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Volume LXXV, Number 14

www.towntopics.com

COVID Count at PU Stays Low With Strict Protocol, Restrictions

McCarter Hosts Concerts On Palmer Square . . . . . 5 Webinar, Book Offer Views of Biden Campaign, Election . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 PHS Graduate Discusses His Book On Super-Rich . . . . . . 10 Passage Theatre Presents Surely Goodness And Mercy . . . . . . . . . 16 Hun Baseball Primed to Compete Against Big-Time Foes . . . . . 27 Fair Making Impact for Stuart Volleyball, Helping It to 5-1 Start . . . . . . 29

This Week Billie Holiday Sings a Birthday Duet with William Wordsworth . . . 15 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 22 Classified Ads . . . . . . 33 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 13 New To Us . . . . . . . . . 23 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 31 Performing Arts . . . . . 17 Police Blotter . . . . . . . . 6 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 33 Religion . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

As colleges and universities across the country struggle to educate their students safely and effectively in the second year of COVID-19, Princeton University, which welcomed back to campus about 2,800 undergraduates at the end of January, is carrying out its multi-faceted response to the pandemic with considerable success. An asymptomatic testing program for all regularly on campus, symptomatic testing for students, contact tracing, quarantine, and isolation, along with a mandatory social contract for students which outlines expectations for their adherence to COVID safety protocols, are all essential elements of the University’s effort to move forward safely. So far, Princeton University, which publishes information on COVID testing results daily on its COVID website, has avoided the kinds of outbreaks that have disrupted a number of other campuses throughout the country. With contact tracing, conducted in close coordination with the municipal public health office, the University can pursue the identification of any potential case clusters. The Princeton University COVID-19 Dashboard for April 6 at covid.princeton. edu shows a positivity rate of just .09 percent for asymptomatic testing during the previous week. That’s 11 positive cases, 1.57 per day, out of 12,426 tests, well below the rate for Mercer County and New Jersey as a whole. “Countless hours of careful planning and hard work went into preparations so we could invite all undergraduates to return to campus for the spring semester,” said Deputy University Spokesman Michael Hotchkiss. Almost every aspect of campus has been modified in the interests of safety, compliance with state requirements, public health guidance, and University COVID policies, Hotchkiss noted. Though most students are on campus, almost all undergraduate instruction remains virtual this spring, with only a few courses being offered in a hybrid format. “The University continues to follow public health best practices for avoiding spread of COVID-19,” Hotchkiss pointed out. “Most faculty and staff continue to work from home, and the campus remains less densely populated with a range of modifications in place to facilitate Continued on Page 11

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COVID Case Numbers Rise for Younger Adults The Princeton Health Department reported on Monday, April 5 that there had been 11 new positive COVID cases in Princeton in the previous 7 days for a daily average of 1.57, and 24 in the previous 14 days, a daily average of 1.71. The average age of individuals with recent new cases in Princeton is 26 years old. “Not surprisingly, new infections are being spread amongst those ineligible or not previously vaccinated,” said Princeton Health Officer Jeff Grosser. “The good news is that hospitalizations are not increasing due to the less severe health complications associated with younger people. With that said, we are still working to vaccinate those that are at high risk of severe COVID-19.” The push to vaccinate most of the state’s adult population in the coming months is gaining momentum. On Monday, April 5, New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy announced that all New Jerseyans age 16 and older will be eligible for COVID-19 vaccinations beginning on April 19, two weeks earlier than the state had originally planned. “Never forget, the power to end this pandemic rests on our collective shoulders — all nine million of us,” said Murphy in his Monday COVID briefing. “The

decisions each of you make as individuals — to get vaccinated, to properly wear a mask, to stay home when not feeling well, to cooperate with contact tracers — these individual decisions protect you, your family, and our community.” As of Tuesday morning, 1,845,335 New Jersey residents had been fully vaccinated, with 3,065,644 having received at least one dose and a total of 4,794,010 doses administered so far by New Jersey health facilities and vaccine centers. The

state’s goal is to vaccinate 70 percent of its adult population, about 4.7 million people, by June 30. “Princeton Health Department is continuing to work with our congregate living sites and multiple dwelling facilities in order to vaccinate ‘pockets’ of our residents who have been unable to get vaccinated,” said Grosser. “We began homebound vaccinations last week and have successfully vaccinated nearly 30 residents within the confines of their homes due to illness or Continued on Page 7

Resiliency Fund Was a Lifesaver For Many Local Small Businesses At a meeting of the Princeton Merchants Association last week, the organization’s president Jack Morrison reported that all but one of the 90 $5,000 grants made available by the Princeton Small Business Resiliency Fund (PSBRF) over the past year had been issued. In two separate rounds, the funds have gone to independently owned shops, restaurants, hair salons, and other businesses to help them weather the pandemic. Most have survived; some have not. “A handful of them aren’t there anymore,” said John Goedecke of the

Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce Foundation, who with Peter Dawson oversaw management of the application process and distribution of the funds. “Some on Chambers Street, where the [Graduate] hotel is going in, have had to move. We haven’t asked them to follow up with us, but through the Chamber relationship, we have stayed in touch.” Last week, Christine Curnan, the Chamber’s vice president for membership and business development, heard back from several business owners asked how Continued on Page 12

FUN AT THE FARM: The Duck Race was one of many kid-friendly activities featured at the annual Bunny Chase Spring Celebration last weekend at Terhune Orchards on Cold Soil Road . Attendees share their favorite spring activities in this week’s Town Talk on page 6 . (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

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KAMMERS HAMMERS: That’s the name of this team that helped raise funds for NAMIWalks in a previous year. This year’s event, which is virtual, is May 22.

Virtual Walk Planned By NAMI Mercer

NAMI Mercer is holding a virtual walk, NAMIWalks You r Way, on May 22, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. to promote its mission of destigmatizing mental illness and providing support, education, and advocacy for families and individuals affected by mental illness in New Jersey’s capital region. NAMI Mercer is a Hamilton-based local affiliate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. This year’s walk theme is Mental Health for All – and Always, a cause championed by the national NAMI organization as well as hu ndreds of af f iliate chapters across the country in both the spring and fall during walk events like this one. Held a n nua l ly, NA M I Walks Mercer Count y is

the county’s largest mental health awareness-raising event, as well as NAMI Mercer’s largest fundraising activity. Participants this year are encouraged to get creative for NAMIWalks Your Way, whether it’s walking with loved ones, going on a solo run and posting about it on social media, hosting a live stream of a yoga flow, doing a virtual bakea-thon, or coming up with another imaginative way to raise awareness for mental health. Last year’s virtual NAMIWalks Your Way event raised more than $110,000 with the support of participants, team captains, sponsors, and the wider community. These proceeds were used to support the programs and services NAMI Mercer offers at no cost to families and individuals coping with mental illness.

This year’s walk event is being planned by a committee including Tsvetelina Churalska, Rob Dolnick, Stephanee Kammer, Ashlyn Johnson, Jason LaViscount, Madeline Monheit, Stephanie Neumann, Jess Pepperman, Debra Porter, Jason Redd, and Sophia Rodriguez, as well as NAMI Mercer Staff. NAMI Mercer Board Member Jerilyn Angotti is once again serving as Walk chair for the 2021 event. Angotti has helped lead the event with great success in the past, serving as Walk chair in 2020 and Walk co-chair in 2019. To participate in NAMIWalks Your Way and learn more about NAMI Mercer, visit namiwalks.org /mercercounty. For sponsorship opportunities, contact Julia Dare at jdare@namimercer. org; (609) 799-8994 x13.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin

Crosswicks • Pennington

getforky.com

P RO C AC C I N I

Summer Jobs for Youth: Princeton residents ages 14-18 can work this summer as part of the Human Services Department’s Summer Youth Employment Program. Work 25 hours a week; earn minimum wage, for eight weeks. Visit princetonnj.gov for details. The deadline is April 30. Vaccination Hotline: New Jersey’s COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center is staffed daily from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Call (855) 568-0545 for questions about registering with the New Jersey Vaccine Scheduling System, finding vaccine locations, and more. New Vaccine Appointment Finder Tool: Gathers information across multiple scheduling platforms multiple times an hour, allowing searches for locations across the state. Visit covid19.nj.gov/finder. HomeFront Diaper Challenge: Help set a Guinness World Record by collecting 250,000 diapers and wipes for families in need, through Mother’s Day, May 9. Drop off at 1880 Princeton Avenue, Lawrenceville. Visit homefrontnj.org for details. Donate Your Bicycle: On April 10, Mercer County and the Park Commission are hosting a bike drive at several locations. Bring old bikes, no matter the condition, to the Trenton Bike Exchange, which repairs and sells them at a very low price to families in need. Drop-off locations are in West Windsor, Pennington, and Trenton. Visit bgcmercer.org for details. Grover Park Cleanup: Help remove trash, litter, and debris as part of the Watershed Institute’s 15th Annual Stream Cleanup on Saturday, April 17. Register online at thewatershed.org/stream-cleanups by April 16 for either a 9 or 10 a.m. start.


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RECONNECTING THROUGH ENTERTAINMENT: The StreetBeat Brass Band is the opening act for McCarter Theatre Center’s series of Sunday afternoon concerts in Palmer Square on April 25.

McCarter’s Concerts on Palmer Square Aim to Keep the Community Engaged

While no firm date is set for when McCarter Theatre Center will offer drama, dance, or music on its two stages again, the administration is not sitting by as they wait for guidelines and executive orders about reopening. McCarter plans to reconnect with past audiences and welcome new ones with a series of Sunday afternoon concerts in Palmer Square.

Starting April 25 from 4-6 p.m. with the brass-based StreetBeat Brass Band, the family-friendly events run through June 20. “After this tough year, we are eager to celebrate the return of spring in Palmer Square with our communities,” wrote McCarter’s Associate Artistic Director Nicole A. Watson, in an email. “While we cannot be indoors yet, we do know that art can happen anywhere, and what a beautiful way to celebrate spring and the warmer weather with our neighbors than this outdoor concert series. It’s a wonderful chance for all of us to meet again and to celebrate new artists.”

TOPICS

Art by Sean Carney

Of the Town

Think spring with these fresh new products from Princeton Magazine Store.

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5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021

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Each of the nine musical acts are making their McCarter debuts. The idea was to present a wide, inclusive range of established musicians from New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania. The styles include Latin, R&B, pop, jazz, swing, reggae, and country music. T h e S t r e e t B e at B r as s Band on opening day is influenced by the multiculturalism of New York City. They play a range of brassbased music including New Orleans jazz, polka, Mexican banda, gospel, klezmer, and funk. On May 2, the country duo October Rose performs, followed on May 9 by Esteem All Stars, which plays pop, rock, and oldies. The music of Pat Guadagno on May 16 is rooted in the historic Jersey Shore music scene. T he Suyat Band on May 23 “delivers high-energy hits from yesterday and today with rock-solid musicianship and warm-hearted Aloha spirit,” according to a press release. The Jeiris Cook Trio, on May 30, comes from a long generation of musicians with deep roots in the South. On Ju ne 6, Moroccan Sheepherders “take classic covers and originals to another dimension with their mélange of genres from tribal ambient trance to blueeyed blues-rock.” Random Test Reggae, which features reggae and soca music, is June 13. The final concert on June 20 is by Ritmo Caliente, a Latin orchestra specializing in salsa, merengue, ballads, waltz, jazz, and songs from the ‘50s: “oldies but goodies in a Latin salsa

beat with English words.” Audiences are encouraged to gather, socially distanced, on the lawn in front of the Nassau Inn. Both McCarter and Palmer Square will be following CDC guidelines, state and local mandates, and industry best practices. Food will be available from vendors around the square. While its Matthews and Berlind theater stages have been quiet during the past year, McCar ter has kept audiences engaged w it h digital offerings, including several classes for different age groups. “McCarter has been able to weather the pandemic thanks to the immense suppor t f rom our members and patrons,” said Watson. “Through their generosity, and in collaboration with local and regional partners,

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021 • 6

McCarter’s Concerts Continued from Preceding Page

McCarter has been able to produce two award-nominated virtual productions [The Manic Monologues and The Work of Adrienne Kennedy: Inspiration and Influence] and continues to provide world-class education programs for both children and adults.” The “McCarter Concerts in Palmer Square” series is a way of thanking the public and welcoming audiences back at a date to be announced. “While we hope to have more information to share soon, we are incredibly excited to offer this slate of outdoor programming and more entertainment for audiences of all ages as we continue into McCarter’s bright future,” Watson said. Vis it m cc ar ter.or g for more information. —Anne Levin

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Police Blotter On April 4, at 1:41 p.m., the manager of a business on Nassau Street reported that someone stole the New York Times delivery from the front of the store on three separate occasions. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On April 2, at 7:30 a.m., a woman reported that her wallet was stolen from her purse while it was unattended in a business on North Harrison Street. The monetary loss was $260. On April 1, at 3:01 p.m., a resident of Hamilton Avenue reported that, between 3 p.m. on March 31 and 8 a.m. on April 1, someone entered her unoccupied home, leaving footprints throughout the home. Nothing was reported stolen, and the incident is under investigation by the Detective Bureau. On March 30, at 7:06 p.m., a 41-year-old male from Princeton was charged with disorderly conduct, subsequent to a report of an unruly person on Witherspoon Street. He was issued a special complaint summons for being in possession of an open container of alcohol on public property. On March 28, at 3:16 p.m., it was reported that the glass of the door of the snack stand in Grover Park was shattered. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On March 27, at 1:07 a.m., a 23-year old female from Trenton was charged with DWI, subsequent to a report of a single car crash on Riverside Drive. On March 26, at 11:35 p.m., a driver of a white SUV failed to stop for an officer after he was observed driving in a reckless manner on Nassau Street. The driver continued to travel at a high rate of speed as the officer had their emergency lights and siren activated. The pursuit was terminated due to the high rate of speed. On March 24, at 9:16 a.m., a resident of Michelle Mews reported that someone stole a painting valued at $14,000 during a move from Princeton to San Diego. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On March 20, at 9:29 p.m., witnesses on Nassau Street reported that two males struck a victim in the head with a glass bottle and kicked him in the face, and then fled. The victim was transported to the hospital for treatment. The Detective Bureau is investigating the incident. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What are your favorite spring activities?” (Asked Saturday at Terhune Orchards) (Photos by Charles R. Plohn)

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“My favorite spring activity is eating popsicles.” —Henry Fair, Princeton

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Tyson: “I like to play sports at the park.” Brianna: “Definitely this Easter Egg Hunt and Bunny Chase at Terhune. We also like to go to the park and ride bikes and things like that.” —Tyson and Brianna McCovery, Queens Village, N.Y.

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Matilda: “I like to go to the pool sometimes.” Lydia: “I really like when the weather is warm and we can enjoy the beautiful landscapes.” Helena: “I like to find Easter eggs.” —Matilda Bolohan, Lydia Oliveira, and Helena Santos, all of Princeton

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Nana: “Getting to ride my bike outside and getting to swim and stuff once it’s really warm.” Jenny: “I enjoy mostly bike riding. I like mountain bike riding in North Jersey and upstate New York.” Joshua: “To go outside and play lacrosse and other sports.” —Nana Poku with Jenny and Joshua Rosteck, all of Princeton

Juliana: “Most of the time I go on walks with my grandmother, or really anyone. Or, I like to play volleyball in the backyard for fun.” Mia: “I like to go to my grandmom’s house and plant flowers.” Amy: “I like going to outdoor events like this one. It just feels good to be out in the warm weather. We are looking forward to it getting even warmer outside so we can go down to the beach.” —Juliana, Mia, and Amy Scartocci, Hamilton


continued from page one

injury. The process will continue for as long as we have vaccines. The Johnson & Johnson vaccine has been an important improvement since it only requires one visit by our nursing staff.” The number of locations In Mercer County and the surrounding area that are administering COVID-19 vaccinations continues to expand, with about 30 sites currently operating in the county, according to the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH). Individuals seeking vaccination must pre-register at covidvaccine.nj.gov. Registering with other NJ COVID-19 vaccine locations (see covid19.nj.gov) might increase chances of getting a vaccination appointment. Also offering vaccines are the following health care centers: Princeton Penn Medicine at princetonhcs.org, Hackensack Meridian at hackensackmeridianhealth. org, and RWJ/Barnabas at rwjbh.org. The NJDOH, consistent with Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommendations, has updated travel guidance for fully vaccinated persons. No quarantine following travel or test before travel (unless

required by the destination) is needed, but fully vaccinated persons should get tested 3-5 days after returning to the United States from international travel. Similar to fully vaccinated travelers, persons who have clinically recovered from COVID-19 in the past three months do not need to quarantine after travel. In addition they do not need to be tested before or after travel, domestic or international. All travelers should continue to wear a mask while traveling, Grosser pointed out, stay six feet from others and avoid crowds, wash hands often or use hand sanitizer, self-monitor for symptoms during and after travel, and self-isolate should symptoms develop. Newly eligible for COVID-19 vaccines as of April 5 were individuals ages 55 and up; individuals 16 and up with intellectual and developmental disabilities; higher education educators and staff; communications infrastructure support, and press; real estate, building, and home service workers; retail financial institution workers; sanitation workers ; laundry service workers; utility workers; and librarians and support staff. —Donald Gilpin

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Activists to Speak at Peace Action Event

r e a d i n g,” s a i d G r e g or y Geehern, the Festival’s acting artistic director. “Amanda Gorman’s reading at the recent Presidential Inauguration showed how positive a force poetry can be in our culture and our lives. We feel this event makes a fitting prelude to our June season of performing arts.” Each poet will read one piece, approximately two minutes long. The readings will premiere via the Festival’s Facebook page (facebook.com/princetonfest) and its Instagram (princetonfest) and YouTube accounts. Readings are on various dates April 7-27 and can be accessed through princetonfestival.org, and will remain available until June 30. Links to the readings will also be available through the Princeton Public Library website, princetonlibrary. org.

The Coalition for Peace Action’s Annual Membership Renewal and New Member Welcoming Gathering will be held virtually on Sunday, April 11 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Rob Goldston, Princeton University astrophysicist, will be the keynote speaker on “Prospects for Reinstating the Iran Nuclear Agreement: Pressure from all Sides.” Goldston has worked closely with the Coalition on advocating for peace with Iran and North Korea at rallies, lobby appointments, and at Peace Voter candidate briefings. Also speaking will be Cecilia Birge, an Asian American activist who was a key organizer of the March 27 Stop Asian Hate Rally in Princeton. She is a former mayor of Montgomery Township and a leader of the Princeton Chinese Community Group. Bridge Students Continue to P re -reg is t rat ion is re Help Others in Community quired. For more informaEver since its founding in tion, visit peacecoalition. 2003, The Bridge Academy org or call (609) 924-5022. has encouraged a sense of gratitude in students by Princeton Festival Presents them about the Poets From Around the World teaching needs in the greater comThe Princeton Festival munity. will stream online readings Each year, three local by nine poets from the U.S. charities are chosen to reand around the world during April as a tribute to National ceive donations. In the past, Poetry Month. The poems, students have visited these written on the topic of “Love organizations to learn more and Loss,” will be read in about them. “It is a good idea for kids their original languages with English subtitles, accompa- to see what the organizanied by imagery from the tions do, who they help, and who they support,” said poets’ native countries. “We are proud to pres- teacher Cathy Bongiovanent a group of highly re- ni. “They learn why our garded poets from Europe, donations are important. Asia, and the Americas for They learn a sense of phiour fourth annual poetry lanthropy.”

