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Volume LXXIII, Number 28

www.towntopics.com

Joint Effort 2019 Will Honor Locals In Week of Festivities

Topics of the Town . . . . 5

Looking ahead to next month’s actionpacked week of educational, celebratory, and athletic events, reflecting this year’s theme of “Celebrating Life by Honoring Our Past, Recognizing Our Families and Lifting Up Our Town,” the Joint Effort Princeton Witherspoon-Jackson Safe Streets Program has announced its honorees for 2019. During the August 3-11 festivities, John Broadway, Ida Belle Dixon, Cecelia B. Hodges, Laura Wooten (posthumously), Mamie Oldham, Bob and Barbara Hillier (Town Topics shareholders), and Minnie and Eric Craig will receive the 2019 Paul Robeson Spirit Award. Leighton Newlin and Lance Liverman will be honored as the 2019 WitherspoonJackson Citizens of the Year, and Frances Broadway Craig and Cynthia “Chip” Fisher (posthumously) will receive the 2019 Jim Floyd Memorial Lifetime Achievement Awards. The 2019 Mildred Trotman Community Service honorees are New Jersey Assemblyman Andrew Zwicker; Princeton Mayor Liz Lempert; Princeton Councilmen David Cohen and Tim Quinn; Princeton School Board Member Jess Deutsch; Mercer County Youth Advocate Grace Kimbrough; Princeton Housing Chair Alvin McGowen; Diversity Advocate John Heilner; Town Topics and this writer Donald Gilpin; and WitherspoonJackson Community Citizen Advocates Antoine Newlin, Ashley Hightower, Marshawn Ferguson, Richard Wilson Jr., and Tommy and Joanne Parker. “The 2019 Joint Effort Princeton Witherspoon-Jackson Awards recipients are a quality group of individuals and all are well deserving of their Joint Effort Safe Streets honor,” said Joint Effort Safe Streets organizer John Bailey in making the announcement. “These 2019 honorees represent a cross-section of the town. They are inter-generational and each supports the Witherspoon-Jackson community and the town of Princeton.” Shirley Satterfield, president of the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and Cultural Society (WJHCS) and a member of the Joint Effort Safe Streets Host Committee, added, “WJHCS is honored to be a part of this year’s Joint Effort Safe Streets Program and is very happy to see

Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

Continued on Page 8

Princeton Student Film Festival Explores Multiple Genres . . . . . . . 5 ACE Program Seeks to Reduce Absenteeism at PHS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Summer Music on Proust’s Birthday . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Brass Ensemble at PU Summer Chamber Concerts Series . . . . . . 13 Princeton Summer Theater Presents Deathtrap . . . 14 PU Grad Smith Pitching in Angels Organization . . . 20 PHS Alumna Shane Has Big Finale for Michigan Women’s Lax . . . . . . . . 22

Peter Westergaard, PU composer and educator, dies . . . . . . . 10 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .18, 19 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 17 Classified Ads . . . . . . 27 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Music/Theater . . . . . . 15 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 26 Police Blotter . . . . . . . . 8 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 27 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

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Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Order Blocks Council From Canceling Contract A temporary restraining order issued Monday by Mercer County Superior Court Judge Mary Jacobson prevented Princeton Council from passing a resolution that would have ended its agreement with a sewer repair company for work on Spruce Street and Linden Lane. At its meeting Monday evening, July 8, the governing body put aside the resolution that would have terminated its contract with Integrated Construction and Utilities of New Jersey (ICUNJ). The company is connected to an investigation into alleged illegal dumping at the River Road sewer department facility. ICUNJ, which does sewer repair, demolition, and asbestos abatement, has done work for Princeton for over a decade. After it was revealed last month that a container filled with asbestos materials was at the River Road facility, the municipality informed ICUNJ that its contract would be canceled. The company responded by filing a lawsuit against the town, saying it was simply following directions from Princeton officials in disposing of materials at the site, and therefore should not be punished. Three municipal employees have been terminated as a result of the illegal

dumping scandal. One has been charged with second degree bribery for allegedly accepting payment in exchange for letting contractors dump dirt and other materials at the municipal site. Council did pass a resolution at Monday’s meeting authorizing the hiring of Whitman Environmental Consulting for an environmental assessment of the sewer site, for a fee of up to $163,375. Municipal Administrator Mark Dashield said that after the New Jersey Department of

Environmental Protection issued a violation notice to the town last month for operating an illegal solid waste facility at the River Road site, the town had five to ten days to hire a licensed state remediation professional to test for contamination. “We hired Whitman because we’ve had good experience with them,” he said, referring to work the company did on the AvalonBay rental complex site in 2016. “We did reach out to another firm, but with Continued on Page 10

Lights for Liberty to Rally in Hinds Plaza; Vigil Friday Evening for immigrant Rights

Hundreds of Princeton area residents are expected to rally in Hinds Plaza this Friday from 7-9 p.m. to support immigrant rights and to protest the treatment of immigrant families by the current administration. “We are expecting a contingent of students associated with LEDA (Leadership Enterprise for a Diverse America) from Princeton, as well as some families directly affected by the policy, people of faith who believe this is not what their church/ mosque/synagogue has taught them, and many community members who believe

it is their duty as human beings to show compassion to those seeking refuge,” said local organizer and Indivisible Cranbury leader Laura Zurfluh. As part of an international demonstration titled Lights for Liberty: A Vigil to End Human Detention Camps, the Princeton event will feature local representatives and activists, including Maria Juega, co-founder of the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund (LALDEF); Princeton Councilwoman Continued on Page 4

CELEBRATING EVERYTHING BLUEBERRY: Pick-your-own-blueberries was just one of the activities at the Blueberry Bash, held last weekend at Terhune Orchards on Cold Soil Road . The annual event also featured a blueberry bake-off contest, wagon and pony rides, live music, a puppet show, wine tasting, and plenty of blueberry treats . Festivalgoers share their favorite ways to enjoy blueberries in this week’s Town Talk on page 6 . (Photo by Erica M. Cardenas)

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Lights for Liberty continued from page one

Leticia Fraga; New Jersey Assemblyman Andrew Zwicker; Patricia Fernandez-Kelly, director of the Princeton University Center for Migration and Development and LALDEF board chair; and Veronica OlivaresWeber, vice chair of the Princeton Human Services Commission. Sponsored by Princeton Marching Forward, Indivisible Princeton, Indivisible Cranbury, Lawrence Citizens Activists, Princeton Progressive Action Group, STAND CNJ, Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice, and others, the event, according to its organizers, will emphasize that while media attention is focused on issues at the southern border of the United States, there are injustices happening right here in Mercer County. “The event will highlight the breadth and reach of these human rights issues and help people get involved in efforts to drive change,” according to a Lights for Liberty press release. Community groups will have tables available to share information, petitions, and action items, beginning at 7 p.m. on Friday. Speeches will begin at 8 p.m., and at 9 p.m. participants, in Hinds Plaza and around the world, will light candles in a silent vigil for all those held in U.S. detention camps. Princeton Mayor Liz Lempert emphasized the impact of the immigrant crisis in New Jersey and throughout the country. “The inhumane treatment of immigrants in our country and right here in our state is deeply disturbing and outrageous,” Lempert said. County jails in Essex, Bergen, and Hudson are making millions of dollars each month off of the suffering of immigrants, including asylum-seekers who are fleeing persecution back home.” Lempert described Friday’s demonstration as a “call for an end to the administration’s cruel deportation policies and an end to our state’s complicity.” Zurfluh noted that the first hour of the event would be dedicated to providing information about local organizations that work with New Jersey’s immigrant communities and local opportunities to help those affected by recent government policies, “so that we can put our compassion into action.” “The importance of this event is not just to bring attention to the humanitarian crisis, but to let our government know that this is unacceptable, and we will continue

 

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to do everything in our power to change our treatment of refugees,” she said. “We will be joining hundreds of events throughout the nation and the world to let everyone on this planet know that we do not support these policies or behaviors, and that this administration does not represent the best of what America is.” More than 600 local events are planned for Friday evening throughout the United States and around the world to support Lights for Liberty, including key rallies in El Paso, Texas, at the border; in Homestead, Florida, at a migrant child detention facility; in San Diego near the point of entry site from Tijuana; in New York City, at Foley Square, where hundreds of immigrants are processed through detention every day; and in Washington, D.C., in Lafayette Park, where demonstrators will be demanding action from Congress to end detention camps and to impeach the president. —Donald Gilpin

Kelly Leaves $712,000 For Young Audiences

Young Audiences New Jersey and Eastern Pennsylvania (YA) has received a gift of $712,000, the second largest gift in YA’s history, from the estate of longtime supporter Gerda Kelly. The gift will support the organization’s endowment and scholarship fund, helping to

bring YA’s arts programs to students who have little to no access to arts experience. YA serves every elementary school in Trenton and is expanding into Camden, Newark, Elizabeth, and Philadelphia schools. “Gerda was a generous and steadfast supporter of Young Audiences,” said YA President and CEO Michele Russo. “We are honored that her legacy will strengthen the endowment and be used for scholarships to fund programs in schools with few resources for the arts. Gerda was passionate about young children having the arts as part of their education, and we’re committed to seeing her wishes fulfilled.” Kelly, who died in 2017 at the age of 97, was an avid arts supporter who donated $52,000 to YA over the years. She once stated, “I can’t imagine living in a world without the arts. I believe that arts education makes better people and ultimately a better world. I support young audiences because children need the arts in their lives — now and in the future.” Founded in 1973, YA prov ide s p er for ma nce s a nd artist-in-residence programs to schools in all 21 counties of New Jersey and the seven easternmost counties of Pennsylvania. The organization has reached more than 15 million children with arts education experiences over the past 45 years.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin New Parking Rates are Effective: All two-hour meters are now effective for three hours. In the three-hour zone, the new rate is $1.75 per hour. Visit princetonnj.gov for specifics. Old Smart Cards: To spend down remaining balances, cardholders can continue to use old cards to pay for parking in the Spring Street garage indefinitely, until the equipment fails. Cardholders can also have their old Smart Card balances transferred to the Park Princeton mobile app. Visit princetonnj.gov. Meet the Mayor: Mayor Liz Lempert will hold office hours in the lobby of Princeton Public Library on Friday, July 19, from 8:30-10 a.m. The library is at 65 Witherspoon Street. Summer Tours at Princeton Airport: Free tours of the airport during July and August every Tuesday morning starting at 10:30 a.m. www.princetonairport.com. Womanspace Seeks Volunteers: Womanspace, Inc., a nonprofit agency that provides services to people impacted by domestic and sexual violence, is currently accepting volunteer applications for the Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Victim Response Teams. The fall training will begin in September. Applications will be accepted until August 16. Contact Heidi Mueller at dvvrt@womanspace.org or (609) 394-0136. Crossing Guards Needed: The Princeton Police Department is recruiting for crossing guards for the next school year. The position pays $15 per 30 minute shift, $22.50 per 45 minute shift. These are key positions to keep our kids safe as they bike and walk to school. Visit princetonnj.gov.


5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019

ROMANTIC AND HUMOROUS: The film “Strings Attached” by Peri Segel is among 18 short

Vote Now For Your worksFavorites! by aspiring high school and college-age filmmakers, at Princeton Public Library July 17 and 18. Do you What’s your favorite area restaurant? have a landscaper that you love? Town Topics Newspaper is happy to announce that its 2019 Readers’ Choice Awards competition The is NOW OPEN for Princeton voting. Student Film library’s Youth Services De- Among the returning filmFestival was launched 16 partment. “But now, we have makers is James Tralie, who

Annual Student Film Festival Explores Multiple Genres

years ago to give young, local students a chance to test out DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS AUGUST 8 their filmmaking talents. Held each summer at Princeton Subscription Information: Public Library, the festival has 609.924.5400 ext. 30 The winners the August & 28 issues of the orwill be announced ingrown and 21 broadened over Town Topics Newspaper. Don’t missmuch your chance subscriptions@ years, to thetodelight of vote for your favorite businesses or services! witherspoonmediagroup.com its founders. “When we started, it was just The Readers’ Choice Awards is open for a handful of local kids with a online voting at towntopics.com urbanagendamagazine.com couple of weeks’ notice,” said Susan Conlon, who heads the One-Year Subscription: $10 Two-Year Subscription: $15

this great mix of genres and styles from a variety of places. This is not just a teen festival. I think anyone interested in film who attends will be blown away by how talented these young people are.” T h is year’s fest ival is Wednesday and Thursday, July 17 and 18. Filmmakers of the 18 short works to be screened come from Montclair University, New York Institute of Technology, Rutgers University, Syracuse University, Tisch School of the Arts at NYU, School of Visual Arts, and the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, as well as Princeton University. There is even one international selection, from France.

TOPICS Of the Town

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“Probably one of the best aspects is the opportunity to hear the filmmakers answer questions after their films are screened,” said Conlon. “So not only do you get a better idea about the film itself, you get to hear about why they decided to make the film, the ups and downs of the process. It really gives an idea of how much of a collaborative process it is.” To qualify, an entrant must be between the ages of 14 and 25. Most of this year’s participants are in college, though there are some high school students. The final selections were made from nearly 140 entries, in genres including animation, comedy, dramatic feature, documentary, experimental, romantic comedy, and personal narratives. Conlon singled out the film Stacy, about a student caught cheating. “On the one hand, it’s about somebody who decides to cheat on an exam. But the other part of the film is all of the boundaries people have crossed with her,” she said. Another film that caught Conlon’s interest is Strength in Numbers, a documentary and personal narrative about a young man’s loss of his father. “It’s about how a family came together, a really nice work,” she said. Different this year is a multiepisode series called Strings Attached. The festival will screen its five short pieces. “This is a comedy romance, but it has some serious aspects to it,” said Conlon. “It has a great script, and hits its target really well. And it’s something new for us.”

just graduated from Princeton University and has contributed the film, Seismology. “He is taking a job at NASA, which is great,” said Conlon. “He has this wonderful, artful way of working on film with scientific data.” Other films that impressed Conlon include Prom Queens by Talia Zinder, Megan Massey and Cory Souto; and an animation comedy by Nick Fulfaro called Winter Vampire / Summer Humans. “There is a great range in this festival,” Conlon said. “It’s a lot more than a bunch of films by kids. These people have spent weeks and months working on the films. They have actors and scripts. This is really good work.” An after-party follows each Continued on Next Page

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Congratulations and best wishes Congratulations andofbest wishes Charter to the to the 46 members Princeton 49 members of Princeton Charter School’s Class School’s Class of 2014 as they graduate of from 2015 high as they graduate fromtohigh school. school and head college, gap It’s time to go change the world! years, and new adventures. American University BatesCollege College Berklee of (2) Music Boston University Carleton College Bryn Mawr College Carnegie Mellon University (2) Carnegie Mellon University Columbia University (2) Columbia University (2) Cornell University (3) Cornell University (2) Elon College (2) Dartmouth College University GeorgeEmory Washington University GeorgeKenyon Washington University College Georgetown McDaniel University College Gettysburg College New York University Grove CityUniversity College (2) Northeastern Howard University Oberlin College New Jersey of Technology PennInstitute State University Princeton Pratt University Institute (6) RutgersUniversity University (6) Princeton Stanford University Purdue University Rochester InstituteofofTechnology Technology Stevens Institute Rutgers University Syracuse University(5) Stanford University The College of New Jersey Tulane University University of the Arts University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) University of California, Berkeley University of Chicago University of Pennsylvania UniversityUniversity of Illinois, of Urbana-Champaign Richmond University of University ofMichigan Rochester(2) University of Pennsylvania University of Tampa Vassar College University of Vermont Washington University, Saint Louis University of Southern California Whitworth University United States Military Academy, West Point Williams College Vanderbilt University Yale University Vassar 100 BUNN DRIVE, PRINCETON NJ 08540 | WWW.PCS.K12.NJ.US Phone: 609 924 0575 | Fax: 609 924 0282


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The Blue Meanies Beatles Tribute

7.25

Alborada Spanish Dance Theatre Spanish Music & Flamenco Dance

8.1

Lauren Marsh Singer/Songwriter Indie Pop

8.8

T.S. Project Motown

8.15

Princeton School of Rock Classic Rock

8.22

Taina Asili Afro-Latin Jazz/Reggae

8.29

Amazin Grace and the GLB Band R&B/Gospel

Don’t forget to bring a blanket or lawnchair! Rain or shine. Princeton Shopping Center 301 North Harrison Street

For more information, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org or princetonshoppingcenter.com. #artscouncilofprinceton #princetonshoppingcenter

Film Festival Continued from Preceding Page

night’s screenings and question-and-answer sessions, with refreshments provided by the bent spoon. Admission is free. Visit www.princetonlibrary.org for more information. —Anne Levin

LiLLiPiES Trains Teens With Job Program

Most food businesses give teens an important first job experience, but few train teens to be leaders. LiLLiPiES Bakery in Princeton Shopping Center is using training to guide leaders of tomorrow. “Shortly after we opened in July, 2016, we noticed a few of our teen staff who really shined,” said Jen Carson, owner and head baker. “They were showing a desire to go above and beyond and to soak in any and all new knowledge and experience we threw at them. They reveled in the growth of the business and were interested in more than just a paycheck. We knew we needed to pay these kids back and invest in them with a program from which they would learn lifelong leadership skills.” Students are led by front-ofhouse managers Liz Moore, who has a background working with teens at her other career, church pastor; and retired teacher Marie ManzoFrost; along with Carson, a former teacher with an advanced degree in education. “Under the management team’s guidance, the bakery’s young employees learn how to delegate tasks and train less-experienced staff assertively and compassionately,” Carson said. “They develop time management skills. They practice the responsibilities of leading a shift, empathy, hospitality, good service, multitasking, and using LiLLiPiES’ mission to make onthe-spot decisions. They have even made edits and improvements to LiLLiPiES’ training manual.” Current participants in the program include Lukas Eriksson, Auggie Eriksson, James Carson, Charlotte Burd, Millie Brigaud, Giovanna DiBianco, Ellie Henry, and Ruby Wright. Chiara Goldenstern, an 11th-grader, has become LiLLiPiES’ in-house food photographer and is focused on taking photos for a cookbook Carson is currently writing. Sean Carson, a junior at Bucknell University, is revising LiLLiPiES’ marketing plan this summer. Gabriel Bar-Cohen and Kai Gibson, recent high school graduates and musicians, lead LiLLiPiES’ Sunday Jazz Brunch series. “We are allowing these kids space and power to help us to foster a culture of caring, learning, hard work, and pride in our hospitality and product. Our teen trainees have become an extremely important part of who we are as a company member of our community,” said Carson. Teens have also contributed by suggesting menus and suggesting local charitable gift recipients. LiLLiPiES gives its leftover bread to two local food pantries and features a menu item-of-the-month program, of which 10 percent of the proceeds go to a local charity. Monthly charities have been chosen by local celebrities Bebe Neuwirth, Trey Anastasio, Cornel West, The Kitchen Twins, Chris Barron, and Blues Traveler, among others.

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What’s your favorite way to enjoy blueberries?” (Asked Saturday at Terhune Orchards’ Blueberry Bash) (Photographs by Erica M. Cardenas)

Abby: “Making smoothies!” Victoria: “I like blueberry pie.” —Abby Josephs, Cranbury with Victoria Ruan, Princeton

“Frozen. I put them in the freezer and just eat them freely.” —Maura Freeland, Lawrenceville

Ava: “I like blueberry muffins, pancakes, cider, pie, and blueberry everything.” Gaby: “Blueberry muffins.” Phoenix: “I don’t like blueberries.” —Ava Wheless, Gaby Amigo, and Phoenix Wheless, all of Mountainside

Michael: “Blueberry strudel.” David: “Blueberry pancakes.” Kay: “I like eating them fresh.” —Michael Eagan with David, Kay, and Leo Apigo, all of Mountainside

Joseph: “I just like them alone.” John: “Grab a handful.” Elliot: “I just stuff them in my face.” Christina: “One by one.” —Joseph, John, Elliot, and Christina Ma, New York City


7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019

ParkPrinceton Announcement Parking Zone and Fee Changes NEW TIME LIMITS

NEW PARKING RATES

• All 2 hour meters will be changed to 3 hour parking time limits.

3 Hour Meters

IMPLEMENTATION

30 Minute metered parking spaces (marked in yellow) are intermixed with the 3 hour metered parking spaces at the rate of $1.00/30 minutes.

• A testing phase will begin on June 24th with the rate change at the all day meters. • All changes effective July 8th or as indicated on individual meters and pay stations.

Zone 6091

$1.75/ hour

All Day Meters

Zone 6092

$1.00 / hour

All Day Pay Stations

Zone 6093

$1.00 / hour

Multi-Day Pay Stations

Zone 6094

$5.00 / day

15 Minute Meters

(Wawa Lot Only)

55¢ / 15 min

Thank you for your patience as we reconfigure equipment and update signage. If you discover an error, please email accessprinceton@princetonnj.gov with the number of the meter or pay station needing fixing.

ParkPrinceton

Revised Parking Map SPRING STREET GARAGE

Entrances on Spring St and Wiggins St

PAYMENT OPTIONS

WIGGINS ST

PRINCETON HIGH SCHOOL

FRANKLIN AVENUE

 M-Th 9am-8pm, Fri & Sat 9am-9pm, Sun 1pm-8pm  24 Hour Monitoring

*

Prepayment is available for 3 Hour and All Day parking spaces from 7am M-Sat and 8am Sun.

NASSAU STREET

C

D

NASSAU STREET

K

Spring Street Garage

B

Tulane Yard

C

Park Place West Yard

D

Park Place East Yard

E

Princeton Rail Station “Dinky” Lot

F

Chambers Street Garage †

G

Hulfish Street Garage †

H

Griggs Corner Yard †

Privately Owned Public Parking

ST

EDWARDS

M

DICKINSON

Weekdays: 5pm to 2am Saturdays and Sundays: All day until 2am I

Princeton University North Garage

J Princeton University West Garage

K K

I PROSPECT

AVENUE

PROSPECT AVENUE

IVY LANE

Please note signage, as many University lots are restricted at all times.

