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Volume LXXV, Number 8

Camp Guide Pages 17-20 Bletchley Park Code Breakers in “Sundays At the Sarnoff” . . . . . . . 5 Council Updated on Plans For Streetscape, Traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Poetry's Bright Star — 200 Years Later John Keats Shines On . . . . . . . . . . 13 Passage Theatre Presents Online Reading Of Babel . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Senior Henderson Relishing Final Season with PDS Girls’ Hockey . . . . . . . . 26 Using Qualities Gained From Football, Smith Starring for Hun Boys’ Hoops . . . . . . . . 28

All in a Day’s Work With Mijin Kim of the Kingston Deli . . . . . . . . 11 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 21 Classified Ads . . . . . . 31 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 12 New to Us . . . . . . . . . . 22 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 30 Performing Arts . . . . . 15 Police Blotter . . . . . . . . 8 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 31 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

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Health Department Leads the Way, As COVID Cases Drop The Princeton Health Department reported on Monday, February 22, only two new cases of COVID-19 in the previous seven days and 15 new cases in the previous 14 days. The highest totals in Princeton were 39 for seven days and 66 for 14 days, both recorded in mid-December. “The Princeton Health Department began seeing a decline in the number of new cases in December, where we were seeing an average of more than 50 new cases every two weeks at the height of the second wave,” said Princeton Health Officer Jeff Grosser. “We are now closing in on fewer than 10 new cases every two weeks. There is discussion of increased vaccinations and seasonality of the virus being two main factors in these declines.” Grosser emphasized the importance of continued mask wearing, physical distancing, and staying home when feeling unwell. “We stand at a period in the pandemic where declining case counts, increasing vaccinations, and continued responsible prevention behaviors are showcasing hope in the face of what has been nearly a year of the COVID-19 pandemic,” he said. Also on February 22, New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy, citing positive trends in infection rates and continuing improvement in the pace of vaccinations statewide, announced an easing of restrictions on capacity limits for churches and houses of worship and on attendance at professional and college sports. Religious services will be able to operate at 50 percent of the capacity of the room where they are held. Services were previously limited to 35 percent of the room capacity with a cap of 150, which has been lifted. Masking and social distancing are required. Collegiate sports can now allow up to two parents or guardians for each participating athlete with the total number of spectators present not to exceed 35 percent of the capacity of the room. Effective March 1, large sports and entertainment venues with seating capacity of 5,000 or more will be permitted to host individuals up to 10 percent of capacity indoors and 15 percent of capacity outdoors. Social distancing and masks, except when eating or drinking, will be required. New Jersey’s seven-day average for new cases, as of February 22, was down Continued on Page 8

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Council Attempts to Repair Affordable Housing Settlement In an effort to emend a situation that leaves open the possibility of new housing projects being built without setting aside 20 percent of the units for affordable housing, Princeton Council is looking for a way to close the loophole and ensure that affordable units are included in new developments. The set-aside requirement was part of an agreement last year in which the municipality settled a five-year lawsuit with the advocacy group Fair Share Housing. But during a recent meeting of the town’s Site Plan Review Advisory Board, it was revealed that the requirement, which was in place in what was formerly Princeton Borough before consolidation with the former Township, was no longer in effect. Council members first believed that the requirement was inadvertently left out. But they have since determined that it was omitted on purpose. “The change was made intentionally by the consultants who were helping us reach the agreement and draft the new ordinances,” Councilman David Cohen said on Tuesday. “It was not clear to the members of Council that the Borough requirement was being eliminated. It was done because apparently there is more recent legislation,

which we’re still trying to nail down exactly, that made the old Borough rule no longer in conformance with state law. The rule had been that any property that was developed with more than five units had to provide 20 percent affordable. Apparently, there were changes in state law instituted after that was passed. We’re still waiting for details from our attorney.” As it now stands, the 20 percent setaside applies only to development applications that require variances. So if a project application conforms to zoning

regulations, it is not required to include affordable units. “As soon as you ask for a density variance you lose the exemption,” Cohen said. To fix the problem, revising the comprehensive affordable housing ordinance was originally considered. “But the likelihood is that the ordinance won’t be revised, because the way it was written was intentional in order to be aligned with current rules at the state level,” Cohen said. “So we can’t change it. It was a knee-jerk Continued on Page 8

Carol Kelley Will be New Superintendent, Chosen to Lead Princeton Public Schools In a February 18 special meeting that Princeton Public Schools (PPS) Board of Education (BOE) President Beth Behrend described as “for a change, all about excitement and hope for the future,” the BOE, in a “unanimous and enthusiastic” vote, welcomed Carol L. Kelley as the new superintendent of the district. Pending approval by the county superintendent, Kelley will begin her tenure on July 1, 2021, when Interim Superintendent Barry Galasso will step down. Galasso has been at the helm since July 1, 2020, when he succeeded the previous

superintendent Steve Cochrane. The BOE members, who have been engaged in the search process over the past year, all spoke up at the hour-long meeting to welcome Kelley, to express their enthusiasm to begin working with her, and to comment on the qualities that led them to select her to lead the PPS. She will receive a four-year contract at $240,000 per year. Kelley has served in education for 27 years, with advanced degrees in education and business and work as Continued on Page 9

ON THE HUNT: Passers-by searched for new titles outside Labyrinth Books on Nassau Street on Sunday . Book lovers share what they have read during the pandemic in this week’s Town Talk on page 6 . (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2021 • 4

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dating from 1884, has its few of the efforts, which inHonors in Lambertville For Historic Preservation original architectural de- cluded repointing brick us-

The Lambertville Historical Society (LHS) has been giving the Narducci Preservation award since 1996 to recognize historical preservation of restoration of buildings in the town. The bronze plaque honors Alice Narducci, a founding society member who was instrumental in saving the Marshall House from demolition in the 1960s. Two more sites have been added to the LHS list of 47 properties. The first, a twin home on Delevan Street

tails. The owners on both sides worked to restore it through historically accurate paint and other improvements continuing the integrity and symmetry of a single home. The second, a 200-yearold brick structure in Lambertville’s downtown, underwent a major rehabilitation. At the LHS January meeting during which the awards were announced, owner Joseph Caprio of North Union Street Holdings LLC described only a

ing special lime/sand mortar mix with a custom-built small trowel. Portland cement was not introduced in the United States until 1875 so he specifically matched the mortar mix more commonly used around 1820. Caprio also returned historically accurate custommade, fully operable shutters to the building along with hardware appropriate to the period. To read more about these projects, visit lambertvillehistoricalsociety.org.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Love Your Park Day Rescheduled: Friends of Princeton Open Space has rescheduled this event, which was originally planned for February 13, to Saturday, March 6. There will be two sessions, from 9 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. Visit fopos. org for details. COVID-19 Vaccine: For the latest information on receiving the vaccine, visit covid19.nj.gov/pages/vaccine or princetonnj.gov/282/Coronavirus-COVID-19-Information. Vaccination Hotline: New Jersey’s COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center is staffed daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (855) 568-0545 for questions about registering with the New Jersey Vaccine Scheduling System, finding vaccine locations, and more. Free COVID Tests: At-home test kits are available for Mercer County residents ages 14 and older. Email HomeTesting@mercercounty.org with questions. Online registration is required. Princeton Health Department has partnered with Navus Health to provide free testing to underinsured and uninsured Princeton residents. Also, Sante Integrative Pharmacy at 200 Nassau Street offers free testing MondayThursday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (609) 921-8820. Volunteers Needed for Cannabis Task Force: The municipality needs volunteers to help gather input on questions regarding cannabis in Princeton. Apply by March 1. Email questions to Councilwomen Eve Niedergang, Leticia Fraga, or Michelle Pirone Lambros. Princetonnj.gov. Princeton Perks Discount Cards: For $25 each, this card provides a discount (usually 10 percent) to local shops and restaurants through the end of the year. The program is a fundraiser for students and teachers in Princeton Public Schools. Purchase by February 28 at princetonperks.com.


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Due in part to the 2014 film The Imitation Game, the story of British mathematician Alan Turing and his work cracking the Enigma code is familiar to many. Less well known, though portrayed in a 2012 television series The Bletchley Circle, is the effort put forth by thousands of women who

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Bletchley Park Code Breakers In “Sundays at the Sarnoff”

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UNSUNG HEROINES: The code breakers and wireless operators at Britain’s Bletchley Park during World War II included thousands of women, whose expert knowledge helped end the war. They are the focus of a virtual talk this Sunday.

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worked on this secret mission at Bletchley Park, a stately home in Britain, during World War II. Joseph Jesson will bring their stories to light this Sunday, February 28 during a 1 p.m. Zoom talk, “Unsung WWII Code Breakers and Y-Operator Heroines of Bletchley Park.” Part of the “Sundays at the Sarnoff” series presented by The College of New Jersey (TCNJ), where Jesson is an adjunct professor of electronic and computer engineering, the program will also focus on his research into the RCA AR88 World War II interception receivers. The interception of German encrypted w irele s s com mu n ic at ion allowed Bletchley Park to process t hese messages into plain text. The RCA AR88 was designed at the company’s headquarters in Camden. “Churchill called it his ‘secret jewel’ in the war against the Nazis,” Jesson said. “The technology was that valuable.”

Park first took place in 1938. According to the website bletchleypark.org.uk, “On 18 September 1938, a small group of people moved into the mansion under the cover story that they were a shooting party. They had an air of friends enjoying a relaxed weekend together at a country house. They even brought w ith them one of the best chefs from the Savoy Hotel to cook their food. Behind the cover were members of MI6 and the Government Code and Cypher School (GC & CS), a secret team including a number of scholars and academics turned codebreakers. As tensions in Europe peaked, Admiral Sinclair, director of GC & CS and SIS, had

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TOPICS Of the Town A few years ago, Jesson did some research about RCA’s development of the technology. “I followed the story from the design of the receiver and its use in Bletchley Park, and it turns out there are a lot of interesting things that are pretty stunning,” he said. “Out of 10,000 to 12,000 people working there, 8,000 were women. This turned into a really cool story. I realized what they were doing, and what their different roles were inside and outside of Bletchley Park to intercept worldwide Nazi communication.” Turing developed the first computer in the world especially for code-cracking. “He was the so-called hero, which of course he is,” Jesson said. “But he couldn’t have pulled it off without two of his closest experts.” One of the experts was Gordon Welchman. “When Turing’s computers didn’t work, he’d go to him,” Jesson said. The other was Joan Clarke, to whom Turing was briefly engaged. “In fact, she was an equal code-cracker to him. These were the two experts he went to see and get his answers.” Code-breaking at Bletchley

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activated their War Station: Bletchley Park. The group’s job was to set up and run intelligence activity from Bletchley Park.” Jesson views the stories of Bletchley Park as motivational. “I’m filling in the blanks of all of these unsung heroes,” he said. “It wouldn’t have worked without them. They were not only encrypting messaging, but they were in Morse code. They had to solve all these problems. A lot of the women were ham radio operators. They were the first pick on the list. They were looking for pure talent, and people who were smart. They started with people who knew Morse code, and then set up schools quickly. How they got these operators up to speed is a part of my story that hasn’t been much reported.” Jesson is currently president and chief technology officer of RFSigint Group, a wireless and patent consulting company in Hamilton Square. He has worked in engineering and technology management at Motorola, CNA, Oak, and Amoco/BP in Chicago, and is a co-founder of Asset Intelligence, a General Electric corporation. He was awarded the General Electric Edison Prize in 2007. In addition to his teaching duties at TCNJ, Jesson is Princeton Life Chair of IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers). He has been awarded more than 15 patents. He has volunteered his considerable skills to help with communications during extreme weather and other emergency situations, and he hopes to pass on the value of knowing these technologies at the Zoom event. “There’s a message there, that this is a powerful skill for young people to learn,” he said. “You can get a license and do this yourself. The other takeaway is just the idea that there are quite a few positions for women in technology. Bletchley is a great story that shows the power of what you can accomplish. Don’t let anybody put you down, and learn all you can learn, even under a trying time.” Visit davidsarnoff.tcnj.edu for registration information. —Anne Levin

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What was your favorite book read during the pandemic?” (Photos by Charles R. Plohn)

“I’ve really enjoyed reading travel and leisure magazines, because it is really nice to kind of plan ahead for the future and think about destinations to go to after COVID. I’m thinking about doing a trip out West to visit National Parks, and I really want to go to Corsica, Sicily, and Sardinia.” —Jessica Sauer, Lawrenceville

“I have been reading a lot of Young Adult fiction and nonfiction books. I really enjoyed The 57 Bus, which is about an incident in the Bay Area in California. I also enjoyed Dear Evan Hansen. Currently I am reading The Mountains Sing by a Vietnamese author, Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai, and that was after finishing The Best We Could Do by Thi Bui.” —Jacquelyn Do, Garden Grove, Calif.

Troy: “It’s called The Ultimate Book of Wisdom: A Guide to Spiritual and Financial Prosperity by LaFoy Orlando Thomas III, Esq. It’s inspirational and getting me on the track of spiritual and financial guidance. For fun, I have also been reading Children of Virtue and Vengeance by Tomi Adeyemi.” Christian: “Today at Labyrinth Books I picked up this art book called If It’s Not Funny It’s Art by Demetri Martin. It’s just a short little comic book of daily musings. And this book by Martin Duberman gives a comprehensive history of the Stonewall riots and the beginning of the LGBTQ rights movement.” —Troy Bardon with Christian Catiis, both of Plainsboro

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Chris: “This morning I finished Long Live the Tribe of Fatherless Girls, and that was a beautiful book. And I am just about finished with a book about Warren Zevon, I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead.” Jacque: “Currently I am reading Is the Internet Changing the Way You Think? I also really enjoyed an adventure novel called The Asiatics by Frederic Prokosch.” —Chris Harford, Princeton with Jacque Hoffman, Brooklyn, N.Y.

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Jalpa: “I read a lot of books, including Sapiens: A Brief History of Mankind by Yuval Noah Harari and American Gods by Neil Gaiman, and in between I read a lot by Jodi Picoult.” Diashay: “I really like books about World War II. I’ve been reading Allies by Alan Gratz, and I also read Grenade by Alan Gratz.” —Jalpa Ubadhyay with Neha and Diashay Barekh, all of Plainsboro


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3 percent from a week ago and 36 percent from a month ago. Numbers of New Jersey hospital patients with COVID, at 2,023, the lowest number since November 12, are down 48 percent from a December 22 peak of 3,872 according to the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH). The statewide transmission rate dropped Sunday for the third straight day and was at 0.86, significantly below the number 1 that indicates a slowing of the outbreak. As of Monday, the state had administered 1,676,496 COVID vaccine doses, 509,373 of those second doses, the NJDOH reported. Grosser pointed out that the Princeton Health Department has successfully scheduled nearly 600 residents for vaccinations at either local community clinics or regional county locations. “The good news is that the number of residents being vaccinated is increasing each day,” he said. “This is indicated by the number of emails we receive daily regarding those receiving doses outside of our allotment. Over 500 residents have informed us that they have received vaccinations elsewhere. This is a good sign in just two months of vaccine distribution to have about a third of our eligible waitlist already vaccinated.” The health department is requesting that residents email healthdepartment@princetonnj.gov if they were registered on the waitlist and have received a shot elsewhere. Grosser emphasized progress made with many of Princeton’s most vulnerable residents. “As a department, our greatest achievement in the pandemic thus far has been connecting Princeton’s most vulnerable to health services they so greatly need,” he wrote in an email. “Particularly in those instances where family members are calling on behalf of a parent and/or aunt or uncle. And they’re often calling from out of state checking in on how to get their loved one a lifesaving vaccine. These instances fulfill our mission.” Grosser went on to report that the Princeton Health Department has vaccinated 800 people to date, including a 500-person second dose clinic operated out of the Suzanne Paterson Princeton Senior Resource Center. “Our local vaccination distribution strategy has gone through continuous improvement to where we are capable of vaccinating nearly 100 people per hour,” he wrote. “With enough vaccine supply, at that rate and based on one to two clinics per week, our office is capable of vaccinating 70 percent of Princeton’s adult population within four months.”

Due to the limited vaccine supply the state will no longer supply vaccines to municipal clinics, and Princeton is currently not holding any new clinics and has no appointments available for the vaccine. Once the supply increases to meet the demand, local health officials will schedule further local clinics. In the meantime the health department will continue to support vaccination efforts underway by assisting the county at the CURE Arena or at Mercer County Community College vaccination sites. Appointments are required at both sites through the New Jersey Vaccine Scheduling System (NJVSS) at covidvaccine.nj.gov. The Princeton Health Department will not be accepting new registrations for the Princeton waitlist. The existing waitlist will be used to identify people to be offered appointments for county-level vaccine clinics. Residents who are able to travel to other sites throughout the state should check the list of vaccine sites throughout the state at covid19.nj.gov and register there for an appointment if available. The Princeton Health Department advises everyone seeking a vaccination to use the state’s centralized registration and to take the first appointment offered. Customer service phone support is also available at (855) 568-0545. In his February 23 email, Grosser made a special point of thanking all of the Princeton Health Depar tment staff for their “tireless, committed work” over the past year. “Although this has been the hardest year of our professional careers, it has also brought public health to light in the community,” he wrote. “The pandemic continues to demonstrate the great need for public health in order to properly protect our communities while maintaining the course of disease prevention.” He continued, “From early days of contact tracing to navigating school and business reopening, first waves and second waves of cases, and now vaccine deployment, the Princeton Health Department continues to serve the community in any way necessary.” Grosser also cited the contributions of Princeton’s elected officials “who acted quickly in the face of adversity during many periods of unknowns.” He pointed out that getting the health department the necessary resources and specifically hiring a full-time public health nurse to more fully investigate new COVID cases and perform contact tracing, and performing vaccinations, all helped Princeton to have fewer cases than other towns of the same size. —Donald Gilpin

Affordable Housing continued from page one

reaction at first, but it’s not the appropriate response.” Instead, the Council is tr ying to figure out how many other properties in town might be subject to the same exemption. “We’re trying to brainstorm how to make sure they don’t use the exemption,” Cohen said. “Council’s intent is that every developer should have to do affordable housing. There are things we can do to try to close the loophole, property by property. The simplest way is to add properties to our affordable housing plan. There is nothing that stops us from doing that. And we know that in 2025, the third round [of the affordable housing obligation] will be completed and the fourth round will kick in. We know we will need more affordable housing going forward, so it makes sense to add more properties to our plan.” Comments from the community have been less than favorable, Cohen acknowledged. “We’ve heard a lot f rom p eople, who were under the same impres sion we were,” he said. “We were under the impression that the old rule was being extended. We shared that with members of the public, and all the affordable housing advocates in town were relying on that understanding. They’re bent out of shape. So we’re trying to get correct information out there, and make people understand it was done under state law. We’re doing what we can to repair the loss.” —Anne Levin

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On February 12, at 6:51 p.m., a resident of Beech Hill Circle repor ted that someone called him and led him to believe he had a warrant for his arrest in Texas, and deceived him into sending sent $9,100 worth of Bitcoin to the suspect. On February 9, at 9:51 a.m., a woman repor ted dropping her $450 prescription sunglasses in a store on State Road, and when she returned they were not there. On February 5, at 1:09 p.m., a resident of Hodge Road repor ted t hat t wo unknown suspects entered her home, then exited and quickly shut the door. On February 5, at 10:32 a.m., a resident of Castle Howard Court reported that, on February 4, someone entered a local bank and attempted to cash a check using an ID with the resident’s name and date of birth, but with the suspect’s photo. On February 4, a resident of Wilkinson Way reported t hat a suspect pretend ing to be a representative of a computer monitoring company convinced him to provide access to his computer. The suspect logged into a bank account and stole $298,340.89 from the resident.

