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Volume LXXV, Number 9

Spring Into Health Pages 23-25 Young Women Lead The Way in Hun School Program . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Einstein Museum Proposed As Tourism Draw . . . . . 11 Municipal Attorney Releases Memo on Affordable Housing Set-Aside . . . . . . . . . . . 12 PSO Presents Second Virtual Collaboration With South African String Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . 15 Former PDS Star Colton Scores Goal in NHL Debut For Lightning . . . . . . . . 27 Featuring Deep Lineup, PHS Girls’ Swimming Produces 3-0 Start . . . . 31

This Week’s Book Review Celebrates the Poetry of Lawrence Ferlinghetti (1919-2021) . . . . . . . . 16 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .20, 21 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 22 Classified Ads . . . . . . 35 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 14 New to Us . . . . . . . . . . 26 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 34 Performing Arts . . . . . 17 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 35 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

www.towntopics.com

Many Voices Speak Up, As Schools Make Plans For Return to Normal On February 23, as they prepared to begin the 7:30 p.m. public session of their regular Tuesday evening meeting, the Princeton Public Schools (PPS) Board of Education (BOE) was looking forward to a report from district administrators on a plan for moving forward in addressing pandemic-related issues and bringing more children safely back into the buildings. Logged in on the Zoom session, however, were more than 800 participants — mostly high school students, but also a significant number of teachers and parents. They wanted to speak on a variety of different concerns, and most were not happy. By 9:30 p.m. the BOE had taken care of preliminary business and heard the administrators’ reports, and the public forum portion of the meeting began, with individuals each allowed two minutes to speak. The Board decided to extend the public comment period from its usual 15 minutes to one hour, then another hour. Community members spoke up, voicing frustrations, stress, sometimes anger, often directed at administration or Board members, sometimes directed against the pandemic in general and its accompanying restrictions, unforeseen disruptions, and constantly changing variables necessitating frequent changes of plans. The BOE members listened. Board members do not respond during the public forum session, though they did frequently reiterate their commitment to hearing everybody who wanted to speak. Finally, as midnight and the legally mandated end of the meeting approached, the Board and Superintendent Barry Galasso committed to carrying on the dialogue in future planning sessions with students, teachers, and parents in the following days. Praising the work of the BOE and superintendent and their commitment to listening and working with the students, Yash Roy, Princeton High School (PHS) senior and one of two student representatives on the BOE, attributed last Tuesday’s contentious meeting to pandemic fatigue and communication lapses, “a confluence of bad factors.” He noted, “It was very high tension, but it cooled down very quickly.” Janelle Wilkinson, PHS French teacher Continued on Page 10

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Vaccines to Be Offered to Educators, Others New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy announced on Monday, March 1 that the state will be expanding vaccination eligibility later this month to include educators and staff in Pre-K through 12th grade settings, child care workers, and transportation workers, among others. Princeton Public Schools Superintendent Barry Galasso applauded the news that teachers would soon be eligible for vaccination. “We’ve been advocating for them to get vaccines since vaccines became available,” he said. “I’ve written to the governor and told him specifically that schools are an integral part of getting the economy going, and the only way that can happen is if teachers feel comfortable coming into the buildings.” He continued, “Vaccines are not a silver bullet, but they will give a number of teachers a level of comfort and safety. We sent out communications asking the Princeton community for support on this, and a number of people in the community have taken up that banner and advocated for this. We appreciate their support. Teachers being vaccinated is a great thing.” New Jersey expects to receive an initial shipment of about 70,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson’s newly approved, one-

dose vaccine this week to supplement the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines currently in use. And, on March 2, federal officials announced that Merck & Co. would be teaming up with Johnson & Johnson in helping to produce the vaccine. In addition, CVS and Rite-Aid will be allotted 22,500 Johnson & Johnson vaccine doses this week through the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program, Murphy added, though the supplies for subsequent weeks are not certain. “As the federal government continues

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to make more vaccine doses available, we are confident in our ability to expand our vaccination program to reach more of our essential workers and vulnerable populations,” Murphy said. “As vaccine supply increases, this phased expansion of new eligibility groups keeps New Jersey moving forward toward our goal of vaccinating 70 percent of the eligible adult population,” said New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) Commissioner Judith Persichilli. She added, Continued on Page 8

Renovations Finally in Progress at Former Downtown Post Office Building The transformation of Princeton’s former post office building into the new location of Triumph Brewery is finally underway. Inside the Palmer Square landmark, Princeton Design Guild is demolishing the old vaults where money and stamps were kept, and everything in the basement, in preparation for the redesign. If all goes according to plan, Triumph could move from its current location at 138 Nassau Street and re-open on Palmer Square by the last quarter of 2022, according to Kevin Wilkes of Princeton Design Guild, who is working as the owner’s

representative on the project. “We are not the general contractor. We will make a selection in a month for a construction management company,” he said. “But I’m getting things started on the front end so we don’t lose time.” Three architects are involved in the project. Gittings Associates of Forrestal Road is the architect of record, Richardson Smith of Witherspoon Street is design architect, and Historic Building Architects of Trenton are the historic preservation architects. “We aim to make this a Continued on Page 13

IS IT SPRING YET?: Despite the cold, a few children recently enjoyed some time in Marquand Park . Residents and visitors share what they are looking forward to this spring in this week’s Town Talk on page 6 . (Photo by Weronkia A.. Plohn)

The Air of a European Estate one Hour from NYC Barbara Blackwell Broker Associate

Wednesday, March 3, 2021

To pass through the iron gates into the stone courtyard is to be swept to another time and place. To share a meal beneath the canopy of sycamores beside the trickling fountain is simply magical. It’s hard to believe such a majestic structure started life 120 years ago as a dairy barn, one of 4 Tudor brick outbuildings on the Drumthwacket Estate in Princeton. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.


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THE KNEE: A TO Z Wednesday, March 10, 2021 | 6 p.m. Location: Zoom Meeting The knee is one of the largest joints in the human body and one of the most complex. Learn more from the experts at Rothman Orthopaedic Institute by joining DR. JOSH HORNSTEIN, a board certified sports medicine orthopaedic surgeon and fellowship trained sports medicine physician, and DR. ARJUN SAXENA, a fellowship trained and board certified orthopaedic surgeon specializing in primary and revision hip and knee replacement/reconstruction and director of the Marjorie G. Ernest Center for Joint Replacement, for a discussion of the anatomy and physiology of the knee, common injuries, and the latest surgical techniques available.

This event will be taking place virtually using Zoom. Register online at capitalhealth.org/events and be sure to include your email address. Zoom meeting details will be provided via email 2-3 days before the program date. Registration ends 24 hours before the program date.

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Chef Shares Recipes At PSRC Fundraiser

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Going Beyond: Climate Action and Equity

Wednesday, March 10, 2021 | 6:00 - 7:30 PM Register: bit.ly/ClimateandEquity

Climate change negatively affects us all, but our communities of color and low-income residents are most severely impacted and are often not part of designing solutions. Join us on March 10 to learn what Princeton is doing to ensure an environmentally just approach to climate action. Our 2020-21 Great Ideas webinar series explores the additional, positive benefits we get from taking action to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions and prepare for climate change. Thank you to our generous sponsor NRG Energy, Inc. and our partner Princeton Public Library.

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This event is free and open to the public.

Princeton Senior Resource Center’s (PSRC) fundraising series finale, “The Science, the Sweets, and the Savories of the Foods You Love,” will be presented on Sunday, March 14 at 1 p.m. Chef Adeena Sussman, New York Times best-selling cookbook author, food writer, and product development and consultant based in Israel, will demonstrate from her kitchen in Tel Aviv. Sussman will be sharing recipes from her recent Israeli cookbook, Sababa : Fresh, Sunny Flavors from My Israeli Kitchen. Sababa was named a Best Fall 2019 Cookbook by the New York Times, Bon Appetit, and Food & Wine. Described by the chef, “Sababa means in Hebrew ‘everything is awesome,’ and it’s this sunny spirit with which I cook and dream up meals in my Tel Aviv kitchen.” Americans have begun to instinctively crave the spicy, bright flavors of Israeli cuisine, and in this timely cookbook, Sussman shows readers how to use border-crossing kitchen staples — tahini, sumac, silan (date syrup), harissa, za’atar — while also intro- GLORIOUS FOOD: Renowned Israeli chef Adeena Sussman ducing more exotic spices brings her expertise to Princeton Senior Resource Center via and ingredients. Zoom on March 14. Register with a $20 donation for the session at princetonsenior.org. For more information about this event, contact Lisa Adler at ladler@ A Community Bulletin princetonsenior.org or (609) Love Your Park Day Rescheduled: Friends of 751-9699, ext. 103. To learn Princeton Open Space has rescheduled this event, more about Sussman, her which was originally planned for February 13, to Satrecipes, and purchase a urday, March 6. There will be two sessions, from 9 cookbook, visit adeenasussa.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. Visit fopos.org for details. man.com. Free Rabies Clinic: On Saturday, March 6 from 9 Increase for Arts Funding a.m. to 12 p.m., the Princeton Fire Department, 363 In State Budget Proposal Witherspoon Street, hosts a free rabies clinic for cats Governor Murphy introand dogs. Shots are free for all New Jersey residents. duced the FY22 New JerDogs must be on a leash no longer than six feet, and sey State Budget proposal cats must be in a carrier. For more information, email on February 23, containing animalcontrol@princetonnj.gov. increased annual appropriCrossing Guards Wanted: Princeton Police Deations for the New Jersey partment is hiring for numerous locations. Salary State Council on the Arts, ranges from $15 per 30-minute shift to $22.50 for a the New Jersey Historical 45-minute shift. Princetonnj.gov/jobs. Commission, the New JerCOVID-19 Vaccine: For the latest information sey Division of Travel and on receiving the vaccine, visit covid19.nj.gov/pages/ Tourism, and the New Jervaccine or princetonnj.gov/282/Coronavirus-COVIDsey Cultural Trust. 19-Information. All totaled, $20.7 million Vaccination Hotline: New Jersey’s COVID-19 Vacsignifies an almost 60 percine Call Center is staffed daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. cent increase in state funds Call (855) 568-0545 for questions about registering to help these sectors aid with the New Jersey Vaccine Scheduling System, findNew Jersey’s economic reing vaccine locations, and more. covery. The increases demFree COVID Tests: At-home test kits are availonstrate the administration’s able for Mercer County residents age 14 and older. recognition of the valuable Email HomeTesting@mercercounty.org with questions. role arts, history, and tourOnline registration is required. Princeton Health Deism play in boosting New partment has partnered with Navus Health to provide Jersey’s economy and overfree testing to underinsured and uninsured Princeton all recovery. residents. Also, Sante Integrative Pharmacy at 200 For more information, visit Nassau Street offers free testing Monday-Thursday, nj.gov/governor. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (609) 921-8820.

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Young Women Lead the Way In Dynamic Hun School Program

In September 1971, The Hun School of Princeton welcomed its first 45 young women students on campus, and almost 50 years later the Young Women’s Leadership Cohort (YWLC) is making sure that women’s leadership is a high priority at Hun in this Women’s History Month and throughout the year.

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Founded three years ago, the YWLC is a group of 20 junior and senior girls plus a new cohort of 20 ninth and tenth grade girls, all nominated by the faculty for their strong leadership potential. The students in the program undergo extensive leadership training, including skill development, networking, and breaking barriers. The program has carried on throughout the pandemic, with many students tuning in via Zoom and at least three different time zones represented. The program’s positive results are apparent. “It’s definitely making a big impact,” said Dayna Gash, YWLC faculty advisor and ninth grade dean. “All the students, especially in the junior-senior cohort, are occupying leadership roles both internally within the school and in the greater community. We have a female student body president and vice president. With the 50th anniversary of women

Society, and a member of Junior State of America. Off-campus, she runs a nonprofit organization called Triple E—Empowering Environmental Education and sits on the STEM Advisory Board for the National Girls Collaboration Project. After being nominated in the ninth or tenth grade, p a r t i c ip a nt s s p e n d t wo years engaged in evening workshops and activities designed to identify and hone their personal leadership styles. There is a strong cor relation bet ween t he students who participate in the program and those who rise to leadership positions at Hun. In a survey of the first cohort to complete the program, participants noted an

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Of the Town at Hun School coming up, the campus continues to build on the work we’re doing. This is one of many programs that looks to do that.” Hun School Junior Bella G omez, who joined t he cohort two years ago as a freshman, feels that being a member of the group has taught her not only how to be a strong leader, but also how to be an advocate for herself and her mental health. “For a long time, I thought to be a good leader I had to show up every day and be this perfect version of myself, but through this cohort I learned that is simply not the case,” she said. “The best leaders I know are raw, honest, and the first ones to admit when they are having a bad day. I’ve really learned about the power of honesty and integrity and how important it is to be honest about where I am mentally and understanding that one bad day doesn’t make me a bad leader.” On campus, Gomez leads the student government environmental committee, is co-president of the Autism Awareness Club, a member of the National Honor

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such subjects as resisting toxic self-criticism, managing stress, building and practicing compassion for oneself, and embracing different leadership philosophies. In their second year in the cohort, the group members gain practical experience in leadership by mentoring the younger girls. After working with a professional diversity and inclusion consultant for higher education, the cohort members use the knowledge they have gained to take a hands-on approach in working with newer cohort members, Gash explained. “The best learning always happens when you are able to apply what you learn to your own life,” said Gash. “It has been amazing to see them learn all these things, understand them through their own lenses, and then apply them in their relationships and leadership roles.” Poller added, “As they get older, they have a group of other women on campus who are also in leadership positions and they have the support of each other and they can talk through any challenges they are facing in being leaders on campus, so they have a built-in support and are networking among themselves.” She went on to reflect on her teen years and the value that a program like YWLC could have had for her. “As a younger woman myself, I would have benefited from that,” said Poller, a 1995 Hun graduate. “I think any young woman would benefit from that support as a teenaged girl.” “Meghan and I talk often about their wisdom already

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5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 2021

One-Year Subscription: $10 Two-Year Subscription: $15

YOUNG WOMEN EMPOWERED: Students participate in a February 2020 workshop as part of the Young Women’s Leadership Cohort, a selective leadership development program at The Hun School of Princeton. (Photo courtesy of Meghan Poller)

increase in skills and confidence in self-compassion, overcoming fear of failure, effective communication skills, and ability to lead on and off campus. Meghan Poller, associate director of resident life at Hun and, along with Gash, a co-advisor of the YWLC since its inception, emphasized that much of the program’s curriculum focuses on breaking down societal stereotypes of masculine qualities associated with leadership. “We talk a lot about what the stereotypical definition of a leader is and what that looks like compared to what the stereotypical definition of a good girl is,” she said. “The two definitions differ greatly, so we talk through how to reconcile those qualities and their personal identities. Identifying those conflicts is often the first step toward establishing comfort with how they feel internally, a necessary step for good leadership.” Poller pointed out that when the program started three years ago, there were girl leaders on campus, but they were primarily in service organizations. “We were hoping to encourage girls to look to some of the more public leadership roles and to aspire to take them on,” she said. “We had a lot of girls who were in more service-oriented leadership roles, and we were hoping to give girls more confidence to aspire to larger leadership roles on campus. We wanted them to feel they could access any leadership role.” In their first year in the program, participants hear guest presenters and participate in workshops on


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 2021 • 6

Young Women Lead Continued from Preceding Page

at such a young age, and it blows me away,” Gash added. “I can only imagine where they’re going to be in the future when they enter the world after school. They’re already making an impact, but where they’re going to be in a couple of years is extraordinary. Their maturity and ability to think things through and support one another and really analyze the situation is really incredible already.” —Donald Gilpin

Womanspace Creates Young Adult Advisory Council

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Womanspace has created a Young Adult Advisory Council (YAAC). This council will be comprised of young adults between the ages of 14-22. Through their social media platforms and life experiences, members will assist in continuing the mission of Womanspace and spread awareness to other young adults who may not be aware of Womanspace programs. “ We are c re at i ng t h e Young Adult Advisory Council to make sure youth who are passionate about ending interpersonal violence have their voices elevated and heard just as loudly as those of us who have been working in this field for years,” said Danielle Scollins, coordinator of Prevention and Community Education and the force behind the initiative. “The Young Adult Advisory Council will be helping to inform and influence our work at Womanspace. We are hoping to reach more people in new and innovative ways.” The council will meet once a month for hour-long virtual meetings. Once it is safe to do so, meetings will transition to in-person. The goal of these meetings will be to create content for five-minute videos for social media platforms on topics related to consent, sexual assault, bystander intervention, and any other related topics. If interested in applying, email des@womanspace.org for further discussion and an application. There will only be eight seats on the Young Adult Advisory Council, so those interested should apply soon. Founded in 1977, Womanspace is a leading nonprofit organization serving the greater Mercer County area and the state of New Jersey by providing a comprehensive array of emergency and follow-up services to individuals and families impacted by domestic violence and sexual assault. For more information, visit womanspace.org.

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What are you looking forward to this spring?” (Photos by Weronika A. Plohn)

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“Nice weather, lots of activities, and some traveling. I am an au pair and I am really looking forward to warm weather so I can travel to another state and explore the country.” —Maria Lopez, Princeton

Bahar: “I am looking forward to getting vaccinated, finally being able to travel, going to the beach, and being back to some sort of normality. I am also looking forward to being able to have my birthday party again.” Alborz: “The vaccination, and especially warmer weather. Taking my dog Coco out takes a long time, especially with all the boots and jackets that we have to put on. In the summer I just put my flip flops on and I am ready to go.” —Bahar Jalali with Alborz Khorsandi, both of Princeton

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Haye: “We are planning some family fun this spring. My kids want to go to Hershey Park this April. We made a reservation and can’t wait to go!” Paul: “My birthday is in the spring and I want to have a party. I am going to be 9 years old. We are going to do Zoom with my friends and play games online and do some drawings.” Chris: “I can’t wait to play games with my brother at the birthday party.” —Haye Lee with Chris and Paul Kang, Princeton

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Eunsong: “My daughter’s birthday is in April and she is looking forward to having a party outdoors with some close friends. My son is looking forward to being able to go to the gym and take some swimming lessons.” Jawon: “I want to practice swimming in the swimming pool.” — Eugine Shin, Eunsong Choi, and Jawon Shin, West Windsor


7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, maRCh 3, 2021

Springpoint Choice: Give Yourself the Very Best Age-in-Place Option

Springpoint Choice is the premier membership-based program for healthy, active adults, ages 55 and older, who live independently and wish to age in place safely and securely. The program provides members with personal coordination of future care needs, along with access to Springpoint’s network of longterm care services and LivWell, our award-winning health and wellness program. Engaging in a variety of social, wellness, and community activities will help you stay active and engaged. Should care needs arise, you can access services with a call to your personal care navigator who will work with you and your family. With Springpoint Choice, you can: • Plan for long-term care that enables

you to remain in your own home for as long as possible • Avoid being a burden to your loved ones regarding your long-term care needs • Have the services of a personal navigator to secure and manage long-term care services, from home health aides to live-in services • Access numerous social and wellness programs and opportunities at Springpoint’s eight Life Plan Communities in New Jersey and Delaware • Preserve and protect your financial assets • Access quality long-term care, if ever needed, in the most appropriate setting, including home care, assisted living, memory support, and skilled nursing and rehabilitation

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Springpoint Choice Provides the Solution Join us online for one of our upcoming webinars or info sessions and discover the many facets of Springpoint Choice. • WEBINAR WEDNESDAYS March 3 at 10:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. March 10 at 10:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. March 17 at 10:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. March 24 at 10:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. March 31 at 10:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. • FINANCIAL ADVANTAGES OF BECOMING A MEMBER Monday, March 22, at 10:30 a.m.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 2021 • 8

Vaccines Offered continued from page one

however, that delays in booking appointments may continue as vaccine demand continues to outpace the supply. As of Tuesday morning, March 2, 2.1 million COVID vaccine doses had been administered in New Jersey, including 1.4 million first doses and 721,000 second doses. In addition to teachers, child care workers, and transportation workers, public safety workers, migrant farm workers, tribal community members, and homeless individuals will also be eligible for vaccination starting on Monday, March 15. Beginning Monday, March 29, frontline essential workers in food production, eldercare, warehousing and logistics, social services support, elections, hospitality, medical supply, postal and shipping services, clergy, and the judicial system will become eligible for vaccination. Further information and preregistration are available at covid19.nj.gov/ vaccine. Princeton Health Officer Jeff Grosser noted that the Princeton Health Department, through its waitlist, had h e ard f rom a l m os t 5,000 Princeton residents who are seek ing a CO VID-19 vaccine. Nearly 35 percent of those individuals have been vaccinated, many through the Princeton Health Department’s clinics. The Health Department is continuing to draw from Princeton’s initial waitlist for those most at risk of severe health complications, but,