7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021

COVID Numbers Rise

HELP FOR HOMEFRONT: Students Jared and Gianna of The Bridge Academy recently made scarves for clients of HomeFront. The Bridge Academy is an independent school for students with language-based learning disabilities, like dyslexia, auditory processing disorder and ADHD. It is the only Orton-Gillingham accredited program in New Jersey. During the recent Friendship Day celebration, students and staff spent the day focusing on qualities of being a good friend, as well as the actions of being a good friend and being kind. As part of that day, the

Social Houses completed an act of kindness for those in need, making 140 scarves to and donating them HomeFront. HomeFront will safely distribute their generous donations to those in need. Other projects this year included the annual Thanksgiv ing Food Baskets for HomeFront. In past years students made bag lunches for TASK, hosted a drive for food and supplies for animals to support APAW and participated in an environmental property clean up.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021 • 8

Webinar and New Book Offer Insider Views Of Biden’s 2020 Campaign and Election

P r ov i d i n g b e h i n d - t h e scenes stories on the campaigns, the primaries, and the twists and turns of the 2020 election, Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes discussed their just-published book, Lucky: How Joe Biden Barely Won the Presidency, in an April 1 Zoom webinar sponsored by Princeton University’s School of Public and International Affairs and Labyrinth Books. In addition to describing the Biden campaign itself, “lucky,” Allen noted, also means that the Democrats were lucky that they nominated Biden, the only candidate who, he thinks, could have beaten Trump, and the nation was lucky that its system of government withstood the onslaught. “We’re lucky that the Republic held,” said Allen, a senior national political reporter with NBC News Digital. Biden was able to capitalize on the breaks that went his way, and it was lucky for the Republic that our system held. People up and down the line in terms of judges and election officials did the right thing, and we were only one adverse decision away from the Republic crumbling.” Also co-authors of HRC: State Secrets and the Rebirth of Hillary Clinton (2014) and Shattered: Inside Hillary Clinton’s Doomed Campaign (2017), Allen and Parnes, who is senior correspondent for The Hill, talked with Princeton University Historian and CNN Political Analyst Julian Zelizer. “Everyone knows what happened in the last election, but

they don’t really know,” said Parnes. “So we kind of give you the ‘Upstairs, Downstairs’ version of what went on behind the scenes. The Democrats tried to rebuild themselves after the 2016 election. They tried to learn their lessons from 2016. We talk about how Joe Biden barely got through the primaries and how he was barely able to win in the general election.” Working almost entirely remotely, Allen and Parnes started by putting together a list of people to talk to. “There were so many candidates,” said Parnes, “25 at one point. So we started talking to people, writing the story in real time. The reporting guided us and almost told the story for us. Jon and I have a very good partnership. Jon is very good at analysis. I’m good at the detail and putting readers in the room.” Allen added, “We were building the car and driving it at the same time, which means that we were going back and tampering with stuff in the first and second chapter on the last day before we had to publish. The key for us is that we try to identify the moments that we think are important in the campaign by a couple of different metrics. One of them is ‘What do people remember?’ We try to take those moments and go behind the scenes to see what led up to them and other factors that people couldn’t see leading up to them.” Allen pointed out that they balance the investigation of those key memorable

moments in the campaign with a look at “stuff you didn’t have any idea about before.” Memorable Moments As an example of one memorable moment, Parnes discussed Senator Kamala Harris’ primary debate attack on Biden when she talked about his stand on busing in the 1970s. “Her campaign had stalled,” said Parnes. “She knew she needed a moment to break through. She’s really good in these moments. We’ve seen her perform in committee hearings. She knows how to stand out, and she was looking for a standout moment here. We took you behind the scenes and showed you how she prepped for that moment.” Parnes continued, explaining how Lucky goes on to tell the story of tensions that remained between Biden and Harris and their staffs throughout the selection process for the vice presidential candidate and how Biden for a long time remained unsure whether he could trust her. Allen and Parnes cited other moments in the primary campaign where Biden suffered setbacks that could have ended his campaign, but luck was on his side. The book describes in detail how the disputes between Bernie Sanders and Pete Buttigieg in the Iowa caucuses and delays in vote counting helped to distract from Biden’s poor fourth-place showing there. “Everyone knew that he had lost the caucus, but no one really knew who won and

we like to think that that was one of the things that played in his favor,” said Parnes. A llen described a low point of Biden’s campaign in the early months of 2020. “What we see with Biden is somebody who did so much more poorly in Iowa and New Hampshire than we would expect of a former vice president, and even in Nevada where he came in second, but a distant second. He gets to the point where his campaign aides are telling him that he might have to refinance his house or take a second mortgage to make payroll. The subtext, as we wrote, is that it might just be time to wrap things up. The betting on Biden at that point was pretty low. As we go through the book there are many points where it could have been curtains for Biden.” In the book, Allen and Parnes describe in detail the dramatic turnaround for Biden in South Carolina as he won the support of influential African American Congressman Jim Clyburn, and then went on to win the nomination and the presidency. Biden’s Message Commenting on lessons learned from the 2016 Clinton-Trump campaign, Allen noted, “Biden was very much conscious about having a message that was about other people and what he could do for them. I think Clinton really failed at that as an overarching need for a good presidential candidate. ‘Why are you running for president?’ The answer has to be about other people, and for Clinton it was ‘I’m with her.’ It was very much about her and that makes it difficult I think to have an umbrella

under which you can put all your policies and explain them as what you’re doing for other people. I think that matters a lot. It matters for how you’re building your organization and the way you respond to things.” He continued, “The main thing is that he had a message and he stuck to it. It was fairly milquetoast — you know ‘the battle for the soul of America,’ but at least it was about something other than him.” “Politics 101” In a particularly dramatic section of the book, Lucky looks beneath the surface to describe what was going on in the chaotic first Biden-Trump debate, a moment when, Zeliger noted, “American politics reached rock bottom.” “Trump really didn’t settle on a strategy,” said Parnes. “One group was telling him he had to trip up Biden and make sure he kept interrupting him and be obnoxious and that Biden would stumble. Another group wanted him to look more presidential. He chose to interface and be obnoxious and that backfired. It didn’t do him any favors.” Allen added, ”He gave away the single greatest advantage of being president, which is looking presidential. Biden ends up looking more presidential than the sitting president. It was an egregious debate performance. Politics 101: never cede being presidential.” Allen went on to cite other missteps in the Trump campaign. “If you look at Trump, from the onset of COVID, there are really very few things he does right politically. Most presidents when they face a crisis recognize

that there’s political opportunity in it, rallying people around the flag. And Trump did the exact opposite. He really drove that division home as hard as he could, and still I’m surprised to this day that he got 12 million more votes than he had in 2016.” Allen described the unusual position of former President Barack Obama during the Biden campaign. “It must be painful to Obama to see that in order to be successful Biden had to campaign significantly to the right of where Obama had campaigned,” he said. “You had the Trump rejection of Obama, then you had the Democratic Party scared to nominate another Obama, so they moved to the right and got together with Joe Biden. And then to watch Biden get into office and be able to do things that Obama could never have gotten away with and push to the left, particularly in matters of race.” He concluded, “It must be very painful for Obama to be experiencing yet another kind of backlash to his presidency and a lack of understanding of people in his party about the constraints that held him where he was politically during his campaign and his presidency.” Zelizer pointed out that Lucky “really helps in making sense of a campaign that was so fast-paced and sometimes hard to digest exactly what was happening. This book does it with a really terrific narrative.” Noting several of his favorite parts of the book, he added, “You guys are great. You know how to tell a story. You know how to put the pieces together.” —Donald Gilpin

Spring Pantry Purge Presented by Artis Senior Living of Princeton Junction, Springpoint at Home and Put it There Organizing and Productivity Consultants Join us in Purging your Pantry while donating to a worthy cause! We will be donating to the Rise Community Food Bank in East Windsor. Those who donate will be entered into a raffle for a 3-hour organizing session with Put it There. Please make sure all donations are nonperishable and not expired. First 20 people to RSVP will receive a complimentary set of canisters to help you organize your pantry.

Join us for a FREE Community Event Wednesday, April 21st

10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Rain or Shine Being Held At: Artis Senior Living of Princeton Junction 861 Alexander Road Princeton, NJ 08540

To RSVP TheArtisWay.com/TownTopics

Join us in this common goal of cleaning and refreshing our homes in a most organized manner!

Please RSVP By Tuesday, April 13th

Artis Senior Living of Princeton Junction: 861 Alexander Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 Check out our other nearby communities in Brick, NJ, and Yardley, PA.


9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021 • 10

Princeton High School Graduate Discusses His Book About Super-Rich

Who hasn’t entertained a fantasy of winning the lottery? Among those who fall significantly below the one percent, the prospect of sudden, immense wealth can seem like entry into a perfect world — no worries about rent, mortgages, college tuition, and just putting food on the table, not to mention sports cars in the garage and trips to exotic locales. Not so fast, says Michael Mechanic, author of the book Jackpot, due for release by Simon & Schuster on April 13. The lively nonfiction account of American wealth and its consequences will be discussed by the author, a 1983 graduate of Princeton High School, at a Zoom event sponsored by Labyrinth Books on April 20 at 6 p.m. “I first had the idea for this probably 25 years ago,” Mechanic said in a telephone interview last week. “I was going to write about the fascination with people like lottery winners, who come into wealth suddenly. We’ve all heard the stories about them imploding.” But Mechanic soon realized that the idea wouldn’t work. “They won’t talk to you,” he said. “They have been so barraged, by everyone from friends they haven’t seen in 20 years to sleazy money managers. These are often simple people who work for a living and have a family. It really messes up families and work life, so what do you do?” Mechanic communicated

with a few lottery winners, but they declined to talk to him. He then broadened his original idea for the book. Wit h s u ch chapter s as “Retail Therapy,” “Entourage,” “The Marriage Premium” and “Losing Touch,” among others, Jackpot reveals the way the nation’s political system unfairly enriches those at the top at the expense of those at the bottom.

Michael Mechanic “There are a lot of books about income inequality,” he said. “But I kind of thought of this as a Trojan horse. It will draw you in by showing you the fantasy side of wealth. Then it examines it more closely, and looks at it as how we perpetuate privilege at the expense of people who are not privileged. We talk about free enterprise. Why shouldn’t this guy be a billionaire, when he worked hard? Well, so does your cleaning lady.” Mechanic, who lives with his family in Oakland, California, is a senior editor at Mother Jones magazine. He

worked with a biotechnology company after graduating from UC Berkeley, where he studied biochemistry. After graduate school, he thought he would pursue a career as a science writer. “But my interests were more general,” he said. Work for magazines and newspap er s la nde d Me chanic at Mother Jones 13 years ago. While he enjoys the work, he felt the need to do something more. “Nobody writes an obit about somebody who just edited a bunch of stories for magazines,” he said. “I wanted to do something that felt bigger. My father has written a million books, and it’s sort of been on my bucket list, in a way.” Dad is David Mechanic, a retired Rutgers University sociology professor who has lived locally since 1982. The family moved to Princeton from Madison, Wisconsin when Michael Mechanic was about to enter high school. They lived on Prospect Avenue, down the street from Princeton University’s eating clubs where Michael often played piano in a band. He has fond memories of his high school years. His first high school party was at the childhood home of former Princetonian Tom Malinowski, who now represents New Jersey’s 7 t h District in Congress. “It was my AP biology teacher Cheri Sprague who inspired me to pursue science,” Mechanic wrote in an email. “And I’ll always rememb er my f re sh man

English teacher, Mr. Buckley, who loved to strike fear into his new students. The first thing he did on the first day of class was scowl at us and proclaim, ‘Freshmen are vegetating blobs of protoplasm!’” At the Labyrinth event, Mechanic will be interviewed by author and political reporter David Corn, who is Mother Jones’ Washington bureau chief. Visit Labyrinthbooks.com for more information. “I think the book gets better as it goes along,” Mechanic said. “We know there are people who are that rich because we hear about it all the time. When you get into the details of what their lives are like, and how much money they have, it can be really surprising.” —Anne Levin

years, as I have lived just over the border in South Brunswick. This will be an exciting and challenging time for Princeton as we begin to emerge from the pandemic. The residents and the business community have struggled over the last year. I am passionate about municipal government and very much look forward to working with Mayor Freda and Council. Together, we can address the adaptive challenges ahead as we look to shape the future of Princeton post-pandemic.”

Princeton Council Appoints New Municipal Administrator

Princeton Council has announced that Bernard “Bernie” Hvozdovic Jr., Esq., has been selected to serve as its new municipal administrator. The official appointment is scheduled to take place at the next Council meeting on April 12. Hvozdovic has served as South Brunswick Township manager since 2011 and will be starting as Princeton adm in is t rator arou nd May 3, 2021. Prior to becoming the manager in South Brunswick, he practiced as an attorney, advocating on behalf of municipalities and municipal employees. “I am extremely honored to have been selected for this position,” said Hvozdovic. “Princeton has been my second home for over 40

Bernard “Bernie” Hvozdovic Jr., Esq. Hvozdovic succeeds former municipal administrator Marc Dashield, who retired April 1 after six years of service. Prior to Dashield, Bob Bruschi was the first administrator of the consolidated municipality of Princeton. Bruschi has been filling in as the interim administrator over the last several weeks and will continue to do so for two weeks into the new administrator’s term to ensure continuity of municipal services and direction for staff. “On behalf of the Administrator Search Committee,

we are very excited to welcome Bernie Hvozdovic to Princeton as our new municipal administrator next month,” said Commit tee Chair and Council member Eve Niedergang. “We had a large number of very qualified candidates and Bernie clearly stood out.” As municipal administrator, Hvozdovic is responsible for carrying out the policies of the mayor and Council including planning, directing, managing, and overseeing day-to - day operations of the local government’s 200+ employees. “Bernie’s passion for public service and commitment to Princeton were evident early on in the search as was his vast experience in dealing with the key issues that Princeton will face in the months and years ahead,” said Mayor Mark Freda. “We are excited to begin our work together.” Hvozdovic graduated with a degree in economics from Wake Forest University, a juris doctor degree from Delaware Law School, and later earned a master’s degree in public administration from Harvard Kennedy School. He is certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a civil trial attorney and is admitted to practice in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit, U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey, and the Supreme Court of the United States of America. Hvozdovic currently serves on the Kingston Village Advisory Commission, providing pro-bono legal services to vulnerable populations.

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social distancing. Masks continue to be required.” Princeton University continues to encourage all members of the community to get vaccinated as soon as they become eligible, though students must abide by the protocols even after they have been vaccinated. The University plans to resume a fully in-person program in the fall of 2021, but has not yet decided whether a COVID-19 vaccine will be mandatory for students at that time. The University has been prepared to be a vaccine distribution site, “ready to vaccinate members of the University community if the state allocates vaccines to the University for that purpose,” said Hotchkiss, but

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“the University has not received any vaccine and does not know when it will receive any.” Looking ahead, Hotchkiss noted that the campus COVID policies, including masking and social distancing, would remain in place at least through the summer. “Our goal for fall 2021 is to resume a fully in-person residential program, prioritizing teaching and research, and informed by public health guidance. Returning to inperson operations in all of our activities will be a complex process guided by public health experts, state regulations, and logistical realities. Some restrictions will undoubtedly extend into the next academic year.” Hotchkiss reported that because most students have been cooperative in adhering to the rules imposed by public health guidance and the social contract, Princeton has been able to avoid the kinds of spikes in COVID cases and the unsafe behavior that have necessitated

additional restrictions at many other colleges and universities. Social contract violations from September 1, 2020 to March 25, 2021 that have been resolved include 87 resulting in disciplinary probation, with 14 of those students barred from campus; 15 resulting in reprimands; and 37 resulting in warnings, according to Hotchkiss. The social contract deems violations involving quarantine and isolation, hosting unpermitted visitors in on-campus residences, and hosting prohibited in-person gatherings as “significant,” resulting most often in serious disciplinary action and barring from campus. Some other offenses include failure to comply with testing protocols, failure to follow proper travel protocols, entering buildings where access was restricted, failure to secure late arrival permission, and failure to adhere to facecovering and social distancing policies. —Donald Gilpin

Promise of Employment Through Rider Program

Rider University recently launched a new program that guarantees undergraduate students who fulfill their responsibilities will obtain an entry-level job related to their field of study or be accepted into graduate or professional school within six months of graduation. Called the Cranberry Investment (“Cranberry” refers to Rider’s primary school color), the program reinforces the University’s longstanding commitment to providing transformative student experiences that lead to career success. “Students who invest in a Rider education should feel confident that we are going to do everything within our power to make sure they reach their full potential,” says Gregory G. Dell’Omo, Ph.D., Rider’s president. “The Cranberry Investment symbolizes our deeply held belief that a Rider University education allows students to achieve their professional dreams.” According to a recent study

by the Office of Career Development and Success, nine of every 10 Rider alumni are employed, in graduate school, or volunteering within a year of graduation. To reach the goal set forth by the Cranberry Investment, Rider will support current students, prior to graduation, by helping them to find internships, co-ops, field work and other professional opportunities. For any eligible student who does not acquire an entry-level position in their field of study or acceptance into graduate or professional school within six months of graduation, Rider will provide focused career coaching and/ or either additional undergraduate coursework (up to nine credits for free) or a paid internship to gain experience in their field of study. Undergraduate students graduating in the Class of 2022 and thereafter who meet specific program requirements are eligible to participate. Other requirements of eligibility are determined by factors such as overall GPA and completing certain workshops or courses

offered through Rider’s office of Career Development and Success. The Cranberry Investment works with other Rider programs designed to promote career success, such as the Engaged Learning Program and Lifting Barriers. Rider launched its signature Engaged Learning Program in 2017, which requires every Rider graduate to participate in certain curricular and/or extracurricular experiences. Last year, a new initiative called Lifting Barriers was announced that set a new goal of 95 percent of students participating specifically in activities that provide Enriched Career Experiences, such as internships, guided research and performances. Lifting Barriers also included a 22 percent tuition reduction beginning in the fall of 2021 and introduced new support for career preparation and academic success, such as the hiring of additional career coaches. For more information about the Cranberry Investment, visit rider.edu/cranberry-investment.

COVID-19 PROTOCOL MATERIAL WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED WITHOUT COMPLIANCE OF THE FOLLOWING REGULATIONS:

-Limit of one person per vehicle -All residents must remain in vehicle at all times with their windows closed -Disposal items must be placed in the trunk or back of vehicle, cannot be in passenger seat

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11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021 • 12

Resiliency Fund continued from page one

the grants had affected them. Jacqui Arce of Pure Barre on Hulfish wrote that her grant went toward renovation of the HVAC system to include an air purifier, which cost about $7,000. Lisa Ruddy of Princeton Soup & Sandwich Company on Palmer Square East said the grant helped bring back staff, buy heat lamps and cushions for outdoor dining, and offset fees associated with online ordering. Paul Shu of Holsome Teas and Herbs on Witherspoon Street wrote that the $5,000 enabled him to create a new website. “We are now on the way to recovery and the future looks promising,” he said. “If there is anything I can contribute to the Foundation, let me know.”

Hinkson’s on Spring Street used the grant to help with rent, payroll, and utilities. “With our business down an average of 35 percent in 2020, every dollar has helped keep our doors open,” wrote owner Andrew Mangone. Adding that while residents have made an effort to buy local, he would like to see the same commitment from other businesses. “We are also grateful for the businesses that do use us: jaZams, Labyrinth, Momo brothers, Kristine’s, and Witherspoon Grill,” he wrote. Grit + Polish salon on Witherspoon Street was less fortunate. While the $5,000 helped keep the doors open two months longer than would have been possible otherwise, owner Jacqueline Fay had to close at the end of October, she wrote. Christine DiDonato of Bella Boutique in Princeton

Shopping Center had some dark days, but the grant gave her “a strong beam of light,” she wrote. DiDonato used the funds for sanitizing, which allowed customers to try on clothing, something they could not do in larger stores. Princeton University provided the seed funding and matching funds to start the Resiliency Fund process last June. The goal was to provide emergency assistance for independently owned small business located in the municipality, in response to the COVID-19 outbreak. The program, a collaborative effort with the municipality and the Chamber Foundation, was formally launched with the University’s $250,000 contribution, which provided a dollar-for-dollar match of up to the next $100,000 in additional contributions to the

fund. A second round was launched in November. From the beginning, it was decided that every successful applicant should receive the same amount. “We agreed that if you meet the criteria, you get $5,000,” said Goedecke. “That allowed us to move as quickly as we could. While it might not have moved the needle for a larger business as for a smaller one, we thought all of these merchants were deserving. We didn’t want to dole out lesser amounts to smaller businesses.” For Theodora Codlington, owner of Theo’s of Princeton Salon at 236 Nassau Street for the past 19 years, the grant allowed her to pay her rent. “We were hanging on, but the rent is high,” she said. “I was shocked when I got it, because I’m not sophisticated with the computer. In Princeton, they

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are eligible for the vaccine under state guidelines. The off-site clinics are being provided in addition to the full schedule of on-site vaccinations that were already arranged at Princeton Health. “We are committed to fulfilling the lifelong health care needs of people in our community, and COVID-19 is the greatest public health challenge in recent memory,” DeFalco said. “Vaccinating as many people as possible is a crucial step. We are working with partners throughout the community to do this in a safe, effective, and equitable manner.”

should have help for people who have trouble with that. But, by the grace of God, I pushed the right buttons and got it done. So I’m happy. We’re going to come back and come back strong.” —Anne Levin

Penn Medicine Princeton Health Helps Vaccinate School Workers

Penn Medicine Princeton Health and school nursing staffs across Central Jersey are teaming up to vaccinate school employees against COVID -19, an important step in protecting staff, teachers, and administrators as school districts return to more in-person instruction. Nurses and other staff members from Princeton Health Community Wellness and Engagement will be traveling to schools in M id d le s ex, Mercer, a nd Somerset counties to provide vaccine clinics for staff members of the host school as well as neighboring districts. School nurses attend the clinics to monitor individuals for 15 minutes after receiving the vaccine. The effort kicked off March 30 at Cranbury School, and will continue for the next several weeks. In mid-April, Princeton Health will also begin working with colleges and universities to vaccinate their staff members. Vaccinating education and higher education staff is part of an ongoing, broader plan by Princeton Health to administer the COVID-19 vaccine to members of demographic groups that state health officials indicate may have challenges scheduling or getting to vaccine appointments, said Margaret DeFalco, assistant vice president, administrative ser vices, who super vises vaccine operations at Princeton Health. She noted that Princeton Health also is focused on assisting people 65 and older who may have difficulty navigating online scheduling systems. Princeton Health’s vaccine clinic on the Princeton Medical Center campus continues to serve all individuals who

Agencies Join Forces to Aid Mobile Food Pantry

Having secured a grant from NJEA PRIDE to purchase two weeks’ worth of meals for Princeton Mobile Food Pantry, the Princeton Regional Educator’s Association (PREA), Princeton Administrator Association ( PAA), and Princeton Regional Educational Support Staff Association (PRESSA) j oi ne d w it h T he Pa nt r y Team to help support the under-served members of the Princeton community. “The Pantry team finds it so meaningful to have our beloved teachers sponsor one of our deliveries,” said the Pantry founder and community outreach coordinator for PPS. “Our primary focus is on PPS families, so it’s very special to receive this support from some of the most important people in the lives of our kids.” PR E A received a grant for $3,500 to purchase the two-week supply of food for around 100 families. Unfortunately, prices and the number of families in n e e d i n c r e a s e d . Vol u n teers thought that the total would be $4,000, so their goal was to raise $500 to make up the difference. The total for the day was $4,600. The organization almost doubled its goal of $500. With the generosity of members plus donations from PA A and PR E SSA, they were able to cover the entire cost.

