Town Topics Newspaper, February 14, 2024.

Page 1

Volume LXXVIII, Number 7

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Sustainable Princeton Gives Progress Report On Climate Action Plan

Meet The Top Agents Pages 33-44 Princeton Festival Returns In June . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PHS Senior Hagedorn Gets First In Math at Taiwan Science Fair . . . 8 PU Trivia Book Takes On Campus Myths And Truths . . . . . . . . 9 Ukrainian Orchestra Makes Long-Awaited Visit to Princeton . . . . 15 Passage Theatre Presents Ghetto Gods In Divineland . . . . . . 16 PU Men’s Hoops Rallies To Beat Penn Before Sell-Out Crowd at Jadwin Gym . . . . . 21

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Eisgruber Delineates “State of the University” In his eighth annual “State of the University” letter last month, Princeton University President Christopher Eisgruber described “a challenging political landscape” for universities with “increasingly virulent threats to academic freedom and institutional autonomy,” as he highlighted Princeton University’s ongoing commitment to inclusivity, free speech, and academic excellence. In the wake of campus conflicts across the country, including protests, charges of Islamophobia and antisemitism, and congressional hearings leading to the resignations of the presidents of the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard, Eisgruber pointed up a “healthier” campus climate at Princeton. He described that climate as “a credit to faculty, students, and staff who have searched for ways to communicate civilly about sensitive issues, to support one another, and to comply fully with Princeton’s policies that facilitate free speech in ways consistent with the functioning of the University.” Noting the University’s policy, in line with the First Amendment, to protect even speech that may be offensive, he wrote, “Free speech and academic freedom are the lifeblood of any great university and any healthy democracy.” He added, “Universities must protect even offensive speech, but that does not mean we must remain silent in the face of

it. On the contrary, we must speak up for our values if we are to make this campus a place where free speech flourishes and where all our students can feel that they are ‘hosts’ not ‘guests.’” Calling for a forceful response to criticism recently faced by universities, Eisgruber went on to enumerate a number of remarkable accomplishments at Princeton University in the past year. “Antagonism toward higher education has been especially intense over the last three

months,” he said. “We must speak up for what we do and for our extraordinary institutions, which are so valuable to learning, to research and to the future of our nation and the world.” Recent achievements at Princeton that he cited include exceptional faculty scholarship and research; ongoing expansion and increasing socioeconomic diversity of the undergraduate population; significant improvements to undergraduate financial aid, graduate student stipends,

Five years ago, Princeton adopted a Climate Action Plan (CAP) to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, preserve environmental quality, and enhance public health and safety. Closely involved in the plan is Sustainable Princeton, which delivered a progress report last Wednesday, February 7 at Princeton Public Library. Christine Symington, executive director of the nonprofit, emphasized to those Continued on Page 11 in attendance in person and on Zoom that the work that has been done since 2019 “is not ours necessarily, but is the result of many individuals putting together their Most travelers who have flown out of “The scope of the project is replacing ideas. We compile it and keep tabs on Trenton-Mercer Airport recently would an outdated and undersized facility with it. But this is not Sustainable Princeton’s probably agree that upgraded facilities an efficient modern terminal that offers Climate Action Plan. It’s the Princeton are needed, but Mercer County’s plans amenities that travelers come to expect community’s Climate Action Plan.” to build a new, larger terminal are meet- when utilizing a terminal facility,” MerMore than 50 community members ing resistance and facing environmental, cer County Director of Communications have served on a steering committee economic, and quality-of-life concerns. and Intergovernmental Affairs Theodore and working groups since the plan was The airport website notes that a new Siggelakis wrote in an email. “There will formed. Among the many professional terminal has been a priority of the county always be a small group of critics. Overand volunteer organizations cited during in order to accommodate airport users whelmingly the reception of these projects the presentation were Princeton’s Shade and to meet future demand. Plans call has been positive and welcomed by the Tree Commission, the Marquand Park (under 4.5’) built Mercer community at large.” for the 28,000-square-foot terminal, Foundation, the Princeton Environmenin the 1970s, to be replaced with a new Trenton Threatened Skies (TTS), an tal Commission, D&R Greenway, and 125,000-square-foot facility located adjaadvocacy group of residents of Mercer numerous others. County and Bucks County, Pa., discent to the existing building, which is to be Alex Dill, Sustainable Princeton’s prodemolished. There is no plan for new or agrees, and has called for a more stringram manager, said that contrary to what longer runways, and the size of the airport gent environmental study to evaluate the most people think, the biggest contribuContinued on Page 10 will remain unchanged, the website says. tion in Princeton to greenhouse gas emissions is buildings, not transportation. “It’s a big misconception,” she said. “It comes from our homes and our businesses.” The plan calls for reducing Princeton’s carbon emissions 50 percent by 2030, 65 percent by 2040, and 80 percent by 2050. “We believe that taking the actions in this plan will be able to get us there,” Dill said. “To calculate this, we update our greenhouse gas inventory every year. That provides a baseline for tracking emission trends, and helps us inform our CAP.” Dill said 493 residents and 57 businesses in Princeton have participated in PSE&G’s energy efficiency program. The municipality has recently started an outreach campaign with the utility to increase those numbers. Community Solar 415 Nassau Park Blvd. 1378 Route 206 is another PSE&G program in which multiple Princeton, subscribers share local NJgeneration 08540 Skillman, NJ 08558 facilities. There is limited space, and an Club) (behind Wells Fargo Bank) existing(near waiting All listSam’s toYou participate. PrincAllRides You Eat Sushi Can Eat OLD-FASHIONED Sushi VALENTINE’S DAY: inCan a two-seater carriage pulled by a light workhorse were among the eton currently has 313 registered solar

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Songs by Frank Sinatra Highlight a Valentine’s Day Book Review . . . 14 Art . . . . . . . . . . . .18, 19 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 20 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . 32 Luxury Living . . . . . . 2, 3 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Performing Arts . . . . . 17 Police Blotter . . . . . . . 10 Real Estate. . . . . . . . . 32 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

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CELEBRATING A MILESTONE: Marking Community Options’ 35th anniversary are, from left, Nikki Stack, president and CEO Robert Stack, New York Board of Directors Trustee Madeleine Will, and Board of Directors Treasurer James Buckley. well-being and success of meticulously drafted bylaws Community Options Marks 35 Years of Helping Disabled individuals with disabilities and corporate documents,

Community Options, the Princeton-based nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting individuals with disabilities, marked its 35th anniversary on February 9,. Founded in 1989 by Robert Stack, the organization manages 650 homes and supports 6,000 people with disabilities across residential, employment, and community-based day services around the country. “Since its inception, Community Options has been devoted to serving individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, thus cultivating a reputation for providing exceptional person-centered services that are unique to individuals’ needs,” said New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy. “As governor, I commend Community Options and applaud all those associated for their endless contributions to the

who are living and thriving throughout New Jersey and beyond. Best wishes to all for continued success and a memorable anniversary.” In the late ’80s, Stack recognized t he pressing need for alternative options for parents of children facing serious disabilities. Witnessing the challenges and limitations within state-run ins t it ut ions, Stack took matters into his own hands. Leaving his position in state government, he rallied the support of friends, families, advocates, and government officials to embark on a mission to create a better future for individuals with disabilities. Stack pledged his own resources, including a second mor tgage on his house and personal savings, to establish Com mu nit y O pt ions. A r m e d w it h a check of $362, along with

he incorporated Community Options as a nonprofit. “What started as a small initiative fueled by a desire to make a difference has grown into a nationwide movement,” he said. “We have come a long way, but our commitment to empowering persons with disabilities remains as strong as ever.” U.S. Sen. Cory Booker shared his appreciation for Community Options. “Their work has positively impacted countless New Jerseyans through their advocacy, and I am deeply grateful for their efforts in helping individuals with disabilities live stronger, healthier, and happier lives,” he said.

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Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin

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Skating on the Square: Through February 25, on the outdoor synthetic skating rink. Thursdays and Fridays, 4-7 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, 12-3 p.m. and 4-7 p.m. Palmersquare.com. Leighton Listens: Councilman Leighton Newlin holds one-on-one conversations about issues impacting Princeton from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. February 14: Earth’s End, 45 Spring Street. February 21: Sakrid Coffee Roasters, 20 Nassau Street. February 28: Chapin Guatemalan and Mexican Restaurant, 146 Witherspoon Street. All are welcome. Free Tax Assistance: The Mercer County AARP Tax-Aide program offers free federal and state tax preparation at Princeton Public Library, the Suzanne Patterson Building, and Nassau Presbyterian Church. Call (888) 227-7669 for specifics. Scholarship Opportunity: College-bound Jewish female students who live in the Princeton/Mercer/Bucks community can apply for funding from the Dr. Esther Wollin Memorial Scholarship Fund. JFCSonline.org. Youth Leadership Programs: Students from Princeton High School, Princeton Day School, the Hun School, and Stuart Country Day School can apply for the municipality’s 2024-25 Youth Leadership programs, open to all sophomores. Applications are due March 19. Visit princetonnj.gov.


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NEW SEASON: Back in the big tent on the grounds of Morven, Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) plans an One-Year eclectic Subscription: mix of programming for the Princeton Festival June 7-22. PSO Artistic $20 Director RossenTwo-Year MilanovSubscription: will lead several $25 performances. (Photo by Carolo Pascale)

Princeton Festival Returns in June With Opera, Gospel, Ballet, and More Subscription Information: 609.924.5400 ext. 30 or subscriptions@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

It has been three years by last summer, things had princetonmagazine.com since the Princeton Sym- fallen into place. phony Orchestra (PSO) first “We actually had no idea staged the annual Princ- what it would be like when eton Festival in a spacious we were planning it. And all tent atop the parking lot of things considered, year one Morven Museum & Garden. was an unbelievable sucThere were certain logistical cess,” said Marc Uys, PSO challenges in year one. But executive director. “Year two was actually really fun.” The festival returns for year three on June 7 with Metropolitan Opera star soprano Angel Blue and the PSO in a program of favorite arias, and continues through June 22 with a varied roster of performances including a Tina Turner tribute, the Mozart opera Cosi fan tutte, American Repertory Ballet in works by Arthur Mitchell and Meredith Rainey, a Juneteenth celebration led by Vinroy D. Brown and anchored by the Capital Singers of Trenton, an evening with Broadway star Sierra Boggess, and additional events.

do think audiences love something like that, especially when there is a chance to hear music in a real symphonic setting.” The anchor production of the season is the opera. The same creative team that was behind last year’s The Barber of Seville is returning this year for Cosi fan tutte on June 14, 16, and 18. “In addition to the director James Marvel, scenic designer Blair Mielnick, and costume designer Marie Miller, we have a great cast of singers,” said Uys. “It’s going to be a wonderful mix of traditional and modern. It should satisfy everyone, whatever kind of opera productions they like.”

Princeton Preaching Sunday, February 18 is University H. Fitzgerald Robertson II, Intern, Princeton Theological Seminary Chapel

Princeton, NJ Open to all. Music performed by the Princeton University Chapel Choir with Nicole Aldrich, Director of Chapel Music and Chapel Choir, and with Eric Plutz, University Organist.

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The venue’s openness to the air and proximity to Morven’s gardens in full bloom are part of what make the festival unique. But figuring out what works inside the tent was an initial hurdle. In the first season, Uys and colleagues quickly realized that reconfiguring the space for offerings of different sizes and scope meant moving hundreds of chairs and scenery — not a good idea. “We did that the first year, but it almost killed us to move everything,” Uys said. “So last year we simplified it by going to one audience configuration, and I think it was a good move. Now in year three, we are really understanding our priorities as an organization, what our audience wants, and how to balance that with what has become a rather inflexible space. We need to fill at least a few hundred seats at each performance.” This year’s lineup builds, in part, on what has worked in the past. Last summer’s tribute to Aretha Franklin was a major success, leading to this summer’s “The Music of Tina Turner” on June 8 with American Idol finalist LaKisha Jones as the late rock star. “We know it’s a very highquality show,” said Uys. “I

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Princeton Festival Continued from Preceding Page

Uys is also looking forward to the June 19 “Honoring Black Choral Music” program in recognition of Juneteenth, conducted by Brown of Westminster Choir College. “We wanted to involve a big chorus,” he said. “The Capital Singers of Trenton will form the core of a mass chorus that we’ll build from community groups all around. He’ll lead them, and then the different constituent groups will perform.” Family Day on June 9 offers activities geared to children, culminating with a concert of Latin American family music with Grammy nominee Sonia De Los Santos and her band, singing in Spanish and English. Empire Wild on June 21 is a Juilliard-trained ensemble of cellos, pianists, and vocalists doing original music. Across Stockton Street at Trinity Church, the Abeo Quartet performs works by Beethoven, Shostakovich, and Esmail on June 13. Also planned for the church, on June 20, is “The Sebastians : Brandenburgs and More.” Music by Bach, Telemann, and Vivaldi is on the program. The festival’s proximity to Morven’s historic garden is a selling point. “We were able to build significantly on that setting from year one to two,” said Uys. “This year, we anticipate many more food vendors prior to the show, so people can picnic. You can really take advantage of the gardens. But even if you don’t, and just go to the show, you’re outdoors. And that is special.” Visit princetonsymphony. org/festival for tickets. —Anne Levin

Magnolia Foundation Offers “Poetry and Discourse”

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The Magnolia Foundation for Peace and Well-being offers an online course, “Po e t r y a nd D is cou r s e : Ref lect ions on Violence and Peace,” from February 29-March 21. The course consists of four sessions, every Thursday from 6-8 p.m. The course is conducted in Spanish. “In both the fields of conflict resolution and violence prevention, as well as in the area of emotional well-being and mental health, poetry can be highly effective,” reads a press release about the course. “With that purpose in mind, this course will analyze the use of language through the poetry of various Latin American poets.” Works by poets Ruben Dario, Cesar Vallejo, Raul Zurita, Javier Sicilia, Jessica Freudenthal, Yolanda Pantin, Diana Villa, and Jimena Gonzalez will be discussed. The instructor is Monica P.B. Benivegna, an editor and social communicator based in Washington. T he cost is $ 50. T he course is recommended for journalists, teachers, writers, psychologists, therapists, peace activists, students, and those who simply enjoy poetry. Visit wearemagnolia.org for more information.

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Question of the Week:

“Do you have any plans for Valentine’s Day?” (Photos by Weronika A. Plohn)

“I always celebrate Valentine’s Day with my wife. I bring her flowers, take her on a date to a restaurant, tell her how much I love her, and we spend some nice time together.” —Herlindo Ovalle, Hamilton

“We are here at Howell Living History Farm to take a ‘couples’ horse ride this afternoon. This Valentine’s Day we are staying home. Ron is the cook in our house, so he is making his lamb while I bake a sweet dessert.” —Robyn and Ron Gordon, Hopewell

Sarena: “We are having a little Valentine’s Day celebration at home with my husband and our daughter. We are picking up some pastries from Chez Alice.” —Liliana Sheng and Sarena Li, Princeton

“It is our first Valentine’s Day together, so we are very excited! We are going to an Asian restaurant in Red Bank that we have never been to before. We are going to have some seafood, have a nice time, and relax. We have some gifts for each other too.” —Lawrence Rubin and Shannon Pultorak, Marlboro


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the fundamental qualified Hagedorn to comPHS Senior Nick Hagedorn Brings Home answer question of the mathemati- pete at the 2023 Regeneron field of knot theory: given International Science Fair First Place In Math at Taiwan Science Fair cal two knots, is there some way in Dallas last May. He won

to twist one of the knots — without cutting the knot or passing any part of it through itself — so that it looks like the other knot?” Admitting that nonscientists might not be impressed by the practical impact of his research on their lives, he continued, “It does help make progress towards some overarching goals of knot theory. A big purpose of knot theory is being able to distinguish distinct knots. Knowing how to do this has a number of applications. For instance: molecules created with the same atoms, but shaped into different knots, have different and often unique properties.” He went on, “In cybersecurity, certain post quantum cryptography algorithms rely on the difficulty of classifying knots. And in biology, DNA reproduction requires topoisomerase to unknot the two DNA strands formed by replication, transcription, and recombination; some chemotherapy drugs work by halting this untangling process, which requires knowing what transformations untie certain knots.” Hagedorn, who was a 2022 New Jersey Governor’s STEM Scholar, became interested in knot theory after reading The Knot Book by Williams College math professor Colin Adams. “I reached out to Professor Adams, and he introduced me to the study of multi-crossing knot projections,” Hagedorn reported on his website. INTERNATIONAL MATH CHAMP: Princeton High School Senior Nick Hagedorn, third from right in Winning the grand prize front row, celebrates his victory in the math competition at the 22nd Annual Taiwan Internaat the Mercer Science and tional Science Fair in Taipei. (Photo courtesy of Princeton Public Schools) Engineering Fair last March

Not a stranger to the worlds of science, math, and highlevel competition, Princeton High School (PHS) senior Nick Hagedorn took his knot theory project to the 22nd Annual International Science Fair in Taiwan (TISF) last month and brought back a first place award in mathematics. During the five-day event, Hagedorn competed with about 630 students from 27 different countries who were presenting their research projects to judges and peers at the National Taiwan Science Education Center in Taipei. The TISF is sponsored

by Taiwan’s Ministry of Education. “Going to Taiwan was a spectacular experience,” Hagedorn wrote in an email. “I loved trying new foods at the night markets. The fair also organized cultural tours across Taipei City and the surrounding Taiwan area.” He described the experience of making friends across cultural and linguistic barriers. “In the absence of a common language, we bonded over each other’s dances and songs,” he noted. “I can now proudly say I have friends who don’t speak any English.”

