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Volume LXXIII, Number 25

www.towntopics.com

Town Employee Charged With 2nd Degree Bribery In Sewer Dumping Scandal

YWCA’s All-Girls Robotics Team Visits SES . . . . . . 5 MoveOn Rally Draws Crowd in Hinds Plaza . . 8 Rare Tick-Borne Virus Has Yet to Affect Princeton . . . . . . . . . . 10 Princeton Symphonic Brass at Westminster Choir College . . . . . . . 16 PU Football Alum Horsted Looking to Make Chicago Bears . . . . . 26 PHS Track’s Wildberg Places 5th in Long Jump at Nationals . . . . . . . 29

Nat King Cole at 100 . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .22, 23 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 24 Classified Ads . . . . . . 35 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Music/Theater . . . . . . 17 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 33 Police Blotter . . . . . . . . 6 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 35 Religion . . . . . . . . . . . 34 School Matters . . . . . . 12 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

As a result of a joint investigation by the Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office and the Princeton Police Department into illegal dumping at the Princeton Sewer Operating Plant, a former municipal employee has been charged with bribery in the second degree. Thomas Hughes, who until June 6 was the supervisor at the facility on River Road, was charged “for accepting payments to influence his official duties,” according to a police report issued this week. Hughes is scheduled to appear in Mercer County Superior Court on June 27. He allegedly allowed contractors to dump materials, including dirt and asphalt, at the facility. In addition, the head of the Department of Infrastructure and Operations, which oversees the Sewer Operating Division, has been placed on paid leave while the investigation continues. “There may be further actions taken as the investigation proceeds,” Mayor Liz Lempert wrote last Friday in her weekly email update. “The municipality has called in the Mercer County Prosecutor’s office, and is committed to a full and thorough investigation and appropriate disciplinary measures. The Council and I are angry about the misuse of the River Road site.  Our goal is to support a thorough investigation, to uncover any systemic failings, and put new procedures in place to safeguard our operations.” First reported by Planet Princeton late last month, the allegations of improper dumping have resulted in Princeton’s Health Department, along with state and county environmental officials, inspecting the site to determine whether violations of environmental regulations have occurred. Last week, the town received a report from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) saying materials were disposed of at the facility without proper approvals. A full inspection report has not yet been filed, according to the agency’s website. “The municipality is in the process of engaging the services of a licensed site remediation specialist to advise on necessary cleanup actions,” Municipal Administrator Marc Dashield wrote in a statement this week. “The municipality intends to terminate the contract with ICUNJ, the contractor for the Linden and Continued on Page 9

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Princeton Pride Parade Rolls Out Saturday Princeton’s first-ever Pride Parade is ready to roll out Saturday morning at 11 a.m. from the Municipal Building on Witherspoon Street. Organized by the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice (BRCSJ), the parade, led by Philadelphia Freedom, an LGBTQIA marching band from Philadelphia, will proceed up Witherspoon Street, turning on Paul Robeson Place, and ending up at an after-party at the YMCA green space with live music, a drag show, food trucks, and “a vast array of speakers,” according to BRCSJ Chief Actifvist Robt SedaSchreiber. “The significance and history of this moment is realized both in celebration of this being Princeton’s very first Pride

Parade and in recognition and respect to Stonewall 50,” said Seda-Schreiber. “In honor of these concurrent events we will sashay and strut in the delight of how far we have come as much as we will march in solidarity of how far we have yet to go.” Seda-Schreiber pointed out that sometimes a parade is more than just a parade. “This event will carry forward well beyond this one event, this one day,” he said. “We hope to create an exponential safe space, as this day inspires folks to recognize and celebrate our diversity and our intersectionality.” Eleven-year-old Mani Martinez, who is organizing a group of young people who will ride bicycles in the parade as part of the “Pride Riders,” commented on the im-

pact of the parade and the BRCSJ, which opened six months ago. “Since it opened, the Center has made me feel safe and happy, more like myself. Now this Pride Parade is going to help a lot of other kids feel that same way, and that makes me even happier.” Emphasizing the potential impact of the event, Seda-Schreiber continued, “Our kids who are bullied in school, our coworkers who are harassed in their offices, our elders who have spent a lifetime unrecognized as their true selves — they will see us assembled and feel represented, respected, even loved. They can feel like they are a part of something rather than constantly on the outside of it.” Continued on Page 11

Youth Committee Advises Council, Forges New Directions for Princeton

ART ALL NIGHT RETURNS: Live mural painting was just one of the many attractions at Art All Night, held last weekend at the Roebling Wire Works in Trenton . The community festival, which also featured plenty of art, live music, interactive events, food trucks, and more, returned with increased security after it was cut short by gun violence last year . Eventgoers share their favorite parts of the festival in this week’s Town Talk on page 6 . (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

Current members of the Princeton Council are all at least a generation removed from their youth, and no matter how strong their memories might be, the world of 2019 presents a very different landscape with different challenges from those of the past. That’s why the Princeton Youth Advisory Committee (YAC) for the last three years has been advising the Princeton mayor and Council on a range of issues of interest to local youth. “We give a voice and platform for the youth population of our town,” said YAC Vice Chair Nandita Nammanamanchi, a Princeton High School (PHS) junior. “Our role in working with the Council is important because we are able to give them first-hand insight on a demographic that is highly important, but one they are detached from, and we can present them with new perspectives on their projects. In general, for the youth of Princeton, we are giving them a voice in the local political sphere.” YAC Chair and PHS Senior Eli Wasserman pointed out, “YAC is extremely valuable to our community because we act as a primary source for the issues facing students in Princeton. High schoolers are becoming more active and outspoken on political and social issues every year, so the YAC is here to listen to the students’ needs.” Continued on Page 12


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019 • 2

Top Grade for Quality 3RD TIME IN A ROW

WHEN YOU NEED A TRUSTED HEALTH CARE PROVIDER, YOU WANT ONE THAT GETS TOP MARKS IN SAFETY. For the third consecutive time, Capital Health Medical Center – Hopewell was awarded an ‘A’ from The Leapfrog Group, a national nonprofit organization committed to improving health care quality and safety. Only one-third of hospitals across the country achieved an ‘A’ during this same time and even less have done it three times in a row. This elite recognition tells our patients and their loved ones that our expert physicians, nurses, and hospital staff are committed to meeting the highest standards of care in the United States and putting patient safety first. So if you believe, as we do, that quality and safety are important, consider a hospital that has earned straight A’s three times in a row: Capital Health Medical Center – Hopewell, One Capital Way, Pennington, NJ 08534

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Thursday, July 18, 2019 | 3 – 4:30 p.m. The group will meet monthly, always on the third Thursday of every month. Capital Health Medical Center – Hopewell NJ PURE Conference Center One Capital Way, Pennington, NJ 08534 This group is for anyone diagnosed with or surviving from a brain tumor, along with their care partners, loved ones, and friends. Members will be encouraged to share experiences, and experts in the field will join us quarterly for guest presentations. Group members will meet together first, and then the group will split so that patients and loved ones will have the opportunity to share and learn from each other privately. FREE VALET PARKING AND REFRESHMENTS WILL BE PROVIDED.

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3 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

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THE ULTIMATE

GET INVOLVED: Tony Porter, founder and CEO of A CALL TO MEN, urged men and women to help in their communities when he was honored May 23 with the annual Barbara Boggs Sigmund Award. From left are: Mercer County Freeholder Sam Frisby, Womanspace Executive Director Pat Hart, Honoree Tony Porter, Barbara Boggs Sigmund’s son Stephen Sigmund, and his daughter Ruby Sigmund.

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Womanspace honored Tony Porter, founder and CEO of A CALL TO MEN, at the 25th Annual Barbara Boggs Sigmund Award Event held on Thursday, May 23 at the Hyatt Regency Princeton. Porter is an author, educator, and social justice activist. His 2010 TED Talk was named by GQ Magazine as one of the “Top 10 TED Talks every man should see.” Womanspace honored Porter for his efforts to prevent violence against women while promoting a healthy manhood. In addition to Porter, Mercer County Freeholder Sam Frisby spoke about his own experience with interpersonal violence. Approximately 300 people attended this year’s event, which included dinner, drinks, Shiseido goodie bags, a vacation raffle (provided by Apple Vacations and Riu Hotels & Resorts), and a silent auction. Janssen Pharmaceuticals was this year’s Presenting Sponsor. The event raised over $150,000 to provide services for men, women, and children affected by domestic and sexual violence.

One Table Cafe Hosts Singer, Pianist

Trinity Church’s One Table Café series continues Friday, June 21 at 6:30 p.m. with special guests Katie Welsh, singer, and David Pearl, pianist.

Correction The story “Immigrants’ Needs, Concerns, and Ways to Help Highlight PCDO Forum (Page 1, June 12) should have noted that LALDEF has issued about 13,000 (not 3,000) Community ID cards since 2009.

This is Welsh’s third visit to the cafe, which has been operating for over eight years. Welsh explores a variety of songs from Richard Rodgers composed in collaboration with Lorenz Hart, Oscar Hammerstein II, and Stephen Sondheim. Olives Restaurant is providing the dinner. Reservations are required. Call (609) 216-7770 by June 19. One Table Café is designed to build community by bringing people together to have dinner and some great conversations while listening to a compelling and community-minded speaker, performer, or group. Every

attendee enjoys a restaurantquality dinner on a pay-whatyou-can basis which is donated by local Princeton restaurants. At One Table Café, diners cannot distinguish between donors and those who really need a meal. Dinner is served on real china on tables with white cloth tablecloths; not the average soup kitchen dining experience. All proceeds go to benefit One Table Café’s partners who work to eliminate hunger: Mercer Street Friends, Trenton Area Soup Kitchen, Bread for the World, and Episcopal Relief & Development. Trinity Church is at 33 Mercer Street.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees Meeting: Wednesday, June 19, 7 p.m. at the library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Pride Parade: Princeton’s first-ever Pride Parade welcoming the LGBTQIA community is Saturday, June 22, starting at 11 a.m. at the Municipal Building, 400 Witherspoon Street. Sponsored by the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice. An after-party follows at the YMCA, Paul Robeson Place. All are welcome. Pool is Open Daily: Community Park Pool now has weekday hours 12-8 p.m.; weekends and holidays 11 a.m.-8 p.m. The Recreation Department office will be open from 10:30 a.m. — 6 p.m. daily for registration, pool photo IDs, etc. County Bicycle Plan Meetings: Mercer County is creating a Bicycle Master Plan. Meetings will be held in Ewing, Hightstown, West Windsor, and Trenton through June 26 to allow the public to learn more and provide input. The West Windsor meeting is Monday, June 24, 5-7 p.m. at Princeton Country Club, 1 Wheeler Way. For information, visit http://www.mercercounty.org/ departments/planning/2019-bicycle-master-plan\. Resource Recovery Tent: At the Princeton Farmers Market June 27, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., resources for recycling and upcycling will be collected. For details of what is accepted, visit sustainableprinceton.org/farmers-market. Summer Tours at Princeton Airport: Free tours of the airport during July and August every Tuesday morning starting at 10:30 a.m. www.princetonairport.com.


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TEAM EFFORTS: Princeton YWCA’s all-girls robotics teams recently visited the Plainsboro offices of SES, a leading satellite operator, to report on their recent, award-winning season. The girls are shown with their coaches and staffers from SES, which contributes $10,000 a year to the program.

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For the two teams of girls who have spent the past year building and engineering robots and taking them to competitions — many of

which they have won — a High School North, reprewww.princetonmagazine.com gathering at the satellite sented their teams at the operating company SES last SES event. The program Results will be featured in our Summer 2019 edition, week was a chance to show “teaches us a lot of skills in homes July of technology,” said outside the experts what they have early learned and what they plan Rajesh, “ like teamwork, for the future. friendship, and perseverSome 40 staffers from ance; sharing your experiSES attended the presenta- ences and abilities with each tions. The YWCA’s Robotic other. We also have to work Rockettes and Prototype G on public speaking skills. teams are familiar to the It encourages us to branch firm, which hired two of the outward.” Coaches of t he teams girls as interns last summer and will host three of them make a point to push not only technical skills, but this year. interpersonal attributes as Top firm in New well.litigation “It’s about the whole

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“These young robotic rock stars are smart, confident, and possess extraordinary communication skills,” said Douglas Clayton, SES senior vice president, human resources. “They embody the entire talent package important to SES and, at a relatively young age, have inspired many of us. Ultimately, they provide a valuable pipeline of skills for SES’s future.” The Y WCA Princeton’s Robotics program for girls in grades 4-12 was launched three years ago as an effort to reduce gender and racial disparities in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) field. “Starting robotics was a dream,” said Cheryl RoweRendleman, YWCA board member and CEO of Omar Consulting Group, at the gathering. “I didn’t know if we could pull this off. It’s not a light lift, it’s a heavy lift. It involves a lot of details, and coaches, and a lot of space.” “I have to admit that at the time we started, I didn’t understand the complications of robotics,” said Y WCA C EO Ju dy H ut ton, t h is week. “We started with one team, and now we have four. They are doing phenomenal work. They are among the few all-girl teams out there. And they have had to learn how to advocate, because being girls, they still get some push-back. It’s been great to watch these girls grow and see what they do.” Aparna Rajesh and Anjali Dhayagude, both juniors at West Windsor-Plainsboro

 

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person,” said Hutton. “It’s about volunteering, problem - s olv i ng, a nd public speaking. If you ever see them at their competitions, it’s so evident that they work as a team. And they are generous, too — if another team is having a problem, they help them out, even thought it’s a competition.” There are 4,700 robotics teams across the globe. The girls have won multiple awards, including a world championship at FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) international high school robotics competitions. The YWCA teams have met with engineers not only from SES, but also from NASA, t he National Center for Women and Infor mation Technology, and Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, to learn more about the STEM field. This summer, the teams are helping the YWCA with a robotics class for students who live at Princeton Community Village. They have been invited to work with the local March of Dimes and other community organizations. A question-and-answer session followed the teams’ presentation, at which the girls displayed their robots and shared binders of weekly jour nals documenting their progress. Afterward, they were given a tour of SES. “It really motivates us as a team that there are so many people interested in what we do,” said Dhayagude. “So many companies say they support STEM, but SES and the YWCA do it especially well.” —Anne Levin

Police Blotter On June 12, at 10:09 a.m., a victim reported that someone accessed her Verizon Wireless account on June 8 to purchase two Apple iPhone cell phones from the Verizon Wireless store on North Harrison Street. On June 12, at 11:33 a.m., a 32-year-old female from Hamilton was charged with hindering apprehension, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop for speeding on South Harrison Street. She was found to have an active ATS warrant out of the Ewing Township Municipal Court. On June 12, at 2:08 p.m., a victim reported that her husband’s wheelchair was stolen from the front of their house on Mountain Avenue between 4 p.m. on June 11 and 11:45 a.m. on June 12. The wheelchair is easily folded, has a blue plaid seat, and is valued at $150. On June 9, at 1:54 a.m., a 29-year-old male from West Virginia was charged with DWI, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop for speeding and failure to keep right on Washington Road. On June 8, at 3:17 a.m., a 19-year-old male from Ewing was charged with possession of under 50 grams of suspected marijuana and drug paraphernalia, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop for failing to observe a traffic control device on Stockton Street. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What brings you to Art All Night - Trenton, and what is your favorite part?” (Photographs by Charles R. Plohn)

“I come to Art All Night for the organization — I like to support Artworks. My favorite part is the community.” —Joe Gilchrist, Hamilton

Michael: “I’m excited to see my sister’s painting and my painting. I made a painting of a Detroit Lions player.” Jennifer: “I came here not only to support my children and see their artwork, but also to support the event and see what else is here.” Madison: “My favorite part is coming with my mom and my brother and seeing the art that we both made.” —Michael, Jennifer, and Madison Skorupa, Lawrence

Terri: “Our favorite part is looking at the art, and it’s just a great way to spend an evening and expose my children to the arts and a very diverse environment.” Brian: “Technically what brings me here is I am an audio engineer, so I work some of the audio booths. But I also like to come here in my free time and enjoy the atmosphere and the energy and the people.” —Terri, Brian, and Xavier Hart, Plainsboro

Erica: “I love the art on display inside, and we are about to try some of the food that they have here.” Nick: “We are interested in the music and art and everything that’s going on here. I especially enjoyed watching the custom bicycles that they are building outside.” —Erica Fuhrman, Hoboken with Nick Rudd, Hightstown

Corey: “I love the environment here. I remember coming here years ago to see my brother perform as a DJ. It’s amazing to me the way this town embraces art, and I wanted to come out to see it again and show support.” Marissa: “I’m an artist, and I submitted work last year but did not get to come. So, this is my first time here, and I wanted to come out to support it because it’s a wonderful community event that supports the arts and artists of all levels.” —Corey Abernathy, Plainsboro with Marissa Bunting, Hopewell


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Rally to Impeach Trump Draws Crowd to Hinds Plaza Carr ying signs reading “High Crimes and Misdemeanors,” “Defend Democracy: Impeach Trump,” and “Trump is Not Above the Law” — demonstrators gathered in Hinds Plaza last Saturday, June 15, and called on Congress to impeach President Trump. Sponsored by MoveOn.org

as part of a national day of action, the rally featured four speakers, all expressing outrage at Trump and his actions and urging the House of Representatives to initiate impeachment proceedings. “How much longer are we going to be governed by scofflaws in the executive branch?” Princeton Councilman Tim

Quinn asked the crowd, estimated at 70 by MoveOn organizer Mary Stevens. “How much longer are we going to allow the legislative branch to abdicate its moral and constitutional obligation to impeach this scofflaw president, whatever the outcome?” Quinn continued, ”How much longer are we going to defund public goods like schools and libraries while demonizing our public workers? How much longer are we going to stand for the 40-year erosion of the modest gains made in the last century?” In her speech, Stevens reviewed the factual justification for seven articles of impeachment, based on a recent Washington Post article. Co-organizer Linda Gochfeld then spoke, reporting evidence of the destructive effects of the Trump administration on the social fabric of our country. She urged, “We must stand up against this threat to our American democracy before it is too late.” Gochfeld, a psychiatrist, pointed out, “People are anxious, worried, and depressed. The country is divided, neighbors can’t speak to neighbors. There are more ‘deaths of despair,’ addiction, and suicide, especially in the millennial generation.” Accentuating the urgency of the current situation, IMPEACHMENT ACTION: Rutgers University Professor Shadi she said, “We can’t wait for Tahvildar-Zadeh demonstrated against President Trump and the 2020 election. Trump circulated a petition calling for impeachment at Saturday’s is wreaking continued de#ImpeachTrump event in Hinds Plaza. (Photo courtesy of Mary Stevens) struction of environmental

and other safeguards, women’s rights, education, the social and economic safety net, our international treaties and alliances, and the very future of the planet. His trade wars and tariffs threaten our economy. His poor judgment and impulsivity threaten a disastrous war at any time.” Coalition for Peace Action Executive Director the Rev. Robert Moore opened the proceedings with a condemnation of the moral and spiritual crisis he says Trump has created. “The Republicans have lost their soul,” Moore said. “They are putting party before country, party before soul,” he added. “That’s very troubling.” Moore noted that Trump’s action are “horrifying,” “treasonous,” and “should outrage every American.” Moore emphasized that impeachment is both “the right thing to do” and “the most effective thing to do too.” The percentage of Americans in favor of impeachment has risen in response to the release of the Mueller report and Mueller’s subsequent statement, according to MoveOn. A recent Reuters poll found that 45 percent of Americans currently support impeachment, with 42 percent opposed. Public support for impeachment is significantly higher than it was when Congress began impeachment inquiries into President Richard Nixon. Rep. Rashida Elaib (D-MI) and Rep. Al Green (D-TX) are co-sponsors of a House resolution to begin an impeachment inquiry. —Donald Gilpin

Municipality Gets Grant Action Plan (CAP) in 20182019, the grant will supFor Climate Action The Municipality of Princeton, in par tnership with Sustainable Princeton, has been awarded a $50,000 grant from the Health Impact Project, a collaboration of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and The Pew Charitable Trusts. With the goal of reducing emergencies during climate crises, this project includes a series of activities to proactively prepare for climate related emergencies and to better anticipate the needs of Princeton’s most climate vulnerable citizens — thus, ultimately reducing the demand for emergency response, allowing improved call response to address unpreventable emergencies for the entire community. A June 18 “table top exercise” will kick-off the grant’s activities by pulling together emergency response personnel with managers of Princeton’s affordable housing facilities, nursing homes, and other facilities housing vulnerable residents, to run through a mock climate crisis. The exercise will help identify Princeton’s emergency response strengths and where improvements can be made. Grant activities also focus on improving emergency response communications and updating the Emergency Operations Plan for climate related emergencies. Coordinated by municipal staff Bob Gregory, director of emergency management, and Jeff Grosser, assistant administrator and health officer, and in collaboration with Sustainable Princeton, a nonprofit which led the efforts to develop Princeton’s Climate

port execution of key strategies outlined in the CAP to strengthen the community’s resiliency to the impacts of the changing climate. “As Hurricanes Sandy and Irene and the increased frequency of violent storms have demonstrated, climate change is already bringing intense weather to our region.” said Sustainable Princeton Executive Director Molly Jones. “We are so grateful to the Health Impact Project for its forward-thinking partnership to help put in place the preventative processes required to better prepare our community as a whole, and in particular our most climate vulnerable community member, for climate crises.”

Trenton Development Series Continues

On Friday, July 12 from 7:30-9:45 a.m., the Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber hosts a program at Trenton Country Club, 201 Sullivan Way. Matthew Bergheiser, president of University City Districts, is the keynote speaker. “Lessons in Successful Community Revitalization from the University City District in Philadelphia” is the title of his presentation, which will be introduced by Trenton Mayor Reed Gusciora. Berhgeiser, former executive director of the Trenton Downtown Association, will detail how the University City District has built partnerships with anchor institutions, strengthened economic vitality, and improved the quality of life in Philadelphia. Tickets are $ 35. Visit princetonchamber.org.

Vote now for Your favorites! What’s your favorite area restaurant? Do you have a landscaper that you love? Town Topics Newspaper is happy to announce that its 2019 Readers’ Choice Awards competition is now open for voting for the Best: Alfresco Dining ________________________ Day Spa _______________________________ Insurance Agency ______________________ Pizza __________________________________ Appliance Store ________________________ Deli ___________________________________ Jewelry Store __________________________ Plastic Surgeon/Plastic Surgery Group Art Class ______________________________ Dentist/Dental Group Kids Activity ___________________________ (choose one) ___________________________

Art Gallery ____________________________ (choose one) ___________________________ Attorney ______________________________ Dermatologist/Dermatology Group (choose one) ___________________________ Auto Shop _____________________________ Electrician _____________________________ Bakery ________________________________ Farmers Market ________________________ Bank __________________________________ Financial Advisor/ Bar ___________________________________ Planner _______________________________ Barber Shop ___________________________ Florist _________________________________

Kitchen & Bath Designer _______________ Public Golf Course _____________________ Landscape Service _____________________ Real Estate Agency ____________________

Liquor Store ___________________________ Realtor ________________________________ Men’s Shop ____________________________ Restaurant ____________________________ Nail Salon _____________________________ Roofing _______________________________ Nursery _______________________________ Sandwich Shop ________________________ Seafood _______________________________ Optometrist/Optometry Group (choose one) ___________________________ Senior Care ___________________________

Bike Shop _____________________________ Furniture Store ________________________ Breakfast ______________________________ Gift Store _____________________________ Orthodontist/Orthodontist Group (choose one) ___________________________ Butcher _______________________________ Grocery Store _________________________ Outdoor Furnishing Store_______________ Caterer ________________________________ Gym __________________________________ Pediatrician/Pediatric Group Children’s Partry Place _________________ Hair Salon ____________________________ (choose one) ___________________________ Chiropractor ___________________________ Happy Hour ___________________________ Pet Groomer ___________________________

Sushi _________________________________ Sweet Shop ___________________________ Team Building Activity _________________ Tutoring _______________________________ Vegetarian Restaurant __________________

Cleaners ______________________________ Holistic Doctor ________________________ Pet Supply ____________________________ Veterinarian/Veterinary Group (choose one) ___________________________ Coffee House __________________________ Hospital _______________________________ Pharmacy _____________________________ Wait Staff _____________________________ Consignment Store _____________________ HVAC _________________________________ Photographer __________________________ Women’s Boutique _____________________ CSA __________________________________ Ice Cream ____________________________ Physical Therapist _____________________ Yoga Studio ___________________________ Day Care/Preschool ___________________ Interior Designer _______________________ Picture Framer_________________________

DeaDline for entries is august 8 The winners will be announced in the August 21 & 28 issues of Town Topics Newspaper. Don’t miss your chance to vote for your favorite businesses or services! The Readers’ Choice Awards is open for online voting now at towntopics.com, or mail to 4438 Route 27, P.O. Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528.


continued from page one

Spruce road project, based on its improper dumping of materials at the River Road site. The municipality is exploring all avenues for holding all contractors responsible for damages incurred by the town.” Among other allegations is a charge that a $300,000 jet truck was used to help a contractor install new sewer pipes at a private residence. According to published reports, a driver employed by the municipality admitted he was dumping materials removed from the site of the Mary Moss Playground renovation, located at John and Lytle streets, at the sewer facility. While contractors are responsible for disposing of dirt from job sites, it was alleged that about 40 truck loads were dumped at the River Road site in exchange for $75 a load. Further investigations are in process. “The municipality continues to cooperate w ith the Mercer Count y Prosecutor’s Office as they evaluate criminally-related matters,” Dashield said. —Anne Levin

Rider to Offer Online MA Program

Star ting in the fall of 2019, Rider University will begin offering an accelerated Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership program that can be completed entirely online in only five semesters. The 30-credit program is designed to enhance students’ leadership, supervisory, and administrative skills. Students will be enrolled in the developing people and organizations concentration, which offers a broad perspective on organizational behavior and leadership. In its accelerated format, each course will be approximately seven-weeks long, and there will be six admission cycles throughout the year. “We recognize that not everyone has the time for a traditional on-campus program model because they’re already very busy with work and family responsibilities, and there are only so many hours in the day,” said Program Director Tricia Nolfi, who is also an assistant professor. “At the same time, they might be required to obtain a master’s degree in order to advance in their careers, and this program will enable them to do that.” Nolfi added that in creating the new program, one of the key goals was ensuring that students taking the online courses will receive the same level of support as those who are on campus. “A big part of Rider’s culture has always been making sure our students succeed. That’s just a part of what we do.” Staff will be available to offer guidance along every step of the process, assisting students with everything from scheduling to financial aid to academic advising. There will even be periodic check-ins to see how the students’ experience is going after they have enrolled. “A few weeks into the course, someone will follow up to ask, ‘How are you doing? Is there anything you need help with?’” she said. “Since these students won’t physically come to campus, there’s going to be a lot

more outreach to ensure that they’re feeling connected to the University.” Prospective students will now be able to choose from among three options for earning their degree. In addition to the new accelerated format, Rider will continue to offer the current version, which follows the traditional 14-week semester format and generally takes three years to complete. For this option, students have the choice of taking classes fully online or in a hybrid format, which combines online learning with on-campus classes. As an interdisciplinar y master’s program at Rider, organizational leadership attracts students from a variety of areas, including education, nonprofits, business, and public organizations. “Our program is really relevant for any individual aspiring to be a leader within an organization,” said Nolfi. Nevertheless, she notes that many of the students in the Developing People and Organizations concentration tend to work in human resources or learning and development positions. Additional infor mation about the Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership program is available at www.rider.edu/ma-orglead. Those interested in learning more about the accelerated program format can contact Program Director Tricia Nolfi at tnolfi@rider.edu.

