Town Topics Newspaper, April 24, 2024.

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Morven Museum Marks Twentieth Anniversary With Untold Stories

Contemplating how to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Morven Museum & Garden, staff at the historic house on Stockton Street came to the conclusion that digging into their own collections was the way to go. “Morven Revealed: Untold Stories from New Jersey’s Most Historic Home,” a show of rarely exhibited objects and newly discovered photographs, opens Friday, April 26 and remains on view through March 2, 2025.

A lit-up Baby Jesus, a lavish inaugural gown, a child’s ring uncovered during archaeological work, and a history of all the pets who lived at the house are among the curiosities on display. Way before it became a museum, Morven was home to numerous notable residents — Richard Stockton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence; Robert Wood Johnson Jr., Johnson & Johnson heir; and ve New Jersey governors have occupied the property. All had families and staffs.

And over the centuries, the house has hosted its share of celebrities. “What do George Washington, Grace Kelly, and Buzz Aldrin have in common? They were all guests at Morven, a home that has played a role in the history of New Jersey and the nation for more than 200 years,” reads a press release on the exhibition.

Elizabeth Allan, Morven’s deputy director and curator, said the process of preparing the show has yielded many surprises.

“We don’t have a huge collection, but everything we do have is connected to people who lived here. And we have been growing our archive over the years,” she said. “We thought this would be a great way to make this a fun birthday party for Morven. We went into it with a relaxed, fun feeling. What are the things people can relate to? We came up with all sorts of great stuff.”

One of the rst- oor galleries focuses on furnishings, with some objects from the 18th and 19th centuries, but most from the 20th. “We look at how it was decorated in the 1920s and 30s, when Robert Wood Johnson and the governors lived here,” said Allan. “There were a lot of different trends. We pulled out pieces of wallpaper, furniture from when the house was refurbished in 1957, and lots of great photos starting with the 1910s.”

Another gallery is devoted to dressing, with wigs, corsets, elaborate gowns, and

P.U. Grad Students File for Union Election

Graduate students at Princeton University have led for an election with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), claiming to have a “strong majority” of graduate students who have signed union cards. They are hoping for an election in the next month.

The Princeton Graduate Students United (PGSU) is currently in discussions with the University administration and the NLRB regional office in Newark to arrange elections and set a date for voting.

If recognized, the PGSU would be afliated with the United Electrical, Radio, and Machine Workers (UE) and would be the largest union at Princeton University. Except for the University of Pennsylvania, where graduate workers are holding a union election next week on May 1 and 2, Princeton is currently the only Ivy League school that has not formally recognized a graduate student union.

“I’m excited,” said PGSU organizer Gaby Nair, a fourth year graduate student in the Princeton University politics department. “I think we’re going to win. We have a strong majority of graduate students who have signed authorization cards and we’re hoping to turn all those people out to vote in the election.”

Nair did not provide an exact count of how many of the 3,225 graduate students had signed cards, but if more than 50 percent of voting graduate students concur, the union will be legally recognized and can create a bargaining committee to negotiate with the University.

“If we win we will be guaranteed a seat at the table,” said Nair. “That means we get a say over our working and research conditions, something that we don’t yet have. Right now we have avenues for graduate student advocacy, but we haven’t yet won the right to a real say over our compensation, our bene ts as employees, and

other rights that come with recognition as workers, like workers’ compensation in case of injury on the job. That would be a change.”

She continued, “Just getting contract negotiations on the calendar is going to be huge. Now, when you’re a graduate student at Princeton you don’t get a contract. You get a re-enrollment letter and all the terms in the letter are decided by the University.”

Depending on the department, graduate students are generally expected to teach during a certain number of semesters and also possibly to serve as research assistants in a lab or as part of a research group.

Principal goals that the PGSU hopes to achieve through unionization include “fair and effective cross-campus grievance procedures,” “improved support for international students,” “comprehensive, inclusive, and funded healthcare and

The Jewish Center Celebrates 75 Years In Princeton

Last week at The Jewish Center Princeton, about 30 men and women over the age of 85 gathered for the “Seasoned Souls” lunch group, with bag lunches and desserts provided by volunteers. Later that day, sixth graders and their families met for a program and had dinner together.

The age range in the building was typical. The Jewish Center seems to have something for everyone: Yoga, Torah and Tea, knitting with Interfaith Stitchers, a book club, adult education, programs tied to religious holidays, weekly Shabbat (Sabbath) services, and more.

As its mission statement says, in part, “Our congregation includes children, parents, grandparents, and friends – families who have been here more than seven generations and recent college graduates. We embrace interfaith families, Jews by choice, people of color, and LGBTQ individuals. We provide a home for teens, empty-nesters, and seniors.”

The Jewish Center has been a spiritual, intellectual, and social home for a diverse Jewish community since 1949.

On May 4, the congregation will embark on a gala 75-year, Diamond Jubilee event with a cruise ship theme (“The Chai Seas, referring to the Jewish number 18 — chai in Hebrew — which means life). Four

Continued on Page 9

Volume LXXVIII, Number 17 www.towntopics.com 75¢ at newsstands Wednesday, April 24, 2024 Therapy Dogs, Horses, And Maybe a Goat 5 Local Author Day Returns To Princeton Public Library 8 Two Princeton High School Teachers Create Programs in Mexico 10 Tauckus Shines on Senior Day with 4 Goals, Helping Tiger Women’s Lax Top Dartmouth 24 PHS Baseball Showing Batting Punch, Ignited by Winters in the Leadoff Spot 26 RECORD NUMBERS: Princeton Record Exchange was one of thousands of independent record stores around the world to celebrate Record Store Day on Saturday, April 20. Fans of the iconic store known as PREX turned out to browse and buy from the slate of titles, many of which have limited production runs. (Photo by Sarah Teo) Art 17, 20 Books 12 Calendar 21 Classifieds 32 Mailbox 11 New to Us 22 Obituaries 31 Performing Arts 15, 16 Police Blotter 10 Princeton PorchFest 18,19 Real Estate 32 Sports 23 Topics of the Town 5 Town Talk 6 Pulitzer Prize-winner Thornton Wilder and His Connection to Princeton 13 Continued on Page 9 Continued on Page 9
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ARBOR DAY PLANTING SESSION: On Saturday, April 27 from 2-4 p.m., help the Friends of Princeton Nursery Lands establish a new colony of Virginia bluebells, transplant wildlife-friendly native tree and wildflower seedlings, and plant this year’s Arbor Day tree, a “Snow Queen” oakleaf hydrangea, at the Mapleton Preserve. Meet at the D&R Canal State Park Headquarters at 145 Mapleton Road in Kingston. Pre-registration is requested at fpnl.org or (609) 683-0483. Rain date is April 28.

Voter Registration: Available in the first floor Assembly Room at Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street, from 6-9 p.m. on April 25 and 1-4 p.m. on April 27. Nassau Presbyterian and its sister congregation, the Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church, are conducting these non-partisan voter registration and information events to help eligible voters register to vote, request mail-in ballots, or update their registration. Light refreshments will be provided.

Tree Saplings: In celebration of Arbor Day and Princeton being named a 2024 Tree City, the Shade Tree Commission will be giving out free tree saplings at Porchfest in Hinds Plaza on Sunday April 27 from 12 to 6 p.m.

Recycling Buckets Available : Mercer County Improvement Authority has announced that free buckets are available again for residents. In Princeton, buckets can be picked up at 27 North Harrison Street. Princetonnj.gov.

Road Closure: Witherspoon Street is closed between Quarry Street and Leigh Avenue for the construction of three raised crosswalks and the milling and paving of the roadway. The project is planned to be finished by April 26. Businesses on the street are accessible from John Street.

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Princeton in Bloom Photo Contest : Photos capturing the essence of Princeton in spring can be submitted through April 30 by all residents and visitors to Princeton in this contest sponsored by Experience Princeton. The grand prize winner gets an Experience Princeton gift card; top 10 finalists’ work will be displayed in the Municipal Building. Visit princetonnj.gov. Nominations Sought : For the 2024 Annual New Jersey Immigrant Entrepreneur Awards, sponsored by the NJ Business Coalition. The deadline is June 1. Visit njbusinessimmigration.org/nominations. Topics In Brief A Community Bulletin ® Town Topics est. 1946 a Princeton tradition! TOWN TOPICS Princeton’s Weekly Community Newspaper Since 1946 DONALD C. STUART, 1946-1981 DAN D. COYLE, 1946-1973 Founding Editors/Publishers DONALD C. STUART III, Editor/Publisher, 1981-2001 ® LAURIE PELLICHERO Editor BILL ALDEN, Sports Editor DONALD GILPIN, WENDY GREENBERG, ANNE LEVIN, STUART MITCHNER, NANCY PLUM, DONALD H. SANBORN III, JUSTIN FEIL, JEAN STRATTON, WILLIAM UHL Contributing Editors FRANK WOJCIECHOWSKI, STEVEN WOJTOWICZ, SARAH TEO Photographers USPS #635-500, Published Weekly Subscription Rates: $60/yr (Princeton area); $65/yr (NJ, NY & PA); $68/yr (all other areas) Single Issues $5.00 First Class Mail per copy; 75¢ at newsstands For additional information, please write or call: Witherspoon Media Group 4428C Route 27, P.O. Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528 tel: 609-924-2200 www.towntopics.com fax: 609-924-8818 (ISSN 0191-7056) Periodicals Postage Paid in Princeton, NJ USPS #635-500 Postmaster, please send address changes to: P.O. Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528 LYNN ADAMS SMITH Publisher MELISSA BILYEU Operations Director JEFFREY EDWARD TRYON Art Director VAUGHAN BURTON Senior Graphic Designer SARAH TEO Classified Ad Manager JENNIFER COVILL Sales and Marketing Manager TRACEY SUGAR Sales Account Manager 989 Lenox Drive Suite 101 Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 (609) 520-0900 www.pralaw.com Divorce / Custody / Parenting Time / Marital Property Settlement Agreement / Prenuptial Agreements /Domestic Violence / Child Relocation Issues / Domestic Partnerships / Mediation/ Palimony / Post Judgment Enforcement and Modification / Appeals John A. Hartmann, III Chairman No aspect o th s advert sement has been veri ied or approved by the Supreme Court of New Jersey Information on the Best Law F rms selec ion process can be found a www bestlawfirms usnews com methodology aspx Informat on on the Super Lawyers selec ion process can be found at www superlawyers com/about/se ect on process htm Before making your choice of a torney you should g ve th s matter carefu thought the select on o an attorney is an important dec s on Committee on Attorney Adver ising Hughes Just ce Complex PO Box 970 Trenton NJ 08625 Questions? “Divorce: the end of an error.” www.pancakes.com Get your favorite late-night munchies TO GO HANDHELDS MUNCHIES FLATBREADS A d h d th y h i f K B h B PJ S ALPHA o es y e bu e i k f ied ch cke ac cheese ch po e bbq aio i 1 PJ S NASHVILLE HOT Homesty e sp cy but erm k f ed ch cken ettuce mayo K rby pick es ranch dress ng | 12 PJ S OR G NAL H ty b t i k f i d h k d b t tt g t t Ki by p k 13 PJ S FR ED CH CKEN BOWL D ced homes y e bu te m k r ed chicken shredded pepper ack cheese app e alapeno s aw guacamole PJ s sec et sauce 1 PJ S ULT MATE TENDERS Buf a o ho sauce b ue cheese crumb e chopped K rby p ckles 8 BUFFALO MAC Bl h b f d d h y b t k d hi k t d h 10 PJ S W NGS (8) BBQ BUFFALO SWEET GOLDEN MUSTARD 1 PJ S POUT NE Shoest ng fr es cheddar cheese curds b own g avy 9 PJ S TENDERS AND FR ES | 9 PJ S OMEGA Homesty e but ermi k f ied ch cken mac n cheese ch po e bbq aio i 7 PJ S TENNESSEE HOT Homesty e sp cy but erm k f ed ch cken ettuce mayo K rby pick es ranch dress ng | 18 PJ S FINEST H ty b t i k f i d h k d b t tt g t t Ki by p k 19
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TIGER AND FRIENDS: Tiger, Princeton Public Schools’ goldendoodle therapy dog, has been a frequent visitor to all four elementary schools, and Princeton High School junior Kayla Resnick has founded an Animal Therapy Club with regular visits by therapy dogs and recently two miniature horses. (Photo courtesy of Sarah Moore)

interacted with students, parents, and teachers, on the front lawn at Princeton High School (PHS) on horses accompanied by handlers from the Pegasus Therapeutic Riding Center in Philadelphia.

TOPICS

Of the Town

At the second meeting each month Resnick often invites speakers to talk about different types of service and therapy animals. She emphasized the difference between service dogs, that require a lot more training than therapy dogs and are trained for just one person, and therapy dogs, that go to schools, hospitals and other public places.

“Not a lot of people have seen miniature horses,” said PHS junior Kayla Resnick, the founder of the PHS Animal Therapy Club who arranged the visit. “Their reactions were partly the shock of ‘Oh, my god, what is that?’ Bringing miniature horses to our school is a dream come true.”

The handlers delivered a presentation about the work they do with many horses and hundreds of human participants of all ages throughout the Philadelphia area. “People couldn’t take their eyes off the horses,” said Resnick. “They were listening so well and asking a lot of good questions. They were all very excited to see the horses, especially once they got to petting them.”

“There’s a big difference,” she said. “You can go up to a therapy dog and pet it, but don’t go up to a service dog

Since she launched the club at PHS in the spring of 2023, Resnick has led two meetings each month and has seen interest grow steadily. “The idea started about a year ago when my mom and I were eating dinner and talking about how we love horseback riding and what it does for us. We were talking about animals and my mom said, ‘Imagine if we had that in school.’ And we both thought, ‘Oh my god. That could be a thing.’”

Assisted by classmate Sarai Martinez and others, Resnick filled out the necessary forms to start a club, met with the dean of students, gathered the necessary signatures, put up posters advertising the new club, attended the club fair, and soon had a sizable roster of members.

At one meeting each month they have a visit from a therapy dog, often from Bright and Beautiful Therapy Dogs, Inc. in Morris Plains, or the Attitudes in Reverse (AIR) Foundation

One-Year Subscription: $20 Two-Year Subscription: $25 Subscription Information: 609.924.5400 ext. 30 or subscriptions@ witherspoonmediagroup.com princetonmagazine.com IN PRINT. ONLINE. AT HOME. 5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024 Jewelry by SJ Mack Design www.princetonmagazinestore.com Shop Princeton Magazine Online Store for all your Princeton gifts! www.princetonmagazinestore.com Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton NEW PRODUCTS FROM HAMILTON JEWELERS Continued on Next Page SHADE Offering SHADE Offering the Finest SHADE TREES & 609.924.6767609.924.6767 609.924.6767 • 4339 Route 27, Princeton 2 miles north of Kingston • Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm • Sunday 9am - 4pm ~ DELIVERY AND PLANTING AVAILABLE ~ 609.924.6767 • Route 27, Princeton 2 miles north of Kingston Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm • Sunday 9am - 4pm Proudly Serving the Montgomery and Princeton Area for Over 36 Years! Landscape Design & Installation From our farm to your yard Same soil, same climate 19 acres of fine quality specimen plant material Currently offering 20 varieties of unique Redbuds and 20 varieties of Dogwoods We grow unique and hard to find trees & shrubs Introducing the newest varieties available in the industry 609.924.6767 • 4339 Route 27, Princeton 2 miles north of Kingston Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm • Sunday 9am - 4pm ~ DELIVERY AND PLANTING AVAILABLE ~ 609.924.6767 • Route 27, Princeton 2 miles north of Kingston Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm • Sunday 9am - 4pm Proudly Serving the Montgomery and Princeton Area for Over 36 Years! Landscape Design & Installation From our farm to your yard Same soil, same climate 19 acres of fine quality specimen plant material Currently offering 20 varieties of unique Redbuds and 20 varieties of Dogwoods We grow unique and hard to find trees & shrubs Introducing the newest varieties available in the industry 609.924.6767 • 4339 Route 27, Princeton 2 miles north of Kingston Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm • Sunday 9am - 4pm ~ DELIVERY AND PLANTING AVAILABLE ~ Offering the Finest quality of locally grown SHADE TREES & FLOWERING TREES 609.924.6767 • Route 27, Princeton 2 miles north of Kingston Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm • Sunday 9am - 4pm Fall is for Planting Proudly Serving the Montgomery and Princeton Area for Over 36 Years! Landscape Design & Installation Same soil, same climate 19 acres of fine quality specimen plant material Currently offering 20 varieties of unique Redbuds and 20 varieties of Dogwoods We grow unique and hard to find trees & shrubs Introducing the newest varieties available in the industry 609.924.6767 • 4339 Route 27, Princeton 2 miles north of Kingston Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm • Sunday 9am - 4pm ~ DELIVERY AND PLANTING Offering the Finest quality SHADE TREES & FLOWERING 609.924.6767 • Route 2 miles north of Kingston Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm • Sunday Fall is for Planting Proudly Serving the Montgomery and Princeton Landscape Design & 19 acres Currently Redbuds We grow Introducing 609.924.6767 • 4339 Route 2 miles north of Kingston Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm • Sunday ~ DELIVERY AND PLANTING AVAILABLE ~ Offering the Finest quality of locally grown SHADE TREES & FLOWERING TREES 609.924.6767 • Route 27, Princeton 2 miles north of Kingston Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm • Sunday 9am - 4pm Fall is for Planting Proudly Serving the Montgomery and Princeton Area for Over 36 Landscape Design & Installation 19 acres of fine quality specimen plant material Currently offering 20 varieties of unique Redbuds and 20 varieties of Dogwoods We grow unique and hard to find trees & shrubs Introducing the newest varieties available in the industry 609.924.6767 • 4339 Route 27, Princeton 2 miles north of Kingston Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm • Sunday 9am - 4pm POTTERY! From our farm to your yard • Same soil, same climate 13 acres of fine quality specimen plant material Currently offering 25 varieties of unique Redbuds and 25 varieties of Dogwoods We grow unique and hard to find trees & shrubs Introducing the newest varieties available in the industry! CELEBRATING 40 YEARS! Offering the Finest quality of locally grown SHADE TREES & FLOWERING TREES ~ DELIVERY AND PLANTING AVAILABLE ~ AND AVAILABLE ~

and pet it. A lot of people get that mixed up.”

“When the animals are there I try not to interfere as much as I can, because I want the students to do whatever is comfortable for them,” said Resnick. “I don’t want to get in the middle of that. I’m there to make sure the dogs are comfortable, that the owners are comfortable, and to make sure the dogs don’t get too overcrowded. Sometimes I tell people to step back a little bit.”

Resnick commented on the growing popularity of the club, especially on days when animals visit. “I’ve heard people say, ‘I’ve really needed it this week’ or ‘This just brightened my day.’ It’s been amazing.”

Though there have been no reported horse visits to the elementary schools, a regular visitor with pre-K through fifth grade students in all four elementary schools is Tiger, a goldendoodle under the guidance of Elementary Education Supervisor Sarah Moore.

“Tiger has come in to talk about social emotional learning, has had students read to him, and has come into quite a few classrooms as a special surprise when students finish reading Because of Winn Dixie [a story about a dog named Winn Dixie after a Southern supermarket],” said Moore.

She added, “Last week Tiger joined in on our staff wellness professional development session and was able to spend time with staff from across Princeton Public Schools. Tiger enjoys getting to meet friends across Princeton and helping students celebrate their learning. He has had a tremendously positive impact on school culture and climate within our four elementary buildings.”

Resnick reflected on the positive effects of animals on individuals and groups. “The environment at PHS seems very friendly, but it’s so competitive,” she said. “It’s really easy to get caught up in that and to forget, ‘Hey, I need a moment for myself too.’ Animals are something that we take time out of our day for. They bring your heart rate down when you pet them. There’s a great release, and therapy animals love being around people. It just creates such a nice environment.”

Resnick looks forward to seeing the Animal Therapy Club continue to grow, with regular monthly visits by dogs and perhaps a return visit from the miniature horses Bleu and Big Mac — and the AIR Foundation claims to have a therapy goat that it is eager to introduce to the PHS community.

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Question of the Week:

“What are you hoping to find today?”

(Asked Saturday at Princeton Record Exchange’s 14th annual Record Store Day)

(Photos by Sarah Teo)

“English Beat, Fun Boy Three, and the reprint of the first Stones album. Also any Zeppelin, and a Beatles limited edition set that comes with 3-inch records.”

Nick: “The recent Type O Negative reissue for Life is Killing Me … actually there’s an At the Gates reissue for Slaughter of the Soul, I’m looking for that … just whatever I can find, there’s always a bunch of stuff here I want.”

Chris: “The Cure; this old ska artist, Prince Buster; Ramones demos; and there’s a Ween and Primus South Park record coming out…hunting for that.”

David: “Today I’m looking for Chicano Batman, to get the new album.”

Isabel: “We like to come to the record shop to buy anything Latin American … we find a lot of one-offs from a specific country, like a record from Venezuela for $1. We found a stash of Brazilian records the last time we were here.” —David

TOWN TALK©
the expression of
national issues.
A forum for
opinions about local and
—Robert Kalama, Princeton —Nick Stype and Chris Frascella, Hamilton Alvarado and Isabel Gallegos, Princeton Marlon: “She wanted to get Wallows’ Nothing Happens…it’s the 5th anniversary edition, a Record Store Day exclusive, and I believe there’s only like 5,000 in existence. We went to Red Bank — Jack’s Music Shop — and they like instantly sold out the moment we were there.”
TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024 • 6 Dogs and Horses
—Marlon Jauregui and Mia Zuccaro, Matawan
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DIRECTOR ’ S CONVERSATION Dance Past, Present, and Future

FRIDAY, APRIL 26

5:30 pm | Wolfensohn Hall 1 Einstein Drive | Princeton, NJ 08540 FREE PUBLIC EVENT

Join IAS Director and Leon Levy Professor David Nirenberg in conversation with mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato on topics ranging from female authors in opera to the future of the arts. A master class with rising star Jeysla Rosario Santos and collaborative artist Justina Lee will be followed by audience Q&A.

Join IAS Director and Leon Levy Professor David Nirenberg for a conversation with Artistic Director Tamara Rojo and dance historian Jennifer Homans on the place and practice of dance in the past, present, and future of our arts and culture.

JENNIFER HOMANS

DAVID NIRENBERG

Pre-registration is required, available using QR code. https://www.ias.edu/form/ directors-convo-april-2024

DIRECTOR ’ S CONVERSATION

FRIDAY, MAY 3

5:00 pm | Wolfensohn Hall

1 Einstein Drive | Princeton, NJ 08540

Pre-registration is required, available using QR code.

https://www.ias.edu/form/ directors-conversation-may-2024

The Power of Song: Creation, Embodiment, E ect
TAMARA ROJO
FREE PUBLIC EVENT JUSTINA LEE JEYSLA R. SANTOS DAVID NIRENBERG

Library’s “Local Author Day”

Offers Several Literary Events

It is billed as Local Author Day. But the annual event at Princeton Public Library, now in its 13th year, is actually a weekend-long celebration of area writers, their books, and the strategies that go into getting them published.

The celebration April 2628 will blend live and virtual presentations designed to appeal to a range of ages and preferences. The main event is Saturday from 1-4 p.m., when 42 local authors take over the library’s first floor to sign books and meet the public. Two online workshops and one in person are also on the agenda.

“This is always a thrilling event for me,” said Adult Services Librarian Nora Walsh. “Every year, we streamline the process to make it better for everybody. We’re taking a hybrid approach that has worked since COVID. We have the author event in person, but also the flexibility to have presentations and workshops virtually, which allows us to reach a wider audience.”

The focus this year is on helping authors get the word out. At the virtual “Book Promotion Strategies” on Friday evening at 6:30 p.m., publicity expert Leah Paulos will share hints about effectively positioning books and finding targeted media outlets for them. Saturday at 11 a.m., librarian and author Gabrielle Esposito hosts a “Revision and Editing Workshop,” also on Zoom. Esposito plans a comprehensive exploration

of the revision and editing process, helping writers know how to create clear, error-free content.

In the library’s STEAM Studio on Sunday at 12:30 p.m., author Megan McCafferty will lead “Prepping for Publication,” geared to young writers in grades five to eight. Participants can bring their works-in-process to share with the group, and learn how to prepare a pitch for publication in youth literary journals. Earlier that day at 11 a.m., architect Robert Hillier (a Town Topics shareholder) will take part in a Book Brunch event in the Community Room, focused on Hillier: Selected Works, written with his late wife, Barbara Hillier.

At the author event, writers of books for children and young readers will be positioned in the library’s main area on the first floor. Authors of books for adults will be at tables in the Community Room. Some of the writers are returning participants; others are new. The annual event always attracts more author applicants than the library can accommodate.

“I can’t speak to other town libraries, but it does feel unusual to have this many,” said Walsh. “There is definitely a large demographic here in Princeton, a nice, local pool of authors.”