PLACES OF INTEREST

OVERNIGHT PARKING

WAWA

Parking is prohibited for longer than one hour between 2:00 A.M. and 6:00 A.M. on all former borough streets. E

FOR MORE INFORMATION Visit www.princetonnj.gov/parking

FREE PARKING IN PRINCETON UNIVERSITY GARAGES & LOTS

NASSAU STREET

K Princeton University Lots 10 & 13

ALEXANDER ST

A

ER

C ER

WASHINGTON ROAD

OFF STREET PARKING

UNIVERSITY PLACE

WILLIAM STREET

EVELYN PL

B

PARK PLACE

QUEENSTON PL

MOORE ST.

PALMER SQ

BARSKY CT

55¢ / 15 min

SPRING STREET

MAPLE ST

Zone 6094 $5.00 / day

F

PINE ST

MONUMENT HALL

AVENUE

CHESTNUT ST

Zone 6093 $1.00 / hour

15 Minute Meters (Wawa Lot Only)

A

MORAN AVE

Multi-Day Pay Stations

H

HAMILTON

OLDEN STREET

*

WIGGINS STREET

HULFISH STREET BANK ST

All Day Pay Stations

G

Zone 6092 $1.00 / hour CHAMBERS ST

*

MONUMENT DR

All Day Meters

ROBESON PLACE

MOORE ST.

30 Minute metered parking spaces (marked in yellow) are intermixed with the 3 hour metered parking spaces at the rate of $1.00/30 minutes.

WESTMINSTER CHOIR COLLEGE

CHARLTON

Zone 6091 $1.75/ hour

S. TULANE ST.

*

JOHN ST

3 Hour Meters

MADISON ST.

PARKING LEGEND

SPRING STREET

VANDEVENTER ST.

N

A SPRING ST MUNICIPAL GARAGE

PRINCETON CEMETERY

N. TULANE

WITHERSPOON ST.

- Wawa Lot 15 minute meters - Princeton Rail Station (7 Day Limit)

ENTRANCE

LINDEN LANE

METERED PARKING & PAY STATION HOURS

JOHN WITHERSPOON MIDDLE SCHOOL

PRINCETON RAIL STATION “DINKY”

J

Palmer Square Nassau Hall Albert E. Hinds Plaza Princeton Public Library 571

Arts Council of Princeton Morven Museum & Garden Princeton Battle Monument McCarter Theatre Center FACULTY ROAD

The new parking map is available online, visit: www.princetonnj.gov/resources/downtown-parking-map

For more information visit: www.princetonnj.gov/parking

N. TULANE ST

HENRY AVENUE

WITHERSPOON ST

Coin, credit card, or mobile payment through the ParkPrinceton App (available for download in the Apple App Store and Google Play).

 PrincetonNJGovernment  Park_Princeton  Park_Princeton

27


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019 • 8

ACE Program Seeks to Reduce Chronic Absenteeism at PHS Reducing chronic absenteeism at Princeton High School (PHS) is the goal of the YMCA’s ACE (Accept. Complete. Excel.) Program, which is kicking off this year with the support of a $300,000 grant over the next five years from the Princeton Area Community Foundation (PACF). Citing an absenteeism rate of nearly 30 percent among PHS junior and senior students of color, ACE Project Director Mike Roseborough, who joined the Y’s team last December, said, “We want to reduce that number by junior year, to help them academically and get them on a path to success, to give them the tools to compete. We want them to excel.” T h e P r i n c e ton Fa m i ly YMCA and PPS were one of 10 nonprofit and school par tnerships selected by the PACF to win support through its All Kids Thrive initiative, which is focused on reducing chronic absenteeism in Mercer County. Recent overall chronic absenteeism rates in Mercer County, according to PACF, were 9.5 percent in Princeton, 6.2 percent in Lawrenceville, 12 percent in Hamilton, and 30 percent in Trenton. Citing poverty, homelessness, and illness as major risk factors for chronic absenteeism, PACF noted that more than one in three children in Mercer County public schools are at a level of poverty where they are eligible to receive free or reduced-price school meals. The first two Princeton YMCA ACE program cohorts of students in the coming year will include seven PHS sophomores and juniors and five freshmen. Roseborough noted that there are many different reasons why these students are chronically absent, rang-

ing from domestic violence, sibling issues, and work versus school conflicts to laundry and dirty clothes issues, lack of food, and health problems. “The main issue is commu n it y d is engagement,” Roseborough said. “It often starts with the parents’ disengagement on multiple f ronts. T his prog ram is about engaging them in the community, about building a community for them.” He continued, “We want to give these students as much exposure as possible, to engage them in the school and the larger community. We want to provide them with resources that can benefit them but that they may not be aware of.” The YMCA and the school district social workers and administrators identify participating students based on attendance, academic records, and other factors. For the first years of the ACE initiative, the Y is focused on engaging boys of color, mostly from economically-disadvantaged circumstances, who miss school frequently because of numerous obstacles and barriers in their daily lives. Modeled after the Baltimore-based THREAD mentoring program that has been very successful in supporting students who are at most risk of failing or dropping out of school, ACE will work with teams of volunteer community mentors to weave together support networks for students, broadening their social networks, academic opportunities, and enrichment activities. “Chronic absenteeism is often about removing barriers — barriers that may prevent access to clean clothes, access to academic supports, and even access to bias-free learning,” said

PPS Superintendent Steve Cochrane. “Our staff have enthusiastically embraced this opportunity to work with volunteers, with our community partners, and with our students to identify, overcome, and eliminate those barriers.” Roseborough, who has worked in the youth services sector for more than 13 years, expressed his enthusiasm for the program and his optimism in working with the two cohorts of PHS students this year. “This is an exciting opportunity for us to make a meaningful difference in the lives of our students,” he said. “Already I’ve enjoyed working side by side with professional colleagues here in town, and the dedicated volunteers who are eager to be a part of a solution. Our students, while challenged in many ways, are wonderful young people who are excited to have caring adults in their lives.”

Roseborough joined the Princeton Family Y MCA from the Newark and Vicinity YMCA, where he served as the program director of the 21st Century Learning Center grant, a program that focuses on academic support and social-emotional learning for students. PACF described its All K ids T hr ive program as a ”bold new initiative to transform the lives of young people living in poverty.” In Mercer County, PACF noted, more than one in 10 students are chronically absent from school and those absences dramatically lower their chance of success thorough their lives. The 10 All Kids Thrive partnerships will work in Trenton, Hamilton, and Lawrence, as well as Princeton. Roseborough described the initiative as “Big Brothers Big Sisters meets YMCA. It’s unique for a YMCA to run a program like this. Setting them up for success is the right idea. I’m looking forward to taking on the challenges.” —Donald Gilpin

Joint Effort 2019 continued from page one

that we are honoring our ancestors, champions in our community, our youth, and some community members posthumously. These honorees reflect who we could be in Princeton. They are a sample of the best of us and an important testament and statement about the potential for our town.” In addition to the awards presentation, there will be Joint Effort Book Scholarships presented in the names of Witherspoon-Jackson citizens to Denise Spivey (Stockton University), Zahrion Blue (Lincoln University), Hailey Young (Brown University), Skylar J. Hall (Hampton University), and Jaylen Johnson (Mercer County Community College). This year’s celebration, the evolution of a program started by Bailey and Satterfield more than a dozen years ago, will open on Saturday, August 3, at 10 a.m. with the Laura Mitnaul Wooten Memorial Community Tribute at the Arts Council of Princeton (ACP). Wooten, at the time of her

ACE MENTORING: Mike Roseborough, Princeton Family YMCA’s ACE (Accept. Complete. Excel.) project director, is working with Princeton Public Schools on the program to reduce chronic absenteeism at Princeton High School. (Photo courtesy of Princeton Family YMCA)

Featuring ingredients from Local Farms prepared by well-known Chefs from

Eno Terra • Mediterra Teresa Caffe Terra Momo Bread Co. Albariño

Police Blotter

Chefs: Jason Hensle Toni Charmello Charmaine McFarlane Larry Robinson Terence Strong Emily Kirstein

On July 4, at 1:46 p.m., a victim reported that between June 23 and July 4 his Mastercard and $100 in cash were stolen from his residence on Mt. Lucas Road. The suspect used the credit card to make charges in Princeton and Milford, Conn., totaling $1,200. On July 3, at 10:51 a.m., it was reported that, on June 20, someone gained access to a legitimate email thread between a victim and a business partner and was trying to act as if they were an authorized representative of the company. The suspect instructed the victim to wire transfer a deposit of $19,558 to either an overseas account or a Wells Fargo bank in Trenton. The victim became suspicious and did not transfer any funds. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

This Year’s Farm to Table will benefit the Green Teams and sustainability Organizations of Mercer County in the Mercer County Sustainability

Thursday July 18, 2019 5 pm Cocktails • 6:30 pm Dinner All Fresh And Local • Live Music

$100 Per Person • $150 Per Couple – Pay Pal Register Online: sustainablelawrence.org Fundraiser for Mercer Sustainability Coalition’s annual Greenfest

death last March 24 at age 98, was the longest continuously serving election poll worker in the United States. On Sunday, August 4, the Joint Effort Gospel Fest at First Baptist Church will feature an evening of gospel music and the presentation of the Citizen of the Year and Paul Robeson Spirit Awards, and on Monday, August 5 at 5 p.m., the official Joint Effort Kick-Off Reception for the community and sponsors will take place at Studio Hillier. An evening conversation about “The Future of the Town” with elected officials, candidates for office, educators, and other community leaders will be the featured event on Tuesday, August 6 at the Princeton Public Library; and on Wednesday, August 7, the ACP will host the Jim Floyd Memorial Lecture and the Cynthia “Chip” Fisher Memorial Art Exhibit. The art exhibit and community reception at 5:30 p.m. will highlight artists Aaron Fisher, Romus Broadway, and Traci Hill, including a community collage by Broadway. Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church Pastor the Rev. Dr. Lukata Mjumbe will present the lecture at 6:15 p.m., followed by the presentation of several awards and scholarships. A free summer concert by T.S. Project at the Princeton Shopping Center at 6 p.m. will be the main event on Thursday, August 8; the Joint Effort Youth Basketball Clinic will take place the following morning at 10 a.m. at the Community Park basketball courts; and Friday, August 9 at 7 p.m. there will be a Joint Effort community and alumni reunion/reception/happy hour at the Elks on Birch Avenue. The week-long festivities will wrap up on August 10 and 11, with a Black Church Historical Walking Tour, meeting in front of Waxwood Apartments at 9:45 a.m. Saturday; a community block festival at the Princeton YMCA field at 1 p.m. on Saturday featuring the Grace Little Band, 1st Baptist Church Choir, and DJ Darius; and on Sunday, starting at 10 a.m., the Pete Young Memorial Games at Community Park, a series of all-day basketball games for youth, both boys and girls. —Donald Gilpin

Coalition: Ewing, Hopewell Valley, Lawrence, Sustainable Lawrence, Sustainable Princeton, East Windsor, Hightstown, West Windsor

A partnership of Mercer County communities working together to build a more sustainable future and supporting efforts towards certification through the Sustainable Jersey Program.


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9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019

CREATE YOUR ULTIMATE OUTDOOR SPACE.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019 • 10

Composer Peter Westergaard Dies After Long Career at University The June 26 passing of comp os er a nd e du c ator Peter Westergaard has inspired numerous tributes in the Princeton University music community, of which he was a prominent member for five decades. In a story on the University’s website, numerous faculty, former students, and colleagues praised Westergaard, citing his warmth and sense of humor as well as his musical skills. Westergaard, who was 88, died at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center af ter a br ief bat tle w ith cancer. “Peter shaped the artistic and intellectual direction of the music department in countless ways, not the least of which was supporting the intersections between performance, composition, and scholarship,” said Wendy Heller, the Scheide Professor of Music History who chairs the music depar tment. Heller also praised Westergaard’s “extraordinary intelligence, sense of humor, gift for language, and deep understanding of poetry.” The website quotes Scott Burnham, the Scheide Professor of Music Histor y, Emeritus: “Peter combined cultural depth with a deft touch, and he brought this gif t to bear upon all his creative work. He was an endlessly generous pres ence in the music department, always there for his students and colleagues in

the richest possible way.” Michael Pratt, the conductor of t he Pr inceton University Orchestra, was hired by Westergaard, who was leading the orchestra, in 1979, because he felt the ensemble needed a professional conductor. The two men collaborated frequently over the years, and, in 1983, founded the June Opera Festival, now called Opera Festival of New Jersey. “Peter was my mentor, my dear f r iend, and my collaborator in t he mad world of opera,” said Pratt. “He was a man of the theater: directing, designing sets, conducting, translating libret ti w ith w it and elegance, producing, and conjuring. I still tell young composers to look at his vocal music to s ee how texts are properly set. He was a master and it seemed like there was no period of music that he did not know intimately. He pushed hard to bring music performance into the mainstream of the traditional liberal arts idea of music education. The strength and relevance of music performance at P r i nce ton to day s t ar te d with Peter’s stubborn insistence, many years ago, that it should be so.” Westergaard began composing as a student at Harvard University, from which he graduated in 1953. He went on to study composition at Princeton with Milton Babbitt and Edward Cone. After earning a master’s

recent compositions was a piece for Pratt’s birthday. Growing up, Westergaard said on Monday, her father’s degree, he had a Fulbright work on The Tempest was Scholarship to the Staatli- a major focus. “That’s the che Hochschule für Musik main thing I remember. For in Freiburg, Germany. He me, it was huge when it was received a Guggenheim Fel- finally completed and performed,” she said. While lowship in 1964-65. the opera earned her father We s tergaard cha ire d a Pulitzer nomination, “He Princeton’s music departdidn’t talk about things like ment from 1974 -78 and awards,” she said. “He just 1983-86. He used his own loved what he did. He loved text, An Introduction to composing. That was the Tonal Theory, published in main thing.” 1975 by W.W. Norton, for Maggie, who recently rethe course “Tonal Syntax.” He also contributed to the tired from the University’s Journal of Music Theor y Office of Communications, and Perspectives of New and her sister Liz WesterMusic and edited two sets gaard, had to study the vioof songs of Austrian com- lin growing up. “We were poser and conductor Anton not thrilled,” she said. “I complained about it. But it von Webern. gave me a good ear. Music While Westergaard taught was always there. I rememundergraduates about tonal ber going to concerts and music, his own compositions operas at a very early age. were atonal. They have been I used to love to talk to him performed throughout North about music. I would bring America, Europe, and Aushim popular music and get tralia. In 1997, he composed him to listen, and he would Ringing Changes on the tell me what he thought. He occasion of the 250th anhad an open mind. That’s a niversary of the University. very fond memory.” A grant from the National Westergaard ’s creative Endowment for the Arts in process included sitting at 1990 allowed Westergaard to edit the final score of the piano at home with his his three-act opera, The two basset hounds nearby. Tempest, for which he was He would work first on panominated for a Pulitzer per, then on computer, then Prize. The project spanned right back to computer printtwo decades and premiered outs. “For me, there’s always at the Opera Festival of New a high ratio of perspiration Jersey in 1994, conducted to inspiration,” he told the Princeton Alumni Weekly in by Pratt. 1997. According to Maggie Af ter 33 years on the Westergaard, one of the Princeton faculty, Westercomposer’s two daughters, Westergaard was writingB:10”gaard switched to emeritus music almost until the endT:10”status in 2001 but remained of his life. Among his most involved in creating new S:10”

works, some of which premiered at the University. He worked for three years on Moby Dick: Scenes from an Imaginary Opera, which premiered at Richardson Auditorium in 2004. Pratt was the conductor, leading the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, a chorus, and soloists. Westergaard collaborated with numerous faculty and students on a new interpretation of the Russian play Boris Godunov in 2007, and Alice in Wonderland in 2008. He did English translations of several operas by Mozart, Beethoven, and Rossini, and composed the children’s opera, Chicken Little. He also worked on design and staging, including a dragon with flapping wings that flew down from the balcony via a system of pulleys for a production of Mozart’s The Magic Flute. He served on the executive board and the concert committee of the International Society for Contemporary Music, the executive committee of the American Society of University Composers, and the editorial board of Perspectives of New Music. In addition to his daughters, Westergaard is survived by his wife, Barbara; sonin-law Tom Kilbourne; and grandchildren Ashe and Peter Kilbourne. Beginning in the fall, the first Princeton University Orchestra concert of the season will be known as the Peter Westergaard Concert. (Page 1 photo by John Simpson). —Anne Levin

Order Blocks Council continued from page one

the timing, we needed to have someone interface with the DEP.” Whitman submitted a proposal last week, indicating the stockpile of soil, millings, asphalt, concrete, and brick on the property “has resulted in an extremely large pile of undocumented and [un]tested soil to be stockpiled around the property.” The proposal goes on to say, “This current stockpile may be impacting wetlands (per NJDEP inspector comments) and possibly extend into Montgomery Township. In addition, there is a roll off on site with bagged asbestos pipe wrap that has been there for 2-7 years. The bags are punctured and the roll off has a number of holes in it, allowing collected water to run out and potentially impact the surrounding soil. There is also evidence of diesel spills due to asphalt hot box clean.” Whitman’s proposal says it will determine whether illegal dumping, deforestation, and the introduction of backfill to create roads, as well as other similar soil disturbances, have taken place in the area of the wetlands. Mayor Liz Lempert said Monday afternoon that the town has filed an insurance claim to cover costs of Whitman’s work. Asked about the ongoing criminal investigation into the illegal dumping, Lempert said it is being handled by the Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office so she did not have an update. “I don’t expect to hear a lot until we hear from the prosecutor’s office,” she said. “Our focus now is looking at the site and looking at the cleanup.” —Anne Levin

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To the Editor: The Princeton Theological Seminary proposal for expansion at its in-town campus has been pulled back for reconsideration in the face of considerable distress from citizens. I would urge that the Seminary use the summer period back at the drawing board to consider a solution which would satisfy a major concern of unhappy neighbors and of lovers of Princeton open space. It is a solution which in the long run could greatly benefit the Seminary by freeing up considerable land for other appropriate uses. The beautiful, historic Green on the Tennant Campus has been targeted by the Seminary’s architects for construction of a four story dormitory. I would urge everyone to drive past the Township’s two-story building under construction at Terhune and Route 206 before endorsing the Seminary’s plan for the Green. The monstrosity being built is like some vulture hanging over 206. It is much lower than the Seminary’s proposed edifice on the Green. Its clone on the Green would destroy a splendid streetscape. See the HPC Subcommittee report to the Planning Board of February 4. The Seminary has extensive acreage devoted to surface

RANTEE A U

To the Editor: I was very pleased to read the letter from Princeton’s mayor and council about the dumping at the River Road site [“Mayor, Council Legally Constrained from Commenting on Criminal Investigation,” Mailbox, July 3]. The letter spoke clearly and directly to residents, without obfuscation or euphemisms. It gave us all the information that could legally be shared with us. It told us what has been done and what will be done. It encouraged us to share our concerns with mayor and council. After reading the letter, I am confident that Princeton’s governing body has taken the situation seriously and is taking appropriate actions to deal with it. I am proud that we have a mayor and council that are honest, direct, and responsible. PHYLLIS TEITELBAUM Hawthorne Avenue

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To the Editor, We’re Princeton Community Television veterans of longstanding who have a few words to say about the disturbing news that the lights may go out in the studio. Let’s be frank: Princeton Community Television is not necessary. It’s not a school, or a bridge, or a municipal building. If it didn’t exist tomorrow, Princeton Township would not dry up and blow away. But as we’ve come to realize during the 21 years we’ve been producing and hosting A Fistful of Popcorn, our movie-discussion show, this small station has been a large part of the cultural mélange that makes Princeton unique. Our main focus has been the small-budget independent features that are the bread and butter of the Princeton Garden Theatre and other local art cinemas. But we’ve also featured guests: local and international filmmakers have sat with us to talk about their work, discussions that had no other platform. We’ve promoted film festivals on the Princeton campus and in town, as well as the Trenton Film Festival, which has a growing worldwide reputation. In addition, we’ve been excited to promote each year several of Princeton Public Library’s film festivals, including its acclaimed Environmental Film Festival and its Student Film Festival. We’ve heard it said that our show and others could simply be produced cheaply, in our own homes, and posted on YouTube. Technically, that’s so. But unlike YouTube, Princeton Community Television is a place with an identity. At a time when community get-togethers and face-

Seminary’s Project on Tennant Campus Would Destroy A Splendid Streetscape

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“Fistful of Popcorn” Veterans Want To “Keep the Lights On”