Free Workshop Offered For Dementia Caregivers

To support local family caregivers of people with dementia, The Education Center at Van Dyck Law is offering a workshop developed by the Rosalynn Carter Institute for Caregiving (RCI) on July 30. The deadline for registration is July 15. The Dealing with Dementia Workshop provides tips and strategies for caregivers on best practices for caring for their loved ones and themselves. “Most family caregivers assume the care of a loved one without access to needed training and education,” said Gayle Alston, director of RCI Training Center for Excellence. “Caregiving for a loved one is a rewarding and loving experience. However, due to the physical and emotional demands of caregiving and the struggles specific to dementia care, caregivers often suffer high levels of stress and depression. The goal for the Dealing with Dementia Caregiver Workshop is for Alzheimer’s and dementia family caregivers to gain a better understanding of dementia, utilize strategies to effectively manage dementia behaviors, and develop habits of stress management and self-care.” Caregivers who attend the four-hour workshop will receive a copy of the new Dealing with Dementia Guide. This guide provides over 300 pages of information and solutions to problems caregivers face every day. Training will take place Tuesday, July 30 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. (9:30 registration) at The Education Center at Van Dyck Law, 707 State Road in Princeton. Individuals must pre-register for the workshop no later than July 15 by contacting Sheli Monacchio at sheli@vandyckfirm.com.

9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

Sewer Scandal

Robert Stack Robert Stack Accepted Into Forbes Council

Robert Stack, the founder, president, and CEO of Community Options, has been accepted into Forbes Nonprofit Council, an invitation-only community for chief executives in successful nonprofit organizations. Stack was vetted and selected by a review committee based on the depth and diversity of his experience. Criteria for acceptance include a track record of successfully impacting business growth metrics, as well as personal and professional achievements and honors. “We are honored to welcome Robert into the community,” said Scott Gerber, founder of Forbes Councils, the collective that includes Forbes Nonprofit Council. “Our mission with Forbes Councils is to bring together proven leaders from every industry, creating a curated, social capital-driven network that helps every member grow professionally and make an even greater impact on the business world.” As an accepted member of the Council, Stack has access to a variety of exclusive opportunities designed to help him reach peak professional influence. He will connect and collaborate with other local leaders in a private forum. He will also be invited to work with a professional editorial team to share his insights in original business articles on Forbes.com, and to contribute to published Q&A panels alongside other experts. Forbes Councils is a collective of invitation- only communities created in partnership with Forbes and the expert community builders who founded Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC). In Forbes Councils, exceptional business owners and leaders come together with the people and resources that can help them thrive. For m or e i n for m at ion ab out Forb e s Nonprof it Council, visit forbesnonprofitcouncil.com.

Girls Show Courage At Princeton YMCA 5K

Girls on the Run New Jersey East par ticipants from Burlington and Mercer counties ran at the Princeton Family YMCA 5K, presented by Bee Fit with Tracy, on Sunday, June 2. T h e pro g r a m i n s pire s girls in third through eighth grades to recognize their power and potential. Trained volunteer coaches lead small teams through a researchbased curriculum that includes discussions, activities, and running games. Over the course of the program, girls develop essential skills to help them navigate their worlds and establish a lifetime appreciation for healt h and f it ness. T he program culminates with

WORKING TOWARD A GOAL: Girls on the Run celebrated the completion of their 10-week program at the Princeton Family WMCA with a 5K race. (Photo by Pete Kolonia) girls positively impacting their communities through a service project and being physically and emotionally prepared to complete a celebratory 5K run. “The 5K experience with the girls was awesome,” said Florence coach Jackie McDermott. “Watching them work towards a goal and achieve that goal was inspiring. I loved that their families were able to see all of their hard work shine when they were running. Hearing the girls cheer for one another and watching them cross the finish line was unforgettable. I was honored and humbled to be part of such a great event with so many amazing girls.” Burlington County Program Director Melissa Neiheisel commented, “As the count y director, it is so amazing to see all the energy come from such young girls. I get to visit each site mid-season and it’s so

rewarding to see each one of them cross the finish line. All of their hard work has paid off and they are walking away with a toolbox of social-emotional strategies.” This year, girls were joined by the Gatorade New Jersey Cross Country Player of the Year, Randolph High S c h o o l ’s A b b y L o v e y s . Loveys encouraged the girls to push aside fears about completing the 5K distance by having fun and enjoying the opportunity to run. Girls on the Run NJ East

is an independent council of Girls on the Run International, which has a network of over 225 councils across 50 states and the District of Columbia. Girls on the Run NJ East was established in 2000 to serve Essex and Union counties and the mission is to inspire girls to be joyful, healthy, and confident. Fall season registration opens on August 1. Learn more about coaching opportunities and fall season registration at www.girlsontherunnj.org.

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Rare Tick-Borne Virus Has Yet to Affect Princeton

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Tick season is here, and existing medical conditions able,” Grosser said. Among a rare, tick-borne virus has are at greater risk for devel- his recommendations: already been confirmed in oping complications. Give children a bath after New Jersey. But the often Diagnosing Powasson vi- they come in from playing fatal Powasson virus has rus is complicated and takes outside, especially in woodnot been recorded in the time, since blood samples ed or grassy areas ; keep Princeton area. have to be sent to the Cen- grass cut relative shor t; A c c o r d i n g t o J e f f r e y ters for Disease Control use mulch borders; make Grosser, Pr inceton’s as - for testing. In 2016, 22 sure children’s playgrounds sistant administrator and cases were reported across aren’t located under trees; healt h of f icer, residents the United States. “What’s wear colored clothing so should take the usual pre- concerning is the fact that ticks are visible; and if you cautions this summer when the signs and symptoms have long hair, have a friend spending time in local parks progress pretty quickly, in check your head. Check or hiking area trails. one to four weeks,” said dogs’ fur, with a LED bulb on a flashlight if needed. “The Powasson virus is Grosser. s om ewhat abnor ma l for The health depar tment While no cases of Powasthe area, and we have not son virus have been report- does not recommend using seen it here,” he said. “That ed locally, Lyme disease insecticides or pesticides being said, it is a pretty in- continues to be a signifi- unless absolutely necessary. tense disease. So if you feel cant problem in this area. “Just look around and try to like you have some symp- I n P r i nce ton, t h ere are avoid areas where there are toms you haven’t had before more cases of Lyme than bushes close to walkways,” that might be from a tick, any other repor table ill- Grosser said. “It’s not a surgoTo: to ___________________________ the doctor.” ness, according to Grosser. prise that Princeton sees a The recent death of an el- “The number of Lyme cases lot of Lyme cases, because From: _________________________ Time: here __________________ people spend a lot he & derly North Jersey man who continues to creep up,”Date of time outside. They go said. “This is to ourrun moment had contracted Here is a proofPowasson of your ad, scheduled ___________________. virus after being bitten by to highlight prevention tac- to parks. They hike. They thoroughly and pay special attentiongotoon thenice following: walks. And that a Please tick has check broughtit the virus tics.” should continue, but just into the check forefront. ConsidThe (Your mark will tell us it’sdisease okay) is a problem ered an emerging disease all over the United States. with precautions.” Levin with a growing number of �Grosser said 36,429 � Phone number Fax number � casAddress �—Anne Expiration Date human cases, the virus is es were confirmed in this transmitted through a bite country in 2015. That figfrom a deer tick. It can ure rose to 42,743 a year cause encephalitis, menin- later. I n P r i nce ton, t he is gitis, fever, headache, vom- he a lt h depar t m ent s e e s iting, weakness, confusion, about 70 to 80 cases a year, printed loss of coordination, speech out of over 200 reportable difficulties, seizures, or no illnesses. Typical symptoms entirely symptoms at all, according include fever, headache, faon to the U.S. Centers for Dis- tigue, and a characteristic ease Control and Preven- skin rash called erythema recycled tion. There is no vaccine migrans. or treatment available, and “Lyme can be pretty depaper. individuals with other pre- bilitating, but it is prevent-

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Seda-Schreiber described an extensive array of activities in conjunction with the Pride Parade, starting the night before with Parade Queen and Miss Gay New Jersey Lady Victoria Courtez leading a “Drag Me to Yoga” class at 6 p.m. at BRCSJ headquarters on Wiggins Street, then the first mini-parade down to the Princeton Arts Council for a Queer Pride Dance at 8 p.m., featuring Grand Marshal Mike Hot-Pence. With 40 different businesses, nonprofits, school groups, and others already registered, and an enthusiastic online response, SedaSchreiber is hoping for a sizable crowd. A volunteer

meeting last Saturday drew more than 50 supporters. “But this is not about the size of the crowd,” he said. “It’s about that one individual in the midst of that crowd who will find solace, acceptance, and love.” G over nor Phil Mur phy and First Lady Tammy Murphy, Assemblyman Andrew Zwicker, and most of the members of Princeton Council are expected to attend, Seda-Schreiber noted. The inaugural Princeton P r i d e Pa r a d e w a s c on ceived by Seda-Schreiber a nd B RC S J C om m u n it y Outreach Coordinator Carol Watchler a few months ago as a way to celebrate Pride Month and spotlight LGBTQIA work done lo cally, especially the current

initiatives of the younger generation. The idea quickly won the support of Mayor L i z L e mp e r t, P r i n ce ton Council members, business and community leaders, and the local Police, Fire Safety, and Health Departments. Hoping to see the momentum from the Pride Parade carry over to the ongoing work of the BRCSJ, SedaSchreiber noted that the Center would be introducing a sliding fee scale, with no one turned away for lack of funds; a therapy program for LGBTQIA youth; social and political programming for LGBTQIA adults; and two events highlighting the history of the movement: Stonewall on June 26 and a talk w ith Hugh Ryan, author of When Brooklyn

Was Queer, on Saturday, July 6. Further information for those who want to march and support the Pride Parade is available at rustincenter.org/pride-parade. Reflecting on the history of the Pr ide movement, Frank Manhood, 80-yearold founding member of Gay People Princeton, recalled, “Although I was out to my friends, in my early 30s and on the staff of the University, I was a little reluctant to come to the new Gay Alliance of Princeton group that had just been started by two brave undergraduate students in 1972. I’m so grateful I did, and it changed my life.” He continued, “The coming together of so many others like myself gave us the courage to protest, march, petition, and succeed in changing laws that discriminated against us. So much of this struggle has taken place on the state and national level, and it is thrilling that the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice has taken up the mantle for us here in the Princeton area. It’s hard to believe that this will be the first such event here, and I’m so grateful the BRCSJ is providing us with this exciting opportunity.” —Donald Gilpin

ONLINE PROUD PARADERS: Gay-Straight Alliance members celebrate at a Pride event at the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice (BRCSJ), with the BRCSJ float in the background. The first-ever Princeton Pride Parade will start out from the Municipal Building, heading up Witherspoon Street, on Saturday, June 22 at 11 a.m. (Photo courtesy of the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice)

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11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

Pride Parade

FLEDGLING GARDENERS: At Lambertville Academy on a recent morning, preschoolers planted a garden for wildlife with help from Lambertville Goes Wild.

Old TV and Radio In Red Mill Exhibit

Mike Molnar, co-curator of the “Sights and Sounds of Old TV and Radio” exhibition at the Red Mill at 56 Main Street in Clinton, will lecture on Tuesday, June 25 at 6:30 p.m. Molnar is a lifelong collector and aficionado of antique radios and televisions, and lent both his collection and expertise to the exhibition. T h is lec t ure w ill ta ke place in the Tomson Gallery where Sights and Sounds is currently on view. Molnar will focus on how the

technology changed over time and how, in turn, that technolog y changed our lives. Wine and refreshments will be served. Please note that the Tomson Gallery is located on the second floor of the Mill and is not handicapped or wheelchair accessible. Admission is $10 for Museum members and $15 for the general public. For more information or to reser ve a space, contact Assistant Director Marie Salthouse at programs @ theredmill.org or (908) 7354101 x100.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019 • 12

Youth Committee continued from page one

Wasserman noted that PHS students’ concerns last year about racism in town led to a YAC collaboration with Corner House to organize the Stand Against Racism Rally in Hinds Plaza for students and other community members. One of the highlights of the past year for YAC was a presentation called “Middle School Milestones: The Importance of Emotional WellBeing” for John Witherspoon Middle School seventh-graders. It provided information and tips for middle schoolers getting ready for high school. “Through skits and monologues and activities, we taught seventh-graders how to manage their time wisely, declutter their schedules, and maintain a low-stress life,” said Wasserman. “We touched upon how to prioritize education, rest, relationships, and personal time, and how to find a general balance in life while seeking out help from others when needed,” Nammanamanchi added. “This was such a rewarding and important experience for us as we were passing on our knowledge to the future of the town.” Wasserman and Nammanamanchi both mentioned that another high point of the year for YAC was the PHS Alumni Panel, which focused on the arts, bringing back four PHS alumni to speak to the student body. The four artists in different fields talked about how they found success and were able to redefine success in nontraditional ways.

Other memorable projects involved work with the Princeton Civil Rights Commission and with Sustainable Princeton. Plans for next year’s YAC include expanding on their successful programs from this year and focusing particularly on mental health among Princeton youth, according to Nammanamanchi. Leticia Fraga, Council liaison to the YAC, noted that, in talking with YAC members and applicants, “The No. 1 issue, last year and this year, was stress and emotional wellbeing. This is not only stress from academic pressure to excel, but also emotional wellbeing in the world of social media. They have less face-to-face interaction, and social media is impacting our youth, who are viewing life from a perspective that is not real.” Fraga praised the YAC members, a total of 12 students — four each from grades 10, 11, and 12, and emphasized that this is a student-centered organization. “They’re doing great work,” she said. “I am so impressed by them, so hopeful for us that they are the ones leading the way now. They run it. They organize it. They generate the ideas for what they want to do.” The YAC is a diverse group in many ways, but both Fraga and the students mentioned the need to bring in members from the town’s private schools and from the Latinx community. “The most important and valuable aspect of the committee,” said Fraga, “is to provide a perspective for those of us who are implementing policy.

It’s important for us to hear from their perspective what the most important issues are and also ideas about how to tackle those issues and how to reach their peers. We’re living in a different world now.” —Donald Gilpin

Free Weekly Tours Of Princeton Airport

Since 1985, the operators of Princeton Airport have opened its doors to visitors to experience the daily operations of the airfield. This summer, Princeton Airport invites the public to free tours during the months of July and August, every Tuesday morning. Starting at 10:30 a.m., the tours will address the past 108 years of the airport’s history, present day-to-day operations and facilities, and the future of the airport. As a privately-owned public use facility, Princeton Airport provides such services as flight training for careers, business, or pleasure in both airplanes and helicopters; sales and services of new and used airplanes; private helicopter charters; and indoor and outdoor parking of aircraft. The public will have the opportunity to walk around and view the different aircraft based at the field. These aircraft consist of homebuilt, experimental, aerobatic, and a variety of others. An explanation of the procedures employed by pilots and the airport management will be made to ensure the safety record of Princeton Airport. A visit into the maintenance hangar will show the public how and why the aircraft must comply with the Federal Aviation Regula-

BASEBALL AT MORVEN: Morven Museum & Garden hosted “Talking Baseball with Bob Ryan and Art Shamsky” last Thursday, the first in a series of events to be held in conjunction with its new exhibit “New Jersey Baseball: From the Cradle to the Major Leagues, 1855-1915.” Pictured from left are Ryan, moderator Bill Glovin, and Shamsky. The exhibit runs through October 27. For more information, visit www.morven.org. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn) tions. During the tour, visitors may be invited to sit inside an airplane to observe and start to understand how the controls work. The tours take approximately 40 minutes. Groups are welcome. Tours will not be conducted during inclement weather. Princeton Airport is at 41 Airpark Road in Montgomery Township off Route 206. Visit www.princetonairport.com for more information.

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School Matters New Assistant Principal at PHS

Rashone Johnson, a graduate of the College of New Jersey and a physical education teacher and coach in the district for more than 20 years, has been appointed as the newest assistant principal at Princeton High School (PHS). The Princeton Public Schools Board of Education selected Johnson, who has served in the past as interim assistant principal at PHS and was named 2018 Track Coach of the Year by nj.com, from more than 200 candidates. “Rashone has developed positive relationships with literally thousands of students, and he has fostered deep connections with his colleagues and within our community,” said Superintendent Steve Cochrane, describing Rashone as “accomplished and caring.” Rashone will be one of three assistant principals at PHS under the leadership of Jessica Baxter, who was recently appointed as the new principal at PHS.

DLI Program Accepting Applications for September Princeton Public Schools’ Dual Language Immersion (DLI) program at Community Park Elementary School (CP) will accept applications during the summer from families with kindergarten and first-graders who would like to participate in the program in September. No prior experience in a foreign language is required. “Our rising fifth graders are the first cohort of children to have been part of the Dual Language Immersion program since first grade, and I can’t tell you how proud I am to see the success and expansion of this program,” said CP Principal Dineen Gruchacz. “The program has been an amazing academic success story for our district.” The program is open to all students in the district, including those in the Littlebrook, Riverside, and Johnson Park neighborhoods. Busing is provided for any student in the district who wants to attend the DLI program and lives beyond walking distance. Call CP at (609) 806-4230 for more information.

Princeton Academy Fourth-Graders Launch Handmade Boat FORGING THE FUTURE: The Princeton Youth Advisory Committee advises the Princeton mayor and Council on issues of interest to youth in the community, recommending policies and sponsoring educational, informational, and social events for youth. Back row, from left: Denzel Washington, Roei Zakut, Nandita Ammanamanchi, Eli Wasserman, Julia Zhang, and Sanyukta Mudakannavar. Front row: Shoshi Henderson, Ben Quainton, Carly Feldstein, Anushka Bhatia, Michelle Girouard, and Akshay Bhamidipati.

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WE BUY CARS AND TRACTORS

On Mercer Lake in West Windsor on June 3, Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart fourth-grade students successfully launched Soar, a boat they had built by hand over the previous eight months. The project-based learning experience, supported by teachers Meghan Dilmore, Dee Harris, and Drew Schoudel, included many hours of sanding, nailing, constructing, priming, and painting before the maiden voyage. All of the fourth-graders had the opportunity to sail in Soar, and many parents and grandparents were present at the Mercer Lake event to celebrate the students’ accomplishments.

Community Park School Awarded $2,000 Sustainability Grant Community Park Elementary School (CP) has been awarded a $2,000 Sustainable Jersey for Schools capacity-building grant funded by the PSEG Foundation. “I’m thrilled that Community Park received this grant,” said CP Principal Dineen Gruchacz. “Our CP Green Team has worked with Sustainable Jersey in the past, and they are a great organization. We’re looking forward to expanding our student Green Team Club next year, and this grant makes it possible.” The grant is one of 30 $2,000 grants and four $10,000 grants distributed to support on-the-ground sustainability and capacity-building projects in schools and districts across New Jersey.

Hopewell Valley Education Foundation Awards Grants Hopewell Valley Public Schools have received more than $26,000 in spring 2019 grants from the Hopewell Valley Education Foundation to support innovation and excellence. The grants will help to support the purchase of culturally diverse books at all the Hopewell Valley Regional School District schools; to add a build-your-own earth oven to Hopewell Elementary School’s outdoor garden; to provide the Swivl system for Bear Tavern Elementary School teachers to make audio and video recordings for professional development and self-assessment; to fund the purchase of four Glowforge 3D printers for each of the four district elementary schools; to create a rain garden and green roof at Toll Gate Elementary School; and to support the visit to Central High School’s Global Diversity Day of former Rutgers University football player Eric Legrand, who was paralyzed in a 2010 game.