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superintendent of schools both in Branchburg Township, New Jersey, from 2012 to 2015 and currently in her sixth year as superintendent of the Oak Park Elementary School District 97, a PreK-8 public school district outside of Chicago. The BOE members praised Kelley’s superior qualities as a listener to all voices, as an educational leader with the ability to help PPS narrow the achievement gap for disadvantaged students, as a passionate champion of students, as a consensus builder with a commitment for consensus-building, and also a commitment to databased decision-making. “The most important thing to the Board is achievement for all of its students,” said BOE member Dafna Kendal. “There has been a persistent gap in opportunity in our district for students of color, students from homes with lower socio-economic status, and students with special needs. It is long past due that we focus on narrowing these gaps. Dr. Kelley has experience and success in helping all students succeed. We are confident that Dr. Kelley will help us narrow these gaps. Beyond a doubt she was the best candidate for this position.” BOE member Daniel Dart, noting Kelley’s educational leadersh ip and com m itment to students, cited her engagement with the Oak Park community, intervention systems she initiated to help students catch up, and her development of “a great team, super-supportive of each other.”

Carol L. Kelley BOE members repeatedly praised Kelley’s listening and consensus-building sk ills and her focus on evidence-based decisionmaking. “I’m thrilled to be able to present you to our community and say this is what leadership looks like,” said BOE member Michele Tuck-Ponder. In responding to the Zoom m e e t i ng a n nou ncem ent, Kelley expressed her happiness at moving back to New Jersey and joining “this amazing school community.” She raised her sons, Jordan and Austin, in Montgomery Township. Kelley said that she looks forward to coming to Princeton to “continue the legacy of excellence and also stitching a new garment, one that fits each and every one of our students.” She continued, responding to the welcoming remarks from the BOE. “If there’s one thing that you heard about me when you talked to my references it’s that I’m a really strong advocate for providing opportunities to listen to the voices of the community.” She promised that there would be many opportunities, digital and/or in-person, to meet with her.

“I want to listen to your desires,” she continued. “I want to listen to your dreams and hopes for our schools and for our students, and I want to take all of that to heart and connect it with collective actions.” Even more enthusiastic were many community members who weighed in along with members of the schools employees’ unions. “I am ecstatic,” said former Councilman Lance Liverman. “I’m not just happy. I’m ecstatic. Your coming here means so much to all of us. During this time of depression with COVID and isolation, it is good to get good news, and this is great news.” Shirley Satterfield , Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and Cultural Society president, offered Kelley some perspective on the PPS. “Being six generations in Princeton, I’ve seen a lot,” Satterfield said. “I went through the school system when it was segregated, and I just wanted to tell you how far we have come. You have a wonderful Board to work with, and I thank the Board for getting a wonderful person for us.” Councilwoman Mia Sacks, Princeton Council liaison with the BOE, expressed excitement at working with Kelley on future collaborative projects between the town and the schools. Princeton Regional Educational Support Staff Ass o ciat ion C o - P re s ide nt s Eric Karch and Ashante Thompson both welcomed Kelley. “I can’t tell you the excitement right now,” said Thompson. I was in tears. It’s the right time for Princ-

eton to do this. The buzz is in the community already, in the minority community, and everyone is excited.” Princeton Regional Educ at i o n A s s o c i at i o n C o Presidents Renee Szporn and John McCann echoed others’ welcoming remarks. “You are so qualified, and we are so excited to have you here,” said Szpor n. “The minority community is ecstatic, and we are ecstatic too.” Riverside Principal Luis Ramirez, who is president of the Princeton Regional Administrators Association, applauded Kelley’s “commitment to equity and educational excellence for all.” He added “We’re here for you. We’re here to help you, and we’re looking forward to building a strong relationship.” Kelley, who was chosen from a group of 13 finalists and semifinalists who were interviewed by the BOE, has served in a wide range of educational leadership positions in addition to leading the Branchburg district from 2012 to 2015 and her six years at the helm in Oak Park from 2015 to the present. She was director of curriculum and instruction for the Hunterdon Central Regional High School District in Flemington, principal of Milltown Elementary School in Bridgewater, K-12 supervisor of mathematics in the Franklin Township Public Schools, assistant principal of Franklin Park Elementary School and Sampson G. Smith Middle School in Franklin Township, and before that a classroom teacher at the Smith Middle School.

After earning her BSE in systems science engineering from the University of Pennsylvania and an MBA from the University of Virginia, Kelley began her career working on cell phones and smart card technology for Bell Atlantic, then developing marketing strategy and packaging in the advanced care product div ision at Johnson & Johnson. She began teaching in 1994 and earned an Ed.D. in organizational and educational leadership from the University of Pennsylvania in 2005. At Oak Park, Kelley reorganized administration to promote the effectiveness of school principals and created new positions to support achievement, equity, and inclusion, according to a PPS news release. She led the implementation of standardized math and literacy curricula in the early grades and promoted the use of research in decisions about curriculum and teaching materials. She expanded the co-teaching model in the Oak Park elementary schools to include special education students and redesigned the gifted program to enhance equity. Ke l l e y a l s o p a s s e d a comprehensive racial and educational equity policy at Oak Park and developed programs to help eliminate opportunity gaps. She partnered with the National Equity Project, supporting a district Equity Design Team to improve the experiences of African American students. She increased the percentage of new teacher hires of color by 37 percent. Kelley has ser ved as a

member of the Executive Board of the Minority Student Achievement Network and the National Equit y Project’s Midwest Network. She is a fellow of the Racial Equity Leadership Network of the Southern Education Foundation and an active m e mb e r of A A SA : T h e School Superintendents Association. “We are delighted to have identified such a talented and accomplished educator to lead the Princeton Public Schools at this crucial time,” said Behrend. “We remain committed to the pursuit of equity and academic excellence in an environment that supports the success of all of our students, preparing them for lives of joy and purpose. Dr. Kelley shares our vision and values; her passion, intellect, and experience will help us deliver on this commitment, benefiting our students for years to come.” Sustaining the celebratory note as she closed the meeting, Behrend added, “We have a path. We have a journey. Today is the first step, and we’re so glad to have all this good will from the community.” —Donald Gilpin

9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2021

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Council Updated on Plans For Streetscape and Traffic Dur ing a work session at its Februar y 16 meeting, Princeton Council was updated on a master plan to improve Wit herspoon Street between Nassau and Green streets, and possible changes at the two main traffic signals in the downtown. The meeting also included passage of an ordinance for modification of bicycle parking; the introduction of an ordinance adding a third member to the Affordable Housing Board ; and establishment of a Vision Zero task force dedicated to eliminating traffic crashes that result in serious injuries and death. David Goldfarb, chair of the Princeton Sewer Operating Committee, made his annual presentation to the governing body, speaking strongly of the need for more resources. “The mayor and Council must devote more of Princeton’s resources to sewers,” Goldfarb said. “The system is in disrepair. Princeton’s aging system demands a greater commitment. The sewer management position remains unfilled.” The illegal dumping scheme revealed in 2019 was “a clear warning,” Goldfarb added. “We must have increased staffing in order to maintain the system properly. S ewers are an essent ial part of our infrastructure. You are responsible for them.” Mayor Mark Freda said a c o m m i t te e s h o u l d b e formed to meet with the town’s sewer design engineer, Andrew Filippi. Since Council approved an ordinance to make traffic one way going north between Nassau and Spring streets last December, the tow n’s E n g i n e e r i n g D e partment has been working with traffic consultants and the Historical Preservation Commission (HPC) to develop the plan, said Municipal Engineer Deanna Stockton. McMahon Associates Transportation Engineers has been reviewing the traffic signal at Nassau Street, Washington Road, and Vandeventer Avenue to tr y and move vehicles t h r o u g h m o r e q u i c k l y. Cha nge s to prov ide p e d e s t r i a n s m or e t i m e to get across the intersection have had mixed results. “ We h ave m ad e g r e at strides with pedestrians, but there has been an impact on traffic movement,” Stockton s aid. “We w ill make a recommendation to the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) to save 12 seconds on the timing on Washington and Vandeventer.” Freda commented that if the signal at Nassau Street is changed, there must be some educational signage advising pedestrians who are cross-

ing diagonally. Also being evaluated is a proposal to switch South Tulane Street from one-way going north to one -way going south. The change would create a clockwise rotation of traffic and relieve some of the pressure off Vandeventer Avenue. Freda said that buildings on Spring Street are too close to the street to allow for tr ucks to t ur n safely. “Are there somehow people t hat believe t hat with the buildings being so close, that somehow you’ll get traffic past the sightlines and not have collisions? ” asked Freda. “I’m just voicing serious concern. This just seems to be a recipe for disaster to me. I’m not saying it’s impossible, I’m just saying it better be really well thought out.” Stockton responded that pedestrian safety was the focus. “In a few weeks, we anticipate having information to meet with local businesses and proper t y owners in that corridor,” she said. The NJDOT also has a project to replace the signal at Witherspoon and Nassau streets, which will come to Council next month. The changes would involve curb extension and bump-outs, possibly in front of Princeton University’s FitzRandolph G ate or Ham ilton Jewelers. Stockton said she is working with the HSP subcommittee on the idea, because the HSP is usually not in favor of curb extensions or bump -outs. “We will be seeing this again in March and have a discussion as to whether Princeton is in support of such a change,” she said. Show ing render ings of how Wit herspoon Street might look after improvements, Stockton said widths of the roadway range from 20 to 25 feet, allowing for the possibility of it being changed back to two-way traffic if ever needed. No parking spaces will be lost as par t of the plan. The Engineering Department is considering what kinds of pavers to install, making a change from the current asphalt and concrete. Trees and green infrastr ucture along the street would help with stormwater control as well as beautification. The department plans to request Council to make a resolution of support next mont h for t he NJ D OT’s i n te r s e c t i o n c o n c e p t at Nassau and Witherspoon streets. A final design will hopefully be ready for bid by summer or fall, and construction could begin next January. Stockton said she will return in a few months to provide another update. The next meeting of Council is Monday, March 8 at 7 p.m. —Anne Levin

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On Wednesday, March 3 at 7 p.m., local author Mimi Schwartz will take part in a discussion with veteran interviewer Ingrid Reed. “1930 and Today: What Does it Mean to Be a Neighbor?” is a virtual event presented by Princeton Public Library and Labyrinth Books. Ten years after the publication of her original memoir, Good Neighbors, Bad Times, Schwartz received a letter from 88-year-old Max Sayer in South Australia. In 1937, months after Schwartz’s family had fled the Nazis, Sayer’s Catholic family moved into an abandoned Jewish home five houses from where the Schwartz family had lived. Eight y-three years later, Schwartz and Sayer began an ongoing conversation as “virtual neighbors.” Sayer wrote an unpublished memoir about his childhood memories and in Schwartz’s new edition, Good Neighbors, Bad Times Revisited, the two memoirs talk to each other. Weaving excerpts from Sayer’s memoir and her yearlong correspondence with him into her book, Schwartz revisits village history from a new perspective, deepening the discussion of decency and demonization. Schwartz also has a “neighborly” connection with Reed. With her late husband, former Princeton Borough Mayor Marvin Reed, and family, Reed lived four houses from Schwartz and her family in Glen Acres. Their 50-year friendship, which began in the planned integrated Princeton neighborhood, offers a third window to explore the meaning of “neighbor” then and its lessons for people today. To register for the event, visit princetonlibrary.org.

NEW TO THE BOARD: From left are Sonia Delgado, Shannon Mason, and Tonya Woodland, who have recently been named to the Princeton Area Community Foundation’s board of trustees.

Area Community Foundation Relief & Recovery Fund to provides leadership to orrespond to the economic ganizations in transition Appoints Three to Board The Princeton Area Community Foundation has appointed three new members to its board of trustees. Sonia Delgado, a partner at the Princeton Public Affairs Group (PPAG ); Shannon Mason, a Trenton pastor, strategy consultant, and leadership coach; and Tonya Woodland, an assistant vice president at the Commonwealth Fund, will serve three-year terms on the board. “We welcome the new trustees, who will bring extensive nonprofit, strategic, and management experience to the board,” said A nthony “Skip” Cimino, the board chair. “They join an extraordinarily talented board, whose members are dedicated to helping our communities thrive.” The three women were appointed to three-year terms on the board of the Community Foundation, which is celebrating 30 years of using the power of philanthropy to help communities thrive. Since 1991, the Community Foundation has awarded more than $154 million in grants to nonprofits and provided an additional $21 million in suppor t to its nonprofit fundholders. Last year, it created a COVID-19

devastation in our region. Delgado, of Lambertville, previously served as a Community Foundation trustee from 2011 to 2016, and she volunteered last year as a member of the team that evaluated grant applications to the Community Foundation’s COVID-19 Relief & Recovery Fund. This year, Delgado, who grew up in Trenton, will also serve as chair of that grants evaluation team, as well as the chair of the Committee on I mpac t, wh ich prov ide s oversight of the Community Foundation’s responsive and strategic grantmaking programs and services. She is a member of the board of L atinas United for Political Empowerment Political Action Committee (LUPE PAC) and previously served on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New Jersey Initiatives Advisory Committee, and the boards of Greater Trenton Behavioral HealthCare and Oaks Integrated Care. She is also the former interim chairperson of the board of trustees of UMDNJ. Mason, of Trenton, holds a Ph.D. in counseling psychology. Her work centers on aligning organizational values and practices. She

and coaches leaders on organizational effectiveness. Mason previously served as executive director of Mercer Street Friends, and she is currently an advisor to the Bunbury Fund at the Community Foundation. Woodland, of West Windsor, is the vice president, administration at the Commonwealth Fund where she oversees human resources, IT, facilities, budget development, and organizational culture initiatives. A Trenton native, Woodland has significant nonprofit experience, having previously served as the senior director of HR and organizational development at the Henry J. Austin Health Center in Trenton, service area director of the Office of Emergency and Communit y Ser v ices for Catholic Charities Diocese of Trenton, executive director at Do Something, Inc., and program officer of organizational capacity building at the Philadelphia Foundation. Five other trustees recently completed their terms of service on the board: Eleanor Horne, John Hatch, Marguerite “Mimi” Mount, Justina Nixon-Saintil, and Carolyn Sanderson. Horne was named as PACF’s first trustee emeritus.


11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 24, 2021

All In A DAy’s Work

Mijin Kim: At the Kingston Deli, “every day is a great day”

A

t 8 o’clock on a weekd a y m o r n i n g, t h e Kingston Deli is a busy scene. The regulars, mostly men in their 70s and 80s, are all in their places, one at each of the eight tables spread around the room. They’ve been there for about an hour, and most of them were sitting outside in their cars before that, waiting for the deli to open. There’s coffee drinking and eating breakfast and non-stop discussion of topics ranging from local news to personal reflections on the day ahead to history, politics, and international events. Difficulties in the COVID vaccination rollout seemed to be the main topic on Monday this week, but most of the regulars apparently had succeeded in getting at least one of their two shots. As the dialogue continues, a constant stream of customers — most essential workers, fire department, road crews, construction workers, snow plowers, landscapers, painters, and others who don’t have time to sit down—come in, order at the counter, and take their food and coffee with them. Presiding over the Kingston Deli is a woman named Mijin Kim. At least that’s her real name and the name her Korean friends and family know her by, but to most of the customers she’s known as just Kim, because, she says, her first name is too difficult for Americans to remember. And her Latino customers and employees all know her as Maria, a name given to her when she took Spanish classes in high school. She studies the Spanish language every day, regularly checks her Spanish notes posted on the counter, converses readily in Spanish, and says she is now semi-fluent. The regulars, “Kingstonians not Princetonians” who come every day to the deli on Route 27, feel like a family, Kim says. “They grew up here and went to school together and their kids went to school together, and their grandchildren went to school together —for generations. Maybe they’re attracted to Kingston Deli because it feels like home. Everybody knows everybody here.” She describes the Kingston Deli as “like Cheers without the alcohol. Everybody knows your name.” Kim bought the deli from her uncle, who retired about four years ago. She has worked there for the past 15 years, and for about a dozen years before that she worked with her uncle at a

deli in Hamilton. She explained why she’d rather be operating the Kingston Deli than anything else she can imagine. “To me every day is a great day to come to the deli,” she said, “because I get to see everybody—all my customers, all my regulars. And they tell me how their days are going. Like if they’re having a bad day they talk to me, and I’m like a psychologist, or a bartender. They tell me their problems, and I try to help them.” She continued, “I listen. I think that’s the most important thing. You don’t have that closeness anymore. If you go to a fancy restaurant, they don’t know you. They don’t know your name. They don’t know anything.” The reliable routine, the simplicity, the good food, and the reasonable prices are all attractions of the Kingston Deli, Kim noted. “The most popular sandwich for lunch is called The Kingston — ham, salami, sopressata, mozzarella, roasted peppers, onions, oil, and vinegar,” she said. “Chicken salad, egg salad, and tuna sandwiches are also popular. People like something simple. They don’t want any weird stuff. They want something plain and simple. Lots of places put grapes and raisins and all kinds of fancy stuff in the food, but here it’s just very simple. They have so many choices, but here it’s just plain normal.” She added, “People will sometimes call me and order their sandwiches and they just say, ‘I want my regular.’ That’s how comfortable they are here, and they’ll say, ‘I’d like to have my usual and also my son, my wife, or my daughter.’ I remember the sandwiches. Sometimes they don’t even know their kid’s sandwich or their wife’s sandwich, but I know. That’s the great thing, even a year later.” You can get a sandwich and drink for under $10, she pointed out. “Other places you have to spend $20 or more,” she said. “That’s the difference. Essential workers — they work very hard for their money. It’s sad that they can’t afford to go to places and spend $20 for lunch.” Though she seldom weighs in on the regulars’ discussions, Kim occasionally will intervene. “We have a lot of divisions here,” she said. “All the Republicans sit on the right side and the Democrats on the left. They fight and have arguments, so I have to yell at them and say, ‘No politics and no religion — you can’t talk about that stuff.’