NO STRINGS ATTACHED

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To the Editor: Princeton’s Witherspoon-Jackson Development Corporation (WJDC) is a 501(c)3 tax-exempt corporation. Its mission is to preserve, restore, and sustain the historic character, diversity, and quality of life of the Witherspoon-Jackson (WJ) neighborhood. WJDC received funds from a settlement with Princeton University to help economically disadvantaged residents in and from the WJ neighborhood with their housing and related needs. The WJDC Board currently has 12 directors. A majority are required by WJDC bylaws to be from the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood. WJDC is a public purpose organization that, by virtue of its tax-exempt status, does not endorse political candidates and does not represent the neighborhood. The original WJDC began in 1976 with $1M in funding from local philanthropists. It benefited from a consortium of local banking institutions committed to meaningful fulfillment of their Community Reinvestment Act obligations. In about 10 years, WJDC purchased, improved, and sold (at a net loss) 23 homes to first-time homebuyers from the neighborhood with financing from the consortium. Forty years later, with $1.25M committed from the settlement, a very competitive housing market, and a different financial environment, the current WJDC must take a different approach and it is decidedly holistic. With just a small administrative budget in December 2017, WJDC rescued one property facing tax sale. WJDC received its first installment of settlement funds in July 2018 and since then, granted over $45,000 in property tax rebates to 35 WJ homeowners and helped a tenant facing eviction. WJDC is repairing a house as an affordable rental and is purchasing a home to sell at an affordable price. WJDC has recently partnered with Habitat for Humanity to make needed repairs and improvements to homes in the neighborhood. WJDC is facilitating a process to improve the fencing along Paul Robeson Place in cooperation with the WJ Historic and Cultural Society and Palmer Square, Inc. WJDC is also proud to support the Princeton Entrepreneurship Summer Camp for Princeton High School students with connections to the WJ neighborhood. Despite limited resources, WJDC strives to address systemic problems of racial discrimination, inequity in education, limited access to resources and jobs, and underemployment. The cost of living in Princeton exacerbates these problems. Princeton property owners know that property taxes are influenced largely by location, zoning, and a property’s future potential. While the WJ historic designation has slowed sales to speculators, somewhat reduced prices, and made demolition of existing homes more difficult, WJ residents know well that the historic designation alone cannot preserve the neighborhood’s character and provide security for WJ’s many homeowners, renters, and businesses. To address these issues, WJDC commissioned a study, “Visioning a Master Plan for the WJ Neighborhood.” Using a wellestablished participatory planning process called “visioning,” this project began in May by consulting neighborhood residents and property owners about existing conditions. In a series of meetings, the neighborhood will begin to establish goals and explore opportunities. The next meeting will be in September. The process of developing a WJ master plan is neighborhood-generated and will supplement community-wide planning efforts. WJDC will continue supporting the WJ neighborhood through a variety of programs and is grateful for the community support it has received. YINA A. MOORE Chair/President for the Board of Directors of the Witherspoon-Jackson Development Corporation

parking lots. Were part of that land allocated to the construction of the in-town student residences, the problem leading to destruction of the Green would be eliminated. If the Seminary were to construct a single multi-story parking facility with one or two stories below grade, it would be able to build the needed structures on what is now parking lot and free up surplus lands all throughout the campus for other uses. The problem is cost. But we should note that the Seminary has had the very substantial benefit of decades of exemption from real property taxes, which has enabled it to divert the dollars it would have otherwise paid to the community to underwrite its operations and its capital projects and to make lucrative investments. So it would be most unfair to use cost now as a reason to eliminate a community asset of great value to its neighbors and, indeed to all the people of Princeton. PETER BIENSTOCK Stockton Street

WITH INTEREST

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Chair of W-J Development Corporation Explains Mission, Need for Master Plan

to-face interactions are dwindling, the station is like the old general store with a cracker barrel around which the neighborhood gathered. It’s where life happens. It’s where Princeton assumes its real nature, beyond what the rest of the world thinks we are. No, Princeton Community Television is not necessary. But it is vital. And without it, a light goes out and further dims the sense of community that binds us together. We need to keep the lights on. MARILYN CAMPBELL Hamilton Avenue JANET STERN Monroe Lane BOB BROWN, CAROL WELSCH Popcorn Vets

11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019 • 12

BOOK REVIEW

The Girl With the Bicycle: Summer Music on Proust’s Birthday

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he performers in Friday morning’s backyard circus are identified in the Audubon guide as Common Grackles, “a very familiar species on suburban lawns, striding about with deliberate steps,” searching for insects, nesting “in small colonies,” and perching “in adjacent treetops to sing their creaking, grating songs.” What held me and had me smiling, however, was the visual music they were making as they gathered, one by one, on the long limb of a hemlock tree until six of them were sitting in a row, the limb rocking under them, as if they were sharing the fun. It may be a common sight for this common species, but I never saw it before and I doubt that I ever will again. To go from watching birds riding a limb to reading Proust, who was born on July 10, 1871, is easier said than done, considering that each of the three volumes of the 1981 Random House edition of Remembrance of Things Past tops a thousand pages. With five days to deadline, all I can do is pack my knapsack with possibilities (birds, summertime, the seaside, the moon landing, the primal joy of victorious athletes) and prepare for the voyage by reading around in the edition of Proust’s Letters edited and translated by Minna Curtis. My guide is the 20-year-old English girl I encountered there. Proust’s biographer George D. Painter says it was “the beautiful Marie Nordlinger” who led Proust “near to the heart of the labyrinth.” Short and slender, “with delicate PreRaphaelite hands, dark eyes, full lips, and a look of warm sincerity and intelligence,” the talented young painter/ sculptor from Manchester was “a godsend” in Proust’s struggle to translate John Ruskin into French. A note in my 1949 edition of the Letters says that she “not only initiated him into the English texts but supplied him with endless information and assistance” and was “the only woman younger than himself, highly intellectual and of his own social background with whom he ever seems to have carried on a friendship.” M a r i e ’s c o n t a c t i n P a r i s w a s h e r cousin, the composer/performer and Proust’s close friend, Reynaldo Hahn. In a variation on the Jules and Jim scenario François Truffaut filmed half a century later, both she and Proust were in love with Reynaldo. Like Jeanne Moreau’s Catherine, Marie delighted in riding a bicycle, and it was the image of “the girl with the bicycle” that sparked Proust’s conception of Albertine, a character who dominates Remembrance of Things Past much as Catherine does Jules and Jim. In Volume 2 of Painter’s biography, the first chapter is titled “Visits from Albertine” and covers the 1903-1904 period following the death of Proust’s father. Painter notes that “Never in his father’s lifetime could Proust have received a young girl in his bedroom, yet shortly after his death, Marie became a constant visitor.” In his letter to Marie

from September 1904, Proust tells her, “The idea that you find your visit ‘improper’ ... seems to me enchanting and has made me laugh a lot. As if it were you who were the young man and I the young girl.” Although Painter acknowledges that Proust’s relationship with Marie was most likely “one of comradely affection and nothing more,” he’s sure that her idyllic visits “were remembered when, out of many girls and three young men, he created Albertine.” “An Assembly of Birds” After Friday’s six-birds-on-a-branch moment, I was alert to the imagery accompanying the narrator Marcel’s first view of Albertine with her bicycle amid the five or six young girls descending on the sea front at Balbec (Cabourg in “real life”), “as different in appearance and manner from all the people one was accustomed to see at Balbec as would have been a flock of gulls arriving from God knows where.” Marcel observes them “impeding the passage of other people in an agglomerate that was at once irregular in shape, compact, weird and shrill, like an assembly of birds before taking flight.” Captioning World Cup Champions The images of fiercely joyous female force lighting up Monday’s New York Times offer evidence of the timely timelessness of Proust, as in the way phrases about the girls in the book’s seaside sequences cohere with the photographs of the American women’s soccer team celebrating the winning of the World Cup, “eyes animated with self-assurance and the spirit of comradeship .... an invisible but harmonious bond.” Progressing “along the esplanade like a luminous comet,” the band of girls “could not set eyes on an obstacle without amusing themselves by clearing it, either in a running jump or with both feet together, because they were all brimming over with the exuberance that youth so urgently needs to expend.” Theirs were “graceful deviations in which caprice is blended with virtuosity .... a certain blend of grace, suppleness, and physical elegance,” and ultimately “a sort of shimmering harmony, the continuous transmutation of a fluid, collective and mobile beauty.”

Celestial Analogies Another topical phenomenon I found reflected in my reading of Proust is the media attention gathering momentum ahead of the 50th anniversary of the moon landing. In Marcel’s first detailed glimpse of Albertine with the band of girls, he catches “her smiling, sidelong glance, aimed from the centre of that inhuman world which enclosed the life of this little tribe, an inaccessible, unknown world wherein the idea of what I was could certainly never penetrate or find a place. ...If she had seen me, what could I have represented to her? From the depths of what universe did she discern me? It would have been as difficult for me to say as, when certain distinguishing features in a neighbouring planet are made visible thanks to the telescope, it is to conclude therefrom that human beings inhabit it, and that they can see us, and to guess what ideas the sight of us can have aroused in their minds.” The moon makes an appearance in another sequence connecting the narrator and Albertine: “Only at the moment when her gaze was directly coincident with mine, without slackening its movement it grew perceptibly duller. So on a starry night the wind-swept moon passes behind a cloud and veils her brightness for a moment, but soon will shine again.” Visions of Marie My first association with the girl from Manchester was Bob Dylan’s “Absolutely Sweet Marie,” whose “house he can’t unlock” because she forgot to leave him the key. I also imagined her in “Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands” (with “your gentleness now, which you just can’t help but show”) and “Visions of Johanna.” There are four visions of Marie in P.F. Prestwich’s The Translation of Memories (Peter Owen 1998). The first, a photograph of her with the bicycle is captioned in her own words: “The only thing I had in common with Albertine was that I rode a bicycle!” The girl in the picture looks downright solemn compared to Marcel’s vision of “the young bicyclist of the little band, with, over her dark hair, her polo-cap pulled down towards her plump cheeks, her eyes merry and almost importunate.” For one thing,

the hat Marie’s wearing is so large and cumbersome that it casts a shadow on her eyes. Stranger yet, or perhaps not strange at all given the Albert hidden in Albertine, the “vivacious beauty” seen by those who knew her could almost be mistaken for a man in drag, an idea at odds with the portrait in oils on the facing page, where she looks cool and beautiful and regally elegant. In a photograph of Marie in her studio outside Manchester, she’s the image of the intense young artist at work. Finally, the image that turns up most often online is the pastel portrait from 1902 where she most closely resembles George Painter’s allusion to warmth, sincerity, and intelligence, not to mention Dylan’s “sad-eyed lady.” The Last Letter Proust ends his first letter to Marie in January 1899 with reference to her “rare and unusual mind,” and “that graciousness of yours, as fresh as a branch of hawthorn.” This was not a casual compliment, as she would discover when she read Swann’s Way, where it’s in May, the “Month of Mary,” that Marcel remembers “having first fallen in love with hawthorns.” The depth of his feeling for Marie illuminates the last letter he ever wrote her, December 8, 1906, which is headed Chère, chère, chère, chère Mary” and begins, “Chère amie, how near you are to my heart, and how little your absence has separated you from me! I think of you constantly with such tenderness and indestructible regret for the past. In my ravaged life, in my demolished heart, the place you hold is sweet.” Proust has good reason to hold her in his heart considering the gift of Japanese water flowers she brought to him in the spring of 1904. Purchased for a few centimes during an afternoon stroll along the Seine embankment, “the wonderful hidden flowers” enabled him, as he wrote her, to “make a Spring of my own.” More than that, the flowers, which open in water, inspired the coda to the most famous passage in his work, the closing lines of the “Overture” to Swann’s Way: nd just as the Japanese amuse themselves by filling a porcelain bowl with water and steeping in it little crumbs of paper which until then are without character or form, but, the moment they become wet, stretch themselves and bend, take on colour and distinctive shape, become flowers or houses or people, permanent and recognisable, so in that moment all the flowers in our garden and in M. Swann’s park, and the water-lilies on the Vivonne and the good folk of the village and their little dwellings and the parish church and the whole of Combray and of its surroundings, taking their proper shapes and growing solid, sprang into being, town and gardens alike, from my cup of tea.” —Stuart Mitchner

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Unique Brass Ensemble Comes to Princeton University Summer Chamber Concerts Series

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f the trumpet, French horn, and trombone, the most familiar is likely the trumpet, thanks to a repertory of 17th and 18th-century music featuring the instrument. The French horn is also well known though a number of concerti over several centuries. The trombone, however, is rarely featured in orchestral settings, and is a pleasure for audiences to hear and see close up. Princeton University Summer Chamber Concerts brought these three instruments together last Tuesday night at Richardson Auditorium with a performance by the New York Brass Arts Trio. Definitely an ensemble for the 21st century, the Brass Arts Trio is comprised of trumpeter Joe Burgstaller, French horn player David Jolley, and trombonist Haim Avitsur, who came together in this performance to demonstrate the power of their instruments within the finesse of ensemble playing. Burgstaller, Jolley, and Avitsur are not only expert performers, but also imaginative arrangers; almost all of the pieces on Tuesday night’s program were arranged by one of them. The Trio presented works spanning three centuries, beginning with David Jolley’s arrangements of three sinfonias of Johann Sebastian Bach. In these short pieces, the three brass instruments were able to achieve appropriate lightness in melodic lines, as well as dynamic contrasts. Burgstaller found numerous opportunities for ornamentation in music tailor-made for a bright trumpet sound. Burgstaller played on several types of trumpets during the concert, including trumpet in C, piccolo trumpet and the 19th-century flugelhorn. He employed the most variety of instrumentation in Jolley’s arrangement of selections from Igor Stravinsky’s Pulcinella Suite, in which he alternated between C and piccolo trumpets. Throughout Stravinsky’s Suite, Burgstaller’s playing was well complemented by sliding trombone passages and crisp rhythms from French horn. The Brass Arts Trio’s most adventurous piece Tuesday night was Jolley’s arrangement of Richard Strauss’ 1895 tone poem Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks, a onemovement work rich in lush orchestration in its original form. Strauss himself arranged the symphonic poem for five instruments in

shortened form, and it was this version which was closest to the adaptation played by the Trio. Till Eulenspiegel, which chronicles the misadventures and pranks of a German peasant folk hero, extensively features the horn, and Jolly played consistently cleanly throughout the work, with running lines tripping right along. Extended trills from both horn and trombone demonstrated the technical difficulty of this arrangement, and all players brought out well the main character’s “merry pranks” with saucy and lively playing. The ensemble came together well for dynamic swells and forte sections, and the close of the piece in particular showed a great deal of stamina from all players. Burgstaller and Avitsur successfully tried their hands at piano accompaniment with Burgstaller’s arrangement of Three Children’s Songs of American jazz keyboardist and composer Chick Corea. A pioneer in jazz fusion, Corea composed a set of 20 “children’s songs” in the 1970s to mirror the Mikrokosmos series of piano miniatures by Hungarian composer Béla Bartók. Burgstaller chose to arrange three of these works for two brass instruments and an impressionistic piano accompaniment contrasting Bartók’s more rhythmic keyboard style. Both Burgstaller and Avitsur proved themselves capable pianists, with sonorities among keyboard and brass instruments working well. The first “Song” played, featuring an extended trombone solo, was haunting in character, as Avitsur showed just how much physical space a trombonist needs to play in all the instrument’s positions. Jolley took the lead in the second “Song,” playing smoothly through all registers. Burgstaller introduced the flugelhorn to the musical palette in the closing “Song,” playing with a rich, bell-like tone. relatively new ensemble, the New York Brass Arts Trio seemed to perform for the imagination and entertainment of its members as much as introducing innovative arrangements of classical and jazz works to the audience. Joe Burgstaller, David Jolley, and Haim Avitsur all have solid performing credits on their own, and their collective ensemble is quickly gaining a well-deserved reputation to take the brass trio into new realms of musicality and performance. —Nancy Plum

A

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13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019

MUSIC REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019 • 14

Deathtrap

THEATER REVIEW

A Playwright Threatens to Murder a Younger Rival in “Deathtrap;” Princeton Summer Theater Presents Mind-Bending, Darkly Comic Thriller

P

rinceton Summer Theater ( PST) states that the mission of its 2019 season is to “explore love in all its forms.” The company’s previous production, Falsettos, was an obvious fit for this theme. That musical’s near-adolescent protagonist sings about his ambivalence toward love, but grows to feel compassion for his father’s terminally ill lover, despite the extent to which the latter disrupts the boy’s family. In this context Deathtrap (1978), currently presented by PST, is a somewhat curious choice. This cerebral, darkly comic thriller by Ira Levin (1929-2007) — the author of novels such as A Kiss Before Dying, Rosemary’s Baby, and The Stepford Wives — chiefly is characterized by urbane banter, professional jealousy, and violence. There are brief displays of physical affection between characters, but to the extent that the theme of love is explored, it is subtle and confined to individual moments, rather than overarching. Immediately the audience sees Jeffrey Van Velsor’s elegant, lavishly decorated set, which includes French doors, a fireplace, and a hallway that makes us wish we could see the rooms beyond it. We are in the study of Sidney Bruhl, a playwright. A bright red sofa and curtains contrast with the dark green walls, which are covered with handcuffs; posters advertising Sidney’s past productions; and an arsenal of weapons that includes guns, axes, and a mace. Sidney enters, wearing a red cloak and black vest, with a white shirt and cravat; he looks like he would not be out of place in the Victorian era. His first piece of business is to spend several seconds adjusting the brightness of his chandelier, suggesting that he likes to control things, and change them. Megan Berry’s lighting creates some striking tableaux and enhances the dramatic tension. While Myra, Sydney’s wife, busies herself preparing drinks, Sidney reads aloud the first pages of a manuscript he has received from Clifford Anderson, a younger playwright who attended a seminar given by Sidney. To his annoyance Sidney finds great potential in his former student’s play, which is titled Deathtrap. Myra remarks that Sidney should be pleased that a student has authored such a successful script. He responds, “For the first time in 11 years of marriage darling: drop dead,” admitting, “I’m green with envy. I’d like to beat the wretch over the head with the mace there … and send the thing off under my own name.” Later Sidney adds, “I may be devious and underhanded enough to be a successful murderer, but not … a Broadway producer,” when Myra recommends that he offer to produce Clifford’s play. But at Myra’s suggestion he offers to collaborate with Clifford, and invites the younger man to visit him. C. Luke Soucy brings panache to the role of Sidney. He has commanding stage presence, and his melodramatic line de-

livery keeps the audience guessing about Sidney’s motivations, and the sincerity of his threats. This is well matched by Kathryn Anne Marie’s graceful, coquettish performance as Myra. Like Soucy, she takes care not to give too much away too soon; her appraising gaze and soothing, reserved line readings build suspense as to Myra’s ultimate reaction to the antics that will unfold around her. Sidney picks up Clifford at the train station, and the two arrive at the Bruhl home. Clifford makes an effort to be deferential, but criticizes one of Sidney’s plays. Myra hastily makes a concerted effort to broker a partnership between the two, urging Sidney to put aside a play about next-door neighbor Helga ten Dorp, a psychic who “finds murderers.” Despite My ra’s prodding, Clif ford abruptly responds that he is disinterested in collaboration, expressing a wish to try his luck selling Deathtrap as written. Sidney retorts that he never would put aside The Drowning Wife, his own work in progress. Sidney exhibits a pair of handcuffs that supposedly belonged to Houdini, and persuades Clifford to try them on. When Clifford seems unable to remove the restraints, Sidney makes a show of looking for the key — and then appears to use the distraction to strangle Clifford, as Myra screams for him to stop. Myra’s consistent effort to be a sup-

portive, calming influence is the element that most strongly supports the inclusion of Deathtrap in a season whose mission is to examine love. There are moments between Sidney and Clifford that hint at an idiosyncratic bond, even tenderness; but that relationship’s predominant — and ultimate — nature is adversarial. To the role of Clifford, Dylan Blau Edelstein brings much of the youthful, sincere charm with which he infused the character of Whizzer in Falsettos. The cast is capably rounded out by Abby Melick as Helga, who visits the Bruhl home when she envisions an aura of pain emanating from Sidney’s study; and by Justin Ramos as Porter Milgrim, Sidney’s suspicious lawyer. Director Annika Bennett gets strong performances out of the cast, and the staging lets Sidney’s apparent murder of Clifford be the surprise it needs to be. Bennett also has a good eye for balance of movement; she often places Sidney at his desk, to anchor our eyes, while Myra swiftly glides around the stage. Where the direction could improve the production is by ensuring that all of the design elements immediately place the audience in the show’s era. Jules Peiperl’s costumes are attractive, but dramaturgically they present ambiguities. Certainly they are opulent, and consistent with the color palette employed by the set. Sidney’s bright red cloak resembles the sofa and curtains, in keeping with that character’s bold, rather diabolical personality.

However, almost all of the outfits are as ornate as that worn by Sidney, which is unhelpful in distinguishing the characters or establishing a specific time period. Levin’s script contains cultural references, particularly the musical The Magic Show (1974), which place Deathtrap in the 1970s. The costumes neither support this setting nor oppose it by presenting a precise alternative, but echo multiple decades. Like Sidney, Clifford and Porter wear outfits that evoke the Victorian era, especially due to Clifford’s cravat and Porter’s watch chain. Helga’s costume, particularly her headband, is reminiscent of the 1920s. Only Myra, with her slick leather pants, looks like she belongs in the 1970s. The costumes are the creation of a talented designer, but greater consistency of style would heighten their effectiveness. Deathtrap earned four Tony nominations, including Best Play, in the course of its fouryear run on Broadway. Princeton Summer Theater’s production has enjoyable performances and attractive visuals. Mystery fans likely will be entertained, as will those who enjoy the play-within-a-play genre. owever, there are areas in which the production’s intentions could be clearer. As an acerbic, melodramatic thriller Deathtrap is engaging — especially in the first act. As a glimpse at a specific time period, and as an exploration of love, this play is somewhat perplexing. —Donald H. Sanborn III

H

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“DEATHTRAP”: Performances are underway for Princeton Summer Theater’s production of “Deathtrap.” Directed by Annika Bennett, the play runs through July 21 at Princeton University’s Hamilton Murray Theater. Sidney Bruhl, a playwright (C. Luke Soucy, left) implies to his wife, Myra (Kathryn Anne Marie) that he may kill a younger rival, in order to steal his script — leaving Myra to try to determine whether or not Sidney is joking. (Photo by Kirsten Traudt) Deathtrap will play at the Hamilton Murray Theater in Murray Dodge Hall, Princeton University, through July 21. For tickets, show times, and further information call (732) 997-0205 or visit http://www.princetonsummertheater.org/deathtrap.

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MUSIC WITH A CONSERVATION THEME: On Saturday, July 13 at 8:30 p.m., the art and music ensemble NOBI comes to Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street. Members Adrian Valosin, Herb Robertson, Will Constantine Jr., and Douglas Miller describe their performance as featuring “original sound motifs embodying a determinative spiritual narrative, including ‘spoken word’ relevant to environmental and conservation issues.” There is no cover charge, but purchases of beverages or food are appreciated.

