Town Topics Newspaper, May 25, 2022

Page 1

Volume LXXVI, Number 21

Young Princetonians Pages 14-15 Panel Discussion on Achievements of Black Scientists at Bell Labs . . .5 Council Passes Two Resolutions to Make Rosedale Road Safer . . . 8 Residents Meet with PU to Air Concerns About Blasting . . . . . 11 Finding Dylan and Whitman in Deutsch’s Bookstore Utopia . . . 18 Theatre Intime, Princeton University Players Present Shrek The Musical . . 19 PU Men’s Lax Defeats Nemesis Yale to Make NCAA Final 4 . . . . . . 27 Hun Softball Rolls Past Lawrenceville to Win Prep A Title . . . . . . . 32

Elle Anhut Helps PDS Girls’ Lax Win Prep B Crown . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 25 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . 36 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 16 New To Us . . . . . . . . . 26 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 35 Performing Arts . . . . . 22 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 36 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

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Dr. Fauci Urges PU Seniors to Combat Failings of Society Emphasizing the challenges of “the failings in our society” and “our divided nation,” Dr. Anthony Fauci urged about 1,200 Princeton University seniors, along with families and friends gathered on Cannon Green on May 23, to commit to fighting injustice “and work with all our might to remedy the cultural disease of racism, just as we fight the viral disease of COVID-19.” Fauci was selected by the Class of 2022 as keynote speaker at the University’s first in-person Class Day since 2019. Chief medical adviser to President Joe Biden and the leader of the White House COVID-19 task force, Fauci is also director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health. He has advised seven presidents on health issues and in 2008 was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Fauci pointed out lessons learned from the pandemic. “Our country’s experience with COVID-19 has shone a spotlight on one of the great failings in our society: the lack of health equity.” He continued, “Many members of minority groups are at increased risk of COVID-19 simply because the jobs they have as essential workers do not allow them to isolate from social activity. More importantly, when people in minority groups are infected with the coronavirus, they have a much greater likelihood of developing a severe consequence due to elevated rates of underlying conditions … that lead to an increased risk of hospitalization and death.” Emphasizing the effects of “the undeniable racism that persists in our society,” Fauci called on his audience for a promise that ”the tragic reality of the inequities experienced with COVID-19 does not fade after we return to our new normal.” He went on to point out that in his extensive career in Washington he has experienced firsthand “the intensity of the divisiveness in our nation” and the “egregious distortions of reality” that have at times accompanied that divisiveness. “Sadly, elements of our society have grown increasingly inured to a cacophony of falsehoods and lies that often stand largely unchallenged, ominously leading to an insidious acceptance of what I call the ‘normalization of untruths,’” he said. Continued on Page 10

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Eisgruber to PU Graduates: “Persisting Matters” Presiding over his second graduation in the past week, Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber told a gathering of more than 1,200 graduating seniors, plus graduate students, families, and friends assembled in Princeton Stadium, that persistence would be the quality that mattered most “across the many dimensions of achievement or talent … the ability and drive to keep going when things get hard.” Eisgruber praised the students for overcoming “challenges that none of us could have imagined when you began your studies here,” and for persisting “brilliantly” throughout their time on campus and away from it, remotely, during the first year of the pandemic. Eisgruber emphasized the value for students to persist to graduation and the value of a diploma, but noted that many students at other universities, because of financial barriers or other difficulties, have not been able to persist. “One way or another, we need to add back the chairs missing from graduation ceremonies around the country,” he said. Last Wednesday, May 18, Eisgruber presided over the graduation of the Class of 2020, which returned to campus for a traditional ceremony nearly two years after their virtual graduation. The Class of 2020 is the only Princeton class ever to have two commencement

ceremonies and is the first class since World War II to wait two years for an inperson graduation. The students of the Class of 2020 were sent home to finish their studies online at the start of the pandemic in March 2020. At its May 24 275th commencement, the University awarded five honorary degrees. The recipients included civil rights attorney Fred David Gray; U.S. Ambassador and former University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann; attorney and

health care industry leader Brent Henry; pioneering neuroscientist and Brandeis University Professor Eve Marder; and FedEx Corporation Founder, Chairman, and CEO Frederick W. Smith. The full text of Eisgruber’s commencement address follows: “The Value of Persistence” In a few minutes, all of you will walk out of this stadium as newly-minted graduates of this University. Before you do, Continued on Page 12

After Months of Local Discussion and Debate, Council Does Not Approve In-Town Dispensary

Cannabis, legal and illegal, is available and in use in Princeton. Sales of retail cannabis have been legal for adults in New Jersey since April 21, with the nearest store just a few miles away on Route 1 and deliveries available throughout the state. The aroma was in the air at the P-rade and at various other Reunions gatherings on the Princeton University campus over the weekend. But there will be no dispensary opening in town in the foreseeable future, as the May 17 Princeton Council Virtual Special Meeting on the issue of cannabis retail provided a relatively quiet culmination to six months of often fierce debate over the pros and cons of opening a cannabis store or stores in Princeton.

The meeting was advertised as a continuing listening session for Council. At the previous session on March 29, there were about 35 members of the public still lined up to speak at the end of a four-hour Zoom session attended by about 345 people. Only 14 of the 35 returned on May 17, however, and after 45 minutes, with 13 of the 14 voicing opposition to a cannabis dispensary in town, the Council members began their discussion. Councilwoman Eve Niedergang, who had headed the Cannabis Task Force that recommended in November 2021 that Council pass an ordinance allowing up to three cannabis retail establishments in town, expressed reluctant acceptance of the fact that despite potential advantages Continued on Page 10

THE P-RADE RETURNS: Grand Marshal Heather M. Butts ’94, center, and other officials lead the way as the Princeton University P-rade, which has been held virtually for the past two years, returned on Saturday afternoon with a march through campus during Reunions Weekend. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022 • 2


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AROUND THE BEND: The history of Horseshoe Bend East Preserve in Kingwood Township is the focus of a walk tour on June 11 at 9 a.m. hosted by Hunterdon Land Trust.

Tour Historic Nature Preserve Near the Delaware River

Hunterdon Land Trust invites the public to take a guided tour of the Horseshoe Bend East Preserve in Kingwood Township and discover its history, while experiencing its woodlands and the picturesque Copper Creek, on Saturday, June 11 at 9 a.m.

The preserve is part of approximately 800 acres of protected land near the Delaware R iver. Par ticipants will learn about native plants, wildlife, and this area’s vital waterways. The program also will cover the property’s history, including the years spent there by journalist William Lindsay White and the adopted

daughter he brought home after covering the Battle of Britain for CBS. Hu nterdon L and Tr us t Land Steward Emily Dunn and Outreach Director Dave Harding will lead the program. Admission is free, but space is limited. Email dave@hunterdonlandtrust. org to reserve.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Fire Department Swearing-In Ceremony: Wednesday, May 25 at 7:15 p.m., in the municipal courtroom, 400 Witherspoon Street. Followed by a Meet and Greet at Station 60, 363 Witherspoon Street. Eleven residents will be sworn in as volunteer members of the Princeton Fire Department. COVID-19 Care Kits for Princeton Families: Low/moderate income families in Princeton can get these kits, which include tests and materials to respond to COVID-19 such as one-use thermometers, an oximeter, and extra household items. They are available for pickup at Princeton Human Services by calling (609) 6882055. Certain eligibility requirements apply. Employee Parking Permit Applications: The municipality is now accepting applications from business owners for employee parking in the Westminster Choir College parking lot A. There are 193 spots available for $30 a month. For details, visit clerksoffice@princetonnj.gov or call (609) 924-5704. Farmers Market Summer Season: Starting Thursday, May 26 from 10 a.m.2 p.m., the Princeton Farmers Market takes place at the Dinky train station lot, adjacent to the Wawa, on Thursdays through November 17. Details at princetonfarmersmarket.com. Volunteer to Be a Land Steward: Friends of Princeton Open Space (FOPOS) holds half-day volunteer sessions on a variety of conservation projects at the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Individuals, families, students, and corporate groups are welcome in May and June. Fopos.org. Camp Counselors Needed: HomeFront’s Camp Mercer needs high-energy, passionate, patient summer employees for camps being held June 27-August 19. For more details, visit homefrontnj.org. Princeton Youth Advisory Committee Seeks Members: Applications are available at princetonnj.gov. The 12-member committee advises the mayor on issues of interests to youth in the community. Applicants must be residents of Princeton and sophomores during the 2022-23 academic year. The deadline is May 31. Poll Workers Needed: For Mercer County; must be registered voters and attend a mandatory training. The pay has been raised to $300 a day. Full and half day positions are available. Visit mercercounty.org for more information. Princeton Public Library Survey: Help plan for the library’s future by taking its Strategic Plan Survey, which is available in English, Spanish, and Chinese. Visit princetonlibrary.org/survey. Volunteers Needed: For Share My Meals, which delivers to underprivileged local families to help fight food insecurity and the environmental impact of food waste by recovering and delivering healthy meals. Sharemymeals.org.


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PLAYING A ROLE IN A RENAISSANCE: Clyde Bethea, shown here with his tunable organic dye laser system in 1978, was among the panelists in a special presentation at Morven Museum, where an exhibit on Bell Labs in New Jersey is on view. (Courtesy of the Bethea Family)

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Panel Discussion at Morven Examines Achievements of Black Scientists at Bell Labs

T h e i nve nt i on of c e l l phones, solar panels, radar, and the discovery of the Big Bang owe a debt to Bell Telephone Laboratories, better known as Bell Labs, which began operat-

ing throughout New Jersey some nine decades ago. Playing a significant role in these and other inventions were Black scientists, researchers, and mathematicians, who were encouraged to flourish at Bell’s Murray Hill headquarters in ways they might not have been as warmly welcomed elsewhere.

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Their accomplishments were the focus of “20th Centur y Black Scientific Renaissance at Bell Labs,” a panel discussion presented live and online May 17 at Morven Museum, where the exhibit “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey” is on view through next March. Moderated by Princeton University Professor William A. Massey, the panel included three Bell veterans. Two who were discussed have died in recent years. Princeton resident and historian Shirley Satterfield introduced the panel. “Their time at Bell Labs was a glowing and noted renaissance,” she said. “Each brings his or her ow n accomplish ment that opened up a better world to their dedicated work.” Between them, the panelists hold a total of nearly 800 patents. T hree are members of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, and one was a member of the inaugural class of the American Mathematical Society Fellows. The lists of accomplishments credited to them is long and impressive. Clyde G. Bethea, recruited by Bell in the early 1970s, is an expert in the field of lasers, imaging, and quantum electronics. Having been at Bell Labs for more than 35 years, he is currently working on laser imaging for noninvasive, early- detection breast cancer tumors, for which a patent is pending. “The idea came to me when I was in the hospital with lymphoma in 2003,” he said. “I started working in these ideas to figure out how to detect breast cancer in real time.” Bethea’s

portable laser-stimulated cancer tumor imaging system, which he first developed at home, would allow cysts and tumors to be seen with very high accuracy. Marian Croak retired from AT&T (which became the parent company of Bell) in 2014 after a long career, and currently leads the center of expertise on responsible artificial intelligence within Google Research, where she has worked on everything from site reliability engineering to bringing public Wi-Fi to India’s railroads. In 2022, Croak was inducted into the National Inventors

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Hall of Fame for her patent regarding VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol). She admits to have encountered some resistance to those ideas at first. “I have to give credit to these gentlemen,” she said of her fellow panelists and others who came before her at Bell Labs. “Because I walked into Bell Labs and thought, ‘This is heaven.’ But I think about all the work that had been done before. I wish you had come to Google, because now I know what it’s like to be a trailblazer. It’s changing, getting better. But there is certainly not the support of programs put in place at Bell Labs. But we’ll get there.” James West, who joined Bell in 1957, is credited with reinventing the notion of microphone technology and making it a much smaller device. He got an honorary degree from Princeton University in 2014 and is currently working on a project with his daughter. West said he and his students came up with a type of inexpensive, electronic stethoscope for use in developing countries. In his remarks as moderator Massey also mentioned the accomplishments of the late Walter Lincoln Hawkins and James Wayne Hunt. Hawkins was one of the first scientists to work at Bell Labs, and came up with a polymer sheath for phone wires that saved Bell billions of dollars, Massey said. “For our story, another important thing is that the year that he started at Bell Labs, 1942, was a focal point for Black science in New Jersey,” he said. “David H. Blackwell, one of the most outstanding Black mathematicians, was at the Institute for Advanced Study; J. Ernest Wilkins Jr. was also at the Institute and went from there to work on the Manhattan Project. I just think it’s very interesting that here are these three pioneering Black scientists, all in New Jersey in the year 1942.” For Morven Executive Director Jill Barry, the evening was illuminating. “The fact that these Black scientists were coming in when this wasn’t a normal field for them, and Bell opened the doors and let them come together and really bring others in, was really a unique moment,” she said. “And these people are amazing. Jim West, who is 90-something, is still discovering and designing things. And Marion Croak — Black, a woman, and a mother of three kids — she had all the cards stacked against her. And Bell heard her voice.” —Anne Levin

Question of the Week:

“What is it like being back on campus?” (Asked during Princeton University Reunions Weekend) (Photos by Charles R. Plohn)

“It’s pretty surreal because we really haven’t been back in three years. We missed out on a lot of traditions, so it’s nice to have some of them now. I think the school has made a really good effort to make up for the time we lost during COVID. It’s great to be back.” —Alice Madar ’21, New York, N.Y.

Daniel: It’s great. We missed our fifth reunion, which was our first major, but we are making up for it this weekend.” Michael: “It feels like we haven’t been gone. We’re just sort of picking up where we left off and it doesn’t really feel any different.” —Daniel Zirkel ’16, South Orange with Michael Wang ’16, Cambridge, Mass.

Nisha: “It’s just a flood of memories and emotions, and also so joyful. It’s a big celebration, and what we’ve all been waiting so long for. It’s for us, it’s for the next class, but it’s also for everyone and what we have gone through together.” Josh: “It’s stunning being back on campus for Reunions. There’s a level of joy and amazingness. There was this sort of memory fog that came up during the pandemic, and it just goes away immediately once you see people that you haven’t been able to see since we all left campus in the spring of 2020.” —Nisha Lakhani ’21, New York , N.Y., with Josh Faires ’20, Princeton

Nicole: “One of the most special things about being back on campus is that it lends a lot of perspective to how many people came here before you, and how special it is that so many people will be coming after you. So it’s just a great feeling knowing you’re part of something bigger at Princeton.” Diana: “This is our first reunion coming back to campus. It kind of feels surreal seeing so many people from our class year, but also from all the other alumni years. I really appreciate the fact that there’s been so much opportunity from the school to bring back such a large community of alums, but also to just able to have fun this weekend and reconnect and be back at our alma mater.” —Nicole Kalhorn ’19, New York, N.Y., with Diana Ortiz ’19, Orlando, Fla.

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Tyler: “It’s pretty amazing. Everybody is so excited to be back and relive one part of the experience here. We’re seeing our friends again and this is a memorable way to celebrate our fifth reunion. We’re having a great time.” Andre: “It’s really nice seeing people I have not seen in a while, but also some of the people I do see more often. Seeing everyone together again is really a nice thing. The spirit here is always amazing. There’s truly nothing like Princeton University Reunions.” —Tyler Fair ’17, San Francisco, Calif., with Andre Arslan ’17, New York, N.Y.


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PU Fires Classics Professor Katz Following Complaint, Investigation

Council Passes Two Resolutions To Make Rosedale Road Safer At its meeting Monday night, Princeton Council voted in favor of two resolutions to enhance safety on Rosedale Road and General Johnson Way, the site of a pedestrian fatality last summer. One of the resolutions reduces the speed limit from 40 and 45 miles per hour to 35; the other allows for a closure of the road this summer to build a roundabout. The hope is that construction will be completed by the time school starts in the fall. The initiatives, which required the cooperation of Mercer County, made their way through the approval system quicker than usual. “We’re very fortunate that Mercer County really put safety as the utmost priority and took the action to get us to this point,” said Deanna Stockton, the town’s deputy administrator for infrastructure and operations. Two ordinances scheduled to be considered were carried over to the next meeting on June 13. One is related to amending sewer connection fees; the other to accessory dwelling units modifying the definitions of “attic” and

“floor area.” A resolution authorizing the hiring of H2M Architects & Engineers, not to exceed $208,100 for a municipal facilities assessment study — principally of 400 Witherspoon Street and Monument Hall — was approved. Council voted in favor of several other resolutions related to a contract for a community block grant dental program with Dr. Lekha Tull, the purchase of four new hybrid vehicles, the purchase of a pickup truck with plow, and the services of various consulting firms. The budget of the recently established Special Improvement District was officially introduced, and a public hearing will be held on June 27. The meeting also included presentations on the town’s proposed bid solicitation for the collection and disposal of solid waste, bulky waste, and organics; and the progress of the Community Center Feasibility Task Force. The next meeting of Council is Monday, June 13 at 7 p.m. —Anne Levin

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although he knew her to be in distress, all in an effort to conceal a relationship he knew was prohibited by University rules,” according to the Princeton University statement. “These actions were not only egregious violations of University policy, but also entirely inconsistent with his obligations as a member of the faculty,” the statement said. The University’s statement does not mention Katz’s claim that he was unfairly targeted for his criticism of a protest group on campus. In 2020 Katz wrote an article in Quillette, an online journal, that criticized a faculty letter which proposed a series of measures to advance equity and racial equality on campus. Over the past two years, Katz’s case has caused much political debate over the question of whether he is being punished for exercising his right to freedom of speech. His lawyer Samantha Harris, as quoted in the New York Times contended, “The University’s decision will have a powerful chilling effect on free speech, because anyone who might wish to express a controversial opinion knows that they must first ask themselves if their personal life can stand up to the kind of relentless scrutiny that Dr. Katz’s life was subjected to beginning just days after the publication of his Quillette article.”

Joshua Katz

The dismissal followed an investigation initiated in February 2021 prompted by “a detailed written complaint” from an alumna who had a consensual relationship with Katz while she was an undergraduate under his academic supervision, according to a statement by Princeton University. That relationship had prompted disciplinary proceedings against Katz in 2018 resulting in his unpaid suspension for the academic year 2018-19 and three years of probation from 2019-2022. The recent investigation concluded that Katz had “misrepresented facts or failed to be straightforward” during the 2018 proceedings and had discouraged the alumna from speaking and f rom “par t icipat ing and cooperating” and from Summer Solstice Fundraiser “seeking mental health care At Brick Farm Tavern New Jersey Conservation Foundation will celebrate preserved land and the start of summer on Thursday, From 11 am June 23, during a gala fundraiser at the historic Brick Farm Tavern in Hopewell. T he “Summer Solstice Celebration of the Land” event will be held outdoors under an open-air tent starting at 6:30 p.m., and will To 11 pm feature gourmet farm-to-table fare and spirits, music, auctions, and hand-crafted signature cocktails. It will be the first in-person fundraiser held by the nonprofit since 2018. “We’re very excited to be able to gather in person at

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CELEBRATING LAND PRESERVATION: Wendy Mager, left, and Anne Wright Wilson are chairing the New Jersey Conservation Foundation’s upcoming “Summer Solstice Celebration of the Land” gala fundraiser on June 23. this fantastic venue,” said Alison Mitchell, co-executive director of the Foundation. “We’re really looking forward to connecting with old friends, meeting new ones, and celebrating preserved land throughout the state – including many special places in the HopewellPrinceton area.” The evening celebrates New Jersey Conservation’s 62 years of preserving open space, parks, and farmland, as well as its commitment to addressing climate change and advocating for sustainable agriculture that supports healthy local foods, clean water, pollinators, and other wildlife. The event w ill include live and silent auctions with unique items from local residents, entrepreneurs, and artisans, including artwork, jewelr y, vacations, food and drink, and New Jersey Conservation staff-guided nature tours of some of the

state’s most beautiful preserved lands. One popular item from previous New Jersey Conser vation auctions is “A Perfect Day in New Jersey,” hosted by Dr. Emile DeVito, staff ecologist. With his expert knowledge of scenic natural treasures throughout the state, DeVito will create a customized adventure based on the auction winner’s interests and favorite pastimes. Event co-chairs are Wendy Mager of Princeton, first vice president of New Jersey Conservation’s board of trustees, and Anne Wright Wilson of Hopewell. To res er ve t ickets for the event, or register for the auction, visit Solstice2022.givesmart.com. Those not able to attend can still participate online. To learn about sponsorship opportunities, contact Erica Colace at ecolace @ njconservation.org.

