for the programs. There will be a field hockey camp for players in grades 3-9 held from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., a tennis camp for players in grades K-4 held from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., and a basketball camp for players in grades 3-9 held from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. One can log onto the Stuart website at stuartschool.org and go the MENU section in the upper right of the home page and hit the summer programs link under the Student Life section for more information about the camps. The Stuart Summer Sports Camps are in partnership with “Let Her Play” (LetHerPlay.org). Log onto the “Let Her Play” website to learn more about the core values curriculum and importance of girls participating in sports.

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

Local Sports

available. The program will also include a small group training to help with transition to a higher school level. In addition, there is a multiple player/sibling discount. All players will be required to bring their own water, snacks, and/or lunch for the applicable programs. For more information, contact Kamau Bailey at (917) 626-5785 or at kamau.bailey@gmail.com.

TOP DOGS: Members of the Mercer Special Hockey program (also known as the Mercer Bulldogs) enjoy the moment after the organization held its third annual Skate-a-thon last month at the Ice Land Skating Center. The event raises money for the Bulldogs, a nonprofit for children with special needs who play hockey that is the local affiliate of the American Special Hockey Association. Holding the check shown in the photo, at left, is Andreas Oskiper along with Collin Penders. Oskiper, a Princeton High grad, and Penders, a graduate of The Pennington School, are junior coaches for the Bulldogs and organized the event. This year’s Skate-a-thon brought in $3,900 and the event has raised nearly $11,000 for the organization over the last three years. The money donated is used for uniforms, ice time, and assistive devices for onice use. Those interested in learning more about in the organization can contact Jackie Zohn at mercer.specialhockey@gmail.com.

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years

20™ SEASON!

MONTGOMERY FRIENDS FARMERS MARKET OPEN SAT JUNE 4th - SAT NOVEMBER 19th HOURS: 9am - Noon LOCATION: Village Shoppes III 1378 Route 2065S, Skillman, NJ Across from ShopRite, in North Lot

Jersey-Fresh produce, local poultry, eggs, fruit pies, flowers, honey, bread, granola, & soaps.

SPONSORS

Summer at the Chapel Worship Begins at 10am Sunday, May 29

Sunday, July 17

United Methodist Campus Minister, American University

Director of Educational Ministries, Nassau Presbyterian Church

Joey Heath-Mason

Corrie Berg

MARKET PATRON The Coder School Montgomery, Princeton Radiology

Sunday, June 5

Sunday, July 24

Resource Director, Greater NJ Conference, United Methodist Church

2022 Summer Princeton Chapel Liturgist M.Div. Candidate, Princeton Theological Seminary

MARKET BASKET Fortunato Architects, Lakeland Bank (Rocky Hill), Montgomery Township, Nassau Tennis, Princeton Orthopaedics, Red Barn Printing, Team Nimbus

Sunday, June 12

Sunday, July 31

Founder & Creative Director, Inspiring Creativity Ministries

Member of the Episcopal Church M.Div. Candidate, Princeton Theological Seminary

MARKET CONTRIBUTORS Belle Mead Co-op, Dogtopia, the Mani Family, Princeton Fitness and Wellness, Tiger’s Tale

We welcome new sponsors: Visit MFOS.org/FarmersMarket

Enger Muteteke

Donna Owusu-Ansah

Wesley Rowell

David King

Sunday, June 19

Sunday, August 7

Author, Child Advocate, and Retreat Leader Princeton, NJ

(Incoming) Pastor of Trinity United Methodist Church, Germantown, MD

Sunday, June 26

Sunday, August 14

Pastor, National Community Church, Lincoln Theater Campus, Washington D.C.

Lancaster Theological Seminary, Assistant Professor of Preaching and Worship, Director of Chapel Worship

Sunday, July 3

Sunday, August 21

Associate Dean of Religious Life & the Chapel, Princeton University

Mt. Nittany United Methodist Church, State College, PA

Shannon Daley-Harris

Jimeka Jones Setzer

Theresa S. Thames

Kate Mackereth Fulton

Catherine E. Williams

Phoebe Quaynor

Sunday, July 10

Sunday, August 28

Executive Director for Episcopal Charities of New York

Office of Religious Life Intern ‘21–’22 M.Div. Candidate, Princeton Theological Seminary

Kevin VanHook, II

Otis Byrd, Jr.

Scan to register


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 30

Obituaries

Lee V. Harrod, 79, beloved TCNJ English Professor, Dies Dr. Lee V. Harrod, who provided joyful access to James Joyce’s Ulysses and Finnegans Wake for hundreds of students, died on the evening of June 15, 2022. Fittingly, it was already June 16 — Bloomsday — in Dublin and the 100th anniversary of the p u bl i c at ion of Uly s s e s , which Dr. Harrod always called “the greatest book in

the English language” and the “blue book of life.” He believed Leopold Bloom’s journey around Dublin was a metaphor for the journey each of us takes through our individual days and lives. Dr. Harrod was like Chaucer’s clerk in The Canterbury Tales : “And gladly wolde he lerne and gladly teche.” He lear ned and taught for 58 years: first as a

Preferred by the

Jewish Community of Princeton because we are a part of it.

Member of KAVOD: Independent Jewish Funeral Chapels Serving All Levels of Observance

609-883-1400 OrlandsMemorialChapel.com 1534 Pennington Road, Ewing, NJ JOEL E. ORLAND

