Town Topics Newspaper, June 29, 2022

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Volume LXXVI, Number 26

New Book on West Windsor History . 5 Dancer Diana Byer has No Plans to Leave the Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Morven to Host Fourth Of July Celebration, Activities . . . . . . . . . . 10 Remembering Lolita and James Mason . . . . . . 12 Princeton Festival Presents Broadway POPS!. . . . . . . . . . . 13 PU Summer Chamber Concerts Continues Series With String Quartet . . 14 Harrington Helps Introduce Unified Track to Special Olympics USA Games . . 22 Hun School’s Sheth Making The Most Out of Opportunities With Post 218 Baseball . . .26

Matthew Brophy Helps Princeton Little League Team Win Intermediate Title . . . 27 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 20 Celebrations . . . . . . . 11 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . 31 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 29 Performing Arts . . . . . 15 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 31 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Summer Sales . . . . . 18-19 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

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Triumph Brewing Co. Looks Forward To Early 2023 Opening The renovations continue at Princeton’s former post office building on Palmer Square, and the Triumph Brewing Company is looking forward to moving into its elegant new home by the first quarter of 2023, according to Triumph owner and CEO Adam Rechnitz. Delays over the past six years, since Triumph first announced its plans to move from its 138 Nassau Street location, have been caused by easements that encroached on municipal property, protected state park land, the need for state permits, and, more recently, pandemic complications and supply chain problems in getting construction materials. But all systems seem to be go for an opening early next year. “They’ve gotten a lot done. It’s going to be a beautiful place — I’ll tell you that,” said Princeton Building Inspector Dan Tagliere. “The framing and mechanicals have been done. A lot of the systems are in place.” Rechnitz was upbeat about Triumph’s new Palmer Square setting — “obviously a better location” than 138 Nassau, he said. “I like the idea of being on the village green. We’ve learned a lot in the intervening 28 years since Triumph opened on Nassau Street about how to design and build, and we’ll be pleased to show the public what we’ve learned.” Triumph closed its restaurant and brewery at 138 Nassau Street in February of this year. Rechnitz noted that it had been in operation for 28 years, ever since he moved to New Jersey in 1994 and founded the Triumph Brewing Company, one of the first brewpubs in the state, in what for a long time had been a bowling alley. In addition to the Princeton location Rechnitz now owns and operates Triumph brewpubs in Red Bank and in New Hope, Pa. As far as the new Palmer Square establishment is concerned, Rechnitz insisted on keeping most of the interior design details a secret in order to “maintain the element of surprise.” The huge brewing vats will be installed in the basement of the building in the next month, he said. One of the supply chain delays involves the brewpub’s new lobby, which will consist of aluminum with framing Continued on Page 10

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Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Princeton Responds to Abortion Rights Decision There was anger, outrage, concern, fear, and in some quarters joy, but little surprise in Princeton in response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision last Friday, June 24, to overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion. There were a number of rallies over the weekend in the northern part of the state, demonstrators protesting the elimination of women’s right to choose and warning of dangerous results for women’s health. Anti-abortion advocates, though much less visible in the area than their opponents, applauded the decision, and in Trenton on Saturday a gathering on the steps of the Statehouse Annex celebrated the overturning of Roe with a “Rally for Life and Justice.” With individual states now determining whether they allow abortion, it will remain legal in New Jersey and in 23 other states. Gov. Phil Murphy — who signed a law, the Freedom of Reproductive Choice Act, in January, ensuring that abortion remains legal in New Jersey —denounced the U.S. Supreme Court decision and urged New Jersey lawmakers to further expand abortion access in the state. “While New Jersey planned for this eventuality by codifying a woman’s right to an abortion under state law, it is incumbent that we do more to fully secure reproductive rights and ensure access to

reproductive health care without delay,” Murphy said. “Until we do, my administration will take the necessary steps to fully protect both New Jersey’s women and those who come to our state to access the freedom which may no longer exist in their home state.” About six weeks ago, a draft majority opinion by Justice Samuel Alito of the decision to overturn Roe was leaked, prompting demonstrations across the country, including a gathering of more

than 500 at Princeton’s Hinds Plaza on May 14. Organized by the Planned Parenthood Action Fund of New Jersey (PPAFNJ), the demonstration drew abortion rights supporters from across the state and beyond. Princeton University issued a statement on the afternoon of June 24, following the announcement of the Supreme Court decision, asserting that “Princeton University health care and benefits for Continued on Page 8

Council Will Not Rescind Designation Of Buildings on Seminary Campus

Responding to a request from the Princeton Coalition for Responsible Development (PCRD) to rescind the designation of the Princeton Theological Seminary’s Tennent-Roberts-Whiteley campus as an Area in Need of Redevelopment (ANR), Princeton Council has opted not to take that action. The underlying zoning is in place until a redevelopment plan is proposed, reviewed, and accepted, said Mayor Mark Freda. “Removing that designation would likely, not for sure but likely, end us up in court, because removing that designation could remove value from the property,” he said. “The town could be sued by the

developer. So at this point, we have decided not to take action on the request.” Neighbors whose homes border the campus and other members of the community have been opposed to the Seminary’s plans to tear down the three buildings in question, which form a kind of gateway into town along Stockton Street. Even though representatives of the Historic Preservation Commission and the Mercer Hill Historic District Association have urged that the buildings be saved, they do not have any historic designation that would protect them. Among those speaking after Freda’s Continued on Page 9

SUNDAY AT THE POOL: Swimmers sought respite from the heat last weekend at Community Park Pool on Witherspoon Street. The pool is open daily through Labor Day. (Photo by Weronika A. Plohn)


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BIDDING FAREWELL: A gathering in the Littlebrook neighborhood for longtime postal carrier Brian Sakowski, center (in white shirt), was among several tributes marking his recent retirement.

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Postal Worker Honored for Service to his customers. “It was Sakowski was honored important to me not only to by several customers. Rose With Parties, Proclamation

After delivering the mail in Princeton for nearly 34 years, Brian Sakowski retired at the end of May, amid parties and tributes by his customers in the Littlebrook neighborhood. Sakowski was a friendly and familiar presence there for 11 years, following routes he held earlier on South Harrison Street and in the Walnut/ Cuyler/Dempsey area. “It has been my pleasure to serve the people of Princeton, which is a wonderful town,” he wrote in a letter

give you good mail service, but also to be a part of the neighborhood. I have made many good friends and have many great memories to cherish.” In honor of Sakowski’s retirement, Mayor Mark Freda and Princeton Council issued a special proclamation. “Brian made the position of ‘postman’ so much more than just delivering the mail,” the document reads. “He delivered joy, concern, comfort, support, gardening advice, and always a smile.”

Nini hosted a backyard party, and a “Brian Block Party” was held on Hamilton Avenue by Linda Lee and Robert Lupton. The Grossmans on Magnolia L ane hosted a retirement picnic, and the staff at The Jewish Center threw a retirement party. Rosalind Muir prepared an album containing photographs of neighbors to whom Sakowski delivered mail in the Littlebrook neighborhood, presented to h im at t he home of Amy Politziner.

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Rosedale Road Closure: The Rosedale Road construction to install a roundabout at General Johnson Drive / Greenway Meadows has been delayed to Tuesday, July 5, due to the need to obtain utility mark outs and to do construction layout by survey. The construction layout will require a full closure of the intersection on Thursday, June 30. Rosedale Road will be open to local traffic only. The project is expected to last through the summer. Not in Our Town Youth Fellowships: Midnight on June 30 is the deadline for high school students to apply for this program focused on youth-led, equity-based work to benefit the local community. Fellows are paired with board members for mentorship. Niot.org. Trash Collection Delays: Due to the nationwide truck driver shortage, which has affected Princeton’s hauler (Interstate Waste Services), the delays are expected to continue as the company works on hiring more drivers. In the meantime, trash will be collected within 48 hours of the scheduled collection. COVID-19 Care Kits for Princeton Families: Low/moderate income families in Princeton can get these kits, which include tests and materials to respond to COVID-19, such as one-use thermometers, an oximeter, and extra household items. They are available for pickup at Princeton Human Services by calling (609) 6882055. Certain eligibility requirements apply. Volunteer to Be a Land Steward: Friends of Princeton Open Space (FOPOS) holds half-day volunteer sessions on a variety of conservation projects at the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Individuals, families, students, and corporate groups are welcome on July 16 or July 30 for a morning (9 a.m. - 12 p.m.) or afternoon (1-4 p.m.). Fopos.org.


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HOW TIMES CHANGE: This view of the Washington Road bridge over the Delaware & Raritan Canal, looking east from Princeton into West Windsor from about 1910-1920, is from the recently released book “West Windsor Then and Now: A New Perspective.”

New Book on West Windsor History Links Township’s Past, Present, and Future

Back when West Windsor turned 200 in 2007, Henry Innes MacAdam wrote West Windsor Then and Now, a comprehensive analysis of the area’s history. In the 25 years since, the township’s population has exploded and housing developments have replaced many area farms, some of which were centuries old. As the 225th anniversary approached, it was time for an update. Paul Ligeti, who

grew up in West Windsor and made its history a focus of his Eagle Scout project in 2009, has taken on the task. West Windsor Then and Now: A New Perspective has just been released and is published by the Historical Society of West Windsor. “West Windsor’s history is really interesting, but it has not been so well publicized,” said Ligeti, who is the vice president of the Historical Society, chairs its 225th anniversary planning committee, leads tours of local historic sites, and writes a monthly history column in the West Windsor and Plainsboro News. In his day job, Ligeti works for the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s Division of Resilience Engineering and Construction.

TOPICS

then there is ‘War of the Worlds’ [ the 1938 radio hoax led by Orson Welles and the Mercury Theater on the Air], which put Grovers Mill on the map.” The book is filled with historic photos and maps, letters, and links to the past. “I have to give most of the credit for the archives to the people who have been involved in this far longer than I have,” said Ligeti. “What I am hoping is that people who don’t know the history will learn that instead of the place they live being 50 years old or younger, this area has been a community since the 1730s,” he said. “And that’s not even counting the thousands of years that the Lenni Lenape and Indigenous populations lived here. Knowing the history of where you live Continued on Next Page

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West Windsor is packed with historic sites. But the lack of a real downtown presents a challenge in bringing that legacy to the forefront. “It’s all spread out, and that’s a problem,” Ligeti said. “That’s the topographical challenge. The other thing is that there are so many new residents here who are not part of families who have lived here for 200 years, so they don’t know the history they are living with. This book is an attempt to bring the history to them. I hope it will be a long-lasting investment.” At the back of the book there is a list of West Windsor’s “100 Club,” properties that the Historical Society believes may be at least 100 years old. Most are private properties. “We call upon their owners and the township to ensure they remained preserved for future generations to appreciate,” reads the introduction to the list. For Ligeti, learning little details of West Windsor history was as interesting as the facts involving famous people and events. “I learned about a man who lived in West Windsor’s Community Park from the 1930s to 1963, who made the Raggedy Ann and Andy books popular, though they were not written by him,” he said. “The famous people — William Jennings Bryan spoke at Princeton Junction train station as part of his presidential campaign in 1900. The funeral procession of Robert Kennedy stopped at the station in 1968. And

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West Windsor History Continued from Preceding Page

makes life richer. And knowing your history makes you a more informed voter, and an active participant in the governmental process.” Samples of the book have been placed in West Windsor businesses, schools, and libraries. To purchase it, visit westwindsorhistory. com/book. —Anne Levin

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What’s on your summer reading list?” (Photos by Weronika A. Plohn)

Small Businesses Help Save the Sourlands

The 17th annual Sourland Mountain Festival benefiting the Sourland Conservancy returns on Saturday, July 23 from 3-8:30 p.m., rain or shine, at Unionville Vineyards in East Amwell Township. There will be live music, local food, craft beer, wine and spirits, as well as a variety of local artisans, businesses, and educational organizations. Festival Chair Suzanne Parsons said, “The Sourland Mountain Festival brings the communities of the Central New Jersey region together and presents the best in musical talent, local food and drink, and family fun, with a spectacular view.” A mong t he businesses par ticipating are Dandelion Wishes, Ben D. Straw Creative, Roastwell Coffee Roasters, Press T Designs, W hitehouse Station Hot Sauce Company, Seeds to S ew Inter nat ional, Wild Bone Alchemy, Turtlemoon Studios, Blawenburg Bistro, Thai Cha Chak, We Squeeze to Please, and Johnson Family Ice Cream. The Ryland Inn will provide VIP service. Unionville Vineyards, Flounder Brewing Company, and Sourland Mountain Spirits are also participating. Sourland Cycles will offer electric bike rides, The fun of a scavenger hunt will also provide youngsters an opportunity to learn more about the importance of the Sourlands. Live critters of the Sourlands will be hanging around from 3-7 p.m. Teen and adult volunteers are needed before, during, and after the festival. Volunteers receive free admission, a T-shirt, and refreshments. Register at SourlandMountainFest.com/volunteer. Unionville Vineyards is at 9 Rocktown Road in Ringoes. Tickets are limited to the first 1,000 and are available online at SourlandMountainFest.com at a discount until July 22. Children under 12 enter free.

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Correction

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In the story “Opposition Grows to U.S. 1 Warehouse Project” [June 22, page 1], it was written that nine warehouses are part of the proposed project for a site that was formerly home of American Cyanamid. West Windsor Township Mayor Hemant Marathe has pointed out that there are seven warehouses in the project, not nine, and the pending application in front of the West Windsor Township Planning Board is only for the first three. He also said that the Planning Board did not give preliminary approval in December 2020; rather, it confirmed to the town council that the ordinance is not in conflict with the land use plan.

“I am reading a book by Liane Moriarty called What Alice Forgot. I like that author a lot! The books are based in Australia, are fun, and are easy to read. I became interested in the author’s work after watching an HBO miniseries called Big Little Lies with Reese Witherspoon and Nicole Kidman, which was based on a novel that Moriarty wrote.” —Holly Murphy, Princeton

“I just finished Swimming in the Dark by Tomasz Jedrowski. I would say that I like romance historical fiction types of books. I rely on my friends’ recommendations when it comes to a good read.” —Joshua Cruz, Tyler, Texas

“I am all for supporting small indie book publishers. Carmilla by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu is on my summer reading list for that reason. The small publisher is based in Philadelphia and my favorite queer author Carmen Maria Machado edited the book and made all the footnotes for it too.” —Nina Stupar, Edison

Emma: “I like to review books on my Instagram account so my friends can find something fun for them to read. Anything that is entertaining and doesn’t require a lot of thinking is on my summer list. Currently I am reading a book called Skye Falling by Mia McKenzie.” Mary: “I usually pick two books for my summer reading list. Currently I am reading The Charm Offensive by Alison Cochrun and next book that my friend recommended is Milk Fed by Melissa Broder.” —Emma Roney, East Windsor with Mary Brown, Greensboro, N.C.

Noor: “We read a lot of Pokémon books. I like to have my dad read me my Frozen books before bed too.” Muhammad: “My summer reading list is whatever my kids want me to read to them.” Hassan: “Pokémon books are my favorite! I also like to read Spider-Man books and Captain Underpants. I read with my dad or my grandma before I go to sleep and in the middle of the day when I get bored.” —Noor, Muhammad, and Hassan Mian, Princeton


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Locally-Trained Dancer Diana Byer Has No Plans to Leave the Studio Since her days as a charter member of the Princeton Regional Ballet Company (now American Repertory Ballet) in 1963, Diana Byer has been busy. T h e Tr e n t o n n a t i v e danced with several ballet troupes before founding the New York Theatre Ballet (NYTB ) company and school in 1978. Just over a decade later, she started a scholarship program for underser ved children. A documentary film about the program, LIFT: A Journey from Homelessness to the Ballet Stage, debuted last month at the Tribeca Film Festival. While she recently stepped down as artistic director of NYTB, Byer is far from retired. She still runs the school. And she is working on putting together a small company of dancers over the age of 60, including Robert LaFosse, Monica Bill Barnes, and Meg Harper as well as herself. “We all want to dance and we still can,” Byer said last week. “We’ll experiment first, find some choreographers, maybe do some in-house performances at the studio and see where it goes. We can still move. We still have something to say. It’s worth looking into.” During her 44-year tenure heading NYTB, Byer focused on restoring and reviving small masterworks by choreographers such as Antony Tudor, Agnes de Mille, and Frederick Ashton, as well as hour-long ballets based on children’s literature. Along the way, she became involved in a program that bused homeless children to cultural organizations during their holiday break. “We served a hot breakfast, taught them about

ballet, did reading and vocabulary, gave them a hot lunch, and created projects for them,” she said. “Each kid got to take home books. But the flaw that I saw was that they got something wonderful for six days, and then it was over. So that’s how I started the program LIFT Community Services.” LIFT is a year-round study program focused on kids living in homeless shelters and public housing. Based on auditions held in shelters and other locations, it enrolls up to 30 children a year. They get partial or full scholarships, and additional support with things like medical care, clothing, and field trips. According to the NYTB website, LIFT has been recognized by the White House and the National Endowment for the Arts as a model national program. “O ur prog ram is ver y small. It’s kind of a safe haven for them,” Byer said. “Nobody really knows where they come from. But we do. Who knew how these kids lived? I didn’t. You have to intervene and give them every tool they need for learning, and some of them — not all — will thrive.” A mong L IF T’s success stories is Steven Melendez, who joined the program in its third year. Named Byer’s successor as artistic director of NYTB in April, he is prominently featured in the documentary about LIFT. “He wasn’t one of the kids I had offered a scholarship to because he was so shy,” Byer recalled. “But the day he was leaving, he grabbed onto my leg and wouldn’t get onto the bus. So, of course I had to take him. We raised funds for him to go to private school and the Professional Children’s School. We do that with other children if

we feel we need to get them into a private system.” Melendez “had an immense talent for dancing,” Byer said. “He was with us, then went on to dance throughout Europe and South America before coming back to New York Theatre Ballet. He is very gifted.” The film, by David Peterson, followed the program for just over a decade. “When I said yes to the idea, I thought it was going to be three weeks. And it was 11 years,” said Byer. “It was disruptive in a funny way. But we made it through, and I think it’s very touching.” Scenes in the film of Melendez working with children from the homeless shelter where he lived as a child are particularly affecting. Also featured prominently is Victor Abreu, who was not from a shelter, but started with NYTB as a 10-year-old. Abreu is now a member of the New York City Ballet. “He is extraordinary,” said Byer. “He’s got such gifts. He had a lot of stage experience with us, because we use children in special roles for kids. We also do in-house performances where they learn how to do lighting, costuming, and choreography. They’re performing in front of people all year long. So, when Victor got onto the stage with City Ballet, he was not like a deer in headlights.” Byer is pleased with Abreu’s success. But steering children toward professional careers is not necessarily the goal. “I think the program is about learning life lessons,” she said. “These kids come with a different set of problems you have to address. Many of them have done very well, with full rides in college and having good careers. Many stay in touch with me. but not all of them. They move on, and we give them the tools to move on. That’s the result we’re after. You break the cycles. But it doesn’t happen with everyone. There are successes and failures.” —Anne Levin

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Abortion Rights continued from page one

employees and students located in New Jersey are not affected by the ruling given current New Jersey law.” The statement went on to note that the University is still assessing how the ruling will affect Princeton University community members outside of New Jersey. In addition to Alito, a 1972 Princeton University graduate who wrote the majority opinion overturning Roe v. Wade, two other Princeton University alumni, Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor, are members of the U.S. Supreme Court. Kagan, a 1981 Princeton graduate, and Sotomayor, a 1976 graduate, were among the three justices who dissented in the 6-3 decision. A number of Princeton University professors responded to last Friday’s decision in comments on the University’s School of Public and International Affairs website. “Americans have woken up to the fact that the majority of this country supports legalized access to abortion,” wrote Psychology and Public Affairs Professor Elizabeth Levy Paluck. “After the initial leak of the Dobbs opinion, Americans saw the extent of this support. Now, public reactions to the overturning of Roe will make it crystal clear: the Court has disregarded the preferences of the majority of people across the country.” Elizabeth Mitchell Armstrong, associate professor of sociology and public affairs, pointed out public health consequences of the ruling. “The best guarantor of fetal health and wellbeing is maternal health and well-being,” she wrote. “Paradoxically, states with the most restrictive abortion regulations also have the highest rates of maternal mortality, severe maternal morbidity, and infant mortality, and some of the worst racial disparities in maternal and infant health. Genuinely pro-life policies would aim to close those gaps, reduce the deaths of all mothers and babies, and preserve families.” Politics Professor Paul Frymer emphasized the impact of the decision on the democratic process and the rights of “targeted” vulnerable populations. “Past landmark decisions were made to defend the rights of peo-

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RED CARPET MOMENT: Former Princeton dancer Diana Byer, left, with dancer Steven Melendez, at the opening of the documentary “LIFT: A Journey from Homelessness to the Ballet Stage” last month.

