Town Topics Newspaper, February 7, 2024.

Page 1

Volume LXXVIII, Number 6

Governors’ Mansions are Theme for Morven’s “Grand Homes” Series . . . . . . . .5 Princeton Author Jinwoo Chong Returns for Library Fundraiser . . . . 7 Closing of Hopewell Theater Marks End of An Era . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Westminster Community Orchestra Showcases Concerto Competition Winners . . . . . . . . . . 15 Snapping Two-Game Losing Streak, PU Men’s Hoops Defeats Brown . . . .24 Senior Baird Displaying Versatility, Leadership As PHS Boys’ Hockey Aims For MCT Title Repeat . . . . . . 27

Paul McCartney Marks a Big Anniversary with a New Book . . . . . . . . . 14 Art . . . . . . . . . . . .20, 21 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 22 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . 32 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Performing Arts . . .16, 17 Police Blotter . . . . . . . . 9 Real Estate. . . . . . . . . 33 Education and Recreation . . . . . . . . 2, 3 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6 Valentine's Day . . . .18, 19

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Nonprofit Share My Meals Reports Big Jump in Healthy Meals Recovered The year 2023 was one of exceptional growth for Share My Meals, the Princeton-based nonprofit that fights food insecurity and the environmental impact of food waste. Compared to 2022, the organization has reported, there was an 85 percent increase in the number of healthy meals recovered from corporations, hospitals, educational institutions, restaurants, farms, and hotels. These meals were delivered to 50 families and 15 senior citizens in Princeton. Clients of 23 nonprofits throughout New Brunswick, Summit, Morristown, Camden, Somerville, and Trenton also received these donations in 2023. In all, the organization, has reported, they recovered 72,000 meals while simultaneously preventing 294,539 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions. The year was “transformative,” said Helene Lanctuit, CEO of the organization since last October. “Our expanded volunteer base, additional food donations, and partnerships have enabled us to make a significant difference in the lives of many.” Founded in 2020 by Isabelle Lambotte, who continues as president of the organization, Share My Meals operates out of Dorothea’s House on John Street and relies on volunteers to deliver meals and help with fundraising, communications, and more. Food insecurity and food waste are the targets of their efforts. “Surplus food that would otherwise go to waste — that is a big part of our mission,” Lanctuit said. “We’re trying to communicate that we are not just about delivering healthy meals. We are fighting waste and carbon emissions. That is one angle of our program that is not always understood.” Share My Meals’ corporate volunteer program, in collaboration with Novo Nordisk, Bristol Myers Squibb, and Campbell’s, has been key in increasing efficiency. As the volunteer team grows, the organization is able to recruit additional donors. “We have reached out to new meal donors in the area, including large corporations with cafeterias, eating clubs, and hospitals,” said Lanctuit. “We just started with Rider University.” Donor organizations want to know that Continued on Page 11

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Plastic Bag Ban Moves Ahead Despite Critics The New Jersey plastic bag ban, enacted in May 2022, is calculated to have resulted in almost nine million single-use plastic bags per year that are not polluting the Princeton environment, according to Environment New Jersey’s Waste Reduction Calculator. Laid side to side, those bags would stretch 1,561 miles, and eliminating those bags has saved 45,318 gallons of oil needed to produce them and has cut single-use plastic bag litter by at least 33 percent each year. New Jersey’s law, in effect now for almost two years, prevents stores from giving out single-use plastic bags to customers and also restricts most stores from providing single-use paper bags as well as polystyrene foam food takeout containers. Single-use plastic straws may be provided only at a customer’s request. “The public has seen a big reduction in plastic bags,” said Environment New Jersey Director Doug O’Malley. “Seeing is believing. In litter cleanups at the shore and in our communities, there are fewer plastic bags overall. That’s a win — a win for our environment, a win for our communities, a win for all of us.” He continued, “We were producing billions of plastic bags per year. Something that we use for 15 minutes can pollute our environment for generations, and that’s essentially what plastic bags became.” New Jersey Environmental Protection

Commissioner Shawn M. LaTourette noted in May 2023, on the first anniversary of the ban, “New Jersey’s initiative to step up and say no to continued plastics pollution in our communities and waterways is worthy of celebration because we have quickly seen the positive effects of this law.” But the naysayers have not remained silent. Most conspicuously, early last month the market research group Freedonia Custom Research issued a report stating that the plastic bag ban might be

doing more harm than good, boosting the use of alternative thicker polypropylene bags. The report also cited an increase in the use of alternative plastic bags by grocery pickup and delivery services and significant profits for retailers selling alternative bags. Alternative bags are reusable, but, Freedonia claimed, on average each bag is reused only two or three times. O’Malley, along with New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy and others, acknowledged Continued on Page 9

PHS Researchers Will Represent New Jersey In National Samsung STEM Competition

A Princeton High School (PHS) team of about 15 student researchers under the direction of PHS science teacher Mark Eastburn has advanced to the finals of the 2024 Samsung Solve for Tomorrow STEM Competition, one of 50 state winners selected from 300 state finalist schools that submitted plans delineating how their project will use STEM to address an important community issue. The PHS team has been creating interactive robots that can speak various languages of the schools’ student population, including Spanish, Haitian Creole, and the Mayan language Mam. The goal is to help preserve Indigenous languages by using a robotic platform powered by artificial intelligence in the form of a stuffed

animal “friend” that will speak Mam. Eastburn stated that these robots can “encourage continued use of native languages, promote social interaction, and navigate computer-based platforms to enter data and gain skills in digital literacy.” He added, “For much of this work, we are using artificial intelligence and natural language processing, though we have come across significant challenges with Mam because no scaffold exists, and this language has extremely complex grammar.” There are several Mam speakers on the PHS research team, who come from a small Mam community in Princeton. There are larger Mam communities in Morristown in northern New Jersey, Continued on Page 10

WASSAILING THE APPLE TREES: Kingsessing Morris dancers were part of the annual celebration Saturday afternoon at Terhune Orchards on Cold Soil Road. The festival follows an ancient tradition of protecting the trees to ensure a good harvest in the coming year. Attendees share their favorite winter activities in this week’s Town Talk on page 6. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

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GETTING READY FOR THE SEMIQUINCENTENNIAL: Alex Robb, a frequent reenactor, has been hired to help with the upcoming celebrations of the country’s 250th anniversary in 2026.

Washington Crossing Park of the McConkey Ferry Inn, Named in Funding Round and another from the Bucks

The Friends of Washington Crossing Park (FWCP) were named in the first round of grant recipients by the Philadelphia Funder Collaborative for the Semiquincentennial. Based on the strength of their proposal, they were awarded $51,000. It is the third new major grant, in addition to one from the National Park Service for the rehabilitation

County Tourism Grant Program to market and enhance programming surrounding the Crossing Reenactments. This funding has been utilized to hire a new staff member, Alex Robb. Robb was hired in January of 2024 as a full-time interpretive programs specialist to assist with the design and implementation of new educational programs that

highlight the park’s unique military history as FWCP continues to prepare for the upcoming Semiquincentennial celebration. He has always been interested in history, as his mother is a history teacher and his grandfather used to take him to reenactments and historical sites. Robb g r a d u ate d f r o m The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) in 2021 with a bachelor’s degree in history and e ducation. He has been a historical reenactor for the past six years, participating in programs at Washington Crossing Historic Park on a volunteer basis. In addition to The Annual Crossing Reenactments, he has helped with the site’s annual Memorial Day Program and fi eld trip programs. He also works with his local historical society in Hamilton Township. Much of his new role will focus on designing and expanding interpretive programs for both the general public and school students. Each year the park hosts just under 10,000 school-aged children from over 150 local schools. “Something I’d love to work on is bringing our programs to schools,” he said. “There are a lot of schools that struggle with budgets and getting kids out of the classroom, so I would love to be able to bring the park to schools. I would also love to come up with programs for different age ranges and incorporate what teachers are trying to get out of their lessons.”

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin

• P R O C A C C I N I •

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Skating on the Square: Through February 25, on the outdoor synthetic skating rink. Thursdays and Fridays, 4-7 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, 12-3 p.m. and 4-7 p.m. Palmersquare.com. Leighton Listens: Councilman Leighton Newlin holds one-on-one conversations about issues impacting Princeton from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. February 7: Local Greek, 44 Leigh Avenue. February 14: Earth’s End, 45 Spring Street. February 21: Sakrid Coffee Roasters, 20 Nassau Street. February 28: Chapin Guatemalan and Mexican Restaurant, 146 Witherspoon Street. All are welcome. Volunteer with FOPOS: Friends of Princeton Open Space is holding two familyfriendly, half-day sessions on Saturday, February 10 to help remove invasive plants and identify native species. Registration is required. Visit fopos.org/getinvolved. Free Tax Assistance: The Mercer County AARP Tax-Aide program begins offering free federal and state tax preparation February 2 at Princeton Public Library, the Suzanne Patterson Building, and Nassau Presbyterian Church. Call (888) 227-7669 for specifics. Scholarship Opportunity: College-bound Jewish female students who live in the Princeton/Mercer/Bucks community can apply for funding from the Dr. Esther Wollin Memorial Scholarship Fund. JFCSonline.org. Donate Blood: On Thursday, February 8 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. Visit nybc.org/njdrive and use sponsor code 65534.

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“STATE-LY HOMES”: Hawaii’s executive mansion Washington Place is among the four homes featured in Morven’s “Grand Homes & Gardens” series. (Creative Commons)

Governors’ Mansions are the Theme For This Year’s “Grand Homes” Series One-Year Subscription: $20 Two-Year Subscription: $25

It has been fiveSubscription years since The series begins March Information: Morven Museum609.924.5400 & Garden ext. 5 and 30 continues through began presenting its popuMarch 27, with a mix of live or lar March series, subscriptions@ “Grand and online programs featurHomes & Gardens,” devot- ing additional governors’ witherspoonmediagroup.com One-Year Subscription: $20 ed to stately mansions and mansions in Maine, Virginia, Two-Year Subscription: $25 princetonmagazine.com lush landscapes. This year’s and Hawaii. Participants can Subscription Information: theme, “State-ly Homes : experience the whole series 609.924.5400 ext. 30 Exploring U.S. Governors’ or individual segments. or Mansions and Gardens,” “One of our committee subscriptions@ starts right here in Princeton memb ers c ame up w it h witherspoonmediagroup.com with Drumthwacket, the of- the idea, and we knew that princetonmagazine.com ficial residence of New Jer- Drumthwacket needed to be sey’s governors since 1981. one of the four homes on the series,” said Greer Luce, Morven’s curator of education and public programs. “I don’t believe Morven, which used to be the governors’ ANTIQUES & USED FURNITURE mansion, has done a program with Drumthwacket in quite a while. So this is a opportunity for our two Antiques • Jewelry • Watches • Guitars nice organizations to do someCameras • Books • Coins • Artwork thing together.”

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TOPICS Of the Town Each of the four — Drumthwacket; First House in Richmond, Va.; Washington Place in Honolulu, Hawaii ; and T he Blaine House in Augusta, Maine — are open to the public. “We want people to be able to tour these houses,” said Luce. “They need to be places that can be visited.” In order to qualify for the series, homes must be architecturally significant, have notable interiors, and tell an interesting history, socially and ot her w ise. Dr umt h wacket fits the bill. “It has a really interesting social histor y based on the people who have lived there,” said Luce. “It was built in the 1830s for Charles Smit h Olden, a farmer-turned-businessman who would eventually serve as a state senator and governor. It then underwent this kind of crazy expansion and renovation during the Gilded Age, under Moses Taylor Pyne. So there is some Gilded Age décor.” D r u m t h w a c ke t d o c e n t Chuck Johnson is the guide for the March 5 talk. Next on March 13 is First House. Historian Mary Miley Theobald, author of First House: Two Centuries with Virginia’s First Families, is the host. The house was first inhabited in 1813 by Gov. James Barbour, and is the oldest continuously occupied governors’ residence in the United States. “The Federal style mansion, little altered architecturally over its long history,

has accommodated more than 50 ‘first families.’ In 1990, Virginia’s executive mansion became the residence of L. Douglas Wilder, the first elected Black governor in America since Reconstruction,” reads a press release from Morven. Hawaii’s Washington Place is the only official governors’ residence in the U.S. that was also home to a monarch, Queen Lili’uokalani. Hawaii’s last reigning royal, she moved into Washington Place in 1862 as the bride of John O wen Dominis, son of Captain John and Mary Dominis, the couple who build the mansion. It remained her private residence until she died in 1917. “We’re really excited for this one,” said Luce. “The speaker, who will be virtual,

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Governors’ Mansions Continued from Preceding Page

is the curator of Washington Place. The house has really preserved the history of her life there, and that history is so interesting.” The other virtual presentation is “The Blaine House: Home to Maine’s Governors,” by Maine’s state historian Earle Shettleworth. “Setting to one of the most wide-ranging careers in the history of American politics, The Blaine House is an architectural gem and home to Maine’s governors and their families,” reads the release from Morven. “In 1862, the house became the residence of James G. Blaine who would go on to serve as speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, a U.S. senator, secretary of state, and, finally, a Republican candidate for president in 1884. The home was donated to the state of Maine in 1919 by Blaine’s daughter, Harriet Blaine Beale.” Each house in the series has its own style, character, and history. Luce, who has researched them all, was particularly taken with on e of D r u m t hw acke t’s residents, Abram Nathanial Spanel. A scientist and inventor, and the founder of Playtex, one of the biggest corset and brassiere companies in the U.S., Spanel lived at the mansion in the 1940s. Among his more than 2,000 additional patents are a pneumatic stretcher de signed to carry wounded soldiers in water, and a spacesuit for the astronauts of the Apollo program. “During Spanel’s time in the house, he actually patented many of his inventions,” Luce said. “People who worked for him would come to the house. His engineering staff lived there. It’s such an interesting part of Drumthwacket’s history.” A ll of t he talks begin at 6:30 p.m. in Morven’s Stockton Education Center. Doors and the virtual waiting room open at 6 p.m. A zoom link is sent to all virtual participants. Light refreshments inspired by each state will be provided for those attending in person. All of the programs will be recorded and shared with registrants following each event. Visit morven.org for tickets and details. —Anne Levin

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What are your favorite winter activities?” (Asked Saturday at Terhune Orchards) (Photos by Charles R. Plohn)

Lincoln: “I like snowball fights, making snowmen, and sledding. I got a tennis ball launcher for dogs called Nerf Dog, and it works very well for launching snowballs too.” Gabe: “Sleeping in is up at the top of my list. The same as Lincoln though, I like a good snowball fight, and I like to go snowboarding sometimes.” —Lincoln Inniss, Princeton, with Gabe Runyon, Hillsborough

Giselle: “We went to visit the German Christmas Market in Philadelphia, which was beautiful. That was very enjoyable. What we especially love to do this winter is visit Princeton and ride scooters through the Princeton University campus.” —Giselle Trujillo and Mateu Javier Abreu-Trujillo, Trenton

Get the scoop from Amy: “My favorite winter activities are going to the park and sledding.” Caius: “Snowball fights.” —Amy Drakeman and Caius Drama, New York, N.Y.

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Ed: “Our new favorite activity is riding Tadpole Recumbent tricycles, which are low to the ground with two wheels in the front and a single wheel in the back. And our retirement goal is to ride them all over New Jersey on trails which I helped build, and then to go around the country on various rides.” —Ed and Angela Wallace, Montgomeryville, Pa.


The novel Flux, which explores grief, trauma, relationships, and corporate culture, has been praised in the New York Times, Publisher’s Weekly, and New York Review of Books, and is on myriad “must read” lists.

Jinwoo Chong (Photo by Kristen Fedor)

The book that has captivated so many is the debut from 2013 Princeton High School graduate Jinwoo Chong, who will return to P r inceton on T hurs day, February 22, to speak at the Princeton Public Library. The 6:30 p.m. event is a fundraiser for the library’s Friends and Foundation. He will appear with Laura Spence-Ash, whose debut novel, Beyond the Sea, was published last year. The plot of Flux ( Melville House, 2023) balances three characters: 28-yearold Brandon, who loses his job after a hostile takeover

of his big-media employer; 8-year-old Bo, who loses his mother in a tragic accident; and Blue, 48, a key witness in a criminal trial who struggles to reconnect with his family. When the lives of all three characters begin to intersect, secrets are uncovered. Woven throughout is a 1980s television detective show character, and the concept of time travel. According to the publisher, “Flux is a haunting and sometimes shocking exploration of the cyclical nature of grief, of moving past trauma, and of the pervasive nature of whiteness within the development of Asian identity in America.” Chong, 28, like his character, drew from some of his experience. “I’m always surprised by what little pieces of my life end up in my work,” he said in an email. “It’s not usually things that I expect, just small details or names of towns that I’m pulling from memory. However, the first chapter of Flux takes place during a corporate takeover of the media company the main character, Brandon, works at, which happened to me at my first job out of college. Looking back, that period of my life was a catalyst for a lot of things, including a decision to try and focus more on writing and even to apply to graduate school.” “Otherwise,” he continued, “the book takes inspiration from the police procedural dramas on TV when I came of age : Law and Order: SVU, CSI, NCIS,

and others. The science fiction element came out of some guidance I received in my MFA at Columbia, and wasn’t an aspect of the book until much later. As a result, the book is a mix of genres that probably wouldn’t have come about if I hadn’t taken so long to write it.” In addition to earning a master’s degree at Columbia, Chong did his undergraduate work at Georgetown University, and currently works on the business side of the New York Times when he is not writing. When he is writing, his process arose, he said, “from needing to balance writing — which I’d always thought of as a hobby,” with his work and school responsibilities. “As a result, I only ever write at night, and seem to work best when everybody else in my house is asleep. It’s the only remaining span of time in my life in which I’m actually alone. I tend to write in bursts, and can sustain momentum far easier than begin in the first place. I seem to outline and prepare large projects for years at a time, procrastinating until I finally find a reason to begin, after which the rest arrives much easier.” The process works — Flux was named on last spring’s New York Times’ “23 works of fiction to read,” was recommended by Vanity Fair, listed in Vu lt ure’s “ best beach reads of 2023” and Chong was deemed an “author to watch” by Shondaland, among other accolades. Chong’s short stories have

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has not forgotten Princeton. “I was born in Princeton, in the hospital that has now moved to the larger campus at Princeton-Plainsboro,” he said. “All my life, as soon as I could read, I was interested in writing on my own. It was always my favorite kind of assignment in school.” He added that he attended kindergarten at Littlebrook, and grades 1 through 8 at Princeton Charter School. “Living in a single place for my entire childhood had enormous benefits. I had a sense of stability that I knew was a great privilege. It also allowed me to see very clearly how I was growing up while my surroundings stayed relatively the same. As a result, It was very hard to leave Princeton. I hope to live here again someday.” Chong is not the only P r i nce ton H igh. S cho ol graduate whose work is featured at the library this month. Karen Bao, Princeton High School Class of 2012, was slated to appear on February 6 to discuss her new book, Pangu’s Shadow, with local author Shveta Thakrar. “It’s a happy coincidence for us to be hosting two PHS grads in Februar y,” said Jennifer Podolsky, executive director of Princeton Public Library. “Janie Hermann, our adult programming manager, told me that we first hosted Karen nine years ago in February, when her first YA book came out and she was an undergrad at Columbia. And we’re so pleased that Jinwoo agreed

to think that in a few years a young person studying or just hanging out in our Teen Center could be a published author.” The event will be held in the Community Room.

or $30 for the talk only. For more information and registration, v isit pr incetonlibrary.libnet.info/ event/9833990. —Wendy Greenberg

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in The Southern to do a Friends and Foun- Tickets, available through Princeton Author of Acclaimed Debut Novel appeared Review, Chicago Quarterly dation fundraiser. His first the events calendar on the and Salamander. He novel has gotten so much library’s website, are $75, Returns for Friends, Foundation Library Event Review, lives in New York City, but buzz. It’s pretty remarkable including a copy of Flux,


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024 • 8

Closing of Hopewell Theater Marks the End of an Era Hopewell Theater, a cultural landmark on South Greenwood Avenue in Hopewell Borough for 144 years, has closed its doors. Citing rising costs and the inability to obtain a liquor license, the theater has notified patrons by email and posted the news on its website. “We are deeply saddened to announce that we must close the Hopewell Theater,” the website reads. “Rising costs and the inability to obtain a

liquor license — a key income source for live venues — have contributed to our decision. Thank you to our patrons, talent, staff, and the community of Hopewell for standing with us through the years. None of what we have accomplished would have been possible without you.” Since taking over the theater nearly a decade ago, Executive Director Sara Scully and her business partner Mitchel Skolnick have offered

a carefully crafted, “selectively eclectic” mix of live music, movies, discussions, and dining options. The theater partnered with the Hopewell, Princeton, and Pennington libraries, hosted private events with local nonprofits, and held open mic nights, among other offerings. An emphasis on local talent was always part of the plan, Scully said in a phone interview this week. “The different programming streams were popular

in different ways, with different kinds of audiences,” she said. “We’d have films and discussions, attracting a different crowd from the ones that came for live music. A lot of emerging talent had an opportunity to perform here, and that fulfilled a goal we had for the theater. We wanted national talent, but local was definitely a focus.” The history of the site stretches back to 1880, when a building known as Columbia Hall served as a community center, theater, and headquarters of the local fire department. In 1940, that building

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was demolished, reopening a year later as a movie house called The Colonial Playhouse. George Gallup bought the building in 1960, and it was used for Gallup polling through the mid-1980s, when it became the Off-Broadstreet Theater. The building was taken over and extensively renovated in 2015, and renamed the Hopewell Theater. Reactions to news of the closing have been “warm and regretful,” said Scully. “This was a really beautiful, special spot while it lasted. Our hope is that the spirit of the theater endures in some fashion, to serve the community as a gathering place in some respect.” Several comments on the theater’s Facebook page expressed sadness about the news. “Made many great memories there and found new artists that continue to bring joy to my family,” wrote Joseph Tino. “You’ll be missed but not forgotten.” “So sad to hear this,” wrote Lisa Wright Theodore. “Thank you for your efforts to bring the arts and community to Hopewell.” “So sorry to see the sad news,” wrote John Abbott. “It was a joy to see the many artists perform there, and I’m grateful for the chance to play on that stage. So many hard working and talented people made the HT a landmark we’ll always hold in our hearts.” While regretful, Scully is proud of what she Skolnick created. “My business partner and I created a business plan for the theater and started a production company to breathe life into Hopewell Theater,” Scully said. “I think we succeeded in doing that. We created a warm and welcoming venue where people could meet friends and get inspired. I will remember this place filled with people enjoying shows, and staying afterward to talk to friends.” The future of the site “is not my story,” Scully said. “We don’t know. We don’t own the building. For me, I’m a producer and social entrepreneur, so I will be on to my next project, I’m sure, in time. Right now, it’s time to close this place properly, clear the decks, and move forward.” —Anne Levin

SCJ Helps Asylum Seekers With Applications, Work Papers

Solidaridad Central Jersey (SCJ), a local all-volunteer organization that helps immigrants in need of asylum and work papers, is looking for volunteers. Founded in 2018, SCJ reports a “dire need for help in applying for asylum,” with a wait list of 60 asylum seekers. According to a recent SCJ press release, Solidaridad volunteers have helped Mercer County immigrants submit 120 applications for asylum and 80 work permits in the past year. No other nonprofits in central New Jersey provide asylum assistance. SCJ operates a virtual Pro Se (“for oneself”) clinic, guided by lawyers and staffed by teams of volunteer interviewers, bilingual interpreters, and recorders. They help the asylum seekers recount the persecution they have suffered and complete and submit their asylum claims. According to SCJ, Asylum seekers may face continuing threats of harm in their countries of origin because of gang violence, or persecution based on their religion, political views, gender, or sexual orientation. Although they can apply for asylum within one year of arrival in the United States, they are often unable to do so because of language barriers, cost, and limited availability of legal representation. Applying for asylum provides access to legal work authorization, leading to self-support and also filling local labor gaps. ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) raids on immigrant homes in Princeton several years ago precipitated SCJ’s first enlistment of volunteers to help provide immigrants with information about rights and to create a supportive presence for immigrant neighbors. Volunteers also provided transportation and accompanied immigrants to ICE check-ins and other appointments. The Pro Se clinic, which has been conducted virtually since the pandemic, was organized in 2019, with community and student volunteers as an important source of support. More volunteers are greatly needed, SCJ notes, and training is provided. For more information, visit solidaridadcentraljersey.org, or email solidaridadproseclinic@gmail.com.