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Since I’m the only woman here, they listen.” Kim, who came to the United States with her parents when she was a young teenager, now lives in Princeton with her husband and twin 12-year-old sons, who attend Princeton Unified Middle School. She has two older sons, who will be graduating from college this year. Aside from the deli her greatest outside interest is yoga. “I do yoga every day for 10 to 20 minutes in the morning before I come to work,” she said. “I love to exercise, but I have to do it on my own now at home because of the pandemic. Before, I took classes.” As far as her sons are con- “EVERYBODY KNOWS YOUR NAME”: Mijin Kim presides over the Kingston Deli on Route 27 in cerned, “I just want them to Kingston. In addition to serving more than 100 customers every day, she describes herself as be happy,” she said. “They “like a psychologist” or “like a bartender,” as she talks with her customers and learns about don’t have to make a lot of their families, their jobs, and their lives. money. As long as they enjoy what they’re doing, I think that’s the most important thing.” She shares that same attitude in her own life, for herself and her customers. “I just want my customers to be happy with our service at the deli,” she said. “That’s the most important thing. Of course, I want to make money, but I’m not here to be rich. I really enjoy what I do.” She continued, ”I don’t like to sit in an office, looking at a screen all day long, looking at a computer. I’m not that person. Here my job is interesting because I get to meet so many different types of people every day. Of course we have regulars, but I get people from all over the country and the world. And they tell me their stories, and I think that’s very interesting.” For the future, as in the past, Kim wants to make sure her customers are happy. “I don’t want to be famous — maybe famous among my customers, but other people — I don’t want to be famous,” she said. According to Robert Brian, a regular who was born in Kingston 84 years ago and has been coming to the Kingston Deli before 7 a.m. every day for decades, Kim is already famous. “We come in, have our coffee and talk,” he said. “Sometimes we eat breakfast. Sometimes we don’t. Sometimes we get a little loud. Not too many people want us hanging around,” he joked, “but she puts up with Princeton Airport, 41 Airpark Road, us. Anything she needs we’ll Princeton, New Jersey 08540 do for her, and she doesn’t forget our birthdays, and on 609-921-3100 holidays she always has little 39N@princetonairport.com donuts and treats for us.” PRINCETON www.princetonairport.com AIRPORT —Donald Gilpin

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Mailbox Thanking Those Who Participated in “Week Of Hope,” and Urging Support of Nonprofits

To the Editor: Many of us value the wonderful work being done here in Mercer County by HomeFront, the organization helping homeless families break the cycle of poverty. Last week, during this time of tremendous economic distress and in the midst of a pandemic, HomeFront offered us an antidote — daily events, volunteer opportunities, and ways of connecting with our neighbors during its annual “Week of Hope.” Those of us who took part learned about the daunting challenges facing so many families, and about the resulting increase in hunger and homelessness in every community in our county, from Trenton to Hamilton to Princeton. We know how expensive housing is in our region — a person earning the minimum wage has to work almost three full-time jobs to be able to afford the average twobedroom rental in New Jersey. This is difficult enough, but the pandemic has erased so many job opportunities, leaving families stranded and facing the loss of their housing. However, we also learned about the efforts of HomeFront and other nonprofits which are working cooperatively to make sure as many families as possible can overcome hunger, homelessness, and other life-altering barriers. I was fortunate to take part in the panel on Homelessness

and Hunger During COVID, along with Connie Mercer, HomeFront’s visionary founder and CEO; Bernie Flynn, CEO of Mercer Street Friends; Emily Lemmerman of the Princeton Eviction Lab; and Sarah Steward, HomeFront’s COO. During the panel, Sarah suggested that each of us tell 10 of our friends, “Did you know that there is hunger in our community, and that there is something we can do about it?” (The Princeton Public Library sponsored and recorded this discussion, which is available on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=daYcQaMohd8.) Thank you to everyone who participated in the “Week of Hope” — we heard such inspiring stories about those working every day to transform lives, and about the strength of the families whom they help. I urge all of us to listen to the panelists’ advice — support these vital nonprofit organizations; donate to them if we are able to do so; and, most importantly, use our voices to amplify their efforts. Only in this way can we, as one community, help families overcome the terrible obstacles that they are facing and instead create lives of hope. GREGORY STANKIEWICZ Jefferson Road

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Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

Books Guthrie, Pynchon Discussed the author of The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, In Feb. 25 Conversation

“Left Pasts, Left Futures” is the topic of a February 25 Crowdcast conversation hosted by Labyrinth B o ok s b e t we e n au t h or s Peter Coviello (Vineland Reread ) and Gustav us Stadler (Woody Guthrie : An Intimate Life ) , a n d Kyla S chuller, aut hor of the forthcoming book, The Trouble with White Women: A Counter-history of Feminism. To register for the 6 p.m. event, visit labyrinthbooks.com. Stadler’s biography has been described in the Los Angeles Review of Books as “an expansive and strikingly unique portrait of a man, not of an immor tal legend.” According to Publishers Weekly, Vineland Reread is a “penetrating and nuanced work of literary criticism … Coviello’s astute and passionate analysis is a pleasure to read.” Coviello is professor of English at the University of Illinois, Chicago, where he specializes in A mer ican literature and queer theory. His books include Tomorrow’s Parties : Sex and the Untimely in Nineteenth-Century America. A professor of English at Haverford College, Stadler is the author of Troubling Minds: The Cultural Politics of Genius in the US, 1840-1890. Schuller is professor in women’s, gender, and sexualit y st udies at Rutgers University. She is

and Science in the Nineteenth Century.

Darwin’s “Descent” is Subject of March 2 Talk

Jeremy DeSilva will join Holly Dunsworth and Augustin Fuentes at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, March 2, for a conversation about his book, A Most Interesting Problem: What Darwin’s Descent of Man Got Wrong About Human Evolution. This Labyrinth Livestream event is cosponsored by Princeton University’s Department of Anthropology and the Princeton University Humanities Council. To register, visit labyrinthbooks.com. A Most Interesting Problem draws on recent discoveries in fields such as genetics, paleontology, bioarchaeology, anthropology, and primatology. Writing in Science, Erika Lorraine Millam comments, “DeSilva’s volume provides a welcome opportunity to reflect on the history of evolutionary theory as a legacy complicated by Darwin’s prescience as well as prejudice.” DeSilva is associate professor of anthropology at Dartmouth College. Dunsworth is professor of anthropology at the University of Rhode Island. Fuentes is professor of anthropology at Princeton University and the author of, among others, Why We Believe: Evolution and the Human Way of Being.

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Poetry’s Bright Star — 200 Years Later John Keats Shines On Though a quarrel in the Streets is a thing to be hated, the energies displayed in it are fine; the commonest Man shows a grace in his quarrel. —John Keats (1795-1821) hy begin a column about friendship, love, death, and poetry with reference to the positive energies displayed in a street quarrel? You might also question the timing of a tribute to the poet of “beauty and truth” and “fellowship divine” when America is still living in the shadow of the monumental lie that led to the January 6th insurrection, not to mention the monumental truth that more Americans have died of the coronavirus in the past year than in two world wars and Vietnam. The fact of the moment is that snow is falling, again, as I write, and that John Keats died in Rome 200 years ago yesterday. And the monumentally unfactual word that comes to mind when watching fresh fallen snow is poetry. If you take some liberties with Keats’s theory that the poet is the most unpoetical of God’s creatures, with no self, foul or fair, no identity, “continually in for and filling some other Body,” sun, moon, sea, then it’s easy to say the poet is the snow, that it’s freshly fallen Keats giving grace and mystery to the day. Five hours later the morning’s poetry has turned to slush and I’m reading “Bright Star,” one of the last poems the unpoetical poet ever completed, a sonnet that begins over our prosaic heads, poetical to a faretheewell, so sculpted and lofty, with “Eremite” pulled out of the poet’s grab bag to rhyme with “night,” and the poetry of falling snow reduced to “a new softfallen mask” to rhyme with “task.” But all the pomp and circumstance vanishes when the poet comes down to earth with the “soft fall and swell” of his fair love’s breast, “Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath, / And so live ever — or else swoon to death.” So ends Jane Campion’s biopic Bright Star (2009), the film and the poem’s last words both beautifully, brokenly uttered by Keats’s grieving Fanny Brawne (Abbie Cornish) as she walks into the snowy dusk on Hampstead Heath. Reading about the poet’s last hours in Robert Gittings’s acclaimed 1968 biography, I was reminded of the most striking scene in the film — the moment Fanny is told of Keats’s death. Rushing from the parlor to the stairs, she holds the bannister for support, she’s lost, she’s falling, turning one way, then another, groping with her hands, helplessly pleading, supplicating, suffocated, bent double, brought to her knees, jabbing one hand toward her chest, calling for help, choking, “I can’t breathe!” Only when she’s being held and lifted and sustained by her mother does the wrenching visceral

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misery of the seizure begin to resemble an the poet’s view of life saved him now in actor’s performative hysteria, except that death.” by now the force of the fit has generated Toward the end, Keats asked Severn if so much breathless momentum there’s he’d ever seen anyone die. If not, “well no relief until the abrupt cut to the next then I pity you poor Severn.” Keats was scene. Seconds later she’s a lone figure thinking of the long days and nights he walking on the snowclad heath, whisper- spent nursing his younger brother, Tom, ing the sonnet so thoughtfully, so tenderly, who had died of consumption. The exthat even the rhetorical formality of the perience that inspired some of the most opening lines live with love as the poet memorable lines in “Ode to a Nightingale” becomes star, night, nature, snow, human (“Where youth grows pale, and spectreshores, mountains and moors. thin, and dies”) almost undoubtedly inA Deathbed Sketch fected Keats with the disease that took For almost a year now I’ve been in coro- his life on February 23, 1821. navirus exile from my desk in Kingston. The Fighter Right now I’m forming a mental picture The “quarrel in the Streets” epigraph of the bulletin board I used to see two to for this column is from Keats’s Decemthree times a week. As work space bulletin ber 12, 1817 letter to his brothers Tom boards go, it’s fairly typical — a calendar and George. Growing up in the rough and (months out of date): photos of cats, wife, tumble East End of London, Keats was son; and son’s artwork (album covers for known for his “violent temperament” and imaginary rock groups). Less typical is “the see-saw of his behaviour ... always the postcard of Joseph Severn’s death- in extremes,” sometimes taking part in bed sketch of Keats fights at school, push-pinned at the where he once atbottom, in my line tacked a teacher. of sight, which is According to Gitwhere I’ve kept it, tings, Keats’s tallwhenever possible, er, longer-limbed even since I bought brother George it, at 19, after visitwould sometimes ing the house where be called on to pin he died. him down until In his biography, his anger “had exRobert Gittings hausted itself.” descr ibes Sever n Another biog“Portrait of John Keats on his death-bed in Rome,” keeping a bedrapher, Nicholas by Joseph Severn (Courtesy of Wikipedia) side vigil “day and Roe, s ays Ke at s night” after “stringmeasured “his poing up a set of canetic ‘reach’ like a dles, so that as one b oxer la n d i ng a guttered it lit the jab,” and thought other.” At 3 a.m. of his long poem on the morning of “Endymion” as a January 28, 1821, bout in the ring, S e ve r n s ke tch e d the “boyish game Keats “to keep at full-length.” himself awake” and “Wherein lies wrote below it, “A “Bright Star” (Co-production United Kingdom-United States-Australia-France; Pathé Renn Productions, Screen Australia, BBC Films, UK Film Council) Happiness?” deathly sweat was on him all this night.” Keats’s head “cast In fact, love and friendship were the a shadow on the wall in the light that subject of the 70 lines of “Endymion” I flickered from the little fireplace with its typed on my high-school-graduation-presdecoration of marble lions.” ent Olympia, along with the Odes “On On the night of February 14, Keats told a Grecian Urn” and “To a Nightingale,” Severn that he wanted his gravestone to and carried in my wallet, to be read durbear the words, “Here lies one whose ing long waits for rides on the road to name was writ in water.” All the while he and from India. The passage from “Endywas holding the large oval carnelian stone mion” that kept me company begins with given to him by Fanny Brawne, “shifting a question, “Wherein lies happiness? ” it from one fevered palm to the other, but The answer is “fellowship divine, / A felnever putting it down.” After February lowship with essence; till we shine, / Full 19, a calm came over him, “astonishing alchemiz’d, and free of space.” What enSevern.” The “ideal of disinterestedness” ergized me had nothing to do with combat Keats had sought “all his mature life in the ring, but the companionable spirit seemed achieved. As he had done in the of lines like “that moment have we stept crisis of life, he now found comfort in the / Into a sort of oneness, and our state / face of death by identifying himself with Is like a floating spirit’s,” leading to “the another person .... His essential belief in chief intensity: the crown of these,” which

is “made of love and friendship, and sits high / Upon the forehead of humanity.” At “the tip-top, / There hangs by unseen film, an orbed drop / Of light, and that is love: its influence, / Thrown in our eyes, genders a novel sense, / At which we start and fret; till in the end, / Melting into its radiance, we blend, / Mingle, and so become a part of it.” The lines that had to be read aloud, where the poetry swept you up like a force of nature, begin (minus the line breaks) — “who, of men can tell that flowers would bloom, or that green fruit would swell to melting pulp, that fish would have bright mail, the earth its dower of river, wood, and vale, the meadows runnels, runnels pebble-stones, the seed its harvest, or the lute its tones, tones ravishment, or ravishment its sweet, if human souls did never kiss and greet?” Something to Fear At 4:25 p.m., rioters outside the Capitol building beat police officers using American flags. Reading this sentence in Monday’s New York Times sent me back to a passage from my Halloween column on Keats’s birthday, October 31, 2018: “My wife and I had been about to take a favorite walk along the lake, it was late afternoon. As we were parking, we saw a group of people heading toward the same path, maybe as many as 20, moving in a straggling line, not quite a parade. Thinking that we’d follow along behind once they’d passed, I was on my way out of the car when my wife urgently motioned for me to get back in. I followed her gaze to a man at the rear of the procession who was carrying a huge American flag and staring right at me. He did not look friendly. The massive flag ended the notion of an innocent nature walk. I got back in the car and we drove to another lakeside spot, saying nothing about what we’d seen until much later. How strange, to think that an American flag could have become something to fear. n the December 1817 letter to his brothers in which Keats wrote about the fine energies of a quarrel in the Street, he observes that “The excellence of every art is its intensity, capable of making all disagreeables evaporate from their being in close relationship with Beauty and Truth.” Note: Disagreeables evaporated for me a few minutes ago when I discovered that Abbie Cornish is not only a gifted actress but a rapper. If you want evidence of Fanny Brawne’s “fine energies,” I recommend a YouTube trip from Bright Star to “Dusk: Way Back Home.” —Stuart Mitchner

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13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2021

FILM/BOOK REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 24, 2021 • 14

Babel

TheaTer review

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A Woman Faces a Painful Choice and a Tough-Talking Stork in “Babel”; Passage Presents an Online Reading of Jacqueline Goldfinger’s Dark Comedy

n Jac q u el i n e G old f i ng e r’s d ark ly comic play Babel, Renee (the main protagonist) exclaims, “What is this, an old episode of Star Trek?” She probably is thinking of a 1992 Star Trek: The Next Generation episode, “The Masterpiece Society.” In that story, the Enterprise crew encounters a colony that has been developed through genetic engineering and selective breeding. Because most episodes of Star Trek take place on a fictional planet in the far-distant future, the concepts it examines tend to be comfortably abstract. Although Babel is set sometime in “the f uture,” G oldfinger str ips away that cushion of remove. The play is set on Earth, much closer to our own time, with characters that are vividly relatable. Babel’s page on the New Play E xchange’s website credits McCarter Theatre with a 2019 developmental reading. The play is the recipient of Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company’s Generations New Play Award, as well as the Smith Prize for Political Theatre. Passage Theatre presented an online reading of Babel from February 18-21. Ticketed viewers were sent links that entitled them to watch the prerecorded video, skillfully directed by Jill Harrison. Babel begins wordlessly; we hear controlled, rhythmic breathing. We then see that it is Renee (who is given an outstanding portrayal by Tai Verley). She an xiously consults a book, and continues her exercises. Her spouse Dani (infused with steely composure by Leah Walton) appears, and soothingly starts singing “Beyond the Sea.” Renee joins her, and it is clear that they often sing it together. We learn that Renee finally has gotten pregnant after trying for eight years, and that an unspecified condition prevents Dani from being the one to give birth. Renee is apprehensive about a medical test that she must undergo the next day. In the play’s dystopian world, there is a “precertification law” that requires all embr yos to be screened for physical, cognitive, and behavioral defects. Renee is distraught at the test results. The physical and cognitive results are acceptable, but the doctor is “concerned about the baby’s behavioral genes” and refuses to issue a certificate. If Renee chooses not to “take the shot” and terminate the pregnancy, the child will be tested again at 18. Unacceptable results at that point banish a person from society. They are forced to live in an “underground village” with constant monitoring, and manual labor as their only career choice. Renee’s state of mind is worsened by a sense that “someone or something” is following her.

Later, in a scene titled “Old Friends,” Renee and Dani visit another couple: Ann, who works with Dani, and seems to have risen in the company with her help; and Ann’s husband, Jamie. Dana Kreitz gives Ann an intense but amiable demeanor, and a penetrating gaze. Griffin Stanton-Ameisen infuses Jamie with debonair, jovial sincerity. Kreitz and Stanton-Ameisen are married in real life, which permits them to share one screen. ( Passage’s website emphasizes that adherence to COVID protocols preclude actors from being “in the same space under any other circumstances.”) This now-rare physical immediacy noticeably enhances the couple’s onscreen chemistry, though to a considerable extent Verley and Walton are able to use powerful line readings to compensate for their socially distant performances. Jamie reveals that Ann, like Renee, is pregnant. Dani’s reaction is to scream and laugh hysterically. Startled by Dani’s outburst, Jamie abruptly glances at his phone, then smiles and gazes in Ann’s direction. Under her screen, a stork’s silhouette appears in a screen of its own. ( Renee whispers to Dani, “I told you I thought someone was following me.”) The stork’s shadow grows until it covers all four screens, its beak pointing ominously at Renee, before it

vanishes. The sequence is an eerie bit of animation. Ann asks whether the tests hurt, and how long it takes the certificate to come through. To Renee’s horror, Dani quickly lies that the baby is pre-certified, even though no paperwork has arrived in the mail due to a “backlog.” Overwhelmed, Renee leaves the room, and Jamie offers to check on her. Ann presses Dani for more details about the couple’s experience with the precertification process. Outside of Ann and Jamie’s home, Renee smokes. The stork appears (infused with a hard-edged, cynical attitude by Stanton-A meisen, in an enter taining dual role). The costume (by Summer Lee Jack) includes eyeholes, prompting Renee to describe the bird as a “mascot.” The stork rudely retorts, “This is why nobody likes you.” Later he adds, “You want to take on society? You want to take on nature, nurture, and the … genetic code itself? ” Renee dismisses the stork as a hallucination; he contradicts her but evaporates again. What makes Verley’s performance so strong, and the stork scenes effective, is that Verley captures Renee’s psychological path from fragile equanimity to painful uncertainty about everything, deftly veering from one to the other. This leads us to ask: is the stork a figment of Renee’s imagination — a manifestation of

her emotional turmoil — or something else? After Dani and Renee go home, Ann and Jamie discuss their own upcoming genetic test. Jamie expresses reservations about the precer tification law. He objects to anyone being “branded at birth” because of less-than-desirable results. Ann coolly replies that “dwindling resources” should not be spent on people who are “unreachable, unpredictable.” During their conversation, Jamie is to our left, while Ann is on our right. For the following scene, in which Renee and Dani also debate the merits of the precertification law, Harrison arranges the screens so that Renee to the left of Dani. This visual parallel is subtle but notable, because the conversations are similar. Renee also has misgivings about the law, and reveals that she could not vote for it (though she abstained rather than vote against it, because Dani supported it.) “Who gets to play God? ” she muses. “Remember Babel? ” “Maybe if God did a better job, we wouldn’t have to play Him,” Dani assertively retorts. “The law is fine; our doctor just made a mistake.” As a business professional, she is convinced that she can use her negotiating skills to compel the doctor to issue a certificate. Next, we see Ann desperately repeating affir mations to herself. “My life skills rating is in the highest percentile,” she quotes. Just as Renee consults her book in the first scene, Ann, frantically looks at her phone to remember what to say next. “My baby’s test results will be perfect!” Ann is a mixture of Renee and Dani. Her apprehensions about her genetic test are similar to Renee’s; but like Dani, she is convinced that she can stay in control of the outcome, through verbal willpower. Babel is a compelling work of speculative fiction, which examines a number of philosophical issues, while remembering to do so through convincing characters. Although the play predates the pandemic, its theme of desperation for a sense of control over unknown circumstances is obviously resonant. ut a sub-theme — established by “Beyond the Sea,” and developed by Brishen Miller’s attractive background design for two scenes set on a beach — cautions against trying to dominate nature too much. The randomness of the sea’s waves illustrates nature’s unpredictability, and Renee’s success in finding peace of mind, and a satisfying resolution, largely will depend on her ability to accept that randomness. —Donald H. Sanborn III

B

“BABEL”: Passage Theatre has presented an online production of “Babel.” Written by Jacqueline Goldfinger and directed by Jill Harrison, the dark comedy is set in a future in which genetic testing may prevent a person from being welcome in mainstream society. Renee (Tai Verley, above) must make a painful decision, with unwanted help from a tough-talking stork. (Photo by Lauren Eliot Photography) For information about Passage Theatre’s upcoming events, visit passage theatre.org.

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MORE BUSKAID: The Princeton Symphony Orchestra continues its Buskaid – A Musical Miracle series with the on-demand  February 26-28 virtual concert “Soulful and Scintillating Solos.” The program, focused on the South African Buskaid Soweto String Ensemble, features a range of music from classical to Rodgers and Hart’s “My Funny Valentine” to South African kwela with solos by Buskaid-trained artists including violinists Mzwandile Twala, Kabelo Monnathebe, and Simiso Radebe, and vocalist Mathapelo Matabane. Buskaid Founder Rosemary Nalden conducts the concert which also features  a performance of Camille Saint-Saëns’ “Wedding Cake” by guest pianist Melvyn Tan, shown here with the ensemble. Tickets are $5 per access link, available at princetonsymphony.org. (Photo by Graham de Lacy)

STAR HARPIST: Alexander Boldachev is a guest soloist in the Princeton Symphony Orchestra’s virtual concert on Sunday, March 7 at 4 p.m.