Grosser noted, there are many Princeton residents who are in need of COVID-19 vaccines who have not reached out to the Health Department or may not be able to register online. “We are asking residents to speak up on behalf of homebound seniors, iso lated residents, or other population groups hesitant to inform our office they are interested in receiving the COVID-19 vaccine,” Grosser wrote in an email. Also, the Princeton Senior Resource Center has deployed “vaccine navigators” to assist those having difficulty navigating the vaccine search. “In the coming weeks, the Princeton Health Department is optimistic we will be receiving doses directly again,” said Grosser. “And our mission is to make sure anyone who wants the vaccine will be connected to a scheduled appointment, or that we will be able to provide a vaccine to them in the community at a mobile site.” Residents seeking vaccinations should first register into the state system through the New Jersey Vaccine Scheduling System at covidvaccine.nj.gov. Princeton residents are encouraged to continue using individual portals such as CVS, RiteAid, and ShopRite to make vaccine appointments, as well as other COVID-19 vaccine locations at covid19. nj.gov. A new Vaccinator Call Center at (856) 249-7007 is assisting New Jersey residents aged 75 and older with registration and scheduling appointments. Princeton residents can contact Princeton Human Ser vices at

humanservices@princetonnj.gov or (609) 688-2055 with technological issues or for assistance in Spanish or English. The Princeton Senior Resource Center is seeking volunteers to assist older adults in navigating the scheduling process to secure vaccine appointments. Volunteers are also needed to work the registration tables in support of county vaccination efforts at the CURE Arena mega-site in Trenton. Anyone interested in volunteering should contact Carla Servin at (609) 751-9699 ext. 118 or at vaccine @ princetonsenior.org. Although case numbers are diminishing, and vaccinations are increasing, Grosser noted that variants of the COVID-19 virus are causing concerns. Mutations, or changes to the virus’ genes, “were not unexpected, likely just overshadowed by everything else happening with the pandemic,” said Grosser. “Most people know of mutations with the flu virus, which is why doctors recommend we get a flu vaccination each year.” Grosser pointed out that there are multiple variants of the coronavirus that are different from the version f irst detected in China, with the first variant being detected in England in fall 2020 and others emerging from South America, California, and South Africa. “What has alarmed public health professionals about variants is the possibility that these mutations of the virus could contribute to things we don’t currently know,” he continued. “These

variants could change things like treatment and prevention due to the way they spread and cause disease, and the big concern is how effective the COVID-19 vaccines are on new variants.” Grosser continued, “Fortunately, if there are major mutations that occur, typically vaccine development processes can accommodate those changes. The good news is that for the new variants, no new prevention strategies are being suggested by the CDC. Residents should continue doing what they’re doing with mask wearing, physical distancing, and getting vaccinated against COVID-19.” On Monday, March 1, the Princeton Health Department reported just 10 active positive COVID-19 cases in Princeton. There were 9 new cases in the previous seven days and just 11 new cases in the previous 14 days, both numbers far below the highest totals from December. Princeton University, after considering a range of options, announced last week that it plans to hold its 2021 commencement outdoors at Princeton Stadium. The event will be held in compliance with social distancing and state public health protocols, the University said in a press release, and the University will be continuing to monitor the public health situation and state guidelines. “Should circumstances change significantly, we may need to pivot to a virtual commencement ceremony,” the University announcement stated. —Donald Gilpin

On-Site Programs Planned at Howell Farm

Howell Living History Farm in Hopewell Township has programs this month that allow in-person participation. Events are Saturday mornings at 10 a.m. In all programs, social distancing will be observed, and all participants are required to carry masks, wearing them when social distancing isn’t possible. On March 6, children ages 5-12 can take part in “Workhorse Rides.” In days gone by, it wasn’t uncommon for a farm child to hitch a ride on the back of a big draft horse while it was being driven back to the barn after a day working in the fields. During this program, kids will learn the differences between draft, saddle, and carriage horses when they climb aboard a fully harnessed workhorse for a ride down the lane after, that is, they help farmers with barn chores like bedding stalls, filling water troughs, and making feed. The program on March 13 is titled “A Visit from the Horse Doctor and Shoer.” Shots, worming medicine, dental exams, and hoof trimming are in store for Howell Farm’s six workhorses when the veterinarian and dentist come for their spring visit. Participants can join them in the barns where they will be at work all day ensuring that horses, sheep, chickens, and farm cat Bushy are fit and ready for spring. Visitors can listen to a horse’s heart through a stethoscope, watch an equine dentist at work, and learn about old and new veterinary instruments and techniques. The farrier will be shoeing, and the blacksmith working in the forge.

“S aw m illing and Tree Planting” is the event on March 20. Barn beams, siding, and floorboards for horse stalls will be the order of the day when logger-sawyer Scott Stevens makes his annual stop at Howell Farm — a visit reminiscent of days when contractors with portable engines and mills came through Pleasant Valley to help farmers cut lumber from trees growing in their woodlots. During the day there will be opportunities for visitors to help roll logs to the mill with logging tools, cut firewood for the kitchen stove, make pegs for use in barn framing, and plant replacement trees in the farm’s woodlot. Helpers will receive a free tubling from the NJ Tree Foundation to take home and plant, while supplies last. The final event, on March 27, is “Lambing.” Will a lamb be born on lambing day? It has happened before, but not according to anyone’s timing but the ewes. Lambing season lasts for several weeks, and whether or not a new arrival appears, there will be much to see and learn about in the barn where sheep spend much of the winter. Visitors will see new lambs, meet expectant ewes, and learn all about the farm’s flock of period Romney-Suffolk sheep. Other signs of spring are in the air: horses are beginning to shed their winter coats, bees are flying in search of early nectar, and, if it’s not too windy, farmers will likely be out spreading manure or plowing the fields. Howell Farm is at 70 Woodens Lane. For directions and information, visit howellfarm. org or call (609) 737-3299.


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Schools Make Plans continued from page one

and mother of two teenagers, one who graduated from PHS last year, emphasized the impact of “Zoom fatigue” on the health of students and teachers. Criticizing the administrators’ plan to add more instructional hours to the high school day, she added, “More work and more hours sitting in front of the screen is exactly the opposite of what these teenagers need during a pandemic.” She went on to describe some of the strains of Zoom education. “Being on Zoom for PHS students for five, six, seven, or eight hours for school is completely exhausting. Zoom fatigue is real, and we know it. A healthy school-life balance, getting them off the screen, is more important than ever during this pandemic.” PHS Educational Media Specialist Jennifer Bigioni, modern languages teacher Malachi Wood, and others emphasized the need for teachers, students, and others in the building to have more influence. “PHS students, teachers, suppor t staff, administrators, and other educators in the building are the ones who are living the schedule and who are most affected by it. We are the ones who should be consulted to be part of the decision-making process,” said Wood in an email. In his comments at the BOE meeting Wood criticized the proposal of an extended schedule, calling it “an equity disaster that will extend the equity gap that already exists at PHS.” He added that “struggling

students need extra time for individual support” and that extending class times would exacerbate the problem rather than fix it. In a March 1 phone interview, Galasso, who has met with various stakeholders, including a group of 17 representative PHS students, in the six days since last Tuesday’s firestorm, commented on the extraordinary upsurge of public sentiment and engagement. “It’s hard to account for that,” he said. “There’s the fact that we’re coming up on the one-year anniversary of COVID and there doesn’t seem to be any significant change from where we were last March. There’s some lessening of restrictions, but we’re still not there.” Emphasizing his ongoing goal of bringing as many students as possible back to a normal high school experience, Galasso continued, “There’s also the fact that predominantly our staff is not vaccinated, and people are concerned about that. And students are still learning remotely and have a significant amount of work. I think all those factors combined probably caused discontent.” He noted also the possibility that the BOE and administration planning could have been communicated more clearly, w ith more voices given the opportunity to weigh in before the February 23 meeting. G alasso descr ibed t he complexities of meeting the needs of students who are taking several AP courses and other students who need credit recovery and the help

to earn appropriate grades to graduate from high school. At PHS many students enjoy the in-person experience, he said, but there are many (about 70 percent) who, for a wide range of reasons, are continuing their studies remotely. “So what we’re doing now, we’re meeting with students and meeting with faculty and with principals, and we’re saying, ‘How do we make this all work?’ So we almost make it an individual kind of program,” depending on whether students need more direct instruction or more time for independent work and collaboration with other students. Galasso sympathized with people who have expressed their unhappiness with frequent changes in plans and schedules, but, he noted, “Any time we bring in more kids, that requires more schedule changes. All parents want us to bring more kids in. Bringing more kids in for opportunities means schedule changes.” It is a definite priority to ensure that all arts and music, clubs and activities, and all sports programs are fully operational by mid-April, fol low i ng spr i ng bre a k, he said. “And we’ll make sure that all students have transportation,” he added. “Youngsters will have the chance to get back to enjoy school, and how we do that with facilities issues and everything else is going to be a cooperative issue among all of us.” Teachers and school officials are currently reconfiguring classrooms in order to maximize the number

of students who can be accommodated safely, and tents will be erected at all the schools for students arriving for in-person learning. “Conversations are being held with all the stakeholders to come up with a plan that meets the needs of each individual youngster,” Galasso added. “At the meeting I had with the students, they had wonderful ideas that can be incorporated into the plan. The intent is to try to provide a couple of months of everybody experiencing what the Princeton schools can be like.” In reflecting on progress made in the past week, Roy stated, “T he Board and the super intendent have been very open. Even during Tuesday’s meeting, they acted incredibly respectfully and they listened. They listened to every single student and faculty member and parent who wanted to speak, and since then they’ve been doing a lot of work to ensure that everyone feels respected and welcomed.” He continued, “I know that they truly care about the community. A lot of what we were voicing was just concern, partially about a schedule that exacerbates the stress of already overstressed students and partially just about the pandemic and everything that’s going on in this senior year.” In an email he added, “We are having a fruitful discussion that will lead to a schedule and spring plan that works for students, the larger community, and e ver yon e i nvolve d. T h e student body is optimistic

about the progress that has already been made. We also appreciate the efforts of the Board and superintendent to listen to students and their concerns, as well as to work to alleviate those issues.” —Donald Gilpin

Poetry of Yehuda Amichai In Online Public Program

On Sunday, March 7 at 12 p.m., book artist and poet Rick Black will engage in an online conversation with Rutgers professor Gary A. Rendsburg about his limited-edition artist book, which pays homage to the poetry of Yehuda Amichai, considered to be Israel’s finest modern poet. Black will unwrap The Amichai Windows, revealing its sculptural design, as well as discuss his personal encounters with Amichai and share the illuminated poems. New Jersey native Black is an award-winning book artist and poet. His artist books are represented in private and public collections, including the Library of Congress, Yale University, and the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. He received the 2019 Isaac Anolic Jewish Book Arts Award. Rendsburg is the Blanche and Irving Laurie Chair in Jewish History at Rutgers University. He was a consultant to Black on the translations of Amichai’s poems from the original Hebrew into English. This event is free and open to the public, it is presented by the Allen and Joan Bildner Center for the Study of Jewish Life at Rutgers University. Advance registration is required at BildnerCenter.Rutgers.edu. More information

about The Amichai Windows can be found at amichaiwindows.com.

Zwicker Launches Book Drive for Reading Month

In an effort to foster the joy of reading and in celebration of National Reading Month in March, Assembly man Andrew Zwicker, representing the 16th NJ Legislative District, is launching a book drive through the end of March to benefit the children enrolled in the YMCA and YWCA day care and early education learning centers throughout the 16th District. Donations of books help the YMCA and YWCA day care and learning centers provide their students with the tools and resources they need to succeed in life. The education and socialization services ensure that everyone, regardless of ability, gender, race, national origin, or income has the opportunity to reach their full potential with dignity. To donate, visit yougivegoods.com/district16-bookdrive, choose a preferred YMCA/YWCA facility, and go shopping for a book or books among a specially selected inventory. Donors will receive a tax receipt from YouGiveGoods, which has successfully partnered with Zwicker’s office on other 16th District outreach initiatives. For more infor mation, contact Zwicker at AsmZwicker@njleg.org.

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Free books to the 1st 30 attendees! Alzheimer’s disease is the most well-known type of dementia, but there are many others that impact older and younger adults. Join us for this informative program to further your knowledge of the types, treatments and causes of dementia. You will get a better understanding of what resources are available to help you handle your loved ones’ specific diagnosis. Jennifer L. Fitzpatrick, MSW, is a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University. She and Cruising Through Caregiving have been featured on:

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Does Princeton need an Albert Einstein museum? The idea of creating a center dedicated to the famed physicist’s years in Princeton was posed at a recent meeting of the town’s Economic Development Committee. Elizabeth Romanaux, who grew up in Princeton, has worked for Liberty Science Center, and was president of the New Jersey Association of Museums, presented the early stages of a concept she has been considering for some time. “As a museum profes sional, I think this is an enor mous piece of r ipe fruit hanging over everyone’s head that hasn’t been picked,” she said. “In the overall scheme of things, I think it would do very well.” Romanaux, who is a friend of Mayor Mark Freda’s wife Beth, said she sent him a note a few weeks after he was sworn in this past January, asking why Princeton didn’t have a museum focused on Einstein, who was associated with the Institute for Advanced Study and lived in a house on Mercer Street until his death in 1955. “I told him I’ve always wondered about this, and he said, ‘Great, look into it.’ That was a month ago,” she said during an interview last week. “So I brought it to the Economic Development Committee meeting.” There are no Einstein museums in the United States, Romanaux said. Two are located in Europe. Hebrew University in Israel owns the trademarks to his name. The

Historical Society of Princeton (HSP) does have an extensive collection of Einstein memorabilia at its location at Updike Farm on Quaker Road. “The audience I’m looking at are people walking around downtown,” Romanaux said. “They may or may not be people who would go out to Quaker Road. But this would be more about his science, even teaching some STEM, or some art. So it would be a different area from the Historical Society.” In an email this week, HSP Executive Director Izzy Kasdin said, “Princeton is home to world-class Albert Einstein collections and stories — there are many sites in town that reflect Einstein’s life in Princeton and, of course, the Historical Society of Princeton preserves furniture from his home, personal belongings like his pipe and compass, oral histories from friends and colleagues, and intimate documents, including the only-known self-portrait of Albert Einstein. Anything that generates excitement about and steers people toward these unparalleled resources would be an asset to Princeton’s tourism infrastructure.” Romanaux’s museum concept would emphasize creativity. “How can we think broadly, and do experiments with issues we have, and come up with solutions? Einstein was a scientist who used what he called ‘thought experiments’ to come up w it h sim iles ab out how

things might work. I think all of us could use the scientific method and creativity to approach things differently,” she said. The proposed museum could start out at empty storefronts in town before considering a permanent site. “The initial discussion was perhaps we could do a ‘vest pocket’ museum in the short term, and maybe move when these storefronts get filled up,” Romanaux said. “For the long term, I don’t know. I’m being encouraged to think larger scale. This is at least a three-to-five-year time frame if we did a big one.” Encouraging tourism would be a major focus. “I’m thinking of the people with the strollers and the kids and the ice cream cones. This could keep them here longer,” Romanaux said at the meeting. Speaking the following week, she said, “I think we could use a museum downtown. We want people to stay longer, to eat and shop. The [Princeton University] art museum is closed [for renovations ] . Landau’s, which had an Einstein section in the back, has closed.” This week, Mimi Omiecinski of Princeton Tour Company said Romanaux had approached her about t he concept. “E li z ab et h was kind enough to ask me for feedback, and I am impressed she included a visitor center component in her presentation as a result,” she said. “Pre-COVID, Princeton hosted 1.8 million

visitors a year with no centralized information center to direct that interest. Tourism data gathered prior to COVID is suspected to be irrelevant for current and future planning. Gathering local data regarding who is visiting Princeton and what potential experiences would be desirable could be a game changer in helping the town prioritize creative suggestions like Elizabeth’s.” The next step in exploring the idea would be a letter to the Hebrew University to see if they would give permission to use Einstein’s name. Just how a museum would be financed is not yet clear. “It’s still early days for that,” Romanaux said. “But I think it is very fundable from a fundraising point of view. I think we’ll be able to raise the money.” Freda said the concept is worth exploring. “I think the idea of an Einstein Museum in Princeton is a natural fit,” he said. “And ideas that help further develop reasons to come visit and shop or eat in Princeton benefit the town on many levels. This is in the very initial stages, so there is a lot of work to be done to make this happen; but hopefully a group can be put together to move this forward. And thank you to Elizabeth for pushing this idea.” —Anne Levin

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Museum About Albert Einstein Proposed as a Tourism Draw


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 2021 • 12

Municipal Attorney Releases Memo On Affordable Housing Set-Aside A memo that aims to clarify the conditions surrounding the terms of Princeton’s T hird Rou nd A f fordable Housing S et tlement has been posted on the municipal website (princetonnj. gov). The 13 -page memo by municipal attorney Kevin Van Hise, which was posted on Tuesday, details reasons why the 20 percent set-aside for affordable housing that was in place in the former Princeton Borough now applies only to properties that have five units or more, are rezoned, or are in zones designated for redevelopment. An ordinance passed by Princeton Council last April eliminates that set-aside for all new developments, a fact that became evident during a meeting of the town’s Site Plan Review Advisory Board last month. The board was reviewing a proposal to build eight apartments at the parking lot on Witherspoon Street, across from Princeton Public Library, known as Griggs Corner. Officials, unaware that the set-aside had not

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been extended to consolidated Princeton, were surprised when representatives from Palmer Square, the developer of the property, said they did not plan to include any affordable units because they were not required to do so. The issue has generated much discussion. “That public discussion has understandably caused significant consternation because of fears that the former Borough’s set-aside ordinance was eliminated, that the municipality does not actually have a setaside ordinance, and that there are ‘loopholes’ in the ordinance,” Van Hise wrote in the memo. “Rumors and conspiracy theories have been exacerbated in news reports and on social media based upon incomplete facts and inaccuracies that continue to be spread.” Van Hise said Tuesday that the town worked closely with Fair Share Housing on the agreement. “Princeton has a very good relationship with them. Council was committed to providing affordable housing. There

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was nothing that was done to negate the efforts of the former Borough,” he said. “Amending the ordinance was necessary to bring it up to date with current legal requirements [from the State of New Jersey]. It was not intentional by Council or staff or professionals. This is not something we intentionally adopted to dis-incentivize affordable housing. The town went above and beyond to create overlays [extending zones where more affordable units can be created]. The language was deliberative and went through all the court requirements. It is accurate.” In the memo, Van Hise wrote, “As an initial matter, despite some of the (incorrect) assertions in the public, please be assured that Princeton does in fact have a municipal-wide mandatory affordable housing set-aside ordinance in place.” He further goes into the background of the town’s affordable housing obligations to explain why it was necessary to bring the former Borough’s ordinance into compliance w ith current legal requirements, and to expand it to the entire consolidated municipality. The memo concludes by recommending that a planning study be undertaken “to evaluate any fur ther sites that could develop without providing an affordable housing set aside. While the ordinance meets the necessary legal requirements, a planning analysis is necessary to determine what

other sites, if any, are likely to develop outside of the mandatory set-aside provisions of Ordinance 202015.” “I believe Council will be doing a more formalized study. Their overall goal is to capture as many affordable units are possible,” Van Hise said. —Anne Levin

Historical Society Digitizes At-Risk Oral History Recordings

The Historical Society of Princeton ( HSP) has successfully digitized approximately 300 at-risk audio cassette oral histor y recordings in HSP’s archival collection, making these resources newly available to researchers, with funding support from the New Jersey Historical Commission. Preservation concerns had previously rendered these cassettes, many of which are almost 50 years old, unplayable and thus inaccessible to HSP patrons. “Since use accelerates a cassette’s deterioration, the Library of Congress now recommends that audiocassettes and other vintage recordings be played as little as possible in order to maximize their lifespan,” said Stephanie Schwartz, HSP curator of collections and research. “Even with such precautions, the average cassette only lasts between 10 to 30 years before it degrades completely. Many of the cassettes that HSP digitized fell far beyond this range, making their immediate preservation a priority.” Funding from the New Jersey Historical Commission, a department of state, enabled HSP to engage

NEW BOARD LEADER: D&R Greenway announced that Peter Dawson, shown third from left at the organization’s recent Trails to Table event, is the new chair of the board of trustees. Shown with Dawson, from left, are Adrienne Rodewald, Kristin Dawson, Linda Mead, and Cindy Taylor. a professional vendor to create high-quality digital files from these delicate recordings. With the tapes digitized, the recordings are now available to researchers and HSP staff for innumerable important and engaging public history uses. Collections transferred include interviews conducted by the Princeton History Project, an oral history initiative during the 1970s and 1980s that documented the stories of Princeton residents alive at the turn of the century; interviews conducted by author Jamie Sayen in the 1970s with Albert Einstein’s Princeton friends and colleagues that provide an intimate look at a man with New Jersey connections and worldwide appeal; and oral histories from the residents of Princeton’s historic African American and Italian American communities, including interviews conducted by author Kathryn Watterson for her award-winning book I Hear

My People Singing: Voices of African American Princeton, publ i s h e d by t h e Princeton University Press in 2017. “Oral histories are critical resources. They provide records of individuals and perspectives not otherwise represented in our collection or the historical narrative at large. They help us to humanize the study of the past,” said Izzy Kasdin, executive director of the Historical Society of Princeton. “We are so pleased to have been able to complete this project, as part of our overall goals to continue to expand the breadth and diversity of history accessible to Princetonians and the research community at large.” HSP staff are regularly adding new catalog records documenting the digitized interviews to HSP’s online database. Researchers can reach out to HSP’s Collections Department at stephanie@princetonhistory.org for additional assistance.