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ple who were not adequately represented by electoral politics,” he said. “Given how many of these populations being targeted by the Supreme Court are vulnerable to both electoral and legislative majorities, it’s a worry that regaining these rights through more democratic avenues will not be so easy, no matter how popular the ideas and practices are across the country.” In an email to her constituents, Congresswoman Bonnie Watson Coleman wrote, “While we may have known this was coming, it does not make it any easier. This is an absolutely devastating time for our country, and for women in particular. I steadfastly believe that the ability of anyone to make choices regarding their own body is a fundamental constitutional right. Unfortunately, the right-wing court does not agree.” She went on to emphasize the disproportionate burden that will be imposed on those unable to afford basic health care. “The consequences of overturning Roe will be most burdensome for those Americans who already face systemic barriers accessing health care, especially women of color,” she said. “While the wealthy few will always be able to receive abortion care, others will be forced to give birth against their will.” New Jersey State Sen. Andrew Zwicker also lamented the Supreme Court decision, but pointed out that the state recently passed the Freedom of Reproductive Choice Act that ensures that abortion is still legal and available in New Jersey. “We are all angry and upset that the Court has turned back the clock 50 years,” Zwicker wrote in an email. “The fight will continue, and we will not rest until every woman in this country has control of her own reproductive health care.” Mercer Count y E xecu tive Brian M. Hughes also weighed in in opposition to what he called a “backward decision by the Court.” He emphasized that reproductive health care rights of women in New Jersey would continue to be protected, and he urged residents “to act and make your voice heard.” “We must send a message to our leaders making clear that we expect them to protect a woman’s right to choose and ensure that no woman or girl is denied that right,” said Hughes. “This decision could have consequences beyond abortion rights. Let this moment in time energize us to go to the polls and vote for candidates who protect instead of erode the rights of all.” —Donald Gilpin

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Talk on Battle of Trenton Planned for Trent House

As part of Trenton’s Liberty Weekend July 8-10, the Trent House Association presents a talk by Dr. Iris de Rode on research by the Marquis de Chastellux as the Continental and French armies prepared for their march through New Jersey to the battle of Yorktown in 1781. This free program will be held on Saturday, July 9 at 2 p.m. in-person at the William Trent House, 15 Market Street, or via Zoom at https:// tinyurl.com/THTalkJuly9. During the last phase of the American Revolution, the French expeditionary army of the Count de Rochambeau came to the aid of George Washington’s forces in 1780. To conduct war in these new, unknown lands, a group of French officers went on a mission to do extensive studies of the American lands, its geography, topography and infrastructure, but also of the former battlefields of the American Revolution. François-Jean de Chastellux (17341788), the major general of Rochambeau’s army, studied these former battlefields extensively, with the approach of a true historian. He wrote a very detailed account of the Battle of Trenton, based on his own thorough research based on accounts of eyewitnesses, in person interviews with the participants, observations he made in Trenton, and maps from both the British and the Americans. He can be considered the first historian of the Battle of Trenton, and during this lecture, de Rode will take a close look at his analysis and conclusions about this important battle, based both on his published travel diary but also on unpublished sources from his family castle in Burgundy, France. De Rode specialized in the French role in the American Revolution. She earned her Ph.D. in 2019 from the University of Paris, and just published François-Jean de Chastellux un soldat philosophe dans le monde atlantique à l’époque des Lumières (Paris, Honoré Champion, 2022), a biography of the Marquis de Chastellux, based on his unpublished private papers that she discovered in the Château de Chastellux. She is now working on her book in English, as well as a travel app for the Washington Rochambeau Revolutionary Trail and a documentary film on her research, and is a research fellow at George Washington’s Mount Vernon. A pay-as-you-wish donation can be made by PayPal at williamtrenthouse.org/donation. html.

Storytelling Network Program At Pettoranello Gardens

Members of the New Jersey Storytelling Network will present a program of stories on Friday, July 8, at 6 p.m. in Pettoranello Gardens at Community Park North, 20 Mountain Avenue. The family-friendly stories will reflect the theme of Princeton Public Library’s Summer Reading programs: Oceans of Possibilities. Stories will include “Tiddalik the Frog,” “Coyote and the Sea Witch,” “Pourquoi Bug Story,” “How Raven Made the Tides,” “The Adventures of Harriet the Horseshoe Crab,” and “A Wish from a Fish,” among others. In the event of rain, this program will take place in the library’s Community Room at 6 p.m. Updates will be posted on the events calendar at princetonlibrary.org.


continued from page one

reading of the decision was former Councilwoman Jo Butler, who lives near the campus on Hibben Road. “Are we really going to sacrifice the town’s historic properties, the right to zone, the responsibility to residents, due to a fear of litigation?” she asked. “Apparently we are.” Tom Chapman of the Mercer Hill Historic District Association said, “We urge the town to withhold any demolition permits and engage an independent historic preservation consultant to evaluate these buildings.” The letter written in response to PCR D repre sentatives Butler and Brad Middlekauff, from attorney Francis Regan, is included in the agenda packet from the meeting and can be viewed on princetonnj.gov. Council voted to ratify the budget of the Special Improvement District (SID) from July 1, 2022 through Ju n e 30, 2023, i n t h e amount of $379,244. The nonprofit Princeton Busine s s Par t ner s h ip ( PB P ) will oversee the SID, which was voted in last February.

“Marketing and events are a big priority,” said Aubrey Haines, president of the PBP. “The board will carefully steward the resources of this organization.” Councilwoman Mia Sacks commented that she hoped sustainability would be a priority. “It is not only the right thing to do, it is also good business,” responded Haines. Council voted in favor of a resolution to dissolve the town’s Economic Development Committee, which enables the SID to get underway. Councilwoman Michelle Pirone L ambros praised those who have served on the committee, calling them “crucial to help resolve and troubleshoot issues these pas t few years. T h is is just moving on to the next phase.” Council voted in favor of several ordinances having to do with sewer connection fees, accessory dwelling units, loading zones on Chambers Street, and the acquisition of scooters for parking enforcement officers. The next public meeting of Princeton Council is July 11. —Anne Levin

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Womanspace Names Vincent to have Troy Vincent as the the latest scientific treatment Lisa Motavalli, MD, a board As 2023 BBS Award Honoree 27th Barbara Boggs Sig- guidelines. The heart failure certified cardiologist with

Wo m a n s p a c e h a s a n nounced that Troy Vincent Sr. is its 2023 BBS Award honoree. A Trenton native, Vincent is an NFL football legend who has played for the Philadelphia Eagles, the Miami Dolphins, the Buffalo Bills, and the Washington Redskins. He currently serves as the executive vice president of football operations for the NFL. He and his wife, Tommi, are advocates against domestic violence and sexual assault and have supported Womanspace over the years.

mund Award recipient,” said Nathalie Nelson, CEO and president of Womanspace. “Domestic violence is not just a women’s issue. It’s an issue that affects the entire world, and Troy’s passion for ending intimate partner violence is inspiring.” Womanspace is thankful for Vincent’s support of their mission of nonviolence and his consistent commitment to the Greater Trenton community. The community is invited to join Womanspace on Thursday, May 4, 2023, as they honor Vincent and his initiatives to prevent abuse within the home and on the field. For sponsorship and ticket information, visit womanspace.org.

Princeton Medical Center Earns Achievement Award

Troy Vincent Sr.

“It is indeed humbling and with great gratitude to be the recipient of the 2023 Barbara Boggs Sigmund Award,” said Vincent. “Its significance and legacy represent decades of dedication to end domestic violence and sexual assault. Turning pain into purpose is an example of how one voice can grow to be amplified on behalf of millions, and it’s a reminder that violence against women and young girls is our issue.” “Womanspace is honored

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Princeton Medical Center (PMC) has earned the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines —Heart Failure Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award, for providing consistent, quality care aligned with the latest evidence-based guidelines. PMC earned two additional, related awards from the American Heart Association (AHA) — Target: Heart Failure Honor Roll and Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll. About 6.2 million American adults live with heart failure, a chronic, progressive condition in which the heart is unable to pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs for blood and oxygen. Get With The Guidelines is an in-hospital program for improving care by promoting consistent adherence to

guidelines establish treatment protocols with the best evidence to speed recovery, reduce hospital readmissions, and improve the quality of life for patients with heart failure. Participating hospitals are evaluated on their performance related to achievement measures in key areas such as prescribing appropriate medications, providing necessary diagnostic tests, and scheduling follow-up visits. To earn Gold, PMC met or exceeded the achievement measures for 24 consecutive months. PMC added Plus status by documenting performance in four additional quality measures. “We are trying to help people with heart failure manage their condition, stay healthy, and lead fuller lives,” said

Princeton Medicine Physicians. “The initiative gives us a quality framework to achieve those goals.” PMC earned its Target: Heart Failure Honor Roll award by meeting criteria that improve medication adherence, provide early followup care and coordination, and enhance patient education. PMC earned the Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll award by ensuring that patients with type 2 diabetes — who are at higher risk for complications — receive the most up-to-date, evidencebased care when they are hospitalized due to heart disease or stroke. U.S. News & World Report has rated PMC as high performing in heart failure treatment for seven years in a row.

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Morven Museum & Garden to Host Independence Day Celebration, Activities “Sw inging back to the 1960s” in celebrating its current Bell Labs exhibit, Morven Museum & Garden has an array of entertainment, foods, and educational activities on tap for its annual Independence Day Jubilee on Monday, July 4 from 12 to 3 p.m. Among the highlights of the afternoon at the former home of Richard Stockton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, will be a Jasper Johns American flag activity led by the Arts Council of Princeton, a “1960s Princeton adventure” organized by the Historical Society of Princeton, dancing in the gardens with Luminarium Dance Company, music from the 1960s and beyond played by the Green Planet Band, and food trucks on the premises from KonaIce and Potato Patoto, which specializes in tater tots with a variety of toppings. In person for the first time since 2019, the Morven Fourth of July Jubilee is sponsored by Honda of Princeton and the Bank of Princeton. “As a home of a signer of the Declaration of Independence, the Fourth of July is cornerstone to our existence,” said Morven Executive Director Jill M. Barry. “This year we are celebrating’60s style, in homage to our Bell Labs exhibition, but also in reference to the civic engagement that was particularly evident in the sixties.” The cur rent exhibit at Mor ven, “Ma B el l : T he Mother of Invention in New Jersey,” features the TelStar 1 satellite flight model, which was made by AT&T and Bell Telephone Laboratories, and many other technological innovations that were created in New Jersey and went on to influence the entire world. Bell Telephone Laboratories, named for its founder A lexander Graham Bell,

inventor of the telephone, had facilities in New Jersey beginning in the 1930s, creating new technology that helped to bring forth cell phones, solar panels, radar, satellites, and the discovery of the Big Bang. Tens of thousands of New Jerseyans have been employed by Bell, AT&T, and Western Electric and have supported the groundbreaking technology of those companies. The Morven exhibit, showcasing the ways in which New Jersey inventions formed the building blocks of much of today’s technology, includes original historical artifacts related to breakthrough discoveries, as well as products and fields of work that comprised the Bell system in New Jersey from the 1920s to about 1984, when the break-up of the Bell system monopoly created the seven Baby Bells known as the Regional Bell Operating Companies. Among related programs at Morven coming up later in the summer will be an evening with AT&T’s corporate historian Sheldon Hochheiser, who on July 28 will talk about six episodes of major inventions at AT&T, and, on August 4, “‘Hello G irls’ G e t t h e Me s s age Through” with Monmouth University Professor and former Army historian Melissa Ziobro telling the story of how the U.S. Army Signal Corps employed women as telephone switchboard operators during World War I. The July 4 festivities at Morven will also include a variety of games and crafts. Among the 1960s hit songs on the playlist for the Green Planet Band will be “Telstar,” honoring the original Telstar satellite, which is on view in Morven’s Garden Room. —Donald Gilpin

Triumph Brewing Co. continued from page one

and glass attached to what was the loading dock on the east side of the building. The new entrance for patrons will be quite a contrast to the long, narrow corridor that led into the 138 Nassau Street restaurant. The main hall of the old post office will be one of two dining rooms that will be on the upper floor, along with a bar and a lounge. Rechnitz explained that the decor in the basement would be familiar to former patrons of the 138 Nassau establishment, but he added that “upstairs will be something quite different.” Richardson Smith Architects of Witherspoon Street in Princeton, who did the interior design of 138 Nassau as well as the designs of Rechnitz’s Triumph breweries in New Hope and Red Bank, have been the design architects for the new Palmer Square renovations. Collaborating with Richardson Smith have been Gittings Associates of Forrestal Road as the architect of record and Historic Building Architects of Trenton as the historic preservation architects. Patrons of the old post office, which was built in 1937, may remember a mural titled America Under the Palms, which was in the lobby. It will not be moved, but will now be on the wall of one of the dining rooms. “It belongs to the federal government,” said Rechnitz. “It’s on loan to us. We have no say about it except we are obliged to keep it where it is and maintain it.” The mural had previously caused some controversy because of its depiction of Native Americans. Additional work to be done before next winter’s opening includes new portions of roadway and curbing and widened sidewalks, according to Assistant Municipal Engineer Jim Purcell. “It’s going along smoothly,” he said. “Final paving will take place in a couple of months.” —Donald Gilpin

Proposed Hospital Deal Will Not Go Forward

After thorough evaluation, Saint Peter’s Healthcare System in New Brunswick will not move forward with a proposed transaction with RWJBarnabas Health (RWJBH), headquartered in West Orange. The leadership of both organizations mutually made the decision after the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) recently fi led suit to block the deal that would have enabled the creation of the first premier academic medical center in New Jersey designed to increase services, provide better access, and reduce the overall cost of such care. The announcement culminates a discernment process at Saint Peter’s during the past several years that included a Request for Proposal in October 2018, seeking a strategic partner best suited to help the organization maintain its rich Catholic mission and identity in an increasingly changing and competitive health care market. “After careful consideration by leadership, the Saint Peter’s Board of Governors, and t he Most Reverend James F. Checchio, Bishop of the Diocese of Metuchen, and sole corporate member of Saint Peter’s, we have decided to terminate the Definitive Agreement to fully integrate with RWJBarnabas Health. We are very disappointed with this outcome. However, we are grateful for the strong partnership we’ve had with the RWJBarnabas leadership,” said Leslie D. Hirsch, FACHE, president and chief executive officer

of Saint Peter’s Healthcare System. Hirsch added, “We were truly excited about the potential of this opportunity with RWJBarnabas to create a premier academic medical center of national distinction that would have improved quality and increased access, especially to the most vulnerable in the communities we serve. We are now assessing the best way to move forward as we consider potential options to ensure Saint Peter’s longstanding Catholic health care mission.” As Middlesex County’s only independent hospital not operated as part of a larger health care system, Saint Peter’s remains committed to providing the highest quality care and patient experience to the community through humble service, particularly to the most vulnerable and chronically underserved.

Princeton Medical Center Earns Accreditation for Stroke Care

The inpatient rehabilitation and stroke specialty programs at Princeton Medical Center (PMC) recently earned threeyear accreditation from CARF International, an independent nonprofit that promotes quality, patient-centered care and continuous performance improvement. CARF — formerly the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities — announced the accreditation following a comprehensive survey conducted this spring in PMC’s Acute Rehab Unit. PMC is one of only nine New Jersey hospitals with CARF-accredited inpatient rehab and stroke specialty programs. PMC previously earned CARF accreditation in 2016 and 2019.

“Congratulations to our physicians, nurses, therapists, and other professionals in Acute Rehab,” said James Demetriades, CEO of Penn Medicine Princeton Health. “This is a significant achievement because it shows that we not only meet or exceed standards of patient care but we are also committed to monitoring our performance and implementing plans to elevate the level of care and services we provide.” Acute Rehab is a 17-bed unit that provides intensive, individualized therapies and medical management to people recovering from serious injury or illness to help them regain function and transition to home. Care is provided in an on-site gym and a variety of public and home-like settings — including a unique, apartment-style suite within the unit — where people can practice life skills and daily activities in preparation for returning home. CARF surveyors noted 11 Areas of Strength, including staff communication and teamwork, high patient satisfaction, organizational support for continuing education, and Princeton Health’s affiliation with Penn Medicine, which offers benefits to patients such as a unified medical record that allows for enhanced communication and continuity of care. The strengths also included the hospital’s facilities, with the report praising environmental services staff for the cleanliness of the unit and the organization for providing physical spaces that are well laid-out, spacious, and bright. The accreditation is valid through May 31, 2025.

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Decision on Warehouse Project Will Impact Quality of Life for Everyone in the Region

Roslynn & Joel Greenberg

To the Editor: Af ter reading your lead stor y on the 5.5 millionsquare-foot warehouse project proposed for U. S. Route 1 [“Opposition Grows to Route 1 Warehouse Project,” June 22, page 1], I immediately wrote and sent the following letter to Hemant Marathe, the mayor of West Windsor Township. Dear Mr. Mayor: The lead article on the front page of Town Topics reports that the members of the West Windsor Township Planning Board are scheduled to vote on the 5.5 million-square-foot warehouse project proposed for the former American Cyanamid property on U. S. Route 1. Before you make this very major decision, I urge you and your colleagues to embrace candor and caution. Specifically, please do more research and have additional open dialogue with all the actual constituencies: with West Windsor’s neighboring municipalities, the county, the state, with environmental experts, and, indeed, with the people of central New Jersey. Your decision will impact the quality of life for ever yone in our region for many years. Moreover, the environmental costs of allowing this gigantic project to be built will, I think, far exceed any economic benefits. Here is one type of serious potential impact from building 5.5 million-square-feet spread across nine warehouses : diesel pollution. Diesel-powered trucks will have to move the vast amounts of “stuff” that will be put into and taken out of the warehouses. Please read this ar ticle I wrote for The New York Times on diesel pollution in New Jersey (https://tinyurl. com/bdfv6n39). Although The Times published it years ago, I believe that the scientific/medical concerns and conclusions it presents are still largely relevant. The bottom line is that diesel exhaust can and does seriously harm creatures that breathe. First, do no harm. RICHARD TRENNER Province Line Road Note: Marathe has pointed out to Town Topics that there are seven warehouses in the project, not nine, and the pending application in front of the West Windsor Township Planning Board is only for the first three.