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9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022 • 10

Dr. Fauci

Cannabis

continued from page one

continued from page one

He exhorted his audience, “It is our collective responsibility not to shrug our shoulders and sink to a tacit acceptance of the normalization of untruths. Because if we do, lies become dominant and reality is distorted. And then truth means nothing, integrity means nothing, facts mean nothing.” He encouraged the seniors to use the abilities of critical analysis that they had developed at Princeton “to discern and challenge weak assertions built on untruths.” He added, “As future leaders in our society, we are counting on you for that.” Noting that years from now “it will be clear that COVID left an indelible mark on you and your entire generation,” Fauci praised the prospective graduates for their “extraordinary adaptability, resilience, and dedication to learning, completing your studies, and graduating despite immense difficulties and uncertainties.” After concluding his speech by calling on the seniors to embrace the joyousness of life, Fauci traded his suit jacket for an orange and black class jacket and was officially inducted as an honorary member of the Princeton University Class of 2022. —Donald Gilpin

of a cannabis store in Princeton, that there was obviously widespread opposition and that the Princeton cannabis debate was too rancorous and time consuming. She emphasized that the issue had had a “disturbingly and perhaps uniquely divisive” impact on the community and had taken a tremendous amount of Council’s time and energy. “I continue to believe that Princeton should approve and regulate its own cannabis dispensary,” said Niedergang in a prepared statement, noting that cannabis and its challenges would exist in Princeton with or without a local store. “Despite all of the above, however, I am recommending that we not move forward with an enabling ordinance for retail cannabis sales at this time,” she concluded. Council President Leticia Fraga shared Niedergang’s concern over the anger often surrounding the debate. “Some of us have received a NEW CLASS OF ’22 MEMBER: Dr. Anthony Fauci spoke to lot of emails, including pictures members of the Princeton University Class of 2022 at stereotyping and attacking inPrinceton’s Class Day celebration on Monday, May 23, and he dividuals,” she said. “It’s upwas inducted as an honorary member of the class. He poses setting to see that happening. with Class Day Co-Chairs, from left, Sarah Lee, Julia Chaffers, Bias is troubling, offensive.” and Christian Potter. (Photo by Princeton University) Fraga added that she was more concerned about findJUNCTION ing ways to control children’s access to marijuana than she Fun Ornaments & Holiday Decor BARBER Best Selling Nautical 3-D Wood Maps & Princeton Decor was about whether there was a dispensary in town or not. SHOP NJ Local Cookbooks & Made To Order Baskets “Whether there’s a dispensary Adorable & Kid Gifts 33Baby Princeton-Hightstown Rd in Princeton or not, we’re still Handmade Pottery & Candles Ellsworth’s Center going to need education and Holiday Masks, Soaps & Hand Sanitizers outreach,” she said in a follow(Near Train Station) And Much, Much More. up May 23 phone conversation. “I’m mostly concerned • • with what we’re going to do Tues-Fri: 10am-6pm; 609.688.0777 | homesteadprinceton.com to ensure that our children 300 Witherspoon Street | Princeton Sat 8:30am-3:30pm understand what is appropri-

ate, that this is not meant for them, just like alcohol.” Councilman David Cohen, stating that this has been “the most difficult and confounding of any issue I have faced in my time on Council,” pointed out “strong and valid arguments on both sides of the question,” with statistics and studies supporting both positions. In concluding that now is not the time for Council to approve cannabis sales in Princeton, Cohen noted the potential negative public health impacts as well as a recent lawsuit against the town of Highland Park over an ordinance allowing cannabis dispensaries. Expressing his consternation at the intensity of opposition and the inability to reach a compromise position on the issue, Councilman Leighton Newlin stated, “We need more positive positions. We need to meet in the middle to see what will work.” He added that a dispensary could be a significant asset to the town. “A regulated state-of-theart cannabis store would be an asset bringing new life and new people to Princeton,” said Newlin. “I do not think children would fall into a black hole.” Councilwoman Michelle Pirone Lambros added her support to the Council members who were looking to move on to pressing matters beyond the current controversy. “This has been divisive for our town at a time when we need to be united in working together towards

many goals that will impact social justice,” she said. Lambros added that a dispensary would be unlikely to provide significant revenue for the town. She went on to urge the many residents who had weighed in on the cannabis controversy to stay engaged and get involved in other local issues in the coming months. Councilwoman Mia Sacks noted that it would not be responsible or appropriate to disregard cautionary concerns from both the Princeton Public Schools Board of Education and the Princeton Board of Health. “We should tread slowly with caution, and do due diligence,” she said. Sacks also commented on the “strong sentiment” expressed by so many people and the vast amount of time that Council members and others had spent on the issue. “We have many responsibilities as a town, many stressors,” she said. “We need to prioritize. Our staff only has so much bandwidth.” In summing up the proceedings, Mayor Mark Freda thanked the hundreds of people who had weighed in either by email or in person or by Zoom. “The vast majority were very respectful,” he said. “There are lots of reasons for us to pause, a whole bunch of reasons not to rush into this, a lot that still needs to be done,” Freda added. —Donald Gilpin

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Just before 1 p.m. each weekday, residents of Fitzr a n dolph Ro ad, Mu r r ay Place, Prospect Avenue, Aiken Avenue, and other streets near the site where P r i n c e to n Un i ve r s i t y i s building a new complex brace themselves for a loud boom that rattles their walls as well as their nerves. The boom is from blasting to prepare for construction of the University’s four new buildings for environmental studies and the School of Engineering and Applied Science (ES & SEAS). The first blasts began in March; the second phase is currently underway. The third and final segment is scheduled to take place from early October through March 2023, and in an area even closer to the residents’ homes. Last week, some 30 homeowners met with staff from the University to express t h e ir g row i n g con c e r n s about effects of the blasting — cracks in sheetrock, molding, and walls; a sinkhole under a house ; and water coming up through the middle of a basement floor. So far, there are nine reports by residents of damage caused by blasting. Ky u J u n g W h a n g, t h e University’s vice president for facilities, told those assembled that blasting is the standard methodology for this type of project. The technology has been used on other campus construction sites, most recently at the site of the East Campus Garage along Faculty Road. “In all instances, we are following all national and local codes and standards,” he said. “We do want to be good neighbors. We have evaluated several alternatives to blasting, but haven’t found one that would work. But we will continue to seek and evaluate more options.” A committee of four homeowners has been meeting with the University to collaboratively figure out how to address the issue. The May 18 community meeting, held at the University’s Carl Fields Center, began with the viewing of a video about the ES & SEAS project, introduced by Kristin Appelget, the University’s vice president of community and regional affairs. Murray Place resident Marty Schneiderman, who is on the fourperson homeowners’ committee, spoke next. “This part of the blasting has been much more powerful and aggressive than anyone expected,” he said, adding that the intensity has been particularly troubling. Since being informed of the damage, the University has placed 12 seismographs in various parts of the neighborhood to measure the effects of the blasting. Whang said the responsibility for the damage lies with the contractor. “We

have established a process for filing a claim with them,” he said, referring to instructions printed out at each table in the room. “We cannot interfere or short-circuit this process. If it is not resolved, we will evaluate. When we say ‘If we break it, we’ll fix it,’ we really mean that.” Homeowners were urged to file claims immediately, but they can submit multiple claims over time rather than just a single one. The contractor’s receipt and inperson investigation of the claims may influence the intensity of the blasting to reduce damages. WhitingTurner has begun sending staff members to houses where damages have been reported to help homeowners complete and submit claims. One resident asked whether the University has data on these kinds of issues from previous construction projects. They do not, but “we are under very strict state guidelines,” said Bill Bausmith, the University’s executive director of capital projects. “They tell us whether we are in compliance.” When the resident said her question had not been answered, Whang said, “We are staying within the guidelines. We have people watching us and reviewing data on a weekly basis.” Another resident said that there are different regulations for different processes. “You might not be exceeding the damage for concrete, but you might be exceeding it for drywall and plaster,” he said. “These are older homes.” Asked if homeowners can choose their own contractor to do repairs, Whang said they can. Neighbors asked about the statute of limitations on submitting damage claims, and the impact of blasting on underground utilities. Whang said the University would research these questions and report back. According to a report by Schneiderman following the meeting, some of the neighbors have decided to engage a company to do house surveys that would be used as a reference in a blasting claim is made. They were given a referral by the University to Saul’s Seismic, the blasting project’s subcontracted seismic company. Appelget said the University will continue to send residents weekly updates on the project. The committee plans to keep meeting monthly with the University, while the next community meeting will be held in September, before the third phase of blasting begins. —Anne Levin

ONLINE www.towntopics.com

Princeton Free Garden Project Will Add a Third Location

The Princeton Free Garden Project, an initiative of Send Hunger Packing Princeton (SHUPP), allows Princeton residents to pick free produce grown on community soil. The project currently has several raised garden beds in two locations: the parking lot of Tortuga’s Restaurant on John Street, and the parking lot of the YMCA Princeton on Paul Robeson Place. A third garden will be added this summer at the Redding Circle community of the Princeton Housing Authority. While produce such as cucumbers, tomatoes, peas, lettuce, and other greens will be available to be picked for free during the summer and fall, volunteers have been working year-found to keep this project going. During the school year, teen volunteers from Princeton High School (PHS) worked to clean the beds and compost the dead plants. In the early spring, they prepared the beds with new soil and compost. Other activities have included painting signs, creating trellises with bamboo sticks, restoring the beds, p l a nt i n g, w e e d i n g, a n d watering the plants. This spring, adult volunteers as well as a group of Montgomery Boy Scouts lent a hand to the regular crew led by Isabel Tellez, a PHS sophomore. “I’m fascinated by the potential of these local gardens,” Isabel said. “They help address issues like food insecurity and climate change, pivotal to most communities nowadays.” This initiative, now in its third year, was started by Ross Wishnick, founder and current president of SHUPP. “We are happy to have created these gardens and to make the freshly grown produce available to Princeton residents,” he said. “This project nicely complements all the work that we do at SHUPP. We now provide first choice produce from the Philadelphia farm market weekly to any student in the schools who signs up, with no questions asked.”

Library’s Board Elects Officers at Meeting

The board of the Friends and Foundation of Princeton Public Library held its organizational meeting recently, electing A ndrea Bradley and Rosalind Muir as cochairs; Shalu Naso as vice president; and Nicky Katz as treasurer. Library Executive Director Jennifer Podolsky will serve as secretary. The new 18-member board is the result of the merger

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11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022

Residents Meet with University To Air Concerns About Blasting

THE GARDENS’ BOUNTY: Raised beds at the Princeton YMCA location of The Free Garden Project, ready for summer. of two previously separate nonprof it organizat ions : the Friends of the Princeton Public Library, which hosted events and operated a used bookstore to raise funds to supplement annual taxpayer support for the library; and the Princeton Public Library Foundation Board of Directors, which managed the library’s endowment. Bradley, president of the former Friends of the Library, and David Hill, president of the former Foundation Board of Directors, worked for more than a year on the merger, which is expected to streamline the process for the community to make private donations to support the library. The consolidation, which will allow the previously separate fundraising arms to provide strong combined support through cost reduction and unified focus, was approved by the library’s board of trustees last November.

The Friends and Foundation will continue to rely h e av i ly on t h e pr u de nt management of the library’s endowment to provide additional, non-tax, support for the library. The merged organization will continue to operate the Friends used bookstore and to host the popular events, including the Beyond Words benefit and the Book Lovers Luncheon. Unusual among public libraries in New Jersey, Princeton Public Library relies on a combination of tax dollars and private funds to fund operations. B et ween 75 percent and 80 percent of the annual operating budget comes from taxpayer support. The remainder of the money used to operate the library comes from private sources, including Friends and Foundation fundraising efforts and an annual distribution from the library endowment. These additional

privately raised funds have, over the years, transformed the Princeton Public Library into the award-winning facility that is a treasure to this community. Podolsky said she looked forward to seeing this new board work w it h t he library Development Office to develop new fundraising strategies and advance the library’s mission. “We are very fortunate to have such a wealth of experience to draw upon in Princeton,” Podolsky said. “Many of the members of this new board are drawn from the boards of the separate organizations and are familiar with our vision for a 21stcentury library in Princeton. It reflects well on our organization that we are able to inspire such distinguished members of our community to work on our behalf. We are truly grateful for this new board.”


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022 • 12

“Persisting Matters”

moment ago, the degree matters. All of us who attend continued from page one ceremonies like this one, all however, it is my privilege of us who celebrate students to say a few words about the who have earned a college path ahead. degree, should recognize the urgent need to bring That privilege feels even back those who have found more special than usual this the path to a college degree year. It is an honor to speak blocked or unpassable. to the great undergraduate and graduate Classes of It is especially damaging 2022. Earning a Princeton when students drop out of degree is an exceptional college after incurring debt, achievement in any year, even if the amount of debt is but you have overcome chalsmall. When media outlets lenges that none of us could cover student debt, they like have imagined when you beto focus on the eye-popping gan your studies here. loans some students accumulate. In fact, though, You, your families, and most student loan defaults your friends can be very involve students with small proud of what you have acdebts who leave college complished. And you can without getting a degree. be sure that the strength you have demonstrated will If students persist to gradserve you well in the years uation, their earning power ahead. goes up, and they can often pay back even large Earlier this year, a Princloans. Without a degree, eton alumnus in Atlanta they see no increase in earnasked me what quality or ing power, and often find no characteristic I considered way to pay back even small the best predictor for sucloans. Half a degree does cess in college and beyond. I not get you half the earning began by saying that I was power: unfortunately, it gets r e l u c t a n t to g e n e r a l i z e you almost nothing. across a very diverse student body with a dazzling array of We need policies to help talents. Princeton students those who have left colsucceed in many and inspirlege. New Jersey Gov. Phil ing ways, a fact that all of Murphy, for example, has propos ed a new “S ome Available for College, No Degree” program to assist the more Lunch & Dinner than 700,000 New JerseyMmm..Take-Out ans who left school withEvents • Parties • Catering out finishing. I hope that 41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton the legislature will fund the www.tortugasmv.com (609) 924-5143 proposal. At the federal level, a bipartisan group of senators sponsored legislation, called the ASPIRE Act, that would have provided colleges and universities with incentives to improve their graduation rates and to increase their representation of low-income students. 2nd & 3rd Generations MFG., CO. That bill did not pass; no proposal is perfect. One way or another, however, we need to make sure that talented students from lowincome families get the support they need to make it to and through college. One way or another, we need to add back the chairs missing from graduation ceremonies around the country. I hope that today and in the week ahead, as you celebrate your degree, you REFINED INTERIORS will take time to thank the friends, family members, te ac h e r s, m e ntor s, a n d others who helped you to persist across the finish line. None of us succeed on our own, in normal times or in difficult ones. And, in that Princeton | 609 921-2827 | eastridgedesign.com spirit, I hope, too, that as all of you pursue quests and adventures beyond this campus, you will help others to persist across the finish line as you have done so remarkably yourselves. I know that, whatever you do, you will make Princeton proud, and that you will put your talents, creativity, and character to work in ways that we can scarcely imagine today. All of us on this platform are thrilled to be a part of your celebration. We ap plau d you r p er s is te n ce, your talent, your achievements, and your aspirations. We send our best wishes as you embark upon the path that lies ahead, and we hope it will bring you back to this campus many times. We look for“PERSISTENT” 2022 GRADUATES: Princeton University held its 275th Commencement on w ard to welcom i n g you Tuesday, May 24, in Princeton Stadium. University President Christopher L. Eisgruber when you return, and we presided and praised the students for their persistence through the challenges of the say, to the Great Class of 2022, congratulations! pandemic. (Photo by Charles Sykes, Associated Press Images for Princeton University) you have vividly confirmed during your time here. Still, I said to our alum, if I had to name one quality that mattered across the many dimensions of achievement and talent, it would be persistence : the ability and drive to keep going when things get hard. All of us go through difficult times. To achieve our goals we have to find ways to continue even when — indeed, especially when — obstacles seem insurmountable or endless, and pressing onward feels exhausting, daunting, or just plain dull. Persistence is, I admit, a rather unglamorous virtue by comparison to, say, genius, creativity, or courage. An old adage, often but perhaps erroneously attributed to the 19th century humorist Josh Billings, praises persistence by comparing it to the postage stamp, which achieves success simply by “sticking to one thing until it gets there.” Modest t hough it may be, however, persistence is at least as important to achievement, including academic achievement, as are any more celebrated characteristics.

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Yo u e a r n e d y o u r d e grees today in many ways and for many reasons, but not least because you persisted brilliantly throughout your time on this campus and away from it. You persisted not only through a world-altering pandemic, but through problem sets, writing assignments, l ab or ator i e s, m i d te r m s, finals, senior theses, disser tations, and the personal crises and doubts that are an inevitable part of college life and, indeed, of life more generally. Getting to and crossing the finish line is hard, which is why we celebrate college degrees so enthusiastically. The degree you earn today matters tremendously. And it really is the degree that matters most, far more than the honors or other decorations that go with it. I do not know if this comes as welcome news or bad tidings, but I must tell you that there is surprisingly little correlation between grade point average and success in later life. But getting a college degree? That correlates with everything from higher incomes to better health to greater civic engagement — and the list goes on. Persisting through college matters, which is why we celebrate Commencement Day with admiration and exuberant joy. At Princeton, students have taken different paths through the challenges of the pandemic. Some took a year off, some did not. One way or another, however, graduation rates for Princeton students remain skyhigh. We s h ou l d r e c o g n i z e, however, that is not true everywhere. At college commencements around t he country, there are missing chairs and missing students this year, and there will likely be more missing chairs in the years to come. Some students left school during the pandemic and have not returned. Some high school students who might have gone to college have made other choices instead. Though the data is incomplete, both problems appear to have a disproportionate effect on students from less advantaged backgrounds and those who attend community colleges and other public, two-year institutions. That is a tragedy. A tragedy because, as I said a

MAJOR TRENT: Jason Cherry will talk about William Trenton’s son and his role in the Revolutionary War in a free hybrid event at The Trent House on June 2.

Role of a Patriot is Topic of Upcoming Talk

The Trent House Association presents a talk by Jason Cherry on the role that William Trent’s son and the Lower Ferry played in the Revolutionar y War. This free program will be held on Sunday, June 5 at 2 p.m., both in person at the Visitor Center, 15 Market Street, Trenton and via Zoom. William Trent, the Philadelphia merchant who bought 1,000 acres at the Falls of the Delaware in 1714 and established Trent’s Town there, had a son who was his namesake. The lieutenant governor of Virginia commissioned the younger William Trent to establish a fort at the Forks of the Ohio, near present-day Pittsburgh, to defend British interests during the French and Indian War. After the war he sailed to England to petition for recompense for funds expended in that cause. Upon retur ning in the summer of 1775, he learned of fighting in Massachusetts

and the colonies in an uproar. With the Revolutionary War looming closer to New Jersey, Trent would propose a new colony, operate a ferry business and plantation in south Trenton, and finally make the decision between King and country. A native of Butler, Pa., and a 2002 graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Cherry has participated for more than 30 years in reenactments of the group of volunteers hired under William Trent Jr. in 1754, a unit known as Captain William Trent’s Company. His book, Pittsburgh’s Lost Outpost: Captain Trent’s Fort, was published in 2019 and he is working on a complete biography of the younger William Trent. In addition to his work on Trent, he has had speaking engagements over the last 15 years on George Washington’s role in Western Pennsylvania in 1753 and 1754. Sign up to attend at tinyurl.com/THAJune5.

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13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022

There are dozens of community-minded organizations There are dozens of community-minded that have aorganizations stake that have a stake in Princeton’s future. Re: June 4 Open meeting... please rsvp to Princeton.Future.2035@gmail.com [a ppt is encouraged]

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This is one in a series of unofficial listening sessions sponsored by Princeton Future to inform and engage residents as the town prepares its new Community Master Plan. It is intended to complement the official master planning process being directed by the Princeton Planning Board. For inquiries [especially if your organization in not mentioned and would like to present]: Princeton.Future.2035@gmail.com

is is one in isa one series unofficial listening sponsored by Princeton Future to inform This in a of series of unofficial listening sessions sessions sponsored by Princeton Future to inform and age residents as the as town prepares itsitsnew Master It is intended to comple engage residents the town prepares new Community Community Master Plan.Plan. It is intended to complement the master official master planning processbeing being directed by the Planning Board. the official planning process directed by Princeton the Princeton Planning Board. For inquiries [especially if your organization in not mentioned and would like to present]: For inquiries [especially if your organization in not mentioned and would like to present]: Princeton.Future.2035@gmail.com Princeton.Future.2035@gmail.com


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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022 • 16

Mailbox Friends and Foundation of PPL Thank Supporters of Book Lovers Luncheon

To the Editor: A heartfelt thank you from the Friends and Foundation of the Princeton Public Library to the more than 160 booklovers who joined us on May 12 for our annual Book Lovers Luncheon. The conversation between Julia Glass, about her newest book, Vigil Harbor, and Associate Professor of English Tamsen Wolff was thoughtful and engaging. We are grateful to Beatrice Bloom of Weichert Realtors for her longstanding support of the Book Lovers Luncheon. Because of the loyalty and generosity of our donors, the Friends and Foundation is able to support the award-winning library in expanding its collections and enhancing its programming. These privately raised funds have also allowed the library to stop charging extended use fees on materials in the children’s and young adult collections. We thank all our supporters and look forward to joining again with you for Beyond Words 2022 on October 15. Stay tuned for more details about this exciting evening. SEVA KRAMER Prospect Avenue AUDREY EGGER Coniston Court 2022 Book Lovers Luncheon Co-Chairs Friends and Foundation Board Members

PPS’ Parent-Teacher Organization Council Thanks School-Community Volunteers

To the Editor: The Princeton Public Schools’ Parent-Teacher Organization Council (PTOC) would like to thank our school-community volunteers whose meaningful contributions, dedication, and engagement have helped our district thrive. Specifically, we’d like to acknowledge our leadership team, whose terms expire this school year. As PTO presidents and PTOC members, they have worked tirelessly on behalf of our students, staff, and families while resiliently leading through the challenges of the last two years. We thank Tara Oakman and Mara Franceschi, our outgoing PTOC vice presidents. Before joining the PTOC Executive Board, Tara was the PTO president of Community Park, and Mara was the PTO president of Johnson Park. We’d also like to acknowledge the outgoing PPS PTO presidents: Shazia Manekia (Princeton High School ), Veronica Foreman (Princeton Middle School), Elme Schmid (Johnson Park), Kati Dunn (Littlebrook ), Sonja Ernst (Littlebrook), Bonnie Funiciello (Riverside), Jyoti Narasimhan (Riverside), Amalie Leano (Community Park), Joanna Canty Wuehr (Special Education Parent Advisory Group), Ginny Bryant (Special Education Parent Advisory Group), Julie Cho (Special Education Parent Advisory Group), and Katherine Lara (Cranbury). We appreciate your hard work, time, and efforts and hope to continue to work closely together in the service of our schools.

