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Volume LXXV, Number 15

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Cancer Research Institute Adds Princeton University As Its Newest Branch

House Tour’s Virtual Format Offers Unique Opportunities . . . . . . . . 5 Princeton University Acceptance Rate at Record Low . . . . . . . . . . 8 Council Votes on Several Measures at Meeting . . . 9 Don't Call It a Spinoff — Better Call Saul Is a Great American Film . . . . . . . 12 PHS Wrestler Ayres Wins 3rd Straight N .J . Girls’ State Title . . . . . . . . 22 Sophomore O’Brien Comes Out Firing for Hun Girls’ Lax . . . . . 25

Jordan Young Helps PDS Girls’ Lax Win Season Opener . . . . . . 25 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . . 16,17 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 18 Classified Ads . . . . . . 27 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 11 New To Us . . . . . . . . . 20 Performing Arts . . . . . 14 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 27 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

Princeton University is the home of a new branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, it was announced Tuesday, April 13. The sole focus will be on cancer metabolism and its promise for new and better ways to prevent and treat the disease, according to statements from the two institutions. Princeton joins the Ludwig Institute’s locations at Memorial Sloan-Kettering, the University of Oxford, Johns Hopkins University, MIT, Stanford University, Harvard University, and the University of Lausanne. “The new branch offers us the chance to capitalize on multiple areas where Princeton is a world leader and has world-leading technologies that haven’t yet been applied to cancer,” said Joshua Rabinowitz, a professor of chemistry and the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics at Princeton. Rabinowitz, who specializes in cancer and metabolism, is the director of the branch. “We want to continue to push the frontiers of those technologies, because ultimately technologies drive biological understanding, which opens up new avenues for cancer treatment and prevention,” he said. The clinical aspect of the program will be conducted in the tri-state area, including in partnership with RWJBarnabas Health and Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, the state’s only U.S. National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center and a consortium cancer center between Rutgers and Princeton universities and the Institute for Advanced Study. Among the questions to be addressed are: Since tumors feast on glucose, should cancer patients eat more sugary treats or fewer? When advanced cancer patients see their bodies wasting away, should they fight back with carb-loading or steak? How does cancer hijack a patient’s metabolism to grow and metastasize? The branch will focus on dietary strategies to prevent and treat cancer; how bodies inadvertently support tumor growth and metastasis; and the interplay between a patient’s metabolism, gut microbiome, and anti-cancer immune response. “Diet is an overlooked therapeutic strategy that can either help turn on an Continued on Page 7

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NJ, Local Officials Pause J&J Vaccinations In accordance with Tuesday’s recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the state of New Jersey and the Princeton Health Department are pausing their administration of Johnson & Johnson vaccinations. The CDC and FDA are investigating potentially dangerous blood clots in six women that occurred in the days after they received the J&J vaccine. Approximately seven million people have had the vaccine, including about 300 vaccinated by the Princeton Health Department. “This temporary pause in administering the J&J vaccination is to provide the FDA and CDC with necessary time to evaluate and further investigate these rare cases, and craft further recommendations,” said Princeton Health Officer Jeff Grosser. He noted that the Princeton Health Department, which currently has 100 doses of the J&J vaccine that are being stored at the proper temperature, will not administer additional J&J vaccines until the CDC and FDA provide clear guidance on the next steps. The New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) also announced Tuesday that it is suspending J&J vaccinations pending

further guidance from federal health officials. All New Jersey vaccination sites have been told to put J&J vaccinations on hold until further notice. New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy on Tuesday urged the 235,000 New Jersey residents who have gotten the J&J vaccination not to worry. No adverse effects similar to those reported elsewhere from the J&J vaccination have been seen in New Jersey, he said. “It is important for residents to be aware

that these six cases were among women ages 18-48, with symptoms occurring 6-13 days post-vaccination,” Grosser said. “If any residents have concerns on the vaccine or experience symptoms such as severe headache, abdominal pain, leg pain, or shortness of breath, they should contact their health care provider and the CDC Vaccine Adverse Emergency Reporting System (VAERS).” Beginning Monday, April 19, all individuals 16 and older will be eligible to receive Continued on Page 7

Documentary on Local Wildlife Debuts At Princeton Environmental Film Festival Last November Jared Flesher, parttime staff videographer in Princeton University’s Office of Sustainability and founder of his own video production company based in Ringoes, heard about an astrophysicist who had occupied himself and his three sons during the pandemic by taking photos of animals in the woods with a $40 motion-sensor camera. “He’d been running around for a few months during the pandemic with a wildlife camera just to see what was out there, exploring around the lake to see what other life was there,” Flesher said.

“During the pandemic a lot of people were feeling cooped up wondering what to do with themselves.” Flesher, who describes himself as a storyteller with a passion for nature and for just looking around, wasted no time in following up on the doings of this astrophysicist, who turned out to be Hungarian-born Princeton University Professor Gaspar Bakos. Bakos lives next to a tiny patch of forest bordering on Lake Carnegie and is known for having helped discover more than 140 planets outside our Continued on Page 10

HONORING A HOMETOWN HERO: Mayor Mark Freda designated April 9 as Paul Robeson Day during the Memorial Wreath Laying ceremony at the bust of Robeson in front of the Arts Council of Princeton . The event was the culmination of the Robeson Week of Remembrance . Attendees share why it is important to commemorate Paul Robeson in this week’s Town Talk on page 6 . (Photo by Weronika A. Plohn)

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IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME: An Overview Wednesday, April 21, 2021 | 6 p.m. Location: Zoom Meeting Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common yet chronic condition that affects the large intestine with symptoms that include abdominal pain, cramping, diarrhea or constipation, or both. For a discussion of IBS symptoms, compounding factors, and options for management, join LISA COSTELLO, a licensed advanced practice nurse from Capital Health – Gastroenterology Specialists. Lisa has significant experience treating patients with IBS and related gastrointestinal conditions. This event will be taking place virtually using Zoom. Register online at capitalhealth.org/events and be sure to include your email address. Zoom meeting details will be provided via email 2-3 days before the program date. Registration ends 24 hours

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CHANGING YOUR DUSK TO DAWN: Finding the Steps Forward with a New Cancer Diagnosis Monday, April 26, 2021 | 6 p.m. | Location: Zoom Meeting Facing a new cancer diagnosis can be overwhelming for you and your loved ones, but you don’t have to make the journey alone. Experts from Capital Health Cancer Center are here to help. Join CHRISTIAN HONG, oncology social worker, to learn how you can navigate common fears and foster collaboration between your doctors and loved ones. ALLISON LUBINA, oncology financial navigator, will also be on hand to help you unlock the health insurance labyrinth and guide you from diagnosis to treatment and survivorship. This event will be taking place virtually using Zoom. Register online at capitalhealth.org/events and be sure to include your email address. Zoom meeting details will be provided via email 2-3 days before the program date. Registration ends 24 hours before the program date.

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PLANTING AT THE PRESERVE: Friends of Princeton Open Space invites volunteers to help plant native wildflowers, grasses, and ferns at the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. The idea is to provide quality habitat for pollinators, birds, and other wildlife, and protect local water quality by filtering and slowing runoff before it enters Mountain Brook. Dates are Saturday and Sunday, April 17 and 18; May 15 and 16; and Saturday, June 5. Registration is required at fopos.org.

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On Thursday, May 6 at 12 p.m. v ia Z oom, t he Princeton Area Community Foundation’s Fund for Women and Girls will host “Health Equity, the Pandemic and the Next Normal,” w ith speakers Dr. Richard E. Besser and Dr. Kemi Alli. As former acting director for the CDC and current president and CEO of

flect on the national impact of the pandemic. Alli, CEO of Henry J. Austin Health Center, will reveal its local impact from her work with the Trenton Health Team. Together, they will discuss the current health crisis through a gender and health equity lens, the state of our community, and an actionable path for ward to advance health equity for all.

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A Community Bulletin Permit Parking Task Force Meeting: Residents and local business owners are invited to join Council President Leticia Fraga and Council members David Cohen and Michelle Pirone Lambros for a virtual meeting of the Permit Parking Task Force on Saturday, April 17 at 9 a.m. The Task Force will review options for a planned pilot program to address parking needs of residents, employees of local business, and visitors. This meeting will focus on the Princeton High School neighborhood, Hamilton-Wiggins corridor, and other nearby streets. Visit princetonnj.gov for more information and a link. Summer Jobs for Youth: Princeton residents ages 14-18 can work this summer as part of the Human Services Department’s Summer Youth Employment Program. Work 25 hours a week; earn minimum wage, for eight weeks. Visit princetonnj.gov for details. The deadline is April 30. Vaccination Hotline: New Jersey’s COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center is staffed daily from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Call (855) 568-0545 for questions about registering with the New Jersey Vaccine Scheduling System, finding vaccine locations, and more. New Vaccine Appointment Finder Tool: Gathers information across multiple scheduling platforms multiple times an hour, allowing searches for locations across the state. Visit covid19.nj.gov/finder. Free Financial Coaching: Offered by United Way of Greater Mercer County to help with debt management to those struggling during the pandemic. Visit uwgmc. org/financialcoaching. Information is also available in Spanish. HomeFront Diaper Challenge: Help set a Guinness World Record by collecting 250,000 diapers and wipes for families in need, through Mother’s Day, May 9. Drop off at 1880 Princeton Avenue, Lawrenceville. Visit homefrontnj.org for details. Grover Park Cleanup: On Saturday, April 17, help remove trash, litter, and debris as part of the Watershed Institute’s 15th Annual Stream Cleanup. Register online at thewatershed.org/stream-cleanups/ by April 16 for either a 9 or 10 a.m. start. Donate Blood: April is National Volunteer Month, and the Red Cross is looking for blood donors, especially with type O blood. Visit RedCrossBlood.org to schedule a donation on April 20 at Stone Hill Church, or April 27 and 28 at Princeton University’s Carl A. Fields Center.


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ZOOMING INTO HISTORY: This 19th century house at 2 Boudinot Street, likely the work of prolific builder/architect Charles Steadman, is among four on the Historical Society of Princeton’s 2021 House Tour.

Historical Society House Tour’s Virtual Format Offers Unique Opportunities

The Historical Society of Princeton’s ( HSP) spring house tour is a much-anticipated event that invites the curious to step inside some of the town’s most historic,

architecturally distinctive homes. With the pandemic still a presence, the decision was made to keep this season’s tour virtual. But there is a silver lining of sorts. The digital format allows for some closer looks, and special details that a traditional event would not. It also makes the houses available for a whole month, from May 15-June 15.

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“Obv iously, for ever yone’s safety, this is a neces s ar y sh if t,” s aid HSP Director Izzy Kasdin. “But I also think it’s a really exciting evolution of what is a beloved event. We don’t really see it as a substitute for what would have been in person. We see it as a totally different experience. We’re not just walking through a house on Zoom. This is an in-depth, detailed look at four very special houses.” That means special content, including interviews with architects and designers, will be woven into the tours of 2 Boudinot Street and 20 Boudinot Street in the Western Section of town; 8 Evelyn Place, which was home to the late Mayor Barbara Sigmund; and 600 Pretty Brook Road, known as “The Bouwerie.” Architect Max Hayden did restorations and renovations at three of the properties — the houses on Boudinot Street and the home on Evelyn Place. Of 2 Boudinot Street, he said, “I view myself as a kind of plastic surgeon to turn the clock back and make things right. This one was stuck in 1976.” Prolific Princeton builder-architect Charles Steadman likely built the Federal/Italianatestyle house in the 1850s. It was originally located at the corner of Nassau Street and University Place, and moved twice before landing at its current location, according to the HSP. “Once home to Princeton University Professor Christian Gauss, beloved mentor to F. Scott Fitzgerald, the house has been completely renovated and restored by

the current owners, creating a new sunlit kitchen and master suite, while also meticulously restoring period details, like intricate metal knobs and hinges, stunning pocket doors, marble fireplaces, and gas lighting petcocks,” a press release reads. The house at 20 Boudinot Street was originally built in 1924 for the family of Princeton Borough Mayor Charles Erdman. The current owners are only the third family to own the home. “This is a great stone house that is very charming,” said Continued on Next Page

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Hayden. “But its problem was that it had a big nose — a garage door smack dab in the middle. As beautifully detailed as it was, it was still a garage door. And it made the front into a driveway. So we got our scalpel and took it off, and made it into the dining room. We also turned what were nine bedrooms into five or six.” The semi-detached home at 8 Evelyn Place, once home to Evelyn College for Women and later to the Sigmund family, underwent a major restoration and modernization. The interior was renovated to allow for an open kitchen. A spacious master suite was created, and a third floor recreation space was put in. Hayden made sure to preserve the home’s historic details, which inclu de d double do or s, a Japanese tile fireplace, and clawfoot tubs. Princeton’s early colonial history is represented by the house on Pretty Brook Road. Originally the homestead for a Dutch farming family, it still has the large hearth fireplace, beehive oven, hand-hewn beams, h a l f- t i m b e r wor k , a n d a “Jersey winder” staircase from the 1770s. The spacious, new kitchen continues the historic farmhouse aesthetic. A new house will be released each week during the month when the tour is live, starting on May 15. Once released, houses will remain available through June 15. Tickets are currently available and range from $20 to $100. To purchase, visit princetonhistory.org or call (609) 921-6748 ext. 100. “We are looking at this as a really exciting, 2.0 version of the usual house tour,” said Kasdin. “Princeton has a unique architectural heritage that is so special.” —Anne Levin

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“Why is it important to commemorate Paul Robeson?” (Asked Friday at the Memorial Wreath Laying, part of Robeson Week of Remembrance) (Photos by Weronika A. Plohn)

“He was a humanitarian who fought for the rights of the Negro, as well as rights for everyone. His father was a minister, he also had his father’s genes. My grandmother was his primary teacher and he used to come and visit us. I remember his deep voice in the house. He lived here in Princeton and he was taken care of by everyone, people loved him. He was in particular happy with our town because of how his father and the African American community were treated here.” — Shirley Satterfield, Princeton

“I have read every book written about him. I have read everything he wrote. I read most of his speeches, listened to all of his music, saw all of his films, and when I was growing up my dad was a labor activist and we had a picture of him on the kitchen wall next to FDR. He had a huge presence in my family, and his achievements are outstanding.” —Bill Moran, Princeton

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The Princeton Community Democratic Organization will host a panel discussion titled “Investment vs. Austerity: Government Response to Economic Downturns,” featuring state and local policy experts, at its monthly meeting on Sunday, April 18 at 7 p.m. on Zoom. PCDO President Afsheen Shamsi will moderate a discussion featuring Sheila Reynerston, senior policy analyst of New Jersey Policy Perspective; Deborah Cornavaca, deputy chief of staff for Gov. Phil Murphy; and Nedia Morsy, organizing director at Make the Road New Jersey. The panel will explore the role of government when the public sector loses revenue during economic downturns: Is it a time for greater investment or belt-tightening? With the federal government making robust investments in public goods on a scale not seen in decades, the panel will explore whether this is a time for state, county, and municipal government to invest in public goods or cut budgets and curtail capital expenditures. The panel will explore the implications of austerity for people who rely on government services such as public schools, parks, libraries, and nutrition programs. For more information, visit princetondems.org.