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13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019 • 14

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Letters do not necessarily reflect the views of Town Topics Email letters to: editor@towntopics.com or mail to: Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528

Response to Cohen’s Status Report On Seminary Redevelopment Process

PCTV Has Increased League’s Ability to Educate Voters

To the Editor: I am writing on behalf of the League of Women Voters of the Princeton Area because, with Council’s recent decision to divert for tax relief the cable franchise fees which originally funded Princeton Community TV, voters are losing a significant public service. Since 2010, and at the invitation of George McCollough, executive director of PCTV, the League has collaborated with Princeton TV to videotape and broadcast League forums. We have covered all Princeton mayoral races and Democratic primary races for Princeton Council, the contested races for Princeton Council and School Board, the Mercer County freeholder and county executive race of 2011, the 16th Legislative District races of 2011, 2013, and 2015, and the 12th Congressional races of 2014 and 2016. George McCollough not only videotapes the forums — adjusting the sound and lighting at the various venues and zooming in on the candidates — but he adds a title and introductory information and then places the name and website of the candidates on screen as they speak. In March of this year, I wrote to the mayor and Council about the importance of Princeton Community TV to the League’s mission of informing voters about their candidates. Mayor Lempert kindly assured me that she would find someone else to videotape the League’s forums. But she didn’t say whether the League or municipality would incur fees. The League of Women Voters of the Princeton Area does not have the money to hire a videographer or rent the camera, sound, and lighting equipment needed to videotape, polish, and post its forums. One of our members, trained by George McCollough, can videotape, but the League has relied on PCTV to loan us the equipment needed at the forum itself and to do the polishing and posting at the studio. And who will train future League videographers? It is not as easy to produce a show as Council implies in its argument for terminating funding. Voters want to watch these forums. I’ve received requests for the broadcast schedule before it’s published because some voters are eager to watch a forum with their spouse in the comfort of their TV room. Every year the League’s forums rank either 9 or 10 as the most-watched programs on Princeton TV in October and November. As to the video, we often garner over 2,000 voters watching a given race, and an astounding 5,000 voters viewed, at least in part, the Lempert/Woodbridge mayoral debate. Is it unfair to Princeton that Montgomery can see a 16th Legislative District forum or Lawrence view that of a 12th Congressional? Perhaps. But couldn’t we also frame PCTV’s outreach as a public service beneficial to Princetonians? It has greatly increased the Princeton Area League’s ability to educate voters in municipalities governed by the same elected officials as Princeton. Princeton Community TV has performed a public service to voters since it first suggested broadcasting League forums nine years ago. The loss of PCTV will be devastating to the League’s mission of informing voters about their candidates. CHRYSTAL SCHIVELL Voter Service, League of Women Voters of the Princeton Area Monroe Lane

To the Editor: We take issue with a number of unsubstantiated and inaccurate statements that Mr. Cohen has made. “Recently, a few neighbors came forward to express their dissatisfaction with the current design.” The reality is that almost all neighbors have opposed the scale of the development being out of context with the residential neighborhood and the massive disparity with what would be allowed under current zoning guidelines. “Further benefits to public storm water management and our Affordable Housing Plan are expected if the project moves into the next stage of a Redevelopment Plan.” The contribution to storm water management is as much a function of the impact of mitigating the impact of 180plus people. There is a substantial concern that the level of local traffic will increase significantly. If built as proposed the benefits of reduced short term commuter traffic benefits are more than outweighed by relocating 35 families and 41 children to Princeton from West Windsor. “It is also true that the Redevelopment Statute permits the municipality to require financial contributions in connection with a Redevelopment Plan, an important tool that many municipalities use to benefit the public interest.” The issue in question is that the town has not been clear on the importance and size of financial contributions related to the approval of this project. It is of substantial concern that the current taxpayers of this area are being overridden in terms of their concerns for a short term, one-time contribution to help the fiscal status of Princeton. Mr. Cohen is also involved in negotiating the Affordable Housing settlement and there is an inherent conflict for him to be driving the zoning decision, and negotiating a payment to an affordable housing fund that is directly tied to the density ultimately approved. “In light of recent concerns raised by these letterwriters and others, the Seminary has proposed a hiatus in the ad hoc committee process to allow them to redouble their efforts over the summer to find creative solutions which will satisfy the broadest cross-section of Princeton residents.” It is clear from Mr. Cohen’s last statement that he lacks impartiality and a sense of the interests of the taxpayers of Princeton. His reference to voters and taxpayers as ‘letter-writers’ is simply unforgivable and reflects his dismissive approach in public meetings and his bias toward development over community-sensitive changes that better respect established neighborhoods. At a minimum, to restore confidence in this process, Mr. Cohen should consider stepping down from his role of chairman of the Ad Hoc Committee. His role, negotiating the COAH settlement, creates an inherent conflict. This may jeopardize thoughtful planning and result in a payment from PTS to help the town deal with their obligation, at the expense of neighbors and tax payers. We need a person leading this process that will embrace the genuine feedback from residents and is seen to be impartial, to To the Editor: fairly consider this development proposal from PTS. I salute the Bayard Rustin Center for initiating the Pride JOHN AND RUTH SAYER JIM AND JO BUTLER Parade coming this Saturday, starting at 11 a.m. at the Library Place Hibben Road Princeton Municipal Building. Family and community acCAROLINE CLEAVES DOUG PALMER AND ceptance are hugely important for everyone, but especially Edgehill Street CHRISTIANIA FOGLIO for LGBTQ+ youth, so this is not without consequences. RAKESH & SOPHIA Mercer Street The parade is a shout-out of acceptance and affection. KUMAR STEVE AND SHIRLEY The Rustin Center says on its invitation “All are welcome, Campbelton Road KERN all are loved!” ANITA WU Mercer Street Through moderating the local PFLAG support group for Armour Road JUSTIN TAFFER families, friends, and allies of LGBTQ+ people these past CHRISTOPHER RICE Stockton Street four years at monthly meetings, I’ve had direct experience Library Place DEAN & JILL MITCHELL learning about multiple families with LGBTQ+ kids. Suicide LEE HAGAN & MIMI Hodge Road attempts often come up and are discussed. One father said MEAD-HAGAN DOROTHY AND of his child, “Alive is what I hope for and am thankful for, Armour Road CHARLES PLOHN, JR. alive and happy would be even better.” MICHAEL AND SUSAN HEAD Hodge Road The rate of attempted suicide among lesbian and gay Hibben Road youth is almost five times higher than among heterosexual youth. No less than 40 percent of transgender adults in a national study reported having made a suicide attempt, nine out of ten of them before they reached the age of 25. Love, indeed, is the answer. Lesbian, gay, and bi-sexual To the Editor: I am not going to respond point by point, as I find argu- youth from families that accept them are 8.4 times less likely ing in public just tends to heighten emotions and entrench to have attempted suicide than LGB youth from highly rejectpeoples’ positions. In the aftermath of last week’s Council ing families (all statistics from the Trevor Project). The more meeting, I reached out to this group on Saturday to request we as a community demonstrate the love and acceptance the a meeting to try to find common ground, and am hope- Bayard Rustin Center is fostering, the better. I will march in ful that they will be willing to work together to improve their parade! SYLVIA STENGLE the plan, as have so many of their neighbors, rather than Markham Road close off dialogue and leave us to plan without their input. We have already taken steps to extend the area in need of redevelopment, per Jo Butler’s suggestion at the May 31st ad hoc committee meeting, and slowed down the process to give the Seminary’s designers an opportunity to creatively address the neighbors’ concerns. I remain To the Editor: Full disclosure: I’m a Princeton TV member and I don’t optimistic – while no one is going to get everything they want in this process, everyone can get more than they live in Princeton — and I’m one of the reasons Princeton no thought was possible at the outset, if we all work together. longer wants to fund the cable access station. Yet by paying COUNCILMAN DAVID E. COHEN membership dues and fees for classes, and providing content without compensation, my use is certainly an asset, not a cost (and in line with the original bylaws; PCTV founders sought ®� an inclusive community). est. 1946 Eons ago I studied filmmaking in college. At the time, un-

Saluting Bayard Rustin Center For Initiating the Pride Parade

Council Member David Cohen Responds to Residents’ Letter

Keep the Lights On At Community TV

Town Topics a Princeton tradition!

less you had a wealthy aunt or uncle willing to front you six figures, it was impossible to make a film. After 36 years in print journalism, and being downsized as an editor in 2010, I still wanted to use my skills to make the public aware of cultural issues. PCTV, where I’ve taken professional level classes in video editing, lighting, and documentary production, has enabled me to make numerous short documentaries that have screened at film festivals, arts centers, historical societies, and on the station itself. PCTV provides a community where I can bounce ideas off others and get important feedback, as well as use equipment and seek guidance when needed. George McCollough and Sharyn Murray have infinite patience in helping the legions of producers who come through the door. Some Princeton Council members have claimed that cable access is no longer necessary with YouTube and Vimeo, but that is a false assertion. PCTV provides curation of its programming — unlike media sharing sites, where anyone can put up a video, George and Sharyn hone the programming. Where else can you see an in-depth interview with Trenton Mayor Reed Gusciora, or a documentary about a Trenton High School program that provides prenatal education and parenting skills for teen parents, as well as daycare for their offspring, to enable the parents to stay in school and be good parents? Or a short film about how a drama program at ARC Mercer enriches the lives of those with developmental disabilities? And yes, these are not Princeton-centric topics — we’re all connected as part of a larger community. As a Princetonbased journalist, I know Princeton residents are interested in the world around them. Princeton TV has cachet. When you tell subjects that the video will air at PCTV, they are proud to participate. At a time when the business model for traditional journalism is broken, I would argue that PCTV’s model of community cable access — giving training, equipment, and the right to broadcast — is essential for civic dialogue in a democratic society. The current funding formula, which it is paid for by cable franchise fees and doesn’t cost the taxpayer a dime, makes perfect sense. Rather than pull the plug on this asset, let’s celebrate the cultural capital it adds to the region. ILENE DUBE Princeton Junction

Princeton Citizens for PCTV Ask Council Not to Defund

To the Editor: We are about to lose a remarkable public resource that offers viewers the opportunity to comment on issues, events, and news relevant to the community. Princeton Community Television is going to go dark. As a free community access channel that airs programming created locally, PCTV not only offers Princeton residents an outlet to express their views on local issues, but unlike YouTube, the internet and Twitter, provides a physical space where they can meet, collaborate, and organize. It builds community. Media experts George Gerbner (“The Cultivation Theory”), Tim Wu (“The Attention Merchant”) and Philip M. Napoli (“What Happens When Your Local News is Coming from Another State?”) concur that public participation is key to keeping democracy strong. The intent was to offset the power of cable conglomerates that often set the national agenda with little or no oversight. PCTV (originally TV30) was launched in the mid 1980s. Funding was and still is derived from cable companies who are required by law to donate a portion of their revenues (franchise fees) to provide facilities and airtime that allow the public to speak it mind. Franchise fees are part of the cost residents who subscribed to cable television, pay. Until this year, those fees have been used to fund PCTV. According to our mayor, “PCTV is relatively unique.” Why then would you not keep it? In this era of cable-dominated news, the public’s voice has faded. Grassroots community empowerment is needed even more for democracy to thrive. To shut down PCTV, a place that affords face to face collaborative programming, seems counterproductive to this goal. Please tell the town Council to reconsider defunding PCTV. JANET WOLINETZ ELLEN GILBERT Bainbridge Street Stuart Road CHRISTINE GRANT ROZ GOLDBERG Brooks Bend Bainbridge Street CAREN STURGES ANNE REEVES Herrontown Road Olden Avenue FREDRIKA SCHWERIN Leabrook Lane

Books Chinese Poet Reading In Community Room

Award-winning Chinese poet Xue Di (雪迪) (pronounced shway- dee ) will present a multi-media, bilingual poetry reading and casual talk at noon on Sunday June 23 in the Community Room at the Princeton Public Library. C om i ng of age u nder Chairman Mao’s Cultural Revolution (1966-77), which suppressed all literary works, Xue Di came across forbidden poems and became determined to be a poet as a young boy.

The poet will read his poems in the original Chinese, followed by English translations read by American poet Jonathan Wells. Xue Di will take questions from the audience and will offer comments and perspectives in English to heighten understanding about China and its people, and poetry in the East. Refreshments will be served after the reading, and Xue Di will sign copies of his books, which will be available for purchase. The talk is co-sponsored by the library and The Princeton Festival.


Nat King Cole at 100 — “To Love and Be Loved in Return”

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hile the St. Louis Blues were on the way to their first Stanley Cup with Laura Branigan’s “Gloria” as their victory anthem, I was celebrating the centenary of Nat King Cole (1919-1965) with submersive listenings to the 4-CD set, Cool Cole: The King Cole Trio Story. My message for the Blues’ crosstown brothers the St. Louis Cardinals was delivered by repeated playings of Cole’s hit from 75 years ago, “Straighten Up and Fly Right.” I’d convinced myself that the song deserved some credit for the April surge that lifted the Redbirds from the depths to the best record in baseball. Alas, true to the song’s built-in warning, “Cool down, papa, don’t you blow your top,” the Cards cooled way down and blew it, losing every series they played in the unmerry month of May. Nat gave me a message for that, too, in “Lost April,” which played in my mind with a slight change in the lyric, “I thought a single win could lead to heaven, but the month had numbered days, and winning couldn’t last.” In the actual lyric, it’s “kiss” for “win” and “love” that couldn’t last, but the way Nat sings it, there’s more to life than winning and losing, the healing has begun, and life goes sadly smiling on. As a devoted follower of the National Pastime who once lost his voice cheering for his team, Cole knew the bumpy road from high to low, the symbiotic relationship of baseball and the blues. He loved all sports, and having played W.C. Handy in the 1958 biopic The St. Louis Blues, he’d have undoubtedly been delighted when the NHL expansion team from St. Louis was named for Handy’s most famous composition. Welcome to the Neighborhood In 1948, “Lost April” appeared as the B side of the number one hit “Nature Boy,” the song about a “strange enchanted” seer whose message was “The greatest thing you’ll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.” In August of the same year, as that message was being heard by Americans on radios, phonographs, and juke boxes, east and west, north and south, the singer and his pregnant wife Maria bought a house in Hancock Park, an exclusive allwhite Los Angeles neighborhood. When word got out that the Coles were moving into the community, the realtor who handled the $85,000 sale was theatened with “a serious automobile accident,” a cross was burned on the singer’s lawn, stones were thrown through his windows, his dog was poisoned, and racist signs befouled the front yard. A lawyer representing the neighbors filed an affidavit forbidding the Coles to move into their home because they were not “Christian Caucasians.” The lawyer’s way of alerting the neighborhood to the approaching catastrophe suggests a cartoon of white postwar paranoia: “How would you like it, if you had to come out of your home and see a Negro walking down the street wearing a big wide hat, a zoot suit, a long chain, and yellow shoes?”

There it is, the “Straighten Up and Fly Right” side of the unprecedented dynamic Gary Giddins articulates in Visions of Jazz: “No other performer in history had two such profoundly different public personalities ... the hip and jivey leader of a black jazz combo” and “the eminent crooner” with a predominantly white following. Cole called a press conference to explain his position (“My wife and I like our home very much and we intend to stay there the same as any other American citizen would”), which led to a meeting with the Property Owners Association. When he was told that the people of Hancock Park did not want any “undesirables moving in,” his answer was to promise that if

Who is Aye Guy? Natalie brought her dad back to life in 1991 for a time-and-space-defying duet 40 years after he first recorded “Unforgettable.” In one video, where she appears to conjure her father with one of his signature songs, what’s unforgettable is the vocalist and the voice. The surge of interest in Cole inspired by the spectral duet also led to the general reevaluation of the pianistic genius described in Giddins’s account of the “resurrection” — his “wit and speed, lightning reflexes that hardly ever call attention to his technique but constantly spice his solos, interludes, intros, and codas.” Referring to his “lucidity and swing,” Giddins points out that on

a singer “of wide popularity” as well as “one of the most important jazz pianists of the day,” with his “advanced harmonic concept and impeccable swing.” Among the “disparate piano stylists” influenced by Cole are Bud Powell and Bill Evans, who called Cole “the most underrated jazz pianist in the history of jazz.” The qualities Kirchner attributes to Lester Young — “romantic, poetic, dreaming, urgent, melancholy, humorous, cheerful, aggressive, showing great drive” — are no less applicable to Cole, whose playing redefines “accompaniment.” On the first track, a Young composition called “Back to the Land,” Cole creates a blues and boogie roadhouse ambiance, his solo a song within a song, actually two songs, one solid, strong, and funky, the other playful and sportive. The Abiding Voice The “strange enchanted” truth is that King Cole could never have afforded his castle in Hancock Park had he given his playing priority over his singing. But then I doubt that he had a choice. His voice was him, his spirit, his humanity. What ultimately made him rich and famous and beloved was his abiding presence, the way he seemed to live a song beyond merely performing it. No matter how old you were, he spoke to you as a thoughtful, caring companion, which meant a lot if you happened to be a teenager eating your heart out over a failed romance or the death of a pet or not making the football team. It finally beggars all the ironies and idiocies of racial prejudice that this “undesirable” neighbor is the same familiar household spirit singing hearthside holiday lullabies like “Christmas Song” to families who loved the voice and wanted nothing to do with the man. o wonder I only had room for Cole the singer in those days, having grown up in a house haunted by “Nature Boy,” which my parents played constantly, and sometimes even “Lost April,” thanks no doubt to my more-bluethan-not mother’s sentimental susceptibility to a song about the month of her birth. To be honest, I didn’t actually connect “Lost April” with the Cardinals’ losing streak (at the moment they seem to be flying again) until I listened to it a few days ago on the Bose Wave and was undone by one of those heart-turning-over phrasings where the “numbered days” of April coalesce with the aching resolution of “So when they passed,” simple words lighting the way to “I lost love and you, and April, too.” There’s enough enlightened melancholy in that sublime interval to mend broken hearts everywhere. —Stuart Mitchner The quotes about Hancock Park are from “When Nat King Cole Moved In” by Hadley Meares; the Dec. 20, 2018 article, which includes photographs by Kwasi Boyd-Bouldin, can be found at la.curbed.com. I found the CD set, like all good things, at the Princeton Record Exchange.

N

he saw any undesirables moving in, he’d be the first to complain. Five children were raised in the house on Muirfield Road, including the singer Natalie Cole (1950-2015), who told the Wall Street Journal, “I loved growing up there ... I loved when my dad was home. He liked to sit in the living room and watch boxing and baseball on TV.” According to Cole’s biographer Marianne Ruuth, in time the same residents who had been “up in arms were bragging about having Nat King Cole for a neighbor.” He lived in the house until his death in 1965, Maria remained there until the early 1970s. In 2003 the residents of Hancock Park named the local postal branch the Nat King Cole Post Office at a ceremony attended by his daughters Carole and Natalie, who thinks her father “would be flabbergasted and probably pleased.” She remembers people “putting firecrackers in our rose bushes” and “a burning cross on our yard” as late as the 1950s.

“practically every one of those relatively rare occasions in which he performed with major jazz soloists, he stole the limelight.” One of those rare occasions was the April 1946 trio session with Lester Young and Buddy Rich, which is what made me want to write about Cole as a pianist long before I realized it was his centenary. David Stone Martin’s striking red and yellow Leaning Tower of Pisa cover design caught my eye back in the era of 10-inch LPs when jazz was a new world for a 14-year-old to explore. When I picked up the record in those adolescent days and saw “Aye Guy” listed as the pianist, I thought a player by that name actually existed and may have gone around asking “Who’s Aye Guy” until someone older and wiser put me right. In 1946, the man disguised as Aye Guy was more famous than Lester Young, as Bill Kirchner points out in his liner notes for the 1994 CD reissue, where Cole is a “musician’s favorite” like Young, and

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15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

RECORD REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019 • 16

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P R I N C E T O N ’ S N AT U R A L F O O D S G R O C E RY F O R 4 8 Y E A R S

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Shopping Center present

6.27 7.4

MUSIC REVIEW

T

Princeton Symphonic Brass Presents Evening of Latin Music

here is a relatively new performing ensemble in Princeton focusing on repertoire for a specific set of instruments. Founded in 2016, Princeton Symphonic Brass draws players from other area ensembles to explore music written specifically for brass instruments — horn, trumpet, trombone, euphonium, and tuba. This past Saturday night, Princeton Symphonic Brass presented a concert of “City Lights, Latin Nights” in the recently renovated Hillman Performance Hall at Westminster Choir College. Led by conductor Lawrence Kursar, the 11 brass and two percussion players of Symphonic Brass performed to an appreciative audience and showed some fancy footwork on instruments often performing from deep in the background of an orchestra. Dressed casually and sitting in a semi-circle in the hall, the members of the ensemble created an informal performance atmosphere which did not detract from achieving high technical standards. Most of the works performed Saturday night were pieces for other instrumental combinations arranged for brass ensemble, giving the audience the chance to hear familiar or new repertoire with different orchestral colors. The program explored music of Latin American composers, as well as a few American works reflecting Spanish flavor or influence. Symphonic Brass opened the program with an iconic fanfare tailor-made for brass — Aaron Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man, composed as a concert season-opener in World War II and arranged for this group by trumpet member Ed Hirschman. The four trumpets of the ensemble were well blended and rhythmically precise, presenting a clean dialog between upper and lower brass. The other major American work on the program was George Gershwin’s one-movement An American in Paris, arranged for brass by Michael Allen. The ensemble began the piece lightly, with exact playing from percussionists Todd Nichols and Mark Bencivengo helping to capture Gershwin’s musical cityscape. A saucy middle section featured crisp trumpet solos by Hirschman and Charlie Megules. The four trumpeters of Symphonic Brass each performed on multiple instruments, creating varying musical effects

Blawenberg Band Brass/Americana Big Country and the Finger Pickin’Good Band Country

and palettes. Use of the standard trumpet in Bb, cornet, and piccolo-like high trumpet added diverse colors to the music, especially to the “toreador” character of certain works. The bullfighter atmosphere particularly came to life in Georges Bizet’s “Aragonaise” from the opera Carmen, as well as Anthony DiLorenzo’s The Blade of Spain. The Bizet excerpt was marked by Megules’ solo trumpet playing and precise tambourine rhythms from Bencivengo. DiLorenzo’s work showed quick and clean playing from both Megules and fellow trumpeter Brian Woodward. The Latin American works performed depicted Mexico and Spain, capturing several dance forms. The tango was the most recognizable, heard in two excerpts from Argentine composer Astor Piazzolla’s Tango Suite. Both of these short pieces were highlighted by muted trumpets, with slinky passages played by Hirschman and a rich euphonium melody played by Ray Henricksen. The Cuban danzón was depicted in Jeremy Van Hoy’s arrangement of Danzón #2 of Mexican composer Arturo Márquez. Led by trombonist Lars Wendt, the dance theme was answered by Megules on high trumpet, with the full ensemble well unified in the syncopated rhythms and musical transitions. This piece also showed a great deal of musical individuality among the players. The Mexican waltz could be heard in Felipe Villanueva’s Vals Poético, arranged by Symphonic Brass horn player Craig Levesque. Led by euphonium soloist Henricksen, the musical material was also well conveyed by the horn and trumpet sections. Throughout the piece, Symphonic Brass maintained the European waltz roots of Villanueva’s music. rinceton Symphonic Brass has only been performing in the area for a handful of years, but the organization has built a loyal following. Although the space at Hillman Hall was almost too resonant at times for an ensemble of brass instruments playing at top volume, Princeton Symphonic Brass seems to have found a good home at Westminster Choir College with fans who appreciate the power of brass. —Nancy Plum

P

P R I N C E TO N

Adam Feldman, Rabbi

N E W

J E R S EY

Jeff Warschauer, Cantor

7.11

Essie Rock/Blues

7.18

The Blue Meanies Beatles Tribute

7.25

Alborada Spanish Dance Theatre Spanish Music & Flamenco Dance

Award winning K-8 Religious School

Innovative new teen program

8.1

Lauren Marsh Singer/Songwriter Indie Pop

Spirit-filled young family programming

8.8

T.S. Project Motown

Extraordinary Adult Education & Programming

8.15

Princeton School of Rock Classic Rock

8.22

Taina Asili Afro-Latin Jazz/Reggae

8.29

Amazin Grace and the GLB Band R&B/Gospel

Don’t forget to bring a blanket or lawnchair! Rain or shine.

A great Jewish Community awaits you! Shabbat and Holiday Worship Services

Interfaith Families Welcome

Come meet us this Summer! To sign up for informal meet & greet with clergy call Judi at 609-454-0110.

Ice Cream Social (the scoop’s on us!) July 16 at Thomas Sweets, Nassau Street from 4:30 - 6:00 pm August 21 at Thomas Sweets, Skillman from 4:30 - 6:00 pm

Princeton Shopping Center 301 North Harrison Street

Shabbat Under the Stars

For more information, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org or princetonshoppingcenter.com.

Playground Shabbat & Supper

July 12 & August 16 at 6:30 pm

June 14 & August 16 at 5:45 pm

Shabbat in the Park at Pettoranello Gardens August 23 from 5:00 - 7:00 pm

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Saturday Morning Shabbat Katan June 8, July 20 & August 24 at 11:00 am

for further information please call our office at 609-921-0100. 435 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 • 609.921.0100 • www.thejewishcenter.org The Jewish Center is a non-profit organization whose policy is to not deny membership or education to any person based on financial need.

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SEASON OPENER: The cast of William Finn and James Lapine’s play “Falsettos,” which begins the season of Princeton Summer Theater on June 20. (Photo by Kirsten Traudt)

Princeton Summer Theater Stonewall. The first act, set Because its two acts were in 1979 and written in 1981, written a decade apart, FalStarts with “Falsettos”

As the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising brings the state of LGBTQ+ rights in America to the forefront of the national conversation, Princeton Summer Theater (PST) will open its 2019 Season on June 20 with William Finn and James Lapine’s Falsettos, directed by PST Artistic Director Daniel Krane. A reworking of two earlier one-act musicals by Finn, Falsettos begins a decade after

chronicles the shifts in family dynamics that arise after New Yorker Marvin (Michael Rosas) leaves his wife Trina (Bridget McNiff) for another man (Whizzer, played by Dylan Blau Edelstein). This turmoil develops into something darker in the second act, written in 1991, which skips forward two years and finds the play’s characters unwittingly facing the beginnings of the 1980s AIDS crisis.

settos captures the epidemic’s sudden and devastating spread while remaining true to its charming, flawed, and compassionately-drawn cast of characters. Uniting both acts is a score by Musical Director Amber Lin. Despite Falsettos’ deep roots in the late seventies and early eighties, many of its conflicts, from divorced parents fighting over a child’s coming-of-age celebration to

Choir Camp Opens In Princeton Junction

Following the successful launch of Westrick Music Academy in 2018, the organization has announced the founding of their first summer choir camp, Camp Westrick. This one-week choir camp

MARKING A MILESTONE WITH MUSIC: At the State Theatre New Jersey’s recent benefit gala in New Brunswick, jazz vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater and pianist Bill Charlap entertained. The evening, celebrating almost 100 years, had a Roaring Twenties theme. The State Theatre opened in 1921 and was designed by architect Thomas W. Lamb. (Photo by Jeffrey Auger) features choir rehearsals and performance with some of the country’s leading children’s choir directors, workshops in musical theater, classes in drumming and ukulele, and more, August 19-23. Students will develop musical and vocal technique while making friendships and learning to work together. The week culminates in a celebratory performance for family and friends. Camp runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with optional early drop-off and late pick-up available for an additional fee. Any student entering fourth through ninth grade in the fall of 2019 is welcome to participate — there are no audition requirements. Camp is held at Westrick Music Academy, 231 Clarksville Road, Princeton Junction.

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F o u n d e d i n 19 8 9 a s Princeton Girlchoir, the organization has grown over the past 30 years from 27 girls to more than 300 singing in seven choirs. In 2017, the organization added the Princeton Boychoir to its ranks with 50 boys singing in the inaugural season. To accommodate these flagship choirs and additional growing programs, the board announced in January 2018 the creation of a new umbrella organization, Westrick Music Academy (WMA), after the founder, Jan Westrick, that would continue to house Princeton Girlchoir and Princeton Boychoir as they currently stand. WMA is currently scheduling auditions for the coming season of Princeton Girlchoir and Boychoir. Auditions for new choristers will be conducted throughout June. All children who will be entering grades 3-12 in the fall are welcomed. For more information about camp, the organization, or to schedule an audition, visit www. WestrickMusic.org, or call (609) 688-1888.