He also pointed out that a visit to the National Palace Museum was a highlight of the week, and he modestly added, “The competition also went very well.” Hagedorn discussed his project, as quoted in a Princeton Public Schools press release. “Imagine you tangle up a piece of string into a knot and then glue the ends of the string together,” he said. “My research finds mathematical equations that can relate different properties of that tangled mess.” He added, “Knowing about these properties helps to

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four awards in the Regeneron Dallas competition: the Second Place Grand Award in Mathematics, the First Place American Mathematical Society Karl Menger Special Award, the First Place Mu Alpha Theta Special Award, and the Taiwan International Science Fair Special Award, which sent him to Taiwan. As he looks toward graduation from PHS in June, Hagedorn is non-committal about the future of his knot research, his ongoing scientific explorations, and his college plans. “I’m currently taking a math course at Princeton University, which I’m greatly enjoying,” he wrote. “I am really excited for college, though I haven’t decided which school I will be attending. Ask me again in May!” —Donald Gilpin

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Maybe you’ve heard of Betsey Stockton, the enslaved servant of a Princeton University president who founded the first school for children of color in Princeton in 1817. Perhaps you’re aware of the year that the University finally admitted women (1969). But you might not know about the 24 Princeton students who were arrested for “sleighing” in Trenton and drunkenly singing “Jingle Bells” loudly, after midnight, on January 18, 1879. It’s also unlikely that you’ve heard the rumor that Alexander Hall was designed by an architecture student as his senior thesis, for which he was failed. Later, seeking revenge, he donated money on the condition that his design be used. Not true, according to The Princeton University Trivia Book, compiled by former Mudd Manuscript Library archivist Helene van Rossum and University Archivist and Deputy Head of Special Collections Daniel J. Linke. The book, a collection of historic and recent facts — some funny, some bizarre, all informative — will be published in May by Lyons Press. It is the fifth such publication in Lyons Press’ College Trivia series, joining trivia books about the universities of Alabama, Central Florida, South Carolina, and Texas. The publishing company reached out to Linke a few years ago and asked if he’d be interested in doing a trivia book about Princeton. He wasn’t sure he’d have time for such a project. “But Helene and I have been collaborators on things for a number of years, so I talked to her about it,” Linke said. “And we decided to collaborate again.” T he t wo brainstor med about categories, and Van Ros s u m put to ge t h er a spread sheet. “First of all, any project with Dan is always fun,” she said. “We had so many resources, starting with what has been posted on the Mudd Manuscript blog — tidbits perfect for trivia questions. So we reviewed them, and we came up with all of these things. We have a whole spreadsheet with all of our sources in case people ask us, ‘How did you get this?’ ” The collaborators knew they wanted the trivia questions to ref lect contem porary as well as historic Pr inceton. A mong other sources, they consulted the book I Can Do Anything: Stories from the First 50 Years of Women’s Athletics at Princeton University by Princeton Athletics historian Jerry Price. Women and minorities are the focus of several queries. “We wanted to make sure cer tain things were well

represented, like the student population, minorities, and things that might not have been talked about 20 years ago,” said Linke. “We wanted to show how Princeton has changed. Our goal was to make readers understand that Princeton has evolved. It’s a much more diverse and welcoming place than it used to be.” There are 650 questions in the book. Some of them are Jeopardy-style, where the answer is provided, and the reader supplies the related question. “Originally, that was one of our categories,” said Linke. “But our editor suggested we intersperse them throughout the book. And it made more sense.” One of the Jeopardy entries is about an incident dur ing Universit y President John Maclean’s tenure (1854-68), when students hauled two donkeys from a nearby farm up to the top floor of Nassau Hall. The question is, “What was Maclean’s response when they asked how the animals got there? ” His answer: “Through their great anxiety to visit some of their brethren.” Another trivia question asks whether it is true or false that the campus radio station played the “Hallelujah” chorus from Handel’s Messiah when the trustees a n n ou n c e d t h at wom e n could attend Princeton as undergraduates. It’s true. Some cartoons and informational tidbits are interspersed among the trivia questions. One, a telegram from 1953 graduate and astronaut Pete Conrad, when he was orbiting the Earth aboard Skylab, responds to an invitation to his 25th reunion: “Sorry, I can’t attend but I’m ‘out of town on business.’ ” There are questions about the annual P-rade, the song “Old Nassau,” and when the Triangle Club performed its first kick line (1903). The origin of Princeton Plasma Physics L aborator y, t he Teach for American program, and the renaming of the former Marx Hall after longtime Campus Dining employee and election poll volunteer Laura Wooten are the subjects of just a few of the other trivia questions. “Some of the questions are funny, and some are reflective of the dedication of alumni,” said Linke. “There is a dedication to the place that I think is unmatched. There is so much loyalty. So hopefully, people will enjoy this book.” —Anne Levin

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New Board Leadership At Womanspace

Womanspace, the Mercer County nonprofit dedicated to serving individuals and families impacted by domestic violence and sexual assault, has announced new leadership roles for chair and vice chair. Meaghan Cannon, chair, is a longtime Womanspace board member with deep ties to the agency. Her mother Mary Ann Cannon was one of the founders of the agency, signing the original certificate of incorporation.

Meaghan Cannon “Womanspace has been a part of my life for almost as long as I can remember, making its mission near and dear to my heart,” said Cannon. “I am excited to help provide leadership as Womanspace moves into the next phases of its growth and evolution.” Cannon is a regional director for FirstService Residential and has held various leadership and management roles in the hospitality and human resources sectors. She is replacing outgoing chair Michelle Bajwa, who served as chair for two years. “I remain grateful for the unique and treasured opportunity to partner with board members, community allies, staff, and clients in our movement to address the oppressive systems that fuel cycles of domestic violence and sexual abuse,” said Bajwa. “I welcome incoming board chair Meaghan Cannon with enthusiasm and confidence as I know Womanspace today is well-positioned to increasingly support and provide preventative educational outreach to the diverse, evolving and dynamic community in Mercer County.” Malina Poshtova Delamere, vice chair, is the founder and president of Vida Rose Coaching S olut ions, an executive coaching practice for women whose business, career, and life are in growth mode. With over 20 years of b u s i n e s s l e a d e r s h i p experience, Poshtova is also a former Fulbright Scholar, with degrees from New York University and the University of Sofia in Bulgaria. She will succeed Joanne Barlow, who has completed her two-year term as vice chair. She is a resident of Pennington.

DJ Darius. An online auction will be launched on Thursday, March 7 at 12 p.m. The fund aims to raise $40,000. “It promises to be an unforgettable night. Not quite Animal House, but still loads of fun for all the Princeton community,” said co-chair Sharon Litvinsky. “We’re excited for guests to relive some of their own carefree college nights, but with much better food and higher quality cocktails,” said co-chair Kelly Harrison. “Request an oldschool dance floor favorite and challenge friends to a foosball game. This is meant to be a casual, let-loose party.” The cost of college can be insurmountable for many students — particularly for the 10 percent who qualify for the free- or reduced-price lunch program at PHS. “Our needbased scholarships often empower first-generation students to pursue a degree,” said Tony Klockenbrink, president of the 101: Fund. “Just that little bit of support can change the path of a student’s life.” In 2023, the fund allocated $141,000 to support students attending Rutgers University, Mercer County Community College, Cornell University, and Howard University, among others. The 101: Fund has provided more than $1 million in aid to PHS seniors since it was founded five decades ago by a school secretary. Formerly known as the Princeton Regional Scholarship Foundation, the fund adopted its current name and logo in 2008. The New Jersey non-profit relies entirely on volunteer leadership to maximize its ability to help PHS students realize their dreams of attending college. Visit fundraiser.uppor t / 101PHSCollegeFund for tickets and details.

9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024

Princeton University Trivia Book Takes on Campus Myths and Truths

Alice Paul to ensure Paul’s dedication Old Barracks Museum Presents Oliphant Award to equality and leadership is

The Old Barracks Museum in Trenton will recognize the achievements of the founding members of the Alice Paul Institute (API) for their contributions to New Jersey historic preservation on Thursday, March 7, from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Wine and hors d’oeuvres will be served as the 2024 Beulah Oliphant Award is presented. The API was founded in 1984 by a group of visionary women dedicated to honoring the life, legacy, and ideals of its namesake, Alice Stokes Paul. Throughout her life, Paul was committed to the cause of equality. She was a founder of the National Woman’s Party, authorized the Equal Rights Amendment, and was crucial to get ting the 19th Amendment to the Constitution ratified in 1920. The API was established

preserved and passed on to future generations. It provides educational programs to nearly 3,000 students annually, give tours of Paulsdale, and host leadership programs for middle and high school girls. Through her foresight and determination, Beulah Oliphant ensured the preservation of The Old Barracks Museum in 1902. She served as the first president of the Old Barracks Association from 1902-1903. She is one of the women recognized on the New Jersey Women’s Heritage Trail. This award is named in her honor and is presented to New Jersey women in recognition of their outstanding contributions to New Jersey history in historic preservation, education, or scholarship. Tickets are $35, to purchase visit barracks.org.

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Airport Plans continued from page one

airport plans, as well as greater transparency by the county in presenting the long-term financial, qualityof-life, and environmental impact of the project. “Clearly people want a new terminal. The old terminal is outdated,” said a TTS member who is a Princeton resident and a physician but wished to remain anonymous. “They need to re-do the terminal, but does it need to be five times the size and have four boarding bridges? People say it’s convenient, it’s nearby, but this is going to be a bigger, more congested airport in many ways, and some of the things people like about it being easy-in, easy-out are no longer necessarily going to be the case.” She continued, “People do not realize the scope of this. Everybody here is concerned about finance and air quality and health, and when people find out, ‘Oh my God, it’s going to be that big,’ people will be floored. We’ve been reading about how nice this is going to be, but people don’t realize that this is going to be massive and that it’s going to impact them.” The essential issue for Judith Hoechner, a TTS member from Bucks County, is the question of communicating to the public clearly

and thoroughly what they can expect. “One of our missions has always been to educate the people in the area and the taxpayers about the potential impact coming. We feel that the county and the airport are mischaracterizing this as a simple replacement and not an expansion.” She continued, “We’ve always wanted an honest review of what size airport this area can handle, and they don’t want to ask that question. We want to continue to educate the area so they can speak up and raise their own concerns.” Ewing resident Michael Schaffer, also a TTS member, said, “Many questions could easily be answered if they just did an environmental impact assessment. They’re trying to get out of doing that it seems. If they did an environmental impact study they could easily tell what kind of effect they’re having on the area and it could help them decide what kind of airport would fit here and the future impact it would have.” Mercer County authorities contend that they have sufficiently addressed environmental regulations and concerns and will soon be ready to move ahead with groundbreaking for what is projected to be a 26-month lon g con s t r u c t ion proj ect. “In consultation with the FAA [Federal Aviation

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Administration], the terminal replacement project did not meet the requirements for a full EIS [environmental impact study],” said Siggelakis. “However, the environmental impact of the terminal project was studied at the appropriate level and the findings concluded that the County could move forward.” In 2022 the FAA approved the county’s plan, which is supported with a countycommissioned Environmental Assessment ( EA), but TTS challenged that approval in federal court, arguing that a more comprehensive EIS is needed. Last month the appeals court ruled that the 2022 FAA report was reasonable and rejected the appeal lodged by TTS along with the towns of Yardley Borough and Lower Makefield Township in Pa. and several residents of Mercer and Bucks counties. Hoechner stated that TTS is currently appealing the January ruling. “We’re asking for a re-hearing,” she said. Hoechner and other TTS members claim that the county has “mischaracterized” the project in order to avoid undergoing more rigorous environmental impact standards. “They’re saying it’s a replacement terminal and because they’re not adding a runway they’re not expanding capacity,” said the Princeton physician TTS member. “But the truth of the matter is that they’re expanding. They’re making the terminal so much bigger.” She went on to discuss the threat to area residents’ health from increased jet em is sions. T he smaller, lighter particles travel further and are potentially more dangerous than larger heavier par ticles, she pointed out. “There’s a lot of environmental toxicology research coming out about

how that matter travels and has an impact on people,” she said. “We have to consider the health costs as well as the economic costs. This new airport is not going to be the good news to the county that people say it is.” Hoechner added that the lives of many people in Bucks County are directly impacted by the noise and vibrations of low-flying jets. “There’s a direct impact on quality of life,” she said. “There’s also concern about the Delaware R iver and drinking water because our water is sourced from there and there’s an issue about contamination on the airport construction site flowing into the river.” TTS and Mercer County authorities also clash on the question of the financial burden of the project. The FAA has estimated $109 million to $121 million in costs, but Siggelakis states, “We are not yet at the point of sharing budgets as we work on finalizing funding.” TTS predicts costs of about $200 million, which could impose a significant burden on taxpayers, but Mercer County Executive Dan Benson, as well as Siggelakis, see the airport project as “a significant economic engine for our entire region,” as quoted by nj.com. Siggelakis described the project as one of the largest Mercer County public works projects in recent memory utilizing local skilled labor and providing thousands of work hours for Mercer residents. He also cited the future airport as a draw for businesses considering relocating to Mercer County and a “significant factor in the county’s appeal for economic development.” He also claimed that the influx of new passengers would “lead to increased patronage of local businesses.” —Donald Gilpin

YWCA Stand Against Racism Support Staff Association Features Author Roxane Gay will host a heart health event

at the Princeton YMCA, 59 Paul Robeson Place. February is Heart Health Month. Heart disease and strokes claim more lives each year in the U.S. than all for ms of cancer and chronic lower respiratory disease combined, according to the American Heart Association. The event is designed to help people make a positive difference in the battle against this disease. Taking part will be Penn Medicine Princeton Health, providing free health checks, CPR training, and mental health talk; Optical Shoppe/Princeton Eye G roup ; “Ke epi ng He ar t Healthy” with Dr. Lisa S. Motavalli; Miracle Natural skin care products ; Inner Beauty Peace Collection; Live Strong YMCA, exercise demonstrations by Princeton YWCA; gift cards from Fleet Roxane Gay Feet; and much more. Gay has made significant For more informacontributions to the field of t i o n , v i s i t o l i v i a s w e l l gender equality and social nessconnection.com. justice. Her appearance is the main activity in the YWCA’s Racial Justice Challenge. During the month of April, participants can engage with others across the country through educational On February 5, at 4:30 opportunities and resource sharing based around the p.m., it was reported that theme of “Building Bridges an unknown person stole a black designer tote bag to Equity.” “We are ecstatic to bring that a female unintentionRoxane G ay’s wealt h of ally mislaid in the vicinity knowledge to our Y WCA of North Harrison Street. Princeton community,” said The bag and the items inside Brigitte Jean-Louis, direc- totaled $659. The Detective tor of mission advancement. Bureau is investigating. On February 4, at 1:19 “Dr. Gay’s decades of supporting women’s rights and p.m., two females entered dismantling systematic bar- a Nassau Street retail clothriers galvanizes her audi- i n g s tor e a n d r e m ove d ence and pushes the needle four clothing items from the shelves. They then attowards equality.” An invite-only youth re- tempted to exchange two of ception will begin at 6:30 the items but were denied by store personnel. The fep.m. males left the store with the “The ETS Center for Ad- remaining two items withvocacy and Philanthropy out rendering payment. The (CA AP) is proud to work value of the stolen items is w ith the Y WCA to host $896. The Detective Bureau Roxanne Gay on our cam- is investigating. pus,” said Jamal Watson, On February 1, at 11:39 executive director of CAAP. a.m., an unknown person “Professor Gay is a brilliant author and thinker, whose attempted to enter a buildwork has advanced the call ing at Grover Park on North Harrison Street. The latch for social justice.” and the exterior lock to the The event is free and open building were damaged. The to the public. Registration is suspects did not gain entry required. Visit ywcaprince- to the structure. ton.org/standagainstracism. Unless noted, individuals “Healthy Hearts Matter” arrested were later released. YWCA Princeton will host author Roxane Gay as keynote speaker at its Stand Against Racism event on T hu r s day, Apr i l 4. T he event, to be held at ETS, 660 Rosedale Road, begins at 7 p.m., followed by a book signing.

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Sustainable Princeton

continued from page one

continued from page one

and postdoctoral salaries; new facilities under construction for the School of Engineering and Applied Science and Environmental Studies, the Princeton University Art Museum, and the Omenn-Darling Bioengineering Institute; and the recent establishment of an artificial intelligence hub in partnership with Gov. Phil Murphy and the State of New Jersey Economic Development Authority. A dom i na nt t h e m e of Eisgruber’s letter was “this relentless quest for excellence” at Princeton. He noted, “Princeton’s academic excellence has increased substantially across every segment of its undergraduate population.” In pointing out the outstanding quality of faculty, graduate students, and underg raduates, E is g r uber concluded, “In short, the Princeton of today is better than that of yesterday, and the Princeton of tomorrow will be even better than the Princeton of today.” Addressing directly recent attacks on diversity, equity, and inclusion programs, Eisgruber insisted that inclusivity and excellence go hand in hand. “America’s leading universities are more dedicated to scholarly excellence today than at any previous point in their history, and our commitment to inclusivity is essential to that excellence,” he wrote. Two upcoming open meetings will provide opportunities for community members to discuss the State of the University letter with Eisgruber and to ask questions: at a session of the Council of the Princeton University Com mu nit y on Monday, February 19 at 4:30 p.m. in the Frist Campus Center multipurpose room and in a town hall meeting for University staff members at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, February 21, in Richardson Auditorium. Eisgruber, a 1983 graduate of Princeton, has served as Princeton University’s 20th President since 2013. Before that he was Princeton University provost for nine years starting in 2004 and a member of the University faculty for three years before that. He earned his MLitt in politics at University College, Oxford on a Rhodes Scholarship, and his law degree from the University of Chicago Law School. —Donald Gilpin

installations, a 73 percent increase from 2019, she said. Symington said how and where we build has to do with the community’s emissions. The connection between land use, transportation, and climate change is “an enormous connection.” By following smart growth principles, the town can help reach three objectives of the plan : to promote mixed use development at a pedestrian-and-transitoriented location, reduce vehicle miles traveled by switching to public transit, and expand access to zeroemission vehicles. The town has completed 3.5 miles of bicycle and pedestrian improvements, and another 4.2 miles are planned for the next two years. The impending delivery of an electric shuttle for in-town transit (formerly the FreeB), and the development of off-road cycle tracks being added by Princeton University on Washington Road are among the other positive developments since the plan was formed. Princeton has added 20 public charging stations throughout town. All new housing developments must have electric vehicle charging stations, according to ordinance. Data about transitions from gas to electric vehicles rates Pr inceton third in New Jersey, based on vehicle registration. Symington mentioned the town’s hiring of a full-time arborist and open space manager, the preservation of the Lanwin tract, and recommendations in the Master Plan to connect green spaces as additional signs of progress. Of the 85 actions in the CAP, some still need to be accomplished. T he presentat ion con cluded with questions and recommendations from the audience. Upcoming events sponsored by the nonprofit include a Princeton Sustainable Home Expo at the Suzanne Patterson Center on March 9 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit sustainableprinceton.org for more information, and to view the February 7 presentation in full. —Anne Levin

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Princeton Awarded Grant For Pedestrian Safety

The New Jersey Departm e nt of Tr a n sp or t at ion (NJDOT) has awarded a $1 million Safe Streets to Transit (SSTT) grant to the Municipality of Princeton to improve safety for pedestrians on Terhune Road between Mt. Lucas Road and North Harrison Street. The proposed work will complete the existing sidewalk network of this impor tant corridor, adding new sidewalks and traffic calming measures to make Terhune Road a safer environment for pedestrians and bicyclists. These improvements will provide walkable, bikeable, safe, and equitable access to commerce, community resources, and bus transportation. “This SSTT grant is the municipality’s second grant b e n e f i t i n g t h e Te r h u n e Road Corridor,” said Deputy Administrator Deanna Stockton. “The municipality proactively seeks grant opportunities for vital infrastructure projects; with this grant, the municipality is set to improve the overall safety of a critical corridor, enhancing multi-modal access to transit and a commercial destination, while reducing vehicle dependency and lessening the associated climate impact.” Additionally, the municipality is coordinating this work with the new housing developments on Terhune Road. The developer-funded improvements, as per the negotiated developer agreements, will upgrade the vehicular, pedestrian, and bicycle accommodations bet ween Nor th Harrison Street and Grover Avenue to include traffic calming elements such as a raised crosswalk, new sidewalks, a dedicated bike lane on the south side of Terhune Road, and on-street parking. The municipal project will supplement and mirror these improvements with the replacement of the sidewalks between North Harrison and Thanet Circle, a dedicated bike lane on the north side of Terhune Road, a raised intersection, and stormwater management. “ T h e S a fe S t r e e t s to Transit program is a crucial grant opportunity for counties and municipalities, enabling us to upgrade our pedestrian infrastructure to be more accessible, safe and equitable,” said Council President Mia Sacks. “We continue to work with our professional staff to secure as much state and federal funding as possible to facilitate forward-thinking, smart growth development without increasing the burden on taxpayers.”