Lastly, the PTOC would like to welcome our new PTOC Executive Board officers: Lori Pesnell (PTOC vice president) and Georgette Stern (PTOC vice president). They are joining the returning PTOC Executive Board officers: Milena DeLuca (president), Beth Leman (vice president), and Melodie Schweitzer (secretary). Again, thank you to all of our volunteers who work tirelessly as a team to help our schools and district thrive. We hope you have a wonderful summer! MILENA DELUCA Hunt Drive BETH LEMAN Evergreen Circle MELODIE SCHWEITZER Shady Brook Lane

Development Decisions Should Benefit Entire Community, Not Just Developers

To the Editor: I grew up in Princeton, and I remember when it was a quiet country town. It’s changed, of course, and some changes have been for the worse. The traffic problem is out of control, and the air, along some busy streets, reeks of fumes. Lately, water has become a problem. Water levels have risen along creeks and ponds, and many homeowners complain about water in their basements. It’s easy to blame our problems on global warming and Washington politicians. But many of our water problems are caused by something closer to home: the financial and political clout of local developers. Years ago, the Route 1 area was mainly farmlands and wetlands. Most of that land has been built over. As empty land becomes scarce, developers have moved in on wetlands, like the many acres near Quaker Bridge Mall now slated to become a vast network of warehouses. This sort of development — paving over wetlands and farmlands — is happening throughout central New Jersey. When natural drainage systems are disrupted, stormwater remains stagnant, or seeps into our basements, or forms little ponds in our backyards. The air becomes contaminated with mold and bacteria — a health problem for many people, but also a potential economic problem since contaminated air is a threat to the laboratories run by local pharmaceutical firms. If the flood problem persists, our insurance bills will get higher, and the resale value of our homes will get lower. In other words, if our natural drainage systems are destroyed, then nature will punish us by creating new and unhealthy ones. Some development is inevitable and even desirable, but we need to make sure that development decisions are made for the benefit of our entire community, and not simply for the benefit of developers. For this reason, I would hope that our elected representatives, both in the town of Princeton and in the state legislature, would reject donations from developers planning to build in our communities. And, if they do accept such donations, I would hope that they would recuse themselves from promoting any developments planned by their donors. This would avoid any conflict of interest, and it would help to keep New Jersey a Garden State. BETSY BROWN Edgehill Street

HIP Thanks Fundraiser Supporters, Community Partners, Local Businesses

To the Editor: On a rainy evening earlier this month, friends of the Housing Initiatives of Princeton (HIP) gathered under tents to hear Prof. Ruha Benjamin preview her new book, Viral Justice: How We Grow the World We Want. Despite the dreary weather, we were delighted by the turnout and show of support and inspired by Prof. Benjamin’s vision of creating transformative change from millions of small individual acts. We want to thank all who contributed to our successful fundraiser, including host Jane Scott and Kale’s Garden Center for providing gift certificates for a silent auction. The money raised at the event will help fund HIP’s transitional housing program which helps families on the brink of homelessness chart a path to financial security. We are grateful for the support of our many community partners. During the busy Mothers’ Day weekend, Color Me Mine at the Princeton Shopping Center opened their doors to the families in our program for an uplifting mother and child painting party. Owner Krystal Bechtel went above and beyond in creating a fun and welcoming event. We also want to thank the local businesses who endeavor to hire local. Many of HIP’s clients are single moms with young kids. These working moms need nearby jobs with decent pay and reasonable hours in order to balance both work and child care. We especially want to thank Anna Maria Miller and Ross

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Wishnick of the Bank of Princeton for their community-minded hiring efforts. Finally, we want to thank the Princeton Area Community Foundation Bunbury Fund for a $19,000 grant that HIP will use to develop a strategic plan and a communications plan to deepen our impact and expand our capacity as an organization. To find out more about our work including how to help, please visit housinginitaitivesofprinceton.org. LIZ LEMPERT Chair, Housing Initiatives of Princeton KATHLEEN GITTLEMAN Executive Director, Housing Initiatives of Princeton

Sharing Thanks and Gating Factors Before Topic of Opening Retail Cannabis Shops is Raised Again

To the Editor: Given the strong public sentiment on both sides, we recognize that whether to open retail cannabis shops was not a simple decision for the Princeton Council. The public health risks to our community, especially the vulnerable and our children, outweigh the perceived benefits. We would like to publicly thank the Board of Health (BoH), especially George DiFerdinando, Meredith Hodach-Aalos, Rick Strauss, and JoAnn Hill for their medical expertise, for being brave stewards of this community’s public health and for maintaining your Hippocratic oath. Thank you also to the Board of Education (BoE) for their position statement, and to Council wo/men Dave Cohen, Michelle Pirone Lambros, Mia Sacks, and Mayor Mark Freda for listening to the BoH, BoE, and for keeping an open mind before reaching your decisions. Thank you for engaging with us and many others in our community in respectful dialogue. Your admirable approach reinforces our belief in the democratic process. Eve Niedergang, we know how passionate you felt about the mission of the Cannabis Task Force, and yet you publicly conceded that now is not the right time to proceed. We recognize and appreciate that you put this town’s will above your own, despite the personal disappointment. There are two gating factors before we can raise the topic of opening retail cannabis shops anew. First, our community needs education. Cannabis — legal and illegal — is already in Princeton, including in our middle school and high school, and we know that we aren’t managing well. With the recent cannabis legalization in New Jersey, the situation will get worse. Let’s get community education and support tools in place for all people who are already using cannabis or are considering using, such that they are informed and use it responsibly. Cannabis education must be formulated and run by mental health and drug addiction experts, with strong partnership and engagement from our public schools. This effort must be organized and funded expeditiously. We must first demonstrate to ourselves that we are managing well before we establish new cannabis sales channels in Princeton. Second, the CRC must tighten cannabis THC regulation, product testing, and develop state-level certification for budtenders. There are currently no state-level certifications of cannabis retail staff to instill confidence that they are knowledge experts, and nobody to hold accountable for ignorant advice that causes harm, as you might a doctor or pharmacy. Inconsistencies or absence of product testing must be addressed, and product labels must be enhanced to include warnings and usage guidelines. In a few years, when the decision to open retail cannabis shops comes up again, we hope that the future members who evaluate the decision are representative of our community demographic; have no ties to the cannabis industry; have nothing to gain financially from the outcome of the decision; includes teachers, mental health experts, physicians; and above all: the group is welcoming and tolerant of all voices and perspectives. The latter describes the Princeton we know and love, and why we all chose to live here and raise our families. RITA RAFALOVSKY Library Place JIAN CHEN Ettl Farm MINZHI LIU Wendover Drive GRACE ZHANG Hemlock Circle

Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.


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17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022

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Finding Dylan and Whitman in Jeff Deutsch’s Bookstore Utopia “Good bookstores reflect a Whitmanian sense of self: they contain multitudes.” —from In Praise of Good Bookstores found Jeff Deutsch’s In Praise of Good Bookstores (Princeton University Press $19.95) under Business & Career (341.45) at the Princeton Public Library. Which is why I almost didn’t find it. I had to ask a librarian for help. I can see why a book about bookstores by a man who runs one could end up in that Dewey Decimal dead zone, but Deutsch’s deceptively small volume is much too multitudinous to be squeezed into 341.45. While it’s true that you’ll pick up some information about managing Chicago’s Seminary Co-op, a vast bookstore with an imposing reputation, you don’t have to read far to know you’ve entered a wondrous realm on the far side of “business and career,” a bookstore utopia where the dead speak to the living in a society Deutsch has woven together with thoughts on books and life and the life in books, from Petrach to Pound, Epicurus to Emerson, Calvino to Conrad, and on beyond the beyond. The Dylan-Whitman Matrix Whenever I’m in the vicinity of Memorial Day, I run into Bob Dylan, born May 24, and Walt Whitman, born May 31, a liaison Dylan exploited in “I Contain Multitudes,” the first song on his album Rough and Rowdy Ways. Deutsch offers a line from Whitman’s “Song of the Open Road” to describe what happens when bookstore browsers surprise themselves, finding “just the sort of book they were hoping for”: “Something there is in the float of the sight of things that provokes it out of the soul.” Whitman’s thought needs more than one reading. The way it’s phrased is so striking, you can imagine it haunting the room at the Chelsea Hotel as Dylan was composing “Visions of Johanna,” and you wonder if it might have provoked something “out of the soul” of Robert Frost when he wrote “Mending Wall” (“Something there is that doesn’t love a wall / That sends the frozen ground-swell under it” ). Another line from Whitman by way of Deutsch that led me straight to Dylan stresses the importance of taking “a more active approach to reading,” meaning that the reader has “to do something for himself, must be on the alert, must himself or herself construct indeed the poem, argument, history, metaphysical essay” (or in Dylan’s case, song or memoir) providing “the start or framework.” It’s not that “the book needs so much to be the complete thing, but the reader of the book.” Dylan provides a demonstration in his freewheeling autobiography Chronicles: Volume One, where his version of a “good bookstore” is the voluminous library of the

Greenwich Village couple he was living with at the time. He describes “a dark cavern with a floor-to ceiling library.... The place had an overpowering presence of literature.... There were all kinds of things in here, books on typography, epigraphy, philosophy, political ideologies. The stuff that could make you bugged-eyed. Books like Fox’s Book of Martyrs, The Twelve Caesars, Tacitus lectures and letters to Brutus. Pericles’ Ideal State of Democracy, Thucydides’ The Athenian General — a narrative which would give you chills.... It’s like nothing has changed from his time to mine.” Riding Tolstoy’s Bicycle Dylan goes on for three more pages, citing novels by Gogol and Balzac; Materia Medica; Machiavelli’s The Prince (“The spirit of the hustler” says a handwritten note in front); quirky pairings such as Rosseau’s Social Contract with Temptation of St. Anthony, Ovid’s Metamorphoses next to the autobiography of Davy Crockett. He also remembers reading “a lot of it aloud,” liking “the sound of the words, the language,” singling out Milton’s protest poem, “Massacre in Piedmont” (“It was like folk song lyrics, even more elegant”). Then there’s “the Russian stuff,” which has “an especially dark presence.” A “book by Count Leo Tolstoy” leads to Dylan’s visit to Tolstoy’s estate “more than twenty years later,” where “a tour guide let me ride his bicycle.” Moving on to Dostoevsky, who “wrote stories to ward off his creditors,” Dylan recalls the early 1970s when “I wrote albums to ward off mine.” There it is, the undead speaking to a living reader who’s making connections, absorbing material, and after referring to stories by Jules Verne and H.G. Wells, noting that “folksingers could sing songs like an entire book, but only in a few verses.” Or, as Dylan would do with a multitude verses. Working at the Eighth Street “Greenwich Village’s Famous Bookshop” — so says the stationery I used when I worked for the Eighth Street Bookshop during my first year in New York City. The store’s rich stock of new, out-of-theway titles exemplified Christopher Morley’s strategy, quoted by Deutsch, that the bookseller “has to combine the functions of the bar-room and the bodega. He must be able to serve, on demand, not only the cocktail of the moment but also the scarcest of old vintages. How rare is the

publican who understands the challenges of both.” Dylan would have been in and out of the store that year, although he was not yet famous. According to a YouTube video on his first stay in New York, he met Allen Ginsberg at the Eighth Street, which his girlfriend Suzie Rotolo, the girl on the cover of The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan, used “as a kind of library,” where she’d sit on the floor “and read Henry Miller and Anais Nin.” Fourth Avenue Deutsch’s reference to the shelf life of books in the context of returns suggests that his store carries primarily new stock, with the presumed emphasis on academic titles like those published by university presses. My own adventure in books began as a 10-year-old visiting the shops on New York’s Fourth Avenue with my father. Picture an overcast day in winter, a street shrouded in metropolitan mystery, every shop a film noir, one after the other, atmospheric movies created by owners who saw subject areas as neighborhoods, rickety tenements inhabited by the illustr ious and “mute, inglorious” undead. It didn’t matter that my taste at the time ran to the Hardy Boys and baseball. I picked up on the mystique of browsing and dreaming, of finding something unfindable. The Old York Twent y years later I found a Fourth Avenue bookstore in New Brunswick, located just around the corner from the Rutgers campus. The owner of the Old York from 1968 to 1983, John Socia, who died in 2001, truly loved books, and had a gift for finding the right ones, which he priced more than fairly. He had a note-in-thebottle notion of his mission, every book set afloat by the readers of shipwrecked castaway authors. When he was growing up, John used to get taken along to used bookstores in Philadelphia by his father, a Sicilian immigrant who apparently developed a passion for books while learning the English language. John was my ideal of the unbookish bookman: he loved James Joyce the way I loved the St. Louis Cardinals. Micawber and Labyrinth I just looked up the letterhead of the Eighth Street to make sure it identified as a bookshop, and so it did. New York’s still-standing Strand and Argosy both identify as bookstores. The best solution may be the one used by two local

booksellers, Labyrinth Books and its predecessor in the same location, Micawber Books, where Logan Fox oversaw a thriving secondhand department that occupied half of the store. Speaking of local booksellers, I’m reminded of the day last week when I ducked from Sylvia Beach Way into the library to look for Deutsch’s book. It’s worth remembering that Sylvia Beach, who lived on Library Place and is buried in the Princeton Cemetery, founded and ran Shakespeare and Company, one of the most famous bookstores in the world, a literary legend still very much alive in the opening scene of Richard Linklater’s Before Sunset (2004), where the author giving a reading is played by Hun School graduate Ethan Hawke. As for bookstores on film, something “in the float of the sight of things” found its way into The Big Sleep (1946), no doubt the only film noir with scenes in two second-hand bookstores, one of which is a front clerked by a drug dealer’s moll who goes “Duh” when a private eye disguised as a simpering bibliophile comes in asking about first editions with special points. The shop across the street clerked by Dorothy Malone is the real thing, however. She knows her books and she knows what to do when Humphrey Bogart walks through the door of the Acme Book Shop on a rainy day with a bottle of rye in his pocket. She pulls the shade and shuts the shop for the afternoon. Sharing hen Deutsch refers to “the companionship of books,” and of how “we find in their pages a companionship that our authors felt in the presence of their books,” I think of the time my best friend and I spent a hot summer afternoon reading together in the greenlamp-shaded cool of the New York Public Library’s main reading room. He picked The Young Lions by Irwin Shaw, I picked Ernest Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms. The idea was that we would read each book all the way through, side by side. It wasn’t a race, or even a competition — we just thought it worth doing and it was. A decade later another friend and I read Coleridge’s “Christabel” out loud together, passing the paperback back and forth, huddled face to face in a tent in the Lake District. Both friends are gone now, one in November 2020, the other this past April. Both will be in my thoughts on Memorial Day. —Stuart Mitchner ——— Correction: In last week’s Book Review (“Exploring The New Princeton Companion”), I wrote “We’ve had the Garden Theatre for 120 years and it’s better than ever.” In fact, the Garden opened in 1920, so that should be 102 years.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022 • 18

BOOK REVIEW


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Theatre Intime, Princeton University Players Present “Shrek The Musical”; The Reclusive Ogre and His Friends Entertain a Reunions Weekend Audience

Erikka Reenstierna-Cates |photographer Richard Termine

heatre Intime and Princeton University Players have collaborated to present Shrek The Musical. The show entertained an enthusiastic mixedage audience, which filled the Hamilton Murray Theater on opening night. The 2008 Broadway musical’s often witty book and lyrics are by David LindsayAbaire, who adapts the screenplays of the popular DreamWorks film series, which is based on William Steig’s 1990 picture book. The music — which incorporates elements of pop, R&B, and traditional musical theater — is by Jeanine Tesori. The show interpolates “I’m a Believer,” which is written by Neil Diamond. This production is smoothly directed by Eliyana Abraham and Gabbie Bourla. They let the audience be a part of the action, by reserving a row of seats through which the cast often moves. The crisp musical direction is by Giao Vu Dinh, assisted by Sam Melton and Chloe Webster. The band opens the show with a brief “Overture,” consisting of a series of triumphal chords followed by a bouncy march. “The wry “Big, Bright, Beautiful World” shows the childhood experiences of Shrek (played by Rafael Collado) and Fiona (Ann Webb). At age 7, Shrek is sent to live on his own having been warned by his parents (played by Aria Buchanan and Matt Gancayco) that he will be shunned for his looks. Eventually he finds a swamp, where he is content to live alone. Fiona blithely re-titles the show Fiona The Musical, and tells her story. As a child she is shut in a tower by her parents, King Harold (Andrew Duke) and Queen Lillian (Jacquelynn Lin), to await Prince Charming. The reclusive Shrek and the exuberant Fiona are opposite personalities. Accordingly, set designer Ricky Feig places the ogre’s hut and the princess’s tower at opposite ends of the stage. Shrek’s solitude is disrupted by the arrival of a crowd of misfit fairytale characters. They include the nervous but feisty gingerbread man “Gingy” (Lydia Gompper), a (not so) Wicked Witch (Layla Williams), Peter Pan (Mel Hornyak), and a cross-dressing Big Bad Wolf (Duke). Also among these creatures — along with assorted bears, mice, and pigs — is Pinocchio (Alison Silldorff). Lauren Owens brings abundant energy to a dual role of a dwarf and the Captain of the Guard. The lengthening of Pinocchio’s nose is skillfully executed, and it is fun to watch it happen.

The fairytale characters inform Shrek that they have been banished for being “freaks,” by the villainous Lord Farquaad. Shrek decides to visit Lord Farquaad — who has threatened the creatures with death if they return — at his castle in Duloc, and try to persuade him to let them return home. On the way, Shrek (who mentions Nassau Hall during his journey) rescues a chatty Donkey from Lord Farquaad’s guards. Donkey (Tobi Fadugba) suggests that, in return, he show Shrek the way to Duloc; Shrek grumbles but reluctantly agrees. As Shrek, Collado skillfully imitates the Scottish accent associated with the character, as well as conveying both his bitter reclusiveness and his fundamentally kind nature. Fadugba is the needed contrast to this, infusing Donkey with all of the jovial sincerity and slightly nervous energy that the character requires. Both actors make their characters’ first meeting particularly entertaining. In the eerily cheerful “What’s Up, Duloc?” Lord Farquaad’s subjects proudly sing about the fascist changes he has brought to their “perfect place.” The diminutive Lord Farquaad (a delightfully snarky TJ Rickey, who also is one of the strongest singers) is not yet a king, but can become one if he marries. He selects Fiona

as his bride. The sequence has some slick choreography by Abraham (who shares the task of choreographing the show with Jenni Lawson and Ines Aitsahalia). As we see Fiona grow from a little girl to an adult, three actors portray her: Sydney Hwang (Young Fiona), Silldorff (Teen Fiona), and Ann Webb (grown). The trio sings the wryly sweet “I Know It’s Today”; they are linked by their reaction to a book of fairy tales, which fuels Fiona’s increasingly frustrated hope that a rescue, by a dashing man, is imminent. Lord Farquaad agrees to give Shrek the deed to his swamp, if the latter will rescue Fiona. When they arrive at Fiona’s tower, Shrek goes to rescue the princess, while Donkey manages to charm the guardian of the tower: a lonely female Dragon (Carrington Symone Johnson, who stands out with her rendition of the rhythmic belter “Forever,” backed by a chorus of knights). The production design is generally faithful to the style and color scheme of the film and Broadway production, while adding some original elements. Elliot Lee’s playful costumes are an example of this; the central characters — Shrek, Fiona, Donkey, and Lord Fargquaad — resemble their counterparts from previous iterations. The Dragon is a notable exception. In many previous productions she has been large and taken multiple puppeteers to

operate. Here she is a handheld puppet, about the size of Gingy, operated by the actor who plays her (Johnson), whom Lee outfits with a glittery low-cut dress. Collado infuses Shrek’s signature “Who I’d Be” with plenty of introspective dreaminess, though this writer found his rendition of the second act’s “When Words Fail” musically superior. Collado and Webb play off of each other well in “I Think I Got You Beat” (an imitation of “Anything You Can Do I Can Do Better,” albeit with more juvenile humor). Along with Rickey, Webb brings some of the strongest vocal performances, including the breezy act two opener “Morning Person.” The ensemble of fairy tale characters is memorable in the rousing “Freak Flag.” The pit band includes AJ Comsti (drums); Devon Ulrich (trumpet); Jay White (electric bass); Minjae Kim (guitar); Sydney Mullin (flute); Kyle Ikuma (keyboard), and Meryl Liu (keyboard). In addition to accompanying the cast, the band provides some welcome entertainment for the audience before the performance starts, adding to a celebratory mood. Balance among the musicians is quite good. However, for future productions of musicals, it would be advisable to pay extra attention to the balance between the band and the singers, which at times is skewed in favor of the former. Some vocalists are able to project strongly enough that this is not an issue; with others, this is somewhat less true. Sound designer Nicabec Casido makes Shrek’s roars suitably fearsome — so it is amusing when the ogre quietly utters the (unamplified) word “roar,” and characters still recoil. Angelica Qin’s lighting is particularly striking in a scene in which the Dragon destroys Lord Farquaad. While Shrek the Musical marks a bit of a departure from Theatre Intime’s usual style, the show does cover, however comically, issues the group explores. “I Know It’s Today” satirizes the extent to which gender stereotypes and expectations are perpetuated by children’s literature. A rather pointed bit of social commentary comes in a sequence in which the citizens “SHREK THE MUSICAL”: Theatre Intime and Princeton University Players have presented of Duloc physically lower themselves to “Shrek The Musical.” Directed by Eliyana Abraham and Gabbie Bourla, it played May 20-22 match Lord Farquaad’s height. ltimately, though, Shrek the Musiat the Hamilton Murray Theater. Above, from left, Princess Fiona (Ann Webb) is rescued by cal is a joyful Reunions Weekend unlikely friends Shrek (Rafael Collado) and Donkey (Tobi Fadugba). (Photo by Emily Yang) treat, presented by actors and musicians who clearly enjoy performing the For information about Theatre Intime’s upcoming productions call (609) 258- show. 5155 or visit theatreintime.org. For information about Princeton University —Donald H. Sanborn III Players, visit pup.princeton.edu.

U

Featuring world premiere choreography by:

JA’ MALIK CAILI QUAN CLAIRE DAVISON

JUNE 3-5, 2022 New Brunswick Performing Arts Center ETHAN STIEFEL, Artistic Director JULIE DIANA HENCH, Executive Director

Tickets start at only $25 arballet.org

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022

Shrek The Musical

THEATER REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022 • 20

Concierge Medicine

There’s a new trend in healthcare, and it’s gaining momentum in our area. By Sarah Emily Gilbert

(Originally published in Princeton Magazine)

Dr. Francis Rehor, Dr. Barbara A. Brown (left) and Dr. Lynne B. Kossow, and Dr. Emily Kossow Sandberg of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine.

F

Princeton Lifestyle Medicine is delighted to announce that Dr. Emily Kossow Sandberg, MD, joined our practice on April 1, 2022.

or the past several years, Dr. Lynne B. Kossow, Dr. Barbara A. Brown, and Dr. Francis E Rehor have offered their patients far more than the traditional primary care practice. Most doctors see 25-30 patients per day for an average of 15 minutes, Drs. Kossow, Brown, and Rehor see 6-8 patients per day. In addition to providing treatment for acute illnesses, the doctors act as their clients’ healthcare coaches through Lifestyle Medicine, a scientific approach to patient wellness by effecting changes in areas such as diet, physical activity, and stress management. With the current shortage of primary care physicians and the abundance of high-volume practices, this type of individualized attention is rare. However, by switching to a concierge format, doctors like the ones at Princeton Lifestyle Medicine are able to practice medicine that consists of this broad-spectrum care. Concierge medicine, also known as retainer-based medicine, is an umbrella term for private medical care wherein patients pay an out-ofpocket fee in exchange for enhanced care. Born in the 1990s, concierge medicine was once thought of as a service for the wealthy that charged patients a lofty fee for luxury medicine. In recent years, it has evolved to accommodate patients across all income brackets, leading to expanding interest among patients and their primary care doctors. According to a survey released by the American Academy of Private Physicians at the AAPP 2015 Fall Summit, more than 45 percent of 862 independent physicians would consider a concierge or similar membership model in the next three years. This may be due in part to our aging population needing increased and varied medical services, leading to an imbalanced patient/doctor ratio. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act has increased the number of insured patients, putting a further strain on primary care doctors. As a result, physicians are often unable to dedicate enough time to each patient. In the hopes of increasing both job and patient satisfaction in a financially sustainable way, primary care physicians are looking toward concierge medicine. “Where conventional medicine is failing is in the prevention and reversal of chronic diseases that are becoming an epidemic in the United States today,” explain the doctors. “The current insurance model is built upon a problem-based economic reimbursement that encourages doctors to address medical problems very quickly. This leads to most doctors rushing to see 25-30 patients per day in order to make ends meet…This is not how we have ever practiced. We always want to have the time to address the root cause of diseases that are preventable today.” Lifestyle Medicine is a 21st century approach to healthcare that consolidates the very best characteristics of traditional medicine with the profound impact of lifestyle behaviors on health. Lifestyle Medicine is an evidence-based practice that has been shown to prevent, reverse, or slow down heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, diabetes, dementia, and some cancers.