Standup Comedians at ActorsNET LaughNET

On Saturday, June 22, the Heritage Center Theatre hosts L aughNET: A Night of Standup Comedy. ActorsN E T, t he center’s resident theater company, presents professional actor/ comic Marc Kaye (Catch a Rising Star) alongside comics Missy Hall (Levity Live) and Tony Parlante (Comedy Clubs Internationally). “W ho doesn’t love to laugh? ” said Joe Doyle, ActorsNET co-founder and general manager. “When Marc Kaye approached us to see if we were interested in presenting professional standup comics on our stage, we jumped at the chance. He and his co-stars, Missy Hall and Tony Parlante, are the real deal, scoring big laughs on television and in comedy clubs. So, we found a small window in which we could offer their comedy magic at The Heritage Center. We hope this will be the first of other musical and comedy shows to be interspersed with our regular productions.” LaughNET: A Night of Standup Comedy performs Saturday, June 22 at 8 p.m. at The Heritage Center Theatre, 635 N. Delmorr Avenue (Route 32), Morrisville, Pa. Admission is $20. For reservations or information, call ActorsNET at (215) 295-3694 or email actorsnet@aol.com.

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

Music and Theater

a family coming together during a serious illness, resonate today. While working on the show, Krane drew heavily on his own experiences, remarking that “[as] a queer, Jewish man living in New York, [ directing Falsettos ] has been one of the most special experiences of my life.” Founded by three Princeton undergraduates in 1968, Princeton Summer Theater was named “New Jersey’s Favorite Small Theater” in 2018, called “summer stock with a Princeton pedigree.” Falsettos will be followed by three other productions in a season which will explore love in all its forms, including: Ira Levin’s Deathtrap, William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Suzan-Lori Parks’ Topdog /Underdog. The company will also premiere an original children’s show by Princeton alumna Annika Bennett entitled Puck’s Midsummer Mischief. Falsettos will run Thursdays-Sundays from June 2030 at the Hamilton Murray Theater. General admission is $29.50 student tickets and matinees are priced at $24.50. Full-season subscriptions are available for $79. For tickets and more information, visit princetonsummertheater.org, call (732) 997- 0205, or send an email at box@princetonsummertheater.org.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019 • 18

Immersive Jazz Workshop tell them what they missed!’ gust 29, at the Princeton Is Open to Teen Musicians It is an intense week where Shopping Center.

Young people looking for an immersive experience in jazz music this summer should head to Mercer County Community College’s (MCCC’s) downtown campus. MCCC presents its 2019 Summer Jazz Institute, a master class for high school and college students July 29 to August 2, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The intensive one-week workshop takes place in Trenton Hall at 137 North Broad Street on the college’s James Kerney Campus (JKC). MCCC Music faculty member Scott Hornick is coordinating the program for the second consecutive year and will teach some of the classes. ALL ABOUT JAZZ: Jazz trumpeter Terell Stafford is among the professionals who will teach at the “The best comment from last Summer Jazz Institute July 29-August 2. The one-week workshop at Mercer County Community summer was from a student College’s Trenton location is open to high school and college students. Stafford is show here at who said, ‘I can’t wait to go back to my high school and last year’s workshop.

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the students do music for eight hours each day. By the end of the day, they were tired but excited,” he said. In addition to Hornick, instructors include Jeanine Haden, Jim Holton, and Joe Falcey. The featured guest artist is Terell Stafford, a professional jazz trumpet player and current director of Jazz Studies at the Boyer College of Music and Dance at Temple University. The curriculum includes instruction in instrumental and vocal music, jazz theory, improvisation, ear training, ensembles, and clinics. There will be opportunities for vocalists and instrumentalists to practice and perform individually and together. Students can expect to be immersed in jazz instruction. Even during the lunch break, important recordings will be playing. “Our classes will cover the full gamut of jazz music, from practice methods, accompanying, group playing, and even promotion,” Hornick said. “One of the week’s highlights will be a dynamic presentation by Terell Stafford, who will share his story and outlook on playing.” The week concludes with an outdoor arts festival in the JKC parking lot (opposite Trenton Hall) on August 2, starting at 3 p.m. The community is invited to this free event, which will feature local artists displaying their work, the opening of a new photography exhibit at the JKC Gallery, food trucks, and musical performances by st udents and facult y throughout the afternoon. Tuition for the week is $250. For more information, call (609) 570-3735 or 570-3716, or register online at www. mccc.edu/community_youth.

Blue Jersey Band Announces Area Gigs

The Blue Jersey Band, which plays swing, gypsy jazz, bluegrass, blues, and more on guitars, mandolin, banjo, vocals, bass, trombone, and synthesizer, has several local engagements this summer. On June 29 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., the band entertains at the West Windsor Farmers Market in the Vaughn Drive lot at Princeton Junction train station. After gigs in Neptune City and North Plainfield, the band appears at Halo Pub Princeton on Hulfish Street on Saturday, July 27, from 6-9 p.m. That performance is scheduled to take place outdoors. T he group appears at Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 46 Yard Road in Pennington, on August 15 from 6-9 p.m. For more information, visit www.bluejerseyband.com.

Summer Concerts at Princeton Shopping Center

The Ar ts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Shopping Center will present the 2019 Summer Courtyard Concert Series every Thursday from 6-8 p.m., June 27 through Au-

This summer’s performers include returning favorites such as the Blawenburg Band and Amazin Grace and the GLB Band, and newcomers to the series such as Essie, The Blue Meanies, and Taina Asili. Concerts are free, held rain or shine. In the event of rain, they will take place in a covered area between Surf Taco and LiLLiPiES. Each concert will be sponsored by a Princeton Shopping Center business. At the August 15 concert by School of Rock, for example, Smith’s Ace Hardware will sponsor a free barbecue and rock-painting activity. The series begins June 27 with The Blawenburg Band, showcasing the golden age of concert band and American patriotic music. Next on July 4 is Big Country and the Finger Pick’n Good Band, followed July 11 by vocalist Essie. The Blue Meanies Beatles tribute band is July 18, and the Alborada Spanish Dance Theatre is on stage July 25. On August 1, singer/songwriter Lauren Marsh performs, followed August 8 by T.S. Project. Princeton School of Rock is August 15. Puerto Rican singer, filmmaker, and activist Taina Asili appears August 22. The series ends August 29 with Amazin Grace and the GLB Band. Concert goers are invited to come early (5 p.m.) to enjoy a free gentle yoga class in the courtyard before the concert. Plus, enter into a raffle for a free membership — every entry receives a one-week-membership. The Princeton Shopping Center is located at 301 North Harrison Street. For information, visit artscouncilorprinceton.org.

Documentary on Cartoonist at ACME

On Saturday, June 22 at 6 p.m., Lambertville’s ACME Screening Room presents the documentary Mr. Fish: Cartooning From The Deep End. The feature explores the cartoonist Mr. Fish, struggling to make a living in an industry that is dying out. Editors previously willing to back controversial work are disappearing as fast as the newspapers which once employed him. In a world where consumerism is king and opportunities are few, will this uncensored artist find a way to sell his art, or be forced to sell himself out? Dwayne Booth, aka Mr. Fish, is a punk rock artist, a man who still has the vibrant energy of a rebellious teenager. But he’s also a middle-aged, married father of two with bills to pay and commitments to keep. Booth will answer questions after the screening, and sign books. The event is followed by dinner with Booth at the Lambertville House. Ad m is sion is $10 - $15 for the film and questionand-answer session ; $50 with dinner. Visit www.acmescreeningroom.org. The location is 25 South Union Street, Lambertville.

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Art

House Association has invited four sculptors to display works that evoke the immigrant experience during the 300-plus year history of the William Trent House and surrounding area. Works by Peter Abrams, Peter Drago, Kate Graves, and David Robinson will be on display. Peter Abrams is an artist working primarily in metal fabrication using found and upcycled materials to create beautiful, functional objects. Peter Drago is a Trenton sculptor and 2015 recipient of the Paul Robeson Emerging Young Artist Award at the Mason Gross School of the Arts

at Rutgers University He says of his piece Guardian, “The reclaimed tools used to create Guardian embody the lifestyle of immigrant culture in this country.” Bucks County, Pa., sculptor Kate Graves makes cast and fabricated metal sculpture in bronze, iron, aluminum, and steel. David Robinson is one of the premier builders of rustic gazebos and landscape work in the country. For more information, call (609) 989-3027 or visit the website at www.williamtrenthouse.org.

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects … what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.” Both exhibits are in keeping w ith “A Universe of Stories,” the theme for this year’s summer reading programs at the library. The Princeton Public Library is in the Sands Library Building at 65 Witherspoon Street. For more information about library programs and services, call (609) 924-9529 or visit www.princetonlibrary.org.

“The Immigrant Experience” Exhibit at Trent House

“DENVER CENTRAL LIBRARY, SOUTH FAÇADE”: This graphite and colored pencil drawing by the late architect and designer Michael Graves is one of nearly 5,000 recently acquired by the Princeton University Art Museum. Graves founded his eponymous practice in Princeton in 1964, and taught architecture at Princeton University for 39 years, retiring in 2001.

PU Art Museum Acquires ing opportunities around look by combining pigments, Graves’s enormously robust fluids, and additives to proGraves Drawings

The Princeton University Art Museum recently acquired a significant group of drawings by renowned A m er ic a n arch itec t a nd designer Michael Graves (1934-2015). The nearly 5,000 drawings, which come to the Museum from Graves’s estate, span the entire range of his subject matter and design concerns, and will form an important resource for researchers, designers, and Museu m audiences. Graves founded his eponymous practice in Princeton in 1964 and taught architecture at Princeton University for 39 years, retiring as the Robert Schirmer Professor of Architecture Emeritus in 2001. “We are pleased to be able to preserve and share these important drawings, which document numerous projects and reflect Michael Graves’s manifold interests and talents, here at the Museum, where he was known as family, and with our global audiences,” said James Steward, Nancy A. Nasher– David J. Haemisegger, Class of 1976, director. All of the drawings that will come to Princeton — which were variously executed in pen and ink, charcoal, graphite, colored pencil, watercolor, and pastel — are in Graves’s own hand. There are draw ings of historic monuments from his 1960s fellowship at the American Academy in Rome, pencil and ink referential drawings in sketchbooks, quick iterative design studies on yellow tracing paper, and meticulously colored building elevations. Together, the drawings in the collection form the essential visual archive of Graves’s work, revealing both his classical training and his commitment to draftsmanship — something Graves advocated for strongly in his teaching. “As a prolific artist, architect, and practitioner, Michael Graves considered drawing to be the foundation of his creative output,” said Sylvia Lavin, professor, history and theory of architecture, at Princeton University and a leading scholar of Graves’s work. “This corpus of work that will now reside at the Museum will facilitate rich research and teach-

legacy.” Graves is known worldwide for his innovative and transformative postmodern design of a vast range of large-scale architectural projects, interiors, consumer products (including his famous Alessi “whistling bird” kettle), and master plans for a global array of public and private clients. Graves also left his creative mark on Princeton, including at the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts on the corner of Witherspoon Street, completed in 2008, and at his former residence, The Warehouse, described by Steward as “Michael’s Monticello, the ongoing focus and forum for his innovation.” Like many 20 t h - c e nt u r y a r ch ite c t s who designed furniture and household objects as well as homes and other buildings, Graves believed that good design should find its way into everyday life and be available for consumers at all price levels. Architecture critic Paul Goldberger called Graves “truly the most original voice in American architecture.” As Graves himself wrote, in a 2012 opinion piece for the New York Times titled “Architecture and the Lost Art of Drawing”: “Architecture cannot divorce itself from drawing, no matter how impressive the technology gets. Drawings are not just end products: they are part of the thought process of architectural design. Drawings express the interaction of our minds, eyes, and hands.” The Princeton University Art Museum is located at the heart of the Princeton campus. Admission is free. For more information, visit www. artmuseum.princeton.edu.

Artists Discuss Their Work at Library Talk

A r tists Fran Eber and Robert J. Vanderbei, whose works are on display on the Princeton Public Library’s second floor, will give a talk about their work Monday, June 24. The talk will be in the library’s Community Room at 7 p.m. Eber describes her work, Luminous Matter, as channeling the forces of fluid dy namics. She says she achieves this otherworldly

duce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Eber describes some of her results as comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula. A lifelong interest in astronomy led Vanderbei to buy a digital camera designed for taking long-exposure astrophotographs in 2003, he says in his artist’s statement, continuing that “I began imaging the

The Trent House Association will present a sculpture exhibit, “The Immigrant Experience,” on the grounds of the 1719 William Trent House Museum, 15 Market Street, Trenton. It will be on view June 22 through November 3, with a reception open to the public on June 22 from 6 to 8 p.m. According to the Association, once settlers from across the ocean began to inhabit the lands of the Lenape on the banks of the Delaware, Trenton has been home to immigrants — both to those who came here willingly, seeking jobs and opportunity for a better life, and to those who came under duress. The William Trent House, its inhabitants, its surroundings, and its circumstances represent that history. As part of the 300th anniversary of the William Trenton House and to help shine a light on its whole story, the Trent

“GUARDIAN”: Sculptor Peter Drago used reclaimed tools to create this work featured in “The Immigrant Experience,” on view on the grounds of the 1719 William Trent House Museum June 22 through November 3. Works by Peter Abrams, Kate Graves, and David Robinson will also be on display. An opening reception is June 22 from 6 to 8 p.m.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019 • 20

HELEN

Frankenthaler PRINTS

SEVEN TYPES OF AMBIGUITY

Opening Celebration | Saturday, June 29 Lecture 5 pm | 10 McCosh Hall Carol Armstrong, Professor of the History of Art, Yale University Reception 6 pm | Art Museum This exhibition is made possible through the generosity of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation; Susan and John Diekman ’65; Heather Sturt Haaga and Paul G. Haaga Jr. ’70; Roberta and Jonathan Golden ’59; the Julis Rabinowitz Family; Christopher E. Olofson ’92; and other benefactors. Made possible in part by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

always free and open to the public artmuseum.princeton.edu

Helen Frankenthaler, Madame Butterfly, 2000. Color woodcut. © 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Tyler Graphics, Ltd., Mount Kisco, New York

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Princeton Friends School Congratulates the Class of 2019!

“BEST MOUNTAIN, COMMUNE, GUILIN”: This brush painting by Thomas George is just one of his works on display at the Princeton Public Library through June 30 in conjunction with the Princeton Festival’s modern opera “Nixon in China.” The paintings will also be shown in the lobby of the Matthews Theatre in the McCarter Theatre Center during performances of the opera on June 23 and 30.

Chinese Landscapes at “New Jersey Trees” Princeton Public Library Student Art Exhibit The Princeton Public Library, in collaboration with the Princeton Festival, is hosting a display of paintings of scenes in China by Thomas George (1918-2014). The internationally-celebrated artist and Princeton resident created the brush paintings in the wake of the opening of U.S. relations with that country by President Nixon in 1972. The paintings are on loan from the artist’s son, Princeton resident John George, as a corollary to the Princeton Festival production of the modern opera Nixon in China. The opera will be performed at 3 p.m. on June 23 and 30 in the Matthews Theatre in the McCarter Theatre Center, 91 University Place, Princeton, and the paintings will be shown in the theater lobby on each day of performance. “These are wonderful, evocative works that might never have been created without the renewal of relations between China and the U.S. depicted in the opera,” said Richard Tang Yuk, general and artistic director of the Festival. “We are grateful to John George for sharing a selection of his father’s China paintings with us and our audience.” Richard Tang Yuk also conducts the opera. For ticket information and a complete listing of Princeton Festival events, visit www.princetonfestival.org or call (609) 258-ARTS (2787).

D & R G r e e n w ay L a n d Trust’s Olivia Rainbow Gallery now presents the work of Princeton Junior School artists in “New Jersey Trees.” The New Jersey Tree Quilt, crafted by master quilter Gail Mitchell for her English As a Second Language (ESL) students, inspired Pre-K through fifth-graders to create their own interpretations of state trees. From the skeletal to the fully leafed-out, vivid evocations of trees special to New Jersey adorn the gallery walls. Princeton Junior School’s Art Studio students tend three pet snails, and sprightly, colorful snail portraits are also interspersed with highly individualistic trees of all seasons. The Olivia Rainbow Gallery was founded and is funded in memory of 5-year-old Olivia Kuenne, who would have begun kindergarten at Princeton Junior School on the day of her memorial service. Having attended that school’s pre-kindergarten, a gallery in this young nature artist’s name also graces Princeton Junior School. The purpose of D&R Greenway’s Gallery is to keep alive Olivia’s spirit and love of nature and art. The gallery’s mission is to inspire preservationists of the future, as they study and draw and paint the nature that surrounds us.

Moving on to... Bordentown High School Friends Seminary George School Hopewell Valley Central HS The Hun School Lawrence High School

The Lawrenceville School Peddie School The Pennington School Princeton High School Solebury School

470 Quaker Road, Princeton, NJ 609.683.1194 www.princetonfriendsschool.org

“NEW JERSEY TREES”: The works of Princeton Junior School artists are on display in D&R Greenway’s Olivia Rainbow Gallery, One Preservation Place, through July 3. Their art was inspired by a New Jersey tree quilt crafted by master quilter Gail Mitchell for her ESL students, along with some pet snails.

“New Jersey Trees” is on view in the Olivia Rainbow Gallery of D&R Greenway’s Johnson Education Center, One Preservation Place, Princeton through July 3. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., closed holidays. For more information, call (609) 924-4646 or visit www.drgreenway.org.

Area Exhibits Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Unstill Life” through June 30. www.lambertvillearts.com. Arts Council of Prince ton , 102 Wit herspoon Street, has “Waves and Ripples” through June 29. www. artscouncilofprinceton.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, has “Ellarslie Open 36” through July 7. www.ellarslie.org. Firestone Library, Ellen and Leonard Milberg Gallery, Princeton University, has “Welcome Additions: Selected Acquisitions 2012-18” through June 23. http://bit.ly/2Tln0hn. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “A Morning at the Updike Farmstead,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. $4 admission WednesdaySunday, 12-4 p.m. Thursday extended hours till 7 p.m. and free admission 4-7 p.m. www.princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Na kash ima L ooks : Studio Furniture” through July 7, “Intrepid Alchemist” through July 28, and “The Color of the Moon” through September 8. www.michenerartmuseum.org. M or p e t h C o n te m p o rary, 43 West Broad Street, Hopewell, has “Mare McClellan : Paintings and Sculpture” and “James Jansma: Glazed Earthenware” t hrough June 23. w w w. morpethcontemporary.com. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “New Jersey Baseball: From the Cradle to the Major Leagues, 1855–1915” through October 27. www.morven.org. West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, has “Cultural Heritage Exhibition” through July 12. www.westwindsorarts.org.


Summer 2019

Restaurant & Enoteca

N E W W O R L D . . . W I N E TA S T I N G : U S A , C H I L E & A RG E N T I NA

Thursday, June 20 | 4:30 - 8 pm We will be presenting a variety of wines from USA, Chile & Argentina. Light hors d’oeuvres will be served.

For reservations:

www.enoterra.com | 609 497-1777 4484 Route 27, Kingston, New Jersey

$30 via PayPal | $35 at the door (Excludes Tax)

VOLUNTEER MAKE A DIFFERENCE Helping The Youth In Your Community Thanks to a funding provided by the Princeton Area Community Foundation’s All Kids Thrive Initiative, the Princeton Family YMCA, together with the Princeton Public Schools, Corner House and the Bonner Foundation, has launched an exciting collaboration that is designed to support qualifying boys enrolled at Princeton High School who are most at risk of missing critical school days. Each student will be paired with a group of volunteers who are dedicated to his success - assuring that he is attending school and classes regularly, and feeling engaged and connected with the larger community to achieve his potential. For more information on the program or how you can get involved, please contact Michael Roseborough at mroseborough@princetonymca.org.

The goal of the All Kids Thrive program is to strengthen and insulate the educational pipeline so All Kids PRINCETON FAMILY YMCA 59 Paul Robeson Place Princeton, NJ 08540 609-497-9622 www.princetonymca.org

Mentors Needed for At-Risk Youth in Mercer County

LifeTies, Inc. is looking for volunteers to mentor youth in Mercer County who have experienced chronic absenteeism or have had contact with the juvenile justice system. Mentors engage in building a caring, nurturing relationship with youth to help develop character, social relationship skills, career interests, and educational choices. LifeTies provides mentors with broad training and support throughout their time as a mentor. Come to an information session to learn more! Information sessions will be held on:

7/11 @ 7/19 @ 7/30 @

05:30 PM 12:30 PM 05:30 PM

8/8 @ 8/20 @ 8/30 @

05:30 PM 05:30 PM 12:30 PM

Contact Teri Triano-Davis to RSVP! Phone: (609)671-0040 Email: ttriano-davis@lifeties.org

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

Town Topics


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019 • 22

NEWLY PRICED

PRESENTING

Open House Sunday 6/23 2-4:30pm 364 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton Twp Marketed by: Roberta Parker $1,758,000

88 N Harrison Street, Princeton Twp Marketed by: Ann “Camille” Lee $695,000

PRESENTING

PRESENTING

Open House Sunday 6/23 1-4pm 302 Jefferson Road, Princeton Twp Marketed by: Roberta Parker $1,588,000

28 Lindbergh Road, East Amwell Twp Marketed by: Ann “Camille” Lee $2,775,000

NEWLY PRICED

PRESENTING

Open House Sunday 6/23 1-4pm 89 N Main Street, Cranbury Twp Marketed by: Terebey Relocation Team/John A. Terebey $899,000

31 Red Oak Way, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Blanche Paul $678,500

NEWLY PRICED

NEWLY PRICED

From Princeton, We Reach the World.

28 Todd Ridge Road, Hopewell Twp Marketed by: Christina “Elvina” Grant | $769,000

6 Wheatstson Court, West Windsor Twp Marketed| by: Carole Tosches $639,000

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

From Princeton, the World. From Princeton,We We Reach Reach the World. From Princeton, We Reach the World. Princeton OfficePrinceton 253 Nassau 609-924-1600 foxroach.com OfficeStreet | 253 Nassau Street

| | foxroach.com Princeton Office || 253| Nassau Street ||| 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street 609-924-1600 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway

symbol are registeredsubsidiary service marks HomeServices ofof America, Inc. ®Inc., EqualaHousing Opportunity. Information notand verified or guaranteed. If yourAffiliates, home is currently listed with Hathaway a Broker, thisHomeServices is not intended asand a solicitation. © BHH Affiliates, LLC.HomeServices An independently operated ofofHomeServices America, Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, a franchisee of BHH LLC. Berkshire the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation. © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.