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024 • 12

Mailbox The views of the letters do not necessarily reflect the views of Town Topics.

HIP Thanks PU for Contribution To Its Eviction Prevention Program

To the Editor: As part of a more than $50 million voluntary contribution package to the Municipality of Princeton, local programs, and residents, Princeton University recently awarded Housing Initiatives of Princeton (HIP) $300,000 over three years in support of HIP’s Eviction Prevention Program. On behalf of HIP, we would like to extend our heartfelt thanks to Princeton University for this tremendously generous and life-changing contribution. For low-income working residents, a single emergency or extra expense can mean the difference between remaining housed or getting evicted. Due to rising rents, the wake of the pandemic, and the end of New Jersey’s moratorium on evictions for non-payment of rent, evictions have skyrocketed. As a result, requests for assistance from HIP’s Eviction Prevention Program have nearly doubled between 2022 and 2023. Eviction is incredibly traumatic, especially for young children, who often bear the emotional and developmental brunt. The funds from the University will allow us to help many more low-income Princeton individuals and families stay in their homes or move from an unsafe living environment to a stable one, and to remain together. While HIP and its 100 percent volunteer-run Eviction Prevention team might be the ones “on the ground,” there is no way we could do what we do without community support from outstanding partners like Princeton University, in cooperation with Council, the Department of Human Services, and the Housing Stability Coalition. It truly is the definition of neighbors helping neighbors. If you or anyone you know is in danger of eviction and needs rental assistance, please visit housinginitiativesorprinceton.org/gethelp. TOM PINNEO Board Chair LIZ LEMPERT Past Board Chair LORI TROILO Executive Director Housing Initiatives of Princeton

Renters Should Be Included in PU Plan for Tax Relief Payments

To the Editor: The recently announced voluntary contribution agreement between Princeton University and the municipality calls for $10 million in tax relief payments for low- and middle-income Princeton homeowners [“University to Contribute 50M+ to Municipality,” January 31, page 1]. This well-intentioned but flawed Princeton plan further compounds the regressive nature of our tax system, which greatly favors homeowners at the expense of the poor. New Jersey made some progress towards greater equity by including renters as beneficiaries of the ANCHOR rebate program, replacing the former Homestead Rebate which benefited only homeowners. But, under ANCHOR, renters only get 30 percent of the subsidy homeowners get ($450 vs. $1,500). Also, the most vulnerable families, those in public

housing, don’t qualify under ANCHOR rules because their homes are not subject to property tax. If the intent of the Princeton contributions is truly to “aid lower- and middle-income residents” and address “the challenges of affordability, sustainability, and equity within the community we share,” why would these subsidies only be reserved to homeowners who, by definition, are the more privileged residents of the community? The Princeton plan also calls for an unnamed nonprofit to administer these funds. Ideally, a set of checks and balances would be implemented to monitor that the program is managed in a more systematic and effective way than having Princeton students “knocking on doors” to ask people if they have applied, as a member of Princeton Council has proposed. Part of the reason why many low-income families, mostly renters, don’t apply for ANCHOR is that they don’t have to file a tax return, and therefore may not have been notified that they qualify. Others lack access to a computer, or don’t know how to get and complete the application forms. If the plan were to include renters, as I would fervently hope, a robust outreach and application assistance program should be implemented to make sure the largest share of these funds is allocated to our more vulnerable neighbors, and not to upper middle class residents with incomes as high as $200,000, which would only perpetuate Princeton’s status as the community with the highest economic inequality index in New Jersey (0.563 Gini coefficient as of 2019). This is the kind of feedback Princeton Council has declined to hear from members of the community who were serving on the boards and commissions it recently disbanded. We need to confront this kind of tunnel vision from our local policy makers. In response to the strong public reaction against the elimination of the long-standing advisory groups, Council members have said It’s about “feelings being hurt,” or unwillingness of the boards and commissions to cooperate. In fact, all three advisory groups attempted to do so several times, over the indifference, objections, and lack of support of municipal administrators and Council. This is not about bruised egos. It’s about social justice and democracy, and in the words of Prof. Matthew Desmond “refusing to live as enemies of the poor.” MARIA JUEGA Grover Avenue The writer was a member of the now disbanded Princeton Affordable Housing Board.

Thanking Those Involved in Bringing National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine to McCarter

To the Editor: A capacity audience of 1,000 listened to Ukraine’s National Symphony Orchestra performance at McCarter on the afternoon of Super Bowl Sunday, February 11. On behalf of Princeton’s small Ukrainian-American community, we’d like to thank McCarter’s impressive team, especially Debbie Bisno for her detailed execution, and Martin Miller, Paula Abreu, and Kelly Ryman for their efforts and engagement with both the audience and musicians. Special thanks to Princeton University’s Patrick Caddeau and Maria Garlock of Forbes College for hosting a warm reception, providing an opportunity for the orchestra members to engage with University students, faculty, and administrators as well as local dignitaries and leaders of Ukrainian-American organizations. Sunday’s performance was also supported by Princeton University’s Humanities Council, Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination, and caring community members. Bill Lockwood was instrumental in bringing Ukraine’s National Symphony Orchestra to McCarter before COVID

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New Town Trash Collection System Doesn’t Work for Larger Families

To the Editor: I wholeheartedly agree with Bob Rabner’s letter from last week [“New Curbside Trash Collection System Needs to Accommodate More Garbage,” Mailbox, February 7]. These new trash bins just don’t work for families with more than four members. I also live in Ettl Farm and often see neighbors with trash piled up and out of their single can. This type of pickup cannot be easy for our trash handlers — in fact it probably makes it a bit harder for them. It’s February and I have trash from Christmas that I am only now able to fit in the small bin. This trash has been sitting in my garage for more than a month. It’s ridiculous. On top of our frustration with this ongoing weekly garbage battle, the town has quite the nerve to charge a lease fee of $300 per year for an additional can. We pay some of the highest taxes in New Jersey. No wonder all of my friends are moving to Pennsylvania. MINDA ALENA Christopher Drive

Consolidation of Board, Commissions Disregards Wishes of Residents, Needs of Most Vulnerable

To the Editor: I am writing in support of the recent letters expressing concern about Princeton Council’s decision to consolidate a board and two commissions. Prior writers have clearly expressed the problems with consolidation. I won’t repeat their arguments. This action is one more example of the disregard by the members of the Council of both the clearly stated wishes of the residents and the needs of the most vulnerable members of our community. If the Council members can’t (or won’t) serve their constituents, it’s time for them to step down from their positions. We all deserve better. MARYANN WITALEC KEYES Franklin Avenue

Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

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and before Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine. We are grateful to Princeton University for its efforts in this sphere and also for its generous support of eight visiting scholars from Ukraine. More broadly, the opportunity of hearing Ukraine’s first symphony, composed by Maxim Berezovsky in 1770, plays a part in raising awareness of the richness and depth of Ukraine’s distinct heritage and culture. The world-class musicians who performed for us on Sunday, as part of their nationwide U.S. tour, are true examples of the resilience and professionalism of the Ukrainian people. ARETA PAWLYNSKY Prospect Avenue LYDIA ZAININGER East Shore Drive

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Books

Authors Noreen Mughees and Tina Gabrielle will discuss the romance genre at a Book Brunch on Sunday, February 25 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The event is in the Community Room at the Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Doors open at 10:45 a.m. for coffee and pastries. Registration is not required. Mughees is a South Asian Muslim writer who lives in New Jersey and loves to cook and travel to places real and imaginary. She is the author of The Mis-arrangement of Sana Saeed (A lcove Press ) in which 33 -year- old Sana Saeed has put away her childhood dream of ishq — an all-consuming, sweeping love. The arranged dates she’s agreed to have failed and she has the responsibility of her autistic younger brother, Zia. Sana and Zia are a package deal, and she wouldn’t have it any other way. But their traditional mother won’t allow Sana to be named as his future guardian . . . unless she’s married. Sana agrees to a marriage arranged by her family, but soon she must choose between family and security, or the one man who claimed her heart long ago. Gabrielle, who also writes under the name Tina Kashian, is an attorney and mechanical engineer whose love of reading for pleasure helped her get through years of academia. She is the author of adventurous historical romances for Entangled Publishing and Kensington Books. She also writes the diverse best-selling Kebab Kitchen Mediterranean cozy mystery series for Kensington and her first book, Hummus and Homicide, spent six weeks on the Barnes and Noble bestseller list. Gabrielle, who grew up in the restaurant business, lives in South Jersey. Among her other books are How Not to Marry a Duke (Entangled). In this book, from the moment her pet pig attacks him, Adeline Foster

“When Books Went to War” is Topic of PU Library Friends Talk Friends of Princeton University Library ( FPUL) is holding a hybrid “Small Talk ” with Molly Guptill Manning, author of When Books Went To War, and curator of “The Best-Read Army in the World,” recently on display at The Grolier Club, on Wednesday, February 28 at 4 p.m. The topic will be the story of the “Armed Services Editions” — pocket-sized books that were sent to American troops during World War II to provide soldiers with not only a pastime, but also a reminder of their fight for democracy. The talk is in person at the Center for Modern Aging Princeton, 101 Poor Farm Road, for cur rent F PUL

members, and virtual, on Zoom, for the public. Register at libcal.princeton.edu/ event/11725414. In addition to When Books We nt to Wa r ( M a r i n e r Books, $19.99), Manning has also written The Myth of Ephraim Tutt, The BestRead Army in the World, and The War of Words. She has published articles in the Columbia Journal of Law and the Arts and the Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy. She was a supervisory staff attorney for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in New York City and is currently an associate professor at New York Law School. For more information, visit humanities.princeton.edu.

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knows she does not care at all for the Duke of Warwick. But when her scoundrel half-brother demands she marry a stranger over a failed investment, the duke announces he’s courting her. For more information, visit princetonlibrary.org/events.

Global Theatre Perspectives Celebrated in New Volume

The power of theatrical performance is universal, but the style and concerns of theater are specific to individual cultures. Labyrinth Books celebrates and discusses a new volume in the Global Theatre Perspectives series, which presents a reconstructed ancient performance text, four one-act Indigenous African plays, and five modern dramas from various regions of Africa and the Caribbean diaspora. A discussion of Ancient, Indigenous, and Modern Plays from Africa and the Diaspora (Methuen Drama, $46.95) will take place on Thursday, February 29, at 6 p.m. at Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau Street. This event is co-sponsored by Princeton University’s Humanities Council, L ew is Center for the Arts, African American Studies Department, and Program in African Studies. The authors are H.W. Fairman, Duro Ladipo, Tekle Hawariat, Elvania Namukwaya Zirimu, Wole Soyinka, Ama Ata Aidoo, Athol Fugard, Derek Walcott, and Michael Gilkes. Simon Gikandi is editor, and R.N. Sandberg is series editor. Discussants are Gikandi, editor, professor and chair of English at Princeton University, where he is also affiliated with the Departments of Comparative Literature, African American Studies and the Program in African Studies. His many books include Writing in Limbo: Modernism and Caribbean Literature and Maps of Englishness: Writing Identity in the Culture of Colonialism. He is the coauthor of The Columbia Guide to East African Literature in English since 1945.

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Sandberg, series editor, is a lecturer at the Lewis Center for the Arts and Department of English, Princeton University. Retired in 2021, he has continued to be affiliated with the Program in Theater, advising and directing student theses. Wolf is professor of theater, director of fellowships, and director of the Program in Music Theater at Princeton University. She is the aut hor of Changed for Good: A Feminist History of Broadway Musical; A Problem Like Maria: Gender and Sexuality in the Amer ican Musical ; and most recently of Beyond Broadway : The Pleasure and Promise of the American Musical.

New York Times’ Leonhardt Speaks with Two Economists

New York Times senior writer David Leonhardt, author of Ours Was the Shining Future: The Story of the American Dream, will be at Robertson Hall, Arthur Lewis Auditorium (Room 100) at Princeton University on Thursday, February 15 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. The Morning Newsletter writer will be in discussion with two Princeton

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Universit y facult y whose research is referenced in his book: Sir Angus Deaton, the Dwight D. Eisenhower P rofe s s or of E conom ic s and International Affairs, Emeritus, and Ilyana Kuziemko, the Theodore A. Wells ’29 Professor of Economics. Ours Was the Shining Future (Random House, $32) is a history of the American economy and the Pulitzer Prize-winning Leonhardt’s first book. The event is co-sponsored by The Griswold Center for Economic Policy Studies, Julis-Rabinowitz Center for Public Policy & Finance, Economic Histor y Workshop, and Center for Collaborative History. Registration is required at jrc.princeton.edu/form/ event-registration-februar y-15 -b #no -back for inperson at tendance only ; livestream is available at MediaCentral, mediacentrallive.princeton.edu.

13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024

Romance is in the Air at Book Brunch

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Life is taxing Depreciation is King…

Personable | Professional | Proactive “Don’t take it personally.” “Don’t take be it personally.” You might surprised. The IRS wants you to take as many deductions as possible. When it comes to deductible business expenses, you cannot claim your personal expenses as being deductible. Sorry! Whenit business—it it comes to deductible business expenses, you cannot claim your personal expenses as being deductible. Sorry! Make that simple. “Don’t take itisispersonally.” Make who it business—it that simple. real estate, this one is for you. For those love or appreciate What? If you want to deduct the cost of a meal (and yes, we all do), you must discuss business to make it a legitimate “Don’t it tothe personally.” ittake comes deductible expenses, claim your expenses as being deductible. Sorry! IfWhen you want to deduct cost of a mealbusiness (and yes, we all do), youyou mustcannot discuss business to makepersonal it a legitimate “Don’t take it personally.” For home buyers business meal expense. If you want to travel to Los Angeles and deduct it as an expense, make a business appointment, business meal expense. If ifyou want toliving travel toaLos Angeles and deduct it as an You expense, make a business appointment, Make it business—it is that simple. You may purchase a “fixer-upper” you enjoy in house which needs some TLC. commit totake a aspeaking or participate some legitimate business activity beforehand to deduct Our is incurring sneaky! Long ago, they realized they could use “Don’t take be it personally.” You might surprised. The IRS wants toitgovernment asittoengagement many deductions asincome possible. commit to speaking engagement or participate iningain some legitimate business activity beforehand deduct the the mayyou renovate and then sell without any capital taxes if you abide When itportion comes deductible business expenses, you cannot claim yourtopersonal expenses as being deductible. Sorry! When it comes to deductible business expenses, you cannot claim your personal expenses as being deductible. Sorry! business portion of costs. business of costs. taxes to setincentivize For example, Clean Energy by certain tax rules by the IRS. That’sour where behaviors. I can help.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024 • 14

BOOK REVIEW

Love Calls the Tune: Sinatra, Swift, the Beatles and Carolyn Leigh ...when love finally calls the tune, it almost always comes from the least expected direction — from the bohemian, the excluded, the marginalized and least powerful folks, and the most hidden places. —Ted Gioia n Valentine’s Day 2024 I’m thinking about the way love happens in a song that’s been synonymous with February 14 ever since I sang along with it as a teenager. Although “How Little We Know” comes from a relatively “hidden” songwriter, it was put on the map in 1956 by Frank Sinatra, one of the “least marginalized” and “most powerful” of performers. According to Ted Gioia’s Love Songs: The Hidden History (Oxford University Press 2015), Sinatra brought a “new level of sophistication” to the romantic ballad by adding “layers of irony, sometimes outright cynicism, to the emotional immediacy of the torch singers,” which resulted in “a performance that delivered the inner meaning of the lyric while also offering an arch commentary on it.” “That Tingle” Chances are you’ve never heard of the woman who devised the combination of words that tells us “how little we understand what touches off that tingle, that sudden explosion when two tingles intermingle.” It’s hard to imagine a more succinct, sing-along-silly account of the “chemical forces” that “flow from lover to lover.” To fully appreciate the song, with its explosive rhetorical question, you have to hear what Sinatra does with “Who cares to define what chemistry this is? Who cares, with your lips on mine, how ignorant bliss is? So long as you kiss me, and the world around us shatters, how little it matters, how little we know.” Carolyn Leigh When Sinatra delivers those soaring lines, never mind “how little it matters,” you know the person on the receiving end of that world-shattering kiss must be a female (for sure it’s not Philip Springer, the tunesmith who provided the music). So who is the woman who created this seductive dynamic? The little I know of Carolyn Leigh’s personal history is that she was Jewish (born Carolyn Rosenthal in the Bronx), she attended Queens College and NYU, and once described herself as a typist “who couldn’t take dictation” and so “wrote stories and poems.” The stark cold facts say she was married three times, had no children, and died at 57 of a heart attack. Quoted in the November 21, 1983 New York Times obituary, the composers