The goal is to find a balance between genres of books, “so people can come and experience not just one thing,” said Walsh. “It’s a little different every year. We like to have

at least a small collection of works for young readers, and we get some really lovely ones for kids. It just always depends on the crop of applicants.”

A browse through the book covers of this year’s participants on the library’s website yields an eclectic mix of topics, from serious self-help to poetry and fiction. There are some familiar names: A Tailor-Made Man by Nick Hilton, of the Hiltons Princeton clothing store on Witherspoon Street; and Pie for my Birthday by Jen Carson, owner of LiLLiPiES Bakery.

“At an event like this, part of the fun is to get something signed. And you have the author right here,” said Walsh. “Getting to interact with the authors is very special.”

All events of the weekend are free. For more information, visit princetonlibrary.org.

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REWARDING CYCLISTS: Thirty-one Princeton businesses team up again this year to encourage and reward cycling in Princeton. For the 19th year running, a representative from the Whole Earth Center will be on the streets of Princeton in May (National Bike Month) to reward random cyclists with packets of gift cards to local businesses. In all, 30 cyclists will receive a packet containing $60+ in gift cards, such as the one seen here being held by last year’s first winner, Jaco De Swart.

Farminary Dinner Series Pairs Food and Talks

“First Thursdays at the Farm,” a dinner series hosted at The Farminary, Princeton Theological Seminary’s 21-acre farm, begins May 2. The series brings together different scholars, activists, and artists to give a short talk or be interviewed over dinner.

First in the series is a conversation with Carolyn Finner, titled “Black Faces, White Spaces: African American’s Representation in the Great Outdoors.” Finney is a storyteller, author, and cultural geographer interested in issues related to identity, difference, creativity, and resilience. She is an artist-in-residence and the Environmental Studies Professor of Practice in the Franklin Environmental Center at Middlebury College. The featured chef is Joe Rocchi.

Admission is $125. The Farminary is at 4200 Princeton Pike. Visit ptsem.edu for more information and a complete schedule.

Princeton-Blairstown Center

To Present Special Awards

Princeton-Blairstown Center (PBC) will present the 2024 Frank Broderick Award to the Community of Christina Seix Academy, and the 2024 Reverend David H. McAlpin, Jr. Community Champion Award to Princeton University at this year’s signature fundraiser “Soirée Under the Stars,” at Springdale Golf Club on Friday, May 3.

The Frank Broderick Award is given to an individual, or group of individuals, who demonstrate a deep commitment to social

justice, compassion, and selflessness, which are qualities that Broderick personified in his efforts to achieve racial integration of the Princeton Summer Camp, an earlier iteration of PBC, and to mobilize those who advocated for racial integration at Princeton University in the 1940s.

As a recipient of this award, the Community of Christina Seix Academy demonstrates a commitment to addressing the systemic educational and other barriers that have historically held back children from underrepresented communities. Like Broderick, the Community of Christina Seix Academy effects positive change by enabling graduates and their families to succeed in their own right and become impactful leaders in and beyond their local communities.

The Reverend David H. McAlpin, Jr. Community Champion Award is presented to an organization that has demonstrated a

deep commitment to social responsibility through the investment of human and financial resources to advance the lives and opportunities of people from historically marginalized communities. The award was created in 2023 to honor the memory of the Rev. McAlpin, who served on the Boards of and supported countless nonprofit organizations in Mercer County and was an Honorary Trustee of PBC. Princeton University will receive this award in recognition of the work it does to ensure socio-economic diversity among their students, staff, and faculty so that they have a genuine opportunity to thrive and engage fully with the University’s mission of research, teaching and service. Like McAlpin, Princeton University demonstrates a strong commitment to a more equitable future for young people from historically marginalized communities. Visit Princetonblairstown. org for ticket information.

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couples will be honored, and members, former members, and community residents are getting together to celebrate.

“With what is in the news, at this time, the Jewish community is thrilled and excited to have a joyous occasion,” said Rabbi Andrea Merow. “It is an exciting time. This is something positive, because there is an uptick in events and participation.”

Ruth Schulman joined the congregation 60 years ago when she moved to Princeton with her young family. Since she had lived on a kibbutz in Israel in the early 1950s, she was asked to teach in the Hebrew School, and got to know a lot of people.

The community was, and is, a diverse one, she said, and had some robust discussions through the years, which was fine with her. “To me, what’s so impressive and so marvelous about The Jewish Center, is that we are a diverse community and we stay together,” she said.

According to The Historical Society of Princeton’s research on the occasion of The Jewish Center’s 50 th anniversary, Princeton’s Jewish community first organized in 1926 as Congregation B’nai Zion, using a borrowed Torah scroll from a Trenton synagogue. Services were conducted in a rented ballroom on the second floor of the Branch Building at 35 Witherspoon Street.

In 1935, the congregation moved to a larger space on the Spring Street side of the building. The Sunday school was organized in 1944, with classes in private homes. In 1947, B’nai Zion hired its first rabbi, who was shared with the new Hillel on the Princeton University campus.

The rapidly expanding Jewish community formed The Jewish Center on December 11, 1949, adopting its first constitution, and meeting at 61 Olden Avenue (now Olden Street). The building at 435 Nassau was completed in 1958, and the structure now used for religious school classes was acquired in the early 1970s. The main building was expanded in 1983 to house the current sanctuary, social hall, and offices.

Today, the synagogue grounds are graced by blossoming trees. A plaza is often the setting for outdoor Shabbat services. Names of members and their families are celebrated and memorialized on a brick walkway leading to the entrances. A nature trail on the property was created by teens during the pandemic.

Rabbi Merow came to The Jewish Center in 2021, “at a very difficult time,” she said, referring to the death of Rabbi Adam Feldman, the rabbi since 2005, who died in December 2019. She considered Rabbi Feldman a colleague. Then, three months later, the synagogue shut down for Covid-19.

But, said Rabbi Merow, “I was grateful to come into a place that is thriving, and has a stellar lay leadership. It’s truly a community

synagogue.” The congregation affiliated with the Conservative movement some 20 years ago, but maintains “an open tent,” she said. “There is a lot of Jewish expression, and there are lots of ways to be involved.

“We are not just celebrating 75 years but the future.”

Congregational President Heidi Joseph said while the founders are gone, some of their children are members, and there are second-generation Bar and Bat Mitzvah celebrants.

The membership is growing, she said, in fact, a new Tot Spot program for children under three years old was recently started. “It’s a warm and inviting community,” she said.

The Jewish Center is part of the Princeton community. Just last month, in recognition of the 75th anniversary, the congregation established in Tiger Park the first Holocaust memorial in Princeton – a daffodil garden which is part of an international program in memory of the children that perished in the Holocaust. The event was attended by more than 150 people.

And, the greater community is celebrating with The Jewish Center, which has received proclamations and letters of congratulation from U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, U.S. Rep Andy Kim, other elected state officials, area municipalities, national and local Jewish organizations, and the Jewish Center’s sister city, City of Omer in Israel. Being honored are Lori and Michael Feldstein, Linda and Michael Grenis, Arlene and Henry Opatut, and Alison and David Politziner.

Hazel Stix, who has been a member almost since the beginning, when she and her husband moved to Princeton in 1950, said that “everyone knew everybody. Everyone stayed friends. It’s a home away from home.”

Phil Carchman, a retired judge, came to Princeton with his wife in 1966 for a judicial clerkship, and one of his first stops was The Jewish Center, to have a place to observe the fall Jewish holidays. As a young married couple, he said, the congregation “adopted” him and his wife, and had them for dinners.

As it became the center of Jewish life in Princeton, more young couples joined, he said. “Many of our friends today are from The Jewish Center.” And as their friends had children, the children became friends.

Carchman, a synagogue president from 1976-1977, said the Jewish Center is where families celebrated milestone events together. “It is where people look to express joy, grief, and concerns about news in Princeton and the rest of the world. This is the place we go,” he said.

Added Ruth Schulman, “We’re there to help each other. The most important thing is, we stayed together as one congregation. It’s beautiful.”

The May 4 gala is sold out but raffle tickets are available through the synagogue website, thejewishcenter.org

—Wendy Greenberg

for all graduate students to thrive will remain a top priority for the University.”

childcare,” “affordable housing guaranteed through graduation,” “guaranteed cost of living adjustments and contingency funding,” and “fair, clear, and safe work standards,” according to the PGSU’s platform as posted on their website.

University officials have expressed “concerns” about the establishment of a graduate student union. Providing an abundance of information sent out to graduate students and on the University website, they seem committed to making sure that students are well informed on the pros and cons of unionization. They also seem committed to support the election.

Morven continued from page one

continued from page one even some polyester garb on display. “We have Mrs. Byrne’s inaugural gown from 1974, which is on loan from the family,” Allan said. “It’s paired with a portrait of Mary Field Stockton done in the 1820’s, where she’s wearing her best fashion. It’s great to have that kind of juxtaposition.”

Nair pointed out that the University, unlike some peer universities, has not strongly resisted the push to unionize. She applauded Princeton administrators’ efforts to encourage students to participate in the process and noted that the administration had held two town halls for graduate students to discuss the pros and cons of union membership.

“I don’t know if I would say that they’re very excited about a union,” she added. “The administration conversations have leaned towards students thinking twice about unionizing.”

“We have received the petition for a union election filed on behalf of Princeton graduate students,” University Director of Media Relations Jennifer Morrill wrote in an April 23 email.

“The University agrees that a secret ballot election is the most inclusive, fair, and secure method for those eligible to express their preference whether to be represented by the United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America.”

She continued, echoing a Febr uary 2023 letter sent out from Graduate School Dean Rodney Priestley to graduate students, “It is important to note that by design, union representation would change some aspects of graduate students’ relationship with Princeton, and the University has concerns about how such representation would affect graduate students’ education and experience here.”

Morrill’s statement concluded, “Regardless of whether our graduate students are represented by a union, providing holistic support and an environment

Nair described some of the benefits she looks forward to with the establishment of a graduate student union. “One thing we hope unionizing will do is to make Princeton attractive to incoming graduate students in the way that students at other institutions have been able to win some control over their lives.”

Noting that graduate students teach many undergraduate students and also produce world class research that helps to make Princeton University what it is, Nair added, “We hope this union wins graduate students some protections that will make graduate work at Princeton better, which will have an impact on how comfortable we are, how effective we are, and what kind of research we can do.”

Earlier this spring postdoctoral workers at Princeton also fi led for an NLRB election, which is scheduled to take place on May 8 and 9. The postdoctoral scholars are hoping to form the first academic union on campus, and Nair is hoping for an election soon after that to establish a graduate student union.

Childhood is the focus of another section. “This house was, at times, bustling with children,” Allan said. “The signer had six. Lots of babies were born in these rooms. We talk about that. We have toys that have been uncovered during archaeology — a Victorian doll fragment, marbles, even a child’s ring.”

One room is all about entertaining at Morven. Silver, china, and porcelain used in setting the table are on view in a recreated butler’s pantry. Holidays at the house, including the electrified Baby Jesus that belonged to the family of Gov. Richard Hughes, are another subject. The home’s famous guests and resident pets are also documented.

“We have a pet wall,” said Allan. “The thoroughbred horses bred by Commodore [Robert F.] Stockton are there, along with all of the puppies that have lived here. We’ve tracked down most of their names. And cats, too.”

The final section of the show has portraits and panels explaining Morven’s connections to Princeton properties including Lowrie House, Westland, Palmer House, and Prospect House. The property was originally much larger than its present five-acre site.

Related programs include “From Mansion to Museum: A Panel Discussion” on May 1 at 6:30 p.m. Speakers from the private and public spheres, who were involved in the process of creating the museum, will take part. On May 19 at 1 p.m., a walking tour of Morven’s neighboring Mercer Hill district will be led by the authors of Discovering Princeton: A Photographic Guide with Five Walking Tours. Space is limited. Visit morven.org to reserve.

“We’re 20 years old, but our history goes back to the 1750s,” Allan said. “This is a great way to celebrate.”

Princeton Professor To Speak at HIP Gala

On May 5, Housing Initiatives of Princeton (HIP) will host its annual spring fundraising event, which will feature a talk by John N. Robinson III, associate faculty in American Studies and assistant professor of Sociology at Princeton University.

Robinson will speak on the history of nonprofits and their impact on the evolution of affordable housing production in the U.S., as well as how our collective wellbeing hinges on us taking care of and feeling responsible for one another.

Robinson studies the racial underpinnings of money and markets, with emphasis on housing and credit policies. His current book project explores the ongoing rise of the affordable housing industry in the U.S. and its intersections with racial and economic inequality.

HIP helps low-income working families and individuals in the greater Princeton area avoid homelessness through its Transitional Housing program, which provides stable housing and wraparound services to local individuals and families experiencing housing insecurity, and its Rental Assistance program, which provides emergency rental assistance to low-income individuals and families facing eviction. With the support of the Princeton community, HIP strives to equip its inneed neighbors with tools for self-sufficiency, acting as a bridge between homelessness and hope.

In addition to Robinson’s lecture, the evening will include a menu by iQuisine, and music by members of the Philadelphia band, Liberty Bell Brass. Visit housinginitiativesofprinceton.org for ticket information.

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Two PHS Educators Make Connections, Create Programs With School in Mexico

Andrea Dinan, director of the Ideas Center for tutoring at Princeton High School (PHS), and PHS social studies teacher Christine Carbone, spent their spring vacation week in the city of Merida, Mexico, leading an English language Boot Camp program for a high school populated mainly by Mayan and itinerant workers.

The high school, Unidad Academica Bachillerato con Interaccion Comunitaria (UABIC), helps to prepare the students to take the college entrance exam in June, and the Boot Camp program, now in its sixth year, is the outgrowth of a Fulbright Distinguished Teachers Program award that Dinan received in 2016.

The two teachers worked with UABIC students daily and coordinated a number of electronic exchanges with PHS, including live Zooms and a pen pal letter program.

“Building Bridges, our English language camp, is a passion project that annually re-invigorates me and leaves me with more enthusiasm, empathy, and commitment for our work helping Spanish-speaking students at Princeton High School,” Dinan wrote in an email.

The UABIC school prioritizes service-learning and has spurred service projects that Dinan and Carbone have established at PHS. “The service programs at UABIC inspired us to push for our programming to go to the next level,” said Dinan. “We offer professional

development and support to teachers district-wide to create new service projects with their students.”

She continued, “Since we visited Merida we have received three grants for our Generation 1 Club from the National Youth Leadership Council for service activities in our school and community.”

Both Dinan and Carbone work with first generation students on college and career readiness, and both have been teaching an immersive summer English language learner program for more than 10 years. Dinan works in the counseling department and coordinates tutoring programs as well as community service and service learning programs. Carbone teaches many English language learners in her history courses and in her psychology-based human behavior course.

Dinan described the origins of their current alliance with UABIC. “In 2016, PHS did not have a robust ELL (English Language Learners) program,” Dinan wrote. “I had spent a handful of summers in Guatemala exploring where our students came from and learning Spanish.”

She traveled to conferences and communicated with refugee groups around the U.S., seeking supports for her students at PHS. Deciding to explore programming in other countries, Dinan applied and was awarded the Fulbright Distinguished Awards in Teaching, and she

embarked to Merida in 2016. Supported by the Rotary Club of Princeton Corridor, of which she was a member and past president, Dinan was able to work with the Club de Rotario in Merida and to visit and make connections with educators and administrators throughout the state of Yucatan.

She was soon drawn to the UABIC. “The school addressed all of the obstacles that their migrant, indigenous, and impoverished students experienced, with wrap-around services and longer school days,” said Dinan. “Additionally, they were a service-learning school and each semester was dedicated to a different service project involving action in the community. It was a perfect match for my interests and research.”

Dinan interviewed students, observed classes, and attended service projects at UABIC. When she asked the principal, Guillermo Gil, how she could repay them, he suggested assistance in English, and in 2017 Dinan enlisted Carbone to help her in creating the English language project, which has continued ever since. More than 50 students work with Dinan and Carbone for a week each spring and connect with their PHS students via Zoom and pen pal letters. Carbone described traveling to Merida in 2017 to visit Dinan on her Fulbright project. “I immediately fell in love with the city, the people, and the culture of

BUILDING BRIDGES: Andrea Dinan (left), director of the PHS Ideas Center, and PHS social studies teacher Christine Carbone have led an English language Boot Camp program in the city of Merida, Mexico during spring break week over the past six years. They have forged strong alliances between their students at PHS and the school in Merida. (Photo courtesy of Andrea Dinan) Merida,” she wrote. “That summer Andrea approached me about co-creating an English immersion program with her that we could run in Merida.”

They worked for the next month to create the program and launched their first camp in 2018 with a program integrating games, art, and conversational English to help students prepare for their university entrance exams.

“The first year we focused our work on highlighting the service-learning aspects of the school,” Carbone said. “Students each selected a project run at the school, wrote articles, and illustrated pictures to highlight the project. In 2019 our focus was the city of Merida. Students created the ABCs of Merida, and other topics included storytelling and poetry.”

Dinan’s work in Merida has encouraged her to work on refugee and other support programs in the Central Jersey area. “The service projects at UABIC were inspirations for new programming that we introduced in our own school,” she said. “I have continued to be very active with Fulbright and have served as a mentor and presented at many conferences for incoming awardees.”

Dinan and Carbone have also hosted Gil on a visit from Merida to PHS. “He was very impressed with Princeton and loved the community and meeting the students,” Carbone wrote. “He gave the ELL students a motivational speech in Spanish.”

Last year an alumnus from their UABIC summer program was awarded a grant to visit the University of Michigan. During his interviews with TV and radio stations he showed a picture of Dinan and Carbone and noted his appreciation for their inspiration. “Best yet, he is now completing his teaching hours to become a dual language teacher and was able to assist us in the program this year,” Dinan reported.

“Thanks to Princeton Public Schools, the Rotary Club of Princeton Corridor, and the Fulbright Distinguished Awards, we have been able to build a lasting partnership that will benefit both districts and all of our students,” she added. “We are so grateful.”

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Arbor Day Foundation

Names Princeton a Tree City

The Municipality of Princeton was named a 2024 Tree City USA by the Arbor Day Foundation for the 28th year in a row in honor of its commitment to effective forest management. The Tree City USA program is sponsored by the Arbor Day Foundation in partnership with the U.S. Forest Service and the National Association of State Foresters.

“Princeton continues to exceed the Tree City USA requirements in our commitment to Princeton’s forest.

We have a Certified Arborist and Licensed Tree Expert on-staff who manages a rigorous shade tree ordinance and spring and fall tree planting projects. He also priorities educational outreach opportunities including Arbor Day events at the elementary schools and Community Night Out”, said Deanna Stockton, deputy administrator.

“I take caring for Princeton’s tree canopy very seriously. Using the knowledge I gained while working for the New York City Parks Department and my formal education and training as an arborist, I aim to make Princeton’s streets as safe and as aesthetically pleasing as possible,” said Municipal Arborist Taylor Sapudar. “Princeton is a great community that has a passion for trees. We are fortunate to have the support of our elected officials and the necessary staff and resources to care for them the best we can.”

In celebration of Arbor Day and Princeton being named a 2024 Tree City, the Shade Tree Commission will be giving out free tree saplings at Porchfest in Hinds Plaza on Sunday April 27 from noon to 6 p.m.

“Everyone benefits when elected officials, volunteers and committed citizens in communities like Princeton make smart investments in urban forests,” said Dan Lambe, chief executive of the Arbor Day Foundation. “Trees bring shade to our homes and beauty to our neighborhoods, along with numerous economic, social and environmental benefits.” More information on the program is available at arborday.org/TreeCityUSA.

Police Blotter

On April 7, at 4:45 a.m., police patrols responded to an activated commercial burglar alarm on Nassau Street. Subsequent investigation revealed that approximately three unknown individuals forced entry into a Nassau Street business and stole several items of jewelry after breaking display cases with a sledgehammer and glass-breaking tools. The unknown persons fled the scene in a white Jeep Grand Cherokee with black rims and a temporary license plate.

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Nassau Swim Club Provided Ideal, Safe Environment for Kids to Learn to Swim

To the

When I was growing up, I did not have many opportunities to swim and consequently, I never learned how to swim. When I had children, it was so important to me that they learn to swim so that they can learn to love the water and not be afraid of it. With so many reports of children drowning, one takes for granted the importance of this life-saving skill.

Nassau Swim Club made recreational swimming accessible to me and my family. When we moved to Hamilton several years ago, I was looking for a local community pool and was disappointed to learn that it had closed some years ago. Nassau Swim Club was open to all and attracted members from the wider Princeton area, many of whom, like me, work at the Institute for Advanced Study or Princeton University. Nassau provided an ideal, safe environment for my young kids to learn to swim, plus a sense of community and belonging. It saddens me to think my children and many other children like them will no longer have this opportunity. The Nassau Swim Club was perfect for our family, not only in terms of affordability, but convenience as well. I am not a resident of Princeton, so the alternatives have higher non-resident rates that are not within our budget and are also much farther away.

We need more places like Nassau, not less. It’s disheartening that the University is not moved by the many pleas from the community, nor the impressive and ongoing effort by the Nassau leadership to turn this situation around. In response to the University’s unexpected move to terminate the lease, the Nassau leadership stepped up and their new business plan shows how Nassau can not only be financially viable and afford the yearly property taxes, but also pay back its debt to the University over time (nassauswimclub.org/retrospective).

The University’s decision at this point to continue on a destructive path is senseless and heartless. Why take away important opportunities for families, including those of its own students/staff, when all that is being asked of the University is to continue a lease for land that is not being used for any other purpose? PU should reconsider its cost/value analysis for Nassau or at least allow time and opportunity for a community partner to invest in this valuable community resource.

Also, as IAS does not have a pool of its own as PU does, it is surprising that they aren’t doing more to ensure that a benefit like this remains available to its members, their families, and its staff. Princeton University offered Broadmead Swim Club a challenge grant when faced with a similar situation. Why was this not offered to the Nassau Swim Club as well? The ones affected by this decision the most are the children. All Nassau Swim Club is asking for is a chance.

PU Should Enter New Lease, Pay Property Tax for Nassau Swim Club

To the Editor: I moved to Princeton with my family as a child nearly 70 years ago, and though I’ve been a member of this wonderful community for so long, I don’t think I’ve been to the Nassau Swim Club more than once or twice, if that. So I have no stake whatsoever in Princeton University’s decision to terminate the lease with the club for financial reasons.

It saddens me, however, that the University has made this decision given the benefits that the club provides to members of this community, so many of whom are children and teenagers and so many of whom are also affiliated with the University itself. It’s my understanding that approximately 20 percent of club members are University students and staff, and that well over a third of the members are associated with either the University or with the Institute for Advanced Study. (While I understand the there is no formal link between the University and the Institute, the two enjoy a close, collaborative relationship.)

It is unarguably true that the swim club has fallen significantly short of fulfilling the financial requirements of its lease with PU. A significant reason for that is because the lease requires the club to reimburse the University for the approximate $20,000 per year property tax it pays to the municipality.

So I have to ask: Given the extraordinary wealth of the University, and the benefits the club provides not only to the town itself but to so many families associated with the University, would it be too much to ask for the University to pay the property tax itself?

What do I mean by “extraordinary wealth?”

According to the University’s Office of Communications, Princeton’s endowment was $34.1 billion as of the end of its last fiscal year. That’s billion, with a B. A paltry investment return of 3 percent would generate income of $1.023 billion per year, or the tidy sum of $2.8 million per day, and a meager 5 percent return would generate $4.67 million per day of income.

But the fact is that over the past 20 years, the average rate of return on the endowment has been 10.5 percent, or close to $10 million per day. It seems clear that asking Princeton to pay the property tax on the property leased to the swim club would have about the same impact on it than if Bill Gates was asked to toss a quarter into the Salvation Army bucket at Christmas time.

So what I suggest is that the University enter into a new long term lease with the club that among other things would provide that the University pick up the tab for property taxes while at the same time forgiving part of the loan the club owes to it and working with the club’s board to restructure other debt and create a reasonable budget.

PU is Ignoring Voices of Nassau Swim Club, its History, and Importance to Future

To the Editor:

As your readers know by now, Princeton University has decided to bulldoze the humble and beloved Nassau Swim club, nestled in the woods near the Institute for Advanced Study.

You have received many letters to the editor, detailing the far-reaching impact Nassau Swim Club has had on so many people throughout the world.

And yet, Princeton University won›t budge. Its reaction has been to continue with its plans to dismantle this humble summer haven. This is heartbreaking as Princeton could make such an important, humane difference by choosing to fund Nassau or, at the very least, giving its members/board another chance.

In 2022, in an online news aggregator and blog called 3 Quarks Daily (3quarksdaily.com), Malcolm Gladwell wrote a piece about Princeton University’s absurd endowment — it’s unimaginable.

After reading information about Princeton University’s unprecedented wealth, and, in light of the paltry fee to keep Nassau going, this whole predicament feels laughable and embarrassing for Princeton University. That is, if Princeton University actually cared.