23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

75 Crestview Drive, Princeton - Location, Location, Location! Best view on the ridge yet minutes from downtown Princeton! Enjoy serene magnificent views year round from this lovely renovated home. It features 5 bedrooms, 3 full and 2 half baths, European style granite kitchen with stainless steel appliances, 900 SQ FT master suite addition features a sitting room, its own laundry room, sumptuous marble bathroom, balcony and a huge custom closet. There is a Cherry wood Library with built-in bookcases, Sunroom, Family Room with a granite wet bar and a wonderful heated in-ground pool. $1,249,000

Deborah “Debbie” Lang Sales Associate, REALTOR® Realtor & Relocation Specialist since 1986 Luxury Collection Specialist Certified International Property Specialist FIVE STAR PROFESSIONAL AWARD PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE AWARD E.P.I.C. AWARD WINNER (609) 683-8513 (Office) (609) 213-1900 (Cell) www.PrincetonAreaHomes.com

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ 08540 | 609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019 • 24

Calendar Wednesday, June 19 7:30-9:30 a.m.: The Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber hosts Business Before Breakfast at the Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street. Speaker is Marge Smith, founder and chair of Community Works. princetonchamber.org. 5-7 p.m.: Auditions for West Windsor Arts’ new summer musical theater program at 952 Alexander Road, Princeton Junction. Program will run Wednesday evenings July 10-August 21 and culminate with a performance. For information, visit westwindsorarts. org/events/. 7 p.m.: Summer Essential Oils Wisdom at Ivy Counseling Group, 182 Tamarack Circle, Skillman. $5. RSVP to www.ivycounselinggroup. com/workshops. 8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Country Dancers at Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive. Mark Widmer with Crossing the Millstone. Free. princetoncountrydancers.org. Thursday, June 20 8-10:30 a.m.: The Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber

hosts the Women of Achievement Awards at Jasna Polana, 4519 Province Line Road. princetonchamber.org. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza. 10 a.m.: The 55-Plus Club presents “The Aging Eye,” a presentation by Dr. Jonathan Prenner at the Jewish Center of Princeton, 435 Nassau Street. Free, with $3 donation suggested. 6 p.m.: SAVE hosts a seminar on summer pet safety at its headquarters, 1010 Route 601, Skillman. $10. www. savehomelessanimals.org. 6-9 p.m.: Trineice performs with pianist Phil Orr, bassist Matthew Parrish, and drummer Darrell Green at Hopewell Valley Bistro & Inn, 15 East Broad Street, Hopewell. $5-$15. Reserve at www.jazzonbroad.com. Friday, June 21 12:30 p.m. Gotham Princeton lunch at Agricola Eatery, 11 Witherspoon Street, has guest speaker Joanne Canady-Brown, owner of The Gingered Peach bakery in Lawrenceville. $38. Pay in advance at https ://w w w. gothamnetworking.com/m/ events/view/PrincetonMeeting-2018-12-09-2. 5 to 8 p.m.: Sunset Sips

330 COLD SOIL ROAD PRINCETON, NJ 08540

& Sounds at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. www.terhuneorchards.com. 6:30 p.m.: Vintage Baseball Weekend Movie Night at Morven Museum, 55 Stockton Street. A League of Their Own. $15 per family ($10 members). morven.org. 6:30 p.m.: One Table Cafe dinner at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, with special guest singer Katie Welsh and pianist David Pearl. RSVP by June 19 to (609) 216-7770. 8-10:30 p.m.: Pride Dance Party at the Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street. In conjunction with Princeton’s first Pride Parade, with music, snacks, and more. $5 donation. artscouncilofprinceton.org. Saturday, June 22 9 a . m .-1 p. m . : We s t Windsor Farmers Market at Vaughn Drive lot, Princeton Junction train station. 11 a.m.: Vintage Baseball Game at Greenway Meadows Park, 275 Rosedale Road. The Flemington Neshanock plays the Diamond State Base Ball Club. Includes a recitation of “Casey at the Bat.” Bring blankets and lawn chairs. 11 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Pride Parade starts at the

www.terhuneorchards.com

609-924-2310

Sunday, June 23 4pm to 9pm Miss Amy and Her Big Kid's Band Pam’s Firefly Food Tent Firefly Crafts: for Children Farm Animals Wagon Rides Pony Rides Farm Store Open

Sips & Sounds Summer Fridays 5-8 pm Sundays 1-4 pm wine tasting, music, light fare

Free Admission Farm store daily 9-6 pm Wine Tasting Room Fri.-Sun. 12-6 pm 609-924-2310 • www.terhuneorchards.com

Municipal Building, goes on to Witherspoon Street, Paul Robeson Place, and ends up at the Princeton YMCA for an after-party. www.rustincenter.org. 1-3 p.m.: International Consciousness Research L ab orator ie s ( ICR L .org ) presents Dr. Wayne Jonas speaking about “How Healing Works.” D&R Johnson Education Center, 1 Preservation Place. Donations requested ; ref reshments served. 2:30-5 p.m.: “How-to Forum” on “How People Power Can Make a Difference,” w it h A s s e mbly m a n D a n Benson as speaker. Breakou t s for br a i n s tor m i n g. Highland Park Reformed Church, 19 South Second Avenue, Highland Park. $5 suggested donation. 8 p.m.: The Eastern Wind Symphony performs works by Martynuik, Maslanka, Tchaikovsky, and Vaughan Williams at Richardson Auditorium. $20- $30. http://easternwindsymphony.org/concert/ fiesta-copy-copy-copy/. Sunday, June 23 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Bordentown Farmers’ Market at Carslake Community Center parking lot, Bordentown. 3 p.m. Princeton Festival presents the opera Nixon in China at McCarter Theatre, 91 University Place. $45$150 with discounts for students and those under 40. princetonfestival.org. 4-9 p.m.: Firefly Festival at Terhune Orchards, Cold S oil Road. Craf ts, music, wagon rides, food, Youth Circus Performance Troupe, and more. Free ($5 for crafts activities). www. terhuneorchards.com. Monday, June 24 Recycling 7 a.m.: Capital Region Minority Chamber of Commerce’s 9th Annual Golf Classic at Old York Country Club, Chesterfield. With guests from the National Football League. www.capitalregionminoritychamber.org. Tuesday, June 25 7 p.m.: 15th Annual ETS Firecracker 5K, at ETS Campus, 660 Rosedale Road. Proceeds benefit Y WCA Princeton’s Bilingual Nursery School. Register at https:// runsignup.com/Race/NJ/ Princeton/YWCA5K. 7:30-9:30 p.m.: Princeton Folkdance Group does international folk dance at the YWCA, 59 Paul Robeson Place. Lesson followed by dance. Beginners welcome, no partner needed. $5. (609) 921-1702.

Wednesday, June 26 3:30-4:30 p.m.: Eden Autism Social Skills Group for children 7-10 with autism or other developmental disabilities. 2 Merwick Road. Register at outreach@edenautism.org. 8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Country Dancers at Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive. Anne Lutun with the Princeton Pickup Band. $10. princetoncountrydancers.org. Thursday, June 27 10 a.m.-3 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza. Collection of resources for recycling or upcycling. For specifics on what is included, visit sustainableprinceton.org. 6-8 p.m.: The Blawenburg Band performs at Princeton Shopping Center, 301 North Harrison Street. Free, rain or shine. Friday, June 28 5 - 8 p.m.: Sunset Sips & Sounds at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. 7 p.m.: Dancing Under the Stars at Hinds Plaza, Princeton Public Library. Members of Central Jersey Dance demonstrate basic steps and lead dancing to recorded music of all kinds. Free. Saturday, June 29 10 a.m.-1 p.m. : We s t Windsor Farmers Market at Vaughn Drive lot, Princeton Junction train station. The Blue Jersey Band entertains. Sunday, June 30 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Bordentown Farmers’ Market at Carslake Community Center parking lot, Bordentown. 3 p.m. Princeton Festival presents the opera Nixon in China at McCarter Theatre, 91 University Place. $45$150 with discounts for students and those under 40. princetonfestival.org. Tuesday, July 2 7:30-9:30 p.m.: Princeton Folkdance Group does international folk dance at the YWCA, 59 Paul Robeson Place. Lesson followed by dance. Beginners welcome, no partner needed. $5. (609) 921-1702. Thursday, July 4 1- 4 p.m.: Early American ice cream and patriotic songs at the Johnson Ferry House, Washington Crossing State Park, New Jersey side. The farmhouse, kitchen garden, and stone barn woodshop will be open, with guides in period clothing. Free. (609) 737-2515. 6-8 p.m. Big Country and the Finger Pick ’N G ood Band perform at Princeton Shopping Center, 201 North Harrison Street. Free. Fri. 06/21/19 to Thurs. 06/27/19

Echo in the Canyon Starting Friday The Dead Don’t Die (R) Continuing Late Night (R)

Fri-Thurs: 3:00, 5:05, 7:10, 9:15 (PG-13)

Pavarotti

Fri-Thurs: 2:00, 4:35, 7:10, 9:45 (PG-13)

The Dead Don’t Die

Ends Thursday Rocketman (R)

Fri-Thurs: 2:40, 5:05, 7:30, 9:55 (R)

Hollywood Summer Nights The Right Stuff (1983) Thu, June 20 at 7:00PM

Fri-Thurs: 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30 (R)

Princeton Public Library Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) Mon, June 24 at 7:00PM

Fri-Thurs: 2:30, 7:20 (UR)

Showtimes change daily Visit for showtimes. PrincetonGardenTheatre.org

Late Night

The Spy Behind Home Plate All is True

Fri-Thurs: 4:55, 9:45 (PG-13)

The Biggest Little Farm Fri-Thurs: 2:45, 5:00, 7:15, 9:30 (PG)

Monday, July 8 Recycling Tuesday, July 9 7:30-9:30 p.m.: Princeton Folkdance Group does international folk dance at the YWCA, 59 Paul Robeson Place. Lesson followed by dance. Beginners welcome, no partner needed. $5. (609) 921-1702. Wednesday, July 10 3:30-4:30 p.m.: Eden Autism Social Skills Group for children 7-10 with autism or other developmental disabilities. 2 Merwick Road. Register at outreach@edenautism.org. Thursday, July 11 10 a.m.-3 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza. 6-8 p.m.: Essie performs at Princeton Shopping Center, 301 Nor th Harrison Street. Free. 6 p.m.: Mariachi with sounds of Mexico at The Open Grove Gazebo on the Lake, Thompson Park, Monroe Township. Free. www.monroetownshipculturalarts.com/. Friday, July 12 Shabbat Under the Stars at The Jewish Center of Princeton, 435 Nassau Street. Followed by dairy potluck dinner. Visit info@thejewishcenter.org for details. Sunday, July 14 12-3 p.m.: Bastille Day Celebration hosted by Alliance Francaise of Princeton, at Turning Basin Park, Alexander Road. Potluck picnic, French conversation, music, sing-a-long, boules. $5-$10. RSVP to membership@allianceprinceton.com. Tuesday, July 16 7:30-9:30 p.m.: Princeton Folkdance Group does international folk dance at the YWCA, 59 Paul Robeson Place. Lesson followed by dance. Beginners welcome, no partner needed. $5. (609) 921-1702. Wednesday, July 17 3:30-4:30 p.m.: Eden Autism Social Skills Group for children 7-10 with autism or other developmental disabilities. 2 Merwick Road. Register at outreach@edenautism.org. Thursday, July 18 10 a.m.-3 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza. 6-8 p.m.: The Blue Meanies perform at Princeton Shopping Center, 301 North Harrison Street. Free. 6 p.m.: Strictly 60’s Band with Beatles, Rolling Stones, Doors, Motown, and more, at Open Grove Gazebo on the Lake, Thompson Park, Monroe Township. www.monroetownshipculturalarts.com/. 7 p.m.: “The Space Race: 1957-1975” celebrates the 50th anniversar y of the Apollo moon landing at L aw r e n c e H e ad q u a r te r s Branch of Mercer County Librar y, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Historic photos and a lecture by Kevin Woyce. Register at www.mcl.org. Sundown: The film Desperately Seeking Susan is screened outside the Princeton University Art Museum, on the Brown/Dod Quad. Free. Saturday, July 20 4-5 p.m.: Dr. Jackie Bosworth discusses “A Child in Urgent Need of Limit Setting” At the American College of Orgonomy, 4419 Route 27, Kingston. Free. Register at (732) 821-1146 or www.adifferentkindofpsychiatry.com.


After learning about the Canine Company’s program to outfit first responders with pet oxygen masks in the communities where it does business, Princeton Fire Depar tment’s Emergency S er v ices Director Robert Gregory requested and received three sets. The department did not have

Pets are at special risk during a home fire because they are unable to leave the house without help. An estimated 40,000 pets die from smoke inhalation across the U.S. each year. The cone-shaped masks are designed for a pet’s snout, which human masks don’t fit. Each set includes masks in three sizes to fit pets from small mammals

help families keep their pets healthy, safe, and happy. We do that with our products and services, and with our charitable programs,” said Renee Coughlin of Canine Company. “We are grateful that first responders in Princeton care about the well being of family pets.” To ensure rescuers know there are pets in a home,

local pet owners. The stickers are available from the fire department, or can be requested by mail through the Request a Decal form on Canine Company’s website at www.caninecompany.com. Canine Company helps families across New York, New England and New Jersey keep their pets safe with services like Invisible Fence

ence training. Over the past decade, the company has donated masks to first responders in more than 500 communities across New England, New York and New Jersey. Other Mercer county communities that have received the masks include East Windsor, West Windsor, Hamilton Township, and Lawrence Township.

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25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

Canine Company has offered pet containment systems Princeton Firefighters the life-saving pet oxygen to giant breed dogs. masks before. free “Pets Inside” decals to and Manners dog obedi“Our company mission is to Get Pet Oxygen Masks


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 2019 • 26

A Wonderful Array of Plants for All Seasons Is Available at Green Haven Garden Center

A

gorgeous display of floral splendor awaits visitors to Green Haven Garden Center. Located at 1181 Hughes Drive in Hamilton, Green Haven is a complete gardening resource. Not only does it offer a full range of plants, shrubs, and selected trees, including unusual varieties, it also provides workshops to help customers learn how to make the most of their gardens.

IT’S NEW To Us

As owner Carol Thomas points out, “We don’t necessarily focus on the product, but on the person. We ask what the customers want, where they will plant it, etc. If they are new to the area or from another country, they may not know what grows well here. We help guide the customer with help and advice.” Like the garden center, Thomas’ background is filled with fascinating variety. Not only does she have a background in horticulture and landscape architecture, having studied at Rutgers, she also has a master’s degree in language arts, and taught at the Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart. Avid Gardeners Horticulture has always been a passion for Thomas no matter what other interests she was pursuing, however, and her enthusiasm for it began at an early age. “My mother and grandmothers were all avid gardeners,” she explains. “My mother set me up with my own garden plot when I was a little girl, and I loved it.” Now that she has her own garden center, she is delighted to share her passion with customers. They come from all over the Princeton area, are all ages, and range from

knowledgeable gardeners to novices. “We help people to create their own haven,” says Thomas. “It could be a porch or patio, window box, or a large garden. We can also help with landscape design. We tend to specialize in unusual plants and also container gardens, hanging baskets, and planters on terraces. Even if you have a small space, you can still have a beautiful garden. “People are always concerned about maintenance, whether plants should be in sun or shade, and how often they should be watered,” she continues. “Watering depends on a lot of things. For example, the weather, and also the wind. If it is windy, it can dry out the plants.” Green Haven offers classes and workshops to help people with their gardening questions, she adds. “We have gardening 101 classes with information on how to prune, how to plant, and how to mulch, among others. Regarding mulch, we constantly tell people, ’Not a volcano!’ T he mulch should be a hands-width from the tree trunk and only a thin layer. Too much can create excess moisture and lead to bacteria and insect infestation.” Deer-Resistant Other classes focus on planting for multi-seasonal interest, learning about annuals and perennials, planting bulbs in the fall, pollinators, and other helpful gardening information. Indigenous plants have become a concern for many gardeners, reports Thomas, and as she notes, “If plants are acclimated to their surroundings, they will do better. They have evolved to cope with the environment they are in. We can give customers a list of native plants, and we can also provide a list of deer-resistant plants. Among them are marigolds, Siberian iris, peonies, hardy hibiscus, clematis, and lavender. Deer resistant shrubs include box-

wood, false cypress, spirea, and weigela. Plants that attract pollinators, such as bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds, are important, she explains, and they include milkweed (butterflies) and lavender (bees). Hummingbirds are drawn to the color red. Green Haven has a pollinator display section, designed with plants especially attractive to pollinators. In fact, the displays are all designed to help customers as they look for specific items. Pictures of plants with explanatory information about sun and shade preferences, size, etc. are all available, and displays are focused on color, perennials, annuals, sun and shade, deer resistance, and other designations In addition, there is a special herb and vegetable section. “Our ‘food court’ contains our herbs and vegetables,” explains Thomas. “Basil is super popular, also tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, and lettuce. In addition, parsley and oregano attract the pollinators.” Knockout Roses “This is a good time to plant anything,” she adds, “except bulbs, which are planted in the fall. Right now, people want the annuals, including impatiens, geraniums, begonias, and petunias — we also have million bells, which are petite petunias, and we now have mildew-resistant impatiens.” Also popular are azaleas, rhododendrons, and hydrangea, and knockout roses, which are available at Green Haven in hard-to-find yellow. Perennials, such as yarrow, columbine, forget-me-nots, peonies, phlox, salvia, and hollyhocks are all favorites, too, as are Shasta daisies, lavender, and iris. Making sure the soil is in the best condition to support the healthy growth of the plants is crucial, and Green Haven

VISUAL SPLENDOR: “Gardening can be a stress release. It provides exercise, fresh air, and you are creating something beautiful now and beautiful over time. Even if it’s on a small scale — just a terrace or window box, it will enhance the space. It’s therapeutic, it’s fun, and you’re creating beauty.” Carol Thomas, owner of Green Haven Garden Center in Hamilton, is shown amid a colorful display of knockout roses. offers special products. “We have organic compost to help the soil texture, depending on the condition, if it’s too sandy or has too much clay,” points out Thomas. “We also have organic fertilizer and organic mulch.” Something Different “We tend to be set apart because we offer unusual plants,” says Thomas. “We try to get something different. For example, we have Hort Couture Canary Wings begonias and Dragon Wings begonias from Peace Tree Farm in Pennsylvania. In addition, we offer Hort Couture canna lilies and Sea Urchin Red coleus, which you will not find everywhere.” Another way in which Green Haven is set apart is its association with Bower & Branch, a Pennsylvania grower, focusing on sustainability. “We are a Bower & Branch affiliate and the only one in the area,” says Thomas. “This is a partnership of growers and garden centers. Customers can shop online, make a selection, and then buy it at the garden center. They can come here to get it or we will deliver.

“By going online, when you select the plant, you can then find all the information about it, and if you have further questions, you can consult the ‘Plant Whisperer,’ who will help you with advice and suggestions. This is a perfect match of the natural world and the technological world.” Visually Appealing Green Haven can also help people create gardens with multi-seasonal interest, so there is always something visually appealing. And it’s not only the flowers — it can be plants with interesting bark, berries, or intriguing textures. Thomas also offers onehour coaching sessions at the customer’s home (within a 10-mile radius). “For $50, I’ll come to your house, and give advice on whatever help you need. We can teach you how to prune, fertilize, water, divide and relocate plants, etc. We can also help to identify the insects, disease or condition that is ailing your plants, and suggest appropriate treatment.” Thomas is a member of the American Horticultural Society, New Jersey Nursery & Landscape Association,

Philadelphia Horticultural Society, and Perennial Plants Association. Green Haven offers a selected collection of garden tools and ornaments, as well as a variety of garden-related artwork from area artists. Assorted pottery planters in bird and animal designs will intrigue adults and children alike. Carol Thomas is pleased that many customers have become regulars, and she offers thanks to them in special ways. “We have water for people and the pets they bring, and we offer dog biscuits. Every child receives a flower, and we also have a changing table for babies. “It’s wonderful having people come in and say ‘It is so beautiful here.’ They say that the display gardens are so beautiful it makes them feel good. I couldn’t be happier about that.” Green Haven Garden Center is open seven days, Monday through Friday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (609) 584-6930. Website: www.greenhavengardencenter.com. —Jean Stratton

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27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 2019

S ports

Squeezing the Most Out of its Potential, PU Men’s Heavyweights Excelled at IRAs

Having coached in the Princeton University rowing program since the late 1990s, Greg Hughes boasts a reservoir of experience in bringing boats together. But Hughes knew he had to be innovative this spring as he guided the Princeton men’s heavyweight crew, with the Tigers having graduated a number of key seniors and thereby breaking new faces into the lineup. “It was an interesting year for me,” said Hughes, a former Princeton lightweight star rower who started as the coach for the Tiger freshman heavyweight crew before guiding the men’s lightweight program from 2006-09 and then taking the helm of the heavyweights in 2010. “It was my 22nd year of coaching and what is so cool for me is to realize that you are still seeing new things and still learning. This was definitely one of those years.” The key focus this spring for Hughes was to learn the best ways to get this group of rowers on the same page. “Rowing is a special sport because you have to put nine people into that boat and they have to work together,” said Hughes. “It has to mesh, you are going to have different personalities and different racing profiles, where some are stronger in the race and where somebody else is stronger. The assets have to all contribute to the whole and everybody has to be willing to recognize that. It needs to be selfless, that is a big ask.” The Princeton crews

meshed at the Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) national championship regatta earlier this month on Lake Natoma in Gold River, Calif. All four of the Tiger top boats made their grand finals at the event with the varsity eight and second varsity eight both placing sixth, the third varsity eight taking fourth, and the varsity four placing third. Coming into the regatta, Princeton benefited from getting a week of intensive training at the University of California boathouse before heading down the coast. “It is such a cool spot, it is a reservoir up in the Berkeley Hills,” said Hughes. “It is just perfect; we just had this gorgeous place all to ourselves. You have this total focus. The guys are relaxed. They get to actually spend some time hanging out with each other.” That preparation resulted in each of the boats hanging in there on the way to the grand final. “I feel like across the board, the team raced really well at the IRAs and I was very proud of the results,” said Hughes, whose squad placed fifth in the Ten Eyck Team Trophy standings for the second straight season, scoring 162 points. “We knew going in, that we were going to have to fire on all cylinders to make the finals in those events and we achieved that goal. We were the only team from the East Coast that put boats in all four finals, Cal and Washington were the other two. That is a big deal for us.” While only one of the

Princeton boats made it to the medal stand, the rowers relished testing themselves against the best. “We knew to go and have a run at the very top end was going to take our absolute perfect race and maybe some mistakes from some of the others,” said Hughes, reflecting in the competition which saw Yale win the varsity eight, Cal take first in the 2V, and Washington posting victories in both the 3V and the V4. “Those boats raced well, we saw their best races at the national championship and that is where we were this year. We got our best races, which was great. You saw that we were in that mix that was a big push for those guys.” The varsity eight got a good push from two freshmen, James Quinlan, a native of Ireland, and Charlie Miller, who hails from Australia. “They stepped up beyond their years, it was awesome to see,” said Hughes. “They were mature, levelheaded kids. As we were moving through the season, they were progressing really well and both were invited to their respective U23 camps and they are 19 year olds. They have done an amazing job. I knew they were good but my expectations weren’t that they were going to walk into the door and be immediate varsity eight rowers. I would not hold them to that standard. They just totally did it; they were super consistent and just awesome kids.” Senior captain Andrew Morgan played a key role in

HEAVY LIFTING: The Princeton University men’s heavyweight varsity eight shows its form in a race this spring. Earlier this month, the top boat placed sixth in the Grand Final at the Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) national championship regatta on Lake Natoma in Gold River, Calif. (Photo provided courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications) helping the team maintain a consistent effort throughout the season. “He fought his way up through the ranks during the season; he was on the 4V for a race or two, fought his way up into the 3V, and then finished Eastern Sprints and IRAs in the 2V,” said Hughes. “He isn’t a big guy, he is probably 6’0, 170 pounds, but he is a really scrappy competitor. That was his leadership style — to come in and lead by example and give more than might be physically possible. He pushed that edge every single day and he was a good motivator. He was able to sniff out those workouts, or those days or individual pieces where we might be on the ropes and rally the squad.That played a really important factor in us being able to meet the potential that we had.” Morgan’s approach exemplified the mindset that helped the Tigers get the most out of their potential. “There are no superstars

in rowing and I think this year was the year that really proved that,” said Hughes. “We didn’t have anywhere near the horsepower on the ERG that we had last year. The 2018 average was 5:52 for our varsity eight and this past year it was 6:02 and yet they were putting up speeds that were comparable.” In the view of Hughes, his rowers haven’t reached their ceiling despite their admirable efforts this spring. “While we can look at it and say we tapped the potential that we had, we need to recognize that there is still more to gain,” noted Hughes. “We know what is going on at places like Yale, Harvard, Washington, and Cal. There is an upper end there that we know we want to go and compete against. There is work for us to do and the summer time is the time you can start getting to work on that. You can’t be satisfied with how it finished and then step back and say we have got to catch our breath and go and relax

for two months. It is a long time.” Making the most of their time this summer will help the Tigers do better against the upper echelon of college rowing. “We do a challenge with the team, shooting for a million meters on the ergometer over the summer,” said Hughes. “It sounds like a massive number, but then when you go and do the math, it is 8,000-10,000 meters a day five days a week. That is like a 40-minute effort. What we know about rowing is that it does require some aerobic base fitness and that is something we can really work on in the summer. Rowing rewards steady, consistent work. It does not reward people who just have amazing skill that they can pull out at the last minute. You have to be fit enough to get yourself into a position in a race where you can use that skill. If you are not fit, you aren’t going to be able to use it.” —Bill Alden

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Opeyemi and the Tigers won the Ivy League title this season and earned a bid to the NCAA Tournament. Opeyemi, a native of Nazareth, Pa., was also one of eight PU Soccer’s Opeyemi Princeton students to win Gets Engineering Award the annual Spirit of PrincPrinceton University men’s eton award. soccer player Martin Opey- Tiger Golfer Brown emi ‘19 was awarded The Joseph Clifton Elgin Prize, Gets Mueller Award Princeton Universit y an annual honor given to a senior in the School of Engi- women’s golf player Amanneering and Applied Science da Brown ‘19 received the who, in the judgment of the Princeton School of EngiDean and the departmental neering and Applied Scichairs, has done the most to ence’s George J. Mueller advance the interests of the Award, given to a senior School in the community at engineering major who best combines academ ic and large. athletic performance, durThe prize honors the late ing the school’s Class Day Professor Emeritus Joseph ceremony on June 3. Clifton Elgin, who served Brown, an operations rethe School as Dean from search and financial engi1954 to 1971. neering major, was a part A four- ye ar let ter w in - of two Ivy League championner on the soccer team, ship teams over the course

PU Sports Roundup

of her career. For her senior t hesis, Brow n designed optimal learning and control strategies for diabetes patients to administer insulin over the course of a day. Brown, who hails from Trabuco Canyon, Calif., will pursue a masters degree in management science and engineering at Stanford University. Tiger women’s golf head coach Erika DeSanty described Brown, who served as team co-captain, as “one of the most influential forces behind the quality of the Princeton golf experience.”

PU Women’s Lax Trio Makes All-American

Princeton University women’s lacrosse stars Elizabeth George, Kyla Sears, and Nonie Andersen have been named as IWLCA (Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association) AllAmericans. George, who graduated earlier t h is mont h, and Sears, who just completed her sophomore year, were named IWLCA second-team All-Americas while Andersen, another recent grad, was a third-team selection. The three All-Americas are the most Princeton has had since the 2005 season. George was the unanimous Ivy League Attacker of the Year as she set the program record for draw controls in a season and career, finish third in a season in total points (87) and fourth in a season in goals (62). Attacker Sears, a secondteam All-America for the second straight year, finished the season with 95

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points, the second-highest total in program history, on 55 goals and a school-record 40 assists. She was one of only four Division I players with at least 55 goals and 40 assists on the year, and her 178 points leave her 62 percent of the way to the school record of 285. She’s now a two-time first-team All-Ivy League selection, the first Princeton player ever to achieve that by the end of her sophomore year, and was also the MVP of the Ivy League tournament. Andersen, the Ivy League’s Defender of the Year, had 76 draw controls, second-

best on the team this year (and the second-best total in a single-season in program history), as well as 17 caused turnovers.

