Town Topics Newspaper, June 22, 2022

Page 1

Volume LXXVI, Number 25

New Littlebrook Murals Bring Color and Joy . . . 5 Amateur Radio Field Day Is Open to Public . . . . . 8 Final Weekend of “Jazz in June” Marks Lockwood’s Retirement . . . . . . . . 11 Princeton Festival Presents Yours Sincerely, Stephen Sondheim . . 14 Comic Opera Albert Herring at Princeton Festival . . . . . . . . . . . 15 PHS Junior Standout Jonathan Gu Wins NJ State Boys Singles Title . . . . .26 After Successful Tenure as Stuart AD, Leith Heading to Bullis School . . . . . 28

Celebrating 100 Years of Judy Garland (19221969) . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 22 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . 31 Healthy Living. . . . . 17-19 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 12 New To Us . . . . . . . . . 23 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 30 Performing Arts . . . . . 16 Police Blotter . . . . . . . . 8 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 31 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Summer Guide . . . . . . 2-3 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

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COVID Rates Are Down; Vaccines Approved For Very Young Children The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Saturday, June 18 recommended COVID-19 vaccines for children from 6 months to 5 years old. As of Tuesday, June 21, New Jersey parents can make vaccination appointments for their young children through covid19. nj.gov, the state’s COVID-19 website. “This is welcome news for parents concerned with ensuring their children have the strongest protection against COVID-19,” New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy and New Jersey Health Commissioner Judith Persichilli noted in a statement issued Saturday. New Jersey has ordered 61,000 doses and is distributing them to medical sites around the state, according to Murphy. The vaccines use the same technology as vaccines for adults, but they are given at different dose sizes and number of shots. Children under 5 who receive the Pfizer vaccine will be given three doses at one-tenth the strength of adult doses. Children under 6 who receive the Moderna vaccine will receive two doses at one-quarter the strength of an adult dose. The Pfizer vaccine was previously approved for children ages 5 to 11, but fewer than 30 percent in that age group have received the recommended two shots. In CDC nationwide surveys conducted in May, only about one-third of parents said they would vaccinate their young children. According to the most recent available Princeton Health Department statistics, 88 percent of all local residents age 5 and over are vaccinated, 90 percent of those 18 and over. In response to a New York Times poll in April, fewer than one-fifth of parents of children under 5 said they were eager to get their children vaccinated right away. Parents gave many different reasons for hesitancy, though most health experts agree on the safety of the vaccine and recommend that all children be vaccinated. New Jersey COVID-19 case numbers have been declining in recent weeks, as have transmission rates and hospitalizations. The rate of transmission in New Jersey on Tuesday, June 21, was 0.8. Numbers below 1 indicate that the outbreak is declining, with each new case leading to less than one additional new case. Continued on Page 10

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Opposition Grows to U.S. 1 Warehouse Project A project that would bring nine warehouses of 5.5 million square feet to a 650-acre parcel bordering U.S. Route 1, Clarksville Road, and Quakerbridge Road in West Windsor, the former home of American Cyanamid, has many residents registering strong opposition. A discussion of the development by the West Windsor Township Planning Board, followed by a vote, is scheduled for its in-person meeting on June 29. The issue was last considered by the Planning Board on June 1. Traffic congestion and environmental issues are among the concerns of those urging that the development be scrapped. West Windsor Township Mayor Hemant Marathe said the former, in particular, will be addressed at the meeting. “I have talked to a lot of people in town, and I understand their concerns,” he said. “Traffic is the main concern. We fully understand that, and the Planning Board is going to impose conditions so that not as many trucks can be on Clarksville Road.” The Planning Board gave preliminary approval to a plan by the developer, Atlantic Realty, in December 2020. Since then, residents have charged that ongoing discussions of the issue have not been open to the public.

“Everything was by Zoom, but the Planning Board of West Windsor did not provide a Zoom link to the public,” said township resident Tirza Wahrman, who ran against Marathe last November. “My perspective is that a decision was made that a Zoom link was not required for the Planning Board, which is in stark contrast to how other township entities run. The whole thing was done under cover of night.” Marathe said the process has been

transparent. “We are 100 percent in person: Live, taped, and put on YouTube,” he said. Opposition to the project is not limited to West Windsor residents. The New Jersey chapter of the Sierra Club and the public advocacy group MoveOn have posted their concerns on social media. “This project brings with it potential for severe congestion on Route 1 and area roads, increased air pollution, and other problems,” Continued on Page 11

Thousands Parade Through Princeton, Celebrating Pride In Person for 2022

Back in person for the first time since Princeton’s first Pride Parade in 2019, Pride 2022 again drew a crowd of thousands of spirited marchers and supporters on Saturday, June 18, all celebrating the message of love, diversity, and inclusion. From babies to 90-year-olds, the diverse throng “marched, sashayed, and rolled,” according to event lead organizer Robt Seda-Schreiber, up Witherspoon Street from the Municipal Building, then down Paul Robeson Place to the YMCA for an afterparty that included entertainment and remarks from several speakers.

“To get the community together again after three years apart — it was beautiful, meaningful, significant, and inspirational — as meaningful as it was fabulous,” said Seda-Schreiber, chief activist of the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice (BRCSJ), which sponsored the event. Seda-Schreiber noted similarities between the 2019 and 2022 events, but emphasized the importance of bringing so many people together after having been kept apart for so long. “Especially for our queer community, for all marginalized folks, not to be able to gather is a really Continued on Page 10

PRINCETON PRIDE PARADE 2022: Thousands of marchers and supporters were in downtown Princeton on Saturday morning for the first in-person Pride Parade since 2019. An afterparty followed at the YMCA field on Paul Robeson Place. Participants share what brought them to the event is this week’s Town Talk on page 6. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022 • 2

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Sunday, June 26 4pm to 9pm Firefly Crafts: for Children Live Interactive Music with Lolly Hopwood Pam’s Firefly Food Tent Children Activities & Play Area Winery in our Apple Orchard Free Admission

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CHURCHES COLLABORATE: Children and adults learned how to worship with movement at last year’s Community Vacation Bible School at Trinity Episcopal Church.

“Compassion Camp” Resumes adu lts explored what it The hunt then begins for means to have compassion the miniature Waldos hidAt Local Congregations Five churches will partner to offer “Compassion Camp,” a free Community Vacation Bible School for all ages from June 27 to 30, 5:30 to 8 p.m. at Mt. Pisgah AME Church, 172 Witherspoon Street. Joining Mt. Pisgah for the second year of this ecumenical summer program will be volunteers from Trinity Episcopal Church, Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church, Princeton United Methodist Church, and Kingston United Methodist Church. “When we bring compassion into our relationships and into the world, we partner with God in bringing God’s love and justice into the world,” said Carolyn Liverman of Mt. Pisgah AME. In 2021 this multi-church Compassion Camp was held outdoors on the grounds of Trinity Episcopal Church. After families had supper together, 70 children and

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A scavenger hunt based on Waldo, the iconic children’s book character in the redand-white-striped shirt and black-rimmed specs, will be held throughout July. Princeton businesses are hosting the free hunt for anyone who wants to search for Waldo. Participants in the Waldo Scavenger Hunt will get prizes and treats, while supporting local businesses. The kickoff is on Saturday, July 2, at 1 p.m. at jaZams, 25 Palmer Square East. It will feature cake and goodie bags, and Waldo fans are invited to dress as one of their favorite characters from the Waldo books.

A Community Bulletin

Where’s Waldo Scavenger Hunt Launches July 2

den among 25 local retailers. The goal is to find 25 Waldos and record each find in a special Waldo passport. The Scavenger Hunt ends July 31, when there will be a live Instagram drawing for prizes for anyone finding 20 Waldos and one grand prize drawing for all those who completed the passport. The Find Waldo Local, although new to Princeton, is celebrating its 10th anniversary nationally. Retail participants include, but are not limited to LiLLiPiES, Labyrinth Books, the Arts Council of Princeton, Small World Coffee, Whole Earth Center, Thomas Sweet, and jaZams (where the Waldo stamp cards can be obtained to start the hunt). For m or e i n for m at ion about hunting for Waldo in Princeton, call jaZams’ Joanne Farrugia or Kristen Paladino at (609) 924-8697 or email jaZams.social @ gmail.com.

Topics In Brief

for others, ourselves, and the world. For information about the free program, call ( 609 ) 924-2613 or email office@ Princetonumc.org.

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Rosedale Road Closure: Starting June 27, Rosedale Road will be closed to through traffic for construction of a mini-roundabout at General Johnson Drive/ Greenway Meadows. The project is expected to last through the summer. The road will be open to local traffic only. Trash Collection Delays: Due to the nationwide truck driver shortage, which has affected Princeton’s hauler (Interstate Waste Services), the delays are expected to continue as the company works on hiring more drivers. In the meantime, trash will be collected within 48 hours of the scheduled collection. COVID-19 Care Kits for Princeton Families: Low/moderate income families in Princeton can get these kits, which include tests and materials to respond to COVID-19, such as one-use thermometers, an oximeter, and extra household items. They are available for pickup at Princeton Human Services by calling (609) 6882055. Certain eligibility requirements apply. Volunteer to be a Land Steward: Friends of Princeton Open Space (FOPOS) holds half-day volunteer sessions on a variety of conservation projects at the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Individuals, families, students, and corporate groups are welcome on June 25, July 16, and July 30 for a morning (9 a.m.-12 p.m.) or afternoon (1-4 p.m.). Fopos.org.


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JOYFUL MURALS AT LITTLEBROOK: Littlebrook Elementary School students and staff recently completed a six-wall indoor mural project during a three-week residency with mural artist Caren Olmsted and a large outdoor mural developed in collaboration with the Arts Council of Princeton. (Photo courtesy of Princeton Public Schools)

New Murals Bring Color and Joy as Littlebrook Culminates Its Big Project

Covering six walls from floor to ceiling, Littlebrook Elementary School’s new murals, were unveiled last week. Their impact has been powerful. “The murals have brought joy to us all at Littlebrook,” said Littlebrook Principal Luis Ramirez. The artwork, completed during a threeweek residency project with

mural artist Caren Olmsted, portrays school activities and traditions, and reflects the input of all the students at the school. “Our murals represent our Littlebrook community, especially our students,” Ramirez noted. “It was important to have every child represented in the artwork. E ach s t u d e nt h as t h e ir unique handpr int in the murals and took part in the painting of them as well.”

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Littlebrook mascot) saying “All are welcome” upside down on the other wall. The “growing” wall focuses on garden activities that the students at different grade levels work on each year. It includes depictions of the Littlebrook mother Redefine your smile and boost your confidence duck, the butterfly life cycle, and a quotation about at Princeton Center for Dental Aesthetics teachers planting the seeds and Implants, the go-to destination for great of knowledge. Next, the giving house advanced cosmetic dentistry outcomes. wall displays a “donation house” and shows in picNow is a great time to put a bright new smile tures how students can care and share, including walking on your face. We welcome your inquiry and a dog, playing together, and look forward to meeting you soon. other examples of sharing and caring that students came up with in working Kirk D. Huckel DMD, FAGD 609-924-1414 He continued, “Our stu- with school counselor Jenny Kiersten Huckel DMD www.PrincetonDentist.com dents’ voices are repre- Walters. Historical ceramShanni Reine-Mutch DDS 11 Chambers St., Princeton sented in the murals. The ics that were already on the children helped us with the Continued on Next Page words of welcome that are painted on the walls of our vestibule and voted to have the word GROW painted in the outdoor mural. I am very proud of all our Littlebrook students.” The indoor mural project was initiated and funded by the Littlebrook PTO, under the leadership of Co-Presidents Kati Dunn, Sonja Ernst, and Magdalena Janas. For the outdoor mural project, the PTO commissioned artists from the Arts Council of Princeton in looking to enhance the look of the playground area and connect to the larger community. Janas described the elaboServices are provided in the following areas: rate process of creating the murals. “The longest phase of the project was the design • Divorce • Claims of Unmarried itself,” she said. “Our artist • Custody and Parenting Time Cohabitants/Palimony Caren Olmsted listened to • Marital Settlement Agreements • Post Judgment Enforcement all inputs and ideas and cre• Prenuptial Agreements and Modification ated a very unique and origi• Domestic Violence • Mediation nal plan. Her work always • Child Relocation Issues • Appeals includes all kids who attend • Civil Unions and • Adoption schools that she works in. Domestic Partnerships • Surrogacy The mural would have been impossible to do without the help of more than 90 parents — countless hours of priming, painting, and finishing the highest spots on the walls.” Collaborating with Olmsted, Littlebrook art teacher Colleen Dell enlisted her art classes for several weeks, Nicole Jillian John A. Jennifer Lydia making sure all students Huckerby Frost Hartmann, III Haythorn Fabbro took part in the painting of Kalyan Chairman Keephart the walls and the completion of the murals. Greenleaf Painters, LLC donated 609-520-0900 * the paint for the murals. www.pralaw.com The first two murals, in the entrance vestibule of 989 Lenox Drive, Suite 101 the school, present words Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 of welcome from students in *Pellettieri Rabstein & Altman was selected to The Best Lawyers Best Law Firms list. The Best Law Firms list is issued by U.S. News & World Report. more than 30 languages on A description of the selection methodologies can be found at https://bestlawfirms.usnews.com/methodology.aspx. No aspect of this advertisement one wall and a giraffe (the has been approved by the Supreme Court of New Jersey.

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Littlebrook Murals Continued from Preceding Page

walls became a part of the design. The next wall includes the initials “LB” along with different representations of giraffes, a magnolia tree (Littlebrook is located on Magnolia Lane), a piece of the Delaware Canal, and a quote: “In a world where you can be anything, be nice.” Other parts of the mural include a painted bookshelf framing the entrance to the library and the planet Earth being held by children’s hands. “I’m very happy the PTO had a chance to improve the look and feel of the school,” said Janas. “We brought in color and happiness to the space where our kids and their teachers spend many hours every day.” Ramirez expressed his appreciation to all the participants who helped to bring the mural project to a successful completion. “A special thank you to all our students and staff members for their participation in the mural painting,” he said. “They have created something for all to enjoy for years to come.” Princeton Public Schools Superintendent Carol Kelley added her praise and appreciation. “I love the Littlebrook murals,” she said. “I particularly like how every student played a role, through their art classes. It’s such a nice community collaboration between the school, the students, the parents, the Arts Council, and also the local business that donated all the paint.” She added, “It’s a great example of everyone working together to build on the best of Littlebrook, and it resulted in these terrific murals.” —Donald Gilpin

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What brought you to the parade today?” (Asked Saturday at the Princeton Pride Parade) (Photos by Charles R. Plohn)

“I love pride events because I love what they represent, which is social justice and equality for all.” —Liz Lamartine, Hopewell

“Because Sesame Street is all about inclusion, empathy, tolerance, and love, and that’s what today is all about. That’s why I am here.” —Alan Muraoka, parade grand marshal, New York, N.Y., with young fans

Liberty Weekend Marks Trenton’s Revolutionary History

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Most people are familiar with the iconic vision of Washington crossing the Delaware in 1776. What may not be as well-known is how Washington’s subsequent victory in Trenton reversed the fledgling nation’s defeat and changed the course of history. Events start with a reenactment of the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence outside of Philadelphia, on Friday, July 8, at 12 p.m. Trentonians will gather exactly 246 years — to the hour — after the reading at the spot on Warren Street where the world outside of Philadelphia first heard t he revolut ionar y words of the Declaration. On Saturday, July 9 at 10 a.m., there will be a flagraising at the Trenton Battle Monument, the site of Washington’s improbable victory over Hessian mercenaries the day after Christmas in 1776. At 2 p.m. participants can learn about the first historian to tell the story of the pivotal battle at the Trent House. The Old Barracks, the State House, and other sites will be open. At 7 p.m., the Capital Philharmonic will give a free performance at Cadwalader Park, led by conductor Daniel Spalding. Visit capitalphilharmonic. org for more information about the concert, tastetrenton.com for information about the city’s restaurants, and facebook.com/kiwanisoftrentonnj for details and directions.

“We are really excited that the Pride Parade is happening in Princeton and it’s wonderful to support all kinds of families.” —Lucas, Lee James, and Lila, Princeton

Lawrence: “And I am here to be an ally with my youngest child, and to show my support for the entire LGBTQIA+ community.” Amanda: “I am happy to be here with fellow queer people and allies and to know that I am not alone and that it’s OK to be queer.” —Lawrence and Amanda Maier, Monmouth Junction

“We are representing the Machestic Dragons dragon boat team in Mercer County Park and are here to support our teammate, Carol Wachler, who is marching in the parade today.” — Susan Benjamin, Monroe Township; Judy Viacava, Washington Crossing, Pa.; Rebecca Lynn, Ewing; Fran Gervasi, Lawrence; and Susan Wieszckek, Chesterfield


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Amateur Radio Field Day Is Open to the Public Before social media, there was ham radio. As far back as the late 19th century, amateur radio operators from different parts of the world were chatting with each other — by voice. In more recent years, they have built their own networks with radio technology. This weekend, some 40,000 “hams” from all over the U.S. will test their skills at the annual AARL

( A m e r i c a n R a d i o Re l ay League) Field Day. Among them are the Delaware Valley Radio Association, which is based in West Trenton and counts several Princeton residents among its 120-member ranks. From 2 p.m. on Saturday, June 25 to 12 p.m. Sunday, June 26, at their clubhouse adjacent to Trenton-Mercer Airport, these amateur radio operators will be setting up

portable radio stations on emergency power, and trying to have as many conversations as possible with others around the country. The public is invited. “We encourage the public to come and take part,” said Greg Mauro, an electrical engineer who serves as president of the club. “It’s a great hobby. We’re hoping to attract more young people, and all are welcome.”

F i el d D ay d ate s f rom 1933. The annual gathering has become one of amateur radio’s most popular organizational events. Participants cart their gear outside to see how well they can communicate with each other in the elements, and in less-thanideal conditions. “We demonstrate emergency preparedness,” said Mauro. “The idea is to set up a station remotely, without access to commercial power. So we run two stations, pitch tents, and run off a generator. We hang antennas between the trees. It’s all temporary, set up in the wild, so to speak.” The gear is assembled and tested just prior to the start of Field Day. “It’s a quasicontest where you try to communicate with as many other stations doing the same thing,” Mauro said. “It’s part contest, part campout, part club gathering, and an instructional event.” Regulated by the government, amateur radio a hobby that has its basis in the beginning of radio. Operators need to get a license to participate. The emergency preparedness aspect is key. “It supports some agencies

like the Red Cross,” said Mauro. “In countries where there isn’t a lot of infrastructure, such as Haiti, it can play a big part when there is a crisis.” The Delaware Valley Radio Association’s “shack,” as they call the clubhouse, has a fully equipped station with several towers and different kinds of antennas. A large satellite dish bounces signals off the moon. It is among the small percentage of clubs that have a clubhouse and a station. Monthly programs include seminars on how to build circuits and antennas, and operate different communication modes. “A mateur radio operators are from every walk of life — men and women of all ages, in every corner of the world,” reads a press release about the event. “They share a passion for experimenting and engineering ways to transmit voice, data, and pictures over the air, near and far. They’re creative, resourceful, and ready to improvise, especially in emergencies.” For more information or to participate, visit w2zq.com. —Anne Levin

R

HAMMING IT UP: Greg Mauro, president of the Delaware Valley Radio Association, examines a newly built antenna at the club’s radio station in West Trenton, where he and other ham radio operators will gather this weekend for the annual national Field Day of the ARRL (American Radio Relay League), making contact with operators from all over the world over 24 hours.

609 . 203 . 0741

Police Blotter On June 18, at 9:12 a.m., a Carriage Way resident reported that an unknown individual fraudulently cashed a check on June 15 from a joint checking account at an unknown ATM in the amount of $8,300.76. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On June 18, at 10:43 a.m., an individual reported that her unlocked bicycle was stolen from a bike rack on Walnut Lane sometime between 8 p.m. on June 17 and 10 a.m. on June 18. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On June 17, at 9:22 a.m., an individual reported that on June 14, between 4 and 8 p.m., her pocketbook at was stolen from her vehicle, which she said was locked wh ile it was parked on Spruce Circle. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On June 14, at 9:31 a.m., a Nor th Harrison Street resident reported that an unknown individual (or individuals) fraudulently altered two checks in the total amount of $39,263.09 from a business bank account, and electronically deposited one check in the amount of $20,131.30 into an unknown bank account. The second check was flagged as fraudulent. The Detective Bureau is investigating.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022 • 10

COVID Rates Down

Pride Parade

continued from page one

continued from page one

Mercer County is one of 11 counties in the state listed by the CDC as in the “medium” risk categor y. Seven New Jersey counties have “high” transmission rates and three counties are listed as “low” risk. Masks are recommended indoors in public and on public transportation in high-risk areas. The Princeton Health Department will be hosting COVID-19 vaccine clinics on Thursday, June 23, at the Princeton Farmers Market, Dinky Train Station Parking Lot, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.; Wednesday, June 29, at the Princeton United Methodist Church, 7 Vandeventer Avenue, 5-7 p.m.; Tuesday, July 19, at Monument Hall, 1 Monument Dr ive, 2- 4 p.m.; and Thursday, July 28, at the Princeton Shopping Center, 301 North Harrison Street, 6-8 p.m. —Donald Gilpin

difficult thing,” he said. “You need to be able to be in a room or a space, a field or a parade or be wherever you might be together in order to have that sense of solidarity.” He added, “Ever ybody was welcome. It was allinclusive. It certainly exceeded our expectations, and I hope the community feels the same way.” Participants in the parade who spoke at the afterparty included Princeton Mayor Mark Freda, New Jersey S t ate S e n ator s A n d r e w Zwicker and Linda Greenstein, Maplewood Mayor Dean Dafis, Detroit poet Michelle Elizabeth Brown, trans activist and BRCSJ Board President Erin Worrell, and Sesame Street’s Alan Murao ka, who was grand marshal of the parade. A mong ot her notables in attendance were “Miss S to n e w a l l I n n” C i s s y Walken, the parade queen; queer icons Chet Kabara and Frank Mahood, co-founder of Gay People Princeton; and the Philadelphia Freedom Band.