In a world where we are losing touch with humanity and what really matters, i.e. people, human touch, face-to-face

Town’s Current Trash System Needs Improvement to Handle More Garbage

To the Editor:

Our current garbage disposal system needs improvement because it does not provide adequate service for situations in which more than typical weekly trash needs to be collected. I recently completed a general house cleaning, and my single bin was not adequate for amount of discards I accumulated. I compost, recycle, reuse, and donate as much as possible. I donate respectfully. I do not use our local charities as disposal facilities for worn and unusable clothing and linens, broken kitchen gadgets and appliances, a well-used cat litter box, or games and puzzles with missing parts or pieces. These items are simply trash.

The solution for the problem of additional trash due to house cleaning, holiday celebrations and large extended family dinners is to add bagged garbage to the items accepted for weekly bulk waste pick-up.

It is ironic that our officials are promoting over-development of our community without providing the basic municipal service of adequate trash pick-up for current residents. However, my solution will eliminate a common, recurring problem.

Hopes for “New” Public Library Have Been Realized Beyond Expectation

To the Editor:

As an avid fan of the Princeton Public Library, I read the April 17 article about the 20th anniversary celebration of “the new building” with pleasure [“Celebrating a New Library for a New Era,” page 1].

It’s worth noting that the artist Faith Ringgold, who died just last week, was present at the 2004 library reopening to unveil her mosaic of the “story quilt” on the cover of her Caldecottwinning book, Tar Beach. Ringgold’s recent obituary in the New York Times notes that her work “is in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Guggenheim Museum, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture . . . and other institutions.” How wonderful that our library is one of those “other institutions!” Visitors to the library will surely want to go up to the library’s third-floor haven for children to admire this captivating work of art.

Last week’s Town Topics article, by the way, does a fine job of describing how the planners’ hopes for greater community engagement and the desire to create welcoming spaces informed their vision of the “new” library. That those hopes have been realized beyond expectation is a tribute to a very remarkable, hard-working staff.

11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024 Mailbox The views of the letters do not necessarily reflect the views of Town Topics. Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.
Editor:
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Books

Presents A History of the Muslim World

Princeton University

Professor Michael Cook is joined by research scholar Sadaf Jaffer on Tuesday, April 30, at 6 p.m. at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, to discuss Cook’s forthcoming book A History of the Muslim World: From Its Origins to the Dawn of Modernity.

Co-presented by Labyrinth Books, the discussion promises to be a timely, panoramic history of the Muslim world from the age of the Prophet Muhammad to the birth of the modern era. The book (Princeton University Press, $39.95) describes and explains the major events, personalities, conflicts, and convergences that have shaped the history of the Muslim world, taking readers from the origins of Islam to the eve of the nineteenth century, and an epilogue continues the story to the present day.

“A timely, wide-ranging examination of the Muslim world. . .. Cook’s study sheds crucial light on Islamic development across borders and centuries,” according to Kirkus Reviews.

A History of the Muslim World contains numerous primary-source quotations that expose the reader to a variety of acutely insightful voices from the Muslim past.

Cook is the Class of 1943 university professor of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University. His books include Ancient Religions, Modern Politics: The Islamic Case in Comparative Perspective ; A Brief History of the Human Race; and The Koran: A Very Short Introduction

Jaffer is an associate research scholar of the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies, and an author.

The event is co-sponsored by Princeton University’s Humanities Council and Center for Collaborative History.

Author Amy Tan delves into birding and the natural world with The Backyard Bird Chronicles, her new book that maps the passage of time through daily entries, thoughtful questions, and beautiful original sketches.

She will speak at the Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, on Wednesday May 1, at 7 p.m. The event is co-presented with Labyrinth Books. The book (Knopf, $35) is illustrated by Tan.

“The drawings and essays in [Tan’s new] book do a lot more than just describe the birds,” writes David Allen Sibley in the foreward. “They carry a sense of discovery through observation and drawing, suggest the layers of patterns in the natural world, and emphasize a deep personal connection between the watcher and the watched.

The birds that inhabit Amy Tan’s backyard seem a lot like the characters in her novels.” In 2016, Tan grew overwhelmed by the state of the world. In search of peace, Tan turned toward the natural world just beyond her window and, specifically, the birds visiting her yard. But what began as an attempt to fi nd solace turned into an opportunity to savor quiet moments during a volatile time, connect to nature in a meaningful way, and imagine the intricate lives of the birds she admired.

Tan is the author of several novels, including The Joy Luck Club and The Bonesetter’s Daughter. She is a co-producer and coscreenwriter of the film version of The Joy Luck Club and is on the board of American Bird Conservancy.

Author Explores Meaning And Significance of Print

Jennifer L. Roberts, Drew Gilpin Faust Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University, is joined in conversation by James Welling, photographer and professor at Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts, to discuss her new book, Contact: Art and the Pull of Print, on Monday, April 29, at 6 p.m., at the Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street.

Registration for this event is requested, but not required. A signing will follow the conversation. A registration link is on the event page on the library web site, princetonlibrary.org

The publisher describes the book (Princeton University Press, $39.95), to be released May 14, as “a new grammar for understanding the meaning and significance of print.” Contact reveals how the physical properties of print have their own poetics and politics, and the book provides a new framework for understanding the intelligence and continuing relevance of printmaking today.

Focusing on the material and spatial transformations of the printmaking process rather than its reproducibility, this illustrated book explores the connections between print, painting, and sculpture, but also between the fine arts, industrial arts, decorative arts, and domestic arts.

The book is published in association with the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington A. Roberts is the author of Transporting Visions: The Movement of Images in Early America; Jasper Johns/ In Press: The Crosshatch Works and the Logic of Print ; and Mirror-Travels: Robert Smithson and History

Welling is a photographer whose work has been the subject of a number of significant survey exhibitions. In 2014, he was a recipient of the Infinity Award given by the International Center of Photography, New York, and in 2016 he received the Julius Shulman Institute Excellence in Photography Award from Woodbury University, Calif. From 1995 to 2016, he was area head of photography at UCLA, and since 2012 he has been a lecturer with the rank of professor at Princeton University.

Three Authors Will Speak

On Issues of Social Justice

Three social entrepreneurs and authors will appear together and share uplifting stories and lessons learned in their journey to justice.

The “Three-Authors” events will be held Friday, April 26 from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Mercer County Library Lawrence Headquarters, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrence Township, and again on Friday, April 26 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Nassau Presbyterian Church Assembly Room, 61 Nassau Street. Both events are free and open to the public.

Local author and activist Sam Daley-Harris will discuss the 2024 edition of his book, Reclaiming Our Democracy: Every Citizen’s Guide to Transformational Advocacy (2024 edition). His recent interviews on NPR’s Here and Now and 1A outline why the ideas in the book are an antidote to the despair many people will feel during the elections and beyond.

Publisher’s Weekly BookLife called his book (Rivertown Books, $32.95) a “rousing guide to advocacy, movement-building, and enacting change in cynical times,” and named it an Editor’s Pick.

Author Alex Counts, who started and ran Grameen Foundation (GF) for its fi rst 18 years, will also speak. GF is an international poverty alleviation organization working to advance the approaches pioneered in Bangladesh by Nobel Peace Prize laureate Dr. Muhammad Yunus. Counts’ books include Changing the World Without Losing Your Mind (revised edition, Rivertown Books, $19.95), which Forbes magazine called one of 12 “must-read books for nonprofi t leaders” and was the Chronicle of Philanthropy’s “Editor’s Pick” from its best nonprofit books of 2019.

Author Debbie Frisch, who, in 2017, opened HelloBaby, the nation’s first free-standing, free-ofcharge, drop-in play space for babies, toddlers, and their caregivers located in the struggling Woodlawn neighborhood of Chicago, will appear with DaleyHarris and Counts. Her book, Hello Baby: Building an Oasis in a Play Desert (Rivertown Books, $19.95 ) tells the story of her life journey and her roadmap to spurring community development in urban play deserts. Publisher’s Weekly BookLife said: “Frisch addresses with insight and sensitivity the dynamics of a white woman working with [communities of color in this] valuable resource.”

After the discussion the authors will sign copies of their book.

There is limited parking at the church, and attendees are asked to use meters or parking garages in Princeton.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024 • 12
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Thornton Wilder Crossed His “Bridge” in Princeton

Thornton Wilder’s The Bridge of San Luis Rey (HarperCollins 2004) was the year’s number one fiction bestseller when it was published in 1927; it also received the 1928 Pulitzer Prize and is still in print, reportedly selling seven thousand copies worldwide every year. So how is it that in my long life as a reader

I ignored it until April 17 of last week, Wilder’s 127th birthday? There may be a clue in the wording of the New York Times December 8, 1975 obituary: “Aloof from the 20th century’s preoccupation with politics, psychology and sex,” Wilder “concentrated in his novels and plays on what he construed as the universal verities in human nature. He seemed to be examining mankind from an Olympian platform.”

In his foreword to the 2004 edition, novelist Russell Banks, who died in January 2023, says that Wilder’s novel is “as close to perfect a moral fable as we are ever likely to get in American literature.” The book “feels, in its exquisite universality and ease of timeless application, ancient, classical, almost biblical.” Probably aware of the “aloofness” issue, Banks admits that while “in certain ways, the prose seems antique,” it’s “not in the least antiquated,” the “sentences are elegant, but never selfadmiring, exquisitely balanced, yet not overformal, and complex without being elaborate.” Banks’s way of bringing the novel into contemporary America, circa 2004, is to suggest an analogy between the fictional fall of the bridge that “precipitated five travelers into the gulf below” on July 20, 1714 and the terrorist attack that killed thousands when it brought down the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.

Referring to Brother Juniper, the “metaphysically anxious” Franciscan missionary who witnesses the collapse of the bridge and asks himself why this happened to those five,” Banks recalls how “on that day in September ..., we all, thanks to the miracle of modern video technology, became witnesses to an event that defies our moral understanding and tempts us to try puzzling out the mind of God, hoping thereby to justify the ways of God to man.” Having highlighted the spiritual dilemma that Brother Juniper was obsessed with, Banks concludes with reference to the “necessary admonition” in the speech by British Prime Minister Tony Blair, delivered at a memorial service in New York for British victims of the attack — a speech Blair dressed in the reflected glory of the novel’s closing sentences: “But soon we shall die and all memory of those five will have left the earth, and we ourselves shall be loved for a while and forgotten. But the love will have been enough; all those impulses of love return to the love that made them. Even memory is not necessary for love. There is a land of the living and a land of the dead and the bridge is love, the only survival, the only meaning.”

Wilder Attacked

Writing in the October 22, 1930 New Republic three years after the publication of The Bridge of San Luis Rey, Michael Gold called Wilder “the Emily Post of culture,” “the preacher of tea parlor Christianity,” the author of “little lavender tragedies,” and “a fugitive from the American scene” who is “at home in Paris and Rome,” likes “museums and culture,” and has no room in his fiction for “coal miners” or other working-class, blue collar issues. According to Malcolm Cowley’s classic Exiles Return (1951), Gold’s article was the occasion for “hundreds of letters to the editor, some carefully reasoned, some violently hysterical,” letters that at first defended Wilder and attacked Gold but that in time were “half-agreeing” with Gold, even though he had “ridiculously overstated his case.”

One of the pro-Wilder letters quoted by Cowley says, “I heartily resent, as do many of my liberal friends, this attack on a man who we consider has done lovely things and who we believe is endowed with a very lovely nature.” As Cowley points out, one thing Gold had correctly diagnosed during the onset of the Great Depression was “the weakness of Wilder’s readers ... as the situation of the country became more desperate. Literature for the next few years would be asked to deal in one way or another with the problems of the day.”

Eight years after Gold’s article, Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer-Prize-winning play, Our Town, written during the Depression, made its debut at Princeton’s McCarter Theatre. Wilder called his play “an attempt to find a value above all price for the smallest events in our life.” Declaring Our Town to be his favorite among all his works, he insisted that it “should be performed without sentimentality or ponderousness — simply, dryly, and sincerely.” In other words, no “Emily Post,” no “tea parlor Christianity,” no “little lavender tragedies.”

the campus” where the idea “came to be full blown.” It was “as he crossed a small bridge over a narrow flow of water” that emptied into Lake Carnegie.

When I read that sentence, I wanted to head for the Graduate College to follow Wilder’s footsteps, even though that “small bridge” is most likely long gone. If I’d known that Lake Carnegie had figured in the geography of Wilder’s conception, I’d have read his novel back in the fall of 1975 when we lived a short walk away from a place I’d come to think of as Einstein’s lake ever since learning that he liked to sail his dinghy there.

Wilder’s Choice

Still on the subject of the Graduate College and Lake Carnegie, Tappan Wilder takes the story of the novel to the moment when Wilder had to decide between continuing to teach French at Lawrenceville Academy or finding “a way to test himself more directly against his pen,” the course he chose because “his ‘Peruvians,’ as he called them, were buzzing in his head.” His job as a tutor and companion in Europe in the fall of 1926 explains why “the completed manuscript pages bore the invisible marks of hotel rooms in London, Rome. Naples, Munich, Berlin, Paris, Juan-les-Pins.”

When Wilder returned to Lawrenceville to teach in the fall of 1927, his salary was $3,000. In 1928, from The Bridge alone, he earned a net taxable income of $87,000 or close to a million dollars in 2004. He was entering “what was for him the uncharted world of an acclaimed author with a growing worldwide reputation.”

Banks Looks Down

A Bridge in Princeton

If the back story of The Bridge of San Luis Rey interests me more than the book itself, it’s because of an afterword by the author’s nephew Tappan Wilder, explaining that the idea for the novel came to Wilder when he was “studying for an M.A. in French at the Princeton Graduate School.” His sister Isabel recalled the time he showed her “the exact spot on

The reference to “blue-collar issues” in Michael Gold’s litany of complaints about Wilder’s work reminded me of the New York Times obituary describing Russell Banks as “a novelist steeped in the working class” who wrote of his “own sometimes painful blue-collar experiences.” That sort of typecasting would seem to make him the last person in the world suited to write an eloquent, sympathetic foreword to The Bridge of San Luis Rey. Curious to find out more about Banks, who taught at Princeton, I looked into his memoir, Voyager: Travel Writings (Ecco 2016), published 12 years after the foreword to The Bridge of San Luis Rey. In the closing chapter, Banks is in the Himalayas crossing a “narrow suspension bridge strung between two cliffs” when he suddenly remembers Wilder’s

“scary novel” and looks down “at the milky river crashing against the rocks five hundred feet below....If the swaying bridge, as in the novel, were to inexplicably give way, I wanted to see where I’d be hurled.”

Banks was 72 when he experienced that moment on the bridge as Wilder’s book with all its “exquisite universality” and “personal philosophical inquiry” suddenly became a “scary novel.”

Deeper Into Wilder

Read deeper into Wilder’s New York Times obituary and there’s a refreshing transition from the characterization of the author as “aloof” and “Olympian” to a man with “an uninhibited appetite for life. Full of bounce and bubble, entirely without airs and immensely interested in people, he fueled himself on travel and conversation. His friendships ranged from truck drivers to waitresses,” from Sigmund Freud to Gertrude Stein to Texas Guinan, “the nightclub entertainer.”

In case the idea of Wilder teaching French at the Lawrenceville Academy sounds less than compelling, it seems that his teaching style had taken some interesting turns by the time he was lecturing on “The Classics in Translation” at the University of Chicago. According to Time’s January 12, 1953 cover story, “It was the big campus show, with Wilder the happiest and hammiest of stars. He would fling his arms about, jump from the platform and leap back again. Talking at trip-hammer speed, he was sometimes in the front of the class, sometimes in the back, sometimes at the window waving to friends. Necks craned to keep up with him; heads swung back and forth as if watching a tennis game. Wilder could play the blind Homer, a Greek chorus or the entire siege of Troy.”

“Perhaps an Accident”

Tappan Wilder’s afterword includes several facsimiles of the original manuscript of The Bridge of San Luis Rey. In the earliest draft, Wilder used his own birthday, April 17, instead of July 20, for the collapse of the bridge. In the early draft, the first part of the novel is titled, “An Act of God.” In the published version, Wilder has replaced it with “Perhaps An Accident.” The only photograph included shows Wilder, walking stick in hand, with heavyweight champion Gene Tunney on the edge of Mont Blanc in the Swiss Alps, in September 1928. A glimpse of the friendship between the fighter and the writer is offered in The New Yorker’s Town Talk for August 4, 1928: After a walking trip through Central Europe, they plan to “settle down somewhere, possibly in Henry James’s old house at Rye, in England, which they are trying to rent.”

—Stuart Mitchner

Note: the photo of Thornton Wilder on the front page of this week’s paper is from the Time magazine cover illustration by Boris Chaliapin.

BOOK REVIEW
13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024

The period in England between 17thcentury composer Henry Purcell and the early 20th century was bleak for native composers. Ralph Vaughan Williams began putting British composition back on the map in the late 19th century, soon joined by Sir Edward Elgar, who had been knocking at the door of recognition for quite a while before the premiere of his epic choral/orchestral The Dream of Gerontius. Taking the practice of incorporating chorus into symphonic works to a new level, Elgar’s Gerontiustraces the journey of the title character from deathbed to judgement before God. The Princeton University Orchestra and Glee Club joined forces this past weekend to present this monumental work at Richardson Auditorium. A combined Walter L. Nollner and Stuart B. Mindlin memorial concert, this performance also acknowledged graduating seniors of both ensembles, sending them off into the world celebrating a musical achievement and contemplating the cycle of life questions Elgar raised.

A setting of verses from English theologian John Henry Newman’s epic poem of the same title, Elgar’s work is divided into two sections, with Part I addressing Gerontius’ time on earth and Part II taking the audience through his soul’s journey through judgement to purgatory. Elgar set Cardinal Newman’s text for three vocal soloists representing Gerontius and several accompanying individuals, with a large chorus serving a variety of dramatic roles throughout the piece. Led by Princeton University Glee Club director Gabriel Crouch, Friday night’s performance (the concert was repeated Saturday night) successfully conveyed Newman’s heroic story with operatic power and artistic finesse. With chorus and orchestra on elevated platforms to accommodate the large numbers and soloists placed throughout and above the stage, the audience heard a lush yet lean instrumental sound accompanying dramatic vocal solos and precise choral singing.

As Gerontius, tenor Anthony Dean Griffey brought a wide range of opera, concert and recital experience to the Richardson stage. Gerontius’ life was the focus of the first part of Elgar’s massive work, preparing for death aided by a chorus of “Assistants.” Griffey took his time in conveying the opening plaintive text, deftly moving from fear to torment, while the Assistants plead for mercy with a well-blended and ethereal choral sound. Griffey’s Soul of Gerontius opened Part II with restraint tinged with wonder, accompanied by a fresh and open string sound characteristic of Elgar’s time. The journey to his fi nal destination was sung with clarity by Griffey, with crisp brass and subtle winds affirming a peaceful finality. Gerontius is guided on his journey to the afterlife by several celestial beings. The role of the Angel, providing consolation and reassurance, was sung by one of Princeton University’s recent success stories. Countertenor Aryeh Nussbaum Cohen, a member of the Princeton class of 2015, has sung with opera companies worldwide, with an extensive discography and résumé of competition wins. Elgar scored the Angel

as a mezzo-soprano, but the casting of a countertenor in this performance enabled the audience to hear a more ethereal vocal sound unencumbered by vibrato. Cohen’s voice exhibited instinctive drama with an edge of urgency as he fulfilled his task of escorting Gerontius from this world to the next and showed particular strength in the upper register as Gerontius crossed over to the afterlife. Cohen and Griffey were frequently in dialog, often accompanied by delicate orchestration. Cohen’s closing aria was complemented with sensitivity by an a cappella quartet of winds, as the Angel set the stage for his charge’s final rest. Bass-baritone Andrew Foster-Williams sang two roles of differing nature. As a Priest sending Gerontius on his journey, he sang from an alcove above the stage with a compelling vocal color against lush instrumental playing and the full choral sound of the Glee Club. Foster-Williams reappeared toward the end of the work as an Angel of the Agony, pleading with Jesus to save the souls of the faithful. He moved down to Gerontius’ level on the stage for this aria, adding a vocally powerful and impassioned intercession to the trio of Cohen’s Angel, the Soul of Gerontius and the Glee Club doubling as Voices on Earth and Souls on Purgatory. The chorus nimbly switched between these two functions, within a musical palette perhaps borrowed from Mahler. A Chamber Choir from within the Glee Club effectively implored a fi nal and prayerful “Praise to the Holiest in the height.”

Throughout the performance, conductor Crouch found great shadings in dynamics and music, leading both ensembles to dramatic cadences. An understated conductor with clear-cut gestures, Crouch consistently built intensity in both ensembles, with good control over the score and style. The more than 100-voice Glee Club was meticulously trained and well-blended, especially in the Handelian praise choruses. The young voices may have needed more bite in dramatic fugal sections, but excelled in the angelic and comforting verses.

The University Orchestra, prepared by Michael Pratt, played with a rich and lean sound, executing graceful dynamic swells and Romantic effects. Elgar’s score made particular use of the solid trios of trombones and bassoons in the Orchestra, as well as the elegant upper winds. Harpists Leila Hudson and Chloe Lau nimbly led Gerontius up to heaven at the conclusion of the piece. The principal players alternated between Parts I and II, providing more students the opportunity to excel in Elgar’s opulent and difficult score.

The Dream of Gerontius is not only very rarely heard in this region but is also one of the most challenging and substantial works the Glee Club and Orchestra have performed in this annual collaboration. Friday night’s performance served as both a hardy conclusion to the season and a secure musical presentation of what Elgar himself called “good, healthy, full-blooded Romantic, remembered worldliness.”

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024 • 14
MUSIC REVIEW
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Performing Arts

Classical Music Season

Announced by McCarter McCarter Theatre Center’s 2024-2025 Classical Music Series, starting in November, will feature the Renaissance Quartet with Randall Goosby, The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center performing

Bach’s The Brandenburg Concertos, Grammy awardwinning chamber choir The Crossing, the Czech National Symphony Orchestra, and Julia Fischer & Jan Lisieki. “This season, we are honoring McCarter’s legacy as a stalwart presenter of classical music, while also pushing the boundaries of the genre, integrating traditional compositions with modern interpretations to create something truly unique and extraordinary,” said Director of Presented Programming

Paula Abreu. “I’m excited to welcome new and returning audiences to fall in love all over again with this vibrant artform.”

A full schedule and subscriptions to McCarter’s 2024-2025 Classical Series for new and returning subscribers are now available at mccarter.org or by calling Patron Services at (609) 258-2787. Subscribers save 20% on tickets and receive benefits like free exchanges, exclusive pre-sale access, and preferred seating.

Music for Two Pianos, Clarinet and Violin

On Sunday, April 28 at 3 p.m., Westminster Conservatory of Music will present “Music for Two Pianos and Friends,” a recital featuring the Barton & Lehrer Piano Duo, Westminster Conservatory clarinetist Kenneth Ellison and guest artist Alexei Yavtuhovich, violin. The concert will take place in Bristol Chapel, 101 Walnut Lane. Admission is free. The program will include Ferruccio Busoni’s Duettino Concertante nach Mozart ; Nuages and Fêtes from Ravel’s arrangement of Debussy’s orchestral work Nocturnes ; and the Concerto in C Major for two keyboards by J.S. Bach. Johannes Brahms’ Sonata in D minor for Piano and Violin, op. 108 and the Sonata for clarinet and piano

bill.

Born in Santiago, Chile, pianist Ena Bronstein Barton began her career in South America, touring her native continent. She has received many honors throughout her career, including a Martha Baird Rockefeller Grant that resulted in a solo recital at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall and the 1996 Distinguished Artists Piano Award by Artists International. Her partnership with pianist Phyllis Alpert Lehrer spans over 35 years. Barton has served as head of the piano department at Westminster Conservatory and as a member of the piano faculty of Westminster Choir College of Rider University for many years.

Lehrer is known internationally as a teacher, performer, clinician, author and adjudicator. She has given master classes and workshops, and has had an active concert career as a soloist and collaborative artist worldwide. She is a professor emerita of piano at Westminster Choir College of Rider University and continues to serve on the faculty of Westminster Conservatory.

Ellison has performed internationally with many ensembles, including the Manhattan Chamber Orchestra, the Riverside Symphonia, the Greenville Symphony and the American Fine Arts Festival. He is an adjunct professor of clarinet at Kean University, and teaches clarinet and saxophone at Westminster Conservatory of Music. Ellison’s recorded collaborations include Bread of Life with the Tim Keyes Consort, On Course by Laurie Altman, Pictures at an African Exhibition by Darrel Yokley and more.