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Asking Princetonians to Help Address Problem of Off-Leash Dogs in Parks

To the Editor: On behalf of Friends of Princeton Open Space (FOPOS), I am writing to ask fellow Princetonians to help address the problem of off-leash dogs in our parks and obey the law, which requires dogs to be leashed at all times when off their owners’ property. Lest anyone think this letter is written out of anti-dog sentiment, let me say that I and many FOPOS board members are ardent dog lovers. We would love to have a place in Princeton like there is at Skillman Park where dogs could run free. However, that is not the situation currently, and two very sad incidents at the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve illustrate how ignoring the law can have serious consequences. In one, which occurred a couple of years ago, an offleash dog ran up to a stag, was gored, and died. Its owner was devastated. Quite recently, an off-leash dog seriously injured a dog that was leashed. There have also been a number of incidents in which people who have had past unpleasant encounters with off-leash dogs have had their enjoyment of the park spoiled by encountering them repeatedly on the trails. We know from conversations with the Animal Control Officer that off-leash dogs are a significant problem at other open space parks; it is not just Mountain Lakes. Being on my fifth in a series of golden retrievers, I am very familiar with the belief that one’s own dog is “friendly” and of no danger to others. That is of course no justification to break the law, but it is not reliably true. If a friendly dog runs up to a not-so-friendly dog, a dog that is very protective of its owner, or a dog that is fearful because it is on-leash and feels like it cannot defend itself, a nasty fracas can ensue. People who are trying to separate fighting dogs can get bitten, with serious consequences for both the person and the biting dog. Violations of the dog leash ordinance also carry hefty fines: $50 for the first offense, and from $100 up to $1,000 for subsequent violations. Finally, please remember that when you have an off-leash dog problem, call the Animal Control officer and report it. (Animal Control: 609-924-2728; in emergency 609-9212100 [police dispatch].) FOPOS tries to encourage obedience of the law, but it is not our job to enforce it, nor do we have the resources to do so. Please, fellow Princetonians, be responsible and obey the leash law. WENDY MAGER President, Friends of Princeton Open Space

To the Editor: We are writing on behalf of the Princeton Public Library’s Board of Trustees to express deep gratitude to PPL’s outstanding staff. The library has long been one of Princeton’s jewels, enriching, educating, and entertaining the community. Throughout the pandemic, the whole team — led by Executive Director Jennifer Podolsky — has worked tirelessly to sustain popular services while also reaching patrons in new ways, including the princetoncovid.org website, StoryWalk, the Keeping TABs podcast, a host of online events, and an expanded mobile device lending program. We are so grateful for this library and its extraordinary staff, who have helped to make a challenging and isolating time more bearable. RUTH MILLER President, Board of Trustees, Princeton Public Library Governors Lane JENNIFER JANG Vice President, Board of Trustees, Princeton Public Library Russell Road

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Shirley Satterfield Middle School Would Be Crowning Achievement for Princeton

To the Editor: What a crowning achievement it would be for the town of Princeton, the Board of Education, and of course the wonderful and beloved Shirley Satterfield to have the Princeton Middle School named after her. For much of her life she has been dedicated to serving others through her involvement in education as a guidance counselor where she has been a mentor to many students and parents. Through her active involvement in the Witherspoon Presbyterian Church, where she is a deacon and is responsible for ministering and looking out for 12 other church members, and is the adviser for the Junior Ushers Ministry. She is also the church historian, participates in three choirs, and serves on various committees. Educationally Shirley spent 14 years at Hightstown High School where she taught seventh and eighth grade English and history, and was a guidance counselor. She then came to Princeton High School where she served as a guidance counselor for six years from 1993-2000 before retiring. That did not last long, because the school system called her back as a consultant where she continued to help students find career paths until 2006. Shirley’s greatest love, her inspiration, and passion is the African American History that exists in the town of Princeton, and in particular the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood, proudly Princeton’s 20 th historic district thanks in large part to Shirley’s leadership with a core group of eight other committed soldiers, who worked tirelessly between 2014-2016 to make the historic designation a reality. Shirley is the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood historian and has catalogued and captured the rich history of Black people in Princeton. In 2017 she founded the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and Cultural Society, “Building our Future ... Honoring our Past,” a community-based organization that is dedicated to the research,

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preservation, understanding, appreciation, and celebration of the rich and proud history of African Americans in Princeton. Shirley also conducts historical tours of the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood. There has never been a school named after an African American in Princeton. All of the finalists are worthy. Shirley Satterfield, however, is 100 percent local and is “still here” actively involved, doing the work, showing and sharing the love, all the while being obedient to the call to serve others, and to do so with intellect, dignity, humility and grace. She is deserving of this wonderful honor for so many reasons, in so many different ways. The Shirley Satterfield Middle School ... go tell it on the mountain! LEIGHTON NEWLIN Birch Avenue

Thanking Environmental Commission For Report on Benefits of Natural Grass

To the Editor: On March 24th, 2021 I took part in a meeting of the Princeton Environmental Commission. I was there because of my interest in the proposed Hilltop Park project to replace grass with synthetic turf. Heidi Fichtenbaum, a member of the commission, gave a very informative report on the impact of synthetic turf versus natural grass. It included the effects to the health of human and animal life, effects on the environment, and the cost of each project over the coming years. For anyone who thought a synthetic turf field was a good idea, the information we heard could easily have changed their minds. The whole report pointed to the huge benefits of having natural grass. And the good news is that the costs of the grass project and upkeep are lower as well. Kudos to PEC! ELIANE GEREN Dempsey Avenue

CASA Shares Special Message for National Child Abuse Prevention Month

To the Editor: Child abuse and neglect is a serious problem affecting every segment of our community, and finding solutions requires input and action from everyone. While this is vital in any year, it is even more important in these challenging times when a family’s way of life is upended because of the COVID pandemic. Child abuse can have long term psychological, emotional, and physical effects that have lasting consequences for its victims. It is essential that communities increase access to programs and activities that create strong and thriving children and families. Effective child abuse prevention activities succeed because of the partnerships created between child welfare professionals, education, health, community and faith based organizations, businesses, law enforcement agencies, and families. April has been declared as National Child Abuse Prevention Month. The volunteers and staff at CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) for Children of Mercer and Burlington Counties strive to ensure the emotional, physical and educational well-being of these children while they reside in foster homes or residential facilities. The ultimate goal of our volunteers is to help establish a safe, stable and permanent home for each child we serve. LAURA WALL Executive Director, CASA for Children of Mercer and Burlington Counties

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Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

Books Labyrinth Livestream Hosts story collections, including Discussion of Debut Novel May We Be Forgiven, This

K i r s t i n Va l d e z Q u a d e and A.M. Homes will be discussing Quade’s debut novel, The Five Wounds (Norton) on Tuesday, April 13 at 6 p.m. The Labyrinth Livestream (LLL) event is cosponsored by the Princeton Public Library and Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts. To register, visit labyrinthbooks.com. According to a starred notice from Kirkus Reviews: “With beautifully layered relationships and an honest yet profoundly empathetic picture of a rural community where the families proudly trace their roots back to the Spanish conquistadors while struggling with poverty and a deadly drug epidemi this novel is a brilliant meditation on love and redemption. Perfectly rendered characters anchor a novel built around a fierce, flawed, and loving family.” A professor of creative writing at Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts, Kirstin Valdez Quade is the author of Night at the Fiestas, winner of the National Book Critics Circle’s John Leonard Prize, among other honors. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, New York Times, The Best American Short Stories, The O. Henry Prize Stories, and elsewhere. Novelist and lecturer in creative writing at the Lewis Center, A.M. Homes is the author of numerous novels and short

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“Just Money” Subject Of LLL Conversation

Katrin Kaeufer will be talking about her book Just Mone y : Mis sion - D r iv e n Banks and the Future of Finance (MIT Press) with Darrin Williams on Thursday, April 8 at 6 p.m. To register for the Labyrinth Livestream event, visit labyrinthbooks. com. Written with Lillian Steponaitis, Just Money explores how to rethink banking and how to use finance as a tool for social change. Katrin Kaeufer is director at the Community Innovators Lab ( CoLab ) at MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and planning and executive director at the Presencing Institute. Her research focuses on leadership, social transformation and mission-based banking. She has consulted with mid-sized as well as global companies, nonprofit organizations, the World Bank, and with the United Nations Development Program. Darrin Williams is the CEO of Southern Bancorp, Inc., where he oversees the strategic direction and operations of each of Southern’s three Community Development Financial Institutions. Williams also served three terms in the Arkansas House of Representatives.

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Billie Holiday Meets Wordsworth — A Birthday Doubleheader The greatest art never loses its mystery. The better we know hers, the more dreamlike and sensational it seems. —Gary Giddins on Billie Holiday (1915-1959) t’s Opening Day at the Great American Ballpark. So begins a fresh, new, hopefully complete season after the travesty of 2020. At first glance there was a touch of poetry in that combination, the idea of a sports venue that hadn’t been branded by a corporation; alas, the home field of the Cincinnati Reds bears the name of The Great American Insurance Company. But then the visiting St. Louis Cardinals, the team I’ve followed almost all my life, play their home games on the site of a slave market in a stadium built and named for a beer baron. I’m not complaining, not after watching Major League baseball played with real people in the stands. Never mind that the crowd amounts to only 20 percent of capacity, these living breathing yelling drinking eating fans are a joy to behold after last year’s cardboard facsimiles, with crowd noise Muzak piped in at peak moments in the action. I’d like to think the upside of that surreal season was that it refreshed our appreciation of the game, the moral being “You don’t know what you’ve got until you almost lose it.” The same story was played out at the same time when America almost lost itself; now democracy is starting a new season, with the MLB commissioner pulling this year’s All Star Game out of Atlanta as a rebuke to Georgia’s recently passed voter suppression bill. Remember the way the Republican secretary of state stood fast against the gangster tactics of an unhinged president? Remember the 1919 Black Sox scandal? It’s as if a right-handed reliever named Raffensperger refused to throw the game, striking out the side in the bottom of the ninth, thus validating the playing-by-the-rules ideal shared by baseball fans bound by a love of the game, whatever their team or party. Except that fans of the Great Lie booed, threw things, and stormed the field of broken dreams screaming “Kill the umpire!” A Birthday Duet Besides baseball, this week’s mixed bag features the poet William Wordsworth, born April 7, 1770, and the singer Billie Holiday, born April 7, 1915. When I teased my wife with the prospect of a “Billie Holiday Sings Wordsworth” column, I was met with the expected look of horrified disbelief. But really, it’s not

I

as strange as it sounds once you take poetry off the page, put it in play, and add a touch of dreamlike mystery in the person of Dorothy Wordsworth. Who better than Billie Holiday to sing the words of a poet whose most moving early work was inspired by his free-spirited sister? Recall what Coleridge said on first meeting Dorothy when she was 27, “a woman indeed! — in mind & heart.” And Thomas DeQuincey, who after picturing her by way of her brother’s poem “Beggars” (“Her face was of Egyptian brown”), claimed “Rarely in a woman of English birth, had I seen a more determinate gipsy tan,” her eyes “wild and startling and hurried in their motion” while “some subtle fire of impassioned intellect burned within.” Writing “Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey,” a poem that seems to flow off the page i n t o l i f e , Wo r d sworth says that he couldn’t have done it without his sister, his “dearest friend,” in whose voice he finds the language of his youthful heart, reading his youthful pleasures i n “t h e s h o ot i n g lights” of her “wild eyes.” “Yesterdays” L is ten to Bi llie Holiday’s 1944 Commodore sessions (CMD boxed set 1997), keeping in mind what Gary Giddins in Visions of Jazz calls her ability to “push song into the realm of unmitigated intimacy,” the way she could sing “around a melody” and “her uncanny harmonic sense,” as her discoverer John Hammond put it, not to mention the genius of her phrasing, her otherworldly sense of timing, the way she renders, lives, flows within lines like “I’ll be seeing you in all the old familiar places that this heart of mine embraces ever more.” Then think what she could do with this passage from “Tintern Abbey” composed by a poet who sees for miles when Tin Pan Alley songsters can’t see past the walls of the Brill Building — a “sense sublime / Of something far more deeply interfused, / Whose dwelling is the light of setting suns, / And the round ocean and the living air, / And the blue sky, and in the mind of man: / A motion and a spirit, that impels / All thinking things, all objects of all thought / And rolls through all things.” Of course it would help to find some

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mute inglorious Schubert or Gershwin to write a suitably intricate melody, plus a lyricist to finesse words like “interfused,” but there’s no doubting Holiday’s power to adapt to multisyllabic challenges when you hear what she does in “Yesterdays” — “happy sweet sequestered days” when “joyous free in flame and life then sooth was mine” — and you begin to realize she’s making her own poetry on the spot, with no lyric too devious or difficult for her to have her shape-shifting way with. “He Ain’t Got Rhythm” It’s so easy to be hard on Wordsworth. For instance Bertrand Russell: “In his youth Wordworth sympathized with the French Revolution, went to France, wrote good poetry, and had a ‘natural’ daughter. At this period he was called ‘a bad man.’ Then he became ‘good,’ abandoned his daughter, ad opted correct principles, and wrote bad poetry.” True, some of t hat’s his ow n fault, his priggishness, his ego. But did he really deserve DeQuincey’s unsparing caricature of him as, “upon the whole, not a well-made man,” one “pointedly condemned by all female connoisseurs in legs.” Still, I can’t help seeing him (it’s so easy to be hard) as the lonely human subject of a music video for the ages, filmed to Billie singing Irving Berlin’s “He Ain’t Got Rhythm,” from 1937, a session marked by Lester Young’s first appearance on record with Lady Day. “Every night he sits in the house alone / He ain’t got rhythm / Every night he sits there and wears a frown / He attracted some attention / When he found the fourth dimension / But he ain’t got rhythm / So no one’s with him / The loneliest man in town.” Let It Flow The great poet who saw “into the life of things” with “an eye made quiet by the power of harmony and the deep power of joy” has all the movement and rhythm he needs in “Tintern Abbey.” Again imagine Billie singing, humming, nodding, smiling along (no line breaks, let it flow): “These forms of beauty have not been to me as is a landscape to a blind man’s eye, but oft, in lonely rooms, and ‘mid the din of towns and cities, I have owed to them, in hours of weariness, sensations sweet, felt

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in the blood, and felt along the heart ... that blessed mood in which the burthen of the mystery, in which the heavy and the weary weight of all this unintelligible world is lighten’d: — that serene and blessed mood, in which the affections gently lead us on.” Hemingway Pitching Take poetry off the page into the life of things and you can see it in baseball. I know I’ll see it when the Cardinals open at home this Thursday. I can already hear the cheer that will greet superstar Nolan Arenado (his name a poem in itself), who hit his first home run as a Cardinal in Saturday’s loss to the Reds. nd how would Ernest Hemingway pitch the great Arenado? I’m thinking of Hemingway after watching an episode of the new Ken Burns/Lynn Novick series on PBS. I’ve always enjoyed reading Hemingway’s insights on the game and the way he identified with it as a writer. When he comes off the plane in Lillian Ross’s May 1950 New Yorker profile, he’s pitching. About his newest, then-not- yet published novel, Across the River and Into the Trees, he says he’s not trying for a no-hit game, figuring on winning “maybe twelve to nothing or maybe twelve to eleven.” Referring to the “considerable rewriting” he had to do, he notes that they can’t “yank” a novelist “like they can a pitcher,” because a novelist “has to go the full nine, even if it kills him.” As for critics: “It is like being a third baseman and protesting because they hit line drives to you. Line drives are regrettable, but to be expected.” Ultimately he sees himself as a pitcher who never struck out anybody, because “I knew I had only so many fast balls in that arm .... Would make them pop to short instead, or fly out, or hit it on the ground.” Referring to French competitors, he mentions “Mr. Flaubert, who always threw them perfectly straight, hard, high, and inside. Then Mr. Baudelaire, that I learned my knuckle ball from, and Mr. Rimbaud, who never threw a fast ball in his life.” —Stuart Mitchner

A

Note: The image is the cover of Lady Day: The Complete Billie Holiday on Columbia (1933-1944) on Columbia/Legacy. I haven’t seen the new film, The United States vs. Billie Holiday, and I doubt that I will. From what I’ve read, Andra Day gives a praiseworthy performance in a flawed project. There’s no substitute for watching and listening to the real Lady Day.

WHAT IT MEANS TO BE HUMAN

The Case for the Body in Public Bioethics O. Carter Snead Professor of Law; Director, de Nicola Center for Ethics and Culture; Concurrent Professor of Political Science, University of Notre Dame with

Robert P. George

McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence; Director, James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions, Princeton University

The Harold T. Shapiro Lecture on Ethics, Science, and Technology Cosponsored by the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs

THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 2021 4:30 - 5:45 PM WEBINAR

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021

BOOK/RECORD REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021 • 16

Surely Goodness and Mercy

THEATER REVIEW

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Students Befriend a Cafeteria Worker in “Surely Goodness and Mercy”; Passage Presents Chisa Hutchinson’s Inspirational Coming-of-Age Drama

assage Theatre has presented Surely Goodness and Mercy. Playwright Chisa Hutchinson’s inspirational coming-of-age drama follows Tino, an intelligent and caring 12-year-old boy. Tino and a classmate form an unlikely friendship with a school cafeteria worker, and seek a way to help her out of a crisis. This online production was presented March 25-28; the run was extended for a second week (April 1-4). Surely Goodness and Mercy has been part of Passage’s Theatre for Families and Young Audiences series — which, according to the company’s website, is “geared towards students in elementary or middle school and focus on themes that affect the youth in our area.” Hutchinson’s play is uplifting, but it also is grittily realistic. Set in Newark, Surely Goodness and Mercy attacks poverty (specifically the inability to afford health care), racism, and child abuse. Hutchinson also explores faith and its ability to empower people to change situations. Tino (serenely portrayed by Layton E. Dickson) lives with his embittered aunt, Alneesa (played by Tamara Anderson, whose performance is characterized by bored, haughty glares and barbed line readings). When Tino tries to engage Alneesa in conversation, she pointedly fastforwards through a commercial to avoid him. Alneesa approves of Tino’s classmates teasing him for reading the Bible at school. She also rants about his generation when she learns that he discovered his church via Yelp. She tasks him with dusting, before abruptly reassigning him to scrubbing the bathtub. Later we learn that Tino’s mother died to save him from a gunshot. Alneesa’s resentment stems from the fact that she did not want children, but has been tasked with raising her late sister’s child. Tino is a recognizable variation of a literary archetype: the abused orphan. Examples include Oliver Twist, Little Orphan Annie, Harry Potter, and even Cinderella. Each of these characters begins their story in an unloving home. The assignment of menial tasks often is an expression of the guardians’ disdain. Tino gets along better with the “lunch lady” at his school, the irascible but protective Bernadette (Jennifer Fouché). Bernadette spends much of her time exasperatedly scolding students for their unsavory behavior in the cafeteria. However, when she discovers that Tino does not like to eat hot dogs, she gives him a peanut butter sandwich instead. She also reveals a liking for the book of Psalms (the play’s title is derived from Psalm 23:6, “Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life...”).