Ben: “Because of his importance, his commitment to excellence in so many ways, especially his emphasis and initiatives regarding civil rights, social action, and his concerns about the poor worldwide, Paul was a true renaissance man and we are very proud that he was born and raised here in Princeton. It is very important that we remember him and all the good work he did.” Anne: “Paul is everything! He was successful in everything he did and we are very proud beyond belief that he was born here.” — Ben Colbert, Lawrenceville with Anne Reeves, Princeton

Roz: “He was a very important figure in history. Paul was a brilliant man and not enough is known about him, both in terms of his work as a lawyer, his cultural contributions as a singer and as an actor, and then his contribution to our political life. He is much misunderstood, and it is important to realize his role in our history.” Callie: “I think Roz said it all. I second those emotions and I think the Robeson family is wonderful and we are so proud that their roots are in our town.” —Roz Anderson Flood with Callie Hancock, Princeton


continued from page one

a COVID-19 vaccine. Over the past several weeks the Princeton Health Department has focused on vaccinating vulnerable populations, including residents in the Spruce Circle, Redding Circle, and Holly House areas. Individuals seeking vaccination must pre-register at covidvaccine.nj.gov. Registering at other COVID-19 vaccine locations (see covid19.nj.gov) may increase your chances of getting an appointment. Health care centers that are also offering the vaccine include Princeton Penn Medicine (princetonhcs.org), Hackensack Meridian (hackensackmeridianhealth.org ), and RWJ/Barnabas (rwjbh.org). A vaccinator call center at (856) 249-7007 can assist New Jersey residents 65 and older with registration and scheduling appointments. As of Monday, April 12, New Jersey had administered 5,440,258 total vaccine doses, with 3,461,239 people with at least one shot, and 2,192,021 people fully vaccinated. On April 12, the Princeton Health Department reported 10 new COVID-19 cases in the previous seven days for a 1.42 daily average, and 21 cases in the previous 14 days for a 1.5 daily average. The highest local totals for new cases were recorded in December with 39 for one seven-day period and 66 for the highest 14-day total. Statewide, the 2,079 new cases reported on April 12 is the lowest number in five weeks, with the seven-day average for confirmed cases down 18 percent from a week earlier, but still up 8 percent from a month ago. New Jersey’s transmission rate fell again on Monday to .94, a steady drop from 1.07 a week ago. Any number less than one indicates a declining transmission rate. Grosser commented on the ongoing push to encourage residents to get vaccinated safely and to help the community work through this second year of the pandemic. “Princeton continues to closely monitor COVID-19 cases and trends within the community,” he said. “This is being performed on a daily basis by both the health officer and an epidemiologist who was contracted during the pandemic.” He cont i nu e d, “R apid and effective distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine is a promising step towards decreasing COVID-19 cases and ‘flattening the curve,’ however it is important for residents to be mindful that vaccination, in conjunction with other prevention methods such as wearing a face mask and social distancing, all help towards mitigating the spread of COVID-19. Please continue to engage in these safety practices and connect with local health agencies to receive your vaccination.” —Donald Gilpin

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Cancer Research

to try to stay nourished, but they really get no detailed continued from page one guidance,” he said. “For eximmune response or work ample, a lot of patients are with classical drugs to make told to take fish oils, because them work better at treating fish oils are viewed as good cancer,” said Rabinowitz. fat. But there’s also both exThe researchers plan to perimental and clinical evirun diet trials that are both dence that polyunsaturated scientifically rigorous and fats like fish oils accelerate immediately beneficial to pa- the growth of certain tumors. tients. “Pharmaceutical com- So here you have dieticians panies won’t typically pay giving very generic health for those,” Rabinowitz said. advice to a set of patients “Hopefully we’ll be engaged who have a really specific in multiple trials of this sort, health problem, and they both locally and taking ad- probably need quite different vantage of the best-in-world advice. Perhaps they need to clinical investigators, wher- be told, ‘Skip the salmon, go have some butter and steak.’ ever they may be.” Eileen White, a professor of I’m not saying we’re there moleculary biology and bio- yet, but that’s where I want chemistry at Rutgers, associ- us to get.” The branch will open new ate director of the branch, is a longtime collaborator with educational and research Princeton career scientists. opportunities for postdocs, Yibin Kang, Princeton’s War- graduate students and undergraduates at Princeton. ner-Lambert/Parke-David Professor of Molecular Biol“Cancer is a disease that ogy, is a principal investiga- touches so many of us,” Rabitor and founding member of nowitz said. “From Princeton the branch. undergraduates to the grad Chi Van Dang, scientific students and faculty, I think director of the Ludwig In- we all appreciate the imporstitute, said, “A more so- tance of this problem, and phisticated understanding we’re all motivated to bring of cancer metabolism holds our expertise to bear on it. considerable promise for At the same time, until now the optimization of cancer Princeton has not really had prevention and therapy, yet a dedicated or coherent effew organizations have as- fort in the cancer area.” sembled a critical mass of He continued: “We have experts dedicated exclusively students and faculty who to this promising frontier of bring incredible technologies research. The Ludwig Princ- and a depth of fundamental eton Branch will fill that gap science knowledge that’s relby bringing together leading evant to cancer, but hasn’t alGo to gorlinpools.com to experts in cancer biology ways been applied effectively Go to gorlinpools.com to and metabolism, focusing to cancer yet. One thing that their efforts on the most I really want to do is catalyze important questions of the the application of the techWEEKLY MAINTENANCE field and supporting the nologies where Princeton is translation their discoverWEEKLYofMAINTENANCE theSafe, world leader to cancer.” Healthy, Clean, Sparkling, ies for the benefit of cancer Water Levin —Anne Healthy, Safe, Clean, Sparkling, Crystal-Clear Pool patients, which remains LudCrystal-Clear Pool Water wig’s top priority.” Rabinowitz hopes to have targeted nutritional advice for cancer patients within the next decade. 908.359.8388 “People know they need Route 206 • Belle Mead

A Taste of History With Chef Walter Staib

The Trent House Association presents a virtual program by Chef Walter Staib, host of the PBS series A Taste of History, Sunday, May 16 at 2 p.m. Staib will bring history to life in his presentation on America’s culinary beginnings. A master in the preparat ion of soph ist i cated 18th-century cuisine, Staib will describe the foods colonists in North America and founders of the United States ate and the recipes they prepared.

A third-generation restaurateur w it h over five decades of culinary experience, Staib is an author, Emmy Award-winning TV host, James Beard-nominated chef, and culinary historian. His career began in Europe, receiving formal training in many of Europe’s noted hotels and restaurants. As founder of Concepts By Staib, Ltd., a global restaurant management and hospitality consulting firm, Staib has opened more than 650 restaurants worldwide and was the driving force behind Philadelphia’s City Tavern for 26 years.

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A virtual open house will be held by Northeast Organic Farming Association of New Jersey (NOFA-NJ) on Tuesday, April 20 at 6 p.m. The subject is “Creating an Edible Garden,” and will be taught by Al Johnson and Tomia MacQueen of NOFA-NJ, Arianna Lindberg of Rutgers Landscape Architecture, and Justin Allen of Isles of Trenton. Kathia Ramirez of CATA (El Comite de Apoyo a los Trabajadores Agricolas) will provide translation. This event will cover “Early Season Grain Growing” with Scott Morgan and Tom Zeng and “Starting Seedlings in Paper Pots” with John Squicciarino. The course is spons o r e d b y D r u m t h w a c ket Foundation and NOFA-NJ and hosted at Drumthwacket, Housewares • Small Appliances • Gadgets • Cookware • Cleaning • Storage

to many more students and high schools than they had in the past. Princeton will continue its test-optional application policy for one more year. “Standardized testing is one element of our holistic review,” said Hotchkiss. “We believe it can be an important metric in understanding a student’s ability to succeed in a rigorous academic environment. While we won’t require it for next year given the continued difficulties in accessing the tests, we will continue to assess for the following cycle.” The Princeton University admission office broadened its reach to high schools through digital programming with 574 virtual visits this past year, 387 with schools not visited in the previous year. “Virtual visits allowed us to expand our recruiting efforts and provide greater flexibility in scheduling,” Hotchkiss said. He continued, “We held virtual evening information sessions, offered one-on-one Zoom conversations between prospective and current students, and started a podcast, Meet Princeton!, where we interview students, faculty, and staff. Many of these new digital programs will continue in the future.” The students admitted to Princeton include 22 percent who will be first-generation college students, an increase of 17 percent over last year. Sixty-eight percent of the U.S. citizens or permanent residents in the admitted group self-identified as people of color, including biracial and multiracial students.

the governor’s mansion on Stockton Street. Seeds are donated by the Cooperative Gardens Commission of New Jersey. The goal is to demonstrate to front and backyard owners across New Jersey how to grow some local organic vegetables for themselves and their family, and to encourage the donation of funds to support home gardens throughout the state. With a donation of $50, the organization can supply a family with enough soil, seed, tools, and equipment to grow all season long. The course takes participants on a sixmonth journey that starts with prepping the beds and continues to growing and enjoying produce. This event is free, but registration is necessary. Visit nofanj.org.

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percent lower than it would be in an ordinary year, because more than 200 students, formerly in the class of 2024, deferred their enrollment by one year, according to The Daily Princetonian student newspaper. About 100 students were admitted in December 2020 through the QuestBridge National College Match, a binding admission program at Princeton for high-achieving, lowincome high school seniors. Other Ivy League schools saw even larger increases in applicants than Princeton’s 15 percent rise, with Columbia’s applications up 51 percent, Harvard’s up 42 percent, Brown up 27 percent, and Dartmouth, University of Pennsylvania and Yale all up about 33 percent, according to the Washington Post. The Common App reported an 11 percent increase overall in applications this year. Princeton application numbers would probably have been higher if the University had not eliminated its fall 2020 Early Action round of admissions in response to application deadline challenges caused by the pandemic. Princeton will resume Early Action applications this fall. Other factors boosting application numbers included the fact that with pandemic disruptions making test access difficult, most colleges, including Princeton, made standardized tests optional for the past year; applicants visited colleges virtually rather than in-person; and, relying on virtual rather than face-to-face communication, most colleges reached out

Creating an Edible Garden Is Focus of Open House

With the most applicants, 37,601, and the fewest admissions, 1,498, it has seen in the past ten years, Princeton University’s acceptance rate dropped to a record-low 3.8 percent for its fall of 2021 incoming freshman class. In this year when every facet of the admissions process has been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, letters offering admission, rejection, or the waiting list, went out on April 6. Low acceptance rates certainly emphasize the desirability of a Princeton University education, but the increase in exclusivity and decrease in access and choice for students are less desirable, particularly, of course, for the 96.2 percent of applicants who were turned away. “It’s not something we set out to do,” said Deputy University Spokesperson Michael Hotchkiss. “It was an unusual year in which we and all of our peers saw an increase in applications.” He continued, “We look forward to being able to welcome more students to the University in fall 2022, when we open our new residential college and are able to increase the class size.” Princeton University’s undergraduate acceptance rate has been dropping steadily over the past decade, with 8.39 percent accepted to the class of 2015 and 5.55 percent accepted in last year’s admission cycle for the class of 2024, before this year’s drop below four percent. The total number of admissions this year was about 20

Fifty-two percent of the students admitted are women, and 48 percent are men. Sixty- four percent of the admitted students come from public schools. Twenty-four percent of admitted students indicated they want to study engineering, and 15 percent are interested in studying the humanities. Ten percent of admitted students are children of Princeton alumni. Admitted students come from all 50 states, plus Washington, D.C., Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, and are citizens of 74 countries. International students represent 14 percent of the admitted students. A press release from the Princeton University Office of Communications noted the University’s expanding partnerships with college access groups that support lower-income students, first-generation students, and students from underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds. The press release also emphasized Princeton’s commitment to affordability, with most students graduating debt-free because they are not required to borrow as part of Princeton’s aid program. Among recent graduates 83 percent were debt-free, and for those who chose to borrow the average total indebtedness at graduation was $9,400. Admitted students have until May 3 to decide whether they will enroll in Princeton’s class of 2025. —Donald Gilpin

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 2021 • 8

PU Acceptance Rate at Record Low With Admissions at Just 3.8 Percent


At a m eet i ng Monday evening, Princeton Council voted in favor of several resolutions, introduced two ordinances, and approved three others including one allowing the municipality to establish a “CAP Bank.” Interim administrator Bob Bruschi said the CAP Bank does not affect this year’s budget, but would allow Council flexibility next year in case there is a major budget issue that needs to be addressed. With one of the resolutions, the governing body officially approved the temporary employment of Bruschi, who was administrator of the former Princeton Borough and consolidated Princeton until his retirement in 2014. He has been back in the post since midMarch, replacing retiring administrator Marc Dashield while the search for a permanent administrator was finalized with the hiring of Bernard Hvozdovic Jr., who will take over early next month. Council also passed a resolution to make that hiring official. Council members delivered updates on various issues. Councilwoman Eve Niedergang reported that a sewer manager has been hired to help address problems and vacancies in that depar tment. Councilman David Cohen said that the Vision Zero Task Force, which aims to eliminate traffic fatalities, held a kickoff meeting and established five subcommittees. Any members of the public who would like to serve on any of those committees should get in touch with him through the municipal website (princetonnj.gov). Councilwoman Mia Sacks reported that she, Cohen, and Councilwoman Michelle Pirone Lambros have been meeting w ith the tow n’s Planning Department, the Fair Share Housing Center, and attorneys regarding recent revelations that a 20 percent set aside of affordable housing units was not part of a development planned for the former Griggs Corner site. “We have been working on it and we now have a draft of what we hope will not only close whatever loopholes

were not covered, but hopefully will be even stronger than the ordinance that existed previously,” she said, adding that it is now being reviewed by the Affordable Housing Board and will be hopefully introduced within the month. Councilman Dwaine Williamson spoke about a petition that was recently circulated proposing the former Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad (PFARS) site as the location for a new community center. “The former PFARS site may not necessarily be the best place to house it,” he said, adding that he, Sacks, and Lambros have met regarding the issue and want to determine exactly what services are needed. “The bottom line is there are some human services issues we think we could do a better job addressing. And we want to figure out what to do with the former PFARS site. So we are listening to the community, but as it stands right now, it appears the former PFARS site would not be the best place to consolidate those services. The conversation is continuing.” Sacks said she wasn’t aware a decision had been made about the site. She also wanted to correct some misconceptions that some residents of the neighborhood had about the site, believing the town had decided to sell the building and adjacent two houses that are part of the parcel. It has not been decided. Br u s ch i rep or te d t hat discussions are underway about reopening the municipal building to the public. He also said there are efforts to allow Council and other municipal groups to meet in person once again. But bringing the public back to those meetings is not yet being considered. Council read a proclamation in honor of Judge Morton Greenberg, who lived in Princeton and died January 28. Greenberg was a Senior United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. He served as a judge for more than five decades. Council meets next on April 26. —Anne Levin

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Instructional Video Available on Eliminating Spotted Lanternfly

New Jersey Department of Agriculture Secretary Douglas H. Fisher is encouraging New Jersey residents to help take part in eliminating spotted lanternfly egg masses before they hatch near the end of April or in early May. Secretary Fisher and NJDA Plant Industry Division Director Joseph Zoltowski provide information and instructions on how to find and destroy the egg masses in a video. “As the temperatures begin to warm, and more people are outside on their own properties we are asking them to look for and destroy spotted lanternfly egg masses,” Fisher said. “The more of these egg masses that can be eliminated now, means there will be less of this nuisance pest later in the spring and during the summer.” Spot ted lanter nf ly egg masses hold between 30-50 eggs of the invasive species. One sign to look for to see where spotted lanternfly has been is a black sooty mold on a tree. The spotted lanternfly prefers the tree of heaven, which is common in New Jersey. While the spotted lanternfly is not a threat to humans or animals, it is known to feed on numerous types of vegetation. NJDA and USDA crews have combined to treat more than 20,000 acres and have destroyed thousands of egg masses on nearly 600 properties throughout this past winter season. The spotted lanternfly is native to Asia, but arrived in the U.S. in Berks County, Pa., on a shipment in 2014. The species has been advancing ever since, causing Pennsylvania to have 34 counties currently under quarantine. The New Jersey counties currently under quarantine are Warren, Hunterdon, Mercer, Burlington, Camden, Gloucester, Salem, and Somerset and are expected to expand. To watch the instructional egg mass scraping video, go to https://bit.ly/3dn8HQu. To learn more about the spotted lanternfly and what to do if you find them on your property go to https://bit. ly/3rAuVnp.

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April 15 | 4 p.m. forwardthinking.princeton.edu/festival

FORWARD THINKERS JESSE JENKINS Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

FORREST MEGGERS Assistant Professor of Architecture and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment; Co-Director, Program in Architecture and Engineering

SHANA S. WEBER Director, Office of Sustainability; Lecturer in the High Meadows Environmental Institute

CLAIRE E. WHITE Associate Professor of Civil and the Environmental Engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

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9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 2021

Council Votes on Several Measures At Recent Virtual Gathering


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 2021 • 10

Local Wildlife continued from page one

solar system. The result of Flesher’s investigations is a short documentary film, Observatory, which premieres April 16 at the Princeton Environmental Film Festival. “Gaspar told this incredible story that to me was fascinating — about this world of wildlife right in Princeton and around Lake Carnegie,” said Flesher. “I think what’s so incredible is that Gaspar put so much time into this project when he has this whole other interest and expertise, which is that he’s a really accomplished astrophysicist who has been instrumental in discovering a significant fraction of the planets in the galaxy outside of our solar system.” Flesher continued, “It’s interesting to me here as a storyteller that professionally Gaspar looks at the farthest thing in the galaxy, but he spends his free time studying and looking at the local raccoons. I think that’s an interesting combination of the big and the small in terms of interest and passion.” Flesher noted that Bakos has recently been testing out different wildlife cameras and, with the support of the University’s Office of Sustainability and a grant from the High Meadows Foundation Sustainability Fund, is planning to expand on his initial photography project with 18 additional cameras. “Everything is still in the planning stages,” Flesher said, “but the video Observatory is a kick-off for this larger project that will tell the story of wildlife in Princeton. The process of discovery — not knowing what you’ll find — is what makes it fun and interesting.” Flesher emphasized the importance of bringing Bakos’ stories and photos to the attention of the

Princeton community and anyone else who is interested. “I think that’s important because it’s easy to forget that we humans share the natural world with a lot of other life, whether minks or raccoons or beavers or interesting birds that live on the lake,” said Flesher. He continued, “It’s an important reminder that the decisions we make and the things we do, whether we build something or where we put up lights or where we use pesticides or where we pollute water — these things impact not just other humans, which is important to think about, but they impact everything that lives in our community.” Flesher, who graduated from the University of Richmond in 2005 with a degree in journalism, has always been interested in writing and journalism. He started out as a beat reporter in Somerville, New Jersey, but with the newspaper industry shrinking he decided to branch out. “I really loved storytelling and wanted to find a way to do it,” he said. He wrote a variety of magazine articles, started taking his own pictures to accompany those stories, and became interested in photography. “The natural progression was telling stories with video,” he said. “As soon as I started making documentary films I realized that I loved every part of the process — the storytelling, narrative process, and there’s also the technical process with cameras and microphones, and editing software. All parts of that were interesting to me.” He continued, “In addition to making documentaries you can make videos for paying clients, and it seemed like there was a livelihood there, so I transitioned slowly but steadily from print journalism toward video production. Eventually I felt

confident enough to start my own production company, Hundred Year Films, and I met a bunch of interesting people along the way.” His interest in environmental subjects led him to join the Office of Sustainability at Princeton University. Another subject of fascination for Flesher is the state of New Jersey. His web series The Creature Show, “based in the wilds of New Jersey,” is all about threatened and endangered species in the state. “I’m very interested in place-based storytelling,” he said, “so the idea that some astrophysicist was running around at night placing cameras around Princeton was a perfect fit for my interests. Sometimes it’s easy to get distracted or to forget how special the place is where you live. Central Jersey is a pretty wonderful place with lots of opportunities and lots of natural value as well.” This spring Flesher is looking forward to promoting a film he made last year called Pine Mud, about the damage off-road vehicles are doing in the Pine Barrens. “One of the most special habitats we have in New Jersey is the Pine Barrens, and there’s significant damage being done to it by off-road vehicles, people who don’t follow the rules down there. The state needs to do more to address this problem. I’m hoping to do more screenings of this film this summer in real life and online as well.” The Princeton Environmental Film Festival, sponsored by the Princeton Public Library online this year, runs through April 18 and includes nine feature length films and nine short films. Flesher’s Observatory, featuring astrophysicist Gaspar Bakos, is free to watch at 7 p.m. on Friday, April 16. Visit princetonlibrary.org for registration and further information. —Donald Gilpin

WILD ANIMALS AND UNDISCOVERED PLANETS: Princeton University astrophysicist Gaspar Bakos has helped to discover more than 140 planets outside our solar system. Now he and his pandemic pastime of photographing animals in the woods near his house are the subject of “Observatory,” a short documentary film by Jared Flesher, premiering online this week in the Princeton Environmental Film Festival.