Blue Curtain Concerts Martinho da Vila, Adoniran Creativity’s Chamber Music Open with Double Bill Barbosa, João Nogueira, and Residency. They take their more. The group most recently won Best Samba Group in 2017 from the 28th Brazilian Music Awards.

Rolston String Quartet Closes Chamber Series

The 52nd season of the Princeton University Summer Chamber Concerts closes on Friday, July 12 at 7:30 p.m. with Rolston String Quartet at Richardson Auditorium on the Princeton University campus. The concert will include Haydn’s “Sunrise” Quartet, Beethoven’s “Razsumovsky,” and “Metamorphoses Nocturnes” by Ligeti. Admission is free. The 2018 recipient and first international ensemble chosen for the Cleveland Quartet Award from Chamber Music America, Canada’s Rolston String Quartet also earned First Prize at the 12th Banff International String Quartet Competition. They then toured Germany, Italy, Austria, Canada, and the United States, followed by a two-year term as the Yale School of Music’s fellowship quartet-in-residence in the fall of 2017. The Quartet was formed in the summer of 2013 at the Banff Centre for Arts and

name from Canadian violinist Thomas Rolston, founder and long time director of the music and sound programs at the Banff Centre. Even though concerts are free, tickets are still required. Starting one week before each concert a block of tickets is available online through tickets.princeton.edu. Once the online tickets are “sold out” the remaining tickets will be available, first-come, firstserved, at the box office on the day of the concert. There is a maximum of four tickets per party. Doors open for general seating one-half hour before the concert. Visit www.princetonsummerchamberconcerts.org or call (609) 570-8404 for more information.

Levin’s “Deathtrap” at Hamilton Murray Stage

Princeton Summer Theater’s production of “Deathtrap,” a play by Ira Levin, is on stage at the Hamilton Murray Theater July 11-14 and 17-21. The show is directed by Annika Bennett. The play tells the story of washed-up thriller playwright Sidney Bruhl, who descends into madness when a former student arrives on his doorstep with a surefire hit. The name of that play? Also Deathtrap, and also a two -act, five-character thriller that’s much more than meets the eye. Though Sidney’s best days are behind him, playwright Levin was at the height of his powers when he wrote Deathtrap, coming off the success of hits like Rosemary’s Baby and The Stepford Wives. Director Annika Bennett, a playwright herself, returns to the Hamilton Mur ray stage after directing 2016’s Gods of Carnage. 2017

Annual Jersey Fest At Old York Cellars

Old York Cellars’ annual Jersey Fest is Saturday, July 13 from 12 to 10 p.m. at the vineyard overlooking the Sourland Mountains at 80 Old York Road, Ringoes. T h e 10 - h o u r, f a m i l y friendly event features five food vendors (with ties to four different continents), a traditional Spanish Paella demonstration, two musical

ROSSEN MILANOV Edward T. Cone Music Director

Photo: Stephen Pariser

Artistic Director C. Luke Soucy (Spider’s Web) makes his PST mainstage debut as Sidney, joined by three-time PST performer Abby Melick (Pippin, Spider’s Web, The Baltimore Waltz), 2019 Company Members Dylan Blau Edelstein and Jus tin Ramos, and newcomer Kathryn Ann Marie. Deathtrap is the second play in Princeton Summer Theater’s season to explore love in all its forms. It will be followed by a new adaptation of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Suzan-Lori Parks’ Topdog/ Underdog, a fable about the fraught relationship between two African American brothers in a hostile world. Performances are at 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, and also 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Visit princetonsummertheater.org or call (732) 997-0205 for tickets.

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Blue Curtain, presented in co-operation with the Princeton Recreation Department, presents a free double bill featuring Freckle Legend and Casuarina on Saturday, July 13, starting at 7 p.m., at Pettoranello Gardens Amphitheater, Route 206 and Mountain Avenue. Originally conceived by RJ Rabin (drums) and Rozhan Razman (bass), Freckle Legend is a collaborative effort between Rabin and Razman, Cale Hawkins (keyboards and vocals), Adam Stoler (guitar), Teddy Kumpel (guitar), and Benjamin Drazen (saxophone). Each member contributes years of experience as sidemen, filling their music with stories and characters that celebrate New York. Casuarina, who celebrates their 18th anniversary this year, is a samba band from Brazil. Originally from Rio de Janeiro’s bohemian neighborhood Lapa, the band plays their repertoire all over Brazil and beyond. They have brought their “samba made in Brazil” to more than 20 countries, performing their original compositions and classic samba repertoire by Paulinho da Viola, Dorival Caymmi,

Tasting Room, will do a live paella demonstration, with insights into his traditional Spanish recipe. At sunset, David Schoner from Garden State Film Festival will introduce the Best of the Fest program. This selection of favorites will close out the evening with six shorts by promising young directors from around the country. The program includes a comedic take on marriage, a story of young love, a mob boss who wants to become president, and a Jersey Devil-inspired horror film. For tickets and a full list of attractions, visit www.OldYorkCellars.com.

Check Out Our Season of Music! SUBSCRIBE TODAY AND SAVE! YOUNG LOVERS: A prince in disguise (Tristan Takacs) and a shepherd’s adopted daughter (Jacqueline Galli) share a loving look in ActorsNET’s production of Shakespeare’s “The Winter’s Tale,” on stage weekends from July 12-28 at the Heritage Center Theatre, 635 North Delmorr Avenue, Morrisville, Pennsylvania. Show times are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Tickets are $20 for adults, $17 for seniors 62 and up, $15 for WHYY members and students, and $10 for children. To reserve, call (215) 295-3694 or email actorsnet@aol.com.

princetonsymphony.org 609/497-0020 These programs are made possible in part by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019

Music and Theater

acts, a photo exhibition depicting agriculture in Hunterdon County, tours of the winery, barrel tastings, craft vendors, and, at sunset, and a screening of short films hosted by the Garden State Film Festival. T he $15 cover charge ($10 for non-drinkers, and free for kids 12 and under) includes a sampling of six wines from Old York Cellars extensive wine list, a souvenir wine glass, and access to all the activities and entertainment of the day. Music starts at 12 p.m. with a solo set from Jo Wymer. At 5 p.m., the Bassboards will take the stage to cover classic and contemporary hits until sunset. Fo o d opt i on s w i l l i n clude Australian veggie and meat pies from the Flying Pie Guy, Latin-influenced s n ack s a n d s a n d w i ch e s from Latin Bites, Asian fusion dishes from Mrs. Fu’s Yummy Food Truck, guacamole-based snacks from The Guac Spot, and cheesecake on a stick from Maddalena’s Cheesecake and Catering. Guests can purchase a bottle of Old York Cellars wine and plate of food in one of the winery’s many outdoor seating areas overlooking the vineyard. T h r o u g h o u t t h e d a y, guests can join one of the educational winery tours, take part in barrel tastings of an unreleased wine, try new releases (2018 Pinot Gr is and 2018 Malbec ), sip an ice-cold wine slushy, meet artists from the photo exhibition, and shop with loTOPICS cal craft vendors. At 3 p.m., José Diaz, the winery’s chef from the Quaker Bridge


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019 • 16

Art

“COLORS OF MEMORY”: This artist book created with laser cut woodblock and collograph plates is featured in “Reflections: Artist Books and Works on Paper by Maria G. Pisano,” on view at the Plainsboro Library gallery through July 31. An artist reception is Sunday, July 14 from 2 to 4 p.m.

“IGNORE ME”: This large-scale sculpture is one of six now on view in “Rebirth: Kang Muxiang,” at Grounds For Sculpture in Hamilton through May 2020. The works are made from steel elevator cables from Taipei 101, one of the world’s tallest buildings. (Photo by George Chevalier) tall and weighing several impacts future generations. “Rebirth” Exhibit at In 2013 Kang was invited Grounds For Sculpture thousand pounds. Kang began his artistic practice w ith traditional woodcarving at the age of 13. Eventually turning to other media, the artist has also worked in bronze and stainless steel. In 2002, Kang spent a year living a largely solitary and primitive lifestyle on Guishan (Turtle Island), off the coast of Taiwan. This experience motivated him to create his Life series of sculptures that explores how our way of life

Now on view at Grounds For S c u lpt u r e ( G F S ) i n Hamilton, “Rebirth: Kang Muxiang” is an exhibition of six large-scale sculptures by Taiwanese artist Kang Muxiang, sited outdoors in the gardens. Massive yet g racef u l, t he embr yonic forms are made from steel elevator cables from Taipei 101, one of the world’s tallest buildings. The works range in size, with the largest standing nearly 10 feet

by Taipei 101 to create art using expired cables from the building’s elevators. Coated in black v iscous oil from their long use, the elevator cables must be cleaned, as the first step in the artist’s process. To aid with this process, Kang employs inmates from a minimum-security prison in a program that renews not just the worn cables but also the assistants’ spirits and sense of purpose.

Summer

FILM SERIES FREE OUTDOOR FILMS UNDER THE STARS These outdoor screenings celebrate the height of romantic-comedy filmmaking set in New York City, inspired by the exhibition Helen Frankenthaler Prints: Seven Types of Ambiguity and the artist’s experience living and working in the city.

THURSDAY, JULY 18

DESPERATELY SEEKING SUSAN (1985) DIRECTOR: SUSAN SEIDELMAN 104 minutes, rated PG-13

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1

MOONSTRUCK (1987) DIRECTOR: NORMAN JEWISON 102 minutes, rated PG

ALL FILMS BEGIN AT SUNDOWN In case of rain, the films will be shown in McCormick Hall

always free and open to the public artmuseum.princeton.edu

Late Thursdays are made possible by the generous support of Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970.

TT_SummerFilmSeries_2019_v2.indd 1

7/1/19 12:19 PM

“We are honored to host this series of Kang’s work,” says Tom Moran, chief curator at Grounds For Sculpture. “His beautiful, organic forms are in harmony with the surrounding landscape, and though he’s using industrial, nearly unwilling material, his sculptures hold grace, poise, and invoke a sense of tranquility.” “Rebirth,” on view through May 2020, comes to Grounds For Sculpture following exhibitions in Washington, D.C. and the Garment District in New York City. “Kang’s themes of adaptive reuse and reimagination align with our evolution from a once-abandoned fairgrounds to the Grounds For Sculpture of today,” says Gary Garrido Schneider, executive director of Grounds For Sculpture. “It also honors the long history of our region, when, nearly 200 years ago, John Roebling began making wire rope in nearby Trenton.” Kang Muxiang visits Grounds For Sculpture on August 13, joined by Garrido Schneider and Moran for a special Art Salon including a tour of “Rebirth.” A presentation by and discussion with the artist, followed by a gourmet three-course meal, w ill take place at Rat’s Restaurant. Members of the public are invited, and tickets are on sale now. For more information, visit groundsforsculpture.org.

Plainsboro Library Gallery Presents “Reflections”

The Plainsboro Library Gallery presents artist books and works on paper by awardwinning artist and Plainsboro resident Maria G. Pisano in “Reflections.” The exhibit runs through July 31, and an art reception will be held on Sunday, July 14, 2 to 4 p.m., with the artist on hand to speak about her work. Pisano’s prints are a combination of collagraph plates and/or monotypes. Her artist books combine a variety of expressive forms, including drawing, painting, print and printmaking media, papermaking, text, and book design, making the book structure a complex and unique form of expression. The book titled Colors of Memor y was created with laser cut woodblock and collograph plates, and relief printed. It is housed in a box made from cherry wood with laser cut title and designs. Pisano says it “presents four environments, Primavera, Estate, Autunno, and Inverno, with accompanying poems, tracing the natural patterns of the seasons. Each season is a marker, beginning with Primavera, a time of discov-

ery and self-awareness and ending with Inverno, a time of fragility, loss and death.” Pisano describes both the medium and her artistic viewpoint: “My art is colored with memories and the places I’ve lived in. The works in this exhibit — works on paper and artist books — reflect a journey on the various influences and themes recurring in the works, showcasing the constant search and gathering of layers of experiences. The resulting landscape is one of continual flux where colors, patterns, wear and tear, all speak of time, memory, and history. As memories accumulate they are selected, organized and stored within. Accessing these visual echoes, finding these markers I allow imagination to manipulate them.” “My principal mode of expression is through printmaking and the artist book, which are published under the Memory Press imprint,” she continues. “As a book artist, I am continuing the tradition of books as keepers of our collective memory, using the format, in its myriad transformative powers, to express and reflect my world. As an artist, I bring forth works that respond to a theme through structure as well as text and image. My book works may seem to challenge the traditional form that we are familiar with today, but if one looks at the long history of the book, these storehouses of knowledge were and are varied in materials and structure in every culture.” Pisano is a book artist, printmaker, curator, and educator. Over the years, she has had solo exhibits alongside numerous group shows here and abroad. She has curated a number of exhibits, the most recent “Book as Witness: The Artist’s Response” at the Center for Book Arts in NYC. Pisano contributes to book arts publications and has given illustrated lectures at the Library of Congress, College Book Arts Association, and the Art Libraries Society of North America. The Plainsboro Librar y is located at 9 Van Doren S t r e e t, P l a i n s b or o. For more infor mation, call (609) 275-2897.

nous Matter” at the Princeton Public Library through September 6. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, has “Ren & Stimpy in A Day at the Museum,” “Writer Janet Purcell Artist,” and “Our Town — Works by Mel Leipzig” July 13 through September 8. www.ellarslie.org. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Michael Rees: Synthetic Cells” through July 14, “Interference Fringe | Tallur L.N.” through January, and other exhibits. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “A Morning at the Updike Farmstead,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. $4 admission WednesdaySunday, 12-4 p.m. Thursday extended hours till 7 p.m. and free admission 4-7 p.m. www.princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Intrepid Alchemist” through July 28, and “The Color of the Moon” through September 8. www.michenerartmuseum.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “New Jersey Baseball: From the Cradle to the Major Leagues, 1855–1915” through October 27. www.morven.org. New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, has “Many Inspired Steps” through November 10. www.statemuseum.nj.gov. Pr inceton Universit y Art Museum has “Helen Frankenthaler Prints: Seven Types of Ambiguity” through October 30 and “Legacy: Selections from the Gillet G. Griffin Collection” July 20 through October 6. www. artmuseum.princeton.edu. West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, has “Cultural Heritage Exhibition” through July 12 and “HomeFront: Expressions of ArtSpace Exhibition” July 15 through September 6. www.westwindsorarts.org. William Trent House Museum, 15 Market Street, Trenton, has “The Immigrant Experience” through November 3.

Area Exhibits Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Breathing In” through August 4. www.lambertvillearts.com. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Our Universe — From Here to Infinity” and “Lumi-

A Princeton tradition!


Wednesday, July 10 1-2 p.m.: Class on The Art of Therapeutic Stretching, at Princeton Fitness & Wellness Center, 1225 State Road. Free. www.princetonhcs.org/ calendar. 3:30-4:30 p.m.: Eden Autism Social Skills Group for children 7-10 with autism or other developmental disabilities. 2 Merwick Road. Register at outreach@edenautism.org. 8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Country Dancers at Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive. Sue Gola with the Princeton Pickup Band. $10. (908) 359-4837. Thursday, July 11 10 a.m.-3 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza. 5 p.m.: Shamarr Allen & The Underdogs perform at Mill Hill Park, 165 E. Front Street, Trenton, as part of the Levitt AMP Music Series. Free. 6-8 p.m.: Essie performs at Princeton Shopping Center, 301 North Harrison Street. Free. 6 p.m.: Mariachi with sounds of Mexico at The Open Grove Gazebo on the Lake, Thompson Park, Monroe Township. Free. www.monroetownshipculturalarts.com/. Friday, July 12 6:30 p.m.: Shabbat Under the Stars at The Jewish Center of Princeton, 435 Nassau Street. Followed by dairy potluck dinner. Visit info@thejewishcenter.org for details. 7:30 p.m.: Rolston String

Junction train station. Bruce Anderson entertains; Yes, We CAN! food drive; free blood pressure screenings, cooking demonstrations. 10:30 a.m.: “Attracting Butterflies,” talk and demonstration by Mercer County Master Gardeners at 431A Federal City Road, Pennington. Free. mcgofmc.org. 10:30 a.m-1 p.m..: Fairy Festival at The Watershed

Institute, 31 Titus Mill Road, Pennington. Celebrate all things fairies, with activities, crafts, costumes. $5 per child 3 and up. www. thewatershed.org. 12-10 p.m.: Old York Cellars’ annual Jersey Fest, 80 Old York Road, Ringoes. Food, music, film, crafts, wine tasting, more. $15 ($10 for non-drinkers, free for under 12). www.OldYor-

kCellars.com. 7 p.m.: Freckle Legend and Casuarina perform at Pettoranello Gardens, Route 206 and Mountain Avenue. Free. 8-11 p.m. Princeton Country Dancers holds an English Country Dance at the Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive. With Ted Rudofker and John, Robert, Paul, and Miranda. $10. (908) 359-4837.

Fri. 07/12/19 to Thurs. 07/18/19

Maiden

Fri-Thurs: 2:30, 4:50, 7:10, 9:30 (PG)

Wild Rose

Fri-Thurs: 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30 (R)

Yesterday

Fri-Thurs: 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55 (PG-13)

The Last Black Man in San Francisco Fri-Thurs: 4:40, 9:30 (R)

Pavarotti

Bluegrass & Blueberries Festival July 20 & 21

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Fri-Thurs: 2:00, 4:35, 7:10, 9:45 (PG-13)

Echo in the Canyon Fri-Thurs: 5:10, 9:40 (PG-13)

Late Night

Fri-Thurs: 2:10, 4:35, 7:00, 9:25 (R)

Starting Friday Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am (PG-13) Echo in the Canyon (PG-13) Continuing The Last Black Man in San Francisco (R) Ends Thursday Late Night (R) Pavarotti (PG-13) Hollywood Summer Nights It Came From Outer Space (1953) Thu, July 11 at 9:15PM Art on Screen Van Gogh & Japan (NR) Sun, July 14 at 12:30PM Encores Casablanca (1942) Tue, July 16 at 7:30PM Hollywood Summer Nights Cabaret (1972) Wed, July 17 at 7:30PM Showtimes change daily Visit for showtimes. PrincetonGardenTheatre.org

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Sunday, August 4 | 3:00 - 5:30 pm Every glass of wine tells a story, one of exploration and expansion. Join us for a tasting across the islands of the Mediterranean to enjoy unique styles and indigenous varietals. Light hors d’oeuvres will be served. $20 via PayPal | $25 at the door (Excludes Tax)

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17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019

Calendar

Quartet at Richardson Auditorium. Free but tickets are required. tickets.princeton.edu. 7-9 p.m.: “Lights for Liberty: A Vigil to End Human Detention Camps” at Hinds Plaza. Speakers, music, art. www.lightsforliberty.org/. Saturday, July 13 10 a.m.-1 p.m. : West Windsor Farmers Market at Vaughn Drive lot, Princeton


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019 • 18

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After Showing Mound Versatility for PU Baseball, Smith Finding a Good Fit with Angels Organization