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high-quality project, so having a lot of architects involved will lead to a better result,” Wilkes said. “It also spreads the workload a bit.” It has been nearly eight years since California businessman David Eichler won the bidding for the property, which was home to the post office for 78 years. Plans for Triumph to relocate to the site were announced in 2016. But several is sues, involving easements encroaching on municipal property and protected state park land, were among the factors that stalled final approval of the deal. “It took a year to get permits out of the state, but we’re now fully permitted,” said Wilkes. “COVID put a real monkey wrench in the process. Everyone was working from home. The only benefit of COVID is that there are fewer people on Palmer Square. So we’re hoping to get a lot done before everything opens up again.” The entry to the new restaurant will be located in the rear of the building, where the post office’s loading dock was located. Plans call for the main hall to become the dining room. The basement and former mail sorting area will also be used. Plans have also included a widened sidewalk, benches, and the planting of trees. E ich ler a nd Tr iu mph owner Adam Rechnitz have pledged to preserve the historic character of the building, which is the oldest on Palmer Square, while adapting it for use as a restaurant. The post office was built in 1937 and contains a mural entitled “America Under the Palms.” The mural, which became controversial because of the way it depicts Native Americans, is to remain, the owners said at the time of approval. “There is a high degree of difficulty, because it’s a historic building,” said Wilkes. “But it’s not a large building. We’re trying to pack a lot in – a brewery, restaurant, and bars. We’re working in Palmer Square, so we’re under the microscope all day long. There’s not a lot of room for sloppiness.” Triumph has been located in a former bowling alley on Nassau Street for 27 years. The company has additional restaurants in Red Bank, and New Hope, Pa. All are currently closed due to the pandemic. —Anne Levin

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Russell Elected President of both British and American, health equity in the United Princeton Battlefield Society men and women, enslaved States. This action is the

Michael Russell was elected president of the Princeton Battlefield Society at its February 23 board meeting. Russell has been a teacher in New Jersey for the past 22 years. As a Society trustee since 2018, Russell has served as the Site Committee chairman and chair of its annual Clean Up Day. Additionally, he was co-director of the 2019 “Experience the Battle of Princeton.” Russell steps into the role of president with praises for Jerry Hurwitz, who served as president for the past 20 years. “Jerry was synonymous with the Princeton Battlefield Societ y,” said Russell. “He guided our Society through difficult years of re-organization coupled with a multi-year struggle to protect the battlefield from real estate encroachment. His role in the recruitment of support from the American Battlefield Trust led to the purchase of almost 15 acres of land on which George Washington rallied his troops to defeat the British Regulars. He was instrumental in preserving the history of the Princeton Battlefield.” The board has given Hurwitz the title of president emeritus. The Princeton Battlefield Society is celebrating its 50 th anniversary in 2021. “We have embarked on a Spirit of American Campaign,” Russell said, “that will focus visitors on our Revolutionary War history and the importance of Washington’s victory at Princeton in the cause of independence. A key part of this campaign will be developing plans for the Princeton Battlefield Society to contribute to the celebration of our nation’s 250 th anniversary in 2026.” The Princeton Battlefield Society is currently completing a new “Battle of Princeton Exhibit” in the historic Thomas Clarke House museum, which is fully funded by its History & Heritage Fund. In addition, plans are underway to continue its development of Eyewitness of the American Revolution cards, offering voices from common soldiers and civilians,

and free who were affected by the local battle. “My roadmap for our future will be based on inclusiveness and outreach, with our trustees and volunteers, the state’s DEP, members, donors, and friends as our par t ners,” s aid Rus s ell. “Education will take center stage as will the preservation of the Clarke House and the battlefield. I invite anyone who is interested in supporting or working with us to reach out. We need you.” Reelected in January were Ben Strong as vice president, Tom Pyle as treasurer, and Rosemary Kelley as secretary. Kim Gallagher was also elected as a new trustee. The Princeton Battlefield Society is the Officially Recognized Friends Organization of the Princeton Battlefield State Park. In support of the battlefield’s designation as a national historic site, its mission ref lects commitments to protection, preservation, and promotion of the battlefield and American Revolution through education. Visit pbs1777.org for more information.

first company update following the August 2020 announcement of commitments of $150 million each by BMS and the Bristol Myers Squibb Foundation to diversity and inclusion. Locally, the grant to the Henry J. Austin Health Center shows the company’s support for the people and patients of Central New Jersey — particularly the more vulnerable and underserved minority residents in Trenton — many of whom are neighbors in need.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 3, 2021 • 14

Mailbox HIP Calls for Systemic Changes to Address Challenges Faced by Low-Income Households

To the Editor: For more than 15 years, Housing Initiatives of Princeton (HIP) has embraced the idea of “neighbors helping neighbors” to ensure that Princeton is a diverse community where low-income families can thrive. We remain thankful for the many neighbors who have helped us in that effort. During the COVID-19 crisis, we’ve received significant support from the town through its Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds, foundations, businesses, congregations, and individuals. With this support, we have been able to help more than 160 households in and around Princeton — the vast majority with young children — evade eviction during the pandemic. As we acknowledge this support and the benefits it has produced, we also need to acknowledge the structural challenges that the pandemic has laid bare and call for systemic changes to address them. Long before COVID-19 disrupted our lives and economy, there was a significant shortage of rental homes available to the 26 percent of New Jersey renter households that are extremely low-income – earning at or below the federal poverty line. Nearly 3/4 of such households pay more than 30 percent of their household income in housing costs, making it challenging for them to afford other basic needs like food, health care, and educational supports, and more likely to face eviction. Increasing the number of affordable housing units can help address this challenge, and the emerging Princeton plans for new affordable housing are signs of progress that HIP welcomes. Another systemic challenge is in the form of restrictions on how the federal CDBG funds can be distributed. These HUD funds can temporarily cover rental payments for struggling households. Payments go directly to landlords. The vast majority of landlords have shown a willingness to negotiate lower payments with HIP in the midst of this crisis. In order to qualify for this assistance, the applicant must be named on a valid lease. Many of our neighbors, especially those with undocumented status, are not named on leases despite contributing towards rental payments and are, therefore, not eligible for assistance. Although lacking documentation, undocumented immigrants contribute more than $500 million in taxes annually in New Jersey ― more than $31 million in Mercer County alone. Yet, they are not eligible for any of the state and federal pandemic relief. HIP believes that providing a statement signed by the leaseholder to whom they are paying rent, stipulating their address and monthly contribution towards rent, should suffice. HIP wants to ensure that policymakers at the state and federal level — and the voters who send them there — understand how vulnerable many of our neighbors are. We are encouraged by the fact that recent guidelines for

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rental assistance from the U.S. Treasury enable applicants to self-attest in cases where they do not have standard documentation. Public policies should not impose requirements that make them ineligible for vital supports that help meet basic needs and also protect the public health of the broader community. CAROL GOLDEN Chair, on behalf of the Board of Housing Initiatives of Princeton Mercer Street

Former Council Member Offers Theory for Loophole in Affordable Housing Settlement

To the Editor: As a former member of the Princeton Council, I voted for the 2019 affordable housing settlement agreement in which the former Borough’s 20 percent set-aside requirement for as-of-right multifamily development was eliminated in favor of set asides only for projects that require some kind of zoning relief, such as a variance. I want to apologize for my mistake. I only skimmed the document and did not realize the loophole was added to weaken the requirement. There is no excuse for my carelessness. My theory for how the language ended up in the document is that the settlement agreement used boilerplate language and the change was an oversight. Given the length and complexity of the agreement and the many pressing issues that were hashed out near the end, this makes the most sense to me. Nearly every official action taken by the Council is accompanied by a memo by staff or legal counsel summarizing or explaining it. It was totally uncharacteristic for the change to have been inserted without explanation. There was no discussion. This does not relieve my responsibility to read the agreement carefully. I was given the document for review in draft form and still didn’t notice. But it may help explain how the loophole remained in the ordinance the Council adopted in April 2020. It was only during a recent site plan review for the proposed “as-of-right” development on the Griggs corner site that Council members became aware of the loophole that took the developer off the hook for affordable housing. It is particularly distressing that the Griggs Corner developer is now proposing to eliminate affordable units in their project given Palmer Square’s history of forcible displacement of a Black neighborhood that is still an open wound for many in the community. Apparently, the developer had originally proposed to include one affordable unit but then withdrew that plan when they realized the ordinance had changed. But there is nothing to prevent the developer from including one or two affordable units. It is one thing to be compelled to do the right thing by law. Another possibility is to do it voluntarily as a good citizen. Affordable units still generate income, just not quite as much. The new building would be profitable even with one or two affordable units — witness that the calculation to buy the property was made before it was known that the 20 percent requirement was no longer operative. Others may have differing recollections or a different understanding. I offer my own perspective because I feel terrible I carelessly overlooked the important passage and I want to come clean to the public and say again how sorry I am. I know the current Council will work to rectify the oversight for future developments. I hope the Griggs Corner developer will reverse their decision to capitalize on the mistake. JENNY CRUMILLER Library Place

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Princeton Community Housing Thanks Virtual Event Speakers, Supporters

To the Editor: At the Princeton Community Housing (PCH) virtual event on Wednesday, February 24, Dr. Eddie Glaude Jr., author of Begin Again: James Baldwin’s Urgent America and its Urgent Lessons for Our Own, proposed a new kind of social contract for Princeton. This social contract was discussed by Dr. Glaude and the Rev. Lukata Mjumbe, pastor of the Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church and trustee of PCH. Dr. Glaude spoke about the need to shift the frame and recognize that social and moral justice is not a philanthropic or charitable enterprise. Racial equality is not something that we give — we need to talk to one another and address this together. He encouraged the Princeton community to assert a different kind of moral and social contract between its citizens. Dr. Glaude expressed this contract as a broad, public infrastructure of care that is focused on addressing basic needs such as housing, health care and mental health services, education, and jobs. PCH organized this discussion to raise awareness of the need to confront racial injustice and to raise funds for PCH’s COVID-19 Emergency Rent Relief Fund to support PCH residents who have been economically impacted by the pandemic. Since June 2020, PCH has provided a total of 63 months of rent relief. We are immensely grateful to Dr. Glaude, who not only contributed his time to the event but also made a very generous personal donation to the Emergency Rent Relief Fund. We also would like to extend our gratitude and appreciation to Rev. Mjumbe for contributing his time, knowledge, and the local perspective that guided the conversation. This included raising questions asked by attendees, speaking about the Princeton community, including our past and current shortcomings in racial equality, and drawing parallels between Paul Robeson and James Baldwin. This event would not have been possible without the more than 120 supporters of PCH who attended and contributed over $16,000 to the COVID-19 Emergency Rent Relief Fund. Thank you! Please go to PCHHomes.org if you wish to support the Relief Fund. Dr. Glaude closed the event by stating that an infrastructure of care is a framework that has to happen across the country, but that there is no better place to begin that process than a town like Princeton. PCH looks forward to continuing to work collaboratively with our community to build this infrastructure. ED TRUSCELLI Executive Director, Princeton Community Housing, on behalf of the Board of Trustees

Books Mimi Schwartz Discusses The result is both deeply af“Good Neighbors” March 3 fecting and full of surprises.”

Author Mimi Schwartz will discusses her book, Good Neighbors, Bad Times Revisited: New Echoes of My Father’s German Village, with Ingrid Reed, in a Labyrinth Library livestream event via Zoom, Wednesday, March 3, from 7 to 8 p.m. For link to register, visit labyrinthbooks. com. Ten years after the publication of her original memoir, Good Neighbors, Bad Times, Schwartz received a letter from 88-year-old Max Sayer in South Australia. In 1937, months after Schwartz’s family had fled the Nazis, Sayer’s Catholic family moved five houses from where the Schwartz family had lived. Eighty-three years later, Schwartz and Sayer began an ongoing conversation as “virtual neighbors,” exchanging their village stories across oceans and time, through two different windows of history. Ingrid Reed, a veteran interviewer about New Jersey public affairs, lived four houses away from Schwartz in Glen Acres. Their 50-year friendship, which began in the planned integrated Princeton neighborhood, offers a third window to explore the meaning of “neighbor” then — and its lessons for us as neighbors today. According to Phillip Lopate, author of Getting Personal and The Art of the Personal Essay, “Mimi Schwartz has found a fresh way to write about the unspeakable loss of the Holocaust: her humor, warm humanity and honesty, her appetite for contradiction and irony, sparkle on every page.

Schwartz is a memoirist essayist and professor emerita in the writing program at Richard Stockton University. Her essays have been widely anthologized, and seven of them have been listed as Notables in the Best American Series.

Wallmark Talks About “Code Breaker” March 9

Children’s book author Laurie Wallmark will discuss her new picture book biography, Code Breaker, Spy Hunter: How Elizebeth Friedman Changed the Course of Two World Wars in a virtual event on Tuesday, March 9 at 6 p.m. To register, visit labyrinthbooks.com. Besides discussing code breaker Fr ied man, who smashed Nazi spy rings, took down gangsters, and created the CIA’s first cryptology unit, Wallmark will talk about the process of writing children’s books and getting them published, and will answer audience questions. Kirkus Reviews comments: “Youngsters will be fascinated by this engaging biographical selection of an original thinker, which includes elements of STEM and history and provides a picture of a dedicated, resilient woman.” Award -w in n ing aut hor Wallmark has written picturebook biographies of women in STEM fields ranging from computer science to mathematics, from astronomy to code breaking. She is a former software engineer and computer science professor. Her previous books include Hedy Lamar’s Double Life: Hollywood Legend and Brilliant Inventor.


15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, maRCh 3, 2021

MUSIC revIew

Princeton Symphony Orchestra Presents Second Virtual Collaboration with South African String Ensemble

P

r i n ce ton S y mphony O rch e s t ra continued its musical partnership with the Buskaid Soweto String Ensemble of South Africa this past week with a concert entitled Soulful and Scintillating Solos, launched Friday and running through the weekend. The Buskaid concert included works of classical composers Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ernest Bloch, and Camille Saint-Saëns, along with American popular music and traditional South African selections. As with the first Soweto String Ensemble broadcast earlier this winter, the performance featured members of the Ensemble as instrumental and vocal soloists. It is difficult to imagine that one of Mozart’s most iconic chamber works was composed as “background” music to an 18 th -century social event, but that may well be the case with the popular Eine Kleine Nachtmusik. Composed in 1787, this four-movement work was likely intended by the composer as a notturno, a chamber piece played late at night at a social gathering. Mozart appears to have given the piece its famous subtitle to differentiate it from a serenade, played earlier in the evening. Regardless of the work’s genesis, the musical themes of Eine Kleine Nachtmusik have remained among Mozart’s most recognizable. Led by conductor Rosemary Nalden and playing from memory, the string players of the Buskaid Soweto String Ensemble played the first movement of Mozart’s Nachtmusik crisply and decisively, leaning into appoggiaturas and demonstrating graceful dynamic swells. Nalden provided effectively supple conducting gestures when required, and the players communicated well among themselves, showing that they had been playing together for a long time. This performance was taken from a 2019 archive, recorded (as were all the works on this program) in the Linder Auditorium of the Wits Education Campus in Johannesburg, South Africa. S oweto St r ing E nsemble v iolinist Mzwandile Twala was featured in a 2018 archival performance of Ernest Bloch’s Nigun, arranged by contemporary French pianist Yves Henry. Composed in 1923, Nigun is the second piece of Baal Shem: Three Pictures of Hassidic Life triptych, which Bloch composed in memory of his mother. Soloist Twala began playing violin at the age of 3 and has studied violin and chamber music in the United Kingdom as well as through the Buskaid curriculum. The word “Nigun” refers to improvisation or melody, and throughout the one-movement piece, Twala maintained the improvisatory flavor of the music within a dark and mournful character. The solo part of the second

section was Gypsy-like, accompanied by punctuation from the orchestra alternating between pointed and delicate. Both String Ensemble and Twala maintained relentless intensity throughout the work in a continuous stream of sound, as the piece effectively faded away at the end. Nineteenth-century Spanish composer Pablo de Sarasate is not as well-known as other Romantic-era composers for solo violin, but Sarasate stretched the repertory with Navarra, a piece for two solo violins and orchestra. For the 2014 performance of Sarasate’s work (as arranged by British composer Michael Pilkington), Buskaid drew on childhood friends and long-time members Simiso Radebe and Kabelo Monnathebe. It was clear in Buskaid’s performance of this piece that the technical demands on each soloist were equal — Sarasate’s work is truly a showcase for two virtuoso violins. Radebe and Monnathebe were frequently in clean and well-tuned thirds through the piece, while conductor Nalden led the orchestral accompaniment in a lively 6/8 tempo. The two soloists almost always played in tandem, with one or the other occasionally breaking into lightning-speed scales, leading to a swirling finish. Pianist Melvyn Tan once again was showcased with the String Ensemble in a 2018 archival recording of Camille Saint Saëns’ Wedding Cake — CapriceValse for Piano and Strings. The piece started right off with solo piano, as Tan played flowing scales with relentless energy. Throughout the work, Tan played with a light touch and great attention to accuracy, with the Ensemble providing graceful accompaniment. or the closing half of the concert, the Soweto String Ensemble turned its attention to popular music of both America and South Africa. Vocal soloist Mathapelo Matabane performed songs of Irving Berlin and Rodgers & Hart expressively, followed by a rich interpretation of the traditional spiritual “Sinnerman” as arranged by Nina Simone, from concerts recorded in 2016 and 2017. Matabane was well accompanied in these songs by the String Ensemble, some of whom also sang in the Simone arrangement, and proved herself again to be a break-out star of the Buskaid program. The South African pieces presented were spirited and full of movement by the players, especially “Kwela Kwela,” featuring vocalists Cecelia Manyama and Tumi Mapholo. In this selection, the string players demonstrated an amazing ability to play and dance simultaneously, clearly enjoying themselves thoroughly while showing the depth of talent within the Soweto String Ensemble. —Nancy Plum

F

Princeton Symphony Orchestra will present its next virtual concert on Sunday, March 7 at 4 p.m. Led by PSO Music Director Rossen Milanov and featuring harpist Alexander Boldachev, this concert will include music of Respighi, Smetana, Piazzolla, and Puccini, as well as two works by harpist Boldachev. The Buskaid Soweto String Ensemble will be featured again March 26-28, with music of Vaughan Williams, Mussorgsky, and Grieg. Information about accessing these performances can be found on the Princeton Symphony website at princetonsymphony.org.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 3, 2021 • 16

book Review

I

The Maze and Amaze of Life: Celebrating Lawrence Ferlinghetti (1919-2021)

magine this scene from a gone world: a live event is underway at San Francisco’s City Lights Bookstore. The owner is reciting a passage from Americus: Book 1 (New Directions 2004). It’s the summer of 2004, you can hear fog horns and there’s a North Beach mist steaming the windows. Projected on the wall next to Lawrence Ferlinghetti as he reads is the final moment of the silent film that gave the store its name. Make this an audience for the ages, a gathering worthy of the poet publisher of City Lights whose subject is the “eternal dialogue echoing through the centuries of all the voices that ever sang or wrote.” Everyone’s feeling the “maze and amaze of life” when Chaplin gazes into the astonished eyes of the once-blind flower girl the moment she realizes that the rich handsome benefactor she’s imagined is a pathetic little tramp. He’s gone to great and hilariously exhausting lengths raising money to help pay for the operation that restored her sight and all he’s got to show for it is the flower she has just gently, sweetly, patronizingly bestowed on him, and yet he’s smiling as he holds the flower to his face, using it to hide the wretched, Chaplinesque wonder of a smile that made Einstein weep, a smile in synch with the words the white-bearded 84-year-old poet is reciting, “a sound of weeping beyond reason, a pianist playing in the ruins of Prague, a London fog.” In his brief preface to the 60th anniversary edition of Pictures of the Gone World (City Lights 1955), Ferlinghetti remembers “the unique San Francisco consciousness of the 1950s” and the “freshness of perception that only young eyes have in the dandelion bloom of youth.” At the moment I’m thinking of 1958 when the then-39-year-old clean-shaven Ferlinghetti was a few blocks away reading from A Coney Island of the Mind (New Directions 1958), with the Cellar Jazz Quintet. I’m realizing that I never felt as close to the man or his poetry as I do now that he’s “no longer with us.” “A State of Change” In his brief preface to “Oral Messages,” Part 2 of Coney Island of the Mind, Ferlinghetti advises the reader that the poems “were conceived specifically for jazz accompaniment ... rather than written for the printed page. As a result of continued experimental live readings, they are still in a state of change.” Going to Ferlinghetti after last week’s bicentenary celebration of Keats is like moving from one live performance to another.

The two poets died a day and 200 years apart, Keats on February 23, 1821, Ferlinghetti on February 22, 2021, yet as soon as you open Coney Island of the Mind, you feel the presence of Keats, whether “silent / upon a peak in Darien” in the second poem; “where no birds sang” in the sixth, or “waiting for the fleeing lovers on the Grecian Urn to catch each other up” in the first of the seven “Oral Messages.” And in case you thought the “chameleon poet” was being treated too gently, “the Beautiful Dame Without Mercy” is pictured “picking her nose” in “Autobiography”: “She did not speak English / She had yellow hair / and a hoarse voice / And no bird sang.” The Poetry of Theft Five decades later in Americus Book 1, Ferlinghetti states his motive at the outset: “To sum mar ize t he past by theft and allusion / with a parasong a palimpsest / a ma nu s cre e d w r it over.” At the back of the book, he actually provides five pages of notes documenting the various “thefts.” The sightings of Keats in Coney Island of the Mind need no documentation, however, being no more “stolen” than Chaplin’s smile at the end of City Lights or the theme of Keats’s breakthrough sonnet “On First Looking Into Chapman’s Homer,” a poem inspired by one poet’s “ b or row ing” from another. The Ultimate Road Show Quoted on the City Lights home page, Ferlinghetti pitches Americus Book 1 as his own born-in-the-U.S.A. epic, “part documentary, part public pillow talk, part personal epic — a descant, a canto unsung, a banal history, a true fiction, lyric

and political.” Get beyond the jacket copy litany to the book itself and it’s “All the images of the splendid life of the world .... a trillion trillion images, kaleidoscopic in a psychedelic tropic (later boiled down to a seminar topic).” The big show really begins in Part III, which could be called “Two Hundred Ways of Looking at Poetry,” with Homer kicking off the festivities “looking like Odysseus drifting over oceans and tilled fields.” Addressing the multitudes “in wild demonic demotic Greek,” Homer begins with a nod to Walt Whitman, “your greatest soul speaker” and all “his wild children.” As the “great rapper” raps on, with instant profiles of Pound, “Doc Williams,” and a long incantation of denunciation that takes in “bedroom visionaries,” “poetry workshop poets,” “masters of the sawmill haiku,” and “poetry critics drinking the blood of the poet,” Homer finally delivers his “burning answer ... as to what poetry can be (which I being blind can see better than thou)”. W hat follows is a rapid-fire scattering of shots of insight from the Ferlinghetti hip on poetr y, po ets, poems. Who says Homer’s blind? There are no misses worth mentioning; you may as well count the number of times Chaplin doffs his derby, twirls his cane, or delivers a kick. Here’s a small sample: “Poetry’s a player piano in an abandoned seaside casino, still playing ... a mute melody in the head of every dumb animal ... the anarchy of the senses making sense ... worth nothing and therefore invaluable ... the voice of the Fourth Person Singular ... the face behind the face of the race ... a strange form of insanity tempered by erotic bliss ... Any child who

can catch a firefly owns poetry... The poet is a trance-dancer in the Last Waltz...” At the end, Ferlinghetti sees poetry as “the last refuge of humanity in dark times” and the poet “by definition the natural born non-violent [his emphasis] enemy of the State.” “Pity the Nation” A few evenings ago I turned on the radio just in time to hear WPRB’s tribute to Lawrence Ferlinghetti, which began with Dexter Gordon and Wardell Gray dueling deep into the white hot excitement of “The Hunt” before a howling cheering ecstatic crowd in mid-century Central Avenue L.A. After Billie Holiday (“Lady Sings the Blues”) and Bird and Diz (“Bloomdido”), Ferlinghetti appears reading “Pity the Nation.” He may sound like a raspy-voiced old poet of the blues, but he’s not singing, he’s testifying, with the authority of 88 years on the scene: “Pity the nation whose people are sheep ... whose shepherds mislead them ... whose leaders are liars ... whose sages are silenced” and “whose bigots haunt the airwaves.” “Pity the nation that knows no other language but its own and no other culture but its own” and “whose breath is money.” You can see Ferlinghetti read it in full, on YouTube. The poem was written during the George W. Bush administration. The Acrobat Quoted in The Independent in May 1998, Ferlinghetti says Charlie Chaplin’s character “represents for me the spirit of Eros, the very definition of a poet — the love-seeking, freedom-seeking spirit.” Here he is in A Coney Island of the Mind: “Constantly risking absurdity and death,” the poet “like an acrobat climbs on rime / to a high wire of his own making / and balancing on eyebeams / above a sea of faces / paces his way / to the other side of day.” At the end the poet acrobat is “a little charleychaplin man” who “may or may not catch” Beauty’s “fair eternal form.” erlinghetti ends “Pity the nation”: “oh pity the people who allow their rights to erode and their freedoms to be washed away.” The last lines, with Ferlinghetti’s emphasis: “My country, tears of thee / Sweet land of liberty.” —Stuart Mitchner A fuller picture of Ferlinghetti can be found in the August 28, 2019 book review headed, “Still Going Strong at 100.”

