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Volume LXXV, Number 7

Preservation of Bonaparte Estate Attracts International Media . . . . 5 Rider Student’s Documentary Series Explores Black Veterans of Two Wars . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Princeton Perks a “WinWin-Win” for Schools, Local Businesses, Consumers . . . . . . . . . 11 Celebrating Love and Scandal on Lola Montez's 200th Birthday . . . . . . 13 McCarter and PU Present The Manic Monologues . . . . . . . . 14 PDS Alum Coffey Debuts For Colorado College Men’s Hockey . . . . . . . 20 Employing Up-Tempo Approach, PHS Girls’ Hoops Produces 3-1 Start . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Ethan Guy Leading The Way for PHS Boys’ Hoops . . . . . . . . 23 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .18, 19 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 17 Classified Ads . . . . . . 28 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 26 Performing Arts . . . . . 15 Police Blotter . . . . . . . . 8 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 28 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

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Demonstrators Demand University Democratize, Share Health Resources More than 100 demonstrators — community members and University students — gathered on the walkways stretching from FitzRandolph Gate on Nassau Street to Nassau Hall on Saturday afternoon, February 13, to demand that Princeton University share its contact tracing and COVID testing resources with surrounding communities. In an event sponsored by Unidad Latina en Accion (ULA), Princeton AntiAusterity Coalition (PAAC), Princeton Mutual Aid (PMA), Princeton Graduate Students United (PGSU), Divest Princeton, and Princeton University Policy Student Government (PUPSG) and lasting more than an hour in the sleet and freezing rain, the speakers also called on the University to democratize all major University decision-making, to include members of the larger community, especially on issues related to the COVID pandemic and other health and safety matters. “I call upon my fellow students to stand in solidarity with our neighbors from Princeton and the surrounding municipalities, and demand that our University extend its free testing, free tracing, and eventual free vaccination services to this local region that is deeply impacted by whatever plan this University adopts,” PAAC member Peter Scharer, a Princeton undergraduate, told the crowd. He went on to emphasize the importance of including local residents, especially those residents who are uninsured, underinsured or undocumented, in the decision-making process. “We must demand that residents, workers, and students alike have a democratic say in the University’s COVID plans, so as to avoid further harm caused by the inevitable austere measures of an unaccountable administration,” he said. The bilingual event, with speeches in Spanish and English, included speakers from the sponsoring organizations with a mix of community members, University graduate students, and undergraduates. Many related stories of hardship and suffering along with their pleas for resources and help from the University in battling the pandemic. University junior and PAAC organizer Marc Schorin noted, “We don’t want your charity. We want your solidarity. It’s not about feeling bad or pity. These people are fighting for their rights, Continued on Page 10

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Officials See Hopeful Signs, COVID Cases Down Princeton Health Officer Jeff Grosser has reported downward trends in COVID case numbers, with indications that the frustratingly slow vaccination rollout will be picking up speed. From the peak of the second wave in late November and early December to last week, Princeton has seen a 71.2 percent decrease in the number of new cases, Grosser wrote in a February 16 email. “In general, cases have been consistently dropping since December 30, 2020,” he added, but he noted that the Latino population has been disproportionately affected by the virus. “Unfortunately, we are still seeing the burden of COVID-19 being heavier on the Hispanic/Latino population than all other ethnic/racial groups,” he said. “Fortunately, through a two-year grant from the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH), the Princeton Health Department hired a vulnerable population outreach coordinator (VPOC). The VPOC will focus on making inroads on Princeton’s populations most impacted from the pandemic, and work towards improving their social and health outcomes as we progress away from what was hopefully the worst of the pandemic.“

Last Thursday, February 11, the Princeton Health Department reported only seven new cases in the seven previous days, down from the highest seven-day total of 39 new cases in December. As of last week, there had been 14 new cases in the previous 14 days, well below the highest 14-day total of 66, also recorded in December. The Health Department reported a total of 40 active positive cases. Hispanic residents have accounted for 27 percent of all COVID-19 cases in Princeton, according to the Health Department.

Princeton Press and Media Communications Director Fred Williams urged caution, warning that the current drop in case numbers is occurring from the highest levels of the pandemic. “So, while this is a welcome trend, we must continue with our COVID safety mindset.” Williams predicted that increased vaccinations, improving weather and continuing masking, social distancing, and other prescribed measures would bring further improvements. “But make no mistake,” Continued on Page 8

Councilwoman Michelle Pirone Lambros To Run for New Jersey State Assembly Princeton Councilwoman Michelle Pirone Lambros announced Tuesday that she will run for the Legislative District 16 Assembly seat being vacated by Democrat Andrew Zwicker, who recently kicked off his campaign for the seat of retiring New Jersey Senator Kip Bateman. “I believe my business skills will be useful in navigating through the complexities of legislative initiatives. I lead through collaboration and my impact on Council and the amount of progress we were able to make, during the most challenging health and economic crisis of our lifetime, attests

to my ability to get things done,” Lambros said in a press release. In a phone conversation Tuesday, Lambros said she can remain on Council while putting herself on the ballot. While she initially thought she wouldn’t have the time to enter the race, she was urged by others to do so. “If I can be effective and people have faith in me to do public service, I’m willing to go for it,” she said. “My main motivation is COVID and all of the economic challenges we are going to have on the municipal level and the state level. I think Continued on Page 8

PALMER SQUARE ON ICE: Residents and visitors enjoyed the snow on the Palmer Square green on Sunday afternoon after watching as a giant block of ice was sculpted into a 3-D figure . The ice carving event continues each Sunday in February from noon to 2 p .m . (Photo by Weronika A. Plohn)

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A SPECIAL HONOR: The Mercer County Park Commission’s Master Plan for Miry Run Ponds has been unanimously honored by the New Jersey Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects. and Robbinsville. The pan- recently initiated work to Miry Run Ponds Receives Landscape Architecture Award el of jurors from the New prepare detailed design and The Mercer County Park Com mission’s Mir y Run Ponds Master Plan has received the 2021 Chapter Award from the New Jersey Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (NJASLA). The master plan was selected by a unanimous vote of jury members and was announced at the NJASLA virtual meeting held on January 31. The master plan is the pro du c t of a ye ar- long process led by consultants Simone Collins Landscape Architecture and Princeton Hydro, resulting in an ambitious, yet environmentally sensitive plan for the 279acre County property in Hamilton, West Windsor,

Jersey Chapter of the ASLA selected Miry Run Ponds Master Plan, also known as Dam Site 21, based on the research, design, restoration, and the public participation process that informed the final plan. “With input from the public, our consultants helped us create a vision for the park that will improve water quality in the lake and make it more accessible to Mercer County residents,” said Park Commission Executive Director Aaron T. Watson. “The Park Commission is honored to have a project recognized by the NJASLA and we look forward to acting on our plan in the years ahead.” T he Park Commission

engineering plans for the first phase of improvements at the park. Phase 1 park improvements are estimated to be completed in 2024. “The master plan propos es 34 acres of new forest, which will contain an estimated 14,800 new trees, and 64 acres of new native meadows,” noted Peter Simone, president of Simone Collins Landscape Architecture. “In addition to ecological restoration of the site, the plan’s predominant recommendation is for six miles of new trails. Access for kayaking, fishing and visitor parking are also proposed.” Visit mercercountyparks. org for more information.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Library Reopening: Princeton Public Library will reopen on Wednesday, February 17. The building was closed for several weeks after a staff member tested positive for COVID-19. Hours are 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Saturday, with evening hours 4-7 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Visit princetonlibrary.org for more information. Love Your Park Day Rescheduled: Friends of Princeton Open Space has rescheduled this event, which was originally planned for February 13, to Saturday, March 6. There will be two sessions, from 9 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. Visit fopos. org for details. Register for COVID-19 Vaccine: For the latest information on receiving the vaccine, visit covid19.nj.gov/pages/vaccine or princetonnj.gov/282/CoronavirusCOVID-19-Information. Vaccination Hotline: New Jersey’s COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center is staffed daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (855) 568-0545 for questions about registering with the New Jersey Vaccine Scheduling System, finding vaccine locations, and more. Free COVID Tests: Saliva tests are available for free from Mercer County for anyone who is experiencing symptoms, has been in close contact with someone who has tested positive, is an essential worker, was recently in a large crowd, or recently traveled to a state with a high COVID infection rate. Visit mercercares.org. For an updated list of locations where tests are being administered, visit trentonhealthteam. org/covidtests.


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Preservation of Bonaparte Estate Attracts International Media Attention

Since the New York Times published an article about plans by D & R Greenway L and Tr ust of Princeton

and partners to preserve the Point Breeze Bonaparte estate in Bordentown last month, media from all over the world have been clamoring for the story. “Yesterday I was on a call with a Spanish news service,” said D&R Greenway CEO and President Linda Mead on Tuesday. “Joseph Bonaparte was the exiled king of Spain, so they are so excited about it. It has been amazing to me how many people have come forward since we made this announcement, and how many calls we have gotten, from everywhere.”

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Poi nt Bre e z e w as t h e palatial estate of Joseph Bonaparte, the elder brother of Napoleon Bonaparte and former King of Spain and Naples. He fled to the United States in 1815 and bought the Point Breeze estate in 1817 from diplomat Stephen Sayre. The land is high on the Bordentown Bluffs overlooking extensive marshlands and the confluence of Crosswicks Creek and the Delaware River. The location, between Philadelphia and New York, was documented in many paintings of the era that can be seen today in museums. Remnants of tunnels, leading from Bonaparte’s mansions to the waterways, can still be viewed. At the time, the estate included sculpture gardens, coach trails, bridges, stables, a gardener’s house, a lake, and a three-story mansion “that contained an extensive wine cellar, an extravagant art collection, and a library that contained 8,000 volumes, more than the Library of Congress at that time, and Bonaparte employed hundreds of people at the estate,” according to an article in Royal Central, one of the international news services to cover the story along with London’s Daily Mail and the Spanish news service EFE. There have also been calls from individuals with Bonaparte c on n e c t ion s. “S o m a ny

people have been in touch with us,” said Mead. “Some have said they are descendants of Bonapartes. Others have objects like chairs or china that have come from Bonapartes.” The $4.6 million preservation agreement is a collaborative effort of D & R Greenway Land Trust, the New Jersey Green Acres Program, and the City of Bordentown. D&R Greenway has been involved for more than 25 years with t he Abb ot t Marsh lands, the wetlands area between

to wait for something from the Vatican!” The final word came in October. The partners had two months to get the deal closed. “It was a bit of a whirlwind, but it worked out in the end,” said Mead. As par t of the overall preservation, D&R Greenway Land Trust purchased the only remaining building on the estate, the gardener’s house. It is said that Joseph Bonaparte brought asparagus to the United States, and grew it at Point Breeze for the first time in the country. Mead said the gardener’s house should be open to visitors by next fall, and will eventually be fully restored. “O f te n w h e n h i s to r i c buildings are purchased, it takes a long time to pull together funding,” she said. “The good news with the gardener’s house is that it is structurally sound. It just needs some cosmetic work in order to open. Eventually, we will put it back to how it was during Bonaparte’s time.” Preservation of the property has been a dream of D &R trustee Peter Tucci, who has assembled a collection of Bonaparte artifacts including letters, books, furniture, and art. Following renovations, he will exhibit them throughout the gardener’s house. “You can understand why a former king would choose this for his home,” said Tucci. “Joseph Bonaparte spent what today would be about $50 million” to build his first house on Point Breeze. The overall plan is for the property to be turned into Continued on Next Page

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AN ERA GONE BY: This historic painting from Joseph Bonaparte’s Point Breeze estate, by Thomas Birch, dates from 1818 and is one of many works of art documenting the property in Bordentown once owned by Napoleon’s brother. News of its preservation has caught the attention of news sources across the globe.

Bordentown and Trenton that is adjacent to the estate. Over the years, the land trust has held some programs at the Divine Word Missionaries, previous owners of the property. Mead and colleagues first learned there might be an opportunity to purchase the property about two years ago. “The scuttlebutt of that time was that the headquarters of Divine Word needed to be moved elsewhere because of the cost,” Mead said. “We called the head priest and he invited us to bring an offer forward. We talked with the state, who immediately said yes — the Green Acres program had pres er ved land already, along the bluffs. Then we reached out to the City of Bordentown.” It turned out that Mayor James E. Lynch Jr. had been raised in Bordentown and knew the property well. He was also looking for larger municipal headquarters, and the surviving building on the property fit the bill. An agreement was put together. “From that point forward, we did studies of the property and negotiated for the contract. One of the staff people at the Green Acres program took the lead. All of us were working from home because of the pandemic. A number of developers were interested, for different reasons, and that was constantly happening while we were putting together what we could come up with for preservation. The final word for that had to come from the consulate in Rome. It was the first time in 30 years of doing land preservation that I’ve had


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 17, 2021 • 6

Bonaparte Estate Continued from Preceding Page

a park with trails through the woods. Plans for interpretive signage and audio tours are in the works, said Mead. “People who live in the area will have a park, practically in their backyard,” she said. “But it will also attract people from all over, as evidenced by these international news stories.” —Anne Levin

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What do you think of all the snow this year?” (Photos by Weronika A. Plohn)

“Partners on a Mission” Workshop Builds Partnerships

Nonprofits will have an oppor tunity to build the partnership of two key players, the executive director and board chair, in an upcoming four-part workshop series “Partners on a Mission” being offered by NonProfitConnect in collaboration with Xan Blake of The Blake Partnership.

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As nonprofits face the extraordinar y challenges of recent months, the executive director (or CEO) and board chair are tasked with the responsibility of moving their organizations forward, which can only be accomplished with a clear understanding of roles and a steadfast partnership. NonProfitConnect, a nonprofit committed to strengthening nonprofits and their boards, is collaborating with consultant and community leader Sam: “I have been enjoying the snow. I went sledding in our Xan Blake to address this P R O viC AC C I N I Crosswicks • Pennington backyard and made a snowman with my brother.” tal relationship in a nonprofAngela: “Sam has a little brother, Benny, who is 3 years old. it organization’s success. We all have been enjoying playing outside in the snow, having T his ser ies gives nonthe snowball fights, and building a snowman that looked like profit leaders an opportuOlaf from the movie Frozen.” nity to set goals for board —Sam and Angela Vanzino, Ewing effectiveness, create a plan for improving board member performance, develop a blueprint for lasting partnership, and set goals for change. “Although the executive director/board chair relationship is key to the success of a nonprofit organization, people in these roles often do not take the time to build thoughtful plans focusing on how to maximize their relationship or the work of the Santo: “At the beginning, when we got 20 inches of snow, board. Partners on a Mission everything was very beautiful. Now I don’t like it that much. The ice and the rain that are coming up do not look very is designed to help you crepromising, and the plowing is just too much.” ate such a plan,” said Blake. Judit: “I liked it at first, especially because we went out and “Partners on a Mission” played with our son, but now I am a little over it. I slipped and will be held on four confell the other day and it is just too cold outside.” secutive Tuesdays — March —Santo and Judit Verta, Whitehouse Station 9, 16, 23, and 30 — from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Participants will have a chance to receive focused attention in a small group setting to define roles and work together on leading their organizations. To learn more, visit NonProfitConnectNJ.org, contact Allison Howe at allison@NonProfitConnectNJ. org, or call (609) 921-8893.

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Lambros to Run continued from page one

I could be a good adviser at the state level as to what we need, for main streets and small business. We need investment and we need to figure out how we’re going to balance our budget and keep property taxes down so people don’t keep leaving New Jersey.” O n C o u n c i l, L a m b r o s chairs the Economic Development Committee and is liaison to the Princeton Merchants Association, among other committees. Her focus has been on small business recovery and economic revitalization during the pandemic. “A number of us in the Democratic leadership in Princeton approached Michelle and strongly encouraged her to run because we feel she has been a very effective leader on Council, particularly with her focus on finding new ways to support local and small businesses before and during the pandemic,” said Jon Durbin, Mercer County Executive Committee/former PCDO president. “We need her experience and skills in Trenton, where she can continue to help Princeton, but also assist the region and state economically as we emerge from the pandemic.” “Michelle is a collaborative and effective member of Princeton Council. I believe she will represent us well at the state level and I am happy to support her,” said Mayor Mark Freda. In addition to her focus on small business recovery and economic revitalization, Lambros has been involved

in redevelopment efforts and is on the negotiating team for many new affordable housing developments. “Michelle believes that social justice is tied to equity of opportunity, and that we can better serve the community at large if there are more opportunities to increase our stock of affordable and ‘missing middle’ housing,” said Fern Spruill, founder of Committed and Faithful Princetonians and member of the Princeton Civil Rights Commission. The press release lists the central components of Lambros’ platform as “economic revitalization, main street investment, tourism, transit, sustainable development, property tax reform, and social justice.” “Improving family leave policies, expanding fair wage legislation, enacting liquor license reform, simplifying and expanding the senior tax freeze, and funding small business revitalization efforts” are other highlights. Green technology is an additional focus. “We have to know how to move in that direction,” Lambros said. “There is going to be a lot coming from the federal government, and we need to make sure New Jersey takes advantage. New Jersey needs to be a hub of green technology. And Central New Jersey should be a hub of tourism, with more coordination between the municipalities and counties. It’s an exciting challenge to think of the opportunities that are ahead. But there are some really grave problems we have that we need to face.” —Anne Levin

COVID Cases Down continued from page one

he added. “A vaccination alone doesn’t mean we are 100 percent in the clear just yet. We must continue our safety measures until we see solid evidence of a virus that has come under control.” Williams acknowledged that the slow pace of vaccinations “has not been what any of us imagined,” and he pointed out that this has been a nationwide problem, not a local distribution network problem. “Efforts at the federal level of government and stepped-up manufacturing, along with other vaccines becoming available soon, are expected to address the supply chain issues that we are currently experiencing,” he said. “Please continue to be patient and continue to share information. Everyone who wants a vaccine will receive one.” New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy, back to holding public events after quarantining for five days because of a family member who tested positive for COVID, reported on Tuesday, February 16, that COVID numbers in the state continue to trend downwards. The number of COVID patients in New Jersey hospitals, 2,411 as of Monday night, the lowest number since November 16, was down 38 percent from its peak on December 22. The seven-day average for new cases, 2,797, is down 8 percent from a week ago and down 48 percent from a month ago. The statewide transmission rate Tuesday was at 0.90, with a number below 1 indicating the outbreak is slowing. As of Tuesday morning,

NJDOH reported 1,411,270 COVID vaccine doses administered in the state, 1,024,769 being first doses and 386,490 second doses. The state’s goal is to vaccinate 70 percent or more of its adult population, about 4.7 million residents, by the end of May. The Mercer County Division of Health announced last week that it had made changes to its vaccine distribution plan in accordance with a directive from the NJDOH. Local, town-based clinics have been relocated to one of Mercer County’s two vaccination sites, the CURE Arena, in partnership with Capital Health System, or Mercer County Community College’s West Windsor campus. “Mercer County receives vaccine doses from the State Department of Health, and there are an extremely limited number of doses made available to Mercer County,” the announcement stated. “This is no fault of the county or the state, as the supply comes directly from the federal government.” The announcement went on to note that to receive a vaccination from Mercer County, residents must first register into the state system at the New Jersey Vaccination Scheduling System (NJVSS) covidvaccine.nj.gov. Anyone on their town’s waiting list will be scheduled at the county-run vaccine clinics as appointments become available. For those who received their first dose from a local health department clinic, second doses will be given at the same location as the first dose, and Princeton Health Department notes that if you

have a second dose scheduled with them, you will receive that dose on the scheduled date. Penn Medicine Princeton Health reported on Monday, February 15, that requests for vaccinations have “greatly exceeded our expectations and our available supply of vaccine.” Princeton Health has closed down its Request an Appointment web form until they can reasonably accommodate the requests coming in. “It may be a few weeks before this happens — unless we begin to receive larger quantities of the vaccine doses each week,” their press release stated. The press release explained that the NJDOH receives an allotment of about 100,000 to 120,000 vaccine doses each week and distributes them to nearly 300 vaccination sites across New Jersey, including Princeton Health. “Each Friday we find out how many doses we will receive on Monday,” the Princeton Health update continued. “Sometimes we receive between 500 and 1,000 doses, and sometimes we do not receive any. The state has instructed us to only schedule appointments according to the number of doses we will have on hand each week —not more than that. Since we know that we have enough to cover both doses for each person, when individuals arrive for their first dose, their appointment for a second dose is scheduled at that time.” Princeton Health will post updates on its website at www.princetonhcs.org. —Donald Gilpin