Bernadette’s arm shakes, and she accidentally spills Tino’s lunch tray, whose contents he blithely eats anyway. We also see her struggle to turn off her alarm clock. Tino notices that her shakiness does not improve; so does his classmate, Deja (portrayed by Camiel Warren-Taylor, with the right mixture of brashness and affection). After Bernadette’s condition worsens to the extent that she ends up in the hospital with a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, Tino visits her and researches a list of neurologists, though she protests that she cannot afford to see one. Tino’s other positive adult role model is the preacher at his church (infused with passionate, genial folksiness by Jamil A.C. Mangan). The first sermon Tino hears is about the importance of charity, and complementing faith with actions. The second sermon, delivered at a service Tino attends with Deja, is about (the problem with) judging others. The preacher reveals his mother died (of cancer) when he was 16. At her funeral a mourner expressed condolences, but then insinuated that the preacher’s behavior must have caused his mother stress, worsening her condition. He angrily tried to throw his Bible in the trash, but missed — accidentally opening it to 1 John 4: ““Do not believe every spirit, but test the spirits to see whether they are from God.” Whether or not audience members hold

Christian beliefs, the quote is integral to the play’s narrative and themes. It can be restated to mean, “Test the mentors, and assess whether or not there is validity in their teaching.” The direction by marcus d. harvey underlines this theme, as does the acting by Dickson and Warren-Taylor. Significantly, the preacher is not onscreen by himself. Tino and Deja appear on either side of him, and their reactions to his sermon serve the scene’s dramatic purpose. Both of the young actors already are skillful, particularly in the subtle use of facial expressions. The sermon inspires both of their characters; the way they look at each other makes clear that the experience has deepened their friendship. This will be juxtaposed against a later scene, in which Tino is faced with an unsympathetic English teacher (portrayed by Anderson in an apt dual role). The teacher (who is not even onscreen) criticizes Tino’s answer to a question on a grammar worksheet, even though — as he points out — she is factually incorrect. Like Alneesa, the teacher complains about Tino’s generation. As she drones on, Dickson’s annoyed body language is in sharp contrast to the scenes involving the preacher. During the conflict with the teacher, Tino uncharacteristically expresses irritation. This places him in violation of the school’s zero-tolerance policy about

“disrespecting teachers,” and the principal (Mangan, in another dual role) regretfully suspends him for two days. This worsens his relationship with Alneesa. When he visits Bernadette in the hospital, she is horrified to see his bloody lip, and to learn about the reason for it. (She reveals that she had an abusive mother, and has a scar to prove it.) Later, Deja suggests a solution to Bernadette’s financial problems: a GoFundMe page. This causes a final conflict with Alneesa, who tries to shame Tino into giving her a percentage of the money. What is satisfying about the play’s exploration of faith is the extent to which we see it motivate Tino’s actions (which inspire other characters). When he announces the fundraising campaign in church, his remarks touch on both of the sermons he has heard. In the course of asking the other parishioners to help financially, he decries unfair judgment and labels, noting people’s inclination to dismiss Bernadette as “the lunch lady.” The scene summarizes Tino’s growth as a character. In the first act we see him listening to the preacher; now, he addresses the congregation. It is a genuinely surprising, but natural, evolution. Driven by the mission he has undertaken, he has come of age. After Bernadette leaves the hospital, she and Deja discuss Tino’s home situation. Bernadette repays his research on her behalf with some of her own, in an attempt to give him a brighter future. A hybrid filming process was employed by the production. Certain scenes were filmed remotely. The remaining segments were filmed in person at Trenton Central High School (following COVID-19 precautions). Costume and scenic designer An-lin Dauber and virtual scene editor Brishen Miller inventively fashioned the backgrounds for the remote segments into an apt imitation of illustrations for a children’s book; this contrasts with the realism of the school scenes. This dual approach results in an inconsistent visual aesthetic, but it is refreshing to see actors perform in person. Tino is an avid reader, so it is germane to suggest that his mind might reconfigure some locations into drawings he has seen in books. hat good is it … if someone says he has faith, but he does not have works?” quotes the preacher. Aided by a talented cast and harvey’s thoughtful direction, Hutchin“SURELY GOODNESS AND MERCY”: Passage Theatre has presented an online production of son’s script — which underlines the impor“Surely Goodness and Mercy.” Written by Chisa Hutchinson and directed by marcus d. harvey, tance of good mentors — reminds us that the play depicts Tino (above, left) and a classmate, who try to help an irascible but caring works of theater can have invaluable lessons to teach, while nourishing the spirit. school cafeteria worker. (Painting by Leon Rainbow, courtesy of Passage Theatre) —Donald H. Sanborn III

“W

For information about Passage Theatre’s upcoming events, visit passagetheatre.org.

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intersection of arts, culture, and politics, his books and curated projects include Audiotopia: Music, Race, and America (2005), and Black Sabbath: The Secret Musical History of Black-Jewish Relations (2010). Advance registration is required at BildnerCenter. Rutgers.edu.

Specialist in Yiddish Song To Perform in Zoom Event Newark Symphony Hall Anthony Mordechai Tzvi Presents “Black Terror”

MEETING MUSICIANS ONLINE: Basia Danilow, concertmaster of the Princeton Symphony Orchestra, gives students in the PSO BRAVO! program a close-up look at her violin.

Orchestra Adapts Programs tion in the Education area of This nomination follows the To Virtual Visits for Schools its website. The section fea- recent announcement that

During this pandemic year, Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) has pivoted its PSO BRAVO! education programs to offer a range of virtual opportunities to area teachers, students, young musicians, and the online community. Virtual school musician visits and online instrument demonstrations are geared to engage the younger set, while discussions of Bach and Youth Orchestra of Central Jersey (YOCJ) master classes are of value to older student musicians. The orchestra is planning on up to 50 “Meet a Musician” visits. Students have the opportunity to talk with an orchestra musician faceto-face online, gain a closeup look at the instrument(s), and listen to live music demonstrations. Over 20 schools are participating, including elementary schools in the Princeton, Hopewell, and South Brunswick school districts. Johnson Park Elementary vocal arts teacher Erin Ketterer said of the program, “The Zoom BRAVO! visits have been absolutely amazing. Our students have been just as captivated as they were during our past live assemblies. These virtual visits have meant so much to me as a music educator, because I think it shows the resiliency and power of music and musicians.” As a supplement to the school Zoom visits and an enr ich ment re s ource for home-school families and the broader community, the PSO is unveiling a new “Instruments of the Orchestra” sec-

tures pages dedicated to specific instruments, complete with informative musician videos and audio playlists to hear how each instrument contributes to the rich sound of the orchestra. Older student musicians can check out the PSO BRAVO! Bach’s Musical Offering Project, a four-episode exploration of Bach’s work complete with video introduction, also housed on the orchestra’s website. Nell Flanders, the PSO’s assistant conductor, serves as instructional guide and PSO musicians play Bach’s music. Through PSO BR AVO ! , Flanders and PSO musicians also work with students at the Youth Orchestra of Central Jersey. Flanders leads classes on Bach and other topics, and PSO musicians are facilitating a series of YOCJ masterclasses on April 20 at 7pm. While the audition period is over, anyone can watch and learn for free. For information, visit yocj.org.

McCarter Theatre Productions Nominated for Drama Awards

McCar ter Theatre Center has announced that The Manic Monologues and The Work of Adrienne Kennedy: Inspiration & Influence have been nominated by The Drama League in the category of Outstanding Digital Theatre, Collection, or Festival. The 2021 nominees were selected by more than 400 alumni of The Drama League’s programs for directors and theater artists inclusive of Tony and Emmy Award winners, artistic directors at more than 60 theater companies across the United States.

the Drama League Awards will celebrate its 87th year by recognizing excellence in digital and socially distanced theatrical work created during the COVID-19 pandemic. Produced in association with Princeton University Health Services, The 24 Hour Plays, and Innovations in Socially Distant Performance, a project of the Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton, The Manic Monologues is a digital theatrical experience to disrupt stigma and spotlight a conversation about mental health, created by Zachary Burton and Elisa Hofmeister in the wake of Burton’s bipolar diagnosis while a Ph.D. student at Stanford University. The two incorporated accounts from dozens of brave individuals across the continent and beyond — from survivors with diagnoses; from health professionals; from mothers, sons, and friends; from lovers. The play premiered in May 2019 at Stanford University, and was performed in Des Moines and Los Angeles before COVID. The free interactive website is live at mccarter.org/manicmonologues. McCarter Theatre Center, in association with Round House Theatre, produced The Work of Adrienne Kennedy: Inspiration & Influence. The digital festival celebrates the experimentalist, with four of Kennedy’s plays produced as virtual theatrical experiences: He Brought Her Heart Back in a Box directed by Nicole A. Watson, Sleep Deprivation Chamber directed by Raymond O. Caldwell, Ohio State Murders directed by Valerie Curtis-Newton,

Russell, an award-w inning American singer and musician sp eciali z ing in Yiddish song, will perform in an online program Thursday, April 22 at 7 p.m. via Zoom. The program is sponsored by the Allen and Joan Bildner Center for the Study of Jewish Life at Rutgers University. Russell has created music influenced by very diverse traditions —Yiddish art songs, African American spirituals, Chassidic melodies, folk songs from the African American South, and more. He will give a performance and engage in discussion about the musical convergences that define his work. Cultural historian Josh Kun will moderate the program, navigating through the rich worlds of sound from which Russell creates his interpretations. Russell is a vocalist, composer, and arranger of Yiddish song whose work in Jewish music has brought him to stages all over the world. His work includes the album Convergence (2018) with the klezmer band Veretski Pass, and also performances and recordings with the band Tsvey Brider (Two Brothers), which creates contemporary, idiosyncratic, and unique in-

Anthony Mordechai Tzvi Russell

terpretations of music in the Yiddish language. Kun, a 2016 MacArthur Fellow, is professor and chair in cross-cultural communication, USC Annenberg School for C om m u n i c at ion a n d Journalism. An expert on the

Newark Symphony Hall (NSH ), New Jersey’s largest Black-led arts and entertainment venue, recently announced Yendor Theatre Company (YTC) as its first company-in-residence. YTC’s first production with the venue will be Richard Wesley’s Black Terror, coproduced by WACO Theater Center, which is based out of Los Angeles’ North Hollywood neighborhood. The production will be directed by WACO’s co-artistic director, Richard Lawson, and will live-stream online this summer. Y TC w i l l a l s o b e t h e first resident of The Lab at Newark Symphony Hall, a career accelerator and business incubator focused on the performing arts. The program is being launched with financial support from Newark Arts. YTC is a 2021 Black Seed grant winner — the first national initiative providing financial support for Black theatre companies across the country. “We’re tremendously excited about the virtual staging of Black Terror and know audiences will appreciate its timeless themes,” said Taneshia Nash Laird, president and CEO of NSH and show producer. She is also the sole Black female leader of a performing arts center in New Jersey. “We’re confident that while housed within our incubator, Yendor will see swift growth, utilizing various creative and professional resources we’ve made available.” Wesley, the award-winning play w r ight, s creenw r iter and New York University professor, wrote Black Terror when he was 26 years old. “The depiction of Black revolution was originally staged as part of the Shakespeare Festival in New York City in 1971. Black Terror was one of my first plays but continues to resonate both culturally and historically. I very much look forward to seeing it staged for an entirely new generation,” said Wesley, who also serves on the NSH board. “I’m grateful to the teams at Yendor, Newark Symphony Hall and

WACO Theater Center for making this happen. I believe this is an important work, thematically, for audiences in Newark, L.A., and across the country.” The virtual production will initiate NSH’s “Lab” — which aims to promote unique programs and performing artists in the Greater Newark region. The Lab will be NSH’s business incubator and career accelerator for live entertainment, including musicians, singers, dancers, actors, spoken word artists, directors, and theater technical staff. “We’re thankful to be part of this bi-coastal partnership, and look forward to working with the Symphony Hall, its company-in-residence and everyone involved in the program,” said WACO’s Lawson, co-artistic director alongside Tina Knowles Lawson, co-founder. “Through WACO programs, hundreds of artists and others learn to put their dreams into action. Black Terror will be one step toward reaching that mark.” Lawson is currently recurring on the ABC series Grey’s Anatomy and has more than 100 stage and screen credits. She will serve as director and will mentor and advise YTC’s co-founder, Andrew Binger. Both NSH and WACO will host bi-coastal calls for auditions, and each venue will cast half of the actors. Local performing artists are invited to register and become participants in the Lab at Newark Symphony Hall program. Applicants will receive access to training and career-advancing resources and opportunities. “Our ‘Lab’ program/accelerator will benefit greatly from WACO’s involvement at our launch,” said Nash Laird. “For this event, let’s remember, L awson and Wesley also have a 45-year history of collaboration, including Lawson appearing in the former’s ‘The Talented Tenth.’ The creative talent here is profound – and a wonderful match for Yendor’s production calendar.” Black Terror is also a part of a new slate of virtual programming for NSH, including Homegrown, an interview-style series sharing the stories of prominent artists and entertainers born and raised in Newark. Guests will describe the impact and legacy of Brick City, along with their contributions to the entertainment industry. The program kicks off with Tony Award-winning actress and longtime R&B recording artist Melba Moore on April 28.

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17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021

Performing Arts

and the world premiere of Etta and Ella on the Upper West Side directed by Timothy Douglas. Recently extended through April 30, all four plays in the festival are available for on-demand streaming. For more information, visit mccarter.org/ Adrienne-Kennedy-Festival.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021 • 18

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residencies at Mana Contemporary and El Museo del Barrio. Her awards include the Blair Dickinson Memorial Prize and the Community Action Partnership award in recognition of her artwork and role in her community.

Art

Dr. William R. Valerio Call for Art: “Ellarslie Open” Annual Juried Show

“IN CONVERSTION”: Artist Maria de Los Angeles will join Timothy M. Andrews for a free virtual conversation on Tuesday, April 13 from 7 to 8: 30 p.m. Her work is featured in “A Voice to be Head, on view in the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery April 10 through May 8.

“In Conversation” With Maria de Los Angeles

The Arts Council of Princeton’s “In Conversation” is a curated series of discussions designed to celebrate and connect those who make art and those who love art. Breaking down the barriers between artist and artappreciator, “In Conversation” delves into inspiration, studio practice, and artistic aspirations. Maria de Los Angeles, curator and artist featured in the Arts Council’s exhibition “A Voice to Be Heard,”

on view April 10 through May 8, will join Timothy M. Andrews, art collector and supporter of the Arts Counci l ’s A r t is t-i n - Re sidence program, for free virtual conversation on Tuesday, April 13 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Register at artscouncilofprinceton.org. De Los Angeles is a New York-based artist who was bor n in Mexico and immigrated to Santa Rosa California in 2000 with her family. Her work is inspired by both personal experience and the larger politi-

cal conversations surrounding migration. She earned her MFA from Yale School of Art in 2015, a BFA from Pratt Institute in 2013, and an associate’s degree in painting from Santa Rosa Junior College in 2010. Her work has been exhibited in the U.S. and abroad at venues including Sonoma C ou nt y Mu s e u m ( S a nt a Rosa, Calif.), El Museo Del Barrio (Manhattan, N.Y.), Casa de Las Americas (Habana, Cuba), and the Los Angeles County Museum among others. She has had

A.I. Nation

The organizers of the 2021 “Ellarslie Open” juried art show invite artists to submit artwork through April 30 via an online entry system. Sidelined in 2020 by the coronavirus pandemic, the Trenton City Museum’s annual juried show will return for 2021 as “Ellarslie Open 37/38” in acknowledgment of its canceled year and its return. Dr. William R. Valerio, director of Philadelphia’s Woodmere Art Museum, will jury the 2021 show. There will be awards and prizes in 10 categories, include a $1,000 prize for Best In Show. The “Ellarslie Open” showcases work by established and emerging artists from across the region and beyond, and has grown into the Delaware Valley’s premier annual juried exhibition since its inception in 1983. This year’s show will open June 26 and remain on

view in person and online through October 3. “Ellarslie Open 37/38” Curator Joyce Inderbitzin said artists may submit up to six entries across a variety of categories through April 30. Through the online entry system artists can submit digital images of artwork in most media (not film or video). Submissions are limited to six works, with a maximum of two from any of the 10 primary judging categories, as outlined at ellarslie.org/ ellarslie-open-2021-call-forart. Director of the Woodmere Art Museum since 2010, Valerio has led the Philadelphia museum into its increasingly vital presence in the cultural life of the region. As the museum’s Patricia Van Burgh Allison Director and CEO, Valerio has overseen the organization of nearly one hundred exhibitions while expanding and digitizing its collection. Valerio graduated cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from Williams College in

1985. He earned his MA in art history at the University of Pennsylvania in 1987 and his PhD in art history at Yale University in 1996. After working as curator at the Queens Museum of Art in New York, he attended the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, earning his MBA in 2004 with a double major in strategic management and marketing. Valerio has received numerous awards and fellowships, including the Rome Prize of the American Academy in Rome. The Trenton City Museum is housed in Ellarslie Mansion, an 1848 Italianate villa in the heart of Trenton’s historic Cadwalader Park. Museum hours are Friday and Saturday from noon to 4 p.m. and Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m. The museum’s social distancing measures include timed entry for visitors. Parking is available. There is no admission charge, but donations, which support the museum’s mission and programs, are appreciated. For more information, visit ellarslie.org.

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West Windsor Arts Names Volunteers of the Year

When West Windsor Arts’ staff reviewed the list of volunteers for the past year of shutdowns and pivots, they didn’t expect to come up with 127 names. This number represents individuals willing to give their time and energy by stepping up to meet the challenges of our times through the arts. It took some innovative ideas to keep volunteers engaged through projects like the Art Against Racism community art installation, sewing face masks to donate to frontline workers, creating online galleries and receptions, and sending joy and encouragement by decorating Art Kit bags for classes and camps. In addition, the board of trustees and other committee members including the External Affairs Committee, Internal Affairs Committee, Governance, and the Exhibition Committee contributed time and expertise on such projects as virtual gala planning, grant and loan applications, and other fundraising drives. All of this enabled West Windsor Arts to do a quick pivot from in-person to online everything, keeping programming relevant during an uncertain time. As part of National Volunteer Week, West Windsor Arts is honoring three dedicated individuals whose service this past year was extraordinary, awarding them the Volunteers of the Year award. Barbara Weinfield of West Windsor and Doreen Garelick of Princeton Junction are recognized for their steadfastness in a difficult time, and their keen perception of the needs of the community. High school student Samhita Ghosh is recognized for the range of services she provided, taking on any and all special projects West Windsor Arts had to offer. Weinfield first got involved as a student, studying oil painting with Zakia Ahmed where she found inspiration not only from her teacher and fellow students, but from the gallery outside the classroom. After class, they would often view and discuss the paintings on display, and she began wondering how art exhibits are developed and curated. Weinfield soon joined the Exhibition Committee and has been learning about these things, plus much more. Her involvement has encompassed everything from data entry of

exhibition pieces, to prospectus writing, to coming up with thematic concepts for exhibitions. There have been unforeseen tasks as well. In 2020, like every other arts organization, the Exhibition Committee had to develop innovative ways of sharing art with the community. This challenge ushered in, among other things, the birth of the virtual opening reception. When the doors of the West Windsor Arts Center opened in 2010, Garelick and her daughter, who was then 15, were among its new volunteers. Their first project was setting up 100 folding chairs for a live performance in the gallery space. Four years later, Garlick was elected to the board of trustees and since then has served as a member of its Governance Committee, as well as the board secretary for all but one of the past seven years. The highlights of her work at West Windsor Arts include writing policies that guide the nonprofit as it fulfills its mission and grant applications that fund impor tant organizational growth projects. Garlick was also one of the founders of the mARTian Project, which is a creative placemaking initiative that combines public art with West Windsor’s unique local history. Ghosh, a junior at West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South, has been volu nteer ing as par t of West Windsor Arts’ Special Events Crew since July of 2019. She has helped out with a variety of events and activities like decorating art kits, the Art Against Racism project, and art show receptions. Ghosh’s most memorable volunteer activity was the WWArts Mask Donation project, as it provided a way to directly help out affected communities during the pandemic. For m or e i n for m at ion about West Windsor Arts, visit westwindsorarts.org, call (609) 716-931, or email info@westwindsorarts.org.

Area Exhibits Check websites for information on safety protocols. A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Imagining Space” April 8 through May 2. Gallery hours are Thursday through

Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Arts Council of Prince to n , 102 Wit herspoon Street, has “A Voice to Be Heard” April 10 through May 8. Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. artscouncilofprinceton. org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “A Virtual Tour of Hamilton’s Princeton” and the “Histor y @ Home” ser ies. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, P a ., “ F e r n C o p p e d g e : New Discoveries” through April 18, “Essential Work 2020: A Community Portrait” through July 11, and “Through the Lens: Modern Photography in the Delaware Valley” through August 15. The museum is open to the public. michenerartmuseum.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “In Nature’s Realm : The Art of Gerard Rutgers Hardenberg” through January 9 and the online exhibit “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints Of New Jersey, 1761–1898.” Open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. morven.org. Old Barracks Museum, 101 Barrack Street, Trenton, has the ongoing virtual exhibits “A Symbol of New Jersey to the World: The Old Barracks at the World’s Fair, ” “When Women Vote — The Old Barracks and the AntiSuffrage Movement,” and “Necessary and Proper for the Public Good.” The museum is temporarily closed to the public. barracks.org. Pr inceton Universit y Art Museum has the online exhibits “Looking at 17th -Century Dutch Painting,” “Life Magazine and the Power of Photography,” “The Eclectic Eye: A Tribute to Duane Wilder,” and more, along with many online events. The museum is currently closed to the public. artmuseum.princeton.edu. West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “2021 WWAC Member Show: Floral Persuasion,” online and in the gallery by appointment through May 14. westwindsorarts.org.

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021

MAYDAY BOWL PROJECT: The Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) will host an outdoor sale at 102 Witherspoon Street on Saturday, May 1 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Artists in the ACP Ceramic Studio have created hundreds of unique ceramic bowls, available for $30 each. All proceeds to benefit the ACP, helping to close the financial gap created by COVID. The first 100 buyers will receive a voucher for a free scoop of ice cream from the bent spoon. Bowls are first-come, first-served as supplies last. For more information, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org.

ARTIST TALK

Renee Cox Thursday, April 15, 5:30 p.m. Photographer Renee Cox explores issues related to the representation and exploitation of Black bodies while seeking to create new, positive imagery. Hear from the award-winning artist about her work and the contexts that inform it.