Yavtuhovich was born in Belarus, where he earned a bachelor’s degree at Sokolovsky’s Musical College and a master’s degree in violin performance from the Belarusian Academy of Music in Minsk, Belarus. At age 17, he won the Republic of Belarus National Young Violinists competition. As a member of the Belarus State Concert Orchestra, the Belarus State Chamber

SING OUT: Westminster Choir of Rider University is celebrating its 100th anniversary with a new recording on the GIA Masterworks label.

international career has taken him to the Metropolitan Opera, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Royal Opera House Covent Garden and many more. Soprano Sungji Kim, who made her company premiere in 2008, has performed in Europe, Asia, Russia, Canada and throughout the United States. Contralto Alison Bolshoi first appeared with Boheme Opera in the company’s 2019 production of Aida

John Finley Williamson.

The centerpiece of Serenity of Soul is the cantata Rejoice in the Lamb by Benjamin Britten, based on the poetry of Christopher Smart. It was recorded in Gill Memorial Chapel on Rider’s campus in Lawrenceville and Christ Church in New York City between May 4 and 11, 2023.

Comprising 15 tracks, it features Gregory Stout on piano and Mary Dolch on organ.

also taught Joseph Flummerfelt, Jordan has helped continue the legacy of John Finley Williamson by upholding the standards of performance, traditions and pedagogy of Williamson, Brown and Flummerfelt.

The choir is composed of students at Westminster Choir College of Rider University.

Orchestra and the Belarus String Quartet, he has performed in several European countries.

Since his immigration to the United States in 1996 Yavtuhovich has devoted himself to a range of activities. In 2015 he restarted his artistic career, performing with multiple organizations in the tri-state area and touring in Belarus as soloist with Gomel Chamber Orchestra. He founded the Collegium Musicum in Keyport, New Jersey, in 2018 and serves as the organization’s president and artistic director.

Visit rider.edu for more information.

Boheme Opera NJ

Marks Milestone Season

Now in its 35th season, Boheme Opera NJ is celebrating by bringing together stars of the company’s past and future for its 35th Anniversary Reunion Concert. The event is May 5 at 3 p.m. at Hillman Performance Hall on the Princeton Campus of Westminster Choir College.

“In 1989, Boheme Opera NJ realized the dream of bringing world-class opera to the regional stage. Thirty-five years later, we are thrilled to celebrate our milestone achievement with some of the outstanding artists who continue to make our mission a reality,” said Artistic Director Joseph Pucciatti.

Pianist Sandra M. Pucciatti, Boheme Opera’s managing director; and Doug Han, the company’s principal rehearsal pianist, will be the accompanists for the event’s vocal performers.

Among those performing are baritone Daniel Sutin, who made his Boheme Opera debut in 2000 as Baron Scarpia in Tosca, and whose

For more information on participating artists and to purchase tickets, visit bohemeopera.org.

“Serenity of Soul”

Marks a Milestone

Serenity of Soul, a new recording by the Westminster Choir that celebrates its 100th year, will be released on May 3 on the GIA Masterworks label. The recording marks the recording debut of GRAMMY-nominated James Jordan as conductor of the choir, the seventh since the group’s founding in 1920 by

“All the music on this recording reflects, in sound, that serenity (and, yes, beauty) is within all of us if we choose to go there,” said Jordan, who has been recognized throughout the music world as one of America’s preeminent conductors, recording artists, writers, music psychologists and innovators in choral music.

At Westminster Choir College of Rider University, Jordan is a professor of conducting and director of choral studies, as well as the co-director of The Choral Institute at Oxford. As a former student of Elaine Brown, who

For the 2023-24 season, the ensemble performed in New York, including at Carnegie Hall, Pennsylvania, Connecticut and Washington, D.C., as well as local performances on campus and at the Presbyterian Church of Lawrenceville.

The recent Carnegie Hall performance included the world premiere of James Whitbourn’s Requiem, orchestrated by John Rutter and commissioned by Westminster.

Serenity of Soul, produced on the GIA ChoralWorks label, will be distributed by Naxos on all major streaming outlets including Spotify and Apple Music.

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024
RENAISSANCE MEN: These Juilliard graduates mentored by Itzhak Perlman make up the Renaissance Quartet, on stage at McCarter Theatre in November. by Francis Poulenc complete the Alison Bolshoi
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Performing Arts

“Mean Girls” Coming to State Theatre New Jersey State Theatre New Jersey presents Mean Girls, the new musical comedy adapted from the Paramount Pictures film, on Saturday, May 11 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. and Sunday, May 12 at 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tickets range from $40-$105.

Direct from Broadway, Mean Girls is the hilarious hit musical from an award-winning creative team, including book writer Tina Fey (30 Rock ), composer Jeff Richmond ( Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt ), lyricist Nell Benjamin ( Legally Blonde ), and director Casey Nicholas ( The Book of Mormon ).

The ballet is set to Felix Mendelssohn’s score with additional music written for film by Erich Wolfgang Korngold. Scenery is by awardwinning designer Howard Jones, lighting by Joseph Walls, and original costumes by ARB’s resident costume designer Janessa Cornell Urwin. The cast will feature the entire ARB Company alongside trainees from Princeton Ballet School.

Performances are Friday, May 10 at 7 p.m.; Saturday, May 11 at 2 and 7 p.m.; and Sunday, May 12 at 2 p.m.

Tickets are $25-$45. The theater is at 11 Livingston Avenue in New Brunswick. Visit arballet.org.

Doric String Quartet Makes Princeton Debut

After a pandemic-related cancellation, the U.K.based Doric String Quartet at last makes its Princeton University Concerts (PUC) debut on Thursday, May 2, at 7:30 p.m. at Richardson Auditorium on the Princeton University campus. Their program includes Ludwig van Beethoven String Quartet in G Major, Op. 18, No. 2, Franz Schubert String Quartet No. 15 in G Major, D. 887, and Brett Dean String Quartet No. 3 Hidden Agendas, a work written for the Doric String Quartet and inspired as a response to today’s political climate.

The composer fi rst began collaborating with the Doric String Quartet in 2007, when he heard them play his composition Eclipse at the Melbourne International Chamber Music Competition.

BACK ON THE SCHEDULE: The Doric String Quartet is coming to Richardson Auditorium following a previously booked concert that was cancelled due to the pandemic. (Photo by George Garnier) Students) are available online at puc.princeton. edu, by phone at (609) 258-9220, or in person 45 minutes prior to the concert at the Richardson Auditorium box office.

Award-winning Pianist Is Orchestra Soloist

After Noon Concert Series

Thursdays at 12:30pm

Cady Heron may have grown up on an African savanna, but nothing prepared her for the wild and vicious ways of her strange new home: suburban Illinois. How will this naive newbie rise to the top of the popularity pecking order? By taking on The Plastics, a trio of lionized frenemies led by the charming but ruthless Regina George. But when Cady devises a plan to end Regina’s reign, she learns the hard way that you can’t cross a Queen Bee without getting stung.

Mean Girls opened on Broadway in April 2018 to rave reviews at the August Wilson Theatre, following its world premiere at the National Theatre in Washington, D.C., in the fall of 2017. For tickets, more information, or group discounts, call State Theatre Guest Services at (732) 246-SHOW (7469) or visit online at STNJ.org.

“Midsummer Night’s Dream”

Back by Popular Demand

American Repertory Ballet (ARB) announces the return of Ethan Stiefel’s production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream , from May 10-12 at New Brunswick Performing Arts Center.

“This production was made during my first year as ARB’s artistic director, and it truly represents the overall vision we wanted to kickstart at the time,” said Stiefel. “Its blend of artful, athletic, whimsical and heartfelt movement and storytelling absolutely encapsulates ARB, and what makes both the show and the company wholly authentic. Simply put, our production is as unique as our artists and our repertoire.”

“[As] I listened, I became increasingly aware that this was one of the finest and most insightful interpretations of a piece of mine that I’d ever heard,” he said. “[ Hidden Agendas ] represents my first opportunity to write a work specifically for them…with individual movement titles such as Hubris , Self-censorship, and On-message , it’s fair to say that this piece – with its five partially connected movements exhibiting strong extremes of energy, dynamics and expression –is a somewhat oblique, abstract look at certain aspects of the strangely fascinating and invariably unsettling political climate of extreme personalities, Twitter-outrage, group-think, and other challenges to the democratic process in which we seem to find ourselves as we enter the 2020s.”

“This concert is the final concert of our 2023-24 season,” said PUC Director Marna Seltzer, “and it exemplifies so much of what this season has been all about — celebrating the next generation of leading artists, reflecting on the context in which the music we love exists, and resetting after the disruption of the pandemic. In the hands of these exceptional musicians, I have no doubt that we will end our 130th season on a poignantly uplifting note.”

The morning after their performance in Princeton, the Doric String Quartet will visit Trenton Public Schools with Trenton Arts at Princeton as part of PUC’s Neighborhood Music Project. The quartet will engage Trenton Central High School orchestra students in a 60-minute concert-conversation.

Tickets for this concert ($25-40 General/$10

Sara David Buechner joins the Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) for performances of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 1 in C Major, Op. 15 the weekend of May 11-12. Music Director Rossen Milanov conducts the program which includes John Luther Adams’ Become River and Robert Schumann’s Symphony No. 4 in D Minor, Op. 120.

The concerts take place on Saturday, May 11 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, May 12 at 4 p.m. at Richardson Auditorium on the campus of Princeton University. The Sunday performance will be preceded by a 3 p.m. preconcert talk hosted by Milanov, which will include Ms. Buechner, and augment a Mother’s Day outing to the concert hall.

Buechner recently performed with Milanov with the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, of which Milanov is music director. “Patrons will be riveted by Sara’s technical expertise and exceptional artistry prominently on display in performance of this first concerto by Beethoven,” he said.

Buechner was the Gold Medalist of the 1984 Gina Bachauer International Piano Competition, and a Bronze Medalist in the 1986 Tchaikovsky International Piano Competition in Moscow. With an active repertoire of more than 100 pi-

ano concertos, she has been soloist with many of the world’s prominent orchestras, and given recitals at Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center, and the Hollywood Bowl. She is the most prominent transgender musician appearing on the classical concert stage today. She received the Eleanor Roosevelt Award of Brandeis University, and is a member of the National Museum of Women in the Arts. She often presents talks and workshops to LGBTQIA+ groups, and has received praise for her solo autobiographical theater show “Of Pigs and Pianos,” which premièred at New York City’s TheaterLab in 2021. Visit princetonsymphony. org for tickets.

Garden Theatre Announces Summer Nights Schedule

The Garden Theatre has announced its 2024 season of Hollywood Summer Nights, the annual program of classic films. From May through September, the theater will celebrate cinematic history from the Golden Age of Hollywood through the rest of the 20th Century, on the big screen.

The series begins May 22 with Alfred Hitchcock’s 1945 thriller, Spellbound Classics including Casablanca and Jaws are also in the lineup. This year, the theater is able to access the Disney and Fox catalogs for the first time, with such films as Mary Poppins and Star Wars now available. Other titles for the summer include: Rushmore , Bringing Up Baby, Raising Arizona , The Sound of Music , and Young Frankenstein

Built in 1920, the Garden Theatre is Princeton’s longest-serving and only walkable cinema. Tickets are $13.50 for general admission and $7.75 for members. Visit princetongardentheatre.org.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024 • 16 Princeton University Chapel
weekly opportunity for the Princeton Community to enjoy performances by local, national, and international organists.
April 25 is Tyrone Whiting, Episcopal Church of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Philadelphia, PA. The Concert Series will return in Fall. Open to all.
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Performing
WATCH OUT FOR THE PLASTICS: The hit Broadway musical comedy “Mean Girls” will be at State Theatre New Jersey on May 11 and 12. Sara David Buechner (Photo by Yukiko Onley)
Continued from Preceding Page JAZZ SMALL GROUPS SMALL GROUP A Rudresh Mahanthappa Director SMALL GROUP X Matthew Parrish Director 7:30 PM TUESDAY APRIL 30 2024 TAPLIN AUDITORIUM FINE HALL FREE UNTICKETED
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music.princeton.edu
ONLINE www.towntopics.com

Art

“CELL”: The Arts Council of Princeton will show mixed media works by Heather Cox as part of “Making Do,” a group show excavating the beauty of everyday objects. The exhibition will be on view April 27 through May 24, with a gallery opening on May 3 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Arts Council Presents “Making Do” Group Exhibit

The Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) will show “Making Do,” an exhibition of mixed media work, in the Arts Council’s Taplin Gallery April 27 through May 24. A free gallery opening will be held on Friday, May 3 from 5 to 7 p.m. This group show features the work of Karla Carballar, Heather Cox, Shannon Curry Hartmann, Mollie Murphy, Rachel Perry, and Emna Zghal.

To “make do” is an idiom. Grammatically, it is a phrase. It means to work with what one has on hand or to persevere through difficult circumstances. Each artist in this show makes work that exemplifies this term. Some of the group has always worked in this way: gleaning the metaphor from the world, finding meaning in everyday objects, and excavating the strange beauty they perceive in the cast-offs in the street, field, and forage. Others found their way to this kind of work during the pandemic: forced into isolation, they questioned, examined, played with, and discovered new and fruitful ways of working.

Ultimately, though, the way in which each of the artists collects, destroys, re-enlivens, manipulates, and rearranges the materials and objects they work with comes from a common place: they are not depicting these materials; rather, the artists are using the materials and objects to make the work itself. They are making do with what they have or find around themselves: newspapers, fruit stickers, fiddling objects, snapshots, staples, tangerine peels, grape stems, and much more. There is so much in all this work that expresses the ethos of “making do.” The emphasis is on “Making”: making objects, making structures, making sense, meaning, and metaphor, and

“Do”: collaging, manipulating, sewing, stapling, and cutting.

But in the end, it is a collection of curious, strange, and often beautiful artworks that function in the way art often will: to provoke the viewer to reconsider the daily world.

The Arts Council of Princeton is at 102 Witherspoon Street. Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org.

State Museum Exhibit Explores Importance, Uses of Tree Bark

The New Jersey State Museum presents “Bark! Indigenous Cultural Expressions,” on view May 4 through January 5, 2025 in the Museum’s Riverside

Gallery on the second floor. The exhibition features objects from the Museum’s Ethnographic collection, exploring Indigenous cultural practices from the Pacific Northwest, South America, Pacific Islands, and the local Eastern Woodlands area. Learn how bark is harvested and crafted, and how these ancient traditions continue today. The exhibition is supported in part by the New Jersey State Museum Foundation.

Assistant Curator of Archaeology and Ethnography

Karen Flinn and Curator of Education Beth Cooper organized the exhibition to present rarely seen objects from the Museum’s collection and help visitors understand the importance of bark to Indigenous populations. According to Flinn, “The use of tree bark is global and ubiquitous, from prehistoric times to today.

Indigenous communities all over the world harvest bark, using it as a source of food and medicine, to craft everyday objects and works of art.”

Activities for all ages will be available on select weekends throughout the run of the exhibit; dates and times will be posted on the museum’s website. The text of this exhibition will be available in Spanish via a QR code and in a large print format.

The New Jersey State Museum, located at 205 West State Street in Trenton, is open Tuesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; closed on all state holidays. General admission is free. For more information visit statemuseum.nj.gov.

Gourgaud Galley Hosts

Digital Photography Exhibit

The Gourgaud Gallery will host a photography exhibit by the Cranbury digital Camera Club (CdCC) May 6 through May 31.

The show will feature original, framed photographs of various subjects and sizes taken by club members. Most photographs will be for sale at prices ranging from $75 to $350, with 20 percent of all sales benefiting the Cranbury Arts Council.

The Cranbury Arts Council provides arts-oriented programs, workshops, and performances aimed at enriching the cultural experiences of the community and keeping the creative spirit alive in adults and children. Their mission is to foster, support, educate, inspire, and promote artists and art appreciation in the community.

The CdCC is a nonprofit organization focused on digital photography techniques and meets on the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at 8 p.m. at the Cranbury Public Library. The club’s objective is to provide an atmosphere where amateurs and professionals can learn from each other to further develop their photography skills. The club can

be found on Facebook and at cranburydigitalcameraclub.org.

The Gourgaud Gallery is located on the second floor of the Cranbury Town Hall at 23-A North Main Street in Cranbury. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, visit cranburyartscouncil.org.

Places, Public Life, and Environment: James Corner

Thursday, May 2, 5 p.m.

100 Arthur Lewis Auditorium, Robertson Hall

The world-renowned landscape architect and urbanist James Corner will discuss his projects from New York’s High Line to his work on Princeton’s campus and the new Art Museum. Reception to follow. Free and open to the public. No tickets required.

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024
FRIENDS ANNUAL MARY PITCAIRN KEATING LECTURE
LATE THURSDAYS! Thursday evening programming is made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970, with additional support from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.
“GORILLA JABARI”: This image by Mathew Renk is part of a photography exhibit by the Cranbury digital Camera Club (CdCC), on view May 6 through May 31 at the Gourgaud Gallery in Cranbury.
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For high achievement in violin, viola and cello performance

“You are to be complimented for fostering a warm, supportive community, where your students are well taught in every respect.”

Call NOW to join our award winning string program:

• Private lessons for violin, viola and cello

• Group lessons/ performance

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• Competition coaching

• Music Theory TWO LOCATIONS: WEST WINDSOR & PRINCETON

“You are to be complimented for fostering a warm, supportive community, where your students are well taught in every respect.”

Jonathan Beiler

Violinist, Philadelphia Orchestra

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2023
18
First Jonathan Beiler First Violinist, Philadelphia Orchestra
For more information call 609.751.7664 or visit our website www.stringacademy.net community, where your students are well taught in every respect.” Jonathan Beiler First Violinist, Philadelphia Orchestra Call NOW to join our award winning string program:
• Private lessons for violin, viola and cello
• Group lessons/ performance
• String quartet coaching/ performance
• Competition coaching
• Music Theory TWO LOCATIONS: WEST WINDSOR & PRINCETON
For more information call 609.751.7664 or visit our website www.stringacademy.net

102 WITHERSPOON STREET

12pm Gabby Toledo (Acoustic/Singer-Songwriter)

1pm WMA Princeton Girlchoir & Boychoir Ensembles (Classical)

2pm The Instant Bingo Family Band (Americana/Folk)

3pm The Shaxe (Classic Rock)

4pm Tony & The Trees (Blues)

5pm The Prisms (Rock/Metal)

254 WITHERSPOON STREET

12pm Crown Acoustic (Americana/Folk)

1pm New Yacht City (R&B/Soul)

2pm TBD

3pm Helen O’Shea & Friends (Americana/Folk)

4pm Fish & Whistle (Bluegrass)

86 LEIGH AVENUE

12pm Dan Leyes (Americana/Folk)

1pm Jani Dumapit (Acoustic/Singer-Songwriter)

2pm Marilyn’s Kitchen (Klezmer)

3pm TB Percussion (Alternative)

4pm Robert Ehee (Acoustic/Singer-Songwriter)

225 BIRCH AVENUE

12pm Shattered Figures (Alternative)

1pm Moore Street Old-Time String Band (Americana/Folk)

2pm OTC Collective (Alternative)

3pm Sunken City Saxophone Quartet (Jazz)

4pm Green Knuckle Material (Alternative)

303 WITHERSPOON STREET

12pm Circle Round the Sun (Americana/Folk)

1pm The Sparks String Quartet (Jazz)

2pm TBD

3pm Isabella Romanello (Acoustic/Singer-Songwriter)

4pm I Think Like Midnight (Alternative)

41 JEFFERSON ROAD

12pm Ecclesia Musician’s Collective (Acoustic/Singer-Songwriter)

1pm Blue Jersey Band (Jazz)

2pm Greg McCarvey (Acoustic/Singer-Songwriter)

3pm RPG Jazz Project (Jazz)

4pm Manuel Barbará (Rock/Metal)

107 MOORE STREET

12pm Strange Brew (Americana/Folk)

1pm Charles Laurita & The Mischief (R&B/Soul)

2pm Olivia Eden (Acoustic/Singer-Songwriter)

3pm Starikova (Rock/Meta)

4pm DeLaVida (World)

30 CHESTNUT STREET

12pm Ragtime Relics (Americana/Folk)

1pm Jonathan Kirschner Trio (Jazz)

2pm Abbey Danna (Acoustic/Singer-Songwriter)

3pm 93 DCRISTO (Hip Hop)

4pm Gravity Hill Band (Alternative)

15 MAPLE STREET

12pm Octopus Music School (Classic Rock)

1pm Maria Palmer & Paul Pessutti (Acoustic/Singer-Songwriter)

2pm Chill Brown (R&B/Soul)

3pm The Roly-Polys (Country)

4pm Bomber Jacket (Alternative)

45 LINDEN LANE

12pm Sourland Mountain String Band (Bluegrass)

1pm ENTITY (World)

2pm Crooked Mowth (Acoustic/Singer-Songwriter)

3pm Jefferson Berry & the UAC (Americana/Folk)

4pm Cherry Blossoms (Alternative)

48 AIKEN AVENUE

12pm Puppy Grease (Classic Rock)

1pm Beth and Anna (Classical)

2pm The Mixxtape (Alternative)

3pm Skip Livingston’s Occasional Dixieland Band (Jazz)

4pm Ruby West (Alternative)

84 MURRAY PLACE

12pm Kevin J. James (Americana/Folk)

1pm Fono (Jazz)

2pm Giant Inflatable Dog (Rock/Metal)

3pm Joshua Mitchell (R&B/Soul)

4pm Close Drive (Alternative)

49 MARKHAM ROAD

12pm Too Cool to Bluff (Classic Rock)

1pm Naked Hugs (Alternative)

2pm The Natvral (Acoustic/Singer-Songwriter)

3pm Ride or Die (Americana/Folk)

4pm The Hive (Rock/Metal)

PALMER SQUARE GREEN

12pm BTE (Classic Rock)

1pm The Johnny Woods Band (Americana/Folk)

2pm Storytime with Jeff (Acoustic/Singer-Songwriter)

3pm Late to the Show (Classic Rock)

4pm Get Nice (Alternative)

MACLEAN HOUSE

11:45am-12pm Princeton University Band

12:05-12:35pm Bletchley Park (Alternative)

12:45-1:15pm

Most sets last 45 minutes, leaving 15 minutes for you tor make your way to another stage, grab a bite, or mix and mingle with your fellow attendees!

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2023
USE OUR MAP! Plan your day with Our interactive map
TBD 1:20-1:35pm Marina Mancoridis 1:50-2:05 pm Wildcats (Acapella) 2:10-2:25pm Roaring 20 (Acapella) 2:35-2:55pm Stack Overflow (Classic Rock) 3:05-3:35pm Althea
3:45-4:20pm Bovine Mystique
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Aguel (Alternative/Folk)
(Acoustic/Singer-Songwriter) 4:30-5:00pm Plum (Rock)

Art

The Hopewell Valley Arts Council has announced the return of the Color Fun Run + Walk on Saturday, May 4 from 3 to 4 pm at Woolsey Park at the new Hopewell Township bandshell. This event promises an explosion of color and joy, catering to everyone from avid runners to leisurely strollers, all in support of the arts in Hopewell Valley.

There will be non-stop entertainment, including a dynamic dance party with music and warm-up sessions led by Angela, the hula hoop virtuoso from Color Me Hoopy. Participants will experience waves of color as they navigate the course, becoming living art pieces. The event culminates with a group color toss, a celebration of hues and happiness.

The Color Fun Run + Walk is an all-ages, all-fitness-levels event, focusing on enjoyment rather than competition. Stroll for 1.5 miles or more in a stressfree atmosphere, and savor refreshments like shave ice, available for purchase.

Participants will receive novelty sunglasses, water, and a color packet for the grand finale color toss.

Ticket information: General Admission ($30) includes novelty sunglasses, a color packet, and water. Children 5 and under (free with a registered adult) includes child-sized sunglasses, a color packet, and water.

Closing Celebration Ticket ($5) includes access to the celebration area, a color packet, and water. For details and tickets, visit hvartscouncil.org/ colorfunrun.

West Windsor Arts Honors 2024 Volunteers of the Year

In recognition of National Volunteer Month, West Windsor Arts has named Shaheen Shahnaz and Latoya Edwards as its Adult Volunteers of the Year and Sharaya Gala and Aarohi Honap as its Student Volunteers of the Year.

These four individuals are being honored not only for donating their time and talents to the arts center, but also for inspiring others to join them in giving back. Their shared community spirit and passion for the arts have made a

considerable impact on the nonprofit organization.

“It is with the support of such an engaged group of volunteers that we are able to enrich our community with innovative, creative programming,” says Aylin Green, executive director, West Windsor Arts. “Every year we shine a spotlight on volunteers who have gone above and beyond in supporting our mission. Yet, it is the collective efforts and energy of all our volunteers that sustain our organization.”

This past year, more than 263 individuals volunteered in various capacities at West Windsor Arts, from running exhibitions and event support to fundraising and advisory board participation.

The West Windsor Arts Council offers art and cultural events, workshops, and classes for all ages and in all disciplines at the West Windsor Arts Center in Princeton Junction and in the community. For more information, call (609) 716.1931 or visit westwindsorarts.org.