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“You Can Still Hear Him” — Remembering “Lolita” and James Mason The ‘watering down,’ if any, did not come from my aspergillum. —Vladimir Nabokov, in the Playboy interview ho else but a high priest of language could anoint the tired old term “watered down” with an implement for sprinkling holy water? Would the average Playboy reader of January 1964 reach for the nearest dictionary or keep reading? In the easy access world of June 2022, I unmasked the elusive aspergillum with a click of an iMac mouse. This was Nabokov’s way of elaborately denying responsibility for “watering down” the central relationship in Stanley Kubrick’s film of Lolita (1962), the novel’s 12-yearold nymphet having been transformed into a 15-year-old blonde who looked 17. Asked if he was satisfied with the final product, Nabokov deemed the movie “absolutely first-rate,” adding that the “four main actors deserve the very highest praise,” and pointing out that he’d had “nothing to do with the actual production.” The Voice In his foreword to Lolita: A Screenplay (McGraw-Hill), dated Montreux, December 1973, Nabokov admits his first reaction to the picture was “a mixture of aggravation, regret, and reluctant pleasure,” but “aggravation and regret soon subsided” as “I told myself that nothing had been wasted after all, that my scenario remained intact in its folder, and that one day I might publish it — not in pettish refutation of a munificent film but purely as a vivacious variant of an old novel.” If you’ve seen Kubrick’s Lolita as many times as I have (I lost count at six), you’ll hear Nabokov pronouncing “vivacious variant” in the rich, suavely melodious voice of the film’s Humbert Humbert, James Mason (19091984), who lived his last two decades just around the proverbial corner from Nabokov (1899-1977). When Mason’s neighbor and close friend Charlie Chaplin died in January 1977, his remains were buried in the cemetery where Mason’s would be interred in 1984, just down the road from Nabokov’s grave in Montreux. “You Can Hear Him” Nabokov and Chaplin are legends, thus the monuments to Nabokov in Montreux (depicted slouched in a chair) and to Chaplin in Vevey (sculpted in his Tramp costume of derby and walking stick). If Nabokov lives on in his world of words and Chaplin in his world of gestures, Mason lives on in his legendary “languid but impassioned” voice, as film historian David Thomson describes it in a May 2009 piece on Mason’s centenary. After mentioning some memorable roles, Thomson writes, “I know you can see Mason in these parts, but it’s just as evident that you can hear him.” Pondering the phenomenon of Mason’s voice, Thomson wonders about the mysterious “something” that “allowed

the actor to become his true self just once, as the voice of Humbert Humbert ... a scholar of comparative literature, as well as a judge of nymphets,” who may be “the purest-spoken scoundrel in all movies,” delivering “Nabokovian prose” as if it were “the most normal and sensible way of speaking the English language yet invented.” Not being a full-fledged legend, Mason has no monument, an oversight I can hear him treating as a trivial jest, the way Humbert does when asked by Lolita’s mother if he believes in God: “The question is does God believe in me?” Thanks to Mason’s voice, Humbert’s narration is one of the abiding pleasures of the film, as he purrs lines like “Queer how I misinterpreted the designation of doom,” or as heartsick Humbert tells a married, pregnant Lo, at the end, when all is lost, “I want you to live with me and die with me and everything with me.” Then there’s the moment Humbert shares a sample of “the Divine Edgar” with Lolita: “And we passed to the end of the vista, / But were stopped by the door of a tomb, / And I said, ‘What is written, sweet sister?’ / She replied, ‘Ulalume, Ulalume.”’ 1962-2022 Lolita came to us the summer before the Cuban Missile crisis. You had to be there at that point in time to feel the excitement of witnessing “something new under the sun.” Among numerous reviews from earlier this month marking the film’s 60th anniversary, the notice in the Guardian refers to the novel as “troubling” and the film as “strange and unnerving,” which is understandable since the review was written in “a world that is gradually becoming more attuned to sexual abuse.” What’s truly strange is the reviewer’s failure to appreciate the free-flowing comic spirit that makes the film so exhilarating. Kubrick is scolded for “repeatedly” letting Peter Sellers “run free,” his scenes with Mason seeming “to stretch on forever, a filibuster of shtick.” A pastemagazine.com review from June 10 mentions the challenge of the “distressing subject matter” and “the dangerously convincing, even likable, voice of the narrator,” along with the consequence of straying too far from the novel that “might explain committing such atrocities.” Lose touch with Nabokov’s book and you risk losing yourself “in the horrifying ethical void of it all.” A June 13 Tilt Magazine review (tilt. goombastomp.com) sees Lolita “in control throughout. Her hunger is insatiable,” she’s “the alpha in the relationship.” Faroutmagazine.co.uk suggests that “audiences in the early 1960s were likely no more accepting of child abuse but may have been less sensitive to details of language and portrayal,”

and worries that Humbert, “might well be mistakenly taken for the hero of the story.” Which of course he is, unless you cast your lot with Quilty. Assuming he reads reviews in the afterlife, Nabokov might shake his cosmic aspergillum at the wordjam of paste, tilt, goombastomp, and far out, while sneering at the BBC’s comments on “the troubling legacy of the Lolita story .... We knew we must make her a sex object.” But “is it fair to blame the film for the role of Lolita in the cultural conversation? Whether the web was spun by Kubrick ... or by Nabokov himself” is “open to argument.” In the end, the “one salient voice” was that of Sue Lyon as Lolita. (Lyon, who died at 73 in December 2019, won a 1963 Golden Globe as Most Promising Newcomer.) The Tyranny of the Normal The “troubling” novel was slammed by the New York Times’ Orville Prescott in 1958, as “dull, dull, dull,” “repulsive,” “disgusting,” “fatuous,” “tiresome.” Four years later the Times film critic Bosley Crowther, the Tweedledum to Prescott’s Tweedledee, observed that Sue Lyon’s Lolita is “possessed of a striking figure,” which makes the “passion of the hero ... more normal and understandable.” In Nabokov’s prose universe the word “normal” is synonymous with the postwar American nightmare in which Humbert Humbert is fated to live, lust, love, murder, and die. For Kubrick, “normal” becomes the foil for a black comedy of repellently banal interiors and situations; “normal” means no under-the-radar sex on the sofa leading to “the last throb of the longest ecstasy man or monster had ever known” and no drugging of the monster’s prey when her mother is conveniently dead and Humbert finally has the child in his clutches. One of the film’s triumphs is the blending of black comedy and romance made possible by Mason’s sympathetic performance, which he considered the finest of his long career. According to Vincent Lobrutto’s biography Stanley Kubrick, what Kubrick and producer James Harris wanted from Nelson Riddle’s lush score was “a straightforward romantic sound” rather than “any form of dissonance” that “might disparage Humbert” and his love “in the audience’s eyes.” Because of the MPAA [Motion Picture Association of America] strictures, it’s not with Lo but with her mother, memorably played by Shelley Winters, that Mason is allowed to become darkly and diabolically Humbertian, the swarthy cad who bursts into satanic laughter after reading her letter proposing marriage and contemplates murdering her, and who, when fate does the job for him, basks in the bathtub drinking scotch.

Taken straight, without benefit of art, literary or performative, Mason’s Humbert could be denounced for his predatory treatment of both mother and daughter. But Kubrick saw the “central relationship” as a unique love story. Humbert’s undying love for Lolita abides, even when he finds that his nymphet has become a slovenly, pregnant housewife; still he tearfully pleads with her to come away with him, and when she refuses, gives her and her deaf young husband all his money, and drives off to execute Quilty. Murder’s Masterpiece The fi lm’s bravura opening scene is set in the party-shattered shambles of Quilty’s rented mansion, a fantastically cluttered and chaotic labyrinth of statuary, kitsch, and bric-a-brac, with here and there amid the chaos a bust of Shakespeare, a harp, a piano, a ping-pong table. Whatever Nabokov ultimately thought of the film, he considered the killing of Quilty “a masterpiece,” as he told Toffler in the Playboy interview. It was while working on the screenplay that he came to appreciate what Kubrick was up against. In fact, it was Nabokov who realized that the film had to begin at the end of the story. Proposed in Nabokov’s screenplay as “a silent shadowy sequence which should last not more than one minute,” Humbert’s murder of Quilty is actually worthy of the version in the novel, arguably the greatest single sequence in all of Nabokov. Driven by Kubrick’s direction and the comic genius of Peter Sellers, it’s a hilarious nightmare in which the straight man kills the clown, who “jigs and ambles” to the end. When Humbert asks Quilty if he wants to die standing or sitting, Sellers dons a pair of boxing gloves: “I wanna die like a champion!” He’s still clowning as the first bullet hits the glove. Finally revealing signs of mortal panic, he flounces over to the piano and begins playing Chopin’s Grand Polonaise (“Nice sort of opening, that. We could dream up some lyrics maybe”). A minute later Quilty, still bantering, is shot dead behind a Gainsborough. A Monument for Mason ames Mason’s innumerable monument-worthy roles other than Humbert Humbert include Johnny, the wounded fugitive in Carol Reed’s masterpiece Odd Man Out; Brutus in MGM’s Julius Caesar; and the fading star in George Cukor’s A Star Is Born, for which he won a Golden Globe. It was Mason’s Norman Maine who witnessed Judy Garland’s mesmerizing performance of “The Man Who Got Away,” a revelation that sets the whole falling star–rising star plot in motion. And it was Mason who would deliver the eulogy at Garland’s funeral 15 years later: “Judy’s great gift was that she could wring tears out of hearts of rock.” Close your eyes and you can almost hear that extraordinary voice. —Stuart Mitchner

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022 • 12

BOOK/FILM REVIEW


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Princeton Festival Presents “Broadway POPS!” Starring Sierra Boggess; Milanov, PSO Join the “Phantom” Star in Offering Vocal, Orchestral Delights

rinceton Festival has presented Broadway POPS! Broadway and West End star Sierra Boggess joined the Princeton Symphony Orchestra in a program of highlights from musical theater. The June 24 concert was conducted by the orchestra’s Edward T. Cone Music Director Rossen Milanov. Boggess made her Broadway debut in the 2007 stage version of Disney’s The Little Mermaid. She has portrayed Christine Daaé in multiple productions of Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera (including the 25th anniversary concert at Royal Albert Hall), as well as the West End premiere of its sequel, Love Never Dies. With Julian Ovenden she has released an album of duets, Together at a Distance. Broadway POPS! marks Boggess’ third collaboration with the PSO, following appearances in 2017 and 2018. The Olivier Award nominee also starred in The Age of Innocence (2018) at McCarter Theatre. Boggess and Milanov created a selection that alternated between orchestral and vocal pieces, letting most of the featured composers be represented by at least one of each. The resulting program delighted the audience that packed the Festival’s performance tent on the grounds of Morven Museum & Garden. Boggess remarked that she chose pieces that she wanted to hear the orchestra perform. The concert opened with an orchestral selection: “The Music Man: Symphonic Impressions,” crafted by Richard Hayman from Meredith Willson’s score. The woodwinds, especially the flutes, shone with the strings in the lush ballad “’Till There Was You.” The piece closes with the rousing “76 Trombones.” A Broadway revival of the show opened this past February. Boggess entered, sporting a bright red dress. Despite her long association with Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera, she chose as her first selection “Home,” a song from a different stage adaptation of the Gaston Leroux novel. Phantom (1991) has a book by Arthur Kopit; the music and lyrics are by Maury Yeston. “Home” is a number that opens delicately and ends operatically — a progression often favored by Boggess — waiting until the end to let the singer reveal her high soprano. Frank Loesser’s score for Guys and Dolls (1950) was represented both by a vocal selection and an orchestral medley. Boggess sang the buoyant “If I Were A Bell,” which she performed (as the character of Sarah Brown) in a 2014 concert presentation at Carnegie Hall. In accompanying her, the PSO used the orchestrations by the musical’s original Broadway arrangers, George Bassman and Ted Royal. The subsequent instrumental potpourri

is arranged by Calvin Custer. Boggess’ next selection was from She Loves Me (1963), a musical that Princeton Festival presented in 2019. The show’s score is by composer Jerry Bock and lyricist Sheldon Harnick (who wrote the songs for Fiddler on the Roof the following year). The eager but introspective “Will He Like Me?” displayed Boggess’ gift for sensitive musical phrasing. The orchestrations were by Don Walker and Frank Matosich Jr. An orchestral “Beauty and the Beast Suite” is arranged by Michael Kosarin, a longtime collaborator of composer Alan Menken. The medley highlights the 1991 animated film’s story arc by jumping from the Prologue — which evokes the “Aquarium” movement of Saint-Saens’ Carnival of the Animals — to the music that underscores the Beast’s transformation back to a prince. The selection also includes “How Does a Moment Last Forever” (from the 2017 remake), and ends with a soaring restatement of the title melody. Boggess spoke glowingly of the “uplifting’ and “hopeful” music of Disney films, particularly those composed by Menken. She then performed “Part of Your World,” which Menken and lyricist Howard Ashman wrote for The Little Mermaid (1989). The song displayed Boggess’ acting talents, as the title character’s mood is by turns eagerly fascinated, amused, and frustrated. The first half closed with the title song from Love Never Dies (2010), which Lloyd Webber wrote with lyricist Glenn Slater.

The plot (crafted by Frederick Forsyth, Ben Elton, Lloyd Webber, and Slater) requires Christine to again choose between Raoul (now her husband, whose gambling debts have strained the marriage) and the Phantom. The singing of the title number — which the Phantom composes for Christine to sing at a Coney Island venue he now owns — signifies that choice. “Love Never Dies” begins reflectively and swells to a soaring climax, as the lyrics guide Christine from ambivalence to certainty. It opens with an extended instrumental introduction, during which Boggess respectfully faced the orchestra. Not until right before her entrance did she turn toward the audience. Of the experience of singing in London, Boggess quipped, “You feel posh in the West End!” The orchestra opened the second half with the Overture to My Fair Lady (1956), arranged by André Previn. Boggess entered (having changed into a light blush pink dress) and led the audience in a singalong of that musical’s jubilant signature number, “I Could Have Danced All Night” (lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner, music by Frederick Loewe). Midway through the song Boggess breezily pointed out, “You’re singing with the Princeton Symphony Orchestra!” This was followed by “My White Night,“ Marian’s first solo from The Music Man (1957), orchestrated by Walker. (Born in Lambertville, Walker spent the end of his life in New Hope, Pa.) Audiences who only know the 1962 film version might not immediately recognize the number,

13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022

Broadway POPS!

THEATER REVIEW

which was replaced by “Being in Love.” However, the two songs share material in the middle. The orchestra played a “Symphonic Suite from Into the Woods,” crafted by Don Sebesky from Stephen Sondheim’s 1987 score. Sebesky gives much of the jaunty title tune to the flutes and piccolos, punctuating it with string pizzicatos and drum beats that suggest footsteps taken by the giants in “Jack and the Beanstalk.” Boggess starred as Cinderella in the 2019 Hollywood Bowl production of the show. The Secret Garden (1991) has a book and lyrics by Marsha Norman, and music by Lucy Simon. From that show Boggess sang the poignant ballad “How Could I Ever Know.” Boggess revealed that when she was younger she wore out her copy of the original cast recording, which she had on a “cassette tape!” In 2016 Boggess herself portrayed Lily in a concert production at Lincoln Center. Boggess paid tribute to Rebecca Luker, who died in 2020. Luker starred as Lily in the 1992 Broadway production, and played Marian in the 2000 revival of The Music Man. The comparatively somber note continued with Boggess singing “Wishing You Were Somehow Here Again” from The Phantom of the Opera (1986). The number was presented as it is in the show: an intricate, jittery violin solo and a brief reprise of the title song preface it. Some critics have chided Lloyd Webber for repeating melodies too often. But as Christine sings about ceasing to mourn her dead father, the melody more subtly evokes an earlier number, “Angel of Music.” It is effective because the moment underlines a shift in Christine’s attitude toward the Phantom. Both this number and “How Could I Ever Know” examine the need of a bereaved character to overcome their grief and start a new life. The final scene of Into the Woods also explores that theme, as a father (the Baker) must raise his son without DISTINCTIVE S his dead wife. Boggess closed with the cautionary lullaby “No One is Alone.” SheFINIS WOODS, punctuated the line “Things will come out right now; we can make it so” by gesturing with crossed fingers. She also paid tribute INSPIRING CUS to Sondheim, who died last November. oggess and Milanov have a wonderful rapport. This was palpable PROJECT MAN in the blend of Boggess’ voice with the orchestra, and in the way the singer FROM CONCEP and the conductor looked at each other appreciatively in between selections. The DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF concert result was a well-balanced of ex“BROADWAY POPS!”: Princeton Festival has presented “Broadway POPS!” Above: Broadway WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES quisitely performed music. The concert let and West End star Sierra Boggess, left, joined the PSO in a program of highlights from Princeton Festival’s post-pandemic audiDISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF musical theater. The concert was conducted by Rossen Milanov, right. (Photo by Carolo Pascale.) CUSTOM INSPIRING DESIGNS enceCUSTOM revel inINSPIRING being, as Yeston’s lyricsDESIGNS say, WOODS, FINISHES “Home, where music fills theAND air.” STYLES PROJECT H. MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT For information about future presentations by Princeton Festival,PROJECT visit —Donald Sanborn III princetonsymphony.org/festival. FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETIO FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION INSPIRING CUSTOM DESIGNS DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF OF WOODS, FINISHES STYLES WOODS, FINISHES ANDAND STYLES

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Princeton University Summer Chamber Concerts Continues Series with String Quartet

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July 30

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In case of rain or excessive heat the shows will move to PHS PAC

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EVERYONE WILL NOTICE, BUT NO ONE WILL KNOW.

t is difficult to get audiences indoors on a summer afternoon, but Princeton University Summer Chamber Concerts was able to entice a good crowd into Richardson Auditorium this past weekend. For the second performance of the 2022 season, the Chamber Concerts series presented the Diderot String Quartet, a 10-year-old ensemble with a well-established commitment to historical performance. Violinists Johanna Novom and Adriane Post, violist Kyle Miller, and cellist Paul Dwyer came to Richardson Sunday afternoon to present eight of Johann Sebastian Bach’s most complex fugal compositions and an elegant string quartet by Felix Mendelssohn on period instruments. J.S. Bach’s The Art of the Fugue was comprised of 14 canons based on a single short theme. Bach subjected this melodic fragment to a combination of contrapuntal treatments, including setting the theme backwards, upside-down, and in varying speeds. The Diderot String Quartet performed eight of these settings, each showing a different side of Bach’s compositional genius. Although likely conceived for harpsichord, The Art of the Fugue has been adapted well to various combinations of instruments. “Contrapunctus I” opened with second violinist Adriane Post presenting the theme, followed by all instruments in fugal fashion. The Quartet’s period instruments provided a more understated and refined sound than modern instruments might have, requiring the audience to listen harder to the intimate ensemble sound. Throughout the Bach work, the Diderot Quartet paid a great deal of attention to dynamics, swelling and decreasing the sound together. Each “Contrapunctus” treated the theme in an altered way, often opening with a different instrument and pairing the strings in varied combinations of color. Violist Miller and cellist Dwyer were particularly well matched in sound, and violinists Post and Novom often provided extended passages of well-tuned intervals. The eight short movements became more complex as the work went on, with faster-moving lines for the players and dotted rhythms with varying degrees of Baroque “swing.” Dwyer played melodic

sequences in “Contrapunctus III” sensitively, with the closing movement requiring expert technical facility from all the instrumentalists. Mendelssohn lived a century after Bach, but the two were certainly connected; Mendelssohn was particularly devoted to the Baroque composer and revived many of his works which had fallen into obscurity. Mendelssohn’s 1827 String Quartet No. 2 in A minor may also have been inspired by the composer’s study of the quartets of Beethoven, as well as his own gift for melodic writing. Composed when Mendelssohn was only 18, this fourmovement work was a memento to the composer’s love for an unidentified girl and incorporated a melodic fragment from one of his love songs. Despite its youthful origins, this Quartet included complex and advanced musical devices well handled by the Diderot players. The Diderot Quartet continued their historically-informed performance approach in the Mendelssohn work, switching to longer bows and maintaining the same intimate ensemble sound. Following a regal introduction to the first movement, the Diderot musicians played phrase repetitions gently, and throughout the work continued the unison dynamic swells and decreases which had marked the Bach fugues. Cellist Dwyer demonstrated the elegant upper register of his instrument, and although not as much in a continuo role in this work, provided a solid foundation to the instrumental palette. he second movement “Adagio” showed Mendelssohn’s musical tribute to love most clearly, and the Diderot Quartet played the church-like opening and closing passages smoothly and reverently. The third movement was also played in a song-like manner, followed by an abrupt opening to the closing movement which is plainly borrowed from Beethoven. The Quartet played the final “Presto” with exact timing and clean unison racing lines, bringing out sforzandi well. With the audience in rapt attention, the Diderot String Quartet maintained Mendelssohn’s passion and longing to the final measures, showing the ensemble’s collaboration, historical meticulousness and technical facility. —Nancy Plum

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Princeton University Summer Chamber Concerts will present its next performance on Friday, July 8 at 7:30 p.m. in Richardson Auditorium, featuring the Manhattan Chamber Players performing music of Mozart, von Dohnányi, and Schumann. Tickets are free and are available one week before the performance at tickets.princeton.edu.

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15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022

Performing Arts

Fleming, violinist Brendan Speltz, cellist Brook Speltz, and pianist David Fung, each of whom have independent careers as soloists and members of professional chamber groups. Tickets are free and available online only starting Friday, July 1. Visit tickets. princeton.edu.

Capital Philharmonic Kicks Off Annual Music Series

A NOSTALGIC LINEUP: Peter Noone and Herman’s Hermits, the 1960s British band, are among the performers at a festival in Bristol, Pa., this summer.

Take a Musical Journey At Summer Music Fest

Bristol Riverside Theatre’s William Penn Bank Summer Music Fest is returning to t he Br istol Tow nship Amphitheater with a lineup that will take audiences on a musical journey through the decades. The second annual summer concert series will feature performances from The Commodores (July 15), Russell Thompkins, Jr. and The New Stylistics with special guest Eddie Holman (July 16), Indigo Girls (August 25), ’70s Flashback (August 26), and culminating with Herman’s Hermits starring Peter Noone (September 9 and 10). The recently-opened outdoor amphitheater seats 4,000 people and has expanded its offerings for this year’s festival to sell beer, wine, and other concessions, plus new premium seating. Tickets are $35$75. Premium admission includes seating in front of the stage with chairs. General admission attendees are invited to bring their own chairs and blankets. The theater is at 2501 Bath Road in Bristol, Pa . Visit brtstage.org for more information.