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continued from page one

the need for consumers to continue to improve their habits of bringing their reusable bags to the store with them, but he largely dismissed the conclusions of the Freedonia study, which was funded by the American Recyclable Plastic Bag Alliance. “The Freedonia report is based on anonymous hearsay and has no citations,” O’Malley said. “It isn’t worth the electronic paper it’s written on. It was produced by the plastic bag industry as an attempt to sell their product. They say we’re producing more plastic, but they are looking at only the first few months after the ban went into effect.” He continued, “Also, most people are reusing their reusable bags many times, not just two or three times. You need to have a healthy skepticism about the findings of that report.” Sustainable Princeton Executive Director Christine Symington also questioned t he Fre e don ia f i nd i ngs. “What is clear is that they don’t provide any research to support how they came to this conclusion,” she said, pointing out the biased funding source for the report. “W hen you see a repor t that is not backed up by any data, you should treat it with a lot of skepticism. It’s a suspicious report, just picking up and creating headlines and clicks, but there is no data behind this.” Symington noted that the biggest issue in initiating the ban was “to reduce litter and pollution from bags and

straws that end up in our streams and on our beaches,” and she emphasized the importance of remembering to reuse the alternate bags. “The key there is you have to use them over and over again, so there’s a behavior change in the habit of bringing a reusable bag back to the grocery store so you don’t have to get another reusable bag,” she said. “It takes a while for everybody to adopt that habit. For this to have the intended effect of reducing emissions from consumption of resources, it is very important that we remember to use the same bags that we have over and over again.” As far as her own habits are concerned, Symington observed, “I’m not perfect, but I’m pretty good. I have bags I’ve had for decades that I’m very fond of when I go shopping.” She went on to point out that Sustainable Princeton has a collection point for bags and a volunteer takes the bags to the Princeton Mobile Food Pantr y and other places in town where they can be reused and their useful lives can be extended. O’Malley noted that public resistance to plastic bags has been around for much longer than the two years since the statewide ban was enacted. In 2014 there was a Mercer County ballot measure to ban plastic bags. “It was ahead of its time,” O’Malley said. “It did not pass, but that was an early sign. Residents had had it with plastic.” Citing a “grassroots movement all across the state saying that plastic bags had become a scourge for our environment and for our communities,” O’Malley

added, “It’s not as if we’ve lived forever with plastic bags. They’re a product of the 1980s.” He went on to commend Princeton as a leader in the state. “Princeton was ahead of the curve,” he said. “A decade ago Princeton voters said, ‘We want to get rid of plastic bags.’” He also noted that many Princeton residents are adamant about recycling, and “plastic bags are the worst enemy of recyclers in Mercer County.” Symington also applauded the community’s efforts to eliminate single-use plastic bags. “There are quite a number of Princeton residents who feel very passionate about this issue and helped to advance it at the state level,” she said. “I think the people in Princeton were very happy to comply with the ban and were glad to see it happen. We owe a lot of credit to people in the towns who made it a priority all the way up to the state level.” —Donald Gilpin

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Community College Marks their college degree or cer- in front of him and blocked tificate. Support topics such him from walking on Nassau Black History Month

Mercer County Community College is celebrating Black History Month 2024 with several events. “Black History Month is a significant annual national observance that highlights t he invaluable contr ibu tions of African Americans to American culture and society much of which has shaped and enriched it,” said Marvin Carter, director of diversity, equity, and inclusion, and Title IX coordinator at the college. “While serving as a platform for recognition and celebration it also serves as a space to educate yourself and raise community awareness about the still present struggles and achievements of African Americans. To many, Black History Month is a highlight reel of civil rights, history, slavery, and popular cultural figures. Still, it’s more than that. There were countless others who contributed, and their stories deserve amplification and honor as well.” Upcoming events include Wednesday, February 7 — All are welcome to attend a 3D Communication and Conflict Resolution discussion from 2-3 p.m. in SC104 on the West Windsor campus. A second Communication and Conflict Resolution session will be held on Tuesday, February 13 from 2-3 p.m. in the second floor Peace Room at the campus in Trenton. On Tuesday, February 20, participants can learn about MCCC’s Bridge to Completion Program and how this state-sponsored initiative is specifically designed to help those looking to finish

as financial assistance, flexible course schedules, prior learning credit eligibility, and more will be discussed on Zoom ( ht tps : //zoom. us /s /7305181386) or in room 229 at JKC in Trenton. Registration is required. A “Keeping Jazz Alive” session is at 5 p.m. on Friday, February 23 on the Trenton campus. Registration is required. On Tuesday, February 27, a screening of the sports documentary Black Boys will be held at 6 p.m. on the Trenton campus. The film highlights Black identity and opportunity in America’s sports, education and criminal justice systems and will be followed by a conversation. On Wednesday, February 28, An insightful conversation about “The Black Vote” will take place at 6 p.m. via Zoom ( https ://zoom. us/s/7305181386). For more information, visit mccc.edu.

Police Blotter On January 29, at 5:09 p.m., Princeton police responded to a reported robbery that occurred in the area of 259 Nassau Street. An individual stated that as he was walking in the parking lot, a male, who was later identified as a 20-year-old from Princeton, exited his parked vehicle, approached him from behind, and threatened him with physical violence, demanding money from him. The suspect stood

9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024

Plastic Bag Ban

Street. According to police, a passerby approached the location and the individual was able to run away from the scene. No physical altercation took place and no one was injured. The suspect returned to his vehicle and fled the scene before patrols arrived. After an investigation conducted by the Patrol and Detective bureaus, the suspect was identified, and a warrant was issued for his arrest. He was arrested on January 30 at 3:53 p.m. on Franklin Avenue by police detectives, w ithout incident, charged with robbery, and later transported to the Mercer County Correctional Center. On January 27, at 12:27 p.m., a caller reported that an unknown individual damaged her vehicle while it was parked on Leigh Avenue. The damage was consistent with the vehicle being “keyed” while it was parked, according to police. There are no suspects at this time. On January 26, at 11:51 p.m., subsequent to a motor vehicle stop on University Place, the driver, a 57-yearold male from Robbinsville, was placed under arrest for Driving While Intoxicated. He was transported to police headquarters, processed accordingly, and later released. Unless noted, individuals arrested were later released.

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PHS Researchers continued from page one

in Washington, D.C., and in Oakland, Calif. There are about 500,000 Mam speakers in Guatemala, but, Eastburn pointed out, the numbers are declining. “We have our students who speak Mam,” said Eastburn, “but they do not have an opportunity to showcase that ability in an academic setting where the language isn’t taught and there’s no real recognition for it. The thought was that we’re getting these students who have amazing skills in linguistics, but how can we acknowledge and recognize and honor that through this project?” PHS, selected in the fall as one of eight New Jersey schools that received a package of $2,500 in technology and classroom supplies from Samsung, submitted an activity plan in early January. As the New Jersey winner, announced last week, the PHS team has now earned a Samsung technology prize package worth $12,000 and is moving forward in hopes of being named one of three national champions eligible to win $100,000 or more for their schools. This is the PHS research team’s third entry in the Samsung competition. They won the national grand prize in 2022 and made it to the state finals in 2023. In preparing for the next round, t he st udent researchers are creating a three-minute video that demonstrates how they are using STEM to address their particular community challenge. “Working with students involved with Samsung Solve for Tomorrow, we’ve heard time and again that helping people in their local communities and society at-large are key motivators,” said Ann Woo, head of corporate citizenship at Samsung Electronics America, as quoted in a Samsung press release. “That’s certainly borne out by this year’s round of Gen Z-led STEM projects.”

20 24

The PHS student researchers divided up into three different groups to tackle three different aspects of the challenging project: robotics, programming/language, and psychology. “We started in October,” said junior Matias da Costa, a member of the robotics group, in a February 2 phone conversation. “Our idea was to have two or three robots f ully f unctional t hat we could use at presentations and events to showcase the project. In the meantime we are also making instruction manuals and planning to teach other kids how to build these robots. We are planning to build tutorials, video and oral, as well as an instruction manual we can send to Morristown and Oakland and elsewhere so that people in these communities can build robots in their own communities.” Thibaut DeVico, also a junior and fellow robotics group member, added, “There are a number of challenges with a project like this. For me the biggest challenge was the design part of the project because we were tasked with having to build something that would fit inside a teddy bear. It was a challenge to design the internal components of the robot, then to fit a computer inside a little stuffed teddy bear.” The researchers tested out many different designs with different materials, DeVico said, in order to make their prototype as easy to build and as cost- effective as possible. The students are making progress in understanding the Mam language, said Debdeep Sen, a sophomore and a third robotics squad member, and they are working on making their prototype 10 times cheaper than their earlier models. Hayah Mian, a junior, explained that her group focused on the psychological issues involved in using the robots for recording. They decided that the

robots should be used in s c h o ol s, s i n c e c h i l d r e n spend the majority of their time in school, but further challenges involve low digital literacy among students without access to the internet as well as the fact that students from indigenous backgrounds often do not have opportunities to speak their native languages in school. “It can be very daunting, scary, to use a robot or computer and to speak into it,” she said. “The first thing we have to test is the student’s comfort level in speaking to a robot. Then. we considered how speaking to a robot actually removes the social stress and stigma of speaking that endangered language. We used cortisol levels and blood pressure levels to measure the students’ stress in speaking to the robot.” Sp ea k ing for t he lan guage/programming contingent, PHS junior Sofia Son described how her group is overcoming barriers in tr ying to bridge the gap between people who don’t speak English and those who do, and also to increase accessibility to technology. “We are going to be using ChatGPT for conversations between the person and the robot, but ChatGP T and Google Translate and other online platforms don’t support Mam,” she explained. “Those are barriers we had to overcome,” she added, “so we’re currently creating a translator for that, using artificial intelligence and transformer models.” Tutorials, a handbook, and a video will also help the users with that process, she pointed out. Amy Lin, a junior and another member of the programming/language team, further noted that one other aspect of the project is to enable the stuffed animal robot to speak in Spanish as well as English so that the robot is able to have conversations in both languages. “We’re focusing on

WINNING RESEARCH SCIENTISTS: The Princeton High School student research team has been selected as the New Jersey finalist in the national finals of the 2024 Samsung Solve for Tomorrow STEM Competition. (Photo courtesy of Mark Eastburn) the Spanish aspect,” she said. “We know that a lot of Indigenous people from Guatemala also speak Spanish, and we want to have this robot so that they feel welcomed in the school community.” Eastburn pointed out that the project goes beyond the typical science experiment into the realms of social justice and human cognition. “Ironically, years of education — time spent in school — can correlate strongly with language loss, because in Guatemala, as in the United States, the dominant language is not an Indigenous language,” he said.

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“Teachers often don’t speak the Indigenous languages in Guatemala, so everyone just defaults to Spanish. Particularly as one gets up to the high school and college levels, everything is in Spanish in Guatemala and English in the U.S.” Eastburn noted that many Iindigenous languages are being lost “and by the end of this century we could lose 90 percent of the languages that are spoken, which is tragic.” He went on to explain that different languages g i v e i n s i g h t s i n to h o w brains function and that in losing languages we are los-

ing knowledge that is only available in those languages. “We’ve talked with a linguist at the University of Kansas who told us that the Mam language is very much infused with history, so the oral histor y of the Mam people will be lost when this language is lost,” said Eastburn. As the PHS research team works on its video, preparing for the next round of competition, he reflected, “When we started this project, we had no idea how challenging it would be, but I think the challenge is what made the project so appealing.” —Donald Gilpin

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continued from page one

the food they provide remains safe. Delivering meals to clients who live in the vicinity of the donors, which keeps t ranspor tation to a minimum, is key. “The launch of our Salesforce-based platform has been crucial in enhancing our meal recovery process and extending our reach,” said Lanctuit ( Salesforce is a cloud-based software company). Share My Meals has started a program in Camden, with Campbell’s as a main par t ner. “We have a ver y strong partnership with them,” Lanctuit s a i d . “ We’r e n o w l o o king for new donors in the Camden area. We have remote programs in Somerville and Morristown, and we’re looking for donors to par tner w ith in those areas too.” Strengthening the pro g r a m i n Tr e n to n w a s a

f o c u s i n 2 0 2 3 . A k e y Friends of Princeton Open Space n onpr of it p a r t n e r t h e r e Seeking Stewardship Volunteers is WorkWell, which has a O n S at u rd ay, Febr u ar y training center that teach- 10, volu nte er s c a n j oi n es work and life skills. Friends of Princeton Open “ T h e m e a l s S h a r e My Space (FOPOS)forhalf-day, Meals volunteers deliver family-friendly stewardship r e a l l y b e n e f i t o u r p r o - sessions to help beautify gram,” said WorkWell Ex- theBilly Johnson Mountain ecutive Director Jeannette Lakes Preserve by removR izk, in a press release. ing invasive plants such “Having a healthy, sustain- as Japanese honeysuckle, ing lunch means WorkWell bittersweet vine, and muland the par ticipants can tiflora rose. focus on working toward The dense cover formed their goals.” by i nv as ive pla nt s pre Share My Meals counts vents young saplings from more than 53 food donors growingintotallcanopy trees across the state. Food in- and degradesnative wildsecurity is everywhere, and lifehabitat. Volunteers will Princeton is no exception. learn how to identify inva“I don’t think people re- sive and native species, and alize the need that is here,” to use tools safely.Two-hour Lanctuit said. “We see it sessions begin at 10 a.m. in Pr inceton, and it has and 1 p.m. been grow ing w ith inf laRegistration is required, tion and the recovery from Bring your own water and COVID-19. Figures are not work gloves. Meet at the coming down.” Mountain Lakes Preserve For more information or main parking lot. Visit fopos. to volunteer, v isit share- org/getinvolved to sign up. mymeals.org. —Anne Levin Pastiamo Grand Opening

New Trustees Named At Sustainable Princeton

Sustainable Princeton has named Liz Cutler, Kara Succoso Mangone, and Abraham Silverman to its board of trustees. Cutler, is the founder of OASIS -Organizing Action on Sustainability In Schools and a whole school sustainability consultant. Mangone is the head of the Sustainab l e F i n a n c e G r o u p at Goldman Sachs. Silverman is managing director of the Non-Technical Barriers to the Clean Energy Transition Initiative at Columbia University’s Center on Global Policy. G ail Ullman, who has served as a trustee for several years, has been appointed vice president, taking over the role from Alexandra B ar- Cohen, whos e ter m ended at the end of 2023. “Our trustees ensure our organization’s good governance, and we’re lucky that our trustees bring so much

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more, including industr y knowledge, experience, and passion for our mission,” said Eve Coulson, board president. “We are also so grateful for Alexandra BarCohen’s work as vice president of the board, chair of the committee on trustees, and member of the fundraising committee. In her six years as a trustee, not only did she provide leadership to Sustainable Princeton, but her entire lifestyle is a testament to her commitment to sustainability.” “I look forward to working with Abe, Kara, and Liz,”

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Mailbox The views of the letters do not necessarily reflect the views of Town Topics.

Sharing Concerns Regarding Council’s Quick Decision to Approve Ordinance

To the Editor: I virtually attended the January 22 public meeting of Princeton Council and like many others asked the question of the evening: Why not wait a month or so to formally assess the proposed ordinance and gain input from the town? [“Council Approves Consolidation of Board, Commissions,” January 24, page 1.] In reply, our elected officials diverted the discussion by rationalizing and insisting on an immediate vote — protesting that their only mistake was a glitch in the “roll out”; that Princeton had a reputation for talking too much and not acting (I would think that particular cliché referred to the town governance rather than the people in general); and, critically, that “the situation” — apparently a vast complex of coordination and communication problems inhibiting Princeton’s ability to help its people — was so dire that something had to be done immediately. No one on the Council attempted to shed light on the relationship of the responsibilities of the salaried town managers, who presumably are assigned much of this work, to the activities of the volunteer committee members being dismissed by the ordinance. A related sideshow around these real issues of public concern made much of vaguely described inefficiencies. The ordinance’s original goal of trimming three groups to one — 29 people to nine — suggested that less volunteers increases efficiency, or, that volunteers themselves “waste” the time of town officials. Town managerial staff did not officially speak — when one did he was told by a Council member he had made a mistake — but difficulties in their and Council members’ personal time management might comprise a flip side of any “waste.” The more important issue in some ways was the development of the proposal behind closed doors, particularly without consulting any members of the groups being discussed. Criticism of this practice directed at town Council members began two weeks before at the “roll out” (ironically that term usually means “finished product”), and continued during the meeting. These legitimate expressions of disappointment and anger at the ordinance being developed during months of secret meetings upset Council members so much that they exhibited a stunning array of diversionary and defensive posturing, merely adding to the ill will. From where I watched most on display was an aversion — or perhaps a true inability — of our elected Council members to take responsibility for their own deficiencies regarding the efficient and effective management of our town. JANE SLOAN Leigh Avenue

New Curbside Trash Collection System Needs to Accommodate More Garbage

To the Editor: Am I the only resident in Princeton who thinks the new curbside trash collection arrangement is a disaster? While I’ll admit that the process is efficient — the truck zips up and down our street in record time (but safely) — the limited items that can fit in the can are absurd. I’m not talking about a piece of furniture or a refrigerator — how about any household item simply a bit too big to fit in the opening of the single allocated trash can? And don’t get me started on what to do after a spring cleaning or a family gathering and you have a few extra bags of trash. I’ve actually called neighbors to ask if they had any room in their trash can. What do other residents do? I have a growing pile of “trash” in my garage that I should be able to dispose of at my curb. But I can’t. I’ve already had a request for a bulk pickup rejected. I hate to come back to this, but for what we pay in taxes in this town I should be able to throw stuff out. BOB RABNER Christopher Drive

Noting that Risks of Improving Cell Service May Be Greater Than Perceived

To the Editor: Last May, there was a flurry of letters in Town Topics in which residents complained about how difficult it was to get reliable cellphone service in parts of Princeton. The mayor and Council held a special meeting with various providers to see if new towers could be built. About seven weeks ago, I read in the Municipality of Princeton newsletter (December 14, 2023) that four new cell towers are in the planning stage to be erected in four different neighborhoods in Princeton. I am concerned that the risks involved in improving cell service may be greater than is perceived. I am aware that there are thousands of peer-reviewed scientific studies (including a U.S. Toxicology Program 16-year, $30 million study) that show a wide range of “statistically significant DNA damage, brain and heart tumors, and infertility,” as well as other ill-effects of microwave radiation emitted by cell towers and cellphones. I am also aware that some people report everyday effects of microwave radiation without fully recognizing the possible source of their symptoms, such as headaches, memory loss, nausea, heart arrhythmia, tightening in the chest, dizziness, tinnitus, diminished concentration, poor sleep, severe fatigue, impaired immune function. It seems that these effects may come not only from cellphones but also from routers, smart meters, Wi-Fi, cordless phones, microwave ovens, baby monitors, or “smart” anything in one’s home. I am concerned that, in 2011, the World Health Organization named wireless radiation as a “Group B, Possibly Carcinogenic to Humans” category, with many experts arguing that it should be placed in Group One as a known carcinogen. I am also concerned that the FCC (Federal Communications

Commission) safety standards have been the same since 1996, years before wireless radiation became ubiquitous. Our exposure is now vastly greater than when these thresholds were established decades ago. I think it would be wise to establish the safety of a technology before implementing it. Instead, what we have is a government requiring that it be proven harmful before stopping implementation. I find it to be of interest that the insurance industry places exclusions in their policies so that health damages from electromagnetic radiation are not covered. These few observations hardly scratch the surface of my worries. The safety concerns about not having continuous cellphone service, may not be commensurate with other safety issues, not only for human beings, but also for the birds, insects, pollinators, and all the creatures with whom we share the Earth. This is a worldwide issue. For information about the regulations of various countries, see Environmental Health Trust (ehtrust.org). For the environmental impact of this radiation on wildlife, see wildlifeandwireless.org. If we continue down this path, we may not only be putting our own lives at risk in the long run, but also in lives of our children and every living being. DEBORAH HUNSINGER Ross Stevenson Circle

Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.