MAX J. ORLAND

Senior Director, NJ Lic. No. 3091

Funeral Director, NJ Lic. No. 5064

graduate assistant at Pennsylvania State University, where he wrote his dissertation on Ford Madox Ford and met his wife Lois Marie Harrod, then as a beloved professor in the English Department at The College of New Jersey (during which time he also served as department head, as head the English Honors Program, and as founder and editor of The Trenton State Review). After his retirement in 2008, when students honored him with a nonstop reading of Ulysses, he volunteered as a reader for the visually impaired at Reading Allies and as a tutor at HomeFront, where he helped dozens earn their GEDs with his “macaroni and cheese” recipe for essay writing. In 2008, he joined the Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Evergreen Forum, where he taught college-level courses on Marcel Proust, D. H. Lawrence, and of course, James Joyce. He also served on Evergreen and PSRC boards. Whether he was teaching literary theory, Finnegans Wake (riverrun, past Eve and Adam’s, from swerve of shore to end of bay), or the five-paragraph essay, Dr. Harrod had a remarkable gift for explaining the difficult and making it accessible. Born in Gillette, Wyoming, the son of LaVern and Lillian Harrod, Lee worked his way through college and graduate school. One of the things that drew him to The College of New Jersey (which was then Trenton State College) was the fact that many of the students there were, like him, the first in their families to attend college. During his 40 years at TCNJ, Dr. Harrod acted with the campus-based theater company Shakespeare 70. Because he lost most of his hair early, he often played the patriarch: “I played every father in Shakespeare.” Among his roles were Duncan ( Macbeth), Polonius (Hamlet), and Peter Quince ( A Mid s umme r Ni g ht’s Dream). On and offstage, he loved to read aloud with his resonant baritone, and his children, Jon and Kate, happily snuggled up and listened to his renderings of The Wind and the Willows, Little House on the Prairie, and twice — The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. During his years at TCNJ, Dr. Harrod served on the Hopewell Valley S chool District school board. He also donated many pints of blood, and his rare O negative, Cytomegalovirus negative blood was of special value to premature babies. Dr. Harrod loved to travel. After retirement, he and his lifelong companion, best friend, and wife Lois (he liked to say he married her “to finish the conversation”), trekked to Ireland, Scotland, Scandinavia, France, Italy, and Latin America. They particularly enjoyed taking their grandson Will to Costa Rica, their grandson James to London, and their grandson Sam and granddaughter Sophia to Scotland, Ireland, and Paris. “PopPop” was up for any grandchild adventure — watching basketball games, swimming meets, ice-skating, school plays, and presentations; bird watching; hiking; eating bagels under collapsing umbrellas; exploring zoos,

catacombs, and canyons; and in his last weeks, discussing existential themes in Japanese anime with his granddaughter. Dr. Harrod also loved to walk daily, and every morning unless it was below 15 degrees, he and Lois would make t heir t rek arou nd Hopewell, often stopping to talk to friends and dog walkers. As James Joyce would say of his death: And even if Humpty shell fall frumpty times as awkward again in the beardsboosoloom of all our grand remonstrancers there’ll be iggs for the brekkers come to mourn him, sunny side up with care. . . . (Finnegans Wake). As a husband, friend, professor, father, and grandfather, Dr. Harrod was sunny side up with care, a vir bonum, and a good, generous, and compassionate man who will be missed by many. There will be a memorial gathering on September 30 in Education 212, on The College of New Jersey campus. His family requests that in lieu of flowers, memorial gifts be given to the places he loved teaching: The College of New Jersey, where an endowed scholarship will be established in his name, HomeFront, or the Princeton Senior Resource Center. For The College of New Jersey, gifts may be given online to the Dr. Lee V. Harrod Endowment Scholarship at the website plannedgiving. tcnj.edu/memorials-and-tribute-gifts or by check made out to TCNJ Foundation. PO Box 7718, Ewing NJ 086280718, and earmarked Dr. Lee V. Harrod. For HomeFront, gifts may be given to online at homefrontnj.org /donate or by check to HomeFront, 1880 Pr inceton Avenue, L awrenceville, NJ 08648-4518. For the Princeton Senior Resource Center, gifts may be given online at princetonsenior.org/support/donate or by check to PSRC, 101 Poor Farm Road, Princeton, NJ 08540.

1954 where her husband set up his medical practice and Mary Elise became active in the newly formed Women’s Auxiliary at the hospital. She, along with two other doctors’ wives, chaired the first June Fete, which later became a major fundraising event for the hospital. Mary Elise was a devoted wife, mother, and grandmother to her family. Her love of cooking brought the family together for holiday and Sunday dinners. She never missed a single high school field hockey, basketball, or softball game. She provided the teams with homemade chocolate chip cookies to celebrate the victories and to soothe the losses. At the end of every season she would hold team banquets for all the players and coaches. She became an honorary member of every team. After her children were grown she became a licensed realtor with Peyton Associates, where she worked for over 20 years. Her inherent knowledge of Princeton was a great asset and her specialty was real estate in the Jugtown Historic District of Princeton, where she grew up. In her retirement she enjoyed spending time on the beach at Barnegat Light, a favorite place where she spent many happy days. Mary Elise is survived by her children, Mary Ann Cook of St. Petersburg, Florida, and Camden, Maine; Margaret Farley of Fort Myers, Florida; and Raymond Cook of West Windsor, New Jersey. She was predeceased by her oldest daughter Sandra Labaree of Wiscasset, Maine. She is also survived by four grandchildren, two great- grandchildren, and her brother Dr. Paul M. Roediger of Gwynedd, Pennsylvania. The family will hold a private burial service. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in her memory to a charity of your choice. Arrangements are under the direction of MatherHodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

George G. Alexandridis On Monday, June 27, 2022, George G. Alexandridis of Lawrenceville, NJ, loving husband, father, and grandfather passed away at age 87. George was born on October 11, 1934 in Long Island City, NY, to Constantine and Anastasia Alexandridis. He received his S.B. degree in Civil Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1956 and proudly served in the Army Corps of Engineers from 1956 through 1958. On December 26, 1956, he married Geraldine Monahan. They raised one son, Mark. George’s passion was engineering. He actively practiced for more than 50 years. His accomplishments resulted in many local engineering awards and honors as well as a government service award. His last role was Chief Engineer of the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission wherein he supervised the seminal design work to rebuild the Scudder Falls Bridge, which has finally come to fruition. He was devoted to both his immediate and extended family and was extremely proud of his Greek heritage. George is survived by his wife Geraldine, his son Mark and his wife Nancy, his grandchildren Kathleen and Iain, and his sisters, Alexandra and Marina. A funeral service was held on Friday July 1, 2022 at the Saint George Greek Orthodox Church in Hamilton, NJ. Burial was in Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, NJ. Extend condolences and share memor ies at T he KimbleFuneralHome.com.