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she worked with called her “a poet with a great feel for music” (Cy Coleman) and “one of the few people who had genuine wit in her lyrics ... a lot of heart,” and “was very human and also very funny” (Marvin Hamlisch ). Other Leigh lyrics include the award-winning Sinatra standards “Young at Heart” and “Witchcraft.” She also wrote “The Best Is Yet To Come,” with lyrics by Cy Coleman, the last song Sinatra sang in public, on February 1995; the title is etched on his tombstone. Bogart and Bacall What makes the words “How Little We Know” doubly relevant to a celebration of love is an earlier song with the same title. Online references distinguish the 1956 song from its predecessor by awkwardly adding “What Little It Matters” to the title. Otherwise Leigh’s lyric has little in common with the dreamy, laid back ballad played by the song’s eternally laconic composer Hoagy Carmichael and performed, unforgettably, by Lauren Bacall in Howard Hawks’s To Have and Have Not (1944). During one of the most sensational debuts in Hollywood history, Bacall croons “Maybe it happens this way” while making bedroom eyes of epic proportions at Humphrey Bogart. The Johnny Mercer lyrics that Bogart and Bacall bond to (they were married less than a year later) are slyly equivocal compared to Leigh’s tingling interminglings: “Maybe it’s just for a day,” Bacall sings, already looking forward to love’s night. “Maybe you’re meant to be mine in spite of how little we know.” In “real life,” Bogart was hers until his death on January 14, 1957. Love Spoken/Unspoken Thirty years earlier, the love song of the day was “Diane,” from Frank Borzage’s Oscar-winning silent romance 7th Heaven, a box office hit whose stars Charles Farrell (Chico) and Janet Gaynor (Diane) became “America’s Sweethearts.” In To Have and Have Not, when Bogart and Bacall were one of America’s most famous couples (today the word would be “hottest”), Bacall famously tells Bogart, “If you want me, just whistle. You know how to whistle, don’t you? You just put your lips together and blow.” In 1927 the lovers had no voices and audiences may have smiled or even snickered when the petite Diane

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was lifted up and hugged by the towering Chico. But no one was laughing after the first lingering close-up of Gaynor’s radiant natural beauty at the moment she knows she is loved by the man she loves. That’s when Depression-bound American filmgoers bonded with the couple and the film. Releasing the Word “Love is so simple,” Arletty’s Garance tells Jean-Louis Barrault’s Debaru in Children of Paradise (1945) at the high point of one of cinema’s most stirring love scenes. Not so simple after all when Garance wants to get seriously physical and Debaru backs out the door. As a word, love does indeed sound simple. Just say it aloud, savor it, and say it again. It’s such a durable, adaptable, powerful little word. It can be recklessly spent, endlessly abused and misused, and come back as good as gold. Or if you’re a genius, you can release it, transform it and set it flowing, as Van Morrison does when “glove” becomes “love” in his novelin-a-song “Madame George.” Toward the end of the 1968 album Astral Weeks, after singing about going into “a trance sitting on a sofa playing games of chance,” Morrison puts the trance in play and a dropped glove releases the word hidden inside, and suddenly language feels bigger than life: “Hey love, you forgot your gloves,” Van sings, and like a magician pulling a rabbit out of a hat pulls out “the love that loves that loves to love the love to love the love the glove,” and does it again in the closing verses, “the loves to love the loves to love.” Morrison calls his incantatory riffing “the inarticulate speech of the heart,” which is just a wordier way of saying love is music and music love, a combination that never ends as long as someone’s singing. “The Word” The Beatles get down to the essence in “The Word,” from the 1965 album Rubber Soul. In that eerie, relentless, evangelical mantra of a song, Lennon and McCartney reduce the most popular term in popular culture to its word-for-word’s-sake core. In the chorus — “Say the word and you’ll be free ... Say the word and be like me ... Say the word I’m thinking of,” the word isn’t sung so much as keened, dementedly, despairingly, like Coleridge’s “woman wailing for her demon lover” in his opium poem “Kubla Khan.”

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Taylor’s Version Having begun with a seemingly unknown female songwriter, I come to Taylor Swift, who at the moment is at the center of a Pop Diva/Football Hero romance; she and Travis Kelce may be the Couple of the Hour, but are unlikely to be the 2024 version of “America’s Sweethearts,” not with the Far Right spewing freaked-out conspiracy theories on social media. Like Carolyn Leigh, Swift has a ball writing (and singing) about love’s ups and downs — she has also produced deeply felt songs like “This Love” and “You’re in Love,” both in last year’s album 1989 (Taylor’s Version). Discoveries How little I knew — it turns out that there’s nothing “seemingly unknown” about the “female songwriter” being remembered online in “Unsung Carolyn Leigh,” an April 5, 2014 American Songbook event at Lincoln Center. The video begins with an audio of her voice as she addresses another, long-ago audience, telling them to “forgive the little introductory remarks” and hoping they “will make some sense of this,” a line she delivers with a touch of irony reminiscent of Ted Gioia’s Sinatra delivering “the inner meaning” of a lyric while “offering an arch commentary on it.” Among the “unsung” songs are several from an unproduced musical based on Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, which features a lively, jazzy ensemble number about the Jazz Age. At a 2009 tribute to composer Cy Coleman, Fiona Apple sings a touching version of Leigh’s “I Walk A Little Faster,” a song I’d never heard of and keep coming back to. Unlike “How Little We Know,” the lyric has an intimate, almost confessional quality, and every time I hear lines like “Pretending life is sweet ‘cause love’s around the corner, I walk a little faster” and “Can’t begin to see my future shine as yet, no sign as yet, you’re mine as yet, rushing to a face I can’t define as yet,” I feel as if I’ve simultaneously discovered and been discovered by a song. I’m also reminded of a phrase from the closing sentence of Ted Gioia’s book: “when love finally calls the tune, it almost always comes from the least expected direction.” —Stuart Mitchner ——— Note: Philip Springer, 97, the man who wrote the music for “How Little We Know” and is best known as the composer of Eartha Kitt’s “Santa Baby,” is reportedly still writing 35 songs a year.

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15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024

MUSIC REVIEW

Renowned Ukrainian Orchestra Makes Long-Awaited Visit to Princeton

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he concert this past weekend by the National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine at McCarter Theatre was long overdue. The Orchestra was scheduled to perform at McCarter a year ago, but the ongoing conflict in that region, combined with travel and economic difficulties, shelved those plans. The Orchestra was finally able to embark on a United States tour this month, and the ensemble brought a rare musical experience to Matthews Theater Sunday afternoon. Led by Volodymyr Sirenko and featuring guest pianist Volodymyr Vynnytsky, the Orchestra presented a program steeped in both the Romantic symphonic tradition and Ukrainian musical history. Founded in 1918, the National Symphony Orchestra has taken on a significant additional role in the past two years as a voice of Ukraine. To open Sunday’s concert, the ensemble presented a gem from the country’s rich musical past. Eighteenthcentury composer Maxim Sozontovich Berezovsky spent his career in Russia and Italy and is considered one of the “Golden Three” composers of Ukrainian classical music and a creator of the Ukrainian sacred choral style. A contemporary of Mozart, Berezovsky also died in his early 30s, leaving a repertory of appealing orchestral and choral music. His Symphony No. 1 in C Major, now recognized as the first symphony by a Ukrainian composer, was composed sometime in the early 1770s; with orchestration including light winds, the three-movement symphony parallels Mozart’s expansion of the symphonic genre beyond works for just strings. Conducting without a baton, Sirenko led the Orchestra in a crisp opening to Berezovsky’s piece, emphasizing a lean sound to music which could have easily fit into the Viennese compositional school. The string sections in particular were lithe and sparkly, with very subtle coloring from single oboe, flute and bassoon, as well as a pair of trumpets. A delicatelyplayed “Andante” middle movement led to a quick closing “Presto” marked by rich thirds between the violin sections and sweeping melodic lines within a martial instrumental palette. Although committed to the 19th-century Romantic style, Camille Saint-Saëns was a champion of the progressive music of Richard Wagner and Franz Liszt. Composed in a mere 17 days, his Piano Concerto No. 2 in G Minor was more like a three-movement symphony than the traditional concerto. Beginning with a solo cadenza, the opening “Andante Sostenuto” especially reflected the technical requirements of Liszt. Saint-Saëns premiered this concerto with himself as piano soloist in 1868, later claiming that a tight rehearsal schedule did not allow him time to practice the virtuosity of what he had written.

This concerto was indeed fiendish in its solo piano writing, but Ukrainianborn Vynnytsky seemingly had no trouble with piano lines which became increasingly more virtuosic as the piece went on. Opening the work with dark arpeggios, Vynnytsky took his time on both the impressionistic cadenza and principal theme of the first movement, against an understated orchestral accompaniment. Conductor Sirenko built tension slowly under the cascading solo piano lines, and Vynnytsky held the audience spellbound in extended passages of technical difficulty. The second movement “Allegro scherzando” conjured a spring frolic on the Seine, as Sirenko kept orchestral rhythms exact against fastmoving piano filigree. The third movement showed the true virtuosity of the work, and Vynnytsky’s fiery piano solo was well matched by furious strings. Sirenko wisely let Vynnytsky lead the way through the music, and the piano soloist never showed a rhythmic mishap or misstep in tempo while performing with phenomenal facility, including continuous and exacting trills from both hands in all registers. The National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine closed Sunday’s concert with a work by a composer with one foot in both the Eastern European and American musical traditions. Antonín Dvorák often drew from the folk tradition of his native Bohemia for his music, as well as years spent in the United States. His 1889 Symphony No. 8 in G Major was a celebratory piece composed on the occasion of Dvorák’s election to the Bohemian Academy of Science, Literature and Arts. In Sunday’s performance, a dark melody opened the four-movement work, made all the more shadowy by the placement of winds and brass at the back of the stage. The rich orchestral texture of the first movement was contrasted by graceful bird calls from flute and piccolo, as the movement took off to display an open and fresh instrumental feel. Flutist Kateryna Yurchenko played a number of chipper and spirited lines throughout the symphony, often joined by oboist Hennadii Kot and clarinetist Yurii Nabytovych. Sirenko often took time at phrase cadences and brought out dynamic contrasts adding elegance and enabling the music to turn from dark to light in an instant. In the closing “Allegro,” a sweet sectional cello melody led to a martial close as the Orchestra drove the music to a fast finish. unday afternoon’s concert was a culmination of musical and community efforts to bring the unique performance style of the National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine to Princeton. The Orchestra well proved its place on the international stage, as well as its vision of courage and determination during a time of war. —Nancy Plum

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024 • 16

Ghetto Gods in Divineland

THEATER REVIEW

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Passage Honors Hip-hop with the Premiere of “Ghetto Gods in Divineland”; A Family’s Conflicts Unfold Via a Powerful Fusion of Drama, Music, and Dance

n honor of the 50th anniversary of hiphop, Passage Theatre is presenting the world premiere of Ghetto Gods in Divineland. The play — a vibrant and poignant blend of drama, music, and dance — is a salute to the Poor Righteous Teachers (PRT), a hip-hop group whose members — Wise Intelligent, Culture Freedom, and the late Father Shaheed — were from Trenton. A press release describes the show as an “experimental Afrofuturism play” that portrays “Trenton’s political and social issues through the lens of the ‘Divineland’ neighborhood — also known as the Mayor Donnelly Project Homes, where the members of PRT met and grew up. The play dramatizes the social trauma of Trenton’s Divineland using progressiveness, modern science, technology, and wisdom from the ancestors.” Ghetto Gods in Divineland borrows from PRT’s music, lyrics, and imagery to tell its central story: a Divineland family’s conflicts with external events — and each other. The theme of the play is revealed right at the beginning. Behind us, the cast moves in rhythm. The sequence is the first example of Sanchel Brown’s choreography, which is smooth, expressive, and evocative of ritual. As the cast proceeds to the stage, they repeatedly chant one word: “power.” This makes clear that Ghetto Gods in Divineland is a meditation on the concept of power. The show contemplates multiple aspects of power — types and sources of it, legitimate (or not) uses of it, and who should have the right to wield it. Written by Richard Bradford and Anthony Martinez-Briggs, the play received a developmental workshop at Passage last October. Ozzie Jones, the workshop’s director and dramaturg, also directs the fully staged premiere. The titular Ghetto Gods (flamboyantly portrayed by Craig Storrod and Alicia Thomas ) function as a contemporary Greek Chorus, though at times they directly affect the action as well as comment on it. As commentators they fill multiple roles, most notably as DJs and news media personalities. Sound Designer Larry Fowler adeptly manages the playback of musical excerpts and the simulated media segments, often giving the latter the audio polish of a real broadcast. In body language as well as line deliveries, Tasha Holmes brings the right mixture of restless drive and reserved studiousness to the role of Gekiyla, a horticulturalist. Having completed her studies, she has returned to Divineland. Gekiyla makes a discovery: a special root (represented by Alyssandra Docherty’s lighting) that has, among other mysterious

properties, a connection with music. Gekiyla believes that this root can be used to benefit her community, but other characters feel that the time she gives to her research would be better spent interacting with, and more immediately aiding, the people she aims to serve. Her harshest critic in this regard is her brother, Ameen (infused with steadily simmering, impassioned anger by Davon Cochran). Ameen’s militancy — his determination to rally those around him to fight injustice by any means necessary — causes him to have little patience with Gekilya’s discovery, the benefits of which he doubts. Both Ameen and Gekilya want to help their community; they just have sharply differing ideas about how best to do so. There are multiple sources of tension between the siblings. One is the recent death of their mother, whose care Ameen accuses Gekiyla of leaving to others. Other stressors are connected with external events that affect the entire neighborhood: a sinkhole (a plot point that echoes several actual headlines over

recent years) that is interfering with residents’ power supply; and a roller coaster that a major corporation wants to install on the Lower Trenton Bridge. The amusement park ride obviously is irrelevant to what the neighborhood actually needs, and exemplifies — especially to Ameen — the apathy of the greedy powers that be toward the community’s plight. Carlo Campbell adeptly balances exuberance and contemplativeness in portraying Papi Shh, a music lover who is lifelong friend and mentor to Gekilya and Ameen. Papi Shh embodies the community, and consensus building; during a particularly tense confrontation between other characters, he attempts to drown them out by leading the audience in a chant. Arguably, the Poor Righteous Teachers are represented onstage by the Ghetto Gods and Papi Shh, who bring music to the community; and by Ameen, who agitates for social justice. Tiffany Bacon’s costumes reinforce the concept of supporting the same community and identity in differing ways. The wardrobe shares common elements and

motifs while keeping the characters distinctive. Papi Shh, Ameen, and Gekiyla all wear African patterns on at least one article of clothing. Ameen’s outfit evokes a military uniform; his hat includes a badge that contains the colors (red, black, and green) of the Pan-African flag (though the outer colors are in the reverse order). In having the Ghetto Gods (and, at crucial times, other characters) deliver lines from the Lower Trenton Bridge, Jones lets the play share imagery with the Poor Righteous Teachers’ 1990 video of their song “Rock Dis Funky Joint.” The video contains several shots of the trio looking down at the viewer as they perform from the bridge. (The camera periodically turns away from the performers to capture the “Trenton Makes, the World Takes” slogan, which is quoted in the show’s dialogue.) For the play, this use of vertical levels astutely develops the theme of power. In this, Jones is aided by Marie Laster’s gritty set. Under the bridge (which connects two brick walls, one of which has been painted with graffiti) is a cramped room with a whiteboard, on which Gekiyla studiously writes her research notes. Characters who speak from the bridge — looking down at both the audience and at other characters — either hold power or seek it. A corporate executive (Storrod), who trumpets the plans for the roller coaster project, already holds power. The Ghetto Gods hold influence over their listeners. Ameen speaks from the bridge in an effort to influence the community to take power away from greedy establishment figures such as the executive. (In a moving juxtaposition, brief footage of Martin Luther King Jr. is projected while Ameen speaks.) By contrast, Gekiyla, in her efforts to make discoveries that will benefit her community, spends a lot of time digging in the sinkhole — the vertically lowest space. It is in the middle space (the living area under the bridge) that Papa Shh talks to Gekilya about the importance of interacting with the community. The playwrights and director appear to be emphasizing that, in order to hold power that is genuine and legitimate, one must be equally comfortable occupying all levels. udience members do not need to be “GHETTO GODS IN DIVINELAND”: Performances are underway for “Ghetto Gods in Difamiliar with hip-hop to find Ghetvineland.” Written by Richard Bradford and Anthony Martinez-Briggs, and directed by to Gods in Divineland meaningful Ozzie Jones, the play with music runs through February 25 at Passage Theatre. Above, (though those that are immersed in the from left, Gekiyla (Tasha Holmes), Papi Shh (Carlo Campbell), and Ameen (Davon Co- genre and its history obviously will find chran) meet on the Lower Trenton Bridge — a tableau that recalls the Poor Righteous heightened resonance — and, at the perTeachers’ 1990 video for their song “Rock Dis Funky Joint.” (Photo by Jeff Stewart) formance attended by this writer, palpably did). The show can be a bridge that not only connects art forms, but hopefully, “Ghetto Gods in Divineland” will play at Passage Theatre in the Mill Hill Playempowers audiences by leading them to Lic #11509A house, 205 East Front Street in Trenton, through February 25. For tickets, show deeper levels of understanding of fundatimes, and further information call (609) 392-0766 or visit passagetheatre.org. mentally universal issues. Bonded and Insured Lic #11509A — Donald H. Sanborn III

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BALLET AT ITS MOST CLASSICAL: Philadelphia Ballet’s version of the classic ballet “Giselle” comes to the Academy of Music February 29-March 10. Tickets for the watch parPhiladelphia Ballet Presents Princeton Garden Theatre ty are $13.50 or $7.75 for Angel Corella’s “Giselle” Holds Awards Watch Party

Philadelphia Ballet will s tage t he clas sic ballet Giselle, in a version by artistic director, Angel Corella, at Philadelphia’s Academy of Music from February 29 to March 10. Tickets for all performances start at $25. A ballet masterpiece, Giselle is about love, betrayal and redemption. “With Giselle, I sought to honor the ballet’s rich heritage while infusing it with a contemporary vitality that resonates with today’s audiences,” said Corella, “It’s a privilege to bring this iconic piece to life and share my vision with the incredible patrons of Philadelphia Ballet.” “As we kick off 2024 and continue our 60th anniversary season, Giselle under the artistic direction of Angel Corella sets the stage for an extraordinary year of performances,” said the ballet company’s Executive Director Shelly Power. “This ballet, with its poignant narrative and breathtaking choreography, exemplifies the artistic excellence that defines Philadelphia Ballet.” Follow ing Giselle, t he company performs works by Alvin Ailey, William Forsy the, and Tw yla T har p March 14-16; and Frederick Ashton’s The Dream and George Balanchine’s Prodigal Son March 9-12. Visit philadelphiaballet.org for more information.

T he Pr inceton G arden Theatre will hold its 6th annual Hollywood Awards Watch Party on March 10, starting at 6:30 p.m. Film lovers will have an opportunity to walk the red carpet before witnessing the biggest night in movies — the Academy Awards — on the big screen. Attire for guests is open, whether formalwear, loungewear, or any thing in-between. This year the theater has added a separatelyticketed red carpet reception preceding the event, to be held at the Nassau Inn’s Palmer Room. Doors open at 6:30 for the watch party, with the awards telecast starting at 7 p.m. In addition to the bottomless popcorn and drinks included with admission, Milk & Cookies and the bent spoon will have baked goods and ice cream available for purchase in the lobby. Patrons will be able to play along at the “Pick the Winners Challenge,” where anyone with a higher score than the theater’s executive director can win free passes or a golden trophy of their own. Tickets are limited for the red carpet reception. Participants can wear fancy clothes and get in the Hollywood spirit with drinks and light fare before walking back to the Garden for the awards on the big screen. Tickets for the reception include admission to the watch party.