Police Blotter On February 10, at 9:38 a.m., a staff member of the Princeton Unified Middle School on Walnut Lane contacted the Princeton Police Department to report a note threatening that there was a bomb in the school. The students were evacuated as the police, along with the Mercer County Sheriff’s office and two K-9s, searched the school. At 10:54 a.m. it was deemed safe for all students to resume their normal schedule. The incident is under investigation. On February 9, between 12:45 and 1:48 p.m., a 50 -year- old male from Princeton went to various locations in Princeton and exhibited harassing and erratic behavior that was deemed to be biased in nature. An investigation showed that he had displayed similar behaviors in surrounding areas. He was subsequently issued criminal complaints for three counts of bias intimidation and one count of terroristic threats. He was later arrested by the Lawrence Township Police Department and transported to the Mercer County Corrections Center. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

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With a grandfather who is a veteran of the National Guard and two uncles who served in Vietnam, Danielle “Dani” Jackson has always felt a strong connection to American military history. The Rider University junior is equally fascinated by film. The recipient of a $5,000 Undergraduate Research Scholar Award (URSA), Jackson has turned her two passions into an ambitious, 12-part documentary series that tells the stories of Black veterans of the two World Wars. “A Two-Front War” is her effort to raise awareness of their forgotten accomplishments while fighting abroad, and their efforts toward civil rights at home. A Kickstarter campaign has upped the budget to more than $8,000, allowing her to finalize the first episode of the series, which should be available in May. “Many people don’t realize that African Americans have been in the American military since the Revolutionary War,” Jackson said. “Typically, we think it has been since the Civil War. African Americans are usually just portrayed as slaves. We show their bondage and their oppression. But I want to show their strength. I would like for these veterans to be remembered for the super soldiers they were.” R ider chooses a small group of students each year for t he research award, which promotes independent student research and s cholarsh ip. “I ap plied for the grant with my

professor and adviser, Dr. Shawn Kildea, last year,” said Jackson. “Ever yone else got a chance to write a paper. I decided to combine both my majors — history and film — into this project. African Americans kind of get a low blow when it comes to this history. I started working on it, and it just started picking up speed over the summer.”

Danielle Jackson

T he more t hey brai n stormed, the more Jackson and her adviser realized the project had the potential to be more than a single episode. “The idea would be to first make a 24-minute program of high enough quality that could be brought to a Netflix, an Amazon, a Hulu, and pitch it as a series,” said Kildea. A film buff since childhood, Jackson is thrilled to be working on the project. “When I was younger, I always had a thing for movies,” she said. “I would go to the library and rent as

many as possible, like three in a weekend. I think films allowed me to process my emotions in ways I couldn’t do otherwise. I could be in a different world. They really helped open my eyes to what I wanted to do as a person, and to connecting with different people through art.” A number of junior Rider film and television majors are also involved in the project, including executive producers Benjamin Ross and Patrick Konopka, production manager Sarah Waldron, assistant project manager Tiffany Hartman, and boom operator Andrew Jacabacci. Throughout the ser ies, Jackson aims to stress that African American soldiers were expected to serve their country faithfully, despite not having the same rights as their white counterparts. “They are carrying the burden of what they are experiencing here at home and they are going overseas and still fighting for a country that doesn’t love them,” she said. “I don’t know what kind of power that is, but I would like for people to recognize that that is a burden no other demographics have had to deal with.” The first episode of “A Two-Front War” focuses on the lives of Charles Hamilton Houston and Medgar Evers. Houston served as an officer in World War I. After retur ning from the war, he graduated from Harvard Law School and wrote foundational legislation for

the civil rights movement, including the monumental Brown v. Board of Education case in 1954. Evers returned to his home state of Mississippi after serving as a sergeant in World War II and became an organizer for voter registration drives and boycotts. He also established new chapters of the NAACP in the deep South. “These two subjects are amazing because you have Houston laying the groundwork legally, and then you have Evers picking up the groundwork for grassroots activism,” Jackson said. “I think that we’ve all seen with 2020, even going into 2021, there’s a lot of political dissension amongst America and amongst the world at the time in which African American voices are now being elevated. It’s important to include these veterans within the narrative, especially the veterans within the underrepresented populations. At a time in which we are having this platform, I would like to utilize it and give a stage to these men and women who have fought so valiantly over hundreds of years and finally get the honor they deserve.” Jackson is considering plans for future projects. “My adviser and I are always talking,” she said. “I’m thinking about a narrative piece on African American women, maybe an adaptation of a novel. Or it could be a second episode of this

ONLINE www.towntopics.com

project, focusing on African American women and their involvement in World War I and World War II. There is just so much to cover.” —Anne Levin

History of Ireland’s Partition Is Topic of Annual Talk

P r i n ce ton Un ive r s it y’s Fund for Irish Studies presents “1921 and 2021: The Partition of Ireland, Then and Now,” the Robert Fagles Memorial Lecture by Fintan O’Toole, one of Ireland’s leading public intellectuals, columnist for The Irish Times, and Leonard Milberg ’53 Visiting Lecturer in Irish Letters at the University, on February 26 at 4:30 p.m.

Fintan O’Toole The lecture is free,

presented via Zoom. Visit arts.princeton.edu/events to register. Ireland was div ided in 1921 by the formation of Northern Ireland as a new political entity in the Protestant- dom inated nor t h eastern part of the island. This led to the creation of two sectarian states, each dominated by a single religious culture. O’Toole notes the prediction by the revolutionary James Connolly that partition would create “a carnival of reaction” both sides of the border was not far wrong. The Troubles of 1968-98 served merely to deepen the divide. Brexit has raised new questions about the future of the U.K. and therefore of the divide. That the contradictions frozen in 1921 have emerged anew a century later will be at the heart of the lecture. O’Toole’s books on politics include the best-sellers Ship of Fools and Enough is Enough. His books on theater include works on William Shakespeare, Richard Brinsley, and Thomas Murphy. He regularly contributes to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, Granta, The Guardian, The Observer, and other international publications.

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Rider Student’s Documentary Series Explores Black Veterans of Two Wars


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 17, 2021 • 10

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such messages as “Democratize all COV ID -related Decisions!” “COVID Support for All,” and “None of us are safe until all of us are safe,” all wore masks and maintained social distance along the pathways in front of Nassau Hall. Princeton Mayor Mark Freda, in a February 16 email, noted that there had been substantive cooperation between the University and the town of Princeton over the past year, with town and University officials meeting weekly to discuss issues arising from the pandemic. He did suggest that in the area of COVID testing there was room for improvement and expansion in working with the University. Mercer County provides free testing to its residents, but that testing is not always readily available or convenient to access. Freda pointed out that the University handles contact tracing for their staff and all their students on campus, and that “this effort is done in communication and cooperation with our Health Officer.” He continued, “The University shoulders the heavy load on this, and we are in the loop to help protect the town. For COVID-positive University students who live off campus, the town and University collaborate on quarantine and isolation protocols.” On the issue of vaccine rollout, Freda explained that the state of New Jersey controls who gets the vaccine and the priority now is to get more vaccines from the state. He described towngown cooperation early on in the vaccine rollout. “The University has purchased freezers capable of storing the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines,” he said, “and that storage capability has been extended to the town for our use. The town was able to receive the vaccine earlier from the state due to the freezer/refrigerator capabilities provided by the University. So that is a big plus. We just need to get a larger supply of vaccine coming into Mercer County so we can try to get approval to use this tool.” Freda added that the University has offered to provide Jadwin Gym as a mass vaccine site for both the town and the University if “we can get enough vaccine in the near future to make this possible.” Princeton Universit y Deputy University Spokesperson Michael Hotchkiss concurred with Freda’s observations on cooperation

between the town and the University, but stated that the University is an educational institution, “not a hospital, a health care provider, or a commercial clinical lab.” He noted that Princeton does not have a medical school or school of public health, but focuses on teaching and research, “and is making a difference during this pandemic through its research and teaching, not by becoming a health care provider.” Hotch k is s went on to point out contributions the University is making to the larger community in collaboration with area health officials; through its support for the local community; through its own efforts to limit the spread of COVID among its students, employees and others; and through the work of its researchers. In regard to vaccine distribution, Hotchkiss stated that the University has not received any vaccines and does not know when or how many vaccines the state might provide. State officials asked the University to be prepared to serve as a fixed facility or closed point of distribution (POD) to vaccinate University students, faculty, and staff and their households. “The University is collaborating with the local officials with regard to vaccines, storing doses in our specialized cold storage facilities, hosting community clinics on campus, and assisting with the staffing of these clinics,” Hotchkiss wrote. As far as the University’s COVID testing policies are concerned, Hotchkiss suggested that w ith limited medical infrastructure and the “tremendous strain on the dedicated staff of University Health Services and staff across the University who are assisting with the program,” the University would be unlikely to extend testing beyond the immediate Princeton University community. He also noted that in receiv ing neces sary government approvals

for testing, the University agreed to test only its own students, faculty, staff, and limited others who work or live on campus. In concluding his threepage statement in response to the demands voiced by the anti-austerity demonstrators, Hotchkiss emphasized the widespread involvement in Princeton University’s decision-making, with ongoing conversations that “include key interlocutors, including the elected members of local government — the mayor and town Council — and officials from the state of New Jersey, including the Department of Health and the Office of the Secretary of Higher Education.” The PAAC seems determined to continue to press its demands. “We’re trying to force their hand by protesting,” said Schorin. “We understand realistically that this is just the beginning of a longer struggle.” Felice Physioc, a graduate student in the Princeton University Department of History, a member of PAAC, and one of the organizers of the demonstration, described feelings of exasperation and outrage reflected in the speeches, particularly among members of the immigrant community. She mentioned the University’s rich endow ment and resources, more of which could serve the community. “We want more members of the town to have a say in the decisions that impact the town and are being made by very few people at the University,” she said. “The University has so much money, and who has a say in what they do with it?” Physioc suggested that the PAAC was already making plans for further action. “We ended the protest by saying this is just the beginning,” she said. “We’re in this for the long haul. We love a good demonstration, and we’re not into petitions. The best way to get your voice heard is to physically show up.” —Donald Gilpin

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Bolster ing suppor t for school programs and at the same time promoting shopping and dining at more than 40 establishments around tow n, Princeton’s public elementar y schools have teamed up to create Princeton Perks, a discount card program open to everyone. Organized by the schools’ PTOs, the program is designed as a “win-win-win” for businesses, who would see a boost in customers; shoppers, who get a special deal when they spend their dollars locally; and the PTOs and schools, who raise much needed funds to support students and teachers. “We pride ourselves on being a strong community, taking care of each other,” Littlebrook Elementar y School PTO Co-Presidents Sonja Ernst and Kati Dunn wrote in an email. “Princeton Perks’ initiative is an excellent example of how we keep standing together, beyond individuals, beyond individual schools, and beyond single businesses. We are one town working together.” Anyone may purchase a Princeton Perks card for $25 by visiting princetonperks.com, and then selecting their neighborhood school’s portal. Cards will be available for purchase through February 28, 2021 for use through December 31, 2021. Cards will also be available at special Princeton Perks booths in Palmer Square on the next two Saturdays from 12 to 4 p.m. and at the Princeton Shopping Center on the next two Sundays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mos t bu s i ne s s e s of fer cardholders 10 percent off. The Princeton Perks website includes an up-to-date list of participating restaurants and retailers, and further details on the deals offered. The Princeton Perks logo is displayed in shop windows or near the register of participating businesses.

During the pandemic the Community Park, Johnson Park, Littlebrook, and Riverside PTOs, like many other nonprofits, have not been able to hold their usual inperson fundraisers this year. “For us at Communit y Park ( CP), unfor tunately fundraising has really flatlined for the year, and we h ave a w h ole r a ng e of needs,” said Amalie Leano, a CP parent and initiator of the discount card. “We saw that our beloved businesses were str uggling too. We wanted to mobilize an army of public school families to shop and eat at local businesses again and again this year.” Proceeds from the sale of the Princeton Perks card will go towards programs that provide extra school support for the many families that need assistance for school supplies or for after-school or summer programs, to reimburse teachers for outof-pocket expenses, and to make sure students are able to enjoy some of the special arts and culture programming that has traditionally been a signature experience for each grade. Leano described how the idea for a discount card program to boost fundraising “had been percolating in my mind for a couple of years.” She enlisted a core group of parents, who realized that in facing the increased challenges of the pandemic it would be valuable to involve all the elementary schools. “We all helped in doing the outreach and partnering with businesses in town,” she said. “Each school contributed in a different way, also creating the website we have and the design work. It’s been a fun outlet for the parents to be able to sink our teeth into something that feels like it’s really going to make a difference for the town.” —Donald Gilpin

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B ot h s e s s ions i nclu de Princeton’s Witherspoonwill focus on the significance Senior Center Announces leadership development, Jackson community. of Chisholm’s candidacy and Center for Lifelong Learning

In December of 2020, the Princeton Senior Resource Center ( PSRC) purchased a 12,000-square-foot facility at 101 Poor Farm Road to supplement its current operations at the Suzanne Patterson Building at 45 Stockton Street. The new facility will house PSRC’s administrative offices and will feature a world-class learning center with hightech classrooms and lecture hall as well as a state-of-theart technology lab. “Our desire is to create both a welcoming destination for gathering with friends and an outstanding lifelong learning environment for older adults in our com mu nit y,” said P SRC E xecutive Director Drew Dyson. PSRC has engaged Richardson Smith Architects to design the new facility. A targeted opening is set for fall of 2021. Philanthropic Princetonian Norman Klath has taken a leadership role in the $5 million capital campaign with a $1.3 million gift. An active board member and longtime supporter of PSRC, Klath made this gift to honor his late wife Nancy S. Klath. Throughout her life, Nancy Klath was a strong advocate for lifelong learning both in her career at Princeton University’s library and, in her volunteer service with the Friends of the Princeton Public Library, the Friends of the Princeton University Library, the Princeton Adult School, and the Princeton Senior Resource Center. A capital campaign for Lifelong Learning at PSRC is currently in a leadership phase and will launch publicly in the months ahead. “I am hopeful that many throughout the community will join me and PSRC in making this campaign successful,” Klath said. Coupled with PSRC’s existing location at the Suzanne Patterson Building, the new facility will provide a multi-site senior center that will serve the community for years to come. “This new building is the culmination of more than a decade of planning and dreaming by our board,” said PSRC president Joan Girgus. “We are excited about what this new building will offer to the community and how it will enable us to carry out our mission to help older adults thrive.”

Plainsboro Library to Explore Chisholm Legacy

On Thursday, February 25 at 7 p.m., the Plainsboro Public Library will sponsor a virtual discussion, “Voices of Change: African American Political Participation and the Legacy of Shirley Chisholm.” Moderated by Professor Claude Taylor of Monmouth University, the event will explore Chisholm, the first woman to run for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination and the first African American candidate for a major party’s presidential nomination. A starting point for the discussion will be Shola Lynch’s film Chisholm ’72 – Unbought and Unbossed. Participants may screen the film in advance through the library’s Kanopy platform. Taylor, who serves as director for academic transition and inclusion at Monmouth’s Center for Student Success,

campaign vis a vis contemporary challenges to full political participation in the nation’s democracy by all its citizens. A lecturer in communication studies at Monmouth University, Taylor teaches courses in communication ethics, media literacy, political communication, and civic participation. To register, visit plainsborolibrary.org.

At the Well Leadership Offering Online Programs

Formerly held in the summer months on the campus of Princeton University, At the Well Conferences (ATW) for minority young women are being offered online this year. The ATW Young Women’s Leadership Academy will hold online weekend intensives. The 11th and 12th Grade College Prep Weekend Intensive for minority girls is July 23-25. The weekend is designed to increase awareness of the essential tools that lead to college success. The program offers concentrated courses to help with academic preparedness and how to make the best personal, social, and financial decisions to ensure a great first college year. From July 30-August 1, the ninth and 10th Grade Intensive is a microcosm of the organization’s previously offered two-week program, currently on hiatus. The core curriculum is specifically created to develop Black female corporate leaders. Students will gain confidence and increase academic achievement.

critical reading and writing, exper ienced instr uctors, and a special guest speaker. The cost of each weekend is $349. The application deadline is March 31. Visit atthewellconferences.org.

Hillier Honored With Community Service Award

Architect J. Robert Hillier, a Town Topics shareholder, has been given the Reginald F. Lewis Community Service Award for Excellence in Business by First Baptist Church of Princeton. Hillier was presented with the honor during a virtual worship service on Sunday morning, February 14. Hillier received the award for his cont r ibut ions to

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11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 17, 2021

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“Bob deserves to be recognized for all that he has contributed to the Witherspoon- Jackson neighborhood,” said church trustee and former Princeton Councilman Lance Liverman. “Especially during this time, we want to recognize folks that have been so good to the community. We want to tell people about how nice they are, and talk about what they have done. Bob fit that criteria right away.” This is the second time the church has recognized an individual for contributions to the community. Last year, the honoree was Jimmy Mack, owner of Jimmy Mack’s Barber Shop, a longtime fixture on John Street.

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Mailbox Bank Street Homeowners Support Hotel, But Objections Still Stand

To the Editor: All of the homeowners on Bank Street that shared comments and objections with the Zoning Board and the hotel group have something in common. We all agree that the proposed Graduate Hotel will positively impact the Central Business District. Our intent was never to stop the project. However, we did object to four of the seven variances sought by GPNJ OWNER LLC. Those variances dealt with the structure’s height, which will increase from 32 to 65 feet, the 10-foot setback required in a residential (and historic) zone, excessive floor area ratio, and not meeting parking space requirements. Each separate variance was related to the other. If one variance were denied or changed, it would have brought the other two or three variances closer to compliance with town ordinances. And the Bank Street neighbors would have supported the changes. Zoning ignored Bank Street testimony, including a proposal to step down the north portion of the building. They ignored the SPRAB and the Princeton Historic Preservation Commission recommendations for Bank Street impacts, as well as traffic, sun, parking, and noise studies. Insignificant was the message from GPNJ, and the board accepted. During the executive session, some board members expressed concern for the neighbors, and for a brief moment, it seemed that they might press the developer for changes. But when the vote came, the Zoning Board of Adjustments unanimously chose not to make adjustments. As I said before, we all support a hotel in the CBD, and our objections, as they were, still stand. BILL GRAY Bank Street

Bank Street Resident Argues New Hotel Building Will Steal Light, Views, Privacy

To the Editor: Bank Street residents were violated by the Zoning Board of Adjustment as they unanimously approved the massive new hotel on Chambers Street, allowing variances for insufficient parking, approving a building with a Floor Area Ratio nearly three times over allowed, only a 4-foot average setback from the residential historic district at the ground level, and a massive 65-foot-high blank brick wall facing Bank Street, most of it only 6 inches from the property line. The building steals light, air, views, and privacy. The western facade looks like a massive windowless warehouse from the southern end of Bank Street. What the Bank Street residents got in return for their hours of meeting, testimony, and exhibits was one small tree, and for the next 100 years a blank wall and additional traffic searching for the entrance to the hotel.