Princeton Hoops’ Alarie Helping USA Hoops 3x3

Princeton University women’s basketball star Bella Alarie helped Team USA reached the semifinals of the FIBA 3v3 Tournament Stop last weekend in Turin, Italy. The United States went 2-1 in group play, defeating the Czech Republic (19-14) and Canada (16-15) before a loss to France (12-14). In the quarterfinals, Alarie’s group

defeated Mongolia, 21-8, but lost in the semifinal to the host country, Italy, 1612. France went on to win the tournament, 21-6. Rising Princeton senior Alarie was joined by Charli Collier (Texas), Aleah Goodman ( Oregon State ) and Chr ist y n Williams ( Con necticut). This squad reached the quarterfinals of the China Series Stop last month, falling to the Netherlands. Up to 12 events in the 3x3 series are expected to take place this year from May to September.

ENGINEERING SUCCESS: Max Veronneau heads up the ice this winter in his senior season for the Princeton University men’s hockey team. The recently graduated Veronneau was the recipient of the George J. Mueller Award, given by the School of Engineering and Applied Science. The award honors that graduating senior who has combined achievement in the study of engineering with quality performance in intercollegiate athletics. As a junior, Veronneau helped the Tigers win the 2018 ECAC Hockey Championship, leading the nation in assists and ranking third in scoring. This year he ranked ninth nationally in both categories. A two-time All-ECAC and All-Ivy League selection, Veronneau finished his Princeton career ranked fourth in program history in scoring with 143 points. Veronneau signed with the Ottawa Senators in March and made his NHL debut on March 14 versus the St. Louis Blues and scored his first NHL goal on March 16 against the Toronto Maple Leafs. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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While the Princeton High b a s e b a l l te a m s t u n n e d many when it edged second-seeded Hamilton 1-0 in the opening round of the Mercer County Tournament this spring, Dom Capuano wasn’t surprised. “That game was awesome; for whatever reason, I had confidence going into that game. I said to them before the game, ‘I have never believed in you more at this point,’” said first-year head coach Capuano, whose team was seeded 15th in the MCT and went on to fall to 10thseeded Lawrence High in the quarterfinals. “That was based on where we were trending and how we played against them the first time and obviously with Ben [Amon] on the mound that makes a world of difference. It was pretty nervewracking from start to finish. We pushed across a run and then we hung on.” After a rocky start this spring, PHS made a strong final push. “We finished 9-13 and we were 3-11 at one point. So we won six out of eight to end the year,” said Capuano. “You are never going to be upset with that. I have also said to everybody who is going to be back next year that our season ended a little earlier than we all know it should have and that is on us. It was definitely a good thing for the program to end like that because I think it does give everybody a taste of what we need to do in the offseason to get better.” Senior standout Amon did some very good things in his final campaign. “Ben threw 32 straight shutout innings to end the ye ar,” s a id C apua no of Amon, who is heading to

The College of New Jersey where he will play for its baseball program. “His first game was OK, his second game got a little better, and then from the end of the second game to the end of the year, he didn’t give up a run. It is funny because Hamilton West was his first win; he had 10 strikeouts in that game.” The squad’s crew of seniors — Teddy Durbin, Owen Seals, Eli Okoye, Tommy Reid, and Amon — gave PHS a winning mentality. “They are going to be pretty hard to replace; the senior class really did a good job of helping us this year,” said Capuano. “Ben is going to be extremely difficult to replace on the mound. Not having Teddy on the mound definitely hurt, but he was a constant in the top of the lineup so that is going to be missed. Owen led the team in batting average; he beat Eli by two points. When you look at every other statistical category, Eli was our guy this year; he did a lot of good things for us. Tom is like a Swiss Army knife, you can put him anywhere in the field and he will play well. You can put him anywhere in the lineup and he does what that role needed. Hopefully the juniors and sophomores took notice and can elevate their games to where our seniors were this year.” Capuano will be looking to sophomore Tommy Delany, junior Gautam Chawla, junior Jason Ramirez, junior Aiden Regan, and junior Judd Petrone to step into those shoes. “Tommy is only going to be a junior but he going to be a third year varsity player, which puts him in a class by himself,” said Capuano.

“We are going to look for Chawla to be like Tommy Reid where we can put him around the field and he is going to help everybody else around him. We are going to look for Ramirez to really lead us on the pitching staff. Aiden had a tremendous year as far as his first season on varsity. If we are going to be as successful next year as I want, he is going to have to be a big part of that. He was pretty much an everyday player down the stretch; he is somebody who is going to really need to be important for us. Judd is another key guy; he is probably going to take over for Tommy [Reid] in center field. I am hoping he will be controlling the outfield, be a top of the order guy to get on base and set the table.” At catcher, freshman Carl Birge made an important contribution. “Carl did a great job this year behind the plate,” said Capuano. “Offensively, we really want him to take the next step next year. He will be a sophomore who has a full year of varsity. He and Tommy Delany are both a little bit more elevated than their class.” In reflecting on his debut campaign at the helm of the program, Capuano gained some lessons he plans to apply next year. “It was a good first year; I walked into a program that was good to be around,” said Capuano. “It was a lot of learning. We lost eight games in a row and you learn something about yourself as a coach, figuring it out during the season. There are some things strategically that we are going to have to talk about and we are going to start working out and doing things earlier.” —Bill Alden

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the school record by nearly three seconds, running 4:08.42 to finish 16th. Later in the weekend, junior standout Linko achieved a year-long goal, breaking 57 seconds in the 400 meters. Linko anchored the girls’ Super Sprint Medley Relay (800 meters run in segments of 100, 100, 200, and 400) with a time of 56.65. In individual events, senior standout Moran broke a 40-year-old school record for the mile, clocking a time of 5:07.77. Senior Jackson McCarthy ran 1:54.95 in the Championship 800, his second fastest time ever. One other highlight of the weekend was the first ever Mixed 4x400 relay run by PHS, with two boys and two girls competing in the same race. Linko, McCarthy, Raina Williamson, and Matt Perello made up the relay, which finished in 16th place.

CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT: Princeton High boys’ track star Nils Wildberg shows off the medal he earned for taking fifth place in the Championship Long Jump at the New Balance National Championships in Greensboro, N.C., last weekend. The Dartmouth-bound Wildberg jumped a huge personal best of 24’3.5, good for a school and Mercer County all-time record as he earned All-America status.

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Heading south to compete in the New Balance National Championships in Greensboro, N.C., to wrap up its season, the Princeton High track team made some history. PHS senior star sprinter and jumper Nils Wildberg leapt into the record book, flying to fifth place finish in the Championship Long Jump, earning A ll-A mer ica stat us. T he Dartmouth-bound Wildberg jumped a huge personal best of 24’3.5, good for a school and Mercer County all-time record. E arlier in June, Wildberg had placed second in the long jump at the New Jersey Meet of Champions with a leap of 22’6. The Tiger girls’ Sprint Medley Relay (1,00 meters run in segments of 200, 200, 400, and 800) of Colleen Linko, Raina Williamson, Kendall Williamson, and Siena Moran shattered

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TOM TERRIFIC: Princeton High baseball player Tommy Reid takes a big cut in a game this spring. Senior outfielder and co-captain Reid helped spark PHS at the top of the lineup. The Tigers went 9-13 this spring, winning six of their last eight games and advancing to the Mercer County Tournament quarterfinals. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

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Ending with a 6-2 Run Down the Stretch, PHS Baseball Confident of Future Success


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019 • 30

Hun Softball Displayed Fighting Spirit, Posting 9-6 Record, Making Prep A Semis Trailing by two runs heading into its last at-bat in the state Prep A semifinals, the Hun School softball team wasn’t about to throw in the towel as it played archival Lawrenceville School. Hun rallied for two runs in the contest at Lawrenceville to tie the game at 5-5 and force extra innings. Although the Raiders ended up losing 6-5 in the bottom of the ninth in the May 15 contest, Kathy Quirk had no qualms with the effort she got from her players. “It was a really well-played game,” said Hun head coach Quirk. “We tied the game up in the seventh and we kept plugging away.” Quirk was not surprised by her squad’s resilience. “We had good leaders. I have always told them, it is not just the wins and losses, it is how you play and how you handle yourself,” said Quirk, whose team ended the 2019 season with a 9-6 record. “It starts in the team room with your dedication and desire. I think that is the most important part of everything - coming out ready to play.” Showing dedication and desire, Hun didn’t back dow n against t wo of its strongest foes. “If you look at our record,

we were 9-6 and five of the losses were to the same two teams, Lawrenceville and Blair,” said Quirk. “E ach t ime we played them we got better. The first time Lawrenceville beat us 7-0 and then we lost 4-3 and lost 6-5. It was the same thing with Blair, we lost 6-0 and then the second time it was 5-3, two pitches won that game for them.” The team’s trio of seniors, E r i n H a r r i g a n, M e g h a n Donohue, and Mary Catherine Shea, made the most out of their time with the program. “All three of them are going to be missed,” said Quirk. “Erin did a great job on the mound; she came to Hun two years ago as a transfer and bought into the program. Meghan and MC were fouryear starters. They never missed a game or a practice in four years, that says something about their intensity and desire. Meghan was a quiet leader and MC was a little more vocal. Meghan always led by example; she was a good hitter for us.” Going forward, Quirk will be looking for junior stars, shortstop Gigi Venizelos and center fielder Abby Zucatti, to lead the way next spring “Gigi and Abby are two

special players; they really know the game,” asser ted Quirk of the pair, who served as team captains this spring along with Donohue and Shea. “I say they are like two peas in a pod, one is infield, one is outfield. They both make things happen. They are both not only good defensive players but their bats come alive. When Gigi starts a game with a hit, it is contagious. I am looking forward to their leadership again next year. We are going to be a little young.” The Raiders boast a core of young talent in junior Jackie Drozd, sophomore Hannah Babushak, freshman Katie Angelini, freshman Nora Shea, and freshman Alexis Murdock. “We have good returners, we have Jackie who has been a starter in left field and does her job,” said Quirk. “We have Hannah as the catcher. Katie came in as a second basemen and really did a nice job. Nora hit well. We have a young pitcher coming back in Alexis.” In Quirk’s view, the returners will be hungry to turn the tables on their rivals when they get the chance. “We left unfinished business and they know that,” said Quirk. “We need to work out in the offseason to be successful next year.” —Bill Alden

PDS Softball Enjoys Competitive Campaign In Coach Lano’s Swan Song with Program Paul Lano made a promise when he took the helm of the Princeton Day School softball team in 2012. “When I came into the program they only had eight players the year before, they had to borrow a player from Stuart Country Day to play games so they were really struggling,” said PDS head coach Lano. “I came to the athletic department and said give me a year or so and I will build it back up. I will get players to come out and play. I had 15, 17 players at times. I was able to build the program back up to where it needs to be in order to become relevant.” With this spring turning out to be Lano’s swan song as he will be leaving PDS to become the assistant coach of t h e Ru tg e r s - C a m d e n women’s volleyball team, his final Panther squad lived up to his word, producing some competitive play with a mix of promising newcomers and senior stalwarts. “What we saw progress in was the newcomers to the team, they were very impressive,” said Lano, whose team went 2-8 this spring. “It was just fun to watch these new kids come into the game and embrace the d if f icu lt ie s and manage them well.” Freshmen Courtney Richter and Veronica Vogelman made a lot of progress as they took up softball. “Cour tney and Ronnie were both able to hit the ball as freshmen; that is a rarity, especially when both of them are new to the game,” said Lano. “They were just going off of what they learned immediately. Cour tney had more than one multiple hit game. She also played second base, third, first and outfield. She was willing to play anywhere we needed her. Ronnie never ceases to amaze me; I just knew that she was hearing and understanding everything I was telling her about hitting. She

was able to put it into action and get results. She was also the first switch hitter in PDS softball history; she got hits from both side of the plate.” With the graduation of senior stalwart Julie Patterson, the Panthers are losing one of the best players in their history. “Julie is a pillar of the program; she has been the best player on this team all four years because of her experience and the position she plays,” said Lano, noting that Patterson is heading to Wilkes University where she will be playing for its women’s hockey program. “She is the best catcher I have seen come through there at PDS. There is no debate about Julie’s value and contribution. You never really understand the value of water until the well is dry. When you don’t have a really good catcher, you don’t know what you are doing without and then when you have one, you know you have it good. Julie had a nice hitting streak too, I think she got a hit in every game she played this year.” Another senior, Elisabeth Berman, has made a big contribution over the last four years. “Elisabeth is terribly special to me; she is an incredible person, player, kid, student athlete, and contributor,” said Lano. “We just completed seven seasons together because she has played volleyball for me for three years. She will always do what she is asked to do. In those first two years, Elisabeth’s value was unmeasured, As a freshman she stepped into that circle because we had no one else to pitch. She had to do the pitching and even though she didn’t love that, she did it for the team. For her junior year, another pitcher came in Gia Massari, but she was only with us for one year. This year Elisabeth came in to close the games out and did a terrific job. She was the shortstop when

she wasn’t pitching.” Senior Brooke Smukler, a soccer and basketball star, emerged as a solid performer in the circle for the Panthers. “Brooke basically carried us these last two years pitching, what an amazing job she did with the minimal amount of work put in,” said Lano, noting that Smukler is busy the rest of the year with her other sports. “I was impressed w ith what she was able to do last year, finally getting over some injuries and having a pitching coach, Angela Parascando, work with her through the preseason. She showed me stuff I didn’t really expect from her. This year, she even got better.” PDS boasted an unsung hero with the right stuff in senior Hailey Young. “The thing about Hailey is that she is the poster child for how to be a good student athlete; she is wonderful,” said Lano. “She never let us down in anything. She is always the first one to practice and the last to leave. She always made sure that the player chores were completed and would do them herself when they weren’t. The last two seasons, she served as a co-captain with Julie. Hailey played multiple positions for us. She was basically our center fielder and she would become the shortstop when Elisabeth pitched. Then we figured out that Ronnie could play the outfield fairly well so we moved Hailey to first base.” While Lano is excited to move on to college volleyball, it was tough for him to leave the student-athletes he coached at PDS. “I am back at the college level. I never thought I was going to get another shot and I feel very fortunate that I did,” said Lano, who previously coached the Rider University women’s volleyball team. “It is the second college volleyball opportunity I have gotten and I am looking forward to it. I feel very lucky; it is the only thing that would pull me away from PDS.” —Bill Alden

REACHING OUT: Hun School softball player Gigi Venizelos, left, lunges to apply a tag in action this spring. Junior shortstop and co-captain Venizelos starred in the field and at the plate for Hun, which ended the season at 9-6 and advanced to the state Prep A semifinals. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

SWINGING AWAY: Princeton Day School softball player Julie Patterson takes a swing in a game this season. Senior catcher and co-captain Patterson was a stalwart for the program over the last four seasons, providing leadership and production from day one as a freshman. PDS posted a 2-8 record this spring. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


When Kevin Durant joined the Golden State Warriors in 2016, it helped transform a title-winning club into an NBA dynasty. Jordan Glover, a former standout for The College of New Jersey, is looking to have a similar impact this year in the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. After playing for Majeski Foundation, the TCNJ men’s hoops entry in the league, the recently graduated Glover has joined Loyaltees, the summer league’s defending champion. L ast Monday evening, Glover helped make the difference as Loyaltees pulled out a 62-57 win over Sakana in opening night action at John Witherspoon Middle School, draining some key buckets on the way to scoring 14 points on the evening. For Glover, hooking up

with Loyaltees was a good fit. “Being a basketball junkie, I have to keep playing the game,” said the 6’5, 222-pound Glover, who averaged 9.6 points and 5.0 rebounds in his TCNJ career with 984 points. “I am playing right now in North Jersey for the Hoopsville Pro-Am league and Loyaltees asked me to come down here to play. Coming in and playing with the guys I grew up with like Nick Davidson and Terrance Bailey is like another day of practice for me.” With Loyaltees trailing 3429 at halftime, the squad picked it up on the defensive end coming down the stretch. “In those moments, you have to come together as a team,” said Glover. “We can’t rely on reaching in, we have to play good defense. They tried to push it. They had a lot of bigs and we

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are guard heavy so defense is definitely important.” Pulling out the win in the opener was an important step forward as Loyaltees looks to get on the same page. “A lot of guys filled their role,” said Glover, reflecting on the win which saw Davison score 18 points and Bailey chip in 14. “We have a lot of scorers, we have a lot of good guys who play overseas and a lot of former college players so coming out today was a good thing for us.” Glover acknowledged that the team needs to work on getting into a better offensive flow. “We know we have the talent, we just have to take good shots,” said Glover, who is looking to play pro ball in Puerto Rico this winter. “ We s h ou l d n ot h ave rushed certain shots. We should have passed the ball more to get the extra pass and get everyone going.” In Glover’s view, Loyaltees has the potential to achieve the title repeat. “We are kind of like the Warriors,” added Glover. “We have a lot of new guys coming in so we have to come together. If we get another championship, that would be great.” —Bill Alden

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TEEING IT UP: Jordan Glover drives to the basket for Loyaltees last Monday at the John Witherspoon Middle School in the opening night of the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. Glover, a former standout for The College of New Jersey, scored 16 points to help Loyaltees pull out a 62-57 win over Sakana. In other action on Monday, NJ Spiritwear defeated Apex Sport 58-45 and Hometown Moving and Storage Co. topped Olives 46-20. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Local Sports ETS Firecracker 5K Slated for June 25

T he 15th annual Firecracker ETS 5K Fun Run/ Walk will take place on the evening of June 25 at the Educational Testing Service (ETS) campus on Rosedale Road. Runners, walkers, families, and corporate or organizational teams are invited to participate. Individuals and

group teams of at least four participants are welcome. The event starts at 7 p.m., rain or shine, and takes place on the flat and safe course, contained within the ETS grounds. The race annually attracts over 550 runners and early registration is recommended. The cost to register is $35 (plus $2.50 sign-up fee). USATF members will get a discounted rate. Those interested can register online at www.ywcaprinceton.org/5k. Proceeds from the event support YWCA Princeton’s Bilingual Nursery School,

which provides non-English speaking preschool children the tools they need to enter kindergarten on par with their English-speaking peers.

Rotary 5K Race Set for June 23

The Rotary Club of Robbinsville Hamilton is hosting ROTARUN, a sanctioned 5K Race on June 23 at Veterans Park in Hamilton Township (Kuser Road Entrance). The event is a fundraiser to benefit The Miracle League of Mercer County and other local charities. In the Miracle League, youngsters play on a barrier-free baseball diamond, allowing

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Nathaniel “Nate” Wilbank Lee Nathaniel “Nate” Wilbank Lee, age 19, of Montgomery Township, NJ, passed away on June 9, 2019 after years of struggle with depression. Nate was born in New York City on the first day of the year of the Dragon. At the time of his birth, his greatgrandparents remarked that he was the “Golden Dragon” baby. Nate’s curiosity about the world began at a young age with trucks and dinosaurs, and grew to include philosophy, math, and writing while he was a student at Skidmore College. He loved his brothers, Noah and Caleb, and his six younger cousins in CT and FL. As the oldest of nine grandchildren, he took good care of his younger brothers and cousins with kindness and affection. He was genuine, smart, caring, and attentive to anyone who needed his help, be it family or friend. He enjoyed so many aspects of life when his depression did not get in the way, especially spending time with his family, eating good food, working out, traveling, skiing, writing fiction, and playing video games. He loved his family so much and was much loved by his entire extended family. He is survived by his loving parents, Dr. Richard and Mrs. Helen Lee, and his beloved brothers Noah and Caleb. He leaves behind his lov-

Clara Sferra Clara Sferra, 89, of Princeton died Sunday, June 16, 2019 at Brandywine Senior Living at Princeton surrounded by her loving family. Born in Pettoranello di Molise, Italy, she immigrated to Princeton in 1945. Clara was a member of St. Paul’s Church and T he Italian American Sportsman Club Ladies Auxiliary. Daughter of the late Michael and Maria Teresa (Rossi) Lise, wife of the late Antonio Sferra, twin sister of the late Angelina Mattera, she is survived by two daughters and two sons-in-law Angelina M. and Joseph Foldes, Patricia M. and Darren Alizio; a son and daughter-in-law Dominick A. and Kim Sferra; six grandchildren Keri Louick and her husband Brian, Ashley Sferra, William, Joseph and Jennifer Foldes, Lauren Alizio; and two great-grandchildren Piper and Kane.

The Funeral will be held o n S at u r d ay, J u n e 22, 2019 at 8 :30 a.m. from the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 9:30 a.m., St. Paul’s Church, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton. Burial will follow in the Princeton Cemetery. Friends may call on Friday, June 21, 2019 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the funeral home.

Dr. Yuan-Min Li 1958-2019

With great sorrow, we share this sad news: our beloved husband and father Yuan-Min Li completed his life’s journey and passed away at Princeton Medical Center on the morning of June 9th, 2019, after battling advanced cancer for months. Words cannot express the deep pain and emptiness we feel from this great loss. Beyond being an extraordinary man with all his accomplishment in photovoltaics, Yuan-Min was a loving husband and father, the most reliable and trustworthy friend, and our mentor and soulmate. He told us just days before his departure, that he was to start a new journey, a journey of love. We know he is now free of pain, and we send love from all of us, wherever he is! Xiaoping Zhang, Dan Lee & Ken Lee; Residents of Princeton Township since 2004

Gerald Malcom Graesser Sadly, G erald Malcom Graesser, 76, passed away after a hard-fought battle, passing on Saturday, June 15 in Princeton. Born in Huntington, Long Island, he moved to the Princeton area in the late ’70s, where he established himself in the Commercial Real Estate appraising field, after working in Long Island as an architect with his father. Son of the late Alber t G rae s s er a nd E l i z ab e t h Graesser, he is survived by his wife Shevawn (McManimon) Graesser, son Sean P. Graesser, and cousin in Long Island Harry Henderson III. There will be no funeral, but a small gathering celebration of life at 31 Titus Mill Road, Pennington, NJ 08534 from 2-4 p.m. on Sunday June 23rd. Memorial contributions can be made to Save the Chocó at http://savethechoco.com/ donate. Arrangements are under the direction of Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

WE WON’T EMPTY YOUR BANK ACCOUNT

From Hanergy: We are sad to announce that Dr. Yuanmin Li, our chief scientist and the co-CTO of Hanergy Thin Film Power Group, passed away on June 9th, 2019 in Princeton, NJ, USA, at the age of sixty. Dr. Yuanmin Li wa s born in Beijing on October 11th, 1958. He graduated from the Department of Modern Physics, the University of Science and Technology of China in 1982. He obtained his master’s degree in physics and Ph.D. in applied physics from Harvard University, in 1984 and 1989, respectively. During his graduate study, he worked as a teaching assistant at the Department of Applied Physics and then a lecturer at the Department of Applied Mathematics. After graduation, he held a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Applied Physics at Harvard University for one year. His industrial career in photovoltaics started in 1990. He had been working in numerous prodigious PV companies such as Solarex, BP Solar, AmPro Corporation, Energy Photovoltaics Inc., Terra Solar Inc., Renewable Energy Solutions Inc., and GS-Solar (Fujian) Energy, Co., Ltd., as senior scientist, process director, technical director, R&D VP, coCTO, co-founder, and president. He also was an active member of thin-film partnership program of the Department of Energy, USA. Dr. Yuanmin Li joined Hanergy in 2010 as a vice chairman and co-CTO of Hanergy Thin Film Power Group, Ltd. Dr. Li devoted his entire career in developing thin-film photovoltaic materials and technologies from hydrogenated amorphous Si and its alloys, nano-crystalline Si, CIGS, perovskite, single and multijunction solar cells and thin-film modules. For more than 30 years, his expertise covered the deposition and characterization of thin-film materials, design, synthesis, analysis, and optimization of photovoltaic devices, manufacturing of large-area photovoltaic modules, displays, optoelectronic devices and materials. He has accomplished a number of silicon-based thin-film solar cell records: first ever single-junction hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cell with the open-circuit voltage (VOC) exceeding 1.0V; especially wide band-gap hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) materials and its solar cell with VOC reaching 1.03V (world record at that time); greater than 8% conversion efficiency of a high performance nano-crystalline silicon solar cells deposited by a single-chamber radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical

vapor deposition (RF-PECVD); the first stable efficiency greater than 9% obtained by doublejunction amorphous silicon/amorphous silicon germanium solar module on 1 m2 glass substrate with initial efficiency above 11%; the DC discharge asymmetric etching for large-area nano-crystalline silicon deposition; single-chamber large-area multi-junction thin-film silicon photovoltaic module production with highest stable conversion efficiency at lowest cost. During his career, he had filed more than 100 patents both in China and abroad, nearly 40 have been granted; published 67 papers in academic journals and international conferences. During his Hanergy times starting from 2010, Dr. Li has done remarkable performance in both R&D and mass production of hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys, CIGS, silicon heterojunction (SHJ), and perovskite technologies, etc. As the leader of the Hanergy Chengdu R&D Center from November of 2011, Dr. Li had made many breakthroughs in mass production of hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium tandem solar modules, BIPV, agricultural greenhouse application, and amorphous/nano-microcrystalline silicon thinfilm tandem solar cell technologies. In particular, the successful application of silicon-based alloy thin films to high-efficiency SHJ solar cells has produced the record cell efficiency in full-6-inch wafer in China in 2018, and the record cell was made from the pilot production line. Dr. Li was diligent, hard-working, and eager to learn and sensitive to new technologies. Dr. Li actively promoted research on perovskite solar cell technology and played a key role in establishing a team in Chengdu R&D Center in June 2018. Promising progress has been made in large-area perovskite solar cell and perovskite/SHJ tandem solar cell developments. Dr. Yuanmin Li, as a leading scientist with numerous outstanding contributions in thin-film photovoltaics, an excellent leader and beloved mentor to young engineers and researchers, a dear friend and colleague, will be long remembered. The passing away of Dr. Yuanmin Li is a great loss to his family, his friends, and colleagues, and the PV communities. However, Dr. Li’s vision and passion of PV, his dedication, work ethic, focus, and no-nonsense leadership will inspire us to strive for greater progress in PV technology and industry.

