Town Topics Newspaper, May 26, 2021

Page 1

Volume LXXV, Number 21

www.towntopics.com

Permit Parking Task Force To Consider Suggestions And Revisit Parking Plan

Mill Hill Garden Tour is Back in Business . . . . . . 5 Watershed Floats Wetlands To Halt Toxic Algae . . . 11 Friday Night Lights Hits Home as Bob Dylan Turns 80 . . . . . . . . . . . 16 PSO Continues Outdoor Chamber Concert Series . . . . . . . 17 PU Men’s Heavyweight Crew Primed for IRA National Championships . . . . . 30 Phogat, Silverio Clicked in Winning Prep B 1st Doubles for PDS Boys’ Tennis . . . . . . . 35

Teacher Joyce Jones is Retiring After 51 Years At PHS . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .22, 23 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 21 Classified Ads . . . . . . 38 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 37 Performing Arts . . . . . 18 Police Blotter . . . . . . . 14 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 38 Religion . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

A work session led by the Permit Parking Task Force at a meeting of Princeton Council Monday evening, May 24, drew numerous expressions of concern, particularly from residents of the Western Section, one of several neighborhoods where regulatory changes are recommended. The task force, which has been working on the issue for the past two years, recently held its first meeting with the Western Section residents. The group’s initial focus was on the Witherspoon-Jackson and Tree Streets neighborhoods, where parking is especially tight. The goal is to offer parking for essential workers in Princeton’s commercial areas, and to harmonize different parking rules from the pre-consolidation days, when Princeton was divided into Township and Borough. The plan strives to assure that residents with no driveway, or limited driveway, will have priority to purchase on-street parking permits allowing 24-hour parking, which is currently unavailable in most zones, for $10 a month. Those who are economically disadvantaged could have free permits. Another goal is to make overnight parking, currently unavailable in most zones, available to all residents and guests. Councilman David Cohen, who is on the task force along with Council President Leticia Fraga, Councilwoman Michelle Pirone Lambros, some residents, and representatives from local businesses, said that if given the go-ahead to proceed, the next step would be to enter an agreement with the vendor Passport, which would provide license plate reading technology mounted on enforcement vehicles and online applications for permits. But after hearing comments from the public, it was decided that the task force will hold more meetings with neighbors and revisit the multi-pronged plan. Some of those who spoke questioned the need for the proposal. Others who live in the Western Section said they were not given enough notice of the plan. “Why wasn’t I given formal notice, and how many other people weren’t, and perhaps do not know about this proposal?” asked a resident of Hodge Road. “I kind of feel like it violates my due process. I feel I deserve information regarding data, proof of need, and data supporting the need.” She added, “The proposal to put Continued on Page 9

75¢ at newsstands

Wednesday, May 26, 2021

COVID Restrictions Lifting Before Memorial Day As Memorial Day weekend approaches, COVID-19 infection levels continue to drop, and vaccination numbers rise, New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy announced plans on Monday to remove almost all pandemic restrictions soon. The indoor mask mandate in public spaces and the six-foot social distancing requirement indoors and outdoors, along with the prohibition of dance floors at bars and restaurants and the prohibition on ordering and eating/drinking while standing at bars and restaurants, will all be lifted on Friday, May 28. Then, on Friday, June 4, indoor gathering and capacity limits will be removed. Individuals who are not fully vaccinated are strongly encouraged to continue masking and social distancing. “Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, my administration has been guided by science, data, and facts to put New Jersey on the road to recovery, with the public health and safety of all New Jerseyans as our highest priority,” Murphy said in signing the executive order lifting restrictions. “Together we have made tremendous progress in crushing the virus, and the last two weeks have shown significant decreases in key areas of our data, including new COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, spot positivity rates, and rates of transmission.”

Murphy noted that this lifting of restrictions over the next two weeks will show “our commitment to carefully and deliberately reopening our state after what has been a truly crushing almost 15-month period.” More than 3.9 million people who live, work, or study in New Jersey have now been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 in-state, including 88,786 out-of-state residents, while another 167,268 residents have been vaccinated in other states.

About 57 percent of New Jersey’s 6.9 million adults have been fully vaccinated so far, and more than 194,000 children between the ages of 12 and 17 have been vaccinated in the state. On Monday, May 24, the Princeton Health Department reported no new positive cases of COVID-19 in the previous 14 days. The health department also announced further expanded vaccination opportunities, with a pop-up vaccination clinic on Thursday, May 27, from 2:30 p.m. Continued on Page 8

$20M Gift To Promote Diversity at PU; Center Will Target Access, Opportunity Committed to increasing enrollment of first-generation and lower-income students and to supporting those students academically and socially on campus, Princeton University will be establishing the new Emma Bloomberg Center for Access and Opportunity, funded by a gift — $20 million according to the Wall Street Journal — from Bloomberg Philanthropies. The Center will serve as headquarters for expanded programs that are designed to provide students with the “mentorship, academic enrichment, and community” that they need to succeed at Princeton,

according to a University press release. “They empower students to successfully navigate the University’s many resources, to achieve their professional, personal, and scholarly goals, and to become active leaders on campus and in the larger world,” the release states. The Center will also be a hub for research for colleges and universities across the country that are seeking to expand college access and enhance success for first-generation and lower-income students. Programs to be scaled up in size and Continued on Page 12

HIGH FIVE: Members of the Hun School baseball team celebrate last Sunday after they defeated Lawrenceville 16-0 in the state Prep A final . It marked the fifth straight Prep A crown for the Raiders, who improved to 19-2 with the victory . For more details on the game, see page 34 . (Photo provided courtesy of the Hun School)

WE’RE TOTAL HOME MANAGER

We are a complete home repair, maintenance, and management company. Whether the job is large or small, we’ll get it done. Done right the first time, both professionally and easily. The single-source solution for all your interior and exterior needs.

Call to schedule your projects or handyman service. 609-466-3355 www.totalhomemanager.com


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 2

Realtors

Real Estate

Mortgage

Closing Services

We i c h e r t R e a l t o r s

Realto Color Key

Specifications

Weichert Black Print: C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

Real Estate

Mortgage

Insurance

Closing Services

We Prin C-0 Dig Hex

PRINCE TON COLLEC TION Open House: Sunday, May 30, 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm • $899,000 For photos and floorplan visit 243CherryHillRoad.info

Real Estate

LeabrookLane.info $1,100,000 Specifications

Real Estate

Mortgage

Insurance

Mortgage

Insurance

Realtors

Realtors

Real Estate

Closing Services

243CherryHillRoad.info We i c h e r t$4,700 R e aper l t omonth rs

40NorthHarrisonStreet.info $885,000

We i c h e r t R e a l t o r s

ors

Insurance

Realtors

We i c h e r t R e a l t o r s

Closing Services Specifications

Specifications

Real Estate Color Key

Mortgage

Insuran

34MayburyHillRoad.info $1,4

Mortgage

Insurance

Closing S

FOR MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO Weichert Black Print: C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

FOR MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO

PRINCETON NCETON

Weichert Yellow Print: C-0,M-0,Y-92,K-0 Digital: Hex

$1,649,000

$1,649,000

the heartPrinceton, of downtown few blocks from Princeton University, stunning the home thatand combines the charm and appeal of heart of In downtown a few Princeton, blocks froma Princeton University, sits a stunning homesits thata combines charm appeal of a century home with a spacious modern open floor plan.Thoft Architect Kirsten remodeledthis and fullyinrenovated ury old home with aold spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten remodeled andThoft fully renovated home 2007 with this home in 2007 with spectacular detail toand both traditional and modern amenities. Thenorenovations nomaintain expensethe to character carefully of maintain the character of the home, acular detail to both traditional modern amenities. The renovations spare expense to spare carefully the home, updated for today’s staircase and mouldings, pocket doors, floors, and extensive built-ins ed for today’s lifestyle. Customlifestyle. staircaseCustom and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, andhardwood extensive built-ins throughout make it boththroughout make it both MORE PHOTOS ANDand FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO mate family space and an entertainer’s dream come9FairwayDrive.info true. dream anFOR intimate family space an entertainer’s come$1,165,000 true. MountLucasRoad.info $999,000 15JeffersonRoad.info $1,125,000 102SnowdenLane.info $875

ETON entrance $1,649,000 pacious hall opens into the room tin ceiling, pocket The cabinets, The spacious entrance hallfamily opens intowith the original family room with and original tin doors. ceiling, andgourmet pocket kitchen doors. with Thecustom gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, ss-steel appliances, and enormous island theisland light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful The great&room art of downtown Princeton,pantry a few blocks from Princeton University, sits a stunning homeoverlooks that combines thelight-filled charm and appeal of room with stainless-steel appliances, pantry andoverlooks enormous the great built-inbar. bookcases beautiful bar. The great room old a home with a spacious modern open floor plan. a Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 with to formal dining that overlooks wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch to function an indoor/ opens to room aand formal room that overlooks a wraparound porch. custom doors allowarea for dining and as porch area to function as an indoor/ ar detail to both traditional moderndining amenities. The renovations spare no expense to carefully maintain theThe character of the home, or entertainment space. A separate mudroom with cubbies and tons built-ins of cubbies storage along with a powder complete the first floor. or today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors,built-in hardwood floors, and extensive throughout it both outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom with built-in andmake tons of storageroom along with a powder room complete the first floor.

Realtors

e family space and an entertainer’s dream come true.

t upstairs to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a

Retreat the master with endoors. suiteThe walk-in steamwith shower. Just down hallwayheated are two additional ous entrance hall opensupstairs into the family room with originalbedroom tin ceiling, and pocket gourmet kitchen custom cabinets, ce and the other a wallto ofisland floor-to-ceiling woodgreat built-in These bedrooms share agreat hall bath with the a BainUltra Jacuzzi tub. bedrooms one with a steel appliances, pantrywith and enormous overlooks the light-filled room closets. with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The room fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. a formal dining room that overlooks a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indoor/ ntertainment A separate with built-in tonstwo of storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. built-in bookcases, desks, own jewelspace. of this homemudroom is the third floorcubbies whichand has additional spacious bedrooms, featuring window seat • • •

Re

Realtors

Real Estate Mortgage Insurance Services • Mortgage • the Real Estate Insurance Closing Services The crown jewel of •this home isand floor which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks,Closing window seat osets. two bedrooms full bath athird bonus sitting area. pstairs toThe the master bedroom withshare en suitea walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a

The twowood bedrooms share a bedrooms full bathshare anda hall a bonus area. and the otherand with aclosets. wall of floor-to-ceiling built-in closets. These bath with sitting a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub.

nced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has n jewel of this home is the third floor which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat fenced in backyard with Ipe the wood deck offers terrific outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has With ample off-street leave at home and stroll space aroundfor town. ts. The two The bedrooms shareparking a full bath you and acan bonus sitting area.cars

18GallupRoad.info 343JeffersonRoad.info $1,548,000 it all. With $1,329,000 ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at$1,347,500 home and stroll around154ChristopherDrive.info town.

d in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town.

If you want your home featured, contact me:

43EttlCircle.info $1,350,000 / $7,00

Real Estate • Mortgage • Ins • Closing Services COMING SOON • $680,000 Beatrice Bloom Beatrice Bloom For photos and floorplan visit 44ChestnutStreet.info PRINCE TON CO Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker PRINCE TON COLLEC TION Beatrice Bloom If you wantReal your Estate home featured, contact me: • Mortgage • Insurance

If you want your home featured, contact me:

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

| BeatriceBloom.com Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

Princeton | 609-921-1900 FOR MOREOffice PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO PRINCETON

$1,649,000

In the heart of downtown Princeton, a few blocks from Princeton University, sits a stunning home that combines the charm and appeal of a century old home with a spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 with spectacular detail to both traditional and modern amenities. The renovations spare no expense to carefully maintain the character of the home, updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout make it both 117LeabrookLane.info $1,100,000 40NorthHarrisonStreet.info $885,000 ane.info $1,100,000 $885,000 243CherryHillRoad.info $4,700 per month 34MayburyHillRoad.info $1,450,000 an intimate family40NorthHarrisonStreet.info space and an entertainer’s dream come true.

The spacious entrance hall opens into the family room with original tin ceiling, and pocket doors. The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous island overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great room opensFOR to a formal dining room that overlooks a wraparound porch. 15LINDENLANE.INFO The custom doors allow for diningFOR and porch areaPHOTOS to function AND as an FLOOR indoor/ PLAN, V MORE MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT FORalong MORE ANDcomplete FLOORthe PLAN, VISIT 15LINDEN FOR MORE PHOTOS AND space. FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO outdoor entertainment A separate mudroom with built-in cubbies and tons of storage withPHOTOS a powder room first floor.

PRINCETON RINCETON Retreat upstairs to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam PRINCETON shower. Just down the hallway are $1,649,000 two additional bedrooms one with a $1,649,000

fireplace Princeton, and the otherfew with a wallfrom of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi In the combines heartPrinceton, of downtown Princeton, a Princeton few from Princeton University, In the heart of downtown a few blocks from University, sitstub. a stunning homes the heartPrinceton, of downtown blocks Princeton University, stunning home that the charm and appeal of blocks wntown a few blocks froma Princeton University, sits a stunning homesits thata combines the charm and appeal of a century old home with a spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten a century old home with a spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and entury home with a spacious modern open floor plan.Thoft Architect Kirsten Thoft renovated remodeledthis and fullyinrenovated this home in 2007 with me with aold spacious modern open plan. Architect remodeled and home 2007 with The crown jewelfloor ofand this home is theKirsten thirdThe floor which hasspare two fully additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat spectacular detail tocharacter both traditional and modern amenities. The renovations spa spectacular detail to both traditional and modern amenities. The renovations spare no expense to care ectacular detail to both traditional modern amenities. renovations no expense to carefully maintain the of the home, to both traditional and modern amenities. The renovations spare no expense to carefully maintain the character of the home, andstaircase closets. The two bedrooms a full pocket bathfloors, and aand bonus sittingbuilt-ins area.for updated for lifestyle. and mouldings, pocket doors, today’s lifestyle. Custom staircaseCustom and mouldings, doors, hardwood floors, andha ex dated for today’s Custom staircase and share mouldings, doors, hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins make it staircase both pocket ’s lifestyle. Customlifestyle. and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood extensiveupdated throughout make ittoday’s boththroughout FOR MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO an intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true. an intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true. 83MountLucasRoad.info $999,000 9FairwayDrive.info $1,165,000 OR MORE PHOTOS ANDand FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO space and an entertainer’s dream come9FairwayDrive.info true. dream intimate family space an entertainer’s come$1,165,000 true. sRoad.info $999,000 15JeffersonRoad.info $1,125,000 102SnowdenLane.info $875,000 The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has

PRINCETON $1,649,0 The spacious entrance hall opens into the family room tin ceiling, pocket Th The spacious entrance hall opens intowith the original family room with and original tin doors. ceiling, a itinto all.the With ample off-street parking you leave cars The at home and stroll with around town. $1,649,000 hall opens room with tin ceiling, and pocket doors. gourmet kitchen custom cabinets, eance spacious entrance hallfamily opens into the original family room withcan original tinthe ceiling, and pocket doors. The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous island overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in b In the heart of downtown Princeton, a few blocks from Princeton University, sits a stunning home that combines the charm and appe stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous island overlooks the light-filled gre liances, and enormous island theisland light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great room ninless-steel Princeton,pantry a few blocks from Princeton University, sits a stunning homeoverlooks that combines thelight-filled charm and appeal of room with appliances, pantry andoverlooks enormous the great built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great room aopens century to old a home with a spacious modern open floor plan. a Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 formal dining room that overlooks wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining a spacious modern open floor plan. a Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 with opens to a formal dining room that overlooks a wraparound porch. The custom d dining room that overlooks wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indoor/ spectacular detail to both traditional and modern amenities. The renovations spare no expense to carefully maintain the character of the ho ens to aand formal room that overlooks a wraparound porch. custom doors allow forentertainment dining and porch area to function as anwith indoor/ cubbies and tons of storage along with traditional moderndining amenities. The renovations spare no expense carefully maintain theThe character of the home, outdoor space. A separate mudroom updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors,built-in hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout ment space. A separate mudroom with built-in cubbiesto and tons of storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom with built-in cubbies andmake tonsit

yle. Custom staircase and mouldings, doors, hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout door entertainment space.pocket A separate mudroom with built-in cubbies andmake tonsit both of storage along with a and powder room dream complete the first floor. an intimate family space an entertainer’s come true. and an entertainer’s dream come true. Retreat upstairs to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway o the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two bedrooms one with a room Retreat to the master endoors. suiteThe walk-in steamwith shower. Ju The additional spacious entrance hall opensupstairs into the family with originalbedroom tin ceiling, and pocket gourmet kitchen custom cabin treat to the master with en suiteThe walk-in steamwith shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with awith ll opensupstairs into the family room with originalbedroom tin ceiling, and pocket doors. gourmet kitchen custom cabinets, fireplace and the other with a wall ofisland floor-to-ceiling wood built-in These bedrooms share agreat hall stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous overlooks the light-filled great room closets. with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The r ther with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These b pantry and enormous island overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great room place and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms a hall withoverlooks a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. opens share to a formal diningbath room that a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an ind oom that overlooks a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indoor/ outdoor entertainment space. A separate with built-in tonstwo of storage along with a powder room complete the first floo The crown jewel of this homemudroom is the third floorcubbies whichand has additional spacious bedrooms, featuring ace. A separate with built-in tonstwo of storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. built-in f this homemudroom is the third floorcubbies whichand has additional spacious bedrooms, featuring bookcases, desks, window seat The crown jewel of this home isand theathird floor which has two additional spaciou and closets. two bedrooms full bath bonus sitting area. ewo crown jewelshare of this home isand theathird floor which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, window seat Retreat upstairs toThe the master bedroom withshare en suiteadesks, walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one w bedrooms a full bath bonus sitting area. Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker aster bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a The twowood bedrooms share a bedrooms full bathshare anda hall a bonus area. fireplace and the otherand with aclosets. wall of floor-to-ceiling built-in closets. These bath with sitting a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi dh aclosets. The twowood bedrooms share a bedrooms full bathshare anda hall a bonus area. wall of floor-to-ceiling built-in closets. These bath with sitting a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created w kyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home haswhich has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, The crown jewel of this home is the truly third floor is the third floor which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat The fenced in backyard with Ipe the wood deck offers terrific outdoorwindow mem it all. With ample off-street parking leave cars at home and stroll space aroundfor town. and closets. The twowith bedrooms share a full bath you and acan bonus sitting area. eome fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created family and friends. This home truly has off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town. rooms share a full bath and a bonus sitting area. 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,000 343JeffersonRoad.info $1,347,500 it all. With ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll aro ad.info $1,329,000 343JeffersonRoad.info $1,347,500 154ChristopherDrive.info $1,548,000 43EttlCircle.info $1,350,000 / $7,000 per month ll. With ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town. The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly ith Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has it all. With ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town. t parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town.

If you want your home featured, contact me:

Beatrice Bloom

609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

If you want your home featured, contact me:

If you want your home featured, contact me: If you want your home featured, contact me:

Beatrice Bloom Beatrice Bloom

Beatrice Bloom

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

| BeatriceBloom.com Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

If you want your home featured, contact me:

If you want your home featured, contact me: If you want your home featured, contact me:

Beatrice Bloom

Beatrice Bloom Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

Beatrice Bloom

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

| BeatriceBloom.com Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist,

Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

Princeton | 609-921-1900 FOR MOREOffice PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO

Princeton | 609-921-1900 FOR MOREOffice PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLA


3 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

SUMMER IS ON THE HORIZON A NEW SEASON IS AROUND THE CORNER AT ASBURY OCEAN CLUB TWO BEDROOMS from $1,210,000

THREE BEDROOMS from $1,600,000

DELUXE PENTHOUSES from $2,000,000

732 532 2117 ASBURYOCEANCLUB.COM

WE OFFER COMPETITIVE PRICING

MASONRY •

Install Steps

Step Repair

CHIMNEY

New Jersey Experts!

HURRY - FIX-UP SALE SPRING DISCOUNTS TODAY!

$800 OFF A New Roof

10% OFF

Any Roof, Chimney, or Step Repair Senior Citizen Discounts Available

(732) 520-9554

We Repair or Replace: • • • • • •

Shingle Roof Flat Roof Chimney Steps Gutters & More

Chimney flashing

Install new chimney

Repair existing chimney

Refine chimney

Clean chimney

Install dampers

Multi-point Inspection

ROOFING •

Residential Roofing

Commercial Roofing

Roof installation

Roof repairs

Roof maintenance

Roof inspections

Roof cleaning

Weatherproofing

HOURS

EMERGENCY SERVICES

expertchimneyroofing@gmail.com

www.expertchimneyroofing.com License #13VH11097900

Over 15 Years of Experience


Finding the right solution for you in

Princeton’s Weekly Community Newspaper Since 1946

DONALD C. STUART, 1946-1981 DAN D. COYLE, 1946-1973 Founding Editors/Publishers DONALD C. STUART III, Editor/Publisher, 1981-2001

Family Law

LYNN ADAMS SMITh Publisher

LAURIE PELLIChERO, Editor BILL ALDEN, Sports Editor

MELISSA BILYEU Operations Director

DONALD gILPIN, ANNE LEVIN, STUART MITChNER, NANCY PLUM, DONALD h. SANBORN III, TAYLOR SMITh, JEAN STRATTON, WILLIAM UhL Contributing Editors

ChARLES R. PLOhN Advertising Director JENNIFER COVILL Sales and Marketing Manager

FRANK WOJCIEChOWSKI, ChARLES R. PLOhN, WERONIKA A. PLOhN Photographers

JOANN CELLA Senior Account Manager, Marketing Coordinator

• • • • • • •

Divorce Custody and Parenting Time Marital Settlement Agreements Prenuptial Agreements Domestic Violence Child Relocation Issues Civil Unions and Domestic Partnerships

John A. Hartmann, III Chairman

Lydia Fabbro Keephart

Nicole Huckerby

• Claims of Unmarried Cohabitants/Palimony • Post Judgment Enforcement and Modification • Mediation • Appeals • Adoption • Surrogacy

Jennifer Haythorn

JEFFREY EDWARD TRYON Art Director

Witherspoon Media Group 4438 Route 27, P.O. Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528 tel: 609-924-2200 www.towntopics.com fax: 609-924-8818

MATThEW DIFALCO Senior Graphic Designer

Periodicals Postage Paid in Princeton, NJ USPS #635-500 Postmaster, please send address changes to: P.O. Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528

(ISSN 0191-7056)

Jillian Frost Kalyan

609-520-0900 www.pralaw.com

*

989 Lenox Drive, Suite 101 Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 *Pellettieri Rabstein & Altman was selected to The Best Lawyers® Best Law Firms list. The Best Law Firms list is issued by U.S. News & World Report. A description of the selection methodologies can be found at https://bestlawfirms.usnews.com/methodology.aspx. No aspect of this advertisement has been approved by the Supreme Court of New Jersey.

330 COLD SOIL ROAD

USPS #635-500, Published Weekly Subscription Rates: $55/yr (Princeton area); $59/yr (NJ, NY & PA); $62/yr (all other areas) Single Issues $5.00 First Class Mail per copy; 75¢ at newsstands For additional information, please write or call:

gINA hOOKEY Classified Ad Manager

Services are provided in the following areas:

PRINCETON, NJ 08540

PICK YOUR OWN

STRAWBERRIES Fresh Vegetables Picked Daily

Taste Trenton Returns With Three-Day Tour

multi-ethnic restaurants to the public. Included are options such as Costa Rican, Venezuelan, Dominican, Guatemalan, African-American, barbecue, and New Orleans styles. Food tourists can purchase a wristband from Taste Trenton. Wristbands are valid for the entire weekend. Come to ArtWorks (19 Everett Alley) to

After a year’s hiatus due to the pandemic Taste Trenton returns June 11-13 with a restaurant crawl of some 40 eateries in the capital city. The self-guided tour, which coincides with the Mill Hill Garden Tour of June 12, is an effort to re-introduce the city’s CONGRATULATIONS

HALO FÊTE Ice Cream Pâtisserie Palmer Square

GRADUATION CAKES 5 Hulfish St. 921.1710

YAY!

& ASPARAGUS

THE PARKLET IS BACK: The Arts Council of Princeton has installed this year’s parklet — its fifth — in front of Chez Alice at 5 Palmer Square, where it will remain until November. This one uses the same structure designed for the 2017 parklet by architect James Hobart Weiss, updated by the Chez Alice design team. To learn more, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org.

YAY!

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 4

TOWN TOPICS

®

pick up the wristband and a passport/guidebook that lists each participating restaurant, notes the specials being offered, and provides a map showing each location. Participants select which restaurants they want to visit, how long they want to stay, and which of the specials they want to try. On Saturday only, there will be free buses transporting guests from Artworks to restaurants in the Chambersburg/ South Broad St area. Since its launch in 2015 as a one-day event focused on 12 restaurants in Chambersburg, Taste Trenton has expanded to an entire weekend promoting dozens of restaurants throughout the city. Visit tastetrenton. com for more information.

CELEBRATE - IT’S YOUR DAY

FOR YOUR GARDEN

Topics In Brief

Hanging Baskets

A Community Bulletin

Herbs Vegetables Flowering Plants May 29 – Maggs & Bud May 30 – Kingston Ridge June 5 – Fabulous Benson Boys June 6 – Rich Seiner

Spring Weekends: Every Saturday & Sunday 12-5 p.m. Enjoy light fare, relaxing music, and friend-filled afternoons in fresh open air of our Wine Orchard.

(609) 924-2310 • www.terhuneorchards.com Mon-Fri 9-6; Sat & Sun 9-6

Vaccine Clinics at Princeton University’s Jadwin Gym: Open to the public, including 12-15 year olds. The Pfizer vaccine is given June 4, 12-5 p.m.; June 8, 2-7 p.m.; June 9, 2-7 p.m.; and June 11, 12-5 p.m. Register with the New Jersey Vaccine Scheduling System at covidvaccine.nj.gov/en-US. Limited walk-ins are available. Recording of Recent Forum: Princeton Community TV (Comcast Channel 30 and Verizon FIOS Channel 45) is airing the recording of the League of Women Voters’ forum among the three Democratic candidates running for Assembly in Legislative District 16. Airtimes are posted on PCTV’s website and at lwvprinceton.org. Links to the video are posted at lwprinceton.org and VOTE411.org. Webinar: How to Apply for State and Local Jobs: The New Jersey Civil Service Commission is holding free virtual session May 27 at 12 p.m. For more information, contact Joe Forte at joseph.forte@csc.nj.gov or call (609) 777-0918. Summer Recreation Programs: The Princeton Recreation Department has several programs to offer youth this summer, including Summer Chess, Wonder of Magic Camp, the Youth Dance Program, and the Summer Youth Sports Program. Visit princetonnj.gov for details. Bags Needed: The Princeton Mobile Food Pantry seeks clean, handled paper grocery bags; large, laundered, cloth bags; and large, clean, Fresh Direct bags for their biweekly deliveries of fresh groceries. Drop points: on the walkways or steps of 83 Mount Lucas Road or 46 Henry Avenue; every other Wednesday morning (911 a.m., June 2, 16, and 30) at the former Bon Appetit site at Princeton Shopping Center. Contact info@pmfpantry.org or visit pmfpantry.org for more information. Free Financial Coaching: Offered by United Way of Greater Mercer County to help with debt management to those struggling during the pandemic. Visit uwgmc. org/financialcoaching. Information is also available in Spanish.


IN PRINT. ONLINE. AT HOME. Subscription Information: 609.924.5400 ext. 30 or subscriptions@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

princetonmagazine.com

Mill Hill Garden Tour Is Back in Business

Tucked behind the brownstone facades of the capital city’s historic Mill Hill district, homeowners are hard at work getting their gardens ready for the annual Mill Hill Garden Tour on Saturday, June 12 from 12-5 p.m. Held virtually last year due to the pandemic, the live tour is back — with reserved, timed visits at the

top of the hour, and walkins on the half-hour. Faithful visitors who return each year will find some more expansive yards this time, as well as some lushly planted more intimate spaces. “This year, we have our first-ever sidewalk garden, which the owner describes as an urban rainforest with lush, tropical plantings,” said Mercer Street resident Amanda Chevalier, who is co-chairing the event with n e i g h b o r E d We n g r y n . “There is a popular garden with chickens named after Jane Austen characters and Mrs. Patmore from Downton Abbey. Ed has a double garden, and he is also a beekeeper. Jean Bickal, who has been on the tour for several years, has a new garden out back.”

completed restoration of the 1888 bridge over the creek, one of New Jersey’s premier historic metal trusses. Bridge historian Patrick Harshbarger of Hunter Research will be on hand to offer remarks and answer questions. Also planned is a reading at 5 p.m. of Passage Theatre’s OK Trenton Project, taking place in the ampitheatre next to the bridge. Wr it ten by Dav id L ee White, Richard Bradford, and members of the OK Trenton Ensemble and directed by Passage Theatre Artistic Director C. Ryanne Domingues, the documentary-style play centers around the reaction to a controversial community sculpture. Visit passagetheatre.org for details. Continued on Next Page

TOPICS

Art by Sean Carney

Of the Town

Think spring with these fresh new products from Princeton Magazine Store.

Projects Watches Art by Jane Zamost

Projects Watches Art by Jane Zamost

www.princetonmagazinestore.com

Mercer Street resident Bickal also has a new mural painted on her alley wall, by well-known local artist and muralist Leon Rainbow. Other outdoor spaces on the tour combine nature and urban living with residents’ distinctive styles. Visitors are often surprised to discover what is behind these houses, which on Bickal’s block go down to the Assunpink Creek and the leafy park across the stream. This is the 30 th anniversary of the tour, one of two major fundraisers held each year by the Old Mill Hill Society. The annual Holiday House Tour, also halted last year due to COVID-19, will hopefully be back in early December. Mill Hill is a diverse mix of people from many professions. There are artists, academics, architects, writers, musicians, state workers, and more. Chevalier is in pharmaceutical marketing; her husband, George Chevalier, does marketing for Grounds For Sculpture. Wengryn works for the New Jersey Farm Bureau. Full disclosure: this reporter is a resident (but without a garden that is tour-worthy). This year’s garden tour coincides with several other events taking place in Trenton. At Mill Hill Park, which lies at the base of Mercer, Jackson, and Liv ingston streets, a ribbon- cutting ceremony at 12 p.m. will officially mark the recently

5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

One-Year Subscription: $10 Two-Year Subscription: $15

URBAN BLOOMS: The enthusiastic gardeners of Trenton’s Mill Hill neighborhood are reopening their gates following a virtual Mill Hill Garden Tour last year. Some 22 are on the map for the Saturday, June 12 event.

Hill Hill Wallack is pleased to Wallack is pleased to Hill Wallack is pleased to announce Stu Dember has announce Stu Dember ha announce Stu Dember has joined the firm’s Real Estate joined the the firm’sfirm’s Real Estate joined Real Est Practice as Partner. Practice as Partner.

Practice as Partner.

Stu University ’69, has been StuDember, has beenPrinceton a recognized legal practitioner ainrecognized practitioner in the Mercer the Mercerlegal County and surrounding areas County and surrounding areas for more than for more than 40 years, representing clients 40 years, representing clients in complex in complex commercial real estate matters. commercial real estate matters.

sdember@hillwallack.com sdember@hillwallack.com 609.924.0808 609.734.6325

Princeton

Cedar Knolls Princeton Cherry Cherry Hill Hill Red Bank Cedar Knolls Yardley RedNew BankYork Yardley New York

Princeton Cherry Hill IN,Cedar PULL UP Knolls Red Bank Yardley New York

hillwallack.com

hillwallack.com

COME ON A CHAIR AND #GETFORKY WITH US

Crosswicks • Pennington

getforky.com

hillwallack.c

P RO C AC C I N I


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 6

Mill Hill Garden Tour Continued from Preceding Page

The city’s annual Taste Trenton restaurant crawl is June 11-13, with several of the 30 restaurants on the list located within walking distance of Mill Hill. Visit TasteTrenton.com for information. Tickets to the garden tour, which are $20, can be purchased in advance at trentonmillhill.org/events. All tourgoers should check in at Artworks on Everett Alley. Masks are required at check-in. “Following last year’s virtual house tour, the Mill Hill neighborhood looks forward to once again welcoming new and returning guests,” said Chevalier. “We can’t wait to reconnect with visitors, share our welcoming and diverse community, and return to the annual tradition that hundreds look forward to each year.” —Anne Levin

H oney Brook H oney rook H oney H oneyBBBrook rook• • o rganic Farm c• ••S• ••a ooWeorganic arm c S a rganic F arm c S a rganic F arm S a bring our farm to your neighborhood! We bring our farm to your neighborhood! We bring our farm to your neighborhood!

Pause Deliveries Anytime!

Custom Boxes!

We bring farmtotoyour yourneighborhood! neighborhood! We bring ourourfarm Pause Deliveries Custom Pause PauseDeliveries Deliveries Custom Custom Pause Deliveries Custom Anytime! Boxes! Anytime! Anytime! Boxes! Boxes! Anytime! Boxes! ly Home-Delivered Organic Produ g We e k ce an n i r e f d Of o r b h h o g i o e d N f o r r u o a Y 2 o 6-Week ries t e c o S r e ason ct G ! Sele

Celebrating H oneyOurBrook oney B rook WeH bring our farm to B your neighborhood! H oney rook H oney B rook• • o rganic F arm c S a 30th Year Pause Deliveries Custom • • • • • • oo rganic FtoFarm arm rganic ccSSSaaa o rganic arm We bring our farmF your neighborhood! Anytime! Boxes!

our farm Webring bring our farmto yourneighborhood! neighborhood! WeWebring our farm totoyour your neighborhood! Celebrating Pause Deliveries Custom Celebrating Pause Deliveries Pause Deliveries Custom Custom Pause Deliveries Custom Anytime! Boxes! Our Anytime! Boxes! Our Anytime! Boxes! Anytime! Boxes!

Celebrating Our Celebrating Year 30th Year PENNINGTON, 30th NJ CHESTERFIELD, NJ 30th Year Our

30th Year Please visit our website honeybrookorganicfarm.com Celebrating Celebrating Celebrating to see if we deliver to a neighborhood near you! Our Our Our Year 30th Year PENNINGTON, 30th NJ CHESTERFIELD, NJ 30th Year

Historic Agricultural Trail Open Near Flemington

The “579 Trail,” a historic agricultural corridor running through Hunterdon County, has begun its peak season for visitors. The trail runs along County Road 579 from the hills of Bethlehem Township to the Delaware River Valley. The trail features farmers markets, vineyards, farm tours, river towns, and an abundance of scenic biking and hiking. Weekly farmers markets are underway that offer produce and artisanal food and beverage products from many of the county’s 1,500-plus farms. Visitors to hunterdon579trail.com can easily learn what each location has to offer through the site’s icon system. “Hunterdon has become New Jersey’s playground for foodies and those seeking to enjoy a scenic rural environment and all that it can offer in terms of food, entertainment and outdoor activity,” said Hunterdon County Economic Development Director Marc Saluk, whose office launched the trail in May 2020 as a way to have residents and visitors safely rediscover the county’s natural resources amid COVID-19. The trail also offers farm tours, interaction with farm animals, and the chance to pick fruits and vegetables to bring home. This season, The 579 Trail will also feature farm-to-table restaurants that utilize ingredients grown throughout Hunterdon County, as well as more special events as COVID-19 restrictions ease. For more information, visit hunterdon579trail.com.