International Harpist Performs Boldachev is the official Your Home” series. Access artist for Salvi Harps, guest is $15 per unique device With Princeton Symphony

On Sunday, March 7 at 4 p.m., the Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) presents the virtual concert “Puccini & Respighi” featuring Ottorino Respighi’s Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite III and Giacomo Puccini’s I Crisantemi, performed by the orchestra under the baton of Edward T. Cone Music Director Rossen Milanov. Guest harpist Alexander Boldachev performs original compositions for solo harp and arrangements of wellknown works by Bedřich Smetana and Astor Piazzolla. Boldachev performs Smetana’s The Moldau, arranged for harp by Hanuš Trneřek, and Boldachev’s own arrangement of Piazzolla’s Libertango. Also on the program are his 2018 work Triomphe de la Musique, dedicated to Marc Chagall and based on his mural hanging at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York, and a new improvisational work inspired by Princeton University’s motto, Dei sub numine viget (Under God’s Power She Flourishes).

artist of Bolshoi Theater, and founder of the Harp Festival Zurich. Following his solo debut at age 8, he began his international career as a soloist, chamber musician, and composer. He has brought the harp to new audiences throughout 35 countries and five continents. As an arranger, his extensive compositional activity concentrates on expanding the harp repertoire by means of transcriptions of major orchestral works, popular hits (by Queen, The Beatles, Nirvana, Adele), and excerpts of movie music (Star Wars, Pirates of the Caribbean, Spirited Away, and James Bond films). His compositions include programmatic works for harp and orchestra, theatrical works featuring harp, choir works, and film music collaborations. He has led master classes at The Juilliard School, Royal Academy of Music, Toronto Royal Conser vator y, and other music schools around the world. This concert is part of the PSO’s “Your Orchestra,

access link and includes the ability to participate in a live chat while watching with an online community of music lovers. Following the broadcast, viewers receive on-demand access to the concert for one week. To purchase, call (609) 497-0020 or visit princetonsymphony.org.

Princeton University Students Help Create Virtual Opera

The students who signed up to participate in the Depar tment of Music’s Fall 2020 cours e M PP/ M T D 219: Opera Performance expected to perform a staged version of La Calisto, Francesco Cavalli’s 17th-century opera, in Richardson Auditorium at the end of the term. The arrival of the pandemic quickly necessitated a change in plans as students returned home for a semester of virtual learning. The result: the creation of a virtual opera, recorded w it h phone cameras from students’ homes scattered across the world, in a product ion conducted by Performance Program D irec tor Michael P rat t ,

directed by Christopher Mattaliano ( Portland Opera, Metropolitan Opera, San Francisco Opera) , edited by videographer Christopher McDonald, and with dramaturgy by Department Chair Wendy Heller. La Calisto will premiere on Saturday, March 6, as a three-episode series on the Department of Music’s YouTube page, accessible through music. princeton.edu. The episodes will remain available for ondemand streaming following the premiere. “As we created this pandemic-infused version of a 1651 masterpiece, we were not exactly sure where we would land. It has been a communal exploration by the whole company, and we have all discovered new perspectives on this ancient tale,” said Pratt. “We have discovered, once again, that timeless art is called that for a reason. La Calisto speaks strongly to our current circumstance in very specific ways, always enveloped in music of poetic beauty.” With a libretto by Giovanni Faustini after the myth from Ovid’s Metamorphoses, La Calisto lent itself well to a time of pandemic as a story centered around impossible yearning. “Most of the characters create their own realities, and dream of what is missing from their lives,” said Mattaliano. Photos and video clips provided by the cast, showcasing what they miss most about pre-pandemic life, are

incorporated as a montage in the final production. The production team, too, created the new reality of inventing a virtual opera format — which involved recording and layering every instrument and voice one at a time with audio equipment and special software mailed to each student’s home, while stage direction was communicated and rehearsed over video calls. “The conditions and limitations under which this virtual production needed to be rehearsed and created — using nothing but our cell phones, laptops, and imaginations — became a source of inspiration for all of us,” Mattaliano said. “It has been a first-hand reminder that art and the need for human expression will continue to survive wars, plagues, political upheavals, and pandemics.” T h e n e e d for e x pr e s sion and connection made the course feel even more meaningful for the student cast members within the isolation posed by a virtual learning environment. “It was definitely exciting and vital for me to feel like I was doing something meaningful during everything that was going on,” said Princeton University senior Kevin Williams, “especially as it can be quite challenging to think of anything new and positive to do or contribute to life right now. Participating in this opera helped me feel sane during this time.”

Featuring a cast of 17 student singers and instrumentalists, La Calisto is part of the Department of Music’s performance program. For more information, visit music.princeton.edu.

Documentary About Comedian To Benefit WW Arts Center

On Saturday, February 27, West Windsor Arts Center will screen the film American Hasi, a comedy/documentary that follows parttime stand-up comedian Tushar Singh on a 35-day tour of India. The event will also include a virtual Q&A with Singh and director Laura Asherman at 8 p.m. Things don’t exactly go as planned for Singh, an Indian American from Huntsville, Alabama, who took a film crew — and his mom — on his “make it or break it” career adventure. This exclusive screening, which benefits the ar ts center, was made possible by Tushar’s sister, Preeti, an active member of West Windsor Arts Center. “American Hasi is for anyone who has ever questioned their identity, experienced rejection, changed careers, pursued a passion despite all odds, rooted for the underdog, or just needed a good laugh. So basically, there is no excuse not to watch it,” said Singh. Tickets are $15 per household, including the film and Q&A. The film is intended for mature audiences. Visit http://r20.rs6.net.

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Performing Arts

FEBRUARY 26

Fintan O’Toole delivers the annual Robert Fagles Memorial Lecture on “1921 and 2021: The Partition of Ireland, Then and Now” 4:30 p.m. via Zoom For more information about the event and the Zoom link, visit fis.princeton.edu


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2021 • 16

Art

“BROKEN PROMISE”: This work by Khalilah Sabree is featured in “Journey to Now – A Twenty Year Retrospective,” on view through March 6 at Artworks in Trenton. The exhibit includes a variety of large scale, mixed media paintings and drawings.

“Journey to Now” Exhibit appoint for Monday through Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 4 On View at Artworks

Artworks, Trenton’s visual arts center, presents “Journey to Now – A Twenty-Year R e t r o s p e c t i v e” t h r o u g h March 6. This retrospective of artist Khalilah Sabree spans over two decades of her work, which is about spir it ua l t ra nsfor mat ion and world issues. Her current body of work contains a variety of large scale, mixed-media paintings and drawings. There are several series in the collection, with a contemporary Islamic flavor. Sabree filters the world through the eyes of an African American Muslim woman and educator. She has a Master of Fine Art in painting from The University of The Arts and received her BA from The College of New Jersey. She maintains a private studio at Artworks Trenton, and her work has been exhibited extensively t hroughout t he t r i - state area. The exhibit is open to the public Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Masks are mandatory. E m a i l g a l l e r y @ a r t wor kstrenton.org to make an

Resch is the Arts Council of Princeton’s Winter 2021 Anne Reeves Artist-in-Residence. During her residency, Resch continues work locally on her series, aptly named Taking Pause, in response to the challenges of this year and the COVID-19 pandemic. The completed portraits will be on display in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April through October. Taking Pause is a docum e n t a r y, c o l l a b o r a t i v e portrait project that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. “With what do we identify and connect most deeply? W hat truly matters to us and why?” Resch documents each participant with two distinct portraits: one of their physical self, and an accompanying portrait of their reflective self through what they choose to share. Each participant is then asked to tell the story behind their selection. “At a time when our country feels so torn and disconnected, this project aims to reconnect and place trust with those we don’t know,” says Resch. “Crucial to this project is its collaborative nature that aspires to connect with people, share stories, and spend time together. In short, to take pause, to reflect.” Registration is free at artscouncilofprinceton.org.

p.m. Artworks is located at 19 Everett Alley, Trenton. ACP, Small World Host For more information, visit “Art of the Perfect Cup” artworkstrenton.org. Join the Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) and Small ACP “In Conversation” With World Coffee for a virtual Photographer Robin Resch master class on “The Art of The Arts Council of Princ- the Perfect Cup” on Tueseton welcomes Princeton- day, March 16 at 7 p.m. based fine arts photographer Small World Coffee experts Robin Resch for a virtual will stream from their Rocky conversation with Timothy Hill Roaster and Witherspoon M. Andrews, art collector Street café to talk beans, and major supporter of the blends, and how to extract residency program, on Tues- the most flavor from your day, March 9 at 7 p.m. preferred brewing method. Get an in-depth look at this popular neighborhood coffee shop during a celebration of all things local. Registration includes the virtual workshop with the option to add a bag of Small World’s coffee and a limitededition ceramic mug created by Arts Council Executive Director Adam Welch in the ACP’s Ceramic Studio. Tickets are $25-60. All proceeds benefit the Arts Council of Princeton, Princeton’s nonprofit community arts organization, helping to close the fiscal gap created by COVID. Register at artscouncilofprinceton.org.

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“WINTER ON THE SOURLAND”: This painting by Joe Kazimierczyk is featured in “Lyrical 2021,” a multi-artist exhibit on view March 4 through April 4 at the Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville. For more information, visit lambertvillearts.com.

Zimmerli Art After Hours — from the 1920s through the Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Highlights Women Artists 1990s — the exhibition offers Museum in Cadwalader Park,

In recognition of Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day, the Zimmerli Art Museum and Rutgers Global present Art After Hours: Women on View on March 2. The evening kicks off with a preview of “Communism Through the Lens: Everyday Life Captured by Women Photographers in the Dodge Collection,” led by Maria Garth, Dodge Fellow at the Zimmerli and Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Art History at Rutgers, who organized this upcoming exhibition. Garth will discuss works by Mara Brašmane, Zenta Dzividzinska, Olga Ignatovich, Valentina Kulagina, Lialia Kuznetsova, Olga Lander, Ann Tenno, and Natalia Tsekhomskaya. In addition, the program spotlights five women artists from other areas of the museum’s collections in honor of the annual #5WomenArtists campaign. This Zoom event is free and open to the public, with registration details at go.rutgers. edu/artafterhours. Note that the museum building remains closed to the public and inperson events are suspended until further notice. Drawn entirely from the Zimmerli’s Norton and Nancy Dodge Collection of Nonconformist Art from the Soviet Union, “Communism Through the Lens” explores themes of political art, documentary photography, and gender. Spanning almost the entirety of the Soviet Union’s history

a historical look at how women photographers interpreted life in the communist state. It features more than 130 objects — including photographs by 15 women photographers, art journals, and books — the majority of which have never been exhibited in the United States. This exhibition highlights the unique — and often overlooked — photographic innovations by women who shaped the history of photography during the 20th century. It delves into Russian photography and design, featuring artists from the Soviet republics of Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Ukraine, as well as rare art books and journals from the Zimmerli’s archival collection. It is divided into five thematic sections: workers and labor; experimenting with the medium; gender and the body; identity and the self; portraiture and fantasy. An online exhibition of “Communism Through the Lens: Everyday Life Captured by Women Photographers in the Dodge Collection” debuts this spring. The full exhibition is scheduled to be on view at the Zimmerli during the fall of 2021; additional details will be announced during the summer.

Area Exhibits

Check websites for information on safety protocols. Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Looking Forward” through February 28 and “Lyrical 2021” March 4 through April 4. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Legends of the Arts: A Black History Month Exhibit” through March 6. Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. artscouncilofprinceton.org. D & R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place, has the ongoing virtual galleries “Trail of Breadcrumbs: Nature in Fairytales” and “Portraits of PreservaVIRTUAL CLASS FOR COFFEE LOVERS: The Arts Council of Prinction: James Fiorentino Art.” eton and Small World Coffee have joined together to present The center is currently closed “The Art of the Perfect Cup” on Tuesday, March 16 at 7 p.m. to the public. drgreenway.org. The online event is a fundraiser for the Arts Council.

Parkside Avenue, Trenton, has “On the Forefront: Trenton’s Junior 1, 1916” through April 24 and “Women Artists, Trenton Style” through June 6. Visit ellarslie.org for museum hours and timed entry tickets. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “A Virtual Tour of Hamilton’s Princeton” and the “History@ Home” series. princetonhistory.org. Hunterdon Art Museum, 7 Lower Center Street, Clinton, has “Glass in the Expanded Field,” Architectonic: Bruce Dehnert Sculptural Ceramics,” and “Laura Moriarty: Resurfacing” through April 18. hunterdonartmuseum. org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Syd Carpenter: Portraits of Our Places” through February 28, “Fern Coppedge: New Discoveries” through April 18, and “Through the Lens: Modern Photography in the Delaware Valley” through August 15. The museum is open to the public. michenerartmuseum.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “In Nature’s Realm: The Art of Gerard Rutgers Hardenberg” through January 9 and the online exhibit “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints Of New Jersey, 1761–1898.” Open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. morven.org. Old Barracks Museum, 101 Barrack Street, Trenton, has the ongoing virtual exhibits “When Women Vote — The Old Barracks and the Anti-Suffrage Movement” and “Necessary and Proper for the Public Good.” The museum is temporarily closed to the public. barracks.org. Princeton University Art Museum has the online exhibits “Looking at 17th-Century Dutch Painting,” “Life Magazine and the Power of Photography,” “The Eclectic Eye: A Tribute to Duane Wilder,” and more, along with many online events. The museum is currently closed to the public. artmuseum.princeton.edu. We s t W i n d s o r A r t s Council, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has ”Harmony Art Show” online and by appointment through February 26. westwindsorarts.com.


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Camp Guide Town Topics

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Town Topics

Camp Guide W E S TM I N S T E R CO N S E RVATO RY OF MUSIC

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19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2021

Camp Guide Town Topics

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Please visit is on On YouTube you can view parents and campers talking about their experiences at Lee Mar.

• Fun traditional summer camp activities • Academics • Speech and language therapy • Daily living skills • Teenage campers enjoy social dancing every week with an end-of-summer “Prom” • Optional trips during the summer

• Exceptional facilities featuring air-conditioned bunks and buildings • Junior Olympic heated pool • Caring Nurturing Staff • Lee Mar LIFE (Living Independently Functional Education) Program. The unique feature of our LIFE Program incorporates everyday living skills into a personalized daily program. We have a

fully functional apartment specifically for this program with a large kitchen, washer & dryer, two bathrooms, a living room and bedroom. Please visit us on Facebook, Instagram and Youtube. On YouTube you can view parents and campers talking about their experiences at Camp Lee Mar.

•Archery •Outdoor Skills On YouTube you can view parents and campers talking SCHEDULE A TOUR AT: about their experiences ramblingpines.com at Camp Lee Mar.

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(609) 466-1212


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2021 • 20

www.princetonacademy.org

From kindergartners to young men of purpose... #HeCanBe part of a community where he is valued, known and needed. Where his full potential is realized because of the people who love and support him. Beyond stellar academics and outcomes, Princeton Academy provides lifelong connections that enrich the whole boy in mind, body and spirit.

Join us for upcoming virtual admission events: Developing Boy Voice and Presence Webinar FEB. 25 at 6:30 PM Athletics Open House Webinar MAR. 4 at 6:30 PM


Wednesday, February 24 6 p.m.: Reading by Ottessa Moshfegh and seniors from the Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Creative Writing. Free Zoom event. Arts.princeton.edu/ events. 7 p.m.: Princeton Comm u n it y H ou s i n g v i r t u a l fundraiser to benefit the organization’s COV ID -19 rent relief. Professor Eddie S. Glaude Jr. will speak about his book Begin Again: James Baldwin’s America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own. Followed by a Q&A led by the Rev. Lukata Mjumbe of Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church. $50 ($25 students). For $85, registrants get a signed copy of the book. PCHHomes.org. Thursday, February 25 1 p.m.: 2nd Annual Black His tor y Mont h prog ram from the Office of Mercer County Clerk. Live on Facebook. Guest speakers, songs, poetry, and history. Also available on the Mercer County YouTube channel. 4:30 p.m.: Washington Post correspondent David Ignatius speaks, “Cybergeddon: Fact, Fiction, and the Future of Warfare.” Free virtual event sponsored by Princeton University School of Public and International Affairs. Princeton.edu. 6 p.m.: Labyrinth Books presents “Left Pasts, Left Fut ures : Peter Cov iello, Gustavus Stadler, and Kyla Schuller in Conversation.” Free Zoom event. Labyrinthbooks.org/events. 6:30 p.m.: Habitat for Humanity hosts virtual Casino Night benefit with live dealers. Blackjack, Three-Card Poker, or Races. $50 and up. Hfhbmc.org. 7 p.m.: Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow, presented by Princeton Public Library and based on the New-York Historical Society’s 2018-19 exhibition. Register at princetonlibrary. org. 7 p.m.: “Voices of Change: African American Political Participation and the Legacy of Shirley Chisholm,” online program sponsored by Plainsboro Public Library, moderated by Monmouth University Professor Claude Taylor. Plainsborolibrary. org. 7:30 p.m.: Historian Shirley Satterfield presents a history of African Americans in Princeton, focused on the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood. Zoom event sponsored by Stone Hill Church. Stonehillprinceton. org. 7:30 p.m.: “Exploring Our National Parks,” Interactive Zoom event sponsored by The Jewish Center Princeton. With Lori and Ed Simon. info@thejewishcenter. org. Friday, February 26 9 : 45 a.m. : Job S e ekers Session: Avoid Getting Scammed. With Melanie Hazim, director of outreach for the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs. Princetonlibrary.org. 11:45 a.m.: FYI Seminar: Introduction to Feldenkrais, which is based on principles of physics and an empirical understanding of learning

s p o n s or e d b y t h e A r t s Council of Princeton. Local artists including Heather Barros, Betty Curtiss, Maria Evans, Kenneth Lewis, Tasha O’Neill, Rhinold Ponder, and Andre Veloux show 20 slides for 20 seconds each, inspired by Japanese “Pecha Kucha” prog ram. Free. Artscouncilofprinceton.org. Wednesday, March 3 10-11:30 a.m.: Princeton Mercer Chamber presents “Navigating the New Administration and What it Means for Business.” Virtual event with panel discussion. Networking with Middlesex County Regional Chamber of Commerce. Princetonmercer.org. 11 a.m. : “Ready, S et, Garden!” with horticulturist Margaret Pickoff, free Zoom event sponsored by Mercer County Library System. mcl. org. 7-8 p.m. Princeton Public Library presents an author talk with local writer Mimi Schwar tz about her new book, 1930s and Today : What Does it Mean to Be a Neighbor: Lessons from my Father’s German Village. In conversation with Ingrid Reed. Princetonlibrary.org. 7 p.m.: Online lecture, “Conversion, Circumcision, and Ritual Murder: A Medieval Mystery, Unraveled.” Free, register at BildnerCenter.Rutgers.edu. Thursday, March 4 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market Winter Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 10 a.m.-12 p.m.: Virtual Veterans Conference and Claims Clinic, sponsored by Assemblyman Andrew Zwicker and the Veterans Affairs Network. Zoom event on VA benefits including compensation, pension, vocational rehabilitation and employ ment, and more. Eventbrite.com. 12 p.m.: “Explaining Positions on Same-sex Marriage in Europe among Would-be MPs,” webinar presented by P r inceton Un iversit y Institute for International and Regional Studies. Free. Spia.princeton.edu. 6-7 p.m.: Pat Foran performs in a Zoom concert for “Save the Sourlands.” $10. Sourland.org. 7 p.m.: “Unsung Heroines: The Role of Women in the American Civil War.” Free Zoom event, presented by Civil War expert Martin Mosho. Sponsored by Friends of West Windsor Library. mcl.org. Friday, March 5 12 p.m.: Gillett G. Griffin Memorial Lecture : Raina L ampk ins - Fielder, S ou ls Grown Deep Foundation. Presented virtually by Princeton University Library. Libcal.princeton.edu. 12-1:30 p.m.: Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber holds a live webinar, “Crisis Communication.” Panelists are from Princeton Strategic Communications. Princetonmercer.org. Saturday, March 6 9 a.m.-12 p.m. and 1-4 p.m.: Friends of Princeton Open Space present Love Your Park Day at Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Preserve. Rescheduled from February 13. Fopos.org. 9:30 a.m.: Science on Saturdays from Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Sophia Gershman, PPPL,