Garden Theatre members. Reception tickets are $45 or $35 for Garden members. All tickets come with reserved seating at the theater. Visit princetongardentheatre.org/awardsparty.

“Pinkalicious The Musical” Comes to New Brunswick

State Theatre New Jersey presents Pinkalicious The Musical on Sunday, March 10 at 2 p.m. After the show, a special meet and greet and photo opportunity with Pink and Peter will take place in the downstairs lobby. Tickets range from $15-$35. In Pinkalicious The Musical, Pinkalicious can’t stop eating pink cupcakes despite warnings from her parents. Her pink indulgence lands her at the doctor’s office with Pinkititis, an affliction that turns her pink from head to toe — a dream come true for this pink-loving enthusiast. But when her hue goes too far, only Pinkalicious can figure out a way to get out of this predicament. The one-hour musical, w ith book and lyrics by Elizabeth Kann and Victoria Kann and music, lyrics, and orchestrations by John Gregor, is based on the bestselling children’s book Pinkalicious by Elizabeth Kann and Victoria Kann. It debuted in New York in 2007 and has since toured around the United States. State Theatre New Jersey is at 15 Livingston Avenue,

Itzhak Perlman Performs at Classical Season Celebration

State Theatre New Jersey (STNJ) presents violinist Itzhak Perlman in recital on Saturday, February 24 at 8 p.m. This special performance is part of State Theatre’s annual Classical Season Celebration. “We are thrilled to once again welcome Itzhak Perlman to anchor our Classical Season Celebration,” said Sarah Chaplin, State Theatre New Jersey president and CEO. “As a nonprofit presenting theater, this signature fundraiser provides essential support from our community for STNJ’s year-round classical presentations and arts education programs.” The Classical Season Celebration includes a pre-show cocktail party, tickets to the performance, and a post-show dessert reception. Classical Season tickets and sponsorship opportunities are available at STNJ.org/CSC. Concert tickets only are available at Stnj.org. The program, in which Perlman is accompanied by pianist Rohan De Silva, includes Handel’s Violin Sonata in E Major, Op. 1, No. 15; Beethoven, Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 9 in A Major, Op. 47 “Kreutzer”; and Schumann, Fantasiestücke, Op. 73. Perlman has performed with every major orchestra and at concert halls around the globe, He was granted a Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama in 2015, a National Medal of Arts by President Clinton in 2000, and a Medal of Liberty by President Reagan in 1986. Perlman has been honored with 16 Grammy Awards, four Emmy Awards, a Kennedy Center Honor, a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, and a Genesis Prize. In the 2023/24 season, Perlman brings his PBS special In the Fiddler’s House program to San Francisco, Houston, Bethesda, and Palm Beach, joined by today’s klezmer stars including Hankus Netsky, Andy Statman, and members of the Klezmer Conservatory Band.

VIRTUOSO: Celebrated violinist Itzhak Perlman is in recital February 24 at State Theatre New Jersey. (Photo by BYU Arts) performed live as a soloist and chamber musician across the United States, Japan and the Caribbean, as well as on television and radio broadcasts world wide. He taught music in the Westfield school district

before coming to Westminster Conservatory. T he nex t We s t m ins ter Conser vator y at Nassau event will take place on March 21, featuring violist Dennis Krasnokutsky and pianist Larissa Korkina.

HEALING WITH MUSIC

Exploring the Intersection of Music, Dance, and Parkinson’s An experiential panel discussion featuring an adapted performance of Mark Morris’ choreography by local Dance for Parkinson’s Disease participants, performed to live music by cellist Joshua Roman

Sunday, March 3, 2024 • 3PM Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall TICKETS: $15 General $10 Students Free to Princeton students through Passport to the Arts puc.princeton.edu

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Theodore Hendricks-Verdejo To Present Piano Recital

Westminster Conservatory at Nassau will present a recital for solo piano on Feb. 15 at 12:15 p.m. The soloist, Theodore HendricksVerdejo, is a member of the teaching faculty of Westminster Conser vator y of Music. The free event will take place in the Niles Chapel of Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street. T he program compr is es Waldszenen, opus 82, by Robert Schumann; two selections from Enrique Granados’ Goyescas, El Fandango de Candil and Quejas Ó La Maja y el Ruiseñor; and Sergei Rachmaninoff’s a r r a n g e m e n t fo r p i a n o of Fr it z Kreisler’s song, Liebesfreud. A native of Trenton, Hendricks-Verdejo received his early musical training at the Escuela Libre de Musica in Hato Rey, Puerto Rico. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in piano performance at Peabody Conservatory of Music in Baltimore, before pursuPINK, PINK, AND MORE PINK: In “Pinkalicious The Musical,” coming to State Theatre New ing postgraduate studies at Jersey on March 10, a lover of all things pink goes a little too far. (Photo by Richard Termine) Temple University. He has

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024

Performing Arts

New Brunswick. Visit Stnj.org for t i cke t s a n d f u r t h e r information.

After Noon Concert Series Thursdays at 12:30pm Princeton University Chapel

A weekly opportunity for the Princeton Community to enjoy performances by local, national, and international organists. Performing February 15 is Kevin O’Malia, All Saints’ Episcopal Church Princeton, NJ Open to all.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024 • 18

Art

“SPRAWL”: This work by Judi Tavill of Rumson was selected for the “2024 International Juried Exhibition,” on view through March 17 at The Center for Contemporary Art in Bedminster. In addition, Tavill was selected for a solo exhibition at the center.

“BLOWING BUBBLES”: Annabelle Schu won the top award for Painting at the 11th annual “Youth Art Exhibition,” on view through Sunday, February 18 at Phillips’ Mill in New Hope, Pa. (Pa.) for Painting, Blowing “Ulises Carrión: Bookworks Phillips’ Mill “Youth Art” Award Winners Announced Bubbles; Anagha Kannur- and Beyond,” the spring Winners across five categories were announced at the 11th annual “Youth Art Exhibition” awards ceremony on January 27 at the historic Phillips’ Mill. Over 140 works of art from students attending 23 area high schools fill the walls of the mill through February 18. Renowned Trenton-based artist Mel Leipzig served as this year’s awards juror. Zoya Gupta of West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South was awarded Best In Show for her painting Dislocation. Also garnering top honors in their categories are Annabelle Schu of Council Rock High School South

exhibition in the Ellen and Leonard Milberg Gallery at Firestone Library, February 21 through June 13. It is curated by Sal Hamerman, metadata librarian for Special Collections at PUL, and Javier Rivero Ramos, a recent Ph.D. graduate from the Department of Art and Archaeology, who is now assistant curator at Art Bridges Foundation in Arkansas. Carrión was one of the most influential of all modern artists engaged in the book, and this new exhibition will be the largest United States retrospective ex“Ulises Carrión: Bookworks hibition of his work to date. And Beyond” at Firestone Library It w ill explore Carrión’s Princeton University Li- pioneering reinvention of brar y ( PUL) will present the book as a material and

patti from Council Rock High School North (Pa.) for Works on Paper, Illumination; Jack Weber of Notre Dame High School for 3-Dimensional Works, Splitting River; Meghan Smith from Hunterdon Central Regional High School for Photography, Grey November; and Summer Layre from Central Bucks High School East (Pa) for Digital Art, Self-Portrait. A full list of awards is posted on phillipsmill.org. Phillips’ Mill Community Association is located at 2619 River Road in New Hope, Pa.

“BOOKWORKS AND BEYOND”: Princeton University Library will feature works by Ulises Carrión in the Ellen and Leonard Milberg Gallery at Firestone Library February 21 through June 13. (Photo by Brandon Johnson)

social platform, primarily featuring Princeton’s extensive holdings, drawn from the Marquand Library of Art and Archaeology and PUL’s Special Collections. PUL is steward to one of the most substantial collections of Carrión’s book and mail art in any American library. The exhibition will also incorporate key audio-visual, performative, and printed works on loan from the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (New York), and LIMA (Amsterdam). Another feature of the exhibition will be a hands-on activity area where visitors can participate in creating and sending their own mail ar t using postcards and stamps inspired by Carrión’s work. The stamps were made at the PUL Makerspace, which will also host a stamp-making workshop this spring. An accompanying exhibition catalog, published by Princeton University Press, was made possible by the Friends of Princeton University Library. Other programming related to the exhibition will include a panel discussion to launch the accompanying exhibition catalog on March 6, and an artists’ talk with Alex Turgeon on April 8. Staff from the Center for Book Arts in New York will also lead selected public tours. Born in San Andres Tuxtla, Veracruz, Mexico, in 1941, Carrión emigrated to Amsterdam in 1972 and joined a dynamic multinational community of artists pushing the boundaries of artistic practices. He eschewed conventional galleries and museums in favor of collaborative “artist-run spaces” such as his own bookstore- galler y, Other Books and So. Carrión also became heavily involved

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in mail art, a participatory and network-driven practice rooted in the exchange of artworks through the postal system and premised on questions of authorship and originality, that was also an important avenue of communication for artists living in countries governed by authoritarian regimes. Carrión’s community-driven practice fostered extensive cross-cultural exchange between experimental artists working in Latin America and Europe. “Carrión raised profound questions about the institutions and social conventions that shape our interactions with books, which he put into practice by stewarding artist-run organizations that reimagined how works are created, collected, and exhibited. It is hugely appropriate that this exhibition takes place in a library,” said Rivero Ramos. In an essay titled “The New Art of Making Books,” Carrión reconceived the book not as a mere physical support for literary expression but as a material, semiotic, and social medium in its own right. His multimedia practice — which encompassed artists’ books, sound poetry, performance, videos, mail art, theoretical writing, publishing, curating, and archiving — is emblematic of the ways that Carrión and his colleagues embraced and radically reconsidered the book within the broader interrogation of language, time, and media that characterized the artistic zeitgeist of the time. Members of the public are welcome to visit the exhibition between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. on weekdays and from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. Guided tours are available to the public. For m or e i n for m at ion about the exhibition, tours, and related programming, visit library.princeton.edu/ ulisescarrion.

Winners Announced for “2024 International Juried Exhibition”

The Center for Contemporary Art’s “2024 International Juried Exhibition” is on view through March 17. Juror Hunter O’Hanian selected 50 pieces from 902 entries from 312 ar tists from across the U.S. and Canada, China, Israel, and Italy. New Jersey artists selected for the exhibition are: Hilary Houston Bachelder (Princeton), Pamela Becker

(Flemington), Bette Blank (Madison), Maryann Burton (Hasbrouck Heights), Mark Davies (Lebanon), Tracy DiTolla (Oakland), Sandy Furst (Basking Ridge), Wendy Hallstrom (Clinton), Jeffrey Hartman (North Bergen), Patti Jordan ( Montclair), S a n d r a Ko s i n s k i ( L o n g Beach Township ), Jennifer Malone ( Maplewood), Kristen Mar tin-Aarnio ( Bayonne ), Dav id Orban (Trenton), Natalie Preston (Jersey City), Donna Ruane Rogers (Frenchtown), Judi Tavill (Rumson), Hui Tian (South Orange), Leah Tomaino (Randolph), and Bonnie Wilkenfeld (Mendham Township). Three artists were awarded cash prizes. First Prize went to Darryl Lauster (Arling ton, Texas ) ; S econd Prize to Yixuan Cai ( Los Angeles, Calif.), and Third Prize to DiTolla. In addition, Jordan and Tavill were awarded solo exhibitions at The Center for Contemporary Art. When speaking about his selection process O’Hanian wrote, “I wanted to assemble a group of works which would successfully work together to make a rewarding group exhibition for the visitor. I picked works that challenged me as a viewer — including some I did not fully understand but trusted the artist was on the right track. I wanted to present a variety of materials and processes. I looked for pieces which reflected contemporary ideas and concepts which are on my mind — and others — daily.” O’Hanian has a long career in supporting visual arts and LGBTQ+ studies. He is the past executive director of the Stonewall National Museum and Archive and the College Art Association, the largest professional association suppor ting ar t historians and visual artists in the world. He is the past board chair of the Alliance of Artists Communities, the national membership organization for artists’ residency programs. He graduated from Boston College and received his law degree from Suffolk University. The Center for Contemporary Art is located at 2020 Burnt Mills Road in Bedminster. For more information, visit ccabedminster.org.

IS ON


COMMUNITY PUPPET SHOW: Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) Artist-in-Residence Kenneth Lewis Sr., right, has led local families in recent puppet-making workshops, which will culminate in a public performance on February 18 at 3 p.m. in the ACP’s Solley Theater. of all ages bringing their objects, and landscapes Arts Council to Host Community Puppet Show hard work to life in this from personal archives and

The Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) will host a Communit y Puppet Show on Sunday, February 18 at 3 p.m. in their Solley Theater. Led by winter Artist-in-Residence Kenneth Lewis Sr., a local artist who has led puppet-making workshops for many years in our area, this collaborative production is designed, constructed, and scripted by Princeton community members of all ages. In January and early February, Lewis and the ACP hosted Saturday morning puppet theater workshops for children and caregivers that covered all the essentials of a full puppet production. Lewis introduced participants to different styles of puppets and the countless possibilities used to create a successful show. The first workshop tasked the group with developing a storyline followed by backdrop painting, puppet making, and script writing. The performance will feature multiple stories running 5-10 minutes each, with the puppet-making teams managing the puppets, sound, scenery, and dialogue. In addition to running the workshops, Lewis designed and created a puppet theater used for the production with materials donated by Hamilton Building Supply. The audience can expect to see “old-school” storytellers

90-minute production. The performance is open to everyone, with tickets available for a $5 suggested donation. Those tickets and a free RSVP option are available at artscouncilofprinceton.org. The Anne Reeves Artist-inResidence Program, named after the ACP’s founding director, was established by the Arts Council in 2009 to offer artists the opportunity to conceptualize and create work while providing the community with creative interaction with working ar tists in all disciplines. Learn more at artscouncilof princeton.org.

“Transversing Nostalgia” On View at Arts Council

The Ar ts Council of Princeton (ACP) presents “Transversing Nostalgia,” a dual exhibition by painters Onome Olotu and Chanelle René, on view in the ACP’s Tap l i n G a l l e r y t h r o u g h March 9. Working with personal and sourced archives, Olotu and René take a drive down memory lane, reminiscing intimate connections that allow the past to speak to the present and future. Of her work in “Transversing Nostalgia,” Olotu said, “In this ‘Postcards’ subseries, my artistic process involved the idea of exploring time and memory by recomposing figures,

sourced archives from the Historical Society of Princeton and residents of the Witherspoon-Jackson community in Princeton and with that, I was able to interact, interview, and hear stories of Black families who have lived in Princeton, going back four generations and more. I have had the opportunity of being part of their history by inserting parts of myself into the lives of these families through my paintings.” Olotu was born in 1993 in Lagos, Nigeria. She studied painting at the University of Benin. After graduation, she worked as a curatorial assistant at the National Gallery of Art, Abuja, and later as an art teacher before taking on full time studio practice at the Universal Studios of Art, Lagos, in 2018. Working predominantly in charcoal and acrylics, her work engages personal family and institutional archives to respond to social and political events. Her works have been exhibited across Nigeria and recently in Canada at the exhibition “Sankofa: African Routes, Canadian Roots” at the Museum of Anthropology, the University of British Colombia, Vancouver, Canada. She lives and works between Lagos and Princeton. The Arts Council featured Onome as an artistin-residence in the spring of 2023.

René said, “My ‘Grant Street Beach’ series debuts over 10 paintings that journey the segregated beach of Cape May, New Jersey. Working from my own family’s photographs and those of other Black families, these works depict joyful, everyday moments of African American beach goers in Cape May from the 1920s through the 1960s. Energetic mark making in stark contrast with detailed fi gures dressed in dual-tone color done in oil and mixed media allow the past to speak to the present. Each work explores the complexity and nuance of the human spirit while celebrating generations of Black beach goers as they transition from segregation to making Grant Street Beach a tradition of choice.” René is a New Jerseybased, award-winning painter who uses bold color and painterly brush strokes to create soulful portraits in oils and mixed media. Her work centers on women of color as she explores themes of diverse beauty, freedom and self-discovery. She is a self-taught artist who, at age 43, transitioned from a career in digital marketing to full-time painter. Awarded Best of Show at Ocean City Arts Center 2021 Annual Juried Art Show, René has exhibited widely throughout southern New Jersey and in global virtual exhibitions. Select media features include The Curator’s Salon, Cape May Magazine, and Soup Can Magazine. The ACP is at 102 Witherspoon Street. It is free and open to the public. For more information, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Exhibits

Art@Bainbridge, 158 Nassau Street, has “Reciting Women: Alia Bensliman and Khailiah Sabree” through March 31. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Gallery-Wide Group Show” through March 31. Gallery hours are T hurs day t hrough Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. A r t on Hulf ish, 11 Hulfish Street, has “Christina Fernandez: Multiple Exposures” through April 28. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Transversing Nostalgia” through March 9 in the Taplin Galler y. artscouncilofprinceton.org. Consid ine G a l ler y, Stuar t Countr y Day School, 12 Stuart Road, has “The Stuart 60th Anniversary Community Art Exhibit” through March 8. stuartschool.org. Fic us A r t G al ler y, 235 Nassau Street, has “Embrace the Everyday” through May 6. ficusbv.com. Gourgaud Gallery, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, has “Members Exhibition” through February 29. cranburyartscouncil.org. H i s to r i c a l S o c i e t y of Pr inceton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and Innovator’s Gallery,” “Pr inceton’s Por trait,” and other exhibits. Muse-

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um hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 12 to 4 p.m., Thursday to 7 p.m. princetonhistory.org. Mor ven Museum & G arde n , 55 Stockton Street, has “Striking Beauty” through February 18, and the online exhibits “Slavery at Morven,” “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898,” and others. morven.org. Phillips’ Mill, 2619 River Road, New Hope, Pa., has “Youth Art Exhibition” on weekends through February 18. phillipsmill.org. Present Day Club, 72 Stockton Street, has “Embraced by Nature” through March 3. The exhibit is open on Fridays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. catherinejmartzloff.com. Pr inceton P ubl ic Libra r y, 65 Wit herspoon Street, has “Anthropomorphic: Photos and Stories” through March 15. princetonlibrary.org. Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, Princeton Universit y, has “Nobody Turn Us Around: The Freedom Rides and Selma to Montgomery Marches: Selections from the John Doar Papers” through March 31. library.princeton.edu. Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie, Cadwalader Park, Trenton, has “Music to My Eyes” February 16 through April 7. A reception is on Saturday, February 17 from 2 to 4 p.m. ellarslie.org. We s t W i n d s or A r t s, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “Manifesting Beloved Community” through March 2. westwindsorarts.org.