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17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 2021

Performing Arts

ANNIVERSARY PRODUCTION: Princeton alumni Tessa Albertson, Class of 2020 (foreground), and Jake Austin Robertson, Class of 2015, are featured in The Wild Project’s production of Samuel Beckett’s “Happy Days,” produced in association with Princeton University’s Fund for Irish Studies. (Photo courtesy of The Wild Project)

ROMANCE GONE WRONG: Andrea Burns, shown here with cinematographer Hudson Flynn, who happens to be her son, stars in “Bad Dates,” the first show of George Street Playhouse’s streamed season. The film tells of a budnation for her portrayal of Actor, Husband, and Son Collaborate to Stream Play Gloria Fajardo in Broad- ding filmmaker and hope-

Broadway actor Andréa Burns stars in the first show of George Street Playhouse’s 2021 streaming season with the premiere of Theresa Rebeck’s Bad Dates, running through March 14. The fulllength, filmed production features direction by Peter Flynn, husband of Burns, and cinematography and editing by their son, Hudson Flynn. “Creating this production was a true family affair,” said Artistic Director David Saint. “Thanks to a generous GSP board member granting us use of her home as a filming location, our star, director, and cinematographer were able to form a safe familial ‘bubble’ and film this one-of-a-kind production from the ground up. We hope patrons will join us as subscribers this year as we work to create high-quality theatre in exciting new ways.” A one - woma n com e dy ab out a s i ngle m om i n search of cute shoes, the perfect dress, and a romantic table for two at a great restaurant, Bad Dates is a funny and hopeful tale of dates gone wrong and looking for Mr. Right. George S t r e e t P l ay h o u s e ov e r saw and maintained strict testing protocols and safety procedures. Burns received an Outer Critics Circle Award nomi-

way’s On Your Feet. She also received a Drama Desk Award for her creation of the role of the hairdresser Daniela in In the Heights and will appear in Steven Spielberg’s upcoming film version of West Side Story. Starting March 23, the season continues with the hit comedy Fully Committed by Becky Mode starring Maulik Pancholy. Tickets for each show can be purchased for $33 per household at GeorgeStreetPlayhouse.org. Patrons can also subscribe to all four shows this season for $132.

Lawrence Filmmaker Selected For Garden State Film Festival

Celebrating its 19th anniversar y March 23 –28, the Garden State Film Festival (GSFF) celebrates the independent film genre by bringing a carefully curated selection of original works to a diverse audience from around the world. Producers are working with F&S Digital again to make GSFF 2021 a hybrid virtual and live event. Among the selection of over 300 feature length and short films, videos, documentaries, comedies, children’s, thrillers, student films and “home-grown” films shot in New Jersey, the film Saudade, directed by Lawrenceville resident Yanis Carreto, will screen at this year’s festival.

less nostalgic who loses all of her life’s work, along with years of treasured family photos and home movies, in a swift computer accident. While grieving the loss and seeking a way to cope, she packs a bag and sets off for Cuba, where she recovers something she never even had — but somehow missed more than anything. “We are extremely proud to present Saudade as a part of our 19th Annual Film Festival, and to share this work with our global audience,” said Lauren Concar Sheehy, the festival’s executive director. Saudade will screen on March 28 at The Mayfair, live stream only. All scheduled film screenings will be presented by live streaming online in a digital format with selected live in-person events and will include world premieres, celebrities, industry panels, par ties, and networking along with entertainment for all. Check the schedule for show times and to see which films are screening in-person. The GSFF will screen over 300 films from 25 various countries. For a full schedule of events, visit gsff.org.

Project of New York’s East Village in association with Princeton University’s Fund for Irish Studies, is being shown via free Zoom webinar on Friday, March 5 at 4:30 p.m., in recognition of this modernist masterpiece’s 60th anniversary. The Wild Project and director Nico Krell are revitalizing the mysterious work. In a rare exception allowed only during the global pandemic, the performance has been recorded and will be broadcast online, translated to the screen by a team of artists working on the cutting edge of digital theater. The Wild Project will present six more showings of the film March 5 through 13, with a recommended donation of $25. In the ultimate emblem of perseverance, Beckett’s Wi n n i e, h e lpl e s s ly b u r ied up to her waist in the ground, endures the wearisome humdrum of endless, interchangeable days. And now, speaking to an audience who has faced a year of quarant ine, t he play

endures as well. It is directed by Princeton alumnus Nico Krell and features alumni Tessa Albertson and Jake Austin Robertson. For more information and to register, visit arts.princeton.edu/happy-days.

Virtual Classes Continue at Westrick Music Academy

Westrick Music Academy (WMA), home of Princeton Girlchoir and Princeton Boychoir, is currently enrolling students of all ages in a variety of music education classes, exploring new and engaging ways to build and streng then musicianship skills. For musicians in grades 3-12, a variety of classes are offered for all levels. Students can learn how to relax and strengthen muscles while focusing on the slow, deep breathing used in singing with Yoga for Singers. In Musical Theater Fun, young artists will engage in activities focused on singing techniques, character development, acting skills, and dance /choreography

in preparation for a final showcase performance. In the Ukulele group class, students w ill build their musicianship while learning to play traditional songs on one of the most delightful instruments. In a group setting, students enjoy social interaction and regular informal performance opportunities as their skills grow. Students can also take indiv idual voice lessons to grow their singing and performance skills. WMA’s teachers create a fun, engaging environment that facilitates learning and encourages musical growth. I n G r o u p U ke l e l e for Adults, basic chords and strumming techniques are the focus. WMA also looks forward to hosting a Comedy Improv Workshop this term. This highly interactive, one-day class is open to anyone of any experience level. For more information, visit WestrickMusic.org/education.

Beckett’s “Happy Days” Stars Princeton University Alums

A filmed production of Samuel Beckett’s Happy Days, produced by The Wild

TIME TO ENROLL: Westrick Music Academy is getting ready to begin Term 4 virtual music classes for groups and individuals of all ages.

SPRING 2021 LECTURE SERIES MARCH 5

Screening of filmed version of Happy Days by Samuel Beckett for The Wild Project, directed by Nico Krell ’18 and featuring Jake Robertson ’15 and Tessa Albertson ’20

4:30 p.m. via Zoom BOLLYWOOD TO HOLLYWOOD: The Arts Council of Princeton celebrates International Women’s Day on Monday, March 8 with a dance workshop led by Bollywood dancer and choreographer Uma Kapoor. In this hour-long, virtual event, participants will learn new moves to favorite songs about girl power including “Single Ladies” and “I Will Survive.” Tickets are $10 and proceeds benefit the Arts Council to help close the gap created by COVID-19. Visit artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Free and open to the public, advance registration required. For more information about the event and to register, visit fis.princeton.edu


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 3, 2021 • 18

31. These camps are generously funded by a grant from Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. The Center for Contemporary Art is located at 2020 Burnt Mills Road in Bedminster. For further information on Summer Art Camps or to register, visit ccabedminster. org or call (908) 234-2345. T he Center is looking for volunteers to s er ve as s u m m er c a mp aides. Aides must be 16 years of age or older and be able to work Monday-Friday for as many weeks as they choose. For more information, contact Rachel Aponte at raponte@ccabedminster. org.

Art

WW Arts Council Hosts Virtual Gala March 13

CALL FOR ART: Arts Festival Volunteer Director Paul Boger has announced that applications for the 2021 Doylestown Arts Festival, scheduled for September 11-12, are now open. Discover Doylestown (Pa.) and the Arts Festival team will be “taking special precautions and initiatives to ensure the safety of everyone involved but remain committed to holding a physical event of some scale, to best support our community and all of you.” For more information, visit dtownartsfestival.com/apply. artists. Small classes, social cartooning, manga/anime, Summer Art Camps at Contemporary Art Center distancing, daily sanitizing, and more.

Registration is underway for Summer Art Camps at The Center for Contemporary Art in Bedminster. Ten weekly in person Summer Art Camps, from June 21 – August 27, are offered for children ages 5-15. The Center’s Summer Art Camps are designed to stimulate creative expression through projects and fun activities that change each week. All sessions are led by professional and creative teaching

and other protocols are in place and enforced to keep your child safe. Each week children ages 5-8 and 9-11 will spend the morning exploring drawing, painting, collage, and other mixed media projects, and pot ter y in t he ceram ics studio. In the afternoon, campers ages 9 -11 w ill explore a wide range of subjects in depth such as drawing, painting, pottery, iPad drawing and painting,

Teens ages 12-15 may choose to spend their mornings or afternoons in an intensive art camp studying a single subject. Each week one teen camp will be offered in a hybrid format, allowing out-of-state teen campers to participate online via Zoom. The Center will also offer camps for children with autism spectrum disorder and other special needs on Saturdays from June 26-July

CONVERSATION

Glenn Ligon and Hilton Als Thursday, March 11, 5:30 p.m. Artist Glenn Ligon, whose work draws on literature and history to explore race, language, desire, and identity, joins Pulitzer Prize–winning author and critic Hilton Als to consider the ways in which art can engage and rethink the most urgent issues of our time.

Stream it live artmuseum.princeton.edu

This event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970. Live closed-captioning for this program is made possible by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

Glenn Ligon. Photo: Paul Mpagi Sepuya; Hilton Als. Photo: Brigitte Lacombe

West Windsor Arts Council is serious about its mission to transform lives through the arts, which is why it is hosting a virtual comedy show as its Annual Gala and Art Auction for 2021. The nonprofit chose humor as the theme for the Saturday, March 13, 7 to 8:30 p.m. event because in times like these, we could all use a good laugh. “Rx: Laughter” is part fundraising gala, part stand-up comedy hour, and part art auction, a lineup that was carefully chosen to keep the presentation moving in a fun yet healing way. “When we laugh, we release feel-good endorphins, which can reduce stress,” said Aylin Green, the art center’s executive director. The event will feature four stand-up comedians, including headliner Tushar Singh, star of the comedy documentary American Hasi, which is available for viewing through the center. Singh has

assembled top talent for the show: colleagues Gilbert Lawand, Amy Shanker, and Corey Ryan Forrester. What’s more, West Windsor Arts Council board member Andrew Morris will serve as the evening’s MC. “We are really excited about this show. Tushar tells funny stories that we can all relate to, with themes ranging from career crisis and rejection to cultural identity and self-realization. His stories about growing up as an Indian American in Huntsville, Alabama, will resonate with just about anyone who has ever felt they didn’t fit in at some point in their lives,” said Green. He is also a talented artist, with family connections to West Windsor, and will be offering a commissioned artwork as part of the art auction. The art auction includes an impressive lineup of artists, who are contributing work in various sizes, mediums, and price points. There will also be a selection of specialty themed baskets featuring

popular goods and services. Anyone can participate in the art auction. No ticket required. Bidding begins on March 8 and ends March 13 at 8:45 p.m. Comedy show tickets are priced at $30 for one or $50 for two. Bistro Boxes, in partnership with the West Windsor Community Farmers’ Market, will also be on sale. Each Bistro Box, priced at $50 for two, contains goodies from Forkin’ Good Nuts, LoRe Pasta, Little Radish, and Terra Momo Bread, as well as a drink recipe, plating challenge, and event swag. For more information and to view the art auction and purchase comedy show tickets and bistro boxes, visit westwindsorarts.org/events. Proceeds from “Rx: Laughter” support WWAC’s education programs benefiting young children, teens, and adults, as well as multidisciplinary arts programming for the community, free of charge whenever possible.

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changes that have happened status of the public health Conversation With Artist Glenn Ligon, Critic Hilton Als this past year, from remote e m e r g e n c y a n d r e l ate d

On Thursday, March 11 at 5:30 p.m., artist Glenn Ligon, whose work draws on literature and history to explore race, language, desire and identity, joins Pulitzer Prize-winning author and critic Hilton Als to discuss the ways in which art can engage and rethink the most urgent issues of our time. Als writes for The New Yorker and is an inaugural Presidential Visiting Scholar at Princeton University for the 2020-21 academic year. This virtual event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970. This program, including live closed - cap tioning in both English and Spanish, is made possible by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts. Registration is free. Visit artmuseum.princeton.edu.

Call for Entries: NJ Teen Media Contest

Teens across the state are invited to submit entries for the 26th Annual New Jersey Teen Media Contest, which highlights New Jersey Department of Human Services’ mission to support families, especially during these challenging times. The contest, run by Hum a n S e r v i c e s’ D iv i s ion of Family Development, is open to all New Jersey middle and high school-age children. This year, the contest will once again accept entries in the hand-painted/ hand- draw n and w rit ten word categories. The 2021 contest challenges teens to illustrate — through art or the written word — how they and their loved ones have supported each other through all of the

schooling to finding new ways to stay connected to friends and family. “These have been challenging times and so much has changed in the world around us,” said Human Services Deputy Commissioner Elisa Neira. “From spending time with our families and loved ones while socially distanced to doing activities on a computer we usually do in-person, this year affected us all in many ways. With that in mind, we again look forward to the creativity of New Jersey teens and to celebrating their talents.” “The contest focuses on celebrating family and the importance of parents and loved ones and their deep involvement in a child’s life,” said Human Services Assistant Commissioner Natasha Johnson, who oversees the Division of Family Development. “The Teen Media Contest has been part of our enduring effort to foster that understanding. Year after year, the entire Human Services team is struck by the creativity, vision, and talent that students bring to the contest. We eagerly anticipate the creative works of this year’s entrants, and how they creatively conceptualize the essence of family.” All entries must be postmarked no later than M a r c h 31, 2021. S t a f f from the Division of Family Development and its Office of Child Support S er v ice s w ill judge t he contest. Winners will be selected in first, second, and third places in both the middle and high school groups, for each of the two entry categories. Typically, winning students are recognized at an awards ceremony in mid-May, but a final decision on an awards ceremony will be made at a later date based on the

health and safety guidelines. Winning entries from the contest will be included in the 2022 Office of Child Support Calendar, as well as potentially being included as part of the office’s marketing materials. A number of honorable mention entries will also be selected for possible inclusion in both areas. The 2021 calendar can be viewed or downloaded from the contest homepage, NJTeenMedia.org, to serve as inspiration for the teens. T he website also provides the official rules, frequently asked questions, entry forms, a look at the winners and honorable mentions from previous contests and other important contest information.

Area Exhibits Check websites for information on safety protocols. A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Lyrical 2021” March 4 through April 4. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com.

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19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 2021

“LOCKS ON THE CANAL”: An exhibit of photographic images by Joseph DeFay will be showcased at Bell’s Tavern Dining Room, 183 North Union Street, Lambertville, from March 10 through the end of April. The images, which focus on unique color and textures often overlooked, present the simpler aspects of everyday life seen with renewed beauty in a new perspective. DeFay is an exhibiting member of Artists’ Gallery in Lambertville.

Arts Council of Prince to n , 102 Wit herspoon Street, has “Legends of the Arts: A Black History Month Exhibit” through March 6. Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. artscouncilofprinceton.org. D & R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place, has t he ongoi ng virtual galleries “Trail of Breadcr umbs : Nat ure in Fairytales” and “Portraits of Preservation: James Fiorentino Art.” The center is currently closed to the public. drgreenway.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City M u s e u m i n C ad w a lad e r Park, Park s ide Avenu e, Trenton, has “On the Forefront: Trenton’s Junior 1, 1916” through April 24 and “Women Artists, Trenton Style” through June 6. Visit ellarslie.org for museum hours and timed entry tickets. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Rebirth: Kang Muxiang,” “Bruce Beasley: Sixty Year Retrospective, 19602020,” and other exhibits. Hours are Thursday through Monday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Timed tickets required. Indoor buildings are closed to the public. groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “A Virtual Tour of Hamilton’s Princeton” and the “Histor y @ Home” ser ies. princetonhistory.org. H u n te r d o n A r t M u s e u m , 7 L ower Center Street, Clinton, has “Glass in the Expanded Field,” Architectonic: Bruce Dehnert Sculptural Ceramics,” and “Laura Moriarty: Resurfacing” through April 18. hunterdonartmuseum.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., “Fern Coppedge: New Discoveries” through April 18 and “Through the Lens: Modern Photography in the Delaware Valley” through August 15. The museum is open to the public. michenerartmuseum.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “In Nature’s Realm : T he Ar t of G erard Rutgers Hardenberg” through

“BUBBLY”: This painting by Beatrice Bork is featured in “Lyrical 2021,” a multi-artist exhibit on view March 4 through April 4 at the Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville. For more information, visit lambertvillearts.com. January 9 and the online exhibit “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints Of New Jersey, 1761– 1898.” Open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. morven.org. Old Barracks Museum, 101 Barrack Street, Trenton, has the ongoing virtual exhibits “When Women Vote — The Old Barracks and the Anti-Suffrage Movement” and “Necessary and Proper for the Public Good.”

The museum is temporarily closed to the public. barracks.org. Pr inceton Universit y Art Museum has the online exhibits “Looking at 17th -Century Dutch Painting,” “Life Magazine and the Power of Photography,” “The Eclectic Eye: A Tribute to Duane Wilder,” and more, along w it h many online events. The museum is currently closed to the public. artmuseum.princeton.edu.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 3, 2021 • 22

Calendar Wednesday, March 3 10-11:30 a.m.: Princeton Mercer Chamber presents “Navigating the New Administration and What it Means for Business.” Virtual event with panel discussion. Networking with Middlesex County Regional Chamber of Commerce. Princetonmercer.org. 11 a.m. : “Ready, S et, Garden!” with horticulturist Margaret Pickoff, free Zoom event sponsored by Mercer County Library System. mcl. org. 7-8 p.m. Princeton Public Library presents an author talk with local writer Mimi Schwar tz about her new book, 1930s and Today : What Does it Mean to Be a Neighbor: Lessons from my Father’s German Village. In conversation with Ingrid Reed. Princetonlibrary.org.

7 p.m.: Online lecture, “Conversion, Circumcision, and Ritual Murder: A Medieval Mystery, Unraveled.” Free, register at BildnerCenter.Rutgers.edu. Thursday, March 4 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market Winter Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 10 a.m.-12 p.m.: Virtual Veterans Conference and Claims Clinic, sponsored by Assemblyman Andrew Zwicker and the Veterans Affairs Network. Zoom event on VA benefits including compensation, pension, vocational rehabilitation and employ ment, and more. Eventbrite.com. 12 p.m.: “Explaining Positions on Same-Sex Marriage in Europe among Would-be MPs,” webinar presented by P r inceton Un iversit y Institute for International and Regional Studies. Free. Spia.princeton.edu. 12-1:15 p.m.: Princeton Mercer Chamber holds

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virtual monthly membership luncheon, with networking. Speaker is James A. Felton III, vice president for inclusive excellence at The College of New Jersey. Princetonmercer.org. 6-7 p.m.: Pat Foran performs in a Zoom concert for “Save the Sourlands.” $10. Sourland.org. 7 p.m.: “Unsung Heroines: The Role of Women in the American Civil War.” Free Zoom event, presented by Civil War expert Martin Mosho. Sponsored by Friends of West Windsor Library. mcl.org. Friday, March 5 12 p.m.: Gillett G. Griffin Memorial Lecture : Raina L ampk ins - Fielder, S ou ls Grown Deep Foundation. Presented virtually by Princeton University Library. Libcal.princeton.edu. 12-1:30 p.m.: Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber holds a live webinar, “Crisis Communication.” Panelists are from Princeton Strategic Communications. Princetonmercer.org. 4:30 p.m.: A filmed production of Samuel Beckett’s play Happy Days, produced by NYC’s The Wild Project and presented by Princeton University’s Fund for Irish Studies. Free Zoom webinar. Ar ts.pr inceton.edu / happy-days. Saturday, March 6 9 a.m.-12 p.m. and 1-4 p.m.: Friends of Princeton Open Space present Love Your Park Day at Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Preserve. Rescheduled from February 13. Fopos.org. 9:30 a.m.: Science on Saturdays from Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Sophia Gershman, PPPL, “Plasma Science Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic.” Pppl.gov. 10 a.m.: Howell Living History Farm in Hopewell Township sponsors workhorse rides for ages 5-12. Kids will also help with barn chores. Programs are modified to encourage social distancing. Masks must be carried at all times. Howellfarm.org. Sunday, March 7 12 p.m.: Book artist Rick Black discusses his book The Amichai Windows with Rutgers professor Gary A. Rendsburg. Zoom program, free. Register at BildnerCenter.Rutgers.edu. 2 p.m. Signs of Spring Walk w it h hor ticult ur ist Louise Senior, at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. $10 ($5 for Friends of Morven). Rescheduled from February 28. Social distancing observed, wear water resistant shoes. Morven.org. 4 p.m.: Virtual concert by the Princeton Symphony Orchestra with guest harpist Alexander Boldachev. $15. (609) 497-0020 or princetonsymphony.org. Monday, March 8 7 p.m.: “1920: The Year T h at Mad e t h e D e c ad e Roar.” Lewis B. Cuyler lecture from the Historical Society of Princeton, following its annual meeting. Free via Zoom. Princetonhistory.org/ events. Tuesday, March 9 6 p.m.: Labyrinth Books presents Laurie Wallmark, “Code Breaker, Spy Hunter: How Elizebeth Friedman Changed the Course of Two World Wars.” Free Zoom event. Labyrinthbooks.org/ events.