In h is remarks to t he crowd, Muraoka, who has been on Sesame Street for almost 25 years, expressed his commitment to the values underpinning the event. “I am so honored to have been asked to serve as grand marshal of the Princeton Pride Parade and to be in community with you all on this Saturday with my friends at the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice,” he said. “On Sesame Street we try to teach empathy, tolerance, acceptance, and love, so children learn how to grow to be smarter, stronger, and kinder. And I realize that these are the exact same values that the good folks at the Center are trying to teach as well.” New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy, who attended the 2019 Princeton Pride Parade in person, could not make it this year, but delivered his support in a statement that was read. “I applaud the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice and the town of Princeton for their dedication to celebrating the diversity and unity within their community and commend everyone in attendance for honoring the achievements and contributions of the LGBTQIA+ community,” he wrote. Though many in attendance were celebrating at their first or second gay pride parade, Mahood shared a longer-term perspective. “This year marks

the 50th anniversary of the first gay rights organization in Princeton, which then became the first community-based organization Gay People Princeton, of which I was a co-founder,” he said. “And now I’m very grateful to the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice for continuing this meaningful work for all of us.” Wesley Rowell, a thirdyear student at the Prince ton T h e olo g ic a l S e m i nar y and BRC S J inter n who moved to Princeton in 2020 from New York City, commented on the spirit of community and inclusion at Saturday’s festivities. “What I found really beautiful and moving was that I have not experienced Princeton being so diverse in race and gender and also the extreme range of ages,” he said. “It was really nice to see that the event brought together the LGBTQIA+ community and all of Princeton as part of that community.” Seda-Schreiber emphasized that Saturday’s parade and afterparty provided “a damn good show,” and much more. “We had horses, roller derby queens, 10-foot-tall pride puppets, drag queens, queer icons — everything and the rainbow kitchen sink,” he said. “We had so many folks and so much going on. We didn’t just put on a show. We made sure that everybody felt part of the show.” —Donald Gilpin

Hun Board Appoints New Head of School

Bart Bronk, currently head of school at University Liggett School in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, will take over as head of school at The Hun School of Princeton in July 2023, succeeding Jon Brougham, Hun’s board of trustees announced last week.

Bart Bronk

Bronk’s appointment follows a nationwide search conducted over the past five months since Brougham announced his retirement. Tell them you saw Brougham, who has led The Hun School since 2009, will their ad in have served for 37 years in education. “Bart Bronk is a dynamic leader with a forward-thinking approach to education,” Available for said Hun School Board Chair Lunch & Dinner Steve Wills. “He has a colMmm..Take-Out laborative style, intellectual curiosity, and an affable and Events • Parties • Catering 41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton warm disposition. We are www.tortugasmv.com (609) 924-5143 confi dent that he will serve our community well, support and advance every tenet of our mission, and keep The Hun School at the forefront of innovative and humanistic teaching.” 741 Alexander Rd, Princeton • 924-2880 Bronk has been head of University Liggett School for five years and previously served as provost, chief operating officer, and dean of faculty. He also has experience as a teacher and coach. He holds a B.A. in English and a M.S in educational leadership from the University of Pennsylvania. Bronk expressed his excitement at being appointed to become the next head at Hun, emphasizing his affinity for Hun’s philosophy and mission. “I am particularly attracted to The Hun School because of the elegant notion of ‘vigorous and joyful learning’ captured in Hun’s mission statement,” Espresso From am FROM: 12:0011 every day he said. “This aligns directly with what I believe teaching 9 Hulfish Street, Palmer Square and learning should be: an engaging, relevant, studentcentered process in which the student’s voice, ideas, choices, WILD ENCOUNTER: A cat made a clever escape from a fox on and passions are most imporIce Cream UNTIL: Sun -Thu 10:00,ToFri-Sat 11 pm 11:30 Monday morning after it was chased onto a porch on Jefferson tant. When learning truly matRoad. (Photo by Amy Schaeffer) ters to students, astounding growth and achievement are Thinking of selling possible and school becomes the transformative, and inyour home? Call me! Espresso From 11 am deed, joyful, human experiJUDITH BUDWIG ence it ought to be.” Sales Associate During his 11 years at UniCell: 609-933-7886 | Office: 609-921-2600 judith.budwig@foxroach.com versity Liggett School, Bronk led the school through a successful $50 million capital campaign and “coalesced the faculty around the school’s Ice Cream To 11 pm progressive curriculum and shared purpose,” according 253 Nassau St, Princeton NJ 08540 to a Hun School press release.

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in the craft area. There is a $7 charge for craft activities. Children can have fun in the children’s play area and on pedal and play tractors. Visiting with Terhune’s farm animals is always fun for everyone. Take a stroll on our farm trail, see what you can discover. Take a pony ride around the pasture. Did you know fireflies are actually beetles? These insects use their bioluminescence as a way to communicate with each other. Look out for their signaling. Fireflies are mostly found along the edges of forests, wooded yard areas, and near streams or ponds. Terhune Orchards goes to great lengths to cultivate habitats for beneficial insects like bees, butterflies, and fireflies on its 250 acres of preserved farmlands. Lolly Hopwood will be performing for young firefly friends. Bring your wings and dancing shoes. Her interactive and imaginative shows encourage the audience to participate in songs that get kids up and moving with fun props like bubbles, parachutes, scarves, and puppets. While enjoying summer on the farm, have an old-fashioned farm supper at Pam’s Food Tent. The grill will be cooking up summer favorites including hot dogs, barbecued chicken, and pork sandwiches along with homemade gazpacho. Pies, donuts, and other freshly baked treats will be available for dessert, too. Stop in the Barn Door café for hand-scooped ice cream and apple cider slush. The wine orchard will stay open late for wine flights, wine slush, and wine by the glass. Admission and parking is free. Craft activities are $7. For more information call ( 609 ) 924-2310 or visit terhuneorchards.com.

Peer Leadership Programs Open to Jewish Teens

Gesher LeKesher is currently accepting applications from 11th and 12th grade teens (as of the 2022-2023 school year) to participate in this Jewish peer leadership program. As Gesher “Madrichim” (peer leaders), teens lead a group of 7th –9th grade “Talmidim” (learners) in outreaches addressing trending topics from a Jewish perspective including friendships, the impact of social media, peer pressure, prejudice, and antisemitism on campus. This is an opportunity to develop leadership skills which can be used in college and beyond while meeting and working with other Jewish 11th and 12th grade teens in the Greater Princeton Mercer Bucks area. Last year’s Peer Leaders represented 10 area high schools. Gesher LeKesher meets six hours each month. There are two Monday night trainings from 6:30-8:30 p.m., and an additional Outreach t i m e e i t h e r M o n d ay or Wednesday night or Sunday morning. Gesher LeKesher is partially sponsored by The Jewish of Federation Princeton Mercer Bucks. For more information, visit jfcsonline.org/gesher-lekesher. Registration is now open for all participants in 8th through 10th grades, and returning participants in 11th and 12th grades. Space is limited. For more information visit jfcsonline.org/jcyf. Community service hours are available for both programs.

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Terhune Orchards Firefly Festival This Sunday

Welcome summertime with Terhune Orchards’ annual kick off to summer — the Firefly Festival. On Sunday June 26, from 4-9 p.m. Admission to Firefly Festival is free. Firefly Festival is a funfilled event for the whole family. Children can dress up as fireflies after decorating wings and making antennas


Jazz is the focus this weekend at McCarter Theatre, where Dee Dee Bridgewater and Bill Charlap perform on Friday, June 24, and the Tyshawn Sorey Sextet is on stage Saturday, June 25. Both concerts, which wrap up the “Jazz in June” series, are at 8 p.m.

Bill Lockwood The weekend also marks a major transition at McCarter. The jazz series is the final one planned by longtime Special Programming Director William W. ( Bill) Lockwood, who is retiring after nearly 60 years at the theater. Last week, McCarter announced Paula Abreu as his replacement. Lockwood, who programmed classical music, dance, spoken word, and other events as well as jazz, will continue as a consultant. Abreu starts in the fall.

Paula Abreu “It is reassuring to know that the performers who consider McCarter home will be in expert hands with Paula Abreu — she is an inspired choice,” Lockwood said in a press release. “It is wonderful to think about the new talent and energy she will bring to our stages, cultivating the next generation of artists and audiences.” Abreu, who is originally from Rio de Janeiro, has been curating live events in New York for the past decade. She has worked with such institutions as Lincoln Center, Red Hot Organization, and the SummerStage and Charlie Parker jazz festivals. “Among her most proud achievements are presenting the late Brazilian samba legend Elza Soares following a 30-year U.S. performance hiatus; curating a community concert with the French Chilean rapper/activist Ana Tijoux; a debut collaboration between Afrobeat icon Seun Kuti and jazz-funk pioneer Roy Ayers; and the birth of her daughter Julia, who joined the Abreu family in 2020,” reads the McCarter release. “I’m thrilled to add my voice to McCarter, to be a part of an organization that has had an incontestable impact on the cultural fabric of New Jersey, and that demonstrates an ongoing commitment to equal opportunity

in the arts,” she said. “I am looking forward to getting to know the surrounding communities, and to exploring collaborative opportunities with the Princeton University campus, area universities, and beyond. After 12 years in New York City’s presenting arts field, I’m thrilled to build upon McCarter’s incredible legacy and forge new connections regionally, nationally, and globally.” McCar ter T heatre has been a part of Lockwood’s life since he was a child. He grew up in Princeton, where he graduated from Princeton High School, and Princeton University. His presenting career began with famed impresario Sol Hurok in San Francisco, where he stayed for a few years before moving back east and taking a job expanding programming at McCarter. For 28 years, he simultaneously worked in programming at New York’s Lincoln Center, where he came up with the title for the famed, four-week festival “Mostly Mozart.” Lockwood’s list of credits also includes programming for the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia and New Jersey Performing Arts Center in Newark. As the creative force behind McCarter’s “Presented” series over the years, Lockwood has brought numerous performers to Princeton — many of whom returned year after year. He is familiar to audiences from the many post-performance questionand-answer sessions he led, joining the artists on stage. The jazz series Lockwood cultivated for this summer was launched in 2018. Due to the pandemic, this season’s lineup is only its third. In the current issue of Jersey Jazz magazine, Lockwood said, “I have been doing the programming at McCarter for 60 years, including all the jazz, so I have a pretty good idea of what I want, and what works. I try to keep some relevance as to what’s happening in the jazz world, but it’s totally my decision. I mean, everybody, managers and agents all have suggestions, but in the end, I figure it out.” Lockwood is particularly enthused about this weekend’s performances. Of Tyshawn Sorey, who will lead a sextet with alto saxophonist Nathan Reising, tenor saxophonist Morgan Guerin, pianist Lex Korten, vibraphonist Sasha Berliner, and bassist Nick Dunston, he said, “There is nobody more prominent right now in the music world not just as a jazz artist, but as a composer, a historian, a creator of projects. He is really a Renaissance person. He does everything. He’s won a MacArthur Genius grant. He’s a drummer, basically, but he’s so much more than that. He’s a shapeshifter. He explores some limits between classical music and jazz. He’s an incredible musician. We’re lucky to have him. He is not part of traditional jazz and the Great American Songbook. That’s not what he’s about. He’s on the cutting edge. And he puts it all together.” McCarter Theatre is at 91 University Place. Visit mccarter.org for tickets and information. —Anne Levin

Opposition Grows continued from page one

wrote Princeton resident Kip Cherry, the Central Jersey conservation chair for the Sierra Club, on its website. “Insufficient information has been provided about the anticipated traffic increase or stormwater flow, which is critical in light of climate change.” A recent MoveOn posting urging people to sign a petition said the project would be more than five times the size of Quaker Bridge Mall. “Implore the West Windsor Planning Board to vote no to the Bridge Point 8 project,” it reads. “There is plenty of vacant warehouse space in New Jersey. Why waste resources building more?” The post continues, “Show up with your signs and metaphorical torches and pitchforks ! Let them know this is BAD for New Jersey!” On June 17, a letter to the Planning Board from an attorney for one of the residents said that a recently released “draft Warehouse Siting Guidance” issued by the New Jersey State Planning Commission, to help local government develop land use plans, mentions factors with which the township does not comply. These include health impacts from diesel truck emissions, negative impacts on residential areas and retail corridors, and the need for municipalities to seek comments from affected nearby communities. The letter urges the planners to reschedule the vote and reconsider the application. Marathe said the project would provide two major advantages for the township. “The developer will pay full taxes on any construction that happens on the property,” he said. “He can’t ask for a PILOT (payment in lieu of taxes) or special tax treatment. The developer can’t sue the township to rezone the property for residential development.” He added that with approval from the New Jersey Department of Transportation, Mercer County “can impose weight limits on Clarksville Road and that will take care of the main concern for the majority of residents.” T he We d ne s day, Ju ne 29 hearing will be held at 7 p.m. at 271 Clarksville Road. “The record is closed, but people will be permitted to hear the deliberations of the Planning Board,” said Wahrman. “We have implored them to take a pause and let the state planning commission guide us.” —Anne Levin

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immediately entering a potentially lucrative field with Every Friday night, Sat- an in-demand credential,” u r d a y, a n d S u n d a y i n said John Aje, dean of the June, July, and August, Ter- school. hune Orchards will present weekly Sunset Sips & Sounds and its Weekend Music Series in the farm’s historic apple orchard, featuring Terhune wine, light fare, and relaxing live music. Performances include jazz, blues, folk, and rock. Sunset Sips & Sounds are on Fridays from 5 to 8 p.m. Visitors can unwind after a busy week and catch up with family and friends while sipping your choice from award-winning red, white, and fruit wines made from fruit grown at Terhune Orchards. Try a tasting flight John Aje to have a variety. The program provides a Tasty fare including sandcomprehensive cloud comwiches, salads, cheese platputing-focused curriculum, ters, chips, and salsas made including core courses built w it h Terhu ne Orchards’ through an academic partproduce and other dinner nership with CompTIA. Acbites will be available while cording to Aje, course work you sip and listen to local includes virtual labs that musical guests. Visit the provide interactive training Barn Door Café for dinallowing students to acquire ner, snacks, hand-scooped ha nds - on exp er ience i n ice cream, and apple cider multiple environments and slush. Families are welcome. troubleshoot various realThe Weekend Music Se- world scenarios. ries continues all summer, “Our objective in launchwith live music on Saturday ing this program was to enand Sunday afternoons from able our students to master 1 to 4 p.m. After having cloud computing and related fun on the farm or picking technologies quickly while your own fruit, kick back in also offering them the flexthe winery with family and ibility to progress through friends. the bachelor’s program at a T he schedule includes pace that fits their lives and Laundrymen on June 17, learning style,” said Aje. Jerry Steele on June 18, “With current talent shortKingston Ridge on June 19, ages in the field and the Ragtime Relics on June 24, need to protect an increasBrian Bortnick on June 25, ingly hybrid workforce, emDan & Charlotte on June ployers across multiple sec26, and ABLO on July 1. tors are clamoring for the Visit terhu neorchards. level of expertise that this com/winery-events for the curriculum will deliver.” full schedule. According to t he U.S. Terhune Orchards is locat- Bureau of Labor Statistics, ed at 330 Cold Soil Road. employment in associated The winery is open Friday, IT careers is projected to 12 to 8 p.m. and Saturday grow 13 percent through and Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m. 2030 (faster than the averNo admission fee. Group age compared to other ocmaximum of eight. Individ- cupations ) adding nearly ual glasses of wine can be 670,000 new jobs to the purchased. No outside food workforce. Current or poor pets. The farm store is tential positions for program open daily; wine bottles are graduates encompass cloud available in the store. infrastructure architects, For more infor mation, cloud engineers, cloud applivisit terhuneorchards.com. cation developers, computer programming and web deCloud Computing Program velopers as well as roles as At Thomas Edison University systems analysts, business The Heaven School of analysts, information secuArts, Sciences, and Tech- rity analysts, cloud systems nology at Thomas Edison administrators, IT support State Universit y ( T E SU ) specialists, IT consultants, announced the launch of a DevOps, IT architects, IT foBachelor of Science ( BS ) rensic investigators, healthdegree in Cloud Computing care IT specialists and moprogram today. The univer- bile application developers. sity is the first New Jersey Registration for the unstate institution to launch dergraduate July 2022 term a BS degree in this area of runs now through June 24. study that is completely on- Visit tesu.edu to learn more. line. Courses will begin in the July 2022 term. Municipal Engineer Recognized The new area of study is For Outstanding Public Service designed to provide students Deanna Stockton, municiwith a solid foundation and pal engineer and deputy adadvanced understanding of ministrator of Princeton’s Encore IT and cloud comput- gineering and Infrastructure ing topics encompassing Operations Department, is networking, programming, to be honored with the Outdatabase management, op- standing Public Service P.E. erating systems, architec- Award by the New Jersey ture, security operations Society of Professional Enand administration, artifi- gineers at its annual instalcial intelligence, machine lation and awards dinner on learning and big data. The June 22 at Mercer Oaks in program will include topics West Windsor. that are essential for indusIn her 17 years in Princetry-recognized certification ton, Stockton has successfulexam preparation. ly led design and construction “This workforce-respon- projects for award-winning sive program is ideal for projects including the Stony those interested in ramping Brook Bicycle and Pedestrian up their expertise and ad- Bridges and Pathways, Bank vancing in their career, or Street and Nassau Street

(NJSH 27) Streetscape Reconstruction, the Mountain Lakes Dams reconstruction and lake dredging, the C o m m u n i t y P a r k Po o l reconstruction, and the Mary Moss Playground renovation. “It’s a great honor to be recognized by my peers in the Engineering Society for the contributions made to municipal engineering,” said Stockton. “I’ve benefited from excellent mentoring, and I continue that teaching with my staff as we work to enhance the quality of life in Princeton. We strive every day to innovate, to be responsive, and to achieve more with less in our public service.” In addition to managing the multimillion-dollar capital program each year, Stockton leads her department in the review and inspection of land development projects and single-family home applications; oversees the municipal transit system and municipal parking department including a parking deck; oversees the Public Works Department; manages the municipal stormwater permit; and oversees the Sewer Division. Stockton has worked at public agencies in California, the Washington State Department of Transportation in Seattle, and a water rights and land development consultant in Oregon. She also enjoyed a three-year work sabbatical while living in the Netherlands. “Deanna’s award is well deserved,” said Municipal Administrator Bernie Hvozdovic. “The broad array of projects she manages day-today are difficult and challenging. They range from dam restoration and municipal transit, to storm water and road design. Her dedication, work ethic, and institutional knowledge are invaluable to the municipality. Her promotion last year to deputy administrator of the Engineering and Infrastructure Operations Department was recognition of the high level of public service she provides and the significant value she brings to the municipality of Princeton.” Stockton has been involved with the New Jersey Society of Professional Engineers for more than 10 years. She is a member of the NJSPE Mercer Chapter (PESMC), has participated as a continuing education presenter, and served on the PESMC Board in all positions including president in 2017-2018. She is currently the municipal representative to the New Jersey’s State Transportation Innovation Council (STIC) for the FHWA Every Day Counts (EDC) program, and treasurer for the New Jersey Society of Municipal Engineers. Dianne Gutierrez-Scaccetti, commissioner of the Department of Transportation, will be the keynote speaker at the awards dinner. In addition, Princeton’s former Assistant Municipal Engineer Tejal Patel will be installed as president of the society.