Stream it live artmuseum.princeton.edu

This event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970. Live closed-captioning for this program is made possible by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts. Renee Cox (born 1960, Jamaica; active New York, NY), The Signing (detail), 2018. Inkjet print. Museum purchase, Kathleen Compton Sherrerd Fund for Acquisitions in American Art (2021-38). © Renee Cox

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SPRING MUSIC SERIES

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APRIL 3RD - MAY 29TH

APRIL 25TH - JUNE 20TH

Please continue to help keep our Square safe by wearing your mask

& practicing social distancing. Thank you.

For more information, please visit palmersquare.com/events & Download the Palmer Square App!


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 7, 2021 • 22

Calendar Wednesday, April 7 5 p.m.: Princeton Symphony Orchestra performs Aaron Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man in Palmer Square; online video premiere. Led by Music

Director Rossen Milanov. On the PSO YouTube channel, followed by a live chat. Princetonsymphony.org. 6 p.m.: C.K. Williams Reading by Franny Choi and Princeton University creative writing seniors, via Zoom. Arts.princeton.edu. 7 p.m.: “Can We Make New Jersey an Equitable Place to Live, Vote, and Thrive?” Zoom roundtable

discussion presented by the Lawrence League of Women Voters with Dr. Simona L. Brickers, Kyla Allen, JaydaMilan Parker, and Kayla Phillips. Register at LWVLT. org or (609) 301-0401. Thursday, April 8 12 p.m.: Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber holds its virtual monthly membership luncheon with speaker P. Sue Perrot t y, interim

Mercer County Sustainability Coalition Greening Together 2021

CELEBRATE EARTH WEEK 2021 WITH US! Visit www.mercersustainabilitycoalition.org/greening-together-2021/ for more details on these events and more! Learn more about sustainability! You are invited to join the Mercer County Sustainability Coalition for community events. All the events are FREE, but please register on our website. If participating in an outdoor event, please wear a mask and take a picture to share with us. Connect on social media with #GreeningTogether to help show your love for our streams, parks, and open spaces! Starting in mid-April, celebrate with stream cleanups done in partnership with The Watershed Institute. They are planned throughout the region in person or on your own. Check www.thewatershed.org for more details. All day Saturday, April 24: Help beautify Lawrence Hopewell Trail Extension by volunteering to help the Mercer County Park Commission install over 2,600 native trees and shrubs in Rosedale Park. Check for additional planting and volunteer dates on our website. Saturday, April 24 12pm-3pm: Check out A Sustainable Landscaping Mini-Expo at Princeton Shopping Center hosted by Sustainable Princeton.

president and CEO of Tower Health. The topic is “Leadership in the Time of COVID.” Princetonmercer.org. 5:30 p.m.: Panel discussion from Princeton University Art Museum. “How to Move a Museum: The Fine Art of Deinstallation.” Free. Artmuseum.princeton.edu. 6 p.m.: Katrin Kaeufer a nd Dar r i n Wi l l ia m s i n conversation: “Just Money: Mission-Driven Banks and the Future of Finance,” presented by Labyrinth Books. Labyrinthbooks.org/events. 7 p.m.: Libby Copeland discusses her book, The Lost Family : How DNA Testing is Upending Who We Are, presented virtually by Princeton Public Library. Princetonlibrary.org. Friday, April 9 9:45 a.m.: Job Seekers Session: How to Stay Motivated; presented by Lynn Williams of the Philadelphia Area Great Careers Group; virtual event from Princeton Public Library. Princetonlibrary.org. 10 a.m.: Men in Retirement: “The Lost Cause : How The South Saw the Civil War.” Virtual program presented by Princeton Senior Resource Center. Register at princetonsenior.org. 11:45 a.m.: “Financial and Tax Strategies for 2021,” online event sponsored by Princeton Senior Resource Center. Register at princetonsenior.org. 12 p.m.: Memorial Wreath Laying at the bust of Paul Robeson in front of the Arts Council, 102 Witherspoon Street. Culmination of Robeson Week of Remembrance. Mayor Mark Freda will designate April 9 as Paul Robeson Day in Princeton.

12 p.m.: Syrian obstetrician Dr. Farida and Alyssa Sharkey, lecturer in Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, present free Zoom event, “Fighting Death while Saving Lives: The Experiences of a Medical Doctor in Aleppo, Syria.” Princeton.edu. 12-3 p.m.: Opening weekend of the Native Plant Nursery at Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve. 1- 3 p.m . Fr i d ay w i t h Friends, held by the YWCA Princeton Area Newcomers & Friends. Zoom gathering featuring Trish Chambers presenting “Women Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court.” RSVP required at ywcaprinceton.org/newcomers. Sunday, April 11 2 p.m.: The Jewish Center Princeton sponsors “Shabbat, Iraqi Style” with Carole Basri, via Zoom. To reserve, email info@thejewishcenter.org. 4 p.m.: Princeton Society of Musical Amateurs invites participation in a Zoom sing of Mozart’s Mass in C Minor. All are welcome. Musicalamateurs.org. Monday, April 12 Recycling 10 a.m.: “Climate Change: Science and Impacts,” presented virtually by Princeton Senior Resource Center with representatives of Climate Central. Register at princetonsenior.org. 4:30 p.m.: Jeffrey Shandler discusses his book Yiddish: Biography of Language, in a Zoom event sponsored by the Allen and Joan Blidner Center for the Study of Jewish Life. Register at BildnerCenter.Rutgers.edu. 7 p.m.: “Pollinators, Food

330 COLD SOIL ROAD

and Climate Change,” virtual program presented by Mercer County Library System with Judith K. Robinson, native plant garden designer. Register at mcl.org. Tuesday, April 13 12:15 p.m.: “Sustainable Finance,” Zoom event sponsored by Princeton University’s Julis-Rabinowitz Center for Public Policy and Finance; with speaker Harun Dogo of Morgan Stanley. Princeton.edu. 3 p.m.: Healthcare Decisions Workshop presented virtually by Princeton Senior Resource Center. Register at princetonsenior.org. Wednesday, April 14 12 p.m.: Stavros Lambrinidis speaks, “A New Era for Transatlantic Relations? The EU Agenda and the Biden Administration.” Sponsored by Princeton University’s Liechtenstein Institute on Self Determination and European Union Program. Zoom event. Princeton.edu. 1 p.m.: Boheme Opera NJ presents “I Could Have Danced 2,000 Years,” program on how the Pygmalion legend evolved to My Fair Lady. Sponsored by Monroe Township Library. Free Zoom event. Register at monroetwplibrary.org. 1-2 p.m.: Online Lunchtime Gallery Series presented by West Windsor Arts Center: “What do Objects Tell Us About the Culture of Mesoamerica?” Free for members; $10 non-members. Westwindsorarts.org. 4-5 p.m.: Panel discussion, “Trends in Digital Health,” sponsored by Princeton Innovation Center Biolabs and the Princeton Entrepreneurship Council. Free virtual event. Princetonbiolabs.com.

PRINCETON, NJ 08540

BRING SPRING HOME

Farm Fresh Greenhouse Lettuce & Flowering Plants

Pick up free “Greening To-Go Kits” at Terhune Orchards in Lawrence or in Hopewell at their 3 parks. This FREE bag will have resources on how to become a more sustainable household, a plantable gift, and family activities. Sunday, April 25 3pm-6pm: Join a virtual C-Change Conversation on energy conservation and CO2 reduction, hosted by Sustainable Lawrence. Monday, April 7pm: Find ways to become a zero-waste with the Hopewell Valley Green Team and West Windsor Green Team. Tuesday, April 27 7pm: Join a panel discussion on Clean Transportation in the Capital City hosted by Trenton’s Green Team. Learn about the EV car share initiative, bike projects, and other transit-oriented development plans.

WINERY SAT & SUN 12-5PM WEEKEND MUSIC SERIES

April 28 is Water Wednesday! Learn why Mercer County is experiencing more flooding and what that means for our water quality. Attend a program hosted by the Friends of Colonial Lake and The Watershed Institute. Thursday, April 29: Explore Green Infrastructure Resources with us. Kory Kreiseder, the Stormwater Specialist at The Watershed Institute, will talk about how we can use trees, plants and soil to capture and clean the polluted stormwater runoff. Friday, April 30: Join an Arbor Day tree planting celebration in your town. Check back for presentations on native tree identification, tree health, and confronting tree-damaging lanterflies. And don’t miss out on the Rider University Eco-Reps who will host an Ultimate Green Trivia Kahoot!

Check with your local Green team of Mercer County to see what other great Earth Week events are being planned.

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“P

eople want to get out and be together in a restaurant — have human contact. This is so important. We are ready to offer them high quality, healthy food in a great setting, and welcoming atmosphere.”

IT’S NEW To Us

Samoil ( Sani ) Risteski, manager of Poké Mahi, Fresca Bowl at 142 Nassau Street (former location of Hulit’s Shoes) is enthusiastic about the new restaurant’s very positive reception. “We opened in September, and have had an excellent response. We already have many repeat customers, and we expect it to get even better as the warm weather arrives, and we can have both indoor and outdoor eating, as well as takeout.” Poké Mahi, Fresca Bowl is a franchise operation, with locations along the East Coast. Princeton is the first in New Jersey, and is a top-notch spot, reports Sani. “Princeton is a great location for us. People here are interested in exploring new dishes, new tastes, to see what something is like. They like to try new things.” Eye Appeal “When you open a new place, a lot of people come in to see what it is like,” he continues. “The important thing is to get them to come back. We believe we have a lot to offer: quality, healthy, organic food that tastes good. We have the freshest ingredients, our own recipes, and a really attractive presentation of all our dishes, with eye appeal, and a wonderful atmosphere.” He adds that the plan eventually is to establish 20 to 30 Poké Mahi, Fresca Bowl restaurants all across the country. “We feel very confident of success. People really like this food, and want to eat healthier. For some, we are a new dining experience; others are familiar with Poké Mahi and Fresca Bowls.” In fact, poké has a long history, and is an extension of the traditional Hawaiian poké or diced raw fish. Poké Mahi has transformed the original poke by infusing the traditional island recipes with popular Asian flavors. At Poké Mahi, the dining experience begins with a “Build Your Own” focus in which customers select the ingredients and watch as the dish is prepared. “The base is rice, then the protein — raw or seared fish,

including tuna, salmon, octopus, and shrimp choices — is added, as well as a variety of vegetables and greens. Then a sauce or dressing, toppings and crunchy sesame seeds or other crispy options,” explains Sani. Many choices are available, and among the most popular is the Taco Poké, including spicy tuna, crispy c o r n t a c o, g u a c a m o l e , shredded lettuce, sushi rice, cilantro, mango salsa, roasted corn, tomato, pickled red onions, and chipotle dressing. The Traditional includes ahi tuna, sushi rice, seaweed salad, avocado, furikake, cucumber, radish sprouts, and ponzu dressing. Varied and Delicious T h e Fo r b i d d e n of fe r s seared octopus, coconut forbidden rice, red radish, avocado, pickled jalapeño, fresh mango, and chipotle aioli. Small medium, and large bowls are available. Also very popular are the Fresca Bowls. Fresca translates to “fresh” in Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese, and can also have a “cool” definition in some quarters. However defined, the Fresca Bowls at the restaurant are both varied and delicious. Acai, chia, kale, oatmeal, and pitaya bowls are all options with many choices in each category. Pesca Acai is a favorite with hemp granola, grilled peaches, banana, cherries, peanuts, and walnuts; and Frescatela offers chocolate granola, strawberries, banana, raspberries, chocolate nibs, and drizzled Nutella. An oatmeal-based bowl includes the Milano, featuring hemp granola, toasted banana, sun-dried grapes, cranberries, and blueberries, goji, toasted peanuts, and drizzled peanut butter. Mamma Mia is a pitaya bowl, with chocolate granola, mango, banana, raspberries, coconut flakes, and drizzled Nutella. Like the Poké Bowls, the Fresca Bowls offer options as to base, granola, fruit,

drizzles, and sprinkles. Another big favorite at the restaurant is its selection of different toasts. Served with a choice of fruits — bananas, peaches, strawberries, raspberries, and grapes, also tomatoes — onions, artichokes, nuts, and honey granola, there really is a “toast” for everyone. Green Monster Soups and salads are also on the menu, with everything from Greek to Caesar to Cobb salad, and chicken noodle, broccoli cheddar, or beef barley and vegetable soup among the choices. And a real highlight at Poké Mahi, Fresca Bowl is one of its smoothies. These popular drinks are offered in many varieties, including the Green Monster with kiwi, green apple, spinach, kale, banana, matcha tea, cayenne pepper, and lemon juice. Power is “powered” with organic acai, strawberries, banana, vanilla protein, and choice of milk. Wonder Woman features organic acai, mango, orange juice, and banana …. and these are just a few of the possibilities. Coca-Cola and other soft drinks, Nespresso, and bottled water are also available, and prices range from $5.99 for toast, $6 for soup and salad, $6.99 for smoothies, $9.95 for Poké Bowls, and $8.99 for Fresca Bowls. Sani believes in a strong future in Princeton for Poké Mahi, Fresca Bowl, and in addition to the sit-down dining and takeout, the restaurant has launched a catering operation. “We handle all sizes and types of events, and we already have catered events at Princeton University, including for 200 people. We do both corporate and residential parties.” He is also pleased that Princeton University students, who are now back on campus, have discovered Poké Mahi, Fresca Bowl. “Lots of students are coming in, and while our customers are all ages, we seem

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23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021

Popular Poké Mahi, Fresca Bowl Restaurant Is Welcome New Arrival on Nassau Street

TWO IN ONE: “We offer two concepts on one site: Poké Mahi and Fresca Bowls,” says Samoil (Sani) Risteski, manager of the Poké Mahi, Fresca Bowl restaurant. A variety of innovative dishes offers an intriguing dining experience, with healthy choices that taste good! The attractive and informal setting invites customers to embark on a new dining journey. to appeal to a lot of young people.” The restaurant can seat 27 inside, and plans call for an outdoor patio, with space for 24 diners. Attractive Presentation The indoor setting with its variety of seating — large comfortable chair/low table arrangement and high benches and counters — is very appealing. Pictures of the dishes, with their bright color combinations, line the wall and are an instant attraction. As Sani notes, the presentation of the food is a very important part of the dining experience. “An attractive presentation is crucial. The food must appeal visually. We have lots of pictures all around, showing what the dish will actually look like.”

Everything is being done to ensure that customers enjoy their time at the cafe, and that they can count on a consistently good dining experience. “There are lots of places to eat,” points out Sani. “In addition to quality food, you need to offer a welcoming environment where customers will be comfortable and happy.” “We never cut cor ners on quality,” he emphasizes. “Customers can be sure of this, and they can count on our consistency. The restaurant business is my passion. My real joy is seeing people enjoy eating, and then be satisfied and happy after a good meal when they leave. This is my great pleasure. They will remember that great dining experience, and tell their

friends. We have already had great word-of-mouth.” Sani adds that he wants Poké Mahi, Fresca Bowl to build a respected reputation in the area, and become a special place that people look forward to visiting. “We definitely want to be part of the community. On the one hand, we take from the community, when they buy our food, but we give back to the community as we support charities and organizations, including scholarship programs. And, of course, we have great food! We are very positive about this opportunity.” he restaurant is open daily, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. (609) 212-2188. Websites: pokemahi.com and frescabowl.com. —Jean Stratton

T


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021 • 24

S ports

As Cleveland Browns Broke Playoff Drought, Princeton Alum Carlson Made Special Impact

A

s an undrafted and unheralded free against coming out of the Ivy League in 2019, Stephen Carlson was a long shot to make the Cleveland Browns. But former Princeton University star receiver turned tight end Carlson beat the odds, making the team’s practice squad and then getting promoted to the active roster midway through the campaign, ultimately seeing action in seven regular season games. After that promising start, however, Carlson felt like he was starting over a year later when the Browns brought in a new head coach, Kevin Stefanski, and then COVID-19 hit and halted inperson activities. “In a lot of ways I thought of it as like my rookie year again with a new playbook and a new coaching staff,” said the 6’4, 240-pound Carlson, 24. “I had to make good first

impressions with the last coaching staff. They learned to know who I am and know what kind of player I am. I had to prove myself all over again. In a lot of ways, I was pretty nervous because of the offseason stuff. I was doing everything on my own, I didn’t know how everyone else is treating it.” As fellow Ivy Leaguers, Carlson bonded with coach Stefanski, a former Penn standout defensive back. “There was a lot of banter back and forth, especially at the beginning,” said Carlson with a chuckle. “There were a lot of Ivy League coaches and staff. A lot of the high up positions are Ivy League guys so we must be doing something right. It is good to see.” At training camp, Carlson did things right, making the team’s active roster from the start of the season. “I felt like it could go either way, the decision of

whether I made the team, get cut, or make the practice squad,” said Carlson. “I was really excited, there is no other way to put it. I was hyped up to know that all of those worries that I had, making a good first impression and learning the playbook that I overcame all of that and picked up right where I left off. It helped my confidence and my mindset just knowing that I am good enough to be on the team.” Displaying that confidence, Carlson played in all 16 regular season games, helping the Browns make the NFL playoffs for the first time in 18 years. Carlson excelled on special teams, making nine tackles over the season and recovering an onside kick late in the season finale, helping to clinch a 24-22 win over Pittsburgh that secured the postseason spot for Cleveland. “Special teams wise I felt really confident; that was my

Sip ‘n Shop JOIN US FOR

Wednesday, May 5th 10:00am to 12:00pm

Enjoy safe shopping with local vendors just in time for Mother’s Day. Safe food and drink to go! Raffle Prizes!

BEE A GOOD NEIGHBOR HARBORCHASE OF PRINCETON & SPRINGPOINT AT HOME are working together to feed our community We will be collecting non-perishable validly dated food. All food collected will go to the local food pantry!

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second time around in the same system because coach Mike Priefer stayed from the last staff,” said Carlson, who also made one reception for 11 yards on the season. “I was confident in the schemes we ran there. Coach Priefer had a lot of trust in me to move around in different spots. I was making some big tackles. I didn’t know necessarily if I would make as big of an impact as I ended up doing.” Carlson’s biggest impact was unquestionably the onside kick recovery against Pittsburgh. With 1:23 left in the fourth quarter and the Browns clinging to their two-point lead, Carlson’s catch, which saw him handle a tricky bounce by squeezing the ball between his legs, allowed Cleveland to run out the clock and seal the victory. “As soon as the Steelers kicker lined up, he was facing right at me and they put all of their speedy guys on my side so I knew it was coming,” recalled Carlson. “The kick that he kicked was a very odd one. I didn’t really look for that big bounce, I was surprised a little and I pushed it on ground and fell on it and it fell between my legs. It was like being a goalie a little. As people ran into me and hit me, luckily I just fell right on it.” Carlson’s clutch play, though, was the product of preparation not luck. “Every Friday during the year, I would recover 10 or 12 kicks after practice from the Browns kicker,” said Carlson. “I have got to thank coach Priefer for even trusting me to be in that position, with what is on the line, going to the playoffs for the first time in 18 years. I am sitting there with the whole franchise on my back.” The win triggered a raucous post game celebration for a Browns team that last made the NFL playoffs in 2002. “It was awesome for the older guys who have been on the team for a while and to see them so excited,” said Carlson. “It is crazy to think about, I can’t really explain the feeling. You are relieved because of all of the work that you put in during the season but next week you have another game.” A week later in a rematch with the Steelers in the AFC Wild Card round, Carlson

SPECIAL EFFECT: Stephen Carlson gets ready for a special teams play this past fall for the Cleveland Browns. Former Princeton University standout Carlson ‘19 played in all 16 regular seasons, helping the Browns make the NFL playoffs for the first time in 18 years. Tight end Carlson excelled on special teams, making nine tackles over the season and recovering an onside kick late in the season finale to help clinch a 24-22 win over Pittsburgh and secure a playoff spot for Cleveland. (Photo provided courtesy of PU’s Office of Athletic Communications/Cleveland Browns)

did it again, grabbing an onside kick late in the contest as the Browns won 48-37 for their first postseason win since they defeated the New England Patriots 20-13 on January 1, 1995 in a Wild Card contest. “Definitely the preparation into the week was so much more, watching so much more film,” said Carlson, reflecting on the intensity of the playoffs. “Everything is a little more serious and a step up from the regular season. The intensity of the game while the plays are going on was higher. It was a great experience and hopefully I can have some more of those.” While playoff run ended the next week with a 22-17 defeat to the Kansas City Chiefs in the AFC Divisional round, Carlson takes pride in what the Browns achieved this season. “It was a great year, I have nothing but joy looking back on it,” said Carlson. “It didn’t end our way but it’s not all bad. We accomplished a few of our goals, some things that people probably thought we weren’t going to do after the season before. Some guys, including me, really fell into our roles and solidified a certain role. It will help us going forward.” By carving out a vital role on special teams, Carlson believes he is laying the foundation for a long NFL career. “I think it was mindset and confidence, especially on special teams,” said Carlson. “It was just having the confidence that I have the ability to compete with all of these guys in the NFL and have the ability to go out here and make these plays and

do exactly what I need to do to help the team. It gives you confidence that I am a guy who could have a solid career in the NFL, not just a guy who fizzles out after a year or two.” Over the offseason, Carlson is focusing on becoming more of a force at tight end. “There is a lot of stuff I have got to work on,” said Carlson. “I obviously feel good in the special teams game. It is getting fast and stronger and that stuff. I have got to work on some technique in the run blocking game at the tight end position. That would really propel me forward. I am already a decent receiving tight end. If I do some little things in the run game and am able to be a more stout one-on-one blocker, it would really propel me into a role that I think the coaches want to me to be in.” With the Browns slated to begin their OTAs (organized team activities) this month in preparation for the 2021 season, Carlson and his teammates see another postseason run on the horizon. “We will have a new confidence, not arrogance, that we should be a playoff team,” said Carlson. “We should be able to make a run as long as we did the things we did last year to get us there in the first place, keeping our heads down, working hard and doing the right thing. It is a credit to the new coaching staff who put everything together.” Having kept his head down and put in the work over the last two years, Carlson figures to play an even more pivotal role in Cleveland’s future success. —Bill Alden

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Three Women’s Squash Stars Earn Scholar Honor

Princeton University women’s squash standouts Grace Doyle, Emily Rose, and Elle Ruggiero have been recognized as Collegiate Squash Association (CSA) ScholarAthletes, the organization said last week. Honorees had to be juniors or seniors, enrolled in 2020-21, and meet a GPA requirement. It is the second honor for Doyle, a senior in the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs. Junior Rose is a history major and junior Ruggiero is a student in the School of Public and International Affairs. The three helped the Tigers finish second in the nation at the 2020 Howe Cup tournament during the 2019-20 campaign, with Ruggiero playing in the top spot, Doyle sixth and Rose eighth through all three matches of the competition.