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hether it’s throwing it’s too different from facing because he wasn’t used to goa 95 mile-per-hour a good college lineup. We’ll ing the distance,” said Russo. “He was more of a power fastball or being flu- see if I’m lucky enough to ent in Spanish to bond with move up if it changes, but guy who went out for a couhis teammates, Ryan Smith right now it’s not too big of ple innings. He’d go out for a couple innings multiple times has found a fit in professional an adjustment.” baseball. Aside from the games, it’s in a week. It took him a while One day after Smith gradu- been a smooth transition and he had to learn to pitch ated from Princeton Universi- for Smith in terms of bond- differently. By his senior year, ty on June 4, he was selected ing with his teammates. He he was pitching into the sixth, by the Los Angeles Angels in earned numerous academic seventh; and one of his goals the 18th round of the Major awards at Garden City before throughout the year was to coming to Princeton, includ- throw a complete game and League Baseball Draft. “It’s been a dream to be ing the Spanish Award after he achieved that in his next to drafted and play professional twice being a gold medalist in last start. He really evolved as baseball so obviously it’s pret- the National Spanish Exam. a pitcher over the four years.” This spring in his senior ty exciting,” said Smith, who He took Spanish courses in grew up in Garden City, N.Y. his first two years at Prince- campaign, Smith led the Ti“I kind of had the idea in my ton and is glad the language gers with 11 starts, 75 2/3 inhead that I would be selected has come back quickly to him nings, 76 strikeouts, five wins and an ERA of 3.45. He had this year, so it was more of for baseball. a career-high 11 strikeouts “We have 15-16 Latin where, not if I would. Obviously I was hoping to get Americans on our team here, against Harvard on March 30. “Overall, I was happy drafted as high as possible. and so I can understand evThe 18th round is a good erything they’re saying,” with the way I pitched,” said Smith. “I think I may have round to get taken in, but Smith said. “Each day, I get a little pitched even better than my obviously I would have loved to go higher. I can have a chip more comfortable speaking numbers showed because it again. I figure in another I would stay in games for a on my shoulder now.” Smith’s professional ca- couple weeks, I’ll be back in while and give up a run in the reer began a little more than the groove again. It’s definite- seventh or eighth inning after a week after he was drafted ly helpful. It helps me speak I threw six scoreless. Overall, as the 5’11, 185-pound left- to the other guys and lets me I definitely had a good seahanded pitcher was assigned relate a little to both sides, son. I think I developed a lot. to the Angels short season the American college guys I was hoping to get selected in the draft last year and it didn’t Class A team, the Orem Owlz and Latin American guys.” Smith developed steadily work out, but I came back and in Utah. over his career at Princeton, had a better year this year. “I’m getting used to having I’m honestly happy it didn’t the mountains,” said Smith. throwing in the mid-80s when work out because I was able “It’s been awesome so far. he entered college and devel- to improve a lot and be a lot We have a beautiful field out oping into a harder thrower. better prepared than I would “When Ryan first came in, have been if I had gotten sehere. We get to travel a little bit.” Smith didn’t allow a run he was a scrawny little left- lected after my junior year.” in his first two appearances handed pitcher that was wiry not getting picked in saidART Princeton pitch- •While for theAPPLIANCE Owlz. He struck out strong,” BEST STORE • BEST CLASSES ART GALtheBEST draft was disappointing, two and allowed two hits in ing coach Mike Russo. it turned out to• be a blessing LERY BEST ARTISANAL CHEESE • BEST AUTO SHOP BEST his first•inning of work against “We always knew he had in disguise for Smith. the Rocky Mountain Vibes a big arm. When he was reBAKERY • BEST BIKE SHOP • BEST CAMERA SHOP BESTthat CA-many “There• aren’t on June 15. He struck out cruited he was probably belefties in the country two and allowed hit and tween TERER • BESToneCOCKTAIL • BEST COFFEE HOUSE • BEST DAY that 83-86 (mph). He really walked one in two innings of worked hard over the last are touching mid-90s,” said SPA BESTOgden DELIon • BEST DENTAL GROUP • BESTSmith. DENTIST • BEST work•against June few years with our strength “I thought maybe I’d get 18. Through July 8, Smith coaches,STORE with playing summerGIFT STORE FLORIST • BEST FURNITURE • BEST • BEST was 0-0 in five appearances ball. He’s a baseball guy. A lot a chance. But honestly it worked out for the best. I with a 2.08 STORE ERA and•nine GROCERY BESTofGYM • BEST SALON • BEST HAPPY our guys want HAIR to explore was super happy I was able strikeouts in 8 2/3 innings. different options over the HOUR • BEST HVAC • BEST HOAGIE • BEST ICE CREAM SHOP • “There’s a relatively wide summer – they’re able to take to graduate with my class and have my last year of baseball at different schools, range LANDSCAPE of not talent, butSERVICE pre- classes BEST • BEST LIQUOR STORE • BEST MEN’S paredness and being pol- they can travel abroad, there at Princeton. It was kind of SHOP BEST OPTOMETRIST • BEST able toOPclose out are a lot•ofBEST different programs nice to be ished,” • said Smith.MUSIC STORE my career not just as an aththat they can do. Ryan was a “There areGROUP a lot of young TOMETRY • BEST ORTHODONTIST • BEST ORTHODONinternational players here guy that always chose base- lete but as a student. Now I’m who were signees out of the ball over all that stuff, not fully ready to dive into the life Dominican Republic or Ven- that school was secondary at of pro baseball.” him, but baseball was After four years of colezuela and countries like that. all to 3x3 Compared to most of those on the same level as academ- lege baseball, Smith is better guys, I’ve probably played ics for him whereas for other equipped to succeed on the more and higher level base- guys it was a little different.” pro level. He made himself a In addition, Smith displayed more polished pitcher each ball. And there’s also college guys who got drafted two his versatility through his year at Princeton, developing years ago. There’s a wide changing roles at Princeton. velocity as well as a stronger range of high level baseball As a freshman, he appeared mindset on the mound after experience. I feel like I fit in four games out of the bull- learning how to pitch smarter. “I don’t think I threw a right in. I’ve only had two pen. He broke out in his sophoutings, but I’ve pitched well omore year when he led the changeup in my first two years so far. I’m definitely talented Tigers with 21 appearances at Princeton,” said Smith. “This year, I threw it probaenough and prepared enough and five saves. to be here.” “He just had a really resil- bly 30-40 percent of the time. Smith is the second Prince- ient arm,” said Russo. “There Those are the most tangible ton player drafted in two years aren’t a lot of guys who throw things. I became a lot more and follows a line of success a bunch of pitches one day mature and was able to slow stories. Ben Gross, a former and want to throw again the the game down. Something Princeton High standout, was next day. As a pitching coach, people talk about is slowing selected last year by the Hous- you like that but at the same the game down. At each level ton Astros before taking a time you have to be careful it’s a little bit quicker, so from graduate school year at Duke about arms and overusing my freshman to my senior this year and being drafted them. Ryan was always a guy year I recognized how I can again by the Minnesota Twins. that has worked hard in the control the game a little more “It’s interesting to see the weight room and was a strong and feel more comfortable on range of places that guys are kid and could throw back-to- the mound. That comes with from,” said Smith. “There back days. He adjusted well experience and I was lucky I aren’t a lot of small schools to the bullpen as a sopho- got to throw a lot of innings and conferences like the Ivy more and then we needed him the past couple years. I do League and Princeton, but I as a starter his junior year.” have a lot of experience so As a starting pitcher for I’m able to carry that over to think I fit right in. The easiest metric is velocity because the first time in college in the professional baseball now.” As a result, Smith was that’s a tangible number that 2018 season, Smith struck you can use to compare guys out 52 in 48 innings, getting thrilled to get a chance at and I fit right in. I haven’t better as he gained experi- the next level. After being drafted, he had a few days been overwhelmed at all by ence in his new role. pro baseball. I don’t think “That was a learning curve at home to enjoy where his

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progress had brought him before reporting to Orem. He is still learning about how the Angels organization operates and the parent club. “I probably know less of them than an East Coast team but I’m learning,” said Smith. “I’m following a lot of the Angels beat writers and fans on social media so I can learn a little more about the team. I think it’s a pretty cool opportunity, and obviously a lot of their minor league affiliates are in places I’ve never been there before so I think that’s a cool opportunity I’ll have. As I work my way up, I’ll be able to see a lot of the country. I think it’ll be a good time.” Actually, Smith had hoped to be drafted out of high school, but when that didn’t happen, he felt confident in his decision to come to Princeton because of the Tigers’ track record with placing players in the pros. “Princeton has had guys in the big leagues throughout the past decade,” said Smith, reflecting on a program that has produced such Major Leaguers as Chris Young, Will Venable, Matt Bowman, David Hale, and Mike Ford. “There’s a guy getting drafted or signing nearly every year out of Princeton. Once I realized that – and when I was in high school I didn’t know a ton about college baseball – but once I was talking to some of these teams and realized you’re going to go and get a RYAN’S HOPE: Ryan Smith delivers a pitch this spring in his segood education and most of nior season with the Princeton University baseball team. The the guys won’t be playing pro- recently graduated Smith was selected last month by the Los fessional baseball but some Angeles Angels in the 18th round of the Major League Baseball APPLIANCE • isBEST ART CLASSES • BEST GALDraft. He currently pitching for the Angels shortART season Class willBEST have the opportunity, itSTORE A team, the Orem Owlz in Utah. wasLERY a good • balance.” BEST ARTISANAL CHEESE(Photo • BEST AUTO SHOP • BEST provided courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications) Now that Smith is settling • BEST BIKE SHOP • BEST CAMERA SHOP • BEST CAintoBAKERY the next level, finding “He’s been a starter, he’s his role will be an important for as long. I throw pretty hard TERER • BEST COCKTAIL • BEST COFFEE HOUSE • BEST DAY adjustment. He did a little of for a lefty, so as a reliever, I been a reliever, he’s even been can throw as hardGROUP as I can for• BEST a set-upDENTIST guy in the Cape Cod everything Princeton and•isBEST SPA •atBEST DELI DENTAL • BEST open to whatever the Angels a couple innings and help the League, and whatever role he’s team that way. I would•think I think he understands FLORIST STORE BESTgiven GIFT STORE • BEST need from him. • BEST FURNITURE I’d be a reliever, and it’s the those roles,” said Russo. “With all theirSTORE first-year• BEST GYM • BEST HAIR SALON • BEST HAPPY GROCERY “He has experience now pitchers, guys who are re- fastest way to move up in so I’m obviously and the CREAM biggest adjustment • BEST • BEST HOAGIE • fine BEST ICE SHOP is• centHOUR draft picks, they’llHVAC only theory, throw a max of two innings with that. I’m not exactly sure. going to just be understandBEST LANDSCAPE SERVICE BEST LIQUOR STORE • BEST I think after•next year’s spring ing what role he’s inMEN’S and just at a time,” said Smith. training, guys will be put more trying to be the best that he SHOP • all BEST MUSICinto STORE • BEST OPTOMETRIST • BEST OP“Right now, the draftees roles. can and not try to do too are relievers. I think I’d be a In Russo’s view, Smith will much, just ORTHODONpitch the way that TOMETRY GROUP ORTHODONTIST • BEST reliever in the future just be- • BEST be a good fit no matter how he knows he can in the role cause I’m a little smaller than the Angels organization dethat he’s given.” the average pitcher, so the —Justin Feil idea is I won’t hold my velocity cides to use him.

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Tiger Open Rowing Earns Slew of Honors

The Princeton University women’s open rowing squad had five rowers named to the CRCA (Collegiate Rowing Coaches Association) AllAmerica teams and earned six scholar-athlete honors. Recently graduated stars Claire Collins and Emily Kallfelz collected first team All-America honors as they helped the varsity eight take Princeton’s fourth straight Ivy League title. Collins picked up her third All-America accolade and was nominated for NCAA’s Woman of the Year award earlier this week. Rising senior Hadley Irwin was honored on the second team while rising junior Hannah Scott and recently graduated Emily Erdos were honorable mention. All of these rowers were part of the first varsity eight that took home the Ivy title by 3.8 seconds. Erdos, Irwin were among the six Tigers to be named CRCA Scholar Athletes with recently graduated Lauren Barnard, recent grad Shuying Sarah Cheng, rising senior Molly Milligan and recent grad Ellie Sawyer. The open rowing squad took seventh at the NCAA Championships, earning the program’s 21st top-ten finish. The Class of 2019 finishes its time at Princeton with four NCAA Top-10 marks and four Ivy League Championships.

Princeton Women’s Hoops Adds 2 Assistant Coaches

The Princeton University women’s basketball team has

the University of Florida. At Florida, she was all-conference first team as a senior helping the Gators to the NCAA Tournament. She later spent time with the Washington Mystics in 2007 and the Atlanta Dream in 2008. Her professional career overseas saw her thrive as one of the best rebounders and scorers in Turkey’s top international league from 2006-09. She also played in the Euro Cup in 2008 before playing in Russia (2009-10), Czech Republic (2011), Portugal (2012), Germany (2012), and Ecuador (2013).

Tiger Men’s Hoops Returning to Barclays

For the third consecutive year, the Princeton University men’s basketball team will compete in an event hosted by the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame, this time at the

Barclays Center in Brooklyn. Princeton will face Iona as part of the Air Force Reserve Basketball Hall of Fame Invitational triple-header on Tuesday, December 17, along with Providence against Florida, and Temple versus Miami (Fla.). Game times and TV arrangements have yet to be announced. Tickets for the Basketball Hall of Fame Invitational will go on sale to the general public on July 12 on Ticketmaster. com. Tickets will also be available at the American Express Box Office at Barclays Center starting July 13. It will be Princeton’s second trip to the home of the NBA’s Brooklyn Nets. The Tigers faced Fordham at the Barclays Center on Dec. 15, 2012, less than three months after the venue opened. Princeton competed in the HoopHall Miami

Invitational two seasons ago against Miami (Fla.) at the American Airlines Arena in Miami, and last season, the Tigers visited Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City for the first time to face Iona as part of the HoopHall Boardwalk Classic. Princeton is 7-0 all-time against Iona with last year’s 85-81 win in Atlantic City in the only meeting between the teams since 2007. “Playing at Barclays Center is just a very special opportunity,” said Princeton head coach Mitch Henderson, who guided the Tigers to a 16-12 record last winter. “There’s a feel in the arena that is unique, and we are appreciative to be able to provide our student-athletes with the opportunity to be a part of the Basketball Hall of Fame Invitational and a night at Barclays Center.”

PU Men’s Volleyball Star in World University Games

Princeton University men’s volleyball star Parker Dixon is competing for the U.S. squad in the World University Games in Napoli, Italy from July 3-14. The United States has placed 17th in the volleyball competition in each of the past two University Games in 2017 and 2015. Rising senior Dixon enjoyed a big year last season as he was named an AVCA Honorable Mention All-American, selected to the EIVA All-Tournament Team, and first-team all-conference. The 6’6 native of Dallas, Texas, was among the conference’s leaders in key statistical categories, placing fourth in kills (368), points (418), sixth in kills per set (3.20), points per set (3.6) and ninth in hitting percentage (.295).

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609.896.3434 | 800.932.4476 | BORD ENPERLMAN .COM 21 CLUB: Princeton University field hockey player Julianna Tornetta gets ready to fire the ball upfield in a game last fall. Rising junior star Tornetta, along with rising junior teammate Mary Kate Neff and incoming Tiger freshmen Sam Davidson and Isla Okkinga, has been named to the U.S. Field Hockey 2019 U-21 Selection Camp. The camp will take place in December. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019

PU Sports Roundup

added assistant coaches Lauren Battista and Dalila Eshe to its staff, new Tiger head coach Carla Berube said last week. Battista comes from Berube’s staff at Tufts while Eshe spent the last three seasons at LaSalle University. Prior to her time at Tufts, Battista was a graduate assistant at Boston College while earning her master’s degree in leadership and administration. Before coming to BC, Battista was at the NCAA office in a postgraduate internship program, helping the women’s basketball staff with the NCAA Tournament and Final Four. Battista graduated from Bentley in 2014. Her senior year was memorable as she led the team to the Division II national title with an undefeated 35-0 season. She was honored as the WBCA Division-II National Player of the Year, the Capital One Academic All-American of the Year, CWSA/Honda Division II Athlete of the Year, and an NCAA Today’s Top 10 Award honoree. Battista graduated summa cum laude with a degree in marketing and minor in finance. Eshe, for her part, was an assistant coach at East Carolina and the Director of Operations at Loyola before joining LaSalle. During her time at East Carolina, Eshe helped I’Tiana Taylor earn the 2014-15 American Athletic Conference Newcomer of the Year along with two all-conference selections. The coach was also responsible in landing the school’s first top-50 recruiting class in 2016. Eshe was picked in the second round of the 2006 WNBA Draft by the Seattle Storm following her career at


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019 • 22

Helping Michigan Women’s Lax Make History, PHS Alumna Shane Enjoys Special Final Season Even though the University of Michigan women’s lacrosse team posted a pedestrian 7-10 record in 2018, Mira Shane sensed the Wolverines were primed to step up this spring. “We had an awesome fall ball season,” said former Princeton High star goalie Shane. “I think from there, we were ‘let’s go, this can really be our year.’” After spending her first three years as a part-time starter, Shane was ready to produce an awesome final campaign. “I was going to finish this out the only way I know how, and that is to give 110% of myself, just keep working hard and keep my head down and grind,” said Shane, who made a total of 21 starts in her first three seasons. “I think everybody on my team took that mentality to the best of their ability.” Employing that mentality, Shane and her teammates got off to a 13-0 start, turning heads in the lacrosse world. “This year was just one for the books, I am just so thankful to the coaches that we had and to my teammates,” said the 5’5 Shane. “We just rallied around each other and it wasn’t about looking back to the past and what had happened. It was about moving forward with a championship-minded team that knew how to win. It just started working and we were undefeated and it got to 7-0, 8-0, all of us look

back, myself included, wow, we are 10-0.” The Wolverines rose to No. 8 in the national rankings before suffering their first loss of then campaign when they fell 14-3 to second-ranked and eventual national champion Maryland on April 6. “At once it was surprising and overwhelming but for me, it was just thrilling and it motivated me even more to want to step up and play to the ability that the rest of these top 10 teams are playing at,” said Shane, looking back on the team’s rise up the rankings. “I have always loved a big stage. Our coach, Hannah Nielsen, has won four national championships and was a two-time Teewaraton winner so that also motivated me. She taught us how to win and to step up for that stage.” When Michigan was named as the eighth seed for the NCAA tournament, it didn’t realize where that put it on the national stage. “We had a little watch party and all of us were shocked to even know that we had gotten a home game,” said Shane with a chuckle, noting that the program had never made the national tourney before this spring. “We knew that we got the No. 8 seed but we are so new to this that we didn’t know that what that meant. Our coach said ‘I thought you guys knew that meant we are hosting’ and then we just rejoiced again because it was like living a dream.”

Taking advantage of playing at home, Michigan defeated Jacksonville 13-9 in an opening round contest as Shane made 14 saves. The Wolverines had one more game in Ann Arbor but things didn’t turn out so well as they fell 9-5 to Denver in the second round with Shane making 11 saves in her finale as Michigan finished with a 16-4 record. “To have the privilege to be able to play on my home field was something really special too in my senior year,” said Shane. “It was special for me to end my career at home when we had been undefeated that whole season.” Shane enjoyed a special senior season, making 19 starts with a 13-4 record, a goals against average of 9.99, and 139 saves. She was named as an Inside Lacrosse honorable mention All-American, an IWLCA (Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association) All-Region second-team selection, and a Tewaaraton Award Nominee. “It speaks magnitudes to the other goalies who are competing with me each and every day and my teammates who have pushed me,” said Shane, who set Michigan program records in career wins (24), career saves (360) and career save percentage (.451). “Those were little goals that I wanted to meet that were in there back of my mind. But the real big goals were to play to the best of my

HISTORIC FINISH: Mira Shane guards the net for the University of Michigan women’s lacrosse this spring in her senior campaign. Former Princeton High star Shane helped Michigan enjoy the best season in program history as it rose to No. 8 in the national rankings and made the NCAA tournament for the first time. The Wolverines advanced to the second round of the national tourney and ended with a 16-4 record. Shane, for her part, set Michigan program career records in wins (24), career saves (360) and career save percentage (.451). This spring, Shane made 19 starts with a goals against average of 9.99 and 139 saves. She was named as an Inside Lacrosse honorable mention All-American and a Tewaaraton Award Nominee. (Photo provided courtesy of Michigan Photography) ability that I could, whether that was in practice or a game or whether that was on the sideline. I was trying to be the best person I could be while I was representing Michigan” Being a member of the a cappella group, 58 Greene, and and having been a U-M Athletic Academic Achieve-

ment award recipient, Shane “My dad never even played represented Michigan well in lacrosse and he is that guy a number of capacities. who is passing a lacrosse ball “I am so proud to have using a baseball mitt. It was been a part of a program those little moments that have like Michigan lacrosse and made me the lacrosse player to leave a legacy and a foun- that I am. I just tried to keep in the forefront of my brain and dation,” said Shane. “It was just the learning it propelled me to play at the things that I got a person, next level this year for sure.” In so doing, Shane has not only an athlete, but beTo: ___________________________ ing able to juggle a cappella blazed a trail as former PHS te am mate Mar iana with lacrosse and academics From: _________________________ Date & Time: __________________ at a school like Michigan. I Lopez-Ona will be joining Here is a proof of your ad, scheduled run ___________________. tried to leave to everything I the Michigan program this fall to be followed next year had on the field with every Please check it thoroughly and pay special attentionbytoathe following: second Tiger standout, game that we played. I take Shaylah Marciano. (Your check mark will tell pride us it’s okay) in that and I also thank the people around me be“I am super excited to see I would not have what they � have in store; the � Phone number �cause Fax number � able Address Expiration Date to do it without them.” program is really going to In reflecting on what she be a great match for them,” has been able to do, Shane said Shane. “Those are two owes a big thank you to her really strong players. I have parents, Max Shane and seen them grow up and think they are going to have Wendy Wright. “My parents have been so a fantastic career.” No matter how well Lopezinvested in my career from my first lacrosse game,” said Ona and Marciano play, they Shane, who will be starting a will have a tough time matchcareer with Anheuser-Busch ing what Shane accomplished later this month, working for in her Michigan career. its people operations team. —Bill Alden Fast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In

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Seven of the offensive linemen on the West squad in the 2019 Sunshine Football Classic had an average weight of 266 pounds. The eighth lineman, re-

cently graduated Princeton High star Connor Coffee, was listed at 6’1, 180 pounds. Play ing in t he all-star game last Wednesday night at Notre Dame High, the

wiry Coffee battled hard at left tackle, more than holding his own against the heavyweights he encountered in the trenches. “Not many can play tackle at 180, I was going against big boys in practice,” said a smiling Coffee. “The Ewing end was working me all week; I got prepared for the game.” Coffee has enjoyed the challenge of thwarting larger foes over the years. “I have played undersized my whole football career,” said Coffee. “I have to use my quickness, use my hands, and focus more on technique than just raw skill.” Unfortunately for Coffee, his career ended on a frustrating note as the West fell 14-7 to the East in the game that saw a delay starting with 6:29 left in the second quarter due to lightning in the area and was then halted for good midway through the third quarter as more stormy weather approached. “We didn’t get to finish the game; we put in a lot of hard work so it hurts,” said Coffee.

For Coffee, working hard in practice against former opponents proved to be worthwhile. “It was a lot of good work,” said Coffee. “It was full speed, pedal to the medal all week. It was nice playing with guys that we had played against for years and ball out.” Getting to play with PHS teammates Jaylen Johnson, Evan Angelucci, and Steve Hennessy on the West squad was a bonus for Coffee. “It was great getting to do it one more time,” said Coffee. “I played all four years with those guys so to put the helmet on one note time with them was a great feeling.” While Coffee’s football finale was abbreviated, he is leaving with a bunch of fond memories from the Sunshine game. “It was a great experience, even just playing a half,” said Coffee, who is headed to the University of Miami, where he will not be playing football. “It was a great time and obviously it is for a good cause. I was glad to do that for the Sunshine Foundation. I enjoyed it.” —Bill Alden

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Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc STRONG COFFEE: Recently graduated Princeton High standout Connor Coffee, center, makes a block playing for the West squad in the 2019 Sunshine Football Classic at Notre Dame High last Wednesday evening. Coffee was joined on the West team by PHS teammates Jaylen Johnson, Evan Angelucci, and Steve Hennessy. The quartet battled hard as the West fell 14-7 to the East in game halted in the third quarter due to lightning strikes in the area. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019 • 24

Emerging as Catalyst for Post 218 Baseball, Paria-Veron Comes Up Big in Split at Ewing Jaedyn Paria-Veron has become a catalyst this summer for the Princeton Post 218 American Legion baseball team. Batting in the leadoff spot for Post 218 as it played a doubleheader at Ewing Post 314 last Sunday, former Princeton High standout Paria-Veron was in center of the action all day long as the teams played for nearly five hours. In the opener, center fielder Paria-Veron had two hits and five RBIs as Post 218 built an 11-2 lead and hung on for a 14-12 win. As afternoon turned into evening for the nightcap at Moody Park, Paria-Veron reached base four times on an error, two walks, and a single to help Princeton rally from an early 7-2 deficit to narrow the gap to one run before falling 8-6 as it dropped to 3-13. Reflecting on his big day, Paria-Veron maintained a consistent approach through the baseball marathon. “I tried to shorten up my swing and stay with the same approach to hit line drives, and get base hits,” said Paria-Veron. Paria-Veron expected a battle with Post 314 as both squads have been struggling and were hungry for victories. “It was a tough game, they were fighting, they wanted to win, you could see that,” said Paria-Veron. “They don’t have a lot of wins, just like us, so these are big games for them. I am glad we got one win out of this.”