11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022

Final Weekend of “Jazz in June” Series Marks Lockwood’s Retirement

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We invite our entire community to celebrate the success of our mutual efforts and to carry forth the message of love, diversity, and inclusivity at our “Welcoming the Community Breakfast” on Friday, July 1 from 8 to 10 a.m. at BRCSJ Headquarters, 12 Stockton Street. Please join us and allow us to truly show our gratitude to our community for allowing us to be of service this day and every day. CAROL WATCHLER Community Outreach Coordinator Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice To the Editor: Stockton Street Princeton’s second Pride Parade and Afterparty was everything our community needed and deserved it to be, as meaningful as it was fabulous and as inspirational as it was exponential! Thousands of us marched, sashayed, and rolled up the beautiful Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood and then were all at once empowered and entertained at To the Editor: I am writing to encourage Princeton area residents to the wonderful Afterparty at the Y. Thank you to Lt. Ben Gering and the Princeton Police for your support keeping visit the Princeton Farmers Market, now relocated to the us safe and to Paul Zeger and the YMCA for welcoming Dinky Train Station lot. Market hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., every Thursday until Thanksgiving, rain or shine. us to your gorgeous green space. Much love and respect to our Grand Marshal Alan Murao- As always, the market offers an incredible array of fruits, ka (bringin’ a sunny day all the way from Sesame Street!), vegetables, meats, prepared foods, flowers, and other esSenators Andrew Zwicker and Linda Greenstein, Mayors sentials. If the time and/or location do not suit your schedule, Mark Freda (Princeton) and Dean Dafis (Maplewood), poet Michelle Elizabeth Brown (Detroit), and trans activist (and please consider visiting the West Windsor Farmers Market, BRCSJ board president) Erin Worrell (Philadelphia) for which is held every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the putting boots on the ground at the parade and sharing lower Vaughn lot at the Princeton Junction Train Station. inspirational remarks at the Afterparty. Although many of us have now returned to regular superFurther kudos to our community members who shared market shopping, we should not forget that local farmers the stage — our BRCSJ flagbearer Rose, who brought us all played a key role in sustaining our community during the to tears at her first Pride; queer icons Chet and Frank, who pandemic. They did so not only by selling fresh food outdropped some important local history as they shared their side — even during winter — but by adopting new online personal journey and how Frank co-founded Princeton’s purchasing systems and delivery services to meet customfirst gay rights organization, Gay People Princeton; and ers’ needs. BRCSJ intern and Princeton Theological Seminary student So let’s return the favor and support New Jersey’s farmWesley Rowell, who led us in convocation and opened ers, who work hard every day to keep some “garden” in us up to the beautiful sentiments that were to follow. We the Garden State! bowed (and bounced!) to our Queen Miss Stonewall Inn JENNIFER JANG Cissy Walken who represented in fabulous fashion, were Russell Road uplifted by the Pride Puppets, and we couldn’t have asked for better syncopation for our mobilization than the delightful Philadelphia Freedom Band. But by far the most love and respect goes out to the thousands-strong community members who came out lo- To the Editor: cally, from across all corners of our great state, and indeed Hundreds and hundreds of neighbors lined up outside beyond our borders as well. The love that carried this day Taim for its opening at Princeton Shopping Center last was brought by you and we only served to amplify it. Tuesday, where they offered $5 bowls to be matched for Princeton’s second Pride Parade would not have been Neighbors’ Kindness Project. I’d like to share a story about the truly magical day it was without the incredible foun- one of those neighbors. dational support of community, business, and religious Due to an overwhelming turnout, Taim’s team had to cut leaders; our own extraordinary BRCSJ volunteers (over the line prior to close. While this didn’t please many of you, 50 strong!); Princeton Council members; and, of course, understandably so, one neighbor was quite perturbed. She our fire, safety, health, and police departments who went plopped down her free cup of iced tea and said, “I didn’t above to serve and protect in a truly affirming and loving even get a sip of this before they rudely cut the line!” As I way. Names too numerous to place here in print but expect wiped up a splash she spilled, I replied, “Look, I feel your a hug very soon each and every one of you, and please passion for wanting to support Taim and our neighbors, so know that you helped to create something significant that I’ll take your order and deliver it on my route tomorrow. will carry on for years and years to come. But, it’ll have to be lunch.” I handed her back the tea she

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Kudos to All Who Helped Make Second Pride Parade and Afterparty Magical

Encouraging Residents to Visit Area Farmers Markets; Support NJ Farmers

Thanking Neighbors for Taim’s Successful Opening at Princeton Shopping Center

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had refused. She seemed to cool down a bit as soon as the icy glass met her palm. The next day, I followed her directions to her porch, looking for the bin as the landmark. This is where I left her food, and it’s there I found a white envelope that read: “To Blair, for the neighbors,” with a $20 bill folded up inside. So, I went back to Taim — to wait in line for a second time — and used those 20 dollars to buy meals for our neighbors in need. We’ve all had that arduous experience of waiting in lines. When mosquitoes are eating away at our sweaty skin as we stand facing others’ backs, we only think of our swelling discomfort, our itching annoyance, and not of who is doing what to make our wait go by faster. For one, Bethany (Taim’s COO) was in that kitchen supporting her staff. Leslie, Miri, and Sarah were giving out those iced teas to make people’s mouths water instead of their bodies. Ellen and Julie from Princeton Shopping Center kept neighbors engaged as they took their pictures in ways that made people feel seen, and others, who saw them, show up for us all. Mayor Freda clipped the ceremonial ribbon, which he then gave to giggling kids to run about with and hold up like streamers in the air. For those of us who don’t have 20 minutes to wait or $20 to donate, perhaps we can find 20 seconds to notice the kindness around us that just might make our wait worthwhile. Because of you line-waiters — and the line-movers-along — Taim sold 752 meals, which will be matched for our neighbors in need. Thanks to you and our Neighbors’ Businesses for participating in our cycle of kindness. Thank you to our volunteers for making the cycle turn. Thank you to our neighbors in need who line up, waiting to get what you lined up to get for them. And, to Taim: Welcome to our neighborhood! BLAIR MILLER Founder, Neighbors’ Kindness Project Franklin Avenue

Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

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“Bigger Than Life” -- 100 Years of Judy Garland “Garland’s rendition of this marvelous torch-song, in its visual and vocal subtlety and dynamic power, is the greatest piece of popular singing I know.” —Douglas McVay, from The Musical Film f there’s a torch in “The Man That Got Away,” which Harold Arlen and Ira Gershwin composed expressly for Judy Garland in A Star Is Born, it’s the one she carries up the mountain of the performance, and you go with her. She’s giving everything she has to the song, pushing aside invisible obstacles, then beckoning to the nearest musician, as if to call him up beside her, but then pushing him away, suddenly reaching for the heavens with her right arm to sing “It’s all a crazy game!” By then her voice is everywhere and everything and “game” could stand for life, death, art, love. But you’re up there with her, you who gloomed into the theater, a zombie at 22, alone in New York after a traumatic summer. In the span of a few minutes, she’s changed the world, you’re alive again, and you feel like shouting your thanks. By all rights the people around you should be standing, cheering, but it’s just you and her, you’re hers, and an hour or so later, you stagger out of the movie into the night thinking Judy Garland Judy Garland Judy Garland. The film you just saw is seven years old. You’ve seen a revival. That’s what they call it, you think, you who have been revived. Time magazine called A Star Is Born “just about the finest one-woman show in movie history,” while Sight and Sound’s Penelope Houston found “the special fascination of Judy Garland’s playing” in “the way it somehow contrives to bypass technique: the control seems a little less than complete and the emotion comes through, as it were, neat. In this incandescent performance, the actress seems to be playing on her nerves; she cannot but strike at ours.” After giving A Star Is Born almost 20 pages of his 164-page survey of the American musical from 1927 to 1966, McVay makes a prodigious apology: “I have dwelt on this film at such length because I consider it to be not only clearly the greatest musical picture I have ever seen, but the greatest picture of any kind I have ever seen” The level of praise reflects the critical excitement the film received on its release in September 1954. Within a month, however, the Warner executives made drastic cuts in the running time, thus, as McVay admits, the greatest picture he

I

ever saw was the version from which 45 minutes had been deleted, the same one that viewers, myself included, had to make do with until the 1983 restoration. “A Sad Judy Pain” I didn’t know about the cuts. All I knew when I walked out of the theatre that night in September 1961 was the wonder of Judy Garland. Interviewed about her supporting role in the 2019 biopic Judy, Jessie Buckley, whose work in films like Wild Rose (2018) shines with something undeniably close to Garland’s charm, energy, and sheer talent, spoke of her in an LRMonline interview “just kind of giving her heart to me, ... and she’s been consistently in my life since then, and I love her.” That’s what Garland does — she gives you her heart, she fills you w it h awe, which becomes joy, then hope, then a transport of adm irat ion, and yes, you love her. A s ke d ab out Garland as Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz, Buckley says “she’s not just a singer, she’s an actress and a storyteller.... It’s a magical film,” and “Over the Rainbow” is “an incredible song that is actually quite sad at the core of it,” a song “about somebody who wants something beyond where they are in that moment, and you feel like they might get it.” Struggling for words, she speaks of “a sad Judy pain” and “the fragility of human hope.” June 22, 1969 I have no idea how much Garland’s struggles, her miseries, her collapses and comebacks, fueled the fire of her genius or can be blamed for the accidental overdose that killed her 53 years ago today, on June 22, 1969, only months after the last hur-

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Mayer apparently once seriously considered doing — the movie would still glow with her strength and sweetness, intelligence, courage, and spirit. Helter Skelter I almost forgot Saturday was Paul McCartney’s 80th birthday. For almost a week now it’s been all about Judy Garland, whose 100th was a week ago Friday. So, after a windy walk across the Princeton Battlefield, thinking of what happened there on January 3, 1777, I click into YouTube for a sepia view of Dorothy and Toto in Kansas, chickens in the yard, Toto on the fence behind Judy, and as she’s singing about bluebirds flying over the rainbow, I glance at the sidebar of postings on my right and there’s Sir Paul in East Rutherford, N.J., last Thursday night, a knight of the realm from Liverpool born eight days and 20 Junes after Judy, and looking more like 60 than 80 as he launches into “Helter Skelter,” one of the most outlandishly heavy rockers the Beatles ever recorded and one he avoided playing on concert tours with Wings because of its association with the Manson murders. To play such a strenuous number now after an hour or more onstage, at 80, has to be a statement, “I’m still rocking.” It could even be read as a torch song in reverse, “I’m coming down fast but I’m miles above you,/ Tell me, tell me, come on tell me the answer, / You may be a lover but you ain’t no dancer.” The Gay Anthem uch has been made of the fact that the Stonewall Riots, the D-Day of Gay Rights, broke out on the night of the “gay icon” Judy Garland’s funeral, which had drawn 21,000 people to the Upper East Side of Manhattan. This past Saturday, the same day McCartney turned 80, Princeton’s Pride Parade took place, and here I’ve been musing on the song from The Wizard of Oz that opened the door to wonder and dream and imagination, and suddenly it dawns on me that Garland’s signature song is also a gay anthem. In a piece posted in April 2015 Kayleigh Marie Adamson refers to gays identifying as Friends of Dorothy: “The song gives them power. Identifying with something bigger than themselves. After all, isn’t that what Judy was? She was bigger than life!” —Stuart Mitchner

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rah in London, the last awkward bow that was the subject of Judy. Although Renée Zellweger has been getting raves for her passionate impersonation of Garland, I found it hard to watch, probably because I’d spent the previous night reveling in more than a dozen different YouTube dates with the real Judy singing, dancing, clowning. Go to “The Judy Garland Experience” for 15 minutes of Garland with the Count Basie Band, including a rousing doubleencore with Mel Torme on the great Basie show stopper “April in Paris” and then an unforgettable rendition of “Cottage for Sale” that left various YouTube bloggers (including this one) in Judy Garland heaven. Over the Rainbow Now I’m thinking of another revival, another moment, another song, first seen by moviegoers in the late summer of 1939, with World War II looming. The Wi zard of O z did well at the box of fice but it wasn’t until it was re-released in 1949 and on CBS television in 1956 that it began to become, according to the Library of Congress, “the most seen film in movie history.” I saw t he 1949 version, with Judy s i n g i n g “O v e r the Rainbow” in a sepia vision of Kansas — a 16-year-old girl in a gingham jumper singing of a land “where the dreams that you dare to dream really do come true.” Like the song that brings you into A Star Is Born, this one brings you into the world of the film and stays with you long after all the witches and munchkins, scarecrows and cowardly lions and color fantasias have faded. Once again the heart and soul of the film is Judy Garland. Even if you were to subtract what became her signature song and one of the signature songs of the American dream — as LB

13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022

BOOK/FILM REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022 • 14

Yours Sincerely, Stephen Sondheim

THEATER REVIEW

I

Princeton Festival Presents “Yours Sincerely, Stephen Sondheim”; Tribute by Vocal Duo Intersperses Songs with Quotes from Letters

nto the Woods is a musical in which familiar fairy tale characters meet, and their stories intersect. In the prologue, the characters sing about their reasons for journeying into the titular forest. Cinderella sings, “I wish to go to the festival.” Last Wednesday she could have been referring to the Princeton Festival, which presented Yours Sincerely, Stephen Sondheim, a tribute to the show’s late composer and lyricist. Vocalists Alyssa Giannetti and Jason Forbach performed several of the Broadway legend’s songs, interspersed with quotes from his letters — many of which his correspondents have shared via social media since his death last November. Music Director Matthew Stephens accompanied the duo. The June 15 concert was presented in a performance tent outside Morven Museum & Garden. The seating was configured to resemble a dinner theater or cabaret; tables were set up so that audiences could enjoy drinks and light (but elegant) snacks — the latter served before the show and during intermission. A set for the Festival’s subsequent production in the tent (Albert Herring) resembled a bar, adding to the illusion of being in a Times Square nightspot. A classically trained singer, Giannetti made her professional debut as an understudy for the role of Christine Daaé in the first national tour of Love Never Dies. She was in the cast of the Paper Mill Playhouse’s world premiere of UNMASKED: The Music of Andrew Lloyd Webber. Forbach currently appears in The Phantom of the Opera on Broadway. He has performed the role of Enjolras in the 25th Anniversary National Tour and Broadway revival of Les Misérables, and has recorded three solo albums (A New Leading Man, Revolutionary, and Remembering to Dream). Stephens has performed in venues such as Lincoln Center and Feinstein’s/54 Below. He was associate conductor for the National Tour of The Sound of Music. Other engagements include The Body Politic (NYMF) and The Mikado (NYGASP). His advocacy for new works has led to collaborations with organizations such as the American Opera Project and American Lyric Theatre. The concert opened with Stephens playing a piano solo whose staccato notes resembled passages from Sunday in the Park with George (1984). The program of vocal selections in the first half loosely followed the chronological order of Sondheim’s early productions. Forbach opened with a suitably boyish, eager rendition of “Something’s Coming” from West Side Story (1957). Collaborating with Leonard Bernstein on the musical numbers for that show gave Sondheim his Broadway debut. After finishing the song, Forbach appreciatively noted the “depth” of Sondheim’s characters, and described his letters as “his other work.” Although the passionate ballad “Take Me to the World” was written as a duet

for the offbeat television musical Evening Primrose (1966), the prominence of the female part enables the song to be performed as a solo in concerts, which Giannetti did here. The lyrics convey a plea for an end to isolation, which makes the song particularly resonant now. Commenting on the continuing relevance of Sondheim’s work, the duo noted the currently running Broadway revival of the 1970 musical Company. For director Marianne Elliott’s production, which recasts the male protagonist as a woman, Sondheim — who was open to revisiting his own work — allowed some character names to be changed, and accordingly rewrote some lyrics. The production won five Tony Awards this year, including Best Revival of a Musical. Giannetti sang one of the revised numbers, “Someone Is Waiting.” The duo read from a letter in which Sondheim remarked, “I’ve never understood why Sweeney Todd is considered ‘controversial.’” The comment is amusing because the show’s subject matter is atypical of musicals, especially for 1979. A barber murders his customers, after which his accomplice uses them as ingredients for her meat pies. Sondheim wrote a letter to thank a school for mounting an almost-canceled production of the show, which explores “injustice, morality, and greed.”

Two songs from Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street were featured. Forbach performed a jazz-infused arrangement of the sentimental “Not While I’m Around,” which took a few liberties with the melody and added some wordless vocalises. Giannetti’s rendition of “Green Finch and Linnet Bird,” another song in which a female character sings wishing for freedom from captivity, was closer in style to the original, and is a good fit for Giannetti’s soprano. The Broadway production of Merrily We Roll Along (1981) closed after 16 performances. But Sondheim was fond of the show, partly because it allowed him to write semi-autobiographically about his own experience as an aspiring composer. “Opening Doors,” which Forbach and Giannetti performed as a duet — with an extended piano interlude by Stephens — conveys the starry-eyed excitement of young, ambitious musical writers as they try to get their work produced. The second half opened with Giannetti singing the breezy “What More Do I Need?” A wry love letter to New York City, the song was written in the 1950s for the unproduced (until 1997) musical Saturday Night. Giannetti infused the rendition with some of her most exuberant body movement of the concert. Much of the second half was given to

a medley from Into the Woods (1987). Sondheim once remarked that he never expected anyone under 40 to like what he wrote. Forbach finds this particularly ironic, because he has loved Woods ever since he was a 14-year-old student who was shown a video of the original production. Forbach has reason to thank his drama teacher: he is slated to perform in the upcoming Broadway revival (which opens June 28), having appeared in the recent Encores! production. Forbach performed segments of four songs from the show, which displayed his versatility as a performer, as well as his sturdy tenor/baritone voice. Included were Jack’s wide-eyed “Giants in the Sky”; the Wolf’s dangerously seductive “Hello, Little Girl” (Giannetti sang Little Red Riding Hood’s part, and Forbach moved into the audience); “Agony,” in which the Princes pine for, respectively, Cinderella and Rapunzel; and the Baker’s pained “No More.” Giannetti sang Cinderella’s “A Very Nice Prince.” There were two other duets (besides “Hello, Little Girl”): the buoyant “It Takes Two” (sung by the Baker and his Wife) and the comforting but cautionary anthem “No One is Alone.” Forbach observed that the latter song’s resonance is heightened by current events. The duo read a montage of quotes from letters in which Sondheim thanked supporters; one of the recipients was Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda. Also in some of these letters were details about the niceties of songwriting, particularly the difficulty of making lyrics fit a melody. Giannetti sang “Goodbye for Now,” which was written for the film Reds (1981). The finale was the uplifting duet “Move On” from Sunday in the Park with George (1984), a number that starts introspectively and swells to a soaring climax. To lead into the song, Giannetti quoted a line of dialogue: “Are you working on something new?” In a clever juxtaposition, Forbach’s response was a quote from a 1983 letter in which Sondheim announced the original production of Sunday (“a small and peculiar musical that I’m writing in collaboration with James Lapine”). As an encore, Giannetti sang “Not a Day Goes By,” a somewhat bitter song from Merrily We Roll Along that captures the ambivalent attitude (toward romantic relationships) that characterizes a fair amount of Sondheim’s work. he concept behind Yours Sincerely, Stephen Sondheim is a smart one. Many of Sondheim’s letters reveal his passion for his craft and his support of talented aspiring songwriters, as well as the elegance and wit that distinguish many of his songs. This thoughtfully programmed, well-performed concert clearly was a love letter in its own right — a tribute that probably would have pleased its subject. —Donald H. Sanborn III

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“YOURS SINCERELY, STEPHEN SONDHEIM”: Princeton Festival has presented “Yours Sincerely, Stephen Sondheim” in tribute to the late Broadway legend. Matthew Stephens was the music director and accompanist for the concert, which was presented June 15 in a performance tent outside Morven Museum & Garden. Above: vocal duo Alyssa Giannetti and Jason Forbach. (Photo by Carolo Pascale) For more information about The Princeton Festival 2022, which runs through June 25, visit princetonsymphony.org. To read the Sondheim letters that have been shared with the public, visit the Instagram account @sondheimletters.

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Princeton Festival Presents Benjamin Britten Comic Opera

rinceton Festival took on an immense op er at ic pro d u c t ion t h is p as t weekend to start the second week of the Festival’s cornucopia of activities. Benjamin Britten’s 1946 comic chamber opera Albert Herring was mammoth not just because of cast size or length but in its complexity of vocal demands and orchestration. The Festival opened Albert Herring Friday night (the opera was repeated Sunday night) to an extremely appreciative audience in the Festival’s performance tent at Morven Museum and Gardens. Although the storyline of Albert Herring could be as silly as Gilbert and Sullivan at times, this opera required heavy-duty singing. For this production, Princeton Festival assembled a cast of well-trained and experienced singers to handle some very challenging roles. Three standout performers were tenor Joshua Stewart in the title role, soprano Ann Toomey as the upper crust Lady Billows, and mezzo-soprano Melody Wilson as Herring’s mother. Educated at Philadelphia’s Curtis Institute of Music, Stewart has been making his mark in the opera world internationally. As the grocer Albert Herring, Stewart was a subtle lead character at first, turning his vocal prowess and full comedic skills loose in the second act dinner scene and third act soliloquy, complemented by animated facial expressions. In his operas, Britten composed rich and complex lead tenor roles, and Stewart met every musical and dramatic challenge. Soprano Ann Toomey has also had considerable success in the opera world and made an immediate impact on the Festival stage both with her singing and her character’s sufficiently snooty demeanor. With a commanding soprano voice, Toomey lit up over the prospects for the annual May Queen festival, and then proceeded to tear the roof off vocally when things did not go her way. When discussing the May Queen prize, Toomey’s singing was especially elegant and courtly while accompanied by harpist André Tarantiles. Although her character enters later in the opera, Melody Wilson’s portrayal of Herring’s somewhat greedy mother was forceful and imposing. A rich mezzo voice with an impressive upper range allowed Wilson to be both matronly and overbearing, eventually pushing her son over the edge into debauchery. Bass Eric Delagrange was both animated and decisive as the local Superintendent, and when joined by the other characters comprising the first scene’s committee meeting, the ensemble sound was well-blended and well timed. Adding a sprightly color to the ensemble sound was soprano Leah Brzyski as a local schoolteacher, and counteracting Lady Billows’ stuffy

autocratic nature was Mariana Karpatova singing the dramatic contralto role of housekeeper Florence Pike — the voice of reason within the town. Well rounding out the town council were baritone Jonathan Lasch as the vicar and tenor Shawn Roth portraying the mayor of the town, with all characters portraying farcical Puratinism well. There were several “village children” in the English town where this opera took place, and the three individuals singing these roles were all experienced and welltrained performers. Alexandra Thomas and Sienna Grinwald-Alves are students at Westminster Choir College, and Grinwald-Alves in particular began her vocal training at a young age. Lewis Jacobson Wasden, singing the role of the third village child, also began performing at a young age with the American Boychoir and is currently a member of the Princeton Boychoir. All three of these performers were animated and on-point with their vocal lines. A subplot of the opera included a romance between the butcher’s assistant, sung by baritone Billy Huyler; and the bakery worker Nancy, portrayed by Curtis Institute student Hannah Klein. Huyler showed a particularly extensive range of dynamics in his role, with Klein shining in her third act soliloquy of regret. In Albert Herring, the orchestra is an additional character in itself. Led by Rossen Milanov, the accompanying Princeton Symphony Orchestra of light winds, string quartet, and a single horn crisply maneuvered Britten’s inventive orchestration, often with solo instruments assigned to specific characters and moods. Players were often required to switch among instruments, including flutist Scott Kemsley also playing alto flute and piccolo, and clarinetist Olivia Hamilton doubling on rich bass clarinet passages. he cast for this opera was considerably larger than last week’s Festival double bill, with expanded sets and props to match. Scenic designer Julia Noulin-Mérat’s sets were bathed in light shades of purple and mauve to match Marie Miller’s costumes, and there was an extensive array of props onstage. R ichard Gammon’s direction moved the actors around the stage well without making things look over-crowded. Adapted from a French short story and transplanted to England, Albert Herring is demanding of all participants, but is considered one of the great comic operas of the 20th century. Princeton Festival took a chance presenting this opera in a new and untested venue, but this was clearly a production with singers and instrumentalists who could adapt, creating a successful performance all the way around. —Nancy Plum

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Princeton Festival continues this week with The Aaron Diehl Trio on June 22; a performance by the Festival Chorus and The Sebastians on June 23, preceded by a vocal recital by Jacqueline Horner-Kwiatek; and POPS performances June 24 and 25. Information about these performances and the complete Princeton Festival season can be found at princetonsymphony.org.

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MUSIC REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022 • 16

Performing Arts

AT THE MOVIES: Enthusiastic audience members are shown at one of State Theatre New Jersey’s past summer screenings, which begin this year on July 19.