Free Chamber Concert At Richardson Auditorium

The Princeton University Summer Chamber Concerts’ 55th Season of free chamber music concer ts continues with the Manhattan Chamber Players (MCP) on Friday, July 8 at 7:30 p.m. in Richardson Auditorium on the Princeton University campus. The program will include Mozart’s Piano Quartet in E flat major, K. 493; Serenade in C Major for string trio, Opus 10 by Dohnányi and Schumann’s Piano Quartet in E flat Major, Opus 47. In 2015, violist Luke Fleming decided to bring together the musicians in MCP. Though he was playing the string quartet repertoire every day, he found himself more and more often trying to create opportunities to play other chamber music with people with whom he had come up in the music world — people who shared a common musical background and ideals of music making. These were the beginnings of the idea to create a chamber music collective with these colleagues and friends, an idea that finally came to fruition with the Manhattan Chamber Players. The ensemble includes

The Levitt AMP Trenton Music Series is returning to Trenton this summer, with 10 concerts planned in the 110-acre Cadwalader Park and one in Mill Hill Park. The first performance, on Saturday, July 9, will feature the Capital Philharmonic of New Jersey led by music director Daniel Spalding conducting music by John Williams, John Philip Sousa, and Irving Berlin on the program. The free 10-concert series, presented by Trenton Downtown Association and the African American Cultural Collaborative of Mercer County, will include local, regional, and national artists representing a wide range of musical styles. The series runs through September 17. Unlike years in the past, all shows will be on Saturday evening, with the exception of the Will Power Funk Band which will perform at Mill Hill Park on Sunday, July 31. Families are encouraged to come out early and enjoy food trucks, food vendors, and more. S i n c e 2 015, Tr e n t o n Downtown Association has presented the Levitt AMP Trenton Music Series, 10 free concerts, each summer in d owntown Trenton. Trenton is one of 20 current cities across the country that received a grant from the Levitt Foundation to bring people of all ages and backgrounds together to enjoy live-free music in their communities. Visit trentondowntown.com for more information.

Musician Wesley Stace To Perform at Benefit

The Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice will present Wesley Stace, also k n ow n as J oh n We s l e y Harding, in a benefit concert on Friday, July 1 at 7 p.m. The event will take place at 12 Stockton Street, and will go toward building a new space. Since 1988, Stace has released many albums under the name John Wesley Harding. He has recorded duets with Bruce Springsteen, Lou Reed, Rosanne Cash, and others. Stace has published four novels, including Misfortune, and co-wrote choreographer Mark Morris’ memoir Out Loud. He also created Cabinet of Wonders, a monthly show that plays at New York City’s City Winery. He has taught at Pr inceton Universit y, Swarthmore College, and Fairleigh-Dickinson University. He writes regularly for the Times Literary Supplement and the Wall Street Journal. All proceeds go toward helping the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice best serve Princeton at its new community activist center and safe-space for LGBTQIA youth and seniors, intersectional families, and MOZART AND MORE: Violinist Brendan Speltz is among the others. members of the Manhattan Chamber Players, coming to Tickets are $25. Visit jwh. Princeton on July 8 at 7:30 p.m. in Richardson Auditorium. eventbrite.com. Anyone who

SOUNDS OF SUMMER: Daniel Spalding conducts the Capital Philharmonic at the first concert of the Levitt AMP Trenton Music Series on July 9 in Trenton’s Cadwalader Park. cannot afford a ticket should contact the organization at RustinCenter.org, as financial difficulties will never bar access for any members of the community.

Princeton University Professor Named as Lewis Center Chair

Princeton University has named Professor of Dance Judith Hamera, an awardwinning dance and performance studies scholar, as the next chair of the University’s Lewis Center for the Arts. Hamera takes over from Michael Cadden, who served as interim chair for the 202122 academic year. Hamera will begin her new duties on July 1.

Judith Hamera (Photo by Jonathan Sweeney)

“I am so happy that Judith Hamera has agreed to serve as the next chair of the Lewis Center!” said Cadden. “Her work testifies to a lifelong interest in seeing connections among the arts and making connections among people living embodied lives in the worlds of academia and artistic practice — and the many other worlds we each inhabit. The Lewis Center dances on the bridges between those worlds and, as a scholar and teacher, Professor Hamera has surveyed many of them with ingenious results. Her eloquence, vision, and work ethic will serve us well — as will her commitment to an engagement with the entirety of our University, local, national, and international communities.” Hamera has been a faculty member in the Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Dance since 2014, and holds a faculty appointment in the University’s Effron Center for the Study of America, as well as affiliations with the Programs in Gender and Sexuality Studies and Urban Studies. Her most recent book, Unfinished Business: Michael Jackson, Detroit, and the Figural Economy of American Deindustrialization received the 2018 Outstanding Book Award from the Association for Theatre in

Higher Education, the 20172018 Biennial Sally Banes Publication Prize from the American Society for Theatre Research, and the 2020 Oscar G. Brockett Book Prize for Dance Research awarded to the best dance studies book of the past three years by the Dance Studies Association. Her essays have appeared in Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies, Cultural Studies, Cultural Studies — Critical Methodologies, Dance Research Journal, Modern Drama, PMLA, Qualitative Inquiry, TDR: The Drama Review, Text and Performance Quarterly, Theatre Journal, Theatre Survey, Theatre Topics, Women and Language, and Women’s Studies. Hamera is the recipient of the National Communication Association’s Lilla Heston Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Performance Studies and has served as editor of Text and Performance Quarterly, the performance studies journal of the National Communication Association. “I am honored to serve the Lewis Center for the Arts as its next chair, grateful to my predecessors who built this dynamic and vital unit, and energized by the work of my brilliant colleagues and our students,” said Hamera. “The arts press us to rigorously investigate our most foundational personal and societal questions and imagine new futures. I look forward to advancing the LCA’s commitment to this necessary and urgent work, and to welcom-

ing even more members of the Princeton community to join us in our courses, events, and efforts.”

All Saints’ Church Hosts Choir from Cambridge

All Saints’ Church presents the renowned choir of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, England, on July 9 at 7:30 p.m. The performance will feature music from across the centuries, primarily from the British choral tradition. The Sidney Sussex College Choir are the inheritors of an illustrious musical tradition dating back to the foundation of Sidney Sussex College in 1596. Since the appointment of Dr David Skinner as the Osborn Director of Music, the Choir has specializing in Renaissance music, making professional recordings for specialist markets including museums, art galleries, and national libraries. Recent tour destinations include Malaysia, Singapore, Rome, and the East and West coasts of the U.S., with performances in San Francisco, Santa Barbara, and Los Angeles, Calif.; Las Vegas, Nev.; Washington D.C.; Philadelphia; Boston; and New York’s Carnegie Hall. There will be a pause for reflection with the singing of “Introitus” from the Requiem of Tomas Luis de Victoria, to commemorate all lost in the COVID-19 pandemic, and all killed by American gun violence. Admission is free, but a $25 donation is appreciated to cover costs. All Saints’ Church is at 16 All Saints’ Road.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022 • 16

Art

“FINDING OUR WAY”: This acrylic painting by Mary Budkoski was presented with Best of Show, the Sally Bush Memorial Award in the annual “Members’ Non-Juried Exhibition and Sale” at The Center for Contemporary Art in Bedminster.

“Members’ Non-Juried Exhibition” diversity and creativity of Arts Center. Tapscott’s 15The Center’s community of year career in education, acAt Contemporary Art Center The Center for Contemporary Art (“The Center”) in Bedminster has announced its annual “Members’ NonJuried Exhibition and Sale,” a yearly oppor tunit y for members to showcase their artwork in any and all media. The variety and range of entries is a testament to the

artists. This year, there are 91 works of art by participating members in painting, pastel, charcoal, ink, graphite, photography, mixed media, ceramics, and more. The judge for this year’s exhibition was M’kina Tapscott, executive director of Artworks, Trenton’s Visual

cess, curation, and advocacy resonates with Artworks’ mission “to connect community, culture, and creativity through the arts.” She began her work as director of education and programs at Project Row Houses, an art and social service development in Houston, Texas, and

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LATE THURSDAYS! This event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970. Additional support for this program has been provided by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Curtis W. McGraw Foundation.

“EAGLE RAYS”: This mixed media work by Minako Ota is featured in “Our Inner Oceans: Paintings by Minako Ota,” on view through August 30 at the Princeton Public Library. continued through education and outreach positions at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and the Houston Center for Contemporar y Craft. A practicing artist, she holds an MFA from the University of Houston and a BFA from Texas State University. Best of Show, the Sally Bush Memorial Award, was presented to Mary Budkoski (Easton, Pa.) for her acrylic painting Finding Our Way; the Ceramics Award of Excellence went to DeAnn L. Prosia (Morristown) for her ceramic work Frosty Gathering ; Awards of E xcellence were given to Daniel C. Boyer (New York, N.Y.) a n d M i c h a e l M c Fa d d e n (Hampton); and Honorable Mentions were received by Wendy Hallstrom (Clinton), Bob Ricciotti ( Randolph) and Florence Shea-Gerold (Blairstown). The exhibition will be on view through August 27. The Center for Contemporary Art is located at 2020 Burnt Mills Road in Bedminster. Hours are Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, call (908) 234-2345 or visit ccabedminster.org.

“Our Inner Oceans” Exhibit At Princeton Public Library

Paintings of marine creatures by award-winning Japanese painter Minako Ota are featured in in the exhibit “Our Inner Oceans: Paintings by Minako Ota,” on view at the Princeton Public Library through August 30. Born in Osaka, Japan, Ota studied traditional Japanese painting at Tama Art University in Tokyo. Upon graduation, she attended Cambridge University in England where she focused on Western painting

conservation. Since she left her native country some 30 years ago, she has submerged herself in Western cultures in the U.S. and Europe. Her artwork is a cultural hybrid between Japan and the West, as she combines western painting techniques that she learned through her 20-plus years as a professional painting conservator and the traditional Japanese aesthetics that she grew up with. Ota started painting marine creatures in spring 2020, when COVID-19 became a serious threat in the U.S. People

were being challenged not only in health and economic aspects, but many others such as social, political, racial, and spiritual as well. She started creating this series with the hope to inspire people to live more fully and joyously, no matter their circumstances. “Life began in the oceans and we are still a part of this amazing living ecosystem, connected by this vast body of water,” said Ota. The library is located at 65 Witherspoon Street. For more information on Ota, visit minako-art.com.

A TIMELY, POWERFUL AND

INSPIRING EXHIBITION

featuring works from 95 artists from throughout the state. On view at the New Jersey State Museum through April 30, 2023.

New Jersey Arts Annual: Reemergence is a project of the New Jersey State Council on the Arts and the New Jersey State Museum.


“Art by Area Cartoonists” At Trenton Public Library

The Trenton Free Public Library and the Trenton Artists Workshop Association (TAWA) will present the exhibition “Art by Area Cartoonists” at the Trenton Free Public Library, 120 Academy Street, from July 1 to July 27. An opening reception is set for Friday, July 1, 5 to 7 p.m. as part of the Trenton Downtown Association’s First Fridays and recognition of the museum’s presence in the city’s Creek2Canal Trenton Arts District. An artist’s talk is scheduled for Thursday, July 7 at 6 p.m. “Art by Area Cartoonists” features work by regional artists who portray everyday events through cartoons and Illustrations. Participating artists include Bill Hogan and Ken Wilkie. Hogan, based in Morrisville, Pa., is the retired editorial cartoonist for the Bergen Record, where he created thousands of images for the major New Jersey daily on subjects ranging from political intrigue to fast food. He is also a fine arts painter who exhibits regularly in the Trenton area and was a member of the Trenton Artists Workshop Association. Wilkie lives in Hamilton and, in addition to being a cartoonist, is a retired teacher at Riverside Elementary School in Princeton and an occasional U.S. 1 illustrator. With a degree in art and his-

tory from Rutgers University and additional study with nationally syndicated cartoonist Mort Gerberg at the New School in New York, Wilkie has created cartoons for numerous publications, ranging from Saturday Evening Post to Good Housekeeping. TAWA is a Greater Trenton nonprofit organization and has a history of more than 30 years exhibiting in such venues as the New Jersey State Museum, Trenton City Museum, Artworks Trenton, Prince Street Gallery in New York City, and more. For more information, visit the organization’s Facebook page.

MC Government Month Poster Contest Winners

Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes has announced the winners of the 2022 “County Government Month” poster contest. The contest, inspired by the National Association of Counties County Government Month designation, promotes awareness of Mercer County’s history, progress, culture, and diversity, and was open to local fourth-grade students. The top five submissions are: Ben Hofmann, Parkway Elementary School, Ewing; Kayleigh Hughes, University Heights Elementary School, Hamilton; Logan Pablacio, Perry Drew School, East Windsor; Maya Rogart, Littlebrook School, Princeton; and Krystina Stansbury, Paul Robeson Charter School, Trenton.

“While I, as your county executive, believe that Mercer County is the greatest, it is refreshing to see that sentiment reflected through the eyes of our children in the more than 70 poster submissions we received,” said Hughes. “Congratulations to all of the participants, and to the teachers and parents who encourage and engage this bright generation, you have my thanks and gratitude.” The winners were presented award certificates, and all five students and their classmates received a pizza party celebration at their school. Winning posters are on display at Mercer County Library Headquarters Branch in Lawrence. More than 70 submissions were received by the County Office of Economic Development, contest host, and all students who submitted a poster received a certificate of Honorable Mention.

Area Exhibits Check websites for information on safety protocols. Art@Bainbridge, 158 Nassau Street, has “Body Matters / Martha Friedman” through July 10. artmuseum.princeton. edu. Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Natural Influences” through July 3. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Art on Hulfish, 11 Hulfish Street, has “Screen Time: Photography and Video Art in the Internet Age” through August 7. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Interwoven Stories: The Final Chapter,” through July 2 and “Communication Between Forms” through June 25. artscouncilofprinceton.org. Gallery 14 Fine Art Photography, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “A Different Look” through July 17. Open Saturday and Sunday from 12 to 5 p.m., or by appointment. gallery14.org. Gourgaud Gallery, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, has “Summer Exhibit” July 1 through July 28. cranburyartscouncil.org. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “What’s in the Garden?” through August 1, “Roberto Lugo: The Village Potter” through January 8, 2023, and “Fragile: Earth” through January 8, 2023, among other exhibits. Hours are Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Friday through Sun-

day 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Timed tickets required. groundsforsculpture.org. Highlands Art Gallery, 41 North Union Street, Lambertville has “A Brush Above The Rest” through June 30. highlandsartgallery.com. H istor ical Soc iet y of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and Innovator’s Gallery,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. Museum hours are Thursday through Sunday, 12 to 4 p.m. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Keith Haring: A Radiant Legacy” through July 31 and “(re)Frame: Community Perspectives on the Michener Art Collection” through March 5, 2023. michenerartmuseum. org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey” through March 2023 and the online exhibits “Slavery at Morven,” “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898,” and others. morven.org. The Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, has “The Glittering Outdoors” through October 2. helenemazurart.com. Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has paintings and animal welfare art by Kyoko Bartley through July 5. Abstract landscape paintings by Nelan Padte are at the 254 Nassau Street location through July 5. smallworldcoffee.com. West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “Faculty Student Show” through July 9. westwindsorarts.org.

“Summer Exhibit” Group Show At Gourgaud Gallery in Cranbury

Gourgaud Gallery will host an exhibition by eight members of the art group Creative Collective: Clara Sue Beym, Bayville; Robert Lowe of Hamilton; Elaine Rosenberg, North Brunswick; Monica Sebald-Kennedy, Cranbury; A l e k s a n d r a S e l e t s k ay a, Monroe; Margaret Simpson, Hamilton; Evie Sutkowski, Monroe; and Lynn Cheng Varga, Yardville. “Summer Exhibit” runs July 1 through 28, and is free

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17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022

“OFF SHORE”: Works by Larry Mitnick are featured in “Spatial Imaginings,” on view at Bell’s Tavern, 183 North Union Street in Lambertville, through the end of August. Mitnick’s work has been exhibited internationally, and he is currently a member artist at Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street in Lambertville. Bell’s Tavern is open daily from 5 to 9 p.m.

and open to the public. An Artists’ Opening Reception will be held on Sunday, July 10 from 1 to 3 p.m. The Creative Collective is a private group of 150+ members on Facebook. They are dedicated to fostering a creative and nurturing community for artists, artisans, and art lovers in central New Jersey and beyond. Their goal is to provide a friendly and supportive atmosphere of inspiration for beginners to professionals, as well as support to the greater artist community. This will be the group’s first exhibit since the pandemic, in which many artists took full advantage of their creative isolation. The public is welcome to drop into the gallery to see the work on display. It consists primarily of water media, mixed media, and ink on Yupo paper. Many of the artists are award-winning watercolorists and members of the Garden State Watercolor Society and other groups. An Open Studio Sunday will be held on July 24 from 1-3 p.m., in which artists exhibiting are invited to paint live in the gallery. As part of the nonprofit Cranbur y A r ts Cou ncil, Gourgaud Gallery donates 20 percent of art sales to the Cranbury Arts Council and its programs that supports arts in the Community. Checks made out to the artist, or cash are accepted as payment. Gourgaud Gallery is located on the first floor of the Cranbury Town Hall at 23-A North Main Street in Cranbury. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, visit cranburyartscouncil.org.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022 • 18

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022 • 20

Mark Your Calendar Town Topics Wednesday, June 29 5-7 p.m.: Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber holds Business After Business at Mrs. G Appliances, 2720 Business Route 1, Lawrence Tow nsh ip. Tours of t he Smart Tiny House will be available. Princetonmercer. org. 5-8 p.m.: ALBO performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards.com. 8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Country Dancers presents Donna Hunt with Pickup Band, at Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. $10. Princetoncountrydancers.org. Thursday, June 30 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees holds a special meeting in the Community Room of the library, 65 Witherspoon Street, to do strategic planning. Friday, July 1 7 p.m.: The Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice presents a benefit concert featuring musician Wesley Stace, at 12 Stockton Street. $25. Jwh.eventbrite.com. Saturday, July 2 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. WWcfm.org. 9 a.m.-10 a.m.: Mid-Day To a s t m a s t e r s m e e t v i a Zoom. Toastmastersclubs. org. 1 p.m.: Launch of “Where’s Waldo?” scavenger hunt at jaZams, 25 Palmer Square East. Cake and goodie bags; fans are invited to dress as one of the characters in the Waldo books. The hunt ends July 31. (609) 924-8697. 1-4 p.m.: Sarah Teti performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards.com. Sunday, July 3 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 1 p.m.: Geert D’hollander is soloist in the carillon concert from the Graduate Tower on Princeton University’s graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. Free. (609) 2587989. 1-4 p.m.: Mike & Laura per for m at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards.com. Monday, July 4 12-3 p.m.: Fourth of July Jubilee at Morven, 55 Stockton

Street. Music by TelStar, performance by Luminarium Dance Company, historical adventure activity, food trucks, and more. $25 family tickets. Morven.org. 12 : 30 - 3 : 30 p.m . : A l lan Wilkcockson performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards.com. Tuesday, July 5 7:30 p.m.: Second virtual community reading of Frederick Douglass’ 1852 speech, “What to the Slave is the 4th of July?” Register at princetonlibrary.org under “events.” Wednesday, July 6 1 p.m.: Tech Class at Princeton Public Library, “G et ting Star ted w it h Google Drive.” Taught by Gayle Stratton. Register at princetonlibrary.org. 6-7 p.m.: State Sen. Andrew Zwicker and Assemblymembers Roy Freiman and Sadaf Jaffer hold a “Gardenside Chat” via Zoom. Free. Register at (732) 823-1684. 7 p.m. “Under the Sea Stor y time” at Pr inceton Public Library, for children ages 4 and up with an adult. Stories, songs, and rhymes about creatures who live under the sea. Princetonlibrary.org. 8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Countr y Dancers presents Dave Rupp with Night Moves, at Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. $10. Princetoncountrydancers.org. Thursday, July 7 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 6 p.m.: Grace Little Band performs a blend of jazz, pop, rock, R&B, funk, reggae, Top 40, swing, and soul at Princeton Shopping Center. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. 8 p.m. (sundown): The film Singin’ in the Rain is screened as part of the Princeton University Art Museum’s outdoor film series, at Alexander Beach, behind Alexander Hall. Bring chairs or blankets; popcorn is provided. Friday, July 8 2:30 p.m.: Boardwalk Bonanza for children 7 and up at Princeton Public Library. Games and activities selected by teen volunteers with adult super vision. Princetonlibrary.org. 5-8 p.m.: Jerry Steele performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards.com. 6 p.m.: New Jersey Storytelling Network is at Pettoranello Gardens, Community Park North, 20 Mountain Avenue. Presented by Princeton Public Library, familyfriendly stories will reflect the Summer Reading programs theme, “Oceans of Possibilities.” If it rains, the event moves to the library’s