Concierge medical practices come in various forms, including those that reject insurance plans all together, but this is not the case for Princeton Lifestyle Medicine. All the doctors there accept insurance for all covered medical services. In addition, their patients pay an annual fee of $1,500 for the Lifestyle Medicine Concierge program, which gives them access to an elevated level of care. The founders of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine trained at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine at Harvard Medical School. They are at the vanguard of their field, having lectured about their practice development model at The Institute of Lifestyle Medicine Conference in 2015. They are also members of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and the American College of Physicians. They are among the first physicians to become board certified in Lifestyle Medicine, as well as maintaining their board certifications in internal medicine. This practice is unique in that it offers patients comprehensive conventional medical care combined with lifestyle counseling. Patients interested in a natural approach to disease prevention are provided in-depth, individualized coaching based on their needs. The doctors can assist with everything from quitting smoking to creating a manageable diet and exercise plan. The concierge model offers Princeton Lifestyle Medicine patients additional benefits including access to the doctors’ emails, cell phone numbers, a private phone line, extended patient office visits, and same or next day appointments. Their patients see their physician not only as accomplished medical doctors, but health advocates, mentors, and even friends. “Our practice structure allows us to spend more time educating our patients about what may be going on with them medically,” the doctors explain. “We are better able to work with them as partners in their care and advocate for them with their specialists or if they are in the hospital. We provide tremendous support and guidance to them and their caretakers or family. We greatly value this enhanced communication with our patients. Princeton Lifestyle Medicine physicians include the two original founders, Dr. Lynne Kossow and Dr. Barbara Brown, as well as Dr. Francis Rehor who joined the practice in 2015.” Princeton Lifestyle medicine is also delighted to announce that Dr. Emily Kossow Sandberg joined the practice in April of 2022 as well. Concierge practices like Princeton Lifestyle Medicine focus the healthcare system on its most vital component: the patient-doctor relationship. The model emphasizes quality care instead of quick care, benefitting both parties. Princeton Lifestyle Medicine has the only physicians in the Princeton area who are board certified in both Internal Medicine and Lifestyle Medicine. As leaders in both concierge and Lifestyle medicine, it comes as no surprise that Princeton Lifestyle medicine is at the forefront of this effort, bringing Princeton into the future of healthcare.

The Princeton Lifestyle Medicine Concierge Program is $1,500 per year. The fee can be paid monthly, quarterly, biannually, or annually, and credit cards are accepted as payment. All medical services are billed through the patient’s insurance company as usual. Princeton Lifestyle Medicine is located at 731 Alexander Road, Suite 201 in Princeton, New Jersey. For more information call 609.655.3800 or visit www.princetonlifestylemedicine.com. — Paid Advertisement —


@capitalhealthnj

Register online at capitalhealth.org/events and be sure to include your email address. Zoom meeting details will be provided via email 2 – 3 days before the program date. Registration ends 24 hours before the program date.

Welcome to Medicare Thursday, June 2, 2022 | 2 p.m. Location: Capital Health Medical Center – Hopewell NJ PURE Conference Center, One Capital Way, Pennington, NJ 08534 Are you a new retiree? Join us to learn what you need to know about your Medicare benefits for 2022 and how to compare health and drug plans to find the best coverage. The speaker, MARY McGEARY, is the director of the NJ State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP), a Medicare information program sponsored by the NJ Department of Human Services, Division of Aging Services.

NOTE: As this event is held in-person at a health care facility, all attendees are required to wear facemasks indoors except when actively eating or drinking. This is in compliance with guidelines set by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention and the New Jersey Department of Health and is subject to change. Class size is limited.

Revolutionizing Prostate Cancer: What All Men Should Know Wednesday, June 8, 2022 | 6 p.m. Location: Zoom Meeting If you or a loved one were recently diagnosed with prostate cancer, understanding treatment options is an important first step. Join DR. CHARLES POLOTTI, a fellowship trained urologist from Capital Health – Urology Specialists, and DR. TIMOTHY CHEN, medical director of Stereotactic Radiosurgery at Capital Health Cancer Center, for a discussion of diagnosis and treatment options for prostate cancer including active surveillance, minimally invasive robotic surgery, and outpatient radiation therapy with the CyberKnife system. The presentation will conclude with a virtual tour of the radiation oncology suite and a closer look at CyberKnife technology.

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022

FREE UPCOMING HEALTH EDUCATION EVENTS


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022 • 22

Milanov conducts the per- Tango Night is Preview formance. “I love Kurt Wei- To Philadelphia Festival ll’s deeply original music — O n e we e k b e for e t h e sensual, inventive, violent at Philadelphia Tango Festimoments,” he said. “Storm val takes place June 2-5, a Large is perfectly at home special preview is happening with the style of this music on Thursday, May 26 at the requiring not just extraordi- Suzanne Patterson Center, nary vocal skills, but also an 45 Stockton Street. amazing stage presence.” Large gained notoriety in 2006 as a finalist on the CBS show Rock Star: Supernova, where despite having been eliminated in the week before the finale, she built a fan base that follows her around the world to this day. She was seen on the 2021 season of America’s Got Talent. Other recent engagements include performing her one-woman autobiographical musical memoir Crazy Enough at Emiliano Messiez La Jolla Music Society and Two h ig h ly ac cla i m e d Portland Center Stage; and musicians will make this debuts with the Philly Pops, an electric evening of mumembers of the Chicago sic and dance. Argentine Symphony Orchestra, and pianist/composer Emiliano the Seattle Symphony, as Messiez and Buenos Aires well as return engagements bandoneonist Leandro Rawith the Houston, Detroit, gusa will perform. Toronto, and BBC SymphoMessiez was the pianist for nies, the New York Pops, the hit Broadway and Lonand the Louisville Orchesdon show Forever Tango. tra, with whom she recorded A prolific composer and rethe 2017 album All In. She FESTIVAL OPENER: Storm Large sings music of Kurt Weill in the Princeton Festival’s first continues to tour concert cording artist, he has also served as the music direcappearance of the season at Morven on Friday, June 10. (Photo by Laura Domela) halls across the countr y tor and pianist for the shows with her band Le Bonheur Princeton Festival Returns with the PSO. On Saturday, movements and actions of and as a special guest on Impact and Tango Buenos June 11 and Sunday, June t wo Annas, a pragmatic Michael Feinstein’s Shaken Aires, and he is the creator With Opening Program of Barolo Tango, a live tanVo c a l i s t S tor m L a r g e 12 at 7 p.m., the Festival singer and a passionate, & Stirred tour. go show based in Argentina. impulsive dancer, through continues with the opening opens the Princeton SymScalia /Ginsburg is about Ragusa, a bandoneonist, arseven U.S. cities in which performances of the comephony Orchestra ( PSO )’s the unlikely friendship be- ranger, and composer, perall-new Princeton Festival on dic, fully staged opera dou- they encounter sinful temp- tween U.S. Supreme Court forms at major tango festitations. Paired with this ble bill consisting of Derrick Friday, June 10 at 7:30 p.m., Justices Ruth Bader Gins- vals, as well as in chamber work is Rodion Shchedrin’s Wang’s Scalia/Ginsburg and in a tent on the grounds of burg and Antonin Scalia. music ensembles, in North Morven Museum and Gar- Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Carmen Suite, for which Mozart’s The Impresario and South America and EuThe Impresario. All three the composer arranged and den, 55 Stockton Street. features a theater impresario rope. vocal works are sung in Eng- orchestrated the music from Large sings the dual Anna named Frank who runs into Bizet’s eponymousMasonry opera for lish with English titles. They will both be performrenovation TOPICS role in Kurt Weill’s The Sevtrouble managing two and rival repair strings and percussion. ing at the Philadelphia TanThe Seven Deadly Sins en Deadly Sins in a concert actresses vying for the same Music Director Rossen leading role. Directed by go Festival as members of performance of the work features songs tracing the Masonry repair is our specialty the Orquesta Tipica Messiez Richard Gammon with scenic on Sunday, June 5. Messiez design by Julia Noulin-Mérat, will be appearing with banthe Princeton Festival’s doudoneonist Horacio Romo Steps • Walls • Patio • Concrete ble bill visually interweaves and violinist Pablo Agri. the two operas by Stone reversing Loose Railings • Blue Specialists Kerry Kay will DJ the May the sets from Scalia /Gins26 and June 5 milongas with burg to create, quite literally, Basement Waterproofing Orquesta Tipica Messiez. a behind-the-scenes setting Brick Driveways • Belgian Block for The Impresario. Princeton-based Walkways and Patiocomposer Construction Julian Grant’s free talk “DiReplacement ofJustices” Cracked Limestone Steps vas and delves further into the operas making up of theour Festival’s Check out some otherdouble smallbill, repair specialties: and is offeredGreg at Morven MuPowers Crackedseum stucco we restore old foundations & Garden’s Stockton HIC#13VH10598000 HIC#13VH06880500 Education Center on SaturRECENTLY COMPLETED OUTDOOR STONE FIREPLACE day, June 11 at 5 p.m. Visit princetonsymphony.org/fes609 . 203 . 0741 tival for a full schedule and Rossen Milanov, Edward T. Cone Music Director Gregory J. Geehern, Festival Director ticket information.

The Milonga (tango dancing) starts at 7 p.m. with live music beginning at 8:30 p.m. Admission is $25. All dancers must show proof of full vaccination on their first visit. Masks recommended, but are optional. For more information, visit philadelphiatangofestival.com.

Performing Arts

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NE

McCarter Welcomes Back Jazz in June Performances

After two years, McCarter Theatre’s annual “Jazz in June” festival of live performances returns next month. The series begins Friday, June 10 with the Joshua Redman Trio, and continues June 11 with the Christian Sands Quartet. Redman made his debut album in 1993, and Sands is an emerging artist known for swing, stride, bebop, progressive, fusion, Brazilian, Cuban, and other styles. The following weekend, the Helen Sung Quar tet performs on Friday, June 17, followed June 18 by Jazzmeia Horn. Sung’s quartet does original compositions and new arrangements by women composers, while Horn’s repertoire includes jazz standards and covers of songs from other genres. On Friday, June 24, Dee Dee Bridgewater and Bill Charlap take the stage, followed June 25 by the Ty s h aw n S or e y S e x te t . Bridgewater and Charlap have a repertoire that “spans the greatest periods and genres in music” according to press material from McCarter. Sorey is known for his virtuosity, memorization of complex scores, and ability to blend composition and improvisation. For tickets and informat ion, v isit mccar ter.org. McCarter Theatre is at 91 University Place.

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SMART ART: Paintings by members of the New York City United Federation of Retired Teachers will be on view at Gourgaud Gallery in Cranbury June 2 through June 27. An artist reception will be held on Sunday, June 5 from 1 to 3 p.m.

Retired Teachers Art Group were in a painting class run Union’s outreach program. Exhibit at Gourgaud Gallery by the United Federation The classes are currently Gourgaud Gallery in Cranbury will host an exhibit by members of the New York City United Federation of Retired Teachers from June 2 through June 27. Many of the exhibiting members

of Teachers as part of the SI Beagle Program, a program designed to be a part of continuing learning by the New York City Teachers Union, which was located in Manalapan as part of the

virtual. Chapters are in the five boroughs of New York City and outreach programs in various states and countries throughout the world. Linda Gilbert, chairperson of Gourgaud Gallery and

ACP Hosts Open-Air Pride Dance Party

The Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) has announced the return of its Dance, Princeton, Dance series just in time for Princeton Pride 2022. On Friday, June 3, the ACP’s parking lot will transform into an open-air dance party from 8 to 10 p.m. with tunes supplied by Princeton Record Exchange’s own DJ ModCon2. This celebration of Princeton Pride is open to everyone and all ages. Admission is a suggested donation of $5, to benefit the ACP’s Pride Art Club, where teens work collabor at ively to c re ate a n d

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022

Art

member of the Cranbury Arts Council, was the original instructor, followed by Deborah Rosen. G ilber t started the painting class in New Jersey in 2010. The artists include Gilbert, Rosen, Donna Rittner. and Frances Gunther, who have all exhibited before in various shows at the Gourgaud Gallery. They also welcome newcomers to this exhibit, who are also retired teachers from New York City. An artist reception will be held on Sunday, June 5 from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Gallery. The exhibiting artists will be present. Light refreshments will be served. On the day of the reception, there will be a basket of unframed paintings ranging from $25-$35. The Cranbury Arts Council provides arts-oriented programs, workshops, and performances aimed at enriching the cultural experiences of the community and keeping the creative spirit alive in adults and children. Their mission is to foster, support, educate, inspire, and promote artists and art appreciation in the community. As par t of a nonprofit Cra nbu r y A r t s C ou nci l, Gourgaud Gallery donates 20 percent of art sales to the Cranbury Arts Council and its programs that support arts in the community. Checks made out to the artist, or cash, are accepted as payment. Gourgaud Gallery is located on the second floor of the Cranbury Town Hall at 23-A North Main Street in Cranbury. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, visit cranburyartscouncil.org.

“ON YELLOW PETALS”: Works by Catherine J. Martzloff will be featured in “The Colors of Hope,” a collection of her contemporary and still life oil paintings, on view June 2 through June 30 at The Bank of Princeton, 10 Bridge Street in Lambertville during banking hours. Martzloff is a longtime resident of New Jersey and currently lives in Cranbury. complete a graphic novel. Led by teaching artist and queer activist Rashad Malik Davis, this free class uses the process of creating a narrative and characters and to explore issues of gender identit y, self- expression, and acceptance in a safe and creative space. The Princeton Pride Dance Party is hosted in collaboration with the Princeton Record Exchange, with support from the Bayard Rustin Center. The Arts Council of Princeton is located at 102 Witherspoon Street. For more information, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Exhibit Showcases Historic Photos by John A. Anderson

A new historical photography exhibit at Lambertville’s J a m e s Wi l s o n M a r s h a l l House Museum showcases 56 images of Lambertville as it transitioned to the 20th century, portraits, and other examples of the art of John A. Anderson. Anderson (1829-1917), a prominent Lambertville resident and railroad executive, was an exceptional, dedicated photographer. His work communicates history and a sense of place in remarkably

high resolution, thanks to his artistry and technical skill, and it holds enduring interest. In addition to the photographs, items on display include Anderson’s scrapbook and articles he wrote about local history and photography. “It took our team 2 ½ years to select the photographs from the Collection of the Mercer Museum Library of the Bucks County Historical Society, to digitally restore and research the images and reference materials, and to develop and install the displays,” said Lambertville Historical Society Trustee Michael Menche. “This is our first new exhibit at Marshall House in more than 20 years, and the first exhibit of John A. Anderson’s work in 40 years. If you love Lambertville, old photography, or local history, we think you’ll find this very worthwhile.” The exhibit is open every Sunday from 1-4 p.m. at the James Wilson Marshall House Museum at 60 Bridge Street in Lambertville. The exhibit is free; donations are welcome. For more infor mation, visit lambertvillehistoricalsociety.org. Continued on Next Page

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“LAMBERTVILLE ON MARCH 16, 1898”: This photo by John A. Anderson looking west along Bridge Street toward New Hope, Pa., is part of a historical photography exhibit on view at the James Wilson Marshall House Museum in Lambertville. (Photo courtesy of the Lambertville Historical Society)

Town Topics a Princeton tradition! ®

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022 • 24

Art Continued from Preceding Page

“CLOVER HILL BARNS”: Landscape oil paintings by Joe Kazimierczyk are on view at Bell’s Tav“CATTUS ISLAND PARK, TOMS RIVER”: This painting by adult student Barbara Weinfield is fea- ern, 183 North Union Street in Lambertville, through the end of June. As one of 16 member tured in “Faculty Student Show,” on view through July 9 at the West Windsor Arts Center on artists at Artists’ Gallery at 18 Bridge Street in Lambertville, many of his works are painted on location throughout the Delaware Valley. Bell’s Tavern is open daily from 5 to 9 p.m. Alexander Road in West Windsor.

West Windsor Arts Presents a personalized learning expe- Watercolor Studio; Pratibha Alexandra Jacqueline, Niam “It’s been a challenging and White” through June Annual “Faculty Student Show” rience for all ages. At WWA, Raju — Drawing Studio and Jain, Alexandra Lauzon, Jayna year for everyone and I am 12. Open Saturday and Sun-

The “Faculty Student Show” at West Windsor Arts (WWA) celebrates the work of teaching artists and their students created in a class or workshop at West Windsor Arts Center (WWAC) during the fall, winter, or spring sessions of the 2021-2022 class year. The exhibition runs through July 9. WWA’s teaching artists comprise a group of talented and accomplished individuals in their field and in the community. With small class sizes there are plenty of opportunities for one-on-one instruction with their supportive staff. This provides each student with

they value learners as creative and independent thinkers, who benefit from work in the arts and the guidance of their teaching artists. No matter the difficulties of COVID-19 and normal life, WWA aims to offer a safe place where students and teachers can leave their worries behind and feel empowered by their art. Faculty highlighted in the exhibition and the art forms they teach include Zakia Ahmed — Adult Guided Oil Painting; Lori Langsner — Beginners and Intermediate Oil Painting; Eleni Litt — Art Circle and Doodling Meet-Up; Susan Mitrano —

Acrylic Studio; Sarika Soman — Brilliant Watercolor, Acrylic Studio, and Watercolor Studio; and Katie Truk — Drawing and Watercolor and Draw, Paint, Sculpt! Adult students featured in the show include Tammy Dawkins, Rupa Sanbui, and Barbara Weinfield. Youth students featured in the show include: Tanish Aiyer, Gillian Appelget, Hayden Appelget, Isabelle Appelget, Nevin Benjamin, Seetha Chimalakonda, Milena Jade Deverell Cortez, Jenna Doyle, Dylan Ellis, Wyatt Ellis, Srinya Gottipati, Callie Jacobs,

Nandakumar, Annabelle Nguyen, and Arna Pakanaty. This year WWA is especially pleased to present so many youth students with the Certificate of Fine Arts (CiFA) program. This program has become the backbone to the art education programs offered at the WWA. The works presented in this exhibition reflect the work and growth of the artists over the course of just a year. Through sequential learning and skill building, students select the Visual Arts or Performing Arts CiFA track and make a commitment to achievement in the arts.

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impressed with the way both our students and faculty were able to adapt to new online classes, programs and camps,” said Kirsten Sanford, education manager. “To see creativity and collaboration thrive has been such a joy and speaks volumes to everyone’s efforts to nurture the arts during a difficult time. ” West Windsor Arts announced that the following students have completed the Foundation 1 program towards their Certificate in Fine Arts: Sam Selekman, Sasha Suresh Gautham, Alexandra Deverell, Milena Deverell, Nevin Benjamin, Jenna Doyle, Cara-Mier Marino, Mia Thomas, Amal Nurullayeva, Arthur Tomim, Melody Salrarini, Evie Fuller, and Norah Wright O’Toole. Accomplishing Foundation 2 students include Ada Lee, Srinya Gottipati, Wyatt Ellis, and Annabelle Nguyen. The fourth year of CiFA will begin in fall 2022. West Windsor Arts Center is located at 952 Alexander Road in West Windsor. Gallery hours are by appointment. For more information, call (609) 716-1931 or visit westwindsorarts.org.

Area Exhibits Check websites for information on safety protocols. Ar t @ Bainbr idge, 158 Nassau Street, has “Body Matters / Martha Friedman” through July 10. artmuseum.princeton.edu. A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Moor ings” through June 5. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Art on Hulfish, 11 Hulfish Street, has “Screen T ime : Photog raphy and Video Art in the Internet Age” through August 7. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Arts Council of Prince to n , 102 Wit herspoon Street, has “STEEP: A National Teapot Exhibition” through May 28 and “Communication Between Forms” through June 25. artscouncilofprinceton.org. G a l ler y 14 Fine A r t Photography, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “Exploring the World in Black

day from 12 to 5 p.m., or by appointment. gallery14.org. Gratz Gallery and Conservation Studio, 5230 Silo Hill Road, Doylestown, Pa., has “Peter Miller — Forgotten Woman of American Modernism” through May 31. Gratzgallery.com. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “What’s in the Garden?” through August 1, among other exhibits. Hours are Thursday through Monday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Timed tickets required. groundsforsculpture.org. Highlands Art Gallery, 41 North Union Street, Lambertville has “A Brush Above The Rest” through June 30. highlandsartgallery.com. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and Innovator’s Gallery,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. Museum hours are Thursday through Sunday, 12 to 4 p.m. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Keith Haring: A Radiant Legacy” through July 31. michenerartmuseum.org. Morpeth G aller y, 43 We s t B r o a d S t r e e t, Hopewell, has “Whistling in the Moonlight” through May 31. morpethgallery.com. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey” through March 2023 and the online exhibits “Slavery at Morven,” “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898,” and others. morven.org. The Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, has “Emergence: Expanding in Light” through June 6. lagphotography. com. Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has paintings by Jacqui Alexander through June 7. Quilling and photography works by Beatrice Wiesner Chianese are at the 254 Nassau Street location through June 7. smallworldcoffee.com. West Windsor Arts Center, 52 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “Faculty and Student Show” through July 9. westwindsorarts.org.


Wednesday, May 25 6:30 p.m.: Operatic Explorations: The Princeton Festival, at Mercer County Library Robbinsville branch, 42 Robbinsville-Allentown Road. Fe s t iv a l D ire c tor Gregory J. Geehern shares t he stor ies, music, cos tumes, and histories of the composers of this year’s productions. Mcl.org. 7 p.m.: “Stories of Place: The Watercolors of Jane Ramsey.” Virtual art talk from Phillips’ Mill, New Hope, Pa. RSVP at Phillipsmill.org. 8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Country Dancers presents contra dance at Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive. Jan Alter with PUB. $10; free for those under 35. Princetoncountrydancers.org. 8 p.m.: Blue Man Group is at State Theatre New Jersey, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. $40-$98. STNJ.org. Thursday, May 26 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 4:30 p.m.: The New Jersey Governor’s Awards in Arts Education, at Patriots Theater at the War Memorial, Lafayette Street, Trenton. Honoring outstanding creative achievements of students, and the promotion and support of arts education by educators and arts organizations. Performances as well as awards. The event will also be livestreamed. Visit njgaae.org. 6 p.m.: Operatic Explorations: The Princeton Festival, at Mercer County Library Lawrenceville branch, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Festival Director Gregory J. Geehern shares t he stor ies, music, cos tumes, and histories of the composers of this year’s productions. Mcl.org. 8 p.m.: Blue Man Group is at State Theatre New Jersey, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. $40-$98. STNJ.org. 8:30 p.m.: Milonga tango night at Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. Pianist Emiliano Messiez and bandoneonist Leandro Ragusa perform. $25. Preview of Philadelphia Tango Festival. Philadelphiatangofestival.com. Friday, May 27 8 p.m.: Noël Coward’s play Present Laughter is at Kelsey Theatre, Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. $18 - $20. KelseyTheatre.org. Saturday, May 28 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. WWcfm.org. 10 a.m.: Spirit of Princeton Memorial Day Parade from Nassau Street at Princeton Avenue to Monument Plaza.