A FRESH APPROACH: The Diderot String Quartet will perform a free concert of 18th and 19th century music on Sunday, June 26 at 2 p.m. in Richardson Auditorium on the Princeton University campus.

Diderot String Quartet Plays at Richardson

The second concer t of Princeton University Summer Chamber Concer ts’ 55th season of free chamber music concerts is with the Diderot String Quartet on Sunday, June 26 at 2 p.m. in Richardson Auditorium on the Princeton University campus. The concert will explore “The Legacy of the Fugue” with Bach’s Art of Fugue and Mendelssohn’s String Quartet No. 2 in A minor, Op. 13. Named after the 18th-century French philosopher and Boccherini enthusiast Denis Diderot, the quartet brings a fresh approach to works of the 18th and 19th centuries. Diderot came together in 2012 after having first met at Oberlin Conservatory and The Juilliard School.

The four musicians share a background in historical performance and a passion for the string quartet genre; they found the thrill of exploring the quartet repertoire on period instruments to be irresistible. Recent and upcoming engagements include Chamber Music Pittsburgh, Santa Fe Pro Musica, Lincoln Friends of Chamber Music ( NE ), Connecticut Early Music Festival, Rockefeller University’s Tri-I Noon Recital Series; The Crypt Sessions (NYC ); and Music Before 1800 in New York. Diderot has also been featured in performance at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Toledo Museum of Art and the Morgan Library in New York. The Quartet served a s q u a r te t- i n - r e s i d e n c e at Wash ing ton Nat ional

Cathedral for five seasons and served as guest faculty for Oberlin’s Baroque Performance Institute. For tickets, visit tickets. princeton.edu. There is a limit of two tickets for orchestra and four for balcony.

Free Summer Movies Return to State Theatre

have a single showing at 7 p.m. All screenings will include Spanish subtitles. Tickets are free but registration is required. Groups of 20 or more or those planning a bus trip, email education@stnj.org. The series offers young people the chance to enjoy these films, whether with their families, summer camps, or other groups. The movies will be shown at the historic and newly renovated State Theatre New Jersey, a 1921 movie palace that has become a venue for live performance. The State Theatre’s state-of-the-art HD digital cinema projection system includes a 46 Stewart film screen, a Barco projector, and digital surround sound. For more information call State Theatre Guest Services at (732) 246-SHOW (7469) or visit STNJ.org. The theater is at 15 Livingston Avenue in New Brunswick.

State Theatre New Jersey of New Brunswick has announced the return of the Free Summer Movies Series. This year’s features include Raya and the Last Dragon on July 19, Luca on July 26, Space Jam: A New Legacy on August 2, Encanto on August 9, and In the Heights on August 16. Showings for Raya and the Last Dragon, Luca, Space Jam, and Encanto “Musical Circus” Concert will be at 10:30 a.m. and From Legacy Arts International Legacy Arts International 7 p.m. In the Heights will presents “Musical Circus,” a variety-style concert, at McCarter Theatre’s Berlind Theatre on Thursday, June 23 at 7:30 p.m. The event is planned in cooperation with Jacobs Music Company, which is providing a Steinway & Sons Spirio concert grand piano for the performance. Headed by concert pianist Cristina Altamura, Legacy Arts International is holding the concert to kick off the All Abilities Music Creation Pilot. The program commissions new pieces of music for students whose educational needs are not being met by the current repertoire and pedagogy for their instrument, due to factors which could include a disability, lack of representation in the field, or other unmet needs. “Understanding the “MUSICAL CIRCUS”: Pianist Cristina Altamura and percussionist David Degge will perform a unique qualities of audimusical tribute to filmmaker Federico Fellini and composer Nino Rota in a variety-style concert ence members, fidgets will on June 23 at 7:30 p.m. at McCarter Theatre’s Berlind Theatre. (Photo by Maria Grazia Facciolá)

be available upon request at the check-in desk in the lobby or people are welcomed to bring their own,” reads a press release about the event. The concert features a musical t r ibute to f ilm maker Federico Fellini and composer Nino Rota, with music from such films as La Dolce Vita and Amarcord. Altamura commissioned arranger Steve Buck to make new arrangements of Rota’s music for per for mances which will also feature percussionists Adam Sliwinski and David Degge. Venezuelan pianist Vanessa Perez, fresh from her debut in Bill Murray’s NewWorlds — The Cradle of Civilization documentary featured at the 2021 Cannes Film Festival and released this year in theaters worldw ide, and her husband, Steve Buck, will perform his arrangements of Venezuelan music on two pianos. Opening the concert will be the 18-year-old jazz singer Anaïs Reno, and a quartet of music students from the Princeton High School Studio Band. “I am most appreciative of every single performer who believes so much in Legacy Arts International, that they are donating their time,” said Altamura. “Our guests will be delighted with this spectacular evening dedicated to the arts.” During the 2022-2023 school year, Legacy Arts International will pair a diverse team of composers with music students to create new works which will harness and emphasize the students’ unique strengths and interests. The pilot will be guided by a committee of disability experts. “All great collaboration in music relies on the composers and performers building bonds of trust and enhancing each other’s’ strengths,” said Adam Sliwinski of So Percussion and the Edward T. Cone Artist in Residence

at Pr inceton Universit y. “Many music students do not have the opportunity to work with living composers. When they can, they see that their unique physicality and ideas matter in the creative process.” Sliwinski and Altamura are artistic directors of the project. Participants will benefit from using a range of different instruments as assistive technology including new technology developed by composer Dan Trueman at Princeton University called the BitKlavier and the Steinway Spirio. The instruments will be on display at the gala. Tickets are $35. Visit legacyartsinternational.org for more information.

State Theatre New Jersey Announces Broadway Shows

The State Theatre New Jersey will host the shows Tootsie, My Fair Lady, Legally Blonde, and Jesus Christ Superstar during the 202223 season. Also included in the lineup are STOMP and R.E.S.P.E.C.T., a tribute to Aretha Franklin. Those who purchase season tickets are able to order their series tickets now before single tickets go on sale to the general public on September 2. They are also able to secure some of the best seats in the historic theater and those seats will remain theirs, year after year, for as long as they remain season ticket holders. Added benefits include 20 percent savings off single ticket prices, a Broadway season lidded cup that can be used at all Broadway shows for half price drinks at concessions, ticket exchanges within the series, and a bring-your-friends discount that allows single tickets (once on sale) to be added on at a 15 percent savings off single ticket prices. For Broadway Season tickets, email Concierge@STNJ. org; call (732) 247-7200, ext. 555; or schedule an appointment at STNJ.org/Concierge.

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17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022

Town Topics

2021 Readers’ Choice award for Best Gluten-Free and Best Vegetarian Restaurant


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022 • 18

Concierge Medicine

There’s a new trend in healthcare, and it’s gaining momentum in our area. By Sarah Emily Gilbert

(Originally published in Princeton Magazine)

Dr. Francis Rehor, Dr. Barbara A. Brown (left) and Dr. Lynne B. Kossow, and Dr. Emily Kossow Sandberg of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine.

F

Princeton Lifestyle Medicine is delighted to announce that Dr. Emily Kossow Sandberg, MD, joined our practice on April 1, 2022.

or the past several years, Dr. Lynne B. Kossow, Dr. Barbara A. Brown, and Dr. Francis E Rehor have offered their patients far more than the traditional primary care practice. Most doctors see 25-30 patients per day for an average of 15 minutes, Drs. Kossow, Brown, and Rehor see 6-8 patients per day. In addition to providing treatment for acute illnesses, the doctors act as their clients’ healthcare coaches through Lifestyle Medicine, a scientific approach to patient wellness by effecting changes in areas such as diet, physical activity, and stress management. With the current shortage of primary care physicians and the abundance of high-volume practices, this type of individualized attention is rare. However, by switching to a concierge format, doctors like the ones at Princeton Lifestyle Medicine are able to practice medicine that consists of this broad-spectrum care. Concierge medicine, also known as retainer-based medicine, is an umbrella term for private medical care wherein patients pay an out-ofpocket fee in exchange for enhanced care. Born in the 1990s, concierge medicine was once thought of as a service for the wealthy that charged patients a lofty fee for luxury medicine. In recent years, it has evolved to accommodate patients across all income brackets, leading to expanding interest among patients and their primary care doctors. According to a survey released by the American Academy of Private Physicians at the AAPP 2015 Fall Summit, more than 45 percent of 862 independent physicians would consider a concierge or similar membership model in the next three years. This may be due in part to our aging population needing increased and varied medical services, leading to an imbalanced patient/doctor ratio. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act has increased the number of insured patients, putting a further strain on primary care doctors. As a result, physicians are often unable to dedicate enough time to each patient. In the hopes of increasing both job and patient satisfaction in a financially sustainable way, primary care physicians are looking toward concierge medicine. “Where conventional medicine is failing is in the prevention and reversal of chronic diseases that are becoming an epidemic in the United States today,” explain the doctors. “The current insurance model is built upon a problem-based economic reimbursement that encourages doctors to address medical problems very quickly. This leads to most doctors rushing to see 25-30 patients per day in order to make ends meet…This is not how we have ever practiced. We always want to have the time to address the root cause of diseases that are preventable today.” Lifestyle Medicine is a 21st century approach to healthcare that consolidates the very best characteristics of traditional medicine with the profound impact of lifestyle behaviors on health. Lifestyle Medicine is an evidence-based practice that has been shown to prevent, reverse, or slow down heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, diabetes, dementia, and some cancers.

Concierge medical practices come in various forms, including those that reject insurance plans all together, but this is not the case for Princeton Lifestyle Medicine. All the doctors there accept insurance for all covered medical services. In addition, their patients pay an annual fee of $1,500 for the Lifestyle Medicine Concierge program, which gives them access to an elevated level of care. The founders of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine trained at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine at Harvard Medical School. They are at the vanguard of their field, having lectured about their practice development model at The Institute of Lifestyle Medicine Conference in 2015. They are also members of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and the American College of Physicians. They are among the first physicians to become board certified in Lifestyle Medicine, as well as maintaining their board certifications in internal medicine. This practice is unique in that it offers patients comprehensive conventional medical care combined with lifestyle counseling. Patients interested in a natural approach to disease prevention are provided in-depth, individualized coaching based on their needs. The doctors can assist with everything from quitting smoking to creating a manageable diet and exercise plan. The concierge model offers Princeton Lifestyle Medicine patients additional benefits including access to the doctors’ emails, cell phone numbers, a private phone line, extended patient office visits, and same or next day appointments. Their patients see their physician not only as accomplished medical doctors, but health advocates, mentors, and even friends. “Our practice structure allows us to spend more time educating our patients about what may be going on with them medically,” the doctors explain. “We are better able to work with them as partners in their care and advocate for them with their specialists or if they are in the hospital. We provide tremendous support and guidance to them and their caretakers or family. We greatly value this enhanced communication with our patients. Princeton Lifestyle Medicine physicians include the two original founders, Dr. Lynne Kossow and Dr. Barbara Brown, as well as Dr. Francis Rehor who joined the practice in 2015.” Princeton Lifestyle medicine is also delighted to announce that Dr. Emily Kossow Sandberg joined the practice in April of 2022 as well. Concierge practices like Princeton Lifestyle Medicine focus the healthcare system on its most vital component: the patient-doctor relationship. The model emphasizes quality care instead of quick care, benefitting both parties. Princeton Lifestyle Medicine has the only physicians in the Princeton area who are board certified in both Internal Medicine and Lifestyle Medicine. As leaders in both concierge and Lifestyle medicine, it comes as no surprise that Princeton Lifestyle medicine is at the forefront of this effort, bringing Princeton into the future of healthcare.

The Princeton Lifestyle Medicine Concierge Program is $1,500 per year. The fee can be paid monthly, quarterly, biannually, or annually, and credit cards are accepted as payment. All medical services are billed through the patient’s insurance company as usual. Princeton Lifestyle Medicine is located at 731 Alexander Road, Suite 201 in Princeton, New Jersey. For more information call 609.655.3800 or visit www.princetonlifestylemedicine.com. — Paid Advertisement —


19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022

Welcome to the

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Aphasia Support Group Second Saturday of Every Month | 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. | Location: Zoom Meeting This support group is for individuals who have sustained aphasia or some form of communication disorder from a neurological condition. This group is meant for patients as well as their loved ones to meet other people who share similar circumstances. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss their experiences, share ideas, form friendships and provide emotional support for one another. The group will also offer individuals education on subjects of interest to all and an opportunity to receive resources and tools for coping with their situation. We will have guest speakers on different topics once every three months. All support group meetings are currently taking place virtually through Zoom. The link to the meeting will be emailed about 30 minutes prior to the start of group. Register online at capitalhealth.org/events or email your contact information to Sarah Contor at scontor@capitalhealth.org. For additional questions or assistance, call 609.537.7157.

@capitalhealthnj


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022 • 20

Art

“LIGHTS AT NIGHT”; This painting by Patricia Allingham Carlson was selected as the Signature Image for this year’s 93rd “Juried Art Show” at Phillips’ Mill. According to the Signature Image Committee, Its sense of community spirit, depicting a diverse group of revelers, helped it win the competition.

Plans Underway for Phillips’ Mill Art Show

There are many traditions in the planning of the historic “Juried Art Show” at Phillips’ Mill, which marks its 93rd year this September. The anticipation builds as artists await the publication of the show prospectus, which is now available on the Phillips’ “WHITE DOVE”: Mosaic works by artist Leyla Spencer will be on exhibit July 1 through July 30 Mill website at phillipsmill. at Bucks on Bridge in Lambertville. An artist’s reception is scheduled for Friday, July 8 from 5 org/prospectus. to 7 p.m. This year’s show will be held September 24 through imaginary birds, but still inis a Dremel, to soften any Mosaics Works on View cludes some of her colorful of the sharpest edges,” said October 30, live at the Mill At Bucks on Bridge and online. “There is nothing Lambertville artist Leyla geometric and imaginative Spencer. “All the glass and like experiencing the show in abstracts in this show. tile is cut by hand.” Spencer will be showing our beloved landmark Mill,” These works are an interThere will be an artist’s her mosaic work at Bucks on said Mary Flamer, chair of Bridge, at 25 Bridge Street esting combination of hand- reception on July 8 from 5 this year’s art show. “Makin Lambertville, from July 1 cut stained glass and glass to 7 p.m. ing it available online, too, tile, along with various other through July 30. For more information, offers unrivaled accessibility embellishments. “The only visit leylaspencer.com. Spencer has been concenand welcomes art lovers near trating on landscapes and machine I use in this process and far.” The Art Show Committee has announced that jurying this year will take place in person at the Mill. This longtime tradition at Phillips’ Mill was interrupted the past two years by the pandemic. “Having the jurors on site to see the submitted works in person, to view the artwork in real light from every angle, to experience texture, brushwork, color, is something special in this day of online jurying,” said Flamer. “We are thrilled to be able to offer this to our submitting artists once again.” All registration will be done online at https://client.

smarterentry.com/PMPE between August 1 and August 31. High-resolution images are required of all work when registering to facilitate the creation of the online show. Work must then be dropped off at Phillips’ Mill during receiving days, September 9 and 10, for in-person jurying, and must have been registered online prior to drop off. Another tradition is the call for Signature Image submissions, when area artists are invited to create an image of the historic old grist mill located at the sharp bend on River Road just north of New Hope, Pa. With nearly two dozen submissions received this year, the competition was fierce according to organizers. The Phillips’ Mill Art Committee has announced that this year’s Signature Image, already appearing on show materials and on the Phillips’ Mill website, is the joyful, colorful, and spirited Lights at Night by Patricia Allingham Carlson of Hatboro, Pa. “We were thrilled that so many artists entered the competition,” said Gene Underwood, chair of the Signature Image Committee. “All the entrants submitted beautiful

work, and gave the committee much to discuss. The winning entry depicts a diverse group enjoying the Mill, and its community spirit helped it win the competition.” “I was so honored to learn that my painting was selected,” said Carlson, “especially when you consider the tradition of the show and the caliber of the artists in our area. When you are accepted at this level, you have arrived.” Carlson’s painting will be used on all marketing, publicity, and advertising materials for the show. The painting will also be exhibited and for sale at the exhibition. Signature Image paintings are often first to sell, having many admirers by the time the Juried Art Show at Phillips’ Mill opens. Phillips’ Mill Community Association, the birthplace of Pennsylvania Impressionism, has served as a meeting place for artists since 1929. The Phillips’ Mill Community Association invites and welcomes the membership of all who love and are interested in the arts. For more information about membership and the 93rd “Juried Art Show” at Phillips’ Mill, visit phillipsmill. org/art/juried-art-show.

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“VACATION TRAVEL STUFF”: To celebrate a return to vacationing and traveling, the West Windsor branch of the Mercer County Public Library System at 333 North Post Road in Princeton Junction now presents Glen Key Dalessandro’s “Vacation Travel Stuff.” On display through July 29, the exhibit features free items from hotels, motels, resorts, casinos, trains, planes, and cruise ships collected by Dalessandro since 1986. For more information, call the library at (609) 275-8901.

Check websites for information on safety protocols. Ar t @ Bainbr idge, 158 Nassau Street, has “Body Matters / Martha Friedman” through July 10. artmuseum.princeton.edu. A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has ““Natural Influences” t hrough July 3. G aller y hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Art on Hulfish, 11 Hulfish Street, has “Screen T ime : Photog raphy and Video Art in the Internet Age” through August 7. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon

Innovator’s Gallery,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. Museum hours are Thursday through Sunday, 12 to 4 p.m. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Keith Haring: A Radiant Legacy” through July 31 and “(re)Frame: Community Perspectives on the Michener Art Collection” through March 5, 2023. michenerartmuseum.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey” through March 2023 and the online exhibits “Slavery at Morven,” “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898,” and others. morven.org. The Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, has “The Glittering Outdoors” through October 2. helenemazurart.com. Small World Coffee, 14 Wit her spoon St reet, has paintings and animal welfare art by Kyoko Bartley through July 5. Ab stract landscape paintings by Nelan Padte are at the 254 Nassau Street location through July 5. smallworldcoffee.com. West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “Faculty Student Show” through July 9. westwindsorarts.org.

REFINED INTERIORS

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21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022

Area Exhibits

Street, has “Interwoven Stories: The Final Chapter,” through July 2 and “Communication Between Forms” through June 25. artscouncilofprinceton.org. G a l ler y 14 Fine A r t Photography, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “A Different Look ” through July 17. Open Saturday and Sunday from 12 to 5 p.m., or by appointment. gallery14.org. Gourgaud Gallery, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, has an exhibit of paintings by members of the New York City United Federation of Retired Teachers through June 27. cranburyartscouncil.org. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “What’s in the Garden? ” through August 1, “Roberto Lugo: The Village Potter” through January 8, 2023, and “Fragile: Earth” through January 8, 2023, among other exhibits. Hours are Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Friday through Sunday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Timed tickets required. groundsforsculpture.org. Highlands Art Gallery, 41 North Union Street, Lambertville has “A Brush Above The Rest” through June 30. highlandsartgallery.com. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022 • 22

Mark Your Calendar Town Topics Wednesday, June 22 8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Country Dancers at Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. Ridge Kennedy with Mind the Gap. $10. Princetoncountrydancers. org. Thursday, June 23 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 7:30 p.m.: Musical Circus Concert and tribute to Federico Fellini at Berlind Theatre of McCarter Theatre Center, 91 University Place. Students of pianist Cristina Altamura and several others perform. Fundraiser for the All Abilities Music Creation program. $35. Legacyartsinternational.org. Friday, June 24 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Motor Vehicle Commission event to provide such ser vices as driver’s license renewal, non- dr iver identification cards, REAL IDs, and license plate services, at 1 Monument Drive parking area. Register by emailing SenZwicker@njleg.org. 5-8 p.m.: Sunset Sips & Sounds at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Music, wine, light bites, and more. Ragtime Relics performs. Terhuneorchards.com. 7 p.m.: Princeton Festival POPS concert; Princeton Symphony Orchestra performs music from Broadway shows with guest artist Sierra Boggess. Princetonsymphony.org/festival. 8 p.m.: ActorsNet presents Shakespeare’s King Lear at the Heritage Center Theater, 635 North Delmorr Avenue, Morrisville, Pa. Actorsnetbucks.org. Saturday, June 25 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m.: First P re sby ter ia n Chu rch of Hamilton Square’s annual r u m mage sale, at 3550 Nottingham Way, Hamilton Square. No strollers allowed. Books, kitchen items, toys, small furniture, sporting goods, and general merchandise. 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. WWcfm.org. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. or 1- 4 p.m.; help Friends of Princeton Open Space with a variety of conservation projects at Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Fopos.org. 10 a.m.-12 p.m.: Rotary End Hunger food distribution event at Boys and Girls Club, 1040 Spruce Street, Lawrence Township (originally scheduled for May 7). Open to food pantries and organizations that feed the hungry; as well as the public. Bring empty boxes, bags, carts. www.rhrotary.org. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.: Naming Party at the Arts Council of Princeton, 105 Witherspoon Street. The community is invited to view photos by late

photographic historian Romus Broadway and help preserve names of family and friends. Coffee, pastries, and lunch will be served. Free. Artscouncilofprinceton.org. 11 a.m.: Vintage Baseball Game, Greenway Meadows Park, 275 Rosedale Road. Annual event presented by the Historical Society of Princeton. The Flemington Neshanock vs. the Diamond State Base Ball Club wearing period uniforms and using 1864 rules. Spectators can take batting practice using replicas of 19th century equipment. Free. Princetonhistory.org. 12-5 p.m.: Winery Weekend Music Series at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Musician Brian Bortnick performs from 1-4 p.m. Light fare available. Terhuneorchards.com. 2 p.m.: Amateur Radio Open Hous e Field Day, through June 26 at 4 p.m., sponsored by the Delaware Valley Radio Association at 798 Bear Tavern Road, West Trenton. Members of the public are invited. Arrl. org/field-day. 3-6 p.m.: Alex Deis-Lauby and Crossover Duo Alex Cumming and Carol Bittenson, presented by Princeton Country Dancers at Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. For experienced dancers; followed by potluck for everybody 6-7:30 p.m.; Intro to Basics at 7:30 p.m.; and contra dance for all 8-11 p.m. Princetoncountrydancers.org. 7 p.m.: Princeton Festival continues with the Princeton Symphony Orchestra led by Rossen Milanov and the Youth Orchestra of Central Jersey led by Kenneth Bean. Family-friendly concert of orchestral works by Handel, Rossini, Brahms, and Grieg, plus patriotic music by Hailstork and Sousa. Instrument “petting zoo” for kids. Princetonsymphony.org/festival. 8 p.m.: ActorsNet presents Shakespeare’s King Lear at the Heritage Center Theater, 635 North Delmorr Avenue, Morrisville, Pa. Actorsnetbucks.org. Sunday, June 26 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.: Bucks County House Tour. Three estates will be open for tours as a fundraiser for Turn Bucks Blue, supporting Democrats in Bucks County, Pa. $75. Visit Turnbucksblue.com for information. 12 p.m. : HiTOPS and Tipple & Rose partner for a Drag High Tea at Tipple & Rose Tea Party and Apothecary, 210 Nassau Street. In celebration of Pride month, with drag queen Divinity Banks. Fundraiser for HiTOPS LGBTQ services. Bit. ly/HiTOPSHighTea.