Community Room, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org. 7:30 p.m.: The Manhattan Chamber Players perfor m work s by Moz ar t, Schumann, and Dohnányi at Richardson Auditorium. Free. Tickets.princeton.edu. Saturday, July 9 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. Wwcfm.org. 1-4 p.m.: Blueberry Bash Festival Music at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards.com. 2 p.m.: “The First Historian of the Revolutionary War: Francois-Jean de Chastellux,” talk at the Trent House, 15 Market Street, Trenton, by Iris de Rode. Part of Trenton’s Liberty Weekend. Williamtrenthouse.org. 7:30 p.m.: The Sidney Sussex College Choir performs at All Saints’ Church, 16 All Saints’ Road. Free, but $25 donation suggested. Allsaintsprinceton.org. 8 p.m.: Lawrence Hopewell Trail’s Full Moon Bike Ride, at Mercer Meadows. Preceded by musical entertainment; picnicking invited. $15 for those 12-17 riding the six-mile loop; $20 for those 18 and up. Free for those who don’t ride. Donations are accepted and group rates are available. Lhtrail.org. Sunday, July 10 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 12-3 p.m.: Alliance Francaise of Princeton Annual Bastille Day Picnic, Community Park South. Bring your own picnic ; French conversation and music. $10-$15. RSVP by July 5 to gailbruno7@gmail.com. 1 p.m.: Paul Stelban is soloist in the carillon concert from Graduate Tower on Princeton University’s graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. Free. (609) 2587989. 1-4 p.m.: Blueberry Bash Festival Music at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards. com. 4 p.m.: Stay Tuned band per for ms garage pop at Hinds Plaza as part of the Listen Local series. If it rains, the event w ill be moved to Princeton Public Library’s Community Room, 65 Wit herspoon St reet. Princetonlibrary.org. Monday, July 11 Recycling 7 p.m.: Writers Room Poets workshop; virtual session sponsored by Princeton Public Library. Poets read from works-in-progress and

JUNE-JULY

receive feedback. Princetonlibrary.org. Tuesday, July 12 7:30 -10 :30 a.m.: “The Future of North Trenton” is the topic of the Trenton Economic Development Series, sponsored by the Princeton Mercer Chamber. At Trenton Country Club, 201 Sullivan Way, West Trenton. Princetonmercer.org. 9:30 and 11 a.m.: Read & Pick program: Blueberries, for young children. At Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. $12 per child including a container of blueberries. Register online at terhuneorchards.com. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Mid-day Toastmasters meet v ia Z oom. Toas t mas tersclubs.org. Thursday, July 14 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 6 p.m.: Kindred Spirit per for ms favor ites f rom the 1960s through today at Princeton Shopping Center. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. Part of the Summer Night Series. 6:30 p.m.: Book launch of The Education of Betsey Stockton, with author/ historian Gregory Nobles, at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Morven.org. 7:15 p.m.: Black Voices Book Group discusses Ida: A Sword Among Lions: Ida B. Wells and the Campaign Against Lynching by Paula J. Giddings. Via Google Meet. Register at Princetonlibrary.org. 8 p.m. (sundown): The film Chicago is screened as part of the Princeton University Art Museum’s outdoor film series, at Alexander Beach, behind Alexander Hall. Bring chairs or blankets; popcorn is provided. Friday, July 15 5-8 p.m.: Catmoondaddy per for ms at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards. com. 7 p.m.: Story & Verse series at Pettoranello Gardens, 20 Mountain Avenue, presents “Spark in the Dark.” Open mic poetic and storytelling events, presented by the Arts Council of Princeton and African American Cultural Collaborative of Mercer County. To perform, arrive 15 minutes before the event. Artscouncilofprinceton.org. 8 p.m.: The Commodores perform at the William Penn Bank Summer Music Fest, Bristol Township Amphitheater, Bristol, Pa. $35-$75. Brtstage.org. Saturday, July 16 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. Wwcfm.org. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. or 1-4 p.m.; help Friends of Princeton

Open Space with a variety of conservation projects at Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Fopos.org. 10-11:30 a.m.: Mid-Day Toastmasters meet at the Library, 42 Robbinsville Allentown Road, Robbinsville. Toastmastersclubs.org. 1-4 p.m.: Bill Flemer performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards.com. 3 p.m.: Moana is screened in the Community Room of Princeton Public Library. Princetonlibrary.org. 7 p.m.: Russell Thompkins Jr. and The New Stylistics with Eddie Holman perform at the William Penn Bank Summer Music Fest, Bristol Township Ampitheater, Bristol, Pa. $35-$75. Brtstage. org. Sunday, July 17 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 1 p.m.: Wade Fitzgerald is soloist in the carillon concert from Graduate Tower on Princeton University’s graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. Free. (609) 2587989. 1-4 p.m.: Jerry Steele performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards.com. Monday, July 18 Recycling Tuesday, July 19 7 p.m.: So Percussion’s musicians and composers perform collaborative and original compositions developed under the So Percussion Summer Institute, at Princeton Public Library’s Community Room. Princetonlibrary.org. Wednesday, July 20 3 p.m.: Puppet Show at Princeton Public Library, “Finnie’s Ocean Treasure.” Original musical play about a young fish who yearns for adventure. Princetonlibrary. org. 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meet either in the Library’s Community Room or via Zoom. Princetonlibrary.org. Thursday, July 21 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 6 :30 p.m.: “A Musical Summer Evening with the Ragtime Relics,” at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. $15. Bring your own blanket or chair. Morven.org. 7:30 p.m.: The Zodiac Trio performs at Richardson Auditorium. Works by Stravinsky, Benny Goodman, William Grant Still, Gershwin, Bartok, and others. Free. Tickets.princeton.edu.

7:30 p.m.: Author Jacob M. G r u mbach d is cus s e s his new book Laboratories Against Democracy: How National Parties Trans formed State Politics with Princeton University political scientist Corrine McConnaughy via Zoom. Register at Princetonlibrary.org. Friday, July 22 5-8 p.m.: Josh Blume & Friends perform at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Part of Sunset Sips & Sounds series. Wine, music, light bites. Terhuneorchards.com. Saturday, July 23 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. Wwcfm.org. 1-4 p.m.: The Barbara Lin Band performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards.com. 3-6 p.m.: Lisa Greenleaf and Raise the Roof, presented by Princeton Country Dancers. Special afternoon dance for experienced dancers, followed by a potluck for everybody from 6-7:30 p.m.; introduction to basics at 7:30 p.m.; and contra dance for all from 8-11 p.m. At Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. Princetoncountrydancers. org. 3 - 8 :30 p.m.: Sourland Mountain Festival at Unionville Vineyards, 9 Rocktown Road, Ringoes. Live music, local food, craft beer, wine, local artisans, and more. Rain or shine. SourlandMoutainFest.com. 6:30 p.m.: Summer Solstice Celebration fundraiser to benefit New Jersey Conservation Foundation, a t B r i c k Fa r m Tav e r n , Hopewell. Food, drinks, entertainment, auction. Solstice2022.givesmart.com. Sunday, July 24 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 1 p.m.: Hunter Chase is soloist in the carillon concert from Graduate Tower on Princeton University’s graduate campus, rain or shine. Listen from outside the tower. Free. (609) 2587989. 1-4 p.m.: Allan Wilkcockson performs at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, as part of the Summer Music series in the wine orchard. Terhuneorchards.com. Tuesday, July 26 9:30 and 11 a.m.: Read & Pick program: Flowers; for children ages preschool to 8 years. At Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. $12 including container of flowers. Register at terhuneorchards. com. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Mid-day Toastmasters meet v ia Z oom. Toas t mas tersclubs.org.


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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022 • 22

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Former PU Assistant Coach Harrington Makes History, Helping to Introduce Unified Track to Special Olympics

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tarting in the late “There is a different en- their athletes to accumulate 1980s, Thomas Har- ergy level. Once a (Special as many points as possirington has experi- Olympics) games is over, I ble. enced success coaching am toast, I am completely “This is a scored competrack at several levels. tired and I am not going tition, it is always a team Guiding Lawrence High back. I end up in a Shop- e v e n t , ” e x p l a i n e d H a rand then moving on to Stu- Rite or Wegmans and I hear rington. “It is a strategy for art Country Day School, somebody say ‘hey coach,’ the coaches and athletes to Harrington’s teams amassed and one of the athletes figure out how your team can over 200 wins, 31 champi- comes running over and score. In the 100, if there onships, and three All-Amer- hugs my knees. They hooked are nine heats, each one me in. This is my passion.” of those nine heats score. ica awards. Earlier this month, Har- Our first, second, and third Stepping up to the college level, Harrington served as rington ran and coordinated place finishers will get 5,3,1 an assistant coach for the the unified track competition points. If I put three athletes Princeton University wom- at the Special Olympics USA in that one event, that one en’s track program from Games held in Orlando, Fla., who may be fastest may not 2005-2016, helping the from June 5-12 as it was score in that fastest heat. Tigers win a number of in- held for the first time in the The heats are seeded based on prior performance. Once door and outdoor Ivy League event. titles. Unified track involves ath- that is done, we re-division Over the last four years, he letes with and without intel- for the finals and then you has been an assistant coach lectual disabilities compet- are matched up again based at Princeton High, focusing ing alongside each other in on that.” For Harrington, the effort on developing the program’s a team competition in seven events, the 100 dash, 200, in Orlando was the latest sprinters and hurdlers. But for Harrington, the 400, 4x100 relay, 4x400, step in his quest to help put unified track in the map. highlight of his stellar coach- shot put, and long jump. “We started unified track “This is historical, I introing career has been his 30plus years of involvement duced unified track and field in New Jersey seven or eight with the Special Olympics. to the Special Olympics,” years ago,” said Harrington. “I have coached at every said Harrington. “Unified “I was the one who put tolevel, from little people to track is totally different gether unified track in New collegiate to Olympian but from other Special Olympics Jersey for Special Olympics. what I have found as I dealt events because it is athletes The very first meet was run with the athletes at this level versus athletes, sometimes over at Hopewell. I was the is that there is such a genu- athletes versus partner and starter and I put the meet ine appreciation that goes sometimes it is partner ver- together. We had maybe five well beyond the coaching sus partner. The difference or six teams then. I think part,” said Harrington, who with unified track is that right now there are close to starting working with Spe- they compete against their 30-plus teams in New Jersey.” cial Olympics in 1989 when performances.” Putting together the SpeThe unified competition he ran coaches clinic for the organization at Lawrence also involves plenty of tac- cial Olympics USA games Residential tics as teams& and match at Princeton University in High. Residential &mixCommercial Commercial

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2014 was a highlight of Harrington’s involvement with the program. “That was probably the greatest event I have ever put on for Special Olympics and probably track in general,” asserted Harrington. “I was part of the team that went to petition the Special Olympics North America to have it in New Jersey. We and Boston were the two finalists. I had to go and speak to our national group and basically I talked about how Special Olympics has not only changed my life but has changed the way people look at our athletes who have intellectual disabilities and what they can do. It is about giving them another opportunity to take their unique ability and still be made part of this country.” Princeton was chosen and the event went smoothly as nearly 3,500 athletes competed, supported by 1,000 coaches and delegates, 10,000 volunteers, and 70,000 spectators. “To do that and host it at Princeton which is my home and then to put the whole meet together and to see the commitment was great,” said Harrington. “We received so many outstanding comments and outstanding kudos about how we ran that meet.” Down in Orlando, Harrington, a wiry and energetic 64, was a busy man as he ran the unified meet. “I was hitting the track everyday between 5:30 and 6, I saw the sun rise five days in a row,” said Harrington, who also handled the scheduling for the whole track meet as well as the unified competition. “We were walking around, making sure everything is running, we had track officials from all over the place. I went around and made sure that the events were running in a meet. It was meet within a meet with the unified competition. We had 12 states that were competing. We had to keep them going. We developed our own text chain so we could answer all of the questions. Any questions about unified always

UNIFIED APPROACH: Thomas Harrington, left, greets members of the New Jersey team in the unified competition at the Special Olympics USA Games held in Orlando, Fla., earlier this month. Former Princeton University women’s track assistant coach Harrington served as a technical delegate at the Games, running and coordinating the unified track competition. (Photo provided by Thomas Harrington) came to me. I had the rulebook, I had everything. If it is unified, see Harrington.” The introduction of the unified competition to the USA Games proved popular and laid the groundwork for its inclusion in future events. “It was totally successful, I have had so much positive feedback,” said Harrington, noting that the team from Virginia ended up winning the competition with New Hampshire coming in second. “You may do your unified track in a particular way, a little deviation from what the rules are. This is what Special Olympics North America is going to do. That is the goal — to set a national template for the next time. This was the model that I presented. That is exciting, it has

never been done nationally.” For Harrington, the excitement of providing athletes with more opportunities to compete is the driving force for him. “It is the inclusion revolution; it is to let the athletes know that they are included,” said Harrington. “You have a different ability but you don’t have a different skill. What you do, you do well for you. By including them with the partners now you are taking two different abilities and putting them together on the same team. That is the inclusion part. The whole thing has been being part of history and laying out the blueprint for what we can do nationally.” —Bill Alden

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SPECIAL ASSIGNMENT: Thomas Harrington takes a break from running and coordinating the unified track competition at the Special Olympics USA Games held in Orlando, Fla., earlier this month. Harrington, a former Princeton University women’s track assistant coach and current assistant with the Princeton High program, helped introduce the competition to the Games which involves athletes with and without intellectual disabilities competing alongside each other in a team competition. (Photo provided by Thomas Harrington)


PU Women’s Volleyball Adds Brown to Staff

The Princeton University men’s volleyball team has named Lindsay Brown as an assistant coach, the program announced earlier this month. Brown is fresh off a summer coaching with the U.S. Boys U19 National Team, where she helped guide them to the gold medal at the 2022 North, Central America and Caribbean Volleyball Confederation (NORCECA) Pan American Cup, qualifying the team for the 2023 Fédération Internationale de Volleyball (FIVB) World Championships. Brown’s tenure with USA Volleyball has been extensive and her future is bright on the international coaching stage. Brown comes to Princeton after serving as the lead assistant coach for men’s volleyball at Purdue Fort Wayne since 2019. Prior to that appointment, Brown served as a graduate assistant for Fort Wayne men’s volleyball program for two years before she was promoted to assistant coach. Within the NCAA ranks, Brown recently helped guide the 2022 Mastodon team to a Midwestern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association (MIVA) final appearance after upsetting McKendree and Loyola before falling to eventual NCAA semi-finalist Ball State. As a former setter for Sonoma State University, Brown finished her collegiate career as the season and career assist record holder for the Sea Wolves as well as the owner of the career service ace record. Brown was an All-Conference selection three times, and was Academic All-Conference four times.

Women’s Track Star Iheoma Wins Discus at U.S. U20 Meet

Making program history, Princeton University women’s track star Siniru Iheoma won the discus last Friday at the USATF U20 Outdoor Championships at Hayward Field in Eugene, Ore. Iheoma’s best mark of 54.47 meters, No. 2 all-time on the Tigers’ list, came on her third throw. It beats her previous PR of 50.36 meters from the 2022 Larry Ellis Invite, and the previous No. 2 mark of 50.89 meters set at the 2018 Kennedy O’Dell ’18 at the 2018 Texas Invite. Iheoma, a rising sophomore from Churchville, Pa., will now compete for the U.S. at the World Athletics U20 Championships in Sanitago de Cali, Colombia, from August 1-6

Men’s Runner Rodman Takes 2nd in 800 at U.S. U20 Meet

Adding another achievement to a superb debut season, Princeton University men’s track star Sam Rodman placed second in the 800 meters last Saturday at the USATF U20 Outdoor

Championships at Hayward Field in Eugene, Ore. Rodman, a rising sophomore from Bealeton, Va., clocked a time of 1:50.91 in taking second and earning a spot on Team USA for the 2022 World Athletics U20 Championships in Santiago de Cali, Colombia, which is slated for August 1-6. During his freshman season for the Tigers, Rodman earned First Team All-America honors in the 800 meters after finishing seventh at the NCAA Outdoor Championships. His time of 1:46.96 at the NCAA meet was a new program record. Rodman was also a First Team All-American in the Distance Medley Relay at NCAA Indoor Championships, as part of the fourth-place finishing team, the Ivy League Champion and a First Team All-Ivy League honoree in the 800 meters, and a Second Team All-Ivy League honoree in the 4x800 meter relay.

Tiger Men’s Rower Long Named to Australia U-23 Team

Princeton University men’s heavyweight rower Patrick Long ’25 has been selected to row on the Australia U-23 men’s 8 at the U-23 World Championships in Varese, Italy, in July. Long, a native of Brisbane, Australia, will join four other Princeton rowers at the U-23 Worlds this summer in Floyd Benedikter, Nick Taylor (U.S. heavyweights), Nick Aronow (U.S. men’s lightweights) and Ella Barry (U.S. women’s open rowing). In the 2022 college season, Long rowed in the Princeton second varsity 8 that placed fifth at Eastern Sprints and sixth at the Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) Championships.

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HONOR ROLL: Princeton University men’s lacrosse player Chris Brown heads to goal this spring during his senior season for the Tigers. Last week, Brown earned United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA) Scholar All-American honors along with three classmates — defenseman George Baughan, goalie Erik Peters, and longstick midfielder Andrew Song. It was latest in a string of honors for Brown, Princeton’s leading scorer in 2022 with 72 points on 31 goals and 41 assists, who was named a first-team All-Ivy League performer and an honorable mention All-American. Princeton went 11-5 in 2022 and reached the NCAA Final 4 for the first time since 2004. In addition, Princeton earned the USILA team All-Academic Award as it was recognized for having a cumulative roster GPA of just under 3.5. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022

PU Sports Roundup

After she finished her time at Sonoma State, she played for Volleyball Club Tirol in Austria and the NorCal Dream Team and Wildfire in the Premier Volleyball League. Brown’s coaching experience includes a head coaching position for the junior club at Empire Volleyball and assistant coaching position at Sonoma State, Ferris State, and Dominican University of California. She was also an assistant coach for the Volleyball Club Tirol U-11 team. Brown earned her degree in general studies with a concentration in sociology from Purdue Fort Wayne in 2017. She is currently pursuing a master’s degree in the communications program.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022 • 24

SPRING REVIEW

PHS Boys’ Tennis Standout Gu, Hun Softball Star Kobryn Get the Nod as Town Topics’ Leading Spring Performers

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hile Jonathan Gu was disappointed when the Princeton High boys’ tennis team fell 4-1 to Millburn in the NJSIAA Group 3 state final in early June, he was proud of how the squad competed. “Millburn is a big test, they are a top team in the state and we are not that far off,” said PHS junior star Gu, who won his match at first singles to give PHS its only point in the defeat. With another big test, the NJSIAA boys state singles competition, on the horizon, Gu was primed to show that he was a top player in the state. “It is just one match at a time, no match is a given match,” said Gu, looking ahead to the singles tourney. “Every match, you have to focus.” Displaying his focus, Gu rolled through the competition, posting a series of straight-set wins on the way to the final against East Brunswick’s Jack Wong. S u r v iv i ng a m ar at hon match, Gu prevailed 7-6 (97), 4-6, 6-2 to earn the singles state crown in a match played on June 16 at the Mercer County Park tennis complex. “It feels pretty good,” said Gu, reflecting on the victory. “I didn’t expect it at all, but with the withdrawals and a couple of matches that could have gone either way it feels pretty good.” Gu became the first state singles champion from PHS since Jacob Leschly in 1984.