A ceremony will be held at 11:15 a.m. on the steps of Monument Hall. Sponsored by Spirit of Princeton. Spiritofprinceton.org. 10 a.m.: Haying at Howell Living History Farm, 70 Woodens Lane, Hopewell Township. Learn how to make hay the old-fashioned way, in the fields. Children’s craft program from 11 a.m.3 p.m. Howellfarm.org. 12-5 p.m.: Winery Weekend Music Series at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Jerr y Steele plays from 1-4 p.m.; fresh produce and baked goods available. Terhuneorchards.com. 1 p.m.: Day of Remembrance ceremony at Princeton Battlefield State Park, 500 Mercer Street. Sponsored by the Princeton Battlefield Society, honoring fallen soldiers from all U.S. wars. Pin memorial pins to a wreath, join historical interpreters, hear the story of the Battle of Princeton. Pbs1777.org. 8 p.m.: Noël Coward’s play Present Laughter is at Kelsey Theatre, Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. $18 - $20. KelseyTheatre.org. Sunday, May 29 8:30-10:30 a.m. (registration 7-8:20 a.m.): Asian American Pacific Islander 5K run and walk, starts at 101 Carnegie Center Drive. $30 ($40 day of race). For details and link, email PrincetonRunningTeam@gmail. com. 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.: Flemington Fine Ar tisans Show, Stangl Factory, 4 Stangl Road, Flemington. Jewelry, ceramics, glass, home décor, fiber art, woodwork, painting and more. Free. FlemingtonFineArtisansShow.com. 12-5 p.m.: Winery Weekend Music Series at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Kara & Corey play from 1-4 p.m.; fresh produce and baked goods available. Terhuneorchards.com. 1-1:45 p.m.: Princeton University carillonneur Lisa Lonie gives a concert at Cleveland Tower; listen outside on the grounds. Free. 2 p.m.: Noël Coward’s play Present Laughter is at Kelsey Theatre, Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. $18 - $20. KelseyTheatre.org. Monday, May 30 10 a.m.-4 p.m.: Flemington Fine Ar tisans Show, Stangl Factor y, 4 Stangl Road, Flemington. Jewelry, ceramics, glass, home décor, fiber art, woodwork, painting, and more. Free. FlemingtonFineArtisansShow. com. 12-5 p.m.: Winery Weekend Music Series at Terhune

Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. For Memorial Day, Bill Flemer plays from 1-4 p.m.; fresh produce and baked goods available. Terhuneorchards.com. Tuesday, May 31 Preschool Nature Class: Life in a Log. At The Watershed Institute, 31 Titus Mill Road, Pennington. For ages 3-5, adult attendance required. $10 per child. Followed by a hike, art activity, and game. Registration required. Thewatershed.org. Wednesday, June 1 10-11 a.m.: How to Get Photos Off Your Phone, presented via Zoom by Princeton Public Library. Register through the events calendar at princetonlibrary.org. 4:30-7:30 p.m.: “Sip & Savor” food and wine tasting at Great Meadow Farm, 3501 Princeton Pike, Lawrenceville, benefit for Share My Meals. Food from Elements and Mistral restaurants and chef Ricardo Ricci from Tuscany; 20 European winemakers, $95. Reserve tickets at greatmeadow. farm. 7 p.m.: The Jewish Center Princeton presents Yizhar Hess, vice chair of the World Zionist Organization, speaking on “The Masorti movement in Israel, pluralism, the WZO, and You.” RSVP at tinyurl.com/2P9FUASU. 7-8:30 p.m.: Princeton Public Library presents a Community Listening Session: Help Plan the Library’s Future, via Zoom. Register at princetonlibrary.org. Thursday, June 2 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot, across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.: Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber monthly membership luncheon at Princeton Marriott Forrestal, 100 College Road East. Bill Baroni, former state senator and assemblyman, is the speaker. Princetonmercer.org. 7 p.m.: Princeton Festival Guild presents the annual Artists’ Round Table with a discussion of the opera Albert Herring, at Princeton Public Library’s Community Room. Panelists include Rossen Milanov, Gregory J. Geehern, Richard Gammon, and cast members. Free. Princetonsymphony. org/festival. Friday, June 3 5-7 p.m.: Princeton Community Pride Picnic, Princeton Shopping Center courtyard, Music, art, games, yoga, and more. Princetonshoppingcenter.com. 7 p.m.: American Repertory Ballet presents “Movin’ & Groovin,” works by choreographers Caili Quan, Ja’ Malik, and Claire Davison at New Brunswick Performing Arts Center, 11 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. $25 and up. Arballet.org. 7:30 p.m.: The Princeton Actors’ Collective presents a staged exploration of Old

MAY-JUNE

Times by Harold Pinter, at the Drapkin Theatre, Lewis Center for the Arts Free. Givebutter.com/LXKp4Y. 8 p.m.: Noël Coward’s play Present Laughter is at Kelsey Theatre, Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. $18 - $20. KelseyTheatre.org. 8 p.m.: Sips & Sounds at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Music, wine, light bites, and more. Bill Flemer & Friends Trio performs. Terhuneorchards.com. Saturday, June 4 8 a.m.-2 p.m.: Household hazardous waste collection and electronics recycling, at Dempster Fire School, 350 Lawrence Station Road. For Mercer County residents. Visit www.mcianj.org for list of accepted materials. 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. WWcfm.org. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.: The Hunterdon Count y Rug Ar tisans Guild holds a regional hook-in at St. Anna Orthodox Church, 85 Voorhees Corner Road, Flemington. Vendors, prizes. $20 registration fee. Walk-ins after 12 p.m. pay $10. Hcrag.com. 9 a .m . : To a s t m a s te r s meet via Zoom. Toastmastersclubs.org. 12-5 p.m.: Winery Weekend Music Series at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Musician Mark Miklos performs from 1-4 p.m. Light fare available. Terhuneorchards.com. 10 a.m.-12 p.m.: Princeton Future meets at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. The topic is the town’s preparation of its new Community Master Plan. Princetonfuture.org. 5:30 p.m.: Trenton Music Ma kers p er for ms at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 1140 Greenwood Avenue, Trenton. Free will offering taken. Capitalharmony.works. 7:30 p.m.: La Fiocco period instrument ensemble presents “Cantate e Canzonetti” at Christ Congregation, 50 Walnut Lane. $10$25. Lafiocco.org. 8 p.m.: American Repertory Ballet presents “Movin’ & Groovin,” works by choreographers Caili Quan, Ja’ Malik, and Claire Davison at New Brunswick Performing Arts Center, 11 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. $25 and up. Arballet.org. 8 p.m.: Noël Coward’s play Present Laughter is at Kelsey Theatre, Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. $18 - $20. KelseyTheatre.org. Sunday, June 5 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers’ Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org.

10 : 30 a.m. : D elaware River Greenway Partnership Annual Pedal & Paddle, starting at Prallsville Mills, 33 Risler Street, Stockton. 8.5-mile bike ride and paddling along the D&R Canal. Family-friendly event. Register at bit.ly/pedalpaddle22. 12-5 p.m.: Winery Weekend Music Series at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Musicians Bill O’Neal and Andy Koontz perform from 1-4 p.m. Light fare available. Terhuneorchards.com. 2-4:30 p.m.: Historical festival at the Bridge Academy property, 1900 Lawrenceville Road. Free. Learn about a historic battle that took place on the property; participate in family activities and games, observe reenactors. Parking behind Adath Israel Congregation. (609) 844-0770. 2 p.m.: American Repertory Ballet presents “Movin’ & Groovin,” works by choreographers Caili Quan, Ja’ Malik, and Claire Davison at New Brunswick Performing Arts Center, 11 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. $25 and up. Arballet.org. 2 p.m.: Noël Coward’s play Present Laughter is at Kelsey Theatre, Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. $18 - $20. KelseyTheatre.org. 2 p.m.: The Trent House Association presents a talk by Jason Cherry on the role of Major William Trent in the Revolution. At Trent House Museum, 15 Market Street, Trenton, or via Zoom. Williamtrenthouse.org. 4 p.m.: Fiona Tyndall and Friends performs at Hinds Plaza as part of Princeton Public Library’s “Listen Local” concert series. Princetonlibrary.org. Monday, June 6 Recycling 7-8:30 p.m.: Continuing Conversations on Race, presented by Princeton Public Library, via Zoom. Princeton High School racial literacy students give their annual presentation. Register at princetonlibrary.org. Tuesday, June 7 9:30 and 11 a.m.: Read & Pick program at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. S t r aw b er r ie s. Ha n d s - on farm activity for young children. $12 per child, includes a container of strawberries. Terhuneorchards.com. Wednesday, June 8 3 p.m. : B o ok L au nch Party: Architect of Courage by Victoria Weisfeld, at Mercer County Library Lawrence Headquarters Branch, 2751 Brunswick Pike. Free; registration required. (609) 883-8293. 7 p.m.: Restorative yoga a n d g u id e d m e d it at ion, presented by Penn Medicine Princeton Behavioral Health. Virtual event open to all. Princetonhcs.org / events. Thursday, June 9 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market is at the Dinky train station parking lot,

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022

Mark Your Calendar Town Topics

across from the Wawa. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 10 :30 a.m.: Pr inceton Public Library’s Fiction Book Group meets at Princeton Shopping Center to discuss Jordy Rosenberg’s Confessions of the Fox. If it rains, the meeting is held at the library. Princetonlibrary.org. 7:15 p.m.: Princeton Public Library’s Black Voices Book Group meets via Google Meet to discuss Jacqueline Woodson’s Another Brooklyn. Princetonlibrary.org. Friday, June 10 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: The Hunterdon County Rug Artisans Guild holds its monthly meeting at Raritan Township Police Department Building, 2 Municipal Drive, Flemington. Guests welcome. Hcrag.com. 7:30 p.m.: The Princeton Festival opens at Morven, 55 Stockton Street, with a performance by singer Storm Large of Kurt Weill’s The Seven Deadly Sins, with the Princeton Symphony Orchestra led by Rossen Milanov. Rodion Shchedrin’s Carmen Suite is also on the program. Princetonsymphony.org/festival. 8 p.m.: Sips & Sounds at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Music, wine, light bites, and more. Jerry Steele performs. Terhuneorchards.com. Saturday, June 11 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, Vaughn Lot of Princeton Junction train station. Enter from 877 Alexander Road. WWcfm.org. 9 a.m.: Walking tour of Horseshoe Bend in Kingswood Township, sponsored by Hunterdon Land Trust. Free. Reser ve a spot by emailing Dave@hunterdonlandtrust.org. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.: Hidden Gardens of L amber t v ille walking tour, rain or shine. $20 in advance; $25 the day of the tour. Kalmiaclub.org. 11 a.m.-7 p.m.: 10th Annual Cultural Festival in Mercer County Park, West Windsor. Bands, dance performances, food trucks and more. Mercercounty.gov. 12-5 p.m.: Winery Weekend Music Series at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Brian Bortnick performs from 1-4 p.m. Light fare available. Terhuneorchards.com. 12-5 p.m.: Mill Hill Garden Tour, Mill Hill neighborhood, Trenton. Urban gardens open to the public. Start at Artworks, 19 Everett Alley. $20. TrentonMillHill.org. 7 p.m.: The Princeton Festival continues at Morven, 55 Stockton Street, with Derrick Wang’s opera Scalia /Ginsburg and Mozart’s The Impresario, conducted by Gregory Jon Geehern. Princetonfestival.org. Sunday, June 12 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust Farmers Market at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Fresh, organic offerings from 20 farmers and vendors. Morning yoga; music. Hunterdonlandtrust.org.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022 • 26

Time-Efficient, Safe Strengthening Exercises Are Offered with the Exercise Coach Concept

“S

tronger Muscles. Stronger Health. Stronger Self.” — The Exercise Coach 20 minutes twice a week? Really? This is indeed the protocol of The Exercise Coach, a unique fitness program focusing on gaining and maintaining strength.

IT’S NEW To Us

20 Minutes And, indeed, what is really unique is that it requires only 20 minutes to complete an exercise session. “Even those with little time to spare find that our program works for them,” point out Tom and K im Swietek, owners of The Exercise Coach, located at 46 Vreeland Drive, Suite 6 in Skillman. “The 20-minute concept is really appealing to people who feel they don’t have time to get to the gym or who don’t really like to work out.” After a previous career as CPAs, the husband and wife team opened the fitness studio in June 2021. They had not been exercise “fanatics,” but as Tom says, “We were health- conscious, active, played sports, and we knew exercise was important. We had talked about making a change and doing something together.” They decided to take their career in a new direction, and their research indicated that the market for fitness centers was growing. “We did our due diligence, and investigated different kinds of gyms and fitness centers,” reports Kim. “We were very enthusiastic about

The Exercise Coach and its approach.” Founded by Brian Cygan in 2000 and headquartered near Chicago, The Exercise Coach offers franchise opportunities, with 154 locations currently in operation nationwide. Technology-Driven “We are the sixth in New Jersey,” says Tom, “and we are excited to offer this special technology-driven program, focusing on strength, to our clients.” The Exercise Coach is very different from other fitness centers and gyms, and as its information statement explains, “T he E xercis e Coach has spent over 20 years innovating an abilitybased, data-driven exercise program we call the Smart 20 Workout. Our workout combines the science of muscle contraction w ith our own proprietary exercise technology that delivers each workout in a way that is perfectly suited to anyone regardless of their ability, age, or fitness level. “We have pioneered and perfected a refreshing approach to getting fit. Research supports our core belief that muscle quality matters more than movement quantity. Everything you want from a fitness program can be achieved with no more than two 20-minute sessions per week that focus on total body fitness through customized muscular conditioning.” Working with a certified coach, each client receives a personalized program, targeted to their fitness level and goals. During the 20 minute session, clients will spend approximately one minute and 20 seconds on eight different machines, each of which has been programmed to the

individual’s specific needs. No free weights are included. Smarter Not Longer “The healthier and more productive approach is to exercise smarter not longer,” continues the Exercise Coach statement. “On any given exercise, an individual’s force-producing capacity varies greatly. The Exercise Coach approach is to combine our understanding of exercise science with 21st century technologies to create protocols that are congruent with each individual’s strength profile. In addition, our equipment provides constant computer feedback to increase motivation and determination.” After a rigorous Exercise Coach training program, including study of physiology and anatomy, the Swieteks both became certified coaches as well as owners of their franchise. They couldn’t be happier with their career change and with the opportunities they are offering to their clients for an efficient exercise program providing successful results. “Our clients are all ages — the youngest is 16, the oldest 80,” they report. “The more typical age range is 50 to 60, and everyone who comes may have a different goal. Wanting to get more exercise, increase energy, strengthen muscles, tone up, lose some weight, etc. Their entire program will be customized to their ability, with the goal of increasing their ability.” When a prospective client comes in, they fill out a questionnaire, including what they hope to achieve. “With The Exercise Coach proprietary ‘Exerbotic’ technology, the client’s range of mot ion and st reng t h ability is tailored to each

TEAM WORK: “Our Exercise Coach program can strengthen muscles, increase bone density, and also improve cholesterol and metabolism levels. People can become stronger and healthier.” Kim, left, and Tom Swietek, owners of The Exercise Coach, are enthusiastic about the company’s proprietary “Exerbotic” program and the results it can achieve. individual,” explains Tom. “Each client has an assigned pin within the Exerbotic technology that stores that client’s information, and keeps track of their progress.” Eight different machines are available to engage the muscles and work on different aspects of strengthening as well as cardio, he adds. “To receive a good muscle burn, each exercise is approximately one minute and 20 seconds. All sessions are either one-on-one with client and coach or with no more than four in a group.” Endurance and Energy Clients often come after recovering from an injury, having physical therapy, and others may have arthritis or a range of physical conditions, but ever yone can see results, emphasizes Kim. “It’s the quality of the session, and the ideal is to come twice a week. Coming twice a week, within four to six weeks, you will feel stronger, have more endurance and energy.

“Our clients are able to accomplish whatever they need to change in order to make life easier for all their day-to-day activities, such as lifting, bending, carrying things. They will become stronger and healthier, and be able to do things they couldn’t do before.” In addition to the Swieteks, three other coaches t ra i ne d i n t he E xercis e Coach method are available, and the owners are delighted to see their clientele increasing all the time, including individuals from all over the Princeton area and beyond. “Sometimes, people come together in our small groups,” says Kim. “Husband and wife, mother and daughter, two friends, etc. That can be fun, and also motivating for them. Many clients have been with us from the beginning, and they have become our friends.” Clients, including a number of physicians, are very e n t h u s i a s t i c ab o u t T h e Exercise Coach program,

often commenting on their improved strength and energy, how much they like working with a coach, and the remarkable results that can be achieved in 20 minutes. Along with the exercise program, healthy eating is also emphasized, report the Swieteks. “We offer nutritional guidance, helping with healthy choices, and we have a nutrition tip of the week.” Open Concept The studio has a comfortable open concept setting, with a changing room, and a friendly, down-to-earth atmosphere, also much admired by clients. All the COVID-19 precautions are in place, including special state-of-the-art filter and cleaning systems. In addition, all necessary safety equipment is available, and coaches are all trained in CPR. A v ar ie t y of p ay m e nt plans, monthly, yearly, etc. are offered, and a free tryout, including two free workout sessions, is offered to newcomers. A referral program also offers a special discount to both parties. The Swieteks are very engaged with their clients and are proud of them when they achieve their goals and gain a sense of accomplishment. “Having the studio is not just about having a business,” they explain. “We really want to help people to make a positive difference in their lives. We see how much our clients value the program, and are willing to invest in themselves, their health, and well-being. It makes us feel good too. They have a strong level of commitment, and we look forward to being with them.” h e E xercis e C o ach is open by appointment Monday through Thursday 6 a.m. to 8 p.m., Friday 6 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Saturday 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. All clients work with a coach. For more information, call (609) 677-6070. Website: exercisecoach.com. —Jean Stratton

T

IS ON


27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022

S ports

Overcoming Nemesis Yale in NCAA Quarters, PU Men’s Lax Makes Final 4, Will Face Maryland

TITLE SHOT: Princeton University men’s lacrosse player Sam English fights to get off a shot against Boston University in the first round of the NCAA tournament on May 14. Last Saturday, junior midfielder English tallied three goals to help fifth-seeded Princeton top fourth-seeded Yale 14-10 in the NCAA quarterfinals. The Tigers, now 11-4, will face top-seeded Maryland (160) in the NCAA semis on May 28 at East Hartford, Conn., with the victor advancing to the title game on May 30. It marks Princeton’s first Final 4 appearance since 2004. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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top of the Ivy League so it was a great step for us. It was good to beat those guys, that is a heck of a team.” Making it back to the Final 4 was big for Princeton players and staff, past and present. “It was great for the program, teams are teams but the programs are different,” said Madalon. “This really has been a program in terms of Division I lacrosse. It has been a little bit of a drought getting back to championship weekend. It is a heck of a group, led by the senior group and our captains. I am proud for everyone involved. It really takes a village to get a team to this point in the season, support staff, alumni, everything.” Now Princeton is getting a rematch against a great Maryland program, a juggernaut who defeated Princeton 1510 on February 26. “At this point in the season, every team is playing at a high level,” said Madalon. “We are excited to be in the Final 4. We are excited for our Maryland matchup and looking forward to getting our group ready this week.” In order for Princeton to pull off an upset of the Terps, Madalon believes his squad needs to stick to basics. “It is a familiar opponent but again that was so early in the season,” said Madalon. “They have continued to take steps every week and put themselves as the undefeated, No 1 team. We fight and clawed to get ourselves in this position. It is being able to get to work around the face-off X and just really just settle into our game plan as early as possible. We need to weather the emotion of the Final 4 and just get back to playing our lacrosse, our style.” —Bill Alden

ID

“That was the story of the whole game, we would get up three and they would chip back and get it to two,” said Madalon. “We would get it back to three and they would chip back to two. I don’t believe it ever closed to one goal, had that happened, maybe the momentum flips a little bit. I think our guys did a really good job on executing at crucial, critical points.” Junior midfielder Sam English came through at crucial points, scoring three goals to help spark the Tigers. “Sam is great, he had a great day,” said Madalon, who got two goals apiece in the victory from Christian Ronda, Alexander Vardaro, and Coulter Mackesy. “He does a lot for us, he plays offense, he plays defense, he plays on the wings at times. He is really helpful in the clearing game, he had a really nice game.” Princeton senior star defender George Baughan had a nice game as he helped hold Yale standout attacker Matt Brandau to one goal and one assist. “That was a huge matchup, those are two premier players in Division I lacrosse,” said Madalon, who got 17 saves from senior goalie Erik Peters. “Matt Brandau is a world class attackman, he is excellent. Both of those guys played really hard. It was a good match, George did a nice job.” Beating Yale in such a high stakes contest was a huge confidence builder for the Tigers. “It was a big step for our program, I hadn’t beaten Yale in my tenure as a head coach,” said Madalon. “That was essentially the standard of Ivy League lacrosse. They won a national championship and competed for another one. They have been at the

S

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att Madalon could have felt an uncomfortable sense of déjà vu as the Princeton University men’s lacrosse team fell behind Yale 3-1 in the NCAA quarterfinals last Saturday afternoon. With fourth-seeded Yale having beaten fifth-seeded Princeton six straight times and Tiger head coach Madalon never having experienced a win over the Bulldogs in his five-year tenure, history seemed to be repeating itself in the contest played at Hofstra University. But Madalon wasn’t fazed by the early deficit. “We were down 3-1 but we were still getting some of the shots off that we would like to get, they just weren’t dropping,” said Madalon. “I think at that point, it was ‘hey, just stick to the game plan and keep working. If we get some shots to drop, we can flip this pretty quickly.’” Princeton did flip the script in a hurry, going on a 7-0 run over a 14-minute stretch from the latter part of the first quarter into the second to seize momentum. “It was really important, I don’t know if we have been on a 7-0 run at any other point of the year,” said Madalon. “It was a couple of good bounces, a couple of good saves, and a couple of really good shooting performances.” Building an 8-5 lead at halftime, the Tigers held off the Bulldogs over the final 30 unites of the contest to pull out a 14-10 win. The Tigers, now 11-4, will face top-seeded Maryland (16-0) in the NCAA semis on May 28 at East Hartford, Conn., with the victor advancing to the title game on May 30. It marks Princeton’s first Final 4 appearance since 2004. Madalon liked the way his squad took care of business in the second half.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022 • 28