12-5 p.m.: Winery Weekend Music Series at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Charlotte Kendrick and Dan Rowe perform from 1-4 p.m. Light fare available. Terhuneorchards.com. 1 p.m.: Carillon concert at the Graduate College, Princeton Universit y, by Princeton Carillonneur Lisa Lonie. Listen from outside the Graduate Tower, rain or shine. 2 p.m.: The Diderot String Quartet performs at Richardson Auditorium. Works by Bach and Mendelssohn. Free. Tickets.princeton.edu. 8 p.m.: ActorsNet presents Shakespeare’s King Lear at the Heritage Center Theater, 635 North Delmorr Avenue, Morrisville, Pa. Actorsnetbucks.org. 4-9 p.m.: Firefly Festival at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Free evening of nature, music, food, and more. Lolly Hopwood performs for kids. Terhuneorchards.com. Tuesday, June 28 9:30 and 11 a.m.: Read & Pick program at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Monarchs, swallowtails, and honeybees. Hands-on farm activity for young children. $12 per child, includes craft activity. Terhuneorchards. com. 11:30 a.m.: Toastmasters meet via Zoom. Toastmastersclubs.org. Wednesday, June 29 8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Country Dancers presents Donna Hunt with Pickup Band, at Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. $10. Princetoncountrydancers.org. Thursday, June 30 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. Saturday, July 2 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. WWcfm.org. 9 a.m.-10 a.m.: Mid-Day Toastmasters meet via Zoom. Toastmastersclubs.org. 1 p.m.: Launch of “Where’s Waldo?” scavenger hunt at jaZams, 25 Palmer Square East. Cake and goodie bags; fans are invited to dress as one of the characters in the Waldo books. The hunt ends July 31. (609) 924-8697. Sunday, July 3 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. Monday, July 4 12-3 p.m.: Fourth of July Jubilee at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Music by TelStar, performance by Luminarium Dance Company, historical advent ure activ it y, food trucks, and more. $25 family tickets. Morven.org.

JUNE-AUGUST

Tuesday, July 5 7:30 p.m.: Second virtual community reading of Frederick Douglass’ 1852 speech, “What to the Slave is the 4th of July?” Register at princetonlibrary.org under “events.” Wednesday, July 6 6-7 p.m.: State Sen. Andrew Zwicker and Assembly members Roy Freiman and Sadaf Jaffer hold a “Gardenside Chat” via Zoom. Free. Register at (732) 823-1684. 8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Countr y Dancers presents Dave Rupp with Night Moves, at Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. $10. Princetoncountrydancers.org. Thursday, July 7 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. Friday, July 8 7:30 p.m.: The Manhattan Chamber Players perfor m work s by Moz ar t, Schumann, and Dohnanyi at Richardson Auditorium. Free. Tickets.princeton.edu. Saturday, July 9 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. WWcfm.org. 2 p.m.: “The First Historian of the Revolutionary War: Francois-Jean de Chastellux,” talk at the Trent House, 15 Market Street, Trenton, by Iris de Rode. Part of Trenton’s Liberty Weekend. Williamtrenthouse.org. 7:30 p.m.: The Sidney Sussex College Choir performs at All Saints’ Church, 16 All Saints’ Road. Free by $25 donation suggested. Allsaintsprinceton.org. 8 p.m.: Lawrence Hopewell Trail’s Full Moon Bike Ride, at Mercer Meadows. Preceded by musical entertainment; picnicking invited. $15 for those 12-17 riding the six-mile loop; $20 for those 18 and up. Free for those who don’t ride with donations accepted. Group rates available. Lhtrail.org. Sunday, July 10 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. Monday, July 11 Recycling Tuesday, July 12 7:30 -10 :30 a.m.: “The Future of North Trenton” is the topic of the Trenton Economic Development Series, sponsored by the Princeton Mercer Chamber. At Trenton Country Club, 201 Sullivan Way, West Trenton. Princetonmercer.org. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Mid-day Toastmasters meet v ia Z oom. Toas t mas tersclubs.org. Thursday, July 14 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton

Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 6:30 p.m.: Book launch of The Education of Betsey Stockton, with author/ historian Gregory Nobles, at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Morven.org. Friday, July 15 7 p.m.: Story & Verse series at Pettoranello Gardens, 20 Mountain Avenue, presents “Spark in the Dark.” Open mic poetic and storytelling events, presented by the Arts Council of Princeton and African American Cultural Collaborative of Mercer County. To perform, arrive 15 minutes before the event. Artscouncilofprinceton.org. Saturday, July 16 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. WWcfm.org. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. or 1- 4 p.m.; help Friends of Princeton Open Space with a variety of conservation projects at Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Fopos.org. 10-11:30 a.m.: Mid-Day Toastmasters meet at the Library, 42 Robbinsville Allentown Road, Robbinsville. Toastmastersclubs.org. Sunday, July 17 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. Monday, July 18 Recycling Wednesday, July 20 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meet either in the Library’s Community Room or via Zoom. Princetonlibrary.org. Thursday, July 21 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 6 :30 p.m.: “A Musical Summer Evening with the Ragtime Relics,” at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. $15. Bring your own blanket or chair. Morven.org. 7:30 p.m.: The Zodiac Trio performs at Richardson Auditorium. Works by Stravinsky, Benny Goodman, William Grant Still, Gershwin, Bartok, and others. Free. Tickets.princeton.edu. Saturday, July 23 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. WWcfm.org. 3-6 p.m.: Lisa Greenleaf and Raise the Roof, presented by Princeton Country Dancers. Special afternoon dance for experienced dancers, followed by a potluck for everybody from 6-7:30

p.m.; introduction to basics at 7:30 p.m.; and contra dance for all from 8-11 p.m. At Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. Princetoncountrydancers. org. 3 - 8 :30 p.m.: Sourland Mountain Festival at Unionville Vineyards, 9 Rocktown Road, Ringoes. Live music, local food, craft beer, wine, local artisans, and more. Rain or shine. SourlandMoutainFest.com. 6:30 p.m.: Summer Solstice Celebration fundraiser to benefit New Jersey Conservation Foundation, a t B r i c k Fa r m Tav e r n , Hopewell. Food, drinks, entertainment, auction. Solstice2022.givesmart.com. Sunday, July 24 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. Tuesday, July 26 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Mid-day Toastmasters meet v ia Z oom. Toas t mas tersclubs.org. Thursday, July 28 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 6 :30 p.m.: An evening with AT&T’s Corporate Historian Sheldon Hochheiser at Mor ven, 55 Stockton Street. In conjunction with the exhibit “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention.” Morven.org. Saturday, July 30 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. WWcfm.org. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. or 1- 4 p.m.; help Friends of Princeton Open Space with a variety of conservation projects at Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Fopos.org. Sunday, July 31 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. Monday, August 1 Recycling Thursday, August 4 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers’ Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. Saturday, August 6 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. WWcfm.org. 10-11:30 a.m.: Mid-Day Toastmasters meet at the Library, 42 Robbinsville Allentown Road, Robbinsville. Toastmastersclubs.org.


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ou have certainly seen those cheerful yellow trucks around town. A signature sign that the N.C. Jefferson Plumbing, Heating, and A /C experts are on the job. What you may not know is that the company has actually been on the job for 75 years! Now celebrating that landmark anniversary, the firm remains family-owned and dedicated to prompt, reliable service, quality products, and conscientious customer attention.

IT’S NEW To Us

Opened in 1947 by Norton C. Jefferson, the company established its first office in the family’s Valley Road home. “My dad had worked for Princeton University for a while, doing a variety of things, including plumb ing and carpentry,” recalls Bruce Jefferson, now owner of the business. “After he left the University, he focused on plumbing, and then established his own business.” Pretty Cool Jefferson remembers learning about the plumbing business at an early age. “My dad had me doing the inventory when I was a boy. I’d count the pipes, tools, fittings, and other supplies. When I was around 12, I

washed the trucks, and also helped put on the snow tires in the winter. I thought that was pretty cool.” After graduating from college, Jefferson worked in other areas for a while, but his heart was in the family business, and he returned full time in 1986. He obtained his master plumber’s license, which required four years of night school while also working on the job as an apprentice. Then he had to work two additional years before he could take the test to become a master plumber. Plumbing and heating services have been available since the company’s beginnings, and air conditioning was added 25 years ago. In addition, the company installs dishwashers and water heaters. It is a given that we will all need a plumber at some time. Stopped up toilets, leaking faucets, f looded basements, lost rings or other jewelry down the drain — you name it, it will happen! Bruce Jefferson has seen it all, and though in certain respects the business has changed, with technological advances, new products and materials, much remains the same. “Leaking faucets and running toilets are among the most common problems,” he points out. “We also have to deal with flooding after a lot of rain, and we are always called upon to find lost items that may have gone down

the drain or stopped up the toilet. Toys in the Toilet “We have had to get rings and earrings out of the drain and toys out of the toilet. We discovered that one little boy was having fun flushing his Tonka toys down the toilet. We also found several toothbrushes in another toilet, and finally, the mother said the kid just didn’t want to brush his teeth!” Really odd things have turned up as well, he says. “We found a woman’s wig in one pipe, and another time, a pair of boxer shorts. According to the story, the husband in the house said, ‘I don’t wear boxer shorts!’” That story was not followed up, and the outcome is unknown. Jefferson reports still other unusual findings, including animal life and remains, during his work. “We found a snake outside in the air conditioning unit, as well as mice and squirrels.” No alligators, raccoons, or coyotes, however. Residential work is the company’s main focus, although some commercial projects are also part of the job. Additional services such as helping with sewer line replacement and water service are also available. As he explains, “Every house has a water service line and a sewer service line. We can help with main water line repair and replacement between the street and the house.”

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022

N.C. Jefferson Plumbing, Heating, and A/C Celebrates 75th Anniversary of Family Business

TEST OF TIME: “We are proud to carry on the tradition of the family business, and to continue to bring the same high quality of service to our customers that we have always been known for.” Bruce Jefferson, owner of N.C. Jefferson Plumbing, Heating, and A/C and his daughter Jill Jefferson-Miller, owner of Jefferson Bath & Kitchen, are shown in the company’s showroom. Clients are from all over Princeton and the surrounding area, and many are longstanding, says Jefferson. “Lots of our customers are now second, even third generation. They know they can count on us, and we are available 24/7. We have a very loyal clientele, and we also have a wonderful staff of long t i m e e mploye e s. Some have been with us for 10 and 15 years, and one was here for 30 years before retiring.” Working with Dad B o t h N .C . J e f f e r s o n Plumbing, Heating, and A/C and its affiliated company

Jefferson Bath & Kitchen are located at 29 Airpark Road, second floor. Opened in 1989, the Bath & Kitchen division has become a separate business, now owned by Jill JeffersonMiller, who joined the company in 2004. She is pleased to be part of the continuing family business, and as she says, “It is special to be able to work with my dad.” With her background in earth and environmental science and geology, JeffersonMiller is in a unique position to introduce customers to the newest environmentallyfriendly products and to help them with their choices. She is able to explain and advise about a wide range of considerations, from energy efficiency to the facts and aesthetics of natural stone countertops, sinks, and tubs. As in everything, trends come and go, and currently, large bathrooms, bigger tile, and hand-held showers are in demand. In addition, Jefferson-Miller points out that “People like matte black faucets, rectangular sinks, and brushed brass fixtures.” The options in every area are truly remarkable, and nowhere is it more amazing than in the choice of toilets. A far cry from the days of the “convenience,” the “necessary,” “privy,” and “outhouse,” this very functional product has undergone a transformation almost like no other. Big Deal “Bidet seats for your toilet are a very big deal right now,” reports Jefferson-Miller. “They can both wash and dry, and some have seated heats, automatic open/close lids, and even a night light.” All the new toilets use 1.28 or 1.0 gallons per flush, compared to the 3.5 gallons used in the past. Because all these options are “overflowing,” it is very helpful to have the expert advice and guidance of Jefferson-Miller. Both she and her father point out that given the widespread information on the internet, people can sometimes be misled by what they have seen. “There is a challenge today with people going to websites and then having u nre a lis t ic exp ec tat ions about price ranges and installation. Prices can vary

significantly in different parts of the country.” Whether people are coming in for a new toilet, a new shower head, sink, or even a total bathroom renovation, Jefferson Bath & Kitchen will provide what the client needs. During the height of the pandemic, when many people were working from home, the number of remodels and renovations increased, and people were looking for new ideas. “Installing a new bathroom is a complicated process,” she notes, “and we are the only bath and kitchen business that is connected to a plumbing company. We will install everything you buy, and we know how things work. We only sell items of high quality.” Top-of-the-Line To p - o f - t h e - l i n e p r o d ucts include Grohe, Jaclo, Koh ler, New por t Bras s, Moen, Stone Forest, Barclay Products, and Woodpro cabinetry, among many others. “While we don’t get highly involved in kitchen design, we love working as the general contractor on kitchen projects,” adds JeffersonMiller. “We work with local showrooms for the kitchen design, and provide kitchen sinks and faucets, which are displayed in our showroom.” As an honored mainstay in Princeton for three quarters of a century, N.C. Jefferson Plumbing, Heating, and A/C has been noted for its charitable work over the years. Helping organizations and giving back to the community has been a major priority for the company. As Bruce Jefferson and Jill Jefferson-Miller look forward to the years ahead, they plan, as they say, “to keep up to date with the new products and the new technology. At the same time, we will continue to offer the same standard of excellent service our customers have always counted on.” nd adds Bruce Jefferson, “I enjoy the fact that every day is different. A new job, a new client, a new location.” For more information or appointments, call ( 609 ) 924-3624. Website : n cj ef fe r s on. com. —Jean Stratton

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022 • 24

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Showing Perseverance After Walking On to PU Crew, Coxswain Venkatraman Guided Varsity 4 to NCAA Title

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uffering a leg injury from running cross country at the Deerfield Academy put Roopa Venkatraman on a path that ultimately ended up with her winning an NCAA title in rowing. Needing to be on a team in the spring of her senior year at the Massachusetts prep school, Venkatraman hit the water. “As we were required to play a sport for at least two seasons, I started looking for an alternative to running track in the spring,” said Venkatraman, a native of Cranbury. “Many of my friends were on the crew team at Deerfield, and I originally joined as a way to just spend some more time with them before we graduated. I didn’t know much about coxing, though many of my friends had told me I’d be a good fit for the role.” Coming home to go to Princeton University in the fall of 2018, Venkatraman decided to join the Tiger w o m e n ’s o p e n r o w i n g program. With her limited crew experience, Venkatraman faced a challenge getting up to speed. “Walking on to the team with 10 weeks of rowing experience, at best, I was put in a position to direct and lead people who had been rowing for five to 10 years, many of whom had national and international titles,” said Venkatraman. “I was not incorrect to think that I was underqualified. I could barely tell port from starboard. It’s true that many people walk on to crew and the opportunity to do so is wonderful. But I think that walking on as a rower is, in some ways, different than walking on as a coxswain. As a coxswain, you’re automatically put in a position to lead. Your mistakes are literally broadcasted on speakers. If you underperform, you actively hinder the ability of the entire crew to practice and reach their potential.” Reaching her potential, Venkatraman guided the Princeton varsity 4 win both the Ivy League and NCAA titles this spring in her senior campaign. In becoming a national champion coxswain, Venkatraman applied a studious approach to the sport and her position. “I asked for feedback from my rowers constantly and taped practices and races, which accelerated my growth,” said Venkatraman. “I was pretty close to the coxswains in the years above me and they also really helped me along the way. I

may not have been the best when I started, but I cared a lot about getting better, which helped my teammates invest in my growth. Even as I found my confidence by the end of my first year, I still asked for feedback all the time and continued to push myself to get better.” Princeton women’s open head coach Lori Dauphiny was impressed by Venkatraman’s rapid improvement. “Roopa is very detail-oriented, she did progress very quickly,” said Dauphiny. “The most challenging part was helping her figure out if this was where she wanted to invest time and energy. She decided yes and when she did that, it was unbelievable. She was good before that and when she knew what she wanted, she just got that much better. She was a student of rowing. She did go out on the coaches launch quite a bit to learn more. She would videotape and listen to the coaches’ commands.” As Venkatraman became proficient in the boat, she fine-tuned her mental approach to racing. “There’s a misconception about coxswains just shouting all the time during races, but I think there’s a value in being technical and relaxed during races,” said Venkatraman. “You’re competing with athletes who already perform at a high level and have a lot of their own internal drive. I tend to believe that just adding more motivation on top of that only has marginal gains. I really like focusing on keeping a cool head and a calm tone to inspire confidence. Being a good coxswain is about building trust with your rowers and I think you have to choose your moments to say “now’s it, you have to go now” during a race carefully.” Dauphiny credited Venkatraman with mastering that aspect of being a coxswain with aplomb. “Her biggest hurdle was learning to be a racer and she became a real racer,” s a i d D a u p h i n y. “ T h a t ’s something that is taught but also has to come from within. She didn’t have that skill coming in because she had done so little of it. She hadn’t manifested it yet. I think she really learned to take command and how to work with a crew and change the intonation in her voice and all of those things besides steering.” After the 2020 season was canceled, Venkatraman took a big step forward last spring in the return to competition when she guided the varsity 4 to first place in the C final at the NCAA championship regatta.

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“I got a lot better at figuring out how to focus on the few low effort, high impact improvements that can make a crew that hasn’t been together long a lot faster,” said Venkatraman. “At the NCAAs in 2021, we had a few days to throw together our best race, and it was under this pressure that we were forced to make the best of what we had. I think our team definitely shares the mentality of making whatever line up you’re in the fastest, but I got much better at identifying and focusing on these changes when the stakes were high. I gained a lot of optimism about the potential of our team, especially in the 4, going into a full season.” I n D a u p h i n y ’s v i e w, Ve n k a t r a m a n a n d h e r teammates made a lot of progress in 2021 even though the schedule was sharply curtailed due to ongoing COVID-19 concerns. “I think it was a big turning point and even though it was the C fi nal we were so proud of winning it,” said Dauphiny. “It was a big stepping stone. It was an experience that carried through to this year and it gave more confidence to those young kids who hadn’t been to the national championships.” Returning to the varsity 4 for the 2022 season, Venkatraman said a 2.8 second loss to Texas in late April actually proved to be a confidence builder for the boat. “We didn’t fi nd the combination we raced at nationals until our duel against Texas,” said Venkatraman. “I’d say this race against Texas was the turning point for us since we’d stacked up decently against the first ranked team and felt like we had serious potential to do some damage at Ivies and beyond. We held them off from the start in that race, though they seemed to have a more sustainable base at that point in the season. However, once we walked on them in the last 250 of that race, we really started to set our sights a bit higher because we knew it was possible. I had a feeling that this would be the lineup we’d need to race at nationals in order to win.” Building on that triumph, the varsity 4 won its grand final at the Ivy League championships, topping Brown by more than four seconds in the grand final after having fallen to the Bears in a qualifying heat. “The final was really exciting for us since we hadn’t raced this lineup in weeks and we had all individually found a lot more speed during the season that greatly improved our boat when we all came back together,” said Venkatraman. “It’s a testament to how everyone our team continues to push themselves, regardless of where they’re sitting. That mentality really helped us gain fitness and speed even as lineups change.” As the boat prepared for the NCAA championship regatta, which took place from May 27-29 at the