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What other events are you looking forward to seeing as more things open up?” (Asked Saturday at the outdoor production of The Lion King Jr. at Princeton Friends School and at Palmer Square) (Photos by Charles R. Plohn)

H s a e p i r p e e v n i l e D e HHomoemDeliveries Happenin

H s a e p i r pening Now! e v i l e D e oH m

H s a e p i r p e v i l e D e H s a e H p s i a e m r p i r p e e e v n v i n o i l i l igngNoNw e e D H D e e m m oH Ho

“I have tickets for the Van Gogh exhibit in New York City this summer. I’m Van Go-ing!” —Madonna Dunn, Lawrenceville

H s a e p i r p e e v n i l e D e m o HoHme De Deliveries Happ

“I’m trying to get tickets to the Broadway show Come From Away. It’s based on events that happened in a small town in Canada where 38 planes were directed to land unexpectedly after all air traffic was ordered grounded on 9/11.” —Leanne White, Sergeantsville

Home DeliverieelsivHearpiepsenHinagppNeonwi!n

eivleivreierisesHaHpappepneinigngNoNw HoHmome eDHeoDlm

“I’m looking forward to theater actually inside again. We always do theater outside with small audiences these days, so I am looking forward to being able to be back inside and with a larger audience.” —Corinna Bisgaier, Yardley, Pa.

Rider

Furniture

Please visit our website honeybrookorganicfarm.com to see if we deliver to a neighborhood near you!

PENNINGTON, NJNJ PENNINGTON,

CHESTERFIELD, NJNJ CHESTERFIELD,

PENNINGTON, NJ CHESTERFIELD, NJ Please visit ourour website Please visit website honeybrookorganicfarm.com PENNINGTON, NJ CHESTERFIELD, NJ PENNINGTON, NJ NJhoneybrookorganicfarm.com CHESTERFIELD, NJ NJ PENNINGTON, CHESTERFIELD, PENNINGTON, NJ CHESTERFIELD, NJ Please visit our website honeybrookorganicfarm.com Please visit our website Please visit our website to see if we deliver a honeybrookorganicfarm.com neighborhood near you!you! to see if we deliver to a neighborhood near PENNINGTON, NJ tohoneybrookorganicfarm.com CHESTERFIELD, NJ

Please visit our website honeybrookorganicfarm.com to visit see ifour we deliver tohoneybrookorganicfarm.com a neighborhood near you! to see if we deliver to a neighborhood near you! Please website Please visit our website honeybrookorganicfarm.com to see if we deliver to a neighborhood near you! to see if we deliver to a neighborhood near you! to we deliver deliver to to a a neighborhood neighborhood near near you! you! to see see ifif we

609-737-8899

“Where quality still matters.”

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

Jack: “I’m looking forward to seeing some shows at the Garden Theatre on Nassau Street when it reopens, and also enjoying the outdoor concerts here on Palmer Square this summer.” Augustina: “I’m looking forward to going to see movies and being able to walk around without a mask.” —Jack Fioretti with Augustina De Leon, both of Plainsboro


Recipient of DealerRater’s Consumer Satisfaction Award for 2021

SUMMER SAVINGS START HERE $58,740

New 2021 Volvo

XC90 T6 AWD MOMENTUM

625 Lease For

$

Per Mo. x 36 Mos.1

$5,025 down, $0 security deposit, 1st mos payment due at signing.

New 2021 Volvo

MSRP $42,295

S60 T6 MOMENTUM AWD

Lease For

379

$

$3,679 down, $0 security deposit,1st mos payment due at signing. MSRP $36,795

XC40 T5 AWD MOMENTUM

Lease For

385

$

MSRP $55,085

XC40 RECHARGE PURE ELECTRIC

Per Mo. x 36 Mos.2

New 2021 Volvo

New 2021 Volvo

Per Mo. x 36 Mos.4

$3,885 down, $0 security deposit, 1st mos payment due at signing.

599

$

Lease For

0APR

.99%

Per Mo. x 36 Mos.3

OR

For 60 Mos.+

$4,099 down, $0 security deposit, 1st mos payment due at signing.

New 2021 Volvo

MSRP $46,545

V60 T5 AWD CROSS COUNTRY

Lease For

439

$

Per Mo. x 36 Mos.5

$3,919 down, $0 security deposit, 1st mos payment due at signing.

*All offers Plus tax, title, license and doc fee. Prices are subject to change. With approved credit through Volvo Car Financial Services (VCFS). No security deposit required. Lessee is responsible for excess wear and mileage over 10 miles/year at $0.25 / mile. (1) Lease based on 2021 Volvo XC90 T6 AWD Momentum, includes destination charge and application of $1,800 Lease Bonus. (2) Lease based on 2021 Volvo S60 T5 AWD Momentum, includes destination charge and application of $3,500 Lease Bonus. (3) Lease based on 2021 Volvo XC40 Recharge Pure Electric, includes destination charge and application of $7,500 Lease Bonus. +Based on $17.09 per mo. per $1,000 financed. Must finance through Volvo Car Financial Services. (4) Lease based on 2021 Volvo XC40 T5 AWD Momentum, includes destination charge and application of $200 Lease Bonus. (5) Lease based on 2021 Volvo V60 T5 AWD Cross Country, includes destination charge and application of $1,250 in Allowance. See dealer for details. Must take delivery of a new vehicle between May 1st, 2021 and June 30th, 2021.

VOLVO CARS BRIDGEWATER

VOLVO CARS PRINCETON

(908) 526-7700

(609) 882-0600

1028 US-22, Somerville, NJ 08876

www.volvocarsbridgewater.com

2931 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648

www.volvocarsprinceton.com

7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

VOLVO CARS BRIDGEWATER & PRINCETON


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 8

COVID Restrictions continued from page one

to 6 p.m. at Lupita grocery store at 50 Leigh Avenue. In partnership with the health department, Princeton Nassau Pediatrics is offering the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, by appointment on ly at ( 609 ) 924 -5510 through Friday, May 28, at its West Windsor office location. P r i n c e ton Un i ve r s it y’s series of COV ID -19 vaccinat ion clin ics open to the public, including 1215 year olds, will continue at Jadwin Gymnasium on campus at the follow ing times: Thursday, May 27, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Tuesday, June 1, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Wednesday, June 2, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Friday, June 4, 12 to 5 p.m.; Tuesday, June 8, 2 to 7 p.m.; Wednesday, June 9, 2 to 7 p.m.; and Friday, June 11, 12 to 5 p.m. Anyone 12 or older can register with New Jersey’s Vaccine Scheduling System at covidvacine. nj.gov to secure an appointment, and limited walk-ups are also possible at these clinics. Visit vaccinatenj.herokuapp.com to find other nearby vaccination site. In an email to the Princeton University community last week, University President Christopher Eisgruber looked ahead to the new school year, “as we restore

normal operations and navigate what we hope are the closing stages of this pandemic.” Calling for “vaccination as t he fou ndat ion for a safe campus environment, Eisgruber announced plans for a fully residential program for the fall, with the University “operating very much as it did before the pandemic struck.” He reiterated a requirement for all students to be f u lly vacci nate d agai ns t COVID-19 and added the possibility of a vaccination requirement for faculty and staff. E i s g r u b e r w e n t o n to note that some travel restrictions and some public health measures, including periodic asymptomatic testing and face mask requirements in certain settings, might continue into the fall along with some restrictions on visitors to c a m p u s a n d on - c a m p u s gatherings. Princeton Public Schools has a n nou n ce d it s pla n to welcome all st udents back in September for a return to the full-day, traditional schedule. “I am very pleased with what we have been able to do this spring, and I anticipate that the situation in September will result in pre-pandemic schooling in most ways,” said Inter im Super intendent Barry Galasso. —Donald Gilpin

Available for Lunch & Dinner Mmm..Take-Out 41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton www.tortugasmv.com

Events • Parties • Catering (609) 924-5143

Princeton Seminary Names Head Of Betsey Stockton Center

The Rev. Dr. David Latimore has been appointed the first full-time director of Princeton Theological Seminary’s Betsey Stockton Center for Black Church Studies, effective June 1. John White, dean of student life and vice president for student relations, led the six-month search to fill the new role. “Support for Dr. Latimore was unanimous among the committee. It didn’t take long for us to recognize the breadth and depth of his academic, industry and pastoral experience,” said White. “We are extremely excited to see the direction and growth of the Center under Dr. Latimore’s leadership.” “I consider this an extraordinary opportunity to utilize the full span of my academic training and research interests, along with my ecclesial and professional experiences, in Princeton Seminary’s vibrant academic community and campus life,” said Latimore. Latimore’s teaching and research interests focus on the intersection of religion, race, and economic justice through the examination of how economic ideological pre-suppositions underlie many of the disparities and inequalities witnessed in African American communities and their impact on the theology of the Black chu rch. Un d er t h e u m brella of academic affairs, Latimore is charged with en hancing program m ing to support ongoing critical theological research and engagement on the legacy of enslavement and enriching

WE DID IT!: More than 2,400 graduates from the classes of 2020 and 2021 were honored during much-anticipated Rider University commencement ceremonies on May 15 and 16. Rider hosted 12 small ceremonies based on graduating year, degree, and college/school under two large tents on the Lawrenceville campus. (Photo by Peter G. Borg/Rider University) the formative experience of seminarians. “The timing couldn’t be better for Dr. Latimore to join our community as we begin our new curriculum in the fall,” said Shawn Oliver, senior associate academic dean and member of the search committee. “With Dr. Latimore’s background, I’m confident that he will make significant contributions toward helping the Seminary creatively engage students in thinking theologically about current and urgent issues of social, economic and public life.” This appointment marks another milestone in the implementation of a multi-year action plan to repent for the Seminary’s historical ties to slavery. The Center has been named for Betsey Stockton, a prominent African American educator in Princeton during the antebellum North and a Presbyterian missionary in the Sandwich Islands (present-day Hawaii). Prior to her emancipation in 1817,

Stockton was enslaved by the chair of Princeton Seminary’s Board of Trustees. “Today, the Betsey Stockton Center for Black Church Studies has the potential to be a beacon of light in theological education and for the church at large,” says Baker. Latimore comes to Princeton Seminary from Tennessee, where he served as senior pastor at Fifteenth Avenue Baptist Church in Nashville, taught at Belmont University, acted as a minority student mentor, and was associate director for the

Academy of Preachers. He earned his PhD from the University of Chicago, his DMin from McCormick Theological Seminary, his MDiv from Duke Divinity School, and his AB from Harvard University. He has served as pastor at three other congregations, Mt. Zion Baptist Church in Joliet, Illinois; Mt. Carmel Baptist Church in Gainesville, Florida; and Southern Union Baptist Church in St. Louis, Missouri. Before attending seminary, Latimore had a successful career in investment management and economic development.

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years


continued from page one

parking on Hodge Road is, respectfully submitted, ludicrous. You might as well put it on [Route] 206 because that’s what it will be like.” A sked by Mayor Mark Freda whether there is a legal requirement to provide not ice of neighb orho o d meetings, Municipal Attorney Trishka Cecil said there was not. “It’s up to the task force for getting the word out,” she said. Informal notice was provided on social media and on the municipality’s newsletter, for which the public can sign up. For mer Cou ncilwoman and Western Section resident Jenny Crumiller said she worried that the plan does not address sustainability. “Keep in mind that this proposal increases parking ability, and that affects sustainability,” she said. Some questioned whether the task force had considered building a new parking garage instead of requiring some residents and businesses to pay for permits. “I fear we’re moving away from sustainability,” said a woman who lives on Mt. Lucas Road. “A parking garage is probably the best way to go for long-term planning. Has the task force looked at that?” Cohen replied, “The most sustainable thing you can do is look at something that has already been built rather than building something new.” Lambros commented that building a new parking garage would cost more than $10 million. Local resident Tony Lunn cautioned the task force

“not to be seduced by a clever technology of LPR [license plate reading]. It will be necessary to check each street at least three times a day,” he said. “If you don’t do that, it won’t work.” He also urged the town to provide a telephone alternative to online bookings. “Some of the people on the streets in question are over 70, even over 90, and not adept.” One aspect of the plan would involve relocating 12 two-hour parking spots and about 49 all-day spots in the Hamilton-Wiggins corridor, should the town decide to install bike lanes on that roadway. A resident of Cleveland Lane said that a petition that was circulated after the recent meeting with the Western Section residents had 119 signers opposed to the parking plan. Another resident said he would like to explore an option that doesn’t include an increase of manpower to enforce the plan. “Please give the task force more time to get this really right,” he said. Anita Garoniak, who lives on Harris Road, said, “This is our town. We want to feel we’re being listened to. We feel we’re being told.” Details of the plan are in the task force’s report, which can be found within t he m eet i ng agenda on princetonnj.gov. —Anne Levin

IS ON

Help from Clerk’s Office ballots. Voters can always The forum is hosted by and Electric (PAGE), Winter On Upcoming Elections mail in their ballots. Thanks the office of 16th District Termination Program, and

With the June 8th Primary Election date approaching fast, Mercer County Clerk Paula Sollami Covello aims to keep her constituents up to date with the most important information. For this year, the June 8 Primary Election voting will return to normal where voters have the option to either vote at the polls, or vote by mail. That means that this year voters will not automatically receive a vote-bymail ballot unless they applied for one this year or have previously selected to receive vote-by-mail ballots, for all future elections. The last day a registered voter can request a voteby-mail ballot in the mail is June 1. The deadline to come to the clerk’s office at, 209 South Broad Street to receive a ballot is June 7 at 3 p.m. In the state of New Jersey, anybody can vote by mail for any reason. Voters do not have to be sick, working, or out of town to request a ballot. If a voter wishes to vote by mail all they have to do is call (609) 989-6494 or email MercerVotes@mercercounty.org to request a voteby-mail application. Once the application is received and processed, a ballot will be sent to the voter. T he of f ice is of fer i ng vote-by-mail instructions in a variety of languages, including: Spanish, Hindi, Chinese, Urdu, Polish, and Haitian Creole. Contact MercerVotes@mercercounty.org to request them. There are three ways in which voters can return their

to a recent law change, as long as the ballots are ma i le d a nd p os t marke d on or before the Primary E l e c t i o n d ate , J u n e 8, ballots will be given up to six days to make it through the mail. A vote will be counted as long as the ballot is postmarked on or before June 8, and it is received by the Board of Elections within six days from the election date. Alternately, voters can turn in their ballots at any drop box within Mercer County. A list of drop boxes can be found online at mercercounty.org/government/countyclerk/elections. Voters may also drop off their ballots at the Mercer County’s Board of Elections office at 1440 Parkside Ave in Ewing. The clerk’s office will be of fer ing extended hours leading up to the Primary Election for voters to apply for and obtain vote-by-mail ballots. In addition to our regular weekday hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., we will also be open from 9 a.m to 1 p.m. on June 5, the Saturday before the Election.

Utility Payment Assistance Is Topic of Virtual Forum

On Thursday, June 3 at 11 a.m. the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities, the Department of Community Affairs, and their partnering organizations will share information on how residential utility customers can obtain grants on energy, heating, and water bills, including opportunities available before and after the statewide moratorium on utility disconnections ends on June 30.

Assemblyman Andrew Zwicker. New Jersey’s utility assistance programs include programs for moderate income households, and Low Income Home Energy Assistance (LIHEAP), Universal Service Fund (USF), Payment Assistance for Gas

NJ SHARES. The one-hour forum is free, virtual, and accessible to all those who register through AsmZwicker@njleg. org, or call (732) 823-1684. A Zoom link will follow registration. Register by the end of the day on June 1.

Joyce Potter and Marissa Woodrow Art Show Princeton Airport - Red Hangar 7

Saturday, June 12, 10-6 Sunday, June 13, 10-2

Free Memory Screening Presented by Princeton Medical Institute

Are you concerned about memory problems? Take advantage of a free, confidential memory screening and pick up educational materials about memory concerns, dementia, caregiving and successful aging.

Memory screenings are a significant first step toward finding out if a person may have a memory problem. Alzheimer’s disease or other medical conditions could cause memory problems. A memory screening is not used to diagnose any particular illness and does not replace consultation with a physician or other qualified healthcare professional.

Join us for a FREE Community Event Tuesday, June 8th 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Being Held At: Artis Senior Living of Princeton Junction 861 Alexander Road Princeton, NJ 08540

To RSVP TheArtisWay.com/TownTopics

Event Will Be Held, Rain or Shine! Registration Is Required

Please Register By Friday, May 28th

Check out our other nearby communities in Brick, NJ, and Yardley, PA.

9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

Parking Plan


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 10

P rofiles i n e ducation Joyce Jones: “Role Model and Advocate” At Princeton High School for 51 Years

“C

elebrating Joyce Jones,” the banner read. “Teaching us to learn from the past, prepare for the future, and embrace the present.” Last Thursday, May 20, was Joyce Jones Day at P r i n c e to n H i g h S c h o o l (PHS), honoring Jones on the eve of her retirement after 51 years at PHS — as physical education teacher, coach, and peer group program leader. The celebrations included banners and balloons, music, commemorative pins, a special Princeton proclamation, and a wide range of tributes and reminiscences from former and current colleagues and guests. In a phone interview last Saturday, Jones reflected on her career at PHS and “the moments when I think I’ve made a difference.” She recalled the last meeting of her peer group leaders a few years ago when a graduating senior got up to speak: “‘Thank you for teaching my mom how to be a leader and facilitator,’ he said, and he also named his two brothers who had been in peer group. ‘And I’m the last one and I want to say thank you as well.’ Everyone was listening, and somehow that statement spoke volumes for me. As I reflect back I see that not just in coaching but also in the peer leadership program and in my classes, there are the students that I know I have touched, but there are also the ones I may have no idea I have influenced. That’s special.” Jones started at PHS in 1970 “with a vision for her students and the desire to empower young women participating in sports,” according to Thursday’s proclamation. She was the PHS field hockey coach for more than 30 years, leading the team to the New Jersey State Championship in 1984. Also head coach of girls lacrosse at PHS, she coached that team to a state championship in 1985. As part of the original peer leadership group staff,

which created the program in 1979, Jones went on to help build up the peer group to include the entire ninth grade every year, and she was instrumental in developing a team of teachers to train participating seniors. Jones remains a par t of the leadership of the peer group, which has been expanded and replicated in other schools throughout the region over the past 40 years. “It’s been very important for the freshmen to have an opportunity to connect with other freshmen and experience a belonging-ness at school,” she said. “That’s very important because the high school for freshmen can be a scary place. It’s also an opportunity to create a connection with a senior, an older person who is where they want to be some day.” Since it s incept ion in 1979, Jones says, the essence of the program has remained the same. “Some of the activities have changed over the years, but the bottom line is to support the freshmen to make a smooth transition to high school, and that underlying theme is still there,” she noted. “That hasn’t changed. They are making connections and establishing relationships with their peers and the school.” In the most impor tant ways, Jones believes that kids haven’t changed so much since 1970. “Over the years, what those seniors want to do is to go out and make a difference for the freshmen,” she said. “The way in which it’s done may have changed, especially with Zoom. They have to be innovative, and they are very savvy in coming up with ideas for how to deliver a lesson online instead of in person. Their overall commitment to freshmen and making a difference in the school — it’s there — it has not changed. I’m very proud of them.” Students Speaking Out One change that Jones did note was in the students’ level of political engagement.

“They speak out more now,” she said. “In the past year I had more kids signing petitions and wanting me to sign petitions than I’ve ever had before in my career. There are a lot of different causes they are taking on, and they’ve asked me to be a part of it.” Jones recalled student walkouts at PHS in t he 1970s. “T hey’ve always been connected to the outside world on big issues, but now they’re taking on more, and it’s more aggressive. I think that’s good. They need to be listened to — not that we have to take action on everything they request, but I think of PHS as very progressive.” She continued, “The greatest gift anyone can give to another human being is listening, and I think sometimes teens see that we’re not listening to them.” She cited an incident earlier this year when hundreds of students attended a virtual Board of Education meeting to object to proposed schedule changes. “The School Board listened, and they didn’t change the schedule,” she said. “They fulfilled our request. They listened to us.” Quest for Racial Equity As an African American educator, Jones has seen some changes in racial equity over the years, but not enough. “It’s in progress, but we need to up the ante,” she said. “I’m not saying we’re not making a concerted effort, but we need to up the game, be more conscious of the gap and what we can do to close that gap. I don’t think it will ever be completely closed, but we have to work on it at a faster pace than what we have over the past 30 years.” She pointed out the need for more teachers of color in t he P r inceton P ublic Schools. “Does our teaching staff reflect the percentage of Asian or Latino or African American students in the schools? ” she asked. “I can count on one or two hands the number of Black teachers in the high school

since I’ve been there — not a lot — and I’m talking about 50 years.” Jones talked about attending a Black educators conference recently and hearing stories about teachers being left out, intentionally or unintentionally not included in social or professional gatherings. “It’s just the way the system is set up,” she said. “A lot of teachers of color are confronted with isolation.” She fondly recalled some of her positive relationships — Carol Wimberg, Tom Murray, Larry Ivan, and others — from her early days at PHS. “They took me under their wing. They showed me the way,” she said. But she also remembered, as a young lacrosse player trying out for the United States Women’s National Lacrosse Team, being turned down and later hearing from a member of the selection commit tee, “Yes, Joyce, you would have been on the team, but they just didn’t know who to put as your roommate.” Jones reflected, “I said to myself, ‘You’re a pioneer, and you’re paving the way for others.’ An African American woman made the team a few years later.” First Generation In College Jones grew up in Linden, New Jersey, where she went to high school. Her father was a contractor, who went to school at night. “When I was young, he was honored for building a church in Morristown that’s still standing,” she said. Her father insisted that she go to college. Her high school recommended that she go to secretary school, “but my dad said no. He demanded that I go to college.” She saw Trenton State College, now The College of New Jersey, for the first time when he dropped her off to begin her freshman year, and there she developed her interest in health, physical education, and sports. She’d never picked up a field hockey stick before she came to college. “We didn’t have sports in my high school,” she said. “We just had three play dates during the year — volleyball in the fall, basketball in the winter, softball in the spring. That was it.” By her sophomore year

51 YEARS AT PHS: Joyce Jones, who will be retiring at the end of this year, in a 1970s Princeton High School (PHS) yearbook photo. Last Thursday, May 20, was Joyce Jones Day at PHS, celebrating her 51 years of service as a physical education teacher, coach, and peer group leader “with a vision for her students.” (Photo courtesy of Princeton Public Schools) Jones was playing on the Trenton State varsity teams for field hockey, basketball, and lacrosse. “That’s how I got started. Next thing I knew I was student teaching at Grice Junior High in Hamilton.” Her first year of teaching was also at Grice. Then in 1970, eager to start coaching along with her teaching, she took a job at PHS, where she has been ever since. The Next Chapter After the PHS graduation on June 22, Jones’ future is yet to be determined. She lives in Newtown, Pennsylvania, and has relatives in Georgia, New Jersey, and Connecticut, but the next chapter of her story may well be written in another country. Since 1992 she has been part of the International Black Summit, an annual gathering of the Black community in early August each year taking place in such locations as Ottawa, Toronto, Belize, Angola, Guyana, Anguilla, and Kenya. “Every year, once a year, it’s the place where I get my rejuvenation in a celebration of who we are,” she said. “It’s about ending the murders of our men, women, and children around the

world, and it’s connected to what’s been happening in the United States in past years.” She’s not sure where she will end up, but she wants to revisit some of the places where she attended International Black Summit gatherings, and she definitely wants to be near an ocean somewhere in the world. “I want to live near a beach and every morning get up and have sand going between my toes,” she said. “I love the ocean. For at least part of the year, I want to live near the ocean.” Joyce Jones Day last week was one of many celebrations Jones has experienced over the years. She talked about the two occasions when the PHS yearbook has been dedicated to her; the state and county championship teams she has coached, their victories and their reunions; and the inception of the peer leadership program and being a part of the founder’s vision. “Those moments become so alive and real,” she said. And she mentioned students coming back long after graduation. “You can just see and hear what they’ve done in their lives and what they’re contributing. Some of them are still into sports, working with school or club teams.” he continued, “It’s in those moments when you can reflect and see what your accomplishments are. Those are the moments when I think I’ve made a difference.” —Donald Gilpin

S

WE BUY HOMES! • Save On Commission Cost • Cash Deal / 30 Day Closing • No Home Inspection • Fair Market Value

Rider

Furniture

152 Witherspoon St., Princeton, NJ Phone: 609.924.7111 Fax: 609.924.7199 www.rbhomesonline.com

“Where quality still matters.”

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5


You can boat and fish on Rosedale Lake this summer. Just don’t eat the fish that you catch. That’s the word from The Watershed Institute, which has begun a project to stop toxic algae blooms and improve water quality at the Mercer County lake. Rosedale is among several New Jersey waterways that have been closed to swimming, fishing, and other activities for the past few summers because of the persistent problem. Blame pesticides, fertilizers, and other pollutants flowing into the water from tributaries and nearby lands. Climate change, too, is thought to be a culprit. “According to the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the warmer days caused by climate change may result in more harmful algal blooms (HABs),” reads a press release from The Watershed Institute. Steve Tuorto, The Watershed’s director of science, said the combination of no rain and the warm temperature of streams are perfect

conditions for the HABs. “There’s a lot of algae in the water,” he said. “The harmful blooms are actually a bacteria, and when they grow to high levels they can be toxic.” Aided by some volunteers from Trout Unlimited, Watershed staff and scientists steered a speedboat into Rosedale Lake over two days last week to drop in the first of 20 floating wetlands. The islands were built on Watershed property using marine foam, canvas, and soil material, before being shipped to Rosedale Lake. The Watershed was contracted by Mercer County to help fight the HABs, with funds from the federal Clean Water Act. The Watershed’s bacterial action team is monitoring the project, with weekly assessments at about 30 locations including Rosedale Lake, where they will watch the 50-square-foot wetlands for two years to determine their effectiveness. At the same time, officials from Mercer County will add lake aeration devices and barley bales along the shoreline to

CONGRATULATIONS

Palmer Square

YAY!

YAY!

HALO FÊTE Ice Cream Pâtisserie GRADUATION CAKES 5 Hulfish St. 921.1710

absorb polluted stormwater runoff coming into the lake. As part of an earlier pilot project, The Watershed installed seven similar wetlands at an East Windsor senior community. The success of that project helped t he organ i zat ion decide which plants would be best to use on Rosedale Lake. The harmful blooms have resulted in restrictions not only at Rosedale, but also at Lake Hopatcong in Morris and Sussex counties, and Mountain Lake in Warren County. In 2017 and 2018, there were a total of 64 HAB advisories, according to the Watershed release. A full list of last year’s advisories is available at njdep.gov. While the algae is still a problem, the situation has cleared up a bit since the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection issued a warning last year regarding Rosedale Lake. Just when the situation will be resolved is impossible to predict. “Other than watching, there is no way of telling,” said Tuorto. “It’s basically a monitoring thing. We have to keep an eye on it. If the bloom goes away, restrictions can be eased, but it’s hard to predict. There is every likelihood, though, that the lake will reopen this year. It won’t close for the whole season.” —Anne Levin

Get the scoop from

CELEBRATE - IT’S YOUR DAY

11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

The Watershed Floats Wetlands To Halt Toxic Algae at Rosedale

SPRING MUSICAL: Princeton Friends School on Quaker Road partnered with the Pegasus Theatre Company to produce an outdoor production of Disney’s “The Lion King Jr.” for performances from May 13 through its finale on Saturday, May 22. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

Local Nonprofits Collaborate On Community Pride Picnic

An organizing committee of local nonprofits has announced the Princeton Community Pride Picnic, a free, family-friendly event to celebrate Princeton’s LGBTQIA+ community with music, art, activities for kids, and more. The picnic is Saturday, June 5 from 5-7 p.m. at the Princeton Family YMCA, 59 Paul Robeson Place. Attendees will gather in the Princeton Family YMCA’s field to enjoy tunes from DJ Linda Leigh, make their mark on a collaborative community mural, take part in a variety of activities, and go home with giveaways. Families are welcome to bring a picnic, and local vendors including the bent spoon, Tico’s Juice Truck, and Milk & Cookies will be on hand.

Mayor Mark Freda and other local government representatives will be in attendance, and local nonprofits will have tables with activities and information for attendees. “We are so excited to be able to gather with our friends and neighbors to celebrate Pride,” said Lisa Shelby, executive director of HiTOPS. “We are proud to be a member of a collaboration that is committed to ensuring that all young people, including youth who identify as LGBTQ+, are surrounded by a supportive, loving, af-

firming community.” This free event is a community collaboration coordinated by the Princeton Public Library, Princeton Family YMCA, Arts Council of Princeton, HiTOPS, Pr inceton Civ il R ights Commission, Corner House Behavioral Health, and McCarter Theatre Center. The Princeton Community Pride Picnic will follow current COVID-19 safety protocols. Attendees are expected to practice social distancing and wear a face mask when appropriate.

Available for Lunch & Dinner Mmm..Take-Out 41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton www.tortugasmv.com

Events • Parties • Catering (609) 924-5143

THERE ARE SOLUTIONS FOR ADDICTION.

ASK ABOUT MEDICATION THAT CAN SUPPORT RECOVERY. Thousands of people with substance abuse disorder have been successfully treated with medication that can support recovery. Get the facts on how FDA-approved medication in combination with counseling and therapy can help you or a loved one get well again. There’s a wonderful life waiting. New Jersey Department of Human Services

Talk to your doctor, or call

844-REACHNJ


continued from page one

scope as part of Princeton’s Emma Bloomberg Center include the Freshman Scholars Institute (FSI), an immersive seven-week summer program for incoming first-year students; the Scholars Institute Fellows Program, building upon FSI and working with first-generation, lowerincome students throughout their undergraduate years; the Princeton University Preparatory Program, offering year-round academic and social opportunities for area high school students and supporting their college applications; the Princeton Summer Journalism Program, a summer on-campus program for high achieving high school juniors from lower-income backgrounds; the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program; and the University’s Program for Transfer, Non-Traditional and Veterans Students. “Over the last five years, I have witnessed tremendous campus support from faculty, staff, alumni, and students, for the important work of building programs and policies that promote equity of access and opportunity and that empower the global community of FLi (first-generation, lower-income) students to achieve their academic and professional goals,” said Princeton University Associate Dean Khristina Gonzalez, who will serve as director of the Center. “Our FLi student

community has been central in this effort.” Gonzalez, who directs the Programs for Access and Inclusion and the FSI, emphasized the importance of the Bloomberg gift in “helping more students access college, ensuring that they have the opportunity to thrive on those campuses, and creating new channels to share best practices and research insights with other schools.” Emma Bloomberg, a 2001 Princeton University graduate, Bloomberg Philanthropies board member, and daughter of billionaire businessman and former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, shared her vision in a press release from the University. “My years at Princeton were tremendously formative and inspiring, and my closest friends to this day remain my classmates,” she said. “I am forever grateful to have experienced such an incredible opportunity, and I want young people across the world, regardless of race, class, or geographic origin, to access the same resources and opportunities.” She continued, “But to achieve that vision, we know that getting students to college isn’t sufficient; we must do all we can to provide a more comprehensive support system for all who matriculate. This Center will help make sure that students who are disproportionately affected by the inequities in education are better able to access supports, resources, and

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co.

“Yes, we also rescreen screens regular & pawproof.”

741 Alexander Rd., Princeton • 924-2880

opportunities, and that lessons learned are shared broadly across the country.” Stating that the new center will be “transformative,” Princeton University President Christopher Eisgruber pointed out that “Increasing educational access and opportunity is one of the University’s highest priorities.” Michael Bloomberg emphasized Princeton University’s commitment to increasing educational opportunities for students who need them most, and he added, “As Princeton continues to raise the bar for what college access and success should mean, we look forward to seeing this new Center help even more firstgeneration, lower-income students achieve their goals — and push our country forward on the path to equality and equity.” Princeton University has increased the diversity of its student body in recent years. First-generation college students comprise 22 percent of admissions to next fall’s freshman class, an increase from about 17 percent last year. About 68 percent of U.S. citizens or permanent residents in this year’s admitted group self-identified as people of color. The University’s no-loan financial aid policy offers grant aid to replace loans to meet 100 percent of each student’s financial need, making it possible for most students to graduate from Princeton with little to no debt. Princeton has increased the percentage of its student body that receives need-based federal Pell Grants from 6.2 percent in 2001 to 19.3 percent in the class admitted a year ago. —Donald Gilpin

GRAND OPENING: New to Princeton Shopping Center, La Rosa Chicken & Grill made it official with a grand opening ribbon cutting ceremony on Saturday, May 22. From left are Co-Owner Lazzaro Merrone, Councilman Dwaine Williamson, Mayor Mark Freda, Princeton Municipal Administrator Bernard Hvozdovic Jr., and Co-Owner Benny Umbra.

Favorite “Bloomsday” Passages To Be Read by Famous Writers

On Wednesday, June 16 at 5 p.m., the Arts Council of Princeton presents a free virtual Bloomsday event with Paul Muldoon, Joyce Carol Oate s, C olu m Mc C a n n, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Sean Wilentz. The event celebrates James Joyce’s Ulysses. Rejected at its publication and burned by the U.S. Post office as “obscene,” today Ulysses is regarded as a landmark in moder n is t literat ure. Bloomsday is a commemoration and celebration of Joyce’s life, observed annually in Dublin and around the world on June 16, the day Ulysses takes place in 1904

and named after its protagonist Leopold Bloom. The writers will share their favorite passages with virtual attendees. The event is sponsored by the Princeton University Humanities Council. Visit artscouncilofprinceton. org for more information.

We Buy Gold, Silver & Diamonds!

Diamond Remounts, Jewelry & Watch repairs Done On Premises

40% OFF GOLD 50% OFF DIAMONDS

IS ON

GIA and EGL Certified Diamonds

GIA and EGL Certified Diamonds

299635

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 12

$20M Gift to PU

30% OFF ALL WATCHES WE CARRY MOVADO AND CITIZEN ECO DRIVE WATCHES

NEW LOCATION: 3550 Route 27, Suite 5 - Kendall Park 732.329.2811 • www.bellejewelry.net

Store Hours: Monday~Friday: 11am-4pm • Saturday: 11am-3pm • Closed Sunday


13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 14

REVISITING THE PRINT CLUB: The history of Princeton University’s Print Club is the focus of a virtual event on Friday, May 28 at 2 p.m. sponsored by Princeton University Library and the Friends of Princeton University Library.

Upcoming Special Webinars Jane Austen” is Sunday, offer,” said Beth Englezos, June 20 at 4 p.m. Claudia JFCS manager of hunger From University Library

The Princeton Print Club and Jane Austen are the subjects of two webinars sponsored by P r inceton University Library and the Friends of Princeton University Library. On Friday, May 28 at 2 p.m., the topic is the Princeton Print Club. In 1940, designer and collector Elmer Adler was invited to Princeton University for three years and stayed for 12, in “an experiment in the study of printing and the graphic arts,” according to a release from the Universit y. He filled 12 rooms at 40 Mercer Street with permanent displays of fine printing along with rotating exhibitions managed by undergraduates, forming the Princeton Print Club. At this event, Graphic Arts Curator Julie Mellby will present an illustrated history; Marilyn Kushner of the New York Historical Society will discuss the explosion of interest in printing and print collecting at that time; and Alexandra Letvin of Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, will talk about Oberlin’s rental program where they continue to circulate fine art prints to students each semester. “30 Great Myths About

Johnson and Clara Tuite consider the questions: Was Jane Austen the best-selling novelist of her time? Are all her novels romances? Did they depict the traditional world of the aristocracy? And Is Austen’s writing easy to understand? To participate in either event, visit libcal.princeton. edu.