Books

Action, with Princeton University’s Miguel Centeno at the Princeton Public Library on Thursday, February 15 at 6 p.m. The talk is in the Community Room of the library, 65 Witherspoon Street. I n S a v ing O ur s e lv e s , (Columbia University Press, $19.95) Fisher contends that despite governments failing to meet goals, and the passage of only watered down policies, there is a realistic path forward for climate action — but only through mass mobilization that responds to the growing severity and frequency of disastrous events. Assessing the current situation, she shows why public policy and private-sector efforts have been ineffective, and why climate activism has become increasingly confrontational. She considers when and how activism is most successful, identifying the importance of creating community, capitalizing on shocking moments, and cultivating resilience. “Few questions could be more important than how to quickly build an effective resistance to the fossil fuel industry; this volume offers some vital clues and insights, and will be a help to many activists,” said Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature. Fisher is the director of the Center for Environment, Community, and Equity and a professor in the School of International Service at American University. Her b o ok s i nclude Activism Inc.: How the Outsourcing of Grassroots Campaigns Is Strangling Progressive Politics in America, and

American Resistance: From the Women’s March to the Blue Wave. Centeno is Musgrave Professor of Sociology and executive vice-dean of the School of Public and International Affairs. His latest publications include War and Society, Global Capitalism, and States in the Developing World. He is finishing a new book project on the sociology of discipline. In 2000, he founded the Princeton University Preparatory Program, which provides intensive supplemental training for lower income students in local high schools. He previously served as the founding director of the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies, as head of Wilson College at Princeton, and as chair of the Sociology Department. The event is presented in partnership with the High Meadows Env ironmental Institute.

The Learned Magician Is Topic of Author Visit

In the book Magus: The Art of Magic from Faustus to Agrippa, author Anthony Grafton explores the magus — the learned magician, and the magus’s place in the intellectual, social, and cultural world of Renaissance Europe. Grafton will be at Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau Street, on Thursday February 22 at 6 p.m. with Jennifer Rampling, a historian of medieval and early modern science and medicine at Princeton University, specializing in alchemy, to discuss Magus (Belknap Press: An Imprint of Harvard University Press; $39.95) The book, according to Colin Dickey of The Chronicle

of Higher Education, “offers a rich set of observations on an oft-neglected intellectual tradition during a turning point in Western thought…. Magic is once again beginning to merit serious study in the academy.” In literary legend, Faustus is the quintessential occult personality of early modern Europe. The historical Faustus, however, was something quite different: a magus — a learned magician fully embedded in the scholarly currents and public life of the Renaissance. Grafton argues that the magus in 16th-century Europe was a distinctive intellectual type. he explores their methods, the knowledge they produced, the services they provided, and the overlapping political and social milieus to which they aspired — often, the circles of kings and princes. Over time, they turned magic into a complex art, which drew on contemporary engineering as well as classical astrology, probed the limits of what was acceptable in a changing society, and promised new ways to explore the self and exploit the cosmos, according to the publisher. Grafton is the author of The Footnote, Defenders of the Text, Forgers and Critics, and Inky Fingers, among other books. The Henry Putnam University Professor of History and the Humanities at Princeton University, he writes regularly for the New York Review of Books. Rampling is the author of The Experimental Fire: Inventing English Alchemy, 1300-1700. This event is co-sponsored by Princeton University’s Humanities Council and Center for Collaborative History.

13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024

Rely i ng on i nter v ie ws with people who knew her, and on new material from private collections and institutional archives, Bitter Crop — a reference to the last two words of Holiday’s moving song about lynching, "Strange Fruit" — depicts Holiday “as a powerful, ambitious woman who overcame her flaws to triumph as a vital figure of American popular music,” according to the publisher. “Making it as real as if you had been there, Paul Alexander has done an incomparable job bringing to life both elements of his title. He shows us the malice and ignorance of Billie’s accusers and eventual killers, the love and support of friends, and her own courage and purity of heart.,” said Dan Morgenstern, executive director emeritus, Institute of Jazz Studies, Rutgers University. Alexander has published eight books, among them Rough Magic, a biography of Sylvia Plath, and Salinger, a biography of J. D. Salinger. His nonfiction has appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe, Newsday, New York, The Guardian, The Nation, Washing ton Post and Rolling Stone. He teaches at Hunter College in New York. “Bitter Crop” Author Alexander The program is presented with support from the NaTells Story of Holiday’s Last Days tional Endowment for the Author Paul Alexander will At the librar y, the au- Humanities. discuss the first biography in thor will sign copies of the more than two decades of re cent ly -rele as e d Bitter Climate Action is Debated jazz legend Billie Holiday, in Crop: The Heartache and At Library Author Talk the Princeton Public Library Triumph of Billie Holiday’s Author Dana R. Fisher, an Community Room, 65 With- Last Year, (Knopf, $32) in American University profeserspoon Street, on Tuesday, which he gives an uncon- sor, discusses her new book, February 20 at 7 p.m. Laby- ventional por trait of the Saving Ourselves : From rinth Books co-presents the eminent jazz singer. Climate Shocks to Climate program.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024 • 14

BOOK REVIEW

February 1964: New York and the Beatles, A Tale of Two Loves People who listen to the Beatles love them — what about that? —Richard Poirier in The Performing Self (1971) Remarkable, unspeakable New York! —Henry James, in The American Scene y mood at the moment is best expressed in Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy, which I was reading when the Beatles landed at JFK on February 7, 1964: “I enter upon this part of my story in the most pensive and melancholy frame of mind that ever sympathetic breast was touched with.... Every line I write, I feel an abatement of the quickness of my pulse, and of that careless alacrity with it, which every day of my life prompts me to say and write a thousand things I should not.” Truer words were never not spoken. Did I really care about the Fab Four? I had no choice since my transistor radio was permanently tuned to Top 40 servings on WINS from Murray the K, the DJ who liked to call himself the Fifth Beatle. My idea of musical bliss in those days was a moment in Sonny Rollins Vol. 2 on Blue Note, the change of pianists that occurs in Thelonius Monk’s “Mysterioso,” after Rollins delivers one of his boldest statements and Monk makes way for Horace Silver as J.J. Johnson’s trombone booms overhead. Never did it occur to me that a bunch of funny looking characters from the U.K. could compete with that. At the time of The Great Arrival, I was living in a small front room of a brownstone at 33 West 87th Street, with a poster of Van Gogh’s Bedroom in Arles over my bed and one of Joan Miró’s The Farm on another wall above a portable stereo and a box of jazz LPs. My window looked across the street to No. 26, where Billie Holiday had been living at the time of her death in 1959. Lady Day’s “townhouse” sold for almost $14 million in 2022. In 1964 I was paying $120 a month. Most likely Billie had a couple of furnished rooms in 1959. She reportedly died with 70 cents to her name. It’s been four years since I felt like going into New York. The city I love is not the one where Billie Holiday’s townhouse sold for $14 million. Pondering the Cover In the foreword to his book 1964: Eyes of the Storm (W.W. Norton 2023), Paul McCartney says he shot the cover photo “after escaping” through a side entrance of the Plaza Hotel. Writing on February 7, 2024, I’m wondering how the guys run-

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ning headlong down 58th Street on the cover, most of them men, can be equated with the crowds of adoring fans, most of them girls, that made McCartney “feel like we were the stars at the centre of a very exciting film. And the good thing was that there was never any malice. The people running after us just wanted to see us, just wanted to say hi, just wanted to touch us.” Given what happened to John Lennon 14 blocks north of 58th on December 8, 1980, it’s wrenching to read this benign take on the “frenzied crowd.” Another explanation of the cover photo is that it “communicates the frenzy of the visit and the power of New York.” At the same time, McCartney knows there’s something “seemingly dire about this need for flight or escape, as if we could end up trapped, though if you think about it, it was really pursuits like this one that put the Beatles in the middle of the storm.” Still in the context of escape and pursuit, McCar tney mentions how often his gaze was drawn to “policemen and their loaded guns,” including the cop in Miami who pulled up next to the car, “his guns and ammo right next to my camera lens.” The reference to guns inevitably leads to thoughts of “President Kennedy’s killing,” in case we forget that the Beatles’ first day in America began at an air por t recently renamed for someone who was being cheered by “friendly crowds” in Dallas a little over two months before. A Turning Point Although New York City rates only 30 pages of a 324 page collection of McCartney photographs that includes chapters on Liverpool, London, Paris, Washington, D.C., and Miami, plus Jill Lepore’s introduction, the city remains the epicenter of the storm. As the Beatles’ then-manager Brian Epstein put it: “There was a turning point in their career, a specific date on which the breadth and scope of their future was to be altered and it was the day their Pan Am jet touched down at Kennedy International in New York to a welcome that has seldom been equaled anywhere.” The unprecedented worldwide attention lavished on the Beatles that day and throughout the year, combined with that

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summer’s release of A Hard Day’s Night, inspired the formation of generations of rock bands, the great “Groupquake” of the sixties, seventies, and eighties. Columbus Circle Captioned “a very mid-century New York scene,” the cityscape shown in McCartney’s photograph of Columbus Circle, a two-page spread that opens the New York chapter, is centered on a super-sized Coca-Cola THIRST KNOWS NO SEASON barometer with the needle pointing to 40 degrees and RAIN and CLOUDY in the forecast slots for Tomorrow’s Weather. Crowded behind this contraption is a panorama of rooftops; a Heineken billboard; the big sign atop the Hotel Mayflower; and a marble statue of Christopher Columbus perched high atop his pillar with a skimpily dressed angel holding a globe at the bottom. This piece of “photographic art,” marred by a huge rear-view mirror and the head and shoulders of a pedestrian, means more to me than any other image in the book. The music of the Beatles has changed and enriched my life, but hundreds of intimate photos of Paul, John, George, and Ringo can’t compare with memories of a year in Manhattan, of school day mornings walking up Central Park West from the subway at Columbus Circle and winter evenings when the big letters atop the Mayflower Hotel were aglow with neon and my homebound view of Central Park South was crowned by the giant floodlit MONY thermometer. Beyond the Circle, weather permitting, was a walk home to East 53rd by way of Broadway or 7th Avenue to 50th past the temples of the cinema, the Roxy and the Radio City Music Hall, and the Rockefeller Plaza skating rink where Holden Caulfield and his date Sally make fools of themselves in The Catcher in the Rye. “People Everywhere” I’m still pondering the implications of the two-page spread of the “frenzied crowd” chasing the Beatles limo and the fact that it follows photos of Central Park, where fans are crowded behind DO NOT CROSS barricades and being “looked after by the NYPD,” while other photos showing the Beatles besieged by the

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press are headed “We were surrounded by people everywhere we went.” In Angus Wilson’s The World of Charles Dickens (Viking 1970), Dickens is quoted about his first visit to America, in the same month, mid-February 1842: “I can do nothing that I want to do, go nowhere where I want to go, and see nothing that I want to see. If I turn into the street, I am followed by a multitude.” Even without the New York connection, Dickens belongs here. He was born on February 7, 1812. “Help” Paves the Way A year and some months after the Beatles landed, I was in London walking among visibly exhilarated crowds near Piccadilly Circus. Something special was happening. It was like a reversal of Blake’s “London.” Instead of bearing “marks of weakness, marks of woe,” these faces were smiling because the Beatles were just around the corner attending the premiere of their second film, Help. What could one do but smile? The joy-givers were near and love and music were in the air. On my way to India a month later, hitching out of Trieste, I got a lift from a small, rotund Iranian in a new VW he’s still learning how to drive; he’s going all the way to Tehran and seems to think he can make it on one tank of gas because he’s got a 45rpm record player attachment under the dashboard and only one record to play on it, “Help” by the Beatles, which he asks me to keep putting in for him because his arm isn’t long enough even in a VW and he apparently doesn’t intend to stop again until Tehran, about 2000 kilometers to the east. Every time the song finishes, he says, “Playplay,” and after about the 20th time it dawns on me that the driver thinks that by keeping a record called “Help” constantly playing, he’s somehow adding fuel, as if there’s some kind of magic Beatles octane flowing. few days later I’m in Istanbul watching and loving A Hard Day’s Night for the ninth time. A few weeks later I’m in a Calcutta record shop listening booth with some friends loving the Beatles for Sale album and wondering how can it get any better than this. Six months later I’m with a girl I love finding out how much better it can get as we listen together to the entire Revolver album in a record shop listening booth in Salzburg. A few years later we’re married and doing graduate study in English at Rutgers thanks to “Learning from the Beatles,” an essay by Richard Poirier, the chairman of the Graduate English Department. —Stuart Mitchner

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Westminster Community Orchestra Showcases Concerto Competition Winners

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he Westminster Community Orchestra performed a veritable potpourri of instrumental and vocal music this past weekend. Sunday afternoon’s concert in Richardson Auditorium had something for everyone, from operatic excerpts to a world premiere to traditional Chinese music. Led by conductor Ruth Ochs, the 55-member ensemble showcased several student winners of the Orchestra’s Concerto Competition, as well as one of Rider University’s choruses. Taking a pep rally approach to drawing the audience into the performance, Ochs brought an additionally festive atmosphere to the afternoon. The Community Orchestra displayed its own capabilities opening with Carl Maria von Weber’s “Overture” to his 1821 opera Der Freischütz. Considered the first German Romantic opera, Weber’s work was revolutionary in its folklore roots and unearthly portrayal of the supernatural. Ochs and the Orchestra began the work with a slow, dark, and mysterious introduction, as a quartet of horns set the Wolf’s Glen scene. The string sound was well balanced, with the second section of the “Overture” fully symphonic and martial. Clarinetists Russell Labe and Pamela Kotula provided graceful lines coloring the music well. Princeton High School junior Daniel Guo has been playing alto saxophone for eight years, winning the Westminster Conservatory Achievement Award Competition twice. The alto saxophone is an instrument not often heard in concerto repertoire, and 20th-century French composer Pierre Max Dubois brought a light and airy approach to both soloist and orchestra in the Concerto for Alto Saxophone and Strings. Unlike the traditional concerto, Dubois’ work begins with a cadenza, rather than featuring the soloist at the end of a movement. In these opening improvisatory passages, Guo played the cadenza with poise and control, tapering nonstop fast passages with elegant phrasing and demonstrating a rich tone which easily filled the hall. A bit of klezmer style marked the “Allegro” portion of the movement, and the Orchestra provided a subtle accompaniment never detracting from the well-executed technical difficulty of Guo’s saxophone solo. The second Concerto Competition winner featured was soprano Madeleine Neiman, currently a sophomore at Princeton High School. Nieman began vocal study at age 8 and has an extensive musical theater background to her credit. For this concert, she chose to sing two 18th-century arias from composers well representing the height of classical opera. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s operatic reputation is legendary, but equally as important in the evolution of the genre was his contemporary, Christoph Willibald Gluck. The arias in Gluck’s operas aimed to move away from the solo coloratura and vocal fireworks of the early 18th century to a more reflective and melodic style. Nieman wisely first sang Mozart’s “Voi che sapete,” a song of innocence usually performed by a “pants role” mezzo-soprano from The Marriage of Figaro. Nieman retained the naïveté of the character well, with clear vocal tone and diction against a light orchestral accompaniment. Her voice soared more on the lyrical and higher melodic lines of “O del mio dolce ardor” from Gluck’s rarelyheard Paride ed Elena. Neiman’s top register projected distinctly in the hall, and she relaxed well into the drama of the text. Her expressive singing was often answered

by delicate and equally as sensitive winds. Clarinetist Matthew Gao, currently a sophomore at the Lawrenceville School, chose to showcase his talent in Weber’s 1811 Concertino for Clarinet and Orchestra. Allegedly composed in three days, this work opened with the same dark introduction as the composer’s Freischütz overture, as Gao began the solo line in the clarinet’s high register. Taking his time on phrases, Gao found effective dynamic contrasts and easily maneuvered the racing scalar passages. Soloist and Orchestra ended the Concertino in majestic and symphonic form, with fast lines and extended trills heard from both Gao and several wind players. Although not specifically a concerto soloist, Pennington School junior Jenny Zhu played an unusual solo instrument with the Orchestra to add even more uniqueness to the afternoon’s concert. “Jasmine Flower” featured Zhu playing a Chinese bowed erhu in a sweet arrangement of a traditional melody. Zhu added vibrato to the melodic lines in a similar manner to string players, and her graceful playing was enhanced by effective brass and wind solos. Zhu’s performance led smoothly into the world premiere of Through the Mist by High Technology High School senior Evan Chang, a former student in Westminster Conservatory’s Young Artist Program. Chang’s inspiration from the Impressionistic school could be heard in the opening flute passages of the work, and the music showed a sophisticated compositional imagination. Ochs maintained a steady conducting beat to keep the piece flowing, and Chang’s orchestration elegance was highlighted by sparse percussion, Barbara Brown’s cello solo and scoring for English horn. The additional “guest soloist” of the afternoon was the Rider University Chorale, which is under the direction of Tom T. Shelton and open to University students, faculty, staff and alumni, as well as members of the community. The 20-voice chorus performed two excerpts of Franz Joseph Haydn’s Missa brevis Sancti Joannis de Deo, also known as the “Little Organ Mass.” The “Gloria” movement of this work is unique in its recalling of the 16th-century quodlibet, in which several phrases of the text are sung simultaneously. Although small in number, the Chorale presented this movement with well-blended alto and soprano sections and well-tuned singing. The “Agnus Dei” also showed a pure soprano sectional sound. The Chorale came to full vocal strength in “Down in the River to Pray,” a spiritual-rooted choral piece featuring mezzo-soprano Sarah Perry and soprano Kamanay Belcher as soloists. Perry had a good feel for the style of the music while Belcher demonstrated a light and clear voice, with both well in tune in a cappella passages. The overall choral sound was freer in this selection than the more restrained Haydn mass, and the women’s sections exhibited particularly good harmonies in this appealing arrangement. unday afternoon’s Westminster Community Orchestra concert showed many different styles of music, but its reach and impact on the numerous soloists, players, and singers involved was undeniable. Especially with the young performers and composer heard, the audience no doubt came away with the feeling more than once that “that student is going to be someone.” —Nancy Plum

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MUSIC REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024 • 16

Performing Arts

Boheme Opera NJ Presents “Carmen”

Boheme Opera NJ stages Georges Bizet’s Carmen on March 15 at 8 p.m. and March 17 at 3 p.m. at Kendall Hall Performance Theater on the campus of The College of New Jersey, 2000 Pennington Road in Ewing. Bizet’s tale of lust and vengeance is consistently in the top five operas performed around the world. Boheme Opera’s version has virtual sets by J. Matthew Root, and the Boheme Opera NJ Orchestra and Chorus under the baton of conductor and artistic director Joseph Pucciatti. Carmen also features members of the Alborada Spanish Dance Theatre and the Princeton Boychoir and Girlchoir.

TRIO: Cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras, violinist Isabelle Faust, and pianist Alexander Melnikov will perform at Princeton University’s Richardson Auditorium on February 15 at 7:30 p.m. Performing together for al- Director Mar na S elt zer. Trio of Famed Musicians At Richardson Auditorium most 20 years, Faust said of “That moment in and of it-

Pianist Alexander Meln i kov, v iol i n is t I s ab el le Faust, and cellist Jean Guihen Queyras made their Princeton University Concerts (PUC) debut as a trio in 2020. They will return to PUC together again on Thursday, February 15 at 7:30 p.m. at Richardson Auditorium. The trio will perform Robert Schumann’s Piano Trio No. 2 in F Major, Op. 80, Elliott Carter’s final composition Epigrams for piano, violin and cello, and Johannes Brahms’ rarely heard Piano Trio No. 1 in B Major, Op. 8.

her partnership with pianist Alexander Melnikov, “We are both constantly being enriched by each other’s ideas, questions and researches, criticism or experiences, while always deeply admiring the other’s musicianship and mastery.” The addition of cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras has added another level of exploration and mastery to the ensemble. “T he musicians of the Melnikov-Faust-Queyras Trio were the last musicians we presented before our series shut down due to COVID -19,” said PUC

self is memorable, but it was their concert that is seared in my memory as one of the most astonishing chamber concerts we’ve ever presented. Individually, each of these artists is exceptional, but together they are breathtaking, bringing a sensitivity to the chamber repertoire that is electrifying. I cannot wait to welcome them back, and clearly the sold-out audience feels the same.” Limited tickets remain. Call ( 609 ) 258-2800 for availability, and visit puc. princeton.edu for more information about the event.