Princeton Men’s Rowers Compete in Oxford Boat Race

The Princeton University men’s heavyweight rowing program had three alumni participating in the 166th annual Oxford Boat Race last Sunday on the River Great Ouse between Ely and Littleport in England. The storied Boat Race is an annual set of rowing races between the Cambridge University Boat Club and the Oxford University Boat Club. Sebastian Benzecry ‘20 rowed for Cambridge while Augustin Wambersie ’18 and Marty Barakso ’16 competed for Oxford. Cambridge ended up winning the 3-mile race by one length in a time of 14:15. “I know how hard Sebastian, Marty, and Augustin have worked this year to earn the chance to race in this year’s Boat Race,” said P r i n ce ton m e n’s h e av y weight head coach Greg Hughes. “The pandemic has presented them all with some difficult challenges and they have been tested. True to their form, they’ve persevered

forward those attributes at Oxford.”

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021

PU Sports Roundup

through it all and are primed and ready to race. I will be tuned in to the live feed on Sunday along with countless others from around the world ready to watch them bring it on.” Benzecry ’20 is at the Jesus College at the University of Cambridge working on his master’s degree in Film and Screen Studies. “I would say Princeton really prepared me for how mentally tough you need to be for a race like the Boat Race,” said Benzecry. “Though the Princeton season is obviously ver y different to the Cambridge season, I think Princeton taught me a real tenacity, and an ability to keep positive and enjoy the process, which was a core tenant of my time on the Princeton team. Those values were absolutely instrumental in keeping going through lockdowns this season that saw months of hard grinding on the ergs at home, and then a really intense selection period for the Blue Boat. I am incredibly grateful to Princeton for teaching me that unwavering commitment.” Wambersie ’18 is a student at the St. Catherine’s College at Oxford striving towards his Ph.D. in engineering science. “The experience of education through athletics at Princeton gave me confidence that I could keep pushing on with both my academic research and athletic achievements,” said Wambersie. “Managing postgraduate research and the Boat Race requires a lot of self-discipline and independence as you have to essentially forge your own way through the world of academia whilst training twice a day.” Baraskso ’16 is doing his postgraduate studies at the Kellogg College at Oxford, going for a masters in Latin American studies. “Princeton prepared me a great deal for being a student athlete at Oxford,” said Barasko. “Four years of balancing classes and rowing at Princeton engrained the time management, collaborative mindset, and work ethic that allow you to excel in both academics and athletics. I have been able to carry

Princeton Distance Runners Make Australian Championships

Princeton University men’s track/cross country standouts Ed Trippas and Duncan Miller turned in outstanding performances in their native Australia over the weekend, earning qualification for the 2021 Australian Track & Field Championships. Trippas ran 8:36.58 seconds in the 3,000-meter steeplechase while Miller ran 3:43.89 in the 1,500 meters. “I’m so proud of Ed and Duncan for continuing to train and compete at a high level despite the challenges this past year has presented,” said Princeton cross country distance head coach Jason Vigilante. “Their commitment and leadership demonstrates what can be done with a positive attitude. The future is bright for these Tigers.” The 2021 Australian Track & Field Championships take place from April 12-19 at the Sydney Olympic Park Athletic Center.

STANDING TALL: Princeton University men’s track star Robbie Otal displays his discus form in a meet for the Tigers. Last weekend, Otal qualified for the U.S. Olympic Trials in the discus with a heave of 60.02 meters at the Chula Vista Training Center Meet. That mark topped his best throw of 59.86 meters competing for the Tigers, which stands second all-time in school history. The Olympic trials are scheduled to take place from June 18-27 at famed Hayward Field in Eugene, Ore. (Photo provided by PU’s office of Athletic Communications)

and had one block, one as- assists in the Magic’s 97-78 During his Tiger career, PU Men’s Hoops Alum Cannady Signs 10-Day Deal with NBA’s Magic sist, and one rebound. Can- triumph on March 11 over Cannady earned a pair of

After recently being named NBA G League Finals MVP, former Princeton University men’s basketball standout Devin Cannady ’20 signed a 10-day contract with the Orlando Magic on Tuesday. This will be Cannady’s second stint with Orlando, as he appeared in two preseason games for the organization ahead of the 2020-21 season. Against the Atlanta Hawks on December 11, 2020, the 6’2, 183-pound guard scored three points

nady also added three points and one rebound against the Charlotte Hornets on December 19, 2020. Following his preseason stint with Orlando, he helped lead the Lakeland Magic, Orlando’s NBA G League affiliate, to the G League title and became the first undrafted G League Finals MVP. He had a game-high 22 points on 9-for-17 shooting from the field and 4-for9 shooting from three along with six rebounds and four

the Delaware Blue Coats in the G League Championship Game. On the season he averaged 11.7 points, 2.8 rebounds, and 2.7 assists per game In Cannady’s first season in the NBA G League he played for the Long Island Nets and averaged 14.4, points, 3.9 rebounds, and 2.6 assists per game. He scored a career-high 33 points in a 109 -95 w in over the Erie BayHawks on December 27, 2019.

All-Ivy League honors. He finished as Princeton’s fifthleading all-time scorer with 1,515 points and is the program’s leading free throw s h o ote r by p e r c e nt ag e, among those with at least 100 attempts, at .896. His 268 made three-pointers rank third all-time in school history. Cannady is one of nine Princeton men’s basketball alumni currently playing professional basketball.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021 • 26

PHS Girls’ Hockey Displayed Blue Collar Mentality As it Competed with Short-Handed Squad in 2021 Wit h a s quad of on ly around ten players, t he Princeton High girls’ hockey team utilized a blue collar mentality to get through the winter. “We had nine, 10 girls and I told them look we have got to play with what we have, it is what it is,” said PHS head coach Christian Herzog, noting that his team practiced early mornings at the Ice L and Rink in Hamilton as its usual home, Princeton’s Hobey Baker Rink, was not open. “We need to do the best that we can, we might end up with a loss but we are not accepting it from the get-go. It was bring the hard hat, the lunch pail, and go to work.” Taking that message to hear t, the Tiger players brought an energy to the ice. “The girls were excited to be there for the opportunity

to p l a y,” s a i d H e r z o g, whose team went 1-2 in an abbreviated season. “Many of them were not the more experienced players.” The squad’s two most experienced players, junior Grace Rebak and sophomore Catie Samaan, proved to be the workhorses for the squad. “ T h e y pr ov i d e d s o m e really good leadership, they definitely logged a ton of minutes,” said Herzog. “Going in I said, look ladies, the two of you are the future of this team as far as leadership and all of that. In our off ice practice sessions, Grace stepped up to that, saying I would like to lead this or this.” At goalie, junior Jade Tom e a ls o s tepp e d u p, continuing to progress. “She did well, she was facing a lot of shots,” said Herzog.

SHOWING RESILIENCE: Princeton High girls’ hockey player Grace Rebak controls the puck in a game this season. Junior star defenseman Rebak made an impact at both ends of the ice as PHS went 1-2 in 2021. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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“She has come a long way; I wished we could have had more games so she could see even more shots. She gets a lot stronger towards the end of the season. She is a lways work i ng. T he one thing about her is just to stay positive. You can’t change the fact that you just got scored on, you have to think about the next one. Her work ethic is strong, she is constantly doing stuff outside.” The team’s two seniors, Hailey Hawes and Olivia Benevento, made a positive contribution. “Hailey, especially with this being her first season and having no experience, def in itely had t he r ight mindset,” said Herzog. “She was always looking to learn, that is one of the things that I loved about her as an individual. She can take some constructive criticism, if you say you need to do this, she would say coach I will do that next shift. Olivia waited to come out because of COVID concerns, she has been part of the program the whole time. She said she reiterated to her parents the importance of how much this team and the relationships mean to her, not necessarily the wins or the record.” A quar tet of juniors — Sarah W hite, Monica Watson, Kelsey Riley, and D ef n e A r s oy — h e lp e d bolster the program this winter. “Sarah played forward last year and we were using her on defense because she was a former figure skater,” said Herzog. “She acclimated pretty well position-wise. Monica was brand new to the game and had never skated before. She was a hard worker, her head is in the right place. She was always willing to push herself, whether it be practice or games, never complaining about anything. Kelsey is a very motivated individual, she has never m is s e d a prac t ice or a game. She is all-in. Defne is a hard worker too, she played center and started winning some face-offs. She contributed.” While Herzog was disappointed that the team lost some games due to cancellations, he credited the players with maintaining t heir s t rong work et h ic throughout. “Overall, it was a positive year with the fact that we got to play,” said Herzog. “It was put on your hard hat, we are going to work. It was not a typical year, the numbers were low. I anticipate that when we get back to normal, that we will have bigger numbers.” —Bill Alden

Buoyed by Composed Seniors, Intense Younger Players, PDS Girls’ Basketball Displayed Resilience to the End Trailing Princeton High 2113 heading into the second half of its season finale, the Princeton Day School girls’ basketball team could have thrown in the towel. Instead, PDS outscored their crosstown rivals 13-7 in the third quarter to turn the game into a nail-biter. While the Panthers ended up falling 39-29 in the March 4 contest, PDS head coach Seraphine Hamilton liked the way her squad battled to the final buzzer. “I was really proud of our push to come back in the third quarter,” said Hamilton, whose squad had edged PHS 30 -29 a day earlier to break into the win column. “The team is resilient, if nothing else. We rebound really well and that is what kept us going. Adriana Salzano got hot, she hit two threes pretty close together. She was a good spark for us.” T he squad ’s closeness helped it make the most of a 2021 season limited by COVID-19 concerns. “We continued to emphasize this that we have to take what we can get, we have to be grateful,” said Hamilton, who guided the Panthers to a 1-7 record in her first year at the helm of the program. “They really are a good g roup. O u r s en ior s are really composed and our underclassmen go really hard; they are intense. It was a nice balance for the two, the seniors reminded them to have fun and the u n d e r c l a s s m e n ke p t u s focused and disciplined. It was really great in that way.” The senior group of Anna Ellwood, Ava Sarnow, Jules Romano, Caroline Topping, and Anna-Marie Zhang set a positive tone. “They were great; with a different group it could have been a very different season,” said Hamilton. “They were out there to have fun, they were out there to spend time with people. Not every student on the team was in class in person. For everyone, it was just this time for them to have some form of normalcy as much as possible. I think the seniors really led the way with that. They were inclusive for everyone. They were doing a lot of stuff for psychs and stuff like that on campus. It had a really good vibe to it.” Hamilton is psyched about t he fou ndat ion in place going forward. “We have some really strong athletes, we need to make sure that we are not coming back hav ing

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not picked up a ball since March,” said Hamilton. “It i s t h e ke y for u s because every other piece is there. They are incredibly coachable, they a r e i n c r e d ib l y at h l e t i c. We have the ability. Now that everyone has had me as a coach for a season, they know what to expect. I think they are going to come back and really make a big difference in the way we can run the floor. The pace we can play is going to be different. They are competitive, they don’t want to have a 1-7 season next year. I think they realize that is one thing that is within their control and they can take advantage of that.” The team’s core of returning strong athletes includes junior Madeline Nowack, freshman Salzano, freshman Mia Hartman, sophomore Kirsten Ruf, junior Ali Surace, junior Elle Anhut, junior Meghan Zarish, freshman Kaitlyn Zarish, and freshman Tocci Owunna. “We have two point guards coming back in Nowack and Salzano and we have Hartman and Ruf under the basket,” said Hamilton. “We have great athleticism with Ali Surace. The Zarish sisters are really athletic. I

think they are going to be able to run the floor and fill in a lot of gaps and the same with Elle. Tocci can run the floor as well. Eight games would be a third of the season and that is when freshmen start to turn the corner. Mia, Adriana, and Tocci all started to make that shift as we ended up. Tocci was rebounding like a machine and playing hard, h a r d d e fe n s e. M i a w a s starting to figure out how to score near the basket as a forward. Adriana started to hit her shots. The three of them really turned the corner, I am really grateful that they got at least to that point.” All in all, Hamilton was thankful that she got the chance to guide the squad. “It was just a lot of fun to be out there again and have those opportunities,” said Hamilton. “I was really grateful that we got the opportunity to play PHS at the end. It was fun to be back in a close game, to be able to have that adrenaline myself. It is one of my favorite parts of my job and it always had been, especially also as a teacher and seeing them on campus and having some of them in the classroom and some of them as advisees. My life at PDS was much more fulfilling, having that role.” —Bill Alden

FRESH APPROACH: Princeton Day School girls’ basketball player Adriana Salzano heads up the court in a game this winter. Freshman point guard Salzano enjoyed a superb debut campaign for PDS, which posted a 1-7 record in 2021. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Although the Hun School baseball team suffered a tough 7-6 loss to LaSalle College High (Pa.) last week in its season opener, Tom Monfiletto saw the setback as a valuable experience for his squad. “That is the exact atmosphere that we want to expose our players,” said Hun head coach Tom Monfiletto, reflecting on the March 30 contest. “It was a very loud, electric atmosphere, a really good program, and a really wellcoached team. It was a perfect first game to have. Obviously we would have liked to have won. We saw some great things and we saw a lot of things that we really

need to work on. We have addressed that stuff this week and we will continue to address it but it was a good one to start the season with. Now we know what these big-time programs are going to look like and how very little room for error we have in those games.” With the 2020 season having been canceled due to the pandemic, there is a great atmosphere around the Hun squad as it has returned to the diamond. “The preseason went great, I think ever ybody was really excited to see each other every single day, that was the fun thing,” said Monfiletto, crediting Hun Co-Athletic Directors Bill

BIG APPLE: Hun School baseball player Carson Applegate heads to first base in a 2019 contest. Last Monday, junior star Applegate came up big on the mound and with the bat, pitching a perfect game with 12 strikeouts and contributing a double and three RBIs to help Hun defeat Blair Academy 11-0 in a game that ended after five innings due to the 10run rule. In upcoming action, the Raiders, who moved to 1-1 with the victory, play at the Pennington School on April 12 and Princeton Day School on April 13. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Quirk and Tracey Arndt, the school’s health services staff, and his coaching staff of Pat Jones, Steve Garrison, and Rich Volz with putting in yeoman’s efforts to help make the season possible. “Everybody was chomping at the bit to get back out there again and be together. Everybody was just dealing with the school the way that it is with one day when they are in school and one day when they are at home. They are getting some everyday normalcy. Being able to compete and work hard outside of school is something that everyone is enjoying from our best players to some of the players who are playing for their first year.” With a gauntlet of tough foes on its schedule, the Raiders will need to compete hard as they look to win the program’s fifth straight state Prep A title. “We have always had that mentality; every year we try to create the most difficult schedule that we can,” said Monfiletto, “The hope is that towards the end of the season that we will be playing our best baseball and be bat t le tested so we will be in the best shape to win a Prep A championship.” The Prep A competition, which is slated for late May, is already circled on Monfiletto’s calendar. “We are hosting this year which is awesome,” said Monf ilet to, whos e team moved to 1-1 as it defeated the Blair Academy 11- 0 last Monday in a game that ended after five innings due to the 10-run rule. “Having the Prep A championship to look forward to and still having that goal at the end of the season is exciting. I feel like our league is very strong this year.” Hun boasts a strong pitching staff this spring, featuring junior Ryan DiMaggio, junior Carson Applegate,

senior Rickey Erbeck, junior Jackson Kraemer, junior Carson Wehner, junior Brody Pasieka, and post-graduate Trevor Kobryn. “Our staff is pretty deep, we have Ryan who is coming back is a junior and Carson Applegate who is also a junior; both of those guys started when they were freshmen,” said Monfiletto, who got five perfect innings and 12 strikeouts from Applegate in the victory over Blair. “Ricky is a senior who pitched a lot of innings for us as a freshman and a sophomore. He will be a starter for us as well. Jacks on nor mally plays centerfield but is also an outstanding pitcher. Carson Wehner will play third base when he doesn’t pitch, he will get some innings on the mound. Brody will get some innings for us. We have a PG, Trevor from Delbarton. He is very good, he is going to Siena next year to play. He is a 6’3, 205-pounder; he throws pretty hard and throws a great curve ball. We are excited to see him.” At the top of the batting order, Hun will be sparked by the one-two punch of junior Applegate and senior star and Lafayette commit Ben Petrone. “Carson will lead off for us; on the first pitch of the season, he hit off the fence for a triple, that is what he does,” said Monfiletto of the Kentucky-bound star who had a double and three RBIs against Blair with Petrone goi ng 3 -for- 4 w it h t wo doubles and two RBIs. “He is aggressive, he is an unbelievable competitor. He is super athletic, he has every tool you could imagine. Ben has been absolutely amazing. He does absolutely everything right. He is an unbelievably complete player. Defensively, he is electric and his bat has been outstanding. He might be the most complete hitter that we have in terms of approach, ability to hit the ball to all fields, and temperament. He is excellent.”