NEW COLLABORATION: St. Michaels Farm Preserve is the site of a climate project being jointly launched by D&R Greenway Land Trust and Soil Carbon Partners.

D&R Greenway Climate Project at St. Michaels

D & R Greenway Land Trust is joining with its newest partner in preservation, Soil Carbon Partners (SCP), to launch The Climate Project at St. Michaels Farm in Hopewell Township. Beginning mid-April, this project combines organic agriculture with soil improvements to test whether they will significantly enhance nutritional content of food while sequestering carbon to mitigate climate change. The SCP team will add a special mix of naturally occurring minerals, organic matter, and beneficial soil microbes to 60 acres of farm fields on St. Michaels Farm, replicating the healthy ecosystem that nourished buffalo on Western prairies. Native grasses and forage crops will nourish a small herd of fully grass-fed cattle, enhancing the bucolic nature of the D&R Greenway preserve. “We know that natural pasture-based grazing systems historically sequestered hundreds of billions of tons of atmospheric carbon in soil throughout the great Plains of the U.S., Canada, and other countries,” said Ed Huling of Soil Carbon Partners. “Our regenerative farming system is modeled upon these natural grazing models to help address the climate crises threatening us all.” Independent s cient ists from Princeton University and other climate-focused institutions will rigorously measure the health of soil, grasses, and cattle. The farming methods used by SCP are expected to increase plant grow th and photosynthesis, in turn increasing the amount of carbon that plants extract from the air and transfer to the soil as stored, or sequestered carbon. Sequestering carbon in farmland is increasingly being recognized as a key strategy in slowing temperature-rise and climate change. Peter Dawson, chair of the board of trustees of D&R Greenway, said, “This

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research project shows our commitment to endorsing regenerative agricultural practices that are both good business practice and protective of the environment. Throughout, we will continue to ensure community access and enjoyment of the St. Michaels Farm Preserve’s trails and gardens.” During the Climate Proje c t, S t. M i ch ael s Far m Preserve trails will remain open. The research project will begin on or around April 15. There will be no noticeable disturbances from this project with the exception of occasional truck deliveries of organic and all-natural components of the soil nutrition blend within the first few weeks. T h e or ga n i z at ion s i n volved share similar values: D&R Greenway’s mission is to preserve and care for land and inspire a conservation ethic. Soil Carbon Partners is committed to mitigating climate change, focusing upon regenerative organic far ming. T his project is funded by the Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment, renowned for investing in innovative climate-mitigation research.

Grace Kelly’s Wedding Dress Among Morven Highlights

A variety of live and virtual programs are planned at Morven Museum and Garden this spring, starting with a celebration of the 65th wedding anniversary of Princess Grace and Prince Rainier of Monaco on Thursday, April 15 at 4 p.m. The two were visitors to Morven during Governor Brendan Byrne’s era. To honor the milestone, Morven will present a virtual pressed flower workshop featuring a brief presentation about Grace Kelly’s iconic wedding gown by Kristina Haugland, the Le Vine Associate Curator of Costume and Textiles and Supervising Curator for the Study Room at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and author of two books on Grace

Kelly’s style. In this pressed flower virtual workshop, led by Morven’s Curator of Education and Public Programs Debra L amper t-Rudman, students will recreate one of Princess Grace’s favorite designs: a pressed flower crown – a design she chose for the invitation to her first Paris exhibition of her pressed flower art. On April 19, at 12 p.m., the museum presents “Morven Moments” a free, virtual lunchtime program that will highlight some of the glamorous garden parties and celebrities who attended them, through a discussion moderated by docent Kim Gallagher and followed by a live Q&A. Next, on April 20 at 2 p.m., is Poetry Palooza, being held in celebration of National Poetry Month. Poet and Clemson University professor Drew Lanham will discuss the poems of Morven’s resident poet Annis Boudinot Stockton and her contemporaries, as well as poetry inspired by ornithology, a topic examined in the current exhibition “In Nature’s Realm: The Art of Gerard Rutgers Hardenbergh.” Lanham will focus on what it means to embrace the full breadth of his African American heritage and his deep kinship to nature and adoration of birds. Writing prompts for participants, relevant beverage recipes, and recordings will be provided. Series and individual program tickets are available at morven.org/ poetry-palooza. On April 26 at 6:30 p.m., “Women, Poetry, and War” is the title of a session featuring Jeffrey Gray, professor emeritus at Seton Hall University, and Mary McAleer Balkun, professor of English at Seton Hall University and scholar of early American literature. The two will begin their discussion with the poetry of the American Revolution and compare and contrast its counterpart in contemporary poetry. For details, visit morven.org.


Mailbox Observing That Spring Brings “Mating Call” Of Gas-Powered Leaf Blowers to Town

To the Editor: Ah spring in Princeton! The sight of flowers, bushes, and now our magnolia tree. The scent of the blooming flowers of the earth itself in spring. And the sound of the birds in the Harrison Street Park chirping their mating calls. Were I to walk along the D&R Canal past the Institute Woods, the cacophony would overwhelm. And as I returned home along Pelham Street on the other side of South Harrison where I live, I heard, for the first time this year, the mating call of a gas-fired leaf blower, a species that has evolved from the inefficiency of the soundless hand-held rake. No wonder they, the rakes, became extinct except in garages where they are kept as specimens of a past age. And then, just before entering my door, I heard a soft higher pitch voice of a female gas-fired leaf blower responding from Aiken Street across the park. Thinking ahead, the 17-year cicadas are about to appear. Imagine their heart throbs on hearing the calls of gas-fired leaf blowers! Will they swarm and then mate? What will the offspring look like when they appear in another 17 years? Long life wished for us all to welcome them! ROBERT KARP South Harrison Street

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To the Editor: The availability of affordable housing improved in Princeton Township due to the attention and support it received from Mayor Phyllis Marchand over her many years in office. She saw affordable housing as playing a key role in advancing diversity in Princeton. In particular, she was an active partner with Princeton Community Housing (PCH), sharing in the belief that a community should offer housing to people of all economic levels. Her assistance was valuable in the building of many new affordable homes at Griggs Farm. The trustees and staff of PCH offer our sincere condolences to her family and our heartfelt thanks for all that Mayor Marchand did for Princeton. EDWARD TRUSCELLI Executive Director, Princeton Community Housing

In Honor of Earth Day, Message Highlights Concerns of Plastic Pollution

To the Editor: Thursday, April 22 is Earth Day. There is a lot to worry about the current situation of our planet, but plastic use/ abuse is one of the main culprits. Each year, the United States alone produces tens of millions of tons of plastic waste and ships 50 million tons of it to poorer countries, whose residents are left to deal with it for generations to come. Billions of tons of plastic trash from all over the world end up in the oceans, killing marine life, or lie in landfills everywhere on Earth, causing damage to birds, mammals, and vegetation. Aside from the amount of waste, a major environmental concern is the leaching of chemicals out of the plastic, and its impact on animals and humans. We eat, swallow, and breath 2,000 particles of plastic a week, about the weight of a credit card. Although no studies have

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been done on the impact of plastic chemicals on humans, what we know so far from animal studies is serious cause for concern. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) contained in plastic cause severe disorders in the developing male reproductive system of laboratory rats. These same chemicals leaked into water streams are known to alter the sexual functions of turtles and fish, turning males into females. In humans, endocrinologists for years have observed a steady decrease in male fertility and an increase in testicular cancer (testicular dysgenesis syndrome), and reported the relentless trend toward early puberty in girls. It probably does not take a wizard to conclude that all these phenomena are related, and that plastic is affecting human bodies too. Before it gets too late, we need to wean ourselves off disposable plastic and reduce plastic pollution. It is a life choice that we must make for the sake of future generations. CHIARA NAPPI Clover Lane

Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

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Princeton Community Housing Offers Thanks For All That Marchand Did For Town


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 14, 2021 • 12

book/film Review

Don’t Call It a Spinoff — “Better Call Saul” Is a Great American Film I travel in worlds you can’t even imagine! You can’t conceive what I’m capable of! I’m so far beyond you, I’m like a god in human clothing! Lightning bolts shoot from my fingertips! —from Better Call Saul, Season 5 etter Call Zeus is more like it. In fact that passionate utterance comes from the owner of a Suzuki Esteem named Jimmy (“S’all good, man!”) McGill, who is at a transformative breaking point not unlike the Shazam moment where Billy Batson becomes Captain Marvel. So, you may be thinking Saul Goodman of the lightning bolts is either a Shakespearean actor in rehearsal or a deranged black comedy superhero out of the Marvel comics universe, surely not a shyster lawyer with a University of American Samoa law degree (by mail) driving a vehicular alter ego of a color somewhere between a “yellow matter custard I-am-the-Walrus” shade of yellow and the Crime and Punishment yellow symbolic of corruption, dilapidation, decay, and soulsick decadence. And don’t forget the slightly unhinged strip of chrome on the passenger side, just down from the blood-red rear door that suggests the work of a body shop mechanic with delusions of abstract expressionist grandeur. Every time Jimmy speeds off on another mission, the camera makes sure you get a clear view of the word ESTEEM to the right of the New Mexico Land of Enchantment license plate. And every time you see that word you’re reminded of how brilliantly far the show’s creators, Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould, have gone — the proverbial extra mile — to put their hero behind the wheel of the perfect car for a driver on his way to the far side of “esteem” as Saul Goodman, a Friend of the Cartel. Jimmy’s 1998 Esteem takes a hit almost as soon as he puts it in motion in the series pilot when an insurance-scamming skateboarder tumbles accidentally on purpose over the hood and smashes the window. Amazingly, the Little Yellow Car That Could almost makes it to the end of Season 5 (spoiler alert) as Jimmy/Saul drives it to the Mexican border. You could say that when the Esteem goes literally over the edge — it’s goodbye Jimmy, hello Saul. The Winner Better Call Saul wins the Best Picture Oscar in my own private award show, dwarfing the competition, be it fulllength film or multi-season series, much as Breaking Bad did a decade ago. If I’m not playing by the Academy/Golden Globe rules, blame the anything-goes spirit of this so-called “prequel.” In fact, it’s time to stop thinking of Better Call Saul as a mere spinoff; you might as well say the same for The Godfather Part 2 or Henry IV Part 2.

B

When I first wrote about Breaking Bad, it was after an online fishing expedition baited with the tag, “Breaking Bad/Dostoevsky.” I was guessing that a series about a terminally ill high school science teacher’s evolution into a methamphetamine overlord had qualities that the author of Crime and Punishment would find compelling. For that matter, so would Robert Louis Stevenson, had the author of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde witnessed Walter White cooking up batches of crystal blue meth in his lab as a Hyde named Heisenberg takes possession of his soul. Jimmy’s Genius Even before Jimmy McGill (Bob Odenkirk) breaks up or down, bad or good or doomed, in the process of becoming Saul Goodman, he exhibits the genius of a born showman, a wordslinging sales pitch virtuoso. Imagine an unhinged, unstoppable travesty of Mad Men’s Don Draper who isn’t afraid to risk everything in the shameless pursuit of his goal. Jimmy suits the action to the word to the action with a vengeance (never mind “the b ou nds of mo d est y” ) . Consider the erection of a gigantic sky-high billboard showing James M. McGill, Attorney at Law, in blue pinstripes, next to the JMM logo (his initials, Justice Matters Most or Just Make Money take your choice). Forced to remove the ad because he’s borrowed (as in theft) the logo of his older brother’s law firm Hamlin Hamlin & McGill, Jimmy stages a spectacular rescue stunt, wherein he scales the heights to pull a dangling workman to safety (“It took you long enough”), thereby making the front page as an Albuquerque Harold Lloyd, or, given the circumstances, Douglas Fairbanks as The Thief of Bagdad. It’s by way of stunts like these that he haphazardly showmanships his way into the middle of a drug war. Jimmy’s gritty genius takes him in the opposite direction when he plumbs the depths of a dumpster reeking of nursinghome garbage in his quest for shredded documents he will piece together as evidence in a class action suit against the corporation that runs the facility. At this point Dostoevsky comes to mind again,

given the Karamazovian intensity of Jimmy’s relationship with his older brother Chuck, a distinguished lawyer, the pride of the firm, albeit out of the office because of his electromagnetic hypersensitivity. Chuck is played by Michael McKean 30 years this side of Spinal Tap’s David St. Hubbins, speaking of electromagnetic hypersensitivity. Kim is Key With the winds of excess and extremity at his back Jimmy/Saul does good without intending to, abets evil without knowing it, enchants, bewilders, terrifies, and delights the lawyerly love of his life, Kim Wexler, played by Rhea Seehorn in a performance that earns her the Best Actress Oscar in my one - ma n aw ard s ceremony (it goes without saying that Odenkirk wins Best Actor for his Zeus-worthy portrayal of Jimmy). The way a buddymov ie workplace friendship blooms into a love stor y is among the special joys of Better Call Saul. Romant ic come dy w it h screwball elements is only one among many genres left out by Wikipedia’s scattergun attempt to label the series ( crime drama / legal drama / black comedy/tragedy). Call the show what you will, Kim and Jimmy make one of television’s most appealingly offbeat couples. They even have a song, “Something Stupid,” which accompanies a split-screen video of their life together. When the romance takes on film-noir shadings toward the end of the fifth season, and then goes the extra mile into a life or death epic in the desert, the split-screen song is movingly reprised, with Kim fretting and fearing the worst and Jimmy very nearly succumbing to it in a sequence that may rouse smiles of fond recognition in fans of The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly. Kim’s Fate Writing in The Ringer (“Don’t Kill Kim”), Lindsay Zoladz finds Kim “perhaps the easiest character to root for on Better Call Saul. In a show full of crooked morals, her compass is true — even when she’s taking the fall for Jimmy.” Or helping him scam a Wall Street loudmouth out of an $800 bottle of tequila. Seehorn plays Kim “with stoic grit” and “a clenched jaw that very

occasionally cracks into a sly smile, mostly when she’s with Jimmy .... But in another sense, loving Kim Wexler is complicated.” True, the more you feel for Kim, the more you fear for her when pondering what’s in store in the sixth and final season as Better Call Saul closes in on the timeline of Breaking Bad. The Strongest Character In the two previous columns I devoted to Breaking Bad, I only mentioned Saul Goodman in passing, with praise for “the sleazy ingenuity of one of the most charming shyster lawyers you’ll ever see,” and for providing “all kinds of unlawful advice along with indispensable comic relief.” There was no mention of Jonathan Banks’s Mike Ehrmantraut in either column. That I’m saving him for last is a tribute to his character’s stature and complexity. Mike is not only indispensable, he’s virtually unfathomable. How is it that a killer emerges as the strongest and single most sympathetic character in the human comedy of Better Call Saul? It’s not enough to simply label him an antihero. Once again, as with “spinoff” and “prequel,” terminology falls short, and you find yourself bringing the big names Dostoevsky, Balzac, and Shakespeare, or Hemingway or Faulkner or Philip Marlowe into the discussion. Even then, it’s a cop out — no pun intended, Mike being an ex-cop from Philadelphia whose son was murdered for standing up to two corrupt fellow officers. Having killed both men after determining their guilt beyond any doubt, Mike turns up in a parking garage kiosk in Albuquerque just in time to refuse to let Jimmy McGill through when he lacks the required number of stamps on his ticket. As soon you as you begin to see the gate-keeping dynamic of that relationship, you’re smiling because you know the series you’re about to watch is going to live up to — or surpass — your expectations. earching for information about Jonathan Banks, I was pleased to find that three decades ago he was a theater student at my alma mater, Indiana University. In April 2016, the university awarded him an honorary degree. In accepting it, he said, “This place gave me my life.” Then, speaking to aspiring actors in the audience, he said he would be developing Mike Ehrmantraut’s backstory until the day he dies. “You don’t need to decide where your character went to kindergarten, but you do need to know where their pain comes from,” he said. He also advised actors to embrace being an artist, and “if you’re an artist, you’re going to have to be prepared to die with your hands empty but with the thought in your mind that ‘I’m an artist, and I’ve done the best I can.’” —Stuart Mitchner

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awareness, and appreciation of the arts education. This event recognizes 100 students and 20 adult leaders who have demonstrated excellence in and dedication to arts education. Across the country, the Governor’s Awards prog rams share similar goals; however, New Jersey sets itself apart because students are the ultimate beneficiaries of the Governor’s Awards in Arts Education. An annual award ceremony — free and open to the public — is held every year to honor award recipients. The students award winners will perform throughout the ceremony, award winners’ names will be read by past award winners, and SPRING IN THEIR STEPS: The Pennsylvania Ballet continues its spring season April 29 with a presentation of award-winBalanchine’s ‘Allegro Brillante,” among other works. A combination of virtual and live events ning artwork will be shown. is planned. Visit njgac.org for details.