JFCS Pantry Seeks Donations From Community Gardens

Jewish Family & Children’s Service of Greater Mercer County (JFCS) is asking the community to help keep the agency pantry stocked with fresh produce throughout the spring and summer by harvesting from their very own gardens. In years past, the JFCS pantry has been able to accept limited donations of fresh produce. But now with its mobile food pantry going out three to five times per week, there is significantly increased demand for a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables. The on-site food pantry also continues to see high use, with 80-100 visits per month. “We always appreciate the donations from local individuals or even community gardens as it provides variety to the produce we usually

prevention. “While we are able to store and distribute fresh and frozen produce from our regular food providers, there is something ex t ra special about be ing able to give out locally grown, fresh from the garden items to our clients.” JFCS is t ying into the national Plant-a-Row initiative, which encourages individuals to plant items in their personal or communal gardens for the specific purpose of harvesting to donate to local food pantries. In addition to encouraging local gardeners to contribute to the food pantry, JFCS is also working to provide clients the tools to grow their own produce. Recently, the agency was able to provide tomato plant seedlings to clients. JFCS agency has a relationship with Abe’s Acres Far m, located in Hightstown, where agency staff bring specific cardboard waste — collected through regular, large-scale food deliveries to the pantry — to the farm. It is then turned into composting material. In early May, when dropping off cardboard, Abe’s Acres provided 200 tomato plant seedlings for JFCS to share with pantry clients. Taryn Krietzman, JFCS

pantry coordinator, created easy-to-follow care instructions to provide along with the plant to pantry clients. “Clients coming to our food pantry are food insecure and low-income. Growing one’s own produce is a simple way to get more food into the refrigerator and to save money,” said Krietzman. Through an ongoing partnership with ONEProject, a Robbinsv ille-based organization, JFCS received a donation of 250 painted planters and cilantro seeds to provide our clients with additional resources. “Food pantries are at the end of h u m a n - fo o d pr o d u c t i o n chain, making it difficult to acquire perishable foods such as fresh produce. By providing these resources directly to our clients, we can circumvent many of those challenges allowing the client to have the freshest source of produce, right in their home,” said Krietzman. SEEDLINGS FROM THE GARDEN: Tomato plant seedlings, donatC ont ac t K r i e t z m a n at ed by Abe’s Acres Farm, with care directions to be provided to TarynK@jfcsonline.org with JFCS food pantry clients. questions about donations.

Police Blotter On May 24, at 9:26 a.m., a man reported that someone fraudulently altered one of his checks that possibly was stolen from the USPS mailbox on Nassau Street near Moore Street. A monetary loss of $2,000 was suffered as a result of the incident, and the Detective Bureau is investigating. On May 24, at 6:02 p.m., a resident of Dick inson Street reported that he was the victim of an attempted ident it y t hef t. S omeone called him and stated that he was a DEA agent and informed the resident that there was an issue with his Social Security number. The resident provided all of his identifying information to the caller and then realized it was most likely a scam when the suspect asked for bank account numbers. There was no monetary loss suffered, and the Detective Bureau is investigating. On May 21, at 11:20 a.m., a resident of Wilkinson Way reported that a man contacted her by phone and stated

he was an Amazon representative and then coerced the resident into allowing him remote access to her laptop. He attempted to scam her out of $11,500, but the resident realized it was a scam and did not send the money to the suspect. The Detective Bureau is investigating. A re s ident of Wit herspoon Street reported that a $2,000 transaction was made from her credit union personal checking account into a credit union savings under another name without her permission. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On May 14, at 4:22 p.m., a resident of Gover nors Lane reported that someone used his identity to purchase an iPhone 12 Max valued at $1,200. The suspect had the phone shipped to the resident’s address, and upon delivery he entered the gated property to retrieve the phone. Surveillance footage shows a male wearing an orange baseball cap, black face mask, Mickey Mouse T-shirt, dark shorts, white socks, and black flip-flops.

The Detective Bureau is investigating. On May 19, at 6:39 p.m., a resident of Mountain Avenue reported that someone gave her a quote of $960 to repave her driveway. When he was finished he aggressively told her it was $9,600 not $960. She complied and paid the money. On May 19, at 12:14 p.m., a resident of Governors Lane reported that someone gained access to their personal contact information and opened an AT&T wireless account. The suspect also ordered an iPhone 12 Max Pro, valued at $1,200, and then stole it from the property when it was delivered. On May 17, at 2:13 p.m., a resident of Ettl Circle received a Wells Fargo cashier’s check in the mail from a suspect to pay for a television and sound system that she was selling online. When she went to the bank to check the validity of the check it was determined that there were insufficient funds in the account, so she did not send the equipment.

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years


Steering Committee Provides Update on Town’s Sustainable Landscaping Project

To the Editor: As spring slides into summer and the sound of cicadas compete with the sound of traditional landscaping, seeds of hope have taken root in Princeton. The Changing the Landscape: Healthy Yards = Healthy People/Cambiando el Paisaje: Jardines Sanos = Gente Sana project kicked off in January and is making progress. The project seeks to move our community to adopt practices that protect the health of landscapers and the environment in a way that embeds racial equity into local decision-making and builds partnerships between government, sustainability groups, and community-led frontline groups. Key accomplishments to date include multiple focus groups with landscapers in English and Spanish; meetings between landscapers and municipal leadership; and kicking off a campaign to educate residents to do their part. The project Steering Committee — which includes the Princeton Environmental Commission, Unidad Latina en Acción NJ, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund, Quiet Princeton, Rutgers School of Public Health, the Rutgers Environmental Stewards program, and several Municipality of Princeton departments and commissions, including Human Services, the Board of Health, and the Civil Rights Commission — invite you to learn more about the project by reading the Spring 2021 Newsletter at sustainableprinceton.org/current-projects. What can you do right now to help? If you employ a landscaper, make sure they wear protective equipment and register with the municipality. Start a conversation with your landscaper — the Toolbook for Sustainable Landscaping Conversations can help – sustainableprinceton. org/current-projects. Help us learn more about current landscaping practices by completing this survey — bit.ly/ PtonSurvey. Changing ingrained landscaping practices may be complex, but it is not impossible when we work together for healthier people and healthier yards. We look forward to sharing more progress in the Summer 2021 Newsletter in August. STEERING COMMITTEE Changing the Landscape/Cambiando el Paisaje

Morven Museum & Garden Thanks Community for Continued Support

To the Editor: Thank you to our community for its amazing continued support. We are delighted to share that this year’s Morven in May weekend was the most successful in our history, despite having the Garden Party “blown” into the following evening by unusually high winds. The plant sale also surpassed all pre-pandemic sales records. Our event chairs Ashley Formento, Liza Morehouse, Martha Sword, Elizabeth Wislar, and Marcia Zweig were superlative hostesses, and we owe them a debt of gratitude. We were delighted by the response to our partnership with the Arts Council of Princeton, with “Paint Out Princeton at Morven in May” hosting record numbers of plein air painters throughout the weekend safely painting on our grounds and producing our first online gallery of their work which can be seen at this link: morven.org/paint-outprinceton-2021. Morven was one of the first New Jersey museums to reopen its galleries in July 2020 following all CDC and safety protocols after keeping our 5-acre property in the heart of Princeton open for passive visitorship throughout the shutdown. We continue to work hard to meet people where they are comfortable; we expanded our garden tours, outdoor history strolls, and turned our traditional weekly tea into no-contact box lunches in the garden and broadened our array of offerings to include presenters from around the world zoomed in for Morven specific content, all features we probably wouldn’t have so quickly adopted had the pandemic not necessitated out-of-the-box thinking. Morven was on track to have its highest visitation numbers of all time when we had to close our doors in March 2020 and while we are slowly seeing visitors return, we know the climb back is uphill. Taking the lessons of the pandemic with us, we plan to have our in-person events also have a virtual component, keeping and ideally growing our distant audience, while inviting those who may not be ready for on-site interaction to peek inside, virtually. We developed a free monthly virtual program “Morven Moments” as part travelogue, part museum resource, to give the public glimpses inside the museum and encourage dialogue with our curator of education and public programs and a longtime docent while keeping a robust schedule of our normal programs and lectures. We began online ticketing to control capacity restrictions which will carry forward to ensure a comfortable visitor flow. We are heartened by the members who stayed with us throughout the pandemic and welcomed members from across the community and globe virtually while our doors were shut, reminding us that the primary lesson an historic site like Morven Museum & Garden teaches us is that there is always tomorrow. We thank you so very much and look forward to seeing you at Morven, soon! JILL BARRY Executive Director, Morven Museum & Garden

To the Editor: My name is Maya Wahrman, and I am currently a Masters of Social Work student at Rutgers University, working full time at Interfaith-RISE in refugee resettlement and serving families and individuals living in Princeton, Trenton, and across central and south Jersey. I moved to Princeton nine years ago as an undergraduate at the University, and after graduating I worked for two years at the University’s Office of Religious Life in interfaith programming, focusing on immigration justice. I came to know the town of Princeton as a community that I wanted to contribute to and see flourish. I volunteered at Princeton High School mentoring unaccompanied minors in the ELL class and with local refugee families. I moved into direct client service and worked for a year at the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund in Trenton (LALDEF) as a bilingual client advocate and case manager in partnership with a Trenton middle school. As an active member of Princeton Mutual Aid and a social worker I see the immense possibilities in Princeton and Mercer County for support of our vulnerable neighbors and the growing immigrant and Latino communities in our town. I have had the great fortune of knowing Eve Niedergang my whole life, as our families have been close friends since before I was born. When I moved to Princeton Eve always hosted me graciously for dinner, drove me to appointments, and helped me with whatever I needed. I saw Eve’s commitment to Princeton, her knowledge and care toward all the different layers of our community. She has always showed me and everyone in my circle immense generosity and kindness of spirit, paired with a nuanced thoughtful approach to politics, from her own neighborhood to the federal level and beyond. Watching Eve grow as a Councilwoman over the past three years has been inspiring. I see her taking seriously every topic that comes before her, recognizing that strengthening and improving our community happens in all issues (no matter how local or small) that her constituents hold dear, taking time to learn them and formulate policies and positions that best reflect her values and that of our town. The care with which she treats her friends and the critical mind with which she approaches all topics of importance are both evident in how she educates herself on all of the important issues we face together. Her work at the Watershed has increased her knowledge and commitment to sustainability and environmental justice, and she has educated herself on racial justice and every other issue that someone brings to her attention as important. I was particularly impressed by her commitment to affordable housing to ensure our town grows equitably and responsibly. She does not shy away from exploring or taking on the issues that her constituents find important. There are few people I trust in Princeton to take our issues and our community more seriously, treating every person she meets and represents with the empathy and full respect they deserve. MAYA WAHRMAN South Stanworth Drive

Thanking Professional, Caring Team at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center

To the Editor: At my advanced age, many may have expected that I would not be here to write this. Neither do I know, after taking every imaginable precaution, how I caught COVID pneumonia. Now that I’m returning to full health, I believe that it was Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center, its doctors and staff, that saved me. I am evermore convinced of how fortunate we are here in Princeton to have such professional, caring, and dedicated medical professionals. My gratitude extends beyond my stay at our local hospital. After I was discharged, I continued receiving excellent care at home including visits from a physical therapist, a home aide, and a registered nurse. And so I continue getting better. The entire medical team with their outstanding skills, dedicated professionalism, and deep kindness have pulled me through this. For that I would like to publicly thank them all. CAROLYN LEEUWENBURGH Jefferson Road

Stating Objections to Proposal for Sale of Residential Parking Spaces

To the Editor: The current proposal for selling parking spaces on our residential streets in order to add bike lanes to a major artery is a disaster. We urge Council to turn down this plan. Both components of the plan — bicycle lanes on a major road, and the sale of parking spaces on residential streets — will have catastrophic and far-reaching results. Hamilton/Wiggins/Paul Robeson is a major artery in town that runs parallel to Nassau Street and serves as a connecting link to major highways in our county, our state, and beyond. It is misguided to think that this major crosstown artery is wide enough to accommodate bicycles as well as the heavy traffic and trucks that use this road on a normal traffic day. Bicycles are not meant to be part of a major network of heavily traveled highways. Where are the traffic surveys that led to this plan? Consider this: during the past 15+ months of the COVID pandemic, traffic was anything but normal, much lighter, almost nonexistent. Schools were closed and most office employees worked at home. No one was commuting to work! This will

change as schools and businesses open again. Summer traffic is also light, with schools closed and people out of town, so any traffic surveys taken during the past 15+ months and including this summer must be incorrect. This is not the time to make major changes to any roads or traffic patterns. You may not be aware that students at Princeton High School are not allowed to drive to school until spring term of senior year. This is a Board of Education ruling that has been on the books for ages. Who are the “school parking spaces” reserved for? The plan you put forth sounds rather complex, with multiple entities paying for permits at times and addresses which overlap. Who will benefit from this plan? How many cyclists? It is not right to use residential neighborhoods for city parking. Residents of Princeton pay very high taxes, and adding the burden of commercial parking on our residential streets will result in unwanted traffic and destroy the tranquility and privacy of our neighborhoods. Right now we have quiet streets and sidewalks that are adequate for use by residents of the neighborhoods, guests, school children, neighbors walking dogs, or going for a run or a stroll. In other words, people enjoying the quality of life in a small town. We have a permit system that has been in place for many years that works well. The idea of a for-profit company selling parking spaces and providing surveillance of parked cars is an outrageous invasion of privacy and an added threat to the safety of our homes and families. This plan has not been adequately thought out. It reeks of commercialism invading our neighborhoods. We urge Council to turn down this proposal. JEAN A. MAHONEY Hawthorne Avenue

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

Mailbox

Supporting Eve Niedergang For Re-Election to Princeton Council

Shopping Center is Essential Community Resource That Should Be Preserved As Is

To the Editor: Let me second Terry Lyons’ letter of May 19 on the vitality of the Princeton Shopping Center (PSC). All retail areas have suffered during the COVID pandemic including downtown Nassau Street. This general retail downturn is not a reason to hand massive tax breaks (PILOTS) to would-be developers of the PSC who could well turn it into another failed Forrestal Village, or Route 1 strip mall. The Sustainable Princeton Fair of April 24 was a vivid example of how valuable the PSC courtyard is as a community resource. Another example is the Blue Bears restaurant that is dedicated to providing a place of dignity to work for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Nomad’s saw a business opportunity in the PSC and opened a new pizza restaurant without any PILOTs. The New York Sports Club (NYSP) at the PSC was thriving but closed on the day of the Governor Murphy’s COVID order, contrary to the claim of “multiple vacancies well before COVID” in the Preliminary Investigation Report by Carlos Rodrigues. I know because I was a regular NYSC member who suddenly could not enter the club that day. McCaffrey’s, Ace Hardware, Walgreens, and many other PSC stores well serve the community. The loss in property taxes from PILOTS would necessarily increase in taxes on Princeton residents. Far from being “obsolete,” the PSC is an essential community resource that should be preserved as is. CHARLES SKINNER Western Way

Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

Thinking of selling your home? Call me! JUDITH BUDWIG

Sales Associate Cell: 609-933-7886 | Office: 609-921-2600 judith.budwig@foxroach.com

253 Nassau St, Princeton NJ 08540


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 16

BOOK/FILM REVIEW

“Friday Night Lights” Hits Home as Bob Dylan Turns 80 Close your eyes. Pretend you’re 10 years old. Playing. Just playing. —from Friday Night Lights Mostly what I did growing up was bide my time. —Bob Dylan, from Chronicles icture two people in a pasture with some cows, a line of pink light balanced on the horizon. Move in closer and you see a high school football coach and his wife. The toxic spillover of a train derailment and an explosion has cost the coach home field advantage, an absolute necessity for the upcoming game that will decide whether his team goes to the state finals. He’s refused the emergency option of a big stadium with all the amenities, an offer tainted by big money, bribery, and corruption. Mainly, he knows what home field means. So, two days before the game, he decides to convert the pasture into a makeshift stadium, with arc lights, stands, scoreboard, end zones, goal posts, everything. Clearly an impossibility, but he’s a determined man. His wife has doubts and questions. “Where would people park? And how would you put lights in here?” Coach says he doesn’t know, doesn’t care. When a cow moos, he takes it as a show of support. “All I’m tryin’ to do,” he says, and suddenly he knows what he wants to say, it’s what the moment’s all about, the heart of the matter. “Come here,” he says. When she’s within whispering distance, he holds her face in both hands, tells her to close her eyes and pretend she’s 10 years old. Just playing. Just playing.... What Hit Home Playing! That’s the word that hit home for me and brought back the essence of play, as in playing ball, 10 years old, me and my friends, as it was and seemed it would surely always be, just us, no adults, no coaches, no parents, no pressure (no cows). Just kids having fun, with a football in fall, a baseball in summer, using scuffed up, grass-stained balls and a few Louisville Sluggers with black friction tape around the handles and nothing but the rough sketch of an infield to play on in a onetime pasture with an old barn at one end and on the bluff beyond it the Illinois Central railroad tracks. We were still playing in the fading daylight right up to the moment parents called or whistled us home. That was before the adult-monitored, organized competition of Babe Ruth or Little League, or in high school, where, if you were lucky you had a coach like the one in Peter Berg’s series Friday Night Lights (2006-2011). Heavy Hitters When my wife and I landed in the football-crazy West Texas town of Dillon on a Hulu rebound from Harlots, I didn’t expect to be bringing Shakespeare and Melville to the game, let alone Bob Dylan

P

and Brood X cicadas. Nor did I expect to find anything as stirring as the scene in the pasture that comes toward the end of the epic 22-episode first season of Friday Night Lights that debuted on NBC in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. But once you begin to ponder terms like play and playing in the context of a show that does rich justice to the human comedy, chances are you’ll find yourself thinking of heavy hitters like the creators of Falstaff and Ahab. In the two seasons I’ve seen so far, there’s a Shakespearean sense of life and play ever y where, whe t her by way of the coach and his wife, Eric and Tami Taylor, as played by Kyle Chandler and Connie Britton — one of the most believably embattled, amusingly complicated couples in the history of series television — or through the plight of a fallen hero, quarterback Jason Street (Scott Porter), struck dow n in the open ing episode, only one a m o n g t h e s h ow’s star-crossed friends and lovers, schemers and dreamers, like the Falstaffian rogue Buddy Garrity (Brad Leland), who becomes more lovable the more he sins and looks for redemption. At this point in the series, probably the closest to an As You Like It, What You Will, Midsummer Night’s Dream threesome is the one bonded and shattered, bound and unbound in love and friendship, composed of Jason, his best friend Tim (Taylor Kitsch), a moody, updated less histrionic James Dean who can’t catch a break, and Buddy’s troubled daughter Lyla (Minka Kelly), the cheerleader with a broken heart of gold. Breakfast with Ahab As for Melville, he enters the series pilot with the coach’s 15-year-old daughter Julie (Aimee Teegarden), who’s reading Moby-Dick at the breakfast table and telling her parents it’s actually “the perfect metaphor for this town … The cold black sea representing the season in all its

uncertainties. The magical white whale is the Holy Grail. … State championship. The boat, I mean, the whalers are the team, right? ” And when her dad asks if that makes him Coach Ahab, she says, “Absolutely. Coach, captain, hunter, hunted. Driven to catch what may be uncatchable.” And who else but Ahab Eric, the classic coach, fighter, father, husband, would imagine converting a pasture into a regulation football field in under two days, put his crew to work making it happen, and then watch them slog through the deciding game in a downpour that turns the field of dreams to a muddy swamp. It’s not clear whether he invented t he team’s rally ing cry, “Clear eyes. Full hearts. Can’t lose!” but he embodies it. Bob Dylan enters the picture with starting quarterback Matt Saracen ( Z ach Gilford), Jason’s seemingly hapless replacement. When Jason is asked by Coach Taylor if he thinks QB2 is up to the task, the answer is that he’s “different,” but cool: “he listens to Bob Dylan.” A lt hough we don’t see or hear Matt listening to Dylan in the first two seasons, he makes a pivotal move late in the series to Dylan’s “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right,” according to Rolling Stone’s Alan Sepinwall. Even though I have three seasons to go, I’m writing now while the pasture scene that inspired this column is still fresh in my mind. Such is the ain’t-no-use-to sitand-wonder-why reality of binge viewing. Dylan’s 80th I’d been listening to Dylan’s song “Day of the Locusts,” and thinking the cicadas were “singing their high whining trill” for him even before I found out Monday was his 80th birthday. From his 1970 album New Morning, the song is based on the emergence of the great-grandparents of Brood X when Dylan was in Princeton 51

years ago to receive an honorary degree. For someone who writes and sings the world his way, it doesn’t really matter that the locusts singing “off in the distance” were actually cicadas, which scan no less smoothly if you make it “And the cicadas sang, yeah, it give me a chill.” What’s worth mentioning is the contrast between the song’s positive energy and Dylan’s downbeat account of the ceremony in Chronicles, which was published in 2004, putting him in synch with the cicadas’ 17-year time frame, and so he is again now, hitting the big 80 right on schedule. In the book there’s no mention of the “sweet melody” of the locusts/cicadas, nothing about how the sound gave him a chill. What comes through loud and clear is his discomfort, with the heat, the cap and gown, and above all his reaction to the wording of the citation (“Oh sweet Jesus! It was like a jolt!”), presenting him as “the authentic expression of the disturbed and concerned consciousness of Young America.” On the Horizon Line “Key West (Philosopher Pirate),” the last song on his last album, Rough and Rowdy Ways, is the one I keep coming back to, haunted by lines like “If you lost your mind, you’ll find it there ... Key West is on the horizon line ... You stay to the left and then you lean to the right ... I play both sides against the middle.” The way he moves the lyric also reminds me of the deceptively careless wayward movement of the prose in Chronicles, which concludes as if looking ahead to 2004, with reference to how the “national psyche would change and in a lot of ways it would resemble the Night of the Living Dead. The road out would be treacherous, and I didn’t know where it would lead but I followed it anyway. It was a strange world ahead that would unfold, a thunderhead of a world with jagged lightning edges. Many got it wrong and never did get it right. I went straight into it. It was wide open. One thing for sure, not only was it not run by God, but it wasn’t run by the devil either.” Winning he “clear eyes, full hearts, can’t lose” mantra the Dillon players chant before each game in Friday Night Lights is barely audible blowing around in the “idiot wind” of 2021’s Big Lie. Peter Berg’s series is less about winning than sustaining a clear-eyed vision of truth and integrity, playing by the rules, being there for your parents or children or friends or siblings. Seen now, it’s like a mirror held up to the distorted face of the nation. As the song says, “We’re idiots, babe. It’s a wonder we can even feed ourselves.” —Stuart Mitchner

T


17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

MUSIC REVIEW

PSO Continues Outdoor Chamber Concert Series with Visiting String Quartet

T

he weat her has been good to Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) this spring. The Orchestra returned to presenting outdoor concerts this past month, and so far each performance evening has been a relaxed opportunity under a clear sky to enjoy high-quality chamber music. Last Thursday night at Morven Museum and Garden’s pool house, Princeton Symphony Orchestra presented the New York-based Momenta Quartet to an audience comfortably “podded” on the lawn. The four musicians of the Quartet — violinists Emilie-Anne Gendron and Alex Shiozaki, violist Stephanie Griffin, and cellist Michael Haas — performed four representative pieces of “Great Music from the Recent and Distant Past,” and interspersed with commentary and musical background, these works created a very entertaining evening under the stars. Sixteenth-century English composer William Byrd is most well-known for sacred choral music, but his large repertory of keyboard pieces brought English works of this genre to new heights. Byrd composed several keyboard collections, often pairing dance movements. The “pavane,” a stately and dignified dance, was frequently paired with the more lively and complex “galliard.” Momenta Quartet played one of these pavane and galliard pairings by Byrd with a somewhat straight tone, reaffirming the 16th -century sound. Violinists Gendron and Shiozaki were well matched in the opening pavane, and the Quartet consistently executed well measures of detached notes. The galliard was uniformly brisk, with the slightly off-beat rhythmic accents well played. Early 20 th -century American composer Florence Price has been popular this year, and her works have received attention from almost every local ensemble. For Thursday night’s performance, Momenta Quartet selected the second movement “andante moderato” from Price’s 1929 String Quartet in G Major, a work which has gained particular popularity over the past few years. As with much of Price’s music, this movement was vocally infused with American folk tunes and spirituals. Led by first violinist Gendron, Momenta Quartet created a very peaceful musical palette, with the ensemble sound echoing lightly in the gazebo in which the musicians were playing. The second section of the movement featured violist Griffin in a rich melody with all players taking effective liberties with the tempo and ending the piece in a full instrumental sound.

Momenta Quartet has built a reputation playing both classical masterworks and pieces from the musical avant-garde, and has a long-standing relationship with American composer John Patitucci, who maintained parallel career as an acoustic bass player with some of the 20 th -century’s leading blues and jazz players. Patitucci’s one movement Snapshots for String Quartet was commissioned by the Elements String Quartet in 2002 and was inspired by a photograph of the composer’s mother. Momenta Quartet began the work with a cello melody smoothly played by Michael Haas, with a second elegant melodic passage played by first violinist Gendron. A slightly rocking accompaniment by second violin and viola gave the work an appropriate maternal feel. The first three short pieces were merely a warm-up for the substantial work which closed the program — Sergei Prokofiev’s 1942 String Quartet No. 2 in F Major. Following the German invasion of Russia in World War II, Prokofiev was evacuated to a remote area of the Caucasus mountain range, at the intersection of Europe and Asia. There the composer found an abundance of regional folk music which he incorporated into his classical works, including this string quartet. The first movement “allegro sostenuto,” inspired by a peasant dance, featured precise dotted rhythms and an effectively heavy-handed peasant sound from the Momenta Quartet, with all four instruments uniform in the movement’s quirkiness. The second movement, based on a Kabardinian love song, began with Haas playing a sweet cello melody, answered by the other instruments. One could hear the isolation of the mountains during wartime in the music, as well as the intensity of the conditions under which Prokofiev was living. The third movement folk dance brought joy to the musical atmosphere, with unusual technical effects from the violins. hroughout its more than 15-year history, Momenta Quartet has maintained an equal commitment to classical masterpieces, contemporary works, and up-and-coming composers not always getting the attention they deserve on the musical landscape. Thursday night’s concert was an eclectic combination of all three, well complemented by the stillness of a pre-summer evening. —Nancy Plum

T

Princeton Symphony will present its next live performance at Morven Museum and Garden on Thursday, March 27 at 6 p.m. Featured in this “America the Beautiful” concert will be a Princeton Symphony Orchestra Brass Quintet playing music of American composers in honor of Memorial Day weekend. Ticket information about this performance and information about the Symphony’s other virtual events can be found at the Princeton Symphony website at princetonsymphony.org.

Town Topics a Princeton tradition! ®

est. 1946

Financial Planning Forum

Retirement Plans Planning Forum Financial Qualified Retirement Plans and Accounts Accounts Qualified Retirement American Families Plan TaxPlans Proposaland

Qualified retirement retirement accounts accounts include include 401(k) and and other other employer employer sponsored sponsored retirement retirement Qualified President Biden recently unveiled plans to 401(k) increase taxes on the wealthy. Although enactment and timing plans and and Individual Individual Retirement Retirement Accounts Accounts (IRA’s). (IRA’s). Typically, Typically, contributions contributions are are not not subject subject plans of the proposed changes is uncertain, it is worth considering the potential impact and possible steps to tomitigate incomethe taxproposed when made, made, the account account grows grows tax tax deferred deferred (without (without tax), tax), and and distributions distributions to income tax when the increases. in retirement retirement (after (after age age 59.5) 59.5) are are subject subject to to ordinary ordinary income income tax. tax. Other Other qualified qualified retirement retirement in Income and CapitalSimplified Gains Tax Increases accounts include Employee Pension Pension Plans Plans (SEP); (SEP); Savings Savings Incentive Incentive Matching Matching accounts include Simplified Employee The proposal would increase theBenefit top marginal tax rate from 37% to 39.6%. The highest marginal tax rate Plans (SIMPLE); and Defined Benefit Pension plans. Plans (SIMPLE); and Defined Pension plans. currently applies to Married Filing Joint Taxable Income (“MFJTI”) over $628,300 and Single taxable income over $523,600. SEP Plan SIMPLE 401(k) Defined Benefit Plan

SEP

SIMPLE

401(k)

Defined Benefit

TheBe proposal also increase capital gain tax Businesses rate from 20% (for thoseBusinesses with MFJTI May Be Best for: for:would Businesses looking Businesses seeking Businesses seeking Self-employed and the long-term May Best looking seeking Businesses seeking Self-employed and to to make large plan flexibility, salary an$1 easy to administer administer small, closely held of over over $501,600) tosmall, 39.6% for MFJTI million. Those gains would alsosalary be subject thelarge 3.8% to make plan flexibility, an easy to closely held contributions on – deferrals and andto matching plan that permits permits businesses looking for net investment taxbusinesses and Newlooking Jerseyfor Stateplan income tax of 10.75% (applicable income over $1 million) contributions on deferrals matching that behalf of of the the owner owner contributions salary deferrals deferrals simple plan plan behalf contributions salary aa simple meaning long term capital gains could be subject to over a 50% tax for the highest income earners. Estate Tax Changes

Is It It Better Better to Save Save in aa Qualified Qualified Retirement Retirement Account? Account? Is to in A. Exemption Amount

The conventional conventional wisdom is yes, yes, but the common common rationale is often often based on unrealistic unrealistic The currentwisdom Federal estate taxbut exemption amountrationale is nearly $12 millionbased per person or over $23 million The is the is on assumptions. For instance, instance, the ending ending after-tax value in aa 401(k) 401(k) or IRA IRA is million/$10 usually million (plus per married couple. These exemption amounts are scheduled to drop to $5 assumptions. For the after-tax value in or is usually compared to the the after-tax value value of aa non-qualified account invested in bonds bonds or cash. cash. inflation adjustments) in 2026. The original proposal would invested have reduced the exemption amount to compared to after-tax of non-qualified account in or However, retirement accounts are often invested invested in stocks stocks anddoes long-term stock appreciation theretirement 2026 amounts or lower.are However, the most recent proposal not include a change to the However, accounts often in and long-term stock appreciation is subject subject to lower lower tax rates rates than bonds bonds or or cash cash (capital (capital gains gains versus versus ordinary ordinary income income tax tax current exemption amount. is to tax than rates). Even so,Step-Up when comparing comparing qualified retirement retirement account account (e.g., (e.g., aa 401(k) 401(k) or or IRA) IRA) to to aa rates). so, when B.Even Ending In Basis aa qualified non-qualified account invested in stocks, stocks, in most most cases, the after-tax value of aagain 401(k) orupon Currently inherited assets receive a step-up in basis to fair market valuevalue for capital taxesor non-qualified account invested in in cases, the after-tax of 401(k) IRA will will be be higher. eventual sale. For example, a stock purchased for $10 a share by the decedent and inherited by IRA higher. an heir at a current price of $100 per share would receive a “step-up in basis” to the current price of Reference Guide for that 401(k) Plans $100.Guide This means if the stock is sold by the heir there is no tax on the $90 per share pre-death Reference for 401(k) Plans gain. can Although the proposal to is aspre-tax “ending contributions, the practice of ‘stepping-up’ the basis for gains,” 401(k) plans plans can be established established tophrased allow for for pre-tax contributions, after-tax Roth Roth contributions, 401(k) be allow after-tax contributions, it hasmatching been widely reported that the proposal woulddiscretionary treat death as profit aprofit realization event so that upon safe harbor harbor matching contributions, and additional discretionary sharing contributions. safe contributions, and additional sharing contributions. death a decedent would Party be treated as if all of his(TPA) or hercan assets were soldthe andemployer any gain intoexcess of A financial financial advisor and Third Third Administrator work with A advisor and Party Administrator (TPA) can work with the employer to million (couple)goals threshold be subject to tax. developaaa$1 plan that(individual)/$2 best fits fits the themillion employer’s andwould budget. Well designed designed plans can can develop plan that best employer’s goals and budget. Well plans help owners and key key personnel personnel maximize maximize retirement retirement contributions contributions as as well well as as attract attract and and Planning Considerations help owners and retain talented employees. Employer contributions to the plan and any other costs are retain employees. Employer to would the plan any other costs1,are Mosttalented experts agree that if enacted in 2021contributions the tax changes likelyand be effective January 2022. Thus, deductible business expenses. high income earners might consider accelerating and not deferring income in 2021, including employee deductible business expenses. stock options. High income earners with IRA accounts might also consider a Roth IRA conversion to avoid With aa 45-year 45-year history history in in the the Princeton Princeton area, Petrone Associates Associates offers thoughtful wealth wealth management, management, With thoughtful the potential income tax increase. And area, thosePetrone with MFJTI income ofoffers over $1 million might consider selling insurance and and retirement retirement planning planning services services to to individuals individuals and and businesses. businesses. We We work work closely closely with with each each insurance highly appreciated assets to avoid the potential nearly doubling of the capital gains tax. of our clients to help them reach their financial goals. of our clients to help them reach their financial goals.