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Princeton got what it wanted, a tax ratable, promoted by the ex-mayor and other Council members. Princeton must have financial problem, even with our very high property taxes. Design and sensitivity to a few neighbors is no concern, room tax is! The result is an oversized, neo-federalist, decorated box on narrow Chambers Street with a fake mansard façade circa 1890s. Undoubtedly, Princeton needs one or more hotels downtown, therefore the developers packed this site with as many rooms as possible. The residents of Bank Street never opposed the hotel, only the gross insensitivity of its design. They had multiple meetings, with each other and a few with the hotel, to determine what they could live with. Pollution remediation was made to the western façade to appease the neighbors, but the design lacked basic sensitivity to the urban context. At the end, all the residents’ conditions, except for the replacement of a tree, were ignored after hours of testimony. At the critical end of the hearing, residents were held to 10 minutes while the applicant enjoyed unlimited time. Unbelievably, most of the conditions in the Municipal Land Use Law were dismissed. Much to our shock, the applicant was fully engaged in the Executive Session with the board members, to justify the variances while the public could only watch in disbelief as it was approved. At the end it was totally unclear what conditions had been approved! Clearly, the negative impacts on Bank Street are of no consequence to Princeton or to the hotel owners whose PR emphasizes the importance of being good neighbors. The one positive thing is that now the standard has been established for all the older one-, two-, or three-story buildings in the downtown which do need a serious rezoning and a makeover. Owners can redevelop, tear down old buildings, build up to 65 feet with a FAR of up to 4, and have to provide minimum or no parking. If you want to go above these limits it appears that the Board of Adjustment will be happy to approve if it has financial benefits to the town. But we must establish good town design standards. TONY NELESSEN Bank Street

of the office buildings at 20 Nassau Street as a hotel is a generally commendable idea, but the details of the plan by Graduate Hotels outlined in Town Topics [“Zoning Board Approves Plan for New Hotel,” page 1, February 10] are very troubling to read. I am not so naive as to believe that Princeton should be “preserved in amber,” but in what universe is it appropriate to demolish a three-story building within a historic block and replace it with a five-story addition? In this specific case, such an increase in the street wall of Chambers Street would do irreparable harm to the scale of this narrow street and is totally incompatible with the narrow sidewalks. Further to this point, why should the project entrance not more appropriately be on Nassau Street, with its much deeper sidewalk? I was not persuaded by the article that it was reasonably explained in the meeting why a 180-room hotel is the ONLY way to make this project work financially, most notably when this same developer has reportedly created successful hotels with lesser numbers of rooms in larger cities. I would argue that the building mass of the current properties that comprise 20 Nassau Street is appropriate “as is” and that a crucial aspect of the proposed hotel’s attraction and value as a project is the center-of-town location, with both retail and campus proximity; these virtues alone should make a smaller hotel viable. It is no secret that development projects routinely request approval for plans that overreach in scale (often asking for relief from zoning and height precedents), while falsely claiming that (a Zoning Board) agreement to these terms is the only way the project can “keep afloat,” all in pursuit of ever greater profit. Is that the case with this proposal by Graduate Hotels and is too much about to be conceded to this company, to the general detriment of Princeton, and most acutely, the immediate residential neighborhood? CHRISTOPHER OLSEN Alexander Street

Wondering if Too Much is Being Conceded To Hotel Company to Detriment of Town

Books

To the Editor: My wife and I have lived in Princeton for seven years and feel privileged to make our home here. We appreciate much about the history of the area and Princeton especially, and greatly respect the old buildings in town and on campus. The community quality represented by the historic architecture here is an immeasurable resource that deserves to be respected and protected. Adaptive re-use

Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

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Zelizer about his book, Kill Ottessa Moshfegh Reading In C.K. Williams Series Feb. 24 Switch : The Rise of the

The Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Creative Writing at Princeton University and the C.K. Williams Series are presenting a reading by best-selling, award-winning novelist and screenwriter Ottessa Moshfegh, along with five seniors in Princeton’s Program in Creative Writing, on February 24 at 6 p.m. Showcasing senior thesis students of the Program alongside established writers as special guests, the series is named after the late Pulitzer Prize and National Book Awardw in n ing poet C.K . Wil liams, who also served on Princeton’s faculty for 20 years. The reading will be presented via Zoom and is free and open to the public. Visit arts.princeton.edu for the link. Ottessa Moshfegh’s books include the PEN/Hemingway Award-winning debut novel, Eileen, named a book of the year by The Washington Post and The San Francisco Chronicle, nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award, and short-listed for the Man Booker Prize; and the New York Times bestseller, My Year of Rest and Relaxation, named a best book of the year by The Washington Post, TIME, and NPR, among other outlets. Her short story collection, Ho me s i c k fo r Ano th e r World, was named a New York Times Book Review Notable Book of 2017. She is originally from Massachusetts and now lives in southern California. The five seniors, Janie Kim, Sophia Marusic, Shira Moolten, Naomi Park, and Jillian Quigley, who are pursuing certificates in creative writing in addition to their major areas of study, will read from their senior thesis projects.

Modern Senate Subject Of Feb. 23 Conversation

Senate insider Adam Jentleson will be talking with Sam Wang and Julian

Modern Senate and the Crippling of American Democracy (Liveright) on Tuesday, February 23 at 6 p.m. This virtual event is cosponsored by L aby r int h Books, The Election Innovation Lab at Princeton University, the Department of History at Princeton University, and the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs. Visit labyrinthbooks.com for the link. Accord i ng to Je n n ifer Szalai, writing in The New York Times, Kill Switch is “an impeccably timed book” in which “Jentleson explains how ‘the world’s greatest deliberative body’ has come to carry out its work without much greatness or even deliberation, serving instead as a place where ambitious legislation goes to die. [Jentleson’s] intimacy with the Senate turns out to be his book’s greatest strength. Jentleson understands the inner workings of the institution, down to the most granular details, showing precisely how arcane procedural rules can be leveraged to dramatic effect.” Adam Jentleson is the public affairs director at Democracy Forward and a former deputy chief of staff to Senator Harry Reid. A columnist for GQ, he is also a frequent political commentator on MSNBC. S a m Wa ng is profe s s or of molecular biology and neuroscience at Princeton Universit y. A co -founder of The Princeton Election Consortium blog and of the Princeton Gerrymandering Project, he is the author of the best-selling Welcome to Your Brain and Welcome to Your Child’s Brain. Julian E. Zelizer is professor of history at Princeton University and the author and editor of 19 books on American political history, most recently, Burning Down the House: New Gingrich, the Fall of a Speaker and the Rise of the New Republican Party.


Celebrating Love and Scandal on Lola Montez’s 200th Birthday But we loved with a love that was more than love. —Edgar Allan Poe, from “Annabelle Lee” his post-Valentine’s Day adventure was launched by a letter I found in Horace Wyndam’s The Magnificent Montez: From Courtesan to Convert (Hutchinson 1935). Written in the revolutionary year of 1848 — from King Ludwig I of Bavaria to the woman he made the Countess of Landsfeld, alias Lola Montez, who was born Eliza Rosanna Gilbert in County Sligo, Ireland, on February 17, 1821 — the letter begins: “Oh, my Lolita! A ray of sunshine at the break of day! A stream of light in an obscured sky! Hope ever causes chords long forgotten to resound, and existence becomes once again pleasant as of yore. Such were the feelings which animated me during that night of happiness when, thanks to you alone, everything was sheer joy. Thy spirit lifted up mine out of sadness; never did an intoxication equal the one I then felt!” After shooting the king’s translator, flash forward to mid-20th-century America and read the opening lines of The Confession of a White Widowed Male: “Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul, Lo-lee-ta .... She was Lo, plain Lo in the morning, standing four foot ten in one sock. She was Lola in slacks. She was Dolly at school. She was Dolores on the dotted line. But in my arms she was always Lolita.” I’ve been here before. Last fall I cushioned the loss of Prof. Nabokov’s former student, Ruth Bader Ginsberg, with a visit to The Annotated Lolita, in which another of his former students, Alfred Appel Jr., devotes almost five pages of commentary to the novel’s opening paragraph. Appel gives special attention to Humbert’s fixation with Poe’s “Annabel Lee,” from whom neither angels nor demons can “dissever” the poet’s soul (“But we loved with a love that was more than love”). While the line “Lola in slacks” prompts a reference to Marlene Dietrich’s Lola in von Sternberg’s film The Blue Angel, there’s no mention of the living, breathing Lola Montez who inspired Ludwig’s cri de coeur. The deposed monarch was writing from a villa on the Riviera while his lovely Lola was in England being denounced by the London papers as “Bavaria’s famous strumpet,” “the notorious courtesan” blamed for “the sanguinary and destructive conduct of the Munich mob.” Love vs. Scandal Too bad Lola’s story isn’t more compatible with the hearts and flowers of Valentine’s Day. Forget King Ludwig’s “ray of sunshine,” it’s not love but scandal that burnishes her legend. She once wrote to an acquaintance: “What makes men and

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women distinguished is their individuality; and it is for that I will conquer or die!” As her biographer notes, she chose her friends “for their disposition, not for their virtue,” one such friend being George Sand (“the possessor of the largest mind and the smallest foot in Paris”). When Vanity Fair was the rage in America, Lola was reportedly upset that Thackeray put her into it as Becky Sharp (“If he had only told the truth about me, I should not have cared, but he derived his inspiration from my enemies in England”). A Love Supreme Although scandal made Nabokov’s Lolita famously infamous, in the end love reigns supreme. On his way to the black comedy tour de force wherein he murders his nightmare nemesis Clare Quilty, Humbert Humbert finds his lost Lolita in the last house on Hunter Road. She’s three years older, several inches taller, married to a nice deaf fellow named D i c k , a n d s h e’s “hugely pregnant.” Wit h her “r u ined looks and her adult, rope-veined narrow hands,” she’s “hopelessly worn at seventeen.” Humbert, who had come with a gun in his pocket, ready to kill, writes, “I looked and looked at her, and knew as clearly as I know I am to die, that I loved her more than anything I had ever seen or imagined on earth, or hoped for anywhere else.” And so the deposed King Humbert shouts his “poor truth,” insisting that “the world know how much I loved my Lolita, this Lolita, pale and polluted, and big with another’s child, but still grayeyed, still sooty-lashed, still auburn and almond, still Carmencita.” As he writes, Nabokov is also no doubt feeling full to the brim with love for his creation. More About Love What I felt reading Lolita for the first time wasn’t love so much as infatuation, a feeling not unlike Ludwig’s, with his ray of sunshine, stream of light, sheer joy, and intoxication. It happened early in the narrative when “a perfect little beauty in a tartan frock, with a clatter put her heavily armed foot near me upon the bench to dip her slim bare arms into me and tighten the strap of her roller skate, and I dissolved in the sun, with my book for a fig leaf, as her auburn ringlets fell all over her skinned knee, and the shadow of leaves I shared pulsated and melted on her radiant limb

next to my chameleonic cheek.” Not put off in the least by the suggestion of selfparody, I was with Humbert all the way — when he dissolved in the sun, so did I; those slim bare arms dipped into me; it was fun and art, poetry and character, and, yes, love happening all at once, and it kept happening as the writing went gloriously, arrogantly on and on transcending itself and reaching into the reader to do with words what the girl on roller skates does to Humbert. “No Sense of Sin” As Lulu in G.W. Pabst’s silent film, Pandora’s Box (1928), Louise Brooks is sexy and girlish, dark and light, sinister and sweet, brilliant and naive. Her performance came to mind when I recalled my response to Nabokov’s little tartan-frocked roller-skater. What shocked audiences at the time and even when the film was revived decades later was t hat L ouise, in her own words, played Lulu “with no sense of sin.” The blending of innocence and experience Brooks brings to Pandora’s Box is most captivating in the backstage sequence at the Revue Theatre when Lulu is capering around like a human glowworm with translucent wings, blissfully unselfconscious, clapping her hands in childish delight in one scene, turning fathers against sons (Courtesy of Wikipedia) and driving grown men to suicide in the next. She’s at once ephemeral and sensual, and there are moments when she seems to be the fluid essence of film come to life; you can see it in the slope of her shoulders, the spontaneity of her smile, the way stars seem to shine in her eyes. Max’s Lola Louise Brooks begins her essay about making Pandora’s Box (“Pabst and Lulu”) with a quote from the prologue of Frank Wedekind’s play: “Out of a circus tent steps the Animal Trainer, carrying in his left hand a whip and in his right hand a loaded revolver. ‘Walk in,’ he says to the audience, ‘walk into my menagerie.’” Brooks suggests that the finest job of casting Pabst ever did was to cast himself as the animal-trainer/director of his film adaptation of Wedekind’s “tragedy of monsters.” In the visually dazzling, multi-leveled, 33-ring circus of Max Ophuls’s Lola Montès (1955), Peter Ustinov is the ringmaster/animal trainer cracking the whip

as he puts Martine Carol’s Lola through her paces. Ophuls’s Lulu is inspired by the real-life original, the same “Lolita” who lifted King Ludwig’s “spirit” out of sadness. But it was the living Lola, the Irish lass Eliza born 200 years ago today, who cracked the whip, smoked like a chimney, and, as described in The Magnificent Montez, raised her skirts so high while performing her signature Spider Dance that the audience at the Theatre Royal in Melbourne “could see she wore no underclothing at all.” After reading a bad review of her performance in another town, she reportedly attacked the editor of the newspaper with a whip. Given her issues with Thackeray’s travesty of her as Becky Sharp in Vanity Fair, the author was lucky to have been spared a horsewhipping. Poetry in Motion Like lots of other moviegoers, I was alerted to Lola Montès by critic Andrew Sarris’s claim that in his “unhumble opinion” it was “the greatest film of all time.” The saving grace of so grandiosely definitive a statement is that it leaves you little choice but to see for yourself, or, as Gary Giddins observes in “Loving Lola,” his essay for the Criterion edition, it “forced everyone” to see the film, “if only to lambaste Sarris, guaranteeing him a place among cinema’s true gallants.” As always, Giddins goes straight to the heart of the matter, that Lola Montès “is a film infatuated with motion” with a heroine who “is often a study in motion denied.” In fact, Ophuls’s Lola “is far removed from history’s spitfire dervish.” Where others saw Martine Carol’s relatively static Lola as a flaw, Giddins sees it as a “blessing” that allows Ophuls to objectify her “in a way that would not have been possible with a more expressive actor,” this being a film “that is often intent on keeping its emotional distance.” After imagining several more commanding alternatives to Carol, from Gina Lollobrigida to Ingrid Bergman, Giddins backs up Ophuls: “With Carol, he presents Lola as a prisoner of sex, and draws a cinematic line — a tracking shot, of course — between the waxen object of our curiosity and her unknowable interior life.” ven so, I can’t help picturing Louise Brooks in her radiant prime lighting up the screen in the poetry-inmotion cinema of Max Ophuls. And I find I can’t stop looking at the portrait of Lola shown here, painted for King Ludwig by Joseph Karl Stieler in 1847, when Ludwig’s Lolita was 26. Look at her, look, and look again, and you may forgive Ludwig’s “ray of sunshine at break of day” rhapsodies and all the rest of the imagery he and Nabokov and Poe and Ophuls created for the sake of loving with a love that was more than love. —Stuart Mitchner

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13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 17, 2021

film/book Review


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 17, 2021 • 14

TheaTer CommenTary

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McCarter and Princeton University Present “The Manic Monologues”; Interactive Website Offers Performances, Discussions About Mental Health

cCarter Theatre will launch The Manic Monologues on February 18. The free interactive website is described by a press release as “a digital theatrical experience to disrupt stigma and spotlight a conversation about mental health.” McCarter is presenting the project in association with Princeton University Health Services; The 24 Hour Plays; and Innovations in Socially Distant Performance, a project of Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts. The monologues, and the panel discussions that complement them, concern “our moment,” says McCarter’s Resident Producer Debbie Bisno. Topics include the extent to which mental health is affected by social media, racial injustice, and COVID. The Manic Monologues is written by Zack Burton and Elisa Hofmeister, based on true stories that were submitted to the playwrights. The anthology of vignettes was inspired by Burton’s personal experience; in 2017 he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. (At the time he was completing his Ph.D. in geology at Stanford). Burton says that the play was conceived “about a year after my diagnosis.” Burton and Hofmeister, who were dating at the time, aimed to improve the conversation about mental health. “We were struggling with this lack of hopeful, uplifting stories,” Burton explains. “Every one of us knows someone touched in some way by a mental health condition … this is a core component of the human experience. It’s a spectrum, and it’s also equal opportunity, so everyone’s affected. So we wanted to capture that diversity.” For material, “We didn’t do interviews; we had people submit stories,” Burton says. Advocacy groups on Facebook were fruitful: “We probably had about 50 stories come in within a few weeks.” The playwrights wanted a sequence of pieces that were “reflective, then a bit funny, then tragic, then uplifting.” Burton acknowledges editorial help from Tom Shroder, a former editor at The Washington Post Magazine. The Manic Monologues premiered at Stanford in May 2019, directed by Hofmeister. Subsequent productions took place at Open Door Rep, in Des Moines; and at UCLA. Some of the monologues were filmed for AdventHealth’s Conference on Mission. Online Experience B i s n o r e c a l l s t h at w h e n D a n i e la Bonafede-Chhabra (a member of the theater’s board of trustees) brought The

Manic Monologues to her attention in 2019, she was fascinated by the project, and drawn to the subject matter. “I thought this would be a perfect project for our lab [The Emily Mann LAB for the Development of New Work],” she says. “We use theater and art as a vehicle for a greater civic dialogue.” Dr. Calvin Chin, Princeton University’s director of counseling and psychological services, remembers that Bisno contacted him “to talk about ways that we could collaborate. We started initial conversations, but then the pandemic hit … we obviously couldn’t do a live show anymore.” Bisno adds, “We were looking at all of our projects, asking ‘What can we save?’” Theaters, including McCarter, started producing online content to mitigate the absence of live productions. Bisno saw The Manic Monologues as a “project that we could easily pivot to a virtual platform.” Chin praises Bisno’s “creativity in figuring out a way to offer the same program through a virtual space.” “What was going to be a one-night event … seen by a maximum of a thousand people, could now be seen by the world,” Bisno remarks. “We should never be complacent in how we create art — because that must change in order to stay relevant.” The project is funded in part by a grant from the TigerWell Initiative at Princeton University. “We’re funded generously by

the Elcan Family Fund,” says TigerWell’s project manager, Anne Laurita, Ph.D. “Our general goal is to engage student, staff, and faculty partners in working together to cultivate a campus community that supports student well-being.” “One of the ways that we add to that engagement is through our grants program,” Laurita continues. “I was involved in bringing the application to a selection committee … and then consulting with Calvin and Debbie, to think about how to sustain impact of the project.” Bisno appreciates that the University was “not only supportive financially, but also in terms of deepening the experience, helping us to curate the resources and panels.” Resources include hotlines and links to services. Elena Araoz, a faculty member at Princeton (where she leads the research project Innovations in Socially Distant Performance), was hired to direct. Although prerecorded videos of performances are a central component of the project, Bisno and Araoz were determined to move beyond the usual livestream. Araoz explains that she sought a way to replicate a live theatrical experience “where the audience gets to see that their interaction affects the experience coming back at them.” Bisno elaborates that they wanted the audience to be able to engage with the monologues “at their own pace, in a way that wasn’t heavy and maudlin, but was actually creative — and even fun, and