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T he Raiders feature a number of other excellent bats in the lineup in junior Ben Romano, Erbeck, DiMaggio, Kraemer, sophomore Mike Chiaravallo, and Wehner. “We have Ben who came in as a sophomore last year from Delbarton,” said Monfiletto. “He is a football/baseball guy. He is an insane athlete, he is going to Tulane to play baseball. He had a great football season this year. That is a big bat in the middle of the order. Ricky has been swinging the bat really well, DiMaggio can swing it. Jackson will be in the middle of the order. Mike Chiaravallo is a very good hitter as well. Carson Wehner is another lefty bat that rounds out our order.” Monfiletto is looking for two sophomores to make an impact behind the plate and at the bat. “We have two guys who will catch for us, sophomores Mike Jolly and Mike Smith, both of them do certain t h i n g s ve r y wel l,” s a i d Monfiletto. “They can both hit, they have a very, very bright future.” The rest of the defensive alignment will include DiMaggio and Erbeck at f irst bas e w it h Pet rone and freshman Tyler Tucker at second, Applegate at s h or t s top w it h Pe t ron e there depending on who is pitching, and Carson Wehner at third with Tucker also seeing some time in the hot corner. Across the outfield, Hun will have Romano in left, Kraemer in center and Chriavello in right, with freshman Mike Olender also seeing time in that spot. In addition, Hun has a number of utility players to fill in when necessary. “We have some ot her unsung guys who will find ways to contribute,” said Monfiletto. “Dylan Ridall is a senior who has been with the program for four years and played in the middle school. Greg Riley is another one who was with us in the mid-

dle school and has been with us for four years. We have a junior Sam Segal who is an outfielder as well.” As the Raiders get tested by the formidable foes on their schedule, they will need contributions through the lineup and an even-keeled approach. “We need to learn from every single game and we have to treat every opponent with the same amount of respect,” said Monfiletto, whose team plays at the Pennington School on April 12 and Princeton Day School on April 13. “We are going down to Holy Spirit, we are going to St Augustine, we are going up to Bergen Catholic and Seton Hall Prep, we are going up to St Joe’s Metuchen and we are going out to Pope John. They are really, really good programs. I know we are going to compete in those games. We are going to win some of them and some of them might not go our way. As long as we continue to learn and get better from those, we will be in good shape. We can’t let an outcome of a game either way prevent us from taking stuff from that game.” In Monfiletto’s view, Hun has the pieces in place to pr o d u c e s om e g o o d outcomes. “We definitely have the ar m s ; ou r appro ach at the plate is something we constantly continue to learn from,” said Monfiletto. “It is thinking what is your job during that at-bat and what does the pitcher want to throw. A lot of times you get something that you don’t want. If you get something that you do want, you need to take advantage of it. With some of the arms that we will see, you might only get one of these pitches in an at-bat. Some of these kids are going on to play big-time college baseball, the best way to prepare them is to put them against the best players that we can.” —Bill Alden

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021

Featuring Strong Pitching Staff, Potent Batting Order, Hun Baseball Primed to Compete with Big-Time Foes


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021 • 28

Looking for Work Ethic to Overcome Inexperience, Hun Softball Fired Up for Return to the Diamond Year in, year out, the Hun School softball team looks forward to its spring trip to balmy Florida to help get it sharp for the upcoming season. B u t w i t h C O V I D -19 concerns preventing any jaunt to Florida this spring, Hun had to battle some w intr y weat her in getting ready for the 2021 campaign as it got back on the field after the 2020 season was canceled due to the pandemic. “We had our preseason on the turf because our field was completely covered with snow,” said Hun head coach Kathy Quirk, whose team was slated to open its season by hosting the Peddie School on April 6 and Springside Chestnut Hill (Pa.) on April 7 before playing at Blair Academy on April 10 and Conwell-Egan Catholic High (Pa.) on April 12. “It wasn’t as good as going away to Florida, but they are excited. We have been working hard.” Quirk is expecting to get

some good work in the circle from a pair of freshman hurlers Jamie Staub and Lexi Kobryn. “Jamie is a lefty, we have never had a lefty pitcher before so I am really excited to have her on the mound,” said Quirk. “Lexi’s presence on the mound is outstanding, she is tall. Both of them throw very hard. I am very impressed with their work ethic. They are just nice kids, there is something really special ab out t hem. T hey have really joined into the team.” Staub and Kobryn should also help spark the Hun hitting attack. “Both Jamie and Lexi are very strong hitters,” said Quirk. “I am hoping Hanna Babuschak steps up. Sammy Kandel has a nice bat. Kat Xiong has been doing a great job. I think we can score. We will definitely miss Gigi Venizelos and Abby Zucatti in our lineup. I am hoping that some of them will step up and try to fill that hole.” Senior Babuschak should

have a strong impact on the Hun defense. “Ha n na has b e en ou r starting catcher since she has been a freshman,” noted Quirk. “She knows program and she knows what pitches to call. She has been working well with the pitchers.” Across the diamond, junior Kandel, junior Ashley Jones, junior Katie Angelini, junior Christina Riviello, and junior Nora Shea are in the mix in the infield. The outfield will feature junior Xiong, junior Lexi Murdock, senior Kayla Hampton, junior A melia Zucatti, sophomore Nina A m o d i o, a n d f r e s h m a n Francesca Somers. Noting that losing the 2020 season means that her squad lacks experience, Quirk wants her players to trust in their abilities. “We have to believe in ourselves, we have to believe in each other,” asser ted Quirk. “Whoever is on the field has to have confidence and believe that they are out there because they can do it.” —Bill Alden

PLAYING TAG: Hun School softball catcher Hanna Babuschak makes a tag in a 2019 game. Senior star Babuschak is looking to enjoy a big final campaign for the Raiders. Hun was slated to start its 2021 season by hosting the Peddie School on April 6 and Springside Chestnut Hill (Pa.) on April 7 before playing at Blair Academy on April 10 and Conwell-Egan Catholic High (Pa.) on April 12. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Drawing on Experience as Multi-Sport Star at TCNJ, Jaeger Excited to Take Helm of Hun Girls’ Lacrosse Starring at soccer, track, and lacrosse for Hunterdon Central helped put Kathleen Jaeger on the path to coaching. “I was just very fortunate to go to a high school where sports were so competitive,” said Jaeger. “That is what led me into coaching because I want to give that opportunity to other people.” In order to achieve that goal, Jaeger headed to The College of New Jersey where she studied special education and competed in cross country, indoor track, and lacrosse from 2015-19. Jaeger’s experience with the school’s powerhouse lacrosse program influenced her approach to coaching. “One of my main takeaways is the team itself, the environment that was created among the girls,” said Jaeger, who was an All-American in both lacrosse and track at TCNJ, tallying 169 goals in lax, tied for the 15th-most in program history, and excelling in the 800 on the track. “That is an aspect I wanted to make sure that I carry with me to teams that I coach in future. Each year it was a different group of starters but everyone on the team came together. It was just so impactful.” This spring, Jaeger is applying those lessons as she takes the helm of the Hun School girls’ lacrosse team. “Being at Hun and knowing that so many people play multiple sports has made me so excited about the program there,” said Jaeger, who is a sixth grade special education math teacher at the Princeton Unified Middle School. “Athletics is so important overall to the community. Most of the kids play another sport and if it is not another sport at the school, they are playing a club sport. It was a perfect fit, not only the location but the community has been so welcoming and so supportive. It has been an

awesome start to the year. I am very excited for what is to come.” Jaeger is looking to build a supportive culture within the lax program. “One of my biggest beliefs is building that whole program community and that positive environment,” said Jaeger. “We have been really focused on that all preseason leading into this first week.” As the squad has gone through preseason, Jaeger has seen a positive response from her players. “One theme we have been following is how lucky and fortunate we are to be on the field and start as early as we did,” said Jaeger, whose team was slated to open the 2021 campaign by hosting Peddie on April 6 and the Blair Academy on April 9. “We are not taking anything for granted, and I think that shows in the girls’ mentality. They come to practice so excited and eager to be there, especially because they missed that time last year. There are a lot of freshmen too and I think that has been so exciting. The energy is great.” The team’s pair of seniors, midfielder Anna Hyson and goalie Gabby Cattani, have been bringing energy at both ends of the field. “Anna has done a beautiful job on the field of bringing everyone together, so I see her as a dominating force in the midfield really taking control,” said Jaeger.

“Her leadership has been absolutely amazing in the preseason. She and the other senior, Gabby, who is in goal, are really setting the tone with their hard work and dedication. Gabby is a very vocal leader on the field, both as a senior and as a goalie, bringing everyone together.” Noting that the Hun squad features a core of younger performers, Jaeger likes her group’s potential. “We have a bunch of strong players,” said Jaeger. “We have some sophomores coming out, we have some freshmen and both of our upperclassman groups are pretty small,” said Jaeger. “I am really excited to see who steps up once the games start because I think we have a lot of different capabilities.” In order to best utilize those capabilities, Jaeger is focusing on developing fundamentals and creativity. “One of the biggest things is the execution of everything we have been working on,” said Jaeger. “We have been breaking down a lot of skills in terms of them building back up and bringing it all together. I am excited to see the aspect of the teamwork and overall communication. The common themes we have been stressing all preseason are coming to practice, being ready to compete, trying new things and seeing what sticks and what we need to move on from. They are always willing to step in and try something new. I could not be more thankful from a coach’s perspective.” —Bill Alden

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In early March, Laila Fair wrapped up a stellar career for the Stuart Country Day School basketball program, starring at forward as the squad went 7-6 against a gauntlet of tough foes. In previous seasons, Fair, who is headed to St. Joseph’s where she will be playing for its Division I women’s hoops squad, would be back in the gym over the spring honing her game. But this March, with the

New Jersey high school volleyball season moved to the spring from the fall due to COVID-19 concerns, Fair is taking advantage of the chance to take her talents to another court, starting for the Tartan volleyball team. The 6’1 Fair has emerged as a towering figure for Stuart, using her height and athleticism to dominate at the net. Last week, she piled up five kills, two blocks, three

NET GAIN: Stuart Country Day School volleyball player Laila Fair makes a play at the net in recent action. After wrapping up a stellar hoops career for the Tartans in early March, Fair has been making an impact for the volleyball squad as the season was moved to the spring from the fall due to COVID-19 concerns. Stuart, now 5-1, is playing at Colonia High on April 7 before hosting Delaware Valley on April 9 and Princeton Day School on April 12. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

digs, one assist, and three service points to help the Tartans defeat Princeton Day S chool 2- 0 ( 25 -19, 25-16). Senior Shirley Xie played a key role in the win over the Panthers, with one kill, 12 digs, six assists, and three service points. Fair, who first played volleyball for Stuart in the fall of 2019, is enjoying her final campaign in the sport. “This is my second year playing volleyball, I wouldn’t say it is a hard transition,” said Fair. Utilizing her basketball skills has helped Fair on the volleyball court. “The main things that I find easy now is defense, I am able to slide faster,” said Fair. “Being able to sprint in such a short amount of time in basketball, going from jogging to sprinting helps in this too. You are going from sprinting to get to the ball. Playing at the net, some of my arm strength has transferred over to this. I am good at the serving but sometimes it is short when I hit too hard.” The presence of Fair’s basketball teammates Nia Melvin, Aleah James, and Jasmine Lewis has helped make Stuart a stronger team. In the win over PDS, senior Melvin had a kill, six digs, and seven service points while senior James had nine digs and eight service points and senior Lewis contributed one dig, one assist, and one service point. “We are getting better at pass setting and hitting and those are definitely our goals for every single game as it should be,” said Fair, reflecting on the win over the Panthers. “I think our offense in this game, the hitting and stuff, was pretty strong.” With Stuart playing at Colonia High on April 7 before hosting Delaware Valley on April 9 and Princeton Day School on April 12, Fair is looking for the Tartans to play stronger throughout matches. “We usually start off slow and then we get faster as we go,” said Fair, who contributed four kills, eight blocks, five digs and 11 ser vice points to help Stuart defeat Hopewell Valley 2-0 (25-9, 25-22) last Thursday and improve to 5-1. “We definitely want to focus on starting fast right off the bat rather than having a slow buildup.” —Bill Alden

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29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021 • 30

Local Sports Princeton Athletic Club Holding 6K April 10

The Princeton Athletic Club ( PAC ) is holding a 6-kilometer Run on April 10 over the Institute Woods course. The run starts at 10a.m. from the Princeton Friends School and the event is limited to 200 participants. The event will be chip timed and all abilities are welcome, including walkers. Participants expecting to take longer than 55 minutes over the 6,000-meter course (about 3.75 miles), should inquire about a separate noncompetitive start. Online registration and full details regarding the

event and race protocols are available by logging onto princetonac.org. The entry fee is $40 through April 7. After that, event day pricing of $55 applies until the field limit is reached. All registration is online. The PAC is a nonprofit, all-volunteer running club for the community that promotes running for the fun and health of it and stages several running events each year.

Post 218 Legion Baseball Team Holding Tryouts April 25, May 2

The Princeton American Legion Post 218 baseball program will be holding tryouts for its 2021 team on April 25 and May 2 from 2-4 p.m. at Smoyer Field in Princeton. Players are strongly recommended to attend both tryout dates and to contact Post 218 Administrative

Manager Jon Durbin at jonwdurbin@gmail.com to confirm participation. Post 218 is planning to play a 20-game schedule in the Mercer County American Legion League (MCALL) this summer. Team practices will begin late May/early June depending on when the spring high school season ends. High school and collegeage players are eligible to play for Post 218 if their primary address is in the municipal boundar y of Princeton or Cranbury or they attend a high school located in Princeton (Princeton High, Princeton Day School, and Hun School). Players must be born on or after January 1, 2002. For information on fees and further details on the program, one can contact Jon Durbin at his gmail address listed above.

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PDS Girls’ Volleyball: Emmy Demore starred in a losing cause as PDS fell 2-0 (1925, 16-25) to Stuart last week. Freshman Demorre had three kills and three service aces in the March 30 contest. Last Monday, the Panthers fell 2-0 (16-25, 18-25) to Hopewell Valley to

move to 0-3. PDS plays at dropped to 1-7 with the setStuart on April 12. back, host Burlington Township High on April 8. Wrestling: Chris Sockler, Aaron Munford, and James Romaine prov ided high lights as PHS fell 56-13 to Robbinsville last Thursday. Sockler posted an 8-3 deGirls’ Volleyball: Yani cision at 138 pounds while Ince contributed three kills, Munford won an 11-1 mathree digs and five service jor decision at 152 and aces but it wasn’t enough Romaine had a pin at 160 as PHS fell 2-0 (19-25, 18- as the Tigers fell to 5-3. In 25) to Rancocas Valley last upcoming action, PHS hosts Wednesday. The Tigers, who Trenton on April 13.

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TITLE FIGHT: Princeton High wrestler Chloe Ayres dominates a foe in a 2019 bout. Last Saturday, senior standout Ayres won the title at 114 pounds in the New Jersey Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Girls’ Southern Region held at Williamstown High. PHS sophomore Ava Rose prevailed at 107 pounds. It was the third region title for Ayres and the second for Rose. The pair will be competing in the NJSIAA Girls’ State Tournament on April 10 at Phillipsburg. Ayres has won two straight state titles while Rose was a runner-up last year. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Ann K. Beneduce Ann K. Beneduce, a longtime resident of Princeton, died on March 18th at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center. She was a 102. Her friends and family will remember her as a person who never promoted herself but always looked out for others. She was incredibly knowledgeable — a google before google — and her family constantly turned to her for answers about the most obscure things and she never failed to have an answer. She read voraciously. She was incredibly elegant. Most importantly, she was positive and supportive of everyone she came in contact with, and an absolute joy to be around. Professionally, Ann was a noted editor of children’s picture books. She supported many authors and artists but is probably best known for her work with Eric Carle, who wrote and illustrated The Very Hungry Caterpillar. Eric came to show Ann his work when he had a first draft of book he wanted to write as well as illustrate. Ann was absolutely “blown away” by the illustrations but felt the story, centered around a worm at the time, needed help. She made gentle suggestions — such as changing the worm into a caterpillar — and continued to help him tweak the story. The book is now famous, one of the most beloved children’s books in the world. Ann and Eric became lifelong friends and worked on many other projects together. Ann came to publishing in the 1950s when it was difficult for women to rise to senior positions. She overcame these challenges and became an editor in chief at many prestigious publishing companies. She was an “internationalist” in her approach to children’s books, finding talents across the globe. She moved beyond a conservative approach to the art, working with innovative and sophisticated artists. Folk tales from around the world were reimagined. After becoming known and highly respected in the publishing world, she was given the well-deserved honor of being able to form her own “imprint,” choosing a list of books to edit and publish. It is called Philomel from the Latin word for nightingale, and continues to this day under successors to Ann, after she retired. Some of the other wonderful authors and artists with whom Ann worked are Tasha Tudor, Ed Young, Jane Yolen, Mitsumasa Anno, Satomi Ichikawa, and Virginia Hamilton. Many books from her list

have won major awards. Ann also was a writer and translator. She adapted folk tales and plays for Princeton local artist, Gennady Spirin, to illustrate. Her writing skills were evident as she translated works from French for Rizzoli as part of a children’s series about famous artists, as well as writing original text. In addition to her professional accomplishments, A n n was an ar t is t who worked not for commercial success, but for her own enjoy ment. She created portraits of friends, which she gave away as gifts, and beautiful still lives and landscapes. When she traveled, she brought her pencils and watercolors with her and returned with lovely images of places she had visited. She loved Paris in particular and visited there many times. Ann will be sorely missed by her friends and family and all who knew her. She was a mentor to many as well as a great, great friend. She is survived by Joel L. Lebowitz, the noted scientist, and her two daughters, Wendy Worth and Cynthia Beneduce. Her cat, Pussycat, also survives her.

Seymour Becker Dr. Seymour Becker, historian, died October 5, 2020, in NYC at the age of 86. A specialist in 19 th and early 20 th century Russian history, he taught Russian and European history at Rutgers University from 1962 until his retirement in 2002. He was among the pioneers in the field of nationalities and empire studies regard i ng Rus sia, when ver y few people realized the importance of studying Russia as an empire. Over his career, he wrote two books and many articles. His first book, Russia’s Protectorates in Central Asia: Bukhara and Khiva, 18651924, published in 1968, became a classic in the field and was reissued in 2004 due to a renewed interest in Central Asian studies. His second book, Nobility and Privilege in Late Imperial Russia, was published in 1985. Select chapters from his unfinished, third book

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021

Obituaries

are being post humously University Foundation.” In her incredible talents in ow n fir m as a Cer tified published in the most re- the memo line, write “Alex- arts and crafts, music, and Public Accountant and then cent issues of the interna- ander Library Gift Fund in popular culture to brighten a partner for many years at tional journal Ab Imperio, memory of Seymour Beck- the day for hundreds of se- deGrouchy-Sifer & Co. Jack a journal “devoted to the er.” Mail checks to: Rutgers niors throughout her career. was a founding member of interdisciplinary and com- University Foundation, PO No crossword puzzle was National Junior Tennis and parative study of the history Box 193, New Brunswick, a match for her profound Learning of Trenton and of nationalism and national NJ 08903-0193. knowledge and intellect, no continued to serve on the movements in the post-Sogolf course was safe from Board of Directors, a past viet space”; he served on her smooth, sweet swing, member of the New town the journal’s board since its and her radiant smile out- Borough Council, Past Presinception in 1999. shone even the sunniest day ident of the Newtown Rotaat the Jersey Shore. ry, member of Pretty Brook Seymour, or “Sy,” was born in Rochester, NY, in Carolyn was preceded in Tennis Club and Springdale 1934 to Aaron P. Becker death by her loving parents Golf Club. and Lena Saperstone BeckCarl C. Schafer and Muriel Son of the late William and er, Jewish immigrants from Silcox Schafer, and her dear Gertrude (Kelly) deGrouchy, Russia who met in the U.S. son Carl Richard Bledsoe. A husband of the late Janet E. His father graduated from family picnic will be held in deGrouchy, brother of the Rochester’s East High in her honor at a later date. In late R. Travis deGrouchy 1920 and sold life insurlieu of flowers, her family and R ichard deGrouchy, ance ; his mother worked suggests that donations be he is survived by his sister as a seamstress. Sy gradumade to the National Hemo- Sally L. McCaffrey, and his ated from Benjamin Frankphilia Foundation. three daughters Felice Kinlin High School where he cannon, Janine deGrouchyJohn (Jack) Carolyn S. Bledsoe was valedictorian, and then Hraska, and Suzanne deearned his BA from Williams Caroly n S chafer Bled- Goodfellow de Grouchy Grouchy, son-in-law, Paul College (1956, Summa Cum soe, 74, died peacefully on John (Jack) Goodfellow Hraska, and grandchildren, Laude) and his MA and PhD March 25, 2021 at the Mar- de Grouchy, 99, of Princ- Zoe Hraska, Thomas Siller, from Har vard Universit y jorie P. Lee Senior Living eton died Friday, March 26, and Georgeanne Siller. He (1958 and 1963). While at Community in Cincinnati, 2021. Born in Upper Darby, is also survived by his stepHarvard he met Carol Cohen Ohio, after a brief battle PA, he resided much of his children Richard Tomlinson, whom he married in 1957, with cancer. She was the life in the Philadelphia area, David Tomlinson, Elizabeth and they had two children. beloved wife of Michael D. later settling down in New- Bar tels, Andrew TomlinAfter accepting the position Bledsoe; dear sister “Moon” town, PA, and Princeton, son, t heir spouses, and at Rutgers, he moved with to Carla (Bruce) Hogg and NJ. more grandchildren: Sarah, his family to Princeton, NJ, Susan (Dean) Carmeris; deColeman, and Sophie BarJack was an accomplished where he lived until 1980. voted mother of Matthew tels ; Chloe, Trevor, Emathlete throughout his life During that time, in 1967- (Jessica) Bledsoe; the best ily, Samuel, Will and Drew and spent summers of his 1968 as part of an IREX Nana ever to Ellery, Jacob, Tomlinson, and three greatyouth lifeguarding with his exchange program, he spent and Finn Bledsoe; and a lovgrandchildren. brothers in Stone Harbor, a year in Moscow doing re- ing aunt to many nieces and In lieu of flowers, memoriNJ. In addition to wrestling, search, and also traveled nephews. al donations can be made to he played football at Haverto Central Asia. In 1980, Carolyn was born on No- ford High School. Jack was the Jack de Grouchy ScholSy moved to NYC with Alla vember 21, 1946 in Princa proud graduate of Lehigh arship fund at NJTL of TrenZeide, a Russian émigré and eton, New Jersey. An imUniversity, where he lettered ton, 949 W. State Street, fellow academic, and the mensely gifted artist in a in football and swimming. Trenton, NJ 08618, https:// two married in 1981. He variety of different media, He was also very active in www.njtloftrenton.org. and Alla spent 2003-2004 Carolyn received a Master’s A graveside service will be the Chi Phi Fraternity. Jack in Florence, Italy, while he degree in Art from Butler was a United States Army held 11 a.m. on Wednesday, was Director of the Rutgers University and went on to World War II Veteran hav- April 7, 2021 at the WashStudy Abroad Program in teach at a variety of schools. ing served in the Pacific ington Crossing Veterans Florence. Carolyn became the Activi- Theater. Jack started his Cemeter y, 830 Highland Sy was known not only ties Director at Marjorie career at WR Grace in New Road, Newtown, PA. for his scholarship, but also P. Lee in 2003, and used York, went on to start his Obituaries Continued on Next Page for his kindness and generosity as a teacher and PhD advisor, and he maintained relationships with many of his former students as they pursued their own academic careers. He and Alla were frequent hosts in their apartment in NYC to colleagues and friends over the years. He loved classical music and opera, classic movies, National Public Radio, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, travel, and good conversation. Most of all, he loved his family. A constant and avid reader, his knowledge of world history was as wide-ranging as it was deep; he was a dedicated intellectual. Sy owned more books than he had shelves for, but that never stopped him from acquiring additional ones, HOPEWELL • NJ HIGHTSTOWN • NJ and he could not walk past a sidewalk display of used books without stopping to see whether there was a title 609.921.6420 609.448.0050 he needed to buy. 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ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE THE PERFECT MEMORIAL THE PERFECT MEMORIAL


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2021 • 32

Obituaries Continued from Preceding Page

Dr. Geddes W. Hanson Dr. Geddes W. Hanson, affectionately known as Guy, passed away on Saturday, March 27, 2021, at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center. Geddes was born in the Bron x, N Y, on May 17, 1934. He was a graduate of Stuyvesant High School in New York City and often spoke proudly of being among the city kids known for their shoulder bags and slide rules. He double-majored in Physics and Philosophy at Howard University before earning a Master of Divinity from Harvard

Divinity School in 1958. On June 6, 1959, Geddes married Carrie McCullough at the Third Baptist Church in Alexandria, Virginia. This marriage would last the rest of his days. After pastoring congregations in New York, Philadelphia, and Indianapolis, in 1966, Geddes and Carrie relocated to Princeton at the behest of the Reverend James I. McCord, then president of Princeton Theological Seminary. Beyond being among the first African Americans to earn a Ph.D. in Theology from Princeton (1972), Geddes became the f irst per manent A f r ican American teacher at the seminary. Here he helped organize the first “Conference of Black Seminarians” on campus in 1968, which led to the development of the Association of Black Seminarians. With a focus on church administration, conflict, and theories of change, Dr. Hanson held various administrative and teaching roles since 1969. He was both Director of the Center for Continuing Education and a cohort leader for the Doctor of Ministry program. Dr. Hanson retired as the Charlotte Newcombe Professor of Congregational

Ministry in 2009. Before his retirement, the Association of Black Seminarians instituted the Geddes W. Hanson Lecture, a biennial lecture in honor of his legacy and contributions to the seminary. Geddes and his wife Carrie were avid international travelers, often visiting museums and art exhibits. His two favorite places were Paris and Vienna. He is predeceased by his parents, Geddes H. and Adele (Gumz) Hanson, as well as two sisters, Ivy and Avis Hanson. He is survived by his loving wife Carrie Hanson and an intentional family comprised of former students and their children known as the “The Hanson Kids.” The funeral was held on Tuesday, April 6 at Trinity Church in Princeton. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Edler Garnett Hawkins Prize at Princeton Theological Seminary. This award celebrates African American academic achievement among the seminary student body. Gifts can be addressed to Princeton Theological Seminary, Attn: Advancement Office, 64 Mercer Street, Princeton, NJ 08542-0803.