“Plasma Science Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic.” Pppl.org. Sunday, March 7 4 p.m.: Virtual concert by the Princeton Symphony Orchestra with guest harpist Alexander Boldachev. $15. (609) 497-0020 or princetonsymphony.org. Monday, March 8 7 p.m.: “1920: The Year T h at Mad e t h e D e c ad e Roar.” Lewis B. Cuyler lecture from the Historical Society of Princeton, following its annual meeting. Free via Zoom. Princetonhistory.org/ events. Tuesday, March 9 6 p.m.: Labyrinth Books presents Laurie Wallmark, “Code Breaker, Spy Hunter: How Elizabeth Friedman Changed the Course of Two World Wars.” Free Zoom event. Labyrinthbooks.org/ events. 7 p.m.: Arts Council of Princeton “In Conversation” with photographer Robin Resch. Virtual event, free. Artscouncilofprinceton.org. Wednesday, March 10 12 p.m.: “Do Diets Work?” with dietician Heather Bainbridge of Princeton Medical Center. Free Zoom event sponsored by Mercer County Library System. Mcl.org. 7 p.m.: “Changing the Landscape: A Community Discussion About a Sustainable Landscaping Transition,” presented via Zoom by Sustainable Princeton. Free. Sustainableprinceton.org. Thursday, March 11 7 p.m.: Forest Threats with Rosa Yoo. Free webinar with $5 suggested donation, sponsored by Sourland Conservancy. http://tiny.cc/ SC2021Talks. Friday, March 12 1-3 p.m. : Fr iday w it h Friends, held by the YWCA Princeton Area Newcomers & Friends. Zoom gathering with a featured comedian. RSVP required at ywcaprinceton.org/newcomers. Saturday, March 13 9:30 a.m.: Science on Saturdays from Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Kory Evans, Rice University, “Ecology and Evolution of Teleost Fishes.” Pppl.org. 1 p.m.: “Passing the Time with Major William Trent.” Video premiere and talk presented digitally by re-enactor Jason Cherry, sponsored by the Trent House. Pay as you wish donation of $10 is suggested. Trenthouse.org. 7-8 p.m.: West Windsor Arts Council hosts a virtual gala, “Rx: Laughter,” comedy event with Tushar Singh and others. Online auction, bistro box, and more. Westwindsorarts.org/event/rxlaughter/. Monday, March 15 Recycling 8 p.m.: Washington Crossing Audubon Society presents “Butterfly Gardening with Native Plants,” online by Jane Hurwitz. Free. Contact.wcas@gmail.com. Tuesday, March 16 6 -7: 30 p.m. : Fu n d i n g an Adoption, webinar by Adoptions from the Heart. $10 per person or $15 per couple. Afth.org. 7-8 p.m.: “The Irish in the Civil War.” Free Zoom event presented by historical reenactor and lecturer Michael Jesberger. Sponsored by Mercer County Library System. Mcl.org. 7 p.m. “The Art of the

Per fect Cup w it h Small World Coffee,” presented by the Arts Council of Princeton as a virtual master class. $25-$60, benefits the Arts Council. Artscouncilofprinceton.org. Wednesday, March 17 1 p.m.: Boheme Opera NJ presents “More Than the Barber,” free Zoom event sponsored by Monroe Township Library. Soprano Sungji Kim sings selections by Rossini and Donizetti. Register at monroetwplibrary.org. 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meeting via Zoom. Princetonlibrary.org. Thursday, March 18 9 : 3 0 -11 a .m . : S o c i a l Coffee held by the YWCA Princeton Area Newcomers & Friends. Ywcaprinceton. org/newcomers. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market Winter Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. Saturday, March 20 7-8 p.m.: Virtual St. Patr ick ’s Day Dance Par t y, sponsored by P r inceton Special Sports & Programs, Princeton Recreation, Montgomer y Township Recreation, and Franklin Township Parks & Recreation. With DJ Redline Steven Knox. Free but registration must be by March 18. Leaguelineup.com. Tuesday, March 23 6 p.m.: Labyrinth Books presents Linda Colley and Maya Jasanoff in Conversation. “The Gun, the Ship, and the Pen: Constitutions, and the Making of the Modern World.” Labyrinthbooks. org/events. 7 p.m.: “T he Working Women of World War II : Rosie and Beyond.” Storyteller Madge Powis is the presenter in this free Zoom event sponsored by Mercer County Library System. Mcl. org. Wednesday, March 24 7-8 p.m.: “Cunard Steamships and the Quest for the Perfect Coal.” Free Zoom event sponsored by Mercer County Library System,

presented by Dennis Waters. Mcl.org. Thursday, March 25 7 p.m.: “The Rescue of Trenton Transit Co. #288.” Free Zoom event presented by J.R. May, sponsored by Mercer County Library System. Mcl.org. Saturday, March 27 8 a.m.-2 p.m.: Household waste collection and electronics recycling. For Mercer County residents, at Dempster Fire School, 350 Lawrence Station Road. Mcianj. org or (609) 278-8086. Monday, March 29 Recycling Tuesday, March 30 5 p.m.: Labyrinth Books presents Daniel Heller-Roazen and Hal Foster in Conversation. “Absentees: On Variously Missing Persons.” Free Zoom event. Labyrinthbooks.org/events. Wednesday, March 31 1 p.m.: Boheme Opera NJ presents “Poor Little Buttercup,” free Zoom event with selections from Gilbert and Sullivan operettas. Sponsored by Monroe Township Library. Register at monroetwplibrary.org. Thursday, April 1 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market Winter Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 6 p.m. : L L L P re s ent s Daphne Brooks and Tracy K. Smith in Conversation. “Liner Notes for the Revolution: The Intellectual Life of Black Feminist Sound.” Free Zoom event. Labyrinthbooks.org/events. 6-7 p.m.: Jake Thistle performs via Zoom for “Save the Sourlands.” $10. Sourland.org. Friday, April 9 1-3 p.m. : Fr iday w it h Friends, held by the YWCA Princeton Area Newcomers & Friends. Zoom gathering featuring Trish Chambers presenting “Women Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court.” RSVP required at ywcaprinceton.org/newcomers. Monday, April 12 Recycling

PRINCETON’S FIRST TRADITION

ONLINE

WORSHIP SERVICE CHAPEL.PRINCETON.EDU

Second Sunday of Lent

Preaching Sunday, Feb 28, 2021

Rev. Alison Boden, Ph.D. Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS LIFE PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 24, 2021

Calendar

and human development. Presented by Princeton Senior Resource Center. Free but registration required. Psrc.org. 12 : 3 0 p. m . : G o t h a m Princeton presents David Trapani, CEO of AGT and Associates Inc., discussing “How the Pandemic has Changed Selling: 3 Keys to Driving Sales Success During COVID.” Zoom webinar. princetongotham @ joshuazinder.com. 2 p.m.: “Acrobatics: Moving Through the Trans Archives.” Presented by Princeton Universit y Librar y. Libcal.princeton.edu. 4 :30 p.m.: “1921 and 2021: The Partition of Ireland, Then and Now,” Robert Fagles Memorial Lecture delivered by Fintan O’Toole and presented via Zoom, free, by Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts. Arts.princeton.edu / events. Saturday, February 27 9:30 a.m.: Science on Saturdays from Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Tracy Drain, of NASA, “Mars Exploration Program.” Pppl. org. Sunday, February 28 11 a.m.: Virtual discussion of The Toni Morrison Book Club. With Winnie Brown-Glaude, Cassandra Jackson, Juda Bennett, and Piper Kendr i x Williams. Fundraiser for Princeton Public Library. $65. Princetonlibrary.org. 12-2 p.m.: Palmer Square on Ice. Giant blocks of ice will be sculpted into 3-D figures on the green at Palmer Square. Palmersquare.com. 1:30 p.m.: Sundays at the Sarnoff presents “Unsung WWII Code Breakers and Y-Operator Heroines of Bletchley Park,” with Joseph Jesson. Free Zoom event. Tcnj.edu. 2 p.m. Signs of Spring Walk w it h hor ticult ur ist Louise Senior, at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. $10 ($5 for Friends of Morven). Social distancing observed, wear water resistant shoes. Morven.org. Monday, March 1 Recycling 6:30-7:30 p.m.: “Understanding Social Security.” Workshop by William M. Greenfield of Wealth Bridge Advisory LLC, sponsored by Mercer County Library System. Free Zoom event. mcl. org. Tuesday, March 2 6 p.m.: Labyrinth Books presents Jeremy DeSilva, Holly Dunsworth, and Augustin Fuentes. “A Most Interesting Problem: What Darwin’s Descent of Man Got Wrong About Human E v o l u t i o n .” F r e e Z o o m event. Labyrinthbooks.org/ events. 7 p.m.: An Evening with Erin Brockovitch, virtual event presented by the Present Day Club. Free, register at presentdayclub.org. 7- 8 p. m . : “ Fe m i n i s m Through the Decades.” Presented by editor Colleen Murphy. Free Zoom event sponsored by Mercer County Library System. mcl.org. 7 p.m.: Planned Giving w ith Sneha Salgam and Robert Morris. Virtual talk sponsored by Sourland Conservancy. Free, with $5 suggested donation. http://tiny. cc/SC2021Talks. 8-9:15 p.m.: “Princeton Pecha,” v ir tual program


H

ow is it that someone ends up doing exactly what he or she not only wants to do, but is certain that it is what they are meant to do? When this happens, it really is a gift. Not everyone is fortunate enough to experience such a congenial happenstance.

IT’S NEW To Us

Mary Homer, owner of the charming new pop-up shop, French Flair Ferme, in the Princeton Shopping Center, knows she is one of the lucky ones. Her unique gift shop, focusing on antique and vintage French enamelware, is an engaging resource not only for her customers, but for her own enjoyment. A s s h e d e s c r ib e s h e r commitment to her work, she points out that “What comes to mind is not something tangible but rather a strong sense of connection and the knowledge that this is exactly where I am meant to be today.” Special Something B efore t h e p a n d e m ic, she often traveled to various French and European street fairs, street markets, and flea markets in search of the unique, one- of-akind items she wanted to offer customers. “I went to France a few times a year and never felt alone for a moment. It is hard work, but

feels like all play. The days begin very early but are never long enough. It provides an adrenaline rush unlike no other. Be it a local Paris vide grenier, the rederie, or braderie. “I find myself immersed in some of the most engaging spaces imaginable, surrounded by hundreds of others who share the same passion — and sometimes, a glass of wine or two — all in search of that special something which speaks to them. And I hope to create an engaging space in my pop-up shop for others to feel similarly connected.” Homer’s journey to this special place — in her shop and in her life — has taken intriguing twists and turns. Earlier, her career focused on finance, and she was a CFO in New York City, associated with an international design firm. After purchasing a home in Vermont, and traveling back and forth to New York, she decided to settle in the Green Mountains, and purchased an antique center/Christmas wreath business. “I was really looking for items to furnish my condo, and then I got interested in antiques and vintage,” she explains. W hen the economy hit rock bottom in 2008/09, she found another direction. Challenges and new adventures have always intrigued her, and as she reports, “I had been reading an article in an antique magazine about the Grande Braderie

de Lille. It is the largest flea market/fair in Europe, and has been ongoing for 800 years. I decided I wanted to see this.” Pink Body Pitcher So off she went to France, not really speaking the language, but undaunted. “I just loved the Grande Braderie, and was immediately drawn to the enamelware items. I especially fell in love with a crusty pink French enamelware body pitcher, and there was no turning back!” As she became more and more involved in this new adventure, she saw it as a future business, and began to bring enamelware to antique centers and also to antique and lifestyle shows and fairs, as well as offering online opportunities to customers. “As with any vintage or antiques dealer, we make a significant time investment personally sourcing all items. It involves days and weeks of traveling, attending annual fairs, brocantes, auctions, and estate sales. My pre-pandemic plan for 2020 was to spend more time in France to expand my offerings to include furniture and other home decor, while still remaining true to my core identity in French enamelware. It is likely those plans will remain tabled until late 2021, better yet realized in 2022, so my immediate focus now will be my shop.” Because she had an existing inventory and many pieces on hand, Homer was able to open French Flair Fe r m e ( Fe r m e t r a n s lat-

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ing to farmhouse), as well as provide items for other bricks and mortar establishments, including Mercantile in Doylestown and Adams Antiques in Denver, Pa. In addition, she attends various shows, fairs, and offers online buying opportunities. Opening her own shop is yet another new adventure for Homer. As she points out, “First and foremost, I wanted to share my passion for what I do and bring the experience and excitement of the French brocantes and vide greniers to anyone who might enjoy the same. When I sell at a live antiques, vintage, or lifestyle show, I am presenting my offerings to a very large, relatively likeminded customer base who have an expectation about t he exper ience and t he chances of finding what they are looking for. “But while I cannot replicate the French flea market, one of my goals for the popup shop is to introduce my concept — unique antique/ vintage collections and an engaging space — to a new audience, one without expectations about the experience, hopefully enlightening and delighting them, and thus expanding my customer demographic. Curated Collections “Today, French Flair Ferme offers curated collections of home decor built on a foundation of Farmhouse and Country design styles, enhanced with a touch of French flair. I have amassed one of the most extensive collections of French enamelware on the East Coast, and I also offer old French pottery and uniquely old French curiosities. All the items have been sourced personally by me and through other French and European dealers directly from France and surrounding countries.” What Homer has accomplished at the Shopping Center is to create an engaging shop, filled with an appealing array of items, primarily enamelware, all attractively displayed. Customers will find vintage and antique enamelware pitchers and basins, body pitchers, tea kettles, salt boxes, umbrella stands, foot baths, utensil racks, and more. Homer explains that enamelware products are handprinted over sheet metal, and are durable as well as handsome and graceful. T h e m o s t w e l l - k n ow n enamelware is from France, Austria, Germany, and Belgium, and the majority of her pieces date from the late 1800s to the 1930s. She points out that the versatility of some of the items, such as the utility rest, which enables them to adapt to and complement modern decor. “It is interesting to me to help a customer see something in a different way, and for use within today’s lifestyle. “I look for things that are different or one-of-a-kind,” she continues. “I love the way enamelware looks, the lines, the design, and the fact that it is both functional and decorative.” “End of the Day” Among the most popular designs is the rose garland, she adds. “There is also the ‘End of the Day’ pattern. When they were finished, the artists would put all the colors they had

EXTRA SPECIAL ENAMELWARE: “What I love is to share my knowledge and passion for enamelware with the customers. The items are so unique, yet basic and functional, and yet so beautifully done, with expert, exquisite craftsmanship.” Mary Homer, owner of French Flair Ferme in the Princeton Shopping Center, is shown with an array of special items, including a vintage hand-painted enamelware French body pitcher on the right and basin and pitcher set on the left. left and mix them together to create wonderful color combinations and patterns. The craftsmanship is just so special.” She also points out that pink items are very much in demand because pink selections are rare. She is pleased to have a lovely pink pitcher on display. Another eyecatching item is a vintage French enamelware body pitcher, featuring a graceful floral design in relief. In addition to the enamelware, the shop offers vintage French pottery, including butter dishes, cafe au lait bowls, and confit pots. Puzzle plates are another item sure to intrigue customers. As Homer explains, “Each plate has a design representing an old French proverb, and the diners had to guess which one it is. The answer is on the back of the plate.” A number of other items in the shop include a variety of bottles, vintage French wo o d e n T- c r o s s - s h ap e d shir t /dress hangers, and wonderfully fragrant Savon Des Marseilles bar soap. “I have also added inexpensive but atmospheric European art,” she reports. “It is especially appealing in that it can complement the enamelware.” Prices range from $5 for the soap to $35 for a cafe au lait pot on up to $500 or more. The majority of enamelware can be in the $100 range. Coveted Items Despite the pandemic, customers are coming to the shop and then returning again, says Homer, and she looks forward to introducing even more newcomers to her collection. “I can’t wait for more people to discover the wonders of authentic and unique vintage and antique home decor objects to complement each individual lifestyle. My passion is to continue to find those coveted items that speak to the hearts and souls of their past and future owners.” The history of the items she finds always sparks her imagination. “Just imagine the stories this piece could tell ! Perhaps a group of enamel artisans were working in the factory, painting

florals in relief on French body pitchers, and trading stories about their Saturday night escapades! Or a confit pot that stood buried in the dirt floor in the pantry through the long cold winter to provide preserved meats to a family of eight children? “And, was that lovely handpainted cafetiere a wedding gift from the hard-working parents of a young couple in the French countryside, or was it one of many that graced the sitting room of a discerning Parisian collector? Generally, one will never know, but can only imagine….” rench F lair Fer me is op e n We d n e s day through Saturday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Hours will be extended to five days in April. (908) 420-6394. French Flair Ferme items are also available on line at Etsy: frenchflairferme and her Instagram: ms_sealie. —Jean Stratton

F

IN PRINT. ONLINE. AT HOME.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 24, 2021 • 22

Antique and Vintage Enamelware and More Are Available at French Flair Ferme Boutique

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23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 24, 2021

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Surviving Grueling ECACH Series Against Quinnipiac Steeled Tiger Women’s Hockey for Historic Title Run

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year ago, the final weekend of February turned out to be both a marathon and a springboard to history for the Princeton University women’s hockey team. Rising to No. 6 in the national polls, Princeton was hosting Quinnipiac for a best-of-three ECAC Hockey quarterfinal series starting on February 28 at venerable Hobey Baker Rink. The Tigers were rolling, having gone 11-1-1 in their last 13 regal season games and they had swept Quinnipiac in two previous meetings in the 2019-20 campaign. Opening the series, Princeton continued to sizzle, jumping out to a 4-1 lead in the first period on the way to a lopsided 5-1 victory in game one. A day later, the Tigers went up 1-0 in the first period and seemed to be on track for a sweep of the underdog Bobcats. But things turned dicey after that as Quinnipiac responded with two unanswered goals in the second period. The Tigers knotted the game at 2-2 late in the third period on a goal by senior star Carly Bullock. On the verge of being eliminated, the Bobcats pulled out a 3-2 win with a goal at 1:45 of the first overtime to force a decisive third game. In the finale, Princeton scored twice to build a 2-0 advantage but Tiger sophomore star Sarah Filler sensed that the series was far from over. “We knew we were going to get their best game, they are ranked 10 in the country,” said Fillier. “I think arguably we play

in the best league in the nation so we knew it was going to be a battle and we were excited to play this one.” Sure enough, Quinnipiac refused to die, scoring two goals to force a second straight OT game. In the first overtime, Princeton looked to finish off Quinnipiac, outshooting the Bobcats 16-6 but to no avail as the teams remained stalemated at 2-2. In the break after the first extra period, Princeton team managers raided the refrigerator in the rink kitchen to microwave snacks to refuel the exhausted Tigers. An energized Fillier ended the marathon, banging in a rebound off a shot by Bullock 8:36 into the second extra session. “It was a 3-on-1 and I just wanted to get a pass early on to try to get their goalie to move and get their defense to readjust,” said a tired but grinning Fillier, recalling the sequence that led to the decisive tally. “I wouldn’t want anyone else with the puck in the slot than Carly Bullock. I was happy she took that shot and luckily the goalie might have been tired and it came right to my stick.” In Fillier’s view, the team’s work ethic helped it pull through. “We are built for this, we strive with our fitness testing and lifts through the season,” asserted Fillier. “We were ready for this game. We were prepared and we had confidence in that preparation.” The deep bonds among the Tiger players also helped the squad overcome the challenge posed by Quinnipiac.