“UNBOTHERED?”: Works by Spriha Gupta are featured in “2nd Life: Rediscovering Nature’s Canvas,” on view at Artworks Trenton, 19 Everett Alley, Trenton, through May 24. An Artist Talk is on April 27 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. For more about the artist, visit sprihagupta.com.

Area Exhibits

Art@Bainbridge, 158 Nassau Street, has “Denison Baniwa: Under the Skin of History” through September 1. artmuseum.princeton.edu.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Immersion” through May 5. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com.

Art on Hulfish, 11 Hulfish Street, has “Christina Fernandez: Multiple Exposures” through April 28. artmuseum. princeton.edu.

Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Making Do” April 27 through May 24 in the Taplin Gallery. A gallery opening is on May 3 from 5 to 7 p.m. artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Sound Journey with Ruth Cunningham

David Scott Gallery at Berkshire Hathaway, 253 Nassau Street, has “This Looks Familiar” through May 19.

Ficus Art Gallery, 235 Nassau Street, has “Embrace the Everyday” through May 6. ficusbv.com.

Gourgaud Gallery, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, has “Paisaje Imaginaro (Imaginary Landscape)” through April 25 and a photography exhibit by the Cranbury digital Camera Club May 6 to May 31. cranburyartscouncil.org.

Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has ““That’s Worth Celebrating: The Life and Work of the Johnson Family” through the end of 2024, among other exhibits. groundsforsculpture. org.

Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and Innovator’s Gallery,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. Museum hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 12 to 4 p.m., Thursday to 7 p.m. princetonhistory. org

Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Renewal and Change: New Acquisitions” through April 28, and “CFEVA at 40” through May 26. michenerartmuseum.org

Morpeth Contemporary, 43 West Broad Street, Hopewell, has “Holly Roberts + Brander Furniture” through April 27. morpethcontemporary.com.

Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has the online exhibits “Slavery at Morven,” “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898,” and others. morven.org.

Phillips’ Mill, 2619 River Road, New Hope, Pa., has “Not Your Run of the Mill Photo Show” through April 28. phillipsmill.org.

Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, has “Inspired Together” through June 1. princetonlibrary.org.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has oil paintings by Elina Lorenz through May 7. Photography by Sheila Bodine is at the 254 Nassau Street location through May 7. smallworldcoffee.com.

West Windsor Arts, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “Leave Your Mark –Member Art Show” through June 1. westwindsorarts.org.

Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers, 71 George Street, New Brunswick, has “George Segal: Themes and Variations” through July 31 and “Michelle V. Agins: Storyteller” through December 8. zimmerli.rutgers. edu.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024 • 20
Princeton University Chapel May 1 at 5:30pm Join Ruth Cunningham, founding member of Anonymous 4 and Sound Healing practitioner, in this time of live music for meditation and introspection.
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Continued from Page 17 HV Arts Council Hosts Color Fun Run + Walk
HUES AND HAPPINESS: The Hopewell Valley Arts Council’s Color Fun Run + Walk, which culminates with a group color toss, is on Saturday, May 4 from 3 to 4 pm at Woolsey Park in Hopewell Township. (Photo by Benoit Cortet) Get the scoop from

Mark Your Calendar Town Topics

Wednesday, April 24

11 a.m.-12:30 p.m .: Leighton Listens. Councilman Leighton Newlin is on hand to discuss current events with members of the public at Mi Espana, Princeton Shopping Center, 301 North Harrison Street.

5-6 p.m .: “The World at Night Photography: Revealing the wonders of natural nights and the global impact of light pollution.” Seminar by photographer Babak Tafreshi. At 100 Arthur Lewis Auditorium, Robertson Hall, Princeton University. Free. Register at iran. princeton.edu.

6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library’s Board of Trustees meets at the library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org

6 p.m.: Cake and Cinema: Short Films About the Sands Library building, public art, and architecture, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Cake will be served. Princetonlibrary.org

6 p.m.: New York Times

bestselling author Nell Irvin Painter will discuss her new collection of essays, I Just Keep Talking: A Life in Essays, with Princeton University’s Ruha Benjamin at Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau Street. Labyrinthbooks. com.

7:30 p.m.: The Puget Sound Piano Trio performs at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street. Works by Mendelssohn, Haydn, and Del Aguila. $45 (half price for children 5-17). Princetonsymphony.org.

Thursday, April 25

11 a.m.-3 p.m .: Winter Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza. Locally grown produce, pasture-raised meats, fresh baked breads, homemade treats, and handmade gifts. Princetonfarmersmarket.com.

12-4 p.m .: D&R Greenway Land Trust Spring 2024

Native Plant Sale, Johnson Education Center, 1 Preservation Place. Drgreenway. org/shop/native-plants/.

7 p.m .: Author Elizabeth

Matto discusses her book To Keep the Republic: Thinking, Talking, and Acting like a Democratic Citizen with John Farmer, at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org.

4:30 p.m .: “American Democracy in 2024 and Beyond” with Tom Edsall of the New York Times. At Robertson Hall Bowl 002, Princeton University. Free.

Friday, April 26

3 p.m .: Art Beast 2024

“ArtStages: Creative Journeys in Motion,” annual student-led arts festival with free food, live performance, and art-making at Rider University, Lawrence Township. Rider.edu.

12-3 p.m .: D&R Greenway Land Trust Spring 2024 Native Plant Sale, Johnson Education Center, 1 Preservation Place. Drgreenway. org/shop/native-plants/.

5:30-7:30 p.m .: Sips and Paint, an evening of painting and wine tasting at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. $60. Terhuneorchards.com.

6:30 p.m.: Princeton Public Library’s 13th Local Author Day, a recognition of area authors, begins with a Zoom event, “Book Promotion Strategies,” led by publicity expert Leah Paulos. Register at Princetonlibrary.org.

Saturday, April 27

9 a.m.-12 p.m.: D&R Greenway Land Trust Spring 2024 Native Plant Sale, Johnson Education Center, 1 Preservation Place. Drgreenway.org/shop/nativeplants/.

10 a.m.-12 p.m.: Arbor Day Celebration at Marquand Park Children’s Arboretum, 87 Lovers Lane, with free seedlings, cookies, lemonade, and a children’s book featuring the park’s special trees. Open to children of all ages. Rain date is April 28. Marquandpark.org.

10 a.m.-8 p.m .: The New Hope, Pa. Arts Center holds a day of free celebrations in honor of International Sculpture Day. Events include a sculpture bike tour, a found objects art workshop, and walking tours. Visit NewHopeArts.org for a full schedule and locations.

11 a.m .: Princeton Public Library hosts Local Author Day, starting with a “Revision and Editing Workshop” (also on Zoom) by librarian and author Gabrielle Esposito. From 1:30-4 p.m ., local published authors of fiction and nonfiction for all ages take part in the Author Fair in the library’s Commu nity Room. 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org.

12-4 p.m.: Arbor Day Planting Session in the Ma pleton Preserve. Help the Friends of Princeton Nurs ery Lands establish a new colony of Virginia bluebells, transplant wildlife-friendly native tree and wildflower seedlings, and plant this year’s Arbor Day tree. Meet at the D&R Canal State Park Headquarters at 145 Mapleton Road in Kingston. Pre-registration is request ed at fpnl.org or (609) 6830483. Rain date is April 28.

12-5 p.m.: Princeton Porchfest, family-friendly event with musicians play ing free shows on porches throughout town. Coordi nated by the Arts Council of Princeton. Closing concert is at the Arts Council, 102 Witherspoon Street, by The Prisms. Visit artscouncilof princeton.org/porchfest.

12-6 p.m.: Spring Win ery Weekend Music Series at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Music from 1-4 p.m. by Bud Belviso. 1 p.m Arbor Day Celebration, sto ries and crafts. $10 per child. Terhuneorchards.com.

12-6 p.m.: Spring

2 p.m .: Talk on public gardens in New Jersey from Colonial times to The Gilded Age, at the Trent House, 15 Market Street, Trenton. Also on Zoom. Michael Gross of the Garden State Gardens Consortium is the lecturer. Tinyurl.com/ THTalkApril27.

2 and 8 p.m.: Clue is at State Theatre New Jersey, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. Stnj.org.

7:30 p.m.: New Jersey

Ballet performs Jerome Robbins’ Fancy Free , George Balanchine’s Rubies, Christopher Wheeldon’s This Bitter Earth , and Gustavo Ramirez Sansano’s Reencounte at New Brunswick Performing Arts Center, 11 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. Npbac.org.

Sunday, April 28

10 a.m .: Run with Rotary, 5K, or 1-mile ramble, held by the Montgomery Rotary Club at Skillman Park, Main Boulevard, Skillman. Runwithrotary.org.

11 a.m .: Author and architect J. Robert Hillier discusses Hillier: Selected Works , co-written with his late wife, architect Barbara A. Hillier, at this Book Brunch event at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org.

12-5 p.m.: Spring Artisan Market at Unionville Vineyards, 9 Rockton Road, Ringoes. Artisan and craft producers, wine, live music. Unionvillevineyards.com.

12-6 p.m .: Spring Win -

at 65 Witherspoon Street. Registration is required. Princetonlibrary.org.

2-3 p.m .: “Try it” with People & Stories/Gente y Cuentos, in the gardens at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Morven.org.

1 and 6:30 p.m.: Clue is at State Theatre New Jersey, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. Stnj.org.

3 p.m .: “Tony Bennett and Bill Evans, The Legendary Recordings,” tribute concert by Joel Zelnik with vocalist Tony Corrao. At Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org.

3 p.m.: The EnglishSpeaking Union–Princeton Branch presents a talk on “Women Explorers of the Victorian and Edwardian Eras” at the Center for Modern Aging, Princeton, 101 Poor Farm Road. Free, refreshments will be served. Esuus.org.

3 p.m .: “Music for Two Pianos and Friends,” with pianists Ena Bronstein Barton, Phyllis Lehrer, clarinetist Kenneth Ellison, and violinist Alexei Yavtuhovich. At Bristol Chapel, Westminster Choir College, 101 Walnut Lane. Free. Rider.edu.

3-5 p.m .: “Building Princeton” at Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road. Teams

work from photos to create models from LEGO blocks; led by architect Stephen W. Schwartz from Building Blocks Workshops. Princetonhistory.org.

4 p.m.: Gathering in solidarity with the October 7 hostages, and a call for their release. Organized by a grassroots group of Israelis in Princeton. At Hinds Plaza.

7:30 p.m.: Westminster Jubilee Singers spring concert at Rider University’s Gill Chapel, 2083 Lawrenceville Road. $15-$20. (609) 8967775.

Tuesday, April 30

5-7 p.m .: “Tricks of the Trade: Partnering with Pharma Companies,” a panel discussion on partnering in biopharma, will be held at Princeton Innovation Center BioLabs, 303A College Road East. Visit princetonbiolabs.com for registration information.

6 p.m .: Author and Princeton University Professor Michael Cook discusses his forthcoming book A History of the Muslim World: From its Origins to the Dawn of Modernity with research scholar Sadaf Jaffer at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org.

APRIL

6 p.m .: Annual meeting and Lewis B. Cuyler Lecture at the Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, Quaker Road. Author/historian Linda J. Barth shares the history of the Delaware and Raritan Canal. Princetonhistory.org.

Wednesday, May 1

6:30 p.m.: “From Mansion to Museum: A Panel Discussion,” at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Part of the “Morven Revealed” exhibition. Hybrid program. Morven.org.

Thursday, May 2

10 a.m.: The 55-Plus Club of Princeton will meet online. T. J. Jackson Lears, the Board of Governors Distinguished Professor of History at Rutgers University and editor-in-chief of Raritan Quarterly Review, will speak on “Writing History in Late Imperial America.” To join, visit princetonol.com/ groups/55plus. Meetings are free, with a suggested donation of $5.

7:30 p.m .: The Doric String Quartet performs at Richardson Auditorium with works by Schubert, Beethoven, and Brett Dean. $10-$40. Puc.princeton. edu.

Artisan Market at Unionville Vineyards, 9 Rocktown Road, Ringoes. Artisan and craft producers, wine, live music. Unionvillevineyards. com.

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024
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Szaferman Lakind, A Full Service Law Firm, Provides Counsel in Multiple Practice Groups

Szaferman Lakind Law firm has a long history of helping clients in New Jersey, and particularly in Mercer County. Established in Lawrencevile by three former deputy attorneys general, Barry Szaferman, Arnold Lakind. and Jeffrey Blumstein in 1977, it is a multi-faceted law firm with highly sophisticated and accomplished areas of specialty, including family law, personal injury, trusts and estates, general litigation, transactional business and commercial real estate, employment law, land use, and workers compensation. The firm provides legal representation for businesses, investors, professionals, families, and individuals.

IT’S NEW To Us

As the firm grew from three attorneys to 30, It moved to its current location at 101 Grovers Mill Road in the Quakerbridge Executive Center in 1986.

The firm epitomizes “True Counsel”, meaning that they provide realistic solutions to complex legal problems, and emphasize rendering quality advice and direction while being practical and cost effective. As its mission statement explains, “The attorneys at Szaferman Lakind strive to provide True Counsel to all our clients through every step of the legal process, both personally

and professionally. To us, it is a pledge of high quality, efficiency, ethical standards, and compassion. Our attorneys are advisors, confidants and strategists.”

Highest Rating

Many Szaferman lawyers have been the recipients of multiple awards, and have achieved the highest rating from their peers, legal organizations, and the judiciary. Numerous former Mercer County judges have worked at Szaferman Lakind as mediators and arbitrators after retiring from the judiciary.

The firm has been awarded the Martindale-Hubbell (a peer review legal rating system) highest rating of AV-Preeminent (AV signifying the highest level of professional excellence and integrity). It has also been rated a Tier 1 Law Firm by U.S. News & World Report in their Best Law Firms List since 2014 in multiple practice areas, including family law.

The firm’s attorneys have been recognized as top-rated attorneys in their respective fields by Best Lawyers in America, Super Lawyers, Super Lawyers Rising Stars, and by Martindale-Hubbell.

Jeffrey K. Epstein, a partner with the firm since 2004, is a specialist in family law, and has received many of these honors and recognition. He has been included in the list of NJ Super Lawyers, issued by Thomson Reuters, for 20 consecutive years, most recently in 2024, after a

rigorous election process that includes both professional achievement and peer recognition. He also has maintained an AV rating with Martindale-Hubbell since 2003, attesting to the highest legal ability and professional ethics.

Accredited Mediator

Epstein is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, and is certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney. He serves on the NJ Supreme Court Committee, which has final approval over attorneys who apply for certification. He has also served on the executive committee of the Family Law Section of the State Bar, and has been a blue ribbon panelist for the Mercer County Early Settlement Program.

In addition, he has served as a featured presenter for the annual case law review before the Middlesex County Bar Association, and has lectured for the New Jersey ICLE (Institute for Continuing Legal Education). He is also an accredited mediator, having received mediator training with ICLE and the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers.

A certified matrimonial attorney, Epstein has a subspecialty in child custody cases. A graduate of Touro College School of Law, where he was a member of the Law Review, he attended law school at night, and worked full-time during the day. He explains that

his specialty in family law evolved over the years. “In the beginning, it just happened that family law cases came along. I continued with it, as the cases touched on various aspects of the law, and allowed me to work closely with clients during challenging times in their personal lives.”

As the cases became more diversified and thoughtprovoking, he saw that he could make a difference in what his clients were experiencing.

“This aspect of the law can be painful at times for all concerned, he points out. “It is stressful, difficult, and yet very rewarding. Interesting and challenging, it can also be gut-wrenching.”

Healthier Situation

“Custody cases are hard, he continues. They can involve sole custody, shared custody, visitation rights, and out of state location issues. “You focus on the best interests of the children, and try to convince parents to move past their own anger toward each other for the benefit of the kids.

“Divorce can be very difficult for children. If the communication between the parents is civil, however, the children do much better in adapting to their changing family. Therapy is often recommended for the parents and children, and this can create a healthier situation for all. It can also continue after the divorce, as that can still be such a stressful time for everyone as they adapt to their new family structure and often, new home environment.”

Epstein stresses the importance of establishing a good working relationship with his clients from the very

“When a prospective client comes in, we have an in-depth consultation, discussing their reasons for seeking a divorce and what is important to them. It is essential to have a good rapport. Very personal issues can be involved. I try to emphasize to the client that being reasonable, honest, and forthcoming is the best way for us to plan a strategy together.

“For the initial consultation, I prefer to meet in person, but if the client prefers Zoom, we will accommodate. In this practice, it is crucial to develop a comfortable and personal relationship with your client while also remaining objective. This is sometimes a difficult balance to achieve.”

A typical divorce can take a year to be finalized, or even longer, he explains. There are so many complex factors involved. Asset valuation issues, taxes, insurance, debt, real estate, business issues, alimony (New Jersey has five different kinds of alimony), child support, personal injuries, contents of the house, and even distribution of household pets, among many others are major concerns.

Negotiated Settlement

As part of the process, mediation is mandated, says Epstein. This usually involves meetings with an accredited mediator, a neutral third party family law attorney, who tries to help clients identify and overcome obstacles to reach a negotiated settlement. The

FAMILY LAW SPECIALIST: “I like helping people understand the ing their move forward, and making concrete suggestions for ful, rough time for them, and I try to help find a resolution that is respectful of their needs.” Jeffrey K. Epstein is a certified

Mercer County Courts also provide mediation on parenting issues.

“Money is usually the biggest issue,” he points out. “Both parties will want to continue the lifestyle they have been accustomed to, and this can be difficult to achieve, and can result in considerable acrimony. Often, the house is sold, and the clients move. That can be an emotional trigger for many people.

“If taxes, business valuation issues, or real estate are involved, we may have to consult experts in other fields, including financial advisors, accountants, appraisers, and others,” he adds. “It also may be necessary to involve arbitration. Although 95 percent of cases are resolved without going to trial, some seek resolution through binding arbitration. Some people just have real difficulty with final decision-making. If they can’t reach an agreement, but don’t want to go to trial in Court, the parties can retain an arbitrator to decide the issues.”

As cases go forward, and as further information is gathered, and the opposing lawyers confer and interact, other issues can emerge. Alcohol, drugs, other addictions, such as gambling, are all very difficult to navigate in a divorce proceeding. Domestic abuse, including physical or mental harm, or sexual issues can also be revealed and adjudicated.

Population Spectrum

These are not easy to deal with, and as Epstein notes, “I am trying to help people when they are often at their worst. I have learned a lot about human nature, People should understand that their lawyer has their back, and any issues they are dealing with will be handled with understanding and support.”

His cases come from all over New Jersey, with the main focus on Mercer, Middlesex, Somerset, and Burlington Counties. “I tend to take cases from a wide variety of people and places as it keeps me on my toes about trending or relevant issues from across the population spectrum.”

Some of his work involves out of state, international, and immigration issues, he adds. “Some cases involve people from other countries who are not citizens. They may be here with only a visa, and this can add another level of complication.”

Changes in the norms of society have also brought

new kinds of cases, including same sex marriage divorces, and un-married households. These can involve additional legal issues, and emotional factors are often at the forefront.

The internet and social media have an impact too. In many cases, a more alienated, meaner environment has been created. “People can be more impatient and less understanding today,” Epstein points out. “While online communication can assist with visitation coordination, often social media plays its own role in driving people toward acrimonious divorce.’

Some clients have been married many years, others only a few, he reports. In one case, the client had been married 50 years, and when asked why he was seeking a divorce, “He said, ‘From the very beginning, each day has been hell!’”

Hugs and Kisses

Other times, people just grow apart over the years, and there can be an amicable outcome. In one memorable case, he recalls, “My client and the ex-spouse had been married many years, and when the divorce was settled, they hugged and kissed! Then, one said to the other, ‘Let’s go celebrate!’ And with family, friends, and attorneys, they got into their Rolls Royce and went to White Castle for hamburgers!”

Such feel good moments are certainly welcome in such a usually stressful and fraught process, and Jeff Epstein is grateful for such a moment.

A happily married man for more than 40 years, he is able to bring understanding and compassion to his clients whose own marriages have been less successful.

As he says, “The key to being a good matrimonial attorney is to recognize the individual needs of a particular client, both in terms of the issues involved and setting realistic goals. Much off our time is spent providing advice to clients on staying focused on the ‘big picture’ and prioritizing pivotal issues.

“I try to help them realize there are more important things than a marginally more lucrative settlement, such as peace of mind and good health for themselves and their children.”

For further information, call (609) 275-0400. Consult the very thorough website at www.szaferman.com.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024 • 22
Fellow, AAMLFellow, AAML Fellow,RisingAAML Star

PU Men’s Lax Displays Urgency in Win over Penn As Unsung Hero Barnds Stars in Last Home Game

As Tommy Barnds left the Class of 1952 Stadium last Saturday evening after his final regular season game on the field for the Princeton University men’s lacrosse team, he got a special embrace.

Princeton head coach Matt Madalon walked over to Barnds and gave him a bear hug, telling the senior midfielder how proud he was of him.

Patiently working his way into the lineup over the years, Barnds contributed two goals and an assist to help Princeton defeat Penn 15-10 before a standing room only throng of 2,766 as the Tigers improved to 8-4 overall and 3-2 Ivy League and stayed alive in their pursuit of a spot in the the upcoming Ivy postseason tournament.

Coming off a disappointing 13-12 loss at Brown a week earlier, Barnds and his teammates were determined to get back on the winning track.

“We were trusting our process,” said Barnds. “We had an extra focus in starting fast and practicing hard so we could come out in this game and really start fast and not get into a hole like we did against Brown.”

There was some extra emotion as the Tigers held their annual Senior Day celebration when they hosted the Quakers.

“It is definitely crazy to think that this is our last game on this field,” said Barnds, a 6’0, 200-pound native of Woodside, Calif.

“We know that all of the seniors are going to show out and all of the underclassmen are too. We have a lot of them who are going to play out there for us and they were going to do their thing also.”

The experience of going through COVID issues has helped Barnds and his classmates develop some tight bonds.

“Our group is closer than anybody else because of those challenges,” said Barnds. “It is another step in the path to get where we are now.”

After a slow start which saw the foes knotted in a scoreless stalemate through 10 minutes, Princeton stepped up with three goals in the last five

minutes of the quarter.

“They are a very good defense, I think they are one of the best in the country,” said Barnds.

“We just had to stay patient and eventually the shots would fall. Two freshmen (Colin Burns and Nate Kabiri) came with our first two goals.”

Barnds got the third goal as the Tigers went up 3-2 and never trailed after that.

“I am just cutting to space and these guys are finding me,” said Barnds, recalling his tally. “They get it to me and I finish it.”

In the second quarter, Princeton kept finishing, outscoring the Quakers 5-2 to take an easy 8-4 halftime lead, highlighted by two goals by Andrew McMeekin as he won face-offs and raced in for shots that found the back of the cage.

Barnds struck again 2:15 into the second half, firing in a tally that put the Tigers up 9-4.

“We got a hangup somehow and I just cut to space,” recalled Barnds. “It was Burns who found me on that one.”

Hanging in there over the years, Barnds has carved out a role in Princeton’s highpowered offense.

“It is just go out there and try and play well and do my best and sometimes the ball goes in and sometimes it doesn’t,” said Barnds, who now has eight goals this season and 23 in his Tiger career.

“You practice every day, you don’t really think that you are getting too much better. It is just over the course of all of the shots that I have taken and eventually I start to get better.”

Playing well against Penn was critical for a Tiger squad that is on the bubble as it looks to qualify for the Ivy postseason tournament that includes the top four teams in the final league standings.

“I think we have confidence in ourselves but we really needed this one,” said Barnds.

“It was almost like a playoff game for us. We brought that urgency all week in practice.”

Princeton head coach Madalon saw a heightened sense of urgency from his players as they prepared for

the clash with the Quakers.

“Our guys just wanted to get back to the locker room and back to practice and back to work,” said Madalon.

“They knew they let one get away from them but Brown also beat us. They were a better team that day.”

Madalon was thrilled to see the team’s Class of ’24 come through in their home finale.

“It is crazy, with all of the adversity and the COVID stuff,” said Madalon.

“It is an awesome group from the captains to the rest of the seniors. It is a true group that has led this program and set the standard. I couldn’t be happier for them that they got to do that on ’52.”

It took some time for the Tigers to find a rhythm against a tough Penn squad that brought a 4-1 Ivy record into the game.

“I think we just needed to get some shots on cage,” said Madalon.

“We were getting good looks, we just weren’t getting them on cage.”

Princeton got a big spark from sophomore face-off specialist McMeekin when he found the back of the cage twice in the second quarter surge.

“I think his first one was from 17 so I don’t think that was in the playbook,” said Madalon with a grin.

“We were obviously very thrilled about it. He has gotten better every practice and everyday he has been with us. He has done a really nice job, he is awesome.”

With the Tigers having played three one-goal games against Penn in the last two years, Madalon was thrilled to see his squad leading 11-7 after three quarters.

“Penn is a great program, every year they are one of the toughest teams we play,” said Madalon.