Benjamin Ari Sandler Benjamin Ari Sandler, of Kansas City, MO, and Princeton, NJ, passed away suddenly and tragically on April 1, 2021 at the age of 39. Ben was born in Philadelphia, PA, and spent his childhood growing up in Princeton, NJ. He graduated from Princeton High School and Wesleyan College in Middleton, CT. He received his MBA from Kellogg at

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Northwestern University. In high school, Ben was in the orchestra, playing percussion and double bass. He also was part of a garage band, playing drums which toured. Upon finishing college, he worked in a job that allowed him to pursue his two great loves, music and cars. He managed rock bands and also helped maintain a collection of vintage cars and even appeared in a movie with a small role driving such a car. He was especially gifted in the tech world. Ben was a one-man IT Support resource for family and friends alike. Aside from his love for music and cars, he enjoyed reading and was a relentless seeker of intellectual pursuits. Ben had a very good heart and was generous with his time and talents. He had a wonderful sense of humor and was always fun to be around. He will be deeply missed by his family and friends. Benjamin is survived by his mother Deborah Sandler (Crosby Kemper), his father Sheldon ( Katie ) Sandler, and his sister Shira (John) Ruppert and two nephews, Samuel and Henry Ruppert. Private funeral services and bur ial were held at Princeton Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to: NAMI National Association for Mental Illness (nami.org) or to Golden State Greyhound Adoption in Walnut Creek, CA ( goldengreyhounds. com). To send condolences to the family visit OrlandsMemorialChapel.com.

Calvin L. Hodock Calvin L. Hodock, 87, of Skillman, passed away on March 31, 2021 at home surrounded by his loving family. He was born in Chicago, Illinois, and was a resident of Skillman for more than 40 years. Calvin was an Army Veteran who served during the Korean War. He attended the University of Cincinnati as an undergrad and received his MBA from the University of Illinois. He launched an illustrious advertising and marketing career in Chicago with Lavidge & Associates, where he met his wife Diane. During his career he worked at Gillette, Clairol, Carter Wallace, Johnson & Johnson, Coke, and Campbell’s. He had a passion for market research and new product innovation. After Calvin’s corporate adventures, he continued his passion for education and mentorship by taking on various teaching positions at Berkeley College, New York University’s Stern School of Business, and was a guest lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business. He is the former chairman of the board of the

American Marketing Association, creating The Edison Awards, a prestigious event recognizing companies and individuals for their contribution to design and innovation. Calvin was an avid sports fan, cheering for The Cubs, The Bears, Notre Dame Football, and Villanova Basketball. He played college basketball for a brief period of time and remained active throughout his life. He worked out daily and could often be seen chatting it up with various people in the lobby of Princeton Fitness and Wellness Center. He was the kind man that treated everyone with compassion and respect. He could always find topics in common with the people he came across and enjoyed sharing his thoughts and opinions. He was well loved by everyone and was often referred to as “The Professor” and “Big Cal” by those that knew him. Predeceased by his parents Lester and Helen Hodock; wife Diane I. Hodock; and Stanley Hodock; he is survived by his daughters Shannon (Kerry) Hodock-McCoy and Courtney Hodock; his grandchildren Reagan and Calv in ; and dogs Roxy, Beau, and Greta. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, April 7, 2021 at St. Paul’s Church, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542. Burial will be private. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Michael J. Fox Foundation at michaeljfox.org/donate. Arrangements are under the direction of Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES DIRECTORY OF DIRECTORY OF 9 Hulfish Street, Palmer Square

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Trinity Church SundayHoly Week 8:00&a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I Easter Schedule

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9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages March 23 10:00Wednesday, a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm

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PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CHAPEL

Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm

Princeton’s First Tradition

ECUMENICAL CHRISTIAN WORSHIP

ONLINE CHAPEL.PRINCETON.EDU Rev. Jenny Smith Tuesday Walz, Lead Pastor Thursday March 24 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist REV. ALISON L. BODEN, PH.D. REV. DR. THERESA S. THAMES Sunday at 10 Holy Worship Eucharist, Rite II,am 12:00 pm Dean of Religious Life Associate Dean of Religious Life EucharistTuesdays with Foot Washing and WeeklyHoly Meditation at Noon and of the Chapel and of the Chapel Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Join the livestream or archived services! PREMIERES SUNDAY ATyou 8 AM Keeping Watch, pmof–with Mar.you 25,are 7:00 amPrayer Wherever you are onEucharist your8:00 journey faith, Wherever youEACH are on your journey of faith, are 5:30 p.m. Holy Healing

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always welcome to worship with us at:

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector

re, Director of Music

Friday,of March 25 First Church Christ, Scientist, Princeton

always welcome to worship with us at:

trinityprinceton.org Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music day, 7:00 am St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org 2:00 pm – 1:00 pm 33 Mercer The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ :00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm 0 pm 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 10:00 a.m. Worship Service Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm day, 7:00 pm 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School ton

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St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton SNassau undayS Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. The Prayer BookMeeting Service Good Friday, 7:00 pm Wednesday Testimony and for Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

Christ,

Wherever you are on your journey of faith, Scientist, Princeton come worship with us 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton

and Youth Bible Study – www.csprinceton.org Adult Bible 609-924-5801 Classes (A multi-ethnic congregation) Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m.

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton 214 Nassau Street, Christian Science Reading RoomPrinceton Saturday, March 26 Walter Nolan, Pastor Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor 609-924-1666 • Fax16 609-924-0365 178 Nassau Street, Princeton 9:00Msgr. am — Adult Formation Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor witherspoonchurch.org ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10pm - 4p.m. Saturday Vigil 5:30 The Great Vigil ofMass: Easter, 7:00 Visit csprinceton.org for more information 10:00 am — Vigil Holy Eucharist II p.m. Mass: 5:30 Christian Science Reading Room Sunday:Saturday 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. 178 Nassau Street, Princeton Sunday, March 27 11:00 am — Coffee Hour Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. Our Services are held in the Church Holy Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 am 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 MassFestive in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. 5:00 pm —Eucharist, Compline Choral Rite II, 9:00 am following Social Distancing Guidelines ¡Eres siempre bienvenido!

Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am

All services are online. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Join usThe atThe. www.trinityprinceton.org Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate

Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org

The Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector, The Rev. Canon Dr. Kara Slade, Assoc. Rector, The Rev. Joanne Epply-Schmidt, Assoc. Rector, Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 • www.trinityprinceton.org

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 10:00 a.m. Worship Service

During 10:00 this timea.m. of COVID-19 crisis, Witherspoon is finding new Children’s Sunday School and Youth Studydoors may be closed, ways to continue our worship. WhileBible our sanctuary Bible Classes church is open and we willAdult find new avenues to proclaim the Gospel and to (Acontinue multi-ethnic congregation) as one faith community! 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365

Join us for worshipwitherspoonchurch.org on Facebook Live every Sunday at 10:00 a.m.

Sunday Church Service and Sunday School at 10:30 am Wednesday Testimony meetings at 7:30 pm

Recorded and live stream sermons can also be found on our website - witherspoonchurch.org

Our Christian Science Reading Room is now open, 178 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ

Join our mailing list to receive notices of our special services, bible study and virtual fellowship. During the COVID-19 crisis our church office is closed, however, please email witherspoon@verizon.net or leave a message at our church office and a staff member will get back to you.

Monday through Saturday 10am-4pm. Curbside pickup and free local delivery are available. Please call ahead 609-924-0919

Church office: (609) 924-1666


“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

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I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21

SERVICE:

01-01-22 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon LOOKING TO TRADE 2001 Cadillac Coupe DeVille 4-door in mint condition (65,000 original miles), with valid inspection & new Goodyear Eagle tires, for old sports car (does not have to run), (609) 915-2848. 04-07

take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf OFFICE SHARE – NASSAU ST: 2nd floor, all included, available most days. Ideal for one or two people. Quiet, parking, Wi-Fi, etc. $20 per hour. 10 hr/month min. (908) 3993499. 03-24-4t

University. Call (609) 216-0092.

04-07-3t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-07-4t ANNA CLEANING SERVICE: Polish precision & detail. Residential & commercial. Available cleaning by owner. Very good references from long-term clients. Free estimates. Please call or text Anna, (609) 4563583. 03-17-8t LAWN MAINTENANCE: Prune shrubs, mulch, cut grass, weed, leaf clean up and removal. Call (609) 954-1810; (609) 240-6404. 03-31-14t KOALA CLEANING SERVICE, LLC: Residential & Commercial cleaning. 20% off your first cleaning! Phone: (267) 990-5901 info@koalacleaningservice.com www.koalacleaningservice.com Company is insured. 04-07-8t

“Maybe that's the best part of going away for a vacation - coming home again." —Madeleine L'Engle

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

WATER WATER EVERYWHERE! Let's rid that water problem in your basement once and for all! Complete line of waterproofing services, drain systems, interior or exterior, foundation restoration and structural repairs. Restoring those old and decaying walls of your foundation.

Call A. Pennacchi and Sons, and put that water problem to rest!

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

Mercer County's oldest waterproofing co. est. 1947 Deal directly with Paul from start to finish.

609-394-7354

Over 70 years of stellar excellence! Thank you for the oppportunity.

apennacchi.com

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


J TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 7, 2021 • 34

e Twp.

Rider $220,000 Furniture

American Furniture Exchange

30 Years of Experience!

nce Line Road

We do NOT have any short-term rentals. For long-term, non-smokers & no-pet Tenants, you may email for more information: sre.marty@gmail.com **********

OffiCE RENTALS:

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items

“Where quality still matters.”

I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-924-0147

609-306-0613

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

e Twp.

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE

$788,800

hOME hEALTh AiDE

$1,300/month 2nd floor OFFICE space, 3 rooms, one with private powder room. Available now. $1,350/month 1st floor OFFICE space, 3 rooms with powder room. Available now.

for Princeton resident. Small apartment. Personal care, housekeeping and medications. Part-time. (732) 741-2398. 04-07

Princeton – $125 each 1 parking space available now, 2 blocks from Nassau Street. Princeton – $1700/mo. Includes heat & water. Apts. #1 & #2. 1 BR, LR & Eat-in Kitchen. Available June 8, 2021. Princeton – $1800/mo. Apt. #2, 1 BR with enclosed porch, LR & Kitchen. Tenant shares laundry & snow & yard maintenance with 1st floor tenant. Available now. Princeton – $1900/mo. Includes heat, water & 1 parking space. Apt. #1, 2nd floor, 1 BR, LR, Eat-in Kitchen. Available June 8, 2021. Princeton – $1900/mo. Includes heat & water. LR, BR & Eat-in Kitchen. Has laundry & 1 car parking. Tenant pays gas & electric. Available NOW. Princeton – $2000/mo. Includes heat & water. Apt. #1, 3 rooms plus Eat-in Kitchen. Has laundry & 1 parking space. Tenant pays gas & electric. Available June 8, 2021. STOCKTON MEANS fULL SERViCE REAL ESTATE We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com

Driver, front of house position. Apply within. Princeton. (609) 683-8900. 03-24-3t

LONG-TERM RENTALS

Witherspoon Media Group

Avenue

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

32 ChAMbERS STREET

PRiNCETON, NJ 08542 · Newsletters

PhONE (609) 924-1416 fAx (609) 228-5151 MARThA f. STOCKTON, bROKER-OwNER

· Brochures · Postcards

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Weekly Inserts Custom Design, Printing, only 10¢ per househ Get the best reach at the best rate! WEEKLY INSERTS START AT ONLY 10¢ PER HOUSEHOLD.

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Publishing and Distribution

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• Postcards · Newsletters · Annual Reports • 8.5x11” flyers i bUY ALL KiNDS of Old or Pretty Sales Associate, REALTOR® Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, · Brochures Witherspoon Group costume jewelry, evening bags, • Menus Media 23 Years Experience Servicing fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) Princeton & Bordering Townships Booklets info 921-7469. contact: · Postcards For• additional 09-30-21 Custom Design, Printing, • Trifolds bUYiNG: Antiques, paintings, Coming Soon! melissa.bilyeu@ · Books Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, Publishing and Distribution 629 Lawrenceville Road, Princeton, NJwitherspoonmediagroup.com 08540 toys, military, books, cameras, • Post its old silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars Four-sided brick Colonial on over five and a half acres just outside & musical instruments. I buy single · Catalogues • We can accomodate · Newsletters items to entire estates. Free appraisdowntown Princeton, set back from the road for privacy. • Postcards als. (609) 306-0613. 5 bedrooms, 3 full baths & 2 half baths. Inground pool.almost anything! 01-01-22 · Brochures

mery Twp. Get $2,550/mo. the best reach Get at the best rate! reach at the be

rive

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• Pos · Annual Reports • 8.5″ x 11″ • 8.5″ • Postcards • Flye Reach· Postcards over 15,000 homes in• Flyers Reach 11,000 homes in Princeton and surroundin Witherspoon Media Group Princeton and beyond! • 8.5x11” flyers · Books • Menus •custome Men Town Topics puts youinfo in frontcontact: of your target For additional than what it would cost to mail a postcard. • Menus Town ·Topics puts you in front• Booklets Custom Design, Printing, • Boo Catalogues melissa.bilyeu@ Please contact to reserve your sPace n • Booklets of your target customer for less Publishing andus Distribution witherspoonmediagroup.com · Annual Reports etc. than what it would cost to mail etc... • Trifolds JOES LANDSCAPiNG iNC. Of PRiNCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21

· Newsletters • Post its · Brochures We can accomodate • We can accomodate TOwN TOPiCS CLASSifiEDS For additional info contact: GETS TOP RESULTS! almost anything! almost anything! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding · Postcards melissa.bilyeu@ a lost pet, or having a garage sale, Listed by Donna M. Murray a postcard!

witherspoonmediagroup.com ® your most We deliver to ALL of Princeton as Let’s createSales a planAssociate, to get you the most value for REALTOR well as surrounding areas, so your important asset - your home. Give me a call today! ad is sure to be read. Cell: 908-391-8396 (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; All conversations are confidential and obligation-free. donnamurray@comcast.net TOWN TOPICS is the way to go!

classifieds@towntopics.com tf

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 Zoom, FaceTime and in-person consultations available. 2015 NJ REALTORS® Circle of 609-924-5400 CDC guidelines for social distancing & mask-wearing will be followed.

We can ac almost a

Town Topics is the only weekly paper that reaches EVERY HOME IN PRINCETON, making it a tremendously valuable product wit

toWn toPIcs neWsPaPeR • 4438 Route 27 noRth • KInGston, nJ 08528 • tel: 609.924.2200 • Fax: 609.924.8818

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Reach 11,000 homes in Princeton Reach and 11,000 surrounding homes in towns. Princeton and surroun ESTATE LiQUiDATiON SERViCE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22

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contact Please your contact sPaceus now! to reserve your sPa 253 St, Princeton, NJ 08540 us to reserve A Gift Subscription! 253 Nassau NassauPlease Street, Princeton, NJ 08540

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toWn toPIcs neWsPaPeR • 4438 Route 27 noRth • KInGston,toWn nJ 08528 toPIcs • tel: neWsPaPeR 609.924.2200 • 4438 • Fax: Route 609.924.8818 27 noRth• •www.towntopics.com KInGston, nJ 08528 • tel: 609.924.2200 • Fax: 609.9

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125


35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, aPRIl 7, 2021

PRINCETON | On an elegant, tree-lined street, just a short walk from the heart of Princeton, is an intentionally understated brick facade. In typical European fashion, this discrete approach belies the breathtaking beauty of the dramatic light-filled interiors that await you beyond the high brick walls surrounding the property. This 10,000+-SF contemporary six- or potentially eight-bedroom showcase home embodies impeccable architectural design, with a fluid, flexible floor plan that combines spectacular walls of glass with earth-tone brick and natural woods, along with original Frank Lloyd Wright copper light fixtures and stained glass panels. This home would be exceptional anywhere in the world, but its location truly sets it apart, just blocks from the shopping, dining and culture of downtown Princeton and the eponymous University. The interior spaces are as livable as they are impressive. They are designed to socialize, whether you are hosting a fundraiser for over 100, a sit-down dinner for 40, or a few friends. The home features an Italian cherry and stainless steel restaurant-quality kitchen by Boffi and a 750-bottle wine-tasting room. Floor-to-ceiling windows flank the dining room, which sits in an exquisitely landscaped and very private park-like setting. The tiered family room leads out to a hardscaped waterfall garden - yet another outdoor room. All of this is accomplished within 3/4 of an acre of easily manageable outdoor space. At day's end, take the stairs or ride the elevator to the second level, where two en-suite bedrooms share the floor with two master suites. One master suite has a glass alcove, and the other has a private terrace, ideal for intimate breakfasts overlooking the waterfall below. Both suites have fireplaces and luxurious baths, one of which features a decadent 5 ft x10 ft multi-spray shower and sculptural tub; the other features a multi-spray steam shower and a jetted tub. The finished lower level includes a fifth bedroom/sitting room, a full marble bath, and several areas for lounging, playing, exercising and hobbies. A one-bedroom 1,400 sq. ft. apartment has its own entrance and own terrace, as well as its own address, allowing you to share the Princeton lifestyle with out-of-town guests and relatives while still affording privacy. Please call for more information or to schedule a private showing.

Randy Snyder & Geniene Polukord REALTOR® Associates Randy's Cell: 609.658.3193 Geniene's Cell: 732.266.4341

33 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

foxroach.com

609.921.2600


PRESENTING

6 Birch Drive, Plainsboro Twp Marketed by: Yael Zakut $844,000

43 Buttonwood Drive, Piscataway Marketed by: Surekha Raghuram $540,000

PRESENTING

22 Exeter Court, West Windsor Twp Marketed by: Yael Zakut $589,999

413 S Main Street, Pennington Boro Marketed by: Donna M. Murray $499,900

22 Maple Lane, Pennington Boro Marketed by: Roberta Parker $890,000

28 N Mill Road, West Windsor Twp Marketed by: Terebey Relocation Team/John A. Terebey $725,000

PRESENTING

From Princeton, We Reach the World.

49 W Spring Street, Somerville Boro Marketed by: Linda Pecsi | $325,000

209 Winant Road, Princeton Marketed | by: Ania Fisher $1,295,000

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street 609-924-1600 foxroach.com |

TEMPORARILY LOCATED AT 33 WITHERSPOON STREET

© BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

From Princeton, We Reach the World. 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 Princeton Office Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com Princeton, NJ ||253 foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

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Town Topics Newspaper, April 7, 2021