Michael G. G. Petrone Petrone Michael CFP®®,, J.D.* J.D.* CFP

Petrone Associates, Associates, Inc. Inc. Petrone Research Way, Way, Princeton, Princeton, NJ NJ 22 Research petroneassociates.com petroneassociates.com

Andrew E. E. Petrone Petrone Andrew Financial Advisor Advisor Financial

609.452.9292

Securities products/services products/services andand advisory services are offered offered through Park Park Avenue Avenue Securities LLC (PAS), aaLLC registered broker/dealer andbroker/dealer investment Securities products/services advisory services are offered through ParkSecurities AvenueLLC Securities (PAS), a registered and Securities and advisory services are through (PAS), registered broker/dealer and investment advisor. Financial Financial Representative, Representative, The The Guardian Guardian Life Life Insurance Company of of America, America, New New York, York, NY NY (Guardian). (Guardian). PAS is an an indirect indirect wholly wholly owned owned advisor. Company is investment advisor. Financial Representative, TheInsurance Guardian Life Insurance Company of America, New PAS York, NY (Guardian). PAS is a whollysubsidiary of of Guardian. Guardian. Petrone Petrone Associates, Associates, Inc. Inc. is is not not an an affiliate affiliate or or subsidiary subsidiary of of PAS PAS or or Guardian. Guardian. PAS PAS is is aa member member FINRA, FINRA, SIPC. SIPC. subsidiary owned of Guardian. Petrone Associates, Inc. isonly notand an is affiliate or construed subsidiaryasoftax, PAS or or Guardian. PAS is aGuardian, member its FINRA, SIPC. Materialsubsidiary discussed is is meant meant for general general informational purposes not to be be legal, investment advice. subsidiaries, Material discussed for informational purposes only and is not as tax, legal, or investment advice. Guardian, its subsidiaries, Material discussed is meant general informational purposes only andtois notconstrued to be construed as tax, legal, or investment advice. Although the agents, and and employees do not not for provide tax, legal, legal, or or accounting accounting advice. Consult your tax, legal, or accounting accounting professional regarding your your individual situation. agents, employees do provide tax, advice. Consult your tax, legal, or professional regarding individual situation. information has been gathered from sources believed to be reliable, please note that individual situations can vary. Therefore, the information 2019-73179 Exp 01/21 *Not practicing law for Petrone Associates, Guardian or its subsidiaries or affiliates. 2019-73179 Exp 01/21 *Not practicing law for Petrone Associates, Guardian or its subsidiaries or affiliates. should be relied upon only when coordinated with individual professional advice. Guardian, its subsidiaries, agents, and employees do not provide tax, legal, or accounting advice. Consult your tax, legal, or accounting professional regarding your individual situation. 2021-121517 Exp 05/23 *Not practicing law for Petrone Associates, Guardian or its subsidiaries or affiliates.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 18

Tall, a brand-new three-song EP with Venture To Zen, and is working on a special all-acoustic instrumental record “The Sourland Symphony.” Popik also appears on Fitness Rock & Roll with Miss Amy & Her Big Kids Band. This event will be the first in-person fundraiser that the Conservancy has hosted since the 2019 Sourland Mountain Fest. The suggested donation is $25. Sales will be limited to 30 tickets, and COVID safety guidelines will be followed. This will be the fifth virtual Happy Hour that the Conservancy has hosted this year. The suggested donation for the virtual event is $10. “We understand that this year has been difficult for our members,” said Marylou Ferrara, board vice president. “We don’t want cost or transportation to be a barrier. We hope everyone will be able to join us, so the Conservancy decided to ask for voluntary donations rather than setting a mandatory ticket price.” These funds have provided a muchneeded boost for the Conservancy’s education, advocacy, and forest restoration efforts. For more information or to register, visit tiny.cc / THE BEAGLES SING THE BEATLES: Classic tunes by the Fab Four will rock Palmer Square on Thursday, June 3 at 6 p.m., when The Beagles perform in a show augmented by horns, key- SCHappyHour. boards, and special guests. The show was originally planned to coincide with the 50th anni- Newman & Oltman Guitar versary of the song “Let it Be” in 2020, but, well, you know the rest. Visit palmersquare.com Duo at Raritan River Festival for details. The Newman and Oltman celebrating the beauty and In addition to Popik, Tom Guitar Duo will perform at Sourland Happy Hour McMillan, Ben Cahill, and the Raritan River Music FesCloses With James Popik culture of our region.” Andy Janowiak will per- tival on Saturday, May 29 at The Sourland Mountain At a concert on Thursday, 4 p.m. The program, Two to June 3 at 6 p.m. that can Festival fundraiser has been form. Danny Coleman will Tango, celebrates the heribe the guest emcee. be attended in person or canceled for a second year At the age of 5, Popik was tage of Hispanic and Latin viewed virtually, New Jer- due to COVID. Funds are American tango traditions sey singer-songwriter James needed to support the mu- chosen to be the MC of his from Argentina and Uruguay. Popik will perform with The sicians who would normally kindergarten class’ ChristThe duo, who have worked Supernova Band. This is the play the Mountain Fest and mas play. He was first out closely with Nuevo Tango other live events that were on stage greeting the crowd final show of the Sourland Mountain Happy Hour this canceled due to the pandem- and introducing the skits. masters Astor Piazzolla, who ic — and also to support the Since then, he has logged would have been 100 this season. year, and Daniel Binelli, who “It’s time for people to get Conservancy’s forest resto- over 2,000 gigs in the last th few years in over 150 differ- celebrates his 75 birthday together again to enjoy live ration efforts. James Popik & The Su- ent venues. Popik just com- this month, will present their music which benefits the works along with Tango Sourland Mountain,” said pernova Band combine jazz, pleted the first songs from favorites for two guitars by “Acoustic Sketches” with Happy Hour coordinator jam, and just enough rock to Isaac Albéniz, Carlos García bassist Lawrence Haber. He form what Popik describes Suzanne Parsons. “We’re Tolsa, Alfonso Broqua, and has also released three EPs all looking forward to spend- as ‘Festival Jazz,’ fun, upGerardo H. Matos Rodríguez. with jam rockers Ten Foot tempo, danceable grooves. ing time with our friends and The performance will take place in an outdoor, 100 percent covered venue, the Blue Army Shrine, located at 647 Mountain View Road East, Asbury. The new no intermission format will start live in-person at 4 p.m. and can also be viewed in real-time live-stream. In-person tickets are $20 and Live-Stream Family Viewing tickets are $20. Tickets will be sold to a limited capacity to ensure safe, socially-distanced seating. All audience members will wear protective face masks. Tickets are available at RaritanRiverMusic.org. For more information call (908) 213-1100 or email info@RaritanRiverMusic.org.

Performing Arts

Westminster College of the Arts MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR SUMMER Pre-college programs for students who love the arts

RIDER.EDU/ PRECOLLEGE

Princeton Symphony Orchestra Awarded Catalyst Fund Grant

The League of American Orchestras has awarded a $19,500 grant to the Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) to strengthen their understanding of equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI), and to help transform organizational culture. Given to 25 orchestras nationwide, the one-year grants comprise the final round of The Catalyst Fund, the League’s three-year, $2.1 million grant-making program, made possible by a generous grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation with additional support from the Paul M. Angell Family Foundation. “This grant represents the second consecutive year of Catalyst funding for the PSO, which will enable us to build upon the foundational work we have begun under the guidance of our EDI consultant this season,” said Marc Uys, the PSO’s executive director. “American orchestras have made a strong commitment to embrace equity, diversity, and inclusion and reverse decades of inequity on-stage and off – an imperative made even more urgent by the pandemic’s disproportionate impact on communities of color,” said Simon Woods, the League’s president and CEO. “This is a long-term journey, but it starts with taking immediate action and creating organizational momentum. We’re grateful for The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation’s long-standing support for the orchestral field, and for the strategic vision that has allowed this group of orchestras to model what change looks like for our entire field through their Catalyst Fund grants.” Through this grant, the Princeton Symphony Orchestra will develop and enact a formalized plan for equity, diversity, and inclusion efforts. The EDI plan will become par t of the larger strategic plan, which will guide the organization forward in the years ahead. Board members, staff, and musicians will continue to engage in shared learning opportunities and discussion through the EDI Task Force and external trainings and workshops. The Catalyst Fund has made a strong impact on the field, with several orchestras receiving multiple grants over three years to sustain their work. Since its launch in 2019, 76 Catalyst Fund grants were awarded to 49 orchestras of all sizes and types, each demonstrating a strong commitment and dedication to EDI work and an increased awareness that systemic change requires a

REFINED INTERIORS

HELPING FAMILIES AT HOME SINCE 1991 eastridgedesign.com | (609) 921-2827 342 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ

sustained effort over time. More than 80% of first-year grantees reported making either policy or programming changes as a result of their funded work, with most engaging board and musicians alongside staff. EDI practitioners are central to The Catalyst Fund grant program, helping orchestras implement a range of organizational development activities involving musicians, staff, board, and, in some cases, volunteers and community leaders. These include anti-bias trainings, institutional audits, the creation of formal EDI plans, and work to build consensus and integrate EDI into mission statements and culture. Community building is also a key component of the program. The Catalyst Fund Learning Cohort, made possible by the support of the Paul M. Angell Family Foundation, enables past and present grantees to interact with colleagues through remote and (pre-pandemic) in-person convenings, peer learning, and a dedicated web-based forum. Applications were reviewed by an independent panel of EDI experts and practitioners in the arts and orchestral fields.

Capital Philharmonic Performs In Trenton’s Cadwalader Park

On Saturday, May 29 at 4 p.m., the Capital Philharmonic of New Jersey (CPNJ) will perform at the Pavilion just down the hill from Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum, in Cadwalader Park. The concert is in honor of Memorial Day. The result of a partnership between the orchestra and the City’s Department of Recreation, Natural Resources and Culture, it is the second outdoor performance held at the Pavilion. It will feature works by Aaron Copland, John Philip Sousa, John Williams, and local “bad-boy” composer George Antheil. In a link to the Women Artists exhibition taking place at Ellarslie, CPNJ Music Director Daniel Spalding will conduct Dances in the Canebreaks, a work by Florence Price, the first African American woman recognized as a composer of classical music in the United States. The concert is expected to last about one hour. CPNJ will also offer a preview announcement of its eighth season that is planned to begin at the War Memorial in October. Admission to the CPNJ concert is free but donations are accepted. Guests are encouraged to bring a lawn chair or blanket for seating. Appropriate pandemic safety guidelines will be enforced. To expand the experience, concertgoers might consider bringing a picnic early dinner. CPNJ has paired up with Taste Trenton to develop a list of area restaurants that will prepare a picnic repast for the concert. Visit TasteTrenton. com/PicnicLunch for a list of restaurants.

JUNCTION BARBER SHOP

33 Princeton-Hightstown Rd Ellsworth’s Center (Near Train Station)

799-8554 Tues-Fri: 10am-6pm; Sat 8:30am-3:30pm


P r i n ce ton Un ive r s it y’s Lewis Center for the Arts has named Lecturer in Theater Elena Araoz, an awardwinning theater and opera director, writer, and actor, as producing artistic director of the Theater and Music Theater Season.

Elena Araoz In this new position, Araoz will oversee all aspects of realizing a growing and diverse season of productions, workshops, and new play development readings, while Director of the Program in Theater Jane Cox, who previously also managed this portfolio, refocuses her attention on expanding and clarifying curricular needs and building collaborative partnerships both on-campus and in the larger theater community. The position will also work in collaboration with the Program in Music Theater, directed by Stacy Wolf. Araoz begins her new position in the fall. “Elena has brought her brilliance and creativity to the theaters, classrooms, and virtual stages of Princeton Universit y for f ive years,” said Cox. “In this new position she will be able to make a broader contribution to the Lewis Center.” In addition to teaching, Araoz works internationally, off-Broadway, and across the country, including her upcoming productions of the national tour of Sugar Skull! A Day of the Dead musical, which will begin another 30-city tour when safe; the new opera I Am A Dreamer Who No Longer Dreams ; The Migration Plays at McCarter Theatre, and several other works. She will continue to teach courses in acting, directing, and theater-making in addition to her new duties at the Lewis Center. Visit arts.princeton.edu for more information.

The Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University has announced more than $129,000 in awards to support the summer projects and research of 56 Princeton undergraduates. Although all first-, second-, and third-year studentartists are eligible to apply, for many of the award recipients the funding provides vital resources to conduct research, undertake training, and pursue other opportunities critical to achieving their senior thesis project goals in the arts. The grants range from $160 to $7,500. Each year, many student proposals typically include traveling domestically or internationally and learning in-person with professional artists or through intensive group workshops. Beginning last spring at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and continuing this year, students have had to revise their plans in response to various restrictions. Many student proposals incorporate several alternate plans for meeting their objectives, including a variety of options depending upon public health policies and guidelines this summer. Among those receiving funding are Silma Berrada, Dylan Fox, and Amanda Kural, who have been selected for the Alex Adam ’07 Award. Established in memory of Alexander Jay Adam ’07 and made possible by a generous gift from his family, the award provides $7,500 in support to each of three Princeton undergraduates who will spend a summer pursuing a project that will result in the creation of new artistic work. While a student at Princeton, Alex Adam pursued artistic interests in creative writing and theater. Joyce Carol Oates, his creative writing professor, praised his work as “sharp-edged, unexpectedly corrosive and very funny.” He was also an actor and performed with the Princeton Shakespeare Company, Theatre Intime, and the Program in Theater. For more information and a full list of students, visit arts.princeton.edu.

Submissions Being Accepted For Environmental Film Festival

Film submissions for the fall session of the 2021 Princeton Environmental Film Festival ( PEFF) are being accepted t hrough July 30. The session will be held October 12-17 with

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

Elena Aroaz Named Lewis Center Awards Grants Producing Artistic Director For Summer Projects, Research

MORE DIGITAL DANCE: The Pennsylvania Ballet concludes its virtual spring season May 27-June 2 with three world premieres, all to music by contemporary composer Jennifer Higdon. Pictured is “Spillway” by Meredith Rainey. Also on the program are works by Russell Ducker and Juliano Nunes. Tickets are $25. Visit paballet.org. screenings presented on a streaming platform. Live events may be included if restrictions on public gatherings are lifted. PEFF is a signature Princeton Public Library event featuring films and filmmaker presentations which explore our relationship with the natural world, environmental justice, climate change, sustainability practices, and other environmental concerns. The Princeton Environmental Film Festival is under the direction of Susan Conlon and Kim Dorman, whose focus is to present films with local, regional, and international relevance, and engage the community in exploring environmental sustainability from a variety of angles and perspectives. Screenings are free and made possible through funding from the Church & Dwight Employee Giving Fund, The Whole Earth Center of Princeton, and others. An entry form is available at princetonlibrary.org/peff along with additional information about the festival. There is no fee to submit a film for consideration.

Virtual Start-up Partners With McCarter Theatre

Bard at the Gate, one of the break-out play series borne of last year’s lockdown, will return for an additional two seasons starting this fall when Paula Vogel’s vir tual star t-up par tners with McCarter Theatre Center, it has been announced by Vogel and Sarah Rasmussen, artistic director of the McCarter Theatre Center. Plays by Zakiyyah Alexander (How to Raise a Freeman), Jose Rivera (Sonnets for an Old Century and Christina Anderson Good Goods) w ill be featured during the 2021-22 season. A total of eight plays will be digitally produced and streamed in the 2021-22

and 2022-23 seasons. The newly formed collaboration will be celebrated with a repeat airing of Eisa Davis’s play Bulrusher on Thursday, June 3 at 8 p.m., followed by a Q&A with Davis, Vogel, and Valer ie Cur tis New ton, ar tistic director for The Hansberry Project. The Vimeo stream will be available through June 9. For reservations to stream and to register for the Q&A, visit mccarter.org/bard or bardatthegate.org. (Donations are suggested to benefit future productions.) Directed by Eisa Davis, the cast includes Andre Holland, Kara Young, Tanis Parenteau, Sydney Elisabeth, Edmund Donovan, and Corey Stoll. Jhanaë Bonnick is stage manager and Sue Slagle is the video artist. Vogel u nder took B ard at the Gate when theaters shut down, recognizing the opportunity to fill the void with some of the overlooked and underappreciated plays, in par ticular by BIPOC, women, LGBTQI A+, and disabled writers with whom she had become familiar as a teacher of playwriting. The four plays presented as readings in 2020 drew audience members in excess of 11,000. While Bard at the Gate’s mission to contribute to a new standard of works produced by American theaters remains in place, the series has grown. It is now co-curated by Vogel, and

Nicole A. Watson, associate artistic director for McCarter Theater Center. “For so long, theater has peered through an ‘only if it’s a premiere’ or ‘only if it’s proven’ lens,” said Rasmussen. “With Bard, we are discovering stunning plays and giving them new life, as well as breaking down barriers of who has access. This past year we have learned so much about making and sharing virtual theater. Our Adrienne Kennedy Festival brought so many to her work for the first time. Accessibility is a priority at McCarter that Bard at the Gate directly addresses.”

Arts Ed NJ Gets Grant For Expansion Project

Ar ts Ed NJ has been approved for a $99,000 Grant for the Arts Projects award to support ARTS ED NOW. This project will support the expansion of the ARTS ED NOW campaign to support and strengthen arts education across New Jersey as the state emerges from the COVID-19 Pandemic. Arts Ed NJ’s project is among the more than 1,100 projects across America totaling nearly $27 million that were selected during this second round of Grants for Arts Projects fiscal year 2021 funding. “As the country and the arts sector begin to imagine returning to a post-pandemic world, the National Endowment for the Arts is proud to announce

funding that will help arts organizations such as Arts Ed NJ reengage fully with partners and audiences,” said NEA Acting Chairman Ann Eilers. “Although the arts have sustained many during the pandemic, the chance to gather with one another and share arts experiences is its own necessity and pleasure.” “We are excited that for the sixth year in a row the National Endowment for the Arts has recognized the important role of Arts Ed NJ and the ARTS ED NOW campaign to support arts education for all New Jersey students,” said Robert Morrison, Arts Ed NJ director. “As the state begins to emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic, the role of arts education in the development of our students will be more important than ever.” ARTS ED NOW is a statewide public action initiative dedicated to expanding access to, and participation in, quality arts education for all students throughout New Jersey. This project will empower educators and citizens with arts education data and local activation strategies, expand statewide public awareness/support, and implement policies and professional development to achieve the campaign goals. These include universal access to arts education, addressing diversity, equity, and inclusion through culturally responsive pedagogy and embedding social-emotional learning into arts education. Visit artsednow.org for more information.

Westminster Conservatory of Music A MUSICAL UTOPIA FOR STUDENTS OF ALL AGES Private lessons and remote instruction for all skill levels RIDER.EDU/CONSERVATORY

DESIGN. EXPERTISE. STYLE. 195 Nassau Street, Suite 25, Princeton NJ 08542 609.977.5872 • www.fredahoward.design


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 20

Art

“SMALL WORLD COFFEE ON NASSAU STREET”: This work by Ryan Lilienthal is part of “Art Speaks,” a gallery show of paintings and photographs by Art+10 area artists. The exhibition will be on view at Small World Coffee, 104 Witherspoon Street, June 2 through July 5.

“Art Speaks” Exhibit Coming to Small World

“Art Speaks,” a gallery show of paintings and photographs, opens Tuesday, June 2 at Small World Coffee, 104 Witherspoon Street. The show by Art+10’s area artists covers a broad range of subjects using narrative and abstract art forms. Narrative ar t is distinguished from other genres in its ability to tell a story across diverse cultures. Narrative works in the show include Ryan Lilienthal’s painting “Small World Coffee on Nassau Street.” It depicts patron John Conway, the renowned mathematician, who died from COVID. Lilienthal says, “It speaks for those who can no longer share their voice.” Heather Barros’ said of her “Sea Gulls” painting, “… when art speaks … each of us hears a different story,” and fairy tales inspired Betty Curtiss’ “Big Bad Little Red.” Other works use abstraction to evoke ideas and emotion. A mixed media work by Gail Bracegirdle suggests an artist’s pallet. Jane Zamost’s sun painting was inspired by Ernest Hemingway and Phyllis Wright uses a blast of color in a painting from her COVID-19 series, while a digital print by photographer Deborah Land employs shadows to form shapes. These works can be seen at Small World in its “Walk

Thru Gallery” during business hours. The show runs through July 5, and all work is for sale. Art+10 is a collective of working artists. Participating in “Art Speaks” are Gail Bracegirdle, Ryan Lilienthal, Deborah Land, Phyllis Wright, Jane Zamost, Betty Curtiss, Heather Barros, and Katja Reutyer. For more infor mation, call (609) 924-4377 or visit smallworldcoffee.com.

Flemington Fine Artisans Show at Stangl Factory

The Flemington Fine Artisans Show returns to Stangl Factory, 4 Stangl Road in Flemington, on Sunday and Monday, May 30-31, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The event will follow current COVID-19 guidelines. The curated show and sale will feature a selection of 25 local artists bringing work in jewelry, ceramics, glass, home décor, fiber art, garden metalwork, photography, painting, and more. The show will feature a mix of the artists who have been with them before and those new to the show. The historic Stangl Factory is full of character and is perfect for the artisan show, providing a beautiful setting for displaying things made by hand. Flemington Fine Artisans Show is dedicated to growing the local arts and crafts

scene by featuring high quality and distinctive value. The show is free and open to the public. Free parking. For more information, visit F l e m i n g ton F i n e A r t i s a n s Show.com.

Artworks to Receive $25K Our Town Grant from NEA

Artworks, Trenton’s visual arts nonprofit, has been approved for a $25,000 National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Our Town grant to support the establishment of a public art program in Tr e n to n i n p a r t n e r s h i p with the City of Trenton and world-renowned public art organization Mural Arts Philadelphia. The NEA funding is one of 63 grants nationwide that the agency has approved to support projects that integrate arts, culture, and design activities into efforts that strengthen communities by advancing local economic, physical, and/or social outcomes; ultimately laying the groundwork for sustainable systems change. “As the country and the arts sector begin to work towards a post-pandemic world, the National Endowment for the Arts is proud to announce this Our Town funding,” said NE A Acting Chairman Ann Eilers. “These awards will support cross-sector partnerships such as the one lead by Artworks Trenton Inc. that demonstrate the power of the arts to help communities create a better future for themselves.” “Artworks is incredibly excited to be receiving an NEA Our Town grant to develop a formal public art program for Trenton,” said Artworks Executive Director Lauren Otis. “Trenton already has a great legacy of public art and many exciting current projects underway, but this funding will enable us to establish a mechanism for the ongoing creation of community-based and communityfocused public art. With the support of Mayor Reed Gusciora and his administration, and the expertise of Mural Arts Philadelphia, this project will help improve the lives of residents throughout Trenton and literally change the face of the city.” “This is great news for the Capital City arts

community,” said Gusciora. “In Trenton we have the celebrated Art All Night festivities as well as other local art venues that add to the city’s landscape. It is hoped with continued NEA support we will see more flourishing artists among our residential byways.” In 2011, Artworks worked with Mural Arts Philadelphia and other partners on the creation of Philip Adams’ “Passage of Time” mural along Route 129 in Trenton’s South Ward. In recent years, Artworks has executed numerous other public art projects in Trenton with multiple community partners, and is actively planning several new projects at present. The creation of a public art program for Trenton will enable Artworks to move beyond a piecemeal, individual project-based approach and engage residents throughout the city on planning community-driven art projects in areas of the city beyond downtown. After the establishment of the program, benefiting from MAP’s expertise and best practices, Ar tworks will commence planning for public art projects in each of Trenton’s four wards. For more information on the projects included in the Arts Endowment grant announcement, visit arts.gov/ news. For more about Artworks, visit artworkstrenton. org.

“OBI”: This piece by Ellen Ramsey is featured in “Weaving ReImagined: At the Intersection of Tradition and Creativity,” a group exhibition on view through July 18 at the New Hope Arts Center in New Hope, Pa.

Area Exhibits Check websites for infor-

mation on safety protocols. New Hope Arts Center A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Spotlights Fine Art Weaving

New Hope Arts Center at 2 Stockton Avenue in New Hope, Pa., now presents “Weaving Re-Imagined: At the Intersection of Tradition and Creativity,” an invitational group exhibition examining a variety of current approaches to traditional weaving techniques. On view through July 18, the exhibition features work by Janet Austin, Rita R. Gekht, Michelle Lester, Bojana Leznicki, Denise Marshall, Ellen Ramsey, Michael F. Rohde, Carol K. Russell, Mary-Ann Sievert, Natalya Smirnova, Rebecca Smith, Armando Sosa, and Betty Vera. The gallery is open to visitors Friday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m., by appointment. Appointments can be scheduled in advance by calling (215) 862-9606. One of the earliest human technologies, weaving has evolved as a fine art medium that is continually being reinvented by contemporary artists. It remains a “slow” art form: typically made by hand, usually in isolation, and often in a state of relative meditation. Weaving is a vital part of every culture. It tells a story. It evokes many senses. It reaches out to us with more questions than answers. This collection of works invites the viewer to explore, feel, and relate to the process of creation even if specific techniques remain beyond comprehension. From flat tapestries to three-dimensional work, the textures and complexities of this medium will intrigue, and viewers will enjoy the richness and imagination demonstrated by these masters of their craft. “Weaving Re-Imagined” was curated by tapestry artist Rita Romanova Gekht, founder and owner of Rita’s Dream Weaving Studio in Lambertville.

Br idge Street, L amber tville, has “Origin of Wonder” through June 6. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Arts Council of Prince to n , 102 Wit herspoon Street, has “Leslie V. Kuenne: A Life in Art” through June 19. Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. artscouncilofprinceton. org. D & R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place, has t he ongoi ng virtual galleries “Trail of Breadcr umbs : Nat ure in Fairytales” and “Portraits of Preservation: James Fiorentino Art.” The center is currently closed to the public. drgreenway.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Mu s e u m i n C ad w a lad e r Park, Park s ide Avenu e, Trenton, has “Women Artists, Trenton Style” through June 6. Visit ellarslie.org for museum hours and timed entry tickets. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Rebirth: Kang Muxiang,” “Bruce Beasley: Sixty Year Retrospective, 19602020,” and other exhibits. Hours are Thursday through Monday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. T imed t ickets requ ired. groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “A Virtual Tour of Hamilton’s Princeton” and the “Histor y @ Home” ser ies. princetonhistory.org. Hunterdon Art Museum, 7 Lower Center Street, Clinton, has “Our Environment” and “Print+” through September 5. hunterdonartmuseum.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown,

Pa., has “Essential Work 2020: A Community Portrait” through July 11 and “Through the Lens: Modern Photography in the Delaware Valley” through August 15. The museum is open to the public. michenerartmuseum.org. Mercer Museum, 84 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Measurement Rules” and “Magn i f i c e nt M e a s u r e s ! T h e Hausman-Hill Collection of Calculating Instruments” through September 6. mercermuseum.org. M or p e t h C o n te m p o rary, 43 West Broad Street, Hopewell, has “Candid in May” through May 31. morpethcontemporary.com. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “In Nature’s Realm : The Art of Gerard Rutgers Hardenberg” through January 9 and the online exhibit “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints Of New Jersey, 1761–1898.” Open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. morven.org. New Hope Arts Center, 2 Stockton Avenue, New Hope, Pa., has “Weaving Re-Imagined: At the Intersection of Tradition and Creativ it y” through July 18. Gallery hours are Friday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m., by appointment. newhopearts.org. Pr inceton Universit y Art Museum has the online exhibits “Looking at 17th -Century Dutch Painting,” “Life Magazine and the Power of Photography,” “The Eclectic Eye: A Tribute to Duane Wilder,” and more, along w it h many online events. The museum is currently closed to the public. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Small World Coffee, 104 Witherspoon Street, has “Art Speaks,” a gallery show of paintings and photographs, June 2 through July 5. smallworldcoffee. com. We s t W i n d s o r A r t s C e n te r, 952 A lexander Road, West Windsor, has “Facult y Student Show,” online through July 9. westwindsorarts.org.


Wednesday, May 26 6-7 p.m.: “Henry Chapman Mercer: A Legacy Built in Concrete.” Virtual lecture from Bucks County Historical Society, $5-$10. Mercermuseum.org. Thursday, May 27 9-10:30 a.m.: BW NICE (Business Women Networking Involving Charity and Education) Mercer County Chapter holds a panel discussion on key business practices at an online networking meeting. $5. bwnicemercer@gmail.com. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 6 p.m.: The PSO Brass Quintet performs America the Beautiful at Morven on the Poolhouse lawn. Princetonsymphony.org. 6 p.m.: “Ask Us: Chromebooks.” Learn about the Princeton Public Library’s Chromebook-lending service, plus tips on use. Virtual event. Princetonlibrary. org. 7: 30 p.m. : Fr iends of Princeton Nursery Lands Program: “We’re Back! The Emergence of the Brood X Periodical Cicadas.” Professor George Hamilton of Rutgers University will speak about the emergence of the 17-year cicadas. To register, contact karenlinder@fpnl. org or call (609) 683-0483. Friday, May 28 2 p.m.: “The Princeton Print Club”; webinar discussion with expert curators presented by Princeton University Library. Free. Libcal. princeton.edu. Saturday, May 29 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Communit y Far mers Market, Princeton Junction. Enter at 877 Alexander Road through the Vaughn lot. 17 farms and 20 artisan food makers. Wwfm.org. 9:45 a.m.: Job Seekers Session: “Preparing for the ‘Bot’ Interview,” with Alex Freund. Virtual event. Princetonlibrary.org. 10 a.m.-6 p.m.: NJ Renaissance Faire, rain or shine, at Liberty Lake, 1195 Florence-Columbus Road, Bordentown. $10-$25. NJRenFaire.com. 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m.: Haying and Hayrides, Howell Farm, 70 Woodens Lane, Lambertville.Learn how to make hay the old fashioned way and take free hayrides around the farm. Masks required. Free. (609) 737-3299. 11: 30 a.m. : S pi r it of Princeton Memorial Day Commemoration Ceremony at Monument Hall. Spiritofprinceton.org. 4 p.m.: New Jersey Capital Philharmonic performs a free concert at Cadwalader Park pavilion, Trenton. Rain date is May 30. Bring chairs or blankets and masks. Capitalphilharmonic.org. 4 p.m.: Newman and Oltman Guitar Duo perform at the Raritan River Music Festival. RaritanRiverMusic. org. Sunday, May 30 10 a.m.-4 p.m.: Flemington Fine Artisans Show at Stangl Factor y, 4 Stangl Road, Flemington. Curated show and sale featuring 25 local artists in jewelry,

P re s e nte d by L aw re n c e Headquar ters Branch of Mercer County Library System. Email hopeprogs @ mcl.org to register. Friday, June 4 6-7 p.m.: Adaptive Outdoor Bingo at Princeton Community Pool, 380 Witherspoon Street. Free socially distanced event sponsored by Princeton Special Sports and Programs and other organizations. Masks are required. Register at pssnj. org by June 1. Saturday, June 5 8 a.m.-2 p.m.: Household waste collection and electronics recycling. For Mercer County residents, at Dempster Fire School, 350 Lawrence Station Road. Mcianj. org or (609) 278-8086. 9 a.m.: “Moving for Mutts” f u n d r a is er for A m a z i ng Mut ts Puppy Rescue, at MarketFair, West Windsor. 90-minute sampler class of kickboxing, Les Mills Core and yoga flow. Also, kids’ Hula Hoopla. Presented by Athleta Princeton and Apart Together in Motion. $25 minimum donation. Register at atinmotion.punchpass. com/classes/8206030. 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Communit y Far mers Market, Princeton Junction. Enter at 877 Alexander Road through the Vaughn lot. 17 farms and 20 artisan food makers. Wwfm.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Pop-Up Kids’ Book Sale at Princeton Shopping Center, rain or shine. Masks are required. Spons ored by t he Br y n Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale. bmandwbooks.com. 10 a.m.-6 p.m.: NJ Renaissance Faire, rain or shine, at Liberty Lake, 1195 Florence-Columbus Road, Bordentown. $10-$25. NJRenFaire.com. 5-7 p.m.: Princeton Community Pride Picnic, free event at Princeton Family YMCA, 59 Paul Robeson Place. Music, art, activities for kids, and more. Artscouncilofprinceton.org. Sunday, June 6 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Pop-Up Kids’ Book Sale at Princeton Shopping Center, rain or shine. Masks are required. Spons ored by t he Br y n Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale. bmandwbooks.com. 10 a.m.-6 p.m.: NJ Renaissance Faire, rain or shine,

at Liberty Lake, 1195 Florence-Columbus Road, Bordentown. $10-$25. NJRenFaire.com. 11 a.m.: The Liam Sutcliffe Combo performs in front of LiLLiPiES Bakery at Princeton Shopping Center as part of a summer Jazz Brunch series. Free. 4 p.m.: Moroccan Sheepherders perform at McCarter Concerts in Palmer Square. Free. Monday, June 7 Recycling Thursday, June 10 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 10 a . m . : W o m e n o f Achievement Awards, virtually presented by the Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber to Erin Klebaur, Amita Mehta, Dr. Nicole McGrath Barnes, and Dr. Deborah Mican. $30-$40. Princetonmercer.org. 7 p.m.: Rep. Ro Khanna speaks at the Coalition for Peace Action’s 40 th anniversary membership gathering, via Zoom. Peacecoalition. org. 7 p.m . : S c r e e n i n g of Monty P ython and the Holy Grail, at Cherry Grove Farm, in partnership with Princeton Garden Theatre. Cheeses and ice cream will be available. Princetongardentheatre.org. Saturday, June 12 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Communit y Far mers Market, Princeton Junction. Enter at 877 Alexander Road through the Vaughn lot. 17 farms and 20 artisan food makers. Wwfm.org. 11:30 a.m.-2 :30 p.m.: “Art on the Plaza,” presented by the Princeton Artist Directory, a newly formed collective of visual artists, musicians, writers, and performance artists, at Hinds Plaza. Rain date is June 13. Princetonartistdirectory. com. 12-5 p.m.: Old Mill Hill Society’s 30 th Annual Garden Tour, in Mill Hill district of Trenton. $20. Visit trentonmillhill.org/events to purchase and get more information. Sunday, June 13 4 p.m.: Random Test Reggae performs at McCarter Concerts in Palmer Square. Free.

5 -7 p.m. : “C om e a n d Whine,” outdoor storytelling and wine tasting event presented by West Windsor Arts. $25. Westwindsorarts. org. Wednesday, June 16 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meeting. Princetonlibrary. org. Thursday, June 17 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 6:30 p.m.: “The Stocktons and the Civil War Amendments.” Historian /author John Baxter is lecturer. $10 (free for members). Virtual program. Morven.org. 7 p . m . : “ Wo m e n o n Wheels : Bicycling in the Gilded Age.” Virtual Event presented by author Ellen Gruber Garvey, sponsored by Lawrence Headquarters Branch of Mercer County Library System. Email hopeprogs@mcl.org to register. Saturday, June 19 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Communit y Far mers Market, Princeton Junction. Enter at 877 Alexander Road through the Vaughn lot. 17 farms and 20 artisan food makers. Wwfm.org. Sunday, June 20 11 a.m.: QPK Trio performs in front of LiLLiPiES Bakery at Princeton Shopping Center as part of a summer Jazz Brunch series. Free. 4 p.m. Ritmo Caliente performs at McCarter Concerts in Palmer Square. Free. 4 p.m.: “30 Myths About Jane Austen,” webinar presented by Princeton University Library, with Claudia Johnson and Clara Tuite. Register at libcal.princeton.edu. Monday, June 21 Recycling Thursday, June 24 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. Friday, June 25 6 p.m.: Concert tribute to The Four Seasons, organized and performed by New Jersey youth to raise funds for NAMI of Mercer County and the Washington Crossing Open Air Theater, which is the venue. Visit tjbconcert.square.site for tickets and information.

Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton NEW PRODUCTS ADDED WEEKLY!

www.princetonmagazinestore.com

Saturday, June 26 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Communit y Far mers Market, Princeton Junction. Enter at 877 Alexander Road through the Vaughn lot. 17 farms and 20 artisan food makers. Wwfm.org. 6 p.m.: Concert tribute to The Four Seasons, organized and performed by New Jersey youth to raise funds for NAMI of Mercer County and the Washington Crossing Open Air Theater, which is the venue. Visit tjbconcert.square.site for tickets and information. Sunday, June 27 3 p.m.: Concert tribute to The Four Seasons, organized and performed by New Jersey youth to raise funds for NAMI of Mercer County and the Washington Crossing Open Air Theater, which is the venue. Visit tjbconcert.square.site for tickets and information Thursday, July 1 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. Saturday, July 3 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Communit y Far mers Market, Princeton Junction. Enter at 877 Alexander Road through the Vaughn lot. 17 farms and 20 artisan food makers. Wwfm.org. Monday, July 5 Recycling Thursday, July 8 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. Saturday, July 10 9 a . m .-1 p . m . : We s t Windsor Community Farmers Market, Princeton Junction. Enter at 877 A lexander Road t hrough t he Vaughn lot. 17 farms and 20 ar tisan food makers. Wwfm.org. Thursday, July 15 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. Saturday, July 17 9 a . m .-1 p . m . : We s t Windsor Community Farmers Market, Princeton Junction. Enter at 877 A lexander Road t hrough t he Vaughn lot. 17 farms and 20 ar tisan food makers. Wwfm.org.