FINAL WEEKS Closes Sunday, February 18

Come view over 50 tall case clocks from private and public collections.

55 Stockton Street • Princeton, NJ 609.924.8144 • www.morven.org Aaron Lane (1753–1819) and Elias Sayre (1770–1814), Elizabethtown. Tall case clock, c. 1790. Private Collection.

Alison Bolshoi Stage Director Stefanos Koroneos sets Carmen in the explosive Spain of the 1940s, when Franco ruled with an iron fist and war raged around the globe. Award-winning contralto Alison Bolshoi has previously appeared with Boheme in Aida and Hansel and Gretel. Tenor Gregory Turay, making his company and role debuts, has starred in Nabucco with West Bay Opera, and baritone Jason Duika makes his company and role debuts

MULTI-TALENTED: Reggie Harris sings, writes songs, and tells stories at his Princeton appearance at Christ Congregation Church on February 16. as the flamboyant toreador, Escamillo. Carmen is sung in French with English super titles. Each performance will be preceded, one hour before curtain, with a talk by Boheme Board President Jerrold Kalstein. Visit bohemeopera.org/ carmen or call (609) 5819551 for tickets and information.

Folk Music Society Presents Reggie Harris

On Friday, February 16 at 8 p.m., the Princeton Folk Music Society presents singer-songwriter, storyteller, and song leader Reggie Harris at Christ Congregation Church, 50 Walnut Lane. Harris is a fluid vocalist, arranger, and guitarist. For over 40 years and nine albums, he performed with his then wife in the Kim and Reggie Harris folk duo, singing of the quest for freedom and care for the environment. The duo were known for their scholarly research and knowledge of

both the Underground Railroad and the modern civil rights movement. After their divorce in 2016, Harris found that continuing without the duo was a challenge, but “it was time to open myself to what I could do.” His On Solid Ground a lbu m w as t h e top C D on the FolkDJ Charts for May 2021. It is a collection of songs compiled in response to the challenges and changes stirred by the COVID-19 pandemic, and to political unrest that erupted from the murders of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor. Harris is a featured artist in the Americans Who Tell the Truth portrait series by Maine artist Rob Shetterly, and a recipient of the 2018 Magic Penny Award for lifetime achievement for his impact on music from the Children’s Music Network. He also can be heard as a rotating DJ on Prisms: The Sound of Color on SiriusXM’s The Village. Tickets are $10-$25. Visit princetonfolkorg.


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Tammy McCann Celebrating the music of Dinah Washington, Sarah Vaughan, Billie Holiday, Mahalia Jackson, and more.

The American Spiritual Ensemble, conducted by Dr. Everett McCorvey, performs alongside The Princeton University Glee Club.

Saturday | Feb 10 | 8pm

Sunday, March 3, 2024 • 3PM Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall

puc.princeton.edu

Born in 1949 in Moscow into a musical family, Petrushansky is included in Neuhaus’ list of some of the greatest pianists of the twentieth century including Emil Gilels, Sviatoslav

DIRECTOR

An experiential panel discussion featuring an adapted performance of Mark Morris’ choreography by local Dance for Parkinson’s Disease participants, performed to live music by cellist Joshua Roman

Free to Princeton students through Passport to the Arts

Boris Petrushansky

Richter, and Radu Lupu. After studying with Lev Naumov, he graduated from the Moscow Conservatory in 1975, having already distinguished himself in major international competitions. He went on to perform in concert halls, with conductors, orchestras and record labels worldwide. Petrushansky has taught major competition winners from around the world. Altamura Legacy Concerts is a new concert series developed in 2023 by pianist and artistic director Cristina Altamura, featuring herself and a roster of guest artists performing on a newly restored 1924 Steinway B grand at Princeton United Methodist Church, home of the majestic Tiffany stained-glass window depicting St. George that graces its façade. Concerts are on selected Sundays at 4 p.m. in the Sanford Davis Room of Princeton UMC, adjacent to the church’s sanctuary. Guest artists range from some of Italy’s and Russia’s most illustrious piano masters, to New York’s current avant-garde, to Princeton’s own community of distinguished pianists. Altamura will be joined by her husband, So Percussion’s Adam Sliwinski, for an informal talk at the beginning of each program.

DR. TRINEICE ROBINSON-MARTIN

Exploring the Intersection of Music, Dance, and Parkinson’s

TICKETS: $15 General $10 Students

Petrushansky’s return to the U.S. and it fulfills Legacy Arts International’s mission to preserve and cultivate the artistic legacies of significant artists, master teachers, and institutions,” said Altamura Legacy Concerts Artistic Director Cristina Altamura. “I have admired his poetic pianism, gentle manner, and profound teaching since I was a student in Italy. I am certain Princeton’s piano-loving audiences will be equally enthralled to watch him perform and teach.”

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024

Dasha Koltunyuk. “David approaches his work with the Parkinson’s community with such passion, care, and joy. Joy is not a word that I think most of us associate with Parkinson’s, but it was palpable in the recent Dance for PD class at Princeton Ballet School which I had the honor of attending. Moving to music together creates community, and for those with Parkinson’s, it creates a physical and emotional freedom that is not otherwise always available.” T i c ke t s a r e $15 g e n eral/$10 students at puc. princeton.edu or call (609) DOCUMENTARIES AND MORE: A still from “Between Earth and Sky,” a film by Andrew 258-9220. Nadkarni that was also shortlisted for the 2024 Academy Awards, is one of the works Pianist Boris Petrushansky to be screened at the 43rd Annual Thomas Edison Film Festival’s in-person premiere at Performs at Princeton Concert Princeton University on February 16, followed by a virtual discussion with the filmmakOn March 3 at 4 p.m., ers on February 17. (Photo courtesy of Andrew Nadkarni) Altamura Legacy Concerts (ALC) at Princeton United Arts Consortium and Prince- and a dance demonstration Methodist Church presents Edison Film Festival At Princeton University ton’s Program in Visual Arts. to live music highlighting Russian pianist and TchaiThe 43rd season of the re- Admission is free. Visit arts. the renowned Dance for PD kovsky Competition jur y nowned Thomas Edison Film princeton.edu for the Zoom program of the Mark Morris member Boris Petrushansky Festival (TEFF) will premiere link and more information. Dance Group, which offers performing Mussorgsky’s specialized dance classes for Pictures at an Exhibition, on February 16 at Princeton “Healing with Music”Series people with Parkinson’s. Its paired with Schumann’s DaUniversity’s James Stewart Film Theater with a screen- Explores Parkinson’s Disease founding teacher and Pro- vidsbündlertänze, Op. 6. Princeton University Con- gram Director David Leving, a virtual discussion with This concert marks the filmmakers, and films avail- certs ( PUC ) continues its enthal will lead Dr. Connie septuagenarian’s historic able to view on demand, Healing with Music series Tomaino, Institute for Music return to the U.S. in over presented in collaboration and affiliated community and Neurologic Function two decades. Admission is with the Lewis Center for events with opportunities co-founder; Princeton Uni- $40, $10 for students, cash to explore the relationship versity Professor Elizabeth at the door or reserved seatthe Arts. between music, movement, Margulis, Princeton Music ing. The church is located T E F F’s in -p ers on pre and the brain. On Sunday, Cog n it ion L ab director; on Nassau Street at Vandemiere opens with a recepMarch 3 at 3 p.m, it will and Iverson, in discussion venter Avenue. The concert tion, screening of seven host “Healing with Music: around the role of music and series opens its doors at films, and a Q&A with fesDance for PD (Parkinson’s dance in Parkinson’s therapy 3:30 p.m. with a welcomtival artists including filmDisease),” an experiential and some of the neurosci- ing Coffee/Tea Bar in the maker James Hollenbaugh, panel exploring the inter- ence behind this impactful venue organized by Illy At poet and performer Bimpé section of music, dance, and approach. Earth’s End. Visit legacyartFageyinbo, lighting director Parkinson’s, at Richardson Participants from the local sinternationa.org for ticket Gabriel Kurzlop, filmmaker Auditorium. Dance for PD chapter at the information. Chehade Boulos, and proAs an extension of this Princeton Ballet School will ducer Julia Anderson. On Petrushansky’s visit conFebruary 17 a livestreamed event, Princeton University present Mark Morris chore- tinues w ith t wo masterdiscussion with the filmmak- Concer ts has teamed up ography adapted for indi- classes. On Monday, March ers will be hosted by Festival with American Repertory viduals with Parkinson’s and 4 from 5:30-8 p.m. at TaDirector Jane Steuerwald, Ballet to offer a new local their caregivers, from his plin Hall on the Princeton Festival Associate and Juror chapter of free Dance for piece Falling Down Stairs, campus, he will work with Henry Baker, and Margaret PD classes; the Princeton set to the Bourrée from the young pianists from the MuParsons, curator, emerita, of Public Library to offer book Cello Suite No. 3 in C Major sic Department at Princeton the National Gallery of Art. group discussions related BW V 1009 by J.S. Bach, University, and on March 5 to this topic; and the Princ- which will be played live by from 4-6 p.m. he will be All seven films will be eton Garden Theatre to of- cellist Joshua Roman. teaching Curtis Institute piavailable to view on defer a screening of Capturing “It’s been an honor to ano students at Jacobs Mumand February 16-23. The Grace, a documentary about gain a better understanding sic’s Philadelphia Steinway films to be shared repreDance for PD along with a of the ethos and method- showroom. These mastersent experimental, animapost-screening talk by direc- ology of the Dance for PD classes are free and open to tion, documentary, screen tor Dave Iverson. program through Program the public. dance, and narrative genres. The March 3 event will in- Director David Leventhal,” The festival is presented by “It is a tremendous the Thomas A. Edison Media corporate a panel discussion said PUC Outreach Manager honor for us to facilitate

Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall $15 General | $5 Student Faculty & Staff: 2 free tickets

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024 • 18

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024 • 20

Art

LOCAL INSPIRATION: Ryan Stark Lilienthal, a short-term artist-in-residence for the Arts Council of Princeton, will lead a community ceramic project working with clay sourced from the site of the Paul Robeson House of Princeton. House, Lilienthal discovered Lilienthal and Welch secured Clay from Historic Site Is Inspiration for Project a natural clay on the site at permission to excavate the

The Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) welcomes Ryan Stark Lilienthal as their latest Anne Reeves Artistin-Residence. During this short-term residency, running through April. Lilienthal will work closely with Executive Director Adam Welch to dig clay directly from the site of the Paul Robeson House of Princeton, located next door to the Arts Council. During the ongoing construction of the Robeson

110 Witherspoon Street. He brought it to Welch for testing to ascertain its quality. Welch said, “Upon firing the sample that Ryan brought me, I found it to be resplendent and spectacular. No finer clay I have ever seen.” The results inspired Lilienthal and Welch to plan a residency at the Arts Council, exploring the possibilities of working with locally sourced, natural clay within a community project. After several conversations,

rich clay deposit before the landscaping at the Paul Robeson House is completed this spring. Working in collaboration with the Robeson House, Princeton Public Schools, the WitherspoonJackson Historic and Cultural Society, and the Paul Robeson Alliance, Lilienthal will lead workshops for local students, working together to excavate clay from the yard. After retrieval, students will learn the process of removing impurities and

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debris from the clay to make it workable. Lilienthal will work with the students to create 3Dprinted stamps, depicting meaning f u l quotes f rom Paul Robeson, that will be pressed into tiles molded from the clay. The group will also conduct tests on the clay to learn more about its physical properties and characteristics. The tiles will be fired in ACP’s ceramic studio and be on display at the Arts Council during Robeson’s 126th birthday celebration this April. “Speaking in 1955, Paul Robeson once explained his work by saying ‘I have simply tried to never forget the soil from which I spring,’” said Joy Barnes-Johnson, trustee of the Paul Robeson House of Princeton. “As the Paul Robeson House of Princeton strives to ‘make Robeson a household name,’ it is perfectly fitting that the ACP and Ryan Lilienthal would want to reclaim soil from the construction site to echo the important history of the Robeson family legacy of social justice work. We are delighted to partner with ACP, students, and families from the community in cementing Robesonian thoughts and artistry in our community.” The Anne Reeves Artist-inResidence program, named after the ACP’s founding director, was established by the Arts Council in 2009 to offer artists the opportunity to conceptualize and create work while providing the community with creative interaction with working ar tists in all disciplines. For more information, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org.

ArtSpace and SewingSpace Programs at HomeFront

To truly break the cycle of poverty, especially for those in the throes of homelessness, an abundance of training and emotional support is required. In conjunction with emergency food and shelter, HomeFront’s 25-plus wraparound services, including ArtSpace and SewingSpace, serve this purpose. These visual therapies can be as vital to one’s recovery as verbal therapy. In fact, HomeFront notes that many clients fi nd it easier to express their feelings by creating with their hands — rather than trying to craft just the right words.

“POINSETTIA”: This painting by Jane Conlon Golde is part of an art show featuring works by seniors in a painting class led by Christina Rang at the Center for Modern Aging. It is on view at the Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, through the end of March. “The class and Center for Aging and all they offer are a great way to meet people and exchange ideas,” said Conlon Golde. For more information, visit cmaprinceton.org. In its studios, HomeFront’s trained staff and a team of dedicated volunteers offer therapeutic programs that allow clients a moment’s respite from their overwhelming challenges. While navigating the creative process the mind becomes present and concentrates on the task at hand — allowing thoughts to quiet. This is the moment when tangible tools for selfexpression, critical thinking, and problem-solving develop; offering each person a chance to rebuild their souls and transform their lives. Also, during HomeFront’s meal deliveries, the newest member of the HomeFront family — “Artie,” their mobile arts studio — is reaching under-resourced communities, including area motels housing homeless families, w it h ar t s and craf t s to

occupy inquisitive and creative young minds. HomeFront’s commitment to empowering each artist’s and crafter’s self-esteem is demonstrated by providing many opportunities to showcase their skills in the community and sell their inspired works to the public, including a new online e-Shop. Homefront encourages ArtSpace and SewingSpace clients to participate in programs such as Peer-to-Peer, where former clients mentor and are compensated for instructing current clients, and Entrepreneurship, where they can learn how to create marketable handmade items. Learn more about HomeFront at homefrontnj.org and its creative programs and e-Shop at homefrontartspace.com.

Middle of the Night Can’t Find Your Town Topics!

Take a stroll down to our previous office at 4 Mercer Street or come to our new location, 4428C Route 27 in Kingston, where you can purchase a copy for 75 cents (3 quarters required) from our coin-operated newspaper boxes, 24 hours a day/7 days a week.

cosponsored by Labyrinth Books

ATELIER @ LARGE:

Virtual OpenHouse: House:Saturday, Sunday, November February 11, Virtual Open 18, 2024 2023 atat11:00 Link on onwebsite website 11:00AM AM –– Zoom Link In-person OpenHouse: House:Saturday, Sunday, November February 11, In-person Open 18, 2024 2023 1:00PM PM –– Gym, Gym, 100 atat1:00 100 Bunn BunnDrive Drive We welcome all applicants from Princeton. Students are admitted to Charter based on a random lottery. Students who qualify for a weighted lottery based on family income will have their names entered into the lottery twice.

CONVERSATIONS on ART-MAKING in by a VEXED ERA moderated PAUL MULDOON 2.13.24

JENNIFER FINNEY BOYLAN BRIDGET 4:30 p.m. KEARNEY

Richardson Auditorium Alexander Hall Free and open to the public

arts.princeton.edu


W hen asked about her I want the viewing public to “Portraits of Immigrants” Exhibit at Trinity Church inspiration for the project, better understand who these

Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, now presents works by Betsy Ashton in “Portraits of Immigrants: Un k now n Faces, Untold Stories,” on view through Easter, March 31. Ashton, a former correspondent for CBS, supported a studio by painting commissioned oil portraits for the rich and accomplished for over 15 years. But she said that the maligning of immigrants and refugees that took place during and since t he 2016 election compelled her instead to seek out, paint, and tell the stories of the immigrants that she saw who were not a threat to America, but an asset.

Ashton said, “Immigrants from ever y where are all around me in New York City; the subway alone captures every gene pool on the planet. Using journalism skills honed in my prior career as a CBS News correspondent, plus my talents as a visual artist, I interviewed and painted people from a variety of countries and cultures who were not born here but chose to come to this country, or were brought here as children, seeking safety or freedom or opportunity or all of the above.” She continued, “The immigrants I see work hard — extremely hard — to support their families here and, in some cases, also abroad.

people are, what they have sacrificed to come here, what living here means to them, and what contributions they have made to their adopted country. I believe that the viewers will discover kindred spirits who are in their hearts as American as they are.” The exhibit is open most days from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, visit portraitsofimmigrants.com.

Delaware Valley Bead Society Hosts Trunk Show

The Delaware Valley Bead Society (DVBS) will host The Artful Beadweaver Trunk Show with Jessica Giovacchini on Tuesday, February 20 at 7 p.m. in the Café of

Area Exhibits Ar t @ Bainbr idge, 158 Nassau Street, has “Reciting Women: Alia Bensliman and Khailiah Sabree” through March 31. artmuseum.princeton.edu. A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Gallery-Wide Group Show” through March 31. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Art on Hulfish, 11 Hulfish Street, has “Christina Fernandez: Multiple Exposures” February 10 through Apri 28. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Transversing Nostalgia”

February 10 through March 9 in the Taplin Gallery. An opening reception is on February 10 from 3 to 5 p.m. artscouncilofprinceton.org. Considine Gallery, Stuart Country Day School, 12 Stuart Road, has “The Stuart 60th Anniversary Community Art Exhibit” through March 8. stuartschool.org. Ficus Art Gallery, 235 Nassau Street, has “Embrace the Everyday” through May 6. ficusbv.com. Gourgaud Gallery, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, has “Members Exhibition” through February 29. cranburyartscouncil.org. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Cloud Swing” through Apr i l 1, “Nig ht For m s” through April 7, and “That’s Worth Celebrating: The Life and Work of the Johnson Family” through the end of 2024, among other exhibits. groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and Innovator’s Gallery,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. Museum hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 12 to 4 p.m., Thursday to 7 p.m. princetonhistory.org. Lambertville Free Public Library, 6 Lilly Street, Lambertville, has “Threads of Nature” through February 15. greencottagestudios.com. Michener Art Museum, 138 S out h P ine St reet, Doylestown, Pa., has “Ethel Wallace : Modern Rebel” through March 10 and “Renewal and Change: New Acquisitions” through April 28. michenerartmuseum.org.

Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Str iking Beaut y” through February 18, and the online exhibits “Slavery at Morven,” “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898,” and others. morven.org. Phillips’ Mill, 2619 River Road, New Hope, Pa., has “Youth Art Exhibition” on weekends through February 18. phillipsmill.org. Present Day Club, 72 Stockton Street, has “Embraced by Nature” through March 3. The exhibit is open on Fridays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. catherinejmartzloff.com. Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, has “Anthropomorphic: Photos and Stories” through March 15. princetonlibrary.org. Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, Princeton Universit y, has “Nobody Turn Us Around: The Freedom Rides and Selma to Montgomery Marches: Selections from the John Doar Papers” through March 31. library.princeton.edu. Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie, Cadwalader Park, Trenton, has “Music to My Eyes” February 16 through April 7. A public reception is on Saturday, February 17 from 2 to 4 p.m. ellarslie.org. West Windsor Arts, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “Manifesting Beloved Community” through March 2. westwindsorarts.org. Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers, 71 George Street, New Brunswick, has “George Segal: Themes and Variations” through July 31. zimmerli.rutgers.edu.

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024

“PORTRAITS OF IMMIGRANTS”: Works by former CBS News correspondent Betsy Ashton are on view at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, through Easter.

the Hunterdon County Senior Center, 4 Gauntt Place, Building No.1, Flemington. The program is free and open to the public, but nonmembers must pre-register. Join the DVBS members and peruse the various types of beads being presented by Giovacchini. Participants will find an array of bead treasures including Delica beads for precision work in a wide range of colors and finishes; point-back crystals for added sparkle; Czech beads including melon drops and rounds, Czech birds, and dahlias ; 4mm glass rondelle strands for a touch of elegance; and essential findings to complement their creations. The Artful Beadweaver Trunk Show will occur during the two-hour DVBS meeting. To register to attend, email your name, address, and phone number to odyssey5@ ptd.net or call (908) 2461231. To learn more about the Delaware Valley Bead Society, visit delawarevalleybeadsociety.org.

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Events • Parties • Catering (609) 924-5143

artist conversation

Khalilah Sabree and Imam Khalil Abdullah Thursday, February 15, 5:30 p.m. Artist Khalilah Sabree joins Imam Khalil Abdullah, the assistant dean for Muslim Life at Princeton, for a conversation exploring Sabree’s work in relation to her faith, her identity as an African American Muslim, and the role of art in the Muslim world. Reception to follow.