7 p.m.: Arts Council of Princeton “In Conversation” with photographer Robin Resch. Virtual event, free. Artscouncilofprinceton.org. Wednesday, March 10 10 a.m . a n d 5 p.m . : “What’s in Your Grocery Cart? ” webinar from The Suppers Program, by donation. Suppers.wildapricot. org/events. 12 p.m.: “Do Diets Work?” with dietician Heather Bainbridge of Princeton Medical Center. Free Zoom event sponsored by Mercer County Library System. Mcl.org. 7 p.m.: “Changing the Landscape: A Community Discussion About a Sustainable Landscaping Transition,” presented via Zoom by Sustainable Princeton. Free. Sustainableprinceton.org. 7: 30 p.m. : Interact ive Zoom class, “The Origin and Tradition Histor y of Passover and Matsot,” with Professor Alan Cooper, presented by The Jewish Center Princeton. Free. Email info@ thejew ishcenter.org w ith course code COOPER. Thursday, March 11 12-1 p.m.: The Suppers Program holds a Signature Meeting: Eating For Your Health. Webinar, by donation. Suppers.wildapricot. org/events. 5:30 p.m.: Virtual conversation between artist Glenn Ligon and writer Hilton Als, presented by Princeton University Art Museum. Free. Artmuseum.princeton.edu. 7 p.m.: Forest Threats with Rosa Yoo. Free webinar with $5 suggested donation, sponsored by Sourland Conservancy. http://tiny.cc/ SC2021Talks. Friday, March 12 1- 3 p.m . Fr i d ay w i t h Friends, held by the YWCA Princeton Area Newcomers & Friends. Zoom gathering with a featured comedian. RSVP required at ywcaprinceton.org/newcomers. Saturday, March 13 9:30 a.m.: Science on Saturdays from Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Kory Evans, Rice University, “Ecology and Evolution of Teleost Fishes.” Pppl.gov. 1 p.m.: “Passing the Time with Major William Trent.” Video premiere and talk presented digitally by re-enactor Jason Cherry, sponsored by the Trent House Museum. Pay as you wish, a donation of $10 is suggested. Trenthouse.org. 7-8:30 p.m.: West Windsor Arts Council hosts a virtual gala, “Rx: Laughter,” comedy event w ith Tushar Singh and others. Online auction, bistro box, and more. Westwindsorarts. org/event/rx-laughter. Sunday, March 14 3 p.m.: “What’s in Your Grocer y Car t? ” webinar f rom T he S upp ers P ro gram, by donation. Suppers. wildapricot.org/events. 3:14 p.m.: Celebrate Einstein’s birthday and Pi Day with an online interactive Zoom program for kids, presented by Eve Mandel of the Historical Society of Princeton. Co-sponsored by Princeton Public Library. Free, but space is limited. Princetonhistory.org. Monday, March 15 Recycling 7:30 p.m.: Irish Coffee House concert with “Uncle” Gerry Dignan, presented virtually by Voices Chorale NJ. $15. Voiceschoralenj.org.

8 p.m.: Washington Crossing Audubon Society presents “Butterfly Gardening with Native Plants,” online by Jane Hurwitz. Free. Contact.wcas@gmail.com. Tuesday, March 16 6-7:30 p.m.: Funding an Adoption, webinar presented by Adoptions from the Heart. $10 per person or $15 per couple. Afth.org. 7-8 p.m.: “The Irish in the Civil War.” Free Zoom event presented by historical re-enactor and lecturer Michael Jesberger. Sponsored by Mercer County Library System. Mcl.org. 7 p.m. “The Art of the Perfect Cup with Small World Coffee,” presented by the Arts Council of Princeton as a virtual master class. $25-$60, benefits the Arts Council. Artscouncilofprinceton.org. Wednesday, March 17 1 p.m.: Boheme Opera NJ presents “More Than the Barber,” free Zoom event sponsored by Monroe Township Library. Soprano Sungji Kim sings selections by Rossini and Donizetti. Register at monroetwplibrary.org. 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meeting via Zoom. Princetonlibrary.org. Thursday, March 18 9 : 3 0 -11 a .m . : S o c i a l Coffee held by the YWCA Princeton Area Newcomers & Friends. Ywcaprinceton. org/newcomers. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market Winter Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. Leaguelineup.com. 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.: “Get to Know Suppers.” Webinar from The Suppers Program, by donation. Suppers. wildapricot.org/events. Friday, March 19 4:30 p.m.: “Symbols from Within, and Symbols from Without: The Celtic Revival and the Harlem Renais sance,” presented by Princeton University’s Fund for Irish Studies via Zoom. Lecture by Tara Guissin-Stubbs of Oxford University. Arts. princeton.edu. 6 p.m.: Reading by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah and seniors from the Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Creative Writing. Arts.princeton.edu. Saturday, March 20 7-8 p.m.: Virtual St. Patr ick ’s Day Dance Par t y, sponsored by Princeton Special Sports and Programs, Princeton Recreation, Montgomer y Township Recreation, and Franklin Township Parks and Recreation. With DJ Redline Steven Knox. Free, but registration must be by March 18. Leaguelineup.com. Monday, March 21 3 p.m.: Virtual concert: Bach’s 336 th Birthday concert. St. John Passion, the Mardi Considine Spr ing Concert. Small orchestra on 18th century instruments, presented by the Dryden Ensemble. Drydenensemble. org. Tuesday, March 23 5:30 p.m.: The Suppers Program Signature Meeting: Eating For Your Health. Suppers.wildapricot.org/ events. 6 p.m.: Labyrinth Books presents Linda Colley and Maya Jasanoff in Conversation. “The Gun, the Ship, and the Pen: Constitutions, a n d t h e Ma k i ng of t h e

Modern World.” Labyrinthbooks.org/events. 7 p.m.: “T he Working Women of World War II : Rosie and Beyond.” Storyteller Madge Powis is the presenter in this free Zoom event sponsored by Mercer County Library System. Mcl. org. Wednesday, March 24 6 p.m.: Reading by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah and seniors from the Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Creative Writing at Princeton University. Free Zoom webinar. Arts.princeton.edu. 7-8 p.m.: “Cunard Steamships and the Quest for the Perfect Coal.” Free Zoom event sponsored by Mercer County Library System, presented by Dennis Waters. Mcl.org. Thursday, March 25 7 p.m.: “The Rescue of Trenton Transit Co. #288.” Free Zoom event presented by J.R. May, sponsored by Mercer County Library System. Mcl.org. Saturday, March 27 8 a.m.-2 p.m.: Household waste collection and electronics recycling. For Mercer County residents, at Dempster Fire School, 350 Lawrence Station Road. Mcianj. org or (609) 278-8086. Monday, March 29 Recycling Tuesday, March 30 5 p.m.: Labyrinth Books presents Daniel Heller-Roazen and Hal Foster in Conversation. “Absentees: On Variously Missing Persons.” Free Zoom event. Labyrinthbooks.org/events. 7:30 p.m.: Play readings and panel discussion on the Federal Theatre Project Negro Unit, presented by the Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Theater at Princeton University in collaboration with CLASSIX. Free Zoom webinar. Arts. princeton.edu. Wednesday, March 31 1 p.m.: Boheme Opera NJ presents “Poor Little Buttercup,” free Zoom event with selections from Gilbert and Sullivan operettas. Sponsored by Monroe Township Library. Register at monroetwplibrary.org. 7-8 p.m.: The Suppers Program Signature Meeting: Eating For Your Health. Suppers.wildapricot.org/ events. Thursday, April 1 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market Winter Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 6 p.m. : L L L P re s ent s Daphne Brooks and Tracy K. Smith in Conversation. “Liner Notes for the Revolution: The Intellectual Life of Black Feminist Sound.” Free Zoom event. Labyrinthbooks.org/events. 6-7 p.m.: Jake Thistle performs via Zoom for “Save the Sourlands.” $10. Sourland.org. Friday, April 9 1- 3 p.m . Fr i d a y w i t h Friends, held by the YWCA Princeton Area Newcomers & Friends. Zoom gathering featuring Trish Chambers presenting “Women Jus tices of the U.S. Supreme Court.” RSVP required at ywcaprinceton.org/newcomers. Monday, April 12 Recycling


23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 2021

Spring into HealtH Town Topics

Arlee’s Raw Blends

Arlee’s Raw Blends are New Jersey’s premier raw, cold pressed juices. Drinking raw juices is the easiest, fastest, and most delicious way to take in essential enzymes and nutrients. If it’s true that you are what you eat, a lot of people might not recognize themselves. Too many products sold in markets, grocer y stores, and even shops promoting “organic” items feature processed preservatives to extend shelf life and are packaged in plastic bottles. These processes destroy the benefits of natural juice by depleting the concentration of vital enzymes and nutrients. Arlee’s juices are cold pressed fresh daily from 100 percent local organic fruits and vegetables, then immediately glass bottled. We are proud to say, “Our juice is just the juice!” Drinking Arlee’s Raw Blends is not only a tasty investment in your physical health – but we like to think that Arlee’s juices freshen the mind and soothe the soul. A rlee’s R aw Blends is committed to be the best and most prominent provider of premium organic juice blends and raw and vegan foods. Arlee’s sells

only freshly made, healthy products of t he highest quality. We reject the belief that healthy eating is synonymous with unpleasant taste. Arlee’s insists that its proprietary juice blends and foods are not only good for you, but that they are also good tasting. Arlee’s also rejects the premise that healthy and clean eating is a luxury that is limited to the affluent. We believe providing healthy food options to economically diverse communities is not only a good thing to do, but that it is also good business. Arlee’s is environmentally conscious and endeavors to align with local suppliers whose vision is consistent with its own. Visit arleesrawblends.com.

Eugenie Brunner, MD, FACS

A combination of proven skill, innovative thinking, and a wealth of experience allows double board-certified facial plastic surgeon and Princeton native Eugenie Brunner, MD, FACS to provide her patients with beautiful, natural-looking facial enhancement and reconstruction results. Committed to rejuvenating the skin and restoring a youthful appearance, Dr. Brunner utilizes injectables, facelift surgery, laser treatments, and various other

progressive technologies and advanced surgical techniques to revitalize facial features and enhance the overall facial aesthetic. By prioritizing patient goals, she is able to customize treatment plans and create a positive overall experience. Visit brunnermd.com.

Greenwood House

Who doesn’t want to know the secret to a centenarian’s longev it y? Wit h s evera l 100-years-plus residents at Greenwood House’s longterm care facility and assisted living facility, Abrams Residence, we don’t have to go far to uncover some of those secrets! And, fortunately, Greenwood House’s centenarians are not shy about sharing great insight and good humor when we recently asked them the pressing question -- What’s your secret? Bessie B. is over 100! She says, “Be happy because life is what you make it.” Fellow centenarian Theresa C. agrees, and every time she field’s questions about longevity, her standard reply is, “Live life to the fullest.” Ruth G., also north of 100 adds, “My secret, keep laughing!” Bessie B., Theresa C., Ruth G., Sylvia A., Lucy J., and Etta H. are the centenar-

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STATE-OF-THE-ART CARE: At her facial plastic surgery facility in Princeton, Dr. Brunner serves patients from the Princeton area, central New Jersey, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and beyond. In addition to a welcoming consultation environment, Dr. Brunner believes honest, straightforward information creates knowledgeable patients who are ultimately happiest with their results. Together, she and her patients will develop a comprehensive approach to address nearly any skin condition or concern. ians at Greenwood House and most have been a part of the Greenwood House family for several years. “These extraordinar y

residents are the living examples of aging with attitude. Each one of them represents so much more than their age,” says Greenwood House Executive Director

Richard Goldstein. “We honor them for their positivity, longevity, and for sharing their wisdom and talents. Continued on Next Page

Jane Schwartz, RDN, CLT, is a registered dietitian/nutritionist, She offers a holistic approach to individual and family nutrition counseling that focuses on your lifestyle as much as the food on your plate. Jane helps patients of all ages achieve their individual goals, whether they are trying to lose weight or manage a chronic health condition.

She specializes in coaching individuals with these and other health conditions to live happier, healthier lives:

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 2021 • 24

Spring Into Health

lifestyle, faith or genetics, they are living examples of how to age with attitude, dignity, and grace. Their contributions are certainly worthy of celebration – Every single day.” “One of the mainstays of our mission at Greenwood House is life enrichment and family. Our residents’ families and caretakers are also a key component in our daily circle of care, and communication and transparency is what makes us unique and why families love the way

Continued from Previous Page

We can learn a lot from a generation that has lived through so many incredible events like the Spanish flu, Great Depression, world wars, prosperity, conflict, COVID-19, and the advent of life-changing technology.” “Centenarians are beacons of life in our community,” says Rachel Watlington, Greenwood House director of life enrichment. “Be it their positive attitude, their

we care,” says Cara Willis, director of social work. “While it’s not every day you get to celebrate a person turning 100, it’s fairly common at Greenwood House Senior Healthcare. It’s the truth — here are six hallmark women right here,” says Goldstein.

Lady and the Shallot

As proud pioneers of the vegan movement in the area since 2018 and two-time winners of Town Topics’ Readers’ Choice Awards, L a d y a n d t h e S h a l lot’s

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mission has always been m ore t ha n ju s t fe e d i ng people good food. While working privately with clients in the Princeton area and adapting to a cleaner lifestyle, we decided to create a place that was clean, plant based, vegan, and affordable. As a farm to table eater y, we wanted to be where the farms were, which is why we chose the historic Trenton Farmers Market. We wanted to create beautiful and diverse plant based dishes that anyone can afford. We wanted to give our guests comfort foods without sacrificing their health. Inspired by our nephew with nut allergies, we are also 100 percent nut free and gluten free. It’s all about giving for us, it truly fulfills us deep down. We also enjoy creating Five Course Charity events, hosted by local charities or supporters of a charity. Contact us for ways you can host one in the future. We believe in a vegan lifestyle for the souls of animals and human beings, but most importantly o u r h ab i t at a n d h o m e, Planet Earth. Lady and the Shallot is located at 960 Spruce Street, Lawrence Township. Call (609) 955-1120 or visit ladyandtheshallot.com.

eating should be enjoyed, cooking can be fun, and optimal health can be achieved when you make healthy eating a priority in your life. She earned her Bachelor of Science degree in nutrition from Cornell University. She then completed a graduate nutrition internship at the Oregon Health Sciences University. After graduation, Jane became the outpatient dietitian at two hospitals. She then opened and maintained a successful private practice in Westfield, New Jersey, where she counseled individuals and families, ran a weight management program, and lectured in the community. In 2004, Jane moved to Princeton, and became a senior writer and nutritionist for myOptimumHealth, a division of United Healthcare. In that role, she provided trusted nutrition expertise for their website, including

week ly ar t icle cont r ibu tions, a popular “Ask the Nutritionist” column, online health coaching, and a series of intensive meal plans and cookbooks ranging from heart healthy and diabetes friendly to vegetarian, Latino, and other ethnic food. Her strong background and renewed interest in functional and integrative nutrition inspired her to return to private practice, as well as become the outpatient and community education dietitian at the University Medical Center at Princeton. She co-founded The Nourishing Gurus with Stephanie Goodman. Together, Jane and Stephanie teach engaging online webinars, group programs and classes geared toward busy women to help them reach their weight and health goals. Call (609) 865-3999 or visit janeschwartz-rd.com.

Jane Schwartz, RDN

Jane Schwartz, RDN helps patients of all ages achieve their individual goals, whether they are trying to lose weight or manage a chronic health condition. She specializes in coaching individuals with these and other health conditions to live happier, healthier lives. Jane offers a holistic approach to individual and family nutrition counseling that focuses on your lifestyle as much as the food on your plate. She believes that

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ONLINE www.towntopics.com

The Trenton Farmers Market Call 609-955-1120 TO ORDER 960 Spruce Street Lawrence Township, New Jersey www.ladyandtheshallot.com Wed: 11-2 • Thurs and Fri: 11-4 Sat 10-4 • Sunday 10-2

The Trenton Farmers Market 960 Spruce Street Lawrence Twp, NJ Now Open Sunday for Brunch ladyandtheshallot.com Friday 11-3 • Saturday 10-3 • Sunday 10-2

We Are In This Together So Please Do Your Part Protect Yourself • Protect Your Family • Protect Your Friends Protect Your Neighbors • Protect Your Community E n j o y P r i n c e t o n’s P u b l i c S p a c e s , o u r B e a u t i f u l P a r k s , O u r P l a z a s and Sidewalks, And All Public Spaces Responsibly

*Message Brought to You by a Group of Caring Princeton Families


25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 2021

Concierge Medicine

There’s a new trend in healthcare, and it’s gaining momentum in our area. By Sarah Emily Gilbert (Originally published in Princeton Magazine) Dr. Barbara A. Brown (left) and Dr. Lynne B. Kossow of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine.

F

or the past few years, Dr. Lynne B. Kossow and Dr. Barbara A. Brown of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine have offered their patients far more than the traditional primary care practice. Most doctors see 25-30 patients a day for an average of 15 minutes, but Drs. Kossow and Brown see six to eight patients a day for up to an hour. In addition to providing treatment for acute illnesses, the doctors act as their clients’ healthcare coaches through Lifestyle Medicine, a scientific approach to patient wellness by effecting changes in areas such as diet, physical activity, and stress management. With the current shortage of primary care physicians and the abundance of high volume practices, this type of individualized attention is rare. However, by switching to a concierge format, doctors like Kossow and Brown are able to practice medicine that consists of this broad-spectrum care. Concierge medicine, also known as retainer-based medicine, is an umbrella term for private medical care wherein patients pay an out-of-pocket fee in exchange for enhanced care. Born in the 1990s, concierge medicine was once thought of as a service for the wealthy that charged patients a lofty fee for luxury medicine. In recent years, it has evolved to accommodate patients across all income brackets, leading to expanding interest among patients and their primary care doctors. According to a survey released by the American Academy of Private Physicians at the AAPP 2015 Fall Summit, more than 45 percent of 862 independent physicians would consider a concierge or similar membership model in the next three years. This may be due in part to our aging population needing increased and varied medical services, leading to an imbalanced patient/doctor ratio. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act has increased the number of insured patients, putting a further strain on primary care doctors. As a result, physicians are often unable to dedicate enough time to each patient. In the hopes of increasing both job and patient satisfaction in a financially sustainable way, primary physicians like Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are looking toward concierge medicine. “Where conventional medicine is failing is in the prevention and reversal of chronic diseases that are becoming an epidemic in the United States today,” explain the doctors. “The current insurance model is built upon a problembased economic reimbursement that encourages doctors to address medical problems very quickly. This leads to most doctors rushing to see 25-30 patients per day in order to make ends meet…This is not how we have ever practiced. We always want to have the time to address the root cause of diseases that are preventable today.” Lifestyle Medicine is a 21st century approach to healthcare that consolidates the very best characteristics of traditional medicine with the profound impact of lifestyle behaviors on health. As our program grew, it became readily apparent to us that integrating Lifestyle Medicine into our internal medicine practice was the best way for us to continue to provide exceptional care. We feel that the concierge model is the only way to effectively do that.

Concierge medical practices come in various forms, including those that reject insurance plans all together, but this is not the case for Princeton Lifestyle Medicine. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown accept insurance for all covered medical services. In addition, their patients pay an annual fee of $1,500 for the Lifestyle Medicine Concierge program, which gives them access to an elevated level of care. Trained at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine at Harvard Medical School, the doctors are at the vanguard of their field, having lectured about their practice development model at The Institute of Lifestyle Medicine Conference in 2015. They are also members of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and the American College of Physicians. They are among the first physicians to become board certified in Lifestyle Medicine, as well as maintaining their board certifications in internal medicine. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown’s practice is unique in that it offers patients comprehensive conventional medical care combined with lifestyle counseling. Patients interested in a natural approach to disease prevention are provided in-depth, individualized coaching based on their needs. The doctors can assist with everything from quitting smoking to creating a manageable diet and exercise plan. According to the doctors, this is an evidence-based practice that has been shown to prevent, reverse, or slow down heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, diabetes, dementia, and some cancers. The concierge model offers Princeton Lifestyle Medicine patients additional benefits including access to the doctors’ emails, cell phone numbers, and private phone line, extended patient office visits, a one-hour consultation, and same or next day appointments. As a result, patients see Drs. Kossow and Brown not only as accomplished medical doctors, but health advocates, mentors, and even friends. “Our practice structure allows us to spend more time educating our patients about what may be going on with them medically,” the doctors explain. “We are better able to work with them as partners in their care and advocate for them with their specialists or if they are in the hospital. We provide tremendous support and guidance to them and their caretakers or family. We are happy to have this enhanced communication with our patients. It allows us to make social visits when they are hospitalized at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro so that we can stay in close touch while they are receiving care.” Concierge practices like Princeton Lifestyle Medicine focus the healthcare system on its most vital component: the patient-doctor relationship. The model emphasizes quality care instead of quick care, benefitting both parties. Dr. Brown and Kossow are now board certified as specialists in the practice of Lifestyle Medicine and are the only physicians in the Princeton area who are board certified in both Internal Medicine and Lifestyle Medicine. As leaders in both concierge and Lifestyle medicine, it comes as no surprise that Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are at the forefront of this effort, bringing Princeton into the future of healthcare.