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

Calendar

ceramics, glass, home décor, fiber art, garden metalwork, photography, painting, and more. 10 a.m.-6 p.m.: NJ Renaissance Faire, rain or shine, at Liberty Lake, 1195 Florence-Columbus Road, Bordentown. $10-$25. NJRenFaire.com. 1-3 p.m.: Free warm vegetarian lunches distributed at the YMCA, 59 Paul Robeson Place, outside by the playground. Sponsored by Princeton Bhakti Vedanta Institute, for COVID relief. Bviscs.org. 1-3 p.m.: Princeton Battlefield Society Memorial Weekend event, Battlefield State Park, 500 Mercer Road. Memorial w reathl a y i n g c e r e m o n y, u s e d American history book sale, musket-firing demonstration, battlefield tour, general store. Pbs1777.org. 4 p.m. The Jeiris Cook Trio performs at McCarter Concerts in Palmer Square. Free. Thursday, June 3 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 11 a.m.: Free one-hour forum on how to take advantage of New Jersey’s initiatives to help residents pay utility bills. Register by 5 p.m. June 1 by emailing Assemblyman Andrew Zwicker at asmZwicker@njleg.org. 12 p.m.: Virtual monthly membership luncheon networking event, presented by the Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber. Princetonmercer.org. 1 p.m.: Navigating Resources for Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder, presented by The Lawrence Headquarters Branch of Mercer County Library System. Virtual event. Email hopeprogs@mcl.org to register. 6 p.m.: James Popik and the Supernova Band perform jazz at a fundraiser for the Sourland Conservancy. Can be attended live or virtually. $10-$25 suggested donation. Visit www.tiny. cc/SCHappyHour for registration and location. 6 - 8 p. m . : I n P a l m e r Square, “Beagles Do Beatles” free Beatles tribute concert. With horns, keyboards, and special guests. Palmersquare.com. 6:30 p.m.: “A Proud Heritage: The African American Presence and Contribution in the Sourland Mountain Region and Surrounding Area,” virtual talk led by historians Elaine Buck and Beverly Mills, co-sponsored by Congregation Beth Chaim, Har Sinai Temple, Flemington Jewish Community Center, and Congregation Kehilat Shalom. Suggested donation is $18 per household but all are welcome regardless of ability to pay. https://bit.ly/33wX301. 7 p.m.: Virtual “Eyes on Eagles” panel discussion w it h fo otage of e agle s’ nests, by Mercer County Park Commission. Focused on eagle behavior, biology, and conservation. Mercercountyparks.org. 7-8 p.m.: West Windsor Arts presents a virtual storytelling workshop, for ages 21 and up. Free to those who sign up for the June 12 storytelling event. Westwindsorarts.org. 7 p.m.: Poetr y Circle, discussion and readings.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 22

NEWLY PRICED

55 Bedens Brook Road, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Yael Zakut $1,399,990

210 Brooks Bend, Princeton Marketed by: Judith Stier $1,725,000

PRESENTING

PRESENTING

260 Fisher Place, West Windsor Twp Marketed by: Debra Foxx $415,000

86 Jamestown Road, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Kelley McCaffrey $574,999

PRESENTING

NEWLY PRICED

22 Simonson Lane, Hillsborough Twp Marketed by: Annabella “Ann” Santos $565,900

30 Slack Avenue, Lawrence Twp Marketed by: Eva Hsu $389,000

PRESENTING

From Princeton, We Reach the World.

156 Spring Hill Road, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Yael Zakut | $700,000

536 State Road, Princeton Marketed by: Yuen Li Huang |$1,175,500

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

From Princeton, We Reach the World. 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 Princeton Office Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com Princeton, NJ ||253 foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.


6 LITTLEBROOK DRIVE, PRINCETON Simply stunning, this classic yet contemporary style home sits on a beautiful wooded lot in one of Princeton’s premiere locations! Custom designed with a unique European flair, this home offers a meticulously appointed gourmet kitchen, six bedrooms, 5.1 baths, an exquisite library with rich mahogany custom built cabinetry, a master suite with double sided fireplace to sitting room, personal gym and walk out terrace. There is also a first floor bedroom with full bath, a large and fully finished basement with music room, office, very spacious recreation room with wet bar, a full bath and lots of storage. Prime location. Yes, Littlebrook section of Carnassa Park... Architect Bill Feinman and custom built by Princeton Design Guild. The highest quality craftsmanship abounds throughout the home and there are so many upgrades, too numerous to mention. The outside of the home has been freshly painted. Please call for a private showing & please view online as well @ https://mls.homejab.com/property/view/6-littlebrook-rd-princeton-nj-08540-usa. Offered at $2,399,000

Eva Petruzziello

CRS, ALHS, SRES Sales Associate, REALTOR® 609-683-8549 Direct 609-865-3696 Mobile

Roberta Parker

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ 08540 | 609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

Sales Associate, REALTOR® 609-915-0206 Mobile roberta.parker@foxroach.com robertasellsprinceton.com

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

A PEACEFUL OASIS IN A PARK-LIKE SETTING!


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 24

Princeton Strong Town Topics

Princeton Organizations and Businesses Are Ready For Good News This Summer Having a great lunch or dinner at your favorite restaurant — indoors or outdoors. Actually going into the library and being there as long as you need or want to. Ta k i n g a g u i d e d tou r through town and reliving Princeton history firsthand. Enjoying that invigorating swim in the Community Pool on a hot day — and so much more! P r i n c e to n i s o p e n i n g again! These are just some of the activities and experiences everyone is looking forward to as the Princeton community begins to approach what we all took for granted as “normal.” After a long, hard year, glimpses of light are appearing at the end of that dark tunnel. As COVID cases decrease, and more people are vaccinated, perhaps hope really is around the corner! COVID Challenge Certainly, increasing numbers of people are out and about, enjoying the warm weather, attending events, shopping in stores, eating in restaurants, happy being together. As the town opens up, Mayor Mark Freda is hoping for the best. Aware of the continuing challenges, he is proud of the way Princeton

residents, restaurants, and businesses of all kinds met the COVID challenge. “The willingness of so many people to come together and work together to find ways to support each other has been amazing,” he says. Freda looks forward to the Council and community members continuing to work together as more and more establishments open, and state regulations ease in the days ahead. He also anticipates more changes and updates in the case of infrastructure, outdoor dining, curbside pickup, landscaping, lighting, and the like. “Princeton will continue to follow the governor’s executive orders concerning COVID. Recently, the mask-wearing zone signs were removed around the Witherspoon dining areas. The Council has been very proactive in taking steps to support our business community, and those efforts will continue. The Health Department has offered a number of local and/or popup vaccine clinics, and those will continue. We will look for ways to open up all aspects of the community in a reasonable and safe manner. For example, the municipal buildings partially reopened recently.

“At the moment, the indoor mask mandate from the state is still in place, and it makes sense. So we urge people to follow that. For outdoor situations, in most cases, those who are vaccinated are no longer required to wear a mask, but this is still a matter of choice for many. For unvaccinated people, mask-wearing is still the best practice.” Future Changes The changes on Witherspoon Street, which eliminated a number of parking spaces to provide room for tables and curbside pickup, have been very popular, and the Council will be determining future changes, adds Freda. “We are discussing and hop ef u l ly f i na l i z i ng t he overall design/layout of the upper Witherspoon Street project at our next Council meeting. Witherspoon will be one-way from Nassau Street to Spring Street. A lot of effort has gone into studying this and making a number of related changes in the overall area to help keep traffic moving.” “When traffic was lighter, Witherspoon Street worked OK with the one-way flow, the curbside pick-up areas, etc.,” he continues. “As traffic has returned to heavier volumes, the need to make

more changes became clear and a nu mber of t hos e changes began on May 24. They are all aimed at making the Witherspoon experience more pleasant for everyone using the street.” This includes looking into new lighting and landscaping as well, he reports. Also, as outdoor dining was such a success, other outdoor opportunities are b eing plan ne d t hrough out town. “Palmer Square is hosting events, and the Princeton Shopping Center is hosting events, so there should be plenty of opportunities for people to enjoy themselves around tow n this summer,” said Freda. “I look forward to seeing more people in town, more people shopping, eating, walking or biking around town. This opening has come at a great time for people to engage each other and to find out how to be socially active again.” He adds, however, that vigilance and care are still very important. “We all need to keep in mind that many of our neighbors still face, and will continue to face, food insecurity, housing challenges, employment issues, and other needs that we should all continue to help with. The problems caused by COVID are not going to disappear overnight.” Popular Outings Getting around town and sharing the experience with

others is a major goal of Mimi Omiecinski, founder and owner of the Princeton Tour Company. Offering year-round guided tours and events in Princeton, the company is set to get started on a new year of its popular outings. “We haven’t given the tours for 16 months,” says Omiecinski. “Now, we do feel very optimistic going forward. There is so much pent-up demand to explore our gorgeous University and town. We can’t wait to get back to showing it off.” An enthusiastic supporter and ambassador for Princeton, Omiecinski and her guides lead a variety of tours through town, focusing on different areas and themes. Who wouldn’t enjoy seeing the houses and hang-outs of Albert Einstein, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Paul Robeson, Woodrow Wilson, James Madison, Jimmy Steward, and T.S. Eliot? Also, those of Nobel and Pulitzer Prize winners, historic Revolutionary War sites, eerie haunted spots around town — and more. Among the most popular tours are Saturday Shameless Name Dropping Walking Tour, Ghost Hunt & Cemetery Visits, and the wintertime Holiday Trolley Tours, reports Omiecinski. “Also, our Princeton Battlefield Leadership Experience, custom Scavenger Hunts, and Super Secret C-Suite events are very popular with

corporate groups.” All Ages T he fact that all ages find the tours entertaining and enlightening especially pleases her. “For younger participants, we make sure they ‘help’ in delivering the tour. All of the guides are parents or trained educators who live, work, and play in Princeton so we’re all in love with our town, and we welcome the challenge of winning over any guest who may have been reluctant in the beginning.” The enthusiasm is contagious, she adds, and seeing everyone out enjoying themselves is what she eagerly anticipates. “Hav i ng t he re s ident s honk, wave, and yell when we walk around town is wonderful. I can’t wait to see this again. Our customers adore it, and it highlights what a truly sweet, supportive community we get to call home. “I must say too that, during the virus, Princeton’s leaders, businesses, and residents operated beyond self-interest. Everyone did their part. I’ve never felt more proud of this town!” Community Pool More oppor t u n it ies to get out and get moving are available through the Princeton Recreation Depar tment. Residents will be glad to know that a wide variety of options for children and Continued on Page 26


Spring on the Square!

Fresh air never felt

so good!

Seasonal fashions | Lavish dining | Live entertainment It all lives here in our open air center.

LOCALS’ NIGHTS

SPRING MUSIC SERIES

MCCARTER CONCERT SERIES

EVERY THURSDAY

EVERY SATURDAY

SUNDAYS THROUGH JUNE 20TH

ENJOY OUR EXTENDED HOURS

STARTING AT 12PM

STARTING AT 4PM

Please continue to help keep our Square safe by wearing your mask

& practicing social distancing. Thank you.

For more information, please visit palmersquare.com/events & Download the Palmer Square App!

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

Nothing compares to


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 26

Princeton Strong Continued from Page 24

teens are offered this summer. “While we are not running our traditional full-day youth day camp or Teen Travel Camp this summer, we do have a large menu of options that includes basketball clinics, track and

running programs, skateboard clinics, and half-day sports programs (soccer, golf, lacrosse, f lag football, and multi-sport),” says Princeton Recreation Department Assistant Director Evan Moorhead. “In addition, we are offering the following youth programs: Magic, Girls’ Empowerment, Chess, Dance,

*Masks required. All CDC protols strictly followed.

Fairytale Theater Club, and Arts & Crafts Club. All programs will be held outdoors. Most programs give priority to Princeton residents in terms of registration and pricing, but when space is available, we do open to non-residents. Costs vary by program.” Swimmers can get ready for the Communit y Pool opening on May 29 for the three - day Memor ial Day weekend, he adds. “In 2020, public pools could not open until late June, which condensed the pool season. In 2021, we can return to our more normal operating season, which typically runs from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day. “Specifically, the pool will be open weekends only through Sunday, June 20. Starting Monday, the 21st, the pool will be open daily through Labor Day. The hours for public swim are 12:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on weekdays, and 11:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. on weekends and holidays. “This year, we are returning to a model that sells both seasonal pool memberships and allows daily admission. From an aquatic programming perspective, we are offering our Bluefish Swim/ Dive Team this summer, as well as youth swim lessons, our adult Deep Water exercise class, and two weeks of lifeguard cer tification classes.” The Recreation Department follows all guidelines from the New Jersey Department of Health concerning the operation of the pool, adds Moorhead. Specific 2021 guidelines have not been released yet.

“In 2020, we were required to limit daily capacity at the pool to no more t han 50 percent of our maximum occupancy. Also in 2020, daily public swim blocks were divided into two 135-minute sessions with 45 minutes in between to clear the complex and clean certain high-touch areas. With the return to a single, longer block of public swim time this year, there is a substantial increase in the total number of hours the pool is available and open to the public. Also, as of now, the concession stand will not be open. Tennis Courts The Community Park Tennis courts are open, and all programming and scheduling are available through the Princeton Tennis Program. Youth basketball clinics as well as men’s outdoor basketball league will be offered by Princeton Recreation, he adds, and all baseball programming for Pr inceton youth is scheduled through independent organizations such as Princeton Lit tle L eague, Pr inceton Babe Ruth, and the American Legion. “The Princeton Recreation Department is extremely optimistic for the upcoming summer,” says Moorhead. “L ast summer was quite a challenge as a result of the pandemic, and we had to pivot on short notice to adjust our programming options. From that experience, we learned a lot about how to operate programs safely in this environment, and it forced us to think creatively about new opportunities for residents.

“A s r e s t r i c t i o n s h av e r e l a xe d a n d g u i d e l i n e s change, it has allowed us to reintroduce some of the programming suspended due to COVID, which complements our newer opportunities. Looking ahead to this summer, the staff believes we have fantastic menu of options for Princeton youth and teens.” Digital Services Another great summer activity — which can be done just about anywhere, including in the hammock, at the beach, in the house, or in the library — is, of course, reading! For many months during the pandemic, the Princeton Public Library was closed, and programs and access to books was virtual. The Sands Library Building was closed for 166 days in 2020, from March 13 to August 26, says Princeton Public Librar y E xecutive Director Jennifer Podolsky, “We are very grateful that we immediately pivoted to enhance and promote our digital resources. Digital downloads and online class at tenda nce s oare d, and there was an almost 200 percent increase in the use of Brainfuse, our homework help and digital learning platform.” Podolsky is encouraged as she looks toward the days ahead. There is no question about what the library means to the reading public. “Prior to the pandemic, the Sands Library Building was open 72 hours a week. As of today, the building is open to the public 46 hours a week. In addition, we are offering seven extra hours

口水鸡 Shredded Chicken in Chili Oil

干锅牛腩 Dry Pot Beef Brisket

板栗红烧肉 Braised Pork with Chestnut

酸菜鱼 Spicy Sour Cabbage Fish

of hold pick-up at the back door. This service is very popular, and is offered during all our operating hours. We will continue to review hours of operation. What more people than ever have discovered is that a library is more than a building. We provide a wide range of services whether the building is open or closed. “We will continue to follow the science and the recommendations of the municipal Health Officer Jeff Grosser. Jeff has been a source of great advice since he knows our building inside and out, and understands the challenges of operating a public indoor space. We recently expanded our indoor capacity in line with state regulations, and will continue to do so. We have restored all services with the exception of study rooms and in-door rental spaces, which will remain closed until we receive further advice.” Many events will remain virtual until fall, including summer reading programs for children and adults, she adds. “We will also be doing a series of outdoor events, i n clu d i n g b o ok g r ou p s, movie screenings, and concerts at multiple venues in the community. We are the lead organization for the June 5 Pride Picnic at the YMCA, and will be presenting programs at the Princeton Shopping Center and on Palmer Square.” Response from the community about the library’s service during the virus has been exceptionally positive, Podolsky reports. “People were so grateful that we kept working to serve them. Continued on Page 28

SCHOUSE SZECHUAN CUISINE 238 Nassau Street, Princeton

Catering • Indoor Dining • Outdoor Dining • Takeout Curbside / Doordash / Grubhub/Uber Eat for pickup or delivery Visit us on Facebook @SchousePrinceton for more information. OPEN EVERY DAY Sunday-Thursday 11:00 AM -9:30 PM • Friday-Saturday 11:00 AM -10:00 PM


presents

Memorial Day

2021

Saturday, May 29 • No parade this year •

Wreath-Laying Ceremony

Community Bell-Ringing

11:30 a.m. Monument Hall

Noon — and lasting for three minutes

Wreath-laying ceremony and words of profound thanks to our service men and women who sacrificed their lives for the United States of America.

An opportunity for residents to contemplate the sacrifices by the men and women in the military fighting in many wars, as well as by the healthcare and other essential workers who, during this current pandemic war, have sacrificed their lives to enable the rest of us to move forward.

The Memorial Day commemoration ceremony is financed by the Spirit of Princeton, a charitable non-profit group of local residents dedicated to bringing the community together through a variety of civic events, including the Memorial Day Parade, Flag Day Ceremony (which will be IN PERSON at town hall, June 14, 2021, noon), and the Veterans’ Day Ceremony. For those unable to catch the event on Facebook live, a link to the ceremony will be posted on the Spirit of Princeton Facebook page and website. https://www.facebook.com/spiritofprinceton; www.spiritofprinceton.org. Donations to Spirit of Princeton are encouraged to ensure the future of these community events. See the website for information on how you can “Get into the Spirit” by donating. For further information, please call: 609-430-0144 or check website: http://www.spiritofprinceton.org/

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

Spirit of Princeton


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 28

Summer Enrichment at YWCA Princeton Join YWCA Princeton for a summer (or a few weeks) of fun! Enroll based on your family’s schedule and your child’s interests.

Summer at YWCA Princeton is filled with opportunity, fun, and learning. Featuring Dance and Robotics programming, each week has a new theme meant to inspire creativity and ignite curiosity.

Princeton Strong Continued from Page 26

I think we will have a great summer and even better fall. Verified Information “I was on the job 33 days when we closed,” she reflects. “I was impressed with the way the community rallied to meet the needs of those most affected by the pandemic. Everyone did the best they could, and we did our part. Two days after we closed, then Mayor Liz Lempert called me, and asked if the library would be willing to partner on a website. Two days later, we launched princetoncovid.org. In the early days of the pandemic, when there was a lot of confusion and things were changing every hour, the site was very important in getting verified information from trusted local sources out into the community.” Podolsky looks forward to great days for the library. “I am always optimistic about the future of the Princeton Public Library,” she says. “We love this town, and they love us back!” Pent-Up Demand Restaurants were among the hardest hit when the pandemic went from bad to worse. To a large extent, outdoor dining was a savior for many. Now that COVID cases are decreasing, people are more confident about going to restaurants, both indoors

and outdoors, says Raoul Momo, owner with his brothers, Carlo and Anthony, of several area restaurants. “There seems to be a pentup demand, with patrons coming out after they are vaccinated, which is great,” he reports. “Outdoor dining remains a huge hit. It’s for safety, but I think it’s more than that too. Guests want to be outdoors after such a long lockdown. Nothing beats sunshine, a glass of wine, and a nice meal with friends and family. I wish we could have perfect weather for many months. Let’s keep our fingers crossed. We deserve it!” Indoor dining is also coming back, he reports. “Folks who are vaccinated feel totally comfor table. And since New Jersey continues to mandate masks indoors (this may change) and social distancing, it is just fine. We also added costly HEPA filters for our HVAC units, and we leave lots of doors and windows open for added safety.” Teresa, My Mom In addition, the staff is regularly tested, and all are being vaccinated, he points out. “There has been enormous help from various community resources like the Princeton Health Department, Princeton University, churches, etc. to help people get vaccinated. It seems to be working to keep COVID infections way down.”

Visit www.ywcaprinceton.org/summer to enroll, or call 609-497-2100 Learn about all of our programs and services at www.ywcaprinceton.org Stay informed, stay engaged: follow us on social media @ywcaprinceton

OFFERING THE FINEST QUALITY OF LOCALLY GROWN:

Deer Resistant Flowers Fresh Herbs 6” Annuals & Perennials Beautiful 6” Lantana flowers

FIRST TOURS BEGIN JULY 3RD AT 1:00 PM WWW.PRINCETONTOURCOMPANY.COM 1-855-743-1415

W E S TM I N S T E R CO N S E RVATO RY OF MUSIC

(Attracts hummingbirds and is Deer Resistant)

Summer

Music

Camps for Toddlers and Teens RIDER.EDU/CON SE RVATO RYC A M P S

609-924-6767 • Route 27, Princeton. 2 miles north of Kingston Mon-Sat 9am to 5:30 Sunday 9am to 4pm

One of the Momo res taurants, the very popular Teresa’s Caffe on Palmer Square, was closed for 14 months for renovation, and now it is open, he says. “It’s almost as if it never closed. Customers poured r ight back in, they were so happy for us to be back. The reviews are positive with the renovations, but of course, there are also many nostalgic memories of the old Teresa’s that operated for 29 years, and you can’t argue with that. My son, Gianni, is now on the pizza table, as I was 30 years ago. He is now the third generation, as it all started with Teresa, my mom!” Customer response for all the restaurants has been very encouraging, as people are so eager to be out again, points out Momo. They still have to adhere to the state regulations regarding capacity, however, and that does limit the number of customers. Full capacity is expected to resume soon, according to state reports. “The demand is so great, and of course, we have to try and keep crowding to a minimum. We are holding off on any large events, so Teresa’s reopened with a limited amount of tickets every day. Eno Terra did its first wine tasting after more than a year, also with extremely limited seating. Labor Shortage “We are not planning any Happy Hours,” he continues. “Instead we encourage customers to try and come in the ‘off peak’ hours — as you hope every hour will be a happy hour!” Despite the good news of customers’ enthusiasm as they return, challenges remain for the restaurant industry, believes Momo. “The issue now is how to serve customer demand. There is a serious labor shortage crisis. We have had to continue to restrict hours and also maintain social distancing, which impedes seating and revenue capacity. So it is challenging to say the least. It’s sort of a double-edged sword. It’s tough to increase pay to attract workers from the big economy jobs like Amazon when we are restricted on revenue to pay them. “The challenge now is to find ways to make our industry more attractive to work for, in terms of pay and benefits. The shortage of staffing is something we have never seen in our 40 years of operating. As an example, the town is working on a solution for employee parking. I know for a fact that costly Princeton parking deters so many people from working in Princeton. To pay for the parking out of your hardearned wages hurts. “As I mentioned, the town and all government agencies have really made it possible to keep our businesses afloat. Clearly, the word got out about how vital restaurants are as cornerstones for the community. The cooperation has been excellent from everyone. And most importantly, from patrons who supported us.” As he looks ahead, however, Raoul Momo sees a somewhat uncertain future, “I cannot really tell what the future will hold for our industry. What I do know is that if people want to conContinued on Next Page


Continued from Previous Page

tinue to be able to go out to a nice restaurant, sit and relax, and enjoy a freshly prepared meal, the independent restaurant business will need to be heard to address these issues. “With the costs of operating, a full-service restaurant versus robotics, automation, technology, ease of takeout, DoorDash, Uber, and food trucks all out there, it will not be easy. The Momos no doubt are now ‘old timers’ in this field, and let’s hope the next generation can continue the legacy.” Cer tainly, t he Momos’ many fans will agree to that! Better Air Quality While the pandemic has been a disaster on so many levels, one noticeable outcome — albeit it temporary — was better air quality. The fact of fewer cars and trucks on the road and planes in the air, was a boon to the environment. Perhaps in future studies and examinations of the consequences of 2020, the state of the environment will be part of the equation. That would please Molly Jones, executive director of Sustainable Princeton. As she notes, “While there have been many hardships during the pandemic, there have been some very positive environmental impacts from changes in our daily lives. We are working to encourage the permanence of these environmentally positive changes.” Established as a nonprofit in 2012, Sustainable Princeton works with residents, businesses, nonprofits, and

local governments to help make Princeton more sustainable. “Our mission is to inspire the community to develop and implement solutions that positively impact the environment. We strive to lead com mu n it y change to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, strengthen resilience to the impacts of the changing climate, and protect the local ecosystem,” is the organization’s stated goal. During the pandemic, Sustainable Princeton focused on vir tual programming, and much of it worked very well, reports Jones. ”As the world opens back up, we are working to figure out the right balance of in-person versus online programming. Some of our programs work well online, and this format allows more people to attend, and is easily recorded for future reference. “Our team pivoted right away. While some planned in-person events had to be canceled, our terrific staff team was able to nimbly adjust most of our programs to socially distant formats.” Sustainable Change Princeton is making progress in furthering environmentally-friendly programs and practices, Jones observes, but adding that still more is necessary. “While there is still much progress to be made, Princeton is one of the top communities pushing sustainable change in New Jersey. We h av e b e e n m a k i n g incremental progress. To date, Princeton has completed or is currently implementing 22 Princeton

Climate Action Plan strat- provide more time to reflect many will stay connected to collective impact on the egies. The Princeton Com- on what we value. We hope their appreciation of nature, environment.” munity Renewable Energy that as the world opens up, and will value reducing our —Jean Stratton program and progress made to improve the accessibility of community solar are two examples of how the community is moving forward. “We are also proud of the equitable approach a collective of Princeton stakeholders is taking in considering cha nge s to la nd s c api ng prac t ices and allowable equipment.” Of course, there is always so much more that can be done, she continues. “As we look ahead, there are three main messages that we think are key. One, your home and office energy use contribute the most emissions to your local footprint. Make your property as energy efficient as possible, and strive to increase renewable energy sources. “Two, your proper ty is part of the local eco-system. Plant native species, mow fewer areas, and build rain gardens to help support the life that creates our environment. Finally, climate change is here. Intense rains and probably droughts will be coming. Are you prepared?” As the saying goes, no one can do everything, but everyone can do something. “We are optimistic looking ahead,” says Jones. “The warmth of the summer is always inspiring, but this year, it seems particularly so, as we consider the possibilities that the pandemic restrictions are being lifted. Princeton Airport, 41 Airpark Road, I’m looking forward to rePrinceton, New Jersey 08540 connecting over backyard 609-921-3100 barbeques with friends and family. 39N@princetonairport.com PRINCETON “The pandemic did quiwww.princetonairport.com AIRPORT et many of our lives and

The BEST GIFT EVER! Learn to Fly at the Princeton Flying School

INTRODUCTORY FLIGHT $199 Get Your Gift Certificate at www.princetonairport.com

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

Princeton Strong


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 30

S ports

Tiger Men’s Heavyweight Crew Competing in IRAs, Focusing on Joy of Racing to Make Most of Opportunity

G

reg Hughes doesn’t know what to expect when his Princeton University men’s heavyweight crew competes in the Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) national championship regatta this weekend at nearby Mercer Lake, and that’s OK. “I don’t even know how to compare it, it is just so just different,” said Princeton head coach Hughes. “Normally we would have seeding, and the seeding would come off the regular season and championship results. We would get a ranking nationally based on our regular season every week and then after the Eastern Sprints. There is no way to really seed it when people haven’t raced that much; there is not any way to cross reference.” The IRA competition will using a different format this spring in view of the disruptions to competition resulting from the pandemic, featuring time trials and an 18-boat semifinal rather than the typical series of heats leading the semis and finals. “The clock starts when you go through the end of the starting block, so you have the lane to yourself and you go,” said Hughes in assessing the time trial piece of the regatta. “You are separated by

30-40 seconds, everyone is going single file down the course like a 1,900-meter head race. The top 18 of those boats will go to the semifinal so it will be three semis with six boats each. It will be the top two from each to the A final, the second two to the B final, and the third two to the C final.” Adding to the uncertainty for Hughes is the fact that Princeton did not have any fall training or head races and the rowers did not get to work together in person until the students returned for spring semester. The Tigers started training by doing ergometer work this February outside the boathouse in pods of 10 athletes. After braving a wintry month on the deck, the Tigers hit the water in singles in early March. They progressed to pairs after that, affording some finetuned rowing. “It is incredible training; with national teams, that is normally what you would do,” explained Hughes of the pairs work. “You would train in pairs all fall. It is one of the best ways to train in sweep rowing. It is really difficult to do with college kids, you don’t normally have the time because you get on the water and you are racing. It is something we have always talked about but never had

the guts to do. For those freshmen, the amount of development that they got was really awesome.” In mid-April, Princeton finally got to train in 4s and 8s. Two weeks later, they competed in the season opening regatta on the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia, topping St. Joseph’s in the first set of races and then coming back later in the day to defeat Drexel “They were pumped; it was crazy as you are looking at the group, you had all of these freshmen and sophomores who had never raced for Princeton,” said Hughes, a former Tiger lightweight star, reflecting on the regatta which marked the program’s first competition in 22 months. “It was such a strange year and so many different kinds of challenges. I feel how they responded to those challenges was really very inspiring. They kept me motivated because I got to do this for four years and this is my 25th year of coaching. I have had these experiences again and again. Their opportunities are so finite and they want any they can get. There was no ‘this isn’t as good as it should be and I feel slighted.’” Showing that they took advantage of the flexible training schedule through the pandemic which featured

HEAVY DUTY: The Princeton University men’s heavyweight varsity 8 crew pulls hard in a race earlier this season. The top 8, along with the second and third varsity 8s ,will be competing in the Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) national championship regatta this weekend at Mercer Lake. (Photo by Ed Hewitt/Row2K, provided courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications) high volume, low intensity to build up aerobic capacity, the Tigers made more progress in their second outing, posting victories over Holy Cross and Navy on May 2 at Overpeck Park near Ridgefield Park in Bergen County. “They would re-tailor their workouts and their volume and then they actually discovered why they love it,” said Hughes. “As guys came back for spring term, they were in great shape and they also were also self-motivated with it. They weren’t motivated because they felt like they had to earn a specific seat or to be on the ergometer sheet at this spot. Those were oftentimes big motivators and that creates a little bit of pressure and a little bit

of stress. What was so cool about those races was that it was just the pure excitement and joy of going and being in that situation and not being concerned about what could happen.” Since that weekend, Princeton has been training hard with the hopes that it would get invited to the IRA. “We have been able to get good training in May but we have been coming at it in a lot of different ways,” added Hughes. “We had two rows on four days last week, the boats are moving. We are winding down on that this week.” As Hughes looks ahead to this weekend, the emphasis will be on the joy of rowing more than winning medals.

“My biggest thing is to get every single person that I can the opportunity to go to the line,” said Hughes. “My focus in this year had been very different. Yeah I want to see them go as fast as possible, and they have really done some good stuff. I think they have some speed and it will be fun. But I care less about that than the opportunity to get to go out and do your sport. I think it is great, people want to talk about how different it is and how decisions were made at different universities but those are first-world problems. In this current situation, we are just lucky to be able to have this opportunity. Let’s just go take it, rip on it, and have a good time.” —Bill Alden

CIFELLI CIFELLI CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC.

CIFELLI CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC. CIFELLI CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC.

ELECTRICAL INC.

CIFELLI

Residential & Commercial

ELECTRICAL INC.

Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential Commercial ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential && Commercial

ELECTRICAL INC. Residential & Commercial

CIFELLI CIFELLI CIFELLI CIFELLI CIFELLI CIFELLI ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL Residential &CONTRACTOR Commercial www.cifellielectrical.com ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR www.cifellielectrical.com ELECTRICAL Residential &CONTRACTOR Commercial www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com Renovations www.cifellielectrical.com ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR www.cifellielectrical.com Renovations Renovations Service Panel Upgrades www.cifellielectrical.com Renovations Renovations Service Panel Upgrades Service Panel Upgrades www.cifellielectrical.com Renovations Paddle Fans Service Panel Upgrades Service Panel Upgrades Renovations Paddle Fans Residential & Commercial Service Panel Upgrades Paddle Fans Renovations Paddle Fans Residential & Commercial Paddle Fans Service Panel Upgrades ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential & Commercial Paddle Fans Residential & Commercial

ELECTRICAL INC.

ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. Cifelli Electrical Inc. ELECTRICAL INC. Service Panel Upgrades ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential & Commercial Residential & Commercial Cifelli Electrical Inc. ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR

CIFELLI CIFELLI

Paddle FansInc. ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Cifelli Electrical Paddle Fans ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Cifelli Electrical Inc. Cifelli Electrical Inc. Residential & Commercial Cifelli Electrical Inc. Residential & Commercial Authorized for sales, Authorized dealer forsales, sales, Authorized dealer Authorizeddealer dealerfor for sales, ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ELECTRICAL installation and startup installation and installation andstartup startup installationCONTRACTOR and startup Cifelli Electrical Inc.

Cifelli Electrical Inc. Authorized for sales, Authorized dealer sales, Authorized dealer sales, Authorized dealer sales, Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer for sales, Authorizeddealer dealerfor for sales, installation and startup installation and startup installation and startup installation and startup installation and startup installation and startup installation and startup installation and startup 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 Renovations Authorized dealer Authorizeddealer dealerfor for sales, Renovations Authorized sales, Authorized forsales, sales, Lic dealer #11509Afor

609-921-3238 installation and startup 609-921-3238 Lic #11509A 609-921-3238 609-921-3238

installation and startup Service Panel installation and startup Bonded and Insured installation and startup Renovations Service Panel Bonded and Insured Renovations Upgrades Renovations Lic #11509A Renovations Upgrades Lic Service Panel Lic #11509A #11509A 609-921-3238 Bonded and Insured ServingPanel Princeton and areas Service Lic Paddle Fans Bonded#11509A andsurrounding Insured Service Panel Upgrades Bonded and Insured Renovations Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Service Panel Paddle Fans Upgrades Bonded and Insured Lic #11509A Upgrades Interior and Renovations Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Paddle Panel Fans Upgrades Service Bonded and surrounding Insured Exterior ServingLighting Princeton and areas Lic #11509A Interior and Paddle Fans Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Upgrades Paddle Fans Service Panel Interior and Bondedand and surrounding Insured Exterior Lighting Serving Princeton areas Paddle Fans Interior and Upgrades ServingLighting Princeton and surrounding areas Exterior Paddle Fans Interior and

609-921-3238

Remember the “old you”? The you that could run, jump, and play with the best of them? It’s time to get back to that. That’s why at Rothman Orthopaedics we are exceptionally specialized. We not only specialize in orthopaedics, each of our physicians only focuses on one area of the body. Which means you can have the confidence that you can get past pain and be what you were.

RothmanOrtho.com/Capital | 609.573.3300

Exterior Lighting

Certified Tesla Interior and Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Exterior Lighting Interior and Paddle Fans

609-921-3238 Car Charging Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting Certified Tesla

609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com Station Installers 609-921-3238 www.cifellielectrical.com 609-921-3238 Lic #11509A Serving Princeton and surrounding areas 609-921-3238 www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com Lic #11509A Bonded and Insured www.cifellielectrical.com 609-921-3238 Bonded and Serving Princeton and Insured surrounding areas Lic #11509A Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Interior and www.cifellielectrical.com Station Installers Car Charging Exterior Lighting Lic #11509A Bonded and Insured Lic #11509A Bonded and Insured

Lic #11509A Bonded and Bonded andInsured Insured www.cifellielectrical.com Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Lic #11509A

ServingPrinceton Princeton and areas Bonded and Insured Serving andsurrounding surrounding areas Lic #11509A

Bondedand and Insured Serving Princeton surrounding areas

Serving Princeton and surrounding areas


PU AD Marcoux Samaan Stepping Down for LPGA

Princeton University Director of Athletics Mollie Marcoux Samaan ‘91 will be leaving Princeton to join the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) as its ninth commissioner, the school said Tuesday. Marcoux Samaan, a former women’s hockey and standout for Princeton, has served in the AD post since 2014. The school will undertake a national search to identify its next director of athletics. A recognized leader with a track record of combining superb scholastic opportunities with top-flight athletics, Marcoux Samaan has built a program at Princeton that has set a national standard for developing student athletes. Under her supervision, Princeton has won 65 Ivy League championships, a total that is more than all other Ivy schools during that time. Over the course of her tenure Princeton has been the highest ranked Ivy League school and consistently in the top 40 of all of Division I programs in the Directors’ Cup standings, measuring overall athletic success through NCAA championship participation and success. Princeton’s student-athletes have also excelled in the classroom and in the community during Marcoux Samaan’s tenure. The department’s NCAA Academic Progress Rate has consistently ranked among the best in the nation and studentathletes have garnered several University and national awards, including the Pyne

to take on this new challenge and lead the LPGA at such a significant moment for women’s golf, sports, and society.”