Performing Arts

Broadway. She is currently set to join the company of the Broadway rev ival of 1776 as both Martha Jefferson and Dr. Lyman Hall. Other credits include, offBroadway: Sweeney Todd (Barrow Street Theatre, Johanna), Assassins (City Center Encores!); world premiere: Sousatzka (Young Sousatzka); National Tour: Jekyll and Hyde (Emma Carew; and regional: Brigadoon (Pittsburgh CLO, Fiona). LeCroy is a National YoungArts Foundation alumna and Presser Scholar. She also serves as a member of the nonprofit organization Broadway Hear ts, which brings music and entertainment to kids in the New York-area Children’s Hospital. The price to attend is $15. Visit westr ick music.org / workshops.

Pennsylvania Ballet Performs “Resilience,” designed to Ballet II of Phrenetic, by Virtual Workshop Planned Italian Wine Tasting With Broadway Actress And Goes “Behind the Seams” showcase the dancers’ tech- Maria Konrad. More live performances Westrick Music Academy Supports State Theatre Pennsylvania Ballet con- nical expertise and artistry, tinues its appearances throughout the spring with a roster of virtual and live events. On April 15 at 7 p.m., “Behind the Seams” takes digital viewers through the journey of making, wearing, preserving, and displaying wearable art and costumes. Designer Julie Watson will share how she has been creating costumes for the company. Kristina Haughland of the Philadelphia Museum of Art will give a sneak peek at how the museum acquires a costume, what they look for in a piece, and what happens when it comes into their care. A Q &A will follow. Participation is free. From April 29-May 5, a v ir tual program titled

includes Balanchine’s Allegro Brillante, Christopher Wheeldon’s Polyphonia, a work by Jermel Johnson, and Raymonda Suite. Tickets are $25 per household. From May 7- June 6, a new exhibit at Cherry Street Pier in Philadelphia is titled “Spread Your Wings.” Photography, video, visual art, and live performance are on view, including artist David McShane’s new work featuring Pennsylvania Ballet dancers. Also on display will be large-scale photography by Vikki Sloviter, Arian Molina, and Shawn Theodore, as well as video produced by Big Picture Alliance. Opening night is at 7 p.m. on May 7 and includes a live performance by Pennsylvania

are schedule June 4 and 5 at Red Rose Farm in Villanova. Participating are dancers from Pennsylvania Ballet, an ensemble of the Pennsylvania Ballet Orchestra brass section, and the Orchestra string section, led by concertmaster Luigi Mazzocchi. This is a benefit, and tickets start at $250. Visit paballet.org for details.

Governor’s Arts Education Awards Honor Students, Leaders

T he 2021 New Jersey Governor’s Awards in Arts Education, considered the highest honor in arts education in the state, will take place virtually on May 22 at 5 p.m. These awards honor excellence, promoting

invites young people to a master class with Broadway actress Er y n L eCroy on Saturday, April 24, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The workshop will allow seven young singers to receive advice from LeCroy, who will also spend time talking about best practices for performance preparation, and answer questions. LeCroy received her Bachelor of Music in Vocal Performance with honors from Oklahoma City University. She most recently performed the iconic role of Christine Daaé in The Phantom of the Opera on

State Theatre New Jersey will present an online Italian Wine Tasting on Saturday, April 24, at 4 p.m. This fundraising event, held on Zoom, supports State Theatre’s fall reopening and will be hosted by New York-based sommelier and Italian wine ambassador Michelle Erland. Event options include participation with or without wine delivery as well as an optional food pairing provided and delivered by Stage Left. The RSVP deadline for the Tasting is Friday, April 16 (Wednesday, April 14 if ordering wine). Guests will journey online into Italy’s

Veneto Wine Region to explore, learn, and taste the wines this region has to offer. Guests can also enhance their wine tasting evening with the selected wines packaged and delivered right to their door. The wine selected by the sommelier can also be paired with a charcuterie board created and delivered by Stage Left. Erland is a graduate of the Intensive Sommelier Program at the International Culinary Center (French Culinary Institute) and a Certified Sommelier through the Court of Master Sommelier’s, Americas. In 2017, she became one of the few Italian wine ambassadors in the United States through the Vinitaly International Academy in Verona. Par ticipants w ill taste through a flight of wines highlighting two of Veneto’s wine regions surrounding the city of Verona including Gini Soave Classico DOC ‘La Frosca’ 2016; Buglioni Valpolicella Superiore Classico DOC ‘l’Imperfetto’ 2016; and Buglioni Amarone della Valpolicella DOCG ‘L’Amarone’ 2016. Attendees will have a chance to enhance their wine tasting with a charcuterie board from Stage Left and paired with each selected wine by Erland. Options range from $150$310 with $150 being a tax-deductible donation in support of State Theatre’s reopening. For more information or to order visit STNJ.org/ WineTasting or contact Linda Van Derveer at (732) 247-7200, ext. 594 or lvanderveer@stnj.org.

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“SIDE ORDER”: This work by Larry Mitnick is featured in “Imagining Space,” his dual exhibition with Heather Barros, on view through May 2 at the Artists’ Gallery in Lambertville. “Viewers don’t quite know “Imagining Space” Dual Exhibit at Artists’ Gallery where they stand,” Barros

Heather Barros and Larry Mitnick’s joint exhibition, “Imagining Space,” is on view at the Artists’ Gallery in L amber t v ille t hrough May 2. According to the artists, Imagining space is different from imagining spaces. Barros and Mitnick understand t hat “spaces” are constrained by boundaries. A meadow may be circumscribed by a row of trees, and a room by its walls. In imagining “space” these two artists seek to invert the perspective. Both ponder space independent of the space’s periphery. They use forms we understand to prescribe a space we may not. That space can be vast. That space can be twisted; it can be atmospheric. So, for these artists and in very different ways, the path through space leads to abstraction. Barros imagines space in paintings of interiors and landscapes. She understands that spatial orientation requires an anchor point. She seemingly provides these for viewers, but upon close inspection her anchors are often unmoored. She may offer a window through which one can see, but the view is empty. If not bare canvas, the paint has been wiped to near-translucency. Detail is sacrificed, information is lost, but volume survives. Other times it is unclear if one is looking at or through water, through fog, or at sheer emptiness.

says of this work. “But like moths attracted to light, I hope to lure their gaze to a certain distance. They may be looking at paint, but I want them to see and imagine space.” Mitnick’s paintings are more overtly abstract. He overlays shapes and colors upon one another to create textured compositions with little correlation to the world we normally perceive. Viewers project upon these works their own imagined sense of space. They see layered elements. Color, value, and varying degrees of transparency are employed to suggest depth. Acknowledgment of depth is this artist’s lure. His hook, what captivates the viewer, is an enigma in its distillation. Exactly which shape is in front of what? How can a color be in front of one element and not behind another? These paintings pose uneasy questions. Their beauty is that they assert their own sense of balance and order. The Artists’ Gallery is located at 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, with gallery hours on Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, visit lambertvillearts.com, or call (609) 397-4588.

Delaware Valley Bead Society Works on Display

The North County Branch Library now presents a display of the jewelry of 25 members of the Delaware Valley Bead Society (DVBS), on view through Thursday,

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 2021

Art

April 29. Forty-eight individual pieces created by DVBS members can be seen in the showcases on the first and second floors of the library at 65 Halstead Street in Clinton. Some of the items are for sale after the exhibit closes; the price list is available by the exhibit. For the Nor th County Branch library’s current hours of operation, visit hclibrary.us/ branches/northcounty.htm. The 2019 Bead Challenge pieces of three members will also be on exhibit. T he pieces on display have been created by Alice Heinzelman and Jean West, Annandale; Victoria Watson, Bridgewater; Christina Herndon, and Linda McKay, Califon; Susan Powell, Clementon; Susan Fellin, Christine Jochem, Valerie Kurz, Brenda Poston, and Debbie Vine, Flemington; Marti Brown and Kathleen vonWebern, Frenchtown ; Linda Williams, Hampton; Kathy Corbo, Carol Lawrence, and Pat Rinderle, High Bridge; Emily Barbour and Joan O’Shaughnessy, Lebanon; Meredith Higgins, Milford; Anna Maria Petersen, Phillipsburg; Kathryn Vernam, Ringoes ; Diana Wilson, Stockton; and Debbie Haydu and Marie Stackhouse, Easton, Pa. The jewelry and beadwork techniques used to create the pieces include bead crochet, bead embroidery, bead knitting, bead stringing, bead weaving, chain maille, freeform bead weaving, Kumihimo braiding with beads, Niobium metal work, metal work, wire weaving, and wire wrapping. The DVBS offered its first Bead Challenge in 2005. It is a members-only competition; the bead society provides a kit and members supply the creativity. The 2019 honors went to Linda Williams, First Place; Kathleen vonWebern, Second Place; with Marie Stackhouse, Anna Maria Petersen, and Diana Wilson tying for Third Place. Due to the pandemic, the 2021 DVBS meetings are being conducted via Zoom at 7 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month (except December and Januar y). Indiv iduals interested in beading, jewelry making, or future membership in the DVBS are welcome to attend a meeting to get acquainted with the Society. Visit the DVBS website to see the meeting announcements in 2021 and to register as a guest to attend a meeting. For m or e i n for m at ion about the Delaware Valley Bead Society, visit delawarevalleybeadsociety.org.

“THREE BOYS. THREE STORIES”: Artist Mary Ann McKay will discuss her work in “Silent Voices: Art of the Children of the Mines” on Thursday, April 15 at 7 p.m. online via Zoom. The presentation is part of Artsbridge’s Distinguished Artists’ Series.

Artsbridge’s Artists’ Series and The Hussian College of Trenton’s Junior 1, 1916” Features Mary Ann McKay Art in Philadelphia. After through April 24 and “Wom-

Artsbridge’s Distinguished Artists’ Series will feature Mary Ann McKay in “Silent Voices: Art of the Children of the Mines” on Thursday, April 15 at 7 p.m. online via Zoom. McKay’s mixed media art feels like it comes through her DNA, as she bears witness to the plight of child laborers her coal miner grandfather saw and worked with in Pennsylvania. Using images taken around 1911 by Lewis Wickes Hine, photographer for the National Child L abor Commit tee, she combines her painting and digital skills with glass, metal, cold wax, oil and film to create extraordinary works that bring color and life back to children’s lives lost to child labor during the industrial age. “My research discovered children as young as 8 years old working in the mines, especially the ‘breaker houses,’ where they sat as long as 10 hours a day, separating and breaking the coal into small pieces by hand. With my artistic efforts, I hope to return a voice to these forgotten boys,” said McKay. In 2019, McKay shifted her focus to Hine’s images of young boys working aroundthe-clock in the southern New Jersey glass industry, for her Children of Glass Series. In addition to her focus on children, earlier work concentrated on abandoned steel and glass factories. “Being from Pennsylvania, I understood the problems and hardships of the industrial working class,” she said. McKay received her art education at The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art

many years as a graphic designer, she now devotes her time to creating her interdisciplinary art in her studio in Keyport, where she also serves as vice president of The Arts Society of Keyport. Her work has been shown in galleries throughout New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Maryland. To learn more about McKay, visit MaryAnnMcKay. com.To attend the free Zoom presentation or for more information, visit artsbridgeonline.com.

Area Exhibits Check websites for information on safety protocols. A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Br idge Street, L amber tville, has “Imagining Space” through May 2. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “A Voice to Be Heard” through May 8. Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. artscouncilofprinceton.org. D & R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place, has the ongoing virtual galleries “Trail of Breadcrumbs: Nature in Fairytales” and “Portraits of Preservation: James Fiorentino Art.” The center is currently closed to the public. drgreenway. org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Mu s e u m i n C ad w a lad e r Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, has “On the Forefront:

en Artists, Trenton Style” through June 6. Visit ellarslie.org for museum hours and timed entry tickets. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “A Virtual Tour of Hamilton’s Princeton” and the “History@ Home” series. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., “Fern Coppedge: New Discoveries” through April 18, “Essential Work 2020: A Community Portrait” through July 11, and “Through the Lens: Modern Photography in the Delaware Valley” through August 15. The museum is open to the public. michenerartmuseum.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “In Nature’s Realm: The Art of Gerard Rutgers Hardenberg” through January 9 and the online exhibit “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints Of New Jersey, 1761–1898.” Open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. morven.org. Princeton University Art Museum has the online exhibits “Looking at 17th -Century Dutch Painting,” “Life Magazine and the Power of Photography,” “The Eclectic Eye: A Tribute to Duane Wilder,” and more, along with many online events. The museum is currently closed to the public. artmuseum.princeton.edu. West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “2021 WWAC Member Show: Floral Persuasion,” online and in the gallery by appointment through May 14. westwindsorarts.org.

“ROLLING IN”: This painting by Heather Barros is part of “Imagining Space,” her joint exhibition “OF LAND AND SEA”: Landscape and seascape oil paintings by Princeton resident Linda Prospero are now on view at Small World Coffee, 224 Nassau Street. The exhibition runs through May 4. with Larry Mitnick, on view through May 2 at the Artists’ Gallery in Lambertville.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 14, 2021 • 16

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From Princeton, We Reach the World.

83 Phillips Avenue, Lawrence Twp Marketed by: Lisa Candella-Hulbert | $455,000

30 Slack Avenue, Lawrence Twp Marketed | by: Eva Hsu $435,000

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street 609-924-1600 foxroach.com |

TEMPORARILY LOCATED AT 33 WITHERSPOON STREET

© BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

From Princeton, We Reach the World. 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 Princeton Office Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com Princeton, NJ ||253 foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.