“We were anticipating a one-goal game. We were happy to get some separation and some breathing room going into the fourth quarter.”

At the defensive end, Princeton did a good job of stifling Penn.

“We were buttoned up for most of the second half, it was good,” said Madalon.

“We had to settle in, we have to protect Gio (goalie Michael Gianforcaro) a little more. He stole a couple too. We have to play a little better in front of him too.”

Scoring a goal late in the fourth quarter, the first for a Princeton goalie since a tally by Alex Hewit against Brown in 2008, Gianforcaro bought the crowd to its feet. “His job is not to score goals but we were really thrilled for him,” said Madalon of Gianforcaro who made 15 saves in addition to his goal and was later named the Ivy Defensive Player of the Week.

“I tried to call a timeout but I am glad we didn’t get it. That was really cool, I was happy for him.”

Madalon was happy to see Barnds come through with his second straight two-goal performance.

“Tommy is on man-up, he does a great job for us,” said Madalon, who also got two goals from another senior Lukas Stanat.

“He just found himself on a solid second line. He did outstanding, he was awesome today.”

As Princeton plays at Yale on April 27 in its regular season finale, the Tigers would clinch a spot in the Ivy tourney with a win over the Bulldogs. However, a Princeton loss and a Brown win over Harvard would eliminate the Tigers. Mirroring its approach to the Penn game, the Tigers will be bringing a sense of urgency this week as it girds for Yale.

“We have an opportunity to solidify that,” said Madalon, reflecting on the team’s prospects.

“We are going to put all of our effort into these next five days of practice.”

Barnds, for his part, believes that the win over Penn can propel the Tigers down the homestretch.

“This is one of the most fun wins I can remember on this field,” said Barnds.

“It is something we can build off going into Yale and the Ivy League tournament where we picked it up last year.”

Princeton’s First Tradition Worship Service

Sundays at 11am

Princeton University

Chapel

Open to all.

Preaching Sunday, April 28 is Rev. Alison L. Boden, Ph.D., Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel, Princeton University.

Music performed by the Princeton University Chapel Choir with Nicole Aldrich, Director of Chapel Music and Chapel Choir, and with Eric Plutz, University Organist.

S ports
23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024
BARN BURNER: Princeton University men’s lacrosse player Tommy Barnds heads to goal in recent action. Last Saturday, senior midfielder Barnds tallied two goals and one assist to help Princeton defeat Penn. The Tigers, now 8-4 overall and 3-2 Ivy League, play at Yale on April 27 in their regular season finale. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)
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Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton! New products from Princeton University Art Museum.

Shines on Senior Day with 4 Goals, Helping Tiger Women’s Lax Top Dartmouth

After playing through rain in each of its home games this spring, the sun was shining on the Princeton University women’s lacrosse team last Saturday afternoon as it hosted Dartmouth and held its annual Senior Day celebration.

Enjoying the finally pleasant weather, senior attacker Grace Tauckus was ready to shine in her last home game.

“It was our last day on ’52, it was obviously an emotional one for all of us,” said Tauckus.

“This team is incredibly special this year, everybody is incredibly close. It makes days like this a little bittersweet. I wanted to make the most of it today.”

Going through COVID interruptions during their college years has led to the Class of ’24 becoming particularly close.

“Everybody stayed very resilient,” said Tauckus, a 5’6 native of Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.

“We have had a lot of challenges thrown at us but we have been able to overcome those and write our own story. It is a unique one for sure.”

Against Dartmouth, Tauckus helped make the home finale a happy chapter, scoring a goal 32 seconds into the contest.

“Dartmouth is a great team, they have a great goalie,” said Tauckus.

“We talked a lot about having to see around her. Trying to strike first was

big for us, I am glad that we were able to do that.”

The Tigers kept striking, jumping out to a 9-0 led by the end of the first quarter, never looking back on the way to a 17-11 win as they improved to 9-5 overall and 5-1 Ivy League.

“That is something we have been trying to put together, finishing the play on both ends, supporting each other,” said Tauckus, reflecting on the first quarter outburst.

“When defense comes up with a big stop, it is making sure that we put the ball away on the other end. It was great to see. We know how well we can play when we play as a unit. That was our goal today - to come out and show how dominant we can be when we all play together.”

Tauckus ended up with four goals in the victory and now has 35 on the season.

“Our teammates did a really good job of setting each other up,” said Tauckus, who has tallied 159 points in her career on 128 goals and 31 assists.

“That doesn’t happen without everyone working together. Haven Dora had a million assists today.”

As a senior leader, Tauckus has looked to help keep things together on the field with her voice.

“I have learned to communicate a lot more from the girls who came before me, they were incredible role models,” said Tauckus.

“It is just trying to be like them as much as I can on the field. I just try to be a really vocal leader out there and work with each other.”

After going 7-9 last year, the Tigers have been making a statement this spring with a bounce back campaign.

“Last year we didn’t have the outcome that we hoped for,” said Tauckus.

“I think a lot of us were able to learn from that and make some tangible changes to prevent that from happening this year.”

Applying those lessons, the Tigers have caught fire down the stretch, going 6-2 in their last eight games.

“This team has a lot of energy; we play for each other and I think it shows on the field,” said Tauckus.

“You see how happy everybody is for each other, supporting each other’s successes has definitely carried us far.”

With Princeton wrapping up regular season play with a game at Harvard on April 27 and then starting action in the Ivy postseason tournament with a semifinal contest on May 3 in New Haven, Conn., Tauckus believes the Tigers can go far.

“We still have another game this season,” said Tauckus. “I think this is a special group. I am excited to see what we can do in May.”

Princeton head coach Jenn Cook views the team’s seniors as a particularly special class.

“This senior group has just been incredible, they have really done an incredible job this year, guiding and mentoring the younger girls on the team,” said Cook.

“They have done a really great job on and off the field, creating connections between different classes. I think the connections really play into how we play as a team on both sides of the ball. It is a credit to those seniors who have really driven our culture all year.”

The Tigers did a great job collectively against the Big Green as they jumped out to a 9-0 lead.

“They came out on fire out of the gate,” said Cook. “This game was all about playing and honoring those seniors and everything they have done for this program over that time as a Tiger. It was just so awesome to see.”

One of the most awesome moments of the day came late in the third quarter when senior Olivia Koch, a former Lawrenceville School star, scored her first career goal, prompting a roar from the crowd.

“We finished strong, we did get a lot of people in,” said Cook.

“Olivia was awesome, our whole team erupted for her. It was just such a great moment. Every single person on this team celebrates each other’s little successes and that makes a massive difference.”

Cook credits Tauckus with making a massive impact for the Tigers over her career.

“Grace has brought so much to this program, to this team and to our attack,” said Cook.

“She plays so selflessly and really just makes everyone around her better. That is what she has done for all four years. It is just a great day to honor that class and Grace.”

Junior star McKenzie Blake had another great day as she tallied four goals and one assist and now has a team-high 51 goals this spring.

“You can give her the ball and you can always trust

that she is going to finish it,” said Cook.

“She has great hands, great vision and her decisions with the ball are always incredible. She has had a great year, we are so excited for her. She has really just done a great job of listening to the coaching and finding those openings and finishing.”

In reflecting on Princeton’s progress this spring after going through a tough season last year, Cook believes that the seniors have played a key role in making that happen.

“I think the bounce back from last year, I can really attribute to our culture which has had a direct impact by the senior class and them really understanding what we want and need in order to have a different result from last year,” said Cook.

“They have just done an incredible job of getting everybody on the same page, playing everyday in practice, playing through the weather and just playing to elevate your game in practice collectively as a team.”

As the Tigers look ahead to the Ivy tourney and a likely return to the NCAA tournament, Cook is confident that the Tigers will elevate their game.

“With this group, I think there is so much love and joy when we play,” said Cook.

“I think we could turn some heads in the Ivy tournament and I also think we could make a really phenomenal run in the NCAA tournament as well. It is continuing to grow, continuing to play connected. We let the game be our teacher. It is all about getting better every single time we have an opportunity to be together, whether at practice or in a game.”

Tauckus believes that Princeton will need to sharpen its focus to produce a memorable postseason run.

“It is showing up for all 60 minutes of our game; we have had some incredible quarters and then we have had some where we don’t

look like ourselves,” said Tauckus.

“Against really good teams, you are going to need to show up for all four quarters so that will be big for us.”

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Tauckus
AMAZING GRACE: Princeton University women’s lacrosse player Grace Tauckus races upfield in a game earlier this season. Last Saturday, senior attacker Tauckus scored four goals to help Princeton defeat Dartmouth 17-11. The Tigers, now 9-5 overall and 5-1 Ivy League, play at Harvard in April 27 to wrap up regular season play before it heads into the Ivy postseason tournament. (Photo by Steven Wojtowicz)
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PU Sports Roundup

Tiger Men’s Volleyball Falls in EIVA Quarters

Ben Harrington starred in a losing cause as the thirdseeded Princeton University men’s volleyball team fell 3-0 to sixth-seeded University of Charleston in the Eastern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association (EIVA)

quarterfinals last Wednesday in State College, Pa.

Senior star Harrington had 12 kills as he wrapped up his career with 1,002 kills but Charleston was able to prevail 25-17, 25-23, 27-25.

The defeat left the Tigers with a final record of 12-12.

PU Wrestling Alums

Compete at Olympic Trials

Former Princeton University wrestling standouts

Quincy Monday ’23 and Matt Kolodzik ’20 competed last weekend in the 2024 U.S. Olympic Team Trials at the Bryce Jordan Center at Penn State.

Monday was seeded third in the men’s freestyle 74kg weight class and fell 5-0 to 11th-seeded Jarrett Jacques in a quarterfinal bout. Kolodzik was seeded 10th in the men’s freestyle 65kg weight class and lost 13-2 to No. 7 Kaleb Larkin in a first-round matchup.

The Princeton alumni represented the New Jersey Regional Training Center. The NJRTC operates under the leadership of Reece Humphrey, who was named USA Wrestling Coach of the Year and previously served as an assistant coach for Princeton wrestling. The NJRTC trains and is based out of the Princeton University wrestling room and has produced two world team wrestlers since it was established in 2017.

Princeton Men’s Golf

Takes 2nd at Ivy Tourney

William Huang led the way as the Princeton University men’s golf team placed second in the Ivy League Championships last weekend at the Watchung Valley Golf Club in Watchung, N.J.

Junior Huang placed second individually, carding a score of eight-under 205 for the three-round event.

In the team standings, Princeton posted a score of six-under 846, three strokes behind champion Yale.

PU Women’s Golf Star Liu

Wins Ivy Title, Tigers 6th Overall

Victoria Liu won her second individual title as the Princeton University women’s golf team competed in the Ivy League Championships last weekend at the Stanwich Country Club in Greenwich, Conn.

Junior Liu carded a twoover 218 for the three-round event, four strokes ahead of runner-up Bridge Ma of Harvard. Liu, who placed first in the 2022 Ivy tourney, is the now the fourth Princeton women’s golfer to win multiple Ivy titles in her career — joining Julia Alison (1999, 2001), Avery Kiser (2002, 2003, 2004) and Susannah Aboff (2008, 2009). It marked the 12th individual title at the event for the Tigers.

In the team standings, Princeton placed 6th at +80 at the tournament which was won by Dartmouth at +35.

Tiger Baseball Goes 2-1 Against Penn Jacob Faulkner produced a mound gem as the Princeton University baseball team defeated Penn 3-1 last Sunday to go 2-1 in a threegame series against visiting Penn last weekend at Clarke Filed.

Junior right-hander Faulkner struck out five and walked one, yielding just two hits and no runs in six innings of work. He started the weekend by going three innings in relief with three strikeouts to get the win as Princeton edged Penn 3-2 in the first game of a doubleheader on Saturday. Faulkner is now 6-1 this season in 16 appearances with a 3.11 ERA in 46 1/3 innings. He was later named the Ivy League Pitcher of the Week.

Princeton, which fell 12-7 in the nightcap on Saturday, is now 12-21 overall and 8-7 Ivy. In upcoming action, the Tigers host Wagner on April 24 before heading to New England for a three-game series against Dartmouth with a doubleheader slated for April 27 and a single game on April 28.

PU Women’s Tennis Tops Harvard, Wins Ivy Title

Neha Velaga starred as the No. 44 Princeton University women’s tennis team edged No. 38 Harvard 4-3 last Sunday to clinch its fifth straight Ivy League title.

Senior Velaga won her match at first singles and helped the Tigers win the doubles point as Princeton improved to 15-6 overall and 6-1 Ivy.

The Tigers, who secured the league’s automatic berth in the NCAA tournament with the title, will find out their first-round opponent and location for the tourney in the selection show on April 29.

Tiger Men’s Tennis Defeats Harvard Battling valiantly, the No. 27 Princeton University men’s tennis team fell 4-3 to No. 13 Harvard last Sunday.

Paul Inchauspe posted a straight-set win at first singles to provide a highlight as the Tigers moved to 22-7 overall and 5-2 Ivy League. Princeton narrowly lost the doubles point and lost a three-setter at fifth-singles as they got edged by the Crimson.

No. 8 Columbia and Harvard both earned shares of the 2024 Ivy men’s tennis title as they went 6-1 in league action.

The No. 27 Tigers will now wait to to learn their assignment in the upcoming NCAA tournament which will be announced in the selection show on April 29.

PU Men’s Heavyweights

Defeat No. 1 Harvard

Coming through in a tight race, the No. 4 Princeton University men’s heavyweight varsity 8 crew edged No. 1 Harvard last Saturday to earn the Compton Cup.

The Tigers clocked a winning time of 5:51.7 over the 2,000-meter course on the Charles River in Cambridge, Mass with Harvard coming in at 5:53.3.

Princeton faces Yale and Cornell on April 27 in Ithaca, N.Y. in the race for the Carnegie Cup.

Princeton Open Crew Beats Yale Building on its strong performance in the Ivy Invite

a week earlier, the No. 4 Princeton University women’s open varsity 8 defeated No. 5 Yale last Saturday in New Haven, Conn. to win the Eisenberg Cup.

The Tiger top boat covered the 2,000-meter course on the Housatonic River in 6:06.7 with Yale finishing in 6:11.9.

In upcoming action, Princeton hosts Columbia, Northeastern and Notre Dame on April 27.

Tiger Men’s Lightweights

Falls to Penn, Tops Georgetown

Coming up just short in a thrilling race, the No. 2 Princeton University men’s lightweight varsity 8 got edged by Penn but did top Georgetown in racing last Saturday morning.

Penn posted a winning time of 5:38.3 over the 2,000-meter course on Lake Carnegie with Princeton second in 5:38.6 and Georgetown taking third in 5:50.3.

Penn earned the the WoodHammond Cup by virtue of its win while Princeton took the Fosburg Cup as a result of defeating Georgetown.

The Tigers head to New England next weekend to face Yale and Harvard in Derby, Conn. in the race for the Goldthwait and Vogel Cup.

PU Women’s Hoops Star Chen

Makes Academic All-America Princeton University women’s basketball senior star Kaitlyn Chen has been selected as College Sports Communicators (CSC) Second Team Academic AllAmerica, the organization announced today.

Chen was named to the CSC Academic All-District Team and Academic All-Ivy earlier this year. This is her first CSC Academic AllAmerica honor.

The senior gaurd is one of only four Tigers to ever receive this accolade, joining Sandi Bittler (1989-1990), Lauren Edwards (2011), and Michelle Miller (2015-16).

Chen, a 5’9 native of San Marino, Calif., finished her senior season at 15.8 points, 4.9 assists, 3.5 rebounds and 1.3 steals per game.

The senior captain’s 147 assists in 2023-24 are tied for the third most in a single-season in program history while her 190 field goals were sixth, her 474 points and 389 field goal attempts were 10th.

Chen will graduate third in Princeton history in assists (359) and 12th in points (1,276). During her time with the Tigers, she collected three Ivy League titles, three Ivy League Tournament titles, three Ivy League Tournament Most Outstanding Player awards and two NCAA Tournament victories.

Princeton Wrestling

Adds Brewer to Staff

The Princeton University wrestling program has added former University of Oklahoma standout Cody Brewer to the staff as its head assistant coach.

Brewer’s most recent coaching experience was at Virginia Tech, where he spent five years and played a key role in helping Joey Prata to ascend the national rankings and achieve a third-place finish at the 2020 ACC Championships.

Before that, Brewer spent three seasons on staff at

MOVING UP: Princeton University softball player Cate Bade about to make contact in a 2023 game. Last Sunday, senior outfielder Bade went 3-for-3 with one run to help Princeton top Yale 6-3 and complete a three-game sweep of the Bulldogs. In action on Saturday, Princeton topped Yale 7-6 and 7-3. By virtue of the 3-0 weekend, Princeton moved into first place in the Ivy League standings. The Tigers, now 23-11 overall and 11-4 Ivy League, host a three-game set with Brown next weekend with a doubleheader on April 27 and a single game on April 28. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Northwestern following a standout career at Oklahoma. With the Sooners, Brewer was a two-time Big 12 champion, a four-time All-American and an NCAA champion in 2015.

During his tenure at Northwestern, Brewer focused on coaching the Wildcats’ lightweights and helped guide Sebastian Rivera, a twotime All-American. Rivera won a Big 10 championship and securing the No. 1 seed at 125 pounds in the 2019 NCAA Championships.

In his collegiate career, Brewer achieved a record of 95 wins and 22 losses overall. Throughout his four seasons, he consistently reached the finals of the Big 12 championships and secured placements of seventh, eighth, first, and third at the national championships from 2013 to 2016.

Originally from Kansas City, Missouri, Brewer graduated from Oklahoma, earning a degree in sociology.

“I am extremely excited for Cody to join the Princeton wrestling family,” said Princeton head coach Joe Dubuque.

“He brings a ton of experience with coaching numerous All-Americans while helping his previous programs to top ten finishes. His passion and energy will be felt immediately.”

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024
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PHS Baseball Showing Batting Punch, Ignited by Winters in the Leadoff Spot

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Alex Winters lived up to his role as the catalyst for the Princeton High baseball team with aplomb as it hosted Princeton Day School last Thursday.

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Senior center fielder and leadoff hitter Winters started the bottom of the first inning by stroking a single and stealing a base to ignite a two-run rally.

We only have 13 guys but it seems like we have 20 guys in here. Everyone wants the same thing, everyone wants to win. That is the consensus. No one is here for stats. Everyone wants to win the game, that is what I love here.”

“The last two days, they have been throwing more strikes,” said Capuano.

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As a battle-tested veteran, Winters also looks to be a catalyst when it comes to promoting that team spirit.

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“That is always the goal, getting a good start especially with the top of our lineup,” said Winters.

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“I have been here for three years, I take it that I need to be a leader for the team, whether on the field, off the field,” said Winters.

“In our losses, it is not that simple. I think both pitchers walked the first batters they saw but then after that they settled in. Justice did great today for his first outing, first start, first everything. You can’t ask for much more, five innings of shutout baseball with one hit. That’s the thing, especially playing five games this week, you need guys like him to do that.”

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“We believe that is what we should be doing every game off of any pitcher to come out strong. We think we should do that and we should keep going.”

Winters kept going, drawing a walk and stealing a base in the third, and coming around to score on a Mike Prete single. In the fourth, he blasted a two-run double over the right fielder’s head to put PHS up 6-0 as it cruised to a 10-0 win in six innings.

“It is give it my all, that is all I have got,” said Winters, who went 2-for-3 with two runs and two RBIs in the win.

“I try to be a vocal leader and keep the guys in the game. I think if we are in the game at all times, good things are going to happen.”

PHS head coach Dom Capuano credits Winters with making things happen for the Tigers.

“That is why he hits leadoff,” said Capuano of Winters who is batting .448 with 12 stolen bases.

“For my money he is definitely the best leadoff hitter in the county, if not one of top three hitters in the county. It shows; he did a good job today. We rely on him.”

Capuano is seeing good things from his players in the early going.

“We are finding our stride,” said Capuano, whose team fell 15-9 to Allentown last Monday to move to 4-5 and hosts Hopewell Valley on April 26, plays at Colts Neck on April 27, hosts Franklin on April 29, and then plays at Lawrence on April 30.

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“I am here to win games, I am here to have a good time.I am here to make a run with these guys.”

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On his double, Winters knew he made good contact. “I was just trying to simplify my approach up there and hit one hard,” recalled Winters.

So far this spring, PHS has been one of the top hitting teams in the county, averaging eight runs a game through nine games.

“One to five is doing really well,” said Capuano, whose first five features Ben Walden, Mike Prete, Dylan Newman and Chase Hamerschlag in addition to Winters.

“We are starting to play complete games, we are starting to throw strikes and doing the things we need to do. We talk about beating teams that you are supposed to beat. It is just keep doing what we are doing. The guys who aren’t hitting, it is make sure we keep focused and make sure that they are adjusting and doing the right things. The pitchers just need to keep throwing strikes and keep the pitch count down.”

Being a tight-knit squad has proved to be an advantage for the Tigers.

“It is nice, everybody understands their role,” said Capuano.

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“I know if I hit one hard, it is probably going to fall somewhere, especially if I pull it. It is exactly what I did, I hit it hard somewhere. I didn’t get the launch angle I was hoping for to get it out but it did the job. It is a deep fence over here. I knew the boys would figure it out on the bases, it was hit it out there and we will get a few runs in.”

“Everyone is willing to be together and fight for each other. It definitely helps. I would love to have 18 guys but if you are going to have 13, this is a good nucleus of guys to have.”

In the view of Winters, the PHS players are taking their roles seriously.

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Winters has a lot of confidence in his teammates, noting that with only 13 players on the squad, the Tigers have developed tight bonds.

“The thing about this team is we have a special fight and a special heart,” said Winters.

“You saw today with the one to five, if you can get them up a lot it helps. Prete is hitting .900 in the last three games. He went Ofor and then he got his first hit and he is killing it. I put him in the nine hole for a game. When I told him about it, he put his head down. I said look it is not a punishment, it is so you can see better pitches and feel comfortable and he did. It hasn’t stopped. Ben is doing great. Everyone in the top five is doing great.”

“We have to stay all business, that is what we like to say,” said Winters.

Thank you to our customers for voting us

Thank you to our customers for voting us Best Pizza

Since [1950] Conte’s has become a Princeton destination; a great old-school bar that also happens to serve some of New Jersey’s best pizza, thin-crusted and bubbly.

The restaurant hasn’t changed much since then; even the tables are the same. It’s a simple, no-frills space, but if you visit during peak times, be prepared to wait well over an hour for a table.

We could not have reached this accomplishment without our dedicated employees and customers.

“I think that is something we haven’t seen in a while with the Princeton program. That is something that makes this team really special, there is a good spirit.

In the win over PDS, the Tigers got a stellar mound effort from junior Jai Justice as he went five innings, striking out seven and giving up just one hit. Nano Sarceno came on in relief in the sixth and closed the door on the Panthers.

“It is don’t talk about it, be about it; that is our team motto. We can say all we want about having energy but it is just show up and play well.”

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We could not have reached these accomplishment without our dedicated employees and customers.

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Thank you from the owners of Conte’s Serving the Princeton community for over 80 years, and we will continue to serve you another 80 years and more.

Thank you from the owners of Conte’s Serving the Princeton community for over 80 years, and we will continue to serve you another 80 years and more.

Thank you from the owners of Conte’s Princeton community for over 80 years, and we will continue to serve you another 80 years and more.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024 • 26 ALEX THE GREAT: Princeton High baseball player Alex Winters takes a cut in recent action. Last Thursday, senior center fielder Winters went 2-for-3 with two runs and two RBIs to help PHS defeat the Princeton Day School 10-0. The Tigers, who fell 15-9 to Allentown last Monday to move to 4-5, host Hopewell Valley on April 26, play at Colts Neck on April 27, hosts Franklin on April 29 and plays at Lawrence on April 30. (Photo by Steven Wojtowicz) Cin facebook Like facebook and Cindy V Like facebook and A-DOOR-A-PET
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Sparked by Senior Castillo’s Leadership, Production, PHS Softball Showing Progress in the Early Going

Maddie Castillo may seem to be a little old to be playing with dolls but she was all smiles as she clutched a Barbie after the Princeton High softball team hosted Hopewell Valley last Friday.

PHS senior third baseman Castillo received the doll after going 3-for-4 with a run in a losing cause as PHS got edged 8-7 by HoVal in a back-andforth contest.

“Teams give out a game ball for the MVP, this is like our game ball, it is Barbie,” said Castillo.

“Natalie [Hester] got it last game and now next game I will get to give it to the next person.”

smarter on the bases and just have more overall good atbats,” said Castillo.

“We all build off of each other. If I see other people hitting, it encourages me to want to hit and that encourages others to hit.”

Castillo is encouraged by the improvement the PHS program has shown during her career.

“The progress in these four years has been insane,” said Castillo.

“The incoming freshmen have a lot of energy and skill that we needed to just build off of. We are all just a close knit team. We are building off of every year and learning from all of our mistakes from the game so it is good.”