“We give a lot of credit to our bench, we were just talking about it in the room, everyone is built around this team and this team culture,” said Fillier. “We never had a lack of energy. Everyone wanted to play for each other so I think that really helped. We have definitely come together through this adversity. We took a harder path than we hoped for and wanted to take. We got a lot out of this for our team and our culture.” Princeton head coach Cara Morey believed that surviving the hard fight would be a plus for the Tigers. “I am almost speechless, I can’t believe that we went through that,” said Morey. “I think it is going to help us as we go on this path. We needed a lot of grit, a lot of mental toughness, and a lot of conditioning. I am still in shock, that was a battle. At the ECACH Final Four held at top-ranked Cornell the next weekend, the Tigers utilized that grit to shock the competition. In the semis against a seventh-ranked Clarkson team that had beaten it 2-1 on February 15, Princeton rode a three-goal outburst in the second period to a 5-1 victory. “It was surreal, hockey is interesting, you can have a ton of chances and you can feel like they just never go in the net,” said Morey, reflecting on the win over Clarkson. “Then all of a sudden, pucks are finding the back of the net. They were good goals. Their goalie is excellent so we really had to make sure that she couldn’t see the puck as the shots were

CAT FIGHT: Princeton University women’s hockey player Maggie Connors, right, gets pushed into the boards by a Quinnipiac defender last February during a best-of-three ECAC Hockey quarterfinal series. The Tigers survived a grueling weekend against the Bobcats, cruising in game one, losing game two in overtime, and then prevailing in the decisive final game in a double overtime thriller. Buoyed by that hard-earned triumph, Princeton went on to defeat Clarkson 5-1 in the league semis and then rally for a 3-2 overtime win at top-ranked Cornell in the final to earn the program’s first-ever ECACH crown. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) coming. I think that was a big factor.” The next day in the championship game against No. 1 Cornell, which was undefeated in league play and had posted a pair of regular season wins over the sixth-ranked Tigers (3-1 on November 2 and 5-1 on December 6), Princeton found itself trailing 2-0 three minutes into the game before rallying to pull out a 3-2 win on overtime. “After the second goal, I was thinking ugh, let’s just keep this respectable,” said Morey. “But after we all settled in and the girls started playing, the message was hey, it is fine, there is so much hockey left. It was 2-0 with 17 minutes left in the first period and 57 minutes left in the game. We had the advantage of less pressure, we weren’t expected to win. We knew

we could win but the pressure was on Cornell.” Displaying the fortitude that helped it overcome Qunnipiac, Princeton got goals from Fillier and Bullock in the second period to knot the game and eventually force overtime. Less than a minute into OT, sophomore defenseman Mariah Keopple found the back of the net to give the Tigers a 3-2 win and the program’s first-ever ECACH title. “I don’t think they realized how hard that first series was going to be,” said Morey. “I think it really prepared them for the next games.” Morey wasn’t quite prepared to put the championship in perspective. “It is such an elite league and to come out as champions of that, it took me until today to process it,” said Morey whose team improved

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to 26-6-1 with the win over Cornell, setting a program record for victories. “I woke up and it was, oh my god we won the ECAC Championship. It is huge. I had no idea that Princeton had never even made it to the championship game. I looked on the trophy to see and it has been given out since 1984 so that is a bit shocking. It is such an honor to bring the cup back to Princeton. I feel like we have been on an upward trajectory for quite a few years so it is awesome to finally see us win.” While the COVID-19 pandemic denied Princeton the chance to go for an NCAA crown as the national tourney was canceled, surviving the grueling weekend against Quinnipiac proved to be a key step in the Tigers’ drive to a historic championship. —Bill Alden


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2021 • 24

PU Sports Roundup Ivy League Presidents Cancel Spring Competition

Citing its commitment to safeguard the health and the well-being of studentathletes, the greater campus community and general public, the Ivy League Council of Presidents said last week that there will be no league competition or league championships held this spring. Due to the ongoing impacts of the pandemic, and in order to maintain compliance both with campus travel, visitor and gathering policies and also with the state guidelines governing each institution, the Council decided that a spring season would not be feasible. While acknowledging that the current public health environment is not compatible with a traditional Ivy League season, the Council has put in place a process that may allow for limited, local competition during the spring if public health conditions improve sufficiently to allow greater levels of in-person activity at league campuses. Athletics training opportunities and practices for enrolled student-athletes will continue to be permitted, provided they are structured in accordance with each institution’s procedures and applicable state and local regulations. This approach is consistent with the phased approach implemented by the Ivy League for all sports in the fall 2020 term. These decisions are grounded in public health

best practices and informed by the pandemic related policies currently in place at member institutions, according to the Council. The ability of the league’s members to continue on-campus operations during the ongoing pandemic requires rigorous limitations on travel, visitors, gatherings, and other elements that are essential for intercollegiate athletics competition. In addition, member institutions will continue with the league-wide phases for athletics activities already in place on all Ivy campuses, subject to individual institutional policies. These phases govern athletics activities including training, practices, and other team and individual activities. While the league’s goal is to work toward local competition in Phase IV, it is currently not permitted on any league campus. If public health conditions substantially improve and if permitted by an institution, local non-conference competition may be allowed to occur this spring. These competitions will be subject to league stipulations and must remain consistent with institutional policies for comparable co-curricular activities, including applicable travel restrictions for on-campus students and university visitor policies. In making its announcement, the Council expressed its sympathy and admiration for the athletes and coaches who have seen their seasons canceled. “We know that this news will come as a disappointment to many in our community,” the Council said. “We regret the many sac-

rifices that have been required in response to the pandemic, and we appreciate the resilience of our student-athletes, coaches and staff in the face of adversity during this difficult and unusual year. While we would like nothing better than to deliver a complete season of competition, these are the necessary decisions for the Ivy League in the face of the health concerns posed by the ongoing and dangerous pandemic. We will continue to monitor the situation as we move forward so that our universities can determine whether Ivy League principles and evolving health conditions might allow for limited, local competition later this spring.”

PU Hockey Alum Robinson Scores Again for Blue Jackets

Former Princeton University men’s hockey star Eric Robinson ’18 kept up his recent offensive surge for the Columbus Blue Jackets of the NHL, tallying a goal in a 3-0 win over Nashville last Thursday. For ward Robinson now has three goals and four assists in 19 games this season for the Blue Jackets. In his career, he has 19 points on 10 goals and nine assists in 83 appearances.

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Glenn Ligon and Hilton Als Thursday, March 11, 5:30 p.m. Artist Glenn Ligon, whose work draws on literature and history to explore race, language, desire, and identity, joins Pulitzer Prize–winning author and critic Hilton Als to consider the ways in which art can engage and rethink the most urgent issues of our time.

Stream it live artmuseum.princeton.edu

This event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970. Live closed-captioning for this program is made possible by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

Glenn Ligon. Photo: Paul Mpagi Sepuya; Hilton Als. Photo: Brigitte Lacombe

GAME-CHANGER: Kelsey Koelzer displays her defensive intensity during her senior season with the Princeton University women’s hockey team. Star defenseman Koelzer ’17, a first-team American Hockey Coaches Association (AHCA) All-America honoree during her Tiger career, is being recognized for her efforts to increase participation by Black women in the game as Black History Month has been celebrated this February. NBC Sports recorded a video conversation with Koelzer about becoming Arcadia University’s first head coach, ahead of that program’s inaugural season in 2021-22, and her thoughts on the game’s diversification. NHL.com also talked with Koelzer about the greater number of Black players she is seeing at rinks around the sport while the NHL’s Soul On Ice podcast talked with Koelzer in their recent episode, The Queens Takeover. As part of Princeton’s Black History Month celebration, Koelzer was the featured alum on February 13. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


Even though its season has started late and there are COVID-19 protocols to follow at the pool, there is still plenty of spirit on deck for the Princeton High swimming program. “First and foremost, I am glad and very fortunate that we even have a season,” said PHS head coach Carly Misiewicz, noting that the team is following strict protocols at practice with limits on how many swimmers can be in the pool at one time and athletes masking whenever they are not in the water. “That is the biggest thing, they are all enjoying just being together. Yes, it is not the same but you are away from a computer screen, you are getting to be around your friends. Swimming has brought more of a sense of normalcy, it is that aspect of having that physical interaction with other people. They are really happy that they are still getting to be with their friends.” The swimmers are certainly happy to get the chance to train and compete. “They are still getting to race,” said Misiewicz. “A lot of club teams are strapped for time and pool availability as well too, so, the fact that we are consistently swimming every day after school and Saturday mornings has been good.” L as t We d ne s day, PHS excelled in its first race of the year, topping Hamilton 134-36 in a coed meet. It marked the program’s first virtual meet which entailed

each team swimming separately at their pool and then sharing times to calculate the score. The Tiger boys’ team dominated the competition, taking first in the 200 medley relay, 200 freestyle relay, and the 400 free relay. Individually, sophomore Daniel Baytin placed first in both the 200 free and the 100 breaststroke while senior Owen Tennant was victorious in the 200 individual medley and the 100 backstroke. Junior Alexander Shaw prevailed in the 50 free and sophomore Julian Velazquez took first in the 100 butterfly. “It is still a learning process for sure, we have only had one of them,” said Misiewicz, reflecting on the virtual procedure. “Every school was given the option for meets. You could swim every Tuesday and Thursday. So the route we decided to go was that Wednesdays are going to be our meet days. We will make our lineups, we will swim on Wednesday and then that will count for our Tuesday meet as well as our Thursday meet. Hamilton West was our Tuesday meet and they did swim on Tuesday night and we swam on Wednesday afternoon. On Wednesday night, the Hamilton coach Mary Kanoc and I met on Zoom and we shared our lineups and times and went through the meet and scored it out together.” Even without opponents in adjacent lanes at the

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Princeton Unified Middle School pool, the Tigers still competed hard. “We still swam in our odd lanes 3-5-7, I think it worked,” said Misiewicz. “In a lot of races, they were pushed by each other. I told them that is what it is going to have to be. You have to push each other, you have to push yourself. Even the club kids who are used to getting all of these meets, they are not getting all of these opportunities so they really need to take advantage of every race they get.” With the boys’ team only hav ing 13 members, its swimmers will get the opportunity to swim in a lot of events. “Having small numbers on the guys team stinks but the positive is that they are very versatile,” said Misiewicz. “A lot of the guys that we have can do a wide range of events. The other good thing too with only having one meet a week is that they are going to swim a lot of different events throughout the season.” After not joining the PHS program until the last few weeks of the 2019-20 campaign, sophomore star Baytin figures to make a big impact for the Tigers this winter. “He is back,” said Misiewicz. “Having Dan back with us from the beginning is great.” Having senior stalwar t Tennant back for his final campaign is also great for PHS.

“Owen just always brings that positive attitude and mindset,” said Misiewicz. “He is someone that really can swim anything and everything from the 50 freestyle all the way to the 500, backstroke, breaststroke, butterfly, and IM. He will really do anything. He has always said that, even in his freshman year, whatever you need me to do coach. As a coach that is the ideal athlete that you want on your team. They are going to get in and race and put in their all no matter what event you put them in.” Misiewicz is depending on a trio of veterans, senior Will Murray, junior Shaw, and sophomore Velazquez, to give their all. “Will is one of our top sprinters in the 50 free, 100 free, and the butterfly,” said Misiewicz.

“Alex is another sprint guy. Julian will do butterfly, backstroke, IM and even sprints. His 100 free has gotten very good as well.” The return of senior Andy Liu gives PHS another top performer. “We have him back, he is healthy this year,” said Misiewicz of Liu. “He had a little bit of an arm injury in the middle of last season. We lost him towards the middle and to the end of the season. He did a lot of rehab. He has built up his strength and his training. He is looking good.” The addition of freshmen Henry Xu and Alvin Tien strengthens the Tiger lineup. “Henry is another good kid to have, he is a quality breaststroker,” said Misiewicz. “He is very talented. He does the 200 breast in club

which is not a high school event; I told him we would be using him in a lot of different places. Alvin is very tall. He surprised me a lot, he swam the 100 back and the IM on Wednesday and he was up there with Owen and Julian.” While PHS may not have a lot of depth, Misiewicz believes the squad has the quality to surprise some foes. “We have seven or eight solid swimmers, you can do some damage with that many swimmers,” said Misiewicz, whose team has a virtual meet against Ewing scheduled for the week of March 1. “There are solid relays that build up and almost all of your first and second lanes for every individual event are solid.” —Bill Alden

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 24, 2021

Thriving in its First Virtual Meet of Season, PHS Swimming Cruises Past Hamilton West

DAN THE MAN: Princeton High boys’ swimmer Daniel Baytin churns to victory in the 200 freestyle last Wednesday as PHS opened its 2021 season with a 134-36 win over Hamilton West in a coed meet. The Tigers have a virtual meet against Ewing scheduled for the week of March 1. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Relishing Final Season for PDS Girls’ Hockey, Senior Henderson Stars in Win Over Westfield Maisie Henderson grinned through her Bauer gray face mask after the Princeton Day School girls’ hockey team defeated Westfield High 4-0 last Wednesday. Wit h PDS hav i ng las t played an of f icial game when it defeated Chatham 7-3 on January 28, senior forward Henderson and her teammates were excited to welcome Westfield to McGraw Rink. “It is awesome having the opportunity to be able to play, especially as a senior,” said Henderson, who scored a pair of goals in the victory as the Panthers improved to 5-0. “It is really cool. Although there are definitely some restrictions and we can’t play a full schedule. It is definitely nice to have the opportunity to play one last year.” It has been particularly cool for Henderson to get a chance this winter to play one last season for PDS since she had moved to New England for her junior year. “I lived in Nantucket Massachusetts last year; last year was the first time they had a girls’ varsity hockey team,” said Henderson. “It was a nice thing to be part of and help start that program. We didn’t really know until May that I was coming back for sure. I am really happy that I was able to come back to have a senior season here.” Henders on was happy to find the back of the net twice against Westfield. “One of my teammates put

the puck my way and there was no defense there; I saw the goalie standing pretty tall so her legs were open and I just shot it through her legs nice and low,” said Henderson, reflecting on her first goal which opened the scoring 2:05 into the contest. “On my second goal, I was just standing in front of the net. I was wide open and Hailey [ Wexler] just passed the puck to me and I just tapped it to me. We have been best friends for a while so it is nice playing with her.” While getting the win was nice, Henderson acknowledged that PDS could have scored more goals. “We haven’t played in three weeks ; we haven’t had an actual game in a little while so you could tell we were a little rusty,” said Henderson. “I think overall we played pretty well.” With the Panthers off to a 5-0 start, things have been going very well overall. “We have a lot of good underclassmen and a lot of very experienced players,” said Henderson. “I think this is the deepest team I have been on at this school. It is good for the future. We don’t have to worry about the future of the team.” Ref lecting on her PDS experience, Henderson believes that she has gained a maturity that will help her down the road. “It is definitely cool to come full circle; to see how

I have grown since being a freshman and how we have all grown as a team,” said Henderson. “It is cool to be able to take what I was taught when I was younger and now teach the younger girls. It has taught me a lot, on and off the ice. I have learned how to become a leader and mentor younger girls. It is going to be helpful no matter where I end up.” Panther head coach John Ritchie credits Henderson with influencing the Panthers at both ends of the ice. “Maisie is a great two-way player; she has really developed and matured since she was a freshman,” said Ritchie. “She is very calm. Whether it is defensively or offensively, she is not flashy, she is just a hard worker. She goes to the right spots. She deserves it and I am glad for the seniors that we have a couple of games left and she had a couple of goals.” Like Henderson, Ritchie believed that PDS should have been more productive around the goal against the Blue Devils. “I give Westfield’s goalie [Alexis Scherzer] a lot of credit; she played really well,” said Ritchie who also got goals from Hailey Wexler and freshman Emily McCann in the contest. “She had 50 shots on net so she made a lot of saves. I look at it from our perspective, we have got to be more efficient. I didn’t think we got to the secondar y chances enough. But I also

chalk it up to the fact that we haven’t played a game in three weeks with snow days and stuff. Now granted we practiced a ton but it has been tough. So I think we were just rusty today coming into the game.” The Panthers were tough around the blue line, limiting Westfield to 10 shots on goal, sparked by having starting goalie Jillian Wexler skating out on the defensive unit. “We did well defensively; we moved Jillian back to defense today,” said Ritchie. “It will probably be her last game playing out. She gave us a little more push going forward. The defense had been doing a good job all year. Of the 10 shots that Westfield got, I think two or three threatened a little more than they should have. They had one in the first period, I think it was the first shot. I thought from my

vantage point that it went in. Fortunately, they thought otherwise. Defensively, we are doing well.” Even though PDS may not have done as well offensively as Ritchie would have hoped, he had no qualms with the effort he got from his players. “They all work hard, it is something I can never be upset with them after a game about,” said Ritchie. “I would just like to see us be a little more efficient but with a season like this, there is only so much you can do. You can’t worry about it.” Wit h just a couple of weeks left in the 2021 season, Ritchie is hoping that his squad will get the chance to face some more hard foes. “Our mindset and our progression is that we want to match the teams that are at the top so we are trying to schedule Summit, we are trying to schedule

Mo-Beard,” said Ritchie, whose team is slated to host Trinity Hall on February 24. “We will see what happens. That is where we want to be, amongst the conversation w ith those teams that have been good for a while. We definitely have to be better than we were today but today we were good enough.” Henderson, for her part, is looking to make the most of everyday she gets on the ice for PDS, no matter what happens. “I think it is take each game by game; theoretically that could have been our last game, you never know,” said Henderson. “Things can get canceled in a second. You prepare for future games but we also want to stay in the present and just focus on being with the team now.” —Bill Alden

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ON TARGET: Princeton Day School girls’ hockey player Maisie Henderson controls the puck in recent action. Last Wednesday, senior forward Henderson tallied two goals to help PDS top Westfield 4-0 and improve to 5-0. In upcoming action, the Panthers are scheduled to host Trinity Hall on February 24. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)