Friend Center 006 This program is cosponsored by the Muslim Life Program and the Office of Religious Life.

LATE THURSDAYS! This event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970, with additional support from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts. Khalilah Sabree, The Inner Compartment (detail), 2016–17, from the series Destruction of a Culture. Collection of the artist. © Khalilah Sabree. Photo: Joseph Hu

“SPRING GARDEN”: This painting by Debbie Pisacreta is featured in “Local Beauty,” her joint exhibition with Bill Jersey, on view through February 29 in the Bell’s Tavern Dining Room, 183 North Union Street, Lambertville. Pisacreta and Jersey are member artists at Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024 • 22

Mark Your Calendar TOWN TOPICS Wednesday, February 7 10:30 a.m.: Discussion: Power of Words. Participants listen to and discuss short stories in this six-week series facilitated by Ellen Gilbert, in the conference room of Princeton Public Librar y, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org. 6:45-8 p.m.: “Cunard Steamships and the Quest for Perfect Coal.” Lecture by Dennis Waters at Hopewell Presby terian Church, 80 West Broad Street. Free. Redlibrary.org. 7 p.m.: “Presidential PreElection Polls: Why it’s Getting Harder to Get it Right.” Program at the Lawrence Headquar ters Branch of Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike. Princeton University Professor Edward Freeland leads. Sponsored by the League of Women Voters. Register at Mcl.org. 7 p.m.: Climate Action Plan Update: Sustainable Princeton gives an update of Princeton’s 2019 Climate Action Plan. In person and virtual. At Princeton Public Librar y, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org.

pasture-raised meats, fresh baked breads, homemade treats, and handmade gifts. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 5-7 p.m.: February Business After Business, sponsored by Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber, at Mrs. G Appliances, 2720 Business Route 1, L aw rence Township. Pre-game networking and tailgating fair; food prepared with newest cooking technology. Princetonmercer.org. 6:30 p.m.: “Finding Peter Hill: The Life and Times of a New Jersey Clockmaker.” Morven Interim Director and Curator Beth Allan leads this talk in honor of Black History Month. Morven.org. 7 p.m.: Paul Halpern discusses his book Allure of the Multiverse, at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Labyrinthbooks.com.

FEBRUARY

Lakes House, 57 Mountain Avenue. Fopos.org. 7 p.m.: Dance event hosted by Shira Gregory. Participants gather in a dimly lit, socialization-free room to create a liberating environment where they can fully express themselves through dance. $5. Westwindsorarts.org. 7 p.m.: “Tribute Concert: The Beatles and Ed Sullivan 60 Years Later,” featuring the bands of the Einstein Alley Musicians Collaborative. At Princeton Public Librar y, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org. 7 p.m. : “Meet Phillis Wheatley,” performance by Daisy Century of American Historical Theatre about the first published African American poet in the U.S., at Mt. Zion AME Church, Stoutsburg Sourland African American Museum, 189 Hollow Road, Skillman. Followed by a Q&A. Free but pre-registration required. Ssaamuseum.org. 8 p.m.: The Cher Show at State Theatre New Jersey, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. $40-$105. Stnj.org. 8 p.m.: A Lovesong for Miss Lydia by Don Evans is performed by Theater to Go at Kelsey Theatre, Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. (609) 570-3333.

8 p.m.: American Patchwork Quartet is at McCarter Theatre, 91 University Place. Bringing together jazz, folk, and world music, led by vocalist Falu Shah, guitarist Clay Ross, drummer Clarence Penn, and bassist Yashsushi Nakamura. McCarter.org.

Saturday, February 10 9:30-11 a.m.: Princeton Plasma Physics Lab’s Science on Saturday series, at 100 Stellarator Road. “The Pathway to Achieve a Netzero Economy in the U.S. by 2050.” Arrive by 8:30 a.m. for coffee and doughnuts. Pppl.gov/events/scienceSaturday. 10 a.m.: Read and Explore : Animal Tracks, at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Read books and make bird feeders, visit farm animals. Terhuneorchards. com. Friday, February 9 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.: Friends of Princeton Open 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: HuntSpace invites volunteers to erdon County Rug Artisans Love Your Park Day, workGuild holds a monthly meeting with the stewardship ing at the Administration team to remove invasive building, Hunterdon County plants. Fopos.org. Complex, Route 12 outside Flemington. Guests are wel10 a.m.- 4 p.m.: Oldcome. Hcrag.com. Fashioned Valentine’s Day at Howell Farm, 70 Woodens Thursday, February 8 4:30-6:30 p.m.: Friends Lane, Hopewell Township. 11 a.m.-3 p.m.: Winter of Princeton Open Space inChildren’s craft: Valentine’s Farmers Market at Hinds Pla- vites the public to help sow Day card (11 a.m.-3 p.m. za. Locally grown produce, native seeds at Mountain Ride in a sleigh or carriage pulled by light workhorses; bobsled; hay wagon. Soup will be on the stove. Howellfarm.org. 11 a.m.: “Meet Phillis Wheatley,” performance by COLD SOIL ROAD TRENTON FARMER’S MARKET Daisy Century of American PRINCETON, NJ SPRUCE STREET Historical Theatre about the first published African American poet in the U.S., at Mt. Zion AME Church, COLD SOIL ROAD TRENTON FARMER’S MARKET Stoutsburg Sourland AfriFeb 10 & 11, 17 & 18 February 19 - 20 PRINCETON, NJ SPRUCE STREET can American Museum, 189 Hollow Road, Skillman. FolEnjoy our lowed by a Q&A. Free but pre-registration required. wines paired Ssaamuseum.org. Celebratewith Valentine’s Day, local 2-5 p.m.: Winery Weekenjoy ourgourmet wines paired with end Music s er ies of fers wine and chocolate at Terlocal Pierre’s Chocolates and Pierre’s hune Orchards, 330 Cold our homemade baked goods Soil Road. Indoor and outChocolates. door seating with firepits. music from 1-4 p.m. Live Music, Celebrate Valentine’s Live Day, by Sarah Teti. Terhuneorindoor &wines pairedchards.com. enjoy our with 2 p.m.: A Lovesong for outdoor February 9 – Larry Tritel February 23local – Jerry Steele Chocolates Miss Lydia by Don Evans Pierre’s and seating with is performed by Theater February 16 – Brooke DiCaro March 1 – Carmen Marranco baked goods our homemade to Go at Kelsey Theatre, fire pits. Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. (609) We cannot tell a lie... 570-3333.

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Post- show conversat ion, “Artists in Wartime,” with orchestra director Alexander Hornostai and Princeton University visiting scholar Iuliia Skybytska. McCarter. org. 2 p.m.: Inventors Day Presentation: “Black Inventors Got Game,” at Princeton P ublic L ibrar y, 65 Witherspoon Street. James Howard of the Black Inventors Hall of Fame examines influential Black inventors and their contributions to the toy and game industry in this interactive, multimedia presentation. At Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org. 2 p.m.: A Lovesong for Miss Lydia by Don Evans is performed by Theater to Go at Kelsey Theatre, Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. (609) 570-3333. 3-5 p.m.: All Ages Folk Dance, at Suzanne Patterson building, 1 Monument Drive. Family-friendly event with square dances, contra dances, party games, traditional American dances, and music by the Mixed Age Dance Band. $7 per person, $20 per family (ages 4 and up ). No par tner needed. Princetoncountrydancers. org/all-ages-dance. 4 p.m.: Choral reading of Haydn’s The Creation by the Princeton Society of Musical Amateurs, at Unitarian Universalist Church, Route 206 at Cherry Hill Road. Free, choral singers welcome. Vo c a l s c or e s pr ov i d e d . $10. Musicalamateurs.org. 4 p.m.: Gathering in solidar it y w ith the October 7 hostages, and a call for their release. Organized by a grassroots group of Israelis in Princeton. Hinds Plaza. Monday, February 12 Recycling Tuesday, February 13 4:30 p.m.: The Atelier@ Large : Conversations on Artmaking in a Vexed Era, w it h t ransgender w r iter Jennifer Finney Boylan and songwriter Bridget Kearney, moderated by Paul Muldoon, at Richardson Auditorium. Free. Arts.princeton.edu. 5-7 p.m.: “Scenario for a Past Future and Avant Garde Immersive Worlds,” panel discussion at Hurley Gallery, Lewis Arts complex, Princeton University and virtually via Zoom. With artist Josephine Meckseper. Free. Arts.princeton.edu. 5 p.m.: “Photo History’s Fut ures : Emilie Boone.” At Princeton University’s Friend Center, Room 101. Boone speaks about her publication A Nimble Arc: James Van Der Zee and Photography. Free. Artmuseum.princeton.edu. 5:30 p.m.: Reading by Vauhini Vara and Princeton University Creative Writing Seniors at Godfrey Kerr Studio, Lewis Arts complex. Part of the C.K. Williams Reading Series. Free.

6 : 45 p.m.: Montgomery Woman’s Club meets at Kaufman Community Center, 356 Skillman Road. Informal fashion show and talk from Toni of the Nearly New Shop. 7 p.m.: “Three WorldRenowned Contemporary Black Artists,” online event pr e s e nte d by L aw r e n c e Headquar ters Branch of Mercer County Library System. Presented by Jeanne Johnson, docent at Princeton University Art Museum. Artists are Samuel Fosso, Nick Cave, and Kehinda Wiley. Register at mcl.org. 7:30 p.m. : “The Universal Timekeepers : Reconstructing History Atom by Atom.” Presentation by astronomer and Columbia University professor John David Helfand at Peyton Hall, Princeton University, and on Zoom. Free. Princetonastronomy.org. Wednesday, February 14 12-3 p.m.: Douglass Day Transcribe-a thon, at Princeton Public Library’s Technology Center, 65 Witherspoon Street. Work side-by-side on a crowdsourcing transcription focused on the general correspondence of Frederick Douglass from the Library of Congress. Princetonlibrary.org. 1-3 p.m.: Birthday party for abolitionist Frederick Douglass at the True Farmstead, Stoutsburg-Sourland African American Museum, 189 Hollow Road, Skillman. Open hours and a transcribe-a-thon. Free but registration required. Ssaamuseum.org. Thursday, February 15 10 a.m.: Meeting of the 55-Plus Club of Princeton, via Zoom. Stephen Vladeck of the University of Texas at Austin speaks on “The Shadow Docket : W hat’s Wrong with and How to Fix the Supreme Court.” Princetonol.com/groups/55plus/. 6 : 3 0 p . m . : “A f r i c a n A m er ic a n G ene a log y — Discovering your Family History,” at Lawrence Headquarters Branch of Mercer Cou nt y L ibrar y System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrence Township. To register and get further information, visit mcl.org. 7 p.m.: Author Dana R. Fisher discusses her book Saving Ourselves : From Climate Shocks to Climate Action, with Princeton University’s Miguel Centeno, at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org. 7: 30 p.m. : Pr inceton University Concerts presents pianist Alexander Melnikov, violinist Isabelle Faust, and cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras at Richardson Auditorium, playing works by Schumann, Carter, and Brahms. Puc. princeton.edu. 8 p.m. : Menopause The Musical 2: Cruising Through ‘The Change’, at State Theatre New Jersey, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. $29-$69. Stnj.org.


23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024

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head coach CarSparked by Career Day from Senior Stalwart Nweke, laPrinceton Berube credited Brown sticking around after No. 25 PU Women’s Hoops Tops Brown, Now 7-0 Ivy with being down 40-26 at half-

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hile Chet Nweke was excited to finally break into the starting lineup for the Princeton University women’s basketball team in late January after making 76 appearances off the bench, she now feels pressure to be on her toes from the opening tip-off. “It has been a little bit of an adjustment for me,” said senior Nweke. “Coming off the bench for so long, I was able to let the other people figure out how to start the game defensively and then I will figure it out and see what they are doing. Now it is more important for me to be locked in from the start, having to know the scout right away and how we are defending certain actions.” Last Saturday as Princeton hosted Brown before a crowd of 2,710 at Jadwin Gym, Nweke was locked in at both ends of the court, tallying nine points on 4-for4 shooting to help the Tigers build a 29-12 lead early in the second quarter. Never looking back, No. 25 Princeton went on to a 76-63 win over the Bears, improving to 17-3 overall and 7-0 Ivy League. In reflecting on her offensive output which saw Nweke tally a career-high 18 points, she said that her production came in the flow of the game. “I am letting my defense fuel my offense and our team

is letting our defense fuel our offense,” said Nweke, who also contributed seven rebounds and three steals in the win. “I try just not to get too high or too low because I feel like when I let it affect me mentally then I go into my head and my own little space. I just let the game come to me as it was. I was just trying to make sure that my teammates were also getting open when I got offensive rebounds and I was passing it out. It was just trying to get everyone involved because that is what matters at the end.” Things did get a little ragged for the Tigers down the stretch as they were outscored 37-36 by Brown in the second half. “The end was pretty tough, I don’t think we played our best defensive game by any means,” said Nweke, a 6’0 native of Woodbine, Md., who had 10 points on 5-of5 shooting in a 79-59 win over Yale on Friday and is averaging 4.4 points and 4.2 rebounds a game. “It is tough going back-toback games having to focus on two teams. This is just a learning lesson for us, having to know the scout just a little bit more and pay more attention to closer things like when shooters are hot and being able to defend the three-point line better than we did. I think we will learn from this game and grow

from it and it is really important that we do.” With the win over the Bears wrapping up a 4-0 homestand for Princeton and extending its winning streak to 12, Nweke believes the Tigers benefited from being at Jadwin over the last two weeks. “We do well when we are at home,” said Nweke. “We are just trying to prove that we can play with anybody and we are just willing to work on the defensive end.” While being unbeaten since a 60-58 loss at Rhode Island on December 3 is impressive, the Tigers aren’t looking past Ivy play. “We try not to focus too much on the winning streaks or anything like that,” said Nweke. “We are just focusing on the goals that we have. Every game is a step towards Mount Ivies. This was step seven. We are halfway through so we just have to carry on the momentum.” Returning to the Associated Press Top 25 after having been there for a week earlier in the season hasn’t shifted the team’s focus either. “I feel like we thrive as the underdog in our heads,” said Nweke. “When we saw the ranking and we were like, ‘Oh this is cool,’ but we want to be the underdogs. If we do stick around that is cool but at the end of the day we are not looking at that.”

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time. “Their three-point percentage was better than their field goal percentage,” said Berube. “We have been watching a lot of film. They have some very skilled players and clearly some great shooters. They are a high volume 3-point shooting team. I think our defense could have been better. We could have been out there and guarding the three-point ball better. We got some stops when we needed to. We got out in transition well and got some easy scoring opportunities.” Building a 41-26 edge in rebounding against the Bears helped lead to those offensive opportunities. “It was getting on the offensive boards, it was the same thing last night,” said Berube, whose team outrebounded Yale 44-21. “The way we have been rebounding the ball has been key. We can take care of the defensive glass and then also get those second chance opportunities offensively. It just gives us more chances to score.” The recent insertion of Nweke into the starting lineup has proved to be key for Princeton. “Chet is a great offense rebounder, she has got great athleticism and timing just like Ellie [Mitchell],” said Berube. “They get after it. She runs the floor really well, she is fast, and athletic. Just that one play where she was bobbling it and saved it and then got back into the play and got the and-one was just a huge play. She has been a great presence for us inside, just making great plays and then hitting her free throws. She is making a great impact. She helps us defensively, being able to guard the perimeter. She definitely makes us better.” The Tigers displayed some offensive balance in the win over Brown as four players reached double figures. Madison St. Rose scored 18 points with Kaitlyn Chen adding 17 and Skye Belker chipping in 11 in addition to Nweke’s 18-point performance. Chen, who scored 27 points in the win over Yale in Friday, was later named as the Ivy Player of the Week. “We got it going when we got some stops we got out in transition,” said Berube. “Kaitlyn is going to get some great looks, she didn’t shoot the ball as well as she did last night. She is a great floor general for us and ran our stuff well. It is great to have a lot of options out there to score. When someone is getting hot, let’s keep going to them. We certainly did that with Skye in that fourth quarter.” While returning to the Top 25 is a feather in the program’s hat, the Tigers are focused on their clash at Penn (11-9 overall, 3-4 Ivy) on February 10. “We are not talking about it, it is certainly great,” said Berube. “It is a testament to the season we have had. We are certainly not resting on that or thinking that is

STEPPING UP: Princeton University women’s basketball player Chet Nweke puts up a shot in a game last season. On Saturday, senior Nweke scored a career-high 18 points to help No. 25 Princeton defeat Brown 76-63. The Tigers, now 17-3 overall and 7-0 Ivy League, play at Penn on February 10. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) important. We are just taking one game at a time and now looking forward to Penn this weekend.” Nweke, for her part, knows that the game with the archival Quakers is going to be a challenge. “I think being now on the road is going to be a little bit

different,” said Nweke. “We are playing against a really good Penn team. We are just going to have to have a really good week of practice, be locked in, and know the scout because they are really good. We get everyone’s best game anyway.” —Bill Alden

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the last year. And it’s Princeton Men’s Hoops Snaps 2-Game Losing Streak, over his time now. He’s a junior and he’s more experienced how to use his frame. Topping Brown 70-60, Now Girding for Clash with Penn with He has more know-how.”

Battling back from some of its first significant adversity of the season, the Princeton University men’s basketball team pulled out a 70-60 win at Brown last Saturday. T he T igers had race d through their non-conference schedule and the first three Ivy League regularseason games, boasting an overall record of 15-1. Then came back-to-back losses at Cornell (83-68 on January 27) and at Yale (70-64 last Friday), and the challenge of responding to their first losing streak of the season. “You learn so much in a loss,” said Princeton head coach Mitch Henderson. “You can learn the same amount in a win and that’s what we were doing for a large part of this season up until those last two games. But it wasn’t impacting us the way these losses did. I don’t mean that in a ‘coachspeak’ way. I mean we’re better than we were eight days ago.” Henderson saw his players respond to some adversity by pulling away for a win over a Brown team that had moved into sixth place in the Ivy League standings with a win over Penn on Friday. Princeton was led by 20 points from Xaivian Lee and 13 points apiece from Caden Pierce and Matt Allocco. Pierce also pulled down 14 rebounds and had four assists. “The last two years, we had back-to-back titles, but a large part of this current

team, with the exception of Allocco, has never really carried the load on these back-to-backs,” said Henderson. “This is really the first time. I know we’re good and we’ve been getting a lot of hype, but winning on the road and getting a split after a really tough Friday loss, I was very pleased and happy. It wasn’t pretty, but we gutted one out which is what you need to learn to do in the league. We have three more of these.” Princeton led Brown by two points at halftime, and never fell behind. The foes were tied, 46-46, seven minutes into the second half but the Tigers made the plays and hit free throws on Saturday to improve to 16-3 overall, 4-2 in the Ivy League with one game remaining in the first half of the conference schedule. “We attempted three free throws on Friday and then 21 and made 20 Saturday,” said Henderson. “That’s a big difference when you can go on the road and be physical and get yourself to the rim. I think that was crucial. We took care of the ball all weekend, which I think is another key ingredient to being successful on the road. But the free throws were a big part of why we were able to be successful on Saturday.” Junior guard Blake Peters had the only three free throw attempts in the loss at Yale — when he was fouled on a 3-pointer. Pierce had 20 points and four assists

and four rebounds against the Bulldogs, while L ee recorded his first career d o u b l e - d o u b l e w i t h 18 points and 11 rebounds. Peters knocked down a pair of 3-pointers early to help Princeton out to an early lead. He also made a pair of threes in the win over Brown. “He didn’t play hardly at all his freshman year,” said Henderson. “Typical of Blake, he is all in on whatever the team needs. He starts. For us, him being on the court he’s so effective just because of the threat of what he brings. But for us internally, he’s just rock solid. He’s a complete, dependable, defensive player. You get maximum concentration and effort every day. And he holds other people to a very high standard because that’s a standard he holds himself to. It’s an absolute joy to coach this team, and Blake is a big part of that.” Peters’ three free throws brought Princeton within 66-64 with 22 seconds left at Yale, but the Bulldogs made a pair of free throws and Princeton got no closer. Peters is one of the players that has taken on a bigger role this year as a starter with his ability to make plays at either end, whether with his shooting or defense, to help the Tigers remain a title favorite. “He’s far more physi cal defensively, which is a trademark of this group,” said Henderson. “And that’s just the work that he’s put in

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The Tigers, too, have a little more know-how as they head into their final game of the first half of the Ivy season. Princeton is hoping to use its latest experiences on the road when it returns home to host Penn on February 10. Princeton is expecting a friendlier feeling at Jadwin Gym than it got in four straight Ivy road contests when opposing crowds came out for the chance to cheer against the defending league champions. “All of our road games in the league have been sold out,” said Henderson. “I believe the Penn game is sold out. To me, that’s a really exciting thing. It’s a testament to the work the team has done so far. It’s also giving us experience and we’re learning how to win in a tough road environment.” Princeton split those road contests, and the experiences have helped to groom Princeton for the stretch run. The Tigers sit third in the Iv y standings behind Cornell (17-3 overall, 6-0 Ivy) and Yale (15-6 overall, 6-0 Ivy) with the top four teams qualifying for the Ivy League March Madness tournament that will determine the league’s automatic bid to the NCAA tournament. The Tigers know it will take big back-to-back efforts to win the Ivy bid again. This year’s tournament will be held at Columbia, where the Tigers started their road trip. “The key thing is there’s tension any where,” said Henderson. “When you’re on the road, you’re getting booed and the overrated chant. It doesn’t go in one ear and out the other when you’re a young kid. But you learn to process it in a healthy way which is what I think we’re learning to do on the road, which is great.” This Saturday, Princeton aims to be serenaded by cheers as it hosts Penn. The Quakers dropped both games at Brown on Friday and at Yale on Saturday to fall to 1-5 in the Ivies. Their leading scorer, Clark Slajchert, has not played since December 30 due to injury, but the Tigers are anticipating another challenging Ivy contest. “It’s Penn,” said Henderson. “It’s always a rivalry game. You tend to watch a lot of their games because they’re your travel partner and we’re always seeing

ON THE REBOUND: Princeton University men’s basketball players Caden Pierce, left, and Xaivian Lee go up for a rebound in recent action as Matt Allocco looks on. Last Saturday, Pierce produced a double-double with 13 points and 14 rebounds while Lee tallied a game-high 20 points as the Tigers topped Brown 70-60 to snap a two-game losing streak. The Tigers, now 16-3 overall and 4-2 Ivy League, host Penn (9-12 overall, 1-5 Ivy) on February 10. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) them a lot. I have really good familiarity with them. The Slajchert kid is hurt, but could be seeing some time here soon. So we know they’re a little shorthanded with a very good player. And the [Nick] Spinosa kid is a really tough cover. Their record isn’t really indicative of what they are. They had a nice win over Villanova earlier in the year so we know it’s a tough one. Overall the league is very good. I’ve always said it, but everybody is kind of beating up on each other. The league is very good. You have Yale and Cornell who we just saw recently are obviously really strong.”