The Princeton Lifestyle Medicine Concierge Program is $1,500 per year. The fee can be paid monthly, quarterly, biannually, or annually, and credit cards are accepted as payment. All medical services are billed through the patient’s insurance company as usual. Princeton Lifestyle Medicine is located at 731 Alexander Road, Suite 200 in Princeton, New Jersey. For more information call 609.655.3800 or visit www.princetonlifestylemedicine.com. — Paid Advertisement —


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 2021 • 26

Respected Pellettieri Rabstein & Altman Law Firm Offers Full Range of Services, Including Family Law

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f the future of a marriage or domestic relationship is in doubt, or clearly headed for disruption, the parties most often seek the help of an attorney.

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The lawyers who assist clients in divorce cases are specialists in family law. This is difficult work, but it is also satisfying in a very important way. The cases these attorneys deal with are very human, complex, and often emotionally disturbing. Helping clients navigate these severely stressful experiences and move on to a new future makes a difficult job worthwhile. Pellettieri Rabstein & Altman (PR&A) has been providing this kind of expert legal representation since 1929. Founded by George Pellettieri, it began as a general law firm in Trenton. In 1934, Pellettieri was joined by attorney Ruth Rabstein, who later became his wife. They were a potent team, and the firm gained a reputation for helping individuals in the community, and not institutions. Committed to assisting working men and women who might be without means to pay, especially during the Great Depression, PR & A was often reimbursed with chickens, homemade pies, and other goods and services. New Cases The ensuing years brought new cases, new successes, and new lawyers to the firm. With the addition of John A. Hartmann III in 1978, the family law department was born. Richard Altman joined the firm a year later, adding commercial litigation to the array of services, and the partnership of George Pellettieri, Ruth Rabstein, Richard Altman, Ira Miller, and John A. Hartmann III, known as Pellettieri Rabstein & Altman, made its debut. The firm’s cases included personal injury, workers’ compensation, nursing home negligence, employment and labor law, family law, insurance litigation, and commercial law. Headquar tered at 989 Lenox Drive in Lawrenceville, it also has offices in Cherr y Hill, Nutley, and Newtown, Pa. Family law is the focus of much of the firm’s work. The department has handled

thousands of matrimonial matters, and many of these cases include divorce. Family law and divorce attorneys deal with the dissolution of mar r iages and domestic partnerships, marital settlement and property settlement agreements, prenuptial agreements, palimony agreements, child custody agreements, and domestic violence situations, among other areas. Family law depar tment chair man and managing partner John A. Hartmann III specializes in complex family law cases that require litigation. Throughout the years of his practice, he has served as the trial attorney and/or the supervising attorney in various landmark family law cases. He has a statewide reputation of excellence for his litigation skills, is the author of numerous articles on family law issues, and has been involved in numerous published decisions. “Each family law case is unique,” he points out. “Some divorces can be settled without going to court; other couples may require a trial to resolve the dispute. The PR&A family law department aggressively represents the individual needs of each of their clients. It is our job to assist you in defining your goals and objectives and then to formulate a strategy to make them happen. All of our attorneys strive to reach reasonable settlements, but we are always prepared and able to seek judicial intervention from the courts.” Many Issues In addition to Hartmann, other members of the family law department include partner Lydia Fabbro Keephart, partner Nicole Huckerby, associate Jennifer Haythorn, and associate Jillian Frost Kalyan. “Family law spans so many issues,” explains Keephart, who specializes in custody matters for married and unwed individuals; also preparation of pre-nuptial agreements, highly contested matrimonial cases involving multi-million dollar assets, domestic violence issues, and same sex partner disputes. She is a skilled trial attorney, as well as a certified mediator trained at the Harvard Law School Program for Negotiation and Mediation, and at Rutgers. A Lawrenceville native, and graduate of Notre Dame High School, Keephart attended The College of New Jersey, and also holds a master’s degree in public and business administration

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from Rider University. Before switching to the law, she taught high school English and biology. In addition, she worked at the Educational Testing Service for several years before entering Seton Hall Law School. Now her skills are directed to family law and the ways in which she can help clients, including examining financial issues, which are an important factor. “Financial aspects are critical as clients realize that their future lifestyles will likely be impacted,” she points out. “Two households demand two budgets. Equitable distribution is often complex, requiring forensic experts. Parents today generally each have jobs, and share responsibilities with respect to the children. Parenting time and the issue of custody is often disputed, and so custody experts are required. The challenge is to help clients realize what is most important and how best to establish what is in everyone’s best interest. A lawyer’s role is to apply the law to the facts of their situation and explain what they can expect if the case goes to trial, and what it will realistically cost both financially and emotionally. “While having handled all aspects of family law, I am devoted to preserving the best interests of children in the family, and thus I address many of the custody cases, including international matters. I also handle domestic violence cases. I often say that ‘we have the best people at the worst time in their lives.’ There are no two cases exactly alike, and the complexities are challenging to the mind and the heart. It is our role to maintain dignity and respect. “I have also handled cases that went up on appeal, and I have argued before the Appellate Court successfully. I have tried several cases to completion, but I am proudest when I help my clients settle their differences. And I also feel humbled by the fact that many of my clients remain friends long after we finish their cases.” Near and Dear Nicole Huckerby agrees with the importance of custody issues and the child’s well-being, and she also points out the wide scope of cases that can arise. “Family law is definitely challenging because you are dealing with issues that people hold very near and dear. If custody is an issue, there is really nothing more important to a parent than his or her child and the child’s care and custody. People are often very emotional at these times and are frequently anxious as well. “It is always best if the parties can work together to determine the best interests of the children. Parents will need to work together, often for years, in a cooperative way for the benefit of their children, and I always encourage them to do so.” “Aside from issues with children, clients are also very concerned about their financial well-being and about the fairness of the division of marital assets,” she continues. “Often, while there is enough money for the parties to meet their

LEGAL EXPERTISE: “Since 1929, Pellettieri Rabstein & Altman (PR&A) attorneys have worked hard to build a track record of honest, smart, and responsible legal representation. We have earned the respect of family law courts, judges, and other New Jersey family law attorneys. We offer one of the largest family law departments in central New Jersey, and have established a statewide reputation of excellence.” Shown are attorneys in the PR&A family law department. Top row: Managing partner and department chair John A. Hartmann III, partner Lydia Fabbro Keephart, and partner Nicole Huckerby. Bottom row: Associate Jennifer Haythorn and associate Jillian Frost Kalyan. expenses while they reside toget her, when you are dividing into two separate households, there may not be enough money to meet all needs, and the parties may have to reduce their lifestyles. This is not easy.” The range of issues family law attorneys face are not only challenging but also compelling, she adds. “Family law is always interesting because there are so many different areas of law that it touches upon. In resolving a divorce, we deal with financial issues, such as business valuations, real estate valuations, and forensic accountings to address lifestyle. The work we do is varied, and each case is very fact sensitive.” Huckerby also points out lifestyle changes that have taken place over the years. “When I started practicing, alimony cases were almost exclusively husbands paying wives. Now, spouses often earn similar incomes, and alimony is not an issue. And I frequently have cases where wives are paying husbands alimony because the wife is the breadwinner for the family.” She is very aware of the significance of helping people at a very distressing time in their lives, and she has witnessed a myriad of difficult situations. As she reports, “After practicing family law for 25 years, there is very little that is surprising. I have divorced people who have been married for a very short time, just a matter of a few years, and I have divorced people who were married for 50 years.” One Last Kiss “W hen I was a you ng lawyer, I represented an elderly gentleman who was a grandfather, and while I was putting the amicable divorce on the record, his soon-tobe-ex-wife asked to resume her maiden name,’ continues Huckerby. “He broke down in tears. As we left the court room, he asked me to ask his wife’s attorney if he could have one last kiss good-bye. She refused. I was a young woman at the time, and this was definitely one of the saddest matters I handled, as the litigants were my grandparents’ ages.” Helping clients to understand the process and to have realistic expectations is important, explains Jennifer Haythorn, whose initial career goal was to join the

foreign service and serve as a diplomat. She decided to go to law school in order, as she points out, “to think like a lawyer — to learn how to identify issues, think critically, and problem-solve.” And then ultimately to put those skills to use in the State Department. After law school, however, an opportunity in family law presented itself, and she saw the contribution she could make in helping guide people through a divorce, where she no doubt is able to use her skills in critical thinking, problem-solving, and diplomacy. As she says, “Managing clients’ expectations is one of the biggest challenges. Individuals going through a divorce are experiencing the most difficult time in their lives, and expect immediate responses and quick turnaround times. They often misunderstand the process and the law. It is important as a family law practitioner to maintain realistic expectations, explain the process and the law, and attempt to resolve cases fairly, in accordance with the prevailing law, and with as little financial, emotional, and mental damage to the parties and their children as possible.” While there are similarities in family law cases, they can also vary considerably, depending on the individuals and the issues at hand, points out Haythorn. “All cases are different, so it depends on the specific facts. Each party prioritizes the issues differently, and we have to adjust depending on our clients. We really have seen it all. It is surprising when people divorce after decades together, but many times it happens after children move out of the house. When I have divorced older couples, say, in their 60s or 70s, it is both sad, but also wonderful, that they have decided to separate and try to find new happiness.” Hometown Girl Associate Jillian Frost Kalyan is a hometown girl, born in Princeton, where she grew up, attended St. Paul’s School and later, Notre Dame. As a teen, she worked at McCarter Theatre (where she met her husband). She agrees that the challenges in family law are very real. “The stakes are really high. The work we do is serious and has real consequences for people’s families, and we take that responsibility very seriously.”

She explains that many factors often come together to cause a marriage to fail, and COVID-19 has not only created new problems, but exacerbated existing difficulties. Financial issues, especially if one or both of the spouses are out of work, or perhaps trying to balance their own jobs and helping children with online school work all at the same time; spending more time at home together for lengthy periods — all of these can contribute to a stressful situation. “All of this can be part of the problem,” she emphasizes. “The pandemic has made things more difficult for everyone in almost every way. Of course, people get divorced because they are unhappy, and that can be at any age, after any length of a relationship. We always try to resolve the case with the least cost and best outcome in the most efficient manner, and always with the best interest of the client uppermost.” Trust is important, adds Kalyan. “Clients need to feel comfortable with their attorney as they go through such a difficult situation. It is very satisfying to be an advocate for someone who has difficulty being an advocate for him or herself.” Most of the client-attorney meetings are currently virtual because of the virus. So far, via Zoom and other remote means, it has been working well. Of course, everyone looks forward to the time when in person meetings can resume. Primarily, the Pellettieri Rabstein & Altman attorneys want to ease the burden as people go through a difficult time, and assist them in moving on to a new chapter in their lives. They are experienced and skilled advocates for their clients, guiding them to the best outcome. s Lydia Keephar t notes, “I am so very proud to be part of such a strong legal team. We are a family, and the lawyers in our department are dedicated to PR&A. Also, we are all happily married, and that is an accomplishment for divorce attorneys!” For further information, call (609) 520-0900, or consult the website at pralaw. com. —Jean Stratton

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27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 2021

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Former PDS Star Colton Enjoys Special NHL Debut, Scoring Goal in 2nd Shift for Tampa Bay Lightning

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t took place in Tampa Bay last Wednesday evening, but it left Ross Colton thinking of a Hollywood script. Making his NHL debut for the Tampa Bay Lightning, former Princeton Day School standout Colton scored a goal on his second shift of the night, helping the Lightning to a 3-0 win. “Two days afterwards, it still hadn’t really sunk in,” said Colton, 24, in a phone interview last Sunday. “It felt like a movie or something. It was like ‘wow, that was awesome.’ That is what I kept telling myself, ‘that was awesome.’” Colton’s awesome moment drew the attention of friends, former teammates, and coaches in the area as texts and tweets were buzzing around Central Jersey last Wednesday night. “The thing that really sticks out is how many people reached out and were so supportive of me,” recalled Colton, a 6’0, 191-pound forward. “After the game, my phone was pretty crazy. I had 200 or so texts and a bunch of Instagram posts and snap chats. It was almost overwhelming. I am doing my best to thank everyone. It is so awesome to see that many people follow me and support me. It was pretty cool, for sure.” Colton has worked long and hard to reach the pinnacle of pro hockey. After playing two years at PDS, he headed north to play for the Taft School (Conn.) from 2013-15 and face tough New England scholastic competition. He then played two years at the junior level for the Cedar Rapids RoughRiders of the United States Hockey League, getting chosen by the Lightning as the 118th pick in the 2016 NHL Entry Draft. Moving on to the college level, Colton played two seasons at the University of Vermont from 2016-18, tallying 28 goals and 22 assists in 69 games. He then started his pro career with the Syracuse Crunch of the American Hockey League (AHL), Tampa Bay’s top affiliate club, tallying 14 goals and 17 assists in 2018-19 and 11 goals and 31 assists in 2019-20. In making the jump to the AHL, Colton focused on developing a professional approach. “It was really just learning how to become a pro, it is definitely a different lifestyle,” said Colton. “You go from college where you practice all of the time, you have to manage school and working out and all of that other stuff. You get to the AHL and it is grueling. It is a longer schedule, I think you play almost 80 games. You have got to manage your body. You have so much more time away from the rink. You have got to take care of yourself. It is learning how to mature and adjust to the pace of play.” It took a while for Colton to get up to speed in his first

season with the Crunch. “As a younger guy and a rookie, I was feeling my way, adjusting to how I had to play so it took me a little longer to get my feet under me,” said Colton. “It is like anything else, you get a little bit of confidence and you start jelling with the guys. You just feel more comfortable. I got more confident and the numbers started to produce a little more.” With one pro campaign under his belt, Colton took his game to a higher level in the 2019-20 campaign. “I tried my best to have a really, really good summer and work on my conditioning and speed because at the next level it is all about speed and skating,” said Colton. “I just wanted to work on my skating and stuff like that. I came in with more confidence because I knew what my role was going to be. I was going to have more of a top six kind of role, be on the power play, first or second line. I came in with a different mindset, knowing my role from day one.” Coming into training camp this fall with the Lightning, Colton was determined to earn a spot in the NHL. “I wanted to make the team out of camp,” said Colton. “They just said it was tough. Being the Stanley Cup champs, it is not the easiest lineup to crack. They told me to keep working, you are so close. This is such a great organization to be with, they said go down to Syracuse, you are right there, stick with it and just have a good mindset.” After tallying a goal and two assists in three games this season for the Crunch, Colton got the call to head south to Tampa. “We played Wilkes BarreScranton on a Saturday (February 13) and right after the game, the GM of the Crunch [Stacy Roest] called me,” said Colton. “Once I saw his name pop up on my phone right after the game, I had an idea what was going on. I was thinking positively. I took the call and he said, ‘we are calling you up, you earned it, you deserve it.’ I immediately called my parents and they were ecstatic. I will definitely remember that call.” After starting to skate with the Lightning in practice, Colton learned that he would be making his NHL debut on February 24 against the Carolina Hurricanes. “I found out I was playing Wednesday on Tuesday afternoon when coach [Jon] Cooper called me and said you are playing tomorrow night,” said Colton. “He said I wanted to give you a heads up to tell your parents if they want to come. It was nice that he gave me a heads up to tell them. I was a little nervous that they weren’t going to be able to come because of COVID. They hopped on a plane and got down here and luckily the Lightning are having fans in their arena so

they were able to come.” With that advance notice, Colton had quite a cheering section on hand at the Amalie Arena, including his parents, older brother Rob, a former PDS hockey star himself, his grandmother, one of his aunts, a cousin, and two of his best friends, including Conrad Denise, another former Panther hockey standout. As he looked forward to face-off that night, Colton tried to calm his nerves by maintaining a professional mentality. “I didn’t want to overthink it, my whole mindset throughout the day was treat it like it is another game and don’t do anything I wouldn’t do normally,” said Colton. “It was just play my game so I just took it like it was just a normal day.” Once at the rink, Colton had to go through a team tradition for players making their debut, skating alone on the ice, hitting pucks strewn on the ice. “They do the rookie lap when you go on ice, I skated for that,” said Colton. “I knocked the pucks off the bench because I am the only one on the ice. What was going on in my head was please don’t step on one of these, that would not be good. I was just trying to take it all in, it was just such an amazing moment.” The reality of what Colton accomplished hit him as “The Star-Spangled Banner” played. “I think it really sunk in for me during the National Anthem,” said Colton. “I looked around and I was like, ‘I made it.’ I have really been dreaming about this since I was 4 or 5 when I started playing at IceLand in the Learn to Skate program, and then playing in house league.” In skating through his first shift on Wednesday, Colton had to fight off some butterflies. “My heart was pounding for sure, I was a little nervous,” said Colton. “We had a d-zone shift so I was like oh boy. It was just do a shift. Once I got to the bench, I was like OK, I have got the first one out of the way, now I can play my game.” Minutes later, Colton displayed his offensive game, banging home a feed from Victor Hedman at 6:43 of the first period to score his first career goal. “I tried to get to the front of the net, they always say good things happen when you are around the front of the net,” said Colton, recalling the sequence that led to the score. “He wheeled around there, he was flying and there was a defender on me and I tried to just push off him and find some open space. Hedman put it in the right spot and I just banged it home. After that, the look on my face says it all. I was kind of in shock. I was ‘oh my god, is this real.’ It happened so quickly, it kind of squeaked in.”

THUNDERSTRUCK: Former Princeton Day School boys’ hockey star Ross Colton enjoys the moment after scoring a goal for the Tampa Bay Lightning last Wednesday in his NHL debut. Forward Colton tallied 6:43 into the contest on a feed from Victor Hedman to give the Lightning a 1-0 lead as they went on to a 3-0 win. (Photo provided courtesy of Ross Colton) Colton’s spontaneous reaction fired up his teammates. “All of the guys were pretty excited for me,” said Colton. “They were joking with me before the game, saying don’t be too nervous and all that stuff. Once they see something like that happen, you could tell in their faces that they were all excited too. It was a special moment.” PDS head coach Scott Bertoli saw something special in Colton from the time he arrived at McGraw Rink in 2011. “I knew he was an exceptional talent; as a freshman and a sophomore, he was averaging a goal a game,” said Bertoli. “I think he had 45 goals in 49 games. He had a knack for scoring that I would only compare to people I have played with like a Jeff Halpern (Bertoli’s teammate at Princeton University, a longtime NHL player, and current assistant coach for the Lightning). He was just that adept at scoring. His ability in scoring areas to elevate pucks, one time pucks, and get shots off quick, always impressed me.” With Colton showing the potential to someday play in the pros, his breakthrough goal last week was thrilling to his former teammates and coaches alike. “On Wednesday there were a lot of text messages flying back and forth from guys that had played with Ross; like myself and our staff, they recognized how special he was,” said Bertoli. “Of all the kids we have had, if you ever thought someone would be good enough, there is an element of luck to it as well, he was probably the one. There were a lot of guys who were excited for him.” It is exciting for the PDS program to have an alum in the NHL. “We have had some great kids come through the program and do some exceptional things in all walks of life,” said Bertoli. “I talked to Halpy [Jeff Halpern] afterward and he was saying it is a pretty cool story. The kid stuck with it, he worked for his opportunities,

and now he is playing on arguably one of the top teams in the league. What Halpy was really excited about was the reaction of Ross when he scored. He said it was almost like the kid couldn’t believe it.” For Colton, being around some of the top players in the sport on a daily basis is cool. “You grow up and you see these guys and some of them are future Hall of Famers,” said Colton. “It is awesome to see the way that they carry themselves, how professional they are and how they go about their business. You just take what you can learn from them. It is not like these guys just show up and it is all natural. They work so hard. It is so cool to be around them but at the same time they are just normal guys. They come to work every day ready to go. They don’t

have these egos or anything, they are guys who want to have a good time and win hockey games.” Having been placed on the team’s taxi squad after his debut, Colton is looking to apply those lessons to stay in the NHL. “For me, it is keep doing what I have been doing; I want to have a positive attitude,” said Colton. “I am just really happy to be here; even just getting the opportunity to play in that game the other day. Every day I come to practice and I try to do as much as I can to get better, whether it is on the ice or in the gym. I want to show them that I am ready to make that jump to the next level and be a regular.” If Colton continues to get better, he should be able to produce quite a sequel to last Wednesday’s opening scene. —Bill Alden Available for Lunch & Dinner Mmm..Take-Out

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PU Seniors Littlefield, Marquardt Earn Student-Athlete Award

Princeton University senior women’s basketball player Carlie Littlefield and Tiger senior men’s swimmer Matt Marquardt have been named as the recipients of the 2021 Winter PNC Student-Athlete Achiever Award, recognizing their efforts as all-around studentathletes. Star point guard Littlef ield, a s en ior c aptai n, two-time first-team All-Ivy honoree and 1,000 point scorer, helped lead Princeton to Ivy League Championships in each of her first three years on campus. Off the court, Littlefield — an economics major — serves as president of the Varsity Student Athlete Advisory Council, where she recently led efforts to deliver valentines to patients at St. Jude Children’s Hospital. Earlier this year, Littlefield, a native of Waukee, Iowa, organized a teamwide free throw challenge that raised over $13,000 for

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Princeton Alum Sowers Rolling for Duke Men’s Lax

Continuing his sizzling play for the Duke University men’s lacrosse team, former Princeton standout Michael Sowers tallied eight points to help the top-ranked Blue Devils defeat Air Force 17-7 last Saturday. Attackman Sowers, who is in grad school at Duke for his fifth year of eligibility after the cancelation of the 2019 season due to COVID-19 pandemic, had three goals and five assists in the victory as the Blue Devils improved to 5-0. Sowers is leading Duke in scoring with 27 points on 10 goals and 17 assists. He graduated from Princeton in 2020 as the program’s alltime leading scorer with 302 points on 121 goals and 181 assists.