Listed by Robin Wallack • Broker Associate • Cell: 609-462-2340 • robin.wallack@foxroach.com

Charm galore! Just move right in to this updated home on Moore Street, one of the sweet spots in Princeton. Gorgeous kitchen, beautiful wood floors, and delightful gardens. Right around the corner from Nassau Street, the library, Arts Council, and restaurants, this vintage house has an enclosed front porch, opening to the formal living room with a fireplace as a focal point, and the open floor plan enables guests to flow effortlessly from one room to another. Beautiful glass tile backsplash in the chef’s kitchen is elegant, as are the counters and cabinets. Easy access to the deck and backyard encourage dining al fresco in warmer weather. Three bedrooms upstairs, and a finished basement, make this offering a real gem! $999,000

PRINCETON OFFICE / 253 Nassau Street / Princeton, NJ 08540 609-924-1600 main / 609-683-8505 direct

Visit our Gallery of Virtual Home Tours at www.foxroach.com A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, aPRIl 14, 2021

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 14, 2021 • 18

Calendar Wednesday, April 14 10 a.m.: The Suppers Programs presents “What’s in Your Grocery Cart?” webinar. Free. The suppersprograms.org. 12 p.m.: Stavros Lambrinidis speaks, “A New Era for Transatlantic Relations? The EU Agenda and the Biden A d m i n i s t r a t i o n .” S p o n sored by Princeton University’s Liechtenstein Institute on Self Determination and European Union Program. Zoom event. Princeton.edu. 1 p.m.: Boheme Opera NJ presents “I Could Have Danced 2,000 Years,” program on how the Pygmalion legend evolved to My Fair Lady. Sponsored by Monroe Township Library. Free Zoom event. Register at monroetwplibrary.org. 1-2 p.m.: Online Lunchtime Galler y Series presented by West Windsor Arts Center: “What do Objects Tell Us About the Culture of Mesoamerica?” Free for members ; $10 non-members. Westwindsorarts.org. 4-5 p.m.: Panel discussion, “Trends in Digital H e a l t h ,” s p o n s o r e d b y Princeton Innovation Center Biolabs and the Princeton Entrepreneurship Council. Free virtual event. Princetonbiolabs.com. Thursday, April 15 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.: “Get to Know Suppers,” free webinar about the Suppers Programs, which advocate eating whole, unprocessed foods. Thesupperspro grams.org. 12 p.m.: Central NJ Women in Development hosts

“Nonprofit Tech Hacks to Increase Fundraising,” via Zoom. Panel discussion, free to members and $15 non-members. Register at widmcercer.org/events. 6 p.m.: Reading by poet Richard Blanco, co-sponsored by Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University and the Program in American Studies. Free virtual event. Arts.Princeton. edu. 7 p.m.: Virtual Walk in the Woods with Jim Amon, presented by the Sourland Conservancy. Free webinar, with suggested donation of $5. Tiny.cc/SC2021Talks. 7:30 p.m. : “Breat hing Space,” sponsored by The Jewish Center Princeton. Barbara Zera Abramson, teacher of the Feldenkrais Method of Somatic Education, leads via Zoom. To register, email info@thejewishcenter.org. Friday, April 16 10 a.m.: Women in Retirement: “Competition Cook: Kitchen Gadget Garage,” virtual program presented by Princeton Senior Resource Center. Register at princetonsenior.org. 10 :30 a.m.: “The Five Wishes : A Discussion of End-of-Life,” virtual program presented by Mercer County Library System with hospice social worker Liz Cohen. Register at mcl.org. 12 p. m . : L a w s o n W. Brigham and Tomas Ries speak, “Environmental Security Challenges and the Arctic.” Sponsored by Princeton University’s Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination. Zoom event. Princeton.edu. 12 p.m.: Goals of Care Coalition New Jersey and other organizations hold “Advance Care Planning: How to Ensure Your Wishes are Known and Honored,” a free virtual town meeting led by expert panel followed by

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Q&A. goalsofcare.org. 4:30 p.m.: Lecture, “Irish Archaeology Now,” presented by Princeton University’s Fund for Irish Studies. Free virtual event. Alan Hayden of University College, Dublin, speaks. Princeton.edu. 7:30 p.m.: Cabernet Cabaret virtual concert, presented by the Arts Council of Princeton. Sarah Donner and friends perform show tunes to benefit community programs. $25. Bit. ly/3bEcpVI. Saturday, April 17 9 and 10 a.m.: Grover Park cleanup as part of the Watershed Institute’s 15 th Annual Stream Cleanup. Volu nte e r s are n e e d e d. thewatershed.org/streamcleanups. 11 a.m.: Represent.Us New Jersey chapter Zoom m eet i ng. “B et ter B a llot NJ: Resolving to End the ‘County Line.’ With Yael Niv of Good Government Coalition of New Jersey. Register at https://bit.ly/3fGCYwH. 12-5 p.m.: Chardonnay Release Weekend at Unionville Vineyards, 9 Rocktown Road, Ringoes. Tastings by appointment. $16. Unionvillevineyards.com. 1 p.m.: Virtual program on history and culture of the Lenni-Lenape people and their descendants in New Jersey today, sponsored by the Trent House Museum. Given by the Rev. J.R. Norwood Jr., via Zoom. Williamtrenthouse.org. Sunday, April 18 12-5 p.m.: Chardonnay Release Weekend at Unionville Vineyards, 9 Rocktown Road, Ringoes. Tastings by appointment. $16. Unionvillevineyards.com. 1 p.m.: “Culinary Herbs in the Garden,” presented by The Suppers Programs. With herbalist Tish Streeten. Free webinar. Thesuppersprograms.org. 2:30 p.m.: Faculty recital from New School for Music Study. “Pictures and Poetry.” Online event with music by Debussy, Liszt, Barber, Mussorgsky, Chopin, and more. Nsmpiano.org. 3 p.m.: “T.S. Eliot & Emily Hale Letters: Re-examined.” Princeton University presents a panel discussion with experts and scholars. Library.princeton.edu. 5:30 p.m.: “An Evening of Fine Wine and Music,” pre s e nte d by P r i n ce ton Symphony Orchestra. Tenor Hak Soo Kim, assistant head sommelier at Per Se in Manhattan, in conversation with PSO Artistic Director Rossen Milanov, with operatic selections. Online event. Princetonsymphony. org. Monday, April 19 10 a.m.: “Sea Level Rise: The Science, the Impacts, and Your Role,” presented virtually by Princeton Senior Resource Center with Kelly van Baalen. Princetonsenior.org. 12 p.m.: “Mor ven Mo ments” with Kim Gallagher. Free virtual program with live Q&A. Private tour of Morven house and garden. Morven.org. 7:30 p.m.: Voices Chorale NJ presents a virtual concert and lecture with soprano Alex Meakem and baritone Michael Banks, accompanied by Akiko Hosaki. Vocal works from the 19 th and 20 th centuries. $15. Voiceschoralenj.org. 8 p.m.: Washington Crossing

Audubon Society presents “Saving the Cerulean Blue Warbler,” online event by Katie Fallon. Free. To register, email contact.wcas@gmail. com. 8 p.m.: Great Minds Salon: A Theatermaker’s Perspective: Creative Pivoting During a Pandemic. Interactive Zoom class with Broadway producer Cheryl Mintz. Register by emailing info@ thejewishcenter.org. Tuesday, April 20 5 p.m.: Spring 2021 Student Reading, presented by the Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Creative Writing at Princeton University. Free virtual event. Arts. Princeton.edu. 6 p.m.: Michael Mechanic, author of Jackpot, discusses the book at a virtual event pre s e nte d by L aby r i nt h B o ok s. L aby r i nt hb o ok s. com/events. 6:30 p.m.: Historical Fiction Book Group discusses Maggie O’Farrell’s Hamnet in a virtual session led by Larry Danson, retired Princeton University English professor. Presented virtually by the Historical Society of Princeton. Princetonhistory. org/events. 7 p.m.: Youth Orchestra of Central NJ presents a virtual Spring 2021 Master Class Performance. Up to 48 students will perform at this free event. Yocj.org. 7 p.m.: Hopewell Valley Arts Council hosts a virtual ArtConnect Forum with guest speakers Catherine Fulmer-Hogan, social justice advocate; and Barry Hantman, ceramics and jewelry artist. Hvartscouncil.org. Wednesday, April 21 8:30-9:30 a.m.: Princeton Regional Chamber presents Business Before Business Virtual Speed Networking. Princetonmercer.org. 12-1 p.m.: Signature meeting of The Suppers Program with Sarah Pipher and Kim Walter. Virtual lunch hour meeting. Free. Thesuppersprograms.org. 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meeting. Princetonlibrary. org. Thursday, April 22 10-11:30 a.m.: Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber presents “Shaping the Future vs. Grinding Through the Present,” part of Women in the Workplace. Live virtual event. $25 members; $35 non-members. Princetonmercer.org. 7 p.m.: “A World Within Worlds: The Music of Anthony Mordechai Tzvi Russell,” performance and presentation via Zoom, moderated by cultural historian Josh Kun, sponsored by The Allen and Joan Bildner Center for the Study of Jewish Life. Register at BildnerCenter.Rutgers.edu. 7:30 p.m.: “From Frozen Chosen to the Hebrew Hammer: The Inspiring Story of Israel’s Olympic Bobsled and Skeleton Team.” Virtual event presented by David Greaves and Larry Sidney, sponsored by the Jewish Center Pr inceton. Email info@thejewishcenter.org to reserve. Free and open to the community. Friday, April 23 12:30 p.m.: “Catalyzing the Billions for a Green Recovery,” free virtual webinar presented by Princeton University’s Department of the Asian Development Bank. Princeton.edu.

7 p.m.: The Marianne Solivan Quartet performs a virtual jazz concert, sponsored by Plainsboro Public Library. With vocalist Solivan, guitarist Leandro Pellegrino, bass player Steve Wood, and drummer Jay Sawyer. Plainsborolibrary. org. Saturday, April 24 10 a.m.-12 p.m.: Westrick Music Academy hosts a virtual master class with Broadway actress Eryn LeCroy. $15. Westrickmusic. org/workshops. 12-3 p.m.: Sustainable Landscaping Mini-Expo at Princeton Shopping Center. Outdoor event focused on electric lawn care equipment, organic lawn care te c h n i q u e s , a n d n a t i v e plants. Sustainableprinceton.org. Monday, April 26 Recycling 1:30 and 8 p.m.: “A Passage in Relief,” presented by the Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Theater. Free vir tual event. Ar ts. Princeton.edu. 6-7 p.m.: “Starting Your Own Vegetable Garden,” presented by The Suppers Programs. Free webinar with Anne Macaulay. Thesuppersprograms.org. Tuesday, April 27 4:30 p.m.: Concert of New Songs, presented virtually by Lewis Center for the Arts’ Princeton Atelier. Princeton University students from the course “How to Write a Song,” taught by Paul Muldoon, perform. Arts.Princeton.edu. Wednesday, April 28 1 p.m.: Boheme Opera NJ presents “Let Us Entertain You,” free Zoom event sponsored by Monroe Township Library. Selections from musicals by Jule Style including Funny Girl and Gypsy. Register at monroetwplibrary. org. 4:30 p.m.: Creative Writing Seniors Reading: Poetry, Translation, and Screenwriting. Presented by Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts. Free virtual event. Arts.princeton.edu. Thursday, April 29 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 11 a.m.: Virtual fundraiser for Princeton Public Library. Erin French, chef/author/ restaurant owner of The Lost Kitchen in Freedom, Maine, discusses her new memoir, Finding Freedom. $60. Princetonlibrary.org. 1-2 p.m.: Virtual tour of historic Princeton, presented by Eve Mandel of the Historical Society of Princeton through Mercer County Library system. Register at mcl.org. 4:30 p.m.: Creative Writing Seniors Reading: Poetry, Translation, and Screenwriting. Presented by Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts. Free virtual event. Arts.princeton.edu. 5:30 p.m.: Lecture from Princeton Universit y Ar t Museum, “Guides for the Soul: Art from China’s Warring States Period.” Free. Artmuseum.princeton.org. 6 p.m.: “Wills, Probate, and Estate Planning 2021 Update,” presented virtually by attorney Kenneth Vercammen through Mercer County Library System. Register at mcl.org. 6 p.m.: “Cooking with

CASA” virtual class to benefit Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children of Mercer and Burlington counties; with chef Ian Knauer of The Farm Cooking School. Casamercer.org. 7 p.m.: Virtual “Eyes on Eagles” panel discussion w it h fo otage of e agle s’ nests, by Mercer County Park Commission. Focused on eagle behavior, biology, and conservation. Mercercountyparks.org. Friday, April 30 7-8 p.m.: Virtual Adaptive Spring Dance Party for adults and teens, 13 and older. Hosted by DJ Redline Steven Knox, sponsored by Princeton Special Sports, Princeton Recreation Department and other agencies. Register by April 28 at pssnj.org. 7 p.m.: Saxophonist Jerry Weldon, Hammond organist Kyle Koehler, and drummer Jerome Jennings of the Jerry Weldon Trio perform a virtual jazz concert presented by Plainsboro Public Library. Plainsborolibrary. org. 7:30 p.m.: Vir tual Ar t Auction and Cinco de Mayo themed gift basket auction, fundraiser for the Robbinsville Hamilton Rotary Club Foundation. Info and free registration at www.rhrotaryorg/art auction. 7:30 p.m.: Virtual Dance Party presented by Princeton Folk Dance. Princetonfolkdance.org. 8 p.m.: Spring Dance Festival presented by Princeton University seniors from the Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Dance. Free Zoom event w ith filmed dance works. Arts.Princeton.edu. Wednesday, May 5 7-8:30 p.m.: “Going Beyond: Climate Action and Local Environmental Quality,” webinar presented by Sustainable Princeton to learn about improving local air, water, and ecosystems. Sustainableprinceton.org. Thursday, May 6 6-7 p.m.: Abbie Gardner performs via Zoom for “Save the Sourlands.” $10. Sourland.org. Monday, May 10 Recycling Thursday, May 13 9:30 -11 a.m.: “Moving Forward: Life Beyond the Pandemic,” presented by Princeton Mercer Regional chamber as part of the Virtual Regional Healthcare Symposium. Keynote speaker is Dr. Brian McDonough, medical editor for K Y W newsradio 1060. Princetonmercer.org. Saturday, May 15 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Trenton Punk Rock Flea Market, Cure Insurance Arena Parking Lot, Trenton. $7. @TrentonPRFM on Instagram. Sunday, May 16 2 p.m.: Chef Walter Staib gives a virtual presentation, “A Taste of History,” sponsored by the Trent House Association. $10 for members ; $15 non-members. https://bit.ly/3mCAOzL. Wednesday, May 19 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meeting. Princetonlibrary. org. Friday, May 21 7:15-9 p.m.: West Windsor Arts Council opening reception for the 2021 Faculty/Student Show. Virtual event. Westwindsorarts.org.


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July 19-23 7-14 Years Old - Girls 9am-12pm 7-14 Years Old - Boys 12:30-3:30pm $200 ($150 members)

August 9-13 7-14 Years Old - Boys 9am-12p 7-14 Years Old - Girls 12:30-3:30pm $200 ($150 members)

August 2-6 7-14 Years Old - Co-ed 9am-3pm $350 ($275 members)

Players will be organized into groups based on age and ability.

Conveniently located off Rt. 130 and I-295 113 North Gold Drive, Robbinsville, NJ 08691 Visit our web site to register: www.idhoops.com/camp (609) 223-0583 • mail@idhoops.com COVID Policy – We have a written COVID policy available on our web site. We comply with the latest guidance from the state and the county and have extensive COVID protocols in place in order to ensure the safety of our visitors, members and staff.

variety of agility equipment including resistance bands, a jump box, medicine balls, hurdles, and more. A player can complete a full-body workout in 10 to 15 minutes. Personalized Program “There is no faster way to improve your game than private skills training,” points out Ben Stirt. “Each session lasts 45 minutes and is packed with specific drills to fit each athlete’s individual needs. After a skill evaluation, a personalized program will be created to improve weaknesses and build on strengths. Parents and athletes may also request to focus on certain skills, and the program will be tailored to your needs in each area.” “Taking a similar approach to private skills training, small group training places three to five athletes of the same skill level together,” adds Kron. “Individual skills are still the main focus, but a small group allows for competitive drills and game situations. For example, the pick and roll, high-low situations, and many other game skills can be honed in this setting. Athletes can sign up as a group or be placed by our staff based on age and skill level.” Clinics offer training in a larger group setting in which players are able to learn and test out new skills in a challenging, yet fun environment. Although clinics provide training in larger groups, individualized skill coaching is still the number one priority. This is an excellent way for beginners to become acclimated to the game or for advanced players to simulate challenging scenarios that they may face in games or practice. The clinics keep a low player to coach ratio to ensure that everyone receives proper feedback to maximize their learning experience. “We have three trainers, two male and one female,” reports Kron, “Our training staff is so special. They understand that each individual has different ways of learning, and they are adept at teaching all levels of ability, from beginners to high school and college players.” “Our trainers are fostering the players’ passion for the game,” points out Stirt. “We help them find a level of challenge where they feel they are accomplishing something, and that builds confidence. Then, they are encouraged to come and practice on their own what they have learned with the trainers.” “Typically, players come once a week or every other week for sessions with a trainer, and then come in to practice in between. Some come every day, others a few times a week.” Dream Come True He adds that during COVID, every sanitary precaution is in place. “We are very careful about this; masks are required, temperatures are taken, and everyone washes their hands when they come in. Everything is sanitized. We really have our facility as safe as it can possibly be. We even wash the balls!” “This is so important,” he emphasizes. “Part of what is so necessary for our players is consistency. And we strive to have a place for them to come regularly and know it is safe. Our main goal is for anyone who is interested in