Princeton will host Brown and Yale the following weekend February 16 and 17, respectively, as the second half of Ivy play begins. The Tigers are hoping that their bounce back win over Brown is just a start, and they can use the lessons from their two-game losing streak to put together a title run. “You learn so much more in a loss,” said Henderson. “The teaching points tend to land just a little more effectively. It’s enabled us to dig in on things where we really need to improve, and we have their full attention. It’s a group that really wants to improve.” —Justin Feil

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Getting last week off to a goal by David Jacobs with “It is a very frustrating a good start, the Princeton 1:40 left into second period, game, I am frustrated from Universit y men’s hockey the Tigers faltered down the seeing that,” said Fogarty, team pulled out a 4-3 win stretch, failing to cash in who saw star ting goalie over West Point in overtime on two five-minute power Ethan Pearson knocked out on Tuesday to snap a six- plays in the third period on of the game late in the secthe way to a disappointing ond period with an injury. game losing streak. Hosting Dartmouth last 5-1 defeat as they moved “We are better than that. Friday, Princeton seemingly to 7-12-2 overall and 5-8-1 Dartmouth is a good team, but we just didn’t puck-manbrought momentum from ECAC Hockey. “It is 3-1 and you get a age in certain times.” the win over Army in the first period as it carried play little bit of life with the fiveWith Princeton playing at minute major, that is the Clarkson on February 9 and for the most part. “Our first period, I thought biggest turning point,” said at St. Lawrence on February we played well; we were out- Fogarty. “You get one goal 10, Fogarty will be looking shooting them 12-6,” said there — it is 3-2, but you for his players to raise the Princeton head coach Ron end up taking a penalty and level of their game down the stretch. Fogarty. “In the first we had then it is 4-1.” Jacobs gave the Tigers a lot of o-zone time.” “We have to be better, we But despite generating some life with his hustle all are better than that; we have a week of practice before those opportunities, the Ti- over the ice. “David Jacobs has been Clarkson and St. Lawrence,” gers found themselves down 2-0 heading into the second playing great for us, even said Fogarty. “There are if he didn’t score, he has eight games left — we have period. “They got a turnover in been a dog on the puck and to bear down and grind it out. We can’t turn the puck battles all of the time,” said the neutral zone and they or ask your Designer for details. capitalized on it,” said Fog- Fogarty. “You are never go- over and shoot ourselves in arty. “They get up 2-0 on ing to get cheated with his the foot. It is probably three self-inflicted wounds that us and we came back. We shift. He played well.” wanted to at least win the Fogar t y ack nowledged cost us the game tonight. period in the second and we that his squad didn’t play That is stuff we have got tied it.” well collectively in the loss to work on.” —Bill Alden Making it a 3-1 game on to the Big Green.

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Princeton Men’s Hockey Defeated 5-1 by Dartmouth, Aims to Get on Winning Track at Clarkson, St. Lawrence

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BIG JAKE: Princeton University men’s hockey player David Jacobs sends the puck up the ice in action last season. Last Friday, sophomore forward Jacobs scored the lone goal for Princeton as it fell 5-1 to Dartmouth. The Tigers, now 7-12-2 overall and 5-8-1 ECAC Hockey, play at Clarkson on February 9 and at St. Lawrence on February 10. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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PU Sports Roundup PU Women’s Hockey Falls to Quinnipiac

Sarah Paul scored the lone goal for the No. 12 Princeton Universit y women’s hockey team as it fell 3-1 to 9th-ranked Quinnipiac last Saturday. The Tigers, now 12-8–5 overall and 6 - 8 -5 ECAC Hockey, host Clarkson on February 9 and St. Lawrence on February 10.

Princeton Wrestling Defeats Brown

Remaining undefeated in Ivy League action, the Princeton University wrestling team defeated Brown 34-13 last Sunday. Individual victors for the Tigers against the Bears included Drew Heethuis at 125 pounds, Sean Pierson at 133, Eligh Rivera at 149, Blaine Bergey at 165, Mikey Squires at 174, Luke Stout at 197, and Matt Cover at 285. P r i n c e to n , w h i c h h a d topped Harvard 20-16 on Saturday, improved to 5-3 overall and 3-0 Ivy League. In upcoming action, the Tigers host Cornell on February 9 and Binghamton on February 10.

PU Men’s Volleyball Tops No. 10 Pepperdine

Nyherowo Oemene starred as the Princeton University men’s volleyball team defeated Pepperdine 3-0 last Friday in Dillon Gym. Junior Omene contributed 15 kills and two blocks to help the Tigers prevail 2519, 25-23, 25-23. In upcoming action, Princeton, now 6-3, hosts Lincoln Memorial on February 9 and Sacred Heart on February 10.

PU Women’s Squash Defeats Yale 7-2

Taking five of the first six matches, the No. 4 Princeton Universit y women’s squash team defeated No. 7 Yale 7-2 last Sunday. Zeina Zein at first posi-

tion, Sonya Sasson at seventh, and Katherine Glaser at eighth were all 3-0 winners for the Tigers while Charlotte Bell won the last two games to close out a 3-1 win at fourth and Olivia Robinson won the last three games to do the same at ninth. Princeton, now 8-2 overall and 4-1 Ivy League, hosts Penn on February 10.

PU Men’s Squash Loses 7-2 to Yale

Suffering its first loss in Ivy League action this season, the No. 2 Princeton Universit y men’s squash team fell 7-2 to No. 5 Yale last Sunday. Hollis Robertson at No. 2 and Gordon Lam at No. 8 earned the only wins on the day for the Tigers as they moved to 7-2 overall and 4-1 Ivy League. Princeton hosts Penn on February 10.

Tiger Men’s Track Shines at Rutgers Open

Tyler Konopka and Camren Fisher provide highlights as the Princeton University men’s track team competed at the Scarlet Knight Open last weekend at the Armory in New York City. Junior Konopka placed first in the shot put with a best throw of 58’ 9.50 while senior Fischer won the 3,000-meter run in a time of 8:09.65. Princeton will be competing in the Fasttrack National Invitational at the Ocean Breeze Athletic Complex in Staten Island, N.Y., on February 9.

PU Women’s Track Excels at Penn State Event

Georgina Scoot, Angela McAuslan-Kelly, and Siniru Iheoma earned wins as Princeton University women’s track team took part in the Sykes and Sabock meet last Saturday in University Park, Pa. Sophomore Scoot placed first in the long jump with a leap of 20’2.5 while freshman McAuslan-Kelly won the weight throw with a best heave of 63’3.25 and junior Iheoma was first in

the shot put with a throw of 48’11.75. Princeton will be competing in the BU David Hemery Valentine Invitational from February 9-10 in Boston, Mass.

PU Women’s Swimming Sweeps H-Y-P Meet

Displaying its depth, the Princeton University women’s swimming team swept the annual Harvard-YalePrinceton meet last weekend at DeNunzio Pool. The Tigers topped Harvard 183-117 and Yale 195105 in the two-day event as they moved to 11-1 overall and 7-0 Ivy League. Individual victors at the meet for Princeton included Ellie Marquardt in the 200yard freestyle and 500 free, Alexa Pappas in the 100 backstroke, Heidi Smithwick in the 100 and 200 butterfly, Sabrina Johnston in the 50 freestyle, Ela Noble in the 100 free, Margaux McDonald in the 200 breaststroke, and Eleanor Sun in the 200 individual medley. The Tigers are next in action when they compete in the Ivy League Championships from February 21-24 in Providence, R.I.

Tiger Men’s Swimming Splits H-Y-P Meet

Mitch Schott starred as the Princeton University men’s swimming team earned a split in the annual HarvardYale-Princeton meet last weekend at DeNunzio Pool. Sophomore Schott placed first in the 100-yard freestyle, 200 free, and 200 individual medley. The Tigers defeated Yale 249-104 while losing to Harvard 198.5-140.5 as they moved to 8-3 overall and 6-1 Ivy League. Pr inceton is next in action when it competes in the ECAC Championships from Febr uar y 23 -25 in Annapolis, Md.

SOUND OF MEMPHIS: Tosan Evbuomwan heads to the hoop last winter in his senior season for the Princeton University men’s basketball team. Last week, Evbuomwan signed a 10-day contract with the Memphis Grizzlies of the NBA. With the signing, Evbuomwan became the only Ivy League player currently on an NBA roster. The 6’8, 217-pound Evbuomwan made his NBA debut last Friday, scoring three points with a rebound and an assist in 16 minutes of action as the Grizzlies fell 121-101 to the Golden State Warriors. On Sunday, he tallied three points and three assists with a game-high 12 rebounds as the Grizzlies lost 131-91 to the Boston Celtics. Previously, Evbuomwan had been playing for the Motor City Cruise of the NBA G League, an affiliate of the Detroit Pistons, where he averaged 15.1 points per game with 8.6 rebounds and 3.9 assists. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Remmick Granozio didn’t waste any time getting the Princeton High boys’ basketball team rolling as it hosted STEMCivics last Wednesday. Gathering in the ball off the opening tip-off, senior guard Granozio raced straight to the hoop and knocked in a lay-up. “It was a tip to me and then I was going to get it to Jahan [Owusu],” said Granozio. “But there was no one in front of me, so I just went in. It was good.” Granozio’s shot was the opening salvo of what turned out to be a very good game for PHS as it jumped out to a 27-6 first quarter lead and never looked back on the way to a 67-48 win. “We wanted to get out early, run and get easy buckets,” said Granozio, who ended up with six points, three assists, and two rebounds in the victory. “We have been playing well the last four games, getting off to hot starts has been big for us.” In reflecting on the hot start against STEMCivics, Granozio saw stifling defense as a key to the PHS outburst. “ W h at r e a l ly g e t s u s started is our defense, just energy and juice on the defensive side of the ball,” said Granozio. “Once we get that, we can push in transition and get running. We are really good when we are running.” With PHS up 44-14 at halftime, it was able to clear the bench and give everyone a chance to see some action. “They put in such hard work at practice, it is awesome to see because when you have a lot of guys it is hard for everyone to get in,” said Granozio of the team’s

reserves. “A day like today is awesome to see everyone with the hard work they put in.” The Tigers have been working well as the win over STEM marked their third straight triumph. “Towards the end of the season, we have counties and states and all of that,” said Granozio. “It is good — we are executing well and bringing energy on defense. We are making shots, that is the most important thing. I think we have good team camaraderie.” As a battle-tested senior, Granozio has looked to enhance the team’s chemistry and execution. “Last year we had Chris Rinaldi. He was a great point guard and I have tried to do everything I can to fill his shoes and learn from him, not only as a player but as a leader,” said Granozio. “I talk to all of the guys and try to get everyone going. When I am out there, I am just trying to help out the team in any way I can. I am always looking to make the right play, whether I have to go score or make a pass. There are a lot of guys on this team who are really talented; we know we can get a lot of open shots.” Having emerged as a star receiver this past fall in making his debut for the PHS football team, Granozio brought some extra confidence into the basketball season. “It takes some adjusting for sure from football season,” said Granozio. “I shot like a football player at first. Football was fun, I have definitely gotten stronger. The game is slowing down for me — it was really fast the first two years.”

NO QUIT: Princeton High boys’ basketball player Remmick Granozio looks to unload the ball under pressure in a game earlier this season. Last Wednesday, senior guard Granozio scored six points with three assists and two rebounds to help PHS defeat STEMCivics 67-48. The Tigers, who lost 44-34 to Delaware Valley last Monday to move to 10-9, play at WW/PNorth on February 7 before hosting Notre Dame on February 9. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) BOB

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show a strong mentality, “When we are facing adversity, we just have to come back and learn from it,” said Granozio. “When things are going well as they were today it is easy to have fun, but we have to do that in in the hard times.” PHS head coach Pat Noone had fun watching his squad click on all cylinders against STEMCivics. “We needed that one,” said Noone, who got 20 points from sophomore reser ve guard Michael Bess Jr. in the win with senior stars Jahan Owusu and Jihad Wilder chipping in 11 and six points, respectively. “We have got a little something going there. It is a good time to hit your stride, that is what you are aiming for.” Noone believes the Tigers are hitting their stride as they look forward to postseason play. “The ball is moving, the defense is playing real good,” said Noone. “We are playing as five, which is really, really good. We are hitting shots, we are playing a little quicker. They are a little more confident. It is that time of the year. Knock on wood, every year we have always gotten better.” Noone credits Granozio with helping to trigger that ball movement. “Remmick really turned a corner when he started not relying on his three,” said Noone. “We moved him on ball as point guard so he is moving. Everything is going a little quicker with a little less thinking and a lot more success.” The play of Owusu and Wilder has been another key factor in the recent success of the Tigers. “Jahan is going to be close to a first team All-CVC player,” said Noone of Owusu who is averaging 16.3 points a game this season. “Jihad is starting to step into his role. He had the injury bug early and now he has got it going.” With PHS playing at WW/ P-North on February 7 and hosting Notre Dame on February 9 before starting action in the Mercer County Tournament next week, Noone believes the Tigers are primed to step up when they get into postseason action. “You always want to peak at the end,” said Noone, whose team lost 44-34 to Delaware Valley last Monday to move to 10-9. “We have to keep making shots and play quick. Our defense is playing really well right now. We are flustering teams, we are getting teams out of what they like to do that are comfortable. It definitely leads to offense. People are going to try to zone us and we get the ball out quick and get as many buckets as we can.” Realizing that the end of his time with the PHS hoops program is fast approaching, Granozio is savoring his final days with his teammates. “I had this moment where I realized that I am probably not going to play in college,” said Granozio. “I just know that these are the last couple of weeks I will get to spend with guys. I love playing with them every day. It has been so much fun — I have enjoyed every moment.” —Bill Alden

Graham Baird is showing his versatility and character this winter for the Princeton High boys’ hockey team. Starting the season at defenseman, senior Baird has moved up the ice for PHS. “I have been just where the team needs me, I am on offense for now,” said Baird. “It is good. Before we didn’t have much depth on offense. Mixing me into the offense gave us more of a second line and we are able to produce which is good.” Last week, Baird produced in the clutch for the Tigers, tallying a goal and an assist as PHS rallied from 1-0 and 2-1 deficits to edge the WW-P Hockey Co-op 4-3. With PHS trailing 1-0 in the first period of the January 30 contestant at the Mercer County Skating Center, Baird got PHS on the board as he found the back of the net on an odd-man rush. “On that play, I saw the goalie hugging the near side of the post so I just wanted to slick it by him on the far side,” said Baird. “It was a 2-on-1 scenario, I opened up my blade just a little bit to hint at the pass.” Early in the third period with the contest knotted at 2-2, Baird helped set up a go-ahead goal by Emil Vecchi. “I didn’t have much of a look and I saw two of our guys in front,” said Baird. “I thought if I could put it off the goalie’s pad, we could hopefully get something. It worked out for us.” Posting four wins in five games after a 1- 6 star t, things are starting to work out for the Tigers. “It is mostly just getting our confidence back — we had a few rough losses towards the beginning of the season,” said Baird. “It is a new year, new team type of thing. We had a lot of hard out-of-conference games. Now that we are back in the conference, we are gaining momentum. Hopefully we

can bring that into the county tournament next week.” As an assistant captain, Baird is looking to instill confidence in his team mates. “It has been nice, it feels good to have a voice and be listened to,” said Baird, who also stars for the PHS boys’ lacrosse team. “I know I am playing with some young kids on the line at forward, so it is good to tell them what I can on the bench with some constructive criticism.” PHS head coach Rik Johnson acknowledged that it took a while for his squad to get going against WW-P. “We had sort of a shorter bench today, it was a little difficult,” said Johnson, who got two goals from junior star forward Brendan Beatty in the win. “Once we get warmed up and start moving the puck and relaxing, things start to click.” Joh nson credits B aird with helping the PHS offense click. “Graham is playing with a lot of young guys, I don’t have him with the seniors,” said Johnson. “He is playing veteran dad on his line. He is very solid on defense. We do have a solid d-corps, so I can bring him up and add a little more firepower and a little more depth.” Beatty has been giving the Tigers firepower all season. “Brendan always brings it, I know he is always going to bring the fire,” said Johnson. Bringing a 4-3 lead into the third period, PHS was able to hold off WW-P with some solid defensive work. “I am always going to push them,” said Johnson. “The important thing was don’t let up another goal. It was defense first and that did the job.” Seeing progress after the 1-6 start, Johnson believes his squad is getting on the right track. “It has been choppy with the rain stuff and the

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024

As PHS heads down the With Senior Baird Displaying Versatility, Leadership, snow outs, we lost a ton of Granozio Looking to Make the Most of Senior Season stretch games,” said Johnson. “So a this winter, Granozio As PHS Boys’ Basketball Heads Into Homestretch believes the squad has to PHS Boys’ Hockey Aiming For 2nd Straight MCT Title little consistency does help

them out. They are a little more tired, but it gets them out there.” PHS will need to show more consistency as it goes for a second straight Mercer County Tournament crown. The Tigers, who are seeded fifth in this year’s MCT, start their title defense when they face fourth-seeded Notre Da m e i n a quar ter f i na l contest on February 9 at the Mercer County Skating Center. “It is really just getting in and take it game by game. You have to just be ready to go, whoever it is,” said Johnson, whose team lost 3-2 to Nottingham last Monday in a regular season contest to move to 5-10. “We have seen all of the teams. They could make a run, the MCT is definitely attainable. They are going to have to want it. They are going to have to be more hungry than they have been all season. They are going to have to play their best hockey.” In Baird’s view, PHS has what it takes to achieve the MCT repeat. “If we really get dialed in and lock in the games that matter, I think we could be a team that once again could contend,” said Baird. “We need to play a full 45 minutes with good defense. As long as we are completely focused, then we should be all right. That is our goal for now. We are looking at MCTs first and then we will worry about states later. It is taking it one game at a time.” —Bill Alden