Mary Elise Cook Mary Elise Cook passed away on July 12, 2022. She was 96. Born and raised in Princeton she was the daughter of Helen Margerum Roediger and Paul Otto Roediger. She graduated from Princeton High School in the class of 1943, and in the following year graduated from Katharine Gibbs in New York City. She is predeceased by her husband of 71 years, Dr. Alfred S. Cook Jr., also a lifelong Princeton resident whom she met at a high school Valentine’s Day party. After her marriage in 1944 she worked as a medical secretary while her husband attended medical school in Philadelphia. The couple settled back in Princeton in

Andrew Wyeth, Evening at Kuerners print

Andrew Wyeth, “The Carry Tote”

www.princetonmagazinestore.com


Longtime Princeton resident John Alan Strother, age 94, died in Princeton Hospital on Monday, June 27, of cardiac arrest brought on by a sudden acute pneumonia infection. John was a pro d ig iously -t a lente d, strong, versatile, kind, and generous-spirited man who will be deeply missed by his family and friends. John Alan Strother was born on December 27, 1927, in Hartford, Connecticut, to Alfred Carter Strother and Mar y Stoughton Parsons Strother, of Windsor, Connecticut. John grew up in Windsor, where he attended Windsor Grammar School, Loomis School, and Windsor High School. John graduated from Windsor High School in June 1945, spent the summer in military training at Norwich University in Northfield, Vermont, and was sent home in August after the Japanese surrender in World War II. He returned to Army service when he was drafted after he turned 18 in December. John served in the Army from January 1946 to July 1947. During his Army service, John completed Basic Combat Training at Camp Crowder, Missouri, and Advanced Individual Training in radio and electronics at the Army Signal Corps in Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, and then worked as a technician at the Army’s Fort Myer military base in Arlington, Virginia. After his discharge from the Army, John resumed his studies at Trinity College in Hartford, where he had completed his first semester term in the fall of 1945. At Trinity, John was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Pi Sigma, a national physics honor society. In June 1950, John graduated from Trinity with a Bachelor of Science degree, with honors in mathematics. In July 1950, John accepted a job offer from the U. S. Nav y’s Underwater Sound Laboratory in New London, Connecticut. John worked for two years at the Underwater Sound Laboratory as a physicist in the Electromagnetics Division’s Infrared Branch. In the spring of 1952, John was awarded a National Science Foundation Predoctoral Graduate Fellowship for graduate work in electrical engineering at Princeton University. John completed his Master of Science degree in Engineering at Princeton in October 1954. In the summer of 1954, John accepted a job offer from the Radio Corporation of America ( RCA). John was eventually assigned to RCA’s A s t ro - E lec t ron ic s Division in East Windsor, New Jersey. At Astro, John was a key member of the team that designed, built, and tested TIROS 1, the first weather satellite to successfully orbit the earth