Serving as a team co-captain along with classmate Ellie van der Schaar, Castillo has worked to build that closeness.

“Freshman year, me and Ellie were there only two freshmen, it is nice to be here all four years,” said Castillo.

“As a captain, I think it is nice to get the team together. We plan a lot of events together which definitely keeps us as a solid team.”

doing a great job and it has to be a one though nine effort,” said Soprano, whose team lost 11-1 to Allentown last Monday to move to 2-5 and is still averaging 8.6 runs a game.

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Although the Tigers came up short against the Bulldogs, they showed plenty of fight. They fell behind 2-0 in the top of the first inning and then scored two runs in the bottom of the frame to knot the game at 2-2. PHS fell behind 4-2 in the top of third and then forged ahead 6-5 in the bottom of the fourth. After yielding a run in the top of the fifth, PHS went up 7-6 in the bottom of the inning. Neither team scored in the sixth but HoVal pushed across two runs in the top of the seventh to pull out the win.

Castillo was not surprised to see the Tigers battling to the final out.

“Our energy is the biggest part of our team,” said Castillo.

“No matter whether we are up or down, we are screaming. It definitely helps. Even when we make errors in the field, we pick each other up and say we are going to get out of the inning. In between innings, coach (Marissa Soprano) gives us a good talk. She tells us get our head into game and it fuels us to get more runs and just be positive.”

Hitting in the eighth spot in the PHS batting order, Castillo has helped fuel the PHS hitting attack.

“I moved down in the lineup and I think it has made me have a more positive mindset in the batter’s box and just be

Over the years, Castillo has become a more solid allaround player.

“I think I definitely improved any hitting, just being smarter,” said Castillo.

“My mentality about the game has definitely improved and skill-wise. I just keep working on myself.”

In reflecting on the loss to HoVal, Castillo noted that the team’s fielding is a work in progress.

“We can definitely learn to talk better in the infield, just to know where to throw the ball to help each other out,” said Castillo.

“If one person makes a mistake, we just need to know what to do with the ball after that.”

PHS head coach Marissa Soprano likes what her players have been doing with the bat this season.

“We emphasize that they are

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“Everyone gets up there and, especially when teammates are on base, they are coming up big and trying to get them across the plate. They are hitting a lot better, they have been doing a great job at the plate.”

Soprano acknowledged that the Tigers need to do a better job in the field.

“It is just about cleaning the defense up, we are still figuring out to field as a team in the infield,” said Soprano.

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“If we get the lead, it is having a shut down inning and being able to stop them from scoring.”

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“They are the only two have got all four years with us,” said Soprano.

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“They both really love the sport, their passion really helps the underclassmen. They have been great, they have been great leaders, not only in enthusiasm but also in skill and how to play the game Castillo’s skill with the bat in the eight hole had been a plus for PHS.

“Maddie is funny because she doesn’t like to be at the top of the lineup so we slid her down,” said Soprano.

“She is more comfortable there. I think there is less pressure on her. It allows her to go up there and get a few hits. She also has a pretty good eye on the strike zone so it is a good spot to have her in and then wraparound to the top of the lineup.”

Sophomore Natalie Hester has been providing a lot of punch in the top of the lineup and some great play at shortstop.

“Natalie is always good offensively and her defense in the hole is great,” said Soprano.

“The other day she had a play basically at second base and got the girl at first base. She is very talented and keeps the girls competitive. She is a great piece for us in terms of athleticism and also competitiveness.”

Sophomore pitcher Erin Pilicer has been competing hard in the circle.

“Erin is so steady and eventempered on the mound and we really appreciate that,” said Soprano, who has also given freshman Genevieve Ritchie some innings in the circle. “She is doing a great job.”

Looking ahead, Soprano believes PHS can do some great things.

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“We are really excited with our talent and our enthusiasm,” said Soprano, whose team plays at Florence on April 25 before hosting Lawrence High on April 30.

Castillo, for her part, is enthusiastic about the squad’s prospects as she wraps up her PHS career along with van der Schaar and fellow seniors Delaney Keegan and Yeahna Lee.

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“I am thinking it could be a very positive year and it is only the beginning so I am hopeful,” said Castillo. “It is the beginning of the end for us, it is exciting.”

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MAD GOOD: Princeton High softball player Maddie Castillo takes a swing in a game earlier this season. Last Friday, senior Castillo went 3-for-4 with a run in a losing cause as PHS got edged 8-7 by Hopewell Valley. The Tigers, who lost 11-1 to Allentown last Monday to move to 2-5, play at Florence on April 25 before hosting Lawrence High on April 30. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)
27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024
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With the Levy Siblings Excelling at Javelin, PHS Track Shines at Mercer County Relays

Devin Levy and his sister Naomi Levy borrowed javelins last spring for the chance to continue to practice in the offseason.

The extra work and dedication is paying off for the Princeton High siblings this year.

Devin, a junior, had the second-best throw of any competitor and combined with sophomore Simon Obregon to take second place in the boys division at the Mercer County Relays last Saturday at Lawrenceville School.

“I felt good,” said Devin. “We had some fun in it last year and wanted to come back. Obviously I wanted to do well. It’s the first big meet of the season and I think Simon and I did pretty well. We placed second so we can’t complain.”

Devin last year won the relays crown with Henry Zief, who graduated and is throwing for High Point University. Devin threw 133’3 at the relays meet last year. On Saturday, he threw 140’6 and Obregon threw 117’8. Only the combination from Allentown threw it further.

“I thought I threw pretty well,” said Devin. “I mean, I think there’s more to be done, but it’s early season. I’m happy where I’m at right now. I think that’s pretty far.”

Naomi had the top throw in the girls division. The sophomore threw 82’10, a personal best for her. Her partner did not have any marked throws, but for

Naomi the chance to compete again was important as she continues to progress.

“This spring I’ve been throwing pretty good and I’ve thrown some PRs at the past meets,” said Naomi. “I’m just having fun with it.”

The Tigers see plenty to build on from their team coming out of the relays meet. The boys relay of Sean Wilton and Osbaldo Morales won the boys shot put at 88’10.25. Sawyer Quallen and Ishaq Inayat won the boys’ triple jump at 80’6. Wilton and Michael Bao were second in the boys discus with a combination that equaled 143’0, nine inches shy of first. Inayat and Oliver Spagnoli were second in boys long jump at 38’9.25. The Tiger boys were third in the distance medley in 11:10.14 and fourth in the 4x200 in 1:34.83.

“Historically, I would say we’ve been a distance focused program and then you know the sprints really started coming into form over the last decade or so,” said PHS head coach Ben Samara.

“This year I think it’s a little bit the opposite. We still have a solid distance program, but you know on the county and sectional level, we’re looking for people to step up and kind of get to that next level to complement what we’re doing in the throws and in the jumps.”

The PHS girls were second in the 4x200 in 1:49.98, second in the 4x1600 in 22:14.55, third in the girls distance medley in 13:11.66,

fourth in the 4x100 in 51.69 seconds and fifth in the 4x400 in 4:18.22.

“We were thrilled with this meet,” said Samara. “A lot of things that we were working on, that we spent a lot of time on, came together. We have a really nice mix of people who are ready to do big things right now and younger athletes who are really going to kind of be the next wave after them. So we had a little bit of everything on Saturday and we were really happy with the results.”

Naomi Levy’s throw Saturday marked the third meet in a row in which she bettered her personal best. Her progression stems from getting extra practice last year and being able to build on a solid fundamental foundation that was reinforced in the summer at home.

“We would throw it occasionally in our backyard because it’s big enough to be able to throw it,” said Naomi.

“And it really helps in the offseason and when it’s nice outside to get to throw.”

In season, she credits the full coaching staff at PHS that now includes former Princeton University head coach Fred Samara on the staff. The Levy siblings also have their father, Jeff, who threw javelin, for guidance outside of their school coaching.

“I think it’s super helpful,” said Devin. “He’s super supportive. We can just talk about throws and it’s always another set of eyes. So at

the end of a throw, it’s like I can go back to him and he’ll tell me what he saw and I’ll tell him what I felt and then we’ll find the middle ground on what to improve on and what exercises to improve it.”

And – not to be overlooked – the Levys have each other.

“It’s really helpful because at practice, if our coach is busy with another throwing group, I can always ask my brother to watch my throw and he knows a lot and he knows more than me about javelin,” said Naomi.

“So he always gives me good advice and it’s also fun because it’s something we can bond over.”

They try to do whatever is possible to help the other. In the summer, that meant taking advantage of their yard to fine-tune their technique.

“I always try to get stronger and also in the summer I would just keep practicing the fundamental movements to make sure I remember them,” said Naomi.

“And then I could practice my steps. So right now I’m working on my run up so I can throw even farther.”

The summer gave them an opportunity to get ahead as they entered their third and second seasons of high school. It kept them sharp during a time when some take off from practicing.

“I think they’re really helpful for getting like the muscle memory of the run up,” said Devin.

“I’m very confident in my steps after a lot of work on it over the summer and there’s just that and really a lot of strength training to get my body to be able to handle the throwing a lot throughout the year.”

Having a built-in cheerleader helps too. They encourage each other year-round and try to be as supportive as possible as they try to reach their potential.

“I’ve just tried to be there for what she needs me for,” said Devin.

“I don’t want to give her too much information and overwhelm her or confuse her, so I just let her know, if you want any advice from me or what I see, just ask and I’ll tell you what I’m thinking.”

“I love to see that she’s having success with it and I just like having a partner to throw with,” said Devin.

“And I also think that she does what I can’t do, like she’s very graceful with her throws, mine are all power.”

At meets like the county relays, they relish the chance to see each other throw and to celebrate the progress of each other. So far, there has been a lot to celebrate.

“Like two weeks ago we both PR’d,” said Naomi, “so it was very exciting.”

Their father has been able to guide them as they’re starting their careers. Naomi picked up the javelin for the first time last year. Devin had started throwing just a little bit in eighth grade. After a couple of injuries hampered his last two seasons, he has been focused on staying healthy through to the end this year and likes the way this year started. He’s been working on improving his technique from the old baseball throw style he would fall back on to a more injury preventative form for the javelin. It gives him confidence he can finish hitting lofty goals.

“It feels like everything’s starting to come together,” said Devin.

“I look at the videos and it looks very good and then I also have just had a great support system this year and last year to sort of get me to this point between Henry, coach Samara, his dad, Mr. Samara and Brandon Williams, and then my dad. I’ve had a lot of eyes and a lot of different people that I can sort of work out what needs to be fixed in my throw.”

The county relays was another meet to show that they are progressing well. The second-place finish was one of the highest finishes for a PHS relay, and Naomi’s throw was the best of any girl competing Saturday. She is focusing on staying ahead of the field. Her improvements are focused on stretching her arm consistently and being quicker to turn her hips after she plants to throw.

“They think they can put another 30 feet on this year for Devin,” said Samara.

“If he goes back to that long run and Naomi just keeps improving over and over and over every meet, she’s just gotta work on putting more power behind her throw. She has perfect technique right now. She just needs to add that power in there.”

The Levys are both working to be able to peak by the end of the season. The PHS coaches think their early throws are just a starting point to bigger things. They are part of a Little Tigers team that is off to a promising start.

“It’s been really, really productive,” said Samara. “It’s been really, really nice to see the hard work and the dedication that the kids are bringing every day. They’re really buying into the values of our program. We talk a lot about growth mindset, we talk a lot about resiliency being two of the hallmarks of what we do, and the kids have really taken that to heart. And so we’re seeing it every day.”

The productivity has PHS on pace for some lofty goals. The Tigers have a championship in their sights if they can continue to get the sort of efforts that they saw at the Mercer County Relays and the dedication that they’ve seen thus far in practices.

“On the boys side, we were Mercer County champions last year and we think we have a really good shot to repeat if we can turn out in our events the way we know that we can,” said Samara.

“On the girls side, we’re in an interesting spot. We know that this is a group of contenders and it’s not this year, but we need to take this year to really build this group up so they can start to contend as early as next year when we have pretty much everybody back. We have a really young distance crew and sprint crew on the girls side. It’s going to be really, really good. So we get to do the boys this year and kind of build for the girls and that’s kind of fun.”

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024 • 28
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and
find ways to impress each other.
FAMILY BUSINESS: Princeton High track standouts Devin Levy, right, and his sister, Naomi, display their javelin form. Last weekend, the Levy siblings excelled as PHS competed in the Mercer County Relays. Devin, a junior, had the second-best throw of any competitor and combined with sophomore Simon Obregon to take second place in the boys division. Naomi, a sophomore, had the top throw in the girls division as she threw 82’10, a personal best for her.
They benefit from having each other’s support in both practice
in meets. They often

Ruf Emerging as a Force in Move to Midfield

As PDS Girls’ Lacrosse Produces 7-2 Start

Last spring, Shelby Ruf helped shore up the defensive unit for the Princeton Day School girls’ lacrosse team with her height and athleticism.

Getting moved up to the midfield this season for PDS, junior star Ruf is utilizing those qualities and her defensive acumen to make an impact for the Panther offense.

“It was definitely a change, I know how the defense works,” said Ruf, who plays goalie for the school’s New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Non-Public A state champion girls’ soccer team in the fall and is a forward on the basketball squad in the winter. “Just taking that into the attack really helps. I love it, it is so much fun.”

Working with PDS senior stalwarts Tessa Caputo, Jesse Hollander, and Kelly Christie has helped ease the transition for Ruf.

“I look up to all of the seniors, they have helped me so much, especially moving from defense to playing more attack,” said Ruf. “In practice or in the game, I always get pointers from them.”

Last Wednesday as PDS hosted the Peddie School,

Ruf was in attack mode, tallying three goals and three assists as the Panthers rolled to a 21-11 win.

Ruf helped Panthers roar out of the gate, tallying a goal four minutes into the contest as the Panthers built an early 5-1 lead.

“Our main goal was to go out there, get the draw and come away with it as fast we can,” said Ruf.

“We have worked a lot on our attack, just executing in the first couple of minutes. That was big and our energy was huge today.

The Panther scoring was spread out over the course of the game as Caputo tallied seven goals and four assists in the win with Hollander chipping in three goals and three assists, Christie adding two goals and one assist, and sophomore Lucia McKee getting three goals.

“We are a very selfless team, we want our teammates to succeed,” said Ruf.

“If we can get the assist and our teammate gets the goal, that is fine. I think that is what helps our attack, having so much diversity.”

In the third quarter, Ruf led the attack as she tallied two goals and two assists in the period.

“I was in synch and my

teammates encouraged me,” said Ruf “Yesterday in practice we worked a lot on draw controls and our transition.

That helped a lot.”

Ruf has been taking draw controls to help ignite the PDS transition.

“I have worked a lot with coach [Lucia] Marcozzi, she has helped a lot with that,” said Ruf.

“We have been focusing on our draws and just helping build our midfield.”

The influence of new head coach Marcozzi has helped give the Panthers a different focus.

“She has been great, we absolutely love her,” said Ruf of Marcozzi, a former Bucknell women’s lax standout. “I think having a change helped, it gave us a different view on things.”

Marcozzi, for her part, loves the way Ruf has adjusted to her new spot in the field.

“Shelby has had such a great coming out here, she has really come into her own,” said Marcozzi

“Coming into the season, she didn’t have a lot of confidence in the midfield because she is predominately a defender. I think putting her there, her teammates, especially the seniors, really trust her. She is a three-sport athlete. People just really love to see her succeed and she feels that confidence and it

is just making her keep rolling. She is crushing it.”

Senior midfielder and Fairfield commit Caputo is also crushing it, having recently hit the 200-goal milestone in her PDS career.

“Tessa is great, that was so well-deserved,” said Marcozzi, referring to Caputo’s career achievement.

“But the thing is, besides the 200 goals, she passes to a freshman or a senior, she doesn’t care. She sees assists the same way she sees goals. I am lucky and this team is lucky that she has that mindset.”

The team’s offensive balance has been a key to its success.

“We have a lot of contributors if we run our offense,” said Marcozzi, whose squad defeated Somerville 17-10 last Monday to improve to 7-2.

“Sometimes we get in our heads that we don’t want to run it. We all try to be heroes. Once we run it, it turns out good.”

At the defensive end, junior goalie Grace Ulrich and senior defender Maddy Flory helped the Panthers hold the fort against Peddie.

“Grace did great in goal,” said Marcozzi. “Maddy is our senior on the back end so once she starts talking, everyone finds their calm and listens to her. I think she really turned it on in the third quarter.”

With PDS playing at WW/ P-North on April 24, hosting Delaware Valley on April 26, and then playing at WW/PSouth on April 29, Marcozzi is looking for her players to combine their enthusiasm with some patience going forward.

“I think the girls are finally getting excited going into games now, they are not nervous about what this game is going to be,” said Marcozzi.

“We have to get better at possessing it; a lot of times I will call out different numbers because I want them to hold that until the clock hits that. We have to get better at being smart and disciplined on when to shoot. I want them to tone it down and possess and play the clock.”

In Ruf’s view, the squad’s camaraderie gives it an edge.

“I think our team chemistry is hard to match, we just fire ourselves up so much,” said Ruf, who has committed to attend Merrimack College and play for its D-I women’s lax program.

“Having the support of our teammates has helped so much. That plays into everybody’s confidence, not just in ourselves but having confidence in our teammates too since it is such a small group.”

Bouncing Back from Two-Game Losing Streak, Hun Baseball Gets Back on Winning Track, Now 8-2

It was a smooth ride for the Hun School baseball team in the first two weeks of the season as it posted six straight wins to start its 2024 campaign.

But Hun hit some bumps last week as it fell 10-3 to Gloucester Catholic on April 14 and then lost 13-0 to Perkiomen School (Pa.) two days later.

In reflecting on the defeat to Perkiomen, Hun head coach Tom Monfiletto acknowledged that his squad needed to step up against high-level teams.

“We just need to compete a little more and a little bit better when we face really good competition because our schedule is loaded with really good competition,” said Monfiletto.

In the wake of the Perkiomen game, Hun competed hard as it got back on the winning track by edging the Pennington School 2-1 last Thursday and then routed the Blair Academy 12-0 last Saturday to improve to 8-2.

The trio of senior Ryan Greenstein, senior Lucas Henderson, and post-graduate Sam Wright has been giving Hun some really good pitching so far this spring.

“Greeny had a couple outings that have been great,” said Monfiletto of Greenstein.

“He threw five innings against Peddie and was excellent last week when he closed a game down in D.C. We are going to keep going to him. Hendy has been great. He had two starts against Lawrenceville and he came in and closed the game out against Landon in D.C. He will get the ball soon too. Sam struggled against Gloucester. His first

outing down in D.C. against Landon was outstanding. I think he threw five innings and struck out 10 and was lights out. We know what he is capable of, he is going to be one of our horses for sure.”

Senior Charlie Batista, senior Mike Olender, junior Will Kraemer, senior Deacon Bowne, and junior Nico Amecangelo have been providing some excellent hitting to spark the Hun offense.

“Charlie has been hitting the ball to all fields, he is becoming much more of a complete hitter,” said Monfiletto.

“Olender has been doing a really great job. Kraemer has had some good hits, Deacon has been really solid for us offensively. Nico had a couple of hits against Gloucester and he had three hits against Peddie.”

With Hun playing at the Hill School (Pa.) on April 24 before hosting the Mercersburg Academy (Pa.) for a doubleheader in April 27 and then hosting Poly Prep (N.Y. ) on April 30, Monfiletto is looking for the Raiders to show a greater sense of urgency.

“I think we need to approach every game the same way, we need to treat every single game as though it is the most important game of the season,” said Monfiletto.

“When you do that you have to be careful to not put too much pressure on guys. These games mean a lot to them, I don’t have to convince them that it has to mean more. I think a consistent approach to every game is what is going to be really important for us, no matter who we play.”

–Bill Alden

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024
IRON MIKE: Hun School baseball player Mike Olender heads to first base in a 2023 game. Last Saturday, senior outfielder Olender scored a run and had one RBI to help Hun defeat the Blair Academy 12-0. The Raiders, now 8-2, play at the Hill School (Pa.) on April 24 before hosting the Mercersburg Academy (Pa.) for a doubleheader in April 27 and then hosting Poly Prep (N.Y.) on April 30. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) RUF AND TUMBLE: Princeton Day School girls’ lacrosse player Shelby Ruf, middle, races between two foes in recent action. Last Wednesday, junior midfielder Ruf tallied three goals and three assists to help PDS defeat the Peddie School 21-11. On Monday, the Panthers topped Somerville 17-10 as Ruf contributed one goal and two assists. PDS, now 7-2, plays at WW/P-North on April 24, hosts Delaware Valley on April 26, and then plays at WW/P-South on April 29. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)
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Hun

Boys’ Lacrosse : Coming up short in a Mid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL) clash, Hun fell 14-10 to the Hill School (Pa.) last Wednesday. The Raiders, now 4-3, play at Princeton Day School on April 25 before hosting Gill St. Bernard’s on April 27 and St. Augustine on April 30.

Girls’ Lacrosse : Sparked by Ava Olender, Hun defeated the Shipley School (Pa.) 15-14 in overtime last Saturday. Senior star and Tufts commit Olender tallied seven goals, including the game-winner in OT, to help the Raiders improve to 5-3. Hun plays at the Blair Academy in April 24 and then hosts the Mercersburg Academy (Pa.) on April 27 and Hightstown on April 29.

Boys’ Tennis : The second doubles pair of Kirtan Chintam and Herschel Mallangada came up big as Hun competed in the opening day of action at the Mercer County Tournament last Monday at the Mercer County Park Tennis

Lawrenceville

Baseball : Leuma Pua’auli starred as Lawrenceville defeated the Hill School (Pa.) 3-1 last Saturday. Pua’auli went 2-for-3 with a run to help the Big Red improve to 3-7. Lawrenceville plays at Hamilton West on April 24 and then hosts the Blair Academy on April 29.

Boys’ Lacrosse: Producing another dominant performance, Lawrenceville defeated the Salisbury School (Conn.) 15-7 last Saturday. The Big Red, now 11-1 and ranked No. 1 nationally by Inside Lacrosse, play at the Salesianum School (Del.) on April 26.

Girls’ Lacrosse : Lexie Koch scored four goals but

Baseball : Unable to get its bats going, PDS fell 16-2 to Hopewell Valley last Monday. The Panthers, now 0-7, play at Ewing on April 24, host WW/P-North on April 26 and Orange High on April 27, play at Notre Dame on April 29, and then host Robbinsville on April 30.

Boys’ Lacrosse : Matt Whittaker starred in a losing cause as PDS fell 18-6 to Hopewell Valley last Thursday. Whittaker scored three goals for the Panthers, who dropped to 2-5. PDS hosts the Hun School on April 25, plays at WW/P-North on April 27, and then hosts Princeton High on April 30.

Boys’ Tennis : Steven Li provided a highlight for PDS as it competed in the opening rounds of the Mercer County Tournament last Monday at the Mercer County Park Tennis Facility. Li advanced to the quarterfinals at second singles where he fell 6-2, 6-0 to Shritan Gopu of WW/P-South.

Pennington PHS PDS

Boys’ Lacrosse : Patrick Kenah triggered the offense to help PHS defeat Pennsbury High 12-7 last Saturday. Senior star and Lafayette commit Kenah tallied one goal with seven assists to help the Tigers improve to 6-2. PHS plays at Robbinsville on April 25, faces Notre Dame on April 27 at Mercer County Community College, and then plays at Princeton Day School on April 30.

Girls’ Lacrosse : Leah Bornstein and Riley Devlin each scored three goals as PHS fell 13-10 to Northern Burlington last Monday. The Tigers, now 7-3, play at Hopewell Valley on April 25 before hosting Allentown on April 26 and Notre Dame on April 29.

Boys’ Golf : Remmick Granozio led the way as PHS defeated Ewing 161-254 last Monday. Senior Granozio carded a one-over 38 on the nine-hole layout at Mountain View Golf Course help the Tigers improve to 10-0. PHS hosts Nottingham on April 25 and Steinert on April 29 with both matches to take place at the Princeton Country Club.

team is holding a second player evaluation/workout on April 28 from 12-2 p.m. at Smoyer Park.

The program encourages all interested high school players from Princeton High, Princeton Day School, Hun School, WW/P-South, WW/P-North, and Notre Dame High, or any players who live in the towns of Princeton and Cranbury to attend these two sessions. In addition, college-aged freshman born in 2005 are also be eligible to play.

The Mercer County American Legion season runs from late May through midJuly and involves playing approximately 20 games with teams from around the Greater Mercer County Area. The competition level is high and all players will receive adequate playing time to develop their game. The summer fee is $595. Scholarships are available. For more information on the program and to RSVP for the tryouts, contact Jon Durbin at jonwdurbin@ gmail.com.

Mercer Tennis Hall of Fame

Announces Class of 2024

Wimbledon doubles semifinalist, a former Princeton University men’s tennis head coach, current assistant coach at The College of New Jersey, and Princeton Tennis Program Teaching Professional; and Betty Sander Thompson, who is receiving a posthumous honor and had received a USTA Umpire Emeritus Award for 32 years of service.