“THE MANIC MONOLOGUES”: McCarter Theatre Center, in association with Princeton University Health Services, The 24 Hour Plays, and Innovations in Socially Distant Performance, is launching “The Manic Monologues.” Written by Zack Burton (left) and Elisa Hofmeister (center), the monologues form the core of a virtual experience conceived and directed by Elena Araoz (right). (Photos courtesy of the artists) The interactive website for “The Manic Monologues” goes live on Thursday, February 18 at 7 a.m. It can be seen at mccarter.org/manicmonologues. For additional information, or to contact the playwrights about permission to perform the monologues, visit themanicmonologues.org.

that would allow for a sense of play.” She adds, “You can doodle and listen to music on the site, [and] you can read the script.” Web development is by Jackie Liu; and Jared Mezzocchi is the multimedia designer. Nathan Leigh is the composer and sound designer. Can a website constitute theater? Araoz argues that it can. “Theater is basically two things: sharing community and space; and sharing a live interaction.” She asserts that the site’s content offers “a sense of a whole community of people who are actively working to advocate for more conversation and research for mental health.” She adds that the coding allows for “feedback. You click or hover over something, and … it all moves, and the sound changes, based upon your interaction.” Araoz sought to emphasize that the monologues form “a visual story as much as a verbal story.” She was interested in the characters’ daily lives: “What kinds of things are in their place? What do they have to do to go to work? What do they do for joy? What do they do for resilience?” The director points to a character (portrayed by Anna Belknap) whose mental illness leads her “to try to commit suicide multiple times.” In one of her two monologues the character is “outside, collecting herbs she’ll use to help make food. You get the sense of resilience and life through it.” Craig Bierko plays a character “who does not have a mental illness, but his father did,” Araoz says. “Craig is an astounding visual artist, so his character is sculpting his father’s figure. It’s beautiful, heart-wrenching, and so full of love.” Chin moderates a panel discussion on “Mental Health and COVID.” He also interviews Jean Twenge, author of iGen. Chin hopes that viewers will “see beyond stereotypes about who is mentally ill,” and “acknowledge their own vulnerability. They may feel less shame in seeking out resources.” He adds, “That’s my hope — that the Manic Monologues experience will start a conversation that will help reduce the barriers to accessing care.” urton wants The Manic Monologues to be “made available to communities across the world. There’s so much power, in narrative, to help people better empathize, connect with, and humanize these experiences of mental health.” He wants to continue to explore ways of using “artistic media to help people better connect.” —Donald H. Sanborn III

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15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 17, 2021

Performing Arts

NOTABLE DEBUT: Pianist Michelle Cann is soloist, for the first time, with the Philadelphia Orchestra on February 18 and 25 as part of the current Digital Stage concert series. With conductor Yannick Nezet-Seguin on the podium, Cann plays a 1934 work by Black composer Florence Price. (Photo by Jeff Fusco) SPARKING CONVERSATIONS: Launched last October, McCarter Theatre Center’s Fireside Chats have been popular with patrons taking part in online programming during the pandemic. Hosted by Artistic Director Sarah Rasmussen, shown here with U.S. Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith in an episode to be aired next week, the discussions are filmed “fireside” on McCarter’s front lawn and air on the theater’s free YouTube channel. Past episodes, which are available to view, have included Princeton RISE fellow Valeria Torres-Olivares, actor Lew Gantwerk, Jammin’ Crepes co-owner Kathy Klockenbrink, former Mayor Liz Lempert, the Rev. Dr. Theresa S. Thames, and fashion designer Assata Andrews. Visit mccarter.org for more information. In addition to Smith, look for Princeton Record Exchange’s Jon Lambert, Tay Walker of the YWCA Princeton, and Trenton Central High School theater educator Felicia Brown in future episodes. Visit mccarter.org/firesidechats for information.

Women Composers are Focus of Video Recital

The next virtual Westminster Conservatory at Nassau recital will be released at 12:15 p.m. on Thursday, February 18 as a video embedded in the Nassau Presby terian Church website (nassauchurch.org/westminster-conservatory-recitals). Marvin Rosen, a member of the Westminster Conservatory faculty, will perform repertoire for solo piano by living women composers, including Beth Anderson,

Dorothee Eberhardt, Helen Jane Long, Dosia McKay, Rebecca Oswald, Ana Milosavljevic, Karen Tanaka, and Rain Worthington. Rosen has centered his performance and outreach activities on little-known music of the 20th and 21st centuries from around the world. He has presented recitals and lecture recitals, as well as radio performances a n d i n te r v i e w s i n N e w York, Philadelphia, Boston, Poland, and at the Phillips Collection in Washington,

D.C. He has per for med r e c it a l s d e vote d to t h e music of Alan Hovhaness in Princeton, Chicago, and New York. He has also performed four recitals for Piano By Nature in Elizabethtown, N.Y.,— the first two with his duo partner at the time, Jennifer Castellano, and the final two devoted to 31 solo miniatures by living women composers. Rosen has recorded two CDs of piano music by Alan Hovhaness and a CD of contemporary music for piano four-hands.

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Since 1997 Rosen has been the host of the weekly radio program Classical Discoveries on WPRB (103.3 FM). The program won the ASCAP Deems Taylor Radio Broadcast Award in 2005. Between 2011 and 2015 he was a board member of the Media Council of New Music USA, and from 2012 until 2019 he was an honorar y member of the board of New York Women Composers. In 2013, he received the Distinguished Musician A lu m n i Award from The College of New Jersey.

experiences as a Black woman raised in the post-Civil War South. The work contains references to spirituals, call-andresponse, and the “juba” — a lively, syncopated plantation dance that predates the Civil War. This performance marks the first time the piece has been played in North America in its original orchestration since the composer’s death in 1953, and possibly since the mid-1930s. Cann’s

performance is supported by ONEcomposer, an initiative dedicated to musicians whose contributions have been historically erased, housed at Cornell University. In providing a platform for the study, performance, and discussion of a single, underrepresented composer’s life and legacy, ONEcomposer promotes a more complete understanding of musical histories. For ticket information, visit philorch.org.

Rarely Heard Work Is On Orchestra Program

Pianist Michelle Cann makes her Philadelphia Orchestra debut with the Orchestra’s first performance of Florence Price’s Piano Concerto in One Movement in digital performances on February 18 and 25. Also on the program, conducted by Yannick Nezet-Seguin, are works by Rossini and Schubert. The Digital Stage is the orchestra’s online content platform. Performances have been reimagined and filmed, without audiences, at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts and Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center. Concerts are available on demand for ticket-holders for one week following the premieres. The concerts with Cann were originally scheduled, pre-pandemic, for March 4-11, 2021. Shortly after its premiere in 1934, a Pittsburgh Sun Telegraph reviewer wrote, “There [in the Concerto] is real American music, and Mrs. Price is speaking a language she knows.” Like her celebrated Symphony No. 1, Price’s Piano Concerto in One Movement evokes her

The Film Premiere of

Meanwhile, Bach at Cradle Valley... Johann Sebastian Bach, Goldberg Variations, BWV 988 Performed by Siwoo Kim - violin , Milena Pajaro-van de Stadt - viola and Michelle Djokic - cello

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 21 Tune in @ 5 PM on our website: CONCORDIAPLAYERS.ORG INFO@CONCORDIAPLAYERS.ORG | 215.816.0227

Concordia Chamber Players ARTISTIC DIRECTOR, MICHELLE DJOKIC


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 17, 2021 • 16

Art

“SHAPELESS ENDEAVOUR”: Ryan Gander’s cararra marble carving of a dolos, a form usually used as a barrier to interrupt natural tide cycles with the intention of preventing coastal erosion, is one of the works featured in the virtual exhibition “Natural and Conventional Signs.”

“Natural and Conventional the everyday world to shine Signs” At Lewis Arts Center new light on how we posiI n t h e v i r t u a l e x h ib i tion “Natural and Conventional Signs,” U.K. artist Ryan Gander presents a s elec t ion of new work s directly guided by his research at Princeton University undertaken during his time as a Hodder Fellow (2019-2020) and made during a period of reflection while the world paused amid a global pandemic. Gander invites an audience into his new gallery space w ithin his studio, Solid Haus, in rural Suffolk, two hours east of London. He has assembled a show in which the works have duality in meaning and utility; subverting the signs, tropes, and markers seen in

tion ourselves in relation to the values of time, money, opportunity, attention, and privilege. Presented by Lewis Center for the Arts, the free video tour of the exhibition is available on demand through February 26 at arts. princeton.edu/gander. Among the works in “Natural and Conventional Signs” is a motionactivated ticket machine, re -prog ram med to pr int unique, computer-generated GPS coordinates taking one to a randomly selected landbased location somewhere on the planet, then redirects the v isitor to another encounter outside the gallery space of conventional signs

into a real world of natural ones. Another work presents what appear to be political campaign or protest leaflets strewn across the floor. On closer view, we find that the political messaging is rendered illegible by comiclike cartoon writing leaving the viewer with a motif of protest or political perspective, condensing the action of political engagement to merely a futile gesture. A very large backlit billboard displays a photo graphic image of a pair of faux-soiled Adidas trainers created by the artist in 2014. However, it is revealed these par ticular trainers were worn by Omar Ruvalcaba during September 2017 in the aftermath of the Mexico City ear thquake, moving rubble and debris in search of life, following his own survival and escape from the collapsed concrete building in which he lived, creating yardsticks for value, worth, cost, and consequence. The exhibition also highlights Gander’s ongoing fascination with the attention economy. Heavily influenced by James Williams, whose book, Stand Out of Our Light: Freedom and Resistance in the Attention Economy, was the official “pre-read” for the incoming Class of 2024 at Princeton, Gander hints at how many social problems could be improved from within, by a fundamental societal change in the way we perceive the value of time. Gander has established an international reputation through artworks that materialize in many different forms, ranging from sculpture, apparel and writing, to architecture, painting, typefaces, publications, and performance. In addition to curating exhibitions, he is a committed educator, having taught at international art institutions and universities, and has written and presented television programs on and about contemporary art and culture for the BBC. In 2017 he was awarded The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE) or services to contemporary arts. For more information, visit arts.princeton.edu.

Zimmerli Launches New Virtual Art Programs

DESIGN. EXPERTISE. STYLE.

195 Nassau Street, Suite 25, Princeton NJ 08542 609.977.5872 www.fredahoward.design

Virtual Events at zimmerlimuseum.rutgers.edu for details and Zoom information. Join the next virtual event for Zimmerli members on February 24, “The Fate of Art in Vienna during the Nazi Era” with Rutgers alumna Victoria S. Reed, curator for Provenance at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA). Many works of art that were in private collections before World War II were displaced, looted, or forcibly sold during the National Socialist period. Recent attempts to recover lost and stolen masterworks have led to highprofile ownership disputes in the United States. This lecture examines the fate of these collections, with particular attention to the journeys of highlights from the MFA’s collection, as well as recognized paintings by G us tav K limt and Egon Schiele. Current members are invited to register at zimmerlimuseum.rutgers. edu. Those interested in becoming a member can find out more on the website.

ACP to Host Artists In “Princeton Pecha”

The Arts Council of Princeton will present “Princeton Pecha,” bringing local artists together to share their work in a free virtual program inspired by PechaKucha, a lively, upbeat format created in Japan that is designed for more show and less talk. Featured artists during this March 2, 8-9:15 p.m. program include Heather Barros, Betty Curtiss, Maria Evans, Kenneth Lewis, Tasha O’Neill, Rhinold Ponder, and Andre Veloux. Each artist will show 20 slides for 20 seconds each (about seven minutes per artist), exhibiting for the audience an array of visual expression. “We are blessed in Princeton with many remarkable artists, who blaze trails in visual expression through a rich array of media and content,” says moderator Ryan Lillienthal. “We hope programs like Princeton Pecha facilitate opportunities for artists to share their work with the community and amplify the many ways they add to the woven tapestry

of community conversation.” H u n te r d o n A r t M u Registration is free at s e u m , 7 L ower Center artscouncilofprinceton.org. Street, Clinton, has “Glass in the Expanded Field,” Architectonic: Bruce Dehnert Sculptural Ceramics,” and “Laura Moriarty: Resurfacing” through April 18. hunterdonartmuseum.org. James A. Michener Art Check websites for infor- Museum, 138 South Pine mation on safety protocols. Street, Doylestown, Pa., has A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 “Syd Carpenter: Portraits of Br idge Street, L amber t- Our Places” through Februville, has “Looking Forward” ary 28, “Fern Coppedge: through February 28. Gal- New Discoveries” through ler y hours are Thursday April 18, and “Through the through Sunday, 11 a.m. to Lens: Modern Photography 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. in the Delaware Valley” Arts Council of Princ- through August 15. The mue to n , 102 Wit herspoon seum is open to the public. Street, has “Legends of the michenerartmuseum.org. Morven Museum & GarArts: A Black History Month Exhibit” through March 6. den, 55 Stockton Street, Gallery hours are Monday has “In Nature’s Realm : through Thursday 11 a.m. to The Art of Gerard Rutgers 6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday Hardenberg” February 19 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. artscoun- through January 9 and the online exhibit “Portrait of cilofprinceton.org. D & R Greenway Land Place: Paintings, Drawings, Trust, One Preservation and Prints Of New Jersey, Place, has t he ongoi ng 1761–1898.” Open Wednesvirtual galleries “Trail of day through Sunday from 10 Breadcr umbs : Nat ure in a.m. to 4 p.m. morven.org. Old Barracks Museum, Fairytales” and “Portraits of Preservation: James Fioren- 101 Barrack Street, Trentino Art.” The center is cur- ton, has the ongoing virrently closed to the public. tual exhibits “When Women Vote — The Old Barracks drgreenway.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City and the Anti-Suffrage MoveM u s e u m i n C ad w a lad e r ment” and “Necessary and Park, Park s ide Avenu e, Proper for the Public Good.” Trenton, has “On the Fore- The museum is temporarily front: Trenton’s Junior 1, closed to the public. bar1916” through April 24 and racks.org. Pr inceton Universit y “Women Artists, Trenton Style” through June 6. Visit Art Museum has the onellarslie.org for museum line exhibits “Looking at hours and timed entry tick- 17th -Century Dutch Painting,” “Life Magazine and ets. Grounds For Sculpture, the Power of Photography,” 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, “The Eclectic Eye: A Tribute has “Rebirth: Kang Mux- to Duane Wilder,” and more, iang,” “Bruce Beasley: Sixty along w it h many online Year Retrospective, 1960- events. The museum is cur2020,” and other exhibits. rently closed to the public. Hours are Thursday through artmuseum.princeton.edu. We s t W i n d s o r A r t s Monday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Timed tickets required. In- Council, 952 Alexander door buildings are closed to Road, West Windsor, has the public. groundsforsculp- ”Harmony Art Show” online and by appointment ture.org. Historical Society of through February 26. wesPrinceton, Updike Farm- twindsorarts.com. stead, 354 Quaker Road, has “A Virtual Tour of Hamilton’s Princeton” and the IS ON “Histor y @ Home” ser ies. princetonhistory.org.

Area Exhibits

The Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers invites the university community and general public to a variety of virtual programs while the museum building remains closed to the public and in-person events are suspended until further notice. The new series BLOOM: Explore Growth and SelfE xpression T hrough Ar t began on February 13. A par tnership between the Zimmerli and Sisterwork, a New Brunswick start-up committed to addressing intergenerational poverty in New Jersey, the program invites participants to engage with artwork in the museum’s collections through m indf ulness, movement, and community narratives. Future workshops include “Life Portraits: Share Your Stories through Art Making” on March 13 and “Thrive: S ke tch i ng You r G row t h through Botany” on April 10. All sessions are free and open to the public and conducted with both Eng- “SWEET LAND OF LIBERTY”: This painting by Bill Jersey is part of “Lyrical 2021,” a multi-artist lish and Spanish instruc- exhibit on view March 4 through April 4 at the Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville. tion. Visit Zimmerli at Home For more information, visit lambertvillearts.com.


HOW CAN WE find resilience and innovation in a time of complexity and challenge? Join us for two sessions of Forward Fest in February, part of A Year of Forward Thinking, as Princeton University alumni explore these topics. The first session highlights Princeton alumni who faced impediments on their paths and have persevered. The second session celebrates the inquisitive Princeton spirit, exemplified by Tigers who have explored new territory — or are in the middle of the hunt — in a variety of fields.

FEBRUARY 20 ALUMNI FORWARD THINKERS 10 AM EST | RESILIENCE 12 PM EST | EXPLORATION

RESILIENCE

FORWARD THINKERS

EXPLORATION

Wednesday, February 17 10 a.m.: “And Yet the Daw n Is Ours : National Youth Poet Laureate Amanda Gorman Lifts Us All.” Discussion of excerpts from G o r m a n’s i n a u g u r a t i o n poem, sponsored by Mercer County Division of Mental Health ’s Traumatic Loss Coalition. Free Zoom event. Mercercounty.org. 12-1:30 p.m.: Lunch & Learn with Connie Mercer and Sarah Steward, CEO and COO of HomeFront; part of Week of Hope. Via Zoom. Homefrontnj.org. 5 p.m.: Princeton University Public Lectures and Partners present “Ayad Aktar, Faisal Devji, and Sadia Abbas: Money and War, an American Conversation.” Free via Zoom. Labyrinthbooks.com/events. 4:30-6 p.m.: Virtual panel discussion on legalization of marijuana in New Jersey presented by Princeton University chapter of Students for Sensible Drug Policy. With Ed “NJ Weedman” Forchion, Jacqueline Ferraro, the Rev. Charles Boyer, and Dr. David L. Nathan. Register at https://forms.gle/ EtbdJ6yDdUpdLjy7A. 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meeting, via Zoom. Princetonlibrary.org. 7-8 p.m.: “NJ Government & Politics: What You Want & Need to Know,” online talk by Ingrid Reed, presented by the Lawrence League of Women Voters. Get link at LWVLT.org. Thursday, February 18 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market Winter Market, Franklin Avenue lot, Princeton. 12:15 p.m.: Westminster Conservatory at Nassau Recital features piano music by women composers, performed by Marvin Rosen. Free online program. Nassauchurch.org. 4-5:15 p.m.: The Women in Business Alliance of the Princeton Mercer Chamber hold a networking event via Zoom. $15 ($25 nonmembers ). Princetonmercerchamber.org/events. 5:30 p.m.: “In Nature’s Realm: The Art of Gerard Rutgers Hardenbergh,” virtual opening and reception and curator walk at Morven Museum. Free, but registration required. Morven.org. 5 :30 p.m.: Reading in Translation: New Student Work, presented by The Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Creative Writing. Zoom event, free. Arts. princeton.edu/events. 5:30 p.m.: “Losing Picasso: The Challenges of Condensing a Life.” Lecture by Caroline Harris of Princeton University Art Museum. Free. Register at artmuseum.princeton.edu. 6 p.m.: “Homelessness and Hunger in the Time of COVID-19,” panel discussion sponsored by Princeton Public Library via Zoom. Part of HomeFront’s Week of Hope. Homefrontnj.org. 7-8 p.m.: Mercer County Library System presents online program, “Abandoned Ruins on Public Lands in New Jersey: Forgotten and Unknown Pasts.” With aut h or a n d p h oto g r ap h e r

3 p.m.: “Collector’s Progress: The Mark Samuels Lasner Collection and its Princeton Connection.” Presented by Princeton University Library via Zoom. Registration necessary. libcal.princeton. edu. 4 p.m.: “Uncovered” with Leah Lax, presented virtually by The Jewish Center Pr inceton. L a x w ill talk about her journey from her book Uncovered, the only gay memoir to come out of the Hasidic community. info@thejewishcenter.org. 7 p.m.: Homeless premiere, featuring the Tiny House Project with words by HomeFront. For details visit HomeFrontnj.org. Monday, February 22 12:15 p.m.: Annamie Paul of the Green Party of Canada speaks in a free virtual event, “Chance of a Lifetime: The Future of Canada-U.S. Cooperation on the Climate Emergency.” Sponsored by Princeton University Center for Policy Research on Energy and the Environment. Princeton.edu. 7 p.m.: Black Women’s Role in the Suffrage Movement, Zoom event presented by Mercer County Library, L aw r e n c e H e ad q u a r te r s Branch. Mcl.org. 7:30 p.m.: “What Made Me Think I Can Build a Guitar? ” A look at how a guitar works and the nature of craftsmanship, with David Schiff. Interactive Zoom class sponsored by The Jewish Center Princeton. info@ thejewishcenter.org. Tuesday, February 23 6 p.m.: Labyrinth Books presents Adam Jentleson in Conversation with Sam Wang and Julian Zelizer. “Kill Switch: The Rise of the Modern Senate and the Crippling of American Democracy.” Free Zoom event. Labyrinthbooks.org/events. 7-8 p.m.: Introduction to the Hindu Faith and Culture, Part 2. Zoom class sponsored by The Jewish Center Princeton. Taught by Rajan Narayanaswamy. Registration required. info@thejewishcenter.org. Wednesday, February 24 6 p.m.: Reading by Ottessa Moshfegh and seniors from the Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Creative Writing. Free Zoom event. Arts.princeton.edu/ events. 7 p.m.: Princeton Comm u n it y H ou s i n g v i r t u a l fundraiser to benefit the organization’s COV ID -19 rent relief. Professor Eddie S. Glaude Jr. will speak about his book Begin Again: James Baldwin’s America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own. Followed by a Q&A led by the Rev. Lukata Mjumbe of Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church. $50 ($25 students). For $85, registrants get a signed copy of the book. PCHHomes.org. Thursday, February 25 4:30 p.m.: Washington Post correspondent David Ignatius speaks, “Cybergeddon: Fact, Fiction, and the Future of Warfare.” Free virtual event sponsored by Princeton University School of Public and International Affairs. Princeton.edu. 6 p.m.: Labyrinth Books presents “Left Pasts, Left Fut ures : Peter Cov iello, Gustavus Stadler, and Kyla Schuller in Conversation.” Free Zoom event. Labyrinthbooks.org/events.