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024

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“WITH JOHN AND FLORENCE BROADWAY”: This acrylic on canvas painting by Onome Olutu is featured in “Transversing Nostalgia,” her dual exhibit with Chenelle René, on view through March 9 in the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery.

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Mark Your Calendar Town Topics Wednesday, February 14 12-3 p.m.: Douglass Day Transcribe-a-thon, at Princeton Public Library’s Technology Center, 65 Witherspoon Street. Work side-by-side on a crowdsourcing transcription focused on the general correspondence of Frederick Douglass from the Library of Congress. Princetonlibrary.org. 1-3 p.m.: Birthday party for abolitionist Frederick Douglass at the True Farmstead, Stoutsburg-Sourland African American Museum, 189 Hollow Road, Skillman. Open hours and a transcribe-a-thon. Free but registration required. Ssaamuseum.org.

FEBRUARY

7 p.m.: Author Dana R. Fisher discusses her book Saving Ourselves : From Climate Shocks to Climate Action, with Princeton University’s Miguel Centeno, at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org. 7: 30 p.m. : Princeton University Concerts presents pianist Alexander Melnikov, violinist Isabelle Faust, and cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras at Richardson Auditorium, playing works by Schumann, Carter, and Brahms. Puc.princeton.edu. 8 p.m.: Menopause The Musical 2: Cruising Through ‘The Change’, at State Theatre New Jersey, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. $29-$69. Stnj.org. 8:30 p.m.: “Timelapse,” dance concert by seniors in Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts Program in Dance, at Hearst Dance Theater in the Lewis Arts complex. Free. Arts.princeton.edu.

Film Theater, 185 Nassau Street. Reception, in-person screening, and Q&A. Free. Princeton.arts.edu. 8 p.m.: The Princeton Folk Music Society presents singer/songwriter/storyteller Reggie Harris at Christ Congregation Church, 50 Wa l nut L a ne. $10 - $ 25. Princetonfolk.org. 8 p.m.: Salsa singer Jerry Rivera appears at State Theatre New Jersey, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. DJ Ralphie Mercado opens the show at 7:30 p.m. $39-$99. 8 p.m.: “Love Type Beat,” new play by Princeton University seniors Nica Evans and Taneyah Jolly, from Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts Program in Theater and Music Theater, at Wallace Theater in the Lewis Arts complex. Free. Arts.princeton.edu. 8:30 p.m.: “Timelapse,” dance concert by seniors in Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts P r o g r a m i n D a n c e, at Friday, February 16 Hearst Dance Theater in 4 p.m.: Lady Sings the the Lewis Arts complex. Blues is screened at Princ- Free. Arts.princeton.edu. eton P ublic L ibrar y, 65 Saturday, February 17 Witherspoon Street. Free. Princetonlibrary.org. 9:30-11 a.m.: Princeton 6:30 p.m.: Opening of Plasma Physics Lab’s Scithe Thomas Edison Film ence on Saturday series, Festival at Princeton Uni- at 100 Stellarator Road. versit y’s James Stewar t “Decarbonizing the Energy

System for a Cleaner and Healthier Future.” Arrive by 8 :30 a.m. for coffee and doughnuts. Pppl.gov/ events/science-Saturday. 10 a.m.: Mid-Day Toastmasters meets at The Library, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Live and on Zoom. Toastmastersclubs.org. 12-5 p.m.: Winery Weekend Music series offers wine and chocolate at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Indoor and outdoor seating with firepits. Live music from 1-4 p.m. by Brian Bortnick. Terhuneorchards.com. 1-4 p.m.: George Washington’s Birthday Celebration, Johnson Ferry House, Washington Crossing State Thursday, February 15 Park, Titusville. Countr y fiddle music and FAQs about 12 p.m.: Pianist Theodore Washington, presented in Hendricks-Verdejo performs the parlor. Also, the history works by Schumann, Graof gingerbread and baking nados, and Rachmaninoff on the hearth, Colonial eduat Nas s au P r e s by te r ia n cation, and quill pen writing. Church, 61 Nassau Street, Refreshments served. Free, as part of the Westminster but donations accepted. Conservatory at Nassau con(609) 737-2515. cert series. Free. 2 p.m.: Chinese New Year 6 : 3 0 p . m . : “A f r i c a n Celebration at Princeton A m er ic a n G ene a log y — Public Librar y, 65 WithDiscovering your Family erspoon Street. Chinese History,” at Lawrence Headpainting, calligraphy, musiquarters Branch of Mercer cal instruments, paper-cutCou nt y L ibrar y System, ting, traditional dances, and 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawgames. Princetonlibrary.org. rence Township. To register and get further information, 6 p.m.: The Princeton visit mcl.org. Singers perform “Love is in the Air” at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street. $20-$40. Princetonsingers.org. COLD SOIL ROAD TRENTON FARMER’S MARKET 7 p.m.: The Sofia PhilPRINCETON, NJ SPRUCE STREET harmonic performs an allBeethoven program at State Theatre New Jersey, 15 LivCOLD SOIL ROAD TRENTON FARMER’S MARKET ingston Avenue, New BrunsPRINCETON, SPRUCE STREET COLD SOIL ROADNJ TRENTON FARMER’S MARKET wick. $25-$55. Stnj.org. February 19 - 20 PRINCETON, NJ SPRUCE STREET 8 p.m.: “Love Type Beat,” new play by Princeton UniEnjoy ourFARMER’S MARKET versity seniors Nica Evans COLD SOIL ROAD TRENTON and Taneyah Jolly, from Feb 10 & 11, 17 & 18 February 19 - wines 20 PRINCETON, NJ SPRUCE STREET paired Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts ProCelebratewith Valentine’s Day,our Enjoy local gram in Theater and Music enjoy ourgourmet wines wines paired with paired Theater, at Wallace Theater in the Lewis Arts complex. local Pierre’s Chocolates and Celebratewith Valentine’s Day, local Pierre’s Free. Arts.princeton.edu. enjoy our winesgoods paired with our homemade baked gourmet 8:30 p.m.: “Timelapse,” Chocolates. local Pierre’s Chocolates and dance concert by seniors Pierre’s in Princeton University’s Live Music, our homemade baked goods Lewis Center for the Arts Chocolates. P r o g r a m i n D a n c e, at indoor & Live Music, Hearst Dance Theater in Celebrate Valentine’s Day,Lewis outdoor the Arts complex. February 9 – Larry Tritel February 23 – Jerry Steele indoor &wines pairedFree. enjoy our withArts.princeton.edu.

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Woods, led by MaryJoan Gaynor and Steve Hiltner as part of the Great Backyard Bird Count. Meet in the Herrontown Woods parking lot, 600 Snowden Avenue. Princetonlibrary.org. 10 a.m-12 p.m.: Backyard Birds, Cof fee, and Crafts. Friends of Princeton Open Space meets at Mountain Lakes Preserve, 57 Mountain Avenue, for hot chocolate and a backyard bird feeder crafting event. Part of the Great Backyard Bird Count. $5. All materials included. Registration required. Fopos.org. 11 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterrd don Land Trust’s Winter Farmers’ Market is at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Hunterdonlandtrust.org.

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12-5 p.m.: Winery Weekend Music series offers wine and chocolate at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Indoor and outdoor seating with firepits. Live music from 1-4 p.m. by Jerry Steele. Terhuneorchards.com. 1-2 p.m. Princeton University Carillon concert, listen on the Graduate School lawn. Gradschool.princeton.edu. 3 p.m.: The New Jersey Symphony presents “RESPECT: A Tribute to Aretha Franklin,” at State Theatre New Jersey, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. C ap at h ia Je n k i n s plays Franklin. $29-$59. Stnj.org. 4 p. m . : G at her ing in solidarity with the October 7 hostages, and a call for their release. Organized by a grassroots group of Israelis in Princeton. At Hinds Plaza. Monday, February 19 1-3 p.m.: The Women’s College Club of Princeton meets at Morven Museum Education Center, 55 Stockton Street, to hear a talk by Paul Castelerio and Christina Francois of Centurion Ministries Innocence Project about freeing wrongly convicted individuals. Free. Wccpnj.org. Tuesday, February 20 7 p.m . : Aut hor Pau l Alexander discusses his book Bitter Crop, a biography of Billie Holiday, at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org. 7:30 p.m.: Reading by David Henry Hwang and Ilya Kaminsky at the Drapkin Studio, Lewis Arts complex, Princeton University. Free. Arts.princeton.edu. Wednesday, February 21 5:30-8 p.m.: Crohn’s and Colitis Education Program, an evening of learning and connecting patients and caregivers of all ages with the latest research and treatments. At St. Peter’s University Hospital, Sister Marie de Pazzi C onference C enter, 254 Easton Avenue, New Brunswick. Free, RSVP required. Crohnscolitisfoundation.org. 5 : 30 p.m. : Princeton Public Library Board meeting, in the Newsroom at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org. 6:30 p.m.: The PBS documentary Revolution ’67 is screened at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, focused on the Black urban rebellions in Newark during the 1960s. Followed by a p a n el d i s c u s s ion. Princetonlibrary.org. 7 p.m.: “Finding Benjamin James and the History of the Mount Ely Hancock House,” virtual talk by Pat Dona hue, ow ner of t he Mount Ely Hancock House in East Windsor, on the history of the house and genealogy of James, an enslaved man who once lived at the house. Register at mcl.org.

Thursday, February 22 11 a.m.-3 p.m.: Winter Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza. Locally grown produce, pasture-raised meats, fresh baked breads, homemade treats, and handmade gifts. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: NSF I-Corps Info Session on turning innovations into products and services that create value in the market. At Princeton Innovation Center BioLabs, 303A College Road East. Lunch served. RSVP by February 15. Princetonbiolabs.com. 5-8 p.m.: Reception and program celebrating Black History Month at the Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street. “Black Angels, Ancestors, and Heritage: Reflections on the People and Growing Up in the Neighborhood,” about the Witherspoon-Jackson district. Artscouncilofprinceton.org. 5:30-8:30 p.m.: Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber presents Pitch Stop VI at Grounds for Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton. Investor panel is Sean O’Sullivan of SOSV, James Howard of Black Inventors Hall of Fame, and David Stengle of Startup Grind. $45$55. Princetonchamber.org. 6 : 30 p.m. : Princeton High School alumnus Jinwoo Chong discusses his novel Flux with Laura Spence-Ash at Princeton Public Librar y, 65 Witherspoon Street. Fundraiser for the library’s Friends and Foundation. $30; $75 with a copy of the book. Registration required. Princetonlibrary.org. 7-8:30 p.m.: Celebrate Culture with Game Night, at West Windsor Arts, 952 Alexander Road. In recognition of Black History Month, games including Bid Whist, Spades, and Dominoes. An art exhibition, “Manifesting Beloved Community,” inspired by Martin Luther King, is on display. Free but registration is necessary. Westwindsorarts.org. 8 p.m.: “Love Type Beat,” new play by Princeton University seniors Nica Evans and Taneyah Jolly, from Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts Program in Theater and Music Theater, at Wallace Theater in the Lewis Arts complex. Free. Arts.princeton.edu. Friday, February 23 7:30 p.m.: William and Mary College Choir in concert at Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street. Works by American composers over the last century including Barber, Hailstork, and Nova; also selections from Faure’s Requiem. Free. 8 p.m.: “Love Type Beat,” new play by Princeton University seniors Nica Evans and Taneyah Jolly, from Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts Program in Theater and Music Theater, at Wallace Theater in the Lewis Arts complex. Free. Arts.princeton.edu.

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21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024

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Thrilling 1st Sell-Out Crowd at Jadwin Since 2001, Princeton Men’s Hoops Rallies to Defeat Penn 77-70

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he fans started streaming into Jadwin Gym 90 minutes before Princeton University men’s basketball team tipped off against arch-rival Penn last Saturday evening in the first sell-out in the building since December 12, 2001 when the Tigers hosted Kansas. In the second half, the throng of 5,515 on hand was uneasy as a gritty Quaker squad led the Tigers 42-36 just after halftime and knotted the contest at 59-59 with 7:59 left in regulation. Princeton brought the crowd to its feet down the stretch, closing the game on an 18-11 run to pull away to a 77-70 win, improving to 17-3 overall and 5-2 Ivy League. Tiger sophomore forward Caden Pierce credited the crowd with giving the Tigers a lift as they outlasted the Quakers. “It was amazing, the media people and everybody on the scene did a great job and promoted the game,” said Pierce. “The fans showed out and it really helped us down the stretch. We feed off that energy, we are really thankful.” The Tigers needed that energy as Penn was sparked by the return of star guard Clark Slajchert, who hadn’t played since early December due to an ankle injury. “They are obviously a really good team,” said Pierce, who ended up with 17 points and 11 rebounds in the win for his 10th double-double of the season. “With Slajchert back, they are a completely different team that they have been the past couple games. It is a great team win, they took it to us a little bit there but we stayed together and made plays.” Pierce kept the Tigers in the game early on as he scored Princeton’s first eight points. “I felt good warming up, it helps when that first one goes in” said Pierce. “Xaivian [Lee] got me a wide open look on the first play of the game and it went in. I felt good and my teammates kept finding me in good spots.” Fellow sophomore Lee got plenty of looks in the paint as he slashed his way to 22 points and 10 rebounds. “I haven’t felt great all week, so I didn’t really get to work out that much and my shot kind of felt terrible,” said Lee. “I thought, just try and get downhill a little bit, get started, and it doesn’t hurt when you make your first couple. So after that my confidence was just up, so I was just attacking, finding others.”

Being more aggressive on the defensive end made the difference for the Tigers as they subdued the Quakers. “We shut them down on defense, I think that was the best we guarded all game,” said Lee. “They played really well in the first half, they made a lot of shots. We knew if we just kept in front of them, we would make some stops. We had to double down in our scout and just keep guarding.” Princeton head coach Mitch Henderson credited his players with being sharp at both ends of the court as they pulled out the win. “We made shots, we got some great shots in the first half,” said Henderson, who got 15 points from Zach Martini with Blake Peters chipping in 12. “I thought we got a little tougher on [Nick] Spinoso and Slajchert towards the end. We didn’t turn the ball over, we had one turnover in the second half. I thought we shot the ball nicely. They were open shots and that is what was called for. If it is 25 feet or two feet, it is an open shot, it is a good shot.” Henderson acknowledged that Slajchert’s return made Penn much tougher to beat. “They are very different with him, he didn’t look like he missed a step,” said Henderson. “He was flying around all over the place. He is a really tough kid to cover. I thought

Mush (Matt Allocco) did a great job on him. It just took us a little time to get our feet into the game. It was keep moving our feet, we were falling down. That was a really hard-fought game, they tested us big-time.” Even though Lee is averaging a team-high 18.1 points a game and Pierce is contributing 15.0 points and a teambest 9.5 rebounds a contest, Henderson believes the two sophomores have plenty of room to grow. “What I appreciate most about them is their willingness to get better and to take coaching; it is a hallmark that we have relied on forever,” said Henderson. “I am grateful that they are willing to listen. They know they are not perfect and that is the beauty of it. No one can change what is inside of each of them because they are both really good players. They are letting mistakes go very quickly which is a really good sign.” With Princeton having posted two straight wins after falling to Cornell (83-68 on January 27) and Yale (70-64 on February 2), Henderson believes the team is in a good place. “We were really bad against Cornell, we talked about it and I thought we made huge strides last weekend,” said Henderson. “We had a really tough loss at Yale and then gutted one out at Brown.

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CROWD PLEASER: Princeton University men’s basketball player Caden Pierce dribbles around a defender in recent action. Last Saturday, sophomore forward Pierce tallied 17 points with 11 rebounds to help Princeton top Penn 77-70 before a sell-out crowd of 5,515 packing Jadwin Gym. The Tigers, now 17-3 overall and 5-2 Ivy League, host Brown on February 16 and Yale on February 17. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) This was a really tough one. I still think we have got some more lessons to learn but we are figuring out ways to win and we are not pulling apart which is a good thing.” As the Tigers host Brown on

February 16 and Yale on February 17, Pierce is hoping to draw some more cheers from the home crowd. “It is good to have them fresh in our minds, we know what we have to do to play

each team well,” said Pierce. “We can look at films from just over a week ago when we were at Yale and Brown. That is really going to help us preparing for those games.” —Bill Alden

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024 • 24

Senior Stalwart Monihan Determined to Give Her All As Tiger Women’s Hockey Heads into Homestretch As Kate Monihan stood on the ice at Hobey Baker Rink last Friday before the Princeton University women’s hockey team hosted Clarkson to start her final regular season home weekend, she took a moment to reflect on her journey with the program. “I was thinking about how grateful I am to play here, I always look at the Patty [Kazmaier] and Hobey banners and appreciate the moment,” said senior defender Monihan. “It felt extra special today, knowing this is one of my last times being able to do that.” Facing the No. 3 Golden Knights, Monihan and her teammates were fired up to get senior weekend started on a high note. “A f ter our Q u in n ipiac game (a 3-1 loss on February 3), we gathered as a group; we realized that there is not much time left in the season and we are a really talented and special group,” said Monihan, a 5’5 native of Moorestown and a former standout for the Lawrenceville School. “We just needed to find our groove. So this week, we really dialed in on the details and focused on executing our game plan. We were also showing each other lots of love and support. I think it showed on the ice today.” No. 12 Princeton battled the Golden Knights all over the ice as the foes skated to a 0-0 stalemate through three periods. Clarkson ended up pulling out a 1-0 win as it scored a power play goal with 2:35 left in overtime. “I think today was one of our best games of the season, we all did our jobs,” said Monihan. “We went the extra mile, whether it was joining the rush, dialing in on breakouts or making clean passes. The entire game we were just supporting one another. What makes this d-corps really special is that we show each other a lot of love, a lot of suppor t and it

translates on the ice.” Monihan feels a lot of love for her classmates. “I am so fortunate to have such a close-knit class, we took a gap year during the COVID time to stay together,” said Monihan of the program’s Class of ’24 which includes Sarah Fillier, Stefanie Wallace, Annie Kuehl, Catherine Kerin, Daniella Calabrese, and Emma Kee. “I just think that makes the bond between our group extra special. We took a year off from school so we could all be together here and finish out our four years. That is just a testament to our relationship with one another, our relationship with the program and Princeton athletics and just what an amazing place it is.” It has been an amazing exper ience for Monihan to serve as a team captain along with Fillier and junior Mia Coene. “Being captain is a wonderful privilege, it is also a lot of responsibility,” said Monihan. “It challenges you but in all of the right ways. Cara (Princeton head coach Cara Morey) was joking but she calls me ‘advo-kate.’ She says you are the people’s captain, you always come up and represent your teammates’ interest. That was my goal as a captain, I want everyone to feel loved. I am going to have an empathydriven leadership. I am going to do everything I can to represent my team and their interests to make sure that we are doing well on and off the ice.” Monihan’s impact off the ice in the Princeton community was recently recognized when she was selected as one of 18 nominees for the Hockey Humanitarian Award, given for outstanding play on the ice and for exceptional volunteerism in the community. “It was a big, big honor, it is something I have always made it a priority to have