ENJOYING THE RIDE: Princeton University women’s open rowing coxswain Roopa Venkatraman guides the varsity 4 in a race this spring during her senior campaign. Venkatraman, a Cranbury resident, helped the varsity 4 win both the Ivy League and NCAA titles this spring. (Photo by Row2k, provided courtesy of Princeton Athletics) Nathan Benderson Park in Sarasota, Fla., the boat was focused on itself rather than its foes. “Our mindset coming into NCAAs was centered around making sure our boat was performing at its peak in order to podium,” said Venkatraman. “Our goal was to meet or beat our third place seed. We never doubted that this wouldn’t be possible if we met our potential on race day. The majority of our focus was on our boat, including important technical changes, and our race plan.” Dauphiny viewed Venkatraman’s serious mindset as a key to success for varsity 4. “Going into the national championships, she was fully prepared and that was a fantastic weapon to have against those other crews who had a different season than us last year,” said Dauphiny. “She just brought an amount of detail and preparation and leadership that was needed. She was so studious, she really had it broken down.” After winning its opening heat and then taking second in the semifinal, the varsity 4 produced a big effort in the grand final. Trailing nemesis Texas early in the race, Princeton took the lead at the 1,000-meter mark and pulled away for a 1.2 second victory, clocking a winning time of 7:05.23 over the 2,000-meter course with Ohio State placing second in 7:06.46 and Texas taking third in 7:07.18. “I think we were the most relaxed and collected going into our grand final compared to any of the other races that weekend,” said Venkatraman, who was joined on the boat by Haley Mead, Catherine Garrett, Natasha Neitzell, and Lauren Johnson. “We didn’t feel like we needed a miracle to win, we just had to execute to the best of our capacity. Our race plan was to get up off the line quickly and use the strokes after our shift to find a solid and sustainable base rhythm. Our battle with Texas and Washington in the middle 1K of the race was exciting. Once we started walking back on both crews, I could hear their coxswains getting rattled. I think what made the difference for us across the board was that we just stayed really relaxed, internal, and confident. Our

boat stayed really responsive to calls and we knew exactly what we had to do to put our bow in front.” The gold medal marked the first V4 medal in program history at the NCAA Rowing Championships and left an indelible memory for Venkatraman. “I was absolutely ecstatic at the finish line. I mean, just over the moon; I don’t think I’ve ever felt that happy, it is definitely one of the proudest days of my life,” said Venkatraman. “It was a bit funny actually because I think I was the only one who had fully realized we’d won once we crossed the finish line. Ohio State and Texas had walked back a good bit during the sprint and we weren’t exactly sure what the final margins were. When my boat started asking me if we’d won, I kept quiet until they announced it because even though I was almost certain, I didn’t want to say we had if we hadn’t. It wasn’t until when we were rowing back to the dock where we saw Lori and shouted at her on the shore to ask if we’d won or not. The second she said we had, we all went nuts.” In reflecting on the boat’s achievement, Venkatraman acknowledged that it wasn’t an easy ride. “The way we’ve grown this season has just been incredible,” said Venkatraman, who credited assistant coach Anna Kalfaian with playing a key role in the boat’s progress. “Every step along the way, it felt more and more possible. Seeing it come to fruition is incredibly gratifying, especially my senior year since I’m able to round out my four years with this feat. More importantly and regardless of our win, being on the team itself has been a privilege, and that’s honestly what means more to me. I’ve grown, struggled, stumbled over these past four years, and I could not be more grateful to have had the team around me to help me get up time and time again. It takes a village to raise a baby, it takes a team to win a title.” For Dauphiny, Venkatraman’s growth was a testament to perseverance. “What I am most inspired by is how she went through these challenging times and came out stronger and better; that is really a lesson

for other coxswains in our program,” said Dauphiny. “When you don’t make the top boat or when things don’t go your way, it is easy to give up or say I am not good enough, I will do something else. It took those four years for her to reach the spot that she did, winning the national championship. Those four years and that development were so important. I think sometimes people lose sight of that, they think they should be good at it immediately. This is proof of what you can do by getting through the challenging times and coming out stronger. That is Roopa. I am just very proud that she developed and hung on throughout the years. She not only did that but pushed herself to be better and the coxswain that she was for that national championship at the end.” In Venkatraman’s view, pushing herself to become a stellar coxswain benefitted her on and off the water. “I’m very proud of how far I’ve come and how much I’ve grown; I couldn’t have asked for a better four years and I certainly didn’t anticipate this walking on freshman year,” said Venkatraman, who will be competing on a Princeton 8 at the Henley Royal Regatta in England at the end of June to wrap up her rowing career and will then be starting a private equity job with McKinsey in New York City in August. “That being said, it was a lot of hard work and I’ve learned a lot of valuable lessons along the way. As an athlete and as a person, I’ve become a lot better at making mistakes with confidence and taking ownership of my role. I’ve learned not to settle and how to bring the best out of others. I’ve learned how to stay collected and make decisions under pressure with a clear mind. Looking back, what stands out to me is how much of a team sport it is and how supportive our coaches are, without whom none of this would have been possible.” —Bill Alden

IS ON


PU Women’s Hoops Adds Carter to Staff

Tiana Carter has joined the Princeton University women’s basketball coaching staff as an assistant coach, the program announced earlier this month. Carter comes to Princeton from Bentley Universit y where she s er ved as a graduate assistant while she finished her MBA with a concentration in Law and Taxation. During her two years at Bentley, the Falcons reached the postseason in both seasons, highlighted by a Northeast-10 title and trip to the NCAA Division II Tournament in 2022. Prior to her time at Bentley, Carter coached at Central Maine Community College, helping the Mustangs go 27- 4 and secure a spot in the USCAA Small College Division II National Championship. Carter graduated from the University of Albany with a Bachelor of Arts degree in communication and rhetoric in 2018 where she starred for its women’s basketball team. During her college career with the Great Danes, Carter received several honors from the America East Conference. The awards included AllRookie Team in 2015, Sixth Player of the Year in 2016 and both All-Conference third team and All-Defensive Team as a senior. Carter is Albany’s all-time leader in blocked shots (154). In addition she totaled 986

PU Women’s Lacrosse Promotes Mauer

support. I am especially grateful to Jenn for having the confidence in me and allowing me to serve as her associate head coach.” A 2015 graduate of Duke University, Maurer was an assistant coach at Mt. St. Mary’s for 2016 and 2017 seasons before making the move to Princeton. A two-time All-American, Maurer graduated as Duke’s all-time leader in assists with 119. She ranked fifth all-time in ACC history in assists and was a three-time AllACC selection. A three-time Tewaaraton Trophy nominee, Maurer graduated second in Duke history in career points with 280 and tied for fourth in career goals with 161, while finishing on a 47-game point scoring streak. Maurer helped the Blue Devils to four NCA A quar ter f inal appearances, and reached the national semifinals in 2015 after topping Princeton in the quarterfinals. A c a d e m i c a l l y, M a u r e r was a two-time All-ACC Academic Team selection and a three-year member of the ACC Academic Honor Roll, while earning her degree in political science. During the summer of 2017, Maurer played in the World Cup as a member of Italy’s national team. On the club level, Maurer served as head coach of Long Island Express Lacrosse based out of Huntington, N.Y., in the summers since 2011. She has also gained experience working at camps in North Carolina, Michigan and New York.

After serving five seasons as an assistant coach with the Princeton University women’s lacrosse program, Kerrin Mauer has been elevated to associate head coach, the program said last week. In her five years at P r i n c e to n , M a u r e r h a s helped the Tigers win three Ivy League championships and three Iv y League Tournaments — claiming trophies in all three full seasons completed due to COVID-19. Princeton has also qualified for the NCAA Tournament three times since Maurer joined the staff, winning games in all three trips to the national tournament and reaching the quarterfinals in 2018 and 2019. The move comes weeks after former Tigers assistant and associate head coach Jenn Cook was named as the head coach of the Tigers, succeeding legendary Hall of Fame coach Chris Sailer, who stepped down after 36 seasons guiding the program. “I remain honored and excited to cont inue my career here at Princeton University, a special place, w ith incredible st udentathletes,” said Maurer. “For the last five years, I have been extremely fortunate to work with Chris Sailer and Jenn Cook, who are undoubtedly two of the best in the game. I would like to thank our 4 Princeton Rowers Athletic Director John Mack, Make U.S. U23 Squad as well as our entire Athletic Four Princeton University Depar tment for their

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022

PU Sports Roundup

points, 642 rebounds and 116 steals in 125 career games for Albany while helping the team to three consecutive America East titles.

BACK IN JERSEY: Toronto FC head coach Bob Bradley patrols the sideline as his team fell 2-0 to the New York Red Bulls last Saturday at the Red Bull Arena in Harrison, N.J. Bradley, a 1980 Princeton University alum and former head coach of the Princeton men’s soccer team, took the helm of Toronto FC last November and has guided the club to a 4-8-3 start. Bradley joined Toronto with the third-most regular season wins (182) in league history and has led teams to an MLS Cup (1998 Chicago Fire), an MLS Supporters’ Shield (2019 Los Angeles FC) and two US Open Cup (1998 and 2000 Chicago Fire) titles during his years in the league. In the international game, Bradley had a 43-25-12 record as the head coach of the U.S. National Team from 20062011 and a record of 22-8-6 as the head coach of Egypt from 2011-2013. Canada will mark the sixth country where Bradley has served in a head coaching role. (Photo by Stephen Goldsmith) rowers have earned spots on the United States U-23 National Team following their performances last week at National Team Trials at Nathan Benderson Park in Sarasota, Fla. The Princeton men’s heavyweight pair of rising senior Floyd Benedikter and rising junior Nick Taylor took first in their final, clocking a winning time of 6:47.53 over the 2,000-meter course to prevail by 9.5 seconds. Pr inceton men’s lightweight rising sophomore Nick Aronow won the singles sculls in 7:13.60, 0.3 seconds in front of Tiger teammate and classmate Matt Willer.

Princeton women’s open rower, rising sophomore Ella Barry, secured a spot as she took second in the single sculls event (8:02.79) but the first-place finisher declined her invitation.

With their finishes, these four w ill now represent the U.S. at the 2022 World Row ing U -23 World Championships in Varese, Italy this July.

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Jonathan Gu had just gone to a new racket tied, 3-3, in the first set tiebreaker of New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) boys singles championship match when he dropped three straight points to fall a point away from losing the set. As was a theme all day, the Princeton High junior rallied when he needed it most. He won the next three points, held off one more set point for East Brunswick’s Jack Wong, then won the final three points of the set to build momentum for a 7-6 (97), 4-6, 6-2 marathon win to earn the singles state crown last Thursday at the Mercer County Park tennis complex. “It feels pretty good,” said Gu. “I didn’t expect it at all, but with the withdrawals and a couple of matches that could have gone either way it feels pretty good.” Gu becomes the first state singles champion from PHS since Jacob Leschly in 1984. Mark Leschly was the last Little Tigers male to reach a state final in 1986. Gu joins Christina Rosca, who won the girls state singles crown in 2013, as state champions coached by Sarah Hibbert. “It’s absolutely fantastic for Jonathan,” said Hibbert. “He really works hard. He has had an amazing season this year. Obviously Christina winning it in 2013 was super exciting for the school. We hadn’t had a champion in certainly my time and looking back in the record books, it’s been since 1984 since we had a boys’

champion. It’s been decades since we had a state champion be able to put it all together.” Gu’s state title capped an unbeaten season for him. He also won his first Mercer County Tournament title — in his first time playing in it because of prior year’s cancellations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Gu was a guaranteed point for the Tigers at first singles, who reached the Group 3 state final, and he appreciated the return of a full season schedule. “It’s definitely fun,” said Gu. “Last year we didn’t have the county tournament. This year the county tournament was a new thing for me since freshman year it was canceled. That felt pretty good winning that. Last year, in the state tournament, I had a tough loss. I was glad I could play better and get farther this time.” Gu fell to eventual state finalist Newark Academy’s Nicolas Kotzen last year in the fourth round of the state singles tournament. This year, Gu was seeded in the 5-8 range. He went through four opponents on his way to the final without dropping a set, including a convincing 6-3, 6-2 win over Kotzen’s brother, Andrew, in the semifinals last Wednesday while Wong needed three sets to overcome top-seeded Eric Li of Montgomery High. “I felt good,” said Gu. “I played pretty well yesterday (Wednesday). And I know that Jack beat Eric, which is a huge match but they played

a while so he might have been a little tired.” Gu also felt nervous given that Wong had proved his ability with the upset win, but he kept the pressure on Wong throughout their finals match even when it looked like he was losing momentum. “He’s had a lot of tough tennis a lot of days in a row,” said Hibbert. “We see conditioning can play a factor in it when it comes down to the very end of it, and he was able to stay really tough throughout a lot of tough days of tennis. There’s a lot of hard work and sacrifice on his part over the past years.” Gu lost a long rally to fall behind in the first-set tiebreaker, 5-3, and when Wong held serve it was 6-3 and Gu was one point away from dropping the set. But Gu’s mindset stayed positive at that point. “I was down 6-3, but it was only one mini-break and I had two serves,” said Gu. “I knew if I got my two serves in, I just thought one more point and it’s back to even. One point at a time I tried to win.” Gu held serve twice and broke Wong to tie the tiebreaker. After Wong put him on the ropes up a point again, Gu held serve twice more for points and won the set on Wong’s service to take the first set. “It was definitely good for motivation since I was down 6-3 and the set was really in his hands,” said Gu. “To be able to come back was really good.”

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022 • 26

PHS Junior Standout Gu Wins State Boys Singles Crown, Prevailing in Marathon 3-Setter to Cap Unbeaten Season

STROKE OF BRILLIANCE: Princeton High boys’ tennis star Jonathan Gu blasts a forehand last Thursday in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) boys singles championship match at the Mercer County Park tennis complex. Junior Gu defeated East Brunswick’s Jack Wong 7-6 (9-7), 4-6, 6-2 to win the title and cap an undefeated season. Gu is the first state boys’ singles champion from PHS since Jacob Leschly in 1984. Christina Rosca won the girls’ state singles crown in 2013 to earn the most recent title for PHS. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) Gu’s resilience in a tough spot made a big difference in the outcome. He battled back to put the pressure on Wong before taking the first set. “That was one of the big points in the match — he didn’t give up on that tiebreak and was able to come back,” said Hibbert. “Jack is an amazing player. He has a wicked forehand. Jonathan had to withstand a barrage of tough balls going past him and he was able to keep it together and he was able to play smart points when it really mattered. It’s fantastic he was able to come away with a title today.” Fatigue factored in after the first set with Wong twice taking injury timeouts, with the first of those coming after just two games of the second set. Wong recovered to use more drop shots, volleyed more consistently and came up with some big winners to take the second set, 6-4. “Second set, he hit a couple more winners,” said Gu. “His forehand he really took aggressively and he put me behind the baseline. I was missing. I got it back later on in the set, but by then it was too late.” One point into the third set,

Wong was treated for another leg injury, but he came back to break Gu’s serve and hold his own to put Gu behind, 2-0, in the deciding set. That’s when Gu rallied again to win the next six games to take the match. He muted his celebration as Wong was treated post-match for his leg injuries. “He was obviously hurt so I didn’t want to cheer for his injury,” said Gu. “I hope he feels better soon. I’ve been in that situation. It’s not fun at all.” Hibbert was impressed by the way Gu handled the ups and downs of the match. There were delays for Wong’s injury treatment as well as referee warnings to Wong for delay of play. But Gu remained focused in the biggest spots, came up with consistent crosscourt backhand winners in key spots, used his serve as a weapon, and took advantage of some unforced errors by Wong as the match went just over three and a half hours. “For him to be able to put it all together in this tournament and come out and shine against some fantastic players, it’s a really tough state and we have some really good tennis,” said Hibbert.

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“He really played an amazing first set, got a little tight in the second, and it was tricky for him to keep mentally focused through two injury timeouts and a lot of other things going on. When it counted, he was able to put it together and play some really great tennis. I’m very pleased and excited for him. It’s a great accomplishment, especially as a junior. We’ll hope for good things next year too.” No Princeton player has ever repeated as state champion. Gu was just happy to be a part of history on the boys side as the first champ in 38 years. “My coach told me,” said Gu. “It’s definitely nice. It’s pretty surprising because a lot of good players have been to Princeton.” Gu isn’t the sort of athlete to rest on his accomplishment. He continues to develop as a player. Over two seasons he has become a tougher player and more hardened competitor. “I think there’s a bit more maturity to his game, a bit more of being able to bounce back when your frustration level starts to get high,” said Hibbert. “He’s able to take it back down and not let your frustrations or poor shot choices get the better of you, be able to wipe out your mistakes and be able to go forward and not be hindered by the past. He’s added more pace on his game as well, and a little more variety. He’s always a hard worker, he’s always training those extra hours, and it’s great to see it pay off for him.” Gu didn’t expect a state title coming into the year. He didn’t even expect it coming into Thursday’s final. He went in just looking to play his best, and did so when the points were biggest to capture a historic win and set up the chance to repeat next season. “Every year is tough,” said Gu. “We’ll have to see.” —Justin Feil


Coming into the spring, the Princeton High boys’ lacrosse team had aspirations of winning the Mercer County Tournament title and making a deep run in the state tournament. But hit by some untimely injuries and illness, PHS ended up falling to Allentown 18-15 in the MCT quarterfinals and losing 14-9 to Mt. Olive in the first round of the North Jersey, Group 3 sectional. While Tiger head coach Chip Casto acknowledged that his squad didn’t achieve what it had hoped, he saw important progress in the program nevertheless. “We fell shor t of our achievement goals — but surpassed our process and culture goals,” said Casto, whose team posted a final record of 9-7. “These seniors were tremendous this year and for the three previous. Will Doran and Will Erickson exemplified what we are about. Be a solid student in the classroom and then commit to helping make our team the best that it can be. They really helped the freshman and like 10-11 new sophomores to understand who we are, how we do things, how we talk and treat each other. It was a tremendous team to be around every day.” Star at tacker Doran produced a tremendous senior campaign, tallying 128 points on 55 goals and 73 assists to lead the state in total points. “When is the last time a CVC kid led the state in scoring?” said Casto of Doran, who ended his career with 119 goals and 119 assists in just three seasons as the 2020 campaign was canceled due to the pandemic. “It was one of the greatest seasons in program history. In fact, it was the second highest behind Mike Olentine ’10 (140 points on 67 goals and 73 assists).” The Williams College-bound Doran had big games even in defeat, contributing two goals and seven assists in the loss to Allentown in the MCT and two goals and six assists in the

defeat to Mt. Olive in the state opener. “What a crazy game; we went down big, like 8-1; got it back to 9-12,” said Casto, reflecting on the defeat to Allentown in the MCT. “We figured some things out in the second and third quarters but did not have enough steam to catch them late. We felt we were basically evenly matched with Mt. Olive but they had improved — as did we — but the big change was that they were now playing a zone and at times had three players going to Will Doran. Then we figure the zone out a little and make a run to maybe 8-11 and then again run out of steam. They are well coached and play very hard.” PHS played hard this spring from beginning to end. “We were really in every game — most losses were by four or less,” said Casto. “Will Erickson did everything for us on defense and played like a guy who wants to win and improve. John O’Donnell was having a tremendous year before his knee. He was a key senior that kept relaying the message of process and work throughout the season even as he showed up with crutches and joined the staff.” Casto credited the squad’s senior group with conveying the right message on a daily basis. “They have really helped to establish the program as one that really helps the studentathlete understand what that term means and to begin to understand that process is so much more important and valuable than achievement,” said Casto. “The seniors talked about working towards winning the MCT but when we failed they showed up the next day ready to move the process towards the next goal of winning games for the best state seeding. It was nonstop. They talked to the team everyday with the same strong message.” The team’s young guns figure to give the Tigers some strong play in the future as

sophomore Patrick Kenah tallied 53 goals and 38 assists this season with freshman Brendan Beatty chipping in 23 goals and 25 assists and freshman Braden Barlag contributing 19 goals and two assists. “Patrick Kenah will run the show and he will also realize how good Will Doran was and how Will made life for Patrick kind of easy at times,” said Casto. “He will have a young crew to work with but he and Braden Barlag will do well together. Brendan Beatty will just keep getting better and be our downhill dodger. Brendan and Braden stepped up as freshmen, we got a lot of time and production out of them. We look at them as building blocks going forward.” Another building block for the Tigers is goalie Rory Dobson, who mades 105 saves this spring in his sophomore campaign. “Rory overachieved in our book,” said Casto. “He is really dedicating himself to stopping the ball; he needs to improve in the clearing game. But it is nice to know that — the next two years are solid in the cage.” Sophomore Archer Ayers improved in his role as the team’s face-off specialist, winning 156-of-259 face-offs. “He is a huge piece next year as we will not be nearly as efficient on offense,” said Casto. “Archer can control a game if he starts controlling the face-off X a little more.” Looking ahead to next year, Casto believes bolstering the team’s positive culture this spring will yield dividends in the future. “We have a big crew of rising sophomores and juniors (like 21) that are ready to come back next year and carry on the traditions and win some games,” said Casto. “We know these kids at PHS have so many interests and talents we help them to find opportunities to play lacrosse or just to keep a stick in their hands.” —Bill Alden