Mark Leschly was the last Tiger male to reach a state final in 1986. Gu joined Christina Rosca, who won the girls state singles crown in 2013, as state champions coached by Sarah Hibbert. The triumph capped an undefeated season for Gu. He also won his first Mercer County Tournament title — in his first time playing in it because of prior year’s cancellations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. PHS head coach Hibbert was thrilled to see Gu come through with the title. “It’s absolutely fantastic for Jonathan,” said Hibbert. “He really works hard. He has had an amazing season this year. Obviously Christina winning it in 2013 was super exciting for the school. We hadn’t had a champion in certainly my time and looking back in the record books, it’s been since 1984 since we had a boys’ champion. It’s been decades since we had a state champion be able to put it all together.” In Hibbert’s view, developing a more well-rounded game mentally and physically was a key to Gu’s success this spring. “I think there’s a bit more maturity to his game, a bit more of being able to bounce back when your frustration level starts to get high,” said Hibbert. “He’s able to take it back down and not let your frustrations or poor shot choices get the better of you, be able to wipe out your mistakes and be able to go forward and not be

hindered by the past. He’s added more pace on his game as well, and a little more variety. He’s always a hard worker, he’s always training those extra hours, and it’s great to see it pay off for him.” That maturity made the dif ference in t he bat t le against Wong. “H e r e a l l y p l ay e d a n amazing first set, got a little tight in the second, and it was tricky for him to keep mentally focused through two injury timeouts and a lot of other things going on,” said Hibbert. “When it counted, he was able to put it together and play some really great tennis. I’m very pleased and excited for him. It’s a great accomplishment, especially as a junior. We’ll hope for good things next year too.” T he cou nt y /s tate t it le double meant a lot of Gu. “It’s definitely fun,” said Gu. “Last year we didn’t have the county tournament. This year the county tournament was a new thing for me since freshman year it was canceled. That felt pretty good winning that. Last year, in the state tournament, I had a tough loss. I was glad I could play better. For making history with his brilliant play, Gu is the choice as the Town Topics top male performer of the spring high school season. After producing a superb freshman season for the Hun School softball team in 2021, Lexi Kobryn wasn’t resting on her laurels as she

STRONG CONNECTION: Hun School softball player Lexi Kobryn belts the ball in action this spring. Sophomore Kobryn starred with the bat and with her pitching as Hun went 18-1 and won the state Prep A title. Kobryn threw two perfect games and four other no-hitters with 190 strikeouts in 87 innings this season. At the plate, Kobryn hit a team-best .500 with team highs in homers (7), RBIs (28), and runs (30). (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

prepared for her sophomore campaign. “I have been in the gym all fall and winter and I have gotten a lot stronger,” said Kobryn, who emerged as a star pitcher and power hitter during her debut season. “I was also working with my pitching coach. I have definitely gotten a lot faster, I am hitting 65.” Kobryn didn’t waste any time showing her strength and velocity, tossing a perfect game in a 6-0 win over Mercersburg Academy in a season opening doubleheader. That was a harbinger of things to come as Kobryn ended up with two perfect games and four other nohitters this spring. Kobryn also excelled with the bat, going 4-of-7 with three runs and three RBIs in that twin bill against Mercersburg and she kept blasting the ball all spring. Sparked by Kobryn, Hun put together a dominant campaign, winning its first 10 games before suffering a disappointing 8-7 loss to Lawrenceville that saw it squander a 7-0 lead in the seventh inning. Rebou nding f rom t hat setback, Hun posted seven straight wins to earn a rematch with Lawrenceville in the state Prep A championship game. Kobr y n and her team mates were fired up to get another shot at the Big Red. “I was definitely nervous; it was one inning that really killed us,” said Kobryn. “We wanted to come back and show what we are made of and what we have been working for.” Kobr yn kept her head, putting on a show with her arm and bat as the Raiders prevailed 11-2 over the Big Red. She hurled a complete game, striking out 10 and yielding five hits and went 3 for 4 at the plate with two runs and two RBIs as Hun posted a final record of 18-1 on the way to winning its first Prep A title since 2017. “I definitely stepped it up from last year,” said Kobryn, who piled up 190 strikeouts in 87 innings this season. “I did well last year but even better this year. I have been working really hard over the fall and winter. I was in the gym every day.” At the plate, Kobryn saw the fruits of her labor, hitting a team-best .500 with team highs in homers (7), RBIs (28), and runs (30). “I did the same thing with my hitting, this is all I do. I work hard, I hit off the tee whenever I can and just focus on my mechanics,” said Kobryn. Hun head coach Kathy Quirk credited Kobryn with being a major spark to the team’s title run. “She just does a great job for us and I am very happy,” said Quirk of Kobryn. “I am very pleased with her, I am proud of her. She just throws hard, she just knows what to do.” Kobryn sensed early on that Hun was primed for a great season. “I knew when we had our spring training, we were

going to do some damage this year,” said Kobryn. “We had some practice games before and we already had a feel of what we were going to go into.” For doing so much damage with her arm and bat this spring as Hun rolled to a state title, Kobryn gets the nod as the top female performer this spring. Top Newcomers ocusing on soccer as his main sport, Zach Della Rocca’s speed stood out as one of the best qualities on the pitch. Wondering whether his speed would translate on the track, junior Della Rocca decided to join the Princeton High track and field program. It didn’t take long for Della Rocca to find a home in the fast lane. “I love it,” said Della Rocca of his introduction to track.“It’s very addicting. It’s a very different type of fitness that you don’t get from soccer. We do a lot of weight training which I really enjoy doing. It’s helped me, especially mentally, focus on being able to compete. It requires a lot of mental attention. Anxiety builds so you have to stay calm. I’ve seen it help me in many ways, and I really enjoy it.” Della Rocca starred at the Mercer County outdoor track championship meet, winning the 400 meters in a school-record time of 48.52 and taking first in the 200 meters. “I’m better at the 400,” said Della Rocca. “What I’m noticing is I can keep my speed going longer than a lot of the short sprinters can. I think that’s from soccer, the many years I played soccer just building that endurance. I think that’s why I’m better at the 400.” PHS head coach Ben Samara was thrilled to have Della Rocca join the Tiger program. “We’re so happy that Zach came out for the team this year and that he’s able to be with us,” said Samara. “His attitude and the way that he carries himself is reminiscent of the guys who were on that state championship team on 2018. And that’s something that we’re really trying to get back to, that mentality of grind and put your head down and get your work done and by all means necessary get yourself better. Zach embodies that and he’s a great example, even in year one, for our entire team.” Building on his success in the county meet, Della Rocca took second in the 400 and third in the 200 at the Central Jersey Group 4 sectional meet. At the Group 4 state meet, he placed third in the 400 and seventh in the 200. Culminating his debut campaign, Della Rocca placed fourth in the 400 at the Meet of Champions. For Della Rocca, taking up track turned out to be a lifechanging decision. “I’ve always wanted to try it, but with COVID, it became hard,” said Della Rocca. “This last soccer season, my coach would say, ‘When you go out on the field, use your speed.’ That curiosity of what I could do on the track, I knew I had to try it. I’m glad I did.” For emerging as a champion in his first season in

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the track, Della Rocca is the choice as the leading male newcomer of the spring. As Mark Maser assessed his St uar t Cou nt r y Day School lacrosse team, he knew that freshman Allison Lee was something special. “Allison has been playing the game for a while, she plays club,” said Stuart head coach Maser. “She is a smaller kid as a freshmen but she can do everything — right hand, left hand, pass, and catch. She is really, really good.” T he sk illed m idf ielder tallied four goals in a season opening 17-7 defeat to Princeton Day School on April 4 in a harbinger of things to come. “Everyone has their role on the team and my role has been to help with the scoring,” said Lee. “I can always count on my team. They are always supporting me so it allows me to score.” Despite making an instant impact, Lee acknowledged t hat mov ing up to high school level was challenging. “It has been hard mentally getting into the groove,” said Lee, who took up lacrosse in third grade and plays for a club program. “But I can rely on my team so much.” The Tartan team ended up relying on Lee to spark its attack. “Allison keeps getting a little bit better every day; we have talked to her about moving the goalie and placing the shots because she has that talent to do it,” said Maser of Lee, who ended up tallying 84 points on 66 goals and 18 assists this season. “She is motivating others through her play. She is modeling good play and others see it. She might not be the most outspoken. Rather than leading by words, she is leading by deed and example.” With Lee leading the way, Stuart produced a late surge that saw it go 5-3 down the stretch after a 1-5 start. “In practice, we have been working really hard, we have been working on different plays,” said Lee. “It is a lot about the teamwork. In the beginning, it was little bit rougher but then we started to come together. The whole team has been working really hard and it has been showing in the results.” For showing a special skill set in her freshman campaign that drove the Stuart offense, Lee gets the nod as the top female newcomer. Top Coaches eading into 2022, Tom Monfiletto was determined to make sure that his Hun School baseball team didn’t take anything for granted coming off a dominant campaign last spring. “I think having commitment to getting better every day is key,” said Hun head coach Monfiletto. “We have had some success these past few years in 2019 and 2021 but we don’t have any room to rest on that. Our schedule is so relentless that we can’t just rely on that. We have to rely on getting coached, getting better, working hard, and understanding that we are not sneaking up on anybody. People are aware of us. It is an awesome thing. We love being in that place but by no means is it a done

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defeating St. Elizabeth 15-4 in the quarterfi nals. Facing fourth-seeded Bishop Eustace in the semis on a sweltering day with the temperatures hitting the 90s, PDS rallied to pull out a 15-14 win. In the fi nal against thirdseeded Holy Spirit, the Panthers utilized their high-powered attack to pull away to a 17-11 win and earn the title double. For PDS senior star Elle Anhut, helping Thomas go out with the championship meant the world to the players. “It is amazing, we wanted to win not just for everyone but for coach Thomas,” said Anhut. “It would send everybody out in the best way possible. We knew we wanted to make history for coach Thomas because she is making history herself. We were like let’s bring it home for her.” In the wake of the triumph, Thomas hugged players, coaches, and team managers with a grin that didn’t leave her face. “Who gets to do that?” said Thomas with a laugh reflecting on going out with the title double and a season that saw the Panthers ultimately go 14-9 as it ended the spring with a 14-9 loss to Oak Knoll in the quarterfinal of the NJSIAA Tournament of Champions. “I couldn’t imagine it. It is the we before the me and everybody bought in. When everybody bought in, then we were the best. Getting the Prep B, maybe it was the semi of that tournament where they started to really believe it would take all of us every day. I think we have been moving forward.”

NO BACKING DOWN: Princeton High boys’ tennis star Jonathan Gu prepares to hit a backhand in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) boys singles championship match. Junior Gu defeated East Brunswick’s Jack Wong 7-6 (9-7), 4-6, 6-2 to win the title and cap an undefeated season. Gu is the first state boys’ singles champion from PHS since Jacob Leschly in 1984. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) For keeping her squad mov- the choice as the top coach ing forward on the way to a of a female team. title double to culminate her —B ill Alden legendary career, Thomas is

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FITTING FINALE: Princeton Day School girls’ lacrosse head coach Jill Thomas, far right, celebrates after PDS defeated Holy Spirit 17-11 in the NJSIAA Non-Public B state final in early June. The triumph marked the second title this season for the Panthers as they had previously edged Montclair Kimberley Academy 13-12 in the Prep B state final. The triumph gave Thomas a special going away present as the New Jersey Lacrosse Hall of Famer previously announced that she is retiring at the end of the season after 34 years at the school. (Photo by Bill Alden)

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deal. We have to earn every bit of recognition that we get.” Producing a sizzling 12-1 start, Hun showed that it had another awesome team. Stocked with Division I talent, the Raiders featured a deep pitching staff and a powerful batting attack. Heading into postseason play, the Raiders were seeded second in the Mercer County Tournament. Seeking the program’s first-ever MCT title, Hun topped WW/P-North 10-0 in an opening round contest and then rallied in the seventh inning to edge archrival Lawrenceville 3-2 in a tense quarterfi nal matchup. After surviving the challenge from the Big Red, the Raiders topped WW/P-South 6-2 in the semis and then blanked Hamilton West 6-0 in the title game. For Monfiletto, a former Hun player and assistant coach, guiding the Raiders to the MCT title was an awesome achievement. “It meant more than I can even describe, from the school community, from the alumni and from the parents with the emotions that were involved in that game,” said Monfiletto, a 2004 Hun alum. “The amount of correspondence I had with people after that game was more than any win that we have had. It is something that we have wanted to do for such a long time and we have never been able to. I was really happy. I thought about coach [Bill] McQuade the whole time because as a player for coach and as coach with him, I know how much that tournament meant to him. We were always in positions where we had to make difficult decisions as to who would pitch based on the Prep tournament and the Mid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL).” Going after its sixth straight Prep A state title, Hun was in a tough position as its

this is a great group of people,” said Thomas. “This group of seniors is pretty special. Since 2019, we haven’t had a full season so I think it is going to be great. It is really about them, not me.” Thomas sensed that the Panthers could do some special things in her fi nal campaign. “They have to keep being together and playing well together, I think that has been a real key factor since we started,” said Thomas. “We have that chemistry that carries you through the not-sogood times. They have to continue to work hard, they have to continue to move the ball down the field in transition and score a lot of goals. I think they are going to be fun to watch, they are going to be exciting. Kudos to them.” Going 7-7 in regular season action, PDS didn’t appear to be headed to a fun postseason. Competing in the Mercer County Tournament, the Panthers fell 13-7 to Princeton High in the MCT quarterfinals. Undeterred by that defeat, PDS showed its mettle in the Prep B state tourney, defeating Morristown-Beard 14-10 in the semis and then rallying from a late 12-9 defi cit to edge Montclair Kimberley Academy 13-12 in the final In refl ecting on that run, which marked the program’s first Prep B crown since 2017, Thomas believed it set the tone for a second title run in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Non-Public B tournament. “That was a big step on the road, you go up north two times, the semis and the finals,” said Thomas. “Those were all nail-biter games and then you are sitting at that No. 1 up there in the NonPublic B.” Making its debut in the Non-Public B competition, the Panthers kept rolling, topping Morris Catholic 13-1 in the opening round and then

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pitching staff got stretched thin competing simultaneously in the MCT and injuries hampered some key players and the Raiders ended up falling 5-3 to Pingry in the final. While that defeat stung, Monfiletto had a memorable spring guiding the squad that ended up with a 22-4 record. “They are extremely talented, that is No. 1; I am very lucky to be able to coach some really, really good baseball players,” said Monfiletto. “On top of that, I truly believe they root for each other. They truly care about each other’s success. They have a very strong personal connection with each other that is going to last for a very long time.” Monfiletto credited his senior group with leaving a strong legacy. “They have propelled this program into a different stratosphere,” said Monfiletto. “We are on a completely different level. We are recognized with some of the best programs in New Jersey which was our goal. I think we will be that way for a while. It is incredible, I think we tied the program record for wins. The schedule that we played was a juggernaut, especially at the end of the season. We had some huge wins, some signature wins.” Monfiletto’s steady leadership in keeping Hun focused on a daily basis as it came through with a historic title makes him the choice as the top coach of a male team. This spring marked the end of an era for the Princeton Day School girls’ lacrosse team. After a quarter century guiding the program, it was the fi nal campaign for head coach Jill Thomas. PDS head coach Thomas, who was inducted into the New Jersey Lacrosse Hall of Fame in 2018 and previously announced that she is retiring after 34 years at the school, was determined to savor the spring “I think it is bittersweet,

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022 • 26

Hun School’s Sheth Making the Most of Opportunity As Princeton Post 218 Legion Baseball Improves to 3-3

Rohan Sheth was a member of the supporting cast this spring for a powerhouse Hun School baseball team that won its first-ever Mercer County Tournament title and advanced to the state Prep A final. While Sheth didn’t see a lot of action this season as the Hun roster was packed with Division I talent, he soaked up some valuable lessons. “They are the hardest workers I know and I try to learn everything from them,” said Sheth. “You see the work they put in everyday and what they they get out of it. You have to trust the process. They lead by example and I am trying to follow in their footsteps.”

This summer, rising senior Sheth has been taking a leading role for the Princeton Post 218 American Legion baseball team, emerging as a solid pitcher and getting some key hits. Last Thursday, Sheth came up big to help Post 218 rally from a 4-1 deficit to defeat Hopewell Post 339 7-4. Sheth slapped an RBI single in the bottom of the third inning to put Princeton up 5-4 and then drove home an insurance run in the bottom of the fifth “We fell behind early but we knew Jaxon [Petrone] could go long, we knew he had in him,” said Sheth. “We just had to keep faith in him and keep putting runs across.

After the second, I think we won pretty much every inning. We just chipped away one run at a time and we got the job done today.” Sheth got the job done against HoVal with his clutch hitting. “I knew there was a fastball coming and I just wanted to put it into play,” said Sheth, rejecting on his third inning single. “There were guys on second and third and I knew if I just put it into play, we were going to score. On the second one, coach put on a hit and run so I was just going to swing wherever it was. I got a nice ground ball up the middle.” With the Post 218 squad i n c l u d i n g a n u m b e r of

Princeton High players who Sheth played with in Little League, it has been nice for him to reunite with them. “I have played with these guys since I have been younger, it is great to get back with them,” said Sheth. “It is fun, there are a lot of seniors so it is one last drive for them.” Sheth is having fun getting the chance to see so much action this summer. “On the mound especially, I didn’t get as much work with the varsity this year,” said Sheth. “I am trying to stretch myself out for the summer and get ready for next spring.” Post 218 manager Benito Gonzalez liked the way his squad kept battling against HoVal. “I told them that it was very easy for anybody, regardless of who you are to have your

ego bruised if you are down like that in the beginning,” said Gonzalez. “The difference was that Jaxon found a routine, he started throwing his breaking ball and his fastball for strikes. We were fortunate at times with some batted balls; they hit the ball hard but it went right at people.” Gonzalez credited Sheet with making a difference this summer with his bat and arm. “It gave us a little cushion with that line drive through,” said Gonzalez referring to Sheth’s second hit. “We were actually having him bunt at first but we took it off and had him hit away. He made us look really good for that. I have really been impressed with his pitching especially, he has done a really good job. He has played for Hun in the spring but he is getting an opportunity to start with us.” After Petrone went six innings, retiring nine of the last 10 batters he faced, Kenny Schiavone came on to close the deal with a strong seventh inning. “I have coached him since he was a freshman and he always did really well,” said Gonzalez, who also coaches in the PHS program. “Last year during Legion ball, he just completely took off. I saw a new type of kid, we gave him the opportunity to start and he ran with it. With the high school team, he was one of the best pitchers in Mercer County. He is just the type of guy who will do whatever you ask of him and he will be so aggressive and intense about it. In the third or fourth inning, I went up to him and asked, ‘hey if we have a lead in the seventh, do you want it?’ and he said yes. It was an easy choice.” Post 218 showed good aggressiveness at the plate as Jaxon Petrone, Drew Petrone, Carl Birge, and Jack Durbin all had key hits in

the comeback. “I really want to stress to getting more kids opportunities,” said Gonzalez. “Obviously we are going to have our starters. I really do think it is important to get some other people looks. Later in the year, they have experienced something and they will be able to give you something. I value being able to do that and pick spots. You end up winning when you have contributions from maybe not the people you would automatically assume but from the people who are here every day and working.” With Princeton improving to 3-3 with a 10-0 win over Bordentown Post 26 on Sunday, Gonzalez believes the squad is heading in the right direction. “I am pleased with the we have played so far; we didn’t play well for one game (a 10-0 loss to North Hamilton on June 19) and we had a struggle for part of yesterday (a 13-5 loss to Allentown on June 22) but overall there is something here,” said Gonzalez. “If we play well, we can compete with anybody. It is just a matter of consistency, throwing strikes, and playing in the field. That is really the main thing for us. Pitchers and defense have to pick each other up. If your pitchers aren’t throwing a lot of strikes, you have to be flawless in the field. If you are not flawless in the field, then the pitchers have to stay mentally tough and pick up your fielders. You have got to work together that way.” Sheth, for his part, believes the work he is getting this summer with Post 218 will help him next spring at Hun. “We have a bunch of seniors leaving but we have a few transfers coming in,” said Sheth. “I think we will be good next year.” —Bill Alden

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Resource Director, Greater NJ Conference, United Methodist Church

2022 Summer Princeton Chapel Liturgist M.Div. Candidate, Princeton Theological Seminary

Enger Muteteke

Wesley Rowell

Sunday, June 12

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Founder & Creative Director, Inspiring Creativity Ministries

Member of the Episcopal Church M.Div. Candidate, Princeton Theological Seminary

Donna Owusu-Ansah

David King

Sunday, June 19

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Author, Child Advocate, and Retreat Leader Princeton, NJ

(Incoming) Pastor of Trinity United Methodist Church, Germantown, MD

Sunday, June 26

Sunday, August 14

Pastor, National Community Church, Lincoln Theater Campus, Washington D.C.

Lancaster Theological Seminary, Assistant Professor of Preaching and Worship, Director of Chapel Worship

Sunday, July 3

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Associate Dean of Religious Life & the Chapel, Princeton University

Mt. Nittany United Methodist Church, State College, PA

Shannon Daley-Harris

Jimeka Jones Setzer

Theresa S. Thames

Kate Mackereth Fulton

Catherine E. Williams

Sunday, July 10

Sunday, August 28

Executive Director for Episcopal Charities of New York

Office of Religious Life Intern ‘21–’22 M.Div. Candidate, Princeton Theological Seminary

Kevin VanHook, II

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Phoebe Quaynor

Otis Byrd, Jr.