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an identity off the ice,” said Monihan. “To me that is giving back to the community and empathy-driven leadership. It was really special to know that those efforts are recognized and valued. I think sometimes as an athlete people tend to hyper focus on your athletic achievements so it is really cool to see that there is value in doing things off the ice and making a difference in your community.” As Princeton wraps up regular season action by playing at Union on February 16 and at RPI on February 17, Monihan will be looking to make a difference for the Tigers. “Every day I am just trying to be where my feet are and be really grateful for the opportunity to be a Princeton women’s ice hockey player and leave it all out on the ice,” said Monihan, who has totaled 28 points in her Tiger career on four goals and 24 assists. “There are only so many games left and so many times for me to wear this jersey. No matter the outcome, I am going to be proud knowing that I gave it my all.” Princeton head coach Morey is proud of her senior group. “They have got a lot of energy, you can see that,” said Morey. “I put three of them (Calabrese, Kerin, and Kee) together as a line and they do a really good job of knowing our systems, bringing energy, knowing where to go being tough defensively. Kate and Stef are anchoring the defense back there as seniors which is awesome. Annie Kuehl has really stepped up in a big way this year, she has become a really strong go-to player and a leader. Sarah Fillier has such an impact in so many ways. in her first couple years, she was definitely the piece to that puzzle that led us to the Ivy League title and then the ECAC title.” In Morey’s view, Monihan

FINAL PUSH: Princeton University women’s hockey player Kate Monihan heads up the ice in a game last season. Senior defender and team captain Monihan has helped spark a stingy Tigers defense the winter. Princeton, which fell 3-1 to St. Lawrence last Saturday to move to 12-10-5 overall and 5-10-5 ECAC Hockey, plays at Union on February 16 and at RPI on February 17. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) has made an indelible impact over her time at Princeton. “Kate is a special person overall, she does everything in her life one way, she gives everything,” said Morey. “Whatever she is doing, she is going to excel. You can tell by the way she plays on the ice, she just leaves it here. She is just like a little engine.” Morey credited her players with leaving it all on the ice against Clarkson. “We were great, we worked on this stuff all week; we implemented some changes in the way we were playing and they bought in this week and understood it,” said Morey, whose team fell 3-1 to St. Lawrence last Saturday to move to 12-10-5 overall and 5-10-5 ECAC Hockey. “They just came with way more energy. This is the team we knew we could be. This is how we have to play if we want to win games. That is the No. 3 team in the country. If we want to play with these big dogs, we have

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Looking ahead to postseason play, Morey believes her squad will be a tough out. “If they completely buy into this way and they play for each other, we are the scariest team to face in the playoffs,” said Morey. Monihan, for her part, is confident that the Tigers will be at their best when it counts the most. “I have no doubt in this group, I have utmost certainty that we are going to come together at the right time,” said Monihan. “We have done it in the past. By the time the end of the season comes around, we get a special energy. This is just the start.” —Bill Alden

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With nine of its senior stars from last season having entered the transfer portal to finish their college careers as graduate students at other schools, the Princeton University men’s lacrosse program is currently stocking such powers as Duke, Syracuse, Johns Hopkins, Georgetown, and Michigan. But while the exodus of such talent leaves a void for Princeton as it heads into the 2024 campaign, the cupboard is hardly bare for the Tigers as they welcome back a mix of battle-tested veterans and a stellar incoming freshman class that has been ranked No. 1 by Inside Lacrosse. Princeton head coach Matt Madalon, who led the Tigers to an 8-7 record last year as they won the Ivy League tournament and fell 13-12 to Penn State in the first round of the NCAA tournament, believes his newcomers can make an immediate impact. “The freshman class is really talented,” said Madalon, whose squad plays at Monmouth on February 17 in its season opener and then hosts Manhattan on February 20. “We have some young attackmen playing. It has got a boatload of midfielders that are stepping in, it has a three-man defensive midfield crew. It has some really impressive poles and a good goalie. It is a really nice complete class.” In its opening scrimmage against Villanova, the Tigers worked through some kinks as they incorporated the new faces. “It was a good learning experience, just to get guys out there and play,” said Madalon, whose team is ranked No. 11 in the Inside Lacrosse Media Poll. “It was a little sloppy from our vantage point from a coaches’ view. This week has been a good week of practice. We are back on the horse, back in the film rooms, just trying to develop our systems. We are not buttoned up yet, we are in the process.” In the wake of the first round exit in the NCA A tournament last spring, the Tigers are focused on getting back there for a third straight season. “I think naturally there is always a hunger,” said Madalon, who guided the Tigers to the NCAA semis in 2022. “Once you taste that for the last couple of years, it becomes the expectation and standard.” The squad’s three senior captains — goalie Michael G i a n for c a r o, at t a c k m a n

Bear Lockshin, and defenseman Pace Billings — have been setting a high standard. “There is no better representations of Princeton lacrosse, all three personalities complement each other very well,” said Madalon. “All three are the truest of competitors. Just chip on your shoulder guys, hungry guys. They bring the intensity, set the tone. They have been doing a nice job for our program.” Junior attacker Coulter Mackesy, who set a program record last year with 55 goals along with 23 assists, has been doing a great job leading the Tiger offense. “Now that he is a junior, he is stepping into that role like offensive coordinator on the field,” said Madalon. “His relationship with coach [Jim ] Mitchell has really grown. His command and maturity around the Xs and Os and his understanding of that continues to get better. His awareness of how to use his skill and his teammates is really impressive to watch. He is a really talented young guy, tough and durable. He is a team-first guy, he doesn’t care who scores.” Two of the prized freshmen, Nate Kabiri and Colin Burns, should be starting on attack. “They are doing a really nice job,” said Madalon. “Kabiri is a really highly touted kid coming out of high school. He is really talented, he is really crafty. He has gotten better every single time he has stepped on the field.” Such battle-tested veterans as junior Braedon Saris (5 goals, 6 assists in 2023), junior Jack Ringhofer (7 goals, 1 assist), and senior Lukas Stanat (10 goals, 10 assists) have been stepping up on attack. “Those are all guys who have played great roles for us as underclassmen, now as they turn into upperclassmen, we are looking for them to lead the way with experience and perspective,” said Madalon. “Those are some guys who have been in some big moments before. They have executed but they also understand what it takes to get there in training and skill development. It is great for the young guys. Stewardship is really important in our program to get the young guys off the block. All of those guys are such experienced veterans, not only systemwise but program philosophy s o t hey have b een great.” In the midfield, junior Sean Cameron (16 goals, 5 assists), senior Tommy

Barnds (8 goals, 7 assists), sophomore Chad Palumbo (2 goals), sophomore John Dunphey (5 goals, 3 assists), sophomore Quinn Krammer, and sophomore Jackson Kane should provide some firepower. “C a m e r o n a n d To m m y Barnds are stepping up as is Jackson Kane,” said Madalon. “Chad Palumbo is stepping into a nice role, he is doing a nice job there as is Quinn Krammer. Those are two sophomores who hope to take a big leap this year.” The freshmen group figures to make a big impact in the midfield. “Tucker Wade along with Brady Upton, Carson Krammer, Jake Todd, and Mark Marino, that is the offensive freshman crew,” said Madalon. “Cooper Mueller, Owen Fischer, and Jackson Green are three really big high-level, multi-sport athletes that will be in the defensive midfield. Fischer and Mueller are high level high school basketball players. Jackson Green is a wide receiver on our football team. That is the hardest position on the field. They are going to continue to learn and get better, that should be great for us.” Sophomore Andrew McMeekin (90-183 on faceoffs last year), senior Tyler Sandoval (48-107), and junior Koby Ginder (61-136) give the Tigers depth at the face-off X. “We will still do a little bit of a rotation this year,” said Madalon. “McMeekin comes in, Tyler returns from an injury, and Koby is a great piece as well.” Senior Billings (17 ground balls and 11 caused turnovers in 2023), junior Colin Mulshine (19 ground balls, 10 caused turnovers), junior Michael Bath (18 ground balls, 14 caused turnovers),and sophomore Cooper Kistler (9 ground balls, 4 caused turnovers) along with freshmen Hunter Spiess and Jack Stahl will anchor the defensive unit for Princeton. “Pace has been the mainstay down there along with Mulshine, they have taken steps forward and can be elite cover guys,” said Madalon, noting that sophomore Zach Friedman and sophomore Nick Crowley are excelling at the longstick midfield spot. “Guys like Cooper Kistler continue to make an incredible impact every day. Spiess and Stahl are two impressive guys who are going to fight for minutes immediately.” In goal, senior Gianforcaro

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024

Boasting Battle-Tested Veterans, Stellar Freshman Crew, Tiger Men’s Lax Primed for Another NCAA Appearance

FINISHING TOUCH: Princeton University men’s lacrosse player Coulter Mackesy heads to goal in a game last year. Junior attacker Mackesy, who set a program record with 55 goals last year, figures to be the go-to finisher again for the Tigers this spring. No. 11 Princeton starts its 2024 campaign by playing at Monmouth on February 17 and then hosting Manhattan on February 20. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) (10.61 goals against average and .577 save percentage in 2023) is looking impressive in the cage. “Michael has been great, obviously he is a leader dow n t here,” said Madalon, whose roster boasts two solid backup goalies in sophomore and former Hun School star Ryan Croddick and freshman Colin Vickrey. ”His intensity and his stature in the cage has been important. He has been great, we think he is one of the best goalies in the country.

We want to do a good job in front of him to protect him. He is a really talented kid.” With Princeton facing a gauntlet of road tests after the opening week of the season with games at Maryland on Februar y 24, at North Carolina in March 1, at Duke on March 3, and at Rutgers on March 10, Madalon believes those contests will steel his squad for the Ivy campaign. “The key to success for us is to continue to grow throughout the year,” said

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doing all those different ship for the Tigers and first Coming Off a 7-9 Season in a Transition Year, byexperiments in the fall and since the 2013 season. trying different mans and dif- PU Sports Princeton plays at Virginia zones. That requires on February 17. PU Women’s Lax Primed to Elevate its Game ferent your players to be open to it Roundup

After transition season in 2023, Jenn Cook is excited to see the improvements in this year’s Princeton University women’s lacrosse team. The Tigers open their season this Saturday at No. 16 Virginia, who improved to 2-0 after a 10-9 win over Stanford on February 11. With Princeton coming off a 7-9 season last spring, the first at the helm for head coach Cook, who took over for the retired Chris Sailer, the program has been building through the fall and preseason practices to turn things around this spring. “We definitely saw in fall ball, and you can definitely see it in practice that our players know what’s expected, they’re not satisfied, they’re hungry,” said Cook. “They really want to make their own mark. We had some really great fall ball learning opportunities and we used them as much as we could to the fullest extent.” Princeton returns a large portion of last year’s contributors. Five of the six players that scored 20 or more goals last year are back led by midfielder Kari Buonanno, who led last year’s team with 48 points on 29 goals and 19 assists. McKenzie Blake and Jami MacDonald were just behind her in points, with Blake leading last year’s Tigers with 39 goals, and both return as well. Grace Tauckus tallied 29 goals last year as a junior and figures to be another key offensive weapon. “We’re one more year experienced,” said Cook. “We return four of our top five scorers. We return all of our midfield, and our defensive unit is another year experienced. The year prior, we had to replace pretty much everybody. So last year, a lot of people were stepping into new roles. I think this year we’re a whole lot more confident, and a whole lot more experienced.” The Tigers spent the fall focusing on ways to execute better as the offensive and

defensive ends. Princeton is hoping its units at either end will be more cohesive this year as well. “After last year’s result, I truly believe it was a growth year for everybody, including the coaching staff,” said Cook. “For us, it was really getting back to using that experience from last spring and helping it propel us into the fall and into this year and really coming together and starting to gel on the offensive and defensive side of the ball.” Princeton took an international trip to Italy in the fall, a unique experience that enabled the team to further bond together. The Tigers are leaning on the experiences shared as they head into this season. “We’ve played a lot and learned a lot since last year,” said Cook. “I think it’s very clear the work that’s required, which is awesome. Our players, leaders, and captains are doing a fantastic job of doing the work that’s required, and they’re really driven and motivated, which is awesome to see. They understand that to get different results we have to be a different type of team and put in a different work ethic and have a different mindset. They’ve been all in on that which has been awesome.” Senior star Buonanno is part of a deep and talented midfield that is the core of the Tigers. The midfield is shored up by the return of Sam DeVito and Sophie Whiteway. Princeton will add in new arrival Colette Quinn to the mix. “She is an incredibly mature first-year who has done a good job studying and picking up both sides of the ball, which is no easy task as a firstyear,” said Cook of Quinn. “We’re really excited about that. I think those newcomers will have a really fantastic impact.” At the attacking end, Meg Morrisroe is a first-year player that will draw some attention. She has a high lacrosse IQ and moves well off-ball to set

GRACE UNDER PRESSURE: Princeton University women’s lacrosse player Grace Tauckus looks to elude some foes in a game last spring. Senior attacker Tauckus, who scored 29 goals in 2023, figures to be a key offensive weapon for the Tigers this season. Princeton plays at No. 16 Virginia (2-0) on February 17 to open its 2024 campaign. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

up scoring options. Princeton also gets back Ellie Mueller, who started the first 10 games last year before a season-ending knee injury. “She’s going to help us on the draw tremendously and on the offensive end,” said Cook. “It doesn’t look like she’s skipped a beat, which is great to see. I’m incredibly happy for her. That’s also really, really exciting for us.” Mueller last year was part of an adjustment to the draw control after a slow start there for the Tigers. Princeton improved as the year went along but still finished 103rd in draw control percentage out of 120 teams in the country. It’s an area that the Tigers figure to be much improved in this season. “We have some new additions in the midfield that take the draw, including Colette and Merrill Watson, who’s also a first-year, along with Lane Calkins and Sophie Whiteway and Ellie Mueller,” said Cook. “We have a pretty good arsenal on the draw and from what I’ve seen from some of our scrimmages, and fall ball contests, we’re looking like we’re in a completely different place which is what we want to see. There’s a better understanding of the communication and where the ball’s going on the circle and reading our opponent. I think it’s really exciting to have a lot of options through the draw that are of course going to have to work through the year and what your opponent does and matching them with one of our players that works well against them, but I think it’s really nice to have those numbers and options on the draw.” Winning more draws will help take some pressure off a defense that also went through a great deal of growth last year. Princeton was 86th in the country last year after allowing 13.69 goals per game. The Tigers graduated defenders Shannon Berry, Shea Smith and Maria Pansini (Pansini is using her fifth year of NCAA eligibility at Florida this year) but standout Sammy Filippi along with Caroline Burnett and Sam Whiting are back at that end, along with second-team All-Ivy League selection Amelia Hughes in goal. “This fall, what I think has been awesome, everywhere all over the field, but particularly on the defensive end I think they’ve been really open to different systems of play,” said Cook. “We really viewed the fall as an opportunity to be in the lab, experimenting with different kinds of defenses that will set our team and unit up for success, give our goalies the shots that they want to see and they really thrive in shot-wise. They made incredible progress.” UVA will be the first team to see what sort of looks the Tigers use on defense. Princeton likes its versatility and ability to counter opposing offenses this year. The versatility along with their growth is something that the Tigers expect will make them stingier at that end. “We have some different things in our back pocket this year with different systems of play and I think they’re looking pretty good,” said Cook. “I think our lax IQ and knowledge of the game has grown

and trying different things. I really credit our upperclassmen in particular with being bought in on that.” Kayla Wood joined Cook’s coaching staff this year and Wood, a North Carolina graduate like Cook, has helped bolster the defensive end. Cook still has longtime PU assistant Kerrin Maurer and former national champion JMU goalie Molly Dougherty on staff as well. They have been in sync in sorting out where the Tigers had gaps last year and how to fix them. “We really understand the pieces that we needed to improve upon as a coaching group in order to set our players up for success this year,” said Cook. “That’s with anything — the more experience you have, the better and better you get. That’s all part of learning. It’s having a growth mindset.” Princeton’s schedule will also help the team grow through this season. The Tigers are playing five non-conference opponents that made the NCAA tournament last year. Princeton will travel to Penn State a week after playing in Charlottesville. They open their home schedule with Rutgers on February 28. Florida, Loyola and Maryland are also on the non-conference schedule. “You’ve got to play the best to be the best,” said Cook. “Opening with UVA, they’re an incredibly talented team, they’re an ACC team. You can expect them to play hard and smar t and really be a fantastic challenge for us. We really look at creating a schedule around the fantastic competition that’s in the Mid-Atlantic out of conference. I think that really helps us as we get into the later part of the year because that’s when everyone is starting to peak, and we want to be peaking as well and having some really phenomenal competitive games under our belt. You don’t want your first pressure-packed, highly ranked game to be in May. You really want to do that earlier and prep your kids earlier.” Princeton is hopeful that its non-conference games will prepare it to return to the top of the Ivy League. The Tigers host Yale, which ousted them from last year’s Ivy Tournament, on March 2 and host defending Ivy champion Penn on April 3. “Every single year within the Ivy League it’s an absolute dogfight,” said Cook. “Basically, the last four teams that made the Ivy tournament were Penn, Yale, Harvard and us. It’s not taking any game for granted. It’s understanding that each and every Ivy League game that we play is going to an extremely competitive one and we need to come in confident and prepped. I think the Ivy League looks great this year. Everyone is elevating their game. That’s what you want to see in your conference year in and year out.” Princeton, too, is looking to elevate its team. After a year of growth with a lot of new roles for players and for coaches, the Tigers return with experience and a strong desire to make a jump this spring in the Ivy and national standings. — Justin Feil

PU Women’s Squash Defeats Penn

Producing a dominant performance, the No. 4 Princeton University women’s squash team topped No. 3 Penn 9-0 last Saturday. Zeina Zein, Liyen Teoh, Emma Trauber, Charlotte Bell, India Stephenson, Molly Chadwick, Sonya Sasson, Katherine Glaser, and Caroline Spahr all earned wins, with the victories from Stephenson, Glaser, and Spahr coming on their Senior Day. The Tigers, now 9-2 overall and 5-1 Ivy, play at Virginia on February 17.