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G-WHIZ: Devin Cannady ’19 heads to the hoop during his career for the Princeton University men’s basketball team. Cannady is currently playing for the Lakeland Magic of the G-League. The 6’2, 183-pound guard is averaging 11.0 points, 2.2 rebounds, and 2.4 assists in 10 appearances for the Magic. Last Monday, Cannady scored 11 points and had five assists and four rebounds to help Lakeland defeat the Greensboro Swarm 110-95 and improve to 7-5. The league is playing all of its games in a bubble set-up at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex at Walt Disney World Resort in Bay Lake, Fla. During his college career, Cannady earned a pair of All-Ivy League honors and finished as Princeton’s fifth-leading all-time scorer with 1,515 points. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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PU Sports Roundup

I Am Trenton, a local nonprofit serving the Trenton community. Additionally, Littlefield has previously served as a Coach for College participant and the Iowa State director for Princeton’s Vote100 Campaign. For her efforts, Littlefield was recently recognized as the NJAIAW Princeton Woman of the Year. Marquardt is a senior on the men’s swimming and diving team, specializing in the backstroke and butterfly. In 2019, Marquardt, who hails from Cincinnati, Ohio, became the first Princeton student to receive a Slavin Fellowship for his entrepreneurship, while also being honored at Princeton Research Day for his work on solar powered windows. He has led numerous research studies on campus related to student sleep habits, and worked with Princeton Tiger Performance to help student-athletes leverage sleep to maximize performance. Marquardt recently completed a 20 day solo crosscountr y bike ride, which raised over $13,000 in support of St. Jude Children’s Hospital and pediatric cancer research. A chemistry major pursuing certificates in entrepreneurship,


There may have only been a handful of people in the gym last Friday as the Princeton High boys’ basketball team held its annual Senior Day celebration, but it was still an emotional moment for Tim Evidente. “I never thought I would be here, time actually flew by; it is crazy,” said Evidente. “Even though there was no crowd, it was just amazing for the team to be here with everyone.” Having suffered a leg injury in the season opener that sidelined him for several games, Evidente was particularly appreciative to be on the court last Friday. “When I initially rolled my ankle, I thought I was not going to play for the rest of the season because it was pretty bad,” recalled Evidente, who played with a brace on his left ankle. “I went to physical therapy. I am just trying to play as much as possible because it is my senior year.” Evidente was at full speed in the third quarter against Ewing, scoring seven points and making some steals as PHS outscored the Blue Devils 16-1 and never looked back on the way to a 56-32 win. “I think it was just our defense; we brought the intensity to them,” said Evidente in assessing the third quarter surge. “They didn’t know how to respond to it. Overall as a team, we did really well.” Playing well with fellow

senior Ethan Guy, Evidente found him down low as Guy also scored seven points in the run. “I have been playing with Ethan for a very long time, since like childhood days way back,” said Evidente. “We know each other’s gotos. It is just amazing to play with him on our Senior Day.” In his role as the team’s point guard, Evidente has learned his other teammates’ go-to moves. “Based off last year, it is just being the floor general,” said Evidente, who tallied 11 points in the win. “It is know ing how to make people succeed and understanding how to operate on the floor, controlling the tempo. It is making sure that everyone gets involved and that everyone has their attempts.” As a battle-tested senior, Evidente has enjoyed mentoring the squad’s younger players. “I love playing with these kids,” said Evidente. “This is my first year playing with some of the younger guys and I already feel a strong connection with them. I am happy that they are in the program.” Evidente has developed a strong connection to his fellow seniors on the squad — Charles Hamit, Wayne Bethea, Zane Scott, and Guy. “As a senior group, we just really try to make everyone else happy, get everyone involved and make sure that is

not an uncomfortable place,” said Evidente, noting that the absence of classmate Hamit due to injury has been a down note for the Tigers. “We just try to make everyone fit in as well and get them into the program. I give huge props to these younger guys, I am barely getting through it. They keep smiling every day in practice, they are so happy to be here. It makes me happy to know that their program is in their hands.” P H S h e a d c o a c h P at Noone tipped his hat to his Class of 2021 for their impact over the last four years and particularly this winter as the players have dealt with COVID and weather issues, among other things. “First of all, this is a special group to begin with, and then with everything they have been through,” said Noone. “I never thought I would say this but this is probably the most proud of a group that I have ever coached. I have never heard them complain. They just came every day. I have never seen anything like it, no matter what hurdle was in front of them, whether it is snow days, whether you are not playing today. It was something special, just for the resiliency that they have. People worry about different generations but a group like this, how they have handled it is just unbelievable.” The combination of senior standouts Evidente and Guy helped spark PHS to its third quarter run.

“In that stretch, it was on the defensive end; Timmy made some steals to get things going,” said Noone, noting that Evidente had a slew of assists in the win. “He and Ethan both played off of each other. For the first time since his injury, Timmy looked like Timmy, so that was a big difference.” The Tigers did well at both ends against Ewing, getting contributions throughout the lineup. “Everybody did well,” said Noone, who got 16 points from Guy in the win with Jaxon Petrone adding seven, Troy Curren scoring eight, and Jaiden Johnson chipping in six. “Wayne is a senior, he gets to go out that way. That was cool, Jaxon has been playing well. Jaiden has been awe-

some. Connor [McDowell] and Troy did well. Everybody has hung in there.” Despite the late start to the season and the limited number of games, Noone believes his players are progressing. “They are growing, I think we have gotten better each week,” said Noone, whose team dropped to 2-6 with an 82-47 loss at Nottingham last Saturday is slated to play at Princeton Day School on March 5. “Everybody got better. We are going in the right direction, so that is cool.” As PHS enters the final week of the 2021 campaign, Noone is hoping to spend as much time as possible with his players. “With a year like this, we just worry about tomorrow,” said Noone.

“I hope we get to Saturday and everybody is healthy and we get to Sunday and everybody is healthy. We hope that we get four more practices and some games and that we can be together for at least another week. It is day-by-day and just hope that everyone is safe and healthy. That is the big thing.” For Evidente, making each day count is the big focus. “We are just doing the best that we can at this point,” said Evidente, who is looking to play for a Division III college program next year. “During these times, it is hard to get as many games in. We are just trying to make the best of it and come back the next day and do even better.” —Bill Alden

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MAKING HIS POINT: Princeton High boys’ basketball player Tim Evidente, left, goes in for a lay-up against Ewing last Friday. Senior point guard Evidente tallied 11 points to help PHS pull away to a 56-32 win over the Blue Devils. The Tigers, who dropped to 2-6 with an 82-47 loss at Nottingham last Saturday, are scheduled to play at Princeton Day School on March 5. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, maRCh 3, 2021

Evidente Enjoys Memorable Senior Day, Helping PHS Boys’ Hoops Roll Past Ewing


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 3, 2021 • 30

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Having not played a game since February 3, Colm Trainor and his teammates on the Princeton High boys’ hockey team were chomping at the bit as they faced the Hamilton hockey co-op last week at the Mercer County Park rink. “As soon as we got on the ice, everybody got ready,” said senior forward and team captain Trainor. “They had all of their stuff on, we came in here in the right mind. We were mentally prepared.” The Tigers jumped out to a 2-0 lead in the February 23 contest as two forwards on the team’s second line, sophomore Ethan Garlock and junior John O’Donnell, each found the back of the net early in the first period. “They are a great group; when I am gone, I know they are going to help out everybody,” said Trainor. “They are going to be part of the first and the second lines; they are already putting up points. When they are seniors, they are going to be doing great.” In the second per iod, Trainor scored the third goal of the game. Combining with his colleagues on the team’s top line, junior John Zammit and sophomore Cooper Zullo, PHS kept rolling from there, increasing its advantage to 5-0 on the way to an 11-1 triumph. “The first one is always a roller, it gets you going,” said Trainor, reflecting on his first goal. “Cooper and John played really well, they move the puck really well. Cooper hit the crossbar a couple of times too many, I think I yelled at him a couple of times. He ended up putting it in a couple of times so it is alright.” The trio of Trainor, Zullo, and Zammit has developed into a formidable unit even

with a limited schedule this winter. “At the start of the year, we were yelling at each other like nobody’s business, missing the puck and all of that stuff,” said Trainor. “Now we are doing really well. I know we have only three games but each game we are getting better as a line.” Things got better and better for Trainor that evening as he ended up with three goals and two assists in the victory. “I started shooting more towards the open spots and less towards his stomach,” said Trainor. “Their goalie Trevor [Malik] played really well, he had a great game. He is a great goalie, he is always standing us up.” As the fourth Trainor to play for the program, having been preceded by older siblings Anthony ’17, Robby ’19, and Aidan ’20, the senior standout is looking to write a positive final chapter in the family history with the team. “It is great, my two older brothers were really fun to watch together,” said Trainor. “To play with Aidan and with Robby was really fun. Being the last one is a little upsetting. Aidan left me alone here. Cooper and John are doing pretty well to fill Aidan’s shoes.” PHS head coach Dave Hansen is going to miss Trainor when he is gone. “His hockey IQ is well beyond normal,” said Hansen of Trainor. “His head is always up, he moves the puck really well. The line moves the puck so well, it is nice to watch.” As the Tigers finally got to play a game, the team showed nice scoring balance in pulling away from the Hamilton squad, which includes players

from Nottingham, Steinert, and Hamilton West. “We had a practice last night and they were excited to get back on the ice,” said Hansen. “We had a good skate last night and they couldn’t wait to play today. The good thing about tonight was that all of the guys contributed. It just wasn’t one line. I just kept telling them keep playing hard and we will score. The goalie is really good, we knew that coming in. Once you start getting guys in front of him, things start happening.” Hansen saw good things all over the ice from his squad. “Princeton is a very unselfish team; it doesn’t matter who scores the goals, they are happy for each other and that is great to see as a coach,” said Hansen, whose team moved to 3-1 with an 8-2 loss to Princeton Day School last Wednesday and is slated to face St. John Vianney on March 4 at the Jersey Shore Arena. “I felt like we played all three zones very well, defensive, neutral, and offensive zones. They all back check well. I kept saying don’t leave the zone early. If all five guys come out of the zone together, they are not going to be able to score. They got one past us; it happens.” Trainor, for his part, is trying to positively influence the team’s younger guys. “It is a rough season but as an upperclassman, I want to show the freshmen what it is like,” said Trainor. “We are trying to get them into the groove and the sophomores too but they already had last year. Some of the freshmen don’t really know all that stuff because they are not used to having three games a week like last year and the year before.” —Bill Alden

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RUNAWAY TRAIN: Princeton High boys’ hockey player Colm Trainor, left, races up the ice last week against the Hamilton hockey co-op. Senior star forward and team captain Trainor tallied three goals and two assists to help PHS skate to an 11-1 win in the February 23 contest. The Tigers, who fell 8-2 to Princeton Day School last Wednesday to move to 3-1, face St. John Vianney on March 4 at the Jersey Shore Arena. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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While the Princeton High girls’ swimming team won’t have the chance to compete in the county championship meet or the state sectionals, Carly Misiewicz believes that her squad can still do some big things in 2021. “T he girls look pret t y good this year,” said PHS head coach Misiewicz, whose squad defeated WW/ P-North 121-49 in a virtual meet last week to improve to 3-0. “We have got a pretty full team. We have got 21 or 22 girls so that is good.” The Tigers have got two very good sophomores in B eatr ice Cai and A nnie Zhao. “B e at r i c e i s on e w h o can do a variety of events, whether it is the individual medley or the 200 freestyle or the 100 butterfly or the 500 free,” said Misiewicz. “At our first meet, she swam the 200 free and 100 fly for us. She mentioned possibly wanting to do the backstroke and she may be in fly a little more. Annie is an IMer and breaststroker. She came in and impressed us as she always does, clocking 1:11 or 1:12 in the first meet in the breaststroke.” A trio of impressive juniors, Abby Walden, Tracey Liu, and Laura Liu, also give the Tigers good versatility.

“Abby is a distance swimmer but she is a pretty good sprinter and does butterflies too,” said Misiewicz. “I had her in three relays and the 500 in our first meet. She won the 500, she wasn’t super happy with her time. The 500 is a tough race, especially if you don’t have anybody right next to you. She got in and got the job done as she always does with a big smile. Tracey will be doing backstroke as usual. She impresses in the 50 free too coming in around 26.0 or 25 high. We need that to fill that gap since Cami [Davis] graduated last year. Laura is also one of our better sprinters in the 100 free, she was right up there with Tracey as well. The return of seniors Ella Caddeau, who had taken a hiatus from the program, and Becca Della Rocca, who returned to PHS after spending two seasons at Hun, will bolster the lineup. “Ella ended up coming back out this year, she was with us a couple of years ago,” said Misiewicz. “She is going to be more backstroke/butterfly. She is pretty good at those for us and freestyle too. With Becca we are thinking butterfly and sprints. Her fly is still solid as usual.” Freshmen Lauren Girouard,

Jesse Wang, and Courtney Weber have all gotten off to a solid start for PHS. “We have quite a few newcomers that are pretty impressive too,” said Misiewicz. “We have Lauren in the IM and backstroke. Jesse is a distance swimmer, doing the 200 and 500 free. Courtney is a very talented breaststroker and IMer. She was right

up there with Annie in the breast.” Even though the 2021 season is limited to virtual meets, which have teams s w im m ing s eparately at their pools and then sharing the results via Zoom and doing the scoring off of that, Misiewicz believes her swimmers can still progress. “There are not going to be any sectionals or a county meet; it is unfortunate but I keep telling myself and I keep telling them take advantage of every opportuni-

ty to swim,” said Misiewicz. “Let’s end 12-0 or whatever we can do. I feel that fact that we are having one meet a week is breaking up practice time a lot less. We can train Monday, Tuesday, have our meet on Wednesday, and then train Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. We are getting more kids who would typically be with their club.” Keeping the kids together at the pool six days a week may be the most important thing that can come out of this winter.

“ W h a t w e h av e b e e n stressing all season is let’s have fun,” said Misiewicz, whose team has a virtual meet against Notre Dame during the week of March 8. “We get to swim some coed meets, that is different. We are going to have fun with it. We are going to be safe, we are going to have fun. All that really matters at the end of the day is that we get to be together.” —Bill Alden

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MAKING A SPLASH: Princeton High girls’ swimmer Annie Zhao displays her breaststroke form in a recent meet. Sophomore Zhao has helped PHS get off to a 3-0 start in virtual meet competition. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Stepping Up for Shorthanded Stuart Hoops, Senior Guard James Stars in Loss to Manasquan Aleah James shouldered extra responsibility as the Stuart Country Day School basketball team hosted powerhouse Manasquan High last Wednesday. With fellow senior guard Nia Melvin unavailable to play, James had the Stuart offense in her hands. “I feel like I really had to pull through when it came to ball-handling because they were double-teaming me a lot,” said James. “I just had to get through for my team and try to get to the other side of the court and make a play.” With an athletic and aggressive Manasquan putting a full-court press on James, she battled to get the ball up the court, keeping Stuart in the game as the teams were knotted in a 24-24 tie at halftime. After trailing the Big Blue Warriors 40-30 late in the third quarter, Stuart rallied down the stretch, narrowing the gap to one twice in the last three minutes of regulation before succumbing 55-51. “In the four th quar ter, we were just trying to pressure the ball more and stop making silly turnovers,” said James. “I think that is what held us back from taking the lead because we had a lot of turnovers due to exhaustion.” James, for her part, scored two lay-ups in the last 10 seconds as she battled to the final buzzer. “That was all about heart,

I never want to go down in a game not fighting my hardest,” said James, who ended up scoring 14 points with 10 rebounds and three assists. “I was really trying my best to try to win the game.” W h i le t he los s s t u ng, James believes the Tartans can take some valuable lessons from the setback. “We need to play from beginning to end,” said James. “I think if we came out with the same energy we had in the fourth quarter, it would have been a different outcome.” With Stuart having played a gauntlet of top foes including Trenton Catholic Academy, Paul VI, Rutgers Prep, and Saddle River Day in addition to Manasquan, James has relished testing her skills against such opponents. “I personally enjoy it, I love competition,” said James, who posted a tripledouble in a 75-61 loss to Saddle River Day last Friday, tallying 22 points with 11 rebounds and 10 assists. “I can’t stand not playing competition because competition allows us to grow as a team and play better. It allows me to grow as an individual and a player.” Reflecting on her role with the team, James has experienced a lot of growth since joining the program. “I would say it has changed a lot since freshman year,” said James. “Freshman year I was pretty much a nobody on

the team. I had the skills, I just didn’t have the confidence. I decided to develop that confidence. I realized what I was really capable of and just performed on the court.” In order to perform at her best, James has put in extra work, customarily staying in the gym after practice and training outside of school. “Usually I practice here and I try to get shots up when I am not in a rush to go to training down in South Jersey,” said James, who is looking to continue her hoops career at the college level. “I also go to HoopsAmerica/US Hoops on the weekend.” Stuart head coach Justin Leith credited James with stepping up in the absence of Melvin. “Aleah is used to that pressure and has seen it before,” said Leith. “She has not just been solely responsible for it and that is the difference. She picked up the slack as she has in our last two games but this is just a more formidable opponent. She was t re m e n dou s. S h e d id n’t come out of the game once and I know she had to be tired.” Leith liked the fight he saw from his team against Manasquan even though its rally fell short. “I think they are ranked No. 10 in the state right now; we knew they were going to be a tough team,” said Leith, who got 14 points

from senior Ariel Jenkins and 12 points and 15 rebounds from senior Laila Fair in the loss. “We are down right now w ithout Nia ; that would have made a difference tonight with the pressure they were putting on the primary ball handler. I was extremely happy with the effort; we fought. We could have just folded and packed our bags.” Juggling the rotation gave other Tartans the chance to gain some valuable experience under fire. “We have kids who are being forced to step up,” said Leith. “Lauren Klein is playing the same position but with a different role. Leila Washington is coming in as a freshman. Catherine Martin is always dependable; she is having to play more minutes and do different things. Laila Fair did not come out the game. We have growth, there is a learning curve. The kids will be able to say when the pressure is on, oh, I have been here before. That is how you get better.” With Stuart having gone 6 -5 as it has worked its way through a challenging slate of games, Leith is less concerned about the record than the improvement of his players. “I challenge you to find a team that has a tougher schedule in the state, nobody does, not TCA, St. Rose, and St. John Vianney,” said Leith, whose team wraps up the 2021 season this week with a rematch at Saddle River on March 4 and then hosting St. Dominic Academy on March 5 and Ewing on March 6.

“I believe our team this year and our program is better for it, playing a schedule like that. A win is nice but the growth and the process is what we focus on.” James, for her part, is focusing on making the most of her last week with the program.

“It is just enjoying the time w ith my team and continuing to get better as a player,” said James. “I want to try new things on the court and see how far I can go.” —Bill Alden

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STEPPING UP: Stuart Country Day School basketball player Aleah James brings the ball up court in a game earlier this season. Last Wednesday, senior guard James scored 14 points in a losing cause as Stuart fell 55-51 to visiting Manasquan. Two days later, James posted a triple-double in a 75-61 loss to Saddle River Day, tallying 22 points with 11 rebounds and 10 assists. The Tartans, who moved to 6-5 with that defeat, have a rematch at Saddle River on March 4 and will then host St. Dominic Academy on March 5 and Ewing on March 6. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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B oys’ B asketba l l : Sparked by Dan Vessey, Hun defeated the Peddie School last Monday. Sophomore guard Vessey tallied 18 points as the Raiders moved to 8-1. Hun was slated to end its season by hosting the Patrick School on March 2. Girls’ Basketball: Kennedy Jardine led the way as Hun defeated Princeton Day School 59-26 last Monday. Senior guard Jardine poured in 25 points to help the Raiders improve to 4-3. Hun was scheduled to end the 2021 campaign by playing at the Peddie School on March 2.

Boys’ Swimming: Owen Te n n a nt a n d H e n r y Xu starred as PHS edged WW/ P-North 86-84 in a virtual meet last week. Tennant won the 200 individual medley while Xu prevailed in the 100 breaststroke. In addition, the Tigers placed first in the 200 freestyle relay to help pull out the victory. In upcoming action, PHS has a virtual meet against Notre Dame during the week of March 8.

Pennington Boys’ Basketball : Jay Jackson led the way as Pennington edged Newark Academy 57- 45 last Friday. Former Princeton High standout Jackson tallied 15 points to help the Red Raiders improve to 2-5. Pennington concludes the 2021 season with a home-andhome set against the Peddie School, playing at Peddie on March 3 before hosting the Falcons on March 5. Girls’ Basketball: Morgan Matthews scored 16 points in a losing cause as Pennington fell 49-41 to the Peddie School last Monday. The Red Raiders, now 3-3, wrap up the season by hosting Peddie on March 4.