ONLINE www.towntopics.com

BEARING DOWN: Princeton High boys’ hockey player Graham Baird, left, controls the puck in recent action. Senior star and assistant captain Baird tallied a goal and an assist to help PHS defeat the WW/P Hockey Co-op on January 30. The Tigers, who lost 3-2 to Nottingham last Monday to move to 5-10, will start play in the Mercer County Tournament on February 9 where they are seeded fifth and will face fourth-seeded Notre Dame in a quarterfinal contest at the Mercer County Skating Center. In addition, PHS will be playing Robbinsville on February 11 at the Grundy Ice Arena in Bristol, Pa. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024 • 28

but we just have to As Stuart Hoops Wraps Up Challenging Campaign, said Bowman, whose squad Making an Impact for Hun Boys’ Basketball, respect, bring the energy.” hosts Central Jersey College Multi-Talented Wright Stars on Senior Night As the season has un- Tartans Focusing on Developing More Consistency Prep on February 8. “It is S a m Wr ight has b een keeping busy athletically doing his post-graduate year at the Hun School. “I am doing baseball and basketball all year round,” said Wright, a star pitcher on the diamond and Quinnipiac baseball commit who has emerged as a star guard this winter for the Hun boys’ hoops team. “I am excited for baseball, but I am really focused on basketball right now.” Last Monday as Hun hosted the Perkiomen School ( Pa.) and held its annual Senior Night celebration, Wright displayed his focus on the court. Wright scored nine points in the first quarter as Hun hung in with powerhouse Perkiomen, trailing 25-18. “It was great energy, we played a really good team,” said Wright, noting that it was his second Senior Night as he previously played at Lower Merion ( Pa.) High before coming to Hun. “I had a little extra juice. I was looking to attack and I was getting to the bucket and scoring. It was good.” In the second quarter, Hun found itself under attack as the Panthers outscored the Raiders 24-8 to go up 49-26 at halftime. “They were being really physical and we wanted to send a message back in the third quarter,” said Wright. “I think we did a good job of that. They were tough and

we just had to be tougher in the second half.” I n t h e t h i r d q u a r te r, Wright tallied three points to help Hun outscore Perkiomen 24-18. The Raiders narrowed the gap to 67-52 early in the fourth quarter but could get no closer as Perkiomen pulled away to a 92-67 victory. “I t h in k t hat was our best quarter of the season, we brought the energy we haven’t really had,” said Wright, referring to the third quarter rally. “That was a really good lesson for our team going into playoffs. This is awesome, this is a great team. I think we are going to see a couple of teams very similar to them in the MAPL (Mid-Atlantic Prep League) playoffs.” The Raiders, who dropped to 8-12 with the loss, will be playing at Pennington on February 8 in a MAPL tournament play-in game with the victor advancing to the semis on February 10 at Hun. With the Raiders having lost 75-69 to Pennington in a regular season meeting on January 4, Wright and his teammates are looking forward to the rematch with the Red Hawks. “I am really excited to play them again, we just have to be tougher,” said Wright, who ended up with 14 points against Perkiomen. “They outrebounded us in our first matchup. They are a great team. We give them a lot of

folded, Wright has looked to bring more offense and leadership to the court for Hun. “I have been touching around with my role,” said Wright. “I think come playoffs, I need to be a guy who is going to score the basketball. I have been in that role before so stepping into that role is not too bad. I think I bring a lot of leadership to this team. I am trying to help the less experienced guys grow as much as they can as players.” While Wright has been stepping up in hoops this winter, he has made time to hone his baseball skills. “I have been throwing, hitting, keeping my speed up when I can, lifting, doing everything,” said Wright. Hun head coach Jon Stone liked what Wright did Monday against Perkiomen. “He came out really, really well,” said Stone. “He is a terrific basketball player — he could play college basketball if he wanted to.” Stone credited his Class of ’24 with making a terrific contribution to the program. “It is a great senior group,” said Stone, whose crew of seniors includes Mac Kelly, Markus Brown, and Derrick Melvin along with Wright. “They are awesome kids, I am so lucky to be able to coach them.” With his group trailing 49-26 at halftime, Stone was looking for his players to raise their intensity after the break. “The refs were letting us play, we had to compete a little more,” said Stone. Senior guard Kelly competed very hard for the Raiders, pouring in 32 points on the night, including 22 in the second half. “Mac doesn’t back down from anybody,” said Stone. “He likes to compete.” While Hun didn’t get the result it wanted against Perkiomen, Stone believes that battling a team like that will steel the Raiders for the MAPL tourney. “That is as good a team as we are going to face, hopefully we will be prepared for Thursday,” said Stone. “Playoff time is such an exciting time — we are just excited to get out and play.” Wright, for his part, is prepared to play hard to the end as he wraps up his hoops career. “I want to win everything; I am going to try and inspire the guys as much as I can,” said Wright. “This is my last go. I want to do everything I can to help the team.” —Bill Alden

After the Stuart Country Day School basketball team fell 49-25 to BridgewaterRaritan last Saturday, the squad headed to a classroom near the gym for an extended postgame debriefing. Stuart head coach Tony Bowman gave his players a clear message as they assembled in the wake of the setback. “The speech at the end was play harder, play together, play as a unit and ever y thing will happen,” said Bowman, whose team dropped to 3-7 with the loss. “That is the only way we can do it.” The Tartans played well in the early going against Bridgewater-Raritan, getting out to a 6-5 lead and trailing by just 10-7 after the first quarter. But things got away from the Tartans in the second quarter as they were outscored 19-6 and found themselves down 29-13 at halftime. “It is the first time we started off a little stronger but we weren’t consistent,” said Bowman, whose team was hampered when sophomore star Taylor States got into foul trouble and had to sit out in the second quarter. “It wasn’t consistent with running the plays. Bringing the ball up has been a problem throughout the season. Everybody puts pressure on and we have not overcome that.” With States back on the court in the fourth quarter, Stuart outscored the Panthers 10-4 over the last eight minutes of the game. “Taylor was playing so that makes a difference,” said Bowman of States who ended up with nine points, eight rebounds, and five blocked shots on the day. “I was telling her this, she needs to manage her fouls. Managing her fouls means a lot for us. She is our top scorer, she has to be on the floor. She is a great defender, she must have gotten five blocks in the fourth quarter.” Bowman spent much of the game instructing his players on fundamentals, urging them to stop ball and stay in front of ball-handlers on defense, follow their shots on offense, and run to loose balls, among other things. “I have got a lot of ninth graders and one junior so it is a relatively young team and a relatively inexperienced team,” said Bowman, who got eight points f r o m s op h o m or e g u a r d Abby Chirik in the loss. “I am training more than I am coaching. You have to step

back and teach them. I am teaching, I am not saying run a play.” While Bowman was encouraged by what he saw in the fourth quarter, he wants his players to show intensity from the opening tip-off. “It is getting more in synch and playing harder and being hungry all of the time,”

don’t wait until the fourth quarter to be hungry, our fourth quarter was the best quarter. You have do that in the first quarter, in the second quarter. I love the kids, I want them to work hard. I am getting effort but I have to push forward. We have to do better and we have to learn from each other.” —Bill Alden

ABBY ROAD: Stuart Country Day School basketball player Abby Chirik puts up a shot on recent action. Last Saturday, sophomore guard Chirik scored eight points in a losing cause as Stuart fell 49-25 to Bridgewater-Raritan. The Tartans, now 3-7, host Central Jersey College Prep on February 8. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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THE WRIGHT STUFF: Hun School boys’ basketball player Sam Wright heads to the hoop for a layup in a game earlier this season. Last Monday, postgraduate Wright scored 14 points as Hun fell 92-67 to the Perkiomen School (Pa.). The Raiders, now 8-12, will be playing at Pennington on February 8 in a Mid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL) tournament play-in game with the victor advancing to the semis on February 10 at Hun. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Girls’ Basketball: Coming up just short in a nailbiter, Hun fell 58-56 to the Mercersburg Academy (Pa.) last Friday. In upcoming action, the Raiders, now 9-9, will be hosting Pennington on February 8 in a Mid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL) tournament play-in game. The victor will advance to the MAPL semifinals on February 10 at Hun. Boys’ Hockey: Suffering its third straight defeat, Hun lost 7-1 to LaSalle College High last Wednesday. The Raiders, now 3-8, host Malvern Prep (Pa.) on February 7 and then play St. Joseph’s Prep (Pa.) at the Skatium in Haverford, Pa., on February 9.

Lawrenceville Boys’ Basketball: Chris Trucano scored 15 points in a losing cause as Lawrenceville fell 53-42 to the Pingry School last Friday. The Big Red, now 2-13, will play at the Blair Academy on February 8 in the playin round of the Mid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL) tournament with the victor advancing to the semis on February 10 at Hun School.

PDS B oys’ B asketba l l : Squandering a 26-15 halft i m e le ad, t h ird - s e e de d PDS fell 50-44 to secondseeded Newark Academy in the Prep B semifinals last Monday. The Panthers, who dropped to 5-13 with the defeat, host Allentown on February 9 in a regular season game and then start play in Mercer County Tournament next week. Boys’ Hockey: Getting outscored 3-0 in the third period, PDS fell 4-1 to Seton Hall Prep last Monday. Wyatt Ewanchyna scored the goal and goalie Calvin Fenton made 18 saves for the Panthers as they moved to 9-7-1. PDS will now compete in the Gordon Conference tournament starting on February 7 at the Jersey Shore Arena in Wall. G irls’ Hockey : Br ynn

Dandy and Julia Escobar scored the goals for PDS as it edged the Pingry School 2-1 last Thursday. Goalie Brigid Milligan made 23 saves in the win as the Panthers improved to 9-5. In upcoming action, PDS is taking part in the Libera Ice Hockey Tournament starting on February 7 at its Lisa McGraw Rink.

with the victor advancing to the semis on February 10 at Hun. The Red Hawks will also be playing at thirdseeded Villa Walsh in the Prep B semis on a date to be determined.

Pennington

Girls’ Basketball: Anna Winter scored 13 points as PHS fell 50-33 to Spotswood last Saturday. The Tigers, who moved to 13-5 as they saw their 10 - game w in ning streak snapped, play at Notre Dame on February 9 and then start play in the Mercer County Tournament on February 12. Girls’ Hockey: Running into a buzz saw, PHS lost 12-0 to Westfield last Friday. The Tigers, now 1-9, host the Friends School on February 7 at Hobey Baker Rink. Wrestling : Coming up just short in a postseason clash with a Mercer County rival, fifth-seeded PHS fell 36 - 30 to fou r t h - s ee de d Hightstown last Monday in the quarterfinals of the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Central Jersey, Group 4 Team Tournament. Individual victors for the Tigers in the dual included Josh Hannan at 106 pounds, Arjun Monga at 120, Blase Mele at 138, Daniel Zelov at 144, Chase Hamerschlag at 175, and Kwabena Afrifah at 285. The Tigers, now 11-10, have a quad at Manalapan High on February 10.

B oys’ B asketba l l : Sparked by Zio Kim, Pennington defeated the Shipley School (Pa.) 81-59 last Monday. Kim scored 25 points as the Red Hawks improved to 14-7. Pennington will host the Hun School on February 8 in a Mid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL) tournament play-in game with the victor advancing to the semis on February 10 at Hun. Girls’ Basketball: Morga n Mat t hews c a m e up big to help seventh-seeded Pennington defeat secondseeded St. Elizabeth 70-41 in the Prep B state quarterfinals last Sunday. Matthews poured in 32 points for the Red Hawks in the win. On Monday, Pennington topped South Brunswick 51-38 to move to 8-9. In upcoming action, Pennington is slated to play at the Hun School on February 8 in a Mid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL) tournament play-in game

PHS

Local Sports Dillon Youth Hoops Recent Results

In action last weekend in the Boys’ 3rd/4th grade division of the Dillon Youth Basketball League, Tortuga’s Mexican Village topped Princeton Air 30-23. Rohan Gregory scored 19 points in the victory for Tortugas while Leo Cronan tallied 16 for Princeton Air. Sportworld edged Princeton Supply 21-18 as Nasir Rollins scored 14 points for Sportworld. King David Guerrero and Brady Goldsmith each tallied four points for Princeton Supply. In the Boys’ 5th/6th grade division, Mason Griffin & Pierson defeated Lependorf & Silverstein 28-15 behind a balanced attack led by Ilan Spiegel who scored eight points. Ali Redjal had 13 points for Pizza Den as it edged Locomotion 26-25. Theodore Hogshire scored 17 points for Locomotion in a losing cause. Jefferson Plumbing topped PBA #130 30-12. Alex Spies led Jefferson Plumbing with 12 points while Hugh Kelly contributed seven points in the loss. In the Boys’ 7/8 Division, the Knicks edged the Celtics 33-30. Quinton deFaria scored 20 points to lead the way for the Knicks while Ryan Tague tallied 18 points for the Celtics. In the Girls’ 3rd-5th grade division, Jaya Verma had 10 points to lead the Mystics to an 18-14 win over Sparks. Elizabeth Howes scored six points for the Sparks. The

Liberty defeated the Sun 21-5 as Lila Kaufman scored 10 points to lead the way for the victors while Isabella Klewe tallied five points for the Sun. In the Girls’ Grade 6-8 Division, Carmela Crepezzi scored 18 points as Homestead posted a 27-8 win over Princeton Pettoranello Foundation. Maite Cattaneo had six points in the loss. Delizioso Bakery + Kitchen edged Princeton Restorative Dental 2217. Isabella Gustus scored 10 points for Delizioso while Eme Moorhead tallied 10 points for Princeton Restorative Dental.

Princeton 5K Race Slated for March 16

The Princeton 5K is returning on March 16 for its 15th year. The event annually brings together athletes — young and old, big and small, fast and not so fast — to run or walk while supporting the Princeton High cross country and track programs. The in-person race starts in front of the Princeton Middle School at 217 Walnut Lane at 8:30 a.m. In addition to the 5K, there is a 300-meter kids dash for children under 10. To register and get more information on the event, log onto runsignup.com/Race/ NJ/Princeton/PrincetonNJ5K. T-shirts are guaranteed for those who register by February 25. Registration is also available in-person on race day. The Princeton 5K is the largest annual fundraiser for the Princeton High School Cross Country Track and Field Booster (PHSCCTF) a 501(c)(3). All donations directly support the PHS boys’ and girls’ cross country and track teams.

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Wednesday RAE OF LIGHT: Princeton Day School girls’ basketball player Sophia Rae Barber dribbles upcourt in a game earlier this season. Last Wednesday, Barber scored 15 points to help ninth-seeded PDS defeat eighth-seeded Stuart Country Day 32-23 in the opening round of the Prep B state tournament. Two days later, Barber tallied 17 points as the Panthers defeated Nottingham 4033 in a regular season contest. PDS, which fell 51-19 to top-seeded Newark Academy in the Prep B quarterfinals to move to 3-11, hosts Hopewell Valley on February 7 and Allentown on February 9. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

February 14, 2024

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29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024

Hun

Girls’ Basketball: Anna O’Keefe tallied 12 points but it wasn’t nearly enough as Lawrenceville lost 59-28 to the Pingry School last Friday. The Big Red, who dropped to 3-14 with the loss, will play at the Mercersburg Academy (Pa.) on February 8 in the play-in round of the Mid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL) tournament with the winners making the semis on February 10 at Hun School.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024 • 30

Obituaries

Dolores B. Broadway Dolores B. Broadway, 94, of Princeton passed away on January 31, 2024, at home in Princeton. She was born in Trenton, NJ. Dolores worked as a Superintendent for Princeton University. Predeceased by her parents Nathan and Daisy (Grover) Hovington, and two sisters Gloria Young and Grace Syphrett. Dolores is sur vived by a daug hter a n d s on - i n -

law Barbara and Vincent Boone; two sons Nathan C. Floyd and Herbert T. Broadway Jr.; five grandchildren Tjuan, Nadia, Karim, Siraj and Aginah and Costa Maltabes; several great-grandchildren; a niece; nephew; and cousins. A Memorial Visitation will be held from 10–11 a.m. on Friday, February 9, 2024, at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, NJ. Burial will be private.

Kathryn A. King Kathryn A. King of Princeton died peacefully at her home on Friday, December 29. Born Kathryn A. Cuomo on November 28, 1934 in Princeton, she attended grammar

school at Saint Paul’s and graduated from Princeton High in 1952. In 1953 she married her high school sweetheart, Joseph King. They lived for

several years in Portsmouth, VA, before returning to Princeton to raise three children. A devout Catholic, Kathryn taught physical education at St. Paul’s in the 1960s. She worked for Weidel Reality, Peyton Associates, and later for Stockton Real Estate, where she retired in 2020. Kathryn was an avid reader and enjoyed writing. She loved relaxing at her house in Point Pleasant Beach, treasure hunting at yard sales, dancing with her husband, and spending time with friends and family. Kind, selfless, generous, and gracious, she will be sorely missed. Kathryn is proceeded in death by her parents Anthony and Harriet Cuomo, her sister Ellen Cuomo, and her husband Joseph King. She is survived by daughter Cheri-Ellen (David) Crowl of Farmingdale, NJ; sons Patrick (Lindsay) King of Belle Mead, NJ, and Michael (Joanna) King of Rochester, MN; grandchildren Caitlin (James) Rumbaugh, Lacey King, and Katie King; and great-grandchildren Jordan Rumbaugh, Cameron Rumbaugh, and Scarlett Jensen-Lida. A Memorial Visitation will be held from 9-11 a.m. on Saturday, February 17, 2024, at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, February 17, 2024, at St. Paul’s Catholic Church, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton. Burial will follow in St. Paul’s Cemetery. In lieu of f lowers, do nations can be made to the Kathryn King Scholarship Fund at St. Paul’s School, 218 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540.

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Princeton Preaching Sunday, February 11 is University Rev. Dr. Brandon Thomas Crowley, Pastor of Myrtle Baptist Church, Chapel West Newton, MA. Open to all. Music performed by the Princeton University Chapel Choir with Nicole Aldrich, Director of Chapel Music and Chapel Choir, and with Eric Plutz, University Organist.

Justine Casteel Rolland February 24, 1922 – January 27, 2024

Justine Casteel Rolland of Pennington, New Jersey, died peacefully at home on January 27. She was 101 years old. Justine was born in Tarpon, Virginia, on February 24, 1922 to Martha Lucretia and Eric Galeon Casteel. She was the fourth of eight children. Raised in Virginia and West Virginia, she enlisted in the Women’s Auxiliary Army Corp in 1943 and served until 1945. She served in the South Pacific and was posted to Australia, New Guinea, and ended her service in the Philippines. After the war she moved to New York City to go to college on the G.I. Bill. There she met her husband Kermit Rolland, a writer. They moved to Princeton, New Jersey, in the 1950s and opened a business on Nassau Street, Kermit Rolland and Associates, which became Scribe International. The family later moved to Cranbury. Justine was predeceased by her husband, Kermit, all her siblings, and her granddaughter, Katherine Wright Gorrie. She is sur vived by her children, Christopher Rolland ( Martha) of Dallas, TX, Margaret Gorrie (Thomas ) of Pennington, NJ, and Elizabeth Mattison (Robert) of Easton, PA. Justine is also survived by her eight grandchildren, Ginny Miller (Mike) of Gastonia, NC, Alex Gorrie (Mary) of London, England, Matthew Rolland and Michael Rolland of Belmont, NC, Robert Gorrie (Amanda) of Princeton, NJ, Margo Lapinski (Todd) of Houston, TX, Anna Mattison of Allentown, PA, and Spencer Mattison (Brittany) of Bethlehem, PA; and 12 great-grandchildren, Katherine and Madeline Miller, Luke and Henry Gorrie, Samantha, Haley, and Turner Rolland, Lucy and G enevieve Lapinski, and Noah, Isla, and Leo Gorrie. Justine had a wonderful sense of adventure and was an intrepid traveler. She observed and cherished the beauty of the natural world. Justine will be remembered for her passion for reading and poetry, gracious nat ure, k ind nes s, s ens e of humor, and her love of friends and family. Fu n e r a l a r r a n g e m e nt s are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home. Burial will be private. A celebration of Justine’s life will be held in the spring. In lieu of flowers, donations in her honor may be made to The Watershed Institute, 31 Titus Mill Road, Pennington, NJ 08534. Justine’s family gives our heartfelt thanks to Amedisys Hospice for their extraordinary compassion and care.


Carol Lynn Middlebrook passed away suddenly on January 22, 2024, with family and loved ones by her side, after complications from breast cancer. She was 70. Born in Princeton, NJ, Carol graduated from Princeton High School and earned her bachelor’s degree from Douglass College of Rutgers University. She earned her master’s degree from American University and continued her education throughout her professional career with ongoing studies at Middlebury College Language Schools and The Taft Educational Center of the Taft School. A resident of Kensington, MD, Carol taught Spanish at Springbrook High School in Montgomery County, MD, for nearly 40 years. She was also an instructor at The Taft Educational Center. She was a gifted and inspiring teacher. She taught AP and IB Spanish and was a

Rider

Furniture “Where quality still matters.”

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

sponsor of the Spanish National Honor Society. She loved her students and the dynamics of the classroom and brought so much energy and creativity to her teaching, as she did to everything in her life. Always active, she was a lifelong tennis player, and she loved hiking and kayaking. She deeply appreciated the beauty of nature. She traveled extensively throughout the world and immersed herself with local people and in the local culture everywhere she went. She had a raucous, boisterous laugh that was distinctively hers. Most important to Carol were the connections she made w it h fam ily, dear friends, and her beloved Shelties. She relished quality time spent with those she cared about. She lived fully and deeply and will be missed immensely. Preceded in death by her parents, Marilyn J. and Robert B., Carol is survived by her brother Robert David (Dave), sister-in-law Amy, niece Alison, soul mate Cherie (Perkins), John (Uncle Jack) Middlebrook and wife Marci, many cousins, and her beloved Sheltie Simba Kai. A celebration of Carol’s life will be held at River Road Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 6301 River Road, Bethesda, MD 20817 at 1 p.m. on Saturday, May 4. A memorial service will also be held at Un itarian Universalist Church at Washington Crossing, 268 Washington Crossing - Pennington Road, Titusville, N J 0 856 0 o n M o n d ay, May 6 at 11 a.m., followed by interment at Princeton

Cemetery, 29 Greenview Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08542. In lieu of flowers, friends are invited to make an “In Memory” donation to Susan G. Komen, 13370 Noel Road, Suite 801889, Dallas, TX 75380.