played baseball and foot- and their spouses, Jean’s ball. As an adult, he bowled husband R ichard ( Dick ) and golfed. He was an avid Tushingham and Nancy’s lifelong fan of the New York husband Laurence (Larry) Yankees, originally inspired Kelly; his four grandchilby his hero and role model dren, Teresa Kim Harrold Lou Gehrig. He also cheered and Bonnie Lee Marlow, for the Mets and the Phillies, Christopher Laurence and Jennifer Christina Kelly; and the Giants and the Jets. John was also a talented his four great-grandchildren, woodworker. He built a Nolan Eugene Harrold, Vioworkshop in the basement let Paige and Ashton Paul of his Princeton home and Kelly, and Riley Elizabeth for many years, he took plea- Marlow. John is also sursure in crafting furniture for vived by his brother, Gordon the home, including several Henry Strother, and his two sets of built-in bookshelves sisters, Mary Alice Peachman and Margaret ( Peg ) and a mantelpiece. John enjoyed a rewarding, Jane Gillies. This fine, accomplished, fulfilling personal life. On June 16, 1951, he married multitalented, loving and beHelene Therese McCurdie, loved man was laid to rest in whom he met at the Navy’s Princeton Cemetery on July Underwater Sound Labora- 7 next to the grave of his tory and whom he would cherished wife. Those who call Terry or Ter. John and wish to honor his memory Terry moved to Princeton, are encouraged to make gifts New Jersey, in the summer in his name to charities of of 1952. After John began their choice. S er v ice s were pr iv ate work at RCA, they spent six years in Mercerville, New and under the direction Jersey, and then in the sum- of Mather-Hodge Funeral mer of 1960, moved back to Home, Princeton. Princeton, where John and Continued on Next Page Terry spent the next 60-plus years. John and Terry had three daughters, Kathleen (Kate) Louise (1953 ), Jean MaTown Topics IS Princeton’s weekly rie (1954), and Nancy Ann (1959), whom they raised community newspaper since 1946! with a combination of deep, abiding love and measured Your source for WEEKLY important local news, discipline. They were devotart happenings, local sports and real estate. ed to their four grandchilA trusted source to learn about local dren, Jean’s two daughters, business, services and offers. Teresa Kim and Bonnie Lee “Where quality still matters.” Schmittberger, and Nancy’s son and daughter, Christo4621 Route 27 (609) 924-2200 pher Laurence and Jennifer Kingston, NJ wmgsales@witherspoonmediagroup.com Christina Kelly, with whom 609-924-0147 they could be more relaxed and indulgent. riderfurniture.com John and Terry enjoyed Mon-Fri 10-6; traveling. Many family vaSat 10-5; Sun 12-5 cations were spent in New England, with excursions to Montreal and Toronto, and eventually in their own summer cottage, a log cabin in Greenville, Maine, on Moosehead Lake. During these years, John and Terry occasionally took vacations without the kids, including trips to Bermuda and Jamaica. After the daughters were grown, John and Terry expanded their horizons, exploring the Eastern seaboard, from the Maritime Provinces to Savannah, Bar Harbor to the Delmarva Peninsula and Outer Banks, and the West Coast, the length of California, the Pacific Northwest, the desert Southwest, and the U. S. and Canadian Rockies. After John’s retirement, they took three car HOPEWELL • NJ HIGHTSTOWN • NJ trips across Europe, plotting their own itineraries, and exploring Belgium, France, 609.921.6420 609.448.0050 and Germany, and Austria, We pride ourselves We pride on ourselves being a on small, being personal, a small, and personal, service and oriented service family oriented business. familyWith business. five generations With five generations of of Italy, and Switzerland. We pride ourselves on being a small, personal, and experience,experience, we are here weto are help here guide to help you through guide you the through difficultthe process difficult of process monument ofservice monument selection. selection. We pride ourselves We pride on ourselves beingonaon small, being a small, and personal, service and oriented servicefamily oriented business. family With business. five generations With five of o On June 16, 2021,WeJohn pride ourselves being a personal, personal, and service oriented family business. With five generations of generations encourage WeWe encourage you to make you antoappointment, make ansmall, appointment, with no obligation, with no obligation, to discuss the to discuss many options the many available optionsto available you. to you. experience, wewe are here toguide help guide you through the difficult process of selection. experience, experience, we are here to are help here help you through guide you the through difficult the process difficult of monument process monument monument selection. and Terry celebrated their We oriented family business. With five generations of experience, We pride pride ourselves ourselves We We pride pride on on ourselves ourselves being being aabeing on on small, small, being being personal, personal, aato small, small, and and personal, personal, service service and and oriented oriented service service family family oriented oriented business. business. family family With With business. business. five fiveof generations generations With With five five generations generations of of selection. of of We pride ourselves on a small, personal, and service oriented family business. With five generations of We encourage you to make an appointment, with nowith obligation, discuss the the many options available to you. We encourage We encourage you to make you an tohere appointment, make anhere appointment, with nothrough obligation, obligation, totodiscuss to many options the many available options to available you. to you. We pride ourselves on being ano small, personal, service experience, experience, experience, experience, we we are are here we we to toare are help help here guide guide to to help help you you guide through guide you you the the through through difficult difficult the the process process difficult difficult of of discuss process monument process monument of of monument selection. monument selection. selection. selection. 70 th wedding anniversary. experience, we are here help guide you the difficult process ofand monument selection. We We pride pride ourselves ourselves on on THAN being being aatosmall, personal, personal, and andthrough service service oriented oriented family family business. business. With With five five generations generations of of ITS EASIER ITS THAN EASIER YOU THINK YOU TO THINK MAKE TO THE PERFECT THE PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL we are here to help guide you through the difficult process of We encourage encourage We We encourage encourage you you to to make make you you an an to to appointment, appointment, make make an ansmall, appointment, appointment, with with no no obligation, obligation, with with no no obligation, obligation, to toMAKE discuss discuss the the to to discuss discuss many many options options the the many many available available options options to to available available you. you. to to you. you. Family owned and operated by Doug Sutphen Sr. We encourage you to make an appointment, with no obligation, to discuss the many options available to you. John’s devotion to his wife We experience, experience, we we are are here here to to help help guide guideWith you you through through thegenerations difficult difficult process of of monument monument selection. selection. oriented family business. fivethe of experience, ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE THE process PERFECT MEMORIAL We We encourage encourage you you to to make make an an appointment, appointment, with with no no obligation, obligation, to to discuss discuss the the many manyPERFECT options options available available to to you. you. ITS EASIER ITSTHAN EASIER YOU THAN THINK YOUTO THINK MAKE TO THE MAKE PERFECT THE MEMORIAL MEMORIAL and genuinely compassionmonument selection. and son Doug Sutphen Jr., who have both been ITS ITS we EASIER EASIER ITS ITS THAN THAN EASIER EASIER YOU YOU THAN THAN THINK THINK YOU YOU TO TO THINK THINK MAKE MAKE TO TO THE THE MAKE MAKE PERFECT PERFECT THE THE PERFECT PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL MEMORIAL MEMORIAL ITS EASIER YOU THINK TOthrough MAKE THE are here THAN to help guide you thePERFECT difficultMEMORIAL process of ate nature were evident in ITS ITS EASIER EASIER THAN THAN YOU YOU THINK THINK TO TO MAKE MAKE THE THE PERFECT PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL raised in the cemetery his dedicated care of Terry monumentbusiness selection. and understand We encourage you to make an appointment, with no obligation, after she developed Alzheimthe details of a delicate time. Weearly pride ourselves We prideon ourselves being aon small, being personal, afine small,toand personal, service and oriented service family oriented business. family With business. five generations With five generations of of er’s dementia in her We encourage you make an appointment, with noyou obligation, towe discuss the many options available to We pride ourselves on being a small, personal, and experience, experience, we are here to are help here guide to help you through guide you the through difficult the process difficult of process monument ofservice monument selection. selection. eighties. John was a miracle We pride ourselves We on ourselves beingonaon small, being personal, a small, and personal, service and oriented service family oriented business. family With business. five generations With five generations of o We pride pride ourselves being a small, personal, and service oriented family business. With five generations of to discuss thenomany available to you We encourage We encourage you to make you antoappointment, make an appointment, with obligation, withoptions no obligation, to discuss the to discuss many options the many available optionsto available you. to you. of patience, resourcefulness, experience, wewe are here toguide help guide you through the difficult process of selection. experience, experience, we are here to are help here to help you through guide you the through difficult the process difficult of monument process monument of monument selection. selection. oriented family business. With five generations of experience, We We pride pride ourselves ourselves We We pride pride on on ourselves ourselves being being a a on on small, small, being being personal, personal, a a small, small, and and personal, personal, service service and and oriented oriented service service family family oriented oriented business. business. family family With With business. business. five five generations generations With With five five generations generations of of of of pride ourselves on being a small, personal, andobligation, service oriented family business. With available five generations of WeWe encourage you to make an appointment, with no discuss the many options to you. Sutphen Memorials Inc. has A.L. Duryee Monuments and resilience, especially We encourage We encourage you to make you an to appointment, make anhere appointment, with nothrough obligation, with obligation, toto discuss the to many options the many available options to available you. to you. We pride ourselves on being ano small, personal, service experience, experience, experience, experience, we we are are here here we we to toare are help help here guide guide to to help help you you guide through guide you you the the through through difficult difficult the the process process difficult difficult of of discuss process monument process monument of of monument selection. monument selection. selection. selection. experience, we are here help guide you the difficult process ofand monument selection. We We pride pride ourselves ourselves on on THAN being being aatosmall, small, personal, personal, and andthrough service service oriented oriented family family business. business. With With five five generations generations of of ITS EASIER ITS THAN EASIER YOU THINK YOU TO THINK MAKE TO THE MAKE PERFECT THE PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL been helping families design has been in Hightstown, NJ we are here to help guide you through the difficult process of We encourage encourage We We encourage encourage you you to to make make you you an an to to appointment, appointment, make make an an appointment, appointment, with with no no obligation, obligation, with with no no obligation, obligation, to to discuss discuss the the to to discuss discuss many many options options the the many many available available options options to to available available you. you. to you. you. during the diffi cult years of We We encourage you to make anhere appointment, with no obligation, to discuss the many options available to you.to experience, experience, we we are are here to to help help guide guide you you through through the the difficult difficult process process of of monument monument selection. selection. oriented family With five generations experience, ITS EASIER THANbusiness. YOU THINK TO MAKE THE PERFECTofMEMORIAL fine granite andTO since and is located We We creates encourage encourage you you to to make make an an appointment, appointment, with with no no obligation, obligation, to to1909 discuss discuss the the many many options options available available to to you. you. the Covid pandemic. FortuITSand EASIER ITSTHAN EASIER YOU THAN THINK YOU THINK MAKE TO THE MAKE PERFECT THE PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE monument selection. ITS ITS EASIER EASIER ITS ITS THAN THAN EASIER EASIER YOU YOU THAN THAN THINK THINK YOU YOU TO TO THINK THINK MAKE MAKE TO TO THE THE MAKE MAKE PERFECT PERFECT THE THE PERFECT PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL MEMORIAL MEMORIAL ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE THE PERFECT MEMORIAL we are here to help guide you through the difficult process of bronze memorials for five next to Cedar Hill Cemetery. nately, despite the ravages ITS ITS EASIER EASIER THAN THAN YOU YOU THINK THINK TO TO MAKE MAKE THE THE PERFECT PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL THE PERFECT MEMORIAL of Alzheimer’s, Terry’s esgenerations in the Greater Full monument display and monument selection. We encourage you to make an appointment, with obligation, sential kindness and empaPrinceton Area. We pride storefront to help no guide you thetic nature remained. John ourselves on being a small throughout the to selection We encourage you tomany make an appointment, with noyou obligation, to discuss the options available was deeply saddened by the boutique-type, personal and process. to discuss the many options available to you loss of his beloved wife earservice-oriented business. lier this year, on January 23, 2022. He was still grieving for her at the time of his own ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE death. THE PERFECT MEMORIAL John is survived by his three devoted daughters