JOSH BRANKMAN ’99 Executive Director, Outward Bound USA

HEATHER GERKEN ’91 Dean and Sol & Lillian Goldman Professor of Law, Yale Law School; Forward Fest moderator

ELIZABETH R. HENRY ’88 (DR. LIZ) Pediatrician and parent coach

SULEIKA JAOUAD ’10 Journalist, author and advocate

JULIA BOORSTIN ’00 CNBC senior media and entertainment reporter; Forward Fest moderator

MAJKA BURHARDT ’98 Professional climber, conservation entrepreneur, author and filmmaker

KAREN ROTER DAVIS ’94 Director, Early Stage Projects, X, Alphabet’s moonshot factory

RICHARD PRESTON *83 Author and science/ environment communicator

ROY SWAN ’86 Director, Mission Investments, Ford Foundation

A Year of Forward Thinking is the University’s engagement campaign inviting faculty, students, alumni, community members and others to join in a conversation focused on responding to the challenges facing the nation and the world.

The online event is free and open to the public.

Visit forwardthinking.princeton.edu to learn more and watch. #PrincetonForward

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 17, 2021

Calendar

Kathleen Butler. Mcl.org. 7 p.m.: “Viruses, Pandem ics, and Im mu n it y,” virtual author event presented by Princeton Public Library and Labyrinth Books. Princetonlibrary.org. 7: 3 0 p . m . : P r i n c e t o n Friends School will host a free, virtual webinar open to the Princeton community entitled “Are Our Children Using Technology or is Technology Using Them?” The event will feature Max Stossel, head of education at the Center for Humane Technology (CHT), an organization founded by former tech insiders dedicated to realigning technology with humanity’s best interests. Head of School Melissa Carroll will moderate the session. princetonfriendsschool.org. 8 p.m.: Great Minds Salon sponsored by The Jewish Center Princeton presents “The What, The How, and the Why of Science Denial.” With Adrian Bardon. Free. Register at info@thejewishcenter.org. Friday, February 19 1 p.m.: Discussion with Kermit Moss, interim director, Center for Black Church Studies, Princeton Theological Seminary, on the historical, emotional, and educational role the church has played within the Black community. Presented by Princeton Senior Resource Center. Free, but registration required. Psrc.org. 4 p.m.: Meet Madam C.J. Walker. Princeton Public Library presents this play exploring the life and accomplishments of entrepreneur and philanthropist Madam C.J. Walker, regarded as America’s first woman selfmade millionaire, from Museums in Motion. Virtual event. Princetonlibrary.org. Saturday, February 20 Available all day: Virtual gospel music concert fundraiser sponsored by the Stoutsburg Sourland African American Museum and Sourland Conservancy, with baritone Keith Spencer. $30 per household. Ssaamuseum.org. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. : We s t Windsor Winter Farmers Market, at Meadow Road lot of MarketFair mall, U.S. Route 1. wwcfm.org. 11 a.m.: Represent Us New Jersey Zoom chapter meeting, “For the People Act.” Josh Silver, co-founder of Represent Us, is speaker. Register at http://bit. ly/2YOg8tr. 12, 2, and 4 p.m.: Wine tastings of 2020 vintages at Unionville Vineyards, 9 Rocktown Road, Ringoes. $18 per person by appointment for up to four guests. (908) 788-0400, ext. 2. 8 p.m.: Premiere of 40 th annual tour of Thomas Edison Film Festival, presented by Lewis Center for the Arts. Several award-winning films are screened, followed by audience Q &A with filmmakers and Festival director Jane Steuerwald. Free. Arts. princeton.edu/events. Sunday, February 21 12, 2, and 4 p.m.: Wine tasting of 2020 vintages at Unionville Vineyards, 9 Rocktown Road, Ringoes. $18 per person by appointment for up to four guests. (908) 788-0400, ext. 2. 12-2 p.m.: Palmer Square on Ice – giant blocks of ice will be sculpted into 3-D figures on the green at Palmer Square. Palmersquare.com.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 17, 2021 • 18

Princeton Welcomes Sunitha Gopal

Sunitha Gopal Sales Associate, REALTOR® (646) 258-2017 cell (609) 683-7372 office Sunitha.Gopal@foxroach.com

Specializing and residing in West

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Passionate about cooking and South

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30 Gordon Way, Princeton Marketed by: Robin L. Wallack $675,000

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6 Littlebrook Road N, Princeton Marketed by: Eva Petruzziello & Roberta Parker $2,399,000

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17 N Main Street, Cranbury Twp Marketed by: Rocco D’Armiento $700,000

1714 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor Twp Marketed by: Terebey Relocation Team/John Terebey $342,888

From Princeton, We Reach the World.

293 Riverside Drive, Princeton Marketed by: Annabella “Ann”| Santos $1,888,000

50 Tiffany Drive, Raritan Twp Marketed by:| Chihlan “Lana” Chan $860,000

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 foxroach.com TEMPORARILY LOCATED AT 33 WITHERSPOON STREET

© BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

From Princeton, We Reach the World. 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 Princeton Office Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com Princeton, NJ ||253 foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.


Helen H. Sherman

Real Estate with Real Results

94 North Rd, Princeton, NJ 08540

Listed at: $2,975,000

Up a long, winding drive sits a home of timeless elegance with a storied past. Designed by Rolf Bauhan, one of Princetons most influential architects, this Norman Tudor was commissioned in 1932 by John Higgins Wallace, a noted chemist at Princeton and completed in 1934. The architectural design features an octagonal turret at the homes center with two separate wings forming an L shape and extending three stories. As a labor of love, this gracious tudor has been completely updated (over $2M) to 21st century standards - both aesthetic and mechanical - by its current owners, with the help of noted architect Jerry Ford. A graceful foyer introduces the living room, dining room and library featuring period details - leaded glass windows (replaced with custom storms), restored red oak paneling, and limestone fireplaces. The timeless beauty of the kitchen, dining area and butlers pantry is enhanced by Carrera marble countertops, heated antique limestone floors, and Viking appliances. The upper two floors provide the perfect spaces to retreat and to work undisturbed. The extensive master suite has been reimagined in neutral hues with a stunning master bathroom, with radiant heat floors and walk-in shower with added steam shower, and separate study/dressing room/half bath with a wall of cedar-lined closets. Three additional bedrooms, a generous office with added dormer window, den, and two full bathrooms complete the second floor, while the homes third floor offers yet another bedroom suite. The homes landscaping features multiple bluestone terraces, gardens and stunning manicured grounds. The back terrace overlooking the tiered lawn is ideal for entertaining, while the property is large enough to easily accommodate a pool, tennis court or even a wedding! Fenced and plans for a lap pool. Almost a mile and a half from downtown Princeton and all it offers, this is a period home of enduring beauty restored for todays lifestyle. Window treatments, custom lighting and fixtures included. Furnishings negotiable. Video (http:// sites.visionnj.com/pv/41331326). Additional documents include an property statement, survey, floor plan and more.

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PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ 08540 | 609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 17, 2021

HS


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2021 • 20

S ports

Achieving Dream of Playing Division I Hockey, PDS Alum Coffey Debuts for Colorado College

T

yler Coffey is living out a dream this winter as he starts his career for the Colorado College men’s hockey team. The former Princeton Day School star decided years ago that he would like to play college hockey someday. “In the eighth grade, I knew it was something I wanted to pursue,” said Coffey, reflecting on his goal to play at the next level. “My parents were always big on me getting an education and being able to play hockey at the same time.” In addition to thriving on the ice for the Panthers, Coffey appreciated the education he got at PDS. “I felt PDS was the best option right there, I was there through my junior year,” said Coffey. “The three years I did have at PDS really prepared me for Colorado College.” After starring for PDS over three seasons, Coffey moved on to juniors to help increase his chances of playing at the next level, playing for the New Jersey Hitmen of the United States Premier Hockey League (USPHL). He was named the USPHL Forward of the Year in 2017 after leading the league in goals (37) and points (60). A year later, Coffey tallied 46 points on 27 goals and 19 assists for the Hitmen. Coffey then headed west to play for Tri-City Storm (Neb.) and Sioux Falls Stampede

(S.D.) of the United States Hockey League (USHL). He was sidelined by injury with Tri-City and then scored 12 points on six goals and six assists in 18 games for Sioux Falls during the 2019-20 campaign. For Coffey, playing juniors proved to be a key stepping stone in his transition to Division I college hockey. “I started playing junior hockey in my senior year in high school, that is when I got most of my exposure,” said Coffey, who did online schooling to complete his high school education. “After that, I went over to the USHL, Tri-City, and Sioux Falls. My time in Tri-City wasn’t as great because I was hurt. Sioux Falls was awesome, that place will always hold a special place in my heart. I had a great time there. I had a great billet family. It was an awesome arena, I don’t think I will ever play in an arena and a place like Sioux Falls.” As he considered college hockey programs, Colorado College emerged early on as the right fit. “CC was the first college that reached out, I talked to a few other schools in the process,” said Coffey. “Scott (PDS head coach Scott Bertoli) also played for Mike Haviland (Colorado College head coach) as well. Bert always emphasized what a good guy Havy was and he is not wrong. The NCHC (National

Collegiate Hockey Conference) is the best conference in college hockey in my eyes.” Arriving at Colorado Springs this past August, Coffey was primed to excel at the next level. “The whole reason of playing at Tri-City and Sioux Falls for those two extra years was to develop, to become bigger, faster, and stronger,” said Coffey. “With college hockey, they will bring you in when they feel you are ready and when you will make an impact. I really didn’t have any questions about my ability this year. I knew I was ready. I am a strong kid.” Coffey’s college career got off to a unique start as Colorado College played its first eight games in a bubble hosted by the University of Nebraska Omaha. “That was pretty cool, I give a lot of credit to Omaha, the school, and the fact that they were able to put that together” said Coffey. “There were no problems in the bubble, it was very well organized. Each player had their own hotel room and all of that. If there was any problem, the whole team would have to go into quarantine. We were testing every single day.” Seeing his first action for Colorado College against Omaha on December 9, Coffey quickly learned how physical the game is at the college level. “I would say the speed is about the same as juniors but we are playing against men,

COFFEY BREWING: Tyler Coffey, left, controls the puck in action this winter in his freshman season for the Colorado College men’s hockey team. Former Princeton Day School standout forward Coffey has an assist in 10 appearances for the Tigers so far in his debut campaign. (Photo provided courtesy of Colorado College Athletics Communications)

guys who are 24, 25,” said Coffey. “So I would just say it is a much heavier game than junior hockey. I don’t think it can even compare to high school hockey.” Getting up to speed, Coffey picked up his first point for the Tigers when he assisted on the team’s first goal in a 4-3 overtime loss to St. Cloud State on December 18. “That was awesome, I back checked and I got the puck, battled, and then just flicked it up,” recalled Coffey. “I did what I was told and it paid off. We scored the first goal of the game, that was an awesome feeling. It was a confidence builder but I am still itching to get my first goal here. I

have had a few opportunities. It is definitely hard to capitalize. I have to keep shooting the puck, there is not much time and they are right on top of you.” In order to have a better chance of capitalizing on those opportunities, Coffey is focusing on combining strength with speed. “I am always getting stronger; I always have had the ability to shoot the puck but my skating ability has gotten better since high school,” said Coffey, who has the one assist in 10 appearances so far this season. “Sometimes I don’t realize how fast I am. Being strong, I can use my speed and be good in corners. I have put on about 15-20 pounds since I have gotten to CC. I am 5’9 and I am

like 190 now. I still have to get used to playing at that weight. I have to be a little more physical and use my body a little more.” With the Tigers having posted a 3-13-2 record so far this winter, losing a number of nailbiters along the way, Coffey is hoping to use that physicality to help the team get on the winning track. “We do play a lot of tough teams, it is the NCHC so the games can go either way,” said Coffey. “For us, we have to execute better. It is just making that pass or putting the puck in the back of the net. We are itching to start getting wins.” —Bill Alden

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7 Princeton Athletes Earn Academic All-Ivy Honors

Seven Princeton University student-athletes have earned Academic All-Iv y honors for the Fall 2020 semester, the league said last week. Ivy institutions nominated one student-athlete from each of the seven Ivy League sponsored sports – football, field hockey, men’s soccer, women’s soccer, women’s v o l l e y b a l l , m e n’s c r o s s country and women’s cross country – to be included on the Academic All-Ivy teams. Student-athletes must be in good academic standing to be eligible for the award. The Princeton honorees included: Henry Byrd, a junior offensive linemen for the football team who is majoring in history; Clara Roth, a senior field hockey standout and 2019 Longstreth/NFHCA First-Team All-America who is studying architecture ; Moulay Hamza Kanzi Belghiti, a senior men’s soccer player major i ng i n econom ic s ;

NEW YEAR, NEW LOOK:

Ivy League Seniors Can Compete as Grad Students

The Ivy League will allow current senior student-athletes to play an additional season as graduate students next season, according to a report from ESPN. The network said it obtained a statement sent to student-athletes setting forth the change in policy which is a one-time waiver because of the Ivy League canceling its fall and winter seasons. “This change is a direct result of the pandemic and will not be available in future years,” the memo stated according to ESPN.

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“The waiver provides current 4th-year students the opportunity to complete their athletics experience at their current institution in 202122 after staying on track to graduate in four years.” Previously, the league had not allowed athletic redshirts or permitted graduate students to play athletics. “St udent- at h le te s who wish to take advantage of this waiver must be admitted to [and then enroll fulltime] as a degree seeking graduate student through regular channels at their undergraduate institution,” the announcement added. “They must receive waiver approval from their institution’s 5th year advisor and the waiver request must be processed and approved by the Ivy League office. Existing Ivy League financial aid

rules will continue to apply.” I n Nove mb er, t h e Iv y League became the first and only Division I conference to cancel all winter sports. Impacted sports included basketball, wrestling, indoor track and field, swimming, and fencing. In addition, the league was the first conference to cancel its men’s and women’s conference basketball tournaments last March and was the first conference to announce it wouldn’t have fall sports because of COVID-19 concerns. Several Princeton athletes had either entered the transfer portal or were looking to play for colleges in other leagues after graduation based on extra eligibility granted due to COVID-19 cancellations.

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Caroline Noonan, a junior on the women’s soccer team who is studying operational research and financial engineering; Clare Lenihan, a senior women’s volleyball standout and 2019 first-team All-Ivy performer majoring in art and archaeology; Melia Chittenden, a senior with the women’s cross country program and two-time first-team All-Ivy selection who is majoring in public and international affairs ; and Eli Krahn, a senior men’s cross country runner studying operational research and financial engineering.

DUKING IT OUT: Michael Sowers lunges forward to goal during his record-breaking career for the Princeton University men’s lacrosse team. Sowers, who ended his Princeton career as the program’s all-time leading scorer with 302 points on 121 goals and a team-record 181 assists, is currently playing for Duke lax as a grad student on an extra year of eligibility resulting from the cancellation of the 2020 season due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Last Saturday, attackman Sowers tallied four goals and two assists to help top-ranked Duke defeat Mercer 17-8 and improve to 3-0. Sowers leads the Blue Devils with 13 points on five goals and eight assists. Another former Princeton standout, Phil Robertson, is also playing for Duke as a grad student and has two goals and an assist so far this season. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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PHS Girls’ Hoops Races Out to 3-1 Start, Employing Depth, High-Pressure Defense Coming off a disappointing 5-20 campaign in 201920, the Princeton High girls’ basketball team didn’t waste any time serving notice that things are going to be different this winter. In its season opener against Hamilton West on January 29, PHS rolled to a 43-19 win over the Hornets. Six days later, the Tigers routed Nottingham 58-17. “We are much better this year, it is just a totally different vibe,” said PHS head coach Dave Kosa. “Actually it is a totally different philosophy; we are uptempo this year, we are pressing.” Fresh man point g uard Casey Serxner has emerged as a catalyst for the squad, speeding things up on both ends of the court for the Tigers. “Casey has been doing a great job as far as leading us on the break,” said Kosa of Serxner, who also stars at soccer for PHS. “She also pressures the other team’s point guard so it really spearheads our offense and defense. She never tires, she is always on the go. That is the type of person she is, always working no matter what sport she is playing. She has a lot on her plate. We are asking

her to run the offense, we are asking her be the half court girl at our press. She is looking to be the anticipator and get some steals which she has done.” Last week, Serxner helped PHS pass a big early season test, tallying 11 points with three assists and two rebounds as the Tigers edged Hopewell Valley 40-37 on February 9. “They were undefeated and they have one of the better point guards in the league in Franki Gomez,” said Kosa. “Even though she got 16 points, she had to work for them. She eventually fouled out at the end. Casey hounded her up and down the floor. I think the first quarter for us was important. They pressed us and we pressed them and we were up 1615.” T he contest was t ight throughout and PHS utilized its team unity to pull out the victory. “It was probably our togetherness and trusting one another because the lead didn’t get up above five or seven points the entire way,” said Kosa. “I think the largest lead was 40 -33 and then we made a couple of turnovers and they cut it to three at the end.”