While Post 218 was happy to get back in the win column, Paria-Veron saw the team’s effort in the second game as even more encouraging. “I am proud of the team, we could have just rolled over and died after that first inning,” said Paria-Veron. “We stayed in it, we kept on fighting. We kept on having really good at-bats.” Paria-Veron is confident that Post 218 will keep on fighting down the stretch and produce a good finish. “There is plenty of time, I see a lot of potential in this team,” said Paria-Veron. “There are a lot of winnable games coming up for us.” Post 218 manager Tommy Parker credits Paria-Veron with getting the most out of his potential. “I think Jaedyn may be leading t he leading t he league in hitting; he has been a spark plug all season long,” said Parker. “I am really impressed with him. He has handled it well. When he first came out this summer, he had to get some of the rust off and we had him in the nine hole, using the concept of the top and bottom lead off. He has also been tremendous defensively.” Parker was impressed with the way his squad played hard to the end on Sunday. “We needed to hang in there,” said Parker. “I think we actually played better in the second game than we did in the first. Consider-

and match to get to nine and be back as this is his final liam Paterson University but 10 on the field,” said Parker. year of Legion eligibility, doesn’t play baseball there. “They have hung in there. he is savoring his time with “It is a little bittersweet I am loving it and I will be Post 218. considering our record but “As of now, this is my last I wouldn’t have it any other back again. I have been very ing we were only playing impressed with this group.” season of baseball,” said way.” with nine or 10 guys, they Since Paria-Veron won’t Paria-Veron, who attends Wil—Bill Alden could have very easily folded and collapsed and said I am tired.” Former Hun School standout Thomas Ramsay played a big role in helping Post 218 keep up its energy. “Thomas Ramsay stepped up today to go from behind the plate to the mound,” said Parker. “He has been stepping up his leadership and his impact on the game.” In Parker’s view, Post 218 can make an impact in the last two weeks of the season. “I just want to see them come out and compete like they did today and give a solid effort all of the time while cutting down on the m e n t a l m i s t a ke s ,” s a i d Parker, whose team plays at Trenton Post 93/182 on July 10, at South Brunswick Post 401 on July 11, hosts North Hamilton on the morning of July 14 and Hightstown Post 148 later that day in a rescheduled game, and then plays at Hopewell Post 339 on July 15. “There are some times you lose focus but I tell the guys they have to stay on it. We might be able to make a move; we are still in it with all of the rainouts. I almost wish we had more games because we seem to catch fire at the end of the year.” IN SYNCH: Princeton Post 218 American Legion baseball player Jaedyn Paria-Veron takes a swing T h e u pb e at Parke r i s in recent action. Last Sunday, former Princeton High standout Paria-Veron starred as Post 218 split fired up by the character a doubleheader at Ewing Post 314. Princeton won the opener 14-12 before dropping the nightcap displayed by his players as 8-6. Paria-Veron had five RBIS in game one and was on base four times in the second game. Post they have dealt with adver- 218, which moved to 3-13, plays at Trenton Post 93/182 on July 10, at South Brunswick Post 401 on sity this summer. July 11, hosts North Hamilton on the morning of July 14 and Hightstown Post 148 later that day in a (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) “We have always had this rescheduled game, and then plays at Hopewell Post 339 on July 15. core of ballplayers; we mix

After 22 seasons in the NFL, including two championships with the New York Giants, you can believe that I’ve had my fair share of injuries. What’s important to me now is staying healthy, playing with my son, and staying active without pain. Through my years I’ve seen a lot of orthopedic and pain management doctors and I’ll allow only the best doctors on my team. That’s why now, I trust the doctors at Princeton Spine and Joint Center to keep me out of pain and on my game without resorting to surgery or dangerous medications. The doctors at Princeton Spine and Joint Center are incredible. They take their time and they listen to you whether you play on a team or sit in an office. They work with you to craft a treatment plan to achieve your goals safely and quickly. Look, I live close to NYC and Philadelphia, and I could go anywhere in the world for my orthopedic care. After seeing scores of doctors, it just doesn’t get any better than the team at Princeton Spine and Joint Center. If you have pain and you want to stay active, be pain-free and receive cutting edge care, call them now and get on the road back to the active life you want to lead. — SEAN LANDETA

At Princeton Spine and Joint Center, we specialize in the latest medical treatments to get people of all ages and abilities better and back to their best performing selves without pain and without surgery. Our Regenerative Medicine Division offers the latest in restorative tissue treatments, including PRP. Our doctors are co-editing along with the chairperson of Mount Sinai’s PM&R department the new textbook, “Regenerative Medicine for Spine and Joint Pain,” and the second edition of “Essential Sports Medicine.”

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There was excitement in the air at the Community Park cour ts last Monday evening as Loyaltees faced NJ Spiritwear in the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. The clash was a rematch of last year’s best-of-three title series won by Loyaltees in a decisive game three and the renewal of the rivalry drew a throng of fans to the park. Loyaltees star guard Vince Anfield and his teammates, for their part, were deter-

mined to come out strong in the showdown against an undefeated Spiritwear squad bent on revenge. “We know what they are capable of; we had them in the championship last year and they took the first game on us,” said Anfield. “The thing is with a lot of the good teams, you have got to play every game. If you come out here and lollygag, you can get hosed. That is how Majeski took us (a 69-66 loss on June 28).” There was no lollygagging

LEADING THE FIELD: Vince Anfield of Loyaltees goes up for a shot against NJ Spiritwear in last year’s championship series in the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. Anfield helped Loyaltees take the title. Last Monday, Anfield came up big as Loyaltees defeated previously undefeated NJ Spiritwear 70-52 in a regular season title rematch. Star guard Anfield tallied 16 points to help Loyaltees pull away to the victory and improve to 5-1. In other action on Monday night, Hometown Moving and Storage defeated Team NRGY 65-47 and Apex Sport topped Majeski Foundation 56-42. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

by Loyaltees on Monday as it reeled off a 10-2 run to start the game and built a 35-26 lead by halftime. Anfield helped spark the squad, hitting two key three-pointers as he tallied eight points at intermission. “The way the team is, some games I am going to have single digits and some games I am going to be taking a lot of shots and dribbling the ball,” said the 5’10, 175-pound Anfield, a former Rancocas Valley High star who scored more than 1,000 points in a college career that saw him play at Rowan College, Montclair State, and Rutgers-Camden. “Today was my day.” Anfield kept hitting shots in the second half, ending up with 16 points as Loyaltees pulled away to a 70-52 win, improving to 5-1. While Anfield was happy to assume more of the scoring load on Monday, he sees the team’s balance as a key to its success. In the win over Spiritwear, Jordan Glover tallied 17 points while Nick Davidson added 14. “I love this roster that we have got,” said Anfield. “Davidson is always a luxury, you get a big man who can dribble, kick it up the court, and shoot. There is not a thing he can’t do out there. Glover is knocking down threes and playing defense.” Anfield also loves the intensity that Loyaltees displays at the defensive end of the court. “Everyone on the roster really wants to play defense,” said Anfield. “You don’t have to get on anybody about effort. That is always a great thing.” A key impetus to that ef-

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fort is the inspiration the players draw from team manager and guard Davon Black, a former Princeton High standout. “Davon is our leader, he comes and brings it every week,” said Anfield of Black, who contributed seven points against Spiritwear. “If he has five points and a win, he is happy and he is over here smiling. He doesn’t have to score but some days it is his day. He had double digits in two of the games this year. We feed off of his energy. He is talking to us the whole game and he loves it out here. He is the reason me and Nick came back out here, he asked us to play again. He knows I love playing on this team. This league is awesome.” In Anfield’s view, Loy-

altees has what it takes to win a second straight league crown. “If we don’t win the championship, then we are not reaching our expectations,” asserted Anfield. “We did it last year, and we come in with a better roster this summer, so I feel like we should do it again. The guys are focused and I think we can do it.” —Bill Alden

tle League (PLL) squad has advanced to the finals of the Section 3/4 Intermediate 50/70 tournament being held at Bodman Park in Red Bank. Representing District 12, Princeton started the competition by defeating Vineland 13-5 on July 3. On Friday, the PLL team defeated Sayrewood South 12-2. After suffering a 9-0 defeat to host Middletown on Sunday afternoon, Princeton bounced back that evening to defeat Jackson 14-4 and clinch a spot in the finals of the double-elimination competition. Princeton is facing undefeated Middletown in the final, with the first game slated for July 9 and the PLL PLL Intermediates squad needing a win to force Make Section Final an if-necessary final, which Displaying some offensive would be played on Wednesfirepower, the Princeton Lit- day evening.

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019

Sparked by Offensive Outburst From Anfield, Loyaltees Wins Title Rematch in Summer Hoops

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019 • 26

Obituaries

Herman Louis Brav “July 4, 1949 was the greatest day of my life,” the quiet wonderful man would often proclaim during his last years. That was the Monday 70 years ago that Herman Brav met Adele, the love of his life, at the old New Yorker Hotel on Eighth Avenue in Manhattan. She was a tall and beautiful young woman who had lost much of her family in the Holocaust but herself survived in a Siberian forced labor camp, arriving in America three years earlier and working at nearby Macy’s Herald Square. He too had come from Europe in 1946, returning with the Fighting 69th Infantry after 16 months of heavy combat from Normandy through France and Germany and the Elbe River meeting with the Russians that signified the end of the war in Europe, earning a Bronze Star and French Legion of Honor for the Liberation of France. Having lost his father at 4 years old and his identical twin brother Seymour to a car accident and sister Nanette to illness by the time he turned 13, Herman was forced to grow up early in Depression Era Brooklyn. These tragedies, and the wartime deaths of his Army brothers, would always haunt but never stop him from building a life out of struggle. After marrying Adele in 1950, they bought a house, raised two children on Long Island, and embraced the relative normalcy and tranquility of their postwar years. Herman became well known for his almost 60 years as a hollow metal door salesperson in the New York area

large construction trade, employed full-time until he was 85 years old. He was an active member of Temple Hillel in North Woodmere, New York, and a casual weekend biker on his old Schwinn three-speed. Forced in 2011 by his wife’s illness to move closer to his longtime Princeton resident son Peter, he was beloved at Stein Assisted Living in Somerset, New Jersey, where he spent his final years, visited often by his son and his daughter Miriam. He no longer had his head for numbers or any memory of what had been said or eaten five minutes earlier. Yet he never lost his love of family and always expressed appreciation for the daily efforts of the nurses and aides, something marveled at for its genuine affection. His smile would always widen when one would mention his wife of 65 years or ask about his military service. “I don’t play Bingo, son,” he would say when his son would arrive every Wednesday evening to call the games at his facility. “Just come sit with me,” his son would reply always. He would come along, he would play and win more than his share, place the few quarters in his son’s hand, and all was good. After years of worries and an instinct to protect that never faded even as his body wound down, in his last years he found for the first time a relaxed peace and an awesome appreciation for the simplest of things, be they kind words, a half hour in the courtyard sun, one scoop of butter pecan on a sugar cone, or a visit by one of his son’s dogs looking for a lap to sit on. Over his 96 years, he had said goodbye to so many loved ones, including Adele who passed four years ago. Now his two children, beloved daughter-in-law Janet, five grandchildren Zarah, Julia, Nathaniel, Gregory, and Seth, and three great-grandchildren Orianna, Josephine, and Luna Adele, say goodbye to him with the greatest of love and admiration for this humble man who always thought of everyone but himself. His family requests that any donations in his honor be made to UJA-Federation of New York and/or the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

The Rev. Dr. A. Orley Swartzentruber Orley Swartzentruber passed away peacefully on June 28, surrounded by his family. He was 93. Born in Argentina, he was the son of the Rev. Amos and Mrs. Edna Swartzentruber, Mennonite Missionaries from Canada. After completing pr imar y and secondary school, he came to the United States for College and Biblical Seminary in Goshen, Indiana. After graduation, he was sent to Brussels, Belgium, then to Par is, France, where he spent the post-war decade of the 1950s in work for the Mennonite Board of Missions and Charities, founding a congregation in the Parisian suburb of Châtenay-Malabry. Upon returning to America, Orley settled in Princeton, NJ, where he studied the Old Testament at Princeton Theological Seminary (1960-62 MA), then, under Dr. R.B.Y. Scott, earned a PhD in Religion from Princeton University (1970). In 1963, while serving as chaplain of Saint Agnes School in upstate New York, he was ordained to the priesthood of the Episcopal Church by the Rt. Rev. A. W. Brown, Bishop of Albany. Orley returned to and remained in Princeton, where he served in the ministry of the Episcopal Church, first as Vicar of All Saints’ Chapel of Trinity Parish, then as its first Rector, as it became the newly self-supporting All Saints’ Church. He enjoyed serving as Chairman of the Committee on Rules of Order and Dispatch of Business in the NJ Diocesan Convention and was twice elected Deputy to the General Convention.

Orley retired to Sarasota, FL, in 1994, where he was grateful to find a vibrant appreciation of the arts and the Church of the Redeemer. He joyfully made his home there until 2016, when he moved to The Evergreens in Moorestown, NJ, nearer to his children. Orley is survived by Jane, his wife of 68 years, three daughters and sons-in-law, Anne and Jay Lewis, Emily and Peter Urquhart, Francine and Jonathan Storck, on e s on a n d d au g hte r in-law, Eric and Johanna Swartzentruber, and seven grandchildren. A Requiem Eucharist will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, August 3 at All Saints’ Church, 16 All Saints’ Road in Princeton, followed by interment in Trinity-All Saints’ Cemetery.

Diana Christine Fredericks (Didi) Waltman Diana Christine Fredericks (Didi) Waltman, 91, passed away on Sunday, June 30 with all four of her children gathered closely around her at the Stonebridge Senior Living Community in Skillman, N.J. She fiercely loved life. She lived life to the very fullest. Didi was born in Buffalo, N.Y., to James Torrey Fredericks and Alice Sibyl Lachmann Fredericks. As was her habit, Didi arrived early. Her parents were visiting Buffalo to attend the theater and rushed to the hospital midperformance. The maternity ward at Buffalo Hospital was still under constr uction. With no available newborn incubator, Didi spent her first days in an instrument sterilizer. I n f lu e n ce d by h er fa ther’s love for hiking, canoeing, and camping, Didi spent childhood summers bushwhacking and portaging through the Canadian w ilds w it h her dad and brother Jim. She was also influenced by her European mother’s love for the arts, starting piano training at age 3 and maintaining a lifelong passion for classical music. Her father insisted she and her brother attend the “farm” school, just outside of Bradford, PA, and they were called “the Agricola” by other students upon

Vote now for Your favorites! What’s your favorite area restaurant? Do you have a landscaper that you love? Town Topics Newspaper is happy to announce that its 2019 Readers’ Choice Awards competition is now open for voting for the Best: Alfresco Dining ________________________ Day Spa _______________________________ Insurance Agency ______________________ Pizza __________________________________ Appliance Store ________________________ Deli ___________________________________ Jewelry Store __________________________ Plastic Surgeon/Plastic Surgery Group Art Class ______________________________ Dentist/Dental Group Kids Activity ___________________________ (choose one) ___________________________

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Cleaners ______________________________ Holistic Doctor ________________________ Pet Supply ____________________________ Veterinarian/Veterinary Group (choose one) ___________________________ Coffee House __________________________ Hospital _______________________________ Pharmacy _____________________________ Wait Staff _____________________________ Consignment Store _____________________ HVAC _________________________________ Photographer __________________________ Women’s Boutique _____________________ CSA __________________________________ Ice Cream ____________________________ Physical Therapist _____________________ Yoga Studio ___________________________ Day Care/Preschool ___________________ Interior Designer _______________________ Picture Framer_________________________

DeaDline for entries is august 8 The winners will be announced in the August 21 & 28 issues of Town Topics Newspaper. Don’t miss your chance to vote for your favorite businesses or services! The Readers’ Choice Awards is open for online voting now at towntopics.com, or mail to 4438 Route 27, P.O. Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528.

transferring to Bradford High School. Didi excelled in academics and attended Smith College, majoring in Math and Art History, and graduating in 1949. D id i s aw t he posit ive beauty in every person and situation. She was a generous friend and a dedicated member of every community in which she participated. She was a doer, with abundant energy, and she applauded this trait in others. Didi was proud to work for the Princeton University Music Department for 14 years, and in that time attended every orchestral concert and student rehearsal. Upon retirement, Didi became a volunteer docent and then co-chair of the docent committee at the Princeton University Art Museum. She also became an avid post-retirement student, taking two to three university classes each year, focusing on Art and History. She traveled to the Yucatan Peninsula with Princeton’s Gillett Griffin to study the Mayan Ruins of Chichen Itza. Didi loved to travel and organized numerous adventures through Europe, Canada, and the American West. Preferring to travel off the beaten path, she steered her husband, children, and fr iends onto French canal barges, Greek fishing boats, and Norwegian mail boats. She hiked Canadian glaciers, Norwegian fjords, and the Samaria Gorge on the island of Crete. In their final years, Didi and her husband Bob moved to Stonebridge, proud members of the “pioneer” cohort of first residents. Didi was deeply grateful for all the dear friends and activities at Stonebridge. She quickly became involved with the Executive Committee, Program Com mit tee, Stonebr idge Singers, and numerous cultural and political groups. A passionate political progressive and strong women’s advocate, Didi engaged in political discourse with zeal. Family was the center of Didi’s world, and Didi was the heart and soul of her family. She was the voice on the phone that could right the world. She believed the world was inherently good. She made the world a better place. Didi is predeceased by her husband, John Robert (Bob) Waltman. She is survived by her daughters Susan Waltman, Sally (Bay) Waltman, and Martha O’Connor (and spouse Michael ), and by her son James Robert (Jim) Waltman (and spouse Alicia) as well as by her eight adoring grandchildren Jack, Diana (Annie) and Matthew Simpson, Kelly, Duncan and John Patrick O’Connor, and Emma and James Torrey (Jimmy) Waltman. Interment w ill be held pr ivately. A r rangements are under the direction of the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home. A celebration of life ceremony will be held at Stonebridge at a later date. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Emily’s List.

Claudia Guenther My Mom, Claudia Guenther, passed away in her sleep the morning of July 1, 2019 while on vacation in Vermont. If there is a better way to go than peacefully in a place you love, Vermont, next to the man

that you love, her husband Jim, I can’t come up with it. Claudia was born in New York City on April 17, 1948. Her family ( mother Maria, brother Eric, and sister Sharon) moved around during her early childhood years before settling in East Millstone, New Jersey, when her college professor father, Smith Palmer Bovie, was granted tenure at Rutgers University. She studied music in Boston as a freshman in college before returning to New Jersey to complete her education at Rider College (now University) with a degree in teaching. Soon after she married her high school sweetheart George Sayler. She taught ninth grade until 1977 when she has her first daughter, Marie, I followed in 1979. When Marie and I were in middle school she rejoined the work force as a personal aide for disabled adults, first working with a wheelchairbound young woman named Jenny as she completed high school and college and then with Archie, a young (ish) man with cerebral palsy. In the early ’90s Claudia met and married Jim Guenther, who turned out to be her “forever lover.” They shared many interests and were (are) longtime members of the Lawrenceville Swimming Association, The Pennington Players, and t he Hopewell Pres byterian Church. Claudia was a member of Hopewell Valley Chorus for decades and never missed an opportunity to sing “Happy Birthday.” She volunteered for Meals-on-Wheels and organized and performed holiday sing-alongs at various senior centers in central New Jersey. Jim and Claudia were true partners. They traveled regularly, attended cultural festivals and free concerts, embracing every style and genre of music. In 2013 Claudia suffered a massive brain aneurysm. The recover y process stretched well over a year and a half and encompassed stays in the ICU at Capital Health Medical Center in Hopewell, the Brain Trauma Unit at Lawrence Rehabilitation Center, and six months at Merwick Rehabilitation in Plainsboro. Jim visited her every day after work during this time. Jim provided full time caregiving for Claudia when she came home in August 2014. She continued to recover with his help and support, occasionally forgoing use of a wheelchair. Claudia loved Vermont, a place she spent every summer during her childhood with her family. She and Jim were on vacation there when he called me to say she had died overnight, in her sleep. Funeral services will be held a later date. In lieu of flowers, please consider the spouse or the loved one who is a full-time caregiver and offer him or her a hand or a break of any duration. Living at home the last five years of her life would not have been possible without Jim’s unending support and care. To send a condolence to the family or for directions, please visit www.poulsonvanhise.com. Arrangements are under the direction of Poulson & Van Hise Funeral Directors, Lawrenceville.


“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS VISA

MasterCard

The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. LOOKING TO RENT YOUR HOME THIS SUMMER? Place an ad with TOWN TOPICS! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

PRINCETON-Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time for studio apartment on Princeton estate. Big windows with views over magnificent gardens, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, full bath with tub & shower. Separate entrance, parking. Possible use as an office or art studio. (609) 924-5245. tf

OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com

well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

watching, hiking beaches, granite cliffs, visiting lighthouses, golfing, fishing, biking, music. Contact Ryan: (215) 369-4400.