After Inspiring Performance at Ivy Regatta, PU Women’s Open Crew Primed for NCAAs H e a d i n g i nto t h e Iv y League Championships earlier this month, the rowers in the Princeton University women’s open crew program experienced a range of emotions. “They were defi nitely fired up for it; we hadn’t had an Ivy championship for almost three years,” said Princeton women’s open crew head coach Lori Dauphiny. “The interesting thing is that most of them had not been in an Ivy championship. There was a little bit of anxiousness as to what is this all about. I thought the seniors did a really nice job of trying to walk them through what is was going to be like.” There were some anxious moments at the regatta held on May 15 in Pennsauken, as Princeton found itself in a tight battle with Yale and Brown for the Sally P. Shoemaker Trophy given to the crew with the most points. A victory by Princeton’s varsity 8 in its grand fi nal proved to be the tiebreaker as the three squads each had 74 points. The Tiger top boat clocked a time of 6:11.703 over the 2,000-meter course on the Cooper River to edge Brown (6:13.730) to win its grand fi nal. “We knew they would be a tough competition,” said Dauphiny of Brown. “We did not change the race plan that we had but we were ready. We knew that it would be close. We talked a lot about that and to be prepared for that and stay internally in the boat. They did that because the team hit a goose in the race and a kid almost lost her oar. They also hit a log somewhere in the race so there were two bobbles in which they hit something. It was a great race. It just heightened the fact that they had a lot of resilience through the year with inconsistencies, different lineups, and sickness. They were able to race through some things that were thrown at them in the race.” Dauphiny credited veteran performers Flo Donald and Annika Maxson with helping the boat keep an even keel. “Flo and Annika were the

two seniors in first varsity and they did step up,” said Dauphiny of the pair who were named fi rst-team AllIvy performers while boat mates Lydia Rosen and Camille Vandeermeer earned second-team All-Ivy recognition. “They did a really nice job of helping to lead the boat, getting them through a championship, and just being stable forces in the boat.” The Tiger varsity four provided a highlight as it won its grand fi nal in 6:52.30, more than four seconds ahead of runner-up Brown. “They exceeded their ranking which is always exciting,” said Dauphiny of the boat which had finished second in its heat. “It was a real battle and I don’t think they knew they could win but then in the race, the coxswain said something, like ‘hey you can do this, you can win.’ It was ‘oh my gosh, this is an opportunity for you right now’ and they took it.” While the second varsity 8 faltered in its grand final as it faded to fourth after a strong start, Dauphiny believed it learned a valuable lesson. “The first half of the race was solid and then they had some trouble, nothing external, just in their boat,” said Dauphiny of the boat which had two first-team All-Ivy performers in Isabelle Grosgogeat and Lara Valt. “They weren’t able to handle the pressure of the competition around them.” The title marked the second straight Ivy team crown for Princeton and the first time it has won back-to-back team trophies since 2011-13. “I am so proud of the rowers and the coaching staff,” said Dauphiny, whose varsity 8 won its fi fth straight Ivy crown. “They stepped up in one of the most challenging two years, getting through a pandemic and then performing at their best. There is no victory sweeter than to feel the accomplishment after such trying times. I keep looking at the pictures from the championship because the smiles on their face are just priceless. It just makes your heart swell.” With the varsity 8 seeded

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second for the upcoming NCAA regatta, the second varsity 8 seeded 13th, and the varsity 4 seeded third, Dauphiny is cautiously optimistic about her crew’s prospects heading into the competition. “I would say that we are excited and it is a really cool opportunity earned,” said Dauphiny. “I can’t wait to see what the boats can do. I am nervous but I think we are in a good place. It is going to be really hard, I am not taking anything for granted. I don’t know if we will be in the grand fi nals. It is one step at a time, it will be really tough. I think we are ready.” — Bill Alden

OPEN THROTTLE: The Princeton University women’s open crew varsity 8 churns through the water in a race this spring. The Tiger top boat, along with the second varsity 8 and varsity 4, will be competing in the NCAA Championships from May 27-29 in Sarasota, Fla. (Photo by Sideline Photos, provided courtesy of Princeton Athletics)

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PU Women’s Lax Standout Sears Wins von Kienbusch Award

Princeton Universit y women’s lacrosse player Kyla Sears has been named as recipient of the 2022 C. Otto von Kienbusch Award, which is presented annually to the school’s top senior female student-athlete. Star attacker Sears rewrote the record books for Princeton women’s lacrosse during the most successful offensive career in program histor y. The 2022 Ivy League Attacker of the Year, Sears now ranks No. 1 all-time in points by a Tiger with 307, No. 1 in goals with 209, and No. 1 in assists with 98. An efficient performer, she has scored at least one goal in every career game played. Her production has made an impact nationally as she ranks No. 7 among active players in points-per-game, No. 12 in goals-per-game, and No. 20 in assists-per-game. A three-time first-team All-Ivy selection, Sears, a 5’4 native of Skaneateles, N.Y., ranks No. 3 all-time in points by an Ivy League player, No. 4 in goals and No. 7 in assists. In 2018, she established new Ivy League freshmen records for goals with 64 and points with 83. A three-time Iv y League champion, Sears’ 40 assists in 2019 are a single-season program record. Sears was named one of 25 nominees for the Tewaaraton Award as national player of the year in 2022. She tallied 70 goals and 30 assists this spring to help Princeton go 15-4 and advance to the second round of the NCAA tournament.

PU Soccer Star O’Toole Wins Roper Trophy

Princeton Universit y men’s soccer player Kevin O’Toole has been chosen as the winner of the 2022 William Winston Roper Trophy, which is presented annually to the school’s top male senior student-athlete. Standout midfielder/forward O’Toole made Princeton men’s soccer history, becoming the first Tiger to win multiple Ivy League Offensive Player of the Year awards over his career and leading Princeton to only the second perfect Ivy League season in program history in 2021. Last fall, O’Toole scored seven goals and added nine assists to lead the Ivy League in scoring on his way to third-team All-American honors from both United Soccer Coaches and College Soccer News. A three-time first-team All-Ivy selection, O’Toole, a 5’10, 165-pound native of Montclair, N.J., tallied 15 goals and 18 assists during his Princeton career, dishing out the fourth-most assists in program history and he will graduate as a two-time Iv y League champion. In January, O’Toole was drafted 34th overall in the MLS SuperDraft by NYCFC and has begun his professional career.

Lane Award for Service Goes to Ebongue, Ruggiero

Princeton University women’s open rower Ornella Ebongue and Tiger women’s squash star Elle Ruggiero have been chosen as the winners of the 2022 Art

Tiger Men’s Golfer Mayer Wins Class of 1916 Award

Princeton University senior men’s golfer Jake Mayer has been named as winner of the Class of 1916 Cup, which is presented annually to the Princeton varsity letter-winner who achieved the highest academic standing at graduation. Mayer is an economics major and served as a team captain for the golf squad. A native of Scotch Plains, N.J., Mayer earned Academic AllIvy honors this spring after being named a GCAA AllAmerica Scholar in 2020. Mayer helped lead the Tigers to the 2019 Ivy League championship, and paced Princeton in scoring at the NCAA Athens Regional. He was named PING All-Northeast Region and awarded the program’s Mar tin P. “Buff” Wohlforth ’76 Memorial Award, presented

to the individual who has contributed the most to the Princeton golf program, for that campaign. Mayer served as co-president of the Student-Athlete Service Council (SASC) for the past two years, helping to organize a variety of on and off-campus service initiatives to connect varsity student-athletes with the Princeton community. He has also been an active volunteer coaching golf with the Special Olympics of New Jersey.

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022

PU Sports Roundup

Lane ’34 Award, which is presented annually to senior student-athletes in recognition of selfless contribution to sport and society. Ebongue, an operations research and financial engineering major from Milton, Mass., picked up the sport of rowing upon her arrival in Princeton, but wasted no time in making her impact felt on the water and in the community. Ebongue has been instrumental in the implementation and success of Princeton Rowing’s STEM to Stern program, which provides local underserved middle school students access to the spor t of rowing and STEM curriculum. Additionally, she has served her residential college community as a student assistant, helping to support and promote civic engagement opportunities. Ebongue participated in the PVC-sponsored Coach for College program in the summer of 2019, where she taught mathematics, life skills and sports to underprivileged youth in rural Vietnam. Ruggiero, a captain and two-time All-American for Princeton women’s squash, helped lead the Tigers to a top-five national ranking in each of her three full seasons. A two-time College Squash Association ScholarAthlete, Ruggiero has dedicated herself to service both on campus and abroad. She was a member of the First College Council, Athlete Ally, and Student-Athlete Wellness Leaders. She has also volunteered as a tutor with the FUTURO Program, providing academic support and mentorship to first and s e c o n d - g e n e r at i o n h i g h school students. Ruggiero, a native of Malvern, Pa., studied in the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs with certificates in Spanish and Latin American studies. She has interned with Child Family Health International, the International Planned Parenthood Federation and the United States Agency for International Development. For her impact f u l work across these organizations, Ruggiero was awarded the Henry Richardson Labouisse ’26 Prize, which funds international civic service projects. She will spend the next year in Brazil studying maternal mortality during the Zika epidemic and COVID-19 pandemic.

Princeton Athletics Names Turner to Diversity Post

Princeton University Athletics has announced the hiring of Jordan “JT” Turner as its first associate director of athletics for diversity, equity, and inclusion. Turner comes to Princeton from the University of Illinois, Chicago, where she currently serves as the director of the Gender and Sexuality Center. Turner’s role with Princeton Athletics will be to lead the athletic department’s efforts to create and maintain a culture of mutual respect and unity and to combat bias based on gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, race, and all other identities. She will have oversight of all aspects of DEI education and training for student-athletes, coaches, and staff with Princeton Athletics. The position will also work collaboratively with the University’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Gender and Sexuality Resource Center, and Campus Life. “When I think about the impact sports has at a university and in our larger society, I get inspired by the difference I will be able to help make in my new role at Princeton,” said Turner. “We are living in a time where student-athlete well-being is capturing national attention and I believe Princeton Athletics has a role in that conversation. I know this work cannot be done in silos and must be intersectional. I look forward to building relationships across Princeton to advance the University’s mission and commitment to equity.” Born and raised in Raleigh, N.C., Turner has over a decade of experience working on college campuses alongside athletic departments and university leadership to oversee the well-being and development of student athletes across various forms of play. Turner’s approach to student-athletes is deeply informed by her understanding of community development and historical and current day justice movements. In her work, she has supported marginalized college students through roles in Residence Life and Multicultural Student Affairs at The University of Connecticut and Northwestern University. As director of the Gender and Sexuality Center at The University of Illinois-Chicago, they consulted campus departments on efforts to push the dial on culture to make campuses more diverse, equitable, and inclusive. Prior to UIC, she worked at Northwestern University, serving as assistant director of multicultural student affairs, advisor to the Black Student Union, and head of outreach and support for students of color and LGBTQ+ students. As a scholar practitioner, Turner has focused her work on the intersections of race, gender,

ALL DONE: Princeton University softball player Allison Ha takes a cut in in recent action. Last Saturday, freshman star Ha went 2-for-3 in a losing cause as Princeton fell 5-4 to Wichita State to get knocked out of the NCAA Fayetteville Regional. The Tigers, who fell 11-0 to fourthseeded Arkansas on Friday to start the double-elimination competition, ended the spring with a 27-17-2 record. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) and sexuality. Turner has ser ved on the executive board for The Consortium of Higher Education LGBT Resource Professionals as well as on the leadership team for ACPA’s Commission of Social Justice Educators. Turner has a master’s degree in college student personnel from Western Illinois University and a bachelor’s degree in sociology with a minor in American Studies from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

She has also studied in the Master of Divinity Program at Garrett Evangelical Theological Seminary with a specific interest in queer theology.

5 Princeton Rowers Selected for US U-23 Camp

The Princeton University rowing program recently had five athletes invited to the USRowing 2022 Under-23 National Team Selection Camp. Nathan Phelps ’23, Erik Spinka ’23, and Zachary Vachal ’25 of the Princeton

men’s heav y weight team along with Claira Fucetola ’24 and Camille Vandermeer ’23 of the open rowing squad were invited to the men and women’s Sweep Selection Camps. Molly Hamrick ’13 will be coaching the women’s sculling camp. Athletes selected through the camps will represent the United States as the 2022 World Row ing Under-23 Championships from July 25-30 in Varese, Italy.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022 • 30

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a big crowd. “We are best friends on the field, best friends off the field and it shows,” said Birge. “We are really comfortable with each other, we are quick to adjust to everything.” After falling behind 4-1 to Franklin, the Tigers adjusted with aplomb, exploding for nine runs in the bottom of the third inning to go up 10-4 and never looked back on the way to a 16-6 victory. “It was a great hitting game where we show off our offense,” said Birge, reflecting on the win which saw PHS pound out 20 hits. “Everyone contributed and that is what we love to see. It was the same with our game against Ewing (an 8-4 win on May 13) where we had a sixrun inning in the first. It helps to build up that big lead and then it becomes a whole lot easier to pitch and play after that.” Birge made a big contribution, going 3 for 4 with three runs and three RBIs, including driving in the last run of the contest on a single through the infield to end the game on the 10 run-rule. “It felt really good warming up,” said Birge. “At the plate I felt really comfortable. I was swinging for the fence on the last one but it worked.” As a four-year starter at catcher, Birge has developed a comfort level with the PHS pitching staff. On Wednesday, he handled things as Kenny Schiavone started and went five innings and then Wes Price came on relief for one inning. “Kenny and Wes are great to catch,” said Birge. “Our chemistry and experience is great. I almost don’t have to put down a sign, they just know everything. It is so fun

catching them.” Over his career, Birge has developed into a team leader from his critical spot in the diamond. “The advice Cap ( PHS head coach Dom Capuano) gave me after my freshman year was to begin to mold into that leader that he wants me to be,” said Birge. “I think it has shown a lot with these young guys, helping them.” Capuano, for his part, appreciates what Birge has given PHS behind the plate and with his bat. “He is the best defensive catcher in the county,” said Capuano. “Not having to worry about calling a game and being able to relinquish that and have him do such a good job is great. It is arguably the most important position in the field. He is really starting to come into his own with the bat.” The team’s senior group has done a great job over the last four years. “There are 13 of them and four of them have been playing in some capacity with varsity since their freshman year,” said Capuano, referring to Jaxon Petrone, Drew Petrone, Schiavone, and Birge. “It is tough to replace 13 seniors who lost their most impor tant year of competition, their sophomore year. This team has really

only three years of experience when you think about it. It begs the question of what it would be like if we had that one more year but they have done tremendous things. It is tough to stay in the moment, knowing what we are going to lose this year as we come to the end. They are all big losses and you weigh everything, that is going to sting.” Capuano enjoyed seeing his seniors enjoy a big hitting game against Franklin. “I turned to Goldy (assistant coach Scott Goldsmith) and I said, “We are going to have to slug this one out if we are going to win,’” said Capuano who got four hits from Jaxon Petrone in the win with Jensen Bergman and Drew Petrone contributing three hits apiece. “The other coach said he hasn’t seen hitting like this in a while. We did the same thing on Friday night at Waterfront against Ewing. It was that kind of hitting.” Even though PHS is making a push for state seeding, Capuano had no qualms getting all of his seniors in the game against Franklin. “It was get every one of them in and make sure that each one of them got to play,” said Capuano, whose team moved to 11-11 with an 1110 loss to WW/P-North last Monday and plays at Seneca on May 26.

“It is tough when you are still hunting for points. Everybody knows their role. I push the guys who play all of the time, I say you do your job and we can get more people in to play. They were always going to play today but it made it easier. I feel comfortable with them in general. They did a good job, it was a good way to go out. It was a good tune-up for states.” Birge believes the Tigers can make a big run in the states which starts next week. “The way it is now we are probably going to see a good arm in the first round and it will be a tough matchup,” said Birge. “We did it before. In my freshman year we beat Hamilton West (a 1-0 win in the Mercer County Tournament) and last year we beat Edison (a 6-4 win in the state tournament). That was the same thing, go up early, get great pitching. That is how we play baseball. We have had a good win over Allentown this year (6-5 on April 25). Every game is a close game, we are never out of any game. Even the games we lose, we are in. I feel if we just stay locked in the whole seven innings then we have every chance to beat any team.” —Bill Alden

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SENIOR MOMENT: Princeton High baseball player Carl Birge follows through on a swing as PHS hosted Franklin High last Wednesday. Senior catcher Birge went 3-for-4 with three runs and three RBIs as PHS topped Franklin 16-6. The Tigers, who moved to 11-11 with an 11-10 loss to WW/P-North last Monday, play at Seneca on May 26. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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For Jackson Kraemer, helping the Hun School baseball team top Hamilton West 6-0 in the Mercer County Tournament championship game last Thursday is something he will never forget. “Thursday was huge, we have been working for this for four years, our program had never done this in its history,” said senior outfielder/ pitcher Kraemer, who scored a run in the win. “It meant a lot. Having our fans out there and the whole setting, it was awesome.” The bonds that Kraemer has developed with his teammates made the title even more awesome. “It is just the brotherhood I have been building up the last four years,” said Kraemer. “The friends and the friendships are going to last me a lifetime. I love the sport.” The love of the game helped Hun push through a baseball marathon last week as it was also competing in the state Prep A tournament. The Raiders fell 8-2 to Pingry on Wednesday in the first round of the double-elimination competition and hosted Peddie on Saturday in a loser’s bracket contest as it looked to keep its Prep title hopes alive. “Coach (Tom Monfiletto) said last week this would be a marathon in these tournaments with all the scheduling,” said Kraemer. “We just had to go out there and compete.” On Saturday, Kramer competed hard, pitching in sweltering 90 degree heat and tossed a two-hitter with 10 strikeouts and hit a homer as Hun rolled to a 15-0 win over Peddie in the semifinal round. “I felt good today it was just going out there and doing a job to get us to Sunday,” said Kraemer, who lost his rhythm as Hun exploded for 10 runs in the bottom of the third inning. “The long inning slowed me down a little bit. It took me a couple batters and then I felt good. It was very hot out there.” Kraemer started the 10-run outburst in style, leading off

the inning by blasting a homer over the left field fence. “In the first at-bat, I got caught looking with a curve ball,” recalled Kraemer. “For my second at bat, I was talking to coach [Steve] Garrison and it was just try to hit a ball to right field. The pitcher got me an inside fastball and I just tried to hit it where it was pitched. I got good barrel on it and I saw it going out. That was awesome.” For Hun head coach Tom Monfiletto, a former Hun player and assistant coach, guiding the Raiders to the MCT title was an awesome achievement. “It meant more than I can even describe, from the school community, from the alumni, and from the parents with the emotions that were involved in that game,” said Monfiletto, a 2004 Hun alum. “The amount of correspondence I had with people after that game was more than any win that we have had. It is something that we have wanted to do for such a long time and we have never been able to. I was really happy. I thought about coach [Bill] McQuade the whole time because as a player for coach and as coach with him, I know how much that tournament meant to him. We were always in positions where we had to make difficult decisions as to who would pitch based on the Prep tournament and the Mid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL).” In the win over Hamilton West, Hun got a superb pitching effort from Brody Pasieka, who came out of the bullpen to pitch four innings, giving up one hit and striking out four to earn tourney MVP honors. “It is something that has eluded us for such a long time there have been years where we felt we had the best team in the county and we just weren’t able to get it done,” said Monfiletto, whose team had to overcome some injuries on the way to the county crown. “We were outplayed in some big situations and it was good

ACTION JACKSON: Hun School baseball player Jackson Kraemer heads to first base in recent action. Senior star Kraemer scored a run to help Hun defeat Hamilton West 6-0 in the Mercer County Tournament championship game last Thursday. On Saturday, he pitched a shot and hit a homer as Hun deferred Peddie School 15-0 in the semifinal round of Prep A state tournament. Hun went on to fall 5-3 to Pingry in the Prep A final round on Sunday to end the spring with a 22-4 record. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

to be able to handle all of the adversity that came in that tournament. I would almost rather win it the way we won it with a lot of unexpected circumstances. It is not going to be smooth sailing. If you are going to win it, it is going to be this way.” Monfiletto was thrilled to see this year’s group earn the breakthrough title. “They are extremely talented, that is No. 1; I am very lucky to be able to coach some really, really good baseball players,” said Monfiletto, who got three RBIs from Mike Chiaravallo in the MCT final with Carson Applegate chipping in two hits and scoring three runs. “On top of that, I truly believe they root for each other. They truly care about each other’s success. They have a very strong personal connection with each other that is going to last for a very long time.” Those players helped propel the Hun program to a higher level. “We have built something here that is very, very special and I think it extends beyond this campus,” said Monfiletto. “Winning a Mercer County championship proves that.” With Hun having won five straight Prep A titles, the squad was fired up to go after another championship. “We take a ton of pride being at the top of our division here in the preps,” said Monfiletto. “Pingry entering it the past few years, they have a very strong, talented team. Lawrenceville has a really, really talented team.” Despite the grind of the arduous week of games, the Hun players arrived on Saturday ready to keep going. “I think they just absolutely love playing with each other,” said Monfiletto. “I think every opportunity they have to play a game with each other is something that they are going to take advantage of.” Monfiletto loved the performance he got from Kraemer in the win over Peddie. “He was incredible, it was a nice, nice finish to his career here on the mound for us,” said Monfiletto. “I am happy that he will take that with him and he hit a home run. I have always loved watching him pitch, I am such a fan of his. When he starts to build confidence as the game goes on, he is untouchable.” Going into Sunday, Monfiletto was confident that Hun could pull out another Prep A crown. “Before all of this stuff happened, the mindset was don’t let us get to Sunday,” said Monfiletto, whose team started Sunday by topping Lawrenceville 10-1 to advance to the final round but ended up falling 5-3 to Pingry to come up just short of the title double. “Whenever we come from the loser’s bracket, that is the mantra, don’t let us get to Sunday.” While Hun didn’t get its Prep A title, Kraemer made another special memory last Saturday with his final appearance on the Hun diamond. “It means the world, I love this team and I love this program,” said Kraemer, who is headed to Wake Forest where he will be playing for its baseball program. “This field has done a lot of good for me.” —Bill Alden

Despite Ending Stellar Season with Loss in Prep A Final, Hun Baseball Cemented its Elite Status with MCT Crown When it was over, Carson Applegate trudged off the field with arm around Ben Romano as they consoled each other after the Hun School baseball team fell 5-3 to Pingry in the Prep A state final last Sunday afternoon. The defeat ended a marathon week for Hun which saw it fighting a two-front war as it won the program’s first- ever Mercer County Tournament title on Thursday night and then battled from the loser’s bracket to make the Prep A final in the double-elimination competition. With his eyeblack smudged by tears, Applegate acknowledged that going for two titles in seven days was a grind. “It was definitely a highly emotional week with a lot of emotional w ins especially Thursday night,” said Applegate. “Winning the MCT, that was a goal for us. With Brody [Pasieka] on the mound and everybody in the field just laying their hearts out, that is the standard we set for this program.” Applegate and his classmates were hear tbroken after coming up just short against Pingr y, hugging each other one by one in right field after the team’s postgame talk. “I think this is the first time I have ever cried on the baseball field,” said Applegate. “These bonds that we have built over the past couple of years are really special.” Having lost 8-2 to Pingry in the first round of the Prep A tourney, Hun rebounded by topping Peddie 15-0 on Saturday and then defeating Lawrenceville 10-1 early Sunday morning to advance to the final against Pingry. Even through Applegate was spent, he was psyched to take the mound for Hun in the finale. “I was drained. I took a four-hour nap when I got home and I felt horrible when I woke up,” said Applegate, who went 5.2 innings with six strikeouts and

three walks and went 2-for-3 with a run and an RBI. “We all came back and win a big game this morning and never gave up and that is just who we are. I was fired up to get my last start out there and do as much as I can.” A subdued Hun head coach Tom Monfiletto was disappointed that the memorable week didn’t culminate with a second title. “It was fun, I wish we could have finished it off,” said Monfiletto, whose program was going for its sixth straight Prep A crown. “We almost got there but we couldn’t pull it off.” Monfiletto credited Applegate with gutting things out, knowing that Hun was playing shorthanded. “We didn’t have much experience after him, he definitely felt that,” said Monfiletto. “We had guys out of position all over the place. I don’t want to make any excuses, Pingry played well.” Hun played hard to the final out, pushing across two runs in the bottom of the sixth after it fell behind 5-1 and getting a runner on in the seventh inning before he was erased by a Pingry double play. “That was what we were really proud of, they left everything on the field, every ounce of sweat, energy, and whatever they could,” said Monfiletto. “They left it all out there. That was fun to see. I am proud of how they competed to the last out. That was a difficult week but they competed for each other and their effort was something I am really proud of.” The efforts of the team’s seniors were major source of pride for Monfiletto. “They have propelled this program into a different stratosphere,” said Monfiletto, whose senior group included Ryan DiMaggio, Jackson Kraemer, Sam Segal, Brody Pasieka, Tommy Kydonieus, and Carson Wehner in addition to Applegate and Romano.