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024

Carol Lynn Middlebrook

Ann (Schramm) Judson

A l o n g t i m e P r i n c e to n resident, Ann ( Schramm ) Judson, who lived at Cuyler Road since 1969, died on the morning of February 1, 2024, while in hospice at the Princeton Medical Center. Born in Covington, Kentucky, on January 10, 1930 to Emma (Stahel) Schramm and Cyril Robert Schramm, Ann was salutatorian at Holmes High School HOPEWELL • NJ HIGHTSTOWN • NJ before graduating from the University of Cincinnati in 1951. 609.921.6420 609.448.0050 She filled a life of 94 Weyears pride ourselves We prideon ourselves being aon small, being personal, a small, and personal, serviceand oriented servicefamily oriented business. familyWith business. five generations With five generations of of with gardening, conversa-experience,experience, We pride ourselves on being a small, personal, and we are here weto are help here guide to help you through guide you the through difficultthe process difficult of process monument ofservice monument selection. selection. 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boutique-type, personal and process. to discuss the many options available to you service-oriented business.

well loved and well read since 1946

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DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES Princeton’s First Tradition

SundayS

8:00 AM: Holy Communion Rite I 10:30 AM: Holy Communion Rite II 5:00 PM: Choral Evensong or Choral Compline The Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector The Rev. Canon Dr. Kara Slade, Assoc. Rector Wesley Rowell, Lay Pastoral Associate 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 • www.trinityprinceton.org

ONLINE

www.towntopics.com

Worship Service in the University Chapel Sundays at 11am Rev. Alison Boden, Ph.D. Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel

Rev. Dr. Theresa Thames Associate Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel

Wherever you are in your journey of faith, come worship with us First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ You are welcome to join us for our in-person services, Sunday Church Service and Sunday School at 10:30 am, Wednesday Testimony meetings at 7:30 pm. Audio streaming available, details at csprinceton.org. Visit the Christian Science Reading Room Monday through Saturday, 10 am - 4 pm 178 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ For free local delivery cal (609) 924-0919 www.csprinceton.org • (609) 924-5801

Mother of God Joy of All Who Sorrow Orthodox Church 904 Cherry Hill Rd • Princeton, N 08525 (609) 466-3058 Saturday Vespers 5pm • Sunday Divine Liturgy 930am • www.mogoca.org

To advertise your services in our Directory of Religious Services, contact Jennifer Covill jennifer.covill@witherspoonmediagroup.com

(609) 924-2200 ext. 31


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024 • 32

Town Topics

CLASSIFIEDS

To place a classified ad, please call:

Deadline: Noon, Tuesday

tel: (609) 924-2200 x10 • fax: (609) 924-8818 • e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com LOOKING TO SELL YOUR CAR? Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS to get top results! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience • Fully Insured • Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only): (609) 356-9201 Office: (609) 216-7936 Princeton References • Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 tf HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 tf

EXPERIENCED AND

MEET YOUR NEW ADMINISTRATOR!

PROFESSIONAL CAREGIVER Available Part-Time With Excellent References in the Greater Princeton Area (609) 216-5000 tf

FOX CLEANING (609) 547-9570 eqfoxcarpetcleaning@gmail.com Licensed and insured Residential and commercial Carpet cleaning and upholestry Pressure and soft washing • Area rugs Strip and wax floors • Sanitizing Water damage • Grout cleaning 01-17-25

How to navigate an “ASͲIS” transaction

with Beatrice Bloom

In the realm of real estate transactions, the phrase "ASͲIS" often signals a sale without guarantees or warranties. Yet, one critical aspect frequently overlooked is the inspection contingency. A genuine ASͲIS sale necessitates the waiver of inspection contingencies. Any inclusion of such clauses, even for informational purposes, grants buyers an exit strategy to cancel contracts. It's a balancing act between transparency and risk, where sellers must comprehend the implications fully. Disclosing all known issues is crucial to avoid legal repercussions. However, there's a strategic approach to navigating this landscape. Conducting an inspection before presenting an offer can provide buyers with the necessary comfort to waive inspections formally. This proactive step not only streamlines the process but also demonstrates sincerity and confidence to the seller. Ultimately, in the world of ASͲIS sales, fostering clear communication and understanding between parties is paramount, ensuring a smoother transaction journey for all involved.

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECOͲBroker Princeton Office 609Ͳ921Ͳ1900 | 609Ͳ577Ͳ2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

As your new administrator, I will take the devil out of the details of your busy day. I will give you more time to devote to your business by taking care of all front office functions from streamlining processes to managing your correspondence. You will find that I am highly communicative, cooperative and personable. Thank you for stopping by – I look forward to working with you, your staff, and your clients. With over 10 years of admin experience, I am looking for full-time position in Princeton, where I will soon be relocating. So, let’s set up an informational interview to see if we’re a good match. My name is Emily and I can be reached at AtWorkForYou@yahoo.com. 02-07 THE MAID PROFESSIONALS: Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Residential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404. 05-29 STORAGE UNIT FOR RENT 10 minutes north of Princeton in Skillman/Montgomery. 10x21, $210 discounted monthly rent. Available now. https://princetonstorage.homestead. com or call/text (609) 333-6932. 03-13 HOME HEALTH AIDE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Live-in or live-out. Driver’s license. References available. Please call Cindy, (609) 227-9873. 02-28 CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak: (609) 466-0732 tf HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

“Home is a reflecting surface, a

place to measure our growth and enrich us after being infused with the outside world." —Josh Gates

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-11-24 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-24 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

tf ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-28-24

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10 circulation@towntopics.com tf LOOKING TO SELL YOUR CAR? Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS to get top results! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience • Fully Insured • Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only): (609) 356-9201 Office: (609) 216-7936 Princeton References • Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 tf

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area STANDARD & POOR’S FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC seeks a Software Engineer in Princeton, NJ to design and develop efficient engineering and data pipelines for analytics platform. Telecommuting permitted within normal commuting distance of Princeton, NJ office. REQ: Bachelor’s in Comp Sci, Comp Engg or rel IT field plus 3 yrs exp w/ Java/J2EE. The anticipated base salary range for this position is $126,547 to $139,800. Final base salary for this role will be based on the individual’s geographic location, as well as experience level, skill set, training, licenses & certifications. In addition to base compensation, this role is eligible for an annual incentive plan. This role is eligible to receive additional S&P Global benefits. For more information on the benefits we provide to our employees, please see: https://spgbenefits.com/benefit-summaries/us. Resume to PeopleMovementSupport@spglobal.com, ref #297611 (Software Engineer). 02-07

Witherspoon Media Group Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

· Newsletters · Brochures

· Postcards ADVERTISING SALES Witherspoon Media Group is looking for · Books an Advertising Account Manager, based Catalogues out of our ·Kingston, NJ office, to generate sales for Town Topics Newspaper · Annual Reports and Princeton Magazine The ideal candidate will:

• Establish new sales leads manage For additional infoand contact: existing sales accounts for both publications

melissa.bilyeu@

witherspoonmediagroup.com • Develop industry-based knowledge and understanding, including circulation, audience, readership, and more. • Collaborate with the advertising director and sales team to develop growth opportunities for both publications

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Track record of developing successful sales strategies and knowledge of print and digital media is a plus.

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

Fantastic benefits and a great work environment. Please submit cover letter and resume to: charles.plohn@witherspoonmediagroup.com

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

4428C Route 27, Kingston, NJ 08528 609.924.5400


We now carry SOLAR WINDOW FILM to protect your furniture.

741 Alexander Rd, Princeton

MONTGOMERY PROFESSIONAL CENTER

Rte. 518 & Vreeland Drive | Somerset County | Skillman, NJ

924-2880

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years

February 6, 2024

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co.

OFFICE & MEDICAL SPACE FOR LEASE

Public Notice

SUITES AVAILABLE: UP TO 1460 SF (+/-)

OFFICE

JAN & HVAC

• Private entrance, bathroom, kitchenette & separate utilities for each suite

14’

WAITING ROOM

LUNCH ROOM

7’ 10”

• On-site Montessori Day Care • 210 On-site parking spaces with handicap accessibility

10’ 7”

• High-speed internet access available

18’

RECEPTION

32’ 6”

Objections, if any, should be made immediately in writing to the Director of the Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control, P.O. Box 087, Trenton, NJ 08625-0087. Hopewell Valley Vineyards 46 Yard Rd. Pennington, NJ 08534

14’

• 1/2 Mile from Princeton Airport & Rt. 206 • Close proximity to hotels, restaurants, banking, shopping, associated retail services & entertainment

10’

5’

17’

• Built to suit tenant spaces

12’ 10”

Take notice that Hopewell Valley Vineyards has applied to the Director of the Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control for a Winery Outlet license for the premises situated at Tino’s Artisan Pizza, 4428 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ, 08528.

Building 10 | Suites 7-8 | 1460 sf (+/-)

LarkenAssociates.com | 908.874.8686 Brokers Protected | Immediate Occupancy No warranty or representation, express or implied, is made to the accuracy of the information herein & same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of rental or other conditions, withdrawal without notice & to any special listing conditions, imposed by our principals & clients.

Want to know how much your home is worth? Scan the QR Code below to receive a free home valuation report from Amanda Botwood, a Mercer County top producing real estate agent.

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

WATER WATER EVERYWHERE! Let's rid that water problem in your basement once and for all! Complete line of waterproofing services, drain systems, interior or exterior, foundation restoration and structural repairs. Restoring those old and decaying walls of your foundation.

Call A. Pennacchi and Sons, and put that water problem to rest!

Mercer County's oldest waterproofing co. est. 1947 Deal directly with Paul from start to finish.

609-394-7354

Celebrating 58 th Year! Over 70 years ofour stellar excellence! Thank you for the oppportunity.

apennacchi.com

Celebrating our 61st Year! Celebrating our 58 th Year!

A Tradition of Quality

ANNUAL WINTER SALE A Tradition Quality A Tradition of of Quality

www.amandabotwood.com Amanda J. Botwood REALTOR® M 609.727.3255 | O 609.710.2021 amanda.botwood@compass.com 90 Nassau Street, 2nd Fl Princeton, NJ 08542

Going on now ANNUALWINTER WINTER SALE ANNUAL SALE until the end of Going onon now Going now January. until the end of until the end of February. Savings in every January. Savings in every department! department! Savings in every department!

(609)737-2466

(609)737-2466 Serving the Princeton Area since 1963

(609)737-2466 Find us on Facebook and Instagram

Amanda Botwood is a real estate salesperson affiliated with Compass RE. Compass RE is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws.

Serving the Princeton Area since 1963 Serving the Princeton Area since 1963 Find us on Facebook and Instagram Find us on Facebook and Instagram


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024 • 34

AT YOUR

SERVICE A Town Topics Directory

HOUSE

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual

HD PAINTING

CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

& MORE

House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish (Benjamin Moore Green promise products)

Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner

609-466-2693

CHERRY STREET KITCHEN Serving food businesses, chefs, bakers, small-batch producers, caterers, food trucks, and more... Cherry Street Kitchen is a licensed commercial kitchen, commissary, and production kitchen with multiple kitchen spaces for short and medium-term rental to professional chefs, bakers, and food professionals. 1040 Pennsylvania Ave. Trenton, New Jersey (Between Cherry and Mulberry Streets)

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

(609) 695-5800 • www.CherryStreetKitchen.com

BLACKMAN FRESH IDEAS LANDSCAPING Innovative Design FREE CONSULTATION

PRINCETON, NJ

Home Repair Specialist

609-683-4013

609-586-2130

AN RIC

KITCHEN CABINET PAINTING or DOOR and DRAWER REPLACEMENT

Trees-shrubs-perennials Native Plants

FURNITURE EXCH

www.cabinetpaintingguru.com Serving Bucks County, PA & Mercer County, NJ

AN

A

GE E WANTED M Professional, Courteous Professional, Courteous Professional, Courteous Professional, Courteous ANTIQUES & USED FURNITURE and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed 609-306-0613 and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed Professional, Courteous

Call for Your Free Consultation Today

215-982-0131

Licensed and Insured in NJ & PA

Professional, Courteous Professional, Courteous Professional, Courteous Professional, Courteous Antiques • Jewelry • Watches • Guitars Professional, Courteous Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, Drywall Repair Professional, Courteous and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed Professional, Courteous Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, andand Drywall Repair and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed Cameras Books • Coins • Artwork and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, Guaranteed andGuaranteed Drywall Repair and 100% Satisfaction and 100% Satisfaction Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, andGuaranteed Drywall Repair and 100% Satisfaction terior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair Interior Painting, Exterior and Drywall Repair Interior Painting, ExteriorPainting, Painting, and Drywall Repair

ior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair nterior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair • Quality Craftsmanship

• Reasonable Rates • Licensed, Bonded & Insured Professional, Courteous Courteous Professional, • Free Estimates and 100%Satisfaction Satisfaction Guaranteed and 100% Guaranteed • Popcorn Ceiling Repair Professional, Courteous Professional, Courteous Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, Painting, and Repair Interior Painting, Exterior andDrywall Drywall Repair •100% Cabinet Painting and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed and Satisfaction Guaranteed • Painting, Power Washing Decks/Home Interior Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair • Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper • Deck Sealing/Staining •Quality Craftsmanship •Quality Craftsmanship •Reasonable Rates (609) 799-9211 •Reasonable •Licensed, Bonded Rates & Insured •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •FreeCraftsmanship Estimates www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Quality •FreeCraftsmanship Estimates •Quality •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Reasonable Rates LicenseInstallation # 13VH047 •Popcorn Ceiling & Repair •Cabinet Resurfacing •Reasonable Rates •Quality Craftsmanship •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •Cabinet Resurfacing •Quality Craftsmanship •Power Washing Decks/Home •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •Reasonable Rates •Free Estimates • Quality Craftsmanship •Decks/Home Cabinet Resurfacing •Power Washing •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper •Reasonable Rates •Free Estimates • Reasonable Rates • Power Washing •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Licensed, Bonded & of Insured • Quality Craftsmanship • Cabinet Resurfacing •Deck Sealing/Staining •Wall Resurfacing/Removal Wallpaper ••Popcorn Licensed, Bonded &Bonded •Quality Craftsmanship • Reasonable Rates • Decks/Home Power Washing Ceiling Installation & Repair •Licensed, & Insured •Cabinet Resurfacing •Quality Craftsmanship •Free Estimates •Deck Sealing/Staining InsuredBonded • Rates Wall Resurfacing/ •Reasonable • Licensed, & Craftsmanship Decks/Home •Quality (609) 799-9211 •Power Washing Decks/Home •Cabinet Resurfacing •FreeBonded Estimates • Free Estimates of & Wallpaper •Popcorn Ceiling Installation Repair •Reasonable Rates Insured • Removal Wall Resurfacing/ •Licensed, & Insured •Reasonable Rates www.fivestarpaintinginc.com (609) 799-9211 • Popcorn Ceiling • Deck Sealing/Staining •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper •Power Washing Decks/Home • Free Estimates Removal of Wallpaper •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Cabinet Resurfacing •Free Estimates •Licensed, Bonded & Insured Installation & Repair •Licensed, Bonded &Sealing/Staining Insured www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Deck Sealing/Staining License # 13VH047 • Popcorn Ceiling • Deck •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Power Washing Decks/Home •Quality Craftsmanship •Cabinet Resurfacing •Free Estimates Installation & Repair •Free Estimates •Deck Sealing/Staining

Over 30 Years Experience

Diamonds • Furniture • Unique Items Daniel Downs, Owner

Erick Perez

Fully insured 15+ Years Experience Call for free estimate Best Prices

You Can’t Find Your Town Topics Newspaper? •Quality Craftsmanship •Quality Craftsmanship Come visit our office atRates 4438 Routh 27 North •Reasonable Rates •Quality Craftsmanship •Reasonable •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •Cabinet Resurfacing License # 13VH047 inCeiling Kingston, where you can purchase a copy •Reasonable (609) 799-9211 •Popcorn Installation & Repair •Reasonable Rates •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper •Power Washing Decks/Home •Quality Craftsmanship (609) 799-9211 •Licensed, &Rates Insured •Power Washing Decks/Home Bonded •Free Estimates •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Cabinet Resurfacing •Licensed, Bonded &ofInsured •Quality Craftsmanship www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Deck Sealing/Staining (609) 799-9211 •Reasonable Rates www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper •Wall Resurfacing/Removal Wallpaper for 75 cents (3Repair quarters required) (609) 799-9211 •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •Free Estimates •Power Washing Decks/Home •Cabinet Resurfacing •Free Estimates •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & •Deck Sealing/Staining •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •Quality Craftsmanship www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Deck Sealing/Staining www.fivestarpaintinginc.com # 13VH047 •Wall Resurfacing/Removal ofLicense Wallpaper •Reasonable Rates •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair from our coin-operated newspaper boxes, (609) 799-9211 •Free Estimates •Power Washing Decks/Home •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Cabinet Resurfacing •Free Estimates •Deck Sealing/Staining (609) 799-9211 •Cabinet Resurfacing License # 13VH047 •Reasonable Rates www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Popcorn Ceiling Installation &a Repair •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper (609) 799-9211 •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •Power Washing Decks/Home www.fivestarpaintinginc.com 24 hours day/7 days a week. •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Cabinet Resurfacing •Power Washing Decks/Home (609) 799-9211 •Cabinet Resurfacing •Deck Sealing/Staining www.fivestarpaintinginc.com License # 13VH047 •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper •Licensed, Bonded & Insured www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Power Washing Decks/Home •Free Estimates •Cabinet Resurfacing •Power Washing Decks/Home •Deck Sealing/Staining •Deck Sealing/Staining # 13VH047 •Wall Resurfacing/Removal ofLicense Wallpaper License # 13VH047 •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper (609) 799-9211 •Power Washing Decks/Home •Free Estimates •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Deck Sealing/Staining (609) 799-9211 www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Deck Sealing/Staining •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper (609) 799-9211 www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Cabinet Resurfacing •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair (609) 799-9211 License # 13VH047 www.fivestarpaintinginc.com License # 13VH047 •Deck Sealing/Staining •Power Washing Decks/Home www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Cabinet Resurfacing (609) 799-9211 License # 13VH047 License # 13VH047 •Wallwww.fivestarpaintinginc.com Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper •Power Washing Decks/Home (609) 799-9211 •Deck Sealing/Staining •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper www.fivestarpaintinginc.com License # 13VH047

B

FIREWOOD SPECIAL

TR

Seasoned Premium Hardwoods Split & Delivered $240 A cord / $450 2 cords Offer good while supplies last

Stacking available for an additional charge

BRIAN’S TREE SERVICE 609-466-6883

60

609-915-2969 Trees & Shrubs

Trimmed, Pruned, and Removed Stump Grinding & Lot Clearing

LocallyOperated Owned & Operated for for overOver 20 years! 25 years! Locally Owned and

Trimm Stum

Locally Owned & Op

License # 13VH047

License # 13VH047

License # 13VH047

CALL 609-924-2200 TO PLACE YOUR AD HERE


35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2024

Elm Road

Katies Pond Road

Introducing: Cherry Valley Road

Princeton, NJ | $3,950,000

Princeton, NJ | $3,800,000

Hopewell Township, NJ | $3,400,000

Maura Mills: 609.947.5757

Norman ‘Pete’ Callaway: 609.558.5900

Princeton Office: 609.921.1050

callawayhenderson.com/id/4R8WP5

callawayhenderson.com/id/BZNX5Y

callawayhenderson.com/id/GS4W93

Avery Lane

Olden Lane

Princeton Kingston Road

Princeton, NJ | $2,999,000

Princeton, NJ | $2,750,000

Princeton | $2,095,000

Michael Monarca: 917.225.0831

Barbara Blackwell: 609.915.5000

Maura Mills: 609.947.5757

callawayhenderson.com/id/32JNBT

callawayhenderson.com/id/9B3Z73

callawayhenderson.com/id/QJQMCJ

Realtor® Owned

Newly Priced: Library Place

Introducing: Parkside Drive

Great Road

Princeton, NJ | $1,995,000

Princeton, NJ | $1,435,000

Montgomery Township, NJ | $899,000

Pamela C Gillmett: 609.731.1274

Barbara Blackwell: 609.915.5000

Stephen Thomas: 609.306.4030

callawayhenderson.com/id/GMKVVK

callawayhenderson.com/id/C326ZL

callawayhenderson.com/id/T2LLPS

Introducing: Marten Road

Introducing: Bayard Lane

Newly Priced: Lovers Lane

Montgomery Township, NJ | $524,000

Princeton, NJ | $462,900

Princeton, NJ | $409,000

Aniko Molnar Szakolczai: 609.651.1840

Robin McCarthy Froehlich: 609.731.4498

Martha Moseley: 609.529.0421

callawayhenderson.com/id/J3JY9Q

callawayhenderson.com/id/B5WELF

callawayhenderson.com/id/ZW9NV7

callawayhenderson.com 609.921.1050 | 4 NASSAU STREET | PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08542 Each office is independently owned and operated. Subject to errors, omissions, prior sale or withdrawal without notice.


Congratulations

TO OUR NJ REALTORS ® CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE AWARD ® WINNERS We are thrilled to celebrate the Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty agents who received the NJ REALTORS® Circle of Excellence Sales Award® for 2023. While we have many top agents who were extraordinarily successful this past year, we congratulate those here who chose to apply for this prestigious award.

Kathryn Baxter

Jennifer E. Curtis

Maura Mills

PLATINUM

PLATINUM

PLATINUM

Susan L. DiMeglio

Yalian “Eileen” Fan

Cynthia Shoemaker-Zerrer

Linda Twining

GOLD

GOLD

GOLD

GOLD

Barbara Blackwell

Michelle Blane

Amy Granato

Danielle Spilatore

SILVER

SILVER

SILVER

SILVER

Lauren Adams

Nina S. Burns

Susan Hughes

Ira Lackey, Jr.

BRONZE

BRONZE

BRONZE

BRONZE

Alana Lutkowski

Clare Mackness

Debra McAuliffe

Sylmarie Trowbridge

BRONZE

BRONZE

BRONZE

BRONZE

callawayhenderson.com 609.921.1050 | 4 NASSAU STREET | PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08542 Each office is independently owned and operated.


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