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: tf

GREEN–PLANET PAINTING: Commercial, Residential & Custom Paint, Interior & Exterior, Drywall Repairs, Light Carpentry, Deck Staining, Green Paint options, Paper Removal, Power Washing, 15 Years of Experience. FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES. CALL: (609) 356-4378; perez@green-planetpainting.com

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469.

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription!

Irene Lee, Classified Manager Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; 08-29-19

circulation@towntopics.com tf

• Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash,ESTATE creditLIQUIDATION card, or check. SERVICE: RENT OFF COAST OF MAINE CARS 04-03-20 • 25 words or less: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 wordsWE inBUY length. Belle Mead Garage $850.00 per week I will clean out attics, basements, HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years garages & houses. Single items available. (908) 359-8131 • 3 weeks:of $40.00 • 4 weeks: • 6cottage weeks: $72.00 6 month and annual discount rates TOWN•TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS 3 bed/2 bath on FDR’s experience. Available mornings to $50.00 to entire estates. No job too big or Ask for Chris GETS TOP RESULTS! take care of your loved one, transport beloved Campobello Island, off the • Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inch • all bold face type: $10.00/week to appointments, run errands. I am Maine Coast. Enjoy seafood, whale Whether it’s selling furniture, finding small. In business over 35 years,

HOME FOR RENT: Stunning stone front estate style Center Hall Colonial in prestigious Upper Makefield Twp/ New Hope of Bucks County. 6000 sq ft, 5 beds/4.5 baths, fireplace, 3-car garage, pets considered, smoke free, $5,250. (609) 924-9144. 06-26-3t

PRINCETON MOVING SALEDESIGNER FURNISHINGS: 35 Boudinot Street, Friday & Saturday June 12 & 13 from 9:30-3. Custom leather sofas, decorative accessories, West Elm, art, carpets, linens, BR furniture, record albums, kitchen items, outdoor furniture, Weber grills, mahogany pool table, Stiga pingpong table, Soul Edge arcade game. House is full! Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 07-10 HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 947-2958. 06-19-4t HOUSE FOR RENT: One-of-a-kind spacious dairy barn conversion with Princeton address, on private, bucolic setting. Open floor plan, 3 BR, 2 bath, breathtaking 2nd floor versatile room. Fireplace, 2-car garage, central air. Includes lawn maintenance & snow removal. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $3,450. (609) 731-6904. 06-26-3t THE PRINCETON WRITING COACH–a professional writer and university teacher-will help you write successfully. College or employment applications, articles, books, ESL, etc. (908) 420-1070. PrincetonWritingCoach@gmail.com 06-26-3t

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf PRINCETON MATH TUTOR: SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com

07-03-4t

07-10-3t COLLEGE COUNSELING:

(609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

07-10-4t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. MOVE YOUR OFFICE TO WHERE THE POLITICAL ACTION IS:

OFFICES WITH PARKING Ready for move-in. Renovated and refreshed. 1, 3 and 6 room suites. Historic Nassau Street Building. (609) 213-5029. 06-19-5t MACK’S WINDOW CLEANING: Windows & storm windows. Inside & out. $9 each window. Fully insured. All work guaranteed. Call (609) 9241404 or (609) 393-2122. 07-10-3t

We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read.

Advising sessions to prepare middle school or high school students for college. All-inclusive college application preparation assistance. Locally based. Contact rona@ orieladmissions.com

07-03-5t

tf

a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go!

tf

serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON

05-01-20

Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 35 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936

MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-31-20

Princeton References

J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS:

•Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-22-20

Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822.

15 West Front Street, Trenton. Join other state-related orgs. and businesses in a classic building near the State House. 2-to-3 room suites and open office. Call Anne LaBate (609) 394-7557.

CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: For houses and small offices. Flexible, reliable, local. Excellent references. Please call Yola (609) 532-4383. 05-01/10-23

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST:

07-10-4t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168.

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613.

Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130

07-10-8t

01-09-20

08-08-19

07-10-20

Celebrating 20 Years!

Innovative Design • Expert Installation Professional Care 908-284-4944 • jgreenscapes@gmail.com License #13VH06981800

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co.

HOME FOR RENT: Stunning stone front estate style Center Hall Colonial in prestigious Upper Makefield Twp/ New Hope of Bucks County. 6000 sq ft, 5 beds/4.5 baths, fireplace, 3-car garage, pets considered, smoke free, $5,250. (609) 924-9144. 06-26-3t PRINCETON MOVING SALEDESIGNER FURNISHINGS: 35 Boudinot Street, Friday & Saturday June 12 & 13 from 9:30-3. Custom leather sofas, decorative accessories, West Elm, art, carpets, linens, BR furniture, record albums, kitchen items, outdoor furniture, Weber grills, mahogany pool table, Stiga pingpong table, Soul Edge arcade game. House is full! Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 07-10 HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 947-2958. 06-19-4t HOUSE FOR RENT: One-of-a-kind spacious dairy barn conversion with Princeton address, on private, bucolic setting. Open floor plan, 3 BR, 2 bath, breathtaking 2nd floor versatile room. Fireplace, 2-car garage, central air. Includes lawn maintenance & snow removal. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $3,450. (609) 731-6904. 06-26-3t

Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

CRAFTED WITH CARE Living Room with fireplace, Dining Area

Established in 1947

State-Of-The-Art Kitchen

RESTORE-PRESERVE-ALL MASONRY

4 bedrooms

MASON CONTRACTORS Mercer County's oldest, reliable, experienced firm. We serve you for all your masonry needs.

BRICK~STONE~STUCCO NEW~RESTORED Simplest Repair to the Most Grandeur Project, our staff will accommodate your every need!

Call us as your past generations did for over 72 years!

Complete Masonry & Waterproofing Services

Paul G. Pennacchi, Sr., Historical Preservationist #5. Support your community businesses. Princeton business since 1947.

609-394-7354 paul@apennacchi.com

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

tf

LOOKING TO RENT YOUR HOME THIS SUMMER? Place an ad with TOWN TOPICS! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Lawn & Landscape Services

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019

to place an order:

3 Full Baths Patio and Garage In Princeton’s Riverside Neighborhood. $1,095,000 www.stockton-realtor.com Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $24.50 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $62.75 • 4 weeks: $80.25 • 6 weeks: $119.25 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019 • 28

THE PRINCETON WRITING COACH–a professional writer and university teacher-will help you write successfully. College or employment applications, articles, books, ESL, etc. (908) 420-1070. PrincetonWritingCoach@gmail.com 06-26-3t PRINCETON-Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time for studio apartment on Princeton estate. Big windows with views over magnificent gardens, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, full bath with tub & shower. Separate entrance, parking. Possible use as an office or art studio. (609) 924-5245. tf

HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf

OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com 07-03-4t RENT OFF COAST OF MAINE $850.00 per week

PRINCETON MATH TUTOR: SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com tf

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

OFFICES WITH PARKING Ready for move-in. Renovated and refreshed. 1, 3 and 6 room suites. Historic Nassau Street Building. (609) 213-5029. 06-19-5t

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

MACK’S WINDOW CLEANING: Windows & storm windows. Inside & out. $9 each window. Fully insured. All work guaranteed. Call (609) 9241404 or (609) 393-2122. 07-10-3t

3 bed/2 bath cottage on FDR’s beloved Campobello Island, off the Maine Coast. Enjoy seafood, whale watching, hiking beaches, granite cliffs, visiting lighthouses, golfing, fishing, biking, music. Contact Ryan: (215) 369-4400. 07-10-3t COLLEGE COUNSELING: Advising sessions to prepare middle school or high school students for college. All-inclusive college application preparation assistance. Locally based. Contact rona@ orieladmissions.com 07-10-4t

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TERESA CUNNINGHAM Sales Associate, ABR®, SRES®

2013-2018 NJ REALTORS® CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SALES AWARD® Licensed in NJ and PA

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STOCKTON REAL ESTATE, LLC CURRENT RENTALS *********************************

OFFICE LISTINGS:

Princeton Office – $1,600/mo. Nassau Street, 2nd floor, reception area & 2 nice-sized offices. One has private powder room. Heat & 2 parking spaces included. Princeton Office – $2,000/mo. 5-rooms with powder room. Front-toback on 1st floor. Available now. Princeton Office – $2,300/mo. Nassau Street. Conference room, reception room, 4 private offices + powder room. With parking. Available now.

RESIDENTIAL LISTINGS: Princeton – $1,675/mo. Includes heat & water. 1 BR, 1 bath, LR, Kitchen. No laundry but Free B Bus is on that block & will take you to Princeton Shopping Center where there is a laundromat. Available 9/1/19. Princeton – $1,775/mo. Plus electric & gas. Marvelous Studio in Palmer Square. FULLY FURNISHED. Available 9/1/19 for 12-month lease. Plainsboro – $2,000/mo. Plus utilities. 2 BR + loft, 2½ baths. Beautiful townhouse. Available now. Princeton – $2,300/mo. Plus heat & hot water. 1 parking space included. 1 BR, Living room/ dining room combo, new kitchen, new bath, laundry. EVERYTHING IS BRAND NEW! Available now. Princeton – $5,800/mo. 4 BR, 3 full baths, LR, DR, Kitchen. Finished basement. For sale or lease. Available now.

We have customers waiting for houses!

STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE. We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com See our display ads for our available houses for sale.

32 CHAMBERS STREET PRINCETON, NJ 08542 (609) 924-1416 MARTHA F. STOCKTON, BROKER-OWNER ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 07-03-5t MOVE YOUR OFFICE TO WHERE THE POLITICAL ACTION IS: 15 West Front Street, Trenton. Join other state-related orgs. and businesses in a classic building near the State House. 2-to-3 room suites and open office. Call Anne LaBate (609) 394-7557. 07-10-4t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 07-10-8t GREEN–PLANET PAINTING: Commercial, Residential & Custom Paint, Interior & Exterior, Drywall Repairs, Light Carpentry, Deck Staining, Green Paint options, Paper Removal, Power Washing, 15 Years of Experience. FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES. CALL: (609) 356-4378; perez@green-planetpainting.com 04-03-20

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

NEW LISTING In a convenient location, not far from Princeton, with easy access to shopping and major highways. Three bedrooms, full bath, living room, dining room, kitchen, all on a one-acre lot. Whether you are downsizing or a first-time buyer, this property makes for a very good investment and a nice alternative to townhouse living. In nearby Franklin Township. $292,000

www.stockton-realtor.com

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 35 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-22-20 CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: For houses and small offices. Flexible, reliable, local. Excellent references. Please call Yola (609) 532-4383. 05-01/10-23 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-29-19 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 05-01-20 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-31-20 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-08-19 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-10-20 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf LOOKING TO RENT YOUR HOME THIS SUMMER? Place an ad with TOWN TOPICS! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf HOME FOR RENT: Stunning stone front estate style Center Hall Colonial in prestigious Upper Makefield Twp/ New Hope of Bucks County. 6000 sq ft, 5 beds/4.5 baths, fireplace, 3-car garage, pets considered, smoke free, $5,250. (609) 924-9144. 06-26-3t

PRINCETON MOVING SALEDESIGNER FURNISHINGS: 35 Boudinot Street, Friday & Saturday June 12 & 13 from 9:30-3. Custom leather sofas, decorative accessories, West Elm, art, carpets, linens, BR furniture, record albums, kitchen items, outdoor furniture, Weber grills, mahogany pool table, Stiga pingpong table, Soul Edge arcade game. House is full! Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 07-10 HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 947-2958. 06-19-4t HOUSE FOR RENT: One-of-a-kind spacious dairy barn conversion with Princeton address, on private, bucolic setting. Open floor plan, 3 BR, 2 bath, breathtaking 2nd floor versatile room. Fireplace, 2-car garage, central air. Includes lawn maintenance & snow removal. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $3,450. (609) 731-6904. 06-26-3t THE PRINCETON WRITING COACH–a professional writer and university teacher-will help you write successfully. College or employment applications, articles, books, ESL, etc. (908) 420-1070. PrincetonWritingCoach@gmail.com 06-26-3t PRINCETON-Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time for studio apartment on Princeton estate. Big windows with views over magnificent gardens, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, full bath with tub & shower. Separate entrance, parking. Possible use as an office or art studio. (609) 924-5245. tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf PRINCETON MATH TUTOR: SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com tf OFFICES WITH PARKING Ready for move-in. Renovated and refreshed. 1, 3 and 6 room suites. Historic Nassau Street Building. (609) 213-5029. 06-19-5t MACK’S WINDOW CLEANING: Windows & storm windows. Inside & out. $9 each window. Fully insured. All work guaranteed. Call (609) 9241404 or (609) 393-2122. 07-10-3t OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com 07-03-4t RENT OFF COAST OF MAINE $850.00 per week 3 bed/2 bath cottage on FDR’s beloved Campobello Island, off the Maine Coast. Enjoy seafood, whale watching, hiking beaches, granite cliffs, visiting lighthouses, golfing, fishing, biking, music. Contact Ryan: (215) 369-4400. 07-10-3t COLLEGE COUNSELING: Advising sessions to prepare middle school or high school students for college. All-inclusive college application preparation assistance. Locally based. Contact rona@ orieladmissions.com 07-10-4t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 07-03-5t


Visit Our Open Houses This Sunday

Cranbury Twp. | $1,295,000 32 Liedtke Open 1 to 4

Princeton | $999,000 348 Mount Lucas Open 12 to 2

Princeton | $940,000 8 Turner Ct Open 12 to 2

Cranbury Twp. | $899,900 17 Chamberlin Ct Open 1 to 3

Montgomery Twp. | $789,000 19 Westbury Ct Open 1 to 4

Montgomery Twp | $779,900 97 Southfield Dr Open 1 to 4

Princeton | $759,000 12 Woodland Open 12 to 2

West Windsor Twp. | $635,000 8 W. Cartwright Dr Open 1 to 4

Monroe Twp. | $634,900 30 McFarlane Cir Open 1 to 4

Lawrence Twp. | $439,000 701 Lake Dr Open 1 to 3

Hopewell Twp. | $363,000 166 Coburn Rd Open 1 to 3

Lawrence Twp. | Rentals start at $1,725 2000 Colts Cir | 55+ Adult Open 12 to 4

COLDWELLBANKERHOMES.COM/PRINCETON Princeton Office 10 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 | 609.921.1411 The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. ©2019 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019

COLDWELL BANKER


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019 • 30

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 7/14, 1:00 - 4:00PM 5BR/5BA 3,811SF 12.16AC Completely Renovated and Modernized Infinity Pool Minutes from the Delaware River & Canal Hellen Cannon: 215.779.6151 7043 Phillips Mill Rd., Solebury Township, PA Kurfiss.com/1000463284

$2,750,000

Harmony Farm: Refined, Relaxed & Incredibly Rare

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 7/14, 1:00 - 3:00PM

Taxes: $13,723 Home & 7 Income Units: +/- $142,017/Yr. Patricia Patterson: 714.336.2800

3BR/2.1BA Low Taxes River Views Large Terrace Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590

Buckingham, PA Kurfiss.com/1000297546

506 Waterview Pl., New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU307974

$2,650,000

Creek’s Edge

$2,495,000

Wonderful Sundrenched Home

5BR/3.1BA 3.84AC Pool Garage w/Studio Linda Danese, Broker: 215.422.2220

4BR/4.2BA 6,558SF 4.35AC Dan Leuzzi: 215.680.2910 Beth Danese: 215.208.6549

Solebury Township, PA Kurfiss.com/1000437850

Solebury Township, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU465174

$1,650,000

$1,585,000

The Residences at Rabbit Run Creek

Renovated Farmhouse on 23+ Acres

3BR/3.1BA 3,700SF Customized New Construction Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590

Private setting Pond Sharon Angle: 215.815.8790 Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590

New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU364666

Buckingham Townhsip, PA Kurfiss.com/1006213416

Kurfiss.com

|

$1,500,000

$1,399,990

Artfully Uniting Extraordinary Homes With Extraordinary Lives

215.794.3227 New Hope Rittenhouse Square Chestnut Hill Bryn Mawr Each Office Is Independently Owned & Operated. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc.


31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019

JUST LISTED: 1953 Mid-Century Modern Stone and Cedar Architecture 3BR/3.1BA 3,000SF 9AC Complete Renovation Dramatic Cook’s Kitchen Detached 2-Car Garage Along the Paunacussing Creek Chris Preston: 215.262.9609 Solebury Township, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU473902

$3,875,000

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 7/14, 1:00 - 3:00PM

JUST LISTED: Pleasant Valley Tree Farm

3BR/3.1BA 3,672SF Riverfront Expertly Renovated Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590

3BR/2BA 22.35AC Lisa Otto: 215.262.3003 Chris Preston: 215.262.9609

4358 River Rd., New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU442756

Titusville

$1,275,000

Kurfiss.com/NJME281838

$1,200,000

Impeccably Expanded and Restored

Classic Victorian farmhouse on 12+ Acres

4BR/3.1BA 4,000SF 1.01AC 1st Floor Main BR Suite Linda Danese: 215.422.2220

4BR/3BA First Floor Main Bedroom Suite Barn w/8 stalls Lisa Frushone: 908.413.0156

Upper Makefield Township, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU467274

Whitehouse Station

$1,195,000

Kurfiss.com/NJHT105246

$839,900

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 7/14, 1:00 - 3:00PM

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 7/14, 1:00 - 3:00PM

4BR/2.1BA 3,461SF 0.41AC Two-Story Family Room Janet Marchione: 267.614.5505

4BR/3.2BA 0.18AC End Unit Meticulously Maintained Ginny Waters: 215.880.5308

4279 Arbor Ln., Doylestown, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU468126

3998 Cephas Child Rd., Doylestown, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU473526

Kurfiss.com

|

$739,000

Artfully Uniting Extraordinary Homes With Extraordinary Lives

215.794.3227 New Hope Rittenhouse Square Chestnut Hill Bryn Mawr Each Office Is Independently Owned & Operated. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc.

$525,000


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019 • 32

AT YO U

R

SERVI

CE

A Town Topics Directory

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual

SWIMMING POOL SERVICE CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS Since 1955 KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

908-359-3000 609-466-2693

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

SWIMMING POOL SERVICE

Starting at $250 For Single-Level Homes Starting at$250 For Single-Level Homes Starting $250For Single-Level Homes Starting atat Single-Level Homes

Starting at $250 For Single-Level Homes Starting at at $250 $250 For Starting For Single-Level Single-LevelHomes Homes

Starting at $250 For Single-Level Homes

609-423-2901 609-423-2901 609-423-2901 609-423-2901 Div. of Hawthorne Property Group, L.P.

Erick Perez

Fully insured 15+ Years Experience Call for free estimate Best Prices

Since 1955

908-359-3000

MOVE YOUR OFFICE TO WHERE THE POLITICAL ACTION IS:

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

15 West Front Street, Trenton. Join other state-related orgs. and businesses in a classic building near the State House. 2-to-3 room suites and open office. Call Anne LaBate (609) 394-7557.

A Gift Subscription!

07-10-4t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 07-10-8t GREEN–PLANET PAINTING: Commercial, Residential & Custom Paint, Interior & Exterior, Drywall Repairs, Light Carpentry, Deck Staining, Green Paint options, Paper Removal, Power Washing, 15 Years of Experience. FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES. CALL: (609) 356-4378; perez@green-planetpainting.com 04-03-20 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 35 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936

American Furniture Exchange

Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-22-20

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

HD

HOUSE PAINTING & MORE

House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish (Benjamin Moore Green promise products)

Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

CALL 609-924-2200 TO PLACE YOUR AD HERE

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner Home Repair Specialist

609-586-2130

CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: For houses and small offices. Flexible, reliable, local. Excellent references. Please call Yola (609) 532-4383. 05-01/10-23 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-29-19

BLACKMAN

LANDSCAPING FRESH IDEAS

Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Stone Walls and Terraces FREE CONSULTATION

PRINCETON, NJ

609-683-4013

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 05-01-20

ONLINE

www.towntopics.com

MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-31-20 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS:

Highest Quality Seamless Gutters. Serving the Princeton area for 25 years Experience and Quality Seamless Gutters Installed

3 Gutter Protection Devices that Work! Free estimates! All work guaranteed in writing!

Easy repeat gutter cleaning service offered without pushy sales or cleaning minimums!