RIGHT DIRECTION: Rohan Sheth fires a pitch in recent action for the Princeton Post 218 American Legion baseball team. Last Thursday, Hun School rising senior Sheth had two hits and two RBIs to help Post 218 rally from a 4-1 deficit to defeat Hopewell Post 339 7-4. Princeton, which improved to 3-3 with a 10-0 win over Bordentown Post 26 last Sunday, plays at Broad St. Park Post 313 on July 1 and at Trenton Post 93/182 on July 5. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


“Finish the journey” became the theme for the P r inceton L it t le L eag ue (PLL) team as it competed in the District 12 Intermediate 50/70 tournament last week. Hosting Millstone-Roosevelt at the Farmview Fields in the two-team, best-ofthree competition in the division which utilizes a 50-foot pitching distance and 70-foot base paths and is open to players ages 1113, PLL manager Matt Bellace almost didn’t make it to game one on Thursday, getting stranded in Chicago on Wednesday when his flight home got canceled. Driving through the night, he made it back to Princeton and described his harrowing travel tale and how he finished his journey to his players in his pregame message. “I met the team in the beginning for a few minutes before we went out and I told them the story,” said Bellace. “They are looking at me with these wide eyes and I said that showed how much I want to be here and how much I want to win. I said, ‘do you want to win that much, would you drive from Chicago? ’ and they were saying, ‘we would, we would.’”

PLL’s journey got off to a rocky start last Thursday as it fell behind 9-2 against Millstone-Roosevelt by the fourth inning. “It was just crushing to start that way, it looked kind of hopeless there,” said Bellace. Undaunted, PLL rallied to pull out a dramatic 10-9 win, scoring the winning run when Asa Collins stole home in the bottom of the last inning. “We had some big hits from Victor Espitia, Asa Collins, and Brady Lee,” said Bellace, noting that the players were chanting “finish the journey” as the comeback was unfolding. “The top of our order was a spark, hammering some base hits. We chipped away, we got three in one inning and one in the sixth. Coming up in the bottom of the seventh, we were down by three. It still seemed like a big hill to climb.” After tying up the game at 9-9, Collins reached third base and Bellace urged him to look for an opening to race home. “On every pitch, I am encouraging Asa to go a little farther down the line, hoping to draw a throw and that

GOING TO THE MATT: Princeton Little League (PLL) pitcher Matthew Brophy fires a pitch last Friday in the District 12 Intermediate 50/70 tournament. Brophy pitched 5 2/3 scoreless inning for PLL as it defeated Millstone-Roosevelt 13-4 to win the tournament held at the Farmview Fields. PLL will now compete in the Section 3 Intermediate 50/70 tournament next week which will also take place at the Farmview Fields. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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they would throw it away,” recalled Bellace. “I said to Asa, ‘go a little more, go a little more.’ He waits for the catcher to throw it to the pitcher and he takes off. He is in completely safe and there wasn’t even a question.” A night later, PLL left no question about the outcome, jumping out to an 8-0 lead on the way to a 13-4 win and the title. “The other team can’t think that a lead is safe after blowing a seven run lead,” said Bellace, reflecting on the team’s mindset heading into Friday. “We had Matthew Brophy on the hill who I have coached so much. He is such a calm, consistent pitcher who gets ground-outs and pop-ups. He puts the offense on their heels a little bit because they can’t figure them out. He pitched 5 2/3 innings of shutout ball. We were up 8-0 with Matthew on the hill and we kept adding to it.” Finishing with the championship was special for Bellace and his players. “It is exciting,” said Bellace. “Last year, I wasn’t with the team. They had a really good squad with some seventh graders. They played a really good West End team and took it to three games and lost. You could feel the heartbreak over that. We wanted to take this one and run the banner around like we did. I am just so proud of these guys.” The chance to earn a banner gave the PLL players some extra inspiration. “I took photos at Grover Field of banners with all of the names of the winners,” said Bellace. “I talked to Jon Durbin ( PLL official and former manager of the Intermediate squad) and he suggested having them close their eyes and envision their names on that banner up at Grover. That is what I did before game two, calling out their names one by one and saying you can see those names up there years from now. I think that helped, they certainly wanted it.” Bellace is hoping that the team’s journey will include adding another banner as PLL will now compete in the Section 3 Intermedia t e 5 0 / 70 t o u r n a m e n t next week, which will also take place at the Farmview Fields. “It is something I didn’t expect; it is exciting, I have less expectation given that I really wanted to win this one,” said Bellace, whose team will face Toms River East, the District 18 winner, in the first round of the fourteam competition. “We are not a big powerhitting team, we are more small ball. If we can play the near errorless or errorless ball that we did last weekend with lots of chaos on the bases, we are going to be in these games.” — Bill Alden

PFC Barcelona Comes Up Big at Both Ends of the Field, Rolling to Eastern Regional Crown, Advancing to Nationals Heading into the US Youth Soccer (USYS) Eastern Presidents Cup Regional in Barboursville, W. Va., last week, Milen Nikolov believed that his Princeton FC’s Barcelona 2006 team could outlast the competition. “The No. 1 thing for me is for them to stay healthy, to have no injuries, and keep them fresh,” said PFC Barcelona head coach Nikolov looking ahead to the competition. “If we want to go all the way, this is five consecutive days.” Staying strong and showing skill at both ends of the pitch, PFC Barcelona went all the way, going 4-0 on the way to the title, topping Beadling SC 2006 Boys South Elite (Pa.) 2-0 in the final. The victor y culminated

a dominant run which saw PFC Barcelona outscore its foes 12-0 in open play. The squad will now compete in the US Youth Soccer (USYS) National Presidents Cup tournament in Greensboro, N.C., from July 7-10. Starting the regional tournament with a bang, PFC Barcelona endured a fourhour lightning delay to defeat Coppermine SC 4-0 in the first game of group play as Azariah Breitman tallied two goals with Archie Smith and Zeb Jerdonek adding one. In its second group game, PFC Barcelona rolled to a 6-0 win over Beadling SC North ( Pa.). Felipe Matar Grandi led the way with a hat trick which came in the space of 11 minutes in the first half. Jerdonek, Bre-

EASTERN EXPRESS: Members of Princeton FC’s Barcelona 2006 team celebrate after they won the US Youth Soccer (USYS) Eastern Presidents Cup Regional in Barboursville, W. Va., last week. PFC defeated the Beadling SC 2006 Boys South Elite 2-0 in the final on June 21. The squad will now compete in the US Youth Soccer (USYS) National Presidents Cup tournament in Greensboro, N.C., from July 7-10. The team includes Jacob Battoglia, Azariah Breitman, Zach Brunell, Brian Donis, Paras Goswami, Connor Hewitt, Izayah Huynh, Kyle Ingersoll, Zeb Jerdonek, Matthew Kim, Chris Lee, Ashwin Lobo, Felipe Matar Grandi, Nick Matese, Francis Savard, Archie Smith, Brandon Urias, Calvin Hopkins, and Liam Kennedy. (Photo provided courtesy of PFC)

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itman, and Antony Fitch added the other goals in the victory. Advancing to the semifinals, PFC Barcelona found itself in a defensive struggle with FC Montco (Pa.). The foes played to a scoreless draw through regulation and overtime. The game went to penalty kicks and PFC Barcelona prevailed 3-1 in the shootout as Nick Matese, Kyle Ingersoll, and Matar Grandi found the back of the net. Zach Brunell stepped up in goal, making two saves on PKs. Facing Beadling SC 2006 Boys South Elite ( Pa.) in the final on June 21, PFC Barcelona jumped out to a 2-0 lead on early goals by Matthew Kim and Brandon Arias. From there, the defense held the fort as the PFC side prevailed 2-0 to win the regional and punch its ticket to the nationals. — Bill Alden

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022

Princeton Little League Team Finishes Journey in Style, Winning the District 12 Intermediate 50/70 Tourney

Est. 1967


When Kevin Johnson put together the Athletic Engineering Institute team to compete in Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League this season, he was cautiously optimistic. “I definitely did feel it was a good group but you don’t know until you play,” said team manager Johnson, a former standout guard at The College of New Jersey who led the Speed Pro team in the summer league last year and noted that the AEI squad is a mix new and old faces from that group. Last Friday evening at the Community Park courts, AEI played very well as it defeated league powerhouse LoyalTees 51-40 to improve to 3-0. “This is the third game, we are doing pretty well,” and Johnson. “We are starting to mesh a little bit, even without our whole team. Johnson and his teammates were fired up for matchup with LoyalTees, the league’s three-time defending champs. “We definitely wanted to play the so-called best,” said

Johnson, a 6’0, 170-pound B elle Mead nat ive who starred at Montgomery High before heading to TCNJ. “I am definitely eager to see when we have our full team and they have their full team how we really match up.” Reeling off an 18-11 run to end the first half, AEI built a 22-19 halftime lead at intermission. “That run definitely helped us, mostly on defense that is where we are starting it,” said Johnson. Outscoring LoyalTees 13-5 over the last eight minutes of the contest, AEI pulled away to the win. “We keep telling ourselves as long as we play hard of defense, the offense will come,” added Johnson. “That is what happened; it also helped that they were missing shots.” AEI’s offense was clicking as Jalen Parham tallied a game-high 20 points with Vaughan Anderson chipping in 13. “It is a good mix,” said Johnson, reflecting on the team’s inside-out scoring prowess. “Jalen can play inside and he can play outside.

He is good.” Concentrating on playmaking duties, Johnson contributed five points in the victory. “I am more of a ball-handler; of course when we need to score, I can help score as well so I can help both ways,” said Johnson, a 2017 TCNJ alum who tallied 239 points in his college career. “I am also trying to provide energy on defense. I am a little bit of a jack of all trades. The last few games I was scoring more, this game it was more facilitating. Whatever works I am good as long as we get the win.” With AEI posting three straight wins to start the summer, Johnson believes the squad could do some big things as the season unfolds. “It is a confidence builder for sure but then again we haven’t seen every other teams so we don’t know how good they are,” said Johnson. “It is definitely good for our momentum to keep going. We will see how it turns out.” —Bill Alden

Local Sports Bailey Basketball Academy Offering Summer Camp in July

T he B ailey B asketball Academy (BBA) is offering a week-long camp in late July. BBA is led by for mer Princeton Day School girls’ hoops coach and Philadelphia 76ers camp director

For more infor mation, and clinician Kamau Bailey. The camp is slated for July contact Kamau Bailey at 25-July 29 at Stuart Coun- (917) 626-5785 or at kamau.bailey@gmail.com. try Day School. There are full day/half day and first hoops options available. The program will also include a small group training to help with transition to a higher school level. In addition, there is a multiple player/sibling discount. All players will be required to bring their own water, snacks, and/or lunch for the applicable programs.

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WINNING FEELING: Members of Team Princeton enjoy the moment after they won the WWP Babe Ruth spring 2022 regular season playoff tournament. Princeton defeated Team CranburyPlainsboro 9-3 at Cuiffani Field at West Windsor Community Park on June 15 in the final to end the spring with an 11-1 record. Members of Team Princeton included Will Arns, David Brophy, Wyatt Engelhart, Will Frole, Brodie Kushner, Simon Obregon, Travis Petrone, Dylan Powers, Mike Prete, Cole Rose, Brendan Scileppi, Alexander Vilarelle, Ben Walden, manager Lee Kushner, coach Scott Howe, and coach Bruce Rose. WWP Babe Ruth Baseball offers recreational baseball for players ages 13-15 in the spring, summer, and fall seasons who live in the towns of Princeton, West Windsor, Cranbury, Plainsboro, East Windsor, Hightstown, and MillstoneRoosevelt. Teams are organized by towns.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022 • 28

With Johnson Providing Leadership, Production, AEI Gets Off to 3-0 Start in Summer Men’s Hoops

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ATHLETIC MOVE: Kevin Johnson dribbles the ball for the Packer Hall All-Stars in a 2017 game in the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. Playing for the Athletic Engineering Institute this season, Johnson helped AEI defeat three-time defending champion LoyalTees 51-40 last Friday to improve to 3-0. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Alexander (Sandy) Fraser June 8, 1937 – June 13, 2022

Alexander (Sandy) Fraser passed away peacefully on June 13, 2022 with his wife, Elisabeth, at his side. Born in Surrey, England in 1937, Sandy spent the war years with his family in Lancashire where his father was a research chemist. The family subsequently moved to Weston Super Mare where his mother ran a small hotel overlooking the sea. Sandy earned his bachelor’s degree in aeronautical engineering from Bristol University, U.K. He began his career at Ferranti and then at Cambridge University, U.K., where he was awarded a Ph.D. He was recruited to join AT&T Bell Labs in 1969. He became Director of its Computing Science Research Center in 1982, Executive Director in 1987, and Associate Vice President for Information Science Research in 1994. In 1996, when AT&T spun off Lucent and Bell Labs., Sandy, who was passionate about research, led the effort to establish Shannon Labs. (AT&T Labs Research) in Florham Park, NJ. As VP for Research he ran Shannon Labs. for two years, at which time he was appointed Chief Scientist so that he could focus his time and research energy on the development of a new architecture and protocols for a large-scale internet focused on networking to the home. In 2002, Sandy retired from AT&T and formed Fraser Research in Princeton, NJ, where he continued his research and provided summer internships for a few select graduate students interested in networking. In 2009, he completed his vision for redesigning the internet. While at Ferranti, Sandy developed Nebula, a language and compiler for the Sirius computer. At Cambridge University he devel-

one has MP4 files, they’re using AAC. Sandy has received numerous awards for his pioneering contributions to the architecture of communication networks through the development of virtual circuit switching technology. He was a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of the British Computer Society and IEEE. He was a life member of ACM. He received the 1989 Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications Award “for contributions to computer communications and the invention of virtualcircuit switching,” the 1992 ACM SIGCOMM Award for “pioneering concepts, such as virtual circuit switching, space-division packet switching, and window flow control,” and the 2001 IEEE Richard W. Hamming Medal “for pioneering contributions to the architecture of communication networks through the development of virtual circuit switching technology.” Sandy has over 20 patents and published numerous professional papers. As a young man, Sandy was an avid cyclist going on weekly rides with the local club (a passion he passed on to his sons). He enjoyed club cycling with his first wife, Thirza, who sadly died at the young age of 31. Sandy and Elisabeth were married in 1971 and subsequently built their house in Bernardsville where they raised their two sons, Tim and Ben. Sandy enjoyed building things and creating things and always had a workshop. He also loved being outside in nature. He especially loved being close to the ocean and the family spent many memorable vacations on Kiawah Island, SC. Sandy is survived by his loving wife, Elisabeth, his son Tim and family of Franklin Township, NJ, Ben and family of East Amwell, NJ, and grandsons Jake, Tyler, Grey, and Leo. Sandy also leaves siblings Carol of Manali, India, David of Pearland, Texas, and Tina of Princethorpe, U.K. Burial of his cremains will be private; a celebration of his life will take place October 1, 2022 at the Hunterdon Art Museum in Clinton, NJ, and also on August 6, 2022 in Cambridge, U.K. In lieu of flowers, a donation in his name may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association or to a charity of your choice. For more information please email fraserpublic62@gmail.com. Arrangements have been under the direction of the Kimble Funeral Home, Princeton, NJ. Share memories at The KimbleFuneralHome.com.

Rita A. Novitt Rita A. Novitt born on J u l y 12, 1921, p a s s e d away peacefully on April 27, 2022, at the incredible age of 100. She will be remembered for the amazing life she lived on her own terms. She was preceded in death by her parents Adam and Victoria Novitt, her siblings Ceifert “Duke” Novitt, Charles Novitt, Anna White, and Marie Minwegen. Surviving her are several nieces and nephews as well as many great-nieces and nephews and their children. In fact, because Rita never had children of her own, she became the beloved “Gigi” to the May, Stevens, and White families and the surrogate great-grandmother for Katie, Noah, Haley, Emily, and Joshua. Rita was born in Spotswood, NJ, and lived the first 88 years of her life in New Jersey. Rita graduated with her bachelor’s degree from Douglass College in New Brunswick, NJ. Rita spent most of her adult life working for Johnson & Johnson and was a trailblazer for women in the workplace. She was one of the highest-ranking women at J&J when women were not able to become executives. In retirement she tended to be even more active and influential as she served on the boards of the Fielding Institute, Kellogg Foundation, Thomas Edison State College, and Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences. She was also a member of the Douglass Society and featured in the book, Who’s Who of American Women 1991-1992. R ita w ill be bur ied at St. Gertrude Cemetery in Woodbridge, NJ, next to her father and mother. A memorial mass will be held in her honor on Wednesday, July 6 at 10 a.m. at the St. Paul Parish, 216 Nassau Street in Princeton, NJ. In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation to the Parish Library at St. Paul Parish.

Memorial Service – Rhett Celebrating the life of Haskell Emery Smith Rhett (1936-2022) Friday, July 8, at 4 p.m. Trinity Church Reception following For more information, trinityprinceton.org (609) 924-2277

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29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022

Obituaries

oped the file system for the Atlas 2 (Titan) computer. Once at Bell Labs, in the early 1970s, Sandy’s attention turned to computer networking. He invented cell-based net works, the precursor to Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), one of the foundational protocols of modern data communications. He also developed Datakit, the first virtual circuit network switch, which became the backbone of the AT&T telecommunications network. In the late 1980s, Sandy created the Experimental Universities Network (XUNET) project to promote graduate research on computer networks. Eight universities and labs across the country were linked by a network of Datakit Virtual Circuit Switches joined by high-speed links to provide a wide area systems research laboratory where student researchers could run network experiments. Although Sandy’s research focused primarily on networking, he was also interested in the benefits that improved networks could provide. He recognized and nurtured technologies that connected people to the internet using cable TV channels, a variety of wireless approaches, and fiber optics believing education and audio and video to the home would require large amounts of bandwidth. In the late 1990s he developed a plan for a network architecture to bring highspeed networking to the home — a capability which is now taken for granted but was almost unknown 25 years ago. Realizing that the new network infrastructure would need a business justification, Sandy promoted research projects that would “fill the pipes.” Among these projects was high-fidelity audio coding. Sandy supported researcher participation in ISO MPEG, resulting in the MPEG A d v a n c e d Au d i o C o d e r (“AAC”) international standard. Sandy promoted AAC use to other companies, notably including Apple, which adopted AAC for its iTunes music application. Sandy contracted for the development of innovative test platforms for AAC, including the Euphony processor, one of the first Systemon-Chip microprocessors. Euphony was the “brains” of one of the first solid-state music players, FlashPAC, which was used to demonstrate AAC to potential adopters. Today A AC is deployed on every smartphone worldwide and is one of the most widely used music compression applications — if some-


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022 • 30

Obituaries Continued from Preceding Page

Marian Carter King Green Marian Car ter King Green (age 84) died peacefully on June 15, 2022 in Santa Monica, CA. Marian was born in New York, NY, on September 5, 1937. Her parents, Frank L amar K ing and G ladys Merritt Carter King, were actors and later Lamar went into government ser vice. Marian grew up in Chevy Chase, MD; London, England; and Berlin, Germany, where she graduated high school in 1955. Marian was the oldest of four sisters. After high school, Marian

traveled to New York City to follow her dream of becoming a model and an actress. She moved into the renowned Rehearsal Club on 53rd street. Billed as a “theatrical girl’s boarding house,” the Rehearsal Club was home to famous artists like Barbra Streisand and Carol Burnett. Marian also was a cigarette girl at the Roxy Theatre in New York. It was there she met Grant Dickson “Dick” Green, the theater’s manager at the time, whom she later married in 1960. Marian had a son, Christopher Nelson Green, in 1962, followed quickly by a daughter, Sallie Merritt Green, in 1963. The family set t led in Pr inceton, NJ, when Dick took a job at P r inceton Un iversit y. Marian was a homemaker until her children were in junior high school when she decided to start her career again. Marian became an administrative assistant at Princeton University, a professional organizer, and she sat on the town’s fire commission. After leaving the University, Marian got her residential real estate license. Mar ian’s husband Dick

passed away in 1998 and, eventually, Marian began spending time with Joseph “Joe” Shelley. Marian and Joe were together for seven years and they enjoyed their time immensely, traveling to many places here and abroad, going to the t heater and seeing con cer ts. Mar ian also loved spending time with Joe’s f i ve c h i l d r e n a n d e i g h t grandchildren who she considered her own family. Joe passed away in 2009. Marian stayed in New Jersey until 2016, when she moved to California to be closer to her daughter. Mar ian was d iag nos ed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2016 and she spent her remaining years being looked HOPEWELL • NJ HIGHTSTOWN • NJ af te r by a c ap abl e a n d compassionate care team at Welbrook Memory Care in Santa Monica, CA. 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we are experience, here towe help guide you through the difficult process of experience, we are are here here to to help help guide guideWith you you through through thegenerations difficult difficult process of of monument monument selection. selection. family business. fivethe of experience, ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE THE process PERFECT MEMORIAL ITSoriented EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE monument selection. ITS ITS we EASIER EASIER ITS ITS THAN THAN EASIER EASIER YOU YOU THAN THAN THINK THINK YOU YOU TO TO THINK THINK MAKE MAKE TO TO THE THE MAKE MAKE PERFECT PERFECT THE THE PERFECT PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL MEMORIAL MEMORIAL ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE THE PERFECT MEMORIAL ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE are here to help guide you through the difficult process of bronze memorials for five next to Cedar Hill Cemetery.

fine granite andTO since and located We We creates encourage encourage you you to to make make an an appointment, appointment, with with no no obligation, obligation, to to1909 discuss discuss the the many manyis options options available available to to you. you. ITSand EASIER ITSTHAN EASIER YOU THAN THINK YOU THINK MAKE TO THE MAKE PERFECT THE PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc

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monument selection. THE PERFECT MEMORIAL WePrinceton encourage you make an appointment, obligation, Area. Wetopride storefront towith help no guide you ourselves being a small throughout the to selection We encourage you tomany make an appointment, with noyou obligation, toon discuss the options available

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES DIRECTORY OF Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years

Happy Fourth of July from

boutique-type, personal and process. to discuss the many options available to you service-oriented business.