We are Town Topics. We are PRINCETON. How can we help you... Plan Your Weekend? Grow Your Business? Sell Your Items? Reach a Digital Audience? Share Your Story?

Rider

Furniture

We do it all. And we reach all of Princeton. Every Wednesday.

ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE THE PERFECT MEMORIAL THE PERFECT MEMORIAL

ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE THE PERFECT MEMORIAL THE PERFECT MEMORIAL

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

John Alan Strother

and transmit photographs of the earth’s cloud cover back to ground stations (TIROS is the acronym for Television Infrared Observation Satellite). During the launch of TIROS on April 1, 1960, and the satellite’s initial orbits of the earth, John was part of the mission control team at NASA, manager of the TIROS project. TIROS, a 270-pound, 42-by-19 inch satellite, sheathed in 9,000 solar cells, successf u lly proved the concept of feasibility of weather stations in space. TIROS took nearly 23,000 photographs of the earth’s cloud cover during its useful life of almost exactly the three months that had been predicted. There is a replica of TIROS 1 in the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. John continued to work as an engineer and project manager at Astro-Electronics until his retirement in 1984, except for an approximately five-year stint in the mid-1960s at ElectroMechanical Research (EMR) Telemetry, first in Sarasota, Florida, and then back in Princeton. At EMR, John was on the team that successfully designed and built encoders for the U. S. Navy that were considered significant for national defense purposes. At Astro-Electronics, John worked on successive generations of the TIROS weather satellite as well as on highlyclassified aerospace projects for NASA. While at AstroElectronics, John received t wo patents for original product design. After his retirement, John continued to lead an active life, exploring and developing his many interests. John had a natural affinity for music. As an avocation, he played the cornet, trumpet, and piano. Louis Armstrong inspired him to take up the cornet and trumpet, and he remained a lifelong fan of jazz. John also enjoyed a range of classical music and considered Johann Sebastian Bach the greatest of all classical composers. During his retirement, John composed songs and created electronic versions of favorite Christmas carols. John also had a lifelong fascination with cars. After his retirement, he completed a number of race car driving courses at the Skip Barber Racing School. He eventually began work on designing a more efficient, less-polluting internal combustion car engine. John described his engine as a reciprocating internal combustion engine operating on a two-stroke cycle comprised of power stroke, and abbreviated exhaust, intake, and compression phases. John explained the benefits of his engine as follows: “The combination of a full expansion stroke with an abbreviated compression phase can offer efficiency superior to that of existing engines. Due to flexibility in the amount of pressurized air that can be introduced during intake, and because of the recirculation of relatively large amounts of exhaust gas, cylinder temperatures can be reduced, as can the emission of undesirable exhaust products.” In 2015, John received a patent for the engine, and in 2019, the patent was revised according to his specifications. John enjoyed sports. During his teenage years, he


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 32

Obituaries Continued from Preceding Page

Harriet Greenblatt Harriet Greenblatt of East Windsor passed away on Sunday, July 3, 2022. She was 74. Born in Philadelphia, Pa., to parents Nora and Manuel Greenblatt, she grew up in Princeton, NJ, where she attended the public schools, graduating from Princeton High School in 1965. Harriet was a gifted musician, both a pianist and vocalist. At Princeton High School she was part of the renowned high school choir, directed by Thomas Hilbish. Following graduation from PHS, Harriet attended the Hart School of Music in Connecticut, and went on to earn a master’s degree in music performance from the Peabody Conservatory in Washington, D.C. Upon returning to the Princeton area, she was active as a pianist in chamber music groups and as a vocalist with and accompanist to the choirs of the two synagogues to which she belonged. She would often lend her talents helping her fellow members learn their parts. Harriet was also a longstanding performer and board member of the

Princeton Society of Musical Amateurs. She was an active member of Congregation Beth Chaim in Princeton Junction and Beth El Synagogue in East Windsor Township. She regularly attended weekly Shabbat morning Torah studies. Always prepared, she loved reading the weekly section aloud to the group. She was also a skilled painter and one of her watercolors hangs on the synagogue wall. Harriet is survived by her sister, Barbara Greenblatt Landau and her brother-inlaw, Robert, both of Baltimore, MD, by two nephews, Matthew Landau of Miami Beach and Simon Landau of Washington, D.C., and by several cousins. Funeral services and burial were held on July 5 at the Ahavath Israel Memorial Cemetery in Hamilton Township. Memorial contributions can be made to Congregation Beth Chaim (BethChaim.org) or Beth El Synagogue (BethElSynagogue.ShulCloud. com). For condolences please visit Harriet’s obituary page at OrlandsMemorialChapel.com. Funeral arrangements are by Orland’s Ewing Memorial Chapel.

Alberto N. Trancon Family, friends, and the many people whose lives he touched mourn the loss of Alberto Trancon, who passed away, peacefully surrounded by his family, at age 90 in his East Windsor home on Sunday, July 3, 2022. Son of Alfonso Trancon and Gliceria Granda, he was born in Lima, Peru, on September 14, 1931. He had resided in the Princeton area for over 50 years. He retired from Princeton University and Institute for Advanced Study of Princeton. You will always be remembered by the people who loved you. Extend condolences and share m emor ie s at T he KimbleFuneralHome.com.

Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton NEW PRODUCTS ADDED WEEKLY!

JUNCTION BARBER SHOP

33 Princeton-Hightstown Rd Ellsworth’s Center (Near Train Station)

799-8554 Tues-Fri: 10am-6pm; Sat 8:30am-3:30pm

www.princetonmagazinestore.com

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES Princeton’s Princeton’s First Tradition

SundayS

8:00 am Holy Communion Rite I 10:00 am Holy Communion Rite II 11:15 am Outdoor Coffee Hour and Fellowship

Worship Service

in in the the University Chapel Sundays Sundaysatat10am* 11am Rev. Alison Boden, Ph.D.

AlisonLifeBoden, Ph.D. DeanRev. of Religious and the Chapel Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel

Rev. Dr. Theresa Thames

Rev. Dr. Theresa Associate Dean of Religious Life and Thames the Chapel

Associate Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel * Service begins at 10am during the Summer. Must be fully vaccinated Covid-19 Must be fullyagainst vaccinated against Covid-19 to attend. to attend. Registration required. For morefor all events on campus. Registration required information, visit chapel.princeton.edu. For more information, visit chapel.princeton.edu

Wherever you are in your journey of faith, come worship with us

All services are online. Join us at www.trinityprinceton.org

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton

The Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector, The Rev. Canon Dr. Kara Slade, Assoc. Rector, The Rev. Joanne Epply-Schmidt, Assoc. Rector,

Our Services are held in the Church following the appropriate protocols Sunday Church Service and Sunday School at 10:30 am, Wednesday Testimony meetings at 7:30 pm

33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 • www.trinityprinceton.org

ONLINE

www.towntopics.com

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ

Visit the Christian Science Reading Room Monday through Saturday, 10 am - 4 pm 178 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ For free local delivery call (609) 924-0919 www.csprinceton.org • (609) 924-5801

To advertise your services in our Directory of Religious Services, contact Jennifer Covill jennifer.covill@witherspoonmediagroup.com

(609) 924-2200 ext. 31


“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS

VISA

MasterCard

The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon

LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23-22

Many local references. Call or text (609) 977-9407. 08-10-12t

loved and preserved throughout the world now and forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us. St. Jude worker of miracles, pray for us. St. Jude helper of the hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day for 9 days. By the 9th day your prayer will be answered. It has never been known to fail. Publication must be promised. Thank you St. Jude. FM 07-13

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

HOME HEALTH AIDE AVAILABLE: CNA, CMA. Live-in or out. More than 20 years experience. Honest, dependable, excellent checkable references. (609) 532-8034. 07-27-8t

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read.

EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Experienced and reliable adult caregiver available weekday mornings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000. tf

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf

Irene Lee, Classified Manager

MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF

PENNINGTON ESTATE SALE YOUR BASEMENT? • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, INcredit card, or check. 42 Temple Court (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; Sell with a TOWN TOPICS Friday and Saturday 7/15 & 7/16 EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE classifi ed ad! • 25 words or less: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in9:30 length. classifieds@towntopics.com - 3:00 for your loved one. Compassionate Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; Mid-century Furniture, Maurice Valcaregiver will assist •with personal 3 weeks: $40.00 • 4 weeks: $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. classifi eds@towntopics.com lency, Kent Coffey, Bograds, Ancare, medication, meals, drive to St. Jude’s Novena: May the sacred DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon LIQUIDATION tiques, Traditional, Decorative Ac• be Ads with spacing: $20.00/inch • ESTATE all bold face type: $10.00/week adored, glorifiline ed, medical appointments, shopping. heart of Jesus

DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000. tf LAWRENCEVILLE MOVING SALE 2805 Main Street Friday and Saturday 7/15 & 7/16 Stunning assortment of decorative items! HEREND, Antiques, Restoration Hardware, Pottery Barn, Art, Decorative Accessories, Outdoor Furniture, House is full! For pictures please go to estatesales.net. MG Estate Sales. 07/13 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf PENNINGTON ESTATE SALE 42 Temple Court Friday and Saturday 7/15 & 7/16 9:30 - 3:00 Mid-century Furniture, Maurice Vallency, Kent Coffey, Bograds, Antiques, Traditional, Decorative Accessories. Please go to estatesales. net for pictures: MG Estate Sales. 07/13

COLLEGE APPLICATION ADVISING Don’t miss out! Reserve your spot now before my client list fills up! After working in the Princeton University Admission Office, I know what attracts colleges to students. My process helps students write original, thoughtful essays that stand out. Visit www.collegeessayexcellence.net or contact caroline@ collegeessayexcellence.net/ (609) 356-2714. 07-20 ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 921-7469. 10-06-22 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23

SERVICE:

I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10 circulation@towntopics.com

LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23-22

DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000. tf

HOME HEALTH AIDE AVAILABLE: CNA, CMA. Live-in or out. More than 20 years experience. Honest, dependable, excellent checkable references. (609) 532-8034. 07-27-8t

LAWRENCEVILLE MOVING SALE 2805 Main Street Friday and Saturday 7/15 & 7/16

St. Jude’s Novena: May the sacred heart of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and preserved throughout the world now and forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us. St. Jude worker of miracles, pray for us. St. Jude helper of the hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day for 9 days. By the 9th day your prayer will be answered. It has never been known to fail. Publication must be promised. Thank you St. Jude. FM 07-13

Stunning assortment of decorative items! HEREND, Antiques, Restoration Hardware, Pottery Barn, Art, Decorative Accessories, Outdoor Furniture, House is full! For pictures please go to estatesales.net. MG Estate Sales. 07/13

MONTGOMERY COMMONS Route 206 & Applegate Dr. | Princeton, NJ

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732 tf

Town Topics is the most comprehensive and preferred weekly Real Estate resource in the greater Central New Jersey and Bucks County areas. Every Wednesday, Town Topics reaches every home in Princeton and all high traffic business areas in town, as well as the communities of Lawrenceville, Pennington, Hopewell, Skilllman, Rocky Hill, and Montgomery. We ARE the area’s only community newspaper and most trusted resource since 1946! Call to reserve your space today! (609) 924-2200, ext 27

cessories. Please go to estatesales. net for pictures: MG Estate Sales. 07/13

EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 977-9407. 08-10-12t

CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

The Top Spot for Real Estate Advertising

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

to place an order:

SPACE FOR LEASE OFFICE & MEDICAL

“The Town Topics provides excellent service and gives our marketing the exposure throughout the Princeton area.”