PHS got a large contribution in the win from junior forwards Nora Devine and Sofia Aguayo. “Nora had a real big game, she is giving us an inside post presence,” said Kosa of Devine who had 10 points and five rebounds against HoVal. “We are pressing a lot and we have her on the back end on the press and subbing her with Sofia. They don’t let any layups go by, they really do a good job back there. They just have another year of experience. They are wiser, they are smarter. Nora had a couple of big blocks against Hopewell, she positions her body well.” Another veteran, senior guard Brynne Hennessy, has benefited from the experience she gained last year. “Brynne gives us an outside presence, a perimeter presence,” added Kosa. “When Casey is driving the ball, she can dish it out to Br ynne. Being a year older is helping her because last year was really her first year on varsity.” In addition to Serxner, PHS is getting a good contribution from three other freshmen — Gabby Bannett, Riley Devlin, and Leah Rose-Seiden. “They are giving us a lot

of exuberance and enthusiasm,” said Kosa. “They are providing that depth. They just allow us to run. When we are tired we can go to them and we don’t fall off that much.” J u n i o r fo r w a r d M o l l y Brown is giving the Tigers a lot all over the court. “I call her our glue girl, she doesn’t score a lot but she gets a couple of boards, a couple of assists and a couple of steals,” said Kosa. “She plays a couple of different positions for us. She knows all of the positions, you can put her in at the three (small forward), the four (power forward), or the five (center) so that is really helpful when we are running the press. She can be on the point of the press or she can be back. She is mobile, she is tough.” Employing the press has helped the Tigers become more potent offensively. “We are doing a full court press pretty much the whole time,” said Kosa. “We might take it off when we have a big lead or some foul trouble. We are getting a lot of stuff off of our press. Even if we don’t get it off the press, we are forcing quick shots and we are pushing our way back down at them.” Having an infusion of talent and players that don’t back down at practice is another key factor in PHS’ hot start.

“I am happy about the competitiveness and the fact that we go ten-deep,” said Kosa, whose team fell 54-48 in double overtime at Lawrence High last Monday to move to 3-1 and plays at Steinert on February 17 and at Trenton Central on February 23. “Even our 11 and 12 girls are solid, they are better than what we have had in years past. In practice, we push each other so the fact that they are competing against one another, they are getting each other better. There are no hard feelings, there is no feeling of don’t make me work too hard. We are going after each other and then at the end of the day, we know we are all doing this for a

common goal. Everybody has bought into that concept.” While the program’s reversal of fortune this winter is promising, Kosa sees even bigger things on the horizon for the program. “The future is so exciting for us right now, it is coming at a great time after last year,” said Kosa. “It was a down year; we lost nine players — six seniors, three juniors, and one freshman — who didn’t play. The girls last year were pretty much first year varsity players, we only had six really. Now we have a good 12 and out of those 12, there are six freshmen and only one senior.” —Bill Alden

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MIGHTY CASEY: Princeton High girls’ basketball player Casey Serxner drives past a Hopewell Valley player last week. Freshman guard Serxner has helped spark PHS to a promising 3-1 start. In upcoming action, the Tigers are slated to play at Steinert on February 17 and at Trenton Central on February 23. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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As a three-year starter for the Princeton High boys’ basketball team, Ethan Guy is looking to give his teammates the benefit of his experience. “It is being that leader to keep this program running and build up a lot of these juniors and sophomores,” said senior forward Guy. “I am trying to be a leader and let them experience the varsity level.” L ast Monday, G uy set a good example for the squad’s younger players, tallying 16 points in a losing cause as PHS fell 50-40 to Lawrence High, dropping to 0-4. While a late Tiger rally fell short, the squad did show some offensive cohesion, particularly in the second quarter when they outscored the Cardinals 13-9. “I felt that we were comfortable, we had three practices this week,” said Guy. “We implemented some more and added on to that offense a little bit. It is nice to just get comfortable.” Although Guy’s offensive output was solid, he wasn’t totally comfortable with his performance. “I have to shoot a little better, it is getting into rhythm,” said Guy. “It has been tough with this whole situation. It is nice to be able to run again and get some hoops.” Guy was excited to get to play with classmate and point guard Tim Evidente, who returned to action on Monday after suffering a leg injury in the season opener

in late January. “It is nice playing with a friend and getting him back,” said Guy. “I am glad that he is healthy.” Although the defeat to Lawrence stung, Guy believes PHS took a step forward. “This is a good building block,” said Guy. “We were up at half. We are just taking the positives and going on to the next game. It was tough to lose that.” As he has matured, Guy has built himself into a tougher presence around the basket. “I feel more physical, I feel more comfortable in my body as a senior,” said Guy. “I am one of the older and more physical guys on the court this season and that is to my advantage, banging down low and getting some fouls.” Diversifying his game, Guy is hoping to play at the college level. “That is definitely a goal of mine,” said Guy, who is looking at Division III programs. “I am just trying to find the right fit, school-wise and athletic-wise. Hopefully we can get some more games and just keep playing.” PHS head coach Pat Noone was happy with the way Guy produced against Lawrence. “We are trying to move some pieces and get something going,” said Noone. “I think we hit something with Ethan playing the mid post. It gave him some free rein and he played well. He

HARD DRIVING: Princeton High boys’ basketball player Ethan Guy, right, drives to the hoop in recent action. Last Monday, senior forward Guy tallied 16 points in a losing cause as PHS fell 50-40 to Lawrence High. The Tigers, now 0-4, are slated to host Steinert on February 17 and Trenton Central on February 23. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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gave us some buckets.” Getting the deft passer Evidente back helped spark the PHS defense. “Without him, we were really lost the last two and half games,” said Noone. “It is good to have him back with his ability as a ball handler. He is like a coach out there, he executes everything. He is a good kid and a good player.” Junior guard Jaxon Petrone stepped up with a very good game against Lawrence, scoring from long distance as he contributed 13 points. “Jaxon Petrone hit some big threes, that was pretty cool,” said Noone. “I think he hit four threes and played better defense so he did well overall.” While PHS pulled to within five points of Lawrence in the waning moments of the contest as it trailed 4338 at one point, it couldn’t get over the hump down the stretch. “We just didn’t execute; we left a lot of buckets out there,” said Noone. “It was a great fight. It is such a difficult situation that we are in and just the fact that they are able to come out here every day and put in the effort and get it done is fantastic. All of the credit to them for doing it.” Noone acknowledged the team has faced challenges in sharpening its execution with the season delayed from the usual November start to mid-January. “It is hard not having that preseason; it was two weeks and then you jump into games and then you have a snowstorm,” said Noone. “We are a program that likes to work on development and without having that it is tough.” Looking ahead, Noone believes his players are still developing notwithstanding the challenges they have faced this season. “It is just to enjoy it and just give them all the opportunity to play, have fun, and have some semblance of a high school season,” said Noone, whose team is slated to host Steinert on February 17 and Trenton Central on February 23. “Having everybody show up and do everything they possibly can has been great. I think overall, it is moving in the right direction. We just need more time.” Guy, for his part, is relishing any time he gets on the court in his abbreviated senior campaign. “It is making the most out of the season,” said Guy. “It changes every week. I am just trying to enjoy every game and every practice because it may be my last.” —Bill Alden

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SPENCER TRASK LECTURE

Ayad Akhtar Novelist and Playwright

In conversation with FAISAL DEVJI, Professor of Indian History and Director of the Asian Studies Center, Oxford University and SADIA ABBAS, Associate Professor of English, Rutgers University

This lecture is hosted in partnership with Labyrinth Books, Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts, McCarter Theatre, Princeton’s Office of the Dean of Religious Life, Princeton’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion, and the Princeton Public Library.

February 17, 2021 5 p.m., Zoom Webinar For information on how to register for this virtual event, visit our website at lectures.princeton.edu Free and open to the Public Ayad Akhtar photo by Vincent Tullo

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With Senior Center Garita Diversifying His Game, PDS Boys’ Hoops Produces Promising 2-1 Start Ethan Garita struggled in the first half as the Princeton Day School boys’ basketball team hosted the Pennington School last week. PDS senior center Garita managed just two points in the first half as the Panthers found themselves trailing archrival Pennington 24-23 at halftime in the February 9 contest. “In the first half I was kind of getting frustrated, I wasn’t getting the calls from the refs,” said Garita. “You have to just keep fighting it out and keep working and it will come to you.” At the break, PDS head coach Eugene Burroughs urged the Panthers to fight harder in the second half. “He told us to keep working; we just wanted to be more aggressive, grab rebounds, and talk on the floor,” recalled Garita. “We had a lot of times where we were kind of selfish and we weren’t passing the ball and running our plays.” Taking that message to heart, Garita poured in 12 points in the third quarter to help PDS forge ahead 43-35. “I felt like I was getting into a rhythm,” said Garita, reflecting on his outburst. “I was setting hard body screens and rolling and going to the line. I have got to keep working.” Weathering a Pennington rally, the Panthers had to work hard to pull out a 5049 victory. “We were getting tired; there were a lot of turnovers and a lot of bad passes,” said Garita, who totaled 14 points in the victory with classmate Dameon Samuels contributing 12. “They were beating us on the boards. I guess we just outhustled them when it came down to the wire.” The nail-biter epitomized the intense local rivalr y between PDS and the Red Raiders. “It has been going on for a while now; last season, we played them at our home and we beat them and then the second time they beat us,” said Garita. “We had an overtime game against them last week. You have just got to fight it out and the best team wins. We came out and showed that we were better.” New he ad coach B u rroughs has showed Garita and his teammates different ways to look at the game. “He has a great background, coaching in the G-League and the college level,” said Garita. “It is his first year coaching high school. There are a lot of times in practice where he calls out different plays that I am not used to so it is a learning process. It is helping all of us and it is preparing us for the next level. I am glad that he could be part of this.” Garita is learning some valuable lessons from Burroughs. “Last year, I was mainly in the post,” said Garita. “He wants me to develop my game, shoot a little bit more, handle the rock, take

it up the court. I have been working on my craft outside and in at practice. I just try to put that in my game.” In reflecting on the win over Pennington, Burroughs credited his players with fighting gamely down the stretch. “My biggest thing for our team is just playing together, I think our defense has been really good,” said Burroughs. “I am really impressed with our ability to defend. We are staying within our principles. Our kids are competing on the defensive end.” Burroughs liked the way Garita competed. “Today he was a little more active and I think he could be even more active,” added Burroughs. “He has got to finish some plays around the basket. He is there, he has got to finish those plays.” PDS also got some big plays against Pennington from junior Connor Topping, junior Anthony Stewart and senior Josh Colon as Topping and Colon each tallied four points with Stewart chipping in six. “Connor has been de fense, he competes and he has been putting the ball on the floor,” said Burroughs. “He has been doing some great things, he got a big block at the end. Stewart is one of our tougher kids, he comes in and plays hard. Josh is that guy who knows where everyone is supposed

to be on the floor. He knows where he is supposed to be, he is a veteran. If those kids do what they are supposed to do, I think we have got a chance to be good.” While Burroughs was happy to see his squad pull out the win, he knows there is plenty of room for growth. “I said to the guys this is how funny the game is, it is a game of runs,” said Burroughs, whose team fell 6251 to the Hun School last Thursday to move to 2-1 and is slated to host Hun in a rematch on February 18 before playing at Pennington on February 23. “We start out slow, we make a run and then weathered the storm. At the end, we held on. You can win games like that. It is a win so be proud of the win. I feel that our internal energy has to be better and we have to uplift ourselves a little more with a little more energy. Offensively I think we have some work to do, I think we can play better offensively.” Garita, for his part, believes that PDS can build on the way it played in the third quarter of the win over Pennington. “We need to be aggressive as a whole and not be selfish,” said Garita. “We put our heads down in the first half. In the third quarter, it was grabbing rebounds, shooting better as a team and just outworking everyone.” —Bill Alden

INSIDE PRESENCE: Princeton Day School boys’ basketball player Ethan Garita puts up a shot in the paint over a Pennington School defender last week. Senior center Garita scored 14 points in the February 9 contest to help PDS prevail 50-49. The Panthers, who fell 62-51 at the Hun School last Thursday to move to 2-1, are slated to host Hun in a rematch on February 18 before playing at Pennington on February 23. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


Princeton Rec Department Offering Multi-Sport Programs

The Princeton Recreation Department is partnering with the U.S. Sports Institute (USSI) to offer a MultiSport program for boys and girls ages 2 to 6 this spring. The program will take place at Grover Park on Sunday mornings for eight weeks starting April 18. The classes being offered are Parent and Me Multi-Sports Squirts (ages 2 to 3) at 9 a.m., Multi-Sports Squirts (ages 3 to 4) at 10 a.m. and Senior Multi-Sports Squirts (ages 5 to 6) at 11 a.m. The program is open to both Princeton residents ($162) and non-residents ($195). Space in the program is limited. The multi-sport participants will learn key skills through small-sided scrimmages in sports such as lacrosse, soccer, t-ball, and track and field. The USSI is a full-time professional sports provider that works with Recreation Departments and community organizations all over the country. All programs are taught by USSI staff in a safe and structured environment that allows participants to experience a variety of sports while emphasizing fun. Adaptations are in place to ensure social distancing and to prevent sharing of equipment. For more information, log onto princetonrecreation. com. To register, go to https://register.communitypass.net/princeton. The program can be found under the tab “2021 Spring Youth Sports Programs.”

Real Central NJ Soccer Signs TCNJ Standout Curtis

Real Central New Jersey Soccer, the region’s newest pre-professional soccer club, said last week that its inaugural women’s signing is Hillsborough native Amelia Curtis. Real Central NJ Soccer’s women’s team will play in the Women’s Premier Soccer League (WPSL) beginning this May. Curtis, a 21-year-old midfielder, is in her junior year at The College of New Jersey and is known for her hardworking, motivating, and leadership approach on the field. She was a key contributor to TCNJ’s 2019

NJAC Championship season and received several awards recognizing her on-field accomplishments. The formation of a new club close to her home and the ability to play in front of friends and family made joining Real Central NJ appealing to Curtis. “I am looking forward to being part of the inaugural team and excited to be surrounded by so many talented players who want to represent our area,” said Curtis. Real Central NJ’s women’s head coach Brian Thomson is excited to have Curtis join his squad. “When you think about the circumstances of the past year, you can’t help but feel for the college players not having opportunities to play,” said Thomsen. “However, I’ve seen Amelia hungrier than ever and I truly think that she will be a breakout star for our team and within our league as she prepares for her collegiate season. She continues to improve the tactical side of her game along with her leadership qualities. The summer of 2021 is going to be an exciting one for Amelia.” Season tickets are on sale now for the women’s team and individual match tickets will be available in March. More information can be found on the club website at realcentralnj.soccer.

B oys’ B asketba l l : Sparked by a superb allaround performance from Jack Scott, Hun defeated Princeton Day School 62-51 last Thursday. Junior guard Scott contributed 19 points, 17 rebounds, and five assists to help the Raiders improve to 2-1. In upcoming action, Hun has a rematch at PDS on February 18 and then hosts Newark Academy on February 23. Girls’ Basketball: Kennedy Jardine had a big game in a losing cause as Hun fell 57-46 to Life Center Academy last Friday. Senior guard Jardine tallied 19 points for the Raiders, who dropped to 0-2. Hun is scheduled to host the Pennington School on February 17, Princeton Day School on February 18, and Stuart Country Day School on February 20. Boys’ Hockey: Will Banford tallied two goals and an

Pennington Boys’ Basketball: Earning its first win of the 2021 season, Pennington defeated Wardlaw Hartridge School 5643 last Friday. The Red Raiders, who improved to 1-2 with the win, play at the Life Center Academy on February 19 before hosting the Princeton Day School on February 23. Girls’ Basketball: M.K. Kramli and Morgan Matthews led the way as Pennington defeated the Princeton Day School 62-33 on February 9. Junior star Kramli and freshman Matthews each scored 21 points for the Red Raiders, now 2-0. Pennington plays at the Hun School on February 17 and at PDS on February 23.

PHS

Boys’ Hockey: Due to the winter storm advisory issued for the area last Monday evening, PHS’ game against Hopewell Valley was canceled. The Tigers, who have gotten off to a 2-0 start, are hoping to get back on the ice when they are scheduled to play the Hamilton Ice Hockey Coop on February 23 at the Mercer County Park rink.

PDS

Girls’ Basketball: Getting outscored 14-3 in the second quarter by Pennington to find itself trailing 30-18 at halftime, PDS never recovered as it fell 62-33 to the Red Raiders on February 9. The Panthers, now 0-3, play at the Hun School on February 18.

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Pursuant to Gov. Order, Parents Can Attend Games

Noting how difficult it has been for him to not be able to see his own children participate in their sporting events, Gov. Phil Murphy issued an Executive Order last Friday allowing parents or guardians to attend practices and games in New Jersey. Pursuant to the order, up to two parents or guardians per athlete under the age of 21 will be allowed to attend indoor or outdoor youth sports practices and competitions. No other spectators are allowed, and even with the parents or guardians, indoor youth sporting events may not exceed 35 percent capacity or 150 people. Additionally, all spectators must follow the Department of Health’s sports activities guidance, including mask requirements, social distancing guidelines, and staying home when sick. Spectators will be expected to cooperate with contacttracing efforts. School districts have the authority to impose stricter guidelines and not allow spectators, and also have the discretion on whether and when to institute the policy regarding parents or guardians. The order was to take effect immediately. “With our metrics trending in the right direction, we feel comfortable taking this step and allowing parents back into youth sporting events,” said Murphy in announcing the directive.

Hun

assist but it wasn’t enough as Hun lost 5-4 to Bergen Catholic last Monday. Senior star Eddie Evaldi chipped in two assists for the Raiders, now 0-2. Hun plays at St. Augustine on February 19.

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Lines Carried: AIR TIME: Stuart Country Day School basketball player Ariel Jenkins goes to the hoop in recent action. Last Saturday, senior star and Georgetown University-bound Jenkins contributed 12 points, five rebounds, and a blocked shot to help Stuart defeat Sinai Christian 80-39. The Tartans, who improved to 5-2 with the victory, are scheduled to host St. Thomas Aquinas on February 18 before playing at the Hun School on February 20.

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25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 17, 2021

Local Sports

In response to Gov. Murphy’s decision, the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) was appreciative of the new policy. “NJSIA A welcomes the governor’s executive order, which provides an opportunity for limited spectators to attend high school sporting events,” said the organization in a statement. “We hope this order marks another positive step in the return to play. At the same time, we urge parents to give our member schools time to review the governors order and determine both overall feasibility and a specific process for increasing occupancy as outlined.”

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 17, 2021 • 26

Obituaries

Honorable Morton I. Greenberg Honorable Mor ton I. Greenberg, a United States Circuit Judge of the Third Circuit, passed away on January 28, 2021 at the Medical Center of Princeton, New Jersey. His death was attributed to non-Covid pneumonia, a complication of pulmonary fibrosis. Judge Greenberg was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on March 20, 1933, to the late Pauline and Harry Greenberg. In addition to his parents, he was predeceased by his brother, the late Judge Manual H. Greenberg. He grew up in Atlantic City, New Jersey. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1954 with a major in history and attended law school at Yale University, class of 1957, where he was a member of the Board of Editors of the Yale Law Journal. Judge Greenberg was married to Dr. Barbara-Ann K.