ITS EASIER THAN TOMAKE MAKE EASIER THANYOU YOU THINK THINK TO ITSITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE THE PERFECT THE PERFECTMEMORIAL MEMORIAL THE PERFECT MEMORIAL

RELIGIOUS SERVICES

Sunday 8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I 9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following undayS

S

Princeton’s Princeton’s First Tradition

Worship Service

in in the the University Chapel Sundays Sundaysatat10am* 11am

8:00Tuesday am Rev. Alison Boden, Ph.D. AlisonLifeBoden, Ph.D. DeanRev. of Religious and the Chapel 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist Rev. Dr. Theresa Thames Holy Communion Rite I Rev. Dr. Theresa Associate Dean of Religious Life and Thames the Chapel 10:00 am Wednesday Must be fully vaccinated against Covid-19 to attend. Registration required for all you eventsare on campus. Wherever you are on your journey of faith, 5:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist with Healing Holy Communion Rite II Prayer For more information, visit chapel.princeton.edu always welcome to worship with us at: 11:15 am 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org First Church of Christ, Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church Outdoor Coffee Hour Wherever you are in your journey of faith, 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ Scientist, Princeton and Fellowship 16 Bayard Lane,with Princeton come worship us 10:00 a.m. Worship Service St. Paul’s Catholic Church During this time of COVID-19 crisis, Witherspoon is finding new Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel

Associate Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel * Service begins at 10am during the Summer. Must be fully vaccinated against Covid-19 to attend. Registration required. For more information, visit chapel.princeton.edu.

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

St. All Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, Princeton 214 Street, Princeton services are online. 214 Nassau Street, Princeton

Msgr. Walter Rosie, Nolan,Pastor Pastor Msgr. Joseph Join us atMsgr. www.trinityprinceton.org Walter Nolan, Pastor

Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30and p.m. Sunday: 7:00,Paul 8:30, 10:00, 5:00 p.m. The Rev. Jeanes III,11:30 Rector, Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. The Rev.Mass Canon Dr. Kara Slade, Rector, in Spanish: SundayAssoc. at 7:00 p.m.

The Rev. Joanne Epply-Schmidt, Assoc. Rector, 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 • www.trinityprinceton.org

ONLINE

www.towntopics.com

609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ ¡Eres siempre bienvenido!

Christianare Science Room Services heldReading in the Church

Our 178 Nassau Street, Princeton following the appropriate protocols 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 Sunday Church Service and Sunday School at 10:30 am, Wednesday Testimony meetings at 7:30 pm Visit the Christian Science Reading Room Monday through Saturday, 10 am - 4 pm 178 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ For free local delivery call (609) 924-0919 www.csprinceton.org • (609) 924-5801

10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School

ways to continue our worship. While our sanctuary doors may be closed, and Youth Bible Study church is open and we willAdult find new avenues to proclaim the Gospel and to Bible Classes continue as one faith community! (A multi-ethnic congregation) 609-924-1666 • Fax Join us for worship on Facebook Live609-924-0365 every Sunday at 10:00 a.m. witherspoonchurch.org

Recorded and live stream sermons can also be found on our website - witherspoonchurch.org Join our mailing list to receive notices of our special services, bible study and virtual fellowship. During the COVID-19 crisis our church office is closed, however, please email witherspoon@verizon.net or leave a message at our church office and a staff member will get back to you. Church office: (609) 924-1666


“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

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Irene Lee, Classified Manager

• Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or07-06 check. ROSA’S 07-21-22 • 25 words or tfless: $15.00 • each $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. CLEANING SERVICE LLC add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: YARD SALE + AIR CONDITIONER NEEDS FIXING: Offering professional cleaning serI BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE • 3 weeks: $40.00 • 4 weeks: $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual discount My 11-month-old YPF2-12Crates Portable available. = GREAT WEEKEND! for your loved one. Compassionate vices in the Princeton community Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, A/C is only giving out warm for more than 28 years! Weekly, bicostume jewelry, evening bags, fan• Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inch Put • all bold face type: $10.00/week air, as if caregiver will assist with personal an ad in the TOWN TOPICS DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon

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weekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

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07-06

tf

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to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

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set to Fan, even when it’s set to Cool. If you can fix it, leave message anytime, 609-683-5456, fab4casper@ yahoo.com.

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HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06-22 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

07-27-8t

“May your walls know joy; may each room hold laughter, and may every window open to great possibility." —Maty Ann Radeacher-Hershey

Established in 1947

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31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022

to place an order:

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


1st month discount 3rd month 10%30% discount

**excluding Morris Hall Meadows** Waived community Waived community fee fee for for St. St. Mary Mary & & Grace Grace Gardens Gardens -- aa $2,500 $2,500 value. value.

Serving The Community – Together Campus Shared with St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center

Campus Shared with St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center **excluding **excluding Morris Morris Hall Hall Meadows** Meadows**

St. Mary’s Assisted Living St. Mary’s Assisted Care LivingAssisted Living Grace Garden Memory •Grace St. Garden Joseph’sMemory Skilled Nursing Center Care Assisted Living St. Joseph’s Skilled Nursing • Morris Hall Meadows Skilled St. Joseph’s Skilled NursingNursing • Morris St. Mary’s Assisted Living, Morris Hall Meadows Skilled Nursing Hall Meadows Skilled Nursing Grace Garden Memory Care New Palliative Care Unit at St. Mary’s

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2nd month 20 % discount

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Located in •• For more please visit us Located in Lawrenceville, Lawrenceville, NJ Formore more information, information, please visitvisit us at at us at Located in Lawrenceville, NJNJ • For information, please www.morrishall.org or us at mhadmissions@morrishall.org www.morrishall.org or contact contact mhadmissions@morrishall.org or or 609-895-1937 609-895-1937 www.morrishall.org or contact us us at atmhadmissions@morrishall.org or 609-895-1937

Morris Hall Senior Care Communities • St. Joseph’s Skilled Nursing & Long Term Care • St. Mary’s Assisted Living • Grace Garden Assisted Living Memory Care • Morris Hall Meadows at Lawrenceville Skilled Nursing

Specialized Services • Short Term Rehabilitation • Respite Care • Palliative Care • Hospice Care

St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center Salutes our Nursing Staff! Thank you for your dedication, hard work and compassion every day and especially during the COVIC-19 pandemic.

2381 Lawrenceville Road | Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 609-896-9500 | www.slrc.org


33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022

A Sophisticated Take on Modern Luxury


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022 • 34

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well loved and well read since 1946

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melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

• Prestigious Princeton mailing address • Built to suit tenant spaces with private bathroom, kitchenette & separate utilities • Premier Series suites with upgraded flooring, counter tops, cabinets & lighting

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4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

Town Topics is the only weekly paper that reaches EVERY HOME IN PRINCETON, Town Topics making is theitonly a tremendously weekly papervaluable that reaches product EVERY with HOME unmatched IN PRINCETON, exposure! making it a tremendously valuable pr

toWn toPIcs neWsPaPeR • 4438 Route 27 noRth • KInGston,toWn nJ 08528 toPIcs • tel: neWsPaPeR 609.924.2200 • 4438 • Fax: Route 609.924.8818 27 noRth• •www.towntopics.com KInGston, nJ 08528 • tel: 609.924.2200 • Fax: 609.9

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125


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35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2022

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Come visit this picture book home in a desirable Princeton location. With inviting curb appeal, this traditional home provides abundant living space, gorgeous setting and opportunities to update at your own pace. The circular driveway leads the way to the door and foyer with stone flooring. Straight away, you are surrounded by multiple options to enjoy the house and Real Estate except for the stone foyer, kitchen and tiled baths, there are hardwood floors throughout the two main floors. Ahead is a hallway with French doors to the covered porch that overlooks • Insurance • Closing Services state •theMortgage yard and stream. Before you reach the formal living room on the left, enjoy a cozy paneled study with a fireplace. Step down into the front to back living room with fireplace and large windows that allow views to the yard. On the right side of the foyer is the spacious kitchen that has stainless steel appliances and marble counters and is adjacent to the breakfast room, side entrance and 2 car garage. Finally, the formal dining room, with ample storage cabinets, has twin sets of French doors to the porch and views of the backyard beyond. Real Upstairs, in addition to the principal ensuite with several and built-ins, there are three bedrooms and two renovated hall bathrooms with stall showers. The staircase continues RealEstate Estate • • Mortgage • closets • Closing ce •to the Closing Real Estate Services Insurance Services lower level with foyer and hall. Running the length of the back of the house, multiple French doors lead onto the covered blue stone terrace and inground pool. A family room with fireplace, a laundry room, two other rooms with closets, plumbing for one and a half baths, a bonus room and utilities complete the lower level. Don’t miss the opportunity to make this beautiful house your own!

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herryHillRoad.info 40NorthHarrisonStreet.info $4,700 per month $885,000 34MayburyHillRoad.info 243CherryHillRoad.info $1,450,000$4,700 per month

1,100,000 243CherryHillRoad.info 40NorthHarrisonStreet.info $4,700 per month $885,000 34MayburyHillRoad.info 243CherryHillRoad.info $1,450,000$4,700 per month

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34MayburyHillRoad.info $1,450,000

117LeabrookLane.info $1,100 34MayburyHillRoad.info $1,450,000

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AN, VISITFOR 15LINDENLANE.INFO MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO RDENLANE.INFO MORE PHOTOS$1,649,000 AND FLOOR PLAN,$1,649,000 VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO $1,649,000

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The of renovations theamenities. home, spare expense to spare carefully the of the home, a century old home 15JeffersonRoad.info 9FairwayDrive.info $1,125,000 $1,165,000 102SnowdenLane.info 15JeffersonRoad.info $875,000 $1,125,000 $875,000 a acentury old home with a spacious updated for today a century old hom updated for today’s lifestyle. Custo century old home with a spaciou today’s s, hardwood lifestyle. floors, Custom extensive staircase built-ins and mouldings, throughout pocket make doors, itand both hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins and Custom extensive staircase built-ins andand throughout mouldings, make pocket it both doors, hardwood floors, extensive built-ins throughout make it boththroughout make it both spectacular spectacular detail tot tointimate traditional FOR MORE PHOT spectacular detail anspectacular intimate detail family space and an en an family detail toboth both traditiona 83MountLucasRoad.info $999 $1,649,000 he rmet family kitchen room with with custom original cabinets, tin ceiling, and pocket doors. 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Custo ases ormous & beautiful island bar. the great light-filled room great with bookcases & beautiful The great&room m Princeton University, sitsThe a stunning that combines thelight-filled charm and appeal of room with FOR MORE PHOTOS om es, pantry with built-in andoverlooks enormous bookcases island &home beautiful overlooks bar.room the The greatbuilt-in room great built-inbar. bookcases beautiful bar. The great room anan intimate family space and an ente an intimate family sps PRINCETON The spacious entrance hall opens FOR MORE PHOTO intimate family space and anentr ent an intimate family 83MountLucasRoad.info $999,00 The spacious 83MountLucasRoad.info $999,0 ,649,000 $1,649,000 or plan. Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 with opens s. The into gourmet the family kitchen room with with custom original cabinets, tin ceiling, and pocket doors. 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The great room mudroom room complete with the cubbies first floor. tons of storage along with a powder room complete the first The spacious entran PRINCETON aPRINCETON century old a home with adining spacious modern oi The spacious entrance hall opens opens to formal room that The spacious entra uldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout make it both rage pace. along A floor separate with awraparound powder mudroom with complete built-in therenovated firstand floor. tons storage alongarea withtoa function powderasroom complete the first floor. nm odern 2007 open with plan.area Kirstenroom Thoft andcubbies fully this homeof in 2007 with opens to pantry aapantry formal dining that and overlooks porch aArchitect to function asremodeled The indoor/ custom doors allow dining and porch an indoor/ and detail toappliances, both traditional and moder Instainless-steel the heart of downtown Princeton, few blocks stainless-steel applia stainless-steel appliances, an ormal tom doors dining allow room that dining overlooks andporch. aanwraparound area to function porch. 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These bedrooms share agreat hall bath with a BainUltra Jacuzzi Retreat upstairs the master bed fireplace and the ot ormous great room overlooks the great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The room Retreat upstairs to The spacious entrance hall opens into thethe family built-in cubbies and tons oflight-filled storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. d -in floor bookcases, which has desks, two additional window seat spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat Retreat upstairs to The spacious entrance hall opens into family opens to a formal dining room that overlooks aro ese the bedrooms other with a share wall of a hall floor-to-ceiling bath with a BainUltra wood built-in heated closets. Jacuzzi These tub. bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. fireplace and the other with a wall of f from town, you fi nd a circular driveway that drops you off in front of the bluestone porch and attractive front door. Inside, the foyer leads you into the huge living room surrounded by fireplace and the other with a wall of srooms, looks an indoor/ a wraparound porch.built-in The custom doors allow for dining and porch areaspacious to function an indoor/ stainless-steel appliances, pantry enormous isla home is featuring the third floor which bookcases, hasalong two desks, additional window seattheasfirst bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous is outdoor entertainment space. A and separate mudroo fireplace and the The crown jewel of this home isaoth th bath and abookcases, bonus sitting area. fireplace and the otw opens to to a formal dining room that overlooks wra ewalk-in irst mudroom with built-in cubbies and tons of storage with a powderbedrooms room complete steam shower. Just down thetwo hallway areFrench twoseat additional one with a floor.dining aturing efull isfloor. the built-in third floor which has desks, additional window spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat opens apool. formal dining room that overlooks a windows, bookcases and a fi replace. doors from the adjacent formal room overlook the bluestone terrace, brick wall and backyard with above ground The sunny galley The crown jewel ot and closets. The two bedrooms sh edrooms share a is full and a which bonus sitting area. outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom The jewel of home ismudroo acious of bedrooms, this home featuring thebath built-in floor bookcases, two desks, additional spacious seat bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat Retreat dwel built-in closets. These bedrooms share asitting hall bath withhas a BainUltra heatedwindow Jacuzzi tub. outdoor entertainment space. A separate upstairs to the master bedroom with en Thecrown crown jewel ofthis this home isthe the full bath and athird bonus area. mms one withshare with en kitchen suite a a walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with with a The crown jewel of t is equipped with double ovens, gas stove and a pantry. A cozy library another fi replace, a wet bar and powder room and a large laundry room and full bath complete the main and closets. The tw and closets. The two bedrooms shar The crown jewel of fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceil mily eck and offers friends. terrific This space home for truly outdoor has memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has and closets. The two bedrooms sha The two bedrooms share a full bath and a bonus sitting area. Retreat upstairs toto the master bedroom with en su Jacuzzi r-to-ceiling tub. wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. Retreat upstairs the master bedroom with en s two additional spaciousthere bedrooms, featuring bedroom built-in bookcases, desks, windowand seatmultiple closets, two bedrooms that share a Jack and Jill bathroom, the fourth bedroom and closets. The two The fenced in backyard with Ipe wo fl oor. Upstairs, is the primary with ensuite bathroom with ensuite bathroom and two fireplace and the other with a wall of of floor-to-ceiling and The tw to with be Ipe created wood with deck offers and terrific friends. space Thisfor home outdoor truly memories has to be created with family andtruly friends. can leave the atfamily home and stroll around town. fireplace and the other aclosets. wall ted Ipe with wood family deck and offers friends. terrific This space home for truly outdoor has memories to be created with family and friends. This home has This home truly has The crown jewel this with home iswith the floor-to-ceilin third floor w bonus sitting area.cars fenced inof backyard Ipe woo window d floor which seat has two 343JeffersonRoad.info additional spacious bedrooms, featuring bookcases, desks, window seatbasement and oversized 2 th The fenced in back itThe all. With ample off-street parking The fenced in backyard with Ipe wo additional rooms that can be used asand an offi cebuilt-in and/or den. The partial fihas nished car garage completes theThis picture. Additional highlights include a full house 22KW $1,347,500 and closets. The two bedrooms share a full bath narking memories backyard to with be Ipe created wood with deck family offers terrific friends. space This for home outdoor truly memories to be created with family and friends. home truly has you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town. The crown jewel of this home is the third floor whic own. eet parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town. The crown jewel of The thisoff-street home is theparking third floor yo w full bath and a bonus sitting area. fenced in backy it all. With ample 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,0 for outdoorGenerator memories (2020), to be created with family and friends. This home truly has fenced in back itclosets. all. With ample off-street parking itThe all. With o and The two bedrooms share aample full bath an ,329,000 343JeffersonRoad.info th (2015). Don’t miss it! Generac new siding (2019), new roof (2019), ACaround unit (2018) and 100 gallon water heater and closets. The two bedrooms share a full mple llcrsspace around off-street town.parking you can leave the cars at$1,347,500 home and new stroll town. The fenced in backyard withWith wood deckbath offe 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,000 it itall. ample offatoffers home and stroll town. 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,00 me ecktruly hasterrific spacearound for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has all. Ipe With ample of

For Sale in Princeton - $1,499,999 Additional photos and floorplan at: 8LafayetteRoadW.info

can leave the cars at home and stroll around town.

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esentative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

m.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | BeatriceBloom.com ECO-Broker Sales Representative/Princeton Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker 989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) Residential | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com ialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Sales| info@BeatriceBloom.com Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

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Introducing: Prospect Avenue

Introducing: Hodge Road

Introducing: Beech Hollow Lane

Princeton, NJ | $3,200,000

Princeton, NJ | $2,895,000

Princeton, NJ | $2,195,000

Maura Mills: 609.947.5757

Jane Henderson Kenyon: 609.828.1450

Sylmarie ‘Syl’ Trowbridge: 917.386.5880

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2018298

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2017808

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2018496

Edgerstoune Road

Introducing: Mulberry Court

Introducing: Ridgeview Road

Princeton, NJ | $1,500,000

Montgomery Township, NJ | $1,329,900

Princeton, NJ | $1,325,000

Owen ‘Jones’ Toland: 609.731.5953

Patricia ‘Trish’ Ford: 908.635.9395

Kimberly A Rizk, Eleanor Deardorff: 609.203.4807

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2015094

callawayhenderson.com/NJSO2001456

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2018476

Introducing: Aster Court

Introducing: Route 518

Introducing: East Broad Street

Montgomery Township, NJ | $1,250,000

Montgomery Township, NJ | $885,000

Hopewell Borough, NJ | $550,000

Antoinette Schielein: 908.313.1078

Antoinette Schielein: 908.313.1078

Linda Twining: 609.439.2282

callawayhenderson.com/NJSO2001476

callawayhenderson.com/3790303

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2018532

Introducing: Amwell Road

Introducing: Palmer Square West

Introducing: Sky Court

East Amwell Township, NJ | $549,000

Princeton, NJ | $374,900

Lawrence Township, NJ | $270,000

Catherine ‘Kate’ Stinson: 609.439.9343

Sarah Strong Drake: 908.229.4260

Madolyn Greve: 609.462.2505

callawayhenderson.com/NJHT2001092

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2018336

callawayhenderson.com/NJME2018490

callawayhenderson.com 609.921.1050 | 4 NASSAU STREET | PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08542 Each office is independently owned and operated. Subject to errors, omissions, prior sale or withdrawal without notice.