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It was a highlight years in the making for Trevor Kunkle. After working his way up through the Princeton Day School boys’ hockey program, playing junior varsity for two years and then getting called up to the varsity last winter, senior forward Kunkle finally found the back of the net last week for the Panthers as they hosted St. Augustine. Five minutes into the February 16 contest, Kunkle battled in the crease and slotted the puck home to give PDS a 1-0 lead. “It was the first varsity goal for me so it felt great,” said Kunkle. “It was good, it lifted the boys up. I was on JV my first two high school years and then last year I got the call up. I didn’t get much playing time. I was a big bench energy guy. This year I am getting a lot of playing time. I have never played travel hockey. I am just happy that I got it out of the way. I got that pressure off my back.” Kunkle is happy to be on the ice in a season limited by COVID-19 concerns. “None of the games are guaranteed, you just have to make the best of it,” said Kunkle. “We are lucky to have a couple of games on the schedule. It was looking pretty grim, that we weren’t going to get any games this season. We had a lot of guys out with COVID. We are just happy to get a game. It was the first game in a while; it felt good, definitely.” The game didn’t turn out so well for PDS as it took a 2-1 lead into the second period only to see St Augustine score two unanswered goals in a span of 1:17 and hold on for a 3-2 victory. “I am disappointed that we didn’t get the outcome we wanted,” said Kunkle, reflecting on the defeat which left the Panthers at 1-1-1 on the season. “Pucks didn’t go our way but it is alright. They just came out smarter, playing stronger than us in the second period.” In the third period, PDS tried valiantly to rally, outshooting St. Augustine 8-4, but couldn’t break through. “We were just trying to play smarter and play harder,” said Kunkle. “They were playing body a lot in the second. We wanted to match that; it just didn’t turn out the way we wanted it to. We tried at the end, it was just unlucky.” Kunkle feels lucky to have

been able to carve out a role with the PDS hockey program. “It has definitely meant a lot to me, I wasn’t expecting to be playing at the varsity level,” said Kunkle, who also plays soccer and lacrosse for PDS. “ I h av e g ot m y b o y s around me and they just keep me fired up and playing and working hard in practice and grinding hard in the games. It has definitely been one of the more exciting experiences. It has been one of my more exciting PDS moments, especially last year because of the Lawrenceville game. It was a lot of fun to just sit in the bench and enjoy the moments with the boys. This year, I didn’t really expect to play much but I just wanted to be around with the guys and the coaches.” PDS head coach Scott B e r to l i e n j o y e d s e e i n g Kunkle break through with his first goal. “Trevor had worked his way up through the middle school program, through the JV program and still plays in JV games, he played in a couple this year,” said Bertoli. “He is a great kid. It is a testament to him that he stuck with it as a senior and now because of his commitment to the sport, he has gotten better. The cross training that he is doing between being a soccer player and a lacrosse player has helped. He is a really likable coachable kid. I know when we put him out there, he is going to be in the right spot.” Although PDS got itself in the right spots against St. Augustine, it didn’t close the deal. “I felt like we played good hockey today but we lacked a little grit,” said Bertoli, who also got a goal from sophomore for ward Nick Bruno. “We lacked a little toughness at times on the 50/50 pucks. I look at the goals that they scored, they were second and third chance opportunities right in front of net. We have to clear the front of the net. We have got to be harder in the hard areas of the rink.” The Panthers did play hard in the third period, generating some good opportunities even as their rally fell short. “We wanted to be more aggressive, we wanted to get back to the way we were playing in the first period,” said Bertoli. “As much as we pushed at the end, we didn’t have that

consistent, sustained pressure that you would like to see when you are down late. I think we have a pretty opportunistic group. We create a lot on the rush. We had some chances on the rush today and I thought we did some good things.” The defensive unit did some good things, led by freshmen Han Shin and Connor Stratton along with s ophomore Will Brow n, sophomore Cole Fenton, and junior Chris Babecki, a converted forward. “They are just good hockey players, they play a lot of minutes, they play the game the right way, and they play hard,” said Bertoli of his two freshman standouts. “It is a position that we are not deep at right now and yet I thought the five of them played very well today. I thought Will moved his feet, we have encouraged him to get more involved offensively and I thought he did that today. I thought Cole had a good game. Chris is just kind of learning the position, he is starting to get a little more comfortable.” While not winning the St. Augustine game was disappointing, Bertoli was happy to see his players get the chance to compete. “It is fun to be around the kids,” added Bertoli, whose team is slated to host Princeton High on February 24. “I can see the excitement in their eyes as they get the opportunity to play and be around each other. Most of our kids have been remote

the vast majorit y of the year. They get that social interaction at the rink that they are not getting in the school building. That has been nice.” Kunkle is determined to enjoy his last few weeks at the PDS rink.

the end is going to come, it is inevitable so we just want to make the most of what we have now and hope that we get some more games on the schedule.” —Bill Alden

SENIOR MOMENT: Princeton Day School boys’ hockey player Trevor Kunkle celebrates last week after scoring his first career goal against St. Augustine. Senior forward Kunkle’s tally was a highlight in the February 16 contest which saw a late PDS rally fall short in a 3-2 defeat. The Panthers, now 1-1-1, host Princeton High on February 24. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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“I am trying to make the most of what I have here with this group of guys, this coaching staff, and my classmates; it is a great senior class,” said Kunkle. “I am just trying to have fun and enjoy the season while we have it. Eventually

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27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2021

Providing a Highlight in 3-2 Loss to St. Augustine, Kunkle Notches 1st Career Goal for PDS Boys’ Hockey


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 24, 2021 • 28

Utilizing Qualities Developed on the Football Field, Smith Emerges as a Force for Hun Boys’ Hoops Kelvin Smith’s explosiveness and physicality helped him emerge as a star wide receiver and linebacker for the Hun School football team. This winter, Smith is applying those gridiron qualities to the basketball court, excelling for the Hun boys’ hoops team. “Football has definitely helped my cutting in basketball,” said senior guard/ forward Smith, a powerfully-built 6’4, 220-pounder. “When I cut now, I am really good at faking out defenders and not letting them know which way I am going. It feels like running a route. Physical-wise, I feel like nobody on the court is too big to stop me. After playing football, the aggressiveness and tenacity I have is very different from everybody else. It helps me get to the basket easier. It definitely helps me in grabbing rebounds over people and getting loose balls.” Last Saturday in a 58-41 win over the Princeton Day School, Smith displayed his aggressiveness, tallying 13

points with four rebounds, two assists, and one steal. “I thought the team performed really well overall; I thought it was a good game,” said Smith, reflecting on the victory which was the third straight for the Raiders as they improved to 4-1. “This past week, COVID was throwing our schedule off a little bit. We wanted to see if we could get back in that rhythm and we did. I think everybody played well.” Despite dealing with stops and starts due to COVID and weather issues, Hun is finding a groove. “I feel like we are playing with confidence right now,” said Smith. “Even though the record isn’t everything, I think that is contributing to the win streak that we have going right now. We are playing with a lot of confidence and that is helping us on the court, defensively and offensively.” Smith is looking to contribute in any way possible this winter in his final

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campaign for the Raiders. “As a senior captain, I feel like my role is to be a leader for the team,” said Smith. “Sometimes we get rushed a little bit so I feel like it’s my job to keep the team under control and to find the open man when somebody is open and to take the open shot when I am open. It is a little bit of everything. I feel like if we need a basket, I can use a screen and get to the basket. If we need a jump shot, I can pass to one of my teammates or take a shot if I see it.” Improving his offensive game has been a key focus for Smith. “Coming into this year, I worked on my shooting the most,” said Smith. “I have been seeing an improvement in the past couple of games; that is really good to see because it is giving me more confidence. It is giving my teammates more confidence to hit me when I am open. It is definitely helping our offense to take the next step, especially with shooters like Jack [Scott] and Dan [Vessey].” Looking ahead to competing at the next level, Smith recently committed to attend Yale University and is hoping to play both football and basketball for the Bulldogs. “I was offered for football and then the basketball coach at Yale [James Jones] who used to coach my dad in high school called me up,” recalled Smith. “ I f y o u w a n t to p l ay

basketball, you can have that here also. My final three was Cornell for basketball, Harvard for football and then Yale for football. It was an easy but hard choice. I didn’t know that I had the chance to play basketball at Yale and so when he called me, that helped me make my decision.” Hun head coach Jon Stone credits Smith with helping the squad all over the floor. “Kelvin’s leadership has been really good all year long,” said Stone. “He is just so versatile for us. We play him on the ball a lot and yet we play him off the ball. He is such a good defender, he just gives us incredible versatility. He has been playing really well. He is a stat sheet stuffer. He just tends to have high numbers in points, rebounds, blocks, and assists every night. He has taken charges and different things like that. He is not always our leading scorer but he recognizes that there is so much more value to him. He gives us so much in every category.” W h i le Stone ack nowl edged that the Raiders didn’t excel in every category in their win over PDS, he did see good defensive intensity from his players. “ We have re a l ly b een improv ing defensively, I thought defensively we did a really nice job,” said Stone. “Offensively, we struggled a lot. We didn’t shoot the ball well. We shot 30 percent for the game. We are still looking to find our offensive rhythm a little bit.” Shar p -shooting sopho more guard Dan Vessey provided a lot of the offense for

Hun against the Panthers, tallying 24 points. “Dan has been playing well, he is a really good scorer,” said Stone. “He can not only shoot the ball but he just finds ways; he has a really good knack for the game. He always seems to be on the right spot at the right time. It is really nice to have him on our side.” It is also nice for the Raiders to have junior guard Jack Scott, who has emerged as a tenacious rebounder from the guard spot to go along with his shooting and passing prowess. “Jack is just so aggressive on the glass; he is our leading rebounder as a guard,” said Stone, noting that Scott had 11 rebounds against PDS. “His defensive game has really risen; he has turned into a really solid defender for us much like Kelvin, just doing a good job overall on the defensive. He can stuff the stat sheet too. He gets a lot of assists on top of those rebounds. He can score in multiple ways.” In the frontcourt, juniors Isiaha Dickens and Toby Thornburg have been stepping up. “Isiaha and Toby have taken their games to the next level from last year and have given us a lot,” said Stone. “Isiaha is shooting the ball really well and has given us a nice inside presence. Toby has really turned into a nice defender as well and shown an ability to pass the ball really well too and stuff the stat sheets like Kelvin and Jack a little bit.” As Hun heads down the

ONCE UPON A POLICY

homestretch of the 2021 campaign, Stone is looking for the squad to take things to a higher level. “I am happiest about our defensive progress more than anything else,” said Stone, whose team is scheduled to host Pennington on February 25, Peddie School on February 27, and the Patrick School on March 2. “The first game that we played I felt like our defense was really poor. I think we have really improved in that area. With our offense, we have yet to hit stride. It is not a question of if, it is a question of when. I look forward to the days when our offense starts clicking a little smoother.” Smith, for his part, believes the team will keep making strides. “We are not taking any games for granted, given the situation that some teams are not even playing,” said Smith. “Our goal is to go undefeated for the rest of the season. We have been doing really well and with the season we are looking at, I feel like we can keep that up.” —Bill Alden

WHO’S BEEN SHOOTING AT MY TREES? with Pepper deTuro WOODWINDS ASSOCIATES

The characteristic straight rows of holes from the pecking of the Yellow-Belly Sapsuckers are a curiosity to many. The birds are not searching for the larvae of boring insects as often assumed. What they do is eat the live inner bark (phloem) of the trees, as well as the insects that are attracted to the resulting wounded areas and sap flow that their pecking creates.

VO LUM E 12 / F EBRUARY:

Losing Their Baubles, and Marbles You’ve scoured the drawers, the back of the cabinet. You contemplate who has been in your home. Misplacing a piece of valuable jewelry can trigger despair, especially if the item isn’t covered on your policy.

Unless the holes are close enough together to cause girdling of stems or branches, the trees are usually not affected. Once the birds have identified a suitable tree, they will return year after year. For trees severely damaged, consider deep root bio-fertilization with organic stimulants to maintain health and improve stress resistance.

A client “Joe” told us that while covered through a previous insurer/broker, his girlfriend had lost her engagement ring, which he estimated to be valued at $15,000.

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When he reported the loss to the insurance company, he was shocked to learn that jewelry was subject to a sub-limit, which typically caps reimbursement at $1000-3000 for any one piece of jewelry.

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Once Joe became our client, he took out a valuable articles policy for the second ring. Incredibly, the ring was lost again, but fortunately this time Joe had coverage for the replacement value. Please call me to see how we can help with your insurance needs – and stay tuned for next month’s claim chronicle.

Heather Vogel, CISR

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APPLYING PRESSURE: Hun School boys’ basketball player Kelvin Smith, right, pressures a foe in recent action. Last Saturday, senior guard/forward Smith contributed 13 points, four rebounds, two assists, and one steal to help Hun post a 58-41 win over Princeton Day School. The Raiders, who improved to 4-1 with the victory, are scheduled to host Pennington on February 25, Peddie School on February 27, and the Patrick School on March 2. (Photo by Lexi Thomas)

Come visit our office at 4438 Routh 27 North in Kingston, where you can purchase a copy for 75 cents (3 quarters required) from our coin-operated newspaper boxes, 24 hours a day/ 7 days a week.


Basketball: Ariel Jenkins and Aleah James starred as Stuart rallied to pull out a 58 - 47 win over the Hun School last Saturday. Senior center Jenkins scored 21 points and senior guard James chipped in 19 as the Tartans overcame a 30-27 half time deficit and im proved to 7-3. Stuart hosts Manasquan High on FebruGirls’ Basketball: Casey ary 24 and Saddle River Day Serxner led the way as PHS on February 26. defeated Steinert 35-28 last Wednesday. Freshman point guard Serxner contributed 12 points, seven rebounds, five assists, and five steals to help the Tigers move to 4-1. In upcoming action, PHS is Boys’ Basketball: De- scheduled to play at Ewing spite a solid all-around game on February 26. from Hampton Sanders, Girls’ Swimming: BeaPDS fell 58-41 to the Hun trice Cai, Annie Zhao, and School last Saturday. Soph- Tracey Liu led the way as omore guard Sanders tallied PHS defeated Hightstown 10 points and contributed 126-44 in a virtual meet last three rebounds, three as- week. Sophomore Cai won sists, and three steals as the both the 200 freestyle and Panthers dropped to 3-2. 100 butterfly while classPDS is slated to play at the mate Zhao prevailed in the Peddie School on February 200 individual medley and 25 and at Koinonia Acad- 100 breaststroke and junior emy on March 2. Liu placed first in the 50 free and 100 backstroke. The Tigers have a virtual meet against Ewing scheduled for the week of March 1.

PHS

PDS

Pennington

Boys’ Basketball: Getting outscored 21-11 in the third quarter after being tied 27-27 at halftime, Pennington lost 69-56 to the Hun School on February 16. The Red Raiders, who dropped to 1-3, are slated to play at Hun on February 25 before hosting Newark Academy in February 26 and Life Center Academy on March 1.

Local Sports Princeton Rec Department Offering Multi-Sport Programs

The Princeton Recreation Department is partnering with the U.S. Sports Institute (USSI) to offer a MultiSport program for boys and girls ages 2 to 6 this spring.

The program will take place at Grover Park on Sunday mornings for eight weeks starting April 18. The classes being offered are Parent and Me Multi-Sports Squirts (ages 2 to 3) at 9 a.m., Multi-Sports Squirts (ages 3 to 4) at 10 a.m., and Senior Multi-Sports Squirts (ages 5 to 6) at 11 a.m. The program is open to both Princeton residents ($162) and non-residents ($195). Space in the program is limited. The multi-sport participants will learn key skills through small-sided scrimmages in sports such as lacrosse, soccer, t-ball, and track and field. The USSI is a full-time professional sports provider that works with Recreation Departments and community organizations all over the country. All programs are taught by USSI staff in a safe and structured environment that allows participants to experience a variety of sports while emphasizing fun. Adaptations are in place to ensure social distancing and to prevent sharing of equipment. For more infor mation, log onto princetonrecreation.com. To register go to https://register.communitypass.net/princeton. The program can be found under the tab “2021 Spring Youth Sports Programs.”

Princeton Athletic Club Holding 6K April 10

The Princeton Athletic Club (PAC) is holding a 6K Run on April 10 over the Institute Woods course. The run starts at 10 a.m. from the Princeton Friends School and the event is limited to 200 participants. The event will be chip timed and all abilities are welcome, including walkers. Participants expecting to take longer than 55 minutes over the 6,000-meter course (about 3.75 miles), should inquire about a separate noncompetitive start. Online registration and full details regarding the event and race protocols are available by logging onto princetonac.org. For 22 days prior to the event, registration is $35 online including a T-shirt. Through 22 days prior, a discounted “No Tshirt” option available. From 21 days to 72 hours prior to the race, online only, the entry fee will be $40, including a T-shirt. Sign up at the event will be $55 if space is available, credit card only. The PAC is a nonprofit, all-volunteer running club for the community that promotes running for the fun and health of it and stages several running events each year.

Did you forget your at home? GRAND ACHIEVEMENT: Hun School girls’ basketball player Kennedy Jardine heads to the hoop in a 2019 game. Last Wednesday, senior guard Jardine accomplished a milestone, scoring her 1,000th career point in a 67-51 win over Pennington. She totaled 24 points in the contest as Hun posted its first win of the season. This past Saturday, Jardine scored 18 points and grabbed four rebounds in a losing cause as the Raiders fell 58-47 to Stuart Country Day School. In upcoming action, Hun, now 1-3, plays at the Pennington School on February 25, at Newark Academy on February 26, and at the Peddie School on March 2. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 24, 2021

Stuart

Girls Basketball : Despite a big game from Morgan Matthews, Pennington fell 67-51 to the Hun School last Wednesday. Freshman Matthews scored 24 points as the Red Raiders moved to 2-1. Pennington hosts the Hun School on February 25 before playing at the Peddie School on March 1.

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TIM TERRIFIC: Princeton High boys’ basketball player Tim Evidente dribbles past a foe in recent action. Last Wednesday, senior guard Evidente scored 14 points to help PHS defeat Steinert 5550 and notch its first win of the 2021 season. The Tigers, who improved to 1-4 with the victory, are slated to host Ewing on February 26. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 24, 2021 • 30

Obituaries

Alison Jean Flemer Alison ( Min ) Flemer is off on a new adventure. Her body has not let her do this in some time. Her daughters Janet Flemer, Kate Barrack, and Rebecca Flemer are grateful that she is free. She leaves behind five grandchildren: Wilkie, John, and Jennifer Barrack, Ana and Jeffrey Clemente; granddaughter-in-law Mary B e t h B ar rack ; a nd one great-granddaughter, Riley Elizabeth Barrack. Min was born in Australia in 1930 and passed February 16, 2021. She met her beloved husband John while living in London. Always up for a new experience, she took weekend trips while there, and they met on a ferry boat to the Isle of Skye in 1956. They were engaged three weeks later on a Vespa in Paris. They had 25 beautiful years together in Princeton. She filled the house with art, creating much of it herself. The family traveled to Puerto Rico, Canada,

Europe, and Australia, and Min and John had their own trips together. Min involved herself with gardening groups, Recording for the Blind, and art. She joined Friends of Foreign Students, hosting Princeton grad students from Australia and New Zealand who remain devoted friends. After John passed suddenly in 1982, Min began spending half the year in Vieques, Puerto Rico. She m ad e d e ep a n d las t i n g friendships there to add to her Princeton group. She took on several formidable renovation projects, built a renowned garden, supported local organizations, and became a beloved part of the tight knit community there. She continued her adventures and traveled with friends and her daughters until ill health kept her close to home. A memorial service will be held at a later date due to COVID-19 restrictions. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be sent to The Vieques Conservation & Historical Trust or a charity of their choice.

loved so dearly, after a long illness surrounded by her family. Born and raised in the town of Tottenville, Staten Island, New York, Janet (known to so many as Janie ) was a loving wife and mother, who lived life passionately and loved her family fiercely. Her greatest joy in life were her five granddaughters, whom she loved deeply. Janet began her career in New York City at Irving Trust and worked at Staten Island University Hospital and Hoenig & Company, both in New York. Moving to New Jersey in 1986, she co-owned and operated AlphaGraphics in New Brunswick, with her husband, David and her son, Donald. Janet retired in 2011 after she enjoyed 10 years working at Watermark Group in Princeton. Her life was filled with family celebrations, travel, her many creative activities, and countless blessings. Through it all, Janet worked hard, laughed loud, and loved with all of her being. She loved to dance, tell stories, and spend time with her family, especially her five granddaughters who illuminated her life. A dedicated wife, mother, and grandmother, she will be missed immensely by her family and many friends. Janet was pre-deceased and is now reunited with her mother and father, Paul and Mary Horvath, and her two brothers, Brian and Paul Horvath. She is survived Janet Horvath Gregory by her husband of 34 years, David; her son Donald and Janet Horvath Gregory, daughter-in-law Dorothy; 76, passed away January her daughter Traci a nd 22, 2021, in the home she

son-in-law Michael; and her beloved five granddaughters, Jessie, Emma, Julia, Jillie, and Hannah. Due to the pandemic, an outdoor memorial service will be held on May 16, 11 a.m. at The Mountain Lakes House in Princeton. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in Janet’s name to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

She volunteered as a Girl S cout leader and was a member of the PTA of the Princeton Regional Schools. She loved her family and friends, the arts, as well as her love for the opera and live theater. She was an avid crossword puzzle solver and competed and placed in national tournaments. Her family endearingly called her “the Latin dilettante.” Marion was predeceased by her husband Dr. Jack L. Roemer and her son Philip B. Roemer. She is survived by her son Jonathan (Grace) Roemer of Princeton ; t wo daughters, Michelle

Roemer (Glenn) Schoen of Doylestown, PA, and Shari ( John ) P f lueger of Aus tin, TX; her brother Barry Plaxen of Bloomingburg, NY; six grandchildren; and many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Funeral services are private. Burial will be in the Princeton Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the American Brain Tumor Association, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and McCarter Theatre. To send condolences to the family visit OrlandsMemorial Chapel.com.