The Hall of Fame dinner will be held on June 14 at 6 p.m. at the Boathouse at Mercer Lake in Mercer County Park, West Windsor.

The Mercer County Tennis Hall of Fame was initiated in 1992 by the Mercer County Tennis Council to recognize people with ties to the County who have made outstanding contributions to the sport. Since the dissolution of the Tennis Council, the Mercer County Park Commission has overseen the nominating committee, voting process and dinner committee. The Hall of Fame honors individuals for their involvement in competition, education, officiating, recreation, media, industry, or in the advancement of tennis.

The Mercer County Park Commission has announced the Mercer County Tennis Hall of Fame Class of 2024 which features five honorees who have made extraordinary achievements in the field of tennis and expanded the popularity of the sport.

Baseball : Landon Hallett had two hits but it wasn’t enough as Pennington fell 2-1 in 10 innings to Lawrence High last Saturday. The Red Hawks, now 4-6, host the Blair Academy on April 24, compete in the Papa Bear Tournament on April 27 at Delran High, and then host the Peddie School on April 30.

Boys’ Lacrosse : Unable to get its offense going, Pennington lost 16-3 to the Lawrenceville B team last Thursday. The Red Hawks, now 2-5, host South Brunswick on April 25 before playing at Hopewell Valley on April 27 and Hightstown on April 29.

Girls’ Lacrosse : Hailey Adamsky came up big to help Pennington defeat the George School (Pa.) 10-7 last Monday. Adamsky tallied six goals and an assist as the Red Hawks improved to 3-4. Pennington plays at Lawrenceville on April 26 and then hosts Gill St. Bernard’s on April 30.

Boys’ Tennis : Showing its depth, Pennington advanced to the semis in four of five flights as it competed last Monday in the preliminary rounds of the Mercer County Tournament at the Mercer County Park Tennis Facility. Rishabh Ramaswamy made the semis at second singles and Ishan Gupta followed suit at third singles. The first doubles team of Declan Karp and Garrett Hardy and the second doubles duo of Shubh Gangrade and Heyi Fan both advanced to the semis. The semis and the finals of the MCT are slated for April 24 at the Mercer County Park Tennis Facility.

Girls’ Golf : Jacqueline Zang starred to help PHS defeat Allentown 173-183 last Monday. Junior Zang fired a one-over 36 on the nine-hole tract at Princeton Country Club for the Tigers, now 4-0. PHS faces Allentown on April 29 at Cream Ridge Golf Course and Notre Dame on April 30 at Springdale Golf Club.

Boys’ Tennis : Producing a dominant performance in the opening rounds of the Mercer County Tournament last Monday, PHS advanced to the semifinals in all five flights of the competition as it looks to win a second straight county title. Sophomore Garrett Mathewson advanced to the semis at first singles, senior Melvin Huang made it at second singles, and sophomore Andrew Kuo followed suit at third singles. Sophomore Aashil Patel and senior Aman Kapur made the semis at first doubles while junior Shaan Zaveri and freshman Tacto Yamada advanced at second doubles. The semifinals and the finals of the MCT are slated for April 24 at the Mercer County Park Tennis Facility.

The Class of 2024 includes: Jim Cryan, Co-Director of the Cryan Memorial Tennis Tournament; Mike Ehrenberg, longtime Director of the G. Nelson Green Memorial Tournament; Ginny Mason, a founding member and continuous supporter of National Junior Tennis and Learning of Trenton (NJTL); Glenn Michibata, a

Induction ceremonies are held every four years, with the honorees selected by 50 leaders in the area’s tennis community. Criteria for induction stipulate that “the record of achievement must be balanced by a reputation that can be admired and respected. Membership is intended to represent a highly selective group.”

Tickets for the Hall of Fame dinner are $100 per person. For more information or to receive an electronic invitation, one can contact Marc Vecchiolla via e-mail at mvecchiolla@mercercounty.org or by phone at (609) 448-2088.

Lacrosse : Allison Lee led the way as Stuart edged Hamilton West 14-13 last Monday. Junior star Lee scored eight goals to help the Tartans improve to 3-3. Stuart hosts the Solebury School (Pa.) on April 25, plays at Robbinsville on April 29 and at Steinert on April 30.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024 • 30 Local Sports
Stuart
MAKING HISTORY: Hun School softball player Lexi Kobryn fires a pitch in a 2022 game. Senior star and Villanova commit Kobryn hit the 500-strikeout mark in her career in a 5-0 win over Hightstown last Thursday. On Monday, Kobryn reached another milestone as she pounded out her 100th career hit in an 11-2 win over Villa Joseph Marie (Pa.). She is the first player in program history to have both 500 strikeouts and 100 hits. She is the only Raider with 500 strikeouts and just the second to have 100 hits in addition to Lauren McQuade. The Raiders, now 8-1, will host the Hill School (Pa.) on April 24 and Mercersburg Academy (Pa.) on April 27 for a doubleheader before playing at the Lawrenceville School on April 30. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)
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Princeton Post 218 Baseball Holding 2nd Player Evaluation The Princeton American Legion Post 218 baseball
enough as Lawrenceville fell 13-5 to Agnes Irwin (Pa.) last Monday. The Big Red, now 6-6, host the Hill School (Pa.) on April 24 and the Pennington School on April 26.

Idamae G. Trenner

Idamae G. Trenner died peacefully at home in Princeton on Friday, April 12, after a long illness. Her four siblings, several nieces and nephews, and many friends spent precious time with her during her final weeks. Although Idamae embraced independence in most aspects of life, she made and kept a lot of friends of varied ages and backgrounds over her 83 years.

Born on July 20, 1940, Idamae was the eldest of the five children of Dr. Nelson Richards Trenner Sr. and Kathryn Farrell Trenner. Except for one year in each of Uppsala, Sweden; Washington, D.C.; and New York City, she always lived in New Jersey: in Westfield from 1940-1991 and Princeton from 1991-2024.

Idamae graduated in 1958 from Westfield Senior High School, where she was an excellent student and won the award as the top female athlete, and in 1962 from

the College of St. Elizabeth, where she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in biology. After graduation, she began what became one of the highlights of her life: working in the laboratory of Peyton Rous at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research in New York City. (Prof. Rous was awarded the 1966 Nobel Prize in Medicine for his discoveries in virology and oncology.)

Following her time at the Rockefeller Institute, she joined Merck & Co. After three years working in drug R&D at Merck and three years teaching biology at Saint Aloysius Academy in Jersey City, Idamae decided to follow her heart and began what turned out to be a highly satisfying career as an executive of the Girl Scouts of America.

One of the happiest aspects of her GSA years was spending some 20 summers as director of Camp Lou Henry Hoover on Swartswood Lake in Middleville, NJ, as well as one summer as director of Camp Blue Bay in East Hampton, LI. She loved her camp summers. Several friends who came to visit her in recent weeks shared fond and often highly amusing memories of Idamae as the kind, enthusiastic, but no-nonsense camp director. A few years ago, Camp Hoover dedicated the Idamae Trenner Pavilion and a sculpture of her.

When Idamae moved to Princeton in 1991 to live closer to her father as well as to one of her sisters, one of her brothers and his growing family, she started a business in money and household management, primarily for

senior citizens. Through word-of-mouth, she gained several Princeton-area clients, many of whom became devoted friends. She continued to work, albeit on a reduced scope, until her death.

The greatest source of meaning and connection in her later years was spending time with friends of all ages, perhaps especially with her two nephews, Miles and Winslow RadcliffeTrenner, who lived literally around the corner. Auntie Ida, Miles, and Win formed early and enduring bonds when she picked them up at Princeton Friends School, took them sledding, skiing, or snowboarding, and spent happy (and sometimes riotous) summer days fishing with them from their boat or from the town dock in Castine, ME. When the boys were older, she thought nothing of driving 300+ miles roundtrip in a single day to be with them for swim meets, water polo games, or musical performances at their high school in Lakeville, CT.

In addition to the Radcliffe-Trenner nephews, Idamae is survived by several other family members, including her siblings, Kathryn T. Trenner of Princeton, Georganna T. Krivonak of Tinicum, PA., Robert F. S. Trenner of Bellevue, WA, and Nelson Richards Trenner Jr. of Princeton, as well as by her nieces and nephews: Kathy Dearborn, Gregory and Daniel Krivonak, Mary K. Benash, and Jake, Katie, and Erik Dearborn. Idamae was predeceased by a niece, Ashley Richards Trenner, and a nephew, Darin Scott Trenner.

A funeral mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, April 30, at St. Paul’s Church in Princeton. It will be followed by a service at the Trenner Family plot in Princeton Cemetery and then by a private reception. The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home in Princeton is handling the arrangements.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that contributions be made to the Camp Hoover Campership Fund, Girl Scouts Heart of New Jersey, 1171 State Route 28, North Branch, NJ 08876.

George A. Vaughn, III

George A. Vaughn, III, age 96, known to many as “Arky,” died peacefully on April 14 surrounded by family.

Inventor, entrepreneur, aviator, avid traveler, active board member, and singer, Arky had numerous vocations and passions.

Arky was born in East Orange, NJ, to Marion and George A. Vaughn, Jr., a WWI flying ace and co-founder of the Vaughn College of Aeronautics. Raised in Staten Island, NY, he graduated from

The Lawrenceville School then enlisted in the US Navy overseas. Following his service, he attended Princeton University and graduated from Ohio State in 1955 with a degree in engineering.

Arky’s career began at ALCOA in New York City, where he also met his future bride, Martha Hinman of Binghamton, NY. In 1965, Arky began working for Mideast Aluminum and moved to Princeton where he and Martha raised their three daughters, Barbara, Susan, and Phoebe. Two years later, with fellow Princeton engineer Dick Hargrave, he founded the Maark Corporation, which designed and manufactured the first aluminum tennis racquets — the Head Master, Standard, and Professional racquets. Arthur Ashe immortalized the Head Graphite racquet, while Pam Shriver helped to popularize a subsequent design for Prince, the first mass-produced oversized racquet. In 1977 AMF acquired Maark, and Arky became the Chairman of Head Racquet Sports Worldwide until the 1985 purchase of AMF by Minstar Corporation.

Arky served on numerous boards: Princeton Day School, Princeton Community Tennis Foundation, the American Boychoir School, Princeton Symphony Orchestra, Princeton Family Center, Vaughn College of Aeronautics, and the Aerospace Education Foundation.

Singing gave Arky great joy. He and Martha were founders of the Witherspooners, a singing group

that performed in Princeton in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and they formed an a cappella group, “The Private Parts,” with friends.

Arky traveled extensively with Martha to exotic destinations across Africa, Asia, the Pacific, and Europe as well as Bermuda, where they bought a house in 1978.

Bermuda became a beloved second home for them.

Arky is survived by three daughters (and sons-in-law), Barbara Vaughn Hoimes (Telly Hoimes) of New York City and Woodbury, CT, Susan Vaughn (O’Brien) of Los Angeles, and Phoebe Outerbridge (Andrew Outerbridge) of Princeton, NJ, and Bermuda, six grandchildren, a brother James Vaughn, and sister Jane Vaughn Love.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Arky’s honor to HomeFront.

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31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024 Obituaries Princeton’s First Tradition Worship Service in the University Chapel Sundays at 11am Rev. Alison Boden, Ph.D. Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel Rev. Dr. Theresa Thames Associate Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES S unday S 8:00 am: Holy Communion Rite I 9:30 am: Christian Education for all ages 10:30 am: Holy Communion Rite II 5:00 pm: Choral Compline or Evensong The Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector The Rev. Canon Dr. Kara Slade, Assoc. Rector Wesley Rowell, Lay Pastoral Associate 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org To advertise your services in our Directory of Religious Services, contact Jennifer Covill jennifer.covill@witherspoonmediagroup.com (609) 924-2200 ext. 31 ONLINE www.towntopics.com Wherever you are in your journey of faith, come worship with us First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ You are welcome to join us for our in-person services, Sunday Church Service and Sunday School at 10:30 am, Wednesday Testimony meetings at 7:30 pm. Audio streaming available, details at csprinceton.org. Visit the Christian Science Reading Room Monday through Saturday, 10 am - 4 pm 178 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ For free local delivery call (609) 924-0919 www.csprinceton.org • (609) 924-5801 Mother of God Joy of All Who Sorrow Orthodox Church 904 Cherry Hill Rd • Princeton, NJ 08525 (609) 466-3058 Saturday Vespers 5pm • Sunday Divine Liturgy 930am • www.mogoca.org

Is Buyer’s Remorse Real?

In a seller's market, where demand outweighs supply, buyers often feel the pressure to act swiftly to secure a property, sometimes leading to hasty decisions and, inevitably, buyer's remorse. This phenomenon is especially prevalent in real estate markets characterized by fierce competition and escalating prices.

Buyer's remorse in a seller's market can stem from various factors. Limited inventory may force buyers to settle for a property that doesn't fully meet their needs or preferences. Additionally, bidding wars can drive prices above the buyer's comfort level, causing them to question the value of their purchase after the adrenaline of the competition subsides.

To mitigate buyer's remorse in a seller's market, it's crucial for buyers to remain patient, conduct thorough research, and define their priorities and non negotiables beforehand. Working closely with a trusted real estate agent can also provide valuable guidance and support throughout the buying process, helping buyers make more informed and confident decisions amidst the frenzy of a competitive market.

“There

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240.

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I BUY ALL KINDS of old or pretty things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 921-7469. 10-11-24

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books,

RENT – 1 bedroom unit available. On downtown Princeton treestreet. Abundant light. One parking space, washer/dryer. From $2300$2600, plus utilities. Call Kathy at (609) 462-3198. www.nspapartment. com. 04-24

—Edward Everett
TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024 • 32 Town Topics CLASSIFIEDS To place a classified ad, please call: Deadline: Noon, Tuesday tel: (609) 924-2200 x10 • fax: (609) 924-8818 • e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com YARD SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf FOR RENT – 4 Bedroom house in downtown Princeton. Lliving room, dining room, washer/dryer, 2 parking spaces and renovated kitchen. Start date is July 1st. Rent $5380, plus utilities. Call Kathy at (609) 462-3198, www.nspapartment.com 04-24 FOR RENT – Charming sunny Victorian 2 bedroom apartment in downtown Princeton. Washer dryer, AC, parking. Start date is July 1. Rent $3360, plus utilities. Call Kathy at (609) 462-3198, www.nspapartment. com. 04-24 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 tf JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience • Fully Insured • Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only): (609) 356-9201 Office: (609) 216-7936 Princeton References • Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 tf EXPERIENCED AND PROFESSIONAL CAREGIVER Available part-time With excellent references in the greater Princeton area (609) 216-5000 tf FOX CLEANING (609) 547-9570 eqfoxcarpetcleaning@gmail.com Licensed and insured Residential and commercial Carpet cleaning and upholestry Pressure and soft washing • Area rugs Strip and wax floors • Sanitizing Water damage • Grout cleaning 01-17-25 THE MAID PROFESSIONALS: Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Residential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404. 05-29 STORAGE UNIT FOR RENT 10 minutes north of Princeton in Skillman/Montgomery. 10x21, $190 discounted monthly rent. Available now. https://princetonstorage.homestead. com or call/text (609) 333-6932. 04-24 WILLIAM F. FURLONG PAINTING & DECORATING: Pressure washing. Residential, Industrial & Commercial. (609) 466-2853. Skillman. 04-24 HOME HEALTH AIDE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Live-in or live-out. Driver’s license. References available. Please call Cindy, (609) 227-9873. 05-08 KARINA’S HOUSECLEANING: Full service inside. Honest and reliable lady with references. Weekly, biweekly or monthly. Call for estimate. (609) 858-8259. 05-29 FOR RENT – Studio apartment. Center of downtown Princeton. Renovated kitchen bathroom. Washer/ dryer, one parking space. $2255, plus utilities. Call Kathy at (609) 462-3198. www.nspapartment.com. 04-24 FOR
cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-24 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-28-24 WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 04-24 HOUSE & OFFICE CLEANING: By an experienced Polish lady. Call Barbara (609) 273-4226. Weekly or biweekly. Honest & reliable. References available. 05-08 Knotty Pine Furniture Knotty pine bookcases a specialty! SKILLMAN FURNITURE CO. 609-924-1881 Elevated gardens • Slat tables Writing desks • Small furniture repair skillmanfurniture.com skillmanfurnitureco@gmail.com tf WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10 circulation@towntopics.com tf YARD SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf FOR RENT – 4 Bedroom house in downtown Princeton. Lliving room, dining room, washer/dryer, 2 parking spaces and renovated kitchen. Start date is July 1st. Rent $5380, plus utilities. Call Kathy at (609) 462-3198, www.nspapartment.com 04-24 FOR RENT – Charming sunny Victorian 2 bedroom apartment in downtown Princeton. Washer dryer, AC, parking. Start date is July 1. Rent $3360, plus utilities. Call Kathy at (609) 462-3198, www.nspapartment. com. 04-24 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf ADVERTISING SALES Please submit cover letter and resume to: lynn.smith@princetonmagazine.com melissa.bilyeu@witherspoonmediagroup.com Witherspoon Media Group is looking for an advertising Account Manager to generate sales for our luxury magazines, newspaper, and digital business. Positions are full- and part-time and based out of our Kingston, N.J. office. Track record of developing successful sales strategies and knowledge of print and digital media is a plus. Compensation is negotiable based on experience. Fantastic benefits and a great work environment. The ideal candidate will: Establish new and grow key accounts and maximize opportunities for each publication, all websites, and all digital products. Collaborate with the sales and management team to develop growth opportunities. Prepare strategic sales communications and presentations for both print and digital. Develop industry-based knowledge and understanding, including circulation, audience, readership, and more. Prepare detailed sales reports for tracking current customers’ activity and maintain pipeline activity using our custom CRM system. • • •
Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO Broker Princeton Office 609 921 1900 | 609 577 2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540 609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com ©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation. Insist on … Heidi Joseph.
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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024 • 34 A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC 26 WELLINGTON COURT This impressive 5000 square foot expanded colonial (2010) emanates all the comforts and conveniences of today’s upscale suburban lifestyle. A perfect floor plan for modern living and the multigenerational household. This exceptional home boasts numerous updates, a first floor bedroom with full bath, home office, finished basement with an egress window, and a beautiful rear yard with an inviting in-ground pool. DONNA M. MURRAY CRS, e-PRO, ASP, SRS, CLHMS Sales Associate, REALTOR® 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540 Cell: 908.391.8396 | Off.: 609.924.1600 donna.murray@foxroach.com donnamurrayrealestate.com Donna Murray HP.indd 1 6/16/23 10:40 AM VIRTUAL TOUR QR CODE A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC 26 WELLINGTON COURT BELLE MEAD NJ 08502 BD 5 | BA 5.5 | Price Upon Request This impressive 5000 square foot expanded colonial (2010) emanates all the comforts and conveniences of today’s upscale suburban lifestyle. A perfect floor plan for modern living and the multigenerational household. This exceptional home boasts numerous updates, a first floor bedroom with full bath, home office, finished basement with an egress window, and a beautiful rear yard with an inviting in-ground pool. DONNA M. MURRAY CRS, e-PRO, ASP, SRS, CLHMS Sales Associate, REALTOR® 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540 Cell: 908.391.8396 | Off.: 609.924.1600 donna.murray@foxroach.com donnamurrayrealestate.com Donna Murray HP.indd 1 6/16/23 10:40 AM VIRTUAL TOUR QR CODE A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC 26 WELLINGTON COURT BELLE MEAD NJ 08502 BD 5 | BA 5.5 | Price Upon Request This impressive 5000 square foot expanded colonial (2010) emanates all the comforts and conveniences of today’s upscale suburban lifestyle. A perfect floor plan for modern living and the multigenerational household. This exceptional home boasts numerous updates, a first floor bedroom with full bath, home office, finished basement with an egress window, and a beautiful rear yard with an inviting in-ground pool. DONNA M. MURRAY CRS, e-PRO, ASP, SRS, CLHMS Sales Associate, REALTOR® 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540 Cell: 908.391.8396 | Off.: 609.924.1600 donna.murray@foxroach.com donnamurrayrealestate.com HP.indd 1 6/16/23 10:40 AM Final Phase Luxury 55+ Townhome Community in Plainsboro, New Jersey. Starting at $738,000 townhomesatriverwalk.com Saturday, April 27th | 8am - 9am For all your real estate needs in 2024. Sell your home faster and for more money with Compass ConciergeSM. Prepare your home for sale, with no hidden fees and no interest charged. The Strategy You Need. The Technology You Want. The Opportunities You Expect. The Results You Deserve. 21 Successful Transactions In 2023 On Average: 11 Days On Market, 106% of List Price Earned for My Sellers Lisa Theodore M: 908-872-1840 lisa.theodore@compass.com • 4 bedrooms • 5 1/2 baths • 5 patios and decks • 1st floor guest suite or office • Finished basement with high ceilings • Approximately 4,500 square feet 42 Gulick Road, Princeton Available May 14, 2024 With an open and airy layout, this modern design provides access to a patio or deck from almost every room. The ground floor provides the ability to entertain friends and guests in a continuous flow from a secluded deck to the kitchen/dining room, great room and two patios. $2,650,000 609-644-4899 Witherspoon Media Group For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution · Newsletters · Brochures · Postcards · Books · Catalogues · Annual Reports Witherspoon Media Group For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution · Newsletters · Brochures · Postcards · Books · Catalogues · Annual Reports Witherspoon Media Group For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution · Newsletters · Brochures · Postcards · Books · Catalogues · Annual Reports 4428C Route 27, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400 One-Year Subscription: $20 Two-Year Subscription: $25 Subscription Information: 609.924.5400 ext. 30 or subscriptions@ witherspoonmediagroup.com princetonmagazine.com IN PRINT. ONLINE. AT HOME. 9 Hulfish Street, Palmer Square HALO PUB Espresso FROM: 12:00 every day HALO PUB Ice Cream UNTIL: Sun -Thu 10:30, Fri-Sat 11:30 9 Hulfish Street, Palmer Square HALO PUB Espresso FROM: 12:00 every day HALO PUB Ice Cream UNTIL: Sun -Thu 10:30, Fri-Sat 11:30 UNTIL: Sun -Thu 11:00, Fri-Sat 11:30 BOB 609-819-1240 Bob’s Rides for Cash AIRPORTS • NYC • CRUISES STADIUMS • LOCAL RIDES • CASINOS 38-C Daniel Webster Ave., Monroe Twp., NJ Better Rates than UBER –AIRPORTS • NYC • CRUISES STADIUMS • CASINOS

Our trucks have changed over the years but our commitment to our customers remains constant.

It started in 1924 with great-grandfather E.L. Bohren. Just one man, one Model T truck and a small warehouse in Princeton, NJ.

Now one hundred years later, we have grown into the Bohren’s Companies, encompassing three divisions: Bohren’s Moving & Storage, Bohren’s Fine Art Transportation, and Bohren’s Logistics.

Through the years thousands of families, businesses and art galleries have trusted our family to move their most precious items. With everything we do, we push ourselves to deliver the best possible performance on every job, in every department, for every customer, every day.

We move the things that matter. Call us today!

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2024
3 Applegate Drive South, Robbinsville, NJ 08691 • 800-326-4736 bohrensmoving.com • bohrenslogistics.com • bohrensfinearttransportation.com COMPANIES
¹Monthly lease payment of $349 per month for 27 months is based on an adjusted capitalized cost of $45,195 (MSRP of $56,700 including destination and delivery fee of $1,400, plus acquisition fee of $995, less $5,000 capitalized cost reduction and additional $7,500 Polestar Clean Vehicle Noncash Incentive). Actual MSRP may vary and could affect your monthly lease payment. Cash due at signing includes $5,000 down payment, $349 first month’s payment and $0 security deposit. Tax, title, license, registration and dealer fees are additional fees due at signing. Advertised payment does not include applicable taxes. Lessee is responsible for excess wear and mileage over 10,000 miles/year at $0.25/mile. Limited availability, excludes certain features and upgrades. Please visit or contact your local Space for more information. Available to qualified customers that meet PFS credit standards at authorized Polestar Spaces. Not everyone will qualify. Offer valid from January 26, 2024 until May 31, 2024. Must take delivery by May 31, 2024. See your participating Polestar Space for details. Polestar reserves the right to make changes to any information and elements at any time, e.g. to final prices, taxes, fees, etc. Automobile financing and account servicing provided by Volvo Car Financial Services U.S., LLC, d/b/a Polestar Financial Services. Polestar Financial Services is a registered trademark of Polestar Holding AB. ²Preliminary data. Range are estimated and subject to final EPA certification. Test drive today Polestar Princeton Lease Polestar 2 from $349/mo¹ With all electric performance and up to 320 miles of range², discover why Polestar 2 is the driver’s EV when you experience a test drive.
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