Greenberg for 33 years. Despite numerous medical challenges, he credited his long, full life to the loving care she gave him over the years. They were devoted to each other. Judge Greenberg’s distinguished law career began w ith his appointment to the Office of the Attorney General in Trenton, New Jersey, in the late 1950s. In 1960, he moved to Wildwood Crest and practiced law as a community lawyer in a small firm in Cape May, New Jersey, for the next 11 years. His eldest daughter Elizabeth remembers her father taking her to his law office when she was a child in the 1960s and telling her she could be a lawyer, too, at a time when few women attended law school or held professional jobs. “My father always believed I could do and be anything I wanted,” she said. In 1971 Judge Greenberg moved to Princeton to take a position appointed by the Attorney General of New Jersey as assistant attorney general in charge of litigation for the state. He would continue to call Princeton home for the rest of his life. His son, Lawrence, said, “I looked forward to having lunch with Dad nearly every weekend, and I often think about what he would do when it came time to make any kind of ethical decision.” In 1973 Governor William T. Cahill appointed Judge Greenberg to the Superior Court of New Jersey. While on t he S up er ior Cour t, Judge Greenberg served on all divisions of that court and ended his service there

on the Appellate Division. President Ronald Reagan nominated him to be a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in 1987, and he remained in that position until his death. Judge Greenberg has written thousands of opinions, many of which have been published and have precedential authority. Given his state and federal service combined, Judge Greenberg was the longest serving judge in New Jersey, serving the judiciary for 47 years. His daughter, Suzanne, remembers her father joking that he never worked a day in his life because he always did what he loved. “There was a great lesson in that for me,” she said. With his passing his Third Circuit colleagues remembered Judge Greenberg as a scholar with an exceptionally strong work ethic and a jurist who enriched the nation and its judiciary. Governor Philip D. Murphy called him a “giant” who served the judiciary for almost a half of a century. His clerks remembered him as a role model – a man of kindness, compassion, open-mindedness, a jurist who showed respect for all who came before him and who had an incomparable sense of humor. They repeatedly expressed feeling honored to be counted among the members of his family of law clerks. At a symposium at Yale, he reminisced: “The more power you have the more restraint you use.” Mary Ann Gartner, the Judge’s judicial assistant for 33 years, said: “He was the most wonderful human being you could ever meet

– so considerate and so personable.” Judge Greenberg has four children, three from a prior marriage, and his wife’s son, Carl, whom he regarded as his own son. His children are Elizabeth J. Greenberg (Robert A. Blecker) of Chevy Chase, Maryland; Suzanne A. Greenberg (Steven Perrin) of Long Beach, California; Lawrence R. Greenberg (Melissa) of New Hope, Pennsylvania; and Carl Hoyler (Sarah) of Summit, New Jersey. He has numerous adoring grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Carl commented about Judge Greenberg: “He showed so much affection to us and our boys, and was such a devoted husband to my mother. He was one of the most honorable, humble, and genuine people we have ever known.” The family wants to express its appreciation to Kwasi Bonsu, his loyal caregiver, Dr. Laura Buckley of Princeton Medical Associates, and the staff of the Medical Center of Princeton for all the care they have given to Judge Greenberg. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Princeton Rescue Squad, 2 Mt. Lucas Road, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.

Lenore Gordon Lenore Gordon, 92, of Princeton, NJ, passed away at home on Thursday, January 28th. Beloved widow and treasured companion of Irwin; devoted mother to Mark (Susan), Princeton, NJ, and Sara, London, England; Grandmom to Thea Colman, (Craig), Winchester, MA, Alene Pearson, (Val Jordan), Albany, CA, and Melissa Gordon, (Jason Lynott), Lynn, MA; and Great Grandmom to Eli, James, Maya, and Zoe. Lenore had a happy upbringing in Newark, New Jersey. She and her gaggle of “MerryMakers” would often end the school day at the local drug store counter. Fate intervened one New Year’s Eve when her date had to cancel due to illness. At the last minute, she went to a party at her cousin’s where she met Irwin, who had recently returned from military service. They married in June, 1948, after Irwin’s graduation from Rutgers University. L e n or e e m br ac e d t h e life of a “50s housewife” in much the same way she approached any exper ience. She cooked and baked from scratch, cleaned and ironed without ever hiring help or using a laundry ... ever! She had amazing energy and determination; the latter never more apparent than when confronting the unspoken malady that took over in her final month. As a teenager and young adult, Lenore worked at

Levy’s Department Store in Newark. She would draw on this experience in later years. When her children were in junior high school, Lenore began employment at Bellows, the specialty women’s and children’s clothing store in Princeton. Lenore always spoke her mind and garnered a loyal following with the families who appreciated her candid suggestions and advice. Despite working full-time, Lenore continued her volunteer activities with many community groups including more than 40 years at Princeton Hospital’s reception desk (and the glorious Fete), many Jewish charities, the “Y” on Avalon Place, the Lawrenceville Library when it was housed in the old fire station, local soup kitchens, and others. Irwin and Lenore were wonderful role models to their children in their energy and generosity to local charities. A number of years after leav ing Bellows, Lenore enjoyed a new career as a telephone interviewer with Gallup Polls. Given her intelligence, she was a natural to draw out the public figures and leading business executives to share their views on current affairs. Lenore was “before her time” in many ways. She was a woman who expressed her opinions. Lenore was always well-intentioned albeit sometimes the recipient of her advice or opinion was not prepared for either the tone or the stance that Lenore would impart. Before the term “health nut” came into vogue, Lenore embraced the need for proper nutrition and exercise. She determined that any recipe would taste better if the amount of sugar was halved, orange juice substituted for water in a pastry dough, as well as ground almonds added to a pie crust. Raw wheat germ was sprinkled on otherwise delicious bowls of ice cream while a tablespoon of cod liver oil was required before bedtime when her children were small. Lenore was a regular at the exercise classes sponsored by Mercer County in the local libraries before community life was “canceled.” She not only enjoyed Bob Kirby’s hour-long classes but was stimulated by her much younger and wonderful classmates. Lenore was hopeful the classes would resume after “lockdown” given their boon to physical and mental health. In the 1960s, before the term “soccer Mom” was coined, Lenore would bake cookies for half-time at Mark’s home soccer games at Lawrence Junior High School. Was this the foundation for the team’s eventual success to win the New Jersey State Championship when the new high school was built? Lenore did not consider patience a virtue except if she learned that someone needed help. Then, she had all the time in the world and inordinate energy to make something better. Years after leaving Bellows, she learned that a former colleague (who did not have any family) needed a ride to doctor’s appointments. This soon expanded to doing the woman’s grocery shopping as well as the laundry at Lenore’s home. The weeks, months, and years ticked by as the woman’s

Parkinson’s took its toll. Early on, Lenore contacted a local church and found some wonderful Jamaican caregivers who allowed this woman to remain in her home until her dying day. This was long before “hospice care” became prominent in the community. These caregivers became Lenore’s friends. One remarked that Lenore assisted over 17 of these women to have sustained employment with other friends and family over the years. O ver ne arly 67 ye ars of marriage, Lenore and Irwin traveled to 43 countries on five continents. They enjoyed the sights but the best memories were made from conversations with local people and experiencing their cultures. Intrigued to learn, Lenore often returned with amazing “finds” which ranged from the Grenoble hotel owner’s recipe for garlic potatoes (which he made nightly for her) as well as a black ball of soap from Guatemala to add shine to one’s hair. Lenore was a tough cookie who knew from a much younger age “how she wanted to go.” She often commented on an illness that “if nothing useful could be done, there was no need to know.” Her children and doctors respected that philosophy in December when it was discovered that she had advanced lymphoma. Another of Lenore’s mantras was that she wanted to spend her final days in the comfort of her home. Thanks to the support of her children, that wish was granted, too. Princeton Hospice was wonderful in their compassion and responsiveness during Lenore’s last few weeks. The family is especially grateful to Hospice staff members Pat Anene and Gladys Benavides who were especially kind and gentle. Lenore’s final wish — with arrangements organized over 20 years ago — was that she wanted to donate her body for medical research to the Rutgers Anatomical Lab. (Her late husband, Irwin, was a proud Rutgers graduate.) Luckily, Covid did not interfere with those plans. Contributions in Lenore’s memory to one of Lenore’s favorite local charities would be appreciated: Rescue Mission of Trenton, HomeFront, or Trenton Area Soup Kitchen (TASK). In recent years, Lenore had a familiar remark during telephone conversations when a topic was exhausted. What better way to end this account than in her own words. “Well, that’s the story!”

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Orest Clarence “Chick” Chaykowsky of Yardley, Pennsylvania, passed away peacef u lly Febr uar y 11, 2021 at the age of 87. He was born on April 27, 1933 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. He lived in the Princeton, New Jersey, are a since 1956. Ch ick graduated from the University of Manitoba with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering. He won the academic gold medal for his achievements in his undergraduate work and earned the Isbister Fellowship. He continued his studies to earn a Master of Science degree in Physics from the same University and earned the University of Manitoba traveling fellowship for continued studies in non-Canadian universities. In 1956, he enrolled in the doctorate program in electrical engineering at Princeton University and was granted The Ar thur LeGrand Doty Scholarship in Electrical Engineering. In 1958, Chick withdrew from his studies at Princeton Universit y to begin his professional career as Chief Engineer and technical advisor to the President at General Devices Inc., a telemetry instrumentation company in Monmouth Junction, NJ. In January of 1961 he co-founded Prince to n A p p l i e d R e s e a r c h Corp. (PAR) and served as Vice President of Marketing, President, and Vice Chairman in his 19 years with PAR until EG &G Inc. of Waltham, MA, acquired PAR. In 1980, he founded a United States subsidiary of a Helsinki, Finland based Bactomatic Inc. where he was the President and CEO. Chick also founded G & C Advertising and Marketing Inc. as well as Preximco Inc., establishing outlets for U.S. d is t r ibut ion of electronic instrumentation for foreign entities. Chick’s professional lifetime memberships included both the Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineers and the scientific research society Sigma Xi. In retirement, Chick enj oye d t ravel i ng far a nd wide and visited almost 70 countries. He was fluent in Ukrainian and “got around” on his French and Russian. He was a longtime member of the Bedens Brook Club in Skillman, N.J., and The Princeton Club of NYC. He was the Bailli of the Baillage of The Princeton Chapter of the international gourmet dining society Confrerie de la Chaines des Rotisseur and an honorary Bailli and Commandeour of the Philadelphia Chapter. He was also a Conseiller of the wine society L’ordre Mondial. Chick was an accomplished violinist in his childhood playing the instruments made by his grandfather.

Constance (Connie) Parker Constance (Connie) Parker, 87, passed away February 13, 2021 at the Elms of Cranbury from pneumonia. Born June 5, 1933 to the late Harold and Molly (Cuomo) Parker, Connie was a lifelong resident of Princeton prior to moving into the Elms in 2015. A f ter g raduat ing f rom Princeton High School, she worked for Zinders on Nassau Street for 30 years, retiring in December of 1981. After retirement, she cared for a number of children of family members and close friends. Her family fondly remembers Sunday family dinners at Connie’s. She is survived by many cousins and close family friends. A viewing will be held o n T h u r s d ay, Fe b r u a r y 18, 2021 at 11 a.m. at the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home. A graveside service to follow at 12 p.m. at Princeton Cemetery.

B a r b a r a Ja n e A s h c r of t, and her brother Harr y A . Wisot zkey I I I. She is sur vived by her children, Ann I. McClellan, William S. McClellan II ( Nelda Zaprauskis McClellan ), and Rober t N. McClellan ( L i n d a S p e n c e r M c Cl el lan ) ; and her g randchildren, Kate A. McClellan, Cassandra H. McClellan, and Garrett B. McClellan, and step-grandson Brook Miller, plus many nieces and nephews, grands, and great-grands. Mary Elizabeth graduated from York Collegiate Institute – York County Academy in 1941 and from Middlebury College in 1945. She married Bruce McClellan in 1946 and accompanied him through his final term at Williams College, his first year of teaching at Deerfield Academy, his two years as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford, and his return to Williams in an administrative position before arriving at The Lawrenceville School where he became an English teacher in 1950. In 1953, they were promoted to be Head of House and wife at Hamill House. In 1959, Bruce became Head of School, a position he held and Mar y Elizabeth supported in every possible way including entertaining and traveling widely until their retirement in 1986. Mary Elizabeth was a proud honorary member of seven Lawrenceville classes and t he grandmot her of t wo Lawrentians. I n ad d it ion to r a i s i n g three children, Mary Elizabeth was the founder of Parents at Lawrenceville, an Elder of the Presbyterian

Church of Lawrenceville, and a founder of the Artisans Guild at the Princeton YWCA, later serving as a YWCA board member, chair ing t he f undraising effort to purchase Bramwell House. She authored Felt- Silk- Straw, Handma d e Ha t s , To ols a nd Processes for the Bucks County Historical Society of Doylestown, Pennsylvania. A f te r m o v i n g to N e w Hampshire in 1986, she served on the board of the Monadnock Community Early Learning Center and the Garden Club of Dublin, following her deep interests in Horticulture and Conservation. She also served as a Reiki practitioner at the Monadnock Healing Ar ts Center in Jaffrey. In more recent years at RiverMead, she s er ved as s ecretar y then president of the Resident’s Council. Her essay, “My New Life Without a Car” was published in the Northern New England Review. She also ser ved as the correspondent for her Middlebury Class of 1945 and Class S ecretar y for the Class of 1947 of the A merican Association of Rhodes Scholars. She was an avid knitter and gardener throughout her life. A ser vice of remembrance will be held at a future date. In lieu of flowers, please make a donat ion in memory of Mary Elizabeth to The Lawrenceville School, or the charity of your choice. To share a memory or offer condolence on his memorial page, please visit www.cournoyerfh.com for more information.

Religion Methodist Church Announces Services to Observe Lent

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2021

Orest C. “Chick” Chaykowsky

Chick is predeceased by his wife Ingrid Birgitta Chaykowsky and his parents John and Jean Chaykowsky. He is survived by his brother Ar thur Eugene Chaykowsky and wife Bette of Kingwood, Texas. He is also survived by his first wife Joy Ann Chaykowsky Hutchinson; his son Richard Steven Chaykowsky of Ottawa, Canada; his sons John Michael Chaykowsky of Yardley, PA, and Robert Steven Chaykowsky and wife Christine Henderson Chaykowsky of Florida; and his grandchildren John Michael Joseph Chaykowsky and Grant Whelan Garret Chaykowsky of Los Angeles, CA, William Chaykowsky and Maxwell Chaykowsky of New Hampshire, and Ingrid Chaykowsky of Florida. Also surviving are numerous nieces, nephews, and c ou s i n s i n C a n a d a a n d Sweden. T he v iew ing for Chick will be held on Wednesday, February 17, 2021 from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Poulson & Van Hise Funeral Directors, 650 Lawrence Road, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648. A graveside prayer will follow at Princeton Cemetery, 29 Greenview Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08540. Please wear a mask and maintain social distancing. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be made in Chick’s name to The Hun School of Princeton, Attn: Advancement Office, 176 Edgerstoune Road., Princeton, NJ 08540. To send condolences to the family, or for directions, please visit www.poulsonvanhise.com. Arrangement are under the direction of Poulson & Van Hise Funeral Directors, Lawrenceville, NJ.

Over the 40 days of Lent, Princeton United Methodist Church (PrincetonUMC) offers virtual programs for adults and children that can be accessed through the church’s website, princetonumc.org, or through its Facebook page. For the six Tuesdays in Lent, starting February 23, from noon to 1 p.m., staff members at PrincetonUMC will lead virtual Lenten services, focusing on a specific scripture each week. A discussion period will follow each 30-minute service. Offering meditations will be PrincetonUMC pastors the Rev. Jenny Smith Walz, the Rev. Erik “Skitch” Mats on a nd i nter i m pas tor Rebekan A nderson ; and church interns CK Bartow, Tayler Necoechea, and Hyelim Yoon. For more information, contact Evangeline Burgers at (609) 924-2613. On Sundays in Lent, children in Compassion Camp (pre-K to fifth grade) and in the Grow program (sixth and seventh grade) are invited to join classes at 11:30 a.m. Compassion Campers use online music, storytelling, and discussion to reflect on times when Jesus prayed and consider ways to integrate prayer in their lives. Older students explore the “Lost and Found” story series. Email evangeline @ princetonumc.org to register and receive supply kits.

Albert Mennello Albert Mennello, 85, of Princeton, NJ, passed away on Thursday, February 11, 2021 at Penn Medicine – Princeton Medical Center in Plainsboro, NJ. He was a for mer Vice P r e s i d e n t o f P r i n c e to n Bank, which subsequently became Chemical Bank of New Jersey and from which he retired in 1992. During his active years, he served as Trustee of the Princeton area United Way, board member and chapter chairman of the Princeton Chapter American Red Cross, and Trustee of the Dorothea House. A lber t was a former member of the Princeton Italian-American Sportsmen Club and the Banking Club of the University of Pennsylvania. He was also a graduate of the Stonier Graduate School of Banking. Predeceased by his parents Alberto Mennello, born in Muro Lucano, Italy, and Ergomina Carnevale Mennello, born in Pettoranello, Italy; and his brother Michael Mennello (Dec. 2020); he is survived by his loving wife, Lois Feola Mennello, and many wonderful, loving, and always caring and helpful cousins, both maternal and paternal. Private graveside services, under the direction of Kimble Funeral Home, Princeton, NJ, will be held in St. Paul Church Cemetery, Princeton, NJ. Extend condolences and share memories at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

Mary Elizabeth Wisotzkey McClellan Mary Elizabeth Wisotzkey McClellan, widow of Bruce McClellan, died peacefully on February 2, 2021 at RiverMead, a retirement communit y in Peterborough, New Hampshire. She was bor n in York, Pen ns ylvan ia, on S ep tember 14, 1923 to Elizabeth Ivison and Harr y A. Wisotzkey, Jr., who pre d e c e a s e h e r, a s d o h e r sisters JoAnn Topley and

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ITS ITS we EASIER EASIER ITS ITS THAN THAN EASIER EASIER YOU YOU THAN THAN THINK THINK YOU YOU TO TO THINK THINK MAKE MAKE TO TO THE THE MAKE MAKE PERFECT PERFECT THE THE PERFECT PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL MEMORIAL MEMORIAL ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE THE PERFECT MEMORIAL ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE are here to help guide you through the difficult process of purchase a copy bronze memorials for five next to Cedar Hill Cemetery. ITS ITS EASIER EASIER THAN THAN YOU YOU THINK THINK TO TOMEMORIAL MAKE MAKE THE THE PERFECT PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL PERFECT THE PERFECT MEMORIAL generations THE in the Greater Full monument display and monument selection. for 75 cents THE PERFECT MEMORIAL WePrinceton encourage you to make an appointment, with obligation, Area. We pride storefront to help no guide you (3 quarters ourselves being a small throughout the to selection We encourage you tomany make an appointment, with noyou obligation, toon discuss the options available required) from our boutique-type, personal and process. to discuss the many options available to you service-oriented business. coin-operated newspaper boxes, ITS EASIER THAN TOMAKE MAKE 24 hours a day/ ITS EASIER THANYOU YOU THINK THINK TO ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE 7 days a week. THE PERFECT THE PERFECTMEMORIAL MEMORIAL

THE PERFECT MEMORIAL


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 17, 2021 • 28

to place an order:

“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS VISA

MasterCard

The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon 02-17

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

ROSA’S

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations

MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon 02-17

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON

ROSA’S

•Fully Insured •Free Consultations

Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs

Commercial/Residential Irene Lee, Classified Manager Over 45 Years of Experience

CLEANING SERVICE LLC: CLEANING LLC:check. Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit SERVICE card, or gmail.com gmail.com For houses, apartments, offices, dayFor houses, apartments, offices, dayHOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 or yearsless: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: HOME HEALTH$15.00 AIDE: 25 years • 25 words for ads greater 60 words in length. care, banks, schools & much more. care, banks, schools than & much more. Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Text (only) (609) 638-6846 of experience. Available mornings to of experience. Available mornings to Has good English, own transportaHas good English, own transportaOffice• (609) 216-7936 Office (609) 216-7936 • one, 3 weeks: $40.00 • 4 weeks: $50.00 6 weeks: $72.00 month take care of your loved transport take care• of6your loved one, and transportannual discount rates available. tion. 25 years of experience. Cleantion. 25 years of experience. CleanPrinceton References Princeton References to appointments, run errands. I am ing license. References. Please call run errands. I am ing license. References. Please call • Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inchtowell•appointments, all bold faceToptype: $10.00/week well known in Princeton. Top care, (609) 751-2188. known in Princeton. care, (609) •Green Company •Green Company 751-2188. excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 9472958. 02-03-4t KOALA CLEANING SERVICE, LLC: Residential & Commercial cleaning. 20% off your first cleaning! Phone: (267) 990-5901 info@koalacleaningservice.com www.koalacleaningservice.com Company is insured. 02-10-8t

GIVE OR GET THE GIFT OF WRITING! Contact the Princeton Writing Coach—a professional writer, editor, and university teacher—to explore customized learning, writing, and editing services delivered virtually. Specialties: school/college applications; tutoring; scientific, business, and ESL writing. Outstanding references. 908-420-1070. r t re n n e r @ a l u m n i.p r i n c e to n .e d u princetonwritingcoach.com 02-17-4t HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Call Roeland- preferred phone, (516) 888-9687. Active original, (609) 933-9240.. tf

HIC #13VH07549500

01-06-7t

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21

06-03-21 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22

tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf

excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

GIVE OR GET THE GIFT OF WRITING! Contact the Princeton Writing Coach—a professional writer, editor, and university teacher—to explore customized learning, writing, and editing services delivered virtually. Specialties: school/college applications; tutoring; scientific, business, and ESL writing. Outstanding references. 908-420-1070. r t re n n e r @ a l u m n i.p r i n c e to n .e d u princetonwritingcoach.com 02-17-4t HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Call Roeland- preferred phone, (516) 888-9687. Active original, (609) 933-9240.. tf

“Home is the place we love best and grumble the most " .