Marion Plaxen Roemer O u r b e l o v e d m o t h e r, grandmother, sister, and aunt, Marion Plaxen Roemer, of Pr inceton, NJ, pas s ed away of nat ural causes at Preferred Care at Mercer in Ewing, NJ, on Wednesday, February 17, 2021, at the age of 85. Born in Far Rockaway, New York, Marion was a longtime resident of Prince ton for 57 ye ar s. S h e g raduate d f rom Q u e ens College, City University of New York, and taught nursery school in Lawrenceville, NJ, for a few years while raising her children. She was a lifetime member of Hadassah, and was active in The Artisan’s Guild of Princeton, the American Brain Tumor Association (Philadelphia chapter), and other local organizations.

Andrew Wyeth, Evening at Kuerners print

DIRECTORY OF IRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES DIRECTORY OF

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GIOUSRELIGIOUS SERVICESSERVICES

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Ages I llowing 5:30 pm

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AN EPISCOPAL PARISH

Trinity Church SundayHoly Week 8:00&a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I Easter Schedule

9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages March 23 10:00Wednesday, a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CHAPEL Princeton’s First Tradition

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Tuesday Thursday March 24 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist Rev. Jenny Smith Walz, Lead Pastor

Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Sunday Worship atFoot 10 am Holy Eucharist with Washing and Wednesday Stripping ofTuesdays the Altar,at7:00 pm Lenten Meditation Noon Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer 5:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist

REV. ALISON L. BODEN, PH.D.

Join the livestream or archived services!

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

Wherever you areFriday, on your journey of faith, March 25you are 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org always welcome to worship with usFriday, at: The Prayer Book Service for Good 7:00 am

Dean of Religious Life and of the Chapel

REV. DR. THERESA S. THAMES Associate Dean of Religious Life and of the Chapel

Wherever youEACH are on your journey of faith, are PREMIERES SUNDAY ATyou 8 AM always welcome to worship with us at:

First Church of Christ,

Wherever you are on your journey of faith, Scientist, Princeton Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church come worship with us 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ

The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The Prayer Book Service Good Friday, 7:00 pm undayS in for ent

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton St. Paul’s Catholic Church S L

St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton 9am — Adult Forum on Zoom 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

214 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, March 26 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Wednesday Testimony Meeting andNolan, Nursery at 7:30 p.m. Msgr. Walter Pastor 11am — Coffee Hour on Zoom Saturday 5:30pm p.m. The GreatVigil Vigil ofMass: Easter, 7:00 ¡Eres— siempre bienvenido! 7pm Choral Compline Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. Christian Science Reading Room Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass in Nassau Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. 178 Street, Princeton W eekdayS in L Holy Eucharist, Rite I,ent 7:30 am MassFestive in Spanish: Sunday at 9:00 7:00 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday 10am - 4p.m. Choral Eucharist, Rite II,from Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery 10am — Holy Communion Rite IIat 10:30 a.m.

Mon-Fri — 7:45am — Morning Prayer Festive— Choral Rite II, 11:00 am Mon-Fri 5pm Eucharist, — Evening Prayer Wed — 7pm — Evening Prayer with Sermon

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector The Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate All services are online. Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music Join us at www.trinityprinceton.org 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org

The Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector,

The Rev. Canon Dr. Kara Slade, Assoc. Rector,

The Rev. Joanne Epply-Schmidt, Assoc. Rector, Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 • www.trinityprinceton.org

609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org 10:00 a.m. Worship Service Sunday Church Service,Sunday Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. 10:00 a.m. Children’s School Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. and Youth Bible Study 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Adult Bible Classes Visit csprinceton.org for more information (A multi-ethnic congregation) Christian Science Reading Room

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton

178 Nassau Street, Princeton 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 Our Services are held in the Church 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 witherspoonchurch.org

following Social Distancing Guidelines Sunday Church Service and Sunday School at 10:30 am Wednesday Testimony meetings at 7:30 pm Our Christian Science Reading Room is now open, 178 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ Monday through Saturday 10am-4pm. Curbside pickup and free local delivery are available. Please call ahead 609-924-0919

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 10:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 Children’s Sunday School During this timea.m. of COVID-19 crisis, Witherspoon is finding new and Youth Bible Studydoors may be closed, ways to continue our worship. While our sanctuary Adult Bible Classes church is open and we will find new avenues to proclaim the Gospel and to (A multi-ethnic congregation)

continue as one faith community!

609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365

Join us for worshipwitherspoonchurch.org on Facebook Live every Sunday at 10:00 a.m. Recorded and live stream sermons can also be found on our website - witherspoonchurch.org Join our mailing list to receive notices of our special services, bible study and virtual fellowship. During the COVID-19 crisis our church office is closed, however, please email witherspoon@verizon.net or leave a message at our church office and a staff member will get back to you. Church office: (609) 924-1666


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HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22

HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 9472958. 02-03-4t

PRINCETON HOUSE FOR SALE: 5-6 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, Western Section, 1 acre. All renovated. Detached garage. Walk to train & University. Call (609) 216-0092. 02-24-3t

Irene Lee, Classified Manager

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

CLEANING • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. KOALA SERVICE, LLC: WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR Residentialin & Commercial 07-15-21 • 25 words or less: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words length.cleaning. A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? 20% off your first cleaning! I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Phone: (267) • 3 weeks: $40.00 • 4 weeks: $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. 990-5901 info@koalacleaningservice.com Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, A Gift Subscription! 02-24-3t www.koalacleaningservice.com • Ads with linecostume spacing: $20.00/inch • all bold face type: $10.00/week jewelry, evening bags, fan-

FOR SALE: Brand new mink coat; woman’s winter jacket made in France; Russian Magazine Apollon. Call (609) 921-7218. ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC:

For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 01-06-7t STRING LESSONS ONLINE OR LIVE: VIOLIN/VIOLA LESSONS. Fiddling, Traditional & Suzuki Methods. Ms. D., Master Of Music, violin/viola pedagogy. Teaches all ages/levels, in Princeton area since 1995. FREE INTRO LESSON. Call (609) 924-5933 or (609) 706-2209. cldamerau@yahoo. com 02-24 HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 9472958. 02-03-4t HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396.

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf GIVE OR GET THE GIFT OF WRITING! Contact the Princeton Writing Coach—a professional writer, editor, and university teacher—to explore customized learning, writing, and editing services delivered virtually. Specialties: school/college applications; tutoring; scientific, business, and ESL writing. Outstanding references. 908-420-1070. r t re n n e r @ a l u m n i.p r i n c e to n .e d u princetonwritingcoach.com 02-17-4t PRINCETON HOUSE FOR SALE: 5-6 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, Western Section, 1 acre. All renovated. Detached garage. Walk to train & University. Call (609) 216-0092. 02-24-3t KOALA CLEANING SERVICE, LLC: Residential & Commercial cleaning. 20% off your first cleaning! Phone: (267) 990-5901 info@koalacleaningservice.com www.koalacleaningservice.com Company is insured. 02-10-8t

tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years

cy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf DO YOU HAVE ITEMS YOU’D LIKE TO BUY OR SELL? Consider placing a classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf FOR SALE: Brand new mink coat; woman’s winter jacket made in France; Russian Magazine Apollon. Call (609) 921-7218. 02-24-3t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 01-06-7t STRING LESSONS ONLINE OR LIVE: VIOLIN/VIOLA LESSONS. Fiddling, Traditional & Suzuki Methods. Ms. D., Master Of Music, violin/viola pedagogy. Teaches all ages/levels, in Princeton area since 1995. FREE INTRO LESSON. Call (609) 924-5933 or (609) 706-2209. cldamerau@yahoo. com 02-24

CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Call Roeland- preferred phone, (516) 888-9687. Active original, (609) 933-9240.. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf GIVE OR GET THE GIFT OF WRITING! Contact the Princeton Writing Coach—a professional writer, editor, and university teacher—to explore customized learning, writing, and editing services delivered virtually. Specialties: school/college applications; tutoring; scientific, business, and ESL writing. Outstanding references. 908-420-1070. r t re n n e r @ a l u m n i.p r i n c e to n .e d u princetonwritingcoach.com 02-17-4t

Company is insured. 02-10-8t

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21

“There is something permanent, and something extremely profound, in owning a home." —Kenny Guinn

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

WATER WATER EVERYWHERE! Let's rid that water problem in your basement once and for all! Complete line of waterproofing services, drain systems, interior or exterior, foundation restoration and structural repairs. Restoring those old and decaying walls of your foundation.

Call A. Pennacchi and Sons, and put that water problem to rest!

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

Mercer County's oldest waterproofing co. est. 1947 Deal directly with Paul from start to finish.

609-394-7354

Over 70 years of stellar excellence! Thank you for the oppportunity.

apennacchi.com

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 24, 2021

to place an order:

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 24, 2021 • 32

ery Twp. $2,550/mo. Donna M. Murray Sales Associate, REALTOR® 23 Years Experience Servicing Princeton & Bordering Townships

You take pride in your home.

You worked hard to own and maintain your most valuable asset. You deserve to get the best price for your investment.

BE A PART OF THE A-TEAM!

Work with someone whose standards are as high as yours. • • • • • •

Extensive Knowledge of Princeton & Greater Princeton Area Aggressive Marketing Program Expert Negotiator Expert in Luxury Homes Approved Agent for Corporate Relocation 70+ Units Sold in 2020

Listed by Donna M. Murray Let’s create a plan to get your property out ® in front of Sales Associate, REALTOR the competition in 2021. Give me a call today! Cell: 908-391-8396 All conversations are confidential and obligation-free. donnamurray@comcast.net Zoom, FaceTime and in-person consultations available. NJdistancing REALTORS® Circle will of be followed. CDC guidelines2015 for social & mask-wearing Excellence Award® Winner -Platinum

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS!

STRING LESSONS ONLINE OR LIVE:

GIVE OR GET THE GIFT OF WRITING!

Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go!

VIOLIN/VIOLA LESSONS. Fiddling, Traditional & Suzuki Methods. Ms. D., Master Of Music, violin/viola pedagogy. Teaches all ages/levels, in Princeton area since 1995. FREE INTRO LESSON. Call (609) 924-5933 or (609) 706-2209. cldamerau@yahoo. com

Contact the Princeton Writing Coach—a professional writer, editor, and university teacher—to explore customized learning, writing, and editing services delivered virtually. Specialties: school/college applications; tutoring; scientific, business, and ESL writing. Outstanding references. 908-420-1070. r t re n n e r @ a l u m n i.p r i n c e to n .e d u princetonwritingcoach.com

We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com

02-03-4t HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396.

CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT

02-17-4t PRINCETON HOUSE FOR SALE: 5-6 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, Western Section, 1 acre. All renovated. Detached garage. Walk to train & University. Call (609) 216-0092. 02-24-3t KOALA CLEANING SERVICE, LLC: Residential & Commercial cleaning. 20% off your first cleaning! Phone: (267) 990-5901 info@koalacleaningservice.com www.koalacleaningservice.com Company is insured.

WE BUY CARS

in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732

Belle Mead Garage

tf

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST:

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Call Roeland- preferred phone, (516) 888-9687. Active original, (609) 933-9240..

Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130

tf

(908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf DO YOU HAVE ITEMS YOU’D LIKE TO BUY OR SELL? Consider placing a classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

02-24-3t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC:

system of BHH Affiliates, LLC.

HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 9472958.

tf

FOR SALE: Brand new mink coat; woman’s winter jacket made in France; Russian Magazine Apollon. Call (609) 921-7218.

253Nassau NassauStreet, St, Princeton, 253 Princeton,NJ NJ08540 08540 609-924-1600 609-924-1600 Cell: 908-391-8396 Donna.murray@foxroach.com A member of the franchise

02-24

tf

02-10-8t

07-15-21 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21

For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188.

Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613.

01-06-7t

tf

01-01-22

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER

STONE MEADOW Stone Meadow is a 5 acre premier property in the heart of Solebury. The stone farmhouse has been lovingly restored featuring a large chef’s kitchen, 3-4 bedrooms and renovated bathrooms. The high ceilings is illustrative of an affluent pedigree. The property contains an in-ground pool and a small barn that has been converted into an insulated artist studio or workshop. Less than 8 minutes to the heart of New Hope. Rarely do renovated stone farmhouses on 5 acres come on the market at this price in Solebury. $1,175,000

Art Mazzei

Art@addisonwolfe.com Cell: 610.428.4885

550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • AddisonWolfe.com • 215.862.5500


Mirrors installed in your frame Brian•Wisner 741 Alexander Rd, Princeton 924-2880

Rider

Furniture

Broker Associate | Luxury Collection C: 732.588.8000 O: 609.921.9202

Brian Wisner

Broker Associate | Luxury Collection

Brian E : Wisner bwisner19@gmail.com

: BrianSellsNJ.com BrokerWAssociate | Luxury Collection “Where quality still matters.”

of Princeton

C: 732.588.8000 O: 609.921.9202

Brian Wisner E : bwisner19@gmail.com

Broker Associate | Luxury Collection W : BrianSellsNJ.com 343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540

C: of732.588.8000 Princeton O: 609.921.9202

343 Nassau St. NJ 08540 C:Princeton, 732.588.8000 O: 609.921.9202

Lic: 1432491 E : bwisner19@gmail.com

2016

Lic: 1432491

E : bwisner19@gmail.com W : BrianSellsNJ.com

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540

W : BrianSellsNJ.com Each Office Independently Owned and Operated 343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

Lic: 1432491

LET’S TALK REAL ESTATE... 2016

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. Of PrINCEtON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

Princeton References

Salary: $15.00 per 30 minute shift Mornings 8:00-8:30 a.m. Afternoons 12:30-1:30 p.m.

•Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21 tOWN tOPICS CLASSIfIEDS GEtS tOP rESULtS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read.

Princeton Police seeks

Crossing Guard

For more information: https://nj-princeton.civicplus.com/Jobs.aspx

American Furniture Exchange

(609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

Lic: 1432491 Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

BUYER FLEXIBILITY IN THE SELLER’S MARKET The real estate market is showing no signs of slowing down as Spring 2021 approaches. Demand for suburban and rural areas remains high, while inventories are extremely low. The lack of inventory has plunged the region into a strong seller’s market that comes with its own challenges. Right now, homes that are priced correctly are gaining multiple offers, often selling over the asking price. Many are going into contract within a few days of being listed for sale. Buyers who can be flexible on their move -in date may be more attractive than buyers who have firm deadlines. We’re also seeing some creative solutions that allow more sellers to cash in on the current market. For example, post-closing leaseback agreements are becoming more common as an option. In a leaseback agreement, the seller remains in the house after the closing for a specified period of time, in effect becoming the buyer’s tenant. This can allow sellers to take advantage of the market while they find a new home.

tf EStAtE LIQUIDAtION SErVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22 WHAt’S A GrEAt GIft fOr A fOrMEr PrINCEtONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

Witherspoon Media Group Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

rOSA’S CLEANING SErVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 01-06-7t

· Postcards

Free estimates! All work guaranteed in writing!

HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 9472958. 02-03-4t

609-921-2299

609-306-0613

· Newsletters

StrING LESSONS ONLINE Or LIVE: VIOLIN/VIOLA LESSONS. Fiddling, Traditional & Suzuki Methods. Ms. D., Master Of Music, violin/viola pedagogy. Teaches all ages/levels, in Princeton area since 1995. FREE INTRO LESSON. Call (609) 924-5933 or (609) 706-2209. cldamerau@yahoo. com 02-24

Serving the Princeton area for 25 years

I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

fOr SALE: Brand new mink coat; woman’s winter jacket made in France; Russian Magazine Apollon. Call (609) 921-7218. 02-24-3t

Highest Quality Seamless Gutters. ☛GUTTER CLEANING ☛GUTTER REPAIRS ☛GUTTER PROTECTION! 3 Gutter Protection Devices that Effectively Work!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items

WE BUY CArS

DO YOU HAVE ItEMS YOU’D LIKE tO BUY Or SELL? Consider placing a classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Princeton Office 609-921-1900 | 609-577-2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

30 Years of Experience!

HOME HEALtH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

· Brochures · Books · Catalogues · Annual Reports For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

CArPENtrY/ HOME IMPrOVEMENt in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

The Mercer Oak, set of 4, 35mm colored film prints, by John Rounds

Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton! www.princetonmagazinestore.com

HANDYMAN–CArPENtEr: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Call Roeland- preferred phone, (516) 888-9687. Active original, (609) 933-9240.. tf PrOfESSIONAL BABYSIttEr Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 24, 2021

2016

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 24, 2021 • 34

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293 Riverside Drive, Princeton Located in the "Riverside” neighborhood of Princeton, this craftsman-built new construction home features 4 Bedrooms, 5 1/2 Bathrooms and a large finished basement on a secluded, tree-lined 0.48 lot. Inside this spectacular home, you will find high-end features including 9 feet high ceilings on the first floor and second floor, tray ceilings, custom tiled showers, an over-sized 2-car attached garage, Andersen 400 series windows, solid oak hardwood floors throughout, Grohe faucets, designer Italian appliances, solid wood cabinets, natural Quartzite kitchen counter tops and granite bathrooms countertops. This home's covered front porch invites you in and opens up to a sprawling, open floor plan. On the first floor, you have a Gourmet, eat-in kitchen with an oversized central island that includes a breakfast bar. The kitchen opens to a large Great room with gas fireplace surrounded by a custom mantel and built in cabinets. Looking through the full wall of windows in the great room, you can see the secluded backyard. From the foyer, French doors lead you into a private den complete with a full bathroom. You also have a formal dining room with a tray celling, double crown molding, and custom wall moldings. Completing the main floor is a half bathroom, large walk-in pantry and even a larger mud/laundry room. On second floor, you have a 10' high, spacious master retreat with en-suite bathroom complete with soaking tub, dual fixture shower, two sinks and a generous walk in closet. A guest bedroom with an en-suite bathroom and walk-in closet, Two additional bedrooms with a Jack-andJill bathroom and a large unfinished storage over the garage complete this floor. The finished basement has a full bathroom and tons of space. Two gas furnaces, two wifi-enabled thermostats, and a video doorbell allows you the flexibility to control your Environment! This is the perfect house for entertaining! Just a stroll to Downtown Princeton, Riverside Elementary Scholl, Princeton University as well as shopping, restaurants, parks and Cultural Landmarks! $1,888,000

Annabella “Ann” Santos

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ 08540 | 609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Fox & Roach, REALTORS® Cell 609-865-9369 Office 609-924-1600 x8553 ann.santos@foxroach.com

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 24, 2021

The “Riverside” Neighborhood of Princeton


30 Gordon Way, Princeton Marketed by: Robin L. Wallack $675,000

754 Great Road, Princeton Marketed by: Chihlan “Lana” Chan $2,338,000

PRESENTING

4 Lexington Court, West Windsor Twp Marketed by: Robin L. Wallack $580,000

6 Littlebrook Road N, Princeton Marketed by: Eva Petruzziello & Roberta Parker $2,399,000

PRESENTING

94 North Road, Princeton Marketed by: Helen H. Sherman $$2,975,000

347 Prospect Avenue, Princeton Marketed by: Robin L. Wallack $999,000

From Princeton, We Reach the World.

50 Tiffany Drive, Raritan Twp Marketed by: Chihlan “Lana”| Chan $860,000

47 Tree Swallow Drive, West Windsor Twp Marketed | by: Ivy Wen $619,000

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 foxroach.com TEMPORARILY LOCATED AT 33 WITHERSPOON STREET

© BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

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Town Topics Newspaper, February 24, 2021