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022 • 28

After Leading Culture Shift To Upgrade Stuart Sports, AD Leith Taking Winning Approach to the Bullis School When Justin Leith became the director of athletics at the Stuart Country Day School in 2014, he had a mandate to inspire the school’s teams to compete harder and better. “The reason I took the job was because the school and the administrators were pining for more athletic achievement, there was a want for that and a need for sure,” said Leith, a former basketball star at Princeton Day School who went on to play in the college and pro ranks and had served as an associate athletics director and hoops coach at the Asheville School (N.C.) for three years before coming to Stuart. “To have that transformation take place, there needed to be a culture shift. It meant small things, like being punctual to practice, making sure that game attendance is required. I remember a lacrosse game in my first year and all of a sudden the day before six of the players couldn’t make because of a Sweet 16 birthday. It is not the kids’ fault, there was no expectation that was created.” Leith moved swiftly to create a winning culture. “We were able to do that through parent-student contracts, conversations, and a coaches handbook,” said Leith, who also served as the head coach of the Stuart basketball team. “There were a few bumps in the road but everyone was responsive, everyone was great.” That responsiveness led to more Stuart students getting

involved in athletics. “Without enrollment growth, we have participation go up significantly in the upper school,” said Leith. “That was done, adding some sports but then it was also a culture thing, kids wanting to play multiple sports. We had our sports awards the other day and we had over 25 kids this year that got a certificate for being three-sport athletes. That is a good percentage of kids in the school.” With the increased numbers and a more serious approach, Stuart has earned numerous Prep B titles in indoor track, outdoor track, and basketball during Leith’s tenure. In addition, the field hockey team advanced to Mercer County Tournament final in 2019 and the basketball squad made the MCT title game in 2020. Now, Leith, 41, is looking to impact a new athletic culture as he is leaving Stuart at the end of the month to become the athletic director of the Bullis School in Potomac, Md. Noting that Bullis reached out to him and the selection process included a number of Zoom interviews and a fullday session on campus, Leith is excited for the challenge of running the school’s big-time sports program which competes in both the Interstate Athletic Conference and the Independent School League and has sent a number of athletes to the college and pro ranks. “I think that my greatest

strength as an athletic director is vision and implementing that vision,” said Leith, who will be succeeded as Stuart AD by Frances Lyons, the associate athletic director at The Brearley School (N.Y.). “It is a place that is certainly rocking and rolling but there are places where we can make things better.” Leith demonstrated his ability to implement a vision in building the Stuart hoops program into a powerhouse. “I enjoyed every up and down and obviously particularly the ups,” said Leith, whose team won state Prep B titles in 2018, 2019, and 2020 in addition to making the program’s first-ever trip to the MCT final in 2020. “First and foremost, they were wonderful kids. Every kid I have coached since I have been at Stuart from the star player to the last person off the bench has been just a pleasure to be around. That is a testament to Stuart. It was a fun ride.” While the wins were fun, Leith is just as proud of the impact the team’s success had on the Stuart community. “The back-to-back-to-back Prep B titles were great as was the county final,” said Leith, who will be succeeded as Tartan hoops head coach by assistant Mandrele Hansford. “The biggest accomplishments are when I think back to flashes and moments like when I was a player. Beating Notre Dame during the regular season one year, that was a great win. I think

they were a top 20 team in the state at the time and that put us on the map a little bit. That same thing happened with Saddle River Day. When I think back to those games, I think of the environment of the school where the whole school is packed in this tiny little gym and they are so excited. The way that the school rallied around those teams was really exciting. It wasn’t just basketball, it was field hockey. There is something special about seeing a kid that you see in the third grade gym class screaming her head off.” Noting that guiding Stuart was the first time he had led a girls’ program, Leith grew as a coach and a person through the experience. “I have become more patient and more thoughtful,” said Leith. “I did a lot more professional development, pre-COVID. I was going up to UConn to watch their practices. I have been to Rider and Rutgers and up to Merrimack, my alma mater, and watched practices. I went to a lot of coaches’ clinics. I can sit there for three hours and not learn a thing and then at 3:02, I learn one thing and add it to the bag and get all the better. I spent a lot of time with that and it pays dividends.” Applying that knowledge, Leith was better able to have a lasting impact on his players. “I am proud of all of the championships of course and getting to county finals and those things but I am really happy that the kids that are

going through the program are having a true athletic experience that will carry on even if they are not playing sports at the next level,” said Leith. “Those life lessons through athletics that we preach all of the time. They are really getting those in whatever program they are playing. When you win that is great but that is the ultimate goal.” As Leith looks ahead to guiding Bullis athletics, he is hoping to create that same kind of balance. “I want Bullis to be Stanford,” asserted Leith. “I think across the board we can be an academically rigorous institution but at the same time have every single sport be highly competitive all of the time.” It will be quite a different institutional situation for Leith, who essentially had a two-person administrative staff at Stuart with trainer Megan Cianfrone serving as associate director of athletics. “I will have an associate AD, three assistant ADs, and administrative assistant at Bullis,” said Leith. “There are 49 or 50 head coaches and there are a bunch of assistant coaches. It is really like a small college. This is an all hands on deck thing, we are a team. It is like being a coach. I don’t have an ego about taking banners down or cleaning the floor before basketball games. Whatever has to be done, I am willing to do. There is not a hierarchy in that sense but at the end of the day but I am the

one who has to make the decisions and I don’t mind doing that, I am comfortable doing that.” W hen Bu llis Head of School Christian Sullivan asked Leith to coach the girls’ varsity hoops team, he was excited to add that to his AD portfolio. “I don’t treat this at all like roll the ball out there in November,” said Leith. “This is an all-year thing. He said I know what you can do as a coach and I want you to be an example. I am pumped, I have a couple of freshmen already. I think it will be easier, not that it is ever easy at all, because of the amount of help that I have. I will be able to delegate during the season whereas it is very difficult in the season when it is just myself and Megan and she is a trainer too. It is larger but I will have more help.” While Leith is pumped for his new job, it wasn’t easy for him to leave Stuart. “I will really miss the kids; when I first started it was shocking to people that I was working at an all-girls school,” said Leith. “I never once in my time here during the day or during sports thought about that fact. They are a bunch of really great kids. They are impressive, they are kind, they are funny and they all have different personalities. It is a special place for sure.” And under Leith’s leadership, Stuart became a better place for sports during his time there. —Bill Alden

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PACKING A PUNCH: Justin Leith makes a point while serving as the head coach of the Stuart Country Day School basketball team. Leith, who was also the Stuart Country Day School director of athletics, is leaving the school to become the AD at the Bullis School in Potomac, Md. Leading a culture shift to upgrade Stuart sports upon arriving at the school in 2014, the Tartans earned numerous Prep B titles in indoor track, outdoor track and basketball during Leith’s tenure. In addition, the field hockey team advanced to Mercer County Tournament final in 2019 and the basketball squad made the MCT title game in 2020. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


T h e r e we r e pl e nt y of laughs and good-natured ribbing as Naysean Burch and his teammates on the Majeski Foundation squad hit the Communit y Park court last Wednesday evening to start action in this year’s Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. The team, which is comprised of players from The C ol l e g e of N e w J e r s e y Men’s basketball program, engaged in a spirited pregame shootaround as people caught up with each other. “We are just building team chemistry out here with our new guys, the freshmen, and our transfer Pat Higgins,” said Burch, a rising senior guard for TCNJ. “ W e a r e getting to know everybody’s game. We are excited to be out here for sure.” Facing PATH Academy, Majeski got the summer off to an exciting star t,

building a 23-14 halftime lead and then pulling away to a 57-28 victory. “I was happiest about our defense, we held them to 28,” said Burch, who scored nine points the win which saw Higgins lead the way with 17 and Danny Bodine chip in 11. “We just looked like we were having fun. When we are having fun, we are going to win.” Brunch had fun in helping to top spark Majeski to the win by setting the pace at both ends of the court. “I am just an older guy,” said Burch, a 6’0, 170-pound native of Edison, who averaged 7.3 points a game last year for TCNJ as it went 10-14. “I look to control the pace, play defense. I am a nice role player, that is really me.” With Majeski hav ing reached the best-of-three championship series in the

summer league in 2021 and getting swept by three-time defending champion LoyalTees, the squad is looking to take it one step further this year. “We are hungry for sure, we want to win it,” said Burch. “We are trying to get the trophy for this league. I don’t think we have won it yet. LoyalTees has been killing it but we are trying to get it this year.” No matter what happens this summer, though, competing this summer in the Com mu n it y Park cour ts should yield benefits for the Lions in their 2022-23 campaign. “It is working on our defensive principles and being where we are at,” said Burch of the squad which played decent defense but lost 5547 to Market on Main last Friday and then fell 54-49 to Princeton Supply last Monday. “It is going to translate over into the fall, it is going to make us better really.” —Bill Alden

Local Sports Mercer Baseball All-Stars Fall in Carpenter Cup Semis

Unable to get its bats going, as the Mercer County all-star baseball team fell 10-1 to Burlington in the semifinals of the 36th annual Carpenter Cup Classic at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia last Sunday. Recently graduated Princeton High star Kenny Schiavone pitched three scoreless innings for Mercer to provide a highlight for the team. The Mercer club, which advanced to the final of the 2021 Carpenter Cup, had defeated Southwestern Pennsylvania ( SEPA) 6 -3 and Bucks-Mont (Pa.) 6-3 to reach the semis. Schiavone was joined on the Mercer roster by PHS teammate Carl Birge and a contingent of Hun School standouts including Carson Applegate, Michael Chiaravallo, Jackson Kraemer, Brody Pasieka, and Tyler Tucker. T he single - elim inat ion tournament of nine-inning games, put in place by the Philadelphia Phillies organization, annually brings together regional all-star baseball squads from Delaware, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey.

Wilberforce Track Athletes Excel at Meet of Champions

The girls’ 4x800-meter relay provided a major highlight as the Wilberforce School track team competed at the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Meet of Champions last Saturday at Franklin High. The quartet of senior Laura Prothero, junior Sophia Park, and freshmen Adeline Edwards and Gwen Mersereau placed eighth in 9:50.26. In addition, sophomore Maura Madigan placed 11th in the 400, with Park finishing 17th in the 1,600 in 5:37.50. As for the Wilberforce boys, junior Jeremy Sallade placed 11th in the 800 in 1:59.01.

BURCH BARK: Naysean Burch of Majeski Foundation, left, guards a PATH Academy player last Bailey Basketball Academy Wednesday in the opening night of action of the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Sum- Offering Summer Camps mer Basketball League. Star guard Burch scored nine points as Majeski prevailed 57-28 with T he B ailey B asketball Pat Higgins scoring 17 and Danny Bodine chipping in 11 for the victors. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) Academy (BBA) will be offering two week-long sumJUNCTION mer camps this summer. BBA is led by for mer BARBER Princeton Day School girls’ Also Buying: hoops coach and PhiladelSHOP phia 76ers camp director Antiques • Collectibles • Jewelry 33 Princeton-Hightstown Rd and clinician Kamau Bailey. Postcards • Ephemera • Pottery Ellsworth’s Center The camps are slated for Prints • Paintings • Coins • Old Watches etc. June 27-July 1 and July 25(Near Train Station) July 29 at Stuart Country Over 40 years serving Mercer County Day School. Downsizing/Moving? Call us. There are full day/half Tues-Fri: 10am-6pm; day and first hoops options 609-658-5213 Sat 8:30am-3:30pm available. The program will also include a small group training to help with transiAmerican Furniture Exchange tion to a higher school level. In addition, there is a multiple player/sibling discount. All players will be required to bring their own water, snacks, and /or lunch for 30 Years of applicable programs. Experience! For more infor mation, contact Kamau Bailey at Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras (917) 626-5785 or at kaBooks - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture mau.bailey@gmail.com. “Where quality still matters.”

The event will take place, rain or shine, at Mercer Oaks Golf Club in West Windsor at 725 Village Road in West Windsor. The goal of the chapter outing is to seek and raise contributions, donations and gifts to provide wrestling camp and clinic scholarships to deserving youth who seek to improve and enhance their skills and love for the sport of amateur wrestling. As a result of those efforts, the chapter will also make contributions to selected veterans and relief organizations, as well as children’s hospitals. The golf package includes brunch and registration (89:30 a.m.), green fees, cart, practice range, putting contest, locker, giveaways, prizes, and silent auction as well as dinner. The cost for foursomes is $599, individuals $155, dinner-only $65, and raffles $20. Players 18-and-under must be accompanied by an adult player. Singles and pairs have to contact the golf chairman for arrangements. Foursomes are not required to do so. For more information, contact golf chairman Ken Bernabe at bernabekenjb@aol.com. Tee, flag, and meal sponsorships are as follows: $300 brunch; $500 dinner; $20 flag; $100 tee. Send sponsorships to Pete Frampton, 82 Pinta Court, Brick, NJ 08723. One can contact Frampton at (732) 759-7970, or email peteframptonjersey@gmail.com. Registration forms must be completed and mailed along with check by June 25. Make check payable to NWHF-NJ Golf and mail to Ed Glassheim, 811 Mowat Circle, Hamilton, NJ 08690. One can contact him at (609) 947-5885 or glassheim @ yahoo.com.

Historical Society of Princeton Holding Vintage Baseball Game

The Historical Society of Princeton is holding its annual Vintage Baseball game on June 25 at Greenway Meadows Park, 275 Rosedale Road, starting at 11 a.m. The event is part game,

part show, and part history lesson as the Flemington Neshanock and the Diamond State Base Ball Club will play a competitive match of bare-handed baseball, wearing period uniforms and using 1864 rules. The event is free and registration is not required. Spectators are invited to take batting practice using authentic replicas of 19th century equipment.

PHS

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022

With Burch Setting the Pace at Both Ends of the Court, Majeski Tops PATH Academy in Summer Hoops Opener

Track: Zach Della Rocca excelled as he competed in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Meet of Champions last Saturday at Franklin High. Junior Della Rocca took fourth in the 400 in a time of 49.81. Fellow junior Andrew Kenney also raced in the MOC, taking 13th in the 800 in 2:01.5. Della Rocca and Kenny also competed in the New Balance Nationals at Franklin Field in Philadelphia. They combined with senior Jensen Bergman and freshman Benjamin Gitai to place ninth in the boys sprint medley relay on Friday, clocking a time of 3:32.17, just 0.4 seconds away from a medal and AllAmerican status. Gitai also competed in three other events at Nationals, running 59.76 for a personal best in the freshman 400 hurdles on Friday and the freshman 100- and 200-meter races on Saturday. Junior Henry Zief threw 152’7 in the Rising Stars javelin competition, good for 6th place and a medal.

CORRECTION: In the story entitled “Utilizing Technical Skill, Team Unity to Raise Level of Play, PFC Barcelona Wins NJ President’s Cup, Headed to Regional” [ June 15, 2022, page 31], it should have said that Zeb Jerdonek scored the go-ahead goal when PFC edged NLSA 1-0 in the semis.

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NJ Wrestling Organization Holding Golf Event July 27

The New Jersey Chapter of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame is holding its 19th golf outing, a shotgun/ scramble, on July 27.

OPENING ACT: Princeton Post 218 American Legion baseball player Kenny Schiavone takes a swing in action last week. Recently graduated Princeton High star Schiavone pounded out three hits to help Post 218 top Lawrence Post 414 7-3 in its season opener last Saturday. In upcoming action, Princeton, which fell 10-0 to North Hamilton on Sunday to move to 1-1, plays Allentown at Mercer County Park on June 22, hosts Hopewell Posts 339 on June 23, hosts Hightstown Post 148 and Bordentown Post 26 on June 25, plays at Hightstown on June 26, and hosts Lawrence on June 27. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022 • 30

Obituaries

Leon H. Whitney Jr. (Lee) Lee Whitney (age 86) of Rocky Hill, NJ, and Vero Beach, FL, passed away p e acef u l ly on Ju ne 15, 2022, at the VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach surrounded by his family. He is survived by his loving wife of 64 years Julie, his sons Ken (wife Liz) and Rich (wife Nancy), and his daughters Nancy Schmidt (husband Dave) and Laura Carmack (husband Kevin). Lee was t h e prou d a n d d e vote d grandfather of 12: Ashley Mur phy ( Mike ), Kathr y n Whitney, Meghan Whitney, Rachel Whitney, Amanda Schmidt, Kirby Carmack, Ali Whitney, Whitney Carmack, Trevor Schmidt, Lucy Whitney, Cole Carmack, and Cameron Schmidt. He was also the loving great-grandfather of Teagan, Kenley, and Locklyn Murphy. Lee was also a beloved uncle for many nieces and nephews. He is predeceased by

his parents Dr. Leon and Margaret Whitney, and his sister Nancy Pritchard Bear. Lee was born in Brooklyn, NY, moved to Manhasset Long Island for middle school, and went to high school in Morristown, NJ. His athletic career got off to a good start in Manhasset, where he was the quarterback of the undefeated football team, and his running back was the NFL Hall of Famer Jim Brown. He spent the summers of his youth at Camp Awosting in Morris, CT, where he was the perennial tennis champ. In high school, he played on the basketball, baseball, and tennis teams, and then went on to play tennis at St. Lawrence University. In 1957, he earned his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from St. Lawrence University. As he would tell everyone, the most important thing that happened in college was meeting his future wife Julie Beaver. At St. Lawrence he served in the ROTC, and upon graduation he married Julie and moved to Arizona where he served in the Army Signal Corp at Fort Huachuca. After two years in the Army where he served as an officer, he took a job with Mountain Bell where he worked for the next 11 years in Arizona, Colorado, and Utah. In 1970, he requested a transfer back to New Jersey where he worked at Bell Laboratories and AT&T. Towards the end of his Bell System career, he worked on the special task force which came up with the Operating Companies’ divestiture plan. Upon divestiture in 1987, he retired and took a job in commercial real estate with

J.T. Boyer in Princeton, NJ, before retiring for good in 2000. Lee was active in volunteer work for many years which included starting an Episcopal Missionary Church and serving as President of a large Little League Baseball League in Bountiful, Utah. In New Jersey, he served on the Montgomery Planning Board for eight years and as a Committeeman for the Somerset County Republican organization. He was a charter member of the Montgomery / Rocky Hill Rotary Club serving as its third President in 1992. In Florida, his favorite volunteer work was helping to build Habitat for Humanity homes. He was a member of the Community Church in Vero Beach. L e e’s t r u e p as s ion i n life was being a husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather. He loved playing bridge and going to water aerobics with Julie. Throughout his life, he spent ever y moment he could coaching, watching, and playing numerous sports with his children and grandchildren. He particularly enjoyed playing golf with them at Orchid Island in Vero Beach and Springdale Golf Club in Princeton. He also had very fond memories of skiing in Utah and spending time at the New Jersey shore with the whole family. Lee was an avid reader of biographies and books about history, and loved passing on the details and/or life lessons from these books to the younger generations of the family. Lee was known by everyone to be very outgoing and

friendly. He had a wonderful gift of gab, and he loved meeting new people from all walks of life. At family meals, he always seemed to have a new story he wanted to share about a friend or someone he just met. Lee will be deeply missed as a husband, father, grandfather, great-grandfather, uncle, and friend. His passing is an immense loss to all who knew him and loved him so much. A private memorial service for immediate family will be held in New Jersey in August. The family plans to hold a Celebration of Life in Orchid Island on Saturday, November 19, 2022. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to Indian River Habitat for Humanity in memory of Lee Whitney via irchabitat.org/donate.

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and Austin, by his sister-inlaw, Margaret Oates, and by many nieces, nephews, and family members and by legions of students he influenced and friends he cherished. The family is very grateful to Frank’s lifelong friends, Eileen and Don Hoffler, to his physician, Dr. David Barile, and to his dedicated caregivers Robert Nkomo, Marcia Higginbotham, Cindy Odinacach, and Chris Godsent who lovingly supported him during the homestretch of his life. Frank’s life may be remembered by donations to the Princeton BoyChoir/Westrick Music Academy and The Jackson Laboratory. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Queenship of Mary Roman Catholic Church, 16 Dey Road, Plainsboro Township, NJ 08536, on Saturday June 25 at 10:30 a.m. followed by a reception. Funeral and cremation services provided by MatherHodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, NJ.

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Frank J. Vogt

Frank J. Vogt, 91, passed away peacefully on June 9, 2022, at his home at the Windrows in Princeton, NJ. Frank was born May 16, 1931, in Queens Village, NY, to Clara and John Vogt. He and his sister, Annemarie (Vogt) Saccani, grew up in Bloomfield, NJ. He attended Newark State Teacher’s College (now Kean University) where he played varsity basketball and earned his B.S. degree in Industrial Arts and Elementary Education. He then served two years in the U.S. Army as a radar specialist based in Formosa (Taiwan) during the Korean conflict. Frank continued his education earning two M.A.s in education and administration from Montclair State University. Frank was a passionate educator for over 40 years serving as a teacher, a guidance counselor, and an administrator in the West Orange School system. He was President of both the Teachers and the Administrators Association. Frank was beloved by faculty and students and was widely HOPEWELL • NJ HIGHTSTOWN • NJ recognized for his dedicated nurturing care of both. 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Duryee Monuments work ethic as a We encourage Weexperience, encourage you to make you an tohere appointment, make anhere appointment, with nothrough obligation, with no obligation, to discuss the to discuss many options the many available options to available you. to indefatigable you. We pride ourselves on being a small, personal, and service experience, experience, experience, we we are are here we we to to are are help help here guide guide to to help help you you guide through guide you you the the through through difficult difficult the the process process difficult difficult of of process monument process monument of of monument selection. monument selection. selection. selection. experience, we are hereTHINK help guide you the difficult process ofWith monument selection. We We pride pride ourselves ourselves on on THAN being being aatosmall, personal, personal, and andthrough service service oriented oriented family family business. business. 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We encourage you toan make anhere appointment, with no obligation, to the discuss the many options available to you.to experience, experience, we we are are here to to help help guide guide you you through through the the difficult difficult process process of of monument monument selection. selection. oriented family With five generations experience, ITS EASIER THANbusiness. YOU THINK TO MAKE THE PERFECTofMEMORIAL ing career he concurrently fine granite andTO since and is located We We creates encourage encourage you you to to make make an an appointment, appointment, with with no no obligation, obligation, to to1909 discuss discuss the the many many options options available available to to you. you. ITSand EASIER ITSTHAN EASIER YOU THAN THINK YOU THINK MAKE TO THE MAKE PERFECT THE PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE monument selection. ITS ITS we EASIER EASIER ITS ITS THAN THAN EASIER EASIER YOU YOU THAN THAN THINK THINK YOU YOU TO TO THINK THINK MAKE MAKE TO TO THE THE MAKE MAKE PERFECT PERFECT THE THE PERFECT PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL MEMORIAL MEMORIAL ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE THE PERFECT worked three jobs: in the early are here to help guide you through the difficult process of bronze memorials for five next to Cedar HillMEMORIAL Cemetery. ITS ITS EASIER EASIER THAN THAN YOU YOU THINK THINK TO TO MAKE MAKE THE THE PERFECT PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL THE PERFECT MEMORIAL morning he was a milkman for generations in the Greater Full monument display and monument selection. WePrinceton encourage you make an appointment, obligation, Becker’s Farm, he would then Area. Wetopride storefront towith help no guide you teach, and then work nights as ourselves being a small throughout the to selection We encourage you tomany make an appointment, with noyou obligation, toon discuss the options available a master carpenter. Frank was boutique-type, personal and process. to discuss the many options available to you supported by his Catholic faith service-oriented business. and by serving as lecturer, a Holy Eucharist Minister, and a member of the Knights of ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE Columbus. He enjoyed playing basketball with students and THE PERFECT MEMORIAL tennis and golf with lifelong

ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE THE PERFECT MEMORIAL THE PERFECT MEMORIAL

friends. A strong swimmer, he favored family vacations in Lake George, NY, and at the family beach house in Manasquan, NJ, where he rose early every morning to ride his bicycle built-for-two to the bakery and left the beach first to get fresh Jersey corn and prepare dinner — what wonderful times were had. In retirement, Frank thoroughly enjoyed being a helping grandparent at the University League Nursery School, cheering at his grandsons’ Little League and soccer games, enjoying his grandsons’ singing with the American Boychoir, and being the go-to repair person at the Windrows. Frank is survived by his son, Thomas F. Vogt, and his wife, Gwen Guglielmi, who was a loving supporter and organizer of his care. He is also survived by their sons Ryan, Tyler and his wife Shannon, and Eric, and by his daughter Susan (Vogt) Guidone, whose music, especially in his later years, brought him joy, and her husband Glenn Guidone, and their sons Justin, Evin,

• Household financial management • Tax preparation (Assembly & analysis of financial information for tax purposes)

• Income & expense management • Healthcare cost administration To talk with us about our services and how we can help you or your loved one during this challenging time please call (609) 371-1466 or email us at info@ppsmore.com. Specialized Services for Seniors and Their Families, Busy Professionals

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“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS

VISA

MasterCard

The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. LOOKING TO SELL YOUR CAR? Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS to get top results! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

HOME HEALTH AIDE AVAILABLE: CNA, CMA. Live-in or out. More than 20 years experience. Honest, dependable, excellent checkable references. (609) 532-8034.