WHAT A SHOT: This high school student and member of Inner Drive Hoops basketball center is practicing shooting at the special training facility. “He is using one of our technology-enhanced shooting stations to practice, where he took 350 shots during the workout,” explains CEO Rob Kron, one of the founders and owners of the center. “Our approach to skills training is process-based workouts that produce optimum results. We want players to focus on the present in order to get everything they can out of each session. Our cutting-edge technology gives players the ability to see improvement in real time.” basketball to be able to get into it at any level and be able to reach their potential. I have worked so hard to teach kids, and now having a place for them to come and practice whenever they want to has been a dream come true.” “We have been very encouraged,” he continues. “Even during COVID, we have been very successful. We have had many people sign up, renew, and continue to come. We have clients from Princeton and the area — it’s an easy drive from Princeton — and they are very enthusiastic. We hear from the players and parents who tell us how happy they are to be able to come here. Parents are proud when their son or daughter makes the team, and they begin to see improvement in their kids’ skills, and just how much they enjoy our program.” And Kron expresses pride in their players achievements as many have recently been recognized for accomplishments this past season. “The coaches in the Colonial Valley Conference ( CVC ) voted following the high school season, and multiple ID Hoops members were selected to both the boys and girls All-Conference teams, including the Girls CVC Player of the Year. Also, one of Coach Ben’s training clients was the leading scorer in the entire state of New Jersey this year, averaging over 29 points per game, including 43 points on his senior night.” Character Development Such recognition is important, of course, but the focus at ID Hoops is helping players to reach their own potential and to be the best they can be personally. “We want to watch players grow in skills and confidence, and take what they learn at the facility and apply it to their school and throughout their lives,” explains Stirt. ”The skills they learn here — discipline, dedication, motivation, and character development — go beyond the court. Sports build character.” And it can begin at the earliest ages, notes Kron. “The development we see can be at any age. For example, someone 8 years old

can be at a high skill level, and a 14-year-old may be just be starting out. The program is directed specifically for each individual and his or her ability and progress. It’s the passion, the love of the game, and what it can lead to. “The combination of being able to be the best they can be, while fostering a love for the game, and offering a safe, technology-enhanced practice environment is what differentiates us from anything else in the area. We do believe we are the only place in the tri-state area with our model. “We are also offering a summer camp program from June 28 through August 13. Sessions will include instruction on shooting, ball-handling, attacking the hoop, getting open, passing, defensive positioning, basketball IQ, and agility/jumping. “It is available for those 7 years old through 14. Players will be organized into groups based on age and ability. Both full day and half day sessions for weekly programs are available. Registration is via our website at idhoops.com/camp.” Year-Round The year-round program offers membership discounts on private training packages for five sessions and 10 sessions, or separate payments for one session. A 45-minute introductory training/evaluation session is also offered for $40. Kron and Stirt look forward to introducing more people of all ages to their unique training program and state-of-the-art facility. Their own love of the game is contagious, and they emphasize the focus on each individual’s stage of ability and wish to succeed. “Whatever works for your needs and what you want to accomplish, we have a solution for you!” nner Drive Hoops is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Tuesday and Thursday 3 to 8 p.m.; and Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. For further information, call (609) 223-0583 or visit the website at idhoops.com. —Jean Stratton

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21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 2021

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PU Wrestler Merkin Competes at Olympic Trials, Gaining Lessons That Will Fuel Bid for 2024 Games

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enny Merkin culminated a rocky year by making his debut at the United States Olympic Trials in Greco Roman style wrestling. The Princeton University senior was disappointed with an early exit after two matches at the Trials on April 2 held in Fort Worth, Texas, but is using it to fuel his desire to go for a spot in the next Olympics. “Now that I got my foot in the door, I’m really optimistic about 2024,” said Merkin. “I’ve seen the stage. I’ve competed with the best guys in the weight class. The guy who’s on the Olympic team, I had a really close match with the last time I wrestled him. He’s beaten me every time, but I think I’m finally starting to understand how to wrestle Greco on the senior level. Now is the perfect time for me to start working on the things that I’m missing. I think not qualifying is going to be my driving force for the following Olympics.” Merkin is the only Tiger wrestler to qualify for this year’s Trials. Princeton University assistant coach Nate Jackson also qualified and competed at the Trials in Fort Worth, Texas, without winning an Olympic berth. “It’s an important step in our process,” said Princeton University wrestling head coach Chris Ayres. “It affirmed to me more than ever we need to get an Olympic gold medal to Princeton. That’s my goal. To have this step where we had two guys at the Trials, it made me more motivated to say we can do this thing.” Merkin lost in his first match at the Olympic Trials to Benji Peak, 9-0. He returned to fall to Calvin Germinaro in the consolation round, 12-4. “I would say I was super relaxed and super comfortable, until I stepped out right near where the mats were set up,” said Merkin. “And when I stepped on the mat, I still felt ready and not much changed in my mindset, but I think unconsciously my body, it didn’t shut down, but it just didn’t want to do anything. Normally, the way I wrestled at the Last Chance Qualifier, I was super active and super aggressive. This time I was absorbing everything, whether it was the energy from the crowd or I was absorbing my opponent pushing into me, I wasn’t the one performing anything. I wasn’t putting any pressure on my opponents, I was just absorbing what they were giving me. That was my biggest takeaway.” Only one week earlier, Merkin came up big as he won his event at the Last Chance Qualifier held at Fort Worth, Texas. Unseeded, Merkin went through four wrestlers, including stopping the top seed Hayden Tuma in the quarterfinals and beating second-seeded Peak by injury default in the final with Merkin already leading 6-2. It was an achievement that he hadn’t been sure

would be possible earlier in the year. “For some reason I was convinced when COVID hit, we weren’t going to have an Olympics, we weren’t going to have Olympic Trials, everything was done,” said Merkin. “I was in that mindset when we got hit. Even three weeks before leading up to the Trials, I had some injuries and I had a lot of things going on with school and being able to figure out if I was going to graduate and trying to fix my body. I was on the fence. I didn’t know if I was going to go. Then I had a conversation with a couple other wrestlers that were set to compete. They were from Ivies as well and had a lot of work and had similar problems that I did. They said, it’s once every four years, give it a shot. After I had that conversation, it kind of brought me back. It snapped me out of the funk I was in.” Training looked nothing like it had in the past. The instability wrought by the pandemic added hurdles to every step. Merkin was wrestling well in the fall when the Ivy League announced there would be no intercollegiate competition, which forced him to continue to train on his own. “I really haven’t had a stable place to train,” said Merkin. “I’m sure everyone else on the national team, they also are struggling. Every week, I felt I had to find some new place to train and some place that didn’t have as many restrictions which were pretty tough. There were a lot of those kinds of challenges.” Without college wrestling, Merkin could focus on Greco Roman style, which differs from college freestyle wrestling in that wrestlers cannot use any holds below the waist in Greco Roman. Merkin trained in a number of locations in New York state while living in his Brooklyn, New York, home and working toward finishing his senior thesis. Remaining virtual for schooling allowed him to travel to train. “Normally whenever I’m back home, there’s always a place to train,” said Merkin. “I’ve been fortunate enough to be invited out to places in upstate near Albany and near Ithaca, where they have good Greco programs established. I was able to volunteer coach and also train myself which was really great. When I was around the Princeton area, it was pretty tough, especially with all mandatory testing and all the other policies that they’ve put in place in the Princeton area.” Merkin had the support of his Princeton teammates and coaches, although it wasn’t the same as being on campus in a school year. “In a way, it would have been better to be around my friends and teammates,” said Merkin. “From a maturity standpoint, I think this independent year was kind of good in that aspect. Coming off the gap year, I took last year,

I got a taste of what making your own schedule looks like and finding training looks like and all those other things that you don’t necessarily learn when you’re a part of a structured team environment. I was able to put that to use once we got news that we weren’t going to have a season. It was really helpful.” He and Jackson, along with former Princeton wrestler Matthew Kolodzik, competed at the Last Chance Qualifier after working through the ups and downs of the previous year. The finality of that tournament makes it especially pressure packed. In addition, as coach Ayres noted, the wrestlers faced challenges in formulating a training regimen due to COVID restrictions. “You have to find a way to win,” said Ayres. “This was the total test of that. It was piecing things together — workout partners, where we’re going to train, if we could be involved as college coaches. It was really challenging. I think we did the best that could possibly be done given the circumstances. We had a few guys do pretty good. In retrospect I don’t think we could do anything better. Moving forward, we’re still in this weird situation so you try to piece things together and get guys the best training that they can get.” Ayres is looking forward to the chance to welcome all of his Princeton wrestlers back on campus for a season. It’s something that he missed mightily during this year when many national schools did hold seasons. “What’s going to happen that’s beautiful is when we get back to Princeton and back to routine and having our facilities, we’re going have more gratitude,” said Ayres. “I can’t wait for the day when we walk in that room and it’s a full room and I have my team there and we can just train. It’s going to make us better. We had to go through these tough situations.” Merkin’s immediate steps are more grounded in the academic side of things. He

TRIAL BY FIRE: Princeton University wrestler Lenny Merkin gets pumped up with Sebby the Sloth, a mascot that he created, in the Utah Salt Flats. Earlier this month, Merkin competed in the U.S. Olympic Trials in Fort Worth, Texas, in the 67-kilogram Greco-Roman event. Senior Merkin fell 9-0 to Benjamin Peak in the first round and then lost 12-4 to Calvin Germinaro in a consolation match in his debut appearance at the event. (Photo provided courtesy of provided by Lenny Merkin) is focusing on finishing his thesis. The civil engineering major is researching how choosing to live in a tiny home and reducing carbon emissions affects one’s mental well-being. Beyond graduation, he is focused on several possible pathways, including the chance to return to college in a graduate program. “I don’t know what that will yield in terms of the wrestling aspect of things,” said Merkin. “It’s a good thing to have in your back pocket. Army is on my mind. There’s potential to wrestle at other regional training centers depending on who reaches out and who I can reach out to. There’s options on the table. It’s about making the right call when the time comes, but right now the main focus is finishing school.” Another potential option for Merkin would be to take advantage of the Ivy League’s waiver for graduate students to compete next year. He lists that is a very small possibility. “I still have some form of spark left in me for collegiate,” said Merkin. “I love the sport regardless of the style. I have to see how it aligns with Greco training. That’s probably going to be my main focus going forward.” Merkin remains dedicated

to growing the sport of wrestling. In the midst of his Trials training, he had the opportunity to coach during his travels. He worked with kids as young as three to adults older than him and shared his passion for Greco Roman style wrestling with them. “My favorite is working with older middle school and younger high school kids just because they’ve had a little experience but they haven’t quite had their Greco minds developed yet,” Merkin said. “They’re coming from a folkstyle background. The club I was training at tries to use Greco as another tool to have in your folkstyle bag of tricks, and from there maybe kids transition to full-time Greco and full-time freestyle. That was my experience. I loved it. Coaching is a huge passion of mine. Especially for the people who want to be coached. That’s really important.” He travels with a mascot he created, Sebby the Sloth, a tool he came up with to introduce young wrestlers to the sport. Merkin got his own start in Greco Roman wrestling at four years old with a gifted coach from the Soviet Union. He picked up the Greco basics early, then in middle school began to focus more on them under Belarus product Dmitriy Landa. “Just from the constant learning of new things of

what my body can do and what new techniques could be effective, I started falling in love with the sport and the culture,” said Merkin. “Also I’m a big fan of underdogs and underrepresented things. Greco Roman and women’s wrestling are on the rise. I think they need help to take off. They need something to give them a push. I want to be able to say I took part in that.” Coaching is one way he can share his love of the sport and share his experiences. He has grown increasingly devoted to the sport that has carried him all the way to the Olympic Trials, an important step as he eyes his goal of an Olympic team berth. “I did feel like I belonged there,” Merkin said. “Unfortunately at the Trials I didn’t really get to show it. I didn’t feel like I wrestled like myself, or wrestled at all. I just kind of stepped out on the mat and was trying to absorb everything. I was trying to absorb the experience. That was one of the biggest flaws I had at the Trials. It was a big deal, it was a big deal for the program at Princeton. Coach Jackson and I were the only two people who qualified. It felt pretty special, but I wanted to do more.” —Justin Feil


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 2021 • 22

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PHS Star Ayres Wins 3rd Girls’ State Wrestling Title, Cementing Status as Her Sport’s Legendary Trailblazer Due to COVID-19 concerns, some key changes were made to the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) girls’ state wrestling championships this year. The finals were switched to April from March and the site of the event was moved to Phillipsburg High from Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City. But in the third year of the competition of the event, one thing remained constant — Princeton High star Chloe Ayres emerged as a state champ. The senior standout earned her third straight state title, prevailing at 114 pounds. Capping her PHS career, Ayres dominated the competition last Saturday, pinning Emily Popek of Kittatinny in the quarterfinal round at 3:13 of the bout, pinning Gianna DeDreaux of Brick Township in the semis at 2:00, and then pinning Riley Lerner of Cedar Creek at 4:40 of the final. “I went out and accomplished what I wanted to accomplish; I hope it was fun to watch, I wanted to put on a show,” said Ayres afterward as quoted on the NJ.com website. “I’m really happy with my performance. I’m so proud to say I competed in the first three women’s state championships and to see how far it’s come is just phenomenal. It’s been such a journey to get here. When I went to high school, I didn’t even know if I would get to compete in a state tournament. My goal this year was to win every match

gotten more mature,” added Monzo. “Her understanding of positioning and understanding of how to score and where to score and sometimes getting out of that mentality that I have to do it this way. She knows there’s more than one way to get a takedown, or get a score.” In addition to Ayres, PHS sophomore Ava Rose made the states, falling in the quarterfinal round at 107 pounds, getting pinned by Lililiana Zaku-Ramos of Kittatinny. “It’s tough; we have to find someone for Ava now,” said Monzo. “Without having a second girl in the room, we don’t want her to be the only one. With Chloe in the room we had two girls. They were able to go places together and feed off each other. Now it’s going to be a little bit taller of a task to find someone else.” But Monzo knows it will be hard to ever find someone else quite like the legendary Ayres. “She’s always going to have a huge impact,” said Monzo. “We’re hoping that younger girls can see that name and say, ‘I want to be that next Chloe Ayres.’ Ava is seeing that and wants to do that as well. She’s a two-time state place-winner too. She can do exactly what Chloe has done. She can move forward. We were in that position last year. This year, she came up a little shorter, but she bumped up a weight class.” —Bill Alden Justin Feil

with bonus points and to get a pin in my last-ever high school match was a good thing to do.” Ayres’ father, Princeton University wrestling head coach Chris Ayres, certainly enjoyed the show put on by his daughter and the other competitors. “What I loved about it was the wrestling was so much better,” said Ayres, who will get to help his daughter continue to get better on the mat as she will be attending Princeton this fall and is looking to help establish a women’s wrestling club at the school. “It has grown so much from that first year three years ago. The level has grown so much. I wish there were people there to experience it.” PHS head coach Jess Monzo credited Ayres with gaining important experience since last season to refine her skills on the mat. “She put the time in during the last year,” said Monzo of Ayres, who went 26-0 in girls’ competition during her PHS career and has also competed against boys for the Tigers. “She traveled to get matches and she made it a point to seek out the best competition across the country knowing at the next level, she’ll see some of those girls later on. It tested her to let her know where she’s at and what she needed to work on and improve on.” Undergoing those tests helped Ayres dominate last weekend. “She’s definitely

2021 Back, and stronger than ever…. # PRINCETONSTRONG edition The quintessential guide to America’s most prestigious backyard

PUBLISHES THIS MAY TRIPLE CROWN: Princeton High wrestler Chloe Ayres, top, battles a foe in a 2018 bout. Last Saturday, senior standout Ayres took first at 114 pounds at the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) girls’ state wrestling championships. It was the third straight state crown for Ayres at the competition, which started in 2019. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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With the Princeton High baseball team featuring a stellar group of 11 juniors, Dom Capuano is primed to mix and match his players in order to grind out wins this spring. “The pieces are there to be that grindy team that just works opponents to death,” said PHS head coach Capuano. “I really think we can wear teams down offensively and defensively. It is just committing to it and understanding that we just need to be ourselves and play within ourselves. It is don’t get out of the comfort zone, don’t get too high, don’t get too low. Stay the course the entire game.” A big piece on the mound for PHS this spring will be senior Tommy Delany. “Tommy is going to pitch at Penn, we are going to rely on him a lot,” said Capuano. “He is the hardest thrower on our team and he is in the upper tier of the CVC (Colonial Valley Conference) when it comes to velocity. He has got a good slider, a good changeup, and he understands pitching.” The Tiger mound corps will also include junior Jaxon Petrone, junior Kenny Schiavone, sophomore Jon Tao, junior Palmer Maurer, junior Connor McDowell, junior James Petrone, and sophomore Wes Price. “Tommy is going to be the ace and then after that we are going to figure out who is going to start week one,” said Capuano, whose team starts its 2021 campaign by playing at Hopewell Valley on April 20. “It is going to be the hot hand until somebody rises to

the occasion.” Capuano is counting on junior Jensen Bergmen, senior Flynn Kinney, Schiavone, Jaxon Petrone, junior Carl Birge, Delany, junior Drew Petrone, and junior Aiden Castillo to spark the team’s batting attack. “We are not the team that is going to hit six doubles in a game,” said Capuano. “We are going to need to hit singles, get a timely double and then use our speed on the bases to steal, to hit and run, and to make things happen.” Junior star Birge will be keying the defense from the vital catcher spot. “For my money, Carl is the best defensive catcher in the CVC,” asserted Capuano. “He can block everything, he has a great arm, and he knows what he is doing. He was our starting catcher as a freshman and even with no season last year, he is just so much more refined. He brings the sense of confidence that pitchers need. With his ability, they are going to be comfortable throwing to him. He can command the field and can see what is going on and tell everyone where to be. He has the intangibles on top of his physical abilities.” Along the infield, Drew Petrone, Kinney, and Delany will rotate between second base, shortstop and third w ith Jaxon Petrone and Schiavone seeing time at first. “They are interchangeable between all three positions,” said Capuano of Petrone, Kinney, and Delany. “Then we have guys like Maurer and Peter Hare who can play third and maybe a

little second.” The outfield will feature B ergmen in center w it h Schiavone, Castillo, senior Andrew L amber t, James Petrone, Tao, and McDowell getting time in the corner spots. In figuring out the defensive alignment, Capuano noted that batting production will play a key role in his decision process. “From my perspective — and I always say this to kids — if you are hitting, you are going to find a spot in the field,” said Capuano. “These people can all play the field. If one person is hitting, we are going to find him a spot.” In Capuano’s view, the Tigers can play very well this spring if they keep the focus on just being themselves. “I think the biggest key to success is understanding who we are; in baseball sometimes people don’t understand who they are,” said Capuano. “We are not a team that is going to hit doubles off the fence, we are a team that is going to need to hit singles to certain spots. We are going to need to bunt, we are going to need to hit and run. We are going to need to do what we can do best. On the mound, outside of Tommy, nobody is really going to overpower anybody so we have got to understand who we are as pitchers. We need to move the ball in and out, we need to throw strikes, we need to force them to put the ball on play and trust our defense. If we can do that, I really think we can have some success.” —Bill Alden

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 2021

Featuring a Stellar Contingent of 11 Juniors, PHS Baseball Looking to Wear Down Foes

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SWING TIME: Princeton High baseball player Connor McDowell takes a cut last summer in the “Last Dance Word Series” statewide New Jersey high school baseball tournament. McDowell is part of a strong junior class that will be leading PHS this spring. The Tigers start their 2021 campaign by playing at Hopewell Valley on April 20. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 2021 • 24

With Emotions Running High As it Returns to Field, PDS Boys’ Lax Fired Up For Big 2021 Campaign While the Princeton Day School boys’ lacrosse team doesn’t boast strength in numbers in terms of a large roster, it is bringing a lot of emotion into the 2021 season. “The consistent feeling across the board is that we are happy to be together,” said PDS head coach Joe Moore, reflecting on the mood around the squad as it returns to the field after the 2020 season was canceled due to the pandemic.