Princeton Rowing Teams Set for National Regattas

and women’s hockey, men’s and women’s squash, men’s and women’s swimming and diving, men’s and women’s indoor track and field, and wrestling – to be included on the Academic All-Ivy teams. Student-athletes must be in good academic standing to be eligible for the award. The Tiger athletes honored included: Carlie Littlefield, a women’s basketball star who majored in economics; Jerome Desrosiers, a men’s hoops player who studied anthropology; Kasia Nixon, a women’s fencing AllAmerica and 2018 NCAA epee champion who majored in politics; Daniel Kwak, a men’s fencing All-America who studied psychology; Julia Edgar, a women’s hockey player who studied molecular biology; Ryan Ferland, a star goalie for men’s hockey who majored in economics; Grace Doyle, a women’s squash standout who studied in Princeton’s School of Public and International Affairs; Alex Engstrom, a men’s squash player who majored in operations research and financial engineering; Regan Barney, a women’s swimming star who studied politics; Matthew Marquardt, a men’s swimmer who majored in chemistry; Obiageri Amaechi, a throwing star for women’s track who majored in psychology; Kelton Chastulik, a men’s track standout thrower who studied in Princeton’s School of Public and International Affairs; and Ty Agaisse, a wrestling standout who majored in ecology and evolutionary biology.

After getting to race this April for the first time in 22 months, the four Princeton University rowing programs will be competing in national championship regattas this weekend. The Tiger women’s open rowing team was selected for an at-large bid to the 2021 NCAA Rowing Championships (May 28-30) in Sarasota, Fla., while the men’s heavyweight, men’s lightweight, and women’s lightweight teams will race at the IRA (Intercollegiate Rowing Association) National Championship regatta (May 28-29) at Mercer Lake. The Princeton women’s open rowing squad will have its varsity 8, second varsity 8, and varsity 4 rowing at the NCAA regatta. Its 1V is seeded ninth, 2V seeded 16th, and its V4 ranked No. 10. The men’s heavyweight squad will have three boats in competition (1V, 2V, and 3V) at the IRA regatta while the men’s lightweight (1V, 2V) and women’s lightweight (V8, double scull) teams will have two boats each. For the heavyweight boats, each one will race in a time trial with the top 18 advancing to three semifinal heats. The top two of each semifinal will move on to the Grand Final. The time trials are on May 28, the semifinals on Friday afternoon with the Grand, and Petite Finals on PU Field Hockey Stars May 29. Each of the light- Selected for Senior Team weight finals are on Friday Princeton University field morning. hockey standouts Clara Roth and Julianna Tornetta have 13 Tiger Athletes been selected to the 2020 NaMake Academic All-Ivy Thirteen Princeton Univer- tional Field Hockey Coaches’ sity athletes been honored for Association (NFHCA) Senior their outstanding efforts in Team, the organization said the classroom, earning Aca- last week. The in-person 2020 NFHdemic All-Ivy honors for the CA Senior Game was canWinter 2021 season. Institutions nominated one celed due to the COVID-19 student-athlete from each of pandemic. During the 2021 the 13 Ivy League sponsored Virtual Coaches Caucus, the winter sports – men’s and NFHCA Division I memberwomen’s basketball, men’s ship agreed to continue to and women’s fencing, men’s recognize a selected group

from the graduating class of 2021 who either played or would have played their senior season during the 2020-2021 academic year. The selected student-athletes were nominated by their NFHCA member coach and were chosen based on their career accomplishments. Roth was named the C. Otto Von Kienbusch Award winner, awarded annually to a Princeton’s top female senior athlete. The Schwetzigen, Germany, native is a two-time All-American, who earned three All-Region and All-Ivy selections. Roth helped Princeton to the NCAA Championship game in 2019 where she was named a Honda Sport Award Finalist, first-team AllAmerica, Regional Player of the Year, and first-team AllIvy. As a sophomore, Roth collected her first All-America selection after being named the Ivy Offensive Player of the Year. She led the squad in goals, more than doubling her total from the year prior, and points. Roth is one of only 11 players in Princeton Field Hockey history to record 100 career points, tallying 35 goals and 31 assists. Tornetta, a native of Plymouth Meeting, Pa., was a nominee for the C. Otto von

Kienbusch Award. The senior was a two-time All-American, adding three All-Region and All-Iv y credits. Tornetta stepped up her game in the postseason as she earned two NCAA Final Four All-Tournament selections. Some of her signature moments included the game-winning goals in the 2019 NCAA Semifinals vs. No. 4 Virginia and the 2018 NCAA Quarterfinals vs. No. 6 Harvard. Tornetta finished at Princeton with 18 goals, 33 assists (good for sixth all-time) and 69 career points.

Tiger Wrestler Brucki Earns Scholar Award

For the second consecutive year, Princeton University star wrestler Patrick Brucki has earned NWCA Scholar AllAmerican honors, this time doing so while finishing his Princeton degree in civil and environmental engineering. Brucki qualified for the NCAA Championships in all three years competing for Princeton, twice earning AllAmerica honors and finishing fourth at the 2019 NCAAs. Brucki was also a three-time All-Ivy League honoree and a three-time EIWA Academic Award honoree. He is one of eight wrestlers in program history to earn at least two AllAmerican honors.

A Legacy of Craft For Our Community Since 1985 609.683.1034 PDGUILD.COM

Get Ready ready to Ride! ride! We’re celebrating National Bike Month! Four times in May we’ll hand a $25 Whole Earth gift card to a randomly chosen cyclist who rides to our store to shop. We look forward to returning to our usual Random Acts program next year when we’ll once again be out in town distributing multiple gift cards from Princeton businesses. In the meantime, please support the businesses that have been part of Random Acts and that support biking in our town:

MAY MADNESS: Connor McCarthy unloads the ball in a 2019 game during his career for the Princeton University men’s lacrosse team. Last Saturday, McCarthy, now playing as a grad student for the University of North Carolina, scored a goal in overtime to give top-seeded UNC a 12-11 win over Rutgers in the NCAA quarterfinals. North Carolina will be facing fourthseeded Virginia in the semifinals on May 29 at East Hartford. Two other former Tiger stars, Michael Sowers and Philip Robertson, will also be competing in the Final Four this weekend as they helped second-seeded Duke beat Loyola 10-9 in overtime in the NCAA quarters last Sunday. Duke with face thirdseeded Maryland in the other semi with the victors advancing to the national title game on May 31. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Mediterra • Teresa Caffe • Nassau Street Seafood • Blue Point Grill Yankee Doodle Tap Room • Nassau Inn • Miya Table & Home Triumph Brewing • Homestead Princeton Princeton Tour Company • Kopp’s Cycle bent spoon • small world coffee • LiLLiPiES Princeton Record Exchange • Olives • jaZams Princeton Family YMCA • Tico’s Juice Bar Labyrinth Books • Hinkson’s Local Greek • Town of Princeton Olsson’s Fine Foods • Jammin’ Crepes Princeton Soup & Sandwich

360 NASSAU ST • PRINCETON M-SAT 8AM-6PM • SUN 9AM-7PM 1ST HOUR RESERVED FOR SENIORS

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

PU Sports Roundup

Prize, Princeton’s highest general distinction conferred on an undergraduate. Marcoux Samaan will be working with the University and the LPGA Board to transition to her new role in the months ahead. Founded in 1950, the LPGA is one of the longestrunning women’s professional sports associations in the world, having grown from its roots as a playing tour into a nonprofit organization involved in every facet of golf. Serving as the face and voice of the association, the Commissioner works closely with the LPGA’s board to lead the organization in all strategic business and management functions. For Marcoux Samann, the move is bittersweet. “Returning to Princeton as the Ford Family Director of Athletics has been a tremendous privilege, and I will deeply miss the amazing students, coaches, administrators, University partners, faculty fellows, alumni, Ivy League and NCAA colleagues, and fans with whom I have had the privilege of working,” said Marcoux Samaan. “Princeton is and has always been about being a part of a community and a team of people that care deeply about learning and growing. I believe we represent the gold standard of athletics and academic integration with a firm commitment to education through athletics, providing our student-athletes with the tools needed to achieve, serve, and lead well beyond their playing days. I am confident that our next leader and our tremendous team of coaches and administrators will continue the legacy of excellence on and off the field for many years to come. I am excited to utilize all that I have learned at Princeton

RANDOM ACTS OF COMMUNITY: Rewarding Biking in Princeton RANDOM ACTS OF COMMUNITY IS A PROJECT OF THE WHOLE EARTH CENTER


Robin Roth did not feel great about winter training, but with the improving weather and a new focus and passion for track, the Princeton High sophomore is coming into her own in her first full outdoor season. Like everyone, Roth didn’t get a spring track season last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but she did enjoy some indoor track and field success. She posted a solid 1,600-meter time of 5:29.04 at the Mercer County Championships and went on to place fifth in the 3,200 meters in the Central Jersey Group 4 sectional meet to qualify for the Group 4 state meet. “I always feel like I have to go at least once step further than I did before, or at least to the same point,” said Roth. “So I felt like I have to get to groups this spring. It felt like something that needed to happen. I knew I’d beat myself up over it if it didn’t happen. Where I was this winter was not on the way to groups.” It was a good cross country season for Roth and the Tiger girls when they won the first CJ Group 4 sectional crown in school history. But the winter weather and training inconsistency eroded some confidence and fitness as the outdoor track season loomed. “It was hard transitioning back especially after having such a good cross country season,” said Roth. “We’d gotten to the point

where we sort of assumed success. In February, we learned we did not still have that success going from the fall, and that we still needed to work hard to stay successful.” Roth has found her pace at the perfect time to help the PHS girls track and field team position itself to compete for a Colonial Valley Conference championship. Though she bounced back and forth between the top runner in some cross country races and their fourth finisher at sectionals, Roth has been a front runner for the Tigers in the spring after getting herself out of a funk in the winter. “After that I was able to recover a bit better than other people,” said Roth. “This season, our mindset has been a big struggle of trying to stay motivated and have real goals when we don’t really know totally what’s going on and what’s going to happen. I did better than some to stay motivated. Charlotte (Gilmore) and Lucy (Kreipke) and Kyleigh (Tangen) are just better at some of the longer distances like 5K, and I have a little more brute speed and can kind of get through the little shorter 16 and 32.” Roth has become a frontrunner for the Tigers on the track, finding success consistently. She hasn’t finished worse than third in a 1,600 or 3,200 this spring. “She just really excels when she’s put in a spot where she needs to be competitive with other good

girls,” said PHS head coach Ben Samara. “She likes to have a target. She likes to have people to compete against and so to be on the track where you can see everybody and you can see how it’s unfolding is a good spot for her, I think.” L ast weekend, Roth won the 3,200 meters in 11:44.48, took second in the 1,600 meters in a personal-record 5:18.56, and placed sixth in the 800 meters in 2:36.44 at the CVC Colonial Qualifier meet that PHS hosted last Friday and Saturday. “I feel like we got to show what we’ve been working on all winter and spring,” said Roth. “I think it wraps together what our past couple weeks with the showdown meets have all been for.” New this year, the CVC qualifier meets send the top four finishers in each event, plus the next eight best marks from around the CVC qualifier meets to this weekend’s CVC Championship at WW/P-North on May 28 and 29. The CVC Championship is a substitute for the normal Mercer County Championship. “We were really happy,” said Samara. “Overall, some people doubled and tr ipled, but we got 49 entries through, which is one of the higher numbers in the conference. Almost everybody that competed made it over to next week. We’re really looking forward to leaving it all out there in the championship meet.”

Sales and Service since 1927

2454 Route 206 Belle Mead, NJ 08502 · 908-359-8131

Visit www.bellemeadgarage.com!

We Service: cars and trucks mowers and snow blowers tractors and machines

We Sell: cars and vans and trucks tractors and mowers parts and implements

Lines Carried: Massey Ferguson, BCS 2 wheeled tractors and attachments Scag Mowers and Yard Equipment

It comes as little surprise that Roth found running. Her older brothers both ran, with former PHS standout Alex Roth just finishing his career at the University of Pennsylvania this year. Roth first gained interest in a Girls On the Run program that pushed her to run with her dad. She turned her focus away from dance and other young interests to run in middle school. “I love r u n ning,” said Roth. “I loved hanging out with the girls on Girls on the Run. I still do now. Girls on the Run was definitely the thing that got me to stick with it.” This year, Roth has found herself more connected to the track team. It has helped to make the spring season more enjoyable and pulled the Tigers together as they head into the championship portion of the year. “We’ve been doing more things with the sprinters,” said Roth. “It’s fun seeing more people and I think the fall is more parent support and support within the distance girls in cross country. The community of the team grew for the spring. Instead of just being a part of the

girls distance, I’m a part of Princeton High School track with the boys, the girls, the sprinters, the throwers, the jumpers.” Roth will have the PHS team behind her when she takes to the track for two days of distance tests in the championship meet this weekend. She is looking forward to the competition and the chance to continue to build toward a return to the group meet level, this time in outdoor track. The CVC Championship is the first big opportunity for her and the Tigers in a spring that has started with plenty of promise. “I definitely want to get a good 16 in and try to win that, which will be tough,” said Roth. “I’ll put most of my effort into the 16 Friday. That’s where the toughest competition is. I’m going to try to win both the 16 and the 32, but I’m supposed to still do the 8 on Saturday. I’m not really focusing on times because I think they’ll come with racing hard for place. Good times will come with the good competitors that will be there.” —Justin Feil

ROCKING ROBIN: Princeton High girls’ track star Robin Roth leads a foe from WW/P-South last Friday in the CVC Colonial Qualifier hosted by PHS last weekend. Sophomore Roth won the 3,200 meters in 11:44.48 at the meet, took second in the 1,600 meters in a personal-record 5:18.56, and placed sixth in the 800 meters in 2:36.44. Roth and the Tigers are next in action when they compete in the CVC Championship meet at WW/P-North on May 28 and 29. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

CONGRATULATIONS

HALO FÊTE Ice Cream Pâtisserie Palmer Square

GRADUATION CAKES 5 Hulfish St. 921.1710

CELEBRATE - IT’S YOUR DAY

YAY!

WE BUY CARS AND TRACTORS

The top overall performer for the girls was Kendall Williamson, who won the 100, 200, and 400 and anchored the 4x400 relay of Megan Rougas, Alysse Kiesewetter, and Catherine Howard to gold. “She ran 58 flat at the end of the 4x4,” said Samara. “It was a pretty good effort. Kendall, it’s hard to wrap my head around the fact that the last time she ran outdoor track, she was a freshman. She’s been putting the work in ever since we got shut down last spring. We take a slow approach in the winter and we build towards more success in May and June. It seems to be really paying off for her. She’s been having a lot of really good training days. She’s stayed relatively injury free. She’s ready to run some really, really big times.” The Tigers had a number of top-three finishers. Kiesewetter was second in the 400 hurdles, Ada Metaxas was second in the 100 hurdles, and the 4x100 relay of the two hurdlers, Rougas and Howard, took third place. “They ran really well and had clean hand-offs,” said Samara. “We think they can run even faster next weekend and maybe steal us some points in a really close meet.” The girls’ 4x800 of Yana Medvedeva, Emma Lipps, Charlotte Gilmore, and Ryan Vaughey won in 10:10.03, and the boys 4x8 of Colin McCafferty, Addison Motto, John Zammit, and Andrew Kenny won in 8:16.94. “I know Coach (Jim) Smirk was very happy with the girls 4x8 and the boys 4x8,” said Samara. “The girls 4x8 in particular was good because there was some struggle with the girls 4x8 a week ago at our last CVC showdown meet and they really wrapped their heads around what they needed to do be successful and now put themselves in a good spot to be conference champions, along with the boys who are the No. 1 seed as well now.” Roth will head into the CVC Championships as one of the runners with a target again. She is trying not to think about the pressure spot. Roth feels like the team performs better when it doesn’t think about the pressures of winning. “I’m definitely a little nervous going in,” said Roth. “Even going into this week, I went in with targets on my back for both the 16 and 32. It was suspected that I would run well and I would help people run well if they stuck with me.” Roth is hoping to run well for the team’s sake. She sees a strong group that has the potential to win. She has seen the camaraderie of the team grow as they have spent more time together and she’s embraced t he spring sport. She played lacrosse in middle school and is finding a new love in the outdoor season. “Something about outdoor track, it’s such a good time,” said Roth. “You can cheer so easily. It’s nice and warm out. Racing in 85-degree weather is not a good time, but it’s warm and you get to hang out and bond over being half-dead and trying to find any bit of shade to drink your water.”

YAY!

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 32

With Sophomore Star Roth Picking Up the Pace, PHS Girls’ Track Pumped for CVC Championships


As usual this spring, the one-two punch of Kate Becker and Shoshi Henderson got things started for the Princeton High girls’ lacrosse team as it hosted WW/P-North last Wednesday. The prolific pair of junior Becker and senior Henderson tallied two and three goals, respectively, as PHS jumped out to a 5-0 lead. But freshman Riley Devlin was fired up to make her presence felt as well. “The game against Notre Dame really pushed me,” said Devlin, referring to a 13-8 loss to the Irish on May 17. “Losing really got me upset and this game really fixed that.” Fueled by that disappointment, Devlin tallied three straight goals in first half, establishing a new career high as the Tigers built a 13-1 lead by intermission and never looked back on the way to a 14-3 win. “It was just to push it as much as we could,” said Devlin, reflecting on the team’s sizzling start. “I think we did a good job with different people playing different positions. Everyone was sharing the ball and everyone was scoring.” Devlin and her classmates are doing a better job offensively as the season goes on. “At first a lot of us freshmen weren’t really scoring but we were there, we were in the game,” said Devlin. “Now with so many games and so many practices, we just work with each other

well. A lot of us have played with each other since middle school and elementary school. We are comfortable with each other and this season is making it stronger. We have so many more years to come, it is really exciting.” It is exciting for Devlin to be playing alongside senior star Henderson and junior standout Becker. “They are just so inspirational and amazing,” said Devlin. “I look up to them a lot. They just got it started in the beginning, they set a really good example for us younger people.” PH S h e ad coach Me g Dunleavy liked the way her younger players stepped up after Henderson and Becker got things going against WW/P-North. “This was very fun. We had our dynamic duo start us off and then we saw some really standout games from some of our freshmen” said Dunleavy. Dunleavy credited Devlin with producing a dynamic performance. “She is the kind of player who is always open and is so quick,” said Dunleavy, who also got goals from freshmen Theona Hsu and Sylvie LeBouef in the win. “Putting her on midfield gave her the ability to be in the action consistently. She usually plays low attack but today she played midfield. She got a lot of draw controls and a lot of ground balls. She has a beautiful shot.”

The Tigers dominated the action at the other end of the field as well. “I was very proud of our defensive front, Sarah Glenn is such a strong defender,” said Dunleavy. “I feel like she doesn’t get as much recognition as she deserves. She is the mouthpiece, she is the glue of our defense. Grace [Rebak] will also take it up into attack. We see her all over the field. Sarah is the one keeping the defense together the entire time.” Wit h p o s t s e a s on p l ay star ting this week, Dunleavy is confident that her squad will play some strong lacrosse. “I think it is coming at the perfect time because now we have confidence,” said Dunleavy, whose team lost 7-6 to Notre Dame last Monday in the CVC pod play to fall to 6-5 and will start play in the South Jersey Group 4 sectional, where it is seeded fourth, and slated to host 13th-seeded Monroe on June 1. “As long as we put everything together, it will be very evenly matched.” In Devlin’s view, the performance against W W/PNorth is a harbinger of some big things to come. “Today we just played really good defense and really good offense, spacing out,” said Devlin. “I think this game really prepared us for the CVC and all of that stuff. The competition won’t be the same but we played really well today. We were really strong.” —Bill Alden

LIFE OF RILEY: Princeton High girls’ lacrosse player Riley Devlin heads to goal against WW/PNorth last Wednesday. Freshman Devlin scored three goals in the contest to help PHS prevail 14-3. On Monday, the third-seeded Tigers fell 7-6 to second-seeded Notre Dame in the CVC Pod semis. PHS, now 6-5, will host Hopewell Valley on May 26 and then start play in the South Jersey Group 4 sectional where it is seeded fourth and slated to host 13th-seeded Monroe on June 1. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Town Topics a Princeton tradition! ®

est. 1946

Senior Star Kirby Looking to End on High Note As PHS Boys’ Lacrosse Heads into Postseason Something had to give as the Princeton High boys’ lacrosse team hosted Allentown in a Colonial Valley Conference showdown last Thursday. PHS brought a six-game winning streak into the clash while Allentown had reeled off nine straight victories. T i g e r d e fe n d e r L u c a s Kirby, for his part, brought some extra emotion into the contest as PHS held its annual Senior Day celebration before face-off. “It was surreal walking through all of the sticks, realizing that this is my last regular season game,” said senior star Kirby. “I have been with this program for four years, of course we lost last year. It means a lot.” PHS appeared a bit distracted as they fell behind 3-1 midway through the first period. “Coming into this, we wanted to get after them,” said Kirby, noting that PHS had lost 12-11 to the Redbirds earlier in the season. “I think Senior Day got to us a little bit, we weren’t all there to start the game. They got us a little bit.” Narrowing the gap to 8-7 at halftime, PHS seized momentum after the break, outscoring the Redbirds 4-1 to take an 11-9 lead heading into the fourth quarter. “We started coming back in the third, we definitely won that third quarter,” said Kirby. “We did tighten up on defense.” But the game got away from the Tigers as Allentown reeled off three unanswered goals in the first 5:40 of the fourth and never looked back on the way to a 14-11 win. “We couldn’t possess the ball at the end,” said Kirby, reflecting on the setback which dropped PHS to 7-3. “Our slide was late on defense and they were shooting well today.” With PHS facing Allentown on May 25 in the CVC semis and then starting play in the state tournament next week, Kirby and his teammates are ready for the final push. “The coaches said the season starts today,” said Kirby. “This game is behind us and we are looking to the postseason. If they play how they have been playing and we play back up to what we are, we are going to see them again and we will be ready that time.” In Kirby’s view, the squad’s defensive unit is ready to keep improving. “The six games before this we really stepped it up, we held Notre Dame to six and they scored 11 on us the first time,” said Kirby. “We are growing as a unit and we are becoming more comfortable.” As a battle-tested senior, Kirby looks to guide things along the back line. “I take the best attacker, I try to be a leader and tell these guys where to go,’ said Kirby. “Sometimes I get carried away with coaching.” PHS head coach Chip Casto credited his senior class with showing good leadership collectively. “They lived through that year off, that is a senior class that last played when they were sophomores,” said

six goals from junior Will Doran in the loss with freshman Patrick Kenah adding three and senior McDonald Casto, whose Class of 2021 chipping in two. includes Jack Lehman, Pat“We were just get ting rick McDonald, Austin Miback-doored and losing our cale, Nevin Motto, Simon guy. They got a lot of easy Sheppard, and Sid Suppiah goals, low effort goals. You in addition to Kirby. can’t win a lot of games like “They made a special com- that.” mitment to make a lot out of In Casto’s view, his squad this year and play for last can gain some valuable lesyear’s seniors. It is a special sons from the defeat. group, they have given a “You try to use the loss as lot. They have modeled the leadership that we are trying a learning tool and certainly to get. They have been con- they will use it as motivation sistent with it and they are to try to get back at these sending a good message to guys,” added Casto. Casto will be counting on the young guys coming up.” In assessing the loss to Kirby to help get the Tigers Allentown, Casto acknowl- back on track. “He always plays the top edged that his team was plagued by some inconsis- attackman so he has done a great job,” said Casto. tent play. “He did a fantastic job at “It was good ball; they were ready to play, they do Notre Dame and did a pretty what they do very well,” said good job on their guy today. Casto. “We weren’t able to Lucas is our defensive core. stop it, we made a thousand He will bounce back, he is a great competitor. He is a little mistakes.” At halftime, Casto looked great kid so he will be ready.” Kirby and his classmates, to have his players clean things up. “It was the same for their part, are looking to as always, just execute what produce a great ending to we do,” said Casto. “We fo- their PHS careers. cus on the basics and fun“There are seven of us on damentals throughout half- the team, we have two guartime.” anteed games left,” said After playing a strong third Kirby. quarter and taking the 11-9 “It is leaving it all out on lead, PHS didn’t execute well the field. We have great guys down the stretch. on offense as long as we “We are man up and then can get them the ball, they OFFER all ofAN a sudden the ball goes score.” to the other end and they The time is NOW to upgrade your —Bill home Alden with score,” said Casto, who got

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

With Freshman Devlin Stepping Up Offensively, PHS Girls’ Lacrosse Primed for Stretch Drive

HEATHY AIR WITH UNSTOPPABLE

a new high efficiency heating and cooling system. BOARDING Raise a happy, healthy home by clearing the air, pure and simple. Specializing in

$1150 0% TRAINING LESSONS HEALTHY SALES

UP TO

OR

classical

AIR PACKAGE ONLY $2,950 dressage riding

Includes Electronic Air Cleaner, Humidifier and Air Scrubber

Family owned and operated over 35 years

ON NEW QUALIFYING TRANE Just& 3COOLING miles from downtown Princeton HEATING SYSTEMS FOR QUALIFIED APPLICANTS

Outstanding boarding facilities Visit us online at www.DresslerStables.com or call 609-915-2636

TRUS

ce 1993 T TsinR U since 1 S T 993 #885895 9

EE # 44 0 SS ICEENN 55

L 09 5 0 0 0 SSEEH## MBB LLLIC 54 UM ICEENN BING PPLU V 01 - R RIC G #13 # 8 8 5 9 PLUM G VACA-R V H O RE H T E C G S IN N 40 IN T E NTR N O A C IC E # H B L E N S E 0 195 455 0 0 0 INNGDITAIOL BO P LU M VH R LR IC C G #13 E M A PLAUIRMCN R R V ENO HO N T R AC TO I THGE AUBIO ITHISNRG DTN HEGAETO N DI&T BAAATTEHR RHEENATOEC RS EY RHG N E CO N IT C E K W R & L SA AI AITNCKHLEERN SM WWW.TINDALLRANSON.COM I TS EKTOTH

609-924-3434

G Y AUD RENO ENERGEN & BATH KITCH

609-924-3434 HVACR LICENSE # IS 19HC00095400

WWW.TINDALLRANSON.COM

Call today for a free estimate! 609-924-3434

Service, Repair and Installation: ---- Furnace ---- Air Conditioner/ Ductless A/C ---- Water Heaters/Tankless ---- Humidifier ---- Gas piping

• • • •

Family owned & operated Licensed & Insured 30 Years in business Maintenance agreements

36-MONTH INTEREST FREE FINANCING AVAILABLE


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 34

Senior Star Catcher Babuschak Battles to the End As Hun Softball Falls 2-1 to Blair in Prep A Semis Although the Hun School softball team had defeated the Blair Academy twice in regular season play this spring, Hanna Babuschak and her Raider teammates didn’t take the Buccaneers lightly when the rivals met in the state Prep A semis last week. “We weren’t underestimating them even though we had beat them before,” said Hun senior catcher Babuschak. “They are always a good team to play.” The third meeting turned into a tense pitching duel between Hun’s Lexi Kobryn and Blair’s Mallory Allen as the teams were knotted in a 0-0 stalemate in the May 18 contest heading into the fifth inning. Babuschak, for her part, battled hard in her first two at-bats, fouling off a number of pitches before making outs in the second and the fourth inning. “I wanted to help my team out and try to hit, that was my mindset going into the at-bats,” said Babuschak. “I was just trying to get on and do what I could.” Hun forged ahead 1-0 in the bottom of the fifth but Blair responded with two runs in the sixth to take a 2-1 lead. Coming up in the bottom of the seventh with the Raiders still trailing 2-1, Babuschak blasted a screaming liner that appeared to be heading to the gap but was speared by the Blair shortstop in a leaping grab. Hun went on to lose 2-1, finishing the spring with a 9-4 record. “That was tough to watch, it is part of the game,” said Babuschak ref lecting on seeing her liner get snagged. While it was tough to see the season end with the disappointing defeat, Babuschak was proud of what the Raiders accomplished this spring. “It was definitely nice coming from last year and not having a season at all,”

about it, which is nice. The parents are saying, ‘hey you have a great group of kids coming back.’ I am looking for ward to the returning players and having a great season next year.” In reflecting on the 2021 season, Quirk was proud of how her squad caught fire in the middle of the season, reeling off a five-game winning streak. “I was happiest about the way we were able to adjust with our bats,” said Quirk. “We had that stretch where we scored one run in two games. We worked hard on our batting and they adjusted. I was pleased with the pitching that we had. Both pitchers [Kobryn and fellow freshman Jamie Staub] felt relieved that neither one of them carried the weight of the team on their shoulders. It was nice to be able to say that if this one is not performing, I have someone I can put in. They each complemented each other as a righty and a lefty, you don’t have that too often.” Babuschak and Hampton made a nice contribution to Hun over their careers. “Hanna was an excep tional catcher for us,” said Quirk. “I was very pleased to have her. She was a quiet leader. With Kayla in center field, she would have played last year so this is really her first year. I thought she did an excellent job. She moves well and can throw the ball well. It was nice to see her, even though she did fly out for the last out of the game, make contact with the ball. A lot of times we DH’d her. She has been working hard and I felt that she proved herself in practice. We gave the chance to hit and she did a nice job.” Starting at catcher from day one as a freshman, Babuschak enjoyed having the chance to play for the program. “I think the relationships I have made with the team and the coaches stand out,” said Babuschak. “We are definitely good friends.” —Bill Alden

Wehner Stars for Hun Baseball in Prep A Final As Raiders Top Lawrenceville, Win 5th Straight Crown

Entering the final round of the state Prep A baseball tour nament last Su nday needing one win to clinch the title in the double-elimination competition, the Hun School squad wasn’t about to mess around as it hosted the Lawrenceville School. “We just wanted to take care of business and win it on our home turf,” said Hun junior third baseman Carson Wehner. “We tried to put the ball in play, do the job, and win the game.” After scoring one run in the bottom of the first inning on a sweltering day with temperatures reaching the 90s, the Raiders erupted for seven tallies in the second. Wehner contributed a single to help spark the outburst and later slapped a two-run double down the left field line to plate the final two runs of the frame. “At the beginning of the inning, I just wanted to get on base and move it to the next guy,” said Wehner. “They will get me in, the whole lineup can hit. On the double, with two strikes I just had to put the ball in play. I spread my stance out, don’t stride and just do the job and I got it down the line.” Hun never looked back, cruising to a 16-0 win in six innings, winning the program’s fifth straight Prep A crown and improving to 19-2. Adding a finishing touch to the rout, Wehner smacked a run-scoring double in the fifth to help the Raiders score eight in that inning. “I saw it was going over his head and I was just thankful,” said Wehner, who ended up going 3-for-4 with two runs and three RBIs in the victory. Wehner and his team mates were t han k f u l to extend Hun’s Prep A title streak. “This is special, I think Blair had it four in a row before us,” said Wehner. “To hold it for longer is really special for us.” With Hun having dominated foes all spring and also winning the Mid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL) regular season title along the way, the 2021 squad is clearly special. “We just have everything we have a great pitching staff, we have great hitters, we just do it all,” added Wehner. Working hard on his defense and batting, Wehner has emerged as a star this spring for the Raiders. “This year I stepped up and played third, I haven’t really done that in the past much but I filled the role,” said Wehner. “My hitting has picked up. At the beginning of the year I was struggling a little bit. I tried to make a lot of adjustments and just put the ball in play. I knew I was going to find holes.” Hun head coach Tom MonFINAL CUT: Hun School softball team player Hanna Babuschak takes a cut in a game earlier filetto sensed that his team this season. Senior catcher Babuschak’s play behind the plate and hitting helped Hun go 9-4 this season. The Raiders saw their 2021 season end last week when they fell 2-1 to the Blair was going to find some holes against Lawrenceville on Academy in the state Prep A semifinals on May 18. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) Sunday. “Their pitcher’s best pitch was his fastball, I think we were pretty geared up for “Yes, we also rescreen screens it,” said Monfiletto. regular & pawproof.” “We stayed in the middle 908.359.8388 of the field. Carson Apple741 Alexander Rd., Princeton • 924-2880 Route 206 • Belle Mead said Babuschak. “I think we did well this year. It was our most winning season since I have been here.” Hun head coach Kathy Quirk realized that it was going to be hard to post a third straight win over the Buccaneers. “I knew from the beginning it was going to be a tough game,” said Quirk. “They always say it is tough to beat a team for a third time.” Hun battled hard, getting base runners in scoring position in the second and fourth before scoring in the fifth in a fielder’s choice by senior Kayla Hampton. “We did hit the ball but not like we have been hitting,” lamented Quirk, noting that 24 balls were hit out of play with some batters fouling off six or seven pitches. “We couldn’t capitalize.” Quirk thought Babuschak surely had a hit when she smacked the liner in the seventh. “She got robbed on that last play,” said Quirk. “The shortstop made a beautiful play; you can’t take anything away from her.” Hun freshman pitcher Kobryn produced some beautiful work in a losing cause, striking out 10 with no walks as she scattered six hits. “I thought she did a nice job on the mound, she did what we asked her to do,” said Quirk of Kobryn. “The hits that they got were nothing exceptional, they were all singles.” Looking ahead, Quirk believes Hun could have an exceptional squad next year. “We are a young team, there is a lot to look forward to,” said Quirk. “We are losing two key players. When you think about the 10 girls that are returning, there is a lot of talent. There is going to be a lot of fighting next year for those starting positions. The kids are already talking

gate hit a double to center field in the first and then a homer to centerfield.” Monf ilet to wasn’t surprised to see Wehner in the middle of the action. “Wehner had a phenomenal day; he is someone that just works tirelessly throughout the year,” said Monfiletto. “He has really, really improved his approach at the plate. When he is going, it is awesome to see.” T he Raiders got some awesome pitching from junior Ryan DiMaggio in the win as he hurled a three-hit shutout with 11 strikeouts and three walks. “Ryan was fantastic today,” said Monfiletto. “Carson [Applegate] was amazing yesterday to get us here to this point.” Getting the fifth Prep A title in a row is an amazing feat for the Hun program. “It is a goal that we have every single year and it is what we work for in the offseason,” said Monfiletto. “As the season goes on, we always want to prove that we are at the top of our peers in the preps. It means a lot. Coach Jim Stone, who was at Blair and had won it four years in a row from ’12, ’13, ’14 and ’15, handed me the trophy in 2016 and said take care of this, it has been here a while.” Monfiletto has been impressed by how his players have taken care of business

this season. “This is probably the most confident team that I have coached,” said Monfiletto. “T hey tr uly believe in themselves and their own ability but they also believe in each other. If somebody has an off day, somebody else picked them up and they know it. There were a lot of times this year where I might have been a little frantic before a game and they calmed me down. That part is amazing, I really learned a lot from them.” With Hun wrapping up its season by playing Allentown on May 26 at Moody Park and at Steinert on May 29, Monfiletto is confident that his squad will keep rolling. “ T h o s e a r e t wo h u g e games,” said Monfiletto, noting that his team has already faced such tough foes this spring as Pope John XXIII, Seton Hall Prep, St. Augustine, and St. Joe’s Metuchen. “That will be fun. Steinert is a team that we want to beat every single year. It is a team that had our number for a really long time. We hope to be able to compete really well against them.” Wehner and his team mates are determined to keep competing hard to cap a brilliant 2021 campaign. “We have got to finish the job, win these next two and then move to next year,” said Wehner. “We are going to be really strong next year, but I don’t know if we will be better than this.” —Bill Alden

FINDING A WAY: Hun School third baseman Carson Wehner makes a play in recent action. Last Sunday, junior Wehner went 3-for-4 with two runs and three RBIs to help Hun defeat Lawrenceville 16-0 in the state Prep A final. It marked the fifth straight Prep A crown for the Raiders who improved to 19-2. Hun wraps up its 2021 campaign by playing Allentown on May 26 at Moody Park and at Steinert on May 29. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co.