- Gerri Grassi, Vice President/Broker Manager,

Verizon Fios Suites Available & Roach, & High speedBerkshire internetHathaway, Fox 743, 830, 917, ® REALTORS , Princeton access available 1260Office & 1660 SF (+/-)

219 Parking Spaces Available on-site with handicap accessibility

The Top Spot for • Prestigious Princeton mailing address Real Estate Advertising • Built to suit tenant spaces with private bathroom, kitchenette & separate utilities Town Topics is the most

4’-7”

comprehensive and preferred • Premier Series suites with upgraded flooring, counter tops, cabinets lighting in weekly Real Estate&resource the greater Central New Jersey Bucks areas. BUILDING 7 and | SUITE 721 |County 830 SF (+/-)

4’

12’-10”

OFFICE

15’

Every Wednesday, Town Topics reaches every home in Princeton LarkenAssociates.com | 908.874.8686 and all high traffic business Brokers Protected | Immediate Occupancy areasexpress in town, as the No warranty or representation, or implied, is as made well to the accuracy of the information herein & same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of rental or other conditions, withdrawal without notice & to any communities of &Lawrenceville, special listing conditions, imposed by our principals clients. Pennington, Hopewell, Skilllman, CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: Rocky Hill, and Montgomery. Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, check. the • 25 words or less: Weor ARE area’s only$25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35 community newspaper and most trusted resource since 1946!


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022 • 34

Rider

American Furniture Exchange

Furniture 30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

“Where quality still matters.”

ADVISING Don’t miss out! Reserve your spot now before my client list fills up! After working in the Princeton University Admission Office, I know what attracts colleges to students. My process helps students write original, thoughtful essays that stand out. Visit www.collegeessayexcellence.net or contact caroline@ collegeessayexcellence.net/ (609) 356-2714. 07-20

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

COLLEGE APPLICATION

Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23

Summer Deck and Driveway Project Ideas

Warm weather and long daylight hours make summer the perfect time to tackle some outdoor home improvement projects. Several popular improvement or maintenance projects are best completed in summer, including those that require warm temperatures.

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732 tf

Witherspoon Media Group

Refinish your deck: Summer is idea for refinishing a wood deck, whether you’re staining or painting the wood. Proper maintenance is key for a longͲlasting and beautiful deck. Prep work is very important before starting to paint or apply stain. Make sure old or chipped paint is removed and the surface is clean and smooth before starting. Deck paint can take a few hours to dry, while stain may take a couple of days.

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240.

Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

Concrete walkway repair: Superficial cracks in a walkway can be repaired with concrete filler product that come in a tube or a small tub. Quick repair methods don’t typically require mixing large amounts of cement or large tools.

· Newsletters

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, STATISTICAL PROGRAMMER: Req: BS in Industrial Engrg., Statistics, Biostatistics, Math, Computer Sci., Life Sci. or rel. +10 yrs of exp. Exp. must inclu. 5 yrs of managerial. Use SAS, statistical programming & developing computing strategies, drug dvpt. process, clinical trial methodology, statistics industry standards, electronic data package submissions, & summaries of clinical safety & efficacy, & regulatory requirements, vendor mgmt., & line mgmt. to lead complex clinical project teams and vendors to deploy programming strategies, standards, specifications & programmed analysis to comply w/ regulatory requirements, SOPs & work practices. Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ. F/T. Send CV to resume.com@bms.com & ref. 2740. No calls/recruiters. No visa sponsorship. 07-13

CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

with Beatrice Bloom

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

Asphalt driveway repair: Similar to cracks in a concrete walkway, cracks in an asphalt driveway can usually be repaired over a weekend. Cracks that are less than ½ inch wide can be repaired with asphalt patch compound, which requires warm temperatures to set properly.

· Brochures · Postcards

tf

WEEKLY INSERTS START AT HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, ONLY 10¢ PER HOUSEHOLD. · Books trim, rotted wood, power washing,

IS ON

SENIOR AUDITOR (ref.#2647). Req. Bach. in Accounting, Fin. Accounting, Auditing or rel. + 3 yrs. of exp., incl. 3 yrs. of public accounting exp. or exp. in fin., operational, or compliance auditing (or Master + 1yr.). Draw on knwl of & exp. w/: U.S. GAAP, bus. laws & regs; auditing techniques & skills; ISAs; ability to analyze complex processes & to determine efficiency & effectiveness of process & rel. controls; Excel & flow charting capability to conduct audit planning activities. Domestic & int’l travel 25-35% of time. May telecommute 2 days per week. BristolMyers Squibb Company. Princeton, NJ. F/T. Send CV to A. Wilson to resume.com@bms.com and ref.#2647. No calls/recruiters. 07-13 CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL PERFORMING ARTS TEACHER Cambridge is seeking a passionate teacher to inspire K-12 students to express themselves creatively through the performing arts. This dynamic teacher will help to produce theatrical school events while nurturing students to discover their creative potential. Please apply to: egonzales@thecambridgeschool.org/609730-9553. 07-13

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co. We now carry SOLAR WINDOW FILM to protect your furniture.

741 Alexander Rd, Princeton

924-2880

Witherspoon Media Group

Weekly Inserts Custom Design, Printing, only 10¢ per househ Get the best reach at the best rate! WEEKLY INSERTS START AT ONLY 10¢ PER HOUSEHOLD.

Weekly Inserts Weekly Inserts only 10¢ per only household. 10¢ per house painting, deck work, sheet rock/

Get the best reach at thegutter best rate! spackle, & roofi ng repairs.

Punch list is my specialty. 40 years · Catalogues experience. Licensed & insured. Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECOͲBroker

Publishing and Distribution

Get the best reach at the best

Creative Woodcraft • Postcards Call(609) · Newsletters · Annual Reports586-213007-21-22 • 8.5x11” flyers I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, Group glass, silver, pottery, · Brochures Witherspoon • Menus Media costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, Local woman buyer. (609) 921• Booklets · Postcards For additional etc. info contact: 7469. 10-06-22 Custom Design, Printing, • Trifolds melissa.bilyeu@ Antiques, paintings, · Books Publishing andBUYING: Distribution Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, witherspoonmediagroup.com • Post its old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars · Catalogues • We can accomodate · Newsletters & musical instruments. I buy• single Postcards items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. almost anything! · Brochures

Princeton Office 609Ͳ921Ͳ1900 | 609Ͳ577Ͳ2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

• Postca • 8.5″ x • Flyers • Menus • Bookle etc...