“We have a pretty strong senior class that was really disappointed last year. Seeing what the seniors went through last year has definitely lit a fire under us but also has made us really just appreciate being back together. From a performance standpoint, we have some holes to fill so we are just trying to learn as much about one another as quickly as we can here.” The heartbreak triggered by t he passing away of

beloved longtime coach Pete Higgins last June at age 57 is adding more fire to the Panthers on a daily basis. “His loss is still fresh in the PDS community and for all of the kids that are in our program right now,” said Moore. “We are playing with him on our hearts. We will be doing some things to recognize him with the shooting shirt under our jerseys and stickers on our helmets.”

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The Panthers boast some strong shooters on attack in senior Xander Gardner, freshman Sebastian Rzeczycki, and sophomore Harry Bernardi. “We are going to look at Xander to lead us down there; he is a senior attack man and two years back he got some time,” said Moore, who guided the Panthers to their fourth straight Mercer County Tournament title in 2019 to cap his debut campaign guiding the program. “We are always pretty light at PDS in terms of depth. We are playing with a few different guys on offense. We will probably be rotating guys like Sebastian, he has a really good body and is talented in terms of playing up top and going behind the net. He will be playing with Xander a lot. The third spot will probably be rotating with Harry and a couple of other guys as well. We are still feeling it out.” A pair of seniors, Trevor Kunkle and Drew McConaughy along with freshmen Logan Herrmann and Charlie Hogshire, will be carrying the load in the middle of the field. “We will be looking at Trevor to lead us in the midfield,” said Moore. “Drew will be in the mix. We also have Logan who has been looking really strong in practice. He is definitely going to be a two-way middie for us. Charlie has phenomenal stick skills and lacrosse IQ. We will be playing with him up top and behind.” On the back line, senior

Gibson Linnehan brings experience and skill. “The defense will definitely be led by Gibby, he is just such a good overall player,” said Moore, noting that Linnehan has committed to attend Providence College and play for its Division I men’s lax program. “His biggest contribution to the team is his off-field contribution as a leader. From an on-field standpoint, what is so special about Gibson is that he is such a good one-on-one defender. Not only can he get the ball on the ground, he is really good at picking it up and pushing transition and making good decisions. He is going to be our go-to, similar to Coby Auslander a couple of years ago. We will look to him to do three or four different things.” Seeing time along with Linnehan on defense will be senior Alex Darenkov, senior Aidan McChesney, and sophomore Nick Somogyi. “We will have Alex as a close defenseman; he is a big body and a good oneon-one guy,” said Moore. “Aidan has made a ton of progress; he is going to be on close for us and is doing a lot for us. We do have strong short-stick middies as well. Nick is a great athlete he will be a short stick defender for us that we will be looking to get a lot of game time.” A f te r w a i t i n g fo r h i s chance to start, senior Eric Gellasch is primed for a big final campaign. “We have a strong goalie with Eric in goal, he hasn’t

had a ton of game experience but he is a strong player,” said Moore. “He is going to play next year at Clarkson. He is a legit goaltender who will do well for us.” In Moore’s view, PDS will need to play a deliberate, disciplined style in order to produce a successful spring. “We are already talking about ways that we want games to go in terms of flow,” said Moore. “We definitely want to rely on our defense to cause turnovers and then get the ball down to the offense and take the air out of the ball and just crush as much clock as we can just because we don’t have a ton of depth. That is our identity here year in, year out. I think we are going to be stronger on the defensive side of the ball. We will rely on our seniors across the board to make the right decisions in games and see if we can squeeze out some wins.” Opening the 2021 campaign by hosting the Hun School on April 15 and then playing at Springside Chestnut Hill (Pa.) two days later, the Panthers face two strong tests. “We have Hun and Springside, those are two challenging games,” said Moore. “I look at it as a win-win because if we win, we are getting off to a really, really strong start. If we lose, we are going to walk away with a ton of things that we are working on and can learn from so that will just make us better.” —Bill Alden

Saturday, April 24, 10am-12: Annual Storm Clean-up at Colonial Lake. Coordinated by Public Works and The Watershed Institute. Great family even. Wear Masks. Enjoy Lawrence Townships only lake. Love Your Park - encouraging everyone to walk or bike. Join our scavenger hunt. Fine 10 locations throughout Lawrence parks and take pictures. Submit your photos to Lawrence Sustainable website or twitter account. Pick up free “Greening To-Go Kits” at Terhune Orchards in Lawrence or in Hopewell at their 3 parks. This FREE bag will have resources on how to become a more sustainable household. Sunday, April 25, 3pm: Climate Change and Energy with Katherine Biggens, Chair of Climate Change Conversations. Learn about the science of Climate Change. 4pm: Susan Hockaday, Local Artist will show another way of seeing the impact of Climate Change. 5pm: KerriAnn Lomardi with Michele Calabrese will present NJ Clean Energy Plan incentives which help us reduce our energy and carbon footprint. Monday, April 26, 7pm: Journey Toward Zero Waste Assess the waste that your family generates and then find ways to reduce that waste with lots of tips from the Hopewell Valley Green Team and the West Windsor Green Team. Tuesday, April 27, 7pm: Clean Transportation. Join a panel discussion on Clean Transportation in the Capital City hosted by Trenton’s Green Team. Learn about the EV car share initiative, bike projects, and other transitoriented development plans. April 28, 7pm is Water Wednesday! Learn why Mercer County is experiencing more flooding and what that means for our water quality. Attend a program hosted by the Friends of Colonial Lake and The Watershed Institute. Thursday, April 29, 7pm: Green Infrastructure Resources. Kory Kreiseder, the Stormwater Specialist at The Watershed Institute, will talk about how we can use trees, plants and soil to capture and clean the polluted stormwater runoff. Friday, April 30 (2 zoom sessions) 2:30pm: Spotted Lanternfly - Learn what to do - with Jillian Stark, land steward, Mercer County Parks. 6:30 pm: Trees are Terrific, especially great program for kids, with Christy Athmejvar, Park Naturalist, Mercer County Parks. Check website for tree planting locations and times.

STICKING WITH IT: Princeton Day School boys’ lacrosse player Drew McConaughy controls the ball in a 2019 game. Senior McConaughy is looking to have a big final campaign for PDS. The Panthers open their 2021 campaign by hosting the Hun School on April 15. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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After dealing with the disappointment of having the 2020 season canceled due to the pandemic, it didn’t take long this spring for Jill Thomas to get fired up about her Princeton Day School girls’ lacrosse team. “It h as b e e n g r e at, I couldn’t even tell you how much, walking up that hill the first time to the field was wonderful,” said PDS head coach Thomas. “There is an amazing vibe out there, it is all about opportunity. I guess when something is taken away from you and you get it back, it is amazing. That is how the girls feel and how Tracy [assistant coach Tracy Young] and I feel. We haven’t had that vibe in a long, long time.” The squad’s veterans have played a big role in creating that positive vibe. “We are loaded at the top, we have eight seniors,” said Thomas, whose Class of 2021 includes Vanessa Devin, Anna Ellwood, Alex Hollander, Ella McIntyre, Caroline Topping, Hailey Wexler, Rachel Richter, and Jordan Young. “We have a ton of juniors too and we have some newcomers that are going to

wow people for the next four years. We have got good leadership all the way around and just a wonderful bond.” The Panthers boast some very good offensive firepower with such skilled performers as junior Elle Anhut, senior Young, freshman Tessa Caputo, sophomore Sophie Jaf fe, sophomore Paige Gardner, and junior Maggie Zarish-Yasunas “You have got Elle, you have got Young on offense,” said Thomas, who got two goals and an assist from Anhut and three assists from Young as PDS defeated the Penning ton School 14 - 6 last Monday in its season opener. “You are going to be hearing a lot from Tessa (3 goals against Pennington ) and Sophie (3 goals and 1 assist). Paige (3 goals and 2 assists) will also be in the offense. There is a lot of overlap; Maggie (1 goal, 1 assist) will be on attack or the midfield.” A trio of seniors — Hollander, McIntyre, and Topping — along with junior standout Ali Surace, will be spearheading the Panther defensive unit. “Eve r y t h i n g s t a r t s on

defense for me,” said Thomas. “We have Alex, Ella, and Caroline. Ali will be on midfield defense. The ball comes out and then you just run it. We have got speed, we have got depth. It is very exciting.” The last line of defense for PDS is in the capable hands of senior star Wexler, who had 13 saves in the win over Pennington. “Hailey is committed to The College of New Jersey, she plays hockey but this is her forte,” said Thomas, whos e backup goalie is sophomore Arden Bogle. Thomas is excited to have the state Prep B tourney to shoot for later in the spring. “If you are just playing games, it is getting that extra level of competition,” said Thomas. “Once you are playing for something, it changes things.” In order to play their best, the Panthers will need to maintain that upbeat approach. “I think this vibe has to continue,” said Thomas, whose team plays at Pingry School on April 14 and at Stuart Country Day on April 20. “You can’t get to game day and forget all of these things — the appreciation for being back out there and the chemistry.” —Bill Alden

Sophomore Attacker O’Brien Comes Out Firing As Hun Girls’ Lax Produces Promising 1-1 Start

Abby O’Brien came out firing as the Hun School girls’ lacrosse team hosted Blair Academy last Friday afternoon. Sophomore attacker O’Brien tallied three goals in the first eight minutes of the contest to help Hun jump out to a 3-1 lead. “I was very excited; I think it is all about the timing and noticing when you have that opportunity to take the shot,” said O’Brien in assessing her hot start. Having transferred to Hun from Montgomer y High, where she never got to see the field last spring as the season was canceled due to the pandemic, O’Brien is making up for lost time. “This is my first year of playing high school, it is my second game,” said O’Brien, who tallied four goals in her debut as Hun defeated Peddie 12-6 in its season opener on April 6. “It is just so fun being out here with my teammates. The athletic office and the administration worked so hard for us to be able to get out here.” Against Blair, Hun worked hard, leading 6-4 and then trailing 7-6 at halftime before the Buccaneers pulled away to a 14-10 win. “I think there are some adjustments that we need to make on both sides,” said O’Brien, reflecting on the setback. “We definitely fought until the end, we will be excited to get back into practice.” O’Brien has adjusted well in making the move to Hun. “I have a lot of family that came here, my dad came here,” said O’Brien. “It is such a great community.” W h i le t r a i n i ng d u r i ng the pandemic wasn’t great, O’Brien was still able to hone her game. “It was just getting outside and practicing my skills so I could come out here and be as sharp as I can,” said O’Brien. In addition to bringing offensive skills to the table for the Raiders, O’Brien is looking to take a bigger leadership role for the squad. “I just want to lead this team to be the very best it can be,” said O’Brien. “Wherever they need me, YOUNG AT HEART: Princeton Day School girls’ lacrosse player Jordan Young looks to pass the I will go and do my best to ball in a 2019 game. Last Monday, senior Young contributed three assists as PDS defeated the get the team excited. ” Pennington School 14-6 in its season opener. In upcoming action, the Panthers play at Pingry Hun head coach Kathleen School on April 14 and at Stuart Country Day on April 20. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) Jaeger believes that O’Brien is making a key impact for the team. Bare Windows??!! “A b b y r e a l l y s te p p e d up on our attack and as a sophomore she is learning to become more of a verbal leader as well,” said Jaeger, who is in her first season at the helm of the program. “I am excited to see that come out this season.” Jaeger was excited by her team’s fast star t against Blair. “We had really nice energy, we were working as a team,” said Jaeger. “We were seeing all of our options in transition, on the attacking end and really connecting on defense.” In reflecting on the loss, Jaeger acknowledged that her squad needs to work better together. “There were a lot of ad195 Nassau Street, Suite 25, Princeton NJ 08542 justments that needed to be made,” said Jaeger, whose 609.977.5872 • www.fredahoward.design

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team plays at the Pennington School on April 14 and then has a rematch at the Blair Academy on April 17. “Early in the season, a lot of new things are happening. We are trying out a lot of new things. I am excited for this week of practice and to be able to see them again in eight days. Blair had a really nice fast transition, especially off the draw, so it is learning to adjust to that and making sure that we have players in the place they need to be.” Freshman Ava Olender got herself in the right place, tallying two goals for the Raiders. “Ava came ready to work today, she is a worker for us,” said Jaeger, who also got goals from Priscilla Stelmach and Olivia Kim against Blair. “I think even the girls who didn’t get goals today played supporting roles that helped Ava and Abby to step up and get those goals today.” W hile Hun made some miscues along the way, the effort was there to the final horn. “At different parts of the game, everyone excelled in certain aspects,” said Jaeger. “Ever yone makes m is -

takes. My big slogan is I know you are going to make a mistake, what I care about is how you make up for it; how you make up for your own and how you make up for your teammates’ mistakes. That is what I was really proud of today — how they were working hard the entire game down to that last minute.” Looking ahead, Jaeger wants her players to pick up the pace and take better care of the ball. “I think as a full team unit, we need to work on the fast transition and adjusting to that,” said Jaeger. “Overall it is just making sure that we are using all of our strengths to our advantage, making up for loose balls, ground balls, and mistakes and really coming together on that aspect.” O’Br ien, for her par t, is confident that Hun will come together as the spring unfolds. “We just need to keep striving for our goals,” said O’Brien. “Our goal is to win as a team and we are still going hard for that. We will learn from this loss, move forward, and make adjustments. We have a lot of games ahead of us and just to be able to get out and improve each game is such a great opportunity.” —Bill Alden

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 2021

Rolling Past Pennington 14-6 in Season Opener, PDS Girls’ Lax Displays Firepower, Positive Vibe

ABBY ROAD: Hun School girls’ lacrosse player Abby O’Brien, right, heads upfield last Friday against a Blair Academy defender. Freshman attacker O’Brien tallied six goals in the contest but it wasn’t enough as the Raiders fell 14-10. In upcoming action, Hun, who moved to 1-1 with the defeat, plays at the Pennington School on April 14 and at the Blair Academy on April 17. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 2021 • 26

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Baseball: Catcher Jack Moses starred in a losing cause as Lawrenceville fell 2-0 to Trinity-Pawling (N.Y.) last Saturday. Sophomore Moses got a hit and threw out two base runners as the Big Red moved to 1-2. In upcoming action, Lawrenceville plays at the Hun School on April 15. Sof tball : Emma Fleming and Mia Bocian each pounded out three hits as Lawrenceville defeated the Kent School (Conn.) 5-3 last Wednesday. The Big Red, now 2-0, play at Hun on April 15, host Penn Charter (Pa.) on April 17, and then play at Blair Academy on April 19.

B oys’ L acrosse : Former Princeton High standout Jay Jackson and Jabril Belle-Walker each tallied three goals and an assist but it wasn’t enough as Pennington got edged 11-10 by Pennsbury (Pa.) in its season opener last Wednesday. In upcoming action, the Red Raiders host Princeton Day School on April 22. Girls’ Lacrosse: Bridget Lawn and Jordan Mahony starred in a losing cause as Pennington fell 14-6 to the Princeton Day School last Monday. Lawn contributed two goals and an assist while Mahony had three goals for the Red Raiders,

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now 2-1. Pennington hosts the Hun School on April 14 and the George School (Pa.) on April 16.

PDS Girls’ Volleyball: Fighting hard, PDS fell 2-0 (2325, 17-25) to Stuart Country Day last Monday. The Panthers, now 0-5, host Blair Academy on April 14 before playing at Notre Dame on April 15 and at Rutgers Prep on April 19.