Projects Watches

PDS Boys’ Basketball: Ethan Garita starred in a losing cause as PDS fell 73-67 to Peddie last Thursday. Senior star Garita scored 19 points and grabbed nine rebounds as the Panthers moved to 4-3. PDS is playing at the Doane Academy on March 3 before hosting Princeton High on March 5. Girls’ Basketball: Kirsten Ruf played well in defeat as PDS fell 59-26 to Hun last Monday. Sophomore standout Ruf tallied 10 points for the Panthers, who dropped to 0-5. PDS has a homeand-home set with Princeton High, hosting the Tigers on March 3 before playing at PHS the next day. B o y s’ H o c ke y : D rew McConaughy, Gibson Linnehan, and Adam Teryek scored two goals apiece to help PDS defeat Princeton

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Princeton Athletic Club Holding 6K April 10

The Princeton Athletic Club (PAC) is holding a 6-kilometer run on April 10 over the Institute Woods course. The run starts at 10 a.m. from the Princeton Friends School and the event is lim-

ited to 200 participants. The event will be chip timed and all abilities are welcome, including walkers. Participants expecting to take longer than 55 minutes over the 6,000-meter course (about 3.75 miles), should inquire about a separate noncompetitive start. Online registration and full details regarding the event and race protocols are available by logging onto princetonac.org. For 22 days prior to the event, registration is $35 online

including a T-shirt. Through 22 days prior, a discounted “No T-shirt” option is also available. From 21 days to 72 hours prior to the race, online only, the entry fee will be $40, including a Tshirt. Sign up at the event will be $55 if space is available, credit card only. The PAC is a nonprofit, all-volunteer running club for the community that promotes running for the fun and health of it and stages several running events each year.

Princeton Rec Department Offering Multi-Sport Programs

The Princeton Recreation Department is partnering with the U.S. Sports Institute (USSI) to offer a MultiSport program for boys and girls ages 2 to 6 this spring. The program will take place at Grover Park on Sunday mornings for eight weeks starting April 18. The classes being offered are Parent and Me Multi-Sports Squirts (ages 2 to 3) at 9 a.m., Multi-Sports Squirts (ages 3 to 4) at 10 a.m., and Senior Multi-Sports Squirts (ages 5 to 6) at 11 a.m. The program is open to both Princeton residents ($162) and non-residents ($195). Space in the program is limited. The multi-sport participants will learn key skills through small-sided scrimmages in sports such as lacrosse, soccer, t-ball, and track and field. The USSI is a full-time professional sports provider that works with Recreation Departments and community organizations all over the country. All programs are taught by USSI staff in a safe and structured environment that allow participants to experience a variety of sports while emphasizing fun. Adaptations are in place to ensure social distancing and to prevent sharing of equipment.

BROWN AND BLUE: Princeton High girls’ basketball player Molly Brown dribbles up court in recent action. Last Friday, junior standout Brown contributed two points, four rebounds, and a steal in a 69-26 loss at Ewing. PHS, which moved to 5-2 with the loss to the Blue Devils, has a home-and-home set with Princeton Day School, playing at PDS on March 3 before hosting the Panthers on March 4. The Tigers wrap up their 2021 campaign by hosting New Egypt on March 6. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 3, 2021 • 34

Obituaries

Funeral services were held February 26 with burial at Fountain Lawn Memorial Park, Ewing Township, NJ. Memorial contributions may be made to Met Council on Jewish Poverty, 77 Water Street, 26th Floor, New York, NY 10005 or Make a Wish Foundation of New Jersey, 1384 Perrineville Road, Monroe Township, NJ 08831. To send condolences to the family, visit Elisabeth’s obituary page at OrlandsMemorialChapel.com.

Elisabeth Joseph

Elisabeth Joseph, of Monroe Township, NJ, passed away on Monday, February 22, 2021 at the age of 97. Born in Berlin, Germany, Elisabeth survived the Holocaust by working as a maid for a family who entertained Nazis, a family who protected her with food, shelter, and false identity papers. Her brother, Hans Martin Jacoby, was deported to Auschwitz and her parents, Bruno and Ella Jacoby, were deported and murdered in Riga, Latvia. After the war, Elisabeth married Ernst Joseph, who survived by living in a small room for 27 months, protected by an ordinary German couple. In 1948, Elisabeth and Ernst immigrated to the United States. There they reunited with Ernst’s brother Gerhard in Trenton, NJ, who was able to escape Germany in 1938. Elisabeth and Ernst settled in Hamilton Township and later moved to Ewing Township. Elisabeth was predeceased by her husband Ernst and her granddaughter, Amy Grossman. She is survived by her loving daughter Evelyn Grossman and her husband, Dr. Leonard Grossman; her grandson, Dr. Eric Grossman and his wife Dr. Elizabeth Grossman of Santa Barbara, CA; and great-grandchildren, Josephine, Knox, and James. In addition, she is survived by her nieces, Judi and Barbara, and their children and grandchildren. Elisabeth was a devoted mother who gave her only child Evelyn deep love and support. Elisabeth was an avid swimmer and shared HOPEWELL • NJ HIGHTSTOWN • NJ that passion with her grandchildren, taking them to the JCC pool, plus cheering on 609.921.6420 609.448.0050 Eric and Amy at their many pride ourselves We prideon ourselves being aon small, being personal, a small, and personal, serviceand oriented servicefamily oriented business. familyWith business. five generations With five generations of of soccer and lacrosse games. 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her positive spirit remained s t rong a nd s he w i l l b e missed by those who were able to enjoy her smile. Those desiring to make a memorial donation in Ann’s honor may do so at Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement (www.thewomensalzheimersmovement.org ) ; Cure Alzheimer’s Fund (https:// curealz.org); or the Demmer Public Library, Three Lakes, Wisconsin. A memorial service will take place in late spring in Three Lakes, Wisconsin. Local arrangements are by the Wilson-Apple Funeral Home, Pennington, NJ. Condolences are welcome at w w w.wilsonapple.com. Arrangements in Wisconsin will be by the Gaffney-Busha Funeral Home, Eagle River, Wisconsin.

Mary H. Walsh Ann Reitzel Ann Reitzel, 89, passed away peacefully on February 24th at Care One in Hamilton, New Jersey. Born in Park Ridge, Illinois, Ann spent her youth in the Chicago area. After marriage she and her husband Glenn raised their family in various locations: Blooming ton-Nor mal, Illinois; Omaha, Nebraska; and Princeton, New Jersey; while Glenn worked for IBM. Upon graduating f rom Iowa State with a degree in child development, Ann worked for Hull House in Chicago as a nursery school teacher before raising a family of three children. Ann contributed a chapter to the book The Parenting Advisor, published in 1978. Once her children were off to college, Ann pursued a career in real estate in the Princeton area. After retirement in Milford, Connecticut, Ann and Glenn moved to Pinehurst, North Carolina, to enjoy 16 years of regular rounds of golf in between many exciting trips abroad. They always looked forward to summers at their cottage in Three Lakes, Wisconsin, with extended family and friends as members of the Three Lakes Rod & Gun Club. Daughter of the late Elmer and Gertrude Jarchow Zitzewitz, wife of the late Glenn Reitzel, mother of the late Glenn (Win) Reitzel III, she is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, Jocelyn Reitzel Sullivan and James Sullivan of San Francisco, CA, and a son, Andrew Reitzel of Plainsboro, NJ. She was predeceased by her sister Gail Zitzewitz Owen and David Zitzewitz. Despite the challenges she faced in recent years,

Mary Hildebrand Walsh died on February 27, 2021 in Skillman, N.J.; she would have been 99 in April. Mrs. Walsh was born in Greenville, KY, to the late Bess ( Procter) Hildebrand and William Alfred Hildebrand. She was predeceased in 2018 by her husband, W. James Walsh. Mrs. Walsh attended the University of Louisville before deciding to move to New York City to pursue an acting career after World War II. She left drama school in New York to become a model at Bergdorf Goodman’s custom-made department and modeled in high fashion shows for many years. Mrs. Walsh met the love of her life at a party in New York City. She and Jim were married in 1950 and resided in Upper Montclair, N.J. After marriage she raised three children, continued her modeling career, and pursued her interest in the theater by working with the Junior League’s Children’s Theater in Montclair, N.J. In 1969 Mrs. Walsh and her family moved to Princeton, N.J., where she was a longtime member of the Present Day Club, the Dogwood Garden Club, the Nassau Club, and the Nassau Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Walsh was most recently a resident of the Stonebridge Montgomery retirement community in Skillman, N.J. Mrs. Walsh is sur vived by her three daughters and their husbands ( Cy nthia Walsh and Rene Milo, Diana Walsh and Paul Magnin, and Jennifer Walsh and Bernard Wharton), five grandchildren (Alex, Christopher, Tyler, Kayleigh, and Zach) and two great-grandchildren (Jayden and Lily). Arrangements are under the direction of the MatherHodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

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woman’s winter jacket made in France; Russian Magazine Apollon. Call (609) 921-7218. 02-24-3t

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

PRINCETON HOUSE FOR SALE: 5-6 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, Western Section, 1 acre. All renovated. Detached garage. Walk to train & University. Call (609) 216-0092. 02-24-3t KOALA CLEANING SERVICE, LLC: Residential & Commercial cleaning. 20% off your first cleaning! Phone: (267) 990-5901 info@koalacleaningservice.com www.koalacleaningservice.com Company is insured. 02-10-8t

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 873-3168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 03-03-8t HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21

•Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

“I long, as does every human being, to be at home wherever I find myself." —Maya Angelou

Established in 1947

WATER WATER EVERYWHERE! Let's rid that water problem in your basement once and for all! Complete line of waterproofing services, drain systems, interior or exterior, foundation restoration and structural repairs. Restoring those old and decaying walls of your foundation.

Call A. Pennacchi and Sons, and put that water problem to rest!

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

Mercer County's oldest waterproofing co. est. 1947 Deal directly with Paul from start to finish.

609-394-7354

Over 70 years of stellar excellence! Thank you for the oppportunity.

apennacchi.com

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, maRCh 3, 2021

to place an order:


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 3, 2021 • 36

AT YOUR

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

SERVICE A Town Topics Directory

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner Home Repair Specialist

609-586-2130

BLACKMAN

LANDSCAPING FRESH IDEAS

Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Stone Walls and Terraces FREE CONSULTATION

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual

PRINCETON, NJ

609-683-4013

CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

A Tradition of Quality

FOR SALE: Brand new mink coat; woman’s winter jacket made in France; Russian Magazine Apollon. Call (609) 921-7218. 02-24-3t HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

GIVE OR GET THE GIFT OF WRITING! Contact the Princeton Writing Coach—a professional writer, editor, and university teacher—to explore customized learning, writing, and editing services delivered virtually. Specialties: school/college applications; tutoring; scientific, business, and ESL writing. Outstanding references. 908-420-1070. r t re n n e r @ a l u m n i.p r i n c e to n .e d u princetonwritingcoach.com 02-17-4t PRINCETON HOUSE FOR SALE: 5-6 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, Western Section, 1 acre. All renovated. Detached garage. Walk to train & University. Call (609) 216-0092. 02-24-3t KOALA CLEANING SERVICE, LLC: Residential & Commercial cleaning. 20% off your first cleaning! Phone: (267) 990-5901 info@koalacleaningservice.com www.koalacleaningservice.com Company is insured. 02-10-8t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 873-3168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 03-03-8t

Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

· Newsletters

Erick Perez

Fully insured 15+ Years Experience Call for free estimate Best Prices

LOOKING TO RENT YOUR HOME THIS SUMMER? Place an ad with TOWN TOPICS! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

Witherspoon Media Group

609-466-2693

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

tf

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

(609)737-2466

Serving the Princeton Area since 1963 Find us on Facebook and Instagram

· Brochures · Postcards · Books · Catalogues

HD Highest Quality Seamless Gutters. Serving the Princeton area for 25 years Experience and Quality Seamless Gutters Installed

3 Gutter Protection Devices that Work! Free estimates! All work guaranteed in writing!

Easy repeat gutter cleaning service offered without pushy sales or cleaning minimums!

609-921-2299

HOUSE

· Annual Reports

PAINTING & MORE

House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish (Benjamin Moore Green promise products)

Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

American Furniture Exchange

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400


37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, maRCh 3, 2021

The Townhomes at Riverwalk

The Townhomes at Riverwalk — Unmatched amenities and an incredible location set this new construction project apart from ANY active adult communities built in the region! Located on campus and down the street from the renowned Penn Medicine Princeton Healthcare, the new community is just minutes from Downtown Princeton, Princeton Junction Train Station, major roadways, as well as shopping, dining, museums, and theaters. In addition to the area’s pristine parks and recreation, the healthcare campus features a direct connection to a newly developed 32-acre park, numerous walking trails and access to the Millstone River. The development features 45 upscale townhomes abutting to Ovation at Riverwalk – a dream come true for anyone looking for a club which has it all, including a SHUTTLE! Steakhouse? You got it! 4-Season indoor pool? Of course! Even a golf simulator, test kitchen, art studio, fitness & yoga retreats are all part of the exclusive membership offered to the residents of the Townhomes at Riverwalk community. Built by MVB Development Group, the homes feature open floorplans with tons of natural light, exquisite details and use of the finest materials. The versatile plans also offer an extensive list of upgrades and options to fit any lifestyle and taste, including an ELEVATOR! All of the models have 3 spacious bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms and a 2-car garage.

Although this active adult community focuses on independent living and provides every possibility for residents to enjoy something new and exciting every day, having immediate access to a medical facility and care is also a big plus, especially during these uncertain times. “Having access to a world-class medical facility has many benefits related to health, especially if one person in the family is in need of more regular care for whatever reason,” Ned Moore, a managing member of MVB Development Group, said in a recent press release. “But in the event that regular care is needed, having access to this kind of care so conveniently reduces the burden on everyone in obtaining the necessary care and makes for an overall better living experience.” The Townhomes at Riverwalk really has it all – gorgeous interiors, unparalleled amenities and close proximity to culture, which allow for an independent and abundant lifestyle, yet with direct access to medical care if there is a need which offers a peace of mind to someone of any age! You would not want to miss this unique opportunity! Call me for a private showing of the elegant models which the Townhomes at Riverwalk has to offer!


hoMe rePair sPecialist: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21

“Yes, we also rescreen screens regular & pawproof.”

741 Alexander Rd., Princeton • 924-2880

A Legacy of Craft For Our Community Since 1985

i buY all kinDs of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 921-7469. 09-30-21

609.683.1034 PDGUILD.COM

buYinG: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc

Joes lanDscaPinG inc. oF Princeton Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience Taking care of Princeton’s trees •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ Local family owned business gmail.com for over 40 years Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References Broker Associate | Luxury Collection •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 C: 732.588.8000 06-03-21 O: 609.921.9202

609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

Brian Wisner

Brian Wisner

Brian Wisner

toWn toPics classiFieDs E : bwisner19@gmail.com : BrianSellsNJ.com BrokerWAssociate | Luxury CollectionGets toP results!

Broker Associate | Luxury Collection

of Princeton

C: 732.588.8000 O: 609.921.9202

Brian Wisner E : bwisner19@gmail.com

Broker Associate | Luxury Collection W : BrianSellsNJ.com 343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540

C: of732.588.8000 Princeton O: 609.921.9202

Lic: 1432491 E : bwisner19@gmail.com

W : BrianSellsNJ.com Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

2016

343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540

Lic: 1432491 2016

Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to all of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

343 Nassau St. NJ 08540 C:Princeton, 732.588.8000 O: 609.921.9202

E : bwisner19@gmail.com W : BrianSellsNJ.com

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540

Lic: 1432491 Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

2016

Lic: 1432491

stockton real estate, llc

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

current rentals *********************************

lonG terM rentals onlY: unfurnished w/laundry & parking:

coMPanion neeDeD

Princeton – $1900/mo. 18 Vandeventer: 1 BR, 1 Bath, LR w/ Eat-in Kitchen. Available now. Princeton – $1900/mo. 29 Wiggins Apt. 1: 1 BR, 1 Bath, LR with Eat-in Kitchen. Includes heat. Available now. Princeton – $2000/mo. 30 Green St: 1-2 BR, 1 Bath, newly renovated 1st floor, large Kitchen, laundry. Includes water & sewer. Available now, minimum 12 month lease.

We have customers waiting for houses!

STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE. We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com See our display ads for our available houses for sale.

for 63-year old handicapped man in small Princeton apt. 5 hours daily. Housekeeping, Personal care, Meal preparation, Food shopping. Handle medications. Must have car & recent references. (732) 241-0170. 03-03-3t

Princeton Police seeks

Crossing Guard Salary: $15.00 per 30 minute shift Mornings 8:00-8:30 a.m. Afternoons 12:30-1:30 p.m.

For more information: https://nj-princeton.civicplus.com/Jobs.aspx

32 chaMbers street Princeton, nJ 08542 (609) 924-1416 Martha F. stockton, broker-oWner estate liQuiDation serVice: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22 What’s a Great GiFt For a ForMer Princetonian? a Gift subscription! call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

We buY cars

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

MASONRY RENOVATION AND REPAIR We fix all masonry problems... it’s our passion!

Repair | Rebuild | Restore Steps • Walls • Patio • Concrete Loose Railings • Blue Stone Specialists Basement Waterproofing Basement Wall and Floor Repair Brick Driveways • Belgian Block Walkways and Patio Construction Replacement of Cracked Limestone Steps

Greg Powers HIC#13VH10598000 RECENTLY COMPLETED OUTDOOR STONE FIREPLACE

LIFETIME WARRANTY ON ALL WORK | WE DESIGN AND BUILD NEW PATIOS!

609-751-3039 www.ReNewMason.com

LET’S TALK REAL ESTATE... COMPROMISE IS NECESSARY NO MATTER THE MARKET As the “red-hot” real estate market continues in New Jersey, reports of low inventories, rising prices, and bidding wars dominate real estate news. And for good reason: the latest New Jersey Realtors® report shows that the inventory of homes for sale is about half of what it was a year ago. In this type of intensely competitive market, it is crucial for buyers and sellers to remain realistic about both the market and the real estate process. Compromise will always be a factor in real estate, even in a market when houses are selling within a day of being listed. Buyers, you will likely discover that it is nearly impossible to find a home that fits every requirement on your wish list. If a house offers everything you want in terms of location and square footage, but the kitchen isn’t in your exact taste, don’t let that eliminate the home as a possibility. Sellers, meanwhile, need to be realistic about their selling price and accept if their house needs a considerable amount of updating or repairs. In the end, the selling price will have to reflect the reality.

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Princeton Office 609-921-1900 | 609-577-2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf lookinG to rent Your hoMe this suMMer? Place an ad with TOWN TOPICS! call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf For sale: Brand new mink coat; woman’s winter jacket made in France; Russian Magazine Apollon. Call (609) 921-7218. 02-24-3t hoMe health aiDe: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf carPentrY/ hoMe iMProVeMent in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf hanDYMan–carPenter: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

Art by Sean Carney

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 3, 2021 • 38

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co.

Think spring with these fresh new products from Princeton Magazine Store.

Projects Watches

ProFessional babYsitter Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf GiVe or Get the GiFt oF WritinG! Contact the Princeton Writing Coach—a professional writer, editor, and university teacher—to explore customized learning, writing, and editing services delivered virtually. Specialties: school/college applications; tutoring; scientific, business, and ESL writing. Outstanding references. 908-420-1070. r t re n n e r @ a l u m n i.p r i n c e to n .e d u princetonwritingcoach.com 02-17-4t

Art by Jane Zamost

Projects Watches Art by Jane Zamost

www.princetonmagazinestore.com


Move-In-Ready and Quick-Delivery Homes in Beautiful New Hope These exclusive residences span 3,600 square feet, offering abundant space and privacy. Our move-in-ready option features the most in-demand extras and upgrades to make your new home feel perfect as soon as you step through the door.

DISTINGUISHING FEATURES

TAKE A VIRTUAL TOUR

Open, Contemporary Floorplans Private Elevators Full Basement Two-Car Rear Garages Private Gated Community

Experience our model residence from the comfort of home. Visit rabbitruncreek.com/tour to view an immersive in-home video tour.

Maintenance-Free Lifestyle

Starting at $1,150,000 215.862.5800 | RabbitRunCreek.com Rte 202 (Lower York Road) & Rabbit Run Drive, New Hope, PA

In-person tours available: Wednesday–Friday | 10am–5pm Saturday–Sunday | 12pm–4pm

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, maRCh 3, 2021

OPEN THE DOOR TO GRACIOUS LIVING


INTRODUCING PROVINCE LINE ROAD • PRINCETON $2,975,000 Jane Henderson Kenyon • 609.828.1450 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME307838

INTRODUCING ELM ROAD • PRINCETON $1,595,000 Owen Toland, Anna Andrevski • 609.731.5953 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME308188

NEWLY PRICED WESTCOTT ROAD • PRINCETON $1,395,000 Marie ‘Michelle’ Miller • 609.455.6557 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME306430

INTRODUCING AUGUSTA COURT • MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP $999,000 Jennifer Dionne • 908.531.6230 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJSO114296

INTRODUCING EAGLE CREEK COURT • MONTGOMERY TWP $965,000 Valerie Smith • 609.658.0394 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJSO114276

INTRODUCING PARKSIDE DRIVE • PRINCETON $945,000 Santina ‘Sandy’ Beslity • 609.577.6626 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME308220

MERCER ROAD • PRINCETON $875,000 Kimberly A Rizk, Eleanor Deardorff • 609.203.4807 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME289468

INTRODUCING NORTH SHORE COURT • MONTGOMERY TWP $810,000 Valerie Smith • 609.658.0394 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJSO114278

NEWLY PRICED MOORE STREET • PRINCETON $799,000 Jane Henderson Kenyon • 609.828.1450 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME295736

INTRODUCING LOVERS LANE • PRINCETON $799,000 Amy Granato • 917.848.8345 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME307968

INTRODUCING BENJAMIN RUSH LANE • PRINCETON $650,000 Linda Twining • 609.439.2282 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME308152

INTRODUCING BLUE SPRUCE DRIVE • HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP $550,000 Deborah W Lane • 609.306.3442 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME308204

CallawayHenderson.com 4 NASSAU STREET | PRINCETON, NJ 08542 | 609.921.1050 Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.

Profile for Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper, March 3, 2021  

The March 3, 2021 issue of the Town Topics Newspaper

Town Topics Newspaper, March 3, 2021  

The March 3, 2021 issue of the Town Topics Newspaper