Get the best reachGet at the best rate! reach at the be

Maximize Your Real Estate Investment

• Pos · Annual Reports • 8.5″ x 11″ • 8.5″ • Postcards • Flye Reach· Postcards over 15,000 homes in• Flyers Reach 11,000 homes in Princeton and surroundin Witherspoon Media Group Princeton and beyond! • 8.5x11” flyers · Books • Menus •custome Men Town Topics puts youinfo in frontcontact: of your target For additional than what it would cost to mail a postcard. • Menus Town ·Topics puts you in front• Booklets Custom Design, Printing, • Boo Catalogues melissa.bilyeu@ Please contact to reserve your sPace • Booklets of your target customer for less Publishing andus Distribution witherspoonmediagroup.com · Annual Reports etc than what it would cost to mail etc... • Trifolds 06-28-23

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS!

Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10;

classifieds@towntopics.com

· Newsletters • Post its I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items · Brochures We can accomodate Barsky Property Management is a full-service property management • We can accomodate entire estates. No job too big or For additional tosmall. info contact: In business over 35 years, company serving central New Jersey. We oversee every step of the almost anything! serving all of Mercer County. Call almost anything! · Postcards melissa.bilyeu@ property management cycle so you don’t have to! (609) 306-0613. a postcard!

• Connect you to qualified tenants • Monitor the real estate market • Ensure the best value for your property

We can a almost

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE:

Town Topics is the only weekly paper that reaches EVERY HOME IN PRINCETON, making it a tremendously valuable product w

toWn toPIcs neWsPaPeR • 4438 Route 27 noRth • KInGston, nJ 08528 • tel: 609.924.2200 • Fax: 609.924.8818

witherspoonmediagroup.com06-28-23 WE BUY CARS

We c alm

· Books Reach over 15,000 homes in Princeton and beyond! · Catalogues

Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 Ask for Chris 609-924-5400 We are an affiliate of R.B. Homes, a highly respected real estate

Town Topics puts you in front of your target customer less than what it · Annualfor Reports would cost to mail a postcard!

Reach 11,000 homes in Princeton Reach and 11,000 surrounding homes in towns. Princeton and surroun

developer with over 30 years of experience. Our clients trust us with their most valuable investment. You can, too!

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

Forinadditional contact: Town Topics puts you in front of Town yourTopics targetputs customer you for front less ofinfo your target custo melissa.bilyeu@ info@barskymanagement.com than what it would cost to mailthan a postcard. what witherspoonmediagroup.com it would cost to mail a postca Schedule a A Gift Subscription!

Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10

Consultation

circulation@towntopics.com

Barskymanagement.com

11 Seminary Ave. (609) 924-2267 NJ 08525 us to reserve Please Hopewell, contact Please your contact sPaceus now! to reserve your sPa EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER

Experienced and reliable adult caregiver available weekday mornings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000.

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

tf

Town Topics is the only weekly paper that reaches EVERY HOME IN PRINCETON, Town Topics making is theitonly a tremendously weekly papervaluable that reaches product EVERY with HOME unmatched IN PRINCETON, exposure! making it a tremendously valuable pr

toWn toPIcs neWsPaPeR • 4438 Route 27 noRth • KInGston,toWn nJ 08528 toPIcs • tel: neWsPaPeR 609.924.2200 • 4438 • Fax: Route 609.924.8818 27 noRth• •www.towntopics.com KInGston, nJ 08528 • tel: 609.924.2200 • Fax: 609.9


1873 stuart Road W. PRINCETON, NJ

Private setting on 2+ acres in pretty brook This Classic colonial wAS redesigned in 2009 by kathy knight, architect & BUILT BY baxter construction, creatING an atmosphere of comfort and style. 5 BEDROOMS, 4.5 BATHS, 2 FAMILY ROOMS,

3 FIREPLACES, 3 CAR GARAGE.

H H H

Cell/Text: 609-658-3771 E: HeidiHartmannHomes@gmail.com W: HeidiHartmannHomes.com Heidi A. Hartmann

$2,195,000

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2022

Coldwell banker realty


Drakes Corner Road

Introducing: Laurel Avenue

Newly Priced: Greenhouse Drive

Princeton, NJ | $4.999,000

Franklin Township, NJ | $4,200,000

Princeton, NJ | $2,475,000

Owen ‘Jones’ Toland: 609.731.5953

Susan L ‘Suzy’ DiMeglio: 609.915.5645

Jane Henderson Kenyon: 609.828.1450

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2016538

callawayhenderson.com/NJSO2001508

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2016918

Introducing: Pardoe Road

Introducing: Pollack Court

Introducing: Montgomery Road

Princeton, NJ | $1,870,000

Plainsboro Township, NJ | $1,675,000

Hillsborough Township, NJ | $1,450,000

Linda Twining, Jessica Feng: 609.439.2282

Maura Mills: 609.947.5757

Patricia ‘Trish’ Ford: 908.635.9395

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2018972

callawayhenderson.com/NJMX2002862

callawayhenderson.com/NJSO2001500

Introducing: Fieldstone Road

Introducing: Sapphire Drive

Introducing: East Shore Drive

Montgomery Township, NJ | $1,399,900

West Windsor Township, NJ | $1,275,000

Hopewell Township, NJ | $1,199,000

Jennifer Dionne: 908.531.6230

Cynthia S Weshnak: 609.651.1795

Christina Phillips: 917.208.5724

callawayhenderson.com/NJSO2001528

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2019404

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2018484

Introducing: Symmes Court

Introducing: Cairns Place

Introducing: Yale Terrace

Cranbury Township, NJ | $1,100,000

Montgomery Township, NJ | $735,000

Montgomery Township, NJ | $680,000

Roberta ‘Bobbie’ Marlowe: 609.575.2253

Valerie Smith: 609.658.0394

Valerie Smith: 609.658.0394

callawayhenderson.com/NJMX2002530

callawayhenderson.com/NJSO2001514

callawayhenderson.com/NJSO2001486

callawayhenderson.com 609.921.1050 | 4 NASSAU STREET | PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08542 Each office is independently owned and operated. Subject to errors, omissions, prior sale or withdrawal without notice.