中国光伏专委会 世界著名硅基薄膜太阳电池研究专家,汉能首席科学家,首批汉能院士,汉能薄膜发电集团异质结高端装备产业公司联席首席技术 官李沅民博士因病医治无效,于美国东部时间2019年6月9日早8点30分,在美国新泽西州普林斯顿市逝世,享年60岁。 李沅民博士于1958年10月11日出生于北京,1982年毕业于中国科技大学近代物理学系,分别于1984年及1989年在哈佛大学取得物 理学硕士学位及应用物理学博士学位,留学期间担任哈佛大学应用物理系助教及应用数学系讲师。毕业后在哈佛大学应用物理系任 职博士后一年时间,之后于1990年至2008年先后在Solarex、AmPro Corporation、Energy Photovoltaics,Inc.(EPV)、Terra Solar Inc、Renewable Energy Solutions Inc、行者太阳能集团有限公司、福建钧石能源有限公司等多家光伏公司任资深高级研究员、制 程工艺总监、技术总监、研发副总裁、总裁兼首席技术官、联合创始人兼总裁等职务。受汉能集团邀约,李沅民博士于2010年加入 汉能,担任汉能薄膜发电集团董事会副主席兼联席首席技术官一职。 李沅民博士长期致力于光伏薄膜技术的研发,在薄膜材料制备、表征及沉积技术、太阳能光伏器件之设计、合成、分析和优化、大 面积光伏组件制造和相关工艺技术、显示器、光电器件和材料拥有超过30年经验,并创造多项硅基薄膜太阳电池记录:首次通过实 验得出非晶硅单结太阳电池开路电压Voc大于1.0V,宽禁带非晶硅碳太阳电池开路电压Voc大于1.03V,创下了当时世界纪录;1992 年-1996年,在实验室条件下,用单腔室射频等离子体增强化学汽相淀积(RF-PECVD)展示高性能的纳米硅电池,单腔室纳米硅 电池效率>8%;第一个在1平方英尺玻璃衬底上获得稳定转换效率大于9%的非晶硅/非晶硅锗双结光伏组件,初始转换率大于11%; 发明直流放电非对称刻蚀的大面积纳米硅均匀沉积方法;最高稳定转换效率及最低成本的单腔室大面积多结薄膜硅光伏组件生产技 术及其产业化。目前在海内外已获受理的专利多达上百项,其中已授权的就有近40项。在国际学术刊物及会议上发表的论文论著有 67篇。自2009年加入汉能以后,李沅民博士先后在非晶硅、非晶硅锗、CIGS、HIT、钙钛矿技术领域进行研发和量产工作,并取得 了骄人的成绩,特别是,李沅民博士带领团队将硅基合金薄膜技术应用于高效硅异质结电池(SHJ)创造了2018年该类太阳电池中国 最高效率记录。 李沅民博士一生勤勤恳恳、兢兢业业,他为薄膜光伏技术领域的科学研究和光伏技术研发以及培养年轻一代光伏人才,奉献了自己 的毕生精力;他的逝世使我们失去了一位令人尊敬的好导师,中国光伏失去了一位赤子,是世界光伏科学技术领域的重大损失。李 沅民博士对科学事业不懈追求和为中国光伏事业献身的崇高精神永远值得我们学习和缅怀!

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

Obituaries

ing grandparents, Wilbank, Jean, Soo Hyun, and Young Ja; his aunt Jennifer and her husband Titus; his aunt Jo; his uncle Douglas and his wife Min; his uncle Hwan Ho; and his cousins Jacob, Lukas, Madeleine, Kieran, Alexandria, and Sebastian. There will be a memorial service for Nate on Saturday, June 22 at 11 a.m. at Stone Hill Church, located at 1025 Bunn Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Good-Grief.org (Princeton area support services to families who’ve lost a family member). Arrangements are under the direction of Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.


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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019 • 34

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Turn to Artis.

Do ve d one g in circles?

Join us for a Memory Café

with Sheli Monacchio, Certified Dementia Practitioner Caregivers and their loved ones living with memory impairment are invited to join us for an interactive musical discussion that focuses on how music has changed through the years. Beginning with the 40’s, we will work our way to today reminiscing through story-sharing and song.

Light Lunch will be served.

Wednesday, June 26th Suddenly you find yourself helping a family member with the things they used to do for themselves. As much as you love and care for them, it’s taking a toll on you.

12:30-2:00 pm

Being held at

Artis Senior Living of Princeton Junction | 861 Alexander Road, Princeton Junction, NJ

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES Space is limited!

Take better care of both of you by getting to know The Artis Way—exceptionally customized, respectful, loving Memory Care in a cozy, neighborhood setting. Precisely the enriching, supportive lifestyle you’d provide if you had the resources we do.

Register now by calling 877-283-9812 or at www.TheArtisWay.com/TownTopics Please RSVP by June 19th

Let us help each of you return to your best selves.

Can’t make it to our event? Call us at 877-283-9812 to schedule a tour today!

DIRECTORY OF RECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVI DIRECTORY DIRECTORY OF 861 Alexander Road | Princeton, NJ 08540 AN EPISCOPAL PARISH

Trinity Church SundayHoly Week 8:00&a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I Easter Schedule

9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages March 23 10:00Wednesday, a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm

IOUS SERVICES RELIGIOUS SERVICESSER RELIGIOUS Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm

Tuesday Thursday March 24 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist

Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer p.m. Holy Eucharist

RECTORY OF GIOUS SERVICES 5:30

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

Friday, March 25

Wherever you are on your PARISH journey of faith, you are AN EPISCOPAL always welcome to worship with us at:

33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

Trinity Church SundayHoly Week First Church ofRite Christ, 8:00 Holy Eucharist, I &a.m. Easter Schedule

Scientist, Princeton Mother of God Orthodox Church 9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages March 23 10:00Wednesday, a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm 904 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, NJfollowing 08540 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton 609-466-3058

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Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 10:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School and Youth Bible Study Adult Bible Classes (A multi-ethnic congregation)

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES Tenebrae 7:00 pm V. Rev. PeterService, Baktis, Rector

www.mogoca.org

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. 214 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, March 26 Tuesday Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Wednesday Testimony Meeting andLiturgy Nursery at 7:30 p.m. Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Sunday, 10:00 am: Divine Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Thursday March 24 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist AN EPISCOPAL PARISH Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Saturday Vigil 5:30pmp.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm The Great Vigil ofMass: Easter, 7:00 Sunday, 9:15 am: Church School Holy Eucharist Foot Washing Vigil Mass: 5:30and p.m. Christianwith Science Reading and Room Sunday:Saturday 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 5:00 p.m. Trinity Saturday, 5:00 pm: Adult Education Wednesday Church Holy Week Sunday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00Princeton pm Classes 178 Nassau Street, Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. 5:30 p.m. Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer Holy Eucharist Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 am Saturday, 6:00 pm:through Vespers 8:00 Holy Eucharist, Rite I &a.m. Easter Schedule 609-924-0919 – Rev. Open MassSmith in Holy Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. Rev. Jenny Walz, Lead Pastor The. PaulMonday Jeanes III, Rector Saturday from 10 - 4 Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, DirectorAges of Music 9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Friday, March 25 FestiveChildren’s Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am Worship and Program 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am Wednesday, March 23 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II The Prayer Service for Good Sundays AM III, Rector HolyBook Eucharist, Rite II, Friday, 12:00 12:00 pm pm – 1:00 pm The.at Rev. 10 Paul Jeanes The Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org

Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are with us at:

Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm 5:00 Evensong with Communion following Holyp.m. Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm

St. Paul’s Catholic Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216 Nassau Street, 214 Nassau Street,Princeton Princeton Tuesday Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365

Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are witherspoonchurch.org always welcome to worship with us at:

First Church of Christ, Princeton Quaker Meeting Witherspoon St Step out ofPrinceton time into the shared silence of a 124 Withersp Scientist, in our historic Meeting House. 16Quaker Bayard meeting Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org Meetings for Worship at 9 and 11

10:00 a 10:00 a.m. C and Ad (A multi

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. 214 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, March 26 Child Meeting Care available Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Wednesday Testimony and Nurseryat at 11 7:30 p.m. Thursday March 24 Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Saturday Vigil 5:30pmp.m. 470 Quaker Road, Princeton NJ 08540 The Great Vigil ofMass: Easter, 7:00 First Church of Christ, Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church HolyChurch Eucharist with Foot Washing and Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30and p.m. Christian Science Reading Room Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 5:00 p.m. www.princetonfriendsmeeting.org 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ Scientist, Princeton 609-924-1 Wednesday 178 Nassau Street, Princeton Sunday, March 27 Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 16 Bayard Princeton AN Lane, EPISCOPAL PARISH 10:00 a.m. Worship ServiceMass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 am withe 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org Keeping Watch, 8:00 pmSunday –with Mar. 25, 7:00 am 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 of - 4 faith, you are Mass in Spanish: at 7:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School Wherever you are on your journey 5:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist Healing Prayer 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am

Wherever always you are on welcome your journey ofto faith, you are worship always welcome to worship with us at:

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton

10:00 a.m. Worship Service and Youth Bible Study Trinity Church SundayHoly Week The. Rev.Choral Paul Jeanes III, Rector Festive Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org Adult Bible Classes 10:00 a.m. Sunday School Br. Christopher McNabb, CurateChildren’s • Mr. Tom Whittemore, 8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! & Easter Schedule Friday, March 25 Director of Music (A multi-ethnic congregation) Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

Princeton University chaPel

and Youth Bible Study www.trinityprinceton.org Reading Room The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector 9:00Christian a.m.Science Christian Education for All Ages 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 7:00 am Adult Bible Classes Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director Music pm – 1:00 pm a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II witherspoonchurch.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, of12:00 609-924-091910:00 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! multi-ethnic Stations (A of the Cross, 1:00congregation) pm – 2:00 pm 5:00 Evensong withPrayers Communion following Holyp.m. Eucharist, Rite II with for Healing, 5:30 pm Prayer BookThe Service forJ.Good Rev. Nancy Hagner, Friday, Associate 609-924-1666 • Fax The 609-924-0365 178 Nassau Street, Princeton Wednesday Testimony MeetingMarch and Nursery Wednesday, 23 at 7:30 p.m. Christian Science Reading Room Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm

178 Nassau Street, Princeton

Tuesday 609-924-091912:00 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 Thursday March 24 p.m. Holy Eucharist

Princeton’s First Tradition St. EcumEnical Paul’s Catholic Church 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 christian worship St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216 Nassau Street, Princeton witherspoonchurch.org 214 Nassau Street, Princeton Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

always welcome to worship with us at:

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. sunday atPrinceton 11am 214 Nassau Street, Saturday, March 26 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. Msgr.Easter Joseph Rosie, Pastor Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Rev. DR.Msgr. Alison l.Walter BoDen Rev. DR. TheResA s. ThAmes Nolan, Pastor ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 Dean ofThe Religious Associate Dean of Religious life Easter, 7:00 pm Wherever youGreat arelife onVigil your of journey of faith, youp.m. are 5:30 and the Chapel and the Chapel Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. Christian Science Reading Room The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector always 8:30, welcome10:00, to worship11:30 with us at: Sunday: 7:00, and 5:00 p.m. Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music Friday, March 25 178 Nassau Street, Princeton Sunday, March 27 JoinFirst us! are welcome! Visit religiouslife.princeton.edu Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org Mass in All Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. Church of Christ, The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am Holy Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 am Witherspoon Street Church 609-924-0919 – Presbyterian Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 MassFestive in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer p.m. Holy Eucharist

Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton

Scientist, Princeton

Festive 16 Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector

124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 10:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School

W


“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

to place an order:

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CANOE: Old Town Saranac 146, (2) West Branch paddles, Thule rack. KAYAK: Cascadia 9.0 fit-on-top package, carrier. All new. 25% off each. (609) 497-0679. 06-19

CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

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CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

CLEANING-EXTENSIVE GENERAL HOME & OFFICE: Move in, move out cleaning. Free estimates. Years of experience, references available. Call Candi Villegas, (609) 310-2048. 06-19-3t

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MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com

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08-08-19

Irene Lee, Classified Manager

LOOKING TO PURCHASE AvailableAll mornings WHERE THE POLITICAL • Deadline: 2pm Tuesdayoftake •experience. Payment: adsto must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. 07-25-19 HOME IN THE care of your loved one, transport ACTION IS: PRINCETON AREA: for ads greater than 60 words to appointments, runcents errands. I •am • 25 words or less: $15.00 • Trenton. eachJoin add’l word 15 Surcharge: $15.00 inPAINTING length.& J.O. 15 West Front Street, state-related orgs. and busi- well known in Princeton. Top care, Local, loving family of 5 seeking to HOME IMPROVEMENTS: PRINCETON • ESTATE 3 weeks:other $40.00 • 4 weeks: $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. nesses in a classic building near the excellent references. The best, cell buy a 3-4 BR home. Pre-approved FURNITURE SALE: Painting for interior & exterior, fram(609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. for mortgage. Please call Barbara roomwith suites and Antiques, 1960s, 1970s, 1975 Dodge State House. •2-to-3 ing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, Ads line spacing: $20.00/inch • all bold face type: $10.00/week tf (609) 731-1701. No real estate open office. Call Anne LaBate (609) Dart SE. Wednesday, June 19, 2-7; Thursday, June 20, 2-7; Saturday, June 22, 9-2. 39 Linwood Circle. 06-19

394-7557.

06-05-3t

PRINCETON – YARD SALE: Saturday, June 22, 9 am-4 pm & Sunday, June 23, 9 am-12 pm at 460 Christopher Drive in Princeton. DR table & chairs, side tables, shelves & other furniture. Art, rugs, china, decorative items & soft furnishings. 06-19

CHARMING PRINCETON APT: Fully furnished, 2 bedrooms, picture windows overlooking yard. W/D, cable, wireless high-speed internet, parking. Utilities included. No smoking or pets. $2,500/mo. Available now. Call (609) 924-4210. 06-19

MOVING SALE: 13 Aunt Molly Road, Hopewell. Friday & Saturday, June 21 & 22 from 9:30-3. Contemporary home filled with quality furnishings. BoConcept sofas, consoles, Jensen-Lewis king bed & furniture. Jensen-Lewis desk unit, Baby Grand piano, ABC Carpet & Home furnishings. Clothing, costume jewelry, carpets, kitchen items, decorative accessories, outdoor table & chairs, fire pit, umbrellas, etc. Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 06-19

MAINE VACATION: Blue Hill Peninsula near Deer Isle & Acadia. Boating excursions including sunset sails, lighthouse cruises. Kayaking. Swimming. Hiking. Relaxing. Foodie paradise, including farm-to-table dinners. 3 BR, 2 full baths, sunporch. June, September, October $650/ weekly; July, August $800/weekly. Plus cleaning & taxes. (207) 3269386. 06-05-3t HOUSE FOR RENT: One-of-a-kind spacious dairy barn conversion with Princeton address, on private, bucolic setting. Open floor plan, 3 BR, 2 bath, breathtaking 2nd floor versatile room. Fireplace, 2-car garage, central air. Includes lawn maintenance & snow removal. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $3,500. (609) 731-6904. 06-05-3t

CRANBURY MOVING SALE: 24 Washington Drive, Friday & Saturday, June 21 & 22 from 9:30-3. House filled with decorative furniture & accessories, tons of gift items, kitchen full. Henkel Harris DR, Hickory Chair, Ethan Allen, Brown Jordan, Gasior’s. Photos can be seen on estatesales. net, MG Estate Services. 06-19 ESTATE SALE + DESIGNER SALE: June 22 & 23, 9 am-4 pm. 4554 Province Line Road, Princeton. See ad & photos on estatesales. net in Princeton zip code, listed as Estate Sale + Designer Sale. Thumbnail photo shows a 1940’s Korean blanket chest. 06-19

HOUSE CLEANING: By an experienced Polish lady. Call Barbara (609) 273-4226. Weekly or biweekly. Honest & reliable. References available. 05-15-6t

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HALF HOUSE FOR RENT (of duplex) 2 BR, 1 Bath, Eat-in-kitchen, LR, Washer/Dryer, 1-car off street parking. $2,250/month. Call (609) 577-2396. 06-12-3t PRINCETON MATH TUTOR: SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com tf LAWN MAINTENANCE: Prune shrubs, mulch, cut grass, weed, leaf clean up and removal. Call (609) 9541810; (609) 833-7942. 04-03-13t OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com 06-05-4t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 06-05-4t

agents, please.

06-12-4t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 05-15-8t HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 947-2958. 06-19-4t OFFICES WITH PARKING Ready for move-in. Renovated and refreshed. 1, 3 and 6 room suites. Historic Nassau Street Building. (609) 213-5029. 06-19-5t GREEN–PLANET PAINTING: Commercial, Residential & Custom Paint, Interior & Exterior, Drywall Repairs, Light Carpentry, Deck Staining, Green Paint options, Paper Removal, Power Washing, 15 Years of Experience. FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES. CALL: (609) 356-4378; perez@green-planetpainting.com 04-03-20 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822.

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-29-19

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-04-19 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 05-01-20

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf

SUMMER IS HERE! YARD SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Lawn & Landscape Services

Celebrating 20 Years!

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$1,195,000

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CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

www.stockton-realtor.com Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $24.50 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $62.75 • 4 weeks: $80.25 • 6 weeks: $119.25 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35

tf


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019 • 36

OFFICES WITH PARKING Ready for move-in. Renovated and refreshed. 1, 3 and 6 room suites. Historic Nassau Street Building. (609) 213-5029. 06-19-5t GREEN–PLANET PAINTING: Commercial, Residential & Custom Paint, Interior & Exterior, Drywall Repairs, Light Carpentry, Deck Staining, Green Paint options, Paper Removal, Power Washing, 15 Years of Experience. FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES. CALL: (609) 356-4378; perez@green-planetpainting.com 04-03-20

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 35 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-22-20

CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: For houses and small offices. Flexible, reliable, local. Excellent references. Please call Yola (609) 558-9393. 05-01/10-23 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-29-19 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20

AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 05-01-20 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-25-19

Rated “MOST SALES” on Zillow | Top 1% of Realtors Nationwide NJAR Circle of Excellence Since 1998 | Platinum Level Since 2012 Cell: 609-903-0621  |  Direct: 609-216-7071 ashulkina@yahoo.com | www.AnnaShulkina.com RE/MAX of Princeton | 343 Nassau Street, Princeton NJ 08540 | 609-921-9202

$1,589,000 - NEW CONSTRUCTION 5BR | 4BA | 3-Car Garage | Finished Basement 4,462 Sq. Ft. | 3.01 Acre

$1,899,000-NEW CONSTRUCTION 5BR | 6.5BA | 3-Car Garage | Finished Basement 5,511 Sq. Ft. | 1.51 Acre

The Best of Borough Living Low Taxes Short Drive To Princeton Easy Commute To NYC or Phila

Historic Newtown Borough, Penna. For the first time in over thirty years, the Barnsley House is being offered. Opulent and private, this 1902 Colonial Revival, with 7+ bedrooms and 4.5 baths, marries the superior craftsmanship of yesteryear with modern convenience and comfort. An inviting front porch beckons you to this exceptional light-filled home with classic pocket doors, an original butler’s pantry, luxurious owner’s quarters and a sweeping kitchen and sunroom opening to a terrace with a breathtaking view. Manicured gardens filled with seasonal color frame the pool oasis and tranquil Japanese tea house or guest cottage. Ideally situated on the most desirable street in Historic Newtown Borough, you are steps from the quaint boutiques and renowned restaurants. Offered at $2.1M, Taxes $14,368. Additional details provided at NewtownBoroLuxury.com

Renée Noel (267) 994-5759 (Mobile) (215) 968-3615 (Direct) Renee@ReneeNoel.com Certified Luxury Home Markeing Specialist

RE/MAX Properties 210 Penns Trail, Suite 100 Newtown, PA 18940


37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

H H H

Heidi A. Hartmann Call / Text 609.658.3771 E: HeidiHartmannHomes@gmail.com W: See Above


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019 • 38

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PRINCETON ESTATE FURNITURE SALE: Antiques, 1960s, 1970s, 1975 Dodge Dart SE. Wednesday, June 19, 2-7; Thursday, June 20, 2-7; Saturday, June 22, 9-2. 39 Linwood Circle. 06-19 PRINCETON – YARD SALE: Saturday, June 22, 9 am-4 pm & Sunday, June 23, 9 am-12 pm at 460 Christopher Drive in Princeton. DR table & chairs, side tables, shelves & other furniture. Art, rugs, china, decorative items & soft furnishings. 06-19 MOVING SALE: 13 Aunt Molly Road, Hopewell. Friday & Saturday, June 21 & 22 from 9:30-3. Contemporary home filled with quality furnishings. BoConcept sofas, consoles, Jensen-Lewis king bed & furniture. Jensen-Lewis desk unit, Baby Grand piano, ABC Carpet & Home furnishings. Clothing, costume jewelry, carpets, kitchen items, decorative accessories, outdoor table & chairs, fire pit, umbrellas, etc. Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 06-19 CRANBURY MOVING SALE: 24 Washington Drive, Friday & Saturday, June 21 & 22 from 9:30-3. House filled with decorative furniture & accessories, tons of gift items, kitchen full. Henkel Harris DR, Hickory Chair, Ethan Allen, Brown Jordan, Gasior’s. Photos can be seen on estatesales. net, MG Estate Services. 06-19 ESTATE SALE + DESIGNER SALE: June 22 & 23, 9 am-4 pm. 4554 Province Line Road, Princeton. See ad & photos on estatesales. net in Princeton zip code, listed as Estate Sale + Designer Sale. Thumbnail photo shows a 1940’s Korean blanket chest. 06-19 CANOE: Old Town Saranac 146, (2) West Branch paddles, Thule rack. KAYAK: Cascadia 9.0 fit-on-top package, carrier. All new. 25% off each. (609) 497-0679. 06-19 MOVE YOUR OFFICE TO WHERE THE POLITICAL ACTION IS: 15 West Front Street, Trenton. Join other state-related orgs. and businesses in a classic building near the State House. 2-to-3 room suites and open office. Call Anne LaBate (609) 394-7557. 06-05-3t CHARMING PRINCETON APT: Fully furnished, 2 bedrooms, picture windows overlooking yard. W/D, cable, wireless high-speed internet, parking. Utilities included. No smoking or pets. $2,500/mo. Available now. Call (609) 924-4210. 06-19 MAINE VACATION: Blue Hill Peninsula near Deer Isle & Acadia. Boating excursions including sunset sails, lighthouse cruises. Kayaking. Swimming. Hiking. Relaxing. Foodie paradise, including farm-to-table dinners. 3 BR, 2 full baths, sunporch. June, September, October $650/ weekly; July, August $800/weekly. Plus cleaning & taxes. (207) 3269386. 06-05-3t

HOUSE FOR RENT: One-of-a-kind spacious dairy barn conversion with Princeton address, on private, bucolic setting. Open floor plan, 3 BR, 2 bath, breathtaking 2nd floor versatile room. Fireplace, 2-car garage, central air. Includes lawn maintenance & snow removal. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $3,500. (609) 731-6904. 06-05-3t HOUSE CLEANING: By an experienced Polish lady. Call Barbara (609) 273-4226. Weekly or biweekly. Honest & reliable. References available. 05-15-6t CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HALF HOUSE FOR RENT (of duplex) 2 BR, 1 Bath, Eat-in-kitchen, LR, Washer/Dryer, 1-car off street parking. $2,250/month. Call (609) 577-2396. 06-12-3t

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 05-15-8t HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 947-2958. 06-19-4t OFFICES WITH PARKING Ready for move-in. Renovated and refreshed. 1, 3 and 6 room suites. Historic Nassau Street Building. (609) 213-5029. 06-19-5t GREEN–PLANET PAINTING: Commercial, Residential & Custom Paint, Interior & Exterior, Drywall Repairs, Light Carpentry, Deck Staining, Green Paint options, Paper Removal, Power Washing, 15 Years of Experience. FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES. CALL: (609) 356-4378; perez@green-planetpainting.com 04-03-20 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 35 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-22-20

PRINCETON MATH TUTOR: SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com tf LAWN MAINTENANCE: Prune shrubs, mulch, cut grass, weed, leaf clean up and removal. Call (609) 9541810; (609) 833-7942. 04-03-13t OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com 06-05-4t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 06-05-4t CLEANING-EXTENSIVE GENERAL HOME & OFFICE: Move in, move out cleaning. Free estimates. Years of experience, references available. Call Candi Villegas, (609) 310-2048. 06-19-3t LOOKING TO PURCHASE HOME IN THE PRINCETON AREA: Local, loving family of 5 seeking to buy a 3-4 BR home. Pre-approved for mortgage. Please call Barbara (609) 731-1701. No real estate agents, please. 06-12-4t

CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: For houses and small offices. Flexible, reliable, local. Excellent references. Please call Yola (609) 558-9393. 05-01/10-23 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-29-19 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton

NEW LISTING

NEW PRODUCTS ADDED WEEKLY!

www.princetonmagazinestore.com

In a convenient location, not far from Princeton, with easy access to shopping and major highways. Three bedrooms, full bath, living room, dining room, kitchen, all on a one-acre lot. Whether you are downsizing or a first-time buyer, this property makes for a very good investment and a nice alternative to townhouse living. In nearby Franklin Township. $292,000

www.stockton-realtor.com


OPEN HOUSE

TOUR TOUR Don’t miss out on the biggest Open House Weekend of the summer! On June 22nd & Don’t miss out on the biggest Open House Weekend of the summer! On June 22nd & 23rd you have the opportunity of special pricing while touring our most coveted homes!