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

07-27-8t

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced,

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613.

DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000.

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23

Irene Lee, Classified Manager tf

LOOKING TO BUY vintage cloth-

• Deadline: 2pm • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, card,1980s or and check. ing forcredit period costume. English speaking, greatTuesday references, 06-29-22 earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. reliable$15.00 with own •transportation. • 25 words or less: each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. Men, women and children. Call Terri: Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green WE BUY CARS 609-851-3754. • 3 weeks:cleaning $40.00 • Susan, 4 weeks: discount rates available. available. (732) 873- $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual Belle Mead Garage 3168. I have my own PPE for your • Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inch • all bold face type: $10.00/week 11-23-22 protection.

EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 977-9407. 08-10-12t

07-06 EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER

ESTATE SALE: Sunday, June 26, 9 am - 4 pm. 152 Grover Ave, Princeton. Furniture: desks, tables & chairs, china hutch, sofa, bookcases; kitchen and household items; rugs, crystal, china, pottery, silver; gardening supplies; musical instruments: Yamaha digital piano, etc.; photography accessories; jewelry; plus more! 609-897-1215. 06-22-2t DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000. tf LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23-22 MUSIC LESSONS ON ZOOM– Learn how to play! Piano, guitar, violin, trumpet, flute, clarinet, saxophone, banjo, uke & more. One-onone, once a week, $32/half hour. CONTACT US TODAY to sign up for a trial lesson for $32! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC (609) 960-4157; www.farringtonsmusic. com. 6-22-4t

Experienced and reliable adult caregiver available weekday mornings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000. tf ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396.

HOME HEALTH AIDE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Live-in or live-out. Driver’s license. References available. Please call Inez, (609) 227-9873. 06-22-3t

tf CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius (609) 466-0732 tf

Specialists

2nd & 3rd Generations

MFG., CO.

609-452-2630

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06-22 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-29-22 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

(908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription!

MUSIC LESSONS ON ZOOM– Learn how to play! Piano, guitar, violin, trumpet, flute, clarinet, saxophone, banjo, uke & more. One-onone, once a week, $32/half hour. CONTACT US TODAY to sign up for a trial lesson for $32! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC (609) 960-4157; www.farringtonsmusic. com.

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10;

6-22-4t

circulation@towntopics.com tf LOOKING TO SELL YOUR CAR? Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS to get top results! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 977-9407. 08-10-12t ESTATE SALE: Sunday, June 26, 9 am - 4 pm. 152 Grover Ave, Princeton. Furniture: desks, tables & chairs, china hutch, sofa, bookcases; kitchen and household items; rugs, crystal, china, pottery, silver; gardening supplies; musical instruments: Yamaha digital piano, etc.; photography accessories; jewelry; plus more! 609-897-1215.

HOME HEALTH AIDE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Live-in or live-out. Driver’s license. References available. Please call Inez, (609) 227-9873. 06-22-3t HOME HEALTH AIDE AVAILABLE: CNA, CMA. Live-in or out. More than 20 years experience. Honest, dependable, excellent checkable references. (609) 532-8034. 07-27-8t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 07-06 EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Experienced and reliable adult caregiver available weekday mornings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000.

06-22-2t

tf

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius (609) 466-0732 tf HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22

“The greatest work you will ever do will be within the walls of your home." —Harold B. Lee

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

MASON CONTRACTORS RESTORE-PRESERVE-ALL MASONRY

Mercer County's oldest, reliable, experienced firm. We serve you for all your masonry needs.

BRICK~STONE~STUCCO NEW~RESTORED Simplest Repair to the Most Grandeur Project, our staff will accommodate your every need!

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

Call us as your past generations did for over 72 years!

Complete Masonry & Waterproofing Services

Paul G. Pennacchi, Sr., Historical Preservationist #5. Support your community businesses. Princeton business since 1947.

609-394-7354 paul@apennacchi.com

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022

to place an order:

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022 • 32

AT YOUR SERVICE A Town Topics Directory

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner Home Repair Specialist

609-586-2130

Scott M. Moore of

MOORE’S CONSTUCTION HOME IMPROVEMENTS LLC carpenter • builder • cabinet maker complete home renovations • additions 609-924-6777 Family Serving Princeton 100 Years. Free Estimates

Erick Perez

Fully insured 15+ Years Experience Call for free estimate Best Prices

BLACKMAN

LANDSCAPING FRESH IDEAS

Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Stone Walls and Terraces FREE CONSULTATION

PRINCETON, NJ

609-683-4013

TREE SERVICE

Offer good while supplies last

Stacking available for an additional charge

TREE TREESERVICE SERVICE Trees & Shrubs

609-466-6883 Trimmed, Pruned, and Removed Trees & Shrubs Stump Trimmed, Grinding &Removed Lot Clearing Pruned, and

609-466-6883

HD

PAINTING & MORE

A Tradition of Quality (609)737-2466

Serving the Princeton Area since 1963 Find us on Facebook and Instagram

(Benjamin Moore Green promise products)

Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius (609) 466-0732 tf

WE BUY CARS

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

Trees & Shrubs A Gift Subscription!

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22

Locally Owned & Operated for over 20 year

House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-29-22

LOOKING TO SELL YOUR CAR? Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS to get top results! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

HOUSE

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

Trimmed, Pruned, and Remo Stump Grinding & Lot Clear

Locally Owned & Operated for over 20 years!

609-466-2693

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23

609-466-688

BRIAN’S

Stump Grinding & Lot Clearing

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-29-22

TREE SERVIC BRIAN’S 609-466-6883

Seasoned Premium Hardwoods Split & Delivered $225 A cord / $425 2 cords

Owned & Operated for over 20 years! Trees & Shrubs Locally Owned &Locally Operated for over 20 years! Trimmed, Pruned, and Removed

CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Experienced and reliable adult caregiver available weekday mornings. Excellent references. Greater Princeton area. Call or text 609216-5000. tf

BRIAN’S BRIAN’S

FIREWOOD SPECIAL

Stump Grinding & Lot Clearing

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06-22

JAMF PAINTING LLC. FULL INSURANCE

WE MAKE READY Call us today (609) 721-1392

American Furniture Exchange

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

CALL 609-924-2200 TO PLACE YOUR AD HERE

EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 977-9407. 08-10-12t ESTATE SALE: Sunday, June 26, 9 am - 4 pm. 152 Grover Ave, Princeton. Furniture: desks, tables & chairs, china hutch, sofa, bookcases; kitchen and household items; rugs, crystal, china, pottery, silver; gardening supplies; musical instruments: Yamaha digital piano, etc.; photography accessories; jewelry; plus more! 609-897-1215. 06-22-2t DOG SITTER: Experienced, loving, responsible and fun dog sitter with great references. In the Princeton area. For small to medium-sized dogs. Call or text 609-216-5000. tf LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23-22 MUSIC LESSONS ON ZOOM– Learn how to play! Piano, guitar, violin, trumpet, flute, clarinet, saxophone, banjo, uke & more. One-onone, once a week, $32/half hour. CONTACT US TODAY to sign up for a trial lesson for $32! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC (609) 960-4157; www.farringtonsmusic. com. 6-22-4t HOME HEALTH AIDE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Live-in or live-out. Driver’s license. References available. Please call Inez, (609) 227-9873. 06-22-3t HOME HEALTH AIDE AVAILABLE: CNA, CMA. Live-in or out. More than 20 years experience. Honest, dependable, excellent checkable references. (609) 532-8034. 07-27-8t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 07-06

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06-22 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-29-22 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-29-22

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf LOOKING TO SELL YOUR CAR? Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS to get top results! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf


(100% remote position; can work anywhere in U.S.). Perform role of Lead Statistical Programmer. Plan, execute & oversee all programming activities on a study. Develop & maintain SAS programs to create complete SDTM & ADaM datasets & TFLs, & perform QC of SDTM, ADaMs & TFLs. Must have at least bachelor’s degree or equivalent in Computing, Life Science, Math, Stats or related field & 6 years progressive SAS programming experience in a CRO or the Pharmaceutical Industry. Must also have: 2 yrs exp w/ CDISC reqs related to SDTM & ADaM; & 1 yr exp as lead statistical programmer on complex studies in clinical research. Send resume to covcentlab@labcorp com & refer to Job Code DR052022. 06-22 LABCORP DRUG DEVELOPMENT SEEKS SR REGULATORY AFFAIRS SPECIALIST (100% remote; can work from anywhere in US). Provide support for creation of & updates to labeling docs including CDS, USPI, SPC for products registered in EU via Centralized, Mutual Recognition or Decentralized Procedures & associated Patient Labeling Documents. Work w/ Labeling Team for notification to stakeholders according to internal SOPs & regulatory reqs. Must have a bachelor’s degree or equivalent in Pharmaceutical Sci, Biotech or related & 2 yrs pharmaceutical labeling experience in regulated environment. Must also have: 2 yrs exp w/ labeling docs such as USPI, SmPC, Core Data Sheet, Core Safety Information; demonstrable knowledge of regulatory guidelines & reqs in US (e.g., Physician Labeling Rule) & EU (e.g., SmPC); & demonstrable exp preparing submission ready docs (e.g., pagination, TOC creation, etc.) & w/ project mgmt. Send resume to covcentlab@labcorp.com & refer to Job Code DK062022. 06-22

A D M I N I S T R AT I V E / B O O K KEEPING ASSISTANT: 3 Hours per day. 4 days per week. $670 weekly. APPLY BY EMAIL: michealjames1928@outlook.com. 06-22

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The genesis of Cabin Run Farm was 1785 in the original keeping room and throughout the years, this formidable homestead has grown to 37 plus acres and has become one of the most prestigious compounds in this area of Bucks The genesis Cabin RunisFarm in the original keepingoverlooking room and County. The of main house sitedwas on 1785 the precipice of a hillside throughout the years, this formidable homestead has grown to 37 plus spent acres Cabin Run Creek and the distant farms. The current stewards have and has become one of the prestigious compounds in thisThe areaadditions, of Bucks endless time restoring themost home to its pristine condition. The genesis of Cabin Run Farm was 1785 in the original keeping room and County. The over main the house is sited on seamlessly the precipice ofone a hillside constructed century, move from room overlooking to another. throughout the years, homestead has grown to 37have plus spent acres Cabin Creek andthis theformidable distant farms. The current stewards Call ArtRun Mazzei 610.428.4885 or Stephanie Garomon 215.595.7402 and has become one of the prestigious compounds in thisThe areaadditions, of Bucks endless time restoring themost home to its pristine condition. $4,375,000 The genesis of Cabin RunisFarm was 1785 in the original keepingoverlooking room and County. The main house sited on the precipice of a hillside constructed over the century, move seamlessly from one room to another. throughout the years, homestead has grown to 37have plus spent acres Cabin Creek andthis theformidable distant farms. The current stewards Call ArtRun Mazzei 610.428.4885 or Stephanie Garomon 215.595.7402 and has become one of the prestigious compounds in thisThe areaadditions, of Bucks endless time restoring themost home to its pristine condition. $4,375,000 County. The over main the house is sited on seamlessly the precipice ofone a hillside overlooking constructed century, move from room to another. Hortulus Farm is arguably one of 1785 the most spectacular private gardens The genesis of Cabin Run Farm was in the original keeping room Cabin Run Creek and the distant farms. The current215.595.7402 stewards have and spent Call Art Mazzei 610.428.4885 or Stephanie Garomon on the American East Comprising 100has acres, thetoproperty offers, throughout the years, thisCoast. formidable homestead grown 37 plus acres endless time restoring the home to its pristine condition. The additions, within 100 acres, separate, fully operational nursery. $4,375,000 and hasthe become one ofathe most prestigious compounds in thisThe areanursery of Buckshas constructed overis the century, move seamlessly from one room to another. Hortulus Farm arguably one of the most spectacular private gardens 60,000 The sq. ft. of greenhouse indoor facility and architecturally County. main house is sitedspace, on theanprecipice of a hillside overlooking Call Art Mazzei 610.428.4885 or Stephanie Garomon 215.595.7402 on theRun American East Coast. Comprising 100 acres, the offers, designed pergolas. The private area Hortulus isstewards filledproperty with Cabin Creek and the distant farms.of The current haveimposing spent within the 100 acres, a separate, fully operational nursery. The nursery has $4,375,000 specimen trees and shrubbery, daffodils, internationally themed endless time restoring the home200,000 to its pristine condition. The additions, Hortulus Farm is arguably one of the most spectacular private gardens 60,000 ft. of greenhouse space, an varieties indoor facility andtoarchitecturally constructed over the century, seamlessly from onevast room to gardens,sq. Birch and Pine alléesmove and other too list.another. The main on the American East Coast. Comprising 100 acres, the property offers, designed pergolas. The private area of Hortulus is filled with imposing Call Art Mazzei 610.428.4885 or Stephanie Garomon 215.595.7402 stone farm house is circa 1700’s and looks out across a stream and a lake within the trees 100 acres, a separate, 200,000 fully operational nursery. The nursery has specimen and shrubbery, daffodils, internationally themed $3,500,000 filled with black swans and other water fowl. $4,375,000 Hortulus Farm is arguably one of the most spectacular private gardens 60,000 sq. ft. of space, an varieties indoor facility andtoarchitecturally gardens, Birch andgreenhouse Pine allées and other too vast list. The main on the American East Coast. Comprising 100 acres, the property offers, designed pergolas. The private area of Hortulus is filled with imposing stone farm house is circa 1700’s and looks out across a stream and a lake within the trees 100 acres, a separate, 200,000 fully operational nursery. The nursery has specimen and shrubbery, daffodils, internationally themed filled with black swans and other water fowl. $3,500,000 60,000 ft. of space, indoor facility and Hortulus Farm is greenhouse arguably oneand of other thean most spectacular private gardens,sq. Birch and Pine allées varieties too vast toarchitecturally list.gardens The main For many years, two lovely and sophisticated Country estates served as designed pergolas. The private area of Hortulus is filled with imposing on the American East Coast. Comprising 100 acres, the property offers, stone farm house is circa 1700’s and looks out across a stream and a lake the Summer residences of the Guggenheim family. OneThe of these properspecimen trees and ashrubbery, 200,000 daffodils, internationally themed within the 100 acres, separate, fully operational nursery. nursery has $3,500,000 filled with black swans and other water fowl. ties, Windwood, in Upper Bucks County, has now become available on gardens, Birch and Pine allées and other varieties too vast to list. The main 60,000 sq. ft. of greenhouse space, an indoor facility and architecturally For many years, two lovely and sophisticated Country estates served as the open market. Windwood isarea approached aislong, meandering stone farm house is circaprivate 1700’s and of looks outviaacross a stream and adrive lake designed pergolas. The Hortulus filled with imposing the Summer residences of the Guggenheim family. One of these properthrough lengthy stand of other Oak200,000 and Pine. The home, sited in athemed desirable $3,500,000 filled withatrees black swans and water fowl. specimen and shrubbery, daffodils, internationally ties, Windwood, Bucks County, has now become available on location, looksand outin atUpper the New hillside. white stucco gardens, Pine allées andJersey other varietiesThe tooclean, vast to list. The mainand For open manyBirch years, two lovely and sophisticated Country estates served as the market. Windwood is approached via a long, meandering drive clapboard has stone farm house, house iscirca circa1870. 1700’s andbeen looksmeticulously outfamily. acrossOne a maintained stream and athrough lake the Summer residences of the Guggenheim of these properthrough lengthy stand Oak and Pine. home, sited in a desirable $2,249,000 the years especially byother its last steward. $3,500,000 filled withaand, black swans andof water fowl.The ties, Windwood, in Upper Bucks County, has now become on location, looks out at the New Jersey hillside. The clean, whiteavailable stucco and For many years, two lovely and sophisticated Country estates served as the open market. is approached via a long, meandering drive clapboard house, Windwood circa 1870. has been meticulously maintained through the Summer residences the Guggenheim family. One of these properthrough lengthy stand of of and Pine. The home, sited in a desirable $2,249,000 the yearsaand, especially by Oak its last steward. ties, Windwood, Bucks County, hasThe now become on location, looks outinatUpper the New Jersey hillside. clean, whiteavailable stucco and For many market. years, two lovely andissophisticated Country estates served drive as the open Windwood approached via a long, meandering clapboard house, circa 1870. has been meticulously maintained through the Summer residences the Guggenheim family. One sited of these The Duane Homestead isof sited, majestically, at$2,249,000 an elevated location amidst through aand, lengthy standof Oak and Pine. The home, in aproperdesirable the years especially by its last steward. ties, Windwood, in Upper Bucks County, has now become available onand 67 fertile farmland acres. The Bedminster countryside moves in all direclocation, looks out at the New Jersey hillside. The clean, white stucco the open market. Windwood is approached via a long, meandering drive tions and the opencirca land 1870. provides opportunity for agrarian through pursuits clapboard house, has ample been meticulously maintained through a lengthy stand of Oak and Pine. The home, sited in a desirable The Duane Homestead is sited, majestically, at an elevated location amidst and/or serious equestrian The stone farmhouse is perfect for $2,249,000 the yearsa and, especially by itsfacility. last steward. location, looks out at the New Jersey hillside. The clean, white stucco and 67 fertile farmland acres. The Bedminster countryside moves in all directhose individuals whose architectural sensibility lies in the “purist” realm. clapboard house, circa hasasbeen meticulously through tions and the open land1870. provides ample opportunity foruntouched agrarian pursuits The Duane Homestead comes close as possiblemaintained to “periThe Duane Homestead is sited, majestically, at an elevated location amidst $2,249,000 the years and, especially by its last steward. and/or a serious equestrian facility. The stone farmhouse is perfect for od” details. The original hardwood flooring, original millwork and custom 67 fertile farmland acres. The Bedminster countryside moves in all directhose individuals architectural sensibility the “purist”through realm. built-ins, beautifulwhose hardware, fireplaces...all add tolies theinauthenticity tions and the open land provides ample opportunity for agrarian pursuits The DuaneofHomestead as $1,650,000 close as possible to untouched “perithe gleam its historicaliscomes patina. The Duane Homestead sited, majestically, at anfarmhouse elevated location amidst and/or a serious equestrian facility. The stone perfect for od” details. The original hardwood flooring, original millworkis and custom 67 fertile farmlandwhose acres.architectural The Bedminster countryside moves in all realm. directhose individuals sensibility lies in the “purist” built-ins, beautiful hardware, fireplaces...all add to the authenticity through tions and the open landis provides foruntouched agrarianamidst pursuits The Duane Homestead comes asample close opportunity asatpossible to “periDuane sited, majestically, an elevated location the gleam ofHomestead its historical patina. $1,650,000 and/or a serious equestrian facility. The stone farmhouse is perfect for od”fertile details. The original flooring, original millwork custom 67 farmland acres. hardwood The Bedminster countryside moves inand all directhose individuals architectural inauthenticity the “purist” realm. built-ins, beautiful hardware, fireplaces...all add tolies the through tions and the openwhose land provides amplesensibility opportunity for agrarian pursuits Thegleam Duane comes as $1,650,000 close as possible to untouched and/or a serious equestrian facility. The stone farmhouse is perfect “perifor the ofHomestead its historical patina. Art@addisonwolfe.com od” details. The original hardwood flooring, original millwork and custom those individuals whose architectural sensibility lies in the “purist” realm. 610.428.4885 built-ins, beautiful hardware, fireplaces...all add toCell: the through The Duane Homestead comes as close as possible to authenticity untouched “perithe gleam its historical patina. flooring, $1,650,000 od” details.ofThe original hardwood original millwork and custom Art@addisonwolfe.com 18938built-ins, • AddisonWolfe.com • 215.862.5500 beautiful hardware, fireplaces...all add to the authenticity through Cell: 610.428.4885 the gleam of its historical patina. $1,650,000

CABIN RUN FARM CABIN RUN FARM CABIN RUN FARM

MOTIVATED SELLER MOTIVATED SELLER MOTIVATED SELLER MOTIVATED SELLER

MOTIVATED SELLER PRICE IMPROVEMENT

PRICE IMPROVEMENT PRICE IMPROVEMENT PRICE IMPROVEMENT PRICE IMPROVEMENT NEW SEPTIC SYSTEM BEING INSTALLED

NEW SEPTIC SYSTEM BEING INSTALLED NEW SEPTIC SYSTEM BEING INSTALLED NEW SEPTIC SYSTEM BEING INSTALLED NEW SEPTIC SYSTEM BEING INSTALLED

HORTULUS FARM CABIN RUN FARM HORTULUS FARM HORTULUS FARM HORTULUS FARM

HORTULUS FARM WINDWOOD

WINDWOOD WINDWOOD WINDWOOD

WINDWOOD THE DUANE HOMESTEAD

THE DUANE HOMESTEAD THE DUANE HOMESTEAD

THE DUANE HOMESTEAD THE DUANE HOMESTEAD

Addison Wolfe Art Mazzei Real Estate Addison Wolfe Art Mazzei Real 550 Union Square, Estate New Hope, PA Addison Wolfe Art Mazzei Art@addisonwolfe.com Real 550 Union Square, Estate New Hope, PA 18938 • AddisonWolfe.com • 215.862.5500 Cell: 610.428.4885 Addison Wolfe Art Mazzei Art@addisonwolfe.com Addison Wolfe Real Estate 550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • AddisonWolfe.com • 215.862.5500 Art Cell: Mazzei 610.428.4885 Art@addisonwolfe.com Real Estate Cell: 610.428.4885 550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • AddisonWolfe.com • 215.862.5500 A BOUTIQUE REAL ESTATE FIRM WITH GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

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35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2022

CABIN RUN FARM


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