Available for Lunch & Dinner Mmm..Take-Out 41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton www.tortugasmv.com

Events • Parties • Catering (609) 924-5143


Aaron Phogat came into his final season for the Princeton Day School boys’ tennis team this spring looking to star at singles while Oliver Silverio was simply hoping to contribute to the squad in his first varsity campaign. After some injuries and lineup juggling, senior Phogat and sophomore Silverio ended up being paired at first doubles late in the season and clicked immediately. They went on to win the state Prep B title in their flight last week as did the PDS second doubles team of senior Will Sedgley and Mark Santamaria, helping the Panthers take third in the team standings in the event behind champion Pennington and runner-up Rutgers Prep. Silverio sensed something special right away with the duo. “From our first match against Hill, we had a really good partnership, especially in terms of communication with each other and overall chemistry,” said Silverio. “That helped us through our matches, especially longer three-set matches. We encouraged each other and problem solved together.” Phogat saw the partnership as a good fit from the start as well. “I didn’t know Oliver too well, I am two years older than him,” said Phogat. “What is nice is that right off the bat, we got along really well. We had really good chemistry. What felt really nice too is that when we were on the court, we were always in synch. We always knew where we needed to be and where the other guy was. We never felt like we were disorganized.” In addition to being in synch, their styles of play meshed well. “ We b o t h h av e s o l i d g rou nds t rokes f rom t he baseline and think Aaron’s work at the net is very

good,” said Silverio. “I think it complements our baseline game because it allows us to be very opportunistic at the net, going for the aggressive shot and getting points quickly.” Taking charge at the net came naturally to Phogat. “Oliver is a bit more of a baseliner than I am, he doesn’t push net as much in singles but his net game is really strong,” said Phogat. “His confidence on the base line and my confidence at being aggressive at the net worked out really well. He was able to hammer home important cross courts at the baseline and then he would open up opportunities for me to take points at the net.” In their third match together, the pair pulled out a three-set win against Rutgers Prep to further bond going into the Prep B tourney. “I think after playing a more grueling match against people who hit a bit harder and better singles players, that really boosted our confidence a lot,” said Phogat. Silverio saw that win as critical. “I think that really increased the teamwork and the bonding between us because we started to realize more each other’s strengths and how we help each other in tough scenarios,” said Silverio. “Our overall mindset was that we were prepared for anything and we could problem solve and stay in the present in any situation.” After cruising to a 6-0, 6-0 win in the first round of Prep B tourney, Silverio and Phogat found themselves in a battle with Pennington’s Ishan Gupta and Avery Sichel in the semis, having to rally to pull out a 5-7, 7-5, 6-3 win. “After that first set, we wiped everything clean, it

was ‘new set let’s figure out what we are going to do,’” said Silverio. “We will put the past behind us, we can’t change it any more so let’s just focus on the present and playing our best. I think in the second set we just got our consistency together.” On match point, Silverio closed the deal, sliding on his knees and scraping them to return a shot at the end of an extended rally. “It got really intense because Pennington started moving us around; I had to go back and Aaron had to move forward to get a ball,” added Silverio. “First he had to dive for a shot, he popped it up and then someone hit behind him so we had to switch sides. I had to run across and I skidded on my left knee on the ground trying to scoop that out. I got up again and the Pennington team made an error and hit it into the net and that is how we won the point. I didn’t even know I was injured until I looked down and after we shook hands at the net.” In Phogat’s view, Silverio’s effort showed something about his fortitude on the court “It was definitely a really fine match point, it was a nice way to close out the match,” said Phogat. “It was an appropriate ending, it was a really good rally, especially for Oliver. It really showed his grit as a player. He is a sophomore and he still has two seasons to play. Seeing him perform like that under stress and reach balls like that is going to really set him up well for his junior and senior year.” There was less drama in the final as Phogat and Silverio posted a 6-2, 6-3 win over Rutgers Prep’s Kiran Lahiri and Anush Polamraju. “Play ing Rutgers Prep

again, we thought we could win as long we kept hammering the cross cour ts in and had aggressive net play,” said Phogat. “Our mindset against then was that we needed to be as consistent as possible with high quality of shots.” Silverio believed that pulling through the regular season meeting against the Rutgers Prep pair was a major plus going into the final. “This time we knew their playing style a bit better and we tried to play to our strengths a lot better,” said Silverio. “That combination of net work and baseline consistency allowed us to pull through.” PDS first-year head coach Michael Augsberger liked the way his team got stronger after losing their first three matches this spring. “It is always good for them to see the different levels that are out there,” said Augsberger, who previously coached at the Salesianum School in Delaware and Immaculata University. “It is a good lesson to let you know where you stand and how much work you do need to put in because you don’t learn as many lessons when you win.” With some injuries hitting the lineup, two sophomores, Josh Chu and Jason Wu, were thrust into the first singles and second singles spots, respectively. “We asked a lot of them this year because of the injuries,” said Augsberger, whose squad ended up with a 4-6 record in dual match play. “W here t hey nor mally have some time to get used to the bumps in the road, they had to be confronted with that right away.” The second doubles pair of Sedgley and Santamaria enjoyed a smoother ride. “That was the easiest decision to make, they are so inseparable that their parents will mix up their names every once in a while,” said

Augsberger of the duo which those triumphs, Augsberger posted straight-set wins in believes that all of his playeach of their matches in the ers gained some lessons in character this spring. Prep B tourney. “What I hope they got the “T hey are ver y strong players because they get most out of is that we found everything back, they are ourselves in some tense athletes. They love soccer situations between opposand that is why they are so ing player and opposing coaches, it is a skill just like tough to beat.” In putting Silverio and any stroke to be a gentlePhogat together at first man,” said Augsberger, who doubles in May, Augsberger credited assistant coach Jon went on intuition and some Brown with playing a key role in the development of input from his players. “Oliver really impressed the players this spring. “When you are pushed, with his selflessness and his willingness to put his when the stakes are so high head down and work hard and it means that much, and just the right attitude your first thought is to think towards things and being of that and individual. But to a team player,” said Augs- able to temper that and say I am representing my school, berger. “It was actually Aaron I am an ambassador for PDS who said I think Oliver and and more importantly I want I make a great team. Some- to respect the game and thing clicked in practice. my opponent, I hope that Aaron has never been shy is what they took from the about voicing what he thinks season.” Silverio will take away is best for the team, nobody knows the guys better than some great memories of his run to a title with Phogat. he does.” “It was special for both of In reflecting on seeing his three seniors prevail us, it is my first season on in the Prep B competition, the team and it is his last,” Augsberger saw the wins said Sliverio. “We both worked really as meaningful for different hard to get here. It was the reasons. “For the second doubles culmination of an unconvenguys, Mark and Will, to ac- tional season.” For Phogat, who won the complish that together, I remember in my playing Prep B title at third singles days, the accomplishments as a freshman, earning a that meant the most were state championship in his the one where you are in the final campaign was coming arms of your best pal, some- full circle in his career. one who you have come up “It definitely meant a lot with all through school,” to me, I am really glad that said Augsberger. Oliver was my partner be“I liken it to being on base cause it is a two-person when your best friend hits thing,” said Phogat, who is the home run or catching heading to Johns Hopkins the pass from your quarter- to concentrate on pre-med back who is your best friend. studies and Gohopefully to gorlinpools.com toplay That is what it is for those club tennis. Go to gorlinpools.com to two; that is real special. Aar“I could not have done it on just loves the team; I feel without him and vice versa, like he takes a lot of pride in he could not have done it WEEKLY MAINTENANCE accomplishing it with Oliver without me. It was really WEEKLY MAINTENANCE Healthy, Sparkling, because he was able to lead niceSafe, to Clean, end on win, espesomeone who never ex- Crystal-Clear Healthy, Safe,has Clean, Sparkling, cially afterPool myWater sophomore Crystal-Clear Pool perienced it before. It Water means year. I didn’t really perform more to him because of that well in the Prep B and then and the sacrifice that he has we didn’t have a season last made during the season, year. It was a nice way to going between singles and close out high school tendoubles.” nis.” In addition to savoring —Bill Alden

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

Clicking Quickly After Being Paired Up Late in Season, PDS 1st Doubles Team of Phogat/Silverio Wins Prep B

SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION NOW!

SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION NOW!

Go to gorlinpools.com Go toto gorlinpools.com to SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION NOW!

SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION NOW! Go to gorlinpools.com to SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION NOW!

Your Joy - Your Safety MAINTENANCE - Your Freedom WEEKLY Your Joy - Your Safety - Your Freedom WEEKLY MAINTENANCE Remains Our Accountability Remains Our Accountability Healthy, Safe, Clean, Sparkling, Healthy, Safe, Clean, Sparkling, Crystal-Clear Pool Water 20 Years For Over 20 Years For Over Crystal-Clear Pool Water

WEEKLY MAINTENANCE Healthy, Safe, Clean, Sparkling,

732-392-7665 732-392-7665 Crystal-Clear Pool Water

www.gorlinpools.com

www.gorlinpools.com

Your Joy - Your Safety - Your Freedom Remains Our Accountability For Over 20 Years

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. 732-392-7665

www.gorlinpools.com

Established in 1947

MASON CONTRACTORS

Your Joy - Your Safety - Your Freedom

Remains Our Accountability RESTORE-PRESERVE-ALL MASONRY

For Over 20 Years Mercer County's oldest, reliable, experienced firm. We serve you for all your masonry needs.

BRICK~STONE~STUCCO 732-392-7665 NEW~RESTORED

www.gorlinpools.com

Simplest Repair to the Most Grandeur Project, our staff will accommodate Your Joy -your Your every Safetyneed! - Your Freedom Remains Our Accountability Call us as your past generations did for over 72 years! Complete Masonry & Waterproofing For Over 20 Years Services Paul G. Pennacchi, Sr., Historical Preservationist #5.

DOUBLE PLAY: Princeton Day School boys’ tennis doubles players, from left, Will Sedgley, Oliver Silverio, Aaron Phogat, and Mark Santamaria show off the medals they earned after winning titles at the state Prep B tournament last week. Senior Phogat and sophomore Silverio prevailed at first doubles while seniors Sedgley and Santamaria won the second doubles flight. Their victories helped the Panthers take third in the team standings in the event behind champion Pennington and runner-up Rutgers Prep. (Photo provided by Michael Augsberger)

Support your community businesses. Princeton business since 1947.

609-394-7354 paul@apennacchi.com 732-392-7665

www.gorlinpools.com


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 36

Stuart

Lawrenceville

Lacrosse: Emily Ix scored three goals in a losing cause as Stuart fell 12-4 to Pennington School last Thursday in its season finale. The Tartans ended the spring with a 1-12 record.

Baseball: Hawkins Sutter had two hits in a losing cause as Lawrenceville fell 16 -0 to Hun School last Sunday in the state Prep A tournament final. The Big Red, who moved to 12-10 with the setback, play at Delbarton on May 26. S of tb a l l : S ara h Z i m merman starred as Lawrenceville defeated Blair Academy 11-3 in the state Prep A championship game last Thursday. Sophomore pitcher Zim mer man had six strikeouts and gave up three hits and also added a triple and an RBI to help the Big Red improve to 13-2. Lawrenceville hosts Pingry School on May 28. Girls’ Lacrosse: Paige Gillen led the way as Lawrencev ille edged P ing r y School 14-13 last Saturday. Gillen tallied four goals and an assist to help the Big Red move to 9-4.

PDS Baseball: Shivam Singh had a big day in a losing cause as PDS fell 16 -13 to Pennington School last Thursday. Senior standout Singh went 3 -for-5 w ith three runs and two RBIs for the Panthers, who dropped to 2-12-1. PDS plays at Pingry School on May 27. Softball: Running into a buzzsaw, PDS fell 19-4 to Gill St. Bernard’s last Monday. T he Panthers, who moved to 4-4 with the loss, were scheduled to end their season by playing at Rutgers Prep on May 24. Boys’ Lacrosse: Producing another superb defensive effort, PDS defeated Hillsborough High 6-4 last Monday. The Panthers, now 6-7, play at St. Augustine on May 26 in their season finale. Girls’ Lacrosse: Despite a big game from Tessa Caputo, PDS fell 19-11 to Mount Saint Mary Academy last Saturday. Freshman Caputo tallied four goals and two assists as the Panthers moved to 8-5. PDS is slated to end its season by playing at Hillsborough High on May 27.

Hun Boys’ Lacrosse : Falling just short in a defensive battle, Hun got edged 5-4 by Princeton Day School last Wednesday. The Raiders moved to 4-6 with the defeat. Girls’ Lacrosse : Abby O’Br ien, Maggie Maffia, and Olivia Kim each scored two goals in a losing cause as Hun fell 18 -7 to the Lawrenceville School last Wednesday. The Raiders

ended the spring with a 7-10 Princeton Day School comrecord. ing in third at seven.

Pennington

PHS

Baseball: Max Gibbard starred as Pennington edged Princeton Day School 16-13 last Thursday. Gibbard when 4-for-5 with two doubles and a triple to help the Red Raiders finish 2021 with a 7-8-1 record, Boys’ Lacrosse: Former Princeton High standout Jay Jackson, Zach Young, Jabril Belle-Walker, and Andrew Rosa each scored two goals as Pennington defeated Oratory Prep 10-7 in its season finale last Wednesday. The victory give the Red Raiders a final record of 5-5. Girls’ Lacrosse: Bridget Lawn came up big as Pennington defeated Stuart Country Day 12-4 last T h u r s d ay. L aw n t a l l i e d three goals and an assist as the Red Raiders posted their fourth straight win to end the spring with an 8-5 record. Boys’ Tennis: Sweeping all three singles flights, Pennington won the state Prep B tennis tournament last week. Josh Finkle posted a 6-4, 4-6, 6-4 win over Rutgers Prep’s Tanay Patil in the first singles final while Theo Sardain topped Ales Jules of Rutgers Prep 2-6, 6-3, 7-6 (10-8) in the second singles title match. Josh Song posted a 6-0, 6-1 win over Montclair Kimberley’s Rohan Moniz at third singles. In the team standings, Pennington finished with 10 points with Rutgers Prep taking second with eight and

Baseball : Sparked by Flynn Kinney, PHS edged Lawrence High 10-8 last Friday. Kinney went 3-for-3 with four RBIs as the Tigers improved to 9-6. PHS hosts WW/P-North on May 26 and WW/P-South on May 27. S of tb a l l : Ju n ior s tar Molly Brown had two hits, two runs, and two RBIs but it wasn’t enough as PHS fell 12-6 to Ewing last Friday. The Tigers, who moved to 2-12 with the loss, host Hightstown on May 26 and WW/P-North on May 28. G olf : Adam Macmillan led the way as top-seeded PHS defeated fourth-seeded Hopewell Valley 151-170 in the CVC Boys’ Match Play Tournament semis last Friday. Senior star MacMillan shot a one-under 34 in the nine-hole competition as the Tigers improved to 13-0. PHS will face second-seeded WW/P-North in the final. In addition, the Tiger girls made the final of their CVC Tournament as fifth-seeded PHS knocked off top-seeded WW/P South 170-172 in the semis last Friday. The Tigers will take on second-seeded WW/P-North in the CVC final.

LET THE PARTY START!

Quality furniture, grills, firepits, heaters & accessories

PATIO DESIGN

PATIO DESIGN

FREE IN-STORE, AT-HOME OR VIRTUAL CONSULTATION. VISIT SKIBARN.COM FOR INFO. FREE LOCAL DELIVERY SKI BARN’S OWN DELIVERY & SET-UP CREW DELIVERY TO THE JERSEY SHORE

SKIBARN.COM

LAWRENCEVILLE • 609-530-1666

SHREWSBURY • 732-945-3900

PARAMUS • 201-445-9070

WAYNE • 973-256-8585

Local Sports Princeton Junior Football Recent Results

In Senior Division (ages 11-14) action in the Princeton Junior Football League ( PJFL) last weekend, the Alizio Sealcoating Giants topped the PBA 130 Vikings 41-35 with Jack Lenkowsky leading the way for the victors, rushing for a touchdown, making a TD reception and returning an interception for a score. Corey Woodson had two receiving touchdowns for the Giants and threw a TD pass to Henry Wilhelm. For the PBA 130 Vikings, Harry Stournaras threw four touchdown passes with Griffin Ettenberg making three touchdown receptions. In other Senior games, the 5C Jets defeated the McCaffrey’s Bills 40-21. Fletcher H a r r i s o n , M a x C a r u s o, Jaiden Jain-Edwards, and Jack Dowling each scored touchdowns for the Jets with Nathaniel Mayer adding an interception return for a TD. The Petrone Associates Steelers edged the Christine’s Hope Colts 3936. For the Steelers, Travis Petrone had an interception return for a TD, threw three touchdowns to Michael Bess, ran for a touchdown, and caught a touchdown from Bess. Wyatt Arshan led the Colts offense with three TD catches. Jacob Reese and Will Bednar added a touchdown apiece. In Juniors ( ages 8 -11) games, the Christine’s Hope Steelers defeated the UOA Giants 21-6 as Liam McCloskey connected with PJ Ross for a touchdown and Lucas Rameriez added a score on the ground. John Monica rushed for a touchdown for the Giants. The Princeton Global Jets topped the COE

STROKES OF BRILLIANCE: Princeton High boys’ tennis first singles player Jonathan Gu displays his form last Thursday as second-seeded PHS defeated third-seeded WW/P-North 5-0 in the CVC Tournament semifinals. The Tigers, who improved to 11-0 with the victory, will face top-seeded WW/P-South in the CVC final. In addition, PHS will start play in the Central Jersey Group 3 sectional where they are seeded first and will host eighth-seeded Brick Memorial in a quarterfinal match in May 26. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) Smiles Patriots 24-12. Abe Arshon received two touchdown passes from Maddox Slosberg and threw a touchdown pass to Leo Miele in the win with Michael Shaver adding a touchdown on the ground. For the COE Smiles Patriots, Sam Gibe threw a touchdown pass to Riordan Knox and caught a TD pass from Devan Jayachandran. In the Rookie Division (ages 6-8), the Princeton Global Tigers edged the COE Smiles Irish 42-35. The Tigers were led by Hugh Murphy w ith five touchdowns and Matthew Ahn, who had an interaction return for a TD. Theo Salganik scored three touchdowns for the Irish in a losing cause.

PDS Boys’ Hoops Coach Holding Summer Camps

P r i nce ton Day S cho ol boys’ basketball head coach Eugene Burroughs will be holding co - ed basketball camps this summer for boys and girls in grades 3-10. Burroughs, who has extensive experience coaching at the college level and for the Philadelphia 76ers organization, will be offering NBA-style skills training and shooting sessions. During the morning session of camp, the focus will be on learning basketball fundamentals based on principles Burroughs has learned at the professional level. In the afternoon session, campers will delve into art of shooting by getting schooled on the proper techniques needed to be a great shooter, starting with the basics and expanding into more advanced drills. T he goal is for ever y camper to develop and learn great habits that will impact their basketball future to take their game to the next level. For the younger campers, the focus will be on cre-

ating a fun environment for them to learn the basic fundamentals of the game. The camps will take place at the PDS Athletic Center during the weeks of June 2125, July 12-16, and July 1923. The morning sessions will run from 8:30-11:30 a.m. with the afternoon sessions going from 12:15-3:15 p.m. Participants may sign up for either the morning or afternoon session or for both. The cost of the week for just the morning or afternoon session is $280. The cost of a week doing both sessions is $540. For more information and to register, log onto pds.org/basketballcamp.

Real Central NJ Women’s Soccer Prevails in Opener

The Real Central NJ Soccer (RCNJ) women’s squad edged North Jersey Alliance 1-0 last Sunday to win its debut in the Women’s Premier Soccer League. Julia Obst scored a first half goal to provide the margin of victory in the Metropolitan Division, South Conference contest. RCNJ goalkeeper Chloe Wieczkowski made several key saves to preserve the shutout while center back Riley Kennett starred on the back line. The RCNJ women are next at home on June 4 when they host Calcio at Mercer County Community College.

JUNCTION BARBER SHOP

33 Princeton-Hightstown Rd Ellsworth’s Center (Near Train Station)

799-8554 Tues-Fri: 10am-6pm; Sat 8:30am-3:30pm


Catherine (Kay) Trotter

Catherine (Kay) Ann Carswell (Pallrand) Trotter died peacefully May 16, 2021 surrounded by her family in Princeton, NJ. Born in Ticonderoga, New York, on December 2, 1927, she was the daughter of the late Watson Goulder Carswell and Mary (Moore) Carswell. Kay will be greatly missed by Hale, her treasured husband of 43 years, her children Nannette and Stephen Pallrand (Rachel Mayeri), and her cherished grandchildren Eli and Cora. Kay is also survived by her beloved brother John

points in between. Kay and Hale would never miss an opera in New York City or a show at the Metropolitan Museum where they were members. Most cherished were their summers at the family cottage on Lake Cecebe in Ontario, Canada. Spending time with family, nephews and nieces, neighbors, listening to the call of the loons, or waking to watch the northern lights created enduring memories. Kay was known for her gregarious personality. She created many lasting and deep friends over the years with students, colleagues, fellow swimmers, acquaintances, her doctors, and the waitresses at her favorite restaurants. Kay thrived on personal interaction and close friendship. She was an avid tennis player, swimmer, and skier who loved art, architecture, and knitting. She was a passionate liberal in politics. A memorial will be held at the Mather-Hodge funeral home in Princeton on Thursday, May 27 between 3 and 5 p.m., with an informal service at 4 p.m. Burial will take place at 2 p.m. Saturday, May 29 at the Evergreen Cemetery in Salem, New York. In lieu of flowers please make donations to the “Kay Trotter Gynecologic Oncology Fund” at the Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Donations can be made online at http:// giving.temple.edu/KayTrotterFund, scroll down to the fund name. Donations can also be mailed to Temple Institutional Advancement, P.O. Box 827651, Philadelphia, PA 19182-7651. Memo line should note that the donation is in-support of the “Kay Trotter Gynecologic Oncology Fund.”

PERSONAL PAPERWORK SOLUTIONS...AND MORE, INC.

Are you drowning in paperwork? • Your own? •Your parents? •Your small business? Get help with: •Paying bills and maintaining checking accounts •Complicated medical insurance reimbursements •Quicken or organizing and filing

also survived by his special friends Dan Troester, Karl Heine, and Randy Hitz, all of York. Prosper is preceded in death by his parents, both wives, and good friend Mel Preslicka. A g raveside service will be held on Thursday, May 27, 2021, 1 p.m. at the Princeton Cemetery.

Memorials may be directed to the American Diabetic Association. Condolences may be emailed to metz@metzmortuary.com. Messages will be given to the family. Arrangements are under the direction of the MatherHodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

PRINCETON’S FIRST TRADITION Prosper F. Cima Jr. Prosper F. Cima Jr., age 79, of York, NE, died Tuesday, May 4, 2021 at York. He was born June 4, 1941 in Princeton, New Jersey, to Prosper Sr., and Adeline (Bell) Cima. Prosper worked with the New York State Police Department. He was a member of St. Joseph Catholic Church in York. On January 1, 2000, he was united in marriage to Sara Eggers at Schroon Lake, New York. Prosper served his countr y in the United States Army, where he was a Rifle Expert. He also worked for Dan’s Construction, Wy-Ad, and Hitz Towing in York as a general handyman. Prosper loved spending time outdoors, and would offer anybody a helping hand. He enjoyed his dog Harvard, and his cat Sticker. Prosper is survived by his son Prosper Cima III of New Jersey, special friends the Connie Horn Family of York, his aunts, Edith Montano and Peg Foster both of Charleston, South Carolina, uncle Robert (Claudette) Bell of Charleston, South Carolina, and two grandchildren. He is

ONLINE

WORSHIP SERVICE CHAPEL.PRINCETON.EDU

SERNA-WALLENDER DIRECTORYALEXOF RELIGIOUS SERVICES DIRECTORY OF DIRECTORY OF 609-371-1466

Insured • Notary Public • www.ppsmore.com

Specialized Services for Seniors and Their Families, Busy Professionals

Guest Preaching Sunday, May 30, 2021

University Chaplain at Trinity University San Antonio, TX

IGIOUSRELIGIOUS SERVICES SERVICES

Rite I or All Ages Rite II ion following

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CHAPEL

Tuesday

ONLINE CHAPEL.PRINCETON.EDU

Rev. Jenny Smith Walz, Lead Pastor 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist Rev. Erik Skitch Matson, Discipleship Pastor Sunday Worship at 10 am Wednesday Weekly Meditation Tuesdays at Noon Wherever you are onEucharist your journey ofwith faith, you are 5:30 p.m. Holy Healing Prayer Join the livestream archived services! always welcome toor worship with us at:

rist

ealing Prayer

re, Director of Music

Sunday 8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I 9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following

Princeton’s First Tradition

ECUMENICAL CHRISTIAN WORSHIP REV. ALISON L. BODEN, PH.D. Dean of Religious Life and of the Chapel

REV. DR. THERESA S. THAMES Associate Dean of Religious Life and of the Chapel

PREMIERES SUNDAY ATyou 8 AM Wherever youEACH are on your journey of faith, are always welcome to worship with us at:

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

First Church of Christ, Witherspoon StreetFirst Presbyterian Churchof Christ, 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org Church 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ Scientist, Princeton Wherever you are on your journey of faith,

trinityprinceton.org

Church Church ton ceton

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

ceton astor stor astor 30 p.m. 30and p.m. 5:00 p.m. and 5:00 7:00 p.m. p.m. 7:00 p.m.

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton SNassau undayS Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

Scientist, Princeton come worship with us

10:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton and Youth Bible Study 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org Adult Bible Classes (A multi-ethnic congregation) Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m.

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton 214 Nassau Street, Christian Science Reading RoomPrinceton Walter Nolan, Pastor Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. Msgr. Rosie, Pastor 609-924-1666 • Fax16 609-924-0365 178 Nassau Street, Princeton 9:00Msgr. am —Joseph Adult Formation Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor witherspoonchurch.org ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4p.m. Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 Visit csprinceton.org for more information 10:00 am — Vigil Holy Eucharist II p.m. Mass: 5:30 Christian Science Reading Room Sunday:Saturday 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. 178 Nassau Street, Princeton 11:00 am — Coffee Hour Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. Our Services are held in the Church 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 Mass5:00 in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. pm — Compline following Social Distancing Guidelines ¡Eres siempre bienvenido!

All services are online. Join us at www.trinityprinceton.org

The Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector, The Rev. Canon Dr. Kara Slade, Assoc. Rector, The Rev. Joanne Epply-Schmidt, Assoc. Rector, Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 • www.trinityprinceton.org

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 10:00 a.m. Worship Service

During 10:00 this timea.m. of COVID-19 crisis, Witherspoon is finding new Children’s Sunday School and Youth Studydoors may be closed, ways to continue our worship. WhileBible our sanctuary Bible Classes church is open and we willAdult find new avenues to proclaim the Gospel and to (Acontinue multi-ethnic congregation) as one faith community! 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365

Join us for worshipwitherspoonchurch.org on Facebook Live every Sunday at 10:00 a.m.

Sunday Church Service and Sunday School at 10:30 am Wednesday Testimony meetings at 7:30 pm

Recorded and live stream sermons can also be found on our website - witherspoonchurch.org

Our Christian Science Reading Room is now open, 178 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ

Join our mailing list to receive notices of our special services, bible study and virtual fellowship. During the COVID-19 crisis our church office is closed, however, please email witherspoon@verizon.net or leave a message at our church office and a staff member will get back to you.

Monday through Saturday 10am-4pm. Curbside pickup and free local delivery are available. Please call ahead 609-924-0919

Church office: (609) 924-1666

37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

Obituaries

(Helen) — predeceased by her sister-in-law Elaine (Kirby) Carswell — and Elaine and John’s five wonderful children, Jim, Sue, Bill, Mandy, and Sarah. She will also be dearly missed by her sister-in-law Jean Trotter (predeceased husband Bernard) — their children Rex (Eliza) and Tory (Tibor), and Rex and Eliza’s children, John, Thomas, Andrew, Marie, Philip, Claire, and Martin. Kay attended Clark University graduating in 1949 with a BA in English Literature, later receiving her MEd from Columbia University. Kay married George Pallrand and soon after they moved to Ann Arbor, Michigan, where Kay had her first teaching job in rural Michigan. Kay put her teaching on hold while raising her two children. After the family moved to Princeton, and the children were in school, Kay returned to her love of teaching, taking a position with the Princeton school system where she taught grades 5–7 for over 50 years. Kay met Hale in 1976, they fell in love and married in June of 1977. Hale was a professor of Mathematics and Computer Science at Princeton University and they enjoyed sharing their careers, sabbaticals, traveling to visit Nannette in Brazil, conferences in Finland, and


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 38

to place an order:

“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS VISA

MasterCard

The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. HOLIDAY WEEKEND YARD SALES! advertise with the TOWN TOPICS Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396.

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon

tf

NASSAU STREET PROPERTIES: 1 BR apartment, 1/2 block from Nassau Street. Parking, hardwood floors & natural light. 3 BR apartment, 1/2 block from Nassau Street. New bath, parking. Call (609) 751-6051. 05-26-3t

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations

HOLIDAY WEEKEND YARD SALES! advertise with the TOWN TOPICS Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396.

Irene Lee, Classified Manager

tf tf • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ MOVING SALE: 79 Parkside Drive, MOVING SALE: 79 Parkside Drive, HOUSECLEANING: CARPENTRY/ CARPENTRY/ gmail.com Princeton. Saturday & Sunday,May 29 words in length. Princeton.•Saturday & Sunday,May 25 words or29less:HOME $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 Experienced, English speaking, IMPROVEMENT HOME IMPROVEMENT Text (only) (609) 638-6846 & 30 from 10-4. Furniture, art, house& 30 from 10-4. Furniture, art, housegreat references, reliable with own in the Princeton• area since 1972. $50.00 in the Princeton area since 1972. 3 weeks: $40.00 4 weeks: • 6 weeks: $72.00 Office • 6 (609) month and annual discount rates 216-7936 wares, toys, clothes, records, DVDs, available. wares, toys, clothes, • records, DVDs, No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, books, etc. books, etc. Princeton Green cleaning available. • Ads with linecleaning. spacing: $20.00/inch • all boldReferences face type: $10.00/week (609) 466-0732 (609) 466-0732 05-26 Susan, (732) 873-3168. I have my 05-26

HUGE GARAGE SALE: Moving after 48 years! Furniture, vintage clothes, books, antiques, housewares, collectibles & much more! Saturday, May 29, 9 am-2 pm. 5 Carter Brook Lane, Princeton. 05-26 MULTI-FAMILY MOVING /YARD SALE: 5 Overbrook Drive, Princeton, NJ. corner of Snowden Ln & Overbrook Dr. Saturday, June 5th, Rain Date Sunday, June 6th. Time: 8:30 AM to 3:00 PM. Antiques, artwork, bikes, books, clothing, furniture, glassware, golf clubs, kitchen items, tools & toys. 05-26-2t KOALA CLEANING SERVICE, LLC:

tf

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

Residential & Commercial cleaning. 20% off your first cleaning! Phone: (267) 990-5901 info@koalacleaningservice.com www.koalacleaningservice.com Company is insured.

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

04-07-8t

SUMMER RENTAL IN PRINCETON’S WESTERN SECTION:

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188.

3 BR, 2.5 baths. $3,600/month. Call Mike (518) 521-7088.

05-05-4t

05-05-6t

05-26-3t HOUSECLEANING/ HOUSEKEEPING: Professional cleaning service. Experienced, references, honest & responsible. Reasonable price. Call Ursula (609) 635-7054 for free estimate.

•Green Company

own PPE for your protection.

HIC #13VH07549500

05-05-9t ANNA CLEANING SERVICE: Polish precision & detail. Residential & commercial. Available cleaning by owner. Very good references from long-term clients. Free estimates. Please call or text Anna, (609) 4563583. 05-12-8t LAWN MAINTENANCE: Prune shrubs, mulch, cut grass, weed, leaf clean up and removal. Call (609) 954-1810; (609) 240-6404. 03-31-14t HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21

06-03-21 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

HUGE GARAGE SALE: Moving after 48 years! Furniture, vintage clothes, books, antiques, housewares, collectibles & much more! Saturday, May 29, 9 am-2 pm. 5 Carter Brook Lane, Princeton. 05-26 MULTI-FAMILY MOVING /YARD SALE: 5 Overbrook Drive, Princeton, NJ. corner of Snowden Ln & Overbrook Dr. Saturday, June 5th, Rain Date Sunday, June 6th. Time: 8:30 AM to 3:00 PM. Antiques, artwork, bikes, books, clothing, furniture, glassware, golf clubs, kitchen items, tools & toys. 05-26-2t

tf

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240.

tf KOALA CLEANING SERVICE, LLC: PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Residential & Commercial cleaning. Available for after school babysitting 20% off your first cleaning! in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Phone: (267) 990-5901 Princeton areas. Please text or call info@koalacleaningservice.com (609) 216-5000 www.koalacleaningservice.com Go to gorlinpools.com to tf Company is insured. SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION NOW! 04-07-8t SUMMER RENTAL Go to gorlinpools.com to IN PRINCETON’S ROSA’S WESTERN SECTION: CLEANING SERVICE LLC 3 BR, MAINTENANCE 2.5 baths. $3,600/month. Call Offering professional cleaning WEEKLY services in the Princeton community Mike (518) 521-7088. SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION NOW!

A Gift Subscription!

WEEKLY MAINTENANCE Healthy, Safe, Clean, Sparkling,

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22

tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

“Regardless of the destination, all roads lead home." —H.L. Balcomb

05-26-3t for more than 28 years! Weekly, biHealthy, Safe,move-in/move-out Clean, Sparkling, Crystal-Clear Pool Water weekly, monthly, HOUSECLEANING/ services Crystal-Clear for houses, apartments, Pool Water ofHOUSEKEEPING: fices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning service. cleaning options! Outstanding refer- Professional ences, reliable, licensed & trustwor- Experienced, references, honest thy. If you are looking for a phenom- & responsible. Reasonable price. enal, thorough & consistent cleaning, Call Ursula (609) 635-7054 for free don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. estimate. 05-05-6t

05-05-4t

tf

Go to gorlinpools.com Go toto gorlinpools.com to SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION NOW!

SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION NOW! Go to gorlinpools.com to SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION NOW!

Your Joy - Your Safety MAINTENANCE - Your Freedom WEEKLY Your Joy - Your Safety - Your Freedom WEEKLY MAINTENANCE Remains Our Accountability Remains Our Accountability Healthy, Safe, Clean, Sparkling, Healthy, Safe, Clean, Sparkling, Crystal-Clear Pool Water 20 Years For Over 20 Years For Over Crystal-Clear Pool Water

WEEKLY MAINTENANCE Healthy, Safe, Clean, Sparkling,

732-392-7665 732-392-7665 Crystal-Clear Pool Water

www.gorlinpools.com

www.gorlinpools.com

Your Joy - Your Safety - Your Freedom Remains Our Accountability For Over 20 Years

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. 732-392-7665

www.gorlinpools.com

Established in 1947

MASON CONTRACTORS

Your Joy - Your Safety - Your Freedom

RESTORE-PRESERVE-ALL MASONRY Remains Our Accountability

For Over 20 Years Mercer County's oldest, reliable, experienced firm. We serve you for all your masonry needs.

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

BRICK~STONE~STUCCO 732-392-7665 NEW~RESTORED

www.gorlinpools.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

Simplest Repair to the Most Grandeur Project, our staff will accommodate Your Joy - your Your every Safetyneed! - Your Freedom Our Accountability Call usRemains as your past generations did for over 72 years! Complete Masonry & Waterproofing For Over 20 Years Services Paul G. Pennacchi, Sr., Historical Preservationist #5. Support your community businesses. Princeton business since 1947.

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

609-394-7354 paul@apennacchi.com 732-392-7665

www.gorlinpools.com

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


Real Estate

Mortgage

Insurance

Closing Services

Realto

We i c h e r t R e a l t o r s

Color Key

Specifications

ns

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

Realtors

Realtors

Weichert Black Print: C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

Real Estate

Mortgage

Insurance

Closing Services

PRINCE TON COLLEC TION

Real Estate

17LeabrookLane.info $1,100,000 Specifications

Real Estate

Mortgage

Insurance

Mortgage

Insurance

Realtors

Real Estate

Closing Services

We i c h e r t R e a l t o r s

Closing Services Specifications

Specifications

Real Estate Color Key

Mortgage

243CherryHillRoad.info We i c h e r t$4,700 R e aper l t omonth rs

40NorthHarrisonStreet.info $885,000

We i c h e r t R e a l t o r s

ltors

Realtors

Weich Print: C-0,M Digita Hex

Insuranc

34MayburyHillRoad.info $1,45

Mortgage

Insurance

Closing Se

FOR MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO Weichert Black Print: C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

FOR MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO

PRINCETON NCETON

Weichert Yellow Print: C-0,M-0,Y-92,K-0 Digital: Hex

$1,649,000

$1,649,000

the heartPrinceton, of downtown few blocks from Princeton University, stunning the home thatand combines the charm and appeal of e heart of In downtown a few Princeton, blocks froma Princeton University, sits a stunning homesits thata combines charm appeal of a century home with a spacious modern open floor plan.Thoft Architect Kirsten remodeledthis and fullyinrenovated ntury old home with aold spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten remodeled andThoft fully renovated home 2007 with this home in 2007 with spectacular detail toand both traditional and modern amenities. Thenorenovations nomaintain expensethe to character carefully of maintain the character of the home, tacular detail to both traditional modern amenities. The renovations spare expense to spare carefully the home, updated for today’s staircase and mouldings, pocket doors, floors, and extensive built-ins ated for today’s lifestyle. Customlifestyle. staircaseCustom and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, andhardwood extensive built-ins throughout make it boththroughout make it both MORE PHOTOS ANDand FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO timate family space and an entertainer’s dream come9FairwayDrive.info true. dream anFOR intimate family space an entertainer’s come$1,165,000 true. 3MountLucasRoad.info $999,000 15JeffersonRoad.info $1,125,000 102SnowdenLane.info $875,

CETON $1,649,000 spacious entrance hall opens into the room tin ceiling, pocket The cabinets, The spacious entrance hallfamily opens intowith the original family room with and original tin doors. ceiling, andgourmet pocket kitchen doors. with Thecustom gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets,

less-steel appliances, and enormous island theisland light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful The great&room heart of downtown Princeton,pantry a few blocks from Princeton University, sits a stunning homeoverlooks that combines thelight-filled charm and appeal of room with stainless-steel appliances, pantry andoverlooks enormous the great built-inbar. bookcases beautiful bar. The great room ury to old a home with adining spacious modern open floor plan. a Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 with ns formal room that overlooks wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indoor/ opens to a formal dining room that overlooks a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indoor/ cular detail to both traditional and modern amenities. The renovations spare no expense to carefully maintain the character of the home, oor entertainment space. A separate mudroom with cubbies and tons built-ins of cubbies storage along with a powder complete the first floor. d for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors,built-in hardwood floors, and extensive throughout it both outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom with built-in andmake tons of storageroom along with a powder room complete the first floor.

Realtors

mate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true.

eat upstairs to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a Retreat the master with endoors. suiteThe walk-in steamwith shower. Just down hallwayheated are two additional acious entrance hall opensupstairs into the family room with originalbedroom tin ceiling, and pocket gourmet kitchen custom cabinets, lace the other a wallto ofisland floor-to-ceiling woodgreat built-in bedrooms share hall bath with the a BainUltra Jacuzzi tub. bedrooms one with a s-steeland appliances, pantrywith and enormous overlooks the light-filled room closets. with built-inThese bookcases & beautiful bar. The a great room

fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub.

o a formal dining room that overlooks a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indoor/ rcrown entertainment A separate with built-in tonstwo of storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. built-in jewelspace. of this homemudroom is the third floorcubbies whichand has additional spacious bedrooms, featuring

• Services • Mortgage • the Real Estate Insurance Closing Services The crown jewel of •this home isand floor which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks,Closing window seat closets. two bedrooms full bath athird bonus sitting area. upstairs toThe the master bedroom withshare en suitea walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a

The twowood bedrooms share a bedrooms full bathshare anda hall a bonus area. e and the otherand with aclosets. wall of floor-to-ceiling built-in closets. These bath with sitting a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub.

Rea

Realtors

bookcases, window seat • Mortgage • Insurance Real Estatedesks,

fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has wn jewel of this home is the third floor which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat fenced in backyard with Ipe the wood deck offers terrific outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has With ample off-street leave at home and stroll space aroundfor town. sets. The two The bedrooms shareparking a full bath you and acan bonus sitting area.cars

218GallupRoad.info 343JeffersonRoad.info $1,548,000 it all. With $1,329,000 ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at$1,347,500 home and stroll around154ChristopherDrive.info town.

ced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has ith ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town.

If you want your home featured, contact me:

If you wantReal your Estate home featured, contact me: • Mortgage • Insurance

If you want your home featured, contact me:

Beatrice Bloom

Closing Services

43EttlCircle.info $1,350,000 / $7,000

Real Estate

Mortgage

Insu

PRINCE TON CO

Beatrice Bloom Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

PRINCE TON COLLEC TION Beatrice Bloom

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

| BeatriceBloom.com Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

Princeton | 609-921-1900 FOR MOREOffice PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO PRINCETON

$1,649,000

In the heart of downtown Princeton, a few blocks from Princeton University, sits a stunning home that combines the charm and appeal of a century old home with a spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 with spectacular detail to both traditional and modern amenities. The renovations spare no expense to carefully maintain the character of the home, updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout make it both 117LeabrookLane.info $1,100,000 40NorthHarrisonStreet.info $885,000 Lane.info $1,100,000 $885,000 243CherryHillRoad.info $4,700 per month 34MayburyHillRoad.info $1,450,000 an intimate family40NorthHarrisonStreet.info space and an entertainer’s dream come true.

NEW LISTING in Princeton - $1,875,000 For photos and floorplan visit 68WesterlyRoad.info

2

The spacious hall opens the family roomSection with original tinwithin ceiling, and pocket The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, “Splendid” is the onlyentrance word to describe thisinto traditional Western dwelling a short distancedoors. to Palmer Square! Its award-winning renovation personifies stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous island overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great room taste andopens elegance, while atdining the same time creating an ambiance of comfort and relaxation. Timeless architecture and charmingarea details combineas to an offer residents a to a formal room that overlooks a wraparound porch. 15LINDENLANE.INFO The custom doors allow for diningFOR and porch to function AND indoor/ PLAN, V MORE PHOTOS FLOOR FOR MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT FOR MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT true work-of-art. FOR MORE PHOTOS AND space. FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO outdoor entertainment A separate mudroom with built-in cubbies and tons of storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. 15LINDEN The spacious, free-flowing interior is light-filled, encompassing sets of French doors and a variety of customized windows, including Palladian upstairs. The PRINCETON PRINCETON PRINCETON Retreat upstairs to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are $1,649,000 two additional bedrooms one with a $1,649,000 focus onfireplace light begins at the entrance. A glass-paned French-style front door and broad entryway openshare todowntown a full-length view outdoor Mahogany deck. University, Both and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms a hall bath with aofBainUltra heated Jacuzzi In the heart of Princeton, athe few from Princeton In the heart of downtown Princeton, a few blocks from Princeton University, sitstub. a stunning homesit t n the heartPrinceton, of downtown few blocks from Princeton University, stunning home thatand combines the charm and appeal of blocks downtown a few Princeton, blocks froma Princeton University, sits a stunning homesits thata combines the charm appeal of a century home with aand spacious modern open plan.Thoft Architect entertaining and relaxed living opportunities abound. French doors in the formal room, family room, room to floor the large-scale deck. Kirsten aremodeled century old home with aold spacious modern open floor plan.open Architect Kirsten remodeled andT century home with a spacious modern open floor plan.Thoft Architect Kirsten Thoft and fully renovated this home indining 2007 with ome with sophisticated aold spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 with The crown jewel ofand thismodern home is the thirdThe floor which hasspare two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat spectacular detail tocharacter both traditional and modern amenities. The renovations spectacular detail to both traditional and modern renovations spare no expense to spar caref pectacular detail archways toand both traditional renovations nomaintain expense to character carefully maintain of amenities. the home, ail to bothCurved traditional modern amenities. The renovations no expense to carefully the of the home, leadThe thetwo waybedrooms from oneamenities. room tospare another, enhancing the beautiful decor. Aupdated charming den isthe also filled with light, andThe offers themouldings, captivating addition and closets. share a full bath and a bonus sitting area. for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and pocket doors, updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, andhard ext pdated for today’s staircase and mouldings, pocket doors, floors, and extensive built-ins ay’s lifestyle. Customlifestyle. staircaseCustom and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, andhardwood extensive built-ins throughout make it boththroughout make it both FOR MORE PHOTOS ANDand FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO an intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true. an intimate family space an entertainer’s dream come true. of a window seat. The gourmet kitchen, appointed with state-of-the art appliances, polished black granite countertops, buffet counter, and built-in wine cooler also 83MountLucasRoad.info $999,000 9FairwayDrive.info $1,165,000 FOR MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO y space and an entertainer’s dream come true. n intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true. asRoad.info $999,000 9FairwayDrive.info 15JeffersonRoad.info 102SnowdenLane.info $875,000 The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood $1,165,000 deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories$1,125,000 to be created with family and friends. This home truly has featuresithandsome Spanish terracotta tile flooring, as does the entryway. PRINCETON $1,649,00 The spacious entrance hall opens into the family room with original tin ceiling, and pocket The The spacious entrance hall opens into the family room with original tin doors. ceiling, an all.the With ample off-street parking you leave cars The at home and stroll with around town. $1,649,000 trance hall opens into room with tin ceiling, and pocket doors. gourmet kitchen custom cabinets, he spacious entrance hallfamily opens into the original family room withcan original tinthe ceiling, and pocket doors. The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, appliances, pantry and enormous island overlooks theisland light-filled great room with built-in bo Instainless-steel the heart ofas downtown Princeton, a few blocks from Princeton University, sits aTwo stunning homeoverlooks thatbedrooms combines thelight-filled charm and appeal stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous the grea The main bedroom ensuite features a luxurious bathroom with whirlpool tub as well an adjoining sitting room and various closets. spacious share ppliances, pantry and enormous island overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great room wn Princeton, a few blocks from Princeton sits a stunning homeoverlooks that combines thelight-filled charm and appeal tainless-steel appliances, pantryUniversity, and enormous island the greatof room withto built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The greatKirsten room aopens century old home with adining spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 wa a formal room that overlooks a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining th a spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 with opens totub. aand formal dining room that overlooks a wraparound porch. custom do al dining that overlooks a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow dining and porch to function as an indoor/ spectacular detail tosoaking both traditional modern amenities. Theas renovations spare no expense to carefully maintain theThe character of the hom pens to room aaand formal dining room that overlooks a an wraparound porch. custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function anwith indoor/ hall bathroom with tub shower and ensuite has afor full bathroom witharea a large oth traditional modern amenities. The renovations spare no expense to carefullybedroom maintain theThe character of the home, outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom cubbies and tons built-ins of cubbies storage along with a updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors,built-in hardwood floors, and extensive throughout it bo nment space. A separate mudroom with cubbies and tons of cubbies storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. outdoor entertainment space. Afirst separate mudroom with built-in andmake tons o style. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors,built-in hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout it both utdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom with built-in andmake tons of storage along with a powder room complete the floor. an intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true. A finished lower e and an entertainer’s dream come true. level not only includes ample recreation, exercise, and office space but also a kitchen and two full baths, easily transforming into a separate Retreat upstairs to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway a to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Justyour downhome the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a room Retreat to the master endoors. suiteThe walk-in steamwith shower. Jusb The contact spacious entrance hall opensupstairs into the family with originalbedroom tin ceiling, and pocket gourmet kitchen custom cabine Ifdoors. you want featured, me: etreat to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just the hallway are additional bedrooms one with awith hall opensupstairs into the family room with original tin ceiling, and pocket The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, fireplace and the other with a wall ofisland floor-to-ceiling wood built-in These bedrooms share agreat hall apartment or in-law suite. Several sliding doors provide direct access tobath a down blue-stone patio and a two carport. stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous overlooks the light-filled great room closets. with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The roo other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share a hall with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These be es, pantry and enormous island overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great room replace and the aother with a wall ofcustom floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms a hall withoverlooks a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. opens share to a formal diningbath room that a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indo g room that overlooks wraparound doors allow forlook diningout and porch area to function as an indoor/ The views fromporch. the The upstairs windows upon a sea of green; a multitude of trees fill the horizon, and overlook the landscaped backyard. This also includes outdoor entertainment space. A separate with built-in tonstwo of storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. Beatrice Bloom The crown jewel of this homemudroom is the third floorcubbies whichand has additional spacious bedrooms, featuring space. A separate with built-in tonstwo of storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. built-in of this homemudroom is the third floorcubbies whichand has additional spacious bedrooms, featuring bookcases, desks, window seat The crown jewel of this home isand theathird floor which has two additional spacious andhedges closets. two bedrooms full bath bonus sitting area. he crown jewel of this home isand the third floor which has twostone-walled additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat a nostalgic foot bridge above a small meandering creek. Formal are on either side the front entrance, accompanying attractive Retreat upstairs toThe thepaired master bedroom withshare en suiteaof walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are twothe additional bedrooms one with two bedrooms share a full bath a bonus sitting area. Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a The twowood bedrooms share a bedrooms full bathshare anda hall a bonus area. fireplace and the otherand with aclosets. wall of floor-to-ceiling built-in closets. These bath with sitting a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tu nd aclosets. The twowood bedrooms share a bedrooms full bathshare anda hall a bonus area. with wall of floor-to-ceiling built-in closets. These bath with sitting a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. plantings surrounding the perimeter. 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created wit ckyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home haswhich has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, The crown jewel of this home is the truly third floor se home is the third floor which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat The fenced in backyard with Ipe the wood deck offers terrific outdoorwindow memo it all. With ample off-street parking leave cars at home and stroll space aroundfor town. and closets. The twowith bedrooms share a full bath you and acan bonus sitting area. he fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created family and friends. This home truly has eedrooms off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town. This inspired property will become a wonderful home to an equally-inspired resident! share a full bath and a bonus sitting area. 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,000 343JeffersonRoad.info $1,347,500 Princeton Office | 609-921-1900it all. With ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll arou

oad.info 343JeffersonRoad.info $1,548,000 43EttlCircle.info $1,350,000 / $7,000 per month all. With $1,329,000 ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at$1,347,500 home and stroll around154ChristopherDrive.info town. The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly h

with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has eet parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town.

it all. With ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town.

If you want your home featured, contact me:

If you want your home featured, contact me: If you want your home featured, contact me:

Beatrice Bloom Beatrice Bloom

Beatrice Bloom

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

| BeatriceBloom.com Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

If you want your home featured, contact me:

If you want your home featured, contact me: If you want your home featured, contact me:

Beatrice Bloom

Beatrice Bloom Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

Beatrice Bloom

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

| BeatriceBloom.com Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, M Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com |B Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

Princeton | 609-921-1900 FOR MOREOffice PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO

Princeton | 609-921-1900 FOR MOREOffice PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLA


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 40

AT YOUR SERVICE A Town Topics Directory

S. SANTINI CONSTRUCTION

High-Quality Home Repair & Total Home Care Service Columbus, NJ 08022

• • • • • • • •

Brick/Stone/Stucco Porches/Decks/Steps Door & Window Installation (609) 456-2063 Exterior Siding Smaller Concrete and Roof & Gutter Repair jobs Basement Waterproofing/Drainage Systems 40 Years Swing Sets/Demo & Removal Experience Heavy Equipment for Land Clearing Licensed Professional Engineer and Master Mason Available

Scott M. Moore of

MOORE’S CONSTUCTION HOME IMPROVEMENTS LLC carpenter • builder • cabinet maker complete home renovations • additions 609-924-6777

1 BR apartment, 1/2 block from Nassau Street. Parking, hardwood floors & natural light. 3 BR apartment, 1/2 block from Nassau Street. New bath, parking. Call (609) 751-6051. 05-26-3t

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner Home Repair Specialist

609-586-2130

BLACKMAN

LANDSCAPING FRESH IDEAS

Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Stone Walls and Terraces FREE CONSULTATION

PRINCETON, NJ

NASSAU STREET PROPERTIES:

609-683-4013

Family Serving Princeton 100 Years. Free Estimates

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 873-3168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 05-05-9t ANNA CLEANING SERVICE: Polish precision & detail. Residential & commercial. Available cleaning by owner. Very good references from long-term clients. Free estimates. Please call or text Anna, (609) 4563583. 05-12-8t LAWN MAINTENANCE: Prune shrubs, mulch, cut grass, weed, leaf clean up and removal. Call (609) 954-1810; (609) 240-6404. 03-31-14t HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21

Highest Quality Seamless Gutters. Serving the Princeton area for 25 years Experience and Quality Seamless Gutters Installed

3 Gutter Protection Devices that Work! Free estimates! All work guaranteed in writing!

Easy repeat gutter cleaning service offered without pushy sales or cleaning minimums!

609-921-2299

A Tradition of Quality

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations

Erick Perez

Fully insured 15+ Years Experience Call for free estimate Best Prices

(609)737-2466

Serving the Princeton Area since 1963 Find us on Facebook and Instagram

Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

609-466-2693

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

HD

HOUSE PAINTING & MORE

House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish (Benjamin Moore Green promise products)

Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read.

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com

Belle Mead Garage

I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 05-05-4t

HOUSECLEANING/ HOUSEKEEPING: Professional cleaning service. Experienced, references, honest & responsible. Reasonable price. Call Ursula (609) 635-7054 for free estimate. 05-05-6t

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE:

WE BUY CARS

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items

KOALA CLEANING SERVICE, LLC: Residential & Commercial cleaning. 20% off your first cleaning! Phone: (267) 990-5901 info@koalacleaningservice.com www.koalacleaningservice.com Company is insured. 04-07-8t

tf

(609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

tf

30 Years of Experience!

MULTI-FAMILY MOVING /YARD SALE: 5 Overbrook Drive, Princeton, NJ. corner of Snowden Ln & Overbrook Dr. Saturday, June 5th, Rain Date Sunday, June 6th. Time: 8:30 AM to 3:00 PM. Antiques, artwork, bikes, books, clothing, furniture, glassware, golf clubs, kitchen items, tools & toys. 05-26-2t

SUMMER RENTAL IN PRINCETON’S WESTERN SECTION: 3 BR, 2.5 baths. $3,600/month. Call Mike (518) 521-7088. 05-26-3t

A Gift Subscription!

American Furniture Exchange

HUGE GARAGE SALE: Moving after 48 years! Furniture, vintage clothes, books, antiques, housewares, collectibles & much more! Saturday, May 29, 9 am-2 pm. 5 Carter Brook Lane, Princeton. 05-26

(908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf HOLIDAY WEEKEND YARD SALES! advertise with the TOWN TOPICS Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf MOVING SALE: 79 Parkside Drive, Princeton. Saturday & Sunday,May 29 & 30 from 10-4. Furniture, art, housewares, toys, clothes, records, DVDs, books, etc. 05-26

NASSAU STREET PROPERTIES: 1 BR apartment, 1/2 block from Nassau Street. Parking, hardwood floors & natural light. 3 BR apartment, 1/2 block from Nassau Street. New bath, parking. Call (609) 751-6051. 05-26-3t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 873-3168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 05-05-9t ANNA CLEANING SERVICE: Polish precision & detail. Residential & commercial. Available cleaning by owner. Very good references from long-term clients. Free estimates. Please call or text Anna, (609) 4563583. 05-12-8t LAWN MAINTENANCE: Prune shrubs, mulch, cut grass, weed, leaf clean up and removal. Call (609) 954-1810; (609) 240-6404. 03-31-14t


I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf HOLIDAY WEEKEND YARD SALES! advertise with the TOWN TOPICS Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf MOVING SALE: 79 Parkside Drive, Princeton. Saturday & Sunday,May 29 & 30 from 10-4. Furniture, art, housewares, toys, clothes, records, DVDs, books, etc. 05-26 HUGE GARAGE SALE: Moving after 48 years! Furniture, vintage clothes, books, antiques, housewares, collectibles & much more! Saturday, May 29, 9 am-2 pm. 5 Carter Brook Lane, Princeton. 05-26 MULTI-FAMILY MOVING /YARD SALE: 5 Overbrook Drive, Princeton, NJ. corner of Snowden Ln & Overbrook Dr. Saturday, June 5th, Rain Date Sunday, June 6th. Time: 8:30 AM to 3:00 PM. Antiques, artwork, bikes, books, clothing, furniture, glassware, golf clubs, kitchen items, tools & toys. 05-26-2t KOALA CLEANING SERVICE, LLC: Residential & Commercial cleaning. 20% off your first cleaning! Phone: (267) 990-5901 info@koalacleaningservice.com www.koalacleaningservice.com Company is insured. 04-07-8t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 05-05-4t

41 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

Summer 2021 is sure to be fun!

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

NEW PRODUCTS ADDED WEEKLY!

SUMMER RENTAL IN PRINCETON’S WESTERN SECTION: 3 BR, 2.5 baths. $3,600/month. Call Mike (518) 521-7088. 05-26-3t HOUSECLEANING/ HOUSEKEEPING: Professional cleaning service. Experienced, references, honest & responsible. Reasonable price. Call Ursula (609) 635-7054 for free estimate. 05-05-6t NASSAU STREET PROPERTIES: 1 BR apartment, 1/2 block from Nassau Street. Parking, hardwood floors & natural light. 3 BR apartment, 1/2 block from Nassau Street. New bath, parking. Call (609) 751-6051. 05-26-3t

www.princetonmagazinestore.com

HOUSE FOR SALE BY OWNER

$1,178,000

Pat O’Connell 116Patton@gmail.com | 609-240-1333 4 Bed, 3 Bath, Office, Garage, 90’ x 148’ lot

Open House: May 29, 30, & 31 Agents welcome to contact seller

www.116Pattonave.com


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021 • 42

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co.

Custom Glass Tabletops

741 Alexander Rd, Princeton • 924-2880

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 873-3168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 05-05-9t ANNA CLEANING SERVICE: Polish precision & detail. Residential & commercial. Available cleaning by owner. Very good references from long-term clients. Free estimates. Please call or text Anna, (609) 4563583. 05-12-8t LAWN MAINTENANCE: Prune shrubs, mulch, cut grass, weed, leaf clean up and removal. Call (609) 954-1810; (609) 240-6404. 03-31-14t

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

**********

RESIDENTIAL LISTINGS No Pets & non-smoking tenants: Princeton–$3200/mo. plus utilities. SHORT TERM FURNISHED SUMMER RENTAL. 3 BR, 4 full baths, LR, DR, Eat-in Kitchen, enclosed porch, private backyard. NO PETS, NON-smoking tenant. Available NOW thru 8/31/2021 ONLY. Princeton – $3000/mo. plus utilities. 3 BR, 2 full & 2 half baths. 3 floors, 1st has a family room w/fireplace & ½ bath & garage; 2nd floor has Eat-in Kitchen, LR & ½ bath; 3rd floor has 3 BR, 2 baths & laundry. Available 6/15/2021. Princeton – $2000/mo. Includes heat, water & 1 parking space. 1st floor front to back, 3 large rooms plus an Eat-in Kitchen. Available 6/8/2021. The owner has hired a contractor to install a Washer/Dryer. Until that is done the rent will be $1900/mo. Princeton – $1900/mo. Includes heat, water & 1 parking space. 2nd floor, 1 BR, LR, Eat-in Kitchen. Available 6/8/2021. Has Laundry in the closet outside the bathroom. Princeton – $1900/mo. Includes heat, water & 1 parking space. 2nd floor, 1 BR, LR, Eat-in Kitchen. Has Laundry in the full bath. Available 7/10/2021. Princeton – $1850/mo. Includes heat, water & 1 parking space. 3rd floor, 2 BR, 1 bath, LR, DR/Office & Kitchen. NO laundry. Date available unknown. Princeton – $1700/mo. Includes heat & water. 2nd floor, 1 BR, LR & Eat-in Kitchen. Available 6/8/2021. The owner has hired a contractor to install a laundry room. When that is completed & ready for use the rent will increase to $1800/ mo. STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE Email for more information: sre.marty@gmail.com We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com

Witherspoon LET’S TALK REAL ESTATE ... Media Group MULTIPLE OFFERS IN A SELLER’S MARKET: HOW TO STAND OUT AS A BUYER

Custom Design, Printing, Bidding wars and surging house prices are the norm right now in real estate Publishing and Distribution markets coast-to-coast. Anyone looking to buy or sell a house in this market should be prepared for a multiple-offer situation. Here are some ways buyers can differentiate themselves beyond the offer amount itself.

· Newsletters

Be as financially prepared as possible. Having a mortgage pre-approval in hand is a given. Buyers who can put down a larger percentage of the down payment in cash may be more attractive to sellers.

Have few or no contingencies on the sale, such as needing to sell another property before closing. In some cases, buyers are waiving appraisal contingencies, limiting inspection demands and even waiving inspections.

· Brochures · Postcards

WEEKLY INSERTS START AT Be flexible. If you can accommodate a quick closing, or let the seller stay in their home longer, that may place you in a better position than other ONLY 10¢ PER HOUSEHOLD. · Books buyers.

SUMMER CAMP LOOKING for a cook and a boating counselor. Located on beautiful Adirondack lake. Call Emily (609) 651-7241. 05-26

SALESFORCE DEVELOPER:

JOB CODE 1224 (Digital Dhara LLC, Princeton, NJ) Wrks w/stakeholders of bus divisions us’g agile methodology to gather doc rqmts. Dsgn & dvlp solut’ns based on functional, migrat’n & Integrat’n rqmts. Review’g test cases provided by the QA Team & provid’g feedback. Us’g Sandbox for test’g & migrat’n the code to deploymt instance after test’g. Uses tools such as Jira, TIBCO, SFDC Platform, REST API’s & Java. Master’s deg in Comp Sci./ Info Systs or rel +12 mths of wrk exp. Loc’n: Princeton, NJ & various unanticipated loc’ns w/ the U.S., reloc may be req’d. Please refer to job code & email res to: hr@digitaldhara.com 05-26

Get the scoop from

SYSTEMS ENGINEER SENIOR

(#6562): Bach deg (or forgn equiv) in Comp Sci, Engnrng, or rel + 5 yrs exp (or Master’s + 3 yrs exp). Use Apache, Tomcat, Jboss and Redhat, Linux and Windows Server Operating Systems to deliver software to target infrastructure. Multiple openings. F/T. Educational Testing Service. Princeton, NJ. Send CV to: Ritu Sahai, ETS, 660 Rosedale Road, MS-03D, Princeton, NJ 08541. No calls/recruiters. 05-26

SOFTWARE DEVELOPER LEAD

(#6557): Master’s deg (or forgn equiv) in Comp Sci, Comp Apps, Comp Info Systs, Engnrng, or rel + 3 yrs exp (or Bach + 5). Use J2EE, Spring, Rest, Kendo, AWS technologies, Hibernate, JQuery, Oracle, Waterfall & Agile to lead software dvlpmt teams, coordinate business analysis activity & oversee software development. F/T. Educational Testing Service. Princeton, NJ. Send CV to: Ritu Sahai, ETS, 660 Rosedale Rd, MS-10J, Princeton, NJ 08541. No calls/recruiters. 05-26

Witherspoon Media Group

Weekly Inserts Custom Design, Printing, only 10¢ per househ Get the best reach at the best rate! WEEKLY INSERTS START AT ONLY 10¢ PER HOUSEHOLD.

Weekly Inserts Weekly Inserts only 10¢ per only household. 10¢ per house

Working with a real estate agent you trust is also important, so that canbest Getyou the depend on their skills and expertise when it comes to negotiating a deal.

reach at the best rate!

· Catalogues

Publishing and Distribution

Get the best reach at the best

• Postcards · Newsletters · Annual Reports • 8.5x11” flyers 32 CHAMBERS STREET PRINCETON, NJ 08542 · Brochures Witherspoon Media Group • Menus Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker PHONE (609) 924-1416 Princeton Office 609-921-1900 | 609-577-2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com FAX (609) 228-5151 MARTHA F. STOCKTON, • Booklets · Postcards For additional infoBROKER-OWNER contact: Custom Design, Printing, • Trifolds melissa.bilyeu@ · Books Publishing and Distribution witherspoonmediagroup.com • Post its · Catalogues • We can accomodate • Postcards · Newsletters almost anything! · Brochures

• Postca • 8.5″ x 1 • Flyers • Menus • Bookle etc...

Get the best reachGet at the best rate! reach at the be HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21

• Pos · Annual Reports • 8.5″ x 11″ • 8.5″ • Postcards • Flye Reach· Postcards over 15,000 homes in• Flyers Reach 11,000 homesMedia in Princeton and surroundin Witherspoon Group Princeton and beyond! • 8.5x11” flyers · Books • Menus •custome Men Town Topics puts youinfo in frontcontact: of your target For additional than what it would cost to mail a postcard. • Menus Town ·Topics puts you in front• Booklets Custom Design, Printing, • Boo Catalogues melissa.bilyeu@ contact to reserve your sPace • Please Booklets of your target customer for less Publishing andus Distribution witherspoonmediagroup.com · Annual Reports etc. than what it would cost to mail etc... • Trifolds

We can ac almost a

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21

a postcard!

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22

· Newsletters • Post its · Brochures We can accomodate • We can accomodate almost anything! almost anything! · Postcards

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 06-03-21

For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

4438 Route 27 North, 609-924-5400 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS

Town Topics is the only weekly paper that reaches EVERY HOME IN PRINCETON, making it a tremendously valuable product wit

toWn toPIcs neWsPaPeR • 4438 Route 27 noRth • KInGston, nJ 08528 • tel: 609.924.2200 • Fax: 609.924.8818

We c alm

· Books Reach over 15,000 homes in Princeton and beyond! · Catalogues

Town Topics puts you in front of your target customer less than what it · Annualfor Reports would cost to mail a postcard!

Reach 11,000 homes in Princeton Reach and 11,000 surrounding homes in towns. Princeton and surroun GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

Forinadditional contact: Town Topics puts you in front of Town yourTopics targetputs customer you for front less ofinfo your target custo melissa.bilyeu@ than what it would cost to mailthan a postcard. what witherspoonmediagroup.com it would cost to mail a postca ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22

Please contact us to reserve Please your contact sPaceus now! to reserve your sPa 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

Town Topics is the only weekly paper that reaches EVERY HOME IN PRINCETON, Town Topics making is theitonly a tremendously weekly papervaluable that reaches product EVERY with HOME unmatched IN PRINCETON, exposure! making it a tremendously valuable pro

toWn toPIcs neWsPaPeR • 4438 Route 27 noRth • KInGston,toWn nJ 08528 toPIcs • tel: neWsPaPeR 609.924.2200 • 4438 • Fax: Route 609.924.8818 27 noRth• •www.towntopics.com KInGston, nJ 08528 • tel: 609.924.2200 • Fax: 609.9


with over $300,000 in Upgrades

The Great Room of the Model Home

Bucks County’s Most Exclusive Gated Community Our quick-delivery homes sold out in record time last fall, so we have made additional homes available for quick delivery this spring – including more than $300,000 in upgrades.

Featuring open floor plans with elegant finishes, these exclusive homes span 3,600 square feet, offering all the privacy, space, and luxury you could want. • Full Basement

• Open, Contemporary Floorplans

• Two-Car Rear Garages

• Private Gated Community

• Maintenance-Free Lifestyle

• Private Elevators

In-person tours available by appointment. Starting at $1,575,000. 215.862.5800 | RabbitRunCreek.com | Rte 202 (Lower York Road) & Rabbit Run Drive, New Hope, PA

43 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2021

LIMITED-TIME OFFER: QUICK-DELIVERY HOMES


CARTER ROAD • HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP $6,250,000 Norman T ‘Pete’ Callaway • 609.558.5900 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME296518

HAGEMAN LANE • PRINCETON $3,225,000 Amy G Worthington • 609.647.8910 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME306788

PAUL ROBESON PLACE • PRINCETON $2,575,000 Michael Monarca • 917.225.0831 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME310006

PENN LYLE ROAD • WEST WINDSOR TWP $1,595,000 Susan McKeon Paterson • 609.468.9017 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME312956

INTRODUCING CROOKED TREE LANE • PRINCETON $1,395,000 Maura Mills • 609.947.5757 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME312384

INTRODUCING POTTERS RUN • PRINCETON $1,295,000 Susan L ‘Suzy’ DiMeglio • 609.915.9645 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME312634

C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME312880

INTRODUCING DEER PATH • MONTGOMERY TWP $980,000 Amy Schaefer • 609.651.5332 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJSO114720

NEWLY PRICED CODDINGTON COURT • MONTGOMERY TWP $875,000 Valerie Smith • 609.658.0394 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJSO114388

INTRODUCING ROUTE 518 • MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP $799,000 Valerie Smith • 609.658.0394 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJSO114714

INTRODUCING MEADOWBROOK LANE • MONTGOMERY TWP $750,000 Amy Schaefer • 609.651.5332 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJSO114718

INTRODUCING PALMER SQUARE WEST • PRINCETON $725,000 David M Schure, Merlene K Tucker • 609.577.7029 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME312992

INTRODUCING MOUNT LUCAS ROAD • PRINCETON $999,000

CallawayHenderson.com 4 NASSAU STREET | PRINCETON, NJ 08542 | 609.921.1050 Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.