23rd you have the opportunity of special pricing while touring our most coveted homes! View our Properties www.glorianilson.com/open-house-summer-tour/

View our Properties www.glorianilson.com/open-house-summer-tour/

SATURDAY

SATURDAY 1-3

2 - 4 PM

111 Georgian Dr., Mantoloking

$1,595,000

PM

1 - 3 PM PM

101 Meirs Rd, Upper Freehold

$899,000

1 - 4 PM PM

1 Ford Dr, Hamilton

1-4

427 Plainsboro Rd, Plainsboro

$699,900

1-4

38 Brewster Ct, Pennington

$645,000

1-3

2-4

111 Georgian Dr., Mantoloking

$1,595,000

1 - 3 PM PM

101 Meirs Rd, Upper Freehold

$899,000

112- -42 PM

427 Plainsboro Rd, Plainsboro 4 N. Woods Dr, Hopewell Twp

1-4

PM

PM

8 Mary Ln, Robbinsville

1-3

1 Ford Dr, Hamilton

1 - 4 PM PM

11 -- 43 PM

$424,900

72 Manley, Hopewell

PM

$699,900 $579,900

72 Manley, Hopewell NEW PRICE

$409,900

NEW PRICE

$409,900

141 Lewis Ln, Brick

38 Pennington 137Brewster HopewellCt,Wertsville Rd. Hopewell Twp

PM

$424,900 $395,000 $334,950

$395,000 $334,900

PM 11 -- 43 PM

84 Ambassador Mary Ln, Robbinsville Ct, Jackson

$645,000 $549,950

PM 11 -- 33 PM

141 Ln, BrickWay, Hamilton 2845Lewis Nottingham

$334,950 $299,900,

112- -32PMPM

10 JacksonTwp 4 N.Normandy Woods Dr,Dr,Hopewell

$534,950 $579,900

12 1 - -32PMPM

2N Sq. Unit 302 , Robbinsville 137Commerce Hopewell Wertsville Rd. Hopewell Twp

$287,000 $334,900

11 -- 43 PM PM

24 Tennyson Dr, Ct, Plainsboro Ambassador Jackson

$459,900 $549,950

11 -- 33 PM PM

14 Fogarty Dr, Hamilton 2845 Nottingham Way, Hamilton

$210,000 $299,900,

1 - 3 PM

10 Normandy Dr, Jackson

$534,950 12 - 2 PM SUNDAY

2N Commerce Sq. Unit 302 , Robbinsville

$287,000

11 -- 34 PM

230Tennyson Dr, Plainsboro Weathervane Cir, Upper Freehold

$459,900 $999,500,

11 -- 33 PM

14 Hamilton 21 Fogarty DogwoodDr,Ln, Hamilton

$210,000 $486,000

1 - 4 PM

222 Monroe Ave, Montgomery

$945,000

12 - 2 PM

198 Stillhouse Rd, Millstone Twp

$474,950,

1 - 4 PM

17 Seminole Rd, Montgomery

$799,000

30

70 Sayre Dr, Plainsboro

$439,900,

11 -- 33 PM

130Michael Way, Hopewell Weathervane Cir, UpperTwpFreehold

$769,900, $999,500,

112- -33PM

459 Sayre Dr, Ln, Plainsboro 21 Dogwood Hamilton

$429,000 $486,000

1 - 3 PM PM

25 Mystic Dr, Montgomery

$729,000

1 - 4 PMPM

3 Papps Dr, Hamilton

$424,900,

1-4

46 Essex Dr, South Brunswick

$709,900,

1-4

1 Ford Dr, Hamilton

17 E. Welling Ave, Pennington

$679,500,

PM

PM

1-4

PM

1 - 4 PM PM 1-4

11 -- 33 PM PM

PM 11 -- 34 PM

1-4

2: -4: 30

30 PM

1 - 3 PM PM 1-4

1-4

PM

SUNDAY 12: -4:

222 Monroe Ave, Montgomery

$945,000

17 Seminole Rd, Montgomery

$799,000

110Michael RobbinsWay, Rd,Hopewell Millstone Twp Twp

17 E. Welling Ave, Pennington

30 PM

PM

12 - 2

PM

198 Stillhouse Rd, Millstone Twp

NEW PRICE

30 PM 70 Sayre Dr, Plainsboro 12:30-4: PM

1-4

$474,950, $409,900

$439,900,

38 Brewster Ct, Pennington

12 1 - -43PM

$729,000 $636,000

PM 11 -- 44 PM

330Papps Dr, Hamilton Magnolia Ct, South Brunswick

NEW PRICE

$624,950 $709,900,

PM 11 -- 34 PM

39 Church St, East Windsor 1 Ford Dr, Hamilton

NEW PRICE

$589,950 $679,500,

1 - 3 PM PM

16 Belmont Cir, Trenton

38 Brewster Ct, Pennington

$276,700,

$639,950,

1 - 4 PM

275 Pennington Harbourton Rd, Hopewell Twp NEW PRICE

218 Concord, Trenton

$269,900,

$375,000

30 Magnolia Ct, South Brunswick 15 Livingston, Hamilton

$259,900

$574,950,

11 -- 43 PM

44 Devon Ct, Robbinsville

$354,900, $264,900,

1 White Birch Dr, Millstone Twp

10 Robbins Rd, Millstone Twp 2 Indian Run, Lawrence

6 Bertran Dr, Bridgewater

1-4

$599,950,

1 - 4 PM

$590,000

1-3

$636,000

2:30-4:30 PM 6 Graham Pl, Millstone Twp

PM

PM

PM

459 Dr, Plainsboro 275 Sayre Pennington Harbourton Rd, Hopewell Twp

$395,000

$769,900, $639,950,

25 Mystic Dr, Dr,Bridgewater Montgomery 6 Bertran

2: SpringBrunswick Rd, Millstone Twp 46 Paint EssexIsland Dr, South 1 30- 4-4:PM30 PM 61 2:30-4:PM30 PM 4 Doe Ct, Millstone Twp

PM

$429,000 $375,000 $424,900, $354,900,

NEW PRICE

$309,900, $409,900

$395,000

30 30 PM 61 PaintTerr, IslandRobbinsville Spring Rd, Mil stone Twp 2: 1 - 3-4:PM 6 Lilac

NEW PRICE

$624,950 $549,900,

PM 11 -- 34 PM

39 ChurchCt,St,Lawrence East Windsor 6 Conrad

$309,900, $262,000

Cranberry Ct, Upper 12 Ct, Millstone TwpFreehold 2:30--4:2 30PMPM 48 Doe

NEW PRICE

$539,950, $589,950

1 - 3 PM

100 Armour Cir, Ave,Trenton Hamilton 16 Belmont

$199,900, $276,700,

$499,999, $599,950,

1 - 4 PM

218 Concord, Trenton

$590,000

1 - 3 PM

44 Devon Ct, Robbinsville

$574,950,

1 - 3 PM

15 Livingston, Hamilton

$264,900,

12:30 - 3-4:PM30 PM 81 LaurelBirch Ave,Dr, Kingston, 1 White MillstoneFranklin Twp

1 - 4 PM

2 Indian Run, Lawrence

2:30-4:30 PM 6 Graham Pl, Millstone Twp

$269,900,

Licensed Real Estate Broker

NEW PRICE

$259,900

1 - 3 PM

6 Lilac Terr, Robbinsville

$549,900,

1 - 4 PM

6 Conrad Ct, Lawrence

$262,000

12 - 2 PM

8 Cranberry Ct, Upper Freehold

$539,950,

1 - 3 PM

100 Armour Ave, Hamilton

$199,900,

1 - 3 PM

81 Laurel Ave, Kingston, Franklin

$499,999,

Licensed Real Estate Broker

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

OPEN HOUSE


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019 • 40

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc

AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 05-01-20

Specialists

609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

Taking care of Princeton’s trees 2nd & 3rd Generations

Local family owned business for over 40 years

MFG., CO.

609-452-2630

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

COUNTRY LIVING NOT FAR FROM TOWN

MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-25-19 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-08-19 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-04-19 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS

On over 2.717 acres of beautiful property, this handsome solar energy contemporary has much to offer. Complementing the surrounding environment, it offers a dramatic home only 9.9 miles to the center of Princeton in the Sourland Mountain area of East Amwell Township. $529,000 www.stockton-realtor.com SUITES AVAILABLE:

MEDICAL OFFICE

SPACE • FOR • LEASE 8’ 6”

11’ 3”

CONFERENCE ROOM

T.R.

CL.

14’ 2” 6’ 7”

OFFICE 11’ 1”

15’7”

OFFICE

OFFICE

10’ 3”

7’ 5” 17’

6’ 1”

Rt. 206 & Applegate Road | Princeton | NJ

Prestigious Princeton mailing address

10’ 6”

GENERAL OFFICE 6’ 4” AREA 21’ 8”

10’

Montgomery Commons

10’6”

Building 1, Suite 111: 1,006 sf (+/-)

Medical/Office Suites Available: From 830 to 1,006 sf (+/-)

Built to suit tenant spaces with private bathroom, kitchenette & separate utilities Premier Series suites with upgraded flooring, counter tops, cabinets & lighting available 219 Parking spaces available on-site with handicap accessibility VERIZON FIOS AVAILABLE & high-speed internet access

(908) 874-8686 | LarkenAssociates.com Immediate Occupancy | Brokers Protected | Raider Realty is a Licensed Real Estate Broker No warranty or representation, express or implied, is made to the accuracy of the information herein and same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of rental or other conditions, withdrawal without notice and to any special listing conditions, imposed by our principals and clients.

Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf

SUMMER IS HERE! YARD SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf PRINCETON ESTATE FURNITURE SALE: Antiques, 1960s, 1970s, 1975 Dodge Dart SE. Wednesday, June 19, 2-7; Thursday, June 20, 2-7; Saturday, June 22, 9-2. 39 Linwood Circle. 06-19

CHARMING PRINCETON APT: Fully furnished, 2 bedrooms, picture windows overlooking yard. W/D, cable, wireless high-speed internet, parking. Utilities included. No smoking or pets. $2,500/mo. Available now. Call (609) 924-4210. 06-19 MAINE VACATION: Blue Hill Peninsula near Deer Isle & Acadia. Boating excursions including sunset sails, lighthouse cruises. Kayaking. Swimming. Hiking. Relaxing. Foodie paradise, including farm-to-table dinners. 3 BR, 2 full baths, sunporch. June, September, October $650/ weekly; July, August $800/weekly. Plus cleaning & taxes. (207) 3269386. 06-05-3t HOUSE FOR RENT: One-of-a-kind spacious dairy barn conversion with Princeton address, on private, bucolic setting. Open floor plan, 3 BR, 2 bath, breathtaking 2nd floor versatile room. Fireplace, 2-car garage, central air. Includes lawn maintenance & snow removal. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $3,500. (609) 731-6904. 06-05-3t HOUSE CLEANING: By an experienced Polish lady. Call Barbara (609) 273-4226. Weekly or biweekly. Honest & reliable. References available. 05-15-6t CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HALF HOUSE FOR RENT (of duplex) 2 BR, 1 Bath, Eat-in-kitchen, LR, Washer/Dryer, 1-car off street parking. $2,250/month. Call (609) 577-2396. 06-12-3t PRINCETON MATH TUTOR: SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com tf

PRINCETON – YARD SALE: Saturday, June 22, 9 am-4 pm & Sunday, June 23, 9 am-12 pm at 460 Christopher Drive in Princeton. DR table & chairs, side tables, shelves & other furniture. Art, rugs, china, decorative items & soft furnishings. 06-19

LAWN MAINTENANCE: Prune shrubs, mulch, cut grass, weed, leaf clean up and removal. Call (609) 9541810; (609) 833-7942. 04-03-13t

MOVING SALE: 13 Aunt Molly Road, Hopewell. Friday & Saturday, June 21 & 22 from 9:30-3. Contemporary home filled with quality furnishings. BoConcept sofas, consoles, Jensen-Lewis king bed & furniture. Jensen-Lewis desk unit, Baby Grand piano, ABC Carpet & Home furnishings. Clothing, costume jewelry, carpets, kitchen items, decorative accessories, outdoor table & chairs, fire pit, umbrellas, etc. Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 06-19

06-05-4t

CRANBURY MOVING SALE: 24 Washington Drive, Friday & Saturday, June 21 & 22 from 9:30-3. House filled with decorative furniture & accessories, tons of gift items, kitchen full. Henkel Harris DR, Hickory Chair, Ethan Allen, Brown Jordan, Gasior’s. Photos can be seen on estatesales. net, MG Estate Services. 06-19 ESTATE SALE + DESIGNER SALE: June 22 & 23, 9 am-4 pm. 4554 Province Line Road, Princeton. See ad & photos on estatesales. net in Princeton zip code, listed as Estate Sale + Designer Sale. Thumbnail photo shows a 1940’s Korean blanket chest. 06-19 CANOE: Old Town Saranac 146, (2) West Branch paddles, Thule rack. KAYAK: Cascadia 9.0 fit-on-top package, carrier. All new. 25% off each. (609) 497-0679. 06-19 MOVE YOUR OFFICE TO WHERE THE POLITICAL ACTION IS: 15 West Front Street, Trenton. Join other state-related orgs. and businesses in a classic building near the State House. 2-to-3 room suites and open office. Call Anne LaBate (609) 394-7557. 06-05-3t

OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 06-05-4t CLEANING-EXTENSIVE GENERAL HOME & OFFICE: Move in, move out cleaning. Free estimates. Years of experience, references available. Call Candi Villegas, (609) 310-2048. 06-19-3t LOOKING TO PURCHASE HOME IN THE PRINCETON AREA: Local, loving family of 5 seeking to buy a 3-4 BR home. Pre-approved for mortgage. Please call Barbara (609) 731-1701. No real estate agents, please. 06-12-4t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 05-15-8t HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 947-2958. 06-19-4t


41 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

JUST LISTED: Prestine 1820 Stone House

Long Willow Farm on 36+ Acres

5BR/4.1BA 59.76AC Pool Guest House Barn Char Morrison: 215.896.4167

6BR/4.1BA 6,811SF 1788 Stone House 2 Guest Houses Hellen Cannon: 215.779.6151

New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU471368

Solebury Township, PA Kurfiss.com/1001939802

$5,200,000

$3,190,000

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 6/23, 1:00 - 3:00PM

Holmquist Farm on 12+ Acres 5BR/5BA 3,811SF Completely Renovated & Turnkey Hellen Cannon: 215.779.6151

4BR/4.1BA Duplex Penthouse Terraces Low Taxes Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590

Solebury Township, PA Kurfiss.com/1000463284

512 Waterview Pl., New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/1002077952

$2,750,000

NEWLY PRICED: $2,495,000

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 6/23, 1:00 - 3:00PM

The Stockton Market

3BR/2.1BA River Views Large Terrace Low Taxes Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590

14,000SF 0.58AC Commercial Building 3 Rental Apt. Chris Preston: 215.262.9609

506 Waterview Pl., New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU307974

Stockton Borough

$2,495,000

Kurfiss.com/NJHT104854

$1,550,000

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 6/23, 1:00 - 3:00PM

JUST LISTED: Impeccably Maintained Colonial

3BR/3.1BA 3,672SF Riverfront Expertly Renovated Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590

4BR/2.1BA 3,026SF 3.76AC Many Upgrades Throughout Beth Danese: 215.208.6549

4358 River Rd., New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU442756

Lambertville

Kurfiss.com

|

$1,275,000

Kurfiss.com/NJHT105276

$609,900

Artfully Uniting Extraordinary Homes With Extraordinary Lives

215.794.3227 New Hope Rittenhouse Square Chestnut Hill - Coming Soon Bryn Mawr Each Office Is Independently Owned & Operated. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019 • 42

Skillman H HFurniture

HALO FÊTE Ice Cream Pâtisserie

Quality

Used Furniture

5 Hulfish Street, Palmer Square

Inexpensive

GRADUATION CAKES FAQ 609.240.8147

New Furniture

Like us on facebook 212 Alexander St, Princeton Mon-Fri 9:30-5, Sat 9:30-1

609.924.1881

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE, LLC CURRENT RENTALS *********************************

OFFICE LISTINGS:

Princeton Office – $1,600/mo. Nassau Street, 2nd floor, reception area & 2 nice-sized offices. One has private powder room. Heat & 2 parking spaces included. Princeton Office – $2,000/mo. 5-rooms with powder room. Frontto-back on 1st floor. Available now. Princeton Office – $2,300/mo. Nassau Street. Conference room, reception room, 4 private offices + powder room. With parking. Available now.

RESIDENTIAL LISTINGS:

GETTING YOUR HOUSE PREPPED FOR SALE Decluttering your house is key to getting your home sold. Personalized decor and collections can limit the imagination of buyers. A way to look through your house it to use the KonMari method. For those of you that are not familiar, this method introduces the idea of only keeping items that are used and bring you joy. Tidying not by room but by category; books, papers, clothes and sentimental items. Take time to consider if the item is useful. When was the last time your used it? Is it something that you should pack away? Once you have gone through the process it will cut down on the items that you pack and move and will ensure that you are off to a great start in your new home.

Princeton – $1,650/mo. Includes heat & water. 1 BR, 1 bath, LR, Kitchen. No laundry but Free B Bus is on that block & will take you to Princeton Shopping Center where there is a laundromat. Available now. Princeton – $1,675/mo. Includes heat & water. 1 BR, 1 bath, LR, Kitchen. No laundry but Free B Bus is on that block & will take you to Princeton Shopping Center where there is a laundromat. Available 9/1/19. Princeton – $1,700/mo. plus utilities. 1 BR, 1 bath, LR/GR, Kitchen. Available 9/1/19. Plainsboro – $2,600/mo. plus utilities. 2 BR + loft, 2½ bath. Beautiful townhouse. Available now.

We have customers waiting for houses!

STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE. We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com See our display ads for our available houses for sale.

Employment Opportunities Witherspoon Media Group in the Princeton Area PREPARED FOODS COOK/KITCHEN ASSISTANT MANAGER/RETAIL SUPERVISOR:

HOUSEKEEPER:

Custom Design, Printing, LIVE-OUT (PRINCETON, NJ) Publishing andNeed Distribution housekeeper with excellent

Whole Earth Center, Princeton’s natural foods store, is looking for a creative & passionate cook to join an experienced & capable team & help lead our vegetarian deli/café. The position entails all aspects of food service in a retail setting, from ordering & receiving, menu planning, cooking, supervising retail & kitchen staff, & modeling & providing outstanding customer service. The ideal candidate will be familiar with vegetarian seasonal cooking & have supervisory/managerial experience in the back of the house (preferably in prepared foods) &/ or a retail environment. Our focus is fresh, organic, made-in-house vegetarian dishes. Paid vacation & holidays, health Insurance, generous discount. Compensation DOE. Great opportunity to join and grow with a well-established company. Please email resume to: jmurray@ wholeearthcenter.com 06-12-2t

references. Position is MondayFriday, 11 am-7 pm. Salary $70,000 gross per year. Please email a detailed resume, all references names and contact information, along with a recent photo to: capitolsearch@ optimum.net Questions- Bob @ (201) 444-6666. 06-19

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IS ON

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Witherspoon Media Group Witherspoon Media Group For additional info contact:

Custom Printing, Custom Design, Design, Printing, melissa.bilyeu@ Publishing Distribution Publishing and and Distribution witherspoonmediagroup.com Newsletters · ·Newsletters

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32 CHAMBERS STREET PRINCETON, NJ 08542 (609) 924-1416 MARTHA F. STOCKTON, BROKER-OWNER

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Family Owned and Operated

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Charlie has been serving the Princeton community for 25 years

FLESCH’S ROOFING For All Your Roofing, Flashing & Gutter Needs

• Residential & Commercial • Cedar Shake • Shingle & Slate Roofs

• Copper/Tin/Sheet Metal • Flat Roofs • Built-In Gutters

• Seamless Gutters & Downspouts • Gutter Cleaning • Roof Maintenance

609-394-2427

Free Estimates • Quality Service • Repair Work

· Annual Reports For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ For additional info contact: witherspoonmediagroup.com

melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

LIC#13VH02047300

“Home is where your people are." — Richie Norton

AN

UNSTOPPABLE OFFER

The time is NOW to upgrade your home with AN OFFER UNSTOPPABLE a new high efficiency

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4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph. TRUS

ce 1993 T TsinR U since 1 S T 993 8859

SE # L IC E N E # 9 5 4 00

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

B S 00 BING P LU M L IC E N 3 V H 0 1 5 4 5 PLUM G VARCAC- RTO R R E G # 1S E # 8 8 5 90 H G IN N T CO N #954 0 L IC E HEAT INNGDITIONIN LU M-BR L IC E N# 1S3 VEH 0 1 5 4 5 0 0 O B P C M L IR U A A PL THGERM S G H VARCAC TOR REG IN AUIO ITIN DN OCONT HEGAETO RG NYDIT& BLATH REN ENCEO A AIR N WWW.TINDALLRANSON.COM ITCHEERM ITS D GEKOTH

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NEAR TOWN PRINCETON $1,347,500 Move into this bright & airy 6-year-old Colonial that’s near to schools, CP pool, Princeton Shopping center & town. Many upgrades done by current owners including SS appliances & a fully finished basement. Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

NEW PRICE PRINCETON $999,000 This light-filled 5 bedroom, 3.5 bath Tudor style Colonial has an open floor plan, formal living and dining area, great room, office space with fireplace, and an eat-in kitchen. Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

CONTEMPORARY HOME

NEW LISTING

PRINCETON $880,000 One-of-a-kind, mid-century modern design by a noted Princeton architect, characterized by its clean lines & integration w/ nature, this 3 BR, 2 BA home has an artist studio & finished basement. Harry Fini 732-403-6385 (cell)

Princeton Office • 609-921-1900

LAWRENCEVILLE

$550,000 This 3 Bedroom, 3.5 bath, 3,200 sq ft home offers a media room, formal dining room, butler’s pantry, living room, kitchen with custom cabinets, exquisite gardens and pool. Joseph Plotnick 732-979-9116 (cell)

R E A L T O R S

®

43 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

PRINCETON $1,150,000 Located on at the end of a cul-de-sac in the Glen, this 4 BR 3.5 BA home is nestled in the trees. The living room has a great room feel with its vaulted ceiling, step down and gallery, open to the second floor. The wall of windows and French door lead to the large deck, hot tub area and glorious yard. Features include a formal dining room with touches such as a chair rail and crown moulding. The kitchen has storage galore! The cherry wood cabinetry is topped with Corian counters, a large island provides extra work space plus there is a large breakfast area. The charming master bedroom located on the first floor offers vaulted ceiling and exposed beams. The yard was created by the current owner and lovingly tended to over the years. Full of mature trees and perennials. Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell)


After 22 seasons in the NFL, including two championships with the New York Giants, you can believe that I’ve had my fair share of injuries. What’s important to me now is staying healthy, playing with my son, and staying active without pain.

Through my years I’ve seen a lot of orthopedic and pain management doctors and I’ll allow only the best doctors on my team. That’s why now, I trust the doctors at Princeton Spine and Joint Center to keep me out of pain and on my game without resorting to surgery or dangerous medications. The doctors at Princeton Spine and Joint Center are incredible. They take their time and they listen to you whether you play on a team or sit in an office. They work with you to craft a treatment plan to achieve your goals safely and quickly. Look, I live close to NYC and Philadelphia, and I could go anywhere in the world for my orthopedic care. After seeing scores of doctors, it just doesn’t get any better than the team at Princeton Spine and Joint Center. If you have pain and you want to stay active, be pain-free and receive cutting edge care, call them now and get on the road back to the active life you want to lead.

— SEAN LANDETA

At Princeton Spine and Joint, we specialize in the latest medical treatments to get people of all ages and abilities better and back to their best performing selves without pain and without surgery. Our Regenerative Medicine Division offers the latest in restorative tissue treatments, including PRP. Our doctors are co-editing along with the chairperson of Mount Sinai’s PM&R department the new textbook, “Regenerative Medicine for Spine and Joint Pain.”

Now offering same day appointments, because we understand that when you have an injury or significant pain, you need to be seen right away. Treating people from ages 8 to 108. Grant Cooper, MD Ana Bracilovic, MD

Zinovy Meyler, DO Marco Funiciello, DO

Scott Curtis, DO Zachary Perlman, DO

Jason Kirkbride, MD

601 Ewing Street, Building A-2, Princeton • 256 Bunn Drive, Suite B, Princeton (609) 454-0760 • www.princetonsjc.com

Profile for Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper June 19, 2019  

Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper June 19, 2019  

Witherspoon Media Group