609-921-2299

Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-08-19 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-10-20

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf LOOKING TO RENT YOUR HOME THIS SUMMER? Place an ad with TOWN TOPICS! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf HOME FOR RENT: Stunning stone front estate style Center Hall Colonial in prestigious Upper Makefield Twp/ New Hope of Bucks County. 6000 sq ft, 5 beds/4.5 baths, fireplace, 3-car garage, pets considered, smoke free, $5,250. (609) 924-9144. 06-26-3t PRINCETON MOVING SALEDESIGNER FURNISHINGS: 35 Boudinot Street, Friday & Saturday June 12 & 13 from 9:30-3. Custom leather sofas, decorative accessories, West Elm, art, carpets, linens, BR furniture, record albums, kitchen items, outdoor furniture, Weber grills, mahogany pool table, Stiga pingpong table, Soul Edge arcade game. House is full! Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 07-10 HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 947-2958. 06-19-4t HOUSE FOR RENT: One-of-a-kind spacious dairy barn conversion with Princeton address, on private, bucolic setting. Open floor plan, 3 BR, 2 bath, breathtaking 2nd floor versatile room. Fireplace, 2-car garage, central air. Includes lawn maintenance & snow removal. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $3,450. (609) 731-6904. 06-26-3t THE PRINCETON WRITING COACH–a professional writer and university teacher-will help you write successfully. College or employment applications, articles, books, ESL, etc. (908) 420-1070. PrincetonWritingCoach@gmail.com 06-26-3t PRINCETON-Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time for studio apartment on Princeton estate. Big windows with views over magnificent gardens, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, full bath with tub & shower. Separate entrance, parking. Possible use as an office or art studio. (609) 924-5245. tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf PRINCETON MATH TUTOR: SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com tf OFFICES WITH PARKING Ready for move-in. Renovated and refreshed. 1, 3 and 6 room suites. Historic Nassau Street Building. (609) 213-5029. 06-19-5t MACK’S WINDOW CLEANING: Windows & storm windows. Inside & out. $9 each window. Fully insured. All work guaranteed. Call (609) 9241404 or (609) 393-2122. 07-10-3t OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com 07-03-4t


PRINCETON MATH TUTOR: SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com tf OFFICES WITH PARKING Ready for move-in. Renovated and refreshed. 1, 3 and 6 room suites. Historic Nassau Street Building. (609) 213-5029. 06-19-5t MACK’S WINDOW CLEANING: Windows & storm windows. Inside & out. $9 each window. Fully insured. All work guaranteed. Call (609) 9241404 or (609) 393-2122. 07-10-3t

COLLEGE COUNSELING: Advising sessions to prepare middle school or high school students for college. All-inclusive college application preparation assistance. Locally based. Contact rona@ orieladmissions.com 07-10-4t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 07-03-5t MOVE YOUR OFFICE TO WHERE THE POLITICAL ACTION IS: 15 West Front Street, Trenton. Join other state-related orgs. and businesses in a classic building near the State House. 2-to-3 room suites and open office. Call Anne LaBate (609) 394-7557. 07-10-4t

OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com 07-03-4t

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 07-10-8t

RENT OFF COAST OF MAINE $850.00 per week 3 bed/2 bath cottage on FDR’s beloved Campobello Island, off the Maine Coast. Enjoy seafood, whale watching, hiking beaches, granite cliffs, visiting lighthouses, golfing, fishing, biking, music. Contact Ryan: (215) 369-4400. 07-10-3t

GREEN–PLANET PAINTING: Commercial, Residential & Custom Paint, Interior & Exterior, Drywall Repairs, Light Carpentry, Deck Staining, Green Paint options, Paper Removal, Power Washing, 15 Years of Experience. FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES. CALL: (609) 356-4378; perez@green-planetpainting.com 04-03-20

Witherspoon Media Group Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

· Newsletters · Brochures · Postcards · Books · Catalogues · Annual Reports For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 35 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-22-20 CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: For houses and small offices. Flexible, reliable, local. Excellent references. Please call Yola (609) 532-4383. 05-01/10-23 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-29-19 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 05-01-20 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-31-20 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-08-19

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf LOOKING TO RENT YOUR HOME THIS SUMMER? Place an ad with TOWN TOPICS! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf HOME FOR RENT: Stunning stone front estate style Center Hall Colonial in prestigious Upper Makefield Twp/ New Hope of Bucks County. 6000 sq ft, 5 beds/4.5 baths, fireplace, 3-car garage, pets considered, smoke free, $5,250. (609) 924-9144. 06-26-3t PRINCETON MOVING SALEDESIGNER FURNISHINGS: 35 Boudinot Street, Friday & Saturday June 12 & 13 from 9:30-3. Custom leather sofas, decorative accessories, West Elm, art, carpets, linens, BR furniture, record albums, kitchen items, outdoor furniture, Weber grills, mahogany pool table, Stiga pingpong table, Soul Edge arcade game. House is full! Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 07-10 HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 947-2958. 06-19-4t HOUSE FOR RENT: One-of-a-kind spacious dairy barn conversion with Princeton address, on private, bucolic setting. Open floor plan, 3 BR, 2 bath, breathtaking 2nd floor versatile room. Fireplace, 2-car garage, central air. Includes lawn maintenance & snow removal. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $3,450. (609) 731-6904. 06-26-3t

THE PRINCETON WRITING COACH–a professional writer and university teacher-will help you write successfully. College or employment applications, articles, books, ESL, etc. (908) 420-1070. PrincetonWritingCoach@gmail.com 06-26-3t PRINCETON-Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time for studio apartment on Princeton estate. Big windows with views over magnificent gardens, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, full bath with tub & shower. Separate entrance, parking. Possible use as an office or art studio. (609) 924-5245. tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf PRINCETON MATH TUTOR: SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com tf OFFICES WITH PARKING Ready for move-in. Renovated and refreshed. 1, 3 and 6 room suites. Historic Nassau Street Building. (609) 213-5029. 06-19-5t

MACK’S WINDOW CLEANING: Windows & storm windows. Inside & out. $9 each window. Fully insured. All work guaranteed. Call (609) 9241404 or (609) 393-2122. 07-10-3t OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com 07-03-4t RENT OFF COAST OF MAINE $850.00 per week

3 bed/2 bath cottage on FDR’s beloved Campobello Island, off the Maine Coast. Enjoy seafood, whale watching, hiking beaches, granite cliffs, visiting lighthouses, golfing, fishing, biking, music. Contact Ryan: (215) 369-4400. 07-10-3t COLLEGE COUNSELING: Advising sessions to prepare middle school or high school students for college. All-inclusive college application preparation assistance. Locally based. Contact rona@ orieladmissions.com 07-10-4t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 07-03-5t MOVE YOUR OFFICE TO WHERE THE POLITICAL ACTION IS: 15 West Front Street, Trenton. Join other state-related orgs. and businesses in a classic building near the State House. 2-to-3 room suites and open office. Call Anne LaBate (609) 394-7557. 07-10-4t

SOLAR PANELS; Retired? Gearing up forSAVING Retirement? CREATING ENERGY WHILE MONEY Solar It Panels reduce costs, add value to your home, create less of a carbon is never tooenergy early to prepare for your housing needs. If your footprint and can generate and 8-10% return on investment. There are current community is where you want to enjoy your Golden some Years, things that you need to know before you decide to move forward to making these you may want to think about what is needed to age in place. changes to your home.

Things to consider are one floor living, convenience to shopping, or•cultural activities. individuals opt for downsizing while What size system doSome you need • How make many square feet doesto your roofexisting space allow for solar panels others modifications their homes in order toto be installed accommodate their needs.

• What is the annual amount of Kilowatt hour you can expect from your system Will loved ones be visiting and need a place to stay? • Are taxsupplemental credits and other incentives Will youthere need income and consider renting space • Energy costs New Jersey expensive; what is the projected savings to increase cashinflow? Or willare you need modifications to improve and how long will it take to recoup the cost of installing the system

accessibility. If so it is important to speak with a professional to

anticipate both andthe timing. When taking into consideration as to buycost or lease panels, you should know that if you chose to lease it may complicate things if you decide to sell your home.

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-10-20

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

ON 2.17 ACRES OF BEAUTIFUL PROPERTY this handsome solar energy contemporary contains 3 bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths, and dramatic great room opening to a large deck, kitchen, family room and home office. Only 9.9 miles to the center of Princeton’s, a truly great property close to Princeton in nearby Montgomery Township. $529,000 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

www.stockton-realtor.com

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019

HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019 • 34

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

LOVELY IN LAWRENCE

On a half acre lot in Lawrence Township, this charming Ranch offers 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, living room with fireplace, kitchen with dining area. The glass enclosed all season room is a total delight and there is an unfinished basement and a 2-car attached garage. A pleasing house offered at a very pleasing price. $449,000

www.stockton-realtor.com

“I could leave - because I could return. I could return - because I knew adventure lay just beyond an open door. Instead of either/or, I discovered a whole world of and." —Gloria Steinem

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

RENT OFF COAST OF MAINE $850.00 per week 3 bed/2 bath cottage on FDR’s beloved Campobello Island, off the Maine Coast. Enjoy seafood, whale watching, hiking beaches, granite cliffs, visiting lighthouses, golfing, fishing, biking, music. Contact Ryan: (215) 369-4400. 07-10-3t COLLEGE COUNSELING: Advising sessions to prepare middle school or high school students for college. All-inclusive college application preparation assistance. Locally based. Contact rona@ orieladmissions.com 07-10-4t

PLUS

An enchanting cottage retreat called “Brookhouse” designed by Kenneth Kassler. Adjacent to Bedens Brook and Cherry Valley Golf Courses. $1,195,000

www.stockton-realtor.com

J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-08-19 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130

MOVE YOUR OFFICE TO WHERE THE POLITICAL ACTION IS: 15 West Front Street, Trenton. Join other state-related orgs. and businesses in a classic building near the State House. 2-to-3 room suites and open office. Call Anne LaBate (609) 394-7557. 07-10-4t

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 07-10-8t GREEN–PLANET PAINTING: Commercial, Residential & Custom Paint, Interior & Exterior, Drywall Repairs, Light Carpentry, Deck Staining, Green Paint options, Paper Removal, Power Washing, 15 Years of Experience. FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES. CALL: (609) 356-4378; perez@green-planetpainting.com 04-03-20 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 35 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-22-20 CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: For houses and small offices. Flexible, reliable, local. Excellent references. Please call Yola (609) 532-4383. 05-01/10-23

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-29-19

Offering a classic Cape Cod with 4 bedrooms and 3 baths on 11.1 acres in Montgomery Township.

07-31-20

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 07-03-5t

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20

BEDENS BROOK AREA

MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 05-01-20

07-10-20

A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf LOOKING TO RENT YOUR HOME THIS SUMMER? Place an ad with TOWN TOPICS! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf HOME FOR RENT: Stunning stone front estate style Center Hall Colonial in prestigious Upper Makefield Twp/ New Hope of Bucks County. 6000 sq ft, 5 beds/4.5 baths, fireplace, 3-car garage, pets considered, smoke free, $5,250. (609) 924-9144. 06-26-3t PRINCETON MOVING SALEDESIGNER FURNISHINGS: 35 Boudinot Street, Friday & Saturday June 12 & 13 from 9:30-3. Custom leather sofas, decorative accessories, West Elm, art, carpets, linens, BR furniture, record albums, kitchen items, outdoor furniture, Weber grills, mahogany pool table, Stiga pingpong table, Soul Edge arcade game. House is full! Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 07-10 HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 947-2958. 06-19-4t HOUSE FOR RENT: One-of-a-kind spacious dairy barn conversion with Princeton address, on private, bucolic setting. Open floor plan, 3 BR, 2 bath, breathtaking 2nd floor versatile room. Fireplace, 2-car garage, central air. Includes lawn maintenance & snow removal. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $3,450. (609) 731-6904. 06-26-3t THE PRINCETON WRITING COACH–a professional writer and university teacher-will help you write successfully. College or employment applications, articles, books, ESL, etc. (908) 420-1070. PrincetonWritingCoach@gmail.com 06-26-3t PRINCETON-Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time for studio apartment on Princeton estate. Big windows with views over magnificent gardens, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, full bath with tub & shower. Separate entrance, parking. Possible use as an office or art studio. (609) 924-5245. tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf


35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2019

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

PRINCETON $1,999,000 New construction in Riverside. Attention to detail. 5 BRs one on first floor, 4 full BAs. Gourmet kitchen with SS appliances, large pantry and butlers pantry with wine fridge. Great spaces throughout. Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell)

PRINCETON $1,699,000 Meticulously maintained home in Riverside. 5 BRs one on first floor, 5.5 BAs. Finished basement and attic, kitchen with SS appliances, center island, breakfast area overlooking patio and yard. Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell)

STUNNING COLONIAL IN ETTL FARM

NEW PRICE

PRINCETON $1,548,000 This brick front Colonial has in-ground pool, deck, 5 BRs, 5 full- and 2-half baths, conservatory, 2 offices and a finished basement with workout area, full bath, wine cellar and storage. For sale or rent. Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

PRINCETON $1,320,000 Move into this 3-year-old Colonial near schools, shopping center and town. Many upgrades have been done including upgraded appliances and a fully finished basement. For sale or rent. Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

NEW PRICE

NEW PRICE

MONTGOMERY TWP. $760,000 Beautiful open-concept 4/5 BR Colonial on a partially wooded 3-acre lot. Features bright kitchen, FR w/ FP, multi-level Trex deck & many upgrades. Freshly painted throughout. Eric Branton 609-516-9502 (cell)

WEST WINDSOR $699,000 Brand New Construction in Princeton Jct. This custom-built 4 bedroom, 3 1/2 bath home is set on a beautiful .75-acre lot. located directly across from the Mercer County Park. Joseph Plotnick 732-979-9116 (cell)

Princeton Office • 609-921-1900


IS ORGANIC FOOD REALLY HEALTHIER AND DOES IT WARRANT THE EXTRA EXPENSE?

Written by Paul and Joanne Profeta

The title to this blog represents a debate that has raged for quite some time now. People understand that organic farming is more expensive because the process requires more manual labor and prohibits the use of chemical pesticides and herbicides, GMOs, etc. In conventional farming the soil has become simply a “placeholder” for the plants and has no nutritive value due to the fact that all minerals, nutrients and microbiology have been killed by the pesticides and herbicides sprayed on the fields. So how does a conventional farm grow crops in dead soil? Simply by bombing the soil with synthetic fertilizers. The plants absorb these chemicals and grow. They get no nutritive value from the minerals and microbiological organisms that used to be in the now-depleted soil before they were bombed out with pesticides and herbicides.

and incorporate them into the plant itself. By eating these plants, you are absorbing the nutrient dense fertility of Mother Earth the way it used to be and is still supposed to be. This is a much more expensive process and more labor-intensive. The crop yield from a conventional farm that has been “hyped” with synthetic chemical fertilizers is significantly greater than the yield from an organic farm that is generating strictly organically raised vegetables. That is one of the main reasons for the differential in price.

er, the Cleveland Clinic recently published an article entitled “A Diet of Highly Processed Junk Foods Could Kill You.” THAT IS A PRETTY BLUNT TITLE. They found that “junk food and convenience foods may simplify your life, but they can also endanger it. They found that “people who regularly consume a significant quantity of foods the researchers termed “ultra-processed” are at an INCREASED RISK OF DEATH. These foods include packaged snacks, soft drinks, breads, candies, processed meats and frozen meals. Over 44,000 adults participated. On average more than 29% of their total calories came from ultra-processed foods. The study took 7 years. The researchers concluded that every 10% increase in the amount of ultra-processed foods consumed increased the risk of death by 14%. Ultra-processed foods tend to be high in calories, carbohydrates, salt and fat and low in fiber and vitamins. In addition, they may contain harmful food additives and contaminants.” That is pretty blunt talk from one of the most respected medical institutions in the country.

AFTER AFTER READING THAT, YOU MIGHT FEELREADING FORCED THAT, TO YOU MIGHT FEEL FORCED TO CONSIDER EATING MORE HEALTHY FOODS. EATING MORE HEALTHY FOODS. CONSIDER

ODDLY ENOUGH, SOME PEOPLE THINK ODDLYORGANIC ENOUGH,FOODS SOME PEOPLE THINK ORGANIC FOODS In addition, organic farmers are proARE BLAND AND TASTELESS. THEY FEEL THEY ARE ARE BLAND AND TASTELESS. hibited from using synthetic pesti- THEY FEEL THEY ARE or sprays if there is any infestaRELINQUISHING THE FUN OFcides EATING. RELINQUISHING THE FUN OF EATING. tion of insects. For example, if there

is an invasion of Japanese Beetles, an THAT OPINION IS COUNTER INTUITIVE. INfarmer FACThasIS ITtoCOUNTER IShire labor to go THAT OPINION INTUITIVE. IN FACT IT IS organic out and pluck the Japanese Beetles JUST THE OPPOSITE. WHICH FOOD IS THE GOING TO HAVE WHICH FOOD IS GOING TO HAVE JUST OPPOSITE. off the plants by hand one by one. MORE FLAVOR AND RICH TEXTURE —This AFLAVOR PRODUCT THAT MORE AND RICH TEXTURE — A PRODUCT THAT is labor-intensive, time-consumOn an organic farm, the soil is the ing and expensive. But you are not WAS PICKED FRESH FROM THAT DAY OR AFROM nutrient base for the food THE that isFARM WASgetting PICKED FRESH THE FARM THAT DAY OR A any pesticide residue in your grown. It is enhanced with organic PRODUCT TRUCKED IN FROM CALIFORNIA ORconventional FLOWNININfarmer food! The PRODUCT TRUCKED FROMjust CALIFORNIA OR FLOWN IN amendments like compost, minerals, sprays the crops with chemical insecFROM A FOREIGN COUNTRY? eggshells, mushrooms, etc. These soil FROM FOREIGN COUNTRY? ticides that end up in A your food. amendments add to the microbiologNew York Times cited a study that ical diversity of the soil and AT maintain Here isSTORE why organic food is worth the TRY THESE SELECTIONS OURTRY FARM THAT THESE SELECTIONS AT OURThe FARM THAT was led bySTORE the Center of Research in a high nutrient dense composition. difference in cost. There are very few ARE MADE WHOLESOME, ORGANIC FOOD Epidemiology and Statistics When FROM seeds areFRESH, planted in this kind studies that have been done and there ARE MADE FROM FRESH, WHOLESOME, ORGANIC FOODShoban Pare Cite of the French National Inof soil the roots absorb the nutrients is a good THESE reason why. Studies require PICKED THAT DAY OR THE DAY BEFORE. ARE PICKED IF THAT DAY THE DAY BEFORE. THESE stitute ofIF Health and ARE Medicine Relots OR of participants NOT THE BEST TASTING FOODS YOU HAVE EVER EATEN, I search. This French study (thousands of peoNOT THE BEST TASTING FOODS YOU70,000 HAVE EVER EATEN,followed I adults and found that FREple to be statistiWILL GIVE YOU YOUR MONEY BACK........ WILL GIVE YOUprojectable) YOUR MONEY BACK........ QUENT CONSUMERS OF ORGANIC cally FOOD HAD 25% FEWER CANCERS NO QUESTIONS ASKED. and are extremely NO QUESTIONS ASKED. OVERALL THAN ADULTS THAT DID expensive. Studies NOT EAT ORGANIC FOOD. “Freare funded by the AND REMEMBER, YOU ARE EATING THE FOODYOU ARE EATING ANDJUST REMEMBER, JUST THEFEEL FOOD quent consumers of organic major chemical and THAT, AFTER READING YOU MIGHT FORCEDfoods TO AND NO PESTICIDES, HERBICIDES, HORMONES, GMOS, had 76% fewer lymphomas, 86% fewdrug companies that CONSIDER EATING MORE HEALTHY FOODS. AND NO PESTICIDES, HERBICIDES, HORMONES, GMOS, er non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas, and a billion-dollar INSECTICIDES, FILLERS OR PINKINSECTICIDES, SLIME. have reduction in breast cancer.” products FILLERS they are OR34% PINK SLIME.

ODDLY ENOUGH, SOME PEOPLE THINK ORGANIC FOODS

Paul and Joanne Profeta. Founders of Profeta Farms LLC.

PF_PM_spread_Summer_19_v2.indd 2

trying to sell. There ARE BLAND AND TASTELESS. THEY Journal FEEL THEY ARE The Wall Street published is no organic farm an article citing a study by Alex Lu, RELINQUISHING THE FUN OF EATING. that can begin to an Associate Professor of Environfund a major nationmental Exposure Biology at Harvard THAT OPINION IS COUNTER INTUITIVE. IN FACT IT IS al study. For that T.H. Chan School of Public Health. JUSTyou THE WHICH FOOD IS GOING TO HAVE reason, seeOPPOSITE. very Lu concluded that organic food is MORE FLAVOR AND RICH TEXTURE — A PRODUCT THAT few of them. Howev-

healthier than conventional food. He states that: “It only makes sense that food free of pesticides and chemicals is safer and better for us than food containing those substances, even at trace levels.” One fascinating thing he discovered was that within five days of substituting organic produce for conventional produce, pesticides disappeared from the urine of the children he was testing. In other words, the benefits are practically immediate. And finally, the Associated Press just came out with an article entitled “FDA: Toxic Compounds Found in Our Food.” This article states: “The Food and Drug Administration found substantial levels of a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds in some grocery store meats, seafood and in off the shelf chocolate cake according to FDA researchers. Last year’s federal toxicology review concluded that the compounds are more dangerous than previously thought, saying consistent studies of exposed people ‘suggest associations’ with some kinds of cancers, liver problems, low birth weight and other issues. These compounds are called PFAS or per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances. The compounds have been dubbed ‘forever chemicals’ because they take thousands of years to degrade and because some accumulate in people’s bodies.” It is tragic that most people in our country do not want to focus on our food supply and the damage caused by consuming ultra-processed foods. Think about it. The most popular restaurant in the country is McDonald’s. Most people are more concerned with convenience, price and taste/texture than nutritional benefits. The connection between food and health just does not seem to be on most people’s radar screen. Is there any wonder that two thirds of us are overweight, about a third of us are morbidly obese and that dialysis is the fastest-growing medical procedure in the country? We have a crisis in this country which is simply not addressed by any of our leaders. We are eating ourselves to death. Not only are the amounts inordinately large, but the ingredients are unhealthy. The research cited here shows convincingly that ultra-processed foods can lead to significant health issues, and that the chemicals used to grow foods conventionally wind up in our bodies. People who choose to ignore the benefits of organic foods can eat at their own risk.

WAS PICKED FRESH FROM THE FARM THAT DAY OR A PRODUCT TRUCKED IN FROM CALIFORNIA OR FLOWN IN FROM A FOREIGN COUNTRY? TRY THESE SELECTIONS AT OUR FARM STORE THAT ARE MADE FROM FRESH, WHOLESOME, ORGANIC FOOD PICKED THAT DAY OR THE DAY BEFORE. IF THESE ARE NOT THE BEST TASTING FOODS YOU HAVE EVER EATEN, I WILL GIVE YOU YOUR MONEY BACK........ NO QUESTIONS ASKED. AND REMEMBER, YOU ARE EATING JUST THE FOOD AND NO PESTICIDES, HERBICIDES, HORMONES, GMOS, INSECTICIDES, FILLERS OR PINK SLIME.

way 202 | Readington, NJ | ProfetaFarms.com 803 US Highway 202 | Readington, NJ | ProfetaFarms.com

6/27/19 8:35 PM

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Town Topics Newspaper, July 10  

Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper, July 10  

Witherspoon Media Group