—Billy Sunday

01-06-7t HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 9472958. 02-03-4t KOALA CLEANING SERVICE, LLC: Residential & Commercial cleaning. 20% off your first cleaning! Phone: (267) 990-5901 info@koalacleaningservice.com www.koalacleaningservice.com Company is insured. 02-10-8t

HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE:

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21

I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613.

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21

A Gift Subscription!

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22

01-01-22 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf

Specialists

2nd & 3rd Generations

MFG., CO.

609-452-2630

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

WATER WATER EVERYWHERE! Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

Let's rid that water problem in your basement once and for all! Complete line of waterproofing services, drain systems, interior or exterior, foundation restoration and structural repairs. Restoring those old and decaying walls of your foundation.

Call A. Pennacchi and Sons, and put that water problem to rest!

Mercer County's oldest waterproofing co. est. 1947 Deal directly with Paul from start to finish.

609-394-7354

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

Over 70 years of stellar excellence! Thank you for the oppportunity.

apennacchi.com

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 17, 2021

PRINCETON | This classic brick front traditional home in Princeton's sought-after Pretty Brook area on 4.6 lush acres could be the perfect place to raise your family! Approached by a circular driveway this spacious house offers a flexible floor plan perfect for remote work and schooling with formal and casual gathering areas for any lifestyle. Grand two-story entrance foyer flanked by fireside living and dining rooms. Home office has a fireplace and adjoins screened porch. A spacious chef's center island kitchen with granite counters and stainless appliances opens to a cathedral ceiling sunroom filled with natural light from multiple skylights overlooking an expansive deck and pool area. Nearby, a beamed ceiling family room adjacent to the porch featuring a handsome stone fireplace. Four finished levels detailed with hardwood floors and six fireplaces with a first level bedroom suite for guests or multigenerational living. Upstairs, the primary suite offers a fireside bedroom, loft, private screened porch and spa bath. Walkout, daylight lower level has a wine cellar, home theater, kitchenette, full bath, recreation, game and storage areas. Call for further details. Offered at $1,900,000

Judith Stier Sales Associate Direct Line: 609.240.1232

33 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

foxroach.com

609.921.2600


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 17, 2021 • 30

AT YOUR

SERVICE A Town Topics Directory

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner Home Repair Specialist

609-586-2130

BLACKMAN

LANDSCAPING FRESH IDEAS

Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Stone Walls and Terraces FREE CONSULTATION

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual

PRINCETON, NJ

609-683-4013

CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

609-466-2693

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

A Tradition of Quality

Erick Perez

Fully insured 15+ Years Experience Call for free estimate Best Prices

(609)737-2466

Serving the Princeton Area since 1963 Find us on Facebook and Instagram

HD Highest Quality Seamless Gutters. Serving the Princeton area for 25 years Experience and Quality Seamless Gutters Installed

3 Gutter Protection Devices that Work! Free estimates! All work guaranteed in writing!

Easy repeat gutter cleaning service offered without pushy sales or cleaning minimums!

609-921-2299

HOUSE PAINTING & MORE

House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish (Benjamin Moore Green promise products)

Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

American Furniture Exchange

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon 02-17 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf GIVE OR GET THE GIFT OF WRITING! Contact the Princeton Writing Coach—a professional writer, editor, and university teacher—to explore customized learning, writing, and editing services delivered virtually. Specialties: school/college applications; tutoring; scientific, business, and ESL writing. Outstanding references. 908-420-1070. r t re n n e r @ a l u m n i.p r i n c e to n .e d u princetonwritingcoach.com 02-17-4t HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Call Roeland- preferred phone, (516) 888-9687. Active original, (609) 933-9240.. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 01-06-7t HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 9472958. 02-03-4t KOALA CLEANING SERVICE, LLC: Residential & Commercial cleaning. 20% off your first cleaning! Phone: (267) 990-5901 info@koalacleaningservice.com www.koalacleaningservice.com Company is insured. 02-10-8t HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon 02-17 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf GIVE OR GET THE GIFT OF WRITING! Contact the Princeton Writing Coach—a professional writer, editor, and university teacher—to explore customized learning, writing, and editing services delivered virtually. Specialties: school/college applications; tutoring; scientific, business, and ESL writing. Outstanding references. 908-420-1070. r t re n n e r @ a l u m n i.p r i n c e to n .e d u princetonwritingcoach.com 02-17-4t HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Call Roeland- preferred phone, (516) 888-9687. Active original, (609) 933-9240.. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 01-06-7t HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 9472958. 02-03-4t KOALA CLEANING SERVICE, LLC: Residential & Commercial cleaning. 20% off your first cleaning! Phone: (267) 990-5901 info@koalacleaningservice.com www.koalacleaningservice.com Company is insured. 02-10-8t


31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 17, 2021

Newly Listed: Thornewood Farm

Custom Residences With Exceptional Views

4BR/5.3BA 12,000SF 35.89AC Custom Home 19-Stall Barn Cary Simons: 484.431.9019 Stockton, NJ Kurfiss.com/NJHT106828 $3,295,000

Lots & Home Packages Available Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590 Cary Simons: 484.431.9019 Tinicum Township, PA Pinnacleatrollinghills.com Lots Starting at $300,000

Newly Listed: European-Influenced ‘San Souci’

Newly Listed: Custom-Built in Rockwood Farm

5BR/5.1BA 4,550SF 6.3AC LEED-Certified Open Concept Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590 Washington Crossing, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU519304 $2,195,000

4BR/4.1BA 6,133SF 4.44AC Elevator 4-Car Garage Linda Danese: 215.422.2220 Solebury Township, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU519946 $2,175,000

Tranquility Awaits at This Custom-Crafted Reproduction

The Zechariah Betts House

5BR/3.2BA 6,588SF 4.94AC Updated Kitchen & Bathrooms Cary Simons: 484.431.9019 Lambertville, NJ Kurfiss.com/NJHT106362 $1,985,000

5BR/3.1BA 4,500SF 4.49AC Barn Guest House Pool Linda Danese: 215.422.2220 Upper Makefield Township, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU494664 $1,785,000

Newly Priced: Townhouse Between the Delaware & Canal

Newly Listed: 1855 Federal Residence

3BR/3.1BA Open Floor Plan Eleanor Miller: 215.262.1222 Daniel Leuzzi: 215.680.2910 New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU518414 $1,095,000

3BR/2BA 1,687SF 0.17 AC Period Details Updated Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590 Carversville, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU520332 $597,500

Experience Property Videos and 3D Walk-Through Tours at Kurfiss.com 215.794.3227 New Hope Rittenhouse Square Chestnut Hill Bryn Mawr © 2021 Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. SIR® is a registered trademark licensed to SIR Affiliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.


2016

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 17, 2021 • 32

Brian Wisner

Broker Associate | Luxury Collection

JUNCTION BARBER Brian E : Wisner bwisner19@gmail.com SHOP : BrianSellsNJ.com BrokerWAssociate | Luxury Collection C: 732.588.8000 O: 609.921.9202

Brian Wisner

Broker Associate | Luxury Collection

of Princeton

C: 732.588.8000 O: 609.921.9202

343 Nassau St. NJ 08540 C:Princeton, 732.588.8000 O: 609.921.9202

Brian Wisner E : bwisner19@gmail.com

Broker Associate | Luxury Collection W : BrianSellsNJ.com 343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540

C: of732.588.8000 Princeton O: 609.921.9202

33 Princeton-Hightstown Rd Ellsworth’s Center (Near Train Station)

799-8554

Lic: 1432491 E : bwisner19@gmail.com

W : BrianSellsNJ.com Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

2016

343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540

Lic: 1432491

E : bwisner19@gmail.com W : BrianSellsNJ.com

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540

Tues-Fri: 10am-6pm; Sat 8:30am-3:30pm

LET’S TALK REAL ESTATE... Lic: 1432491

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

2016

Lic: 1432491 Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

WHAT MANY HOME BUYERS WANT MOST NOW

Current home buying trends reflect changes brought on by the pandemic and its expected aftermath. Buyers are planning to spend more time at home in the future, particularly as companies continue to offer remote work options to their employees as a permanent option. Here are some of the features that are currently in high demand:

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-01-22

Commercial/Residential

looking for similar features. These features are popular in both suburban and rural markets alike.

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIfIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS!

∗ ∗

Crossing Guard Salary: $15.00 per 30 minute shift Mornings 8:00-8:30 a.m. Afternoons 12:30-1:30 p.m.

For more information: https://nj-princeton.civicplus.com/Jobs.aspx

American Furniture Exchange

Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs

Larger yards and outdoor living spaces. This includes decks, patios, and room for amenities such as a fire pit. People want outdoor space of their own to enjoy. Updated kitchens tend to top buyers’ wish lists no matter the real estate trend. But buyers are looking for larger kitchens and upgraded appliances. Rooms that can be converted to a permanent home office space. Multi-purpose spaces for children who are learning at home. This includes room for computers, activity tables, or even gaming areas. Energy-saving windows, siding, and HVAC systems.

Princeton Police seeks

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. Of PRINCETON

Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com

Witherspoon Media Group Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company

#13VH07549500 Custom Design, HIC Printing, ∗ 06-03-21 Publishing and Distribution Both first time home buyers and those looking to upgrade to a larger home are

· Newsletters Whether it’s selling furniture, finding

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go!

We deliver to ALL of Princeton as · Brochureswell as surrounding areas, so your

Witherspoon Media Group

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Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Princeton Office 609-921-1900 | 609-577-2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

(609) 924-2200 ext. 10;

WEEKLY INSERTS START AT ONLY 10¢ PER HOUSEHOLD. · Books ESTATE LIQUIDATION

Weekly Inserts Custom Design, Printing, only 10¢ per househ Get the best reach at the best rate! WEEKLY INSERTS START AT ONLY 10¢ PER HOUSEHOLD.

Weekly Inserts Weekly Inserts only 10¢ per only household. 10¢ per house tf

SERVICE:

Get the best reachI at rate! will the clean best out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items · Catalogues to entire estates. No job too big or

Publishing and Distribution

Get the best reach at the best

• Postcards · Newsletters · Annual MASONRY RENOVATION AND REPAIR Reports • 8.5x11” flyers 01-01-22 We fix all masonry problems... it’s our passion! WHAT’S A GREAT GIfT fOR · Brochures Group • Menus Media Repair | RebuildWitherspoon | Restore A fORMER PRINCETONIAN? Steps • Walls • Patio • Concrete • additional Booklets info A Gift Subscription! · Postcards contact: Loose Railings • BlueFor Stone Specialists Basement Waterproofing Custom Design, Printing, • Trifolds Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; Basement Wall and Floor Repairmelissa.bilyeu@ · Books Publishing andcirculation@towntopics.com Distribution Brick Driveways • Belgian Block witherspoonmediagroup.com • Post its tf Walkways and Patio Construction WE BUY CARS Replacement of Cracked Limestone Steps · Catalogues • We can accomodate · Newsletters Belle Mead Garage • Postcards (908) 359-8131 Greg Powers almost anything! Ask for Chris HIC#13VH10598000 · Brochures small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613.

• Postca • 8.5″ x 1 • Flyers • Menus • Bookle etc...

Get the best reachGet at the best rate! reach at the be

• Pos · Annual Reports • 8.5″ x 11″ • 8.5″ LIFETIME WARRANTY ON ALL WORK | WE DESIGN AND BUILD NEW ·PATIOS! • Postcards • Flye Reach Postcards over 15,000 homes in• Flyers Reach 11,000 homes in Princeton and surroundin Witherspoon Media Group Think Global 609-751-3039 Princeton and beyond! • 8.5x11” flyers Buy Local • Menus · Books •custome Men Town Topics puts youinfo in frontcontact: of your target www.ReNewMason.com For additional than what it would cost to mail a postcard. • Menus Town ·Topics puts you in front• Booklets Custom Design, Printing, • Boo Catalogues melissa.bilyeu@ contact to reserve your sPace • Please Booklets of your target customer for less Publishing andus Distribution witherspoonmediagroup.com · Annual Reports etc. than what it would cost to mail etc... • Trifolds

RECENTLY COMPLETED OUTDOOR STONE FIREPLACE

We can ac almost a

tf

a postcard!

For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

NEW PRODUCTS ADDED WEEKLY!

· Newsletters • Post its · Brochures We can accomodate • We can accomodate almost anything! almost anything! · Postcards

Town Topics is the only weekly paper that reaches EVERY HOME IN PRINCETON, making it a tremendously valuable product wit

toWn toPIcs neWsPaPeR • 4438 Route 27 noRth • KInGston, nJ 08528 • tel: 609.924.2200 • Fax: 609.924.8818

We c alm

· Books Reach over 15,000 homes in Princeton and beyond! · Catalogues

Town Topics puts you in front of your target customer less than what it · Annualfor Reports would cost to mail a postcard!

Reach 11,000 homes in Princeton Reach and 11,000 surrounding homes in towns. Princeton and surroun

Forinadditional contact: Town Topics puts you in front of Town yourTopics targetputs customer you for front less ofinfo your target custo melissa.bilyeu@ than what it would cost to mailthan a postcard. what witherspoonmediagroup.com it would cost to mail a postca

Please contact us to reserve Please your contact sPaceus now! to reserve your sPa www.princetonmagazinestore.com

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

Town Topics is the only weekly paper that reaches EVERY HOME IN PRINCETON, Town Topics making is theitonly a tremendously weekly papervaluable that reaches product EVERY with HOME unmatched IN PRINCETON, exposure! making it a tremendously valuable pro

toWn toPIcs neWsPaPeR • 4438 Route 27 noRth • KInGston,toWn nJ 08528 toPIcs • tel: neWsPaPeR 609.924.2200 • 4438 • Fax: Route 609.924.8818 27 noRth• •www.towntopics.com KInGston, nJ 08528 • tel: 609.924.2200 • Fax: 609.9


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33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 17, 2021

OPEN THE DOOR TO GRACIOUS LIVING


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 17, 2021 • 34

®

Weichert and NJ Realtors 2020 Circle of Excellence Awards

Beatrice Bloom

Mary Saba

Deborah Coles

Platinum - Chairman’s Club

Platinum - Chairman’s Club

Gold - Ambassador’s Club

Lisa Theodore

Abdulbaset Abdulla

Eric Payne

Vanessa Reina

Silver - Paramount Club

Silver - Paramount Club

Paramount Club

Bronze - Paramount Club

Lori Janick

Victoria Wang

Hala Khurram

Atreyee DasGupta

Silver - Paramount Club

Paramount Club

Paramount Club

Silver - Paramount Club

Local Offices:

Princeton Princeton Junction Hillsborough www.facebook.com/weichertprinceton

www.weichert.com


35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, fEbRuaRy 17, 2021



Cynthia Conshue Silver - Paramount Club

Eric Branton Bronze - Executive Club

Ayesha Shafique

Marva Morris Bronze - Executive Club

Yoomi Moon

Adam Chu

Francesca D’Antuono

Silver - Paramount Club

Silver - Paramount Club

Sarah Saba

Victoria Holly

Bronze - Executive Club Bronze - Executive Club

Ruchika Panjwani

Rana Bernhard

Bronze - Executive Club Bronze - Executive Club

Bronze - Executive Club

Bronze - Executive Club

Nadia Maculey

Denise Varga

Laurent Ouzilou

Joe Plotnick

Executive Club

Executive Club

Executive Club

Directors Club

Carolyn Walsh

Josephine Allen

Annie Jeon

Directors Club

Directors Club

Directors Club

Christine Alleyne Directors Club

Katherine Pease Executive Club

William Mazzucca Bronze - Executive Club

Zoraida Maldonado Directors Club

Jean Budny Directors Club


INTRODUCING AUNT MOLLY ROAD • HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP $7,750,000 Norman T Callaway, Jr • 609.647.2001 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME307788

INTRODUCING EDGERSTOUNE ROAD • PRINCETON $2,500,000 Robin McCarthy Froehlich • 609.731.4498 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME300874

NEWLY PRICED PETTIT PLACE • PRINCETON $2,250,000 Barbara Blackwell, Olga Barbanel • 609.915.5000 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME307604

INTRODUCING MONTADALE DRIVE • PRINCETON $1,950,000 Owen ‘Jones’ Toland • 609.731.5953 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME307516

INTRODUCING PENNINGTON TITUSVILLE RD•HOPEWELL TWP $1,299,000 Norman T Callaway, Jr • 609.647.2001 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME305610

INTRODUCING WESTCOTT ROAD • PRINCETON $1,250,000 Maura Mills • 609.947.5757 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME307154

INTRODUCING NORTH MAIN STREET•PENNINGTON BOROUGH $1,240,000 Brinton H West • 609.462.0556 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME307560

INTRODUCING PECAN VALLEY COURT • MONTGOMERY TWP $1,135,000 Jennifer Dionne • 908.531.6230 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJSO114266

INTRODUCING BAYARD LANE • PRINCETON $999,000 Linda Twining • 609.439.2282 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME307642

INTRODUCING INNISBROOK ROAD • MONTGOMERY TWP $830,000 Jennifer Dionne • 908.531.6230 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJSO114242

INTRODUCING WILKINSON WAY • PRINCETON $755,000 Amy G Worthingon • 609.647.8910 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME307668

INTRODUCING LAFAYETTE STREET • HOPEWELL BOROUGH $465,000 Jane Henderson Kenyon • 609.828.1450 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME307556

CallawayHenderson.com 4 NASSAU STREET | PRINCETON, NJ 08542 | 609.921.1050 Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.

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Town Topics Newspaper, February 17, 2021  

The February 17, 2021 edition of the Town Topics Newspaper.

Town Topics Newspaper, February 17, 2021  

The February 17, 2021 edition of the Town Topics Newspaper.