“We are on a completely different level. We are recognized with some of the best programs in New Jersey which was our goal. I think we will be that way for a while. A lot of that is because of the effort they have put in in the three seasons that they had here. It is a shame they didn’t have that 2020 season.” While this season didn’t end the way Hun wanted, the 2022 campaign will go down as one of the best in program history. “It is incredible, I think we tied the program record for wins,” said Monfiletto, whose team went 22-4. “The schedule that we played was a juggernaut, especially at the end of the season. We had some huge wins, some signature wins. It sucks to finish on this note but after we think about this for a while, we will be able to think about Thursday and appreciate what we achieved there and winning a third straight Mid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL) championship.” Applegate, for his part, is proud of the legacy this year’s squad will be leaving. “I think that this team definitely left a mark in Hun’s history, winning the MCTs for the first time in program history, having a chance at another Prep A tournament, and winning the MAPL for the third straight year,” said Applegate, who is headed to the University of Kentucky where he will be playing for its baseball program. “All of the guys worked their butts off the whole year in the offseason and that really showed.” —Bill Alden

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022

After Helping Hun Baseball Win its First MCT Title, Kraemer Stars as Raiders Advance to Prep A Final

A Princeton tradition!

FINAL INNINGS: Hun School baseball player Carson Applegate fires a pitch in the Mercer County Tournament. Applegate starred as Hun won its first-ever MCT title, beating Hamilton West 6-0 in the final Thursday. Last Sunday, senior star Applegate battled hard on the mound as Hun fell 5-3 to Pingry in the Prep A state final. Applegate went 5.2 innings with six strikeouts and three walks as the Raiders ended the spring with a 22-4 record. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022 • 32

Learning Lessons From Earlier Loss to Lawrenceville, Hun Softball Tops Big Red 11-2 in Prep A Title Game Lexi Kobryn has produced some remarkable pitching performances this spring for the Hun School softball team, hurling two perfect games and four other no-hitters. But sophomore star Kobryn was involved in one meltdown this season as Hun squandered a 7-0 seventh inning lead against Lawrenceville in late April with her in the circle on the way to an 8-7 defeat for its first loss of 2022. When the rivals met last Thursday in the state Prep A title game at the Adventure Sports and Entertainment Center in Jackson, Kobryn had that setback on her mind. “I was definitely nervous; it was one inning that really killed us,” said Kobryn. “We wanted to come back and show what we are made of and what we have been working for.” Kobryn kept her head, putting on a show with her arm and bat as the Raiders prevailed 11-2 over the Big Red. She hurled a complete game, striking out 10 and yielding five hits and went 3-for-4 at the plate with two runs and two RBIs as Hun posted a final record of 18-1 on the way to winning its first Prep A title since 2017. “They have some good hitters but I threw all of my pitches,” said Kobryn. “It was just keeping them off balance. My rise was working, I got a lot of batters on that. I had confidence in myself, I was trying to keep it together.” Kobryn has gained confidence through the spring as she hurled one gem after the other. “I definitely stepped it up from last year,” said Kobryn, who piled up 190 strikeouts in 87 innings pitched this season. “I did well last year but even better this year. I have been working really hard over the fall and winter. I was in the gym every day.” At the plate, Kobryn saw the fruits of her labor, hitting

a team-best .500 with team highs in homers (7), RBIs (28), and runs (30). “I did the same thing with my hitting, this is all I do. I work hard, I hit off the tee whenever I can and just focus on my mechanics.” In Kobryn’s view, the April 26 loss to Lawrenceville helped set up a big May for Hun. “I do think it was a blessing in disguise because we weren’t focusing going into each game,” said Kobryn. “It was like ‘oh no, what if we lose.’ We lost so we are not undefeated and that is OK and that pushes us to be better. That loss really showed us what we can do and what can happen and how we need to jump back and learn. It is OK to fail, you have to fail to succeed.” The squad developed a good chemistry along the way that helped it succeed. “It is an amazing, amazing team, we have such a bond,” said Kobryn. “I trust everyone behind me, we all trust each other.” Over the year, Kobryn developed a deep bond with senior catcher Nora Shea. “I had so much confidence in throwing to Nora,” said Kobryn. “We will really miss her next year.” Hun head coach Kathy Quirk credited her players with producing their best hitting performance of the season in the Prep A final. Hun pounded out 14 hits against Lawrenceville as Anna Murphy went 3-for-4 with three runs while senior Christina Riviello went 2-for-3 with four RBIs and sophomore Jamie Staub chipped in two hits and two RBIs. “I have never seen us hit the ball as well as we did tonight,” said Quirk, whose team was aggressive from the start as leadoff hitter Kat Xiong ripped a single up the middle on the first pitch Hun saw on the evening. “We tell Kat, she sets the tone for the game. If she gets

on base that sets the tone. We weren’t getting little bloopers, we were hitting it hard.” Kobryn’s stellar pitching kept the Big Red’s hitters from getting into a groove. “She just does a great job for us and I am very happy,” said Quirk of Kobryn. “I am very pleased with her, I am proud of her. She just throws hard, she just knows what to do.” Quirk was proud of how her squad responded in the wake of the loss to Lawrenceville. “I think it was the turning point of our season, we learned a really good lesson,” said Quirk. “We never use the undefeated word and we bounced back. We beat Lawrence High, we beat Hopewell Valley, we beat West Windsor North. It just made us a stronger team mentally.” Displaying her affection for the squad, Quirk and her players came together in a group hug at home plate after the trophy presentation. “It is just a great bunch of girls, I am going to miss the three seniors,” said Quirk, referring to Shea, Ashley Jones, and Christina Riviello. “I am just so proud of them, it was a dream come true.” Making that dream come true was the product of a lot of hard work. “Every day we practice hitting, every day we practice defense and we just go over situations,” said Quirk. “We drill and they buy into it. They know what we do every day and they just do it.” Kobryn sensed early on that Hun was bought in and primed for a special season. “I knew when we had our spring training, we were going to do some damage this year,” said Kobryn. “We had some practice games before and we already had a feel of what we were going to go into.” —Bill Alden

MEMORABLE RUN: Hun School softball player Lexi Kobryn, right, celebrates with Kat Xiong after scoring a run in a game this spring. Last Thursday, sophomore star Kobryn led the way with her arm and bat as Hun defeated Lawrenceville 11-2 in the Prep A state title game. She hurled a complete game, striking out 10 and yielding five hits and went 3-for-4 at the plate with two runs and two RBIs as Hun posted a final record of 18-1. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Lines Carried: CROWNING GLORY: Members of the Hun School softball team display the hardware they earned for topping Lawrenceville 11-2 in the state Prep A title game last Thursday night. Hun ended the season at 18-1 on the way winning their first Prep A crown since 2017. (Photo by Jamie McKee/The Hun School)

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As Elle Anhut and her teammates on the Princeton Day School girls’ lacrosse team looked ahead to the homestretch of this season, they were determined to give retiring coach Jill Thomas a special farewell tour. The goal was to send out New Jersey Lacrosse Hall of Famer Thomas with a pair of state titles, starting with the Prep B state tournament, to honor her impact on the program and players. “She pushes you to be your best, you might not know you can give it,” said senior star midfielder and tri-captain Anhut, reflecting on the experience of playing for Thomas. “She knows what you can give and she is pushing it from you. It may seem like a bit at times but she is pushing you to be your best and take on certain roles. She believes in you.” With the Panthers trailing MKA 12-9 in the state Prep B final, the players kept believing, reeling off a fourgoal run to pull out a dramatic 13-12 win and earn the program’s first Prep title since 2017. “I think as a team we worked the best that we have the entire season, everybody was in it the entire time,” said Anhut, who had four assists in the final with Sophie Jaffe tallying five goals and an assist and Tessa Caputo chipping in four goals and an assist. “Everybody is proud of how they played. We played super well, super strong, especially against a North Jersey team too. It felt awesome because my freshman year, we lost in the semi.” Getting the Prep B crown

was worth the wait. “It was huge, I know the captains and were feeling it, we were freshman on varsity that first year,” said Anhut, who is a team captain along with classmates Ali Surace and Maggie Zarish-Yasunas. “It was ever y t hing we could have wished for that is something we have been trying to get her since freshman year. We were super excited for us but also for coach Thomas because we wanted to win it for her. To be able to get that trophy was amazing. We gave her the game ball and to see the smile on her face was awesome.” Last Monday, PDS took the first step to a second title as the top-seeded Panthers defeated 16th-seeded Morris Catholic 13-1 in the first round of the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Non-Public B tournament, improving to 11-8. “We were ecstatic, coming off a win we were trying to stay focused and not thinking we are so good,” said Anhut, reflecting on the program’s debut in the Non-Public competition. “We are ranked No. 1 in this tournament but we didn’t want that get to our heads.” Showing that focus, PDS jumped out to a 10-1 lead 12 minutes into the contest and cruised from there. “On both sides of the field we were clicking better,” said Anhut. “Coming off that win Friday, it felt really, really good. It was a good win for us. We were able to battle back, it was definitely a confidence booster for us.” Anhut assisted on three

DOUBLE TAKE: Princeton Day School girls’ lacrosse player Elle Anhut heads to goal last Monday as PDS hosted Morris Catholic in the first round of the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Non-Public B tournament. Senior star Anhut tallied a goal and three assists to help the Panthers post a 13-1 win over 16th-seeded Morris Catholic. PDS, now 11-8, will host eighth-seeded St. Elizabeth in the quarterfinals on May 26. The Panthers are seeking a title double, having won the Prep B state tournament final last Friday when they rallied for a 13-12 win over Montclair-Kimberley Academy. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

goals by sophomore star Caputo in that early run. “We have a pretty good connection, we work well together,” said Anhut, who ended up with a goal and three assists in the victory. “We find each other off of the cuts, that is something that has been working well. We want to expand that to other parts of the field.” Coach Thomas, for her part, was proud of the way her team worked in its rally against MKA in the Prep B final. “They called a timeout with 6:38 to go and all I said was one at a time, and we have to have the draw,” said Thomas, crediting Surace and Jaffe for their work in the draw circle down the stretch. “To go to North Jersey twice and win (PDS topped Morristown-Beard 14-10 in the Prep B semis) is huge. It is a whole different game up there, they can knock you down, they can do everything. To be able to go twice and do it for the girls, that is a statement game to be tough and not back down.” In the view of Thomas, her three senior captains have set that winning tone. “They want it; we have had some challenges, we had COVID, we had issues, we had all of those things,” said Thomas. “They have always come back and been there. It is just win it and that meant including everybody.” Com ing into t he Non Public opener, Thomas was a bit apprehensive despite the Prep B run. “I was ner vous, it was such a high on Friday,” said Thomas. “We didn’t practice over the weekend, I gave them off. I came in here today and told them Friday is over but you never know, it is Monday.” The Panthers, though, didn’t look like they had missed a beat as their attack was sharp from the opening draw against Morris Catholic. They will now host eighth-seeded St. Elizabeth in the quarterfinals on May 26. “The transition game was beautiful,” said Thomas, who got four goals apiece from Caputo and Paige Gardner in the win with Surace chipping in three assists as she passed the 100-point mark in her career. “We are getting there, it is huge. It is take it one at a time.” As the Panthers pursue the title double in her final campaign, Anhut is having the time of her life. “The whole mentality for this year is team over me,” said Anhut, who is headed to Cal where she will be playing for its women’s lacrosse program. “This is one of the closest teams I gave been part of. It has been the best senior season I could wish for and the other seniors would say the same.” —Bill Alden

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PDS Boys’ Tennis Wins Prep B by Edging Pennington, Now Focused on Making Big Run in Non-Public Tourney Michael Augsberger sensed that his Princeton Day School boys’ tennis team was all in as it hit the court last week to compete in the Prep B state tournament. “The guys were laser focused, we always talk about p e a k i n g at to u r n a m e n t time,” said PDS head coach Augsberger. “Their mental energy peaked at the right time, you could tell going into the first day that they really wanted it badly. Neel Adusumilli is the vocal senior leader. He and Andrew Marshall are the two guys that held everybody accountable and got them worked into a frenzy. I have to give them the credit.” The Panthers needed that intensity as the tournament tur ned into a t wo -horse race between PDS and rival Pennington. In the first day of action, the Panthers advanced to the finals in four of the five flights of the competition to build a narrow 9-8 lead over Pennington. Heading into the finals on May 17 at Edison, Augsberger wasn’t taking anything for granted. “We told the guys this is not a coronation day, it is a work day,” said Augsberger. “It could go any way. Even though we have four guys in there, it could easily be a spectacular demise.” It ended up being a spectacular day for the program as PDS prevailed at both first doubles and second doubles to pu ll out t he crown with 11 points, one better than runner-up Pennington. It was the first team title for the program since 2018. The first doubles team of Adusumilli and junior Oliver Silverio got the Panthers on the board in the finals, posting a 6-3,6-1 win over Montclair Kimberley Academy’s Dhruv Jetley and Aidan Szilagi.

“The final was all about making their foes hit tough volleys,” said Augsberger. “They were getting it up high to the back hand and going after whoever was at the net. Their experience shows and that really propelled us because that was the first one done.” The triumph was special for senior leader Adusumilli who was sidelined by injury last season. “That is a really great feeling for him and to be so instrumental in it,” said Augsberger. “He is the one who set the tone for the week, it means so much more when it comes from the guys. Coming from Neel like that, he took charge and he took responsibility.” The second doubles pair of senior Albert Ming and f r e s h m a n J a y l e n Pe n g earned the clinching point as they edged Montclair Kimberley’s Brandon Yeu and Chris Hernandez. 6-2, 5-7, 7-6 (7-5). “They won the first set and we feel like we are cruising,” recalled Augsberger. “MKA just came back and they did not give up. We are reminded why this is such a great sport. They are out of the team title but they feel they owe it to Pennington, they owe it to themselves and they owe it to the sport and it is beautiful.” The pair of Ming and Peng didn’t give up as the team title was on the line with only one other match in progress as Pennington’s Josh Finkle was in a three-set battle with Tanay Patil of Rutgers Prep eventually won by Patil. “It is 5-4 MKA and then it 6-5 us; we can close the door and we are two points away from the tournament and they break us and we go to the tiebreaker,” said Augsberger. “Alber t hits this great poach to make it 6-5 and on the last point

they send one long and that starts the celebration. We know we have the title.” W hile Marshall fell in three sets to Theo Sardain of Pennington in the second singles final and junior Jason Wu lost in straight sets to Pennington’s Ishan Gupta in the third singles final, Augsberger liked the way they competed. “With Jason and Andrew, it was about keeping them positive,” said Augsberger. “It is always going back to positive thinking and they did that.” In reflecting on the team title, Augsberger credited Pennington with bringing the best out of PDS. “It was on a knife’s edge the whole time, it could have so easily gone to Pennington,” said Augsberger. “You do it a hundred times and you don’t know how many times your team gets it. It is good to realize that because it makes you appreciate it more. Without the rival, you never know how good you can be. They played incredible and they have two champions to show for it.” PDS is now competing in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) South Jersey Non-Public B tournament where it is seeded third and topped sixth-seeded Bishop Eustace 5-0 last Monday in a quarterfinal contest. In Augsberger’s view, the Prep B triumph should help the squad make a deep run in the Non-Public competition. “They are really excited, the way that the team has bonded from it, and it is not just winning; it is their preparation coming into the tournament,” said Augsberger, whose team will now play at second-seeded Rutgers Prep in the semis on May 27. “They are more bonded, more focused, and more together. That is what is going to get us through states, not necessarily just winning the Prep tournament.” —Bill Alden

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022

PDS Girls’ Lacrosse Edges MKA in Prep B Final, Now On Track for Title Double, Winning Non-Public Opener

SPOILS OF VICTORY: Members of the Princeton Day School boys’ tennis team show off the plaque and trophies they earned for winning the team title at the Prep B state tournament last week. PDS totaled 11 points to edge runner-up Pennington by one point. Pictured, from left, are head coach Michael Augsberger, Steven Li, Jaylen Peng, Farhan Mohammad, Josh Chu, Jason Wu, Dhruv Balajji, Andrew Marshall, Oliver Silverio, Neel Adusumilli, Albert Ming, and assistant coach Jon Brown. PDS is now competing in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) South Jersey Non-Public B tournament where it is seeded third and topped sixth-seeded Bishop Eustace 5-0 last Monday in a quarterfinal contest. The Panthers will now play at second-seeded Rutgers Prep in the semis on May 27. (Photo provided by Michael Augsberger)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022 • 34

Hun

PDS

Lawrenceville

Boys’ Lacrosse: Unable to get its attack going, Hun fell 12-4 to Academy of New Church (Pa.) last Saturday in the semis of the Mid-Atlantic Prep Championships. The loss left the Raiders with a final record of 12-6.

B aseba l l : Hunter von Zelowitz had two RBIs in a losing cause as PDS fell 14-2 to Hopewell Valley last Monday. The Panthers, now 3-15, are next in action when they compete in the NJSIAA Non-Public tournament.

Baseball: Hawkins Sutter had a strong game in a losing cause as Lawrenceville lost 10-1 to Hun School last Sunday in the semifinal round of the Prep A state tournament. Sutter went 2-for-3 with an RBI for the

Big Red, who posted a final record of 13-8. Boys’ Lacrosse: Falling short in a battle of highpowered programs, Lawrenceville fell 12-6 to the Brunswick School (Conn.) in the High School Nationals final last Sunday. The Big Red finished the spring with a 15-4 record. Girls’ Lacrosse : Bella Koch starred as Lawrenceville topped Phillips Exeter (N.H) 16-6 last Sunday to win the SEAL Cup at Andover, Mass. Koch tallied three goals and four assists as the Big Red ended the season with a 14-5 record.

Mt. Olive last Wednesday in the first round of the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) North Jersey Group 3 sectional. Senior star Doran tallied two goals and six assists as the Tigers finished the spring with a 9-7 record. Girls’ Lacrosse: Phoebe Steiger scored two goals but it wasn’t enough as seventh-seeded PHS lost 11-4 to 10th-seeded Scotch Plains-Fanwood last Thursday in the first round of the

NJSIAA North Jersey Group 3 sectional. The loss left the Tigers with a final mark of 12-6. Boys’ Tennis : Posting its fourth straight win, PHS defeated Hamilton West 5-0 last Thursday. The Tigers, who improved to 11-1 with the victory, are seeded first in the NJSIAA Central Jersey Group 3 sectional and were slated to host eighthseeded Colts Neck in a quarterfinal contest on May 24.

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Since [1950] Conte’s has become a Princeton destination; a great old-school bar that also happens to serve some of New Jersey’s best pizza, thin-crusted and bubbly. The restaurant hasn’t changed much since then; even the tables are the same. It’s a simple, no-frills space, but if you visit during peak times, be prepared to wait well over an hour for a table.

you to our customers for voting us

We could not have reached this accomplishment withoutWeour employees and customers. coulddedicated not have reached these accomplishment without dedicated e could not haveyou reached this accomplishment Thank fromour the owners of Conte’s employees and customers. thout ourThank dedicated employees customers. you from the owners of Conte’s ng the Princeton community for over 80and years, and we will continue to serve Serving Princeton forof over Thank youthefrom thecommunity owners Conte’s you another 80 years and more.

B o y s’ Te n n i s : T h e o Sardain and Ishan Gupta provided highlights as Pennington took second in the Prep B state tournament last week. Sardain took first at second singles while Gupta prevailed at third singles. Princeton Day School placed first in the team competition with 11 points while the Red Hawks had 10 to finish second.

Stuart Track: Giselle Jean-Marie led the way as Stuart placed third at the state Prep B state championship meet last Monday. Sophomore Jean-Marie placed first in the high jump, triple jump, shot put, and 100 -meter hurdles. In the team standings. Stuart had 71 points, trailing champion Montclair Kimberley Academy (111) and Villa Walsh (71.50).

80 years, and we will continue to serve

rinceton community for 80 over 80and years, you another years more.and we will continue to serve ow serving gluten-free pizza, pasta, beer & vodka! you– another 80 years–and more. Mon 11:30-9 · Tues-Fri 11:30-10:30

PHS

Sat – 4-10:30 · Sun – 4-9

Mon – 11:30-9 · Tues-Fri – 11:30-10:30 · Sat – 4-10:30 · Sun – 4-9 erving gluten-free pizza, pasta, beer & vodka! 339 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ 08540 339 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ 08540 11:30-9 · Tues-Fri – 11:30-10:30 ·•Sat – 4-10:30 · Sun – 4-9 (609) 921-8041 • www.contespizzaandbar.com could not have reached this accomplishment (609) 921-8041 www.contespizzaandbar.com 339 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ and 08540customers. out our dedicated employees 09) 921-8041 • www.contespizzaandbar.com

Thank you from the owners of Conte’s

Get Get Ready ready to Ride! ride!

ceton community for over 80 years, and we will continue to serve youWeanother 80 years more.Five times in May we will wait at a are celebrating Nationaland Bike Month!

randomly chosen Princeton street corner to give the first 6 bicyclists who ride by over $60 in gift certificates from local businesses. Participating businesses include:

ving gluten-free pizza, pasta, beer & vodka!