Hun Softball: Sparked by Jamie Staub, Hun edged the Blair Academy High 1-0 last Wednesday. Freshman Staub pitched a complete game, striking out nine and giving up three hits, while also contributing a hit as the Raiders improved to 3-0. Hun hosts the Lawrenceville School on April 15, the Blair Academy on April 17, and the Hill School (Pa.) on April 20.

Stuart Volleyball: Snapping a two-match losing streak, Stuart defeated Princeton Day School 2-0 (25-23, 2517) last Monday. The Tartans, now 6-3, play at Rutgers Prep on April 15 before hosting Stem Civic on April 16 and Blair Academy on April 17.

PHS Girls’ Volleyball: Amanda Shi played well in a losing cause as 10th-seeded PHS fell 2-0 (13-25, 8-25) to 7thseeded Montgomery in the opening round of the NJSIAA Group 4 Central Jersey Sectional last Monday. Senior co-captain Shi contributed seven digs, three assists, and a service point for the Tigers, who moved to 2-11. PHS wraps up its season by hosting Notre Dame on April 16. Wrestling: PHS wrestlers Chris Sockler, Aaron Munford, and James Romaine have been selected to compete at the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Central Region Championships taking place this Saturday and Sunday at Hunterdon Central High. Senior Sockler is seeded 16th at 138 pounds while junior Munford is seeded 14th at 152 and senior Romaine is seeded third at 160.

tryout dates and to contact Post 218 Administrative Manager Jon Durbin at jonwdurbin@gmail.com to confirm participation. Post 218 is planning to play a 20-game schedule in the Mercer County American Legion League (MCALL) this summer. Team practices will begin in late May/early June depending on when the spring high school season ends. High school and collegeage players are eligible to

play for Post 218 if their primary address is in the municipal boundar y of Princeton or Cranbury or they attend a high school located in Princeton (Princeton High, Princeton Day School, and Hun School). Players must be born on or after January 1, 2002. For information on fees and further details on the program, one can contact Jon Durbin at his gmail address listed above.

Local Sports Post 218 Legion Baseball Team Holding Tryouts April 25, May 2

The Princeton American Legion Post 218 baseball program will be holding tryouts for its 2021 team on April 25 and May 2 from 2-4 p.m. at Smoyer Field in Princeton. Players are strongly recommended to attend both

BIG BEN: Hun School baseball player Ben Romano takes a swing in recent action. Last week, junior Romano contributed a double to help Hun defeat the Peddie School 11-1. The Raiders, who improved to 2-1 with the victory in the April 6 contest, are slated to host the Lawrenceville School on April 15, the Blair Academy on April 17, and King’s Christian School on April 20. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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07-15-21

OFFICE SHARE – NASSAU ST: 2nd floor, all included, available most days. Ideal for one or two people. Quiet, parking, Wi-Fi, etc. $20 per hour. 10 hr/month min. (908) 3993499. 03-24-4t HOPEWELL MOVING SALE: 7 Timberbrooke Drive. Friday & Saturday, April 16 & 17 from 9:303. Mid-century, Poul Cadovius rosewood unit, Le Corbusier style furniture, vintage silk kimonos, Richard Schultz, Brown Jordan, Young Chang Baby Grand piano. La Pavona coffee maker, full kitchen, garage items. House full! Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. COVID protocol in place, please wear a mask. 04-14 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 873-3168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 03-03-8t PRINCETON HOUSE FOR SALE: 4-5 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, Western Section, 1 acre. All renovated. Detached garage. Walk to train & University. Call (609) 216-0092. 04-07-3t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-07-4t

“Your true home is in the here and the now."

—Thich Nhat Hanh

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

WATER WATER EVERYWHERE! Let's rid that water problem in your basement once and for all! Complete line of waterproofing services, drain systems, interior or exterior, foundation restoration and structural repairs. Restoring those old and decaying walls of your foundation.

Call A. Pennacchi and Sons, and put that water problem to rest!

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

Mercer County's oldest waterproofing co. est. 1947 Deal directly with Paul from start to finish.

609-394-7354

Over 70 years of stellar excellence! Thank you for the oppportunity.

apennacchi.com

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 2021 • 28

Town Topics a Princeton tradition! ®

est. 1946

LET’S TALK REAL ESTATE...

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE We do NOT have any short-term rentals. For long-term, non-smokers & no-pet Tenants, you may email for more information: sre.marty@gmail.com **********

OffiCE RENTALS:

$1,300/month 2nd floor OFFICE space, 3 rooms, one with private powder room. Available now.

LONG-TERM RENTALS

FRONT YARD TREES TO BOOST CURB APPEAL Here in the northeast, spring is an excellent time to plant trees in your yard. Besides adding beauty and curb appeal, did you know that landscaping can add value to your home? Nationwide studies show that trees and landscaping can add anywhere from 5% to 15% to your home’s value. Like any other home improvement project, plan out the details of your planting and landscaping design ahead of time. A typical plan will include a budget (trees can be expensive), and choosing trees based on your location and on how much care and maintenance they will need. Be sure to take into account how your trees will look in three, five, and 10 years. Plant and space your trees based on their mature height and width. A mix of evergreens, flowering trees and deciduous trees provides color and beauty throughout the year. Some popular choices in the mid-Atlantic region are as follows: Flowering and ornamental trees: Eastern Redbud, Flowering Cherry, Crepe Myrtle, Japanese Maple, River Birch, Kousa Dogwood Evergreen: Spruce (Blue, Norway), Weeping Blue Atlas Cedar, American Holly, Leyland Cypress

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Princeton Office 609-921-1900 | 609-577-2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

Princeton – $125 each 1 parking space available now, 2 blocks from Nassau Street. Princeton – $1700/mo. Includes heat & water. Apts. #1 & #2. 1 BR, LR & Eat-in Kitchen. Available June 8, 2021. Princeton – $1850/mo. Includes heat, water & 1 parking space. Apt. #1, 2nd floor, 1 BR, LR, Eat-in Kitchen. Available June 8, 2021. Princeton – $2000/mo. Includes heat & water. Apt. #1, 3 rooms plus Eat-in Kitchen. Has laundry & 1 parking space. Tenant pays gas & electric. Available June 8, 2021. STOCKTON MEANS fULL SERViCE REAL ESTATE We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area fT/PT - whOLE EARTh CENTER is hiring stockers & cashiers. Come work for Princeton’s beloved natural foods store. Great benefits. Nice place to work. Please visit our website to download an application. You may forward it to: accounts@wholeearthcenter.com or apply in person at 360 Nassau St. Princeton. 04-14

MAiNTENANCE POSiTiON: YWCA Princeton has a PT 20 hours/ week maintenance position available n Princeton. M-F, 4 hours each day. Visit https://www.ywcaprinceton.org/ about/employment-opportunities/ for details. 04-14-3t

HELP WANTED at WIldflour Bakery/Cafe

FULL TIME DISHWASHER: Hours are 7:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Tuesday through Sunday. FARMERS MARKET WORKER: Looking for a salesperson with a driver’s license to run our stand at the West Windsor Farmers Market. Saturdays, May 1- November 20, 7:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m.

32 ChAMbERS STREET PRiNCETON, NJ 08542

www.wildflourbakery-cafe.com/contact/

PhONE (609) 924-1416 fAx (609) 228-5151

TOWN TOPICS

MARThA f. STOCKTON, bROKER-OwNER

is printed entirely on recycled paper. ANNA CLEANiNG SERViCE: Polish precision & detail. Residential & commercial. Available cleaning by owner. Very good references from long-term clients. Free estimates. Please call or text Anna, (609) 4563583. 03-17-8t LAwN MAiNTENANCE: Prune shrubs, mulch, cut grass, weed, leaf clean up and removal. Call (609) 954-1810; (609) 240-6404. 03-31-14t

East Brunswick | $1,250,000

Montgomery | $1,148,000

Montgomery | $749,000

Lambertville | $660,000

Tucked away at the end of a prestigious cul de sac in the Farrington Lake section of East Brunswick, is 6 Kulessa Ct. This stately 5500 sqft colonial boasts 5BR, 4.5BA, and sits on a large corner lot (1.81AC).

Beautiful 4-bedroom, 3.5 bath home in the highly desirable Montgomery Township with top-rated public and private schools. A two-story entry foyer and family room with wall of windows with amazing views of the wooded property.

East Facing Custom Brick Front colonial nestled on an acre of property on cul du sac location in the heart of Montgomery Twp. This lovely home features 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 1st floor study, finished basement, deck and gazebo on a level lot.

Simply Impeccable! Welcome home to the finest living in Lamberts Hill. This original model boasts 3700 sq ft of luxury living, end unit, 3 bedrooms, loft area, 3 full baths and 2 powder rooms.

Leyla Bortnowski | 732-762-5741

Joseph Marino | 732-398-0460

Maria DePasquale | 609-851-2377

Maria DePasquale | 609-851-2377

Montgomery | $640,000

Hopewell Boro | $369,000

Lawrence | $250,000

Beautifully maintained Colonial nestled on a sprawling 1.47 acres offering 4 Bedrooms and 3.5 baths. Spacious Living Rm and Dining Rm with new LVP floors is perfect for entertaining.

This beautiful renovated home is located on a quiet street in the Boro! Relax on your spacious front porch and upon entry you will be greeted with tasteful engineered wood floors.

Welcome to this classic home in Lawrenceville tucked down side street not far from the Hamilton Train Station.

Sunitha Nair | 732-397-3845

Claudia Ryan | 908-227-6084

Claudia Ryan | 908-227-6084

KOALA CLEANiNG SERViCE, LLC: Residential & Commercial cleaning. 20% off your first cleaning! Phone: (267) 990-5901 info@koalacleaningservice.com www.koalacleaningservice.com Company is insured. 04-07-8t TOwN TOPiCS CLASSifiEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf i bUY ALL KiNDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21 hOME REPAiR SPECiALiST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21 bUYiNG: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22

Lawrence | $239,000

East Windsor | $237,500

Bordentown | $209,900

Welcome to this fully updated, well maintained two-bedroom, one bath bungalow home located in Lawrence Township.

Well maintained 2 Bedroom, 1.5 Bath townhouse in Twin River. New stove and refrigerator. The A/C, furnace and hotwater heater are only 7 yrs. Young. Beautiful hardwood floors though out and lovely deck.

This 3 bedroom, 1 bath move in ready home. Step inside into the living room featuring hardwood floors and plenty of windows letting in lots of natural light. Plenty of space for your dining area as well.

Rocky Balsamo | 609-731-4687

Nancy Recine | 609-516-9296

Sharon Roman | 609-306-0351

Princeton Office | 190 Nassau Street, Princeton NJ | O: 609.921.2700 

 



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JOES LANDSCAPiNG iNC. Of PRiNCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21


29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 2021

Custom Residences With Exceptional Views

Spring Meadow Farm & Estate

Lots & Home Packages Available Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590 Cary Simons: 484.431.9019 Tinicum Township, PA Pinnacleatrollinghills.com Lots Starting at $300,000

5BR/3.3BA 4,811SF 18.34AC Private Many Outbuildings Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590 Buckingham Township, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU518526 $5,950,000

2100 Hamilton: New Exclusive Residences

Newly Listed: Custom-Built Colonial

2BR/2.1BA 1,780SF Heated Terraces 10-Yr. Tax Abatement Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590 Art Museum Area, Philadelpha, PA Kurfiss.com/PAPH983150 $2,196,000

5BR/4BA 4,961SF 5.66AC Mary Walrond: 215.350.3212 Lisa Frushone: 908.413.0156 Buckingham Township, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU523578 $1,595,000

The Residences at Rabbit Run Creek

Newly Listed: Light-Filled Hideaway

3BR/3.1BA 3,700SF Custom New Construction Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590 New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU2000170 $1,482,000

5BR/4.1BA 3.79AC Mid-Century Solarium Office Michael Richardson: 609.647.4523 New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU519750 $1,450,000

Newly Listed: Alexauken Creek Farmhouse

Newly Listed: Charming Twin

3BR/2.1BA 9.14AC Period Details Updated Tranquil Setting Lisa Frushone: 908.413.0156 Stockton, NJ Kurfiss.com/NJHT106918 $995,000

2BR/1BA 700SF Reclaimed Wood Floors Updated Kitchen Beth Danese: 215.208.6549 Stockton, NJ Kurfiss.com/NJHT106966 $319,900

Experience Property Videos and 3D Walk-Through Tours at Kurfiss.com 215.794.3227 New Hope Rittenhouse Square Chestnut Hill Bryn Mawr © 2021 Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. SIR® is a registered trademark licensed to SIR Affiliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 2021 • 30

AT YOUR

SERVICE A Town Topics Directory

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

Scott M. Moore of

MOORE’S CONSTUCTION HOME IMPROVEMENTS LLC carpenter • builder • cabinet maker complete home renovations • additions 609-924-6777 Family Serving Princeton 100 Years. Free Estimates

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

609-466-2693

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner Home Repair Specialist

609-586-2130

BLACKMAN Witherspoon Media Group

LANDSCAPING

FRESH IDEAS Custom Design, Printing, Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Publishing and Distribution Stone Walls and Terraces

FREE CONSULTATION · Newsletters 609-683-4013

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf YARD SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf YARD SALE: Saturday, April 17, starting 8 am. 25 MacLean Street, (between Witherspoon & John). Lots of artwork, lots of furniture, lots of new lawn furniture & lots of new exercise equipment. Clothing, shoes, etc. 04-14

SKILLMAN MOVING SALE: 3 Pecan Valley Court. Friday & Saturday, April 16 & 17 from 9:30-3. Baker dining room, Amy Karyn upholstered club chairs, Michael Weiss for Vanguard chairs, art, carpets, decorative accessories, Pottery Barn. House full! Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. COVID protocol in place, please wear a mask. 04-14 OFFICE SHARE – NASSAU ST: 2nd floor, all included, available most days. Ideal for one or two people. Quiet, parking, Wi-Fi, etc. $20 per hour. 10 hr/month min. (908) 3993499. 03-24-4t HOPEWELL MOVING SALE: 7 Timberbrooke Drive. Friday & Saturday, April 16 & 17 from 9:303. Mid-century, Poul Cadovius rosewood unit, Le Corbusier style furniture, vintage silk kimonos, Richard Schultz, Brown Jordan, Young Chang Baby Grand piano. La Pavona coffee maker, full kitchen, garage items. House full! Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. COVID protocol in place, please wear a mask. 04-14 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

PRINCETON, NJ

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• Pos · Annual Reports • 8.5″ x 11″ • 8.5″ Serving the Princeton Area since 1963 • Postcards • Flye Reach· Postcards over 15,000 homes in• Flyers Reach 11,000 homes in Princeton and surroundin Witherspoon Media Group Princeton and beyond! • 8.5x11” flyers · Books • Menus •custome Men Town Topics puts youinfo in frontcontact: of your target For additional than what it would cost to mail a postcard. • Menus Town ·Topics puts you in front• Booklets Custom Design, Printing, • Boo Catalogues melissa.bilyeu@ contact to reserve your sPace n • Please Booklets of your target customer for less Publishing andus Distribution witherspoonmediagroup.com · Annual Reports etc. than what it would cost to mail etc... • Trifolds Highest Quality Seamless Gutters.

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31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 2021

LIMITED-TIME OFFER: QUICK-DELIVERY HOMES


INTRODUCING PARKSIDE DRIVE • PRINCETON $2,950,000 Barbara Blackwell • 609.915.5000 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME310544

PETTIT PLACE • PRINCETON $2,250,000 Barbara Blackwell, Olga Barbanel • 609.915.5000 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME307604

INTRODUCING VICTORIA MEWS • PRINCETON $1,600,000 Michael Monarca • 917.225.0831 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME310018

BATTLE ROAD • PRINCETON $1,375,000 Marilyn R ‘Lynne’ Durkee • 609.462.4292 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME305264

INTRODUCING WINDERMERE WAY • PRINCETON $1,275,000 Jane Henderson Kenyon • 609.828.1450 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME310506

INTRODUCING BALCORT DRIVE • PRINCETON $1,275,000 Kelly D Eager • 609.468.4235 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME310272

INTRODUCING WINANT ROAD • PRINCETON $950,000 David M Schure, Grant Wagner • 609.577.7029 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME310010

INTRODUCING TOMLYN DRIVE • LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP $899,000 Amy Granato • 917.848.8345 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME310408

LEIGH AVENUE • PRINCETON $899,000 Susan L ‘Suzy’ DiMeglio • 609.915.5645 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME308498

INTRODUCING RICHMOND DRIVE • MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP $650,000 Carolyn Spohn • 609.468.2145 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJSO114464

INTRODUCING SLEEPY HOLLOW LANE • MONTGOMERY TWP $625,000 Alana Lutkowski • 908.227.6269 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJSO114458

INTRODUCING BURNT HILL ROAD • MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP $500,000 Sita A Philion • 609.658.2659 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJSO114474

CallawayHenderson.com 4 NASSAU STREET | PRINCETON, NJ 08542 | 609.921.1050 Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.

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Town Topics Newspaper, April 14, 2021  

The April 14. 2021 edition of the Town Topics Newspaper

Town Topics Newspaper, April 14, 2021  

The April 14. 2021 edition of the Town Topics Newspaper

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