:30-9 ·

B oys’ L ac rosse : Will Doran had a big game in a losing cause as 12th-seeded PHS fell 14-9 to fifth-seeded TOUGH COOKIE: Princeton Day School boys’ lacrosse goalie Jackson Cook makes a save in a game earlier this season. Last Friday, ninth-seeded PDS defeated eighth-seeded MorristownBeard 11-6 in the first round of the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Non-Public B tournament. The Panthers, now 5-10, will play at top-seeded Gill St. Bernard’s in a quarterfinal contest on May 25. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Whole Earth Center Mediterra • Eno Terra • Teresa Caffe • Terra Momo Bread Company Tues-Fri – 11:30-10:30 · Sat 4-10:30 · SunGrill – 4-9 Nassau Street Seafood • Blue Point – Grill • Witherspoon • Kristine’s Yankee Doodle Tap Room • Nassau Inn • Miya Table & Home Homestead Princeton • Princeton Tour Company Kopp’s Cycle • bent spoon • small world coffee Princeton Family YMCA • Tico’s Eatery & Juice Bar Princeton Soup & Sandwich • Labyrinth Books Jammin’ Crepes • Local Greek • Hinkson’s LiLLiPiES • Princeton Record Exchange Olsson’s Fine Foods • jaZams • Olives Princeton Recreation Department Princeton Corkscrew Wine Shop

39 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ 08540 ) 921-8041 • www.contespizzaandbar.com

WONDERING WHERE WE ARE GIVING OUT REWARDS? FOLLOW US ON TWITTER FOR CLUES @WholeEarthNews

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co. We Install Quality Aluminum Triple Track Storm Windows

741 Alexander Rd, Princeton • 924-2880

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

MASON CONTRACTORS RESTORE-PRESERVE-ALL MASONRY

Mercer County's oldest, reliable, experienced firm. We serve you for all your masonry needs.

BRICK~STONE~STUCCO NEW~RESTORED Simplest Repair to the Most Grandeur Project, our staff will accommodate your every need!

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Paul G. Pennacchi, Sr., Historical Preservationist #5. Support your community businesses. Princeton business since 1947.

360 NASSAU ST • PRINCETON MON-SAT 8AM-6PM SUN 9AM-6PM

RANDOM ACTS OF COMMUNITY: Rewarding Biking in Princeton RANDOM ACTS OF COMMUNITY IS A PROJECT OF THE WHOLE EARTH CENTER

609-394-7354 paul@apennacchi.com


William H. Nicholson July 16, 1929 – May 15, 2022

William H. Nicholson, a longtime resident of Princeton New Jers ey, s ad ly passed away in South Surrey, BC, Canada after his recent ple as a nt s t ay at his retirement community Amica White Rock on May 15, 2022, with family at his side. Bill (as he preferred) was

born in Ottawa, Canada on July 16, 1929, to Harold and Luella Nicholson. William was married to Shirley Hunt on August 29, 1952, in Ottawa, Ontario. Once William completed his Ph.D. studies at Queen’s University they moved to Montreal where he worked as a Chemist for Merck Sharp & Dohme.

Bill and Shirley enjoyed the ocean and spent many summers at their home in Barnegat Light, NJ, on LBI. During the winter holidays, they would spend time in Puerto Rico enjoying the sun and relaxing with friends. William is survived by his two loving children, Pamela Lahoda, her husband Eric, Michael Nicholson, his wife Sarun; his grandchildren, Sarah and Jason Lahoda, Mya, Sofie, and William Nicholson Jr.; and his sisterin-law Beverly Swords.

Richard A. Hanson Richard Arthur Hanson, “Dick,” passed away on May 19, 2022 from Parkinson’s disease. Dick lived most of his life in Fair Lawn, Wyckoff, Skillman, and Princeton, New Jersey, He is survived by his wife of 64 years, and two children, Craig and A lex and their spouses, Liz and Laura, as well as six grandchildren and two

great-grandchildren. A celebration of his life will be held privately. Dick was born on April 8, 1936 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. After eight years there, and a stop in West Texas, his family moved to Bergen County, New Jersey, where he met h is h igh school sweetheart, and later wife, Carol Jadick, while walking home from fourth grade. After graduating from Fair Lawn High School, Dick attended Cornell University, graduating in 1958 with a degree in economics. After four years in ROTC, he joined the Marine Corps where he served in the 1st Marines Division, 5th Regiment based at Camp Pendleton, CA, where Craig was born. Dick next joined the Chase Manhat tan Bank, N.A., where he spent 18 years rising to become the youngest executive appointed to Senior Vice President to that point. The family settled in Wyckoff, NJ, where Alex was born. He served in many roles, including as head of all the New York City retail branches, and later as head of all middle-market lending. Dick left Chase to work briefly for an industrial company, and then joined Merrill Lynch. Dick and Carol soon moved to Skillman, where he held a number of executive positions including head of industrial lease financing (which when sold accounted for 25 percent of Merrill’s earnings one quar-

ter) and building and leading the Working Capital Management Account business, WCMA, which is still a major Merrill product group. Dick was widely respected as a strong, successful leader and mentor to many aspiring colleagues. As members of the Nantucket Angler’s Club, Bedens Brook Club, and Nantucket Golf Club, he was an avid sportsman, particularly in golf, fishing, and shooting. Dick retired around the age of 60 and focused on these things. He loved introducing people to fishing for bass and bluefish on the beaches of Nantucket, and took great interest in a wide range of people. In his once Midwestern or Texas fashion, he always said hello to everyone he passed or met anywhere.

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022

Obituaries

During this time Bill and Shirley had their two children, Pam and Mike. After a short stay in Montreal, the family moved to Lansdale, PA, where they lived for over 10 years. In that time, he continued to work for Merck and went to Temple Law School at night where he earned his Juris Doctorate degree in 1970. In 1971, Bill became a Patent Attorney for Merck and worked his way up to Senior Patent. As one of the first to have had a Chemical background, Bill set the standard for all the incoming Patents going forward. In 1973, the family moved to a house on Turner Court in Princeton, NJ, where the family enjoyed 47 years in the Princeton community. While there, Bill enjoyed spending time with a group accomplished friends called the ROMEOs — Retired Old Men Eating Out — at the Princeton Shopping Center, having his daily morning coffee. In early 2020, Bill and Shirley moved back to Ottawa, Canada, to stay at Stirling Park Retirement C om m u n it y w h e r e t h e y spent some qualit y time with Shirley’s sister Beverly Swords. After Shirley passed away in December of 2020, Bill moved to Amica White Rock Retirement Community in South Surrey, BC, Canada to be near his son Michael and family who he said many times, were a great help to him.

Rider

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022 • 36

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HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

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UPSCALE MOVING SALE! Fantastic buys on Simon Pearce glass bowls, Erté art and sculptures, furniture, lamps, chandelier, kitchenwares, outdoor planters, Precor EF X trainer, treadmill, and more! No reasonable offers refused! Friday, May 27 and Saturday, May 28, 9 am - 3 pm, 115 Montadale Drive, Princeton. 05-25

• Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; • 25 words or less: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. classifieds@towntopics.com • 3 weeks:Single $40.00 • 4 weeks: woman seeks to rent room $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and tfannual discount rates available. in Kingston, Princeton, Princeton • Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inch • ESTATE all bold face type: $10.00/week LIQUIDATION Junction or Lawrenceville. College

KARINA’S HOUSECLEANING: Full service inside. Honest and reliable lady with references. Weekly, biweekly or monthly. Call for estimate. (609) 858-8259. 06-08-7t COLLEGE APPLICATION ADVISING: Is your student already stressed out at the idea of starting their college applications? They’re not alone — and I can help. After working for the Princeton University Admission Office, I know what attracts colleges to students. My process helps students write original, thoughtful essays that stand out. 2022-2023 Common App essay prompts are available now: reserve your spot before the summer rush and let’s get started! Visit www.collegeessayexcellence.net or contact caroline@collegeessayexcellence.net /609-356-2714. 05-25-4t PERENNIAL PLANTS grown in my home garden and potted for sale. More info, prices and photos at craigslist:

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grad willing to help senior or handicapped person. Please leave message at (609) 921-1702. 06-15-4t

UPSCALE MOVING SALE! Fantastic buys on Simon Pearce glass bowls, Erté art and sculptures, furniture, lamps, chandelier, kitchenwares, outdoor planters, Precor EF X trainer, treadmill, and more! No reasonable offers refused! Friday, May 27 and Saturday, May 28, 9 am - 3 pm, 115 Montadale Drive, Princeton. 05-25 ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius (609) 466-0732 tf

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Specialists

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MFG., CO.

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©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

609-394-7354 paul@apennacchi.com

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


Listed by Robin Wallack • Broker Associate • Cell: 609-462-2340 • robin.wallack@foxroach.com

LOOK NO FURTHER! Superior house in superior location --- Princeton’s Riverside school, the University, close to the New York bus, Uptown, and all things that make Princeton the unique place it is. Five bedroom, 4.5 bath colonial offers all this, and more. Gorgeous first floor addition by Princeton Design Guild creates so many options and quality living, no matter how you allocate the spaces. The current owners created lovely outdoor spaces, as well. In all seasons, inside or outside, this is a very special house. $1,400,000 WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITY TO LIVE IN PRINCETON LANDING! One of the area’s most popular communities. Carnegie model offers plenty of space, superior location, and is ready to go!! Sought-after West Windsor/Plainsboro schools, easy access to commuter trains, and terrific amenities within the complex. You’d better hurry up and make an appointment to see this property soon! Plainsboro Township. $500,000

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37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022 • 38

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We c · Postcards Interior Designer with excellent demonstration patio of design skills, knowledge of finishes, selecting Books MAS FF&E, a · minimum of 3-5 years of professional Mas experience, and a strong knowledge of Revit. · Catalogues We fi Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

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fixWET all mas PAPER Witherspoon Media Group IN THE • Blue Stone Specialists Steps • Loose Walls Patio • Concrete Witherspoon Media Group We specialize in Steps • Walls••Railings Patio • Concrete it’s ou DRIVEWAY? Basement Waterproofing small masonry repair Loose Railings • Blue Stone Specialists

We fix3.allYour masonrySteps problems... it’s ourorpassion! Walls • emailed Patio •toConcrete is• texted you the SAME DAY! Masonry|estimate repair is our specialty Repair Rebuild | Restore Steps • Walls re is no repair too small for us! • Patio • Concrete Repair | Rebuild | Restore Loose Railings • Blue Stone Specialists

Basement Waterproofing Loosepatios, Railings • Blue e repair sunken walkways, andStone walls Specialists Basement Waterproofing Brick Driveways BelgianOne Block brick, one stone, We fix loose railing issuesBrick onWaterproofing steps Basement Driveways •• Belgian Block Brick Driveways • Belgian Block even two... Walkways and Patio Construction clean and waterproof all masonry structures: Brick Driveways • Belgian Walkways andBlock Patio Construction Walkways and Patio Construction tiny cracks...loose railings... ios, walls, steps, porches, walks, driveways. Replacement of Cracked LimestoneSteps Steps Replacement of Cracked Limestone Steps Limestone Walkways and Patio Construction Replacement ofsunken Cracked We restore old foundations, repair patios, There is no repair walkways, walls,small and more Check out some of other repair specialties: Replacement ofour Cracked too small for us! Greg Powers Check out some ofLimestone our other Steps small repair specialties:

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HIC#13VH10598000 HIC#13VH06880500 Greg Powers sonry problems... Greg Powers Cracked stucco -- we restore old foundations foundations STONE FIREPLACE Cracked stucco we restore old HIC#13VH10598000 ur passion! Greg Powers HIC#13VH06880500 HIC#13VH10598000 HIC#13VH06880500 609-751-3039 ty all designAND and build new patios! NTYonONFIREPLACE ALLwork WORK | we WE DESIGN BUILD NEW PATIOS! HIC#13VH10598000 HIC#13VH06880500 STONE Rebuild STONE| Restore FIREPLACE

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609-751-3039 609-751-3039 609-751-3039 609-751-3039 renewmason@gmail.com 09-751-3039 09-751-3039 www.ReNewMason.com

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www.renewmason.com www.renewMason.com www.renewmason.com www.ReNewMason.com Wewww.ReNewMason.com specialize in small masonry repair w.renewmason.com A C ECharlie has been serving the Princeton community for 25 years One brick, one stone, even two.......

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· Annual Reports ll work ALL WORK FLESCH’S ROOFING MASONRY RENOVATION AND REPAIR tiny cracks Weloose fix all railings..... masonry problems... it’s our passion!

For additional info contact: 609-75 09-7 5 For additional info contact:

small masonry repair For Allmasonry Your Roofing, Flashing & Gutter Needs small repair

Repair Rebuild | Restore We There no repair too| in small for us! Weisspecialize specialize in Steps • Walls • Patio • Concrete brick, even two....... two....... • Residential &Loose Commercial •stone, Copper/Tin/Sheet Metal Railings •one Blue Specialists We repairOne sunken patios, walkways, andStone walls One brick, one stone, even We fix loose railing issues onWaterproofing steps• Flat Roofs Basement • Cedar Shake tiny cracks We clean and waterproof all masonry structures: tiny cracks Brick Driveways • Belgian Block • Shingle Slate Roofs • Built-In Gutters patios,&walls, steps, porches, walks, driveways. Walkways loose and Patiorailings..... Construction Replacement ofloose Crackedrailings..... Limestone Steps

• Seamless Gutters & Downspouts MASONRY RENOVATIONAND AND• REPAIR REPAIR Gutter Cleaning MASONRY RENOVATION Roofpassion! Maintenance We fix all masonry problems... it’s •our

melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

www.ReNew w.renew melissa.bilyeu@ We fix all masonry problems... it’s our passion! Repair Rebuild Restore There too|| Rebuild small for for us! Repair ||Restore We fix all masonry problems... is no repair There is no repair too small us! it’s our passion!

609-394-2427

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

Greg Powers

Steps Walls Patio Concrete HIC#13VH10598000 HIC#13VH06880500 Free Estimates • Quality Service • Repair Work Steps •• Walls •• Patio ••Concrete ETED OUTDOOR STONE FIREPLACE Loose Railings Blue Stone Specialists We sunken patios, walkways, and walls Specialists Loose Railings •• Blue Stone We| repair repair sunken patios, walkways, and walls warranty we design andBUILD build new patios! ME WARRANTYonONall ALLwork WORK WE DESIGN AND NEW PATIOS! 609-751-3039 We issues on onWaterproofing steps Basement Waterproofing Wefix fix loose loose railing railing issues steps Basement Repair | Rebuild | Restore

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1,100,000 243CherryHillRoad.info 40NorthHarrisonStreet.info $4,700 per month $885,000 34MayburyHillRoad.info 243CherryHillRoad.info $1,450,000$4,700 per month

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NEW LISTING in Princeton - $1,750,000 Additional photos and floorplan at: 194DoddsLane.info

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An extensive custom addition nearly doubled the size of this home, and created a bright great room with vaulted The spacious entrance hall opens opens to formal room that The spacious entra uldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout make it both rage pace. along A floor separate with awraparound powder mudroom with complete built-in therenovated firstand floor. tons storage alongarea withtoa function powderasroom complete the first floor. nm odern 2007 open with plan.area Kirstenroom Thoft andcubbies fully this homeof in 2007 with opens to pantry aapantry formal dining that and overlooks porch aArchitect tobeams, function porch. asremodeled The indoor/ custom doors allow dining and an indoor/ and detail toappliances, both traditional and moder Instainless-steel the heart of downtown Princeton, few blocks stainless-steel applia stainless-steel appliances, an ormal tom doors dining allow room that dining overlooks and aan wraparound area to function porch. 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Formal rooms include a living with fireplace spectacular detail to both traditional and modern wn master the hallway bedroom are with two en additional suite walk-in bedrooms steam one shower. with Just a down the are two additional bedrooms a with original tin ceiling, and pocket The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, outdoor entertainment space. A separ ner’s dream come true. outdoor entertainment space. A sep updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and with r-to-ceiling a BainUltra wood heated built-in Jacuzzi closets. tub. These bedrooms share agreat hall bath with aand BainUltra heated Jacuzzi entertainmen Retreat upstairs to the master bed updated for today’soutdoor lifestyle. Custom staircase a outdoor entertainm verlooks the two light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The room and bay window, and an oversized dining room with chair rail, crown molding gleaming hardwood floors. Atub. study/office with fireplace andtub. built-in cabinetry, powder room, and the er llway bedroom are with additional en suite bedrooms walk-in steam one with shower. a Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a heated anan intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream Retreat upstairs to The spacious entrance hall opens into the famil with oms a share wall of a hall floor-to-ceiling bath with a BainUltra wood built-in heated closets. Jacuzzi These tub. bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra Jacuzzi intimate family spaceother and an with entertainer’s dre er. airs Just to the down master the hallway bedroom with two en additional suite walk-in bedrooms steam one shower. with Just athebath down the hallway are two additional one withofathestainless-steel fireplace and the a wall o m he cabinets, family room original tin ceiling, and pocket doors. The gourmet kitchen custom cabinets, und porch. Thewith custom doors allow are for dining and porch area to function aswith an indoor/ Retreat upstairs toto bedro appliances, pantry and enormous laundry room-mudroom with cubbies next to the garage entry, complete main floor. Upstairs the primary bedroom suitebedrooms extends front-to-back house, and features athe fiberglass a wall hall ofisland bath floor-to-ceiling with atons BainUltra wood heated built-in Jacuzzi closets. tub. These bedrooms share agreat hall with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. Retreat upstairs themaster master bed fireplace and the ot ormous great room overlooks the great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The room Retreat upstairs to The spacious entrance hall opens into thethe family built-in cubbies and oflight-filled storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. d -in floor bookcases, which has desks, two additional window seat spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat Retreat upstairs to The spacious entrance hall opens into family opens to a formal dining room that overlooks aro ese the bedrooms other with a share wall of a hall floor-to-ceiling bath with a BainUltra wood built-in heated closets. Jacuzzi These tub. bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. fireplace and the other with a wall of f fireplace and the other with a wall of srooms, looks an indoor/ a wraparound porch.built-in The custom doors allow dining and porch areaspacious to function an indoor/ stainless-steel appliances, pantry enormous isla balcony overlooking the grounds, a for luxurious and sunny bathroom with whirlpool tub and largebuilt-in shower. Three bedrooms desks, share a hall bathroom with double vanity and tub-shower. The home is featuring the third floor which bookcases, has two desks, additional window seattheas bedrooms, featuring bookcases, window seat stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous is outdoor entertainment space. A and separate mudroo fireplace and the The crown jewel of this home isaoth th bath and abookcases, bonus sitting area. fireplace and the otw opens to to a formal dining room that overlooks wra ewalk-in irst mudroom with built-in cubbies and tons of storage along with a powderbedrooms room complete first steam shower. Just down thetwo hallway are twoseat additional one with a floor. built-in bookcases, desks, window seat aturing efull isfloor. the built-in third floor which has desks, additional window spacious bedrooms, featuring opens a formal dining room that overlooks a The jewel ot features abath custom Gunite heated pool with attached spa, upgraded copingfeaturing and sandstone decking, enclosed bydesks, a Jerith custom fence with outdoor child safety locks, and acrown recently and closets. The two bedrooms sh edrooms share a is full and a which bonus sitting area. entertainment space. A separate mudroom The jewel of home ismudroo acious of backyard bedrooms, this home featuring the built-in floor bookcases, two desks, additional spacious seat bluestone bedrooms, built-in bookcases, window seat dwel built-in closets. These bedrooms share asitting hall bath withhas a BainUltra heatedwindow Jacuzzi tub. outdoor entertainment space. A separate Retreat upstairs to the master bedroom with en Thecrown crown jewel ofthis this home isthe the full bath and athird bonus area. mms one withshare with en upgraded suite a a walk-in steam shower. Justnew down the hallway are twofinish. additional bedrooms one with a The crown jewel of t and closets. The tw motor, heater, and tiling and plaster Entertain and dine outdoors year-round on the spacious Zuri deck with pergola, lighting, and infra-red heaters. The fabulous fenced and closets. The two bedrooms shar The crown jewel of fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceil mily eck and offers friends. terrific This space home for truly outdoor has memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has and closets. The two bedrooms sha The two bedrooms share a full bath and a bonus sitting area. Retreat upstairs toto the master bedroom with en su Jacuzzi r-to-ceiling tub. wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. Retreat upstairs the master bedroom with en s two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat and closets. The two The fenced in backyard with Ipe wo fireplace and the other with a wall of of floor-to-ceiling infamily backyard displays many ofhome the quality details ofoutdoor this truly home. The extensive package includes anhome automatic irrigation system, an additional patio, two sheds and mature and The tw to with be Ipe created wood with deck offers and terrific friends. space This for home memories has toexterior be created with family andtruly friends. home truly hasbluestone can leave the atfamily home and stroll around town. fireplace and the other aclosets. wall ted Ipe with wood deck and offers friends. terrific This space for truly outdoor has memories to be created with family and friends. This has This The crown jewel this with home iswith the floor-to-ceilin third floor w bonus sitting area.cars fenced inof backyard Ipe woo window d floor which seat has two 343JeffersonRoad.info additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat The fenced in back itThe all. With ample off-street parking The fenced in backyard with Ipe wo $1,347,500 th professional landscaping. Additional highlights include a whole house generator, attached two car garage, and finished basement with a full bathroom and egress window. Recent upgrades and closets. The two bedrooms share a full bath narking memories backyard to with be Ipe created wood with deck family offers and terrific friends. space This for home outdoor truly memories has to be created with family and friends. This home truly has you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town. The crown jewel of this home is the third floor whic own. eet parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town. The crown jewel of The thisoff-street home is theparking third floor yo w full bath and a bonus sitting area. fenced in backy it all. With ample 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,0 for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has fenced in back itskylights all. With ample off-street parking itThe all. With o and closets. The two bedrooms share aample full bath an ,329,000 343JeffersonRoad.info th alarm system (2021), new roof (2020), new and closets. The two bedrooms share a full include new Anderson Series double-hung windows throughout the house (2021), updated central-monitored mple llcrsspace around off-street town. parking you can A leave the cars at$1,347,500 home and stroll around town. The fenced in backyard withWith wood deckbath offe 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,000 it itall. ample offatoffers home and stroll town. 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,00 me ecktruly hasterrific spacearound for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has all. Ipe With ample of

resurfaced driveway can leave (2020), the cars at home and stroll around(2020), town.

and updated front landscaping (2022). Don’t miss this opportunity to become the new owner of this fantastic home!

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