Men’s Hockey Tops St. Lawrence in OT

Adam Robbins came up big as the Princeton University men’s hockey team rallied to edge St. Lawrence 5-4 in overtime last Saturday. Robbins tallied two goals and an assist, including the game-winning score, to help the Tigers improve to 8-13-2 overall and 6-9-1 ECAC Hockey. It was the third OT goal for senior forward Robbins this season. Princeton trailed 4-3 late in the third period before Nick Seitz knotted the game with a goal that came on an assist from Robbins. Princeton hosts RPI on February 16 and Union on February 17.

PU Women’s Water Polo Tops Villanova 18-7

Displaying offensive balance, t he eight h -ranked Princeton University women’s water polo team defeated Villanova 18-7 last Thursday at DeNunzio Pool in its home opener. Kayla Yelensky, Kaila Carroll, Ally Lurie, and Shanna Davidson each scored three goals for Princeton as it improved to 2-2. The Tigers are next in action when they host their annual Princeton Invitational from February 17-18.

Princeton Wrestling Falls to Binghamton

Eligh Rivera, Rocco Camillaci, and Nate Dugan posted wins as the Princeton University wrestling team fell 26-12 to Binghamton last Saturday. Rivera prevailed at 149 pounds with Camillaci winning at 157 and Dugan earning a victory at 184. The Tigers, now 5-5 overall, host Penn and then travel to Lehigh for a pair of duals on Princeton Fencers February 17. Tie for Ivy Titles It was a banner weekend PU Men’s Volleyball for the Princeton University Edged by Sacred Heart Ben Harrington starred in fencing program as both its a losing cause as the No. 10 men’s and women’s team tied Princeton University men’s for first in the Ivy League volleyball team fell 3-2 to Sa- Championships held in New York City. cred Heart last Saturday. It marked the third straight Senior Harrington contributed a match-high 23 kills but Ivy title for the women and it wasn’t enough as the Pio- the fi rst for the men since neers prevailed 22-25, 25-27, 2017. That year was also the last time both Tiger fencing 25-21, 33-31, 15-10. teams won league championPrinceton, now 6-5, hosts ships. Penn State on February 16 B ot h teams share t he and 17. league title three ways, Princeton Men’s Squash with the men finishing at Rallies to Top Penn 3-1 alongside Columbia and Rallying from a 4-1 deficit, Harvard and the women fi nthe No. 3 Princeton Universi- ishing at 5-1 alongside Coty men’s squash team edged lumbia and Penn. No. 2 Penn 5-4 last SaturOn the men’s side, Princday to earn a share of the Ivy eton’s lone loss was to HarLeague title. vard (15-12), whose lone Avi Agarwal posted a win loss was to Columbia (15at No. 6 to start the come- 12), whose lone loss was to back for the Tigers. Gordon the Tigers (15-12). On the Lam then won at No. 9 fol- women’s side, Princeton’s lowed by Ahmad Hussein lone loss was to Penn (14winning at No. 4 and Karim 13), whose lone loss was to Elbarbary prevailing in fi ve Columbia (14-13), whose games at No. 1 to clinch the lone loss was to the Tigers win. the Tigers improved to (16-11). 8-2 overall and 5-1 Ivy lo Princeton will be competshare the title with Penn (12- ing in the Temple Duals on 2 overall, 5-1 Ivy). It marked February 25. the 19th overall champion-

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Jaiden Xu produced a personal breakthrough as the second-seeded Princeton High boys’ swim team edged third-seeded Summit 92-78 in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) North 2 Group B sectional semis last Friday. Racing against his twin brother David in the 200yard individual medley, Xu took first just ahead of his brother, earning his first triumph in the IM sibling rivalry. “I was really happy that I was able to win an event,” said junior standout Xu. “That was the first time I have beat him.” While excited to get the win, Xu saw the 1-2 finish with his brother as the most meaningful aspect of the race. “I got the win but we got 1-2 so that’s the best thing,” said Xu. “We really just wanted that first and second place just to get more points in each event.” The Xu twins have made each other better as they also compete together with the X-Cel swim club. “We push each other, we train at Princeton,” said Xu. “Every day in practice, we try to beat each other.” In the win over Summit, the brothers piled up points for the Tigers as Jaiden took second in the 500 freestyle and David won the 100 butterfly. Those efforts were critical as the meet turned into a nip-and-tuck battle with PHS trailing early and clinging to a 72- 68 lead heading into the final event. “We came into this meet, we know they are strong but we didn’t expect them to have the speed that they had today,” said Xu. “There were some disqualifications that held us back, but I think we pulled back really good. My teammates are really amazing, we did our part today.” In the 500 free, Xu produced a strong performance as he battled Summit star Will Moon stroke for stroke, getting edged by .06. “It was a little rough for me; coming off the 200 IM, I still had some lactic acid,” said Xu. “Will Moon is really fast. I got a good race with a 4:45. Going into next meet, I hope to improve on that.” T he m e e t c a m e dow n to the 400 free relay with the Tigers needing at least a second place finish to

prevail. Swimming the leadoff leg, Xu help the PHS A relay take first as the Tigers pulled out the win and improved to 13-0. The Tigers will now face top-seeded Chatham in the sectional final on February 14 at the Raritan Bay Aquatic Center in Perth Amboy. “I didn’t have the best start,” said Xu. “I put all of my trust into my teammates. They really know how to come back, they really know how to go fast. I am really thankful for them, this year we have a really strong squad.” In reflecting on the team’s strong season, Xu credited an upbeat spirit on the deck as a critical factor. “It is teamwork, we all motivate each other every day,” said Xu. “If someone has a bad race, we never talk down on them. We always say it is one race, you can always improve next time. We try to keep it positive here.” Xu has brought extra motivation into this season. “I have spent more time in the gym and team bonding gave me more confidence in the pool,” said Xu. “Overall, I have been getting my happiness up with the sport.” PHS head coach Carly ( Misiew icz ) Fack ler was happy to see her boys’ squad overcome t he challenge from Summit. “It was super close, down by two, tied, up by two, it was just back and forth, we 100 percent expected that going into it,” said Fackler. “I knew Summit was going to bring it, they are always up there with us. Last year we saw them in the same situation and I knew that they were even stronger this year than they were last year. I think we were just really excited to have a good meet, gearing up for the rest of states.” In Fackler’s view, the Xu twins have played a key role in gearing up the Tigers for the postseason run. “Jaiden is somebody who has really, really impressed me from freshman year but even the amount that he has improved from last year to this year is great,” said Fackler. “They are both so humble too, they both push each other. They are both such great competitors and such great athletes. At the end of the day, for them to go 1-2 is all we ever wanted. We needed those points today and we will need them

they bring out the best in each other and even others that they are swimming and racing with as well. They bring ever ybody up with them.” The Tigers got several good swims against Summit with individual victors including David Brophy in the 200 free, Daniel Guo in the 100 free, and Henry Xu in the 100 breaststroke. “David did two relatively close races time wise and he was able to go a personal best time in the 200 free,” said Fackler. “Zach Guan had a very nice swim in the 100 fly, the fact that we went 1-2, he out-touched by a 100th of a second to get second. T hat was a great race; we had a lot of really good races across the board.” PHS ended the day with some great racing in the 400 free relay as the season hung in the balance. “We needed second, I had all of the confidence in the world in our guys,” said Fackler. “You don’t really let on that, we want them to work for it. We don’t want them to be like we have got this one. It was that statement piece, that icing on the cake at the end, to go 1-3 was amazing.” In Fackler’s view, pulling out the nail-biter was a confidence builder for her squad. “It being our last home meet, you never want to lose at home,” said Fackler. “That adds that extra little incentive and motivating factor.” As the Tigers face nemesis and top-seeded Chatham in the sectional final, Fackler believes her swimmers will be motivated to bring their best to the pool. “They have been on our radar from last year,” said Fackler, whose boys’ squad lost to Chatham in the Public B state final in 2022 and the sectional final last season to suffer their only two losses over the last three seasons. “Every now and then their name pops up nonchalantly and I am like OK, yeah, yeah, cool, let’s focus on right now. That will be Wednesday.” Xu and his teammates are primed for the rematch against Chatham. “We are stoked for it, we are all ready to give them our best,” said Xu. “Hopefully we can pull the upset.” —Bill Alden

OH BROTHER: Princeton High boys’ swimmer Jaiden Xu displays his freestyle form in a meet earlier this season. Last Friday, junior Xu placed first in the 200-yard individual medley, edging twin brother David, and second in the 500 freestyle to help second-seeded PHS top third-seeded Summit 92-78 in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) North 2 Group B sectional semis. The Tigers, now 13-0, face top-seeded Chatham in the sectional final on February 14 at the Raritan Bay Aquatic Center in Perth Amboy. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Sabine Ristad didn’t waste any time getting things rolling for the top-seeded Princeton High girls’ swim team as it hosted fifth-seeded W W/P-South in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Central Jersey Group B sectional semis last Friday. Swimming the backstroke leg to lead off the 200-yard medley relay in the first event of the meet, junior Ristad helped the PHS A quartet take first by nearly three seconds. “It is my favorite; coming right out of warmup, I jump in and I get ready to go,” said Ristad. “It is like alright. it gets me in the right headspace. It is fun to swim for my team.” Ristad had a lot of fun in the meet, going on to place first in both the 500 free and the 100 backstroke as PHS rolled to a 120-50 win over the Pirates. The Tigers, now 12-0, will face secondseeded Manasquan in the sectional final on February 15 at The College of New Jersey. Other individual victors for PHS against W W/P-S included Annie Flanagan in the 200 free, Courtney Weber in the 200 individual medley, Kyleigh Tangen in both the 50 free and 100 free, and Nia Zagar in the 100 breaststroke. Ristad and her teammates were fired up for a big effort as they started their sectional run as they look to defend their Group B state title. “It is where the season really picks up for us, this is so exciting for us,” said Ristad. “We come in and we want to win so bad. Every little thing builds on itself. We win one race and then we want to win the next race more. It just builds and builds and gets more exciting.” In the 500 free, Ristad prevailed in an exciting race that saw PHS go 1-2-3 with Jessie Wang taking second and Rachel McInerney placing third. “I definitely love distance, it is one of my favorite things to swim,” said Ristad, who clocked a winning time of 5:30.40 with Wang coming in at 5:35.62 and McInerney posting a 5:43.52 mark. “I usually swim with Jesse and Rachel, it is so fun to swim with those girls. I love swimming with them. I can’t slack off, I need to be with Jesse. I need to be with Rachel.

We all push each other forward, it was amazing.” As for the 100 back, Ristad was pushed hard by Flanagan, posting a winning time of 1:02.73, just 0.18 ahead of her teammate. “I love back s t roke s o much; whenever I come out of the 500, I have got to get tight back into my headspace, I can’t let myself drift,” said Ristad. “I swim with Annie, she pushes me so hard every time, especially with under water. I come up and Annie is still underwater. I have got to do more.” As a junior, Ristad has been looking to do more for the Tigers. “Having lost so many seniors last year that we really relied on, I knew personally it was time to step up and to improve myself over the summer and the fall to get better for the team,” said Ristad, who also swim for X-Cel club. “I do some open water swimming on the side. I have been training hard with my team, putting in more yards all to build to this. It is the very exciting part of my year.” Ristad has drawn inspiration from this year’s senior group. “We have lovely seniors, I have grown up swimming with a lot of them through age group stuff,” said Ristad. “I train with Courtney Weber on a daily basis. Jesse and I swim with her on a daily basis. I have swum with a lot of them before outside of high school. They are such good leaders, they really push our team in the right direction.” PHS head coach Carly (Misiewicz) Fackler believes her girls’ team has room to grow despite its sparkling 12-0 record. “I still don’t know if we have reached our full potential on the girls’ side which is great,” said Fackler. “I want us to be exactly at that point. I want us to have more to go. I want us to have that next level that we can still find. We don’t want to peak today, we want to peak in a week and a half or two weeks from now.” Fackler believes that Ristad has reached a higher level this winter. “The 500 free is her bread and butter. She does open water, triathlons, and all of that stuff, so she is used to that,” said Fackler. “The pool is nice. It is nice and calm, it is predictable.

You know what you get. In open water, you never know what you are getting. She is somebody who is really stepping up across the board with relays as well.” Two of the squad’s senior stars, Tangen and Weber, stepped up in the win over the Pirates. “Kyleigh is Kyleigh, you saw her dive in that that 200 free relay and she was I am not going to let us lose,” said Fackler. “She is a great competitor, she has that true race mentality. Courtney did have some good swims. Nia beat her in the 100 breast, it is good that they have been pushing each other the entire year. They really bring out the best in each other.” As PHS heads into the sectional final against Manasquan, Fackler knows her team will need to bring its best to prevail. “It is knowing that every level is going to get that much more competitive and that much more tough,” said Fackler, whose squad topped Manasquan in the sectional final last year on the way to the state title. “It is not going to be easy wins, it is not something where we can just coast to wins.” Ristad, for her part, believes the Tigers have what it takes to make a run at another state title. “We know that the stakes are higher and that it is important to really put our foot in the right place for the rest of the season,” said Ristad. “We want to take it meet by meet; push ourselves to this meet, push ourselves to the next meet and see where it takes us because that is what happened with us last year. I don’t think we were expecting to go all the way. We definitely really want it badly. We are all working hard in practice, we are all working hard with each other. I have a good feeling about it.” —Bill Alden

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024

the next round too. To see PHS Boys’ Swim Team Edges Summit in Sectional Semi in Sparked by Another Superb Effort from Ristad, what they are capable of and how they push each other, 12-0 PHS Girls’ Swim Team Makes Sectional Final As Jaiden Xu Gets Breakthrough in Sibling Battle

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GOING THE DISTANCE: Princeton High girls’ swimmer Sabine Ristad heads to victory in a 500yard freestyle race earlier this season. Last Friday, Ristad placed first in both the 500 free and the 100 backstroke to help top-seeded PHS defeat fifth-seeded WW/P-South 120-50 in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Central Jersey Group B sectional semis. The Tigers, now 12-0, will face second-seeded Manasquan in the sectional final on February 15 at The College of New Jersey. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024 • 28

whose team fell 87Bannett Produces Solid Senior Day Performance Kosa, 33 to Trenton Catholic last Monday in the quarterfinal of the Mercer County As PHS Girls’ Basketball Defeats WW/P-North round Tournament to move to 14-

Gabby Bannett has been dealing with a balky shoulder this winter but she wasn’t about to sit out her Senior Day game for the Princeton High girls’ basketball team last week. “I have dislocated it three times so it has been a little tough; actually last game it happened again,” said senior guard/forward Bannett, who has been wearing a brace on her shoulder. “I wasn’t sure if I should play today, but I am really happy that I did.” There were some happy moments before the game against W W/ P-Nor th on February 6 as Bannett was honored along w it h t he team’s other senior, Riley Devlin, with posters and balloons displayed in the gym. “I have been here for four years so these girls are part of my family,” said Bannett. “It is just so amazing to celebrate with them. We were all so excited for this game — it was such a great energy.” The Tigers displayed a lot of energy in the early stages of the contest as they jumped out to a 13-0 lead to start the game. “That was because of how excited we all were,” said Bannett, who got a bucket in that run. “We work so well together as a team.” Clinging to a 34-32 lead entering the fourth quarter, PHS pulled away to a 47-33 triumph. “During halftime, coach (Dave Kosa) talked and we all realized that we need to

win this game, not just for me and Riley but the whole team,” said Bannett. “We really put it together. We really had to focus on our defense, that was how we were going to win the game.” Bannett prides herself on bringing an all-around game to the court for the Tigers. “I don’t get t he mos t points in the games but I like to think that I facilitate,” said Bannett, who scored six points with three rebounds, two steals, and an assist in the win. “I help keep everybody focused on task and together in what we need to get accomplished.” Over the years, Bannett has developed a deep bond with fellow senior Devlin. “Our freshman year we had like seven girls in our grade and over time, girls slowly started going away,” said Bannett. “I think that really strengthens our bond that we did stick with it. It makes our relationship stronger. We know that we are in it to win. We have a great chemistry on the court.” With PHS having put together a 10-game winning streak from January 5 to February 2, Bannett attributed that success to team chemistry. “This is the best record we have had in my four years here, I truly think it is because we are such a closeknit team,” said Bannett. “We do so much team bonding and we are all friends off the court. It really makes a difference. A lot of teams

don’t have that, so I am really grateful that I got to experience this in my senior year.” PHS head coach Dave Kosa is grateful to have two senior stalwarts like Bannett and Devlin. “Both of them have been in it for four years, you couldn’t ask for two better student-athletes,” said Kosa. “They take it seriously in the classroom, they take it seriously out on the court. They are hard workers and their commitment to the program is really, really appreciated. They are great leaders that is why both of them are captains. Both of them are going to be successful down the road.” The Tigers produced a successful finish against the Northern Knights with a 13-1 fourth quarter. “It was a close game until the last quarter — in the last quarter we sort of pulled away,” said Kosa, who got 16 points from Devlin in the win with Anna Winters chipping in 11 and Sephora Romain contributing 10. “We have had stretches like that against other teams where the game is close and one quarter sets us apart. I just told them we had to play defense. They were hot today, we knew they were good shooters.” In Kosa’s view, PHS has raised its game this winter. “This is the best stretch since I have been here, it is just them staying together, playing together, and understanding our roles,” said

8. “There is great team camaraderie and we have got gamers. Anna [Winters] is a gamer, Riley is a gamer. Riley was struggling the last couple of games with her shot. Today she really stepped up and was confident. We have a lot of offensive firepower so that when one is off someone else can pick it up. It is just a matter of making sure that we look for that person and click.” With PHS slated to compete in the upcoming New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSI A A) state tournament, Kosa is hoping his players can click down the stretch. “Tournament time is a great time of year, it is a lot of fun,” said Kosa. “You play an entire season to get to that point. We still have some work to do. When we get to that point, everybody is good. It is who rises up. I am excited for it.” Bannett, for her part, has enjoyed a great ride on and off the court with the Tigers. “This experience is more than basketball knowledge, it is really giving me life lessons that are invaluable,” said Bannett, who is headed to George Washington University where she plans to study business. “Working together as a team, these are things I will use my whole life. A lot of people don’t get this experience this young. I am grateful I can learn these things.” —Bill Alden

GABFEST: Princeton High girls’ basketball player Gabby Bannett puts up a shot in recent action. Last week, Bannett starred on her Senior Day, tallying six points with three rebounds, two steals, and an assist as the Tigers topped WW/P-North 4733 on February 6. On Monday, PHS competed in the Mercer County Tournament where it was seeded sixth and fell 87-33 to third-seeded Trenton Catholic in a quarterfinal contest. PHS, now 14-8, is next in action when it takes part in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) state tournament. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES SundayS

8:00 AM: Holy Communion Rite I 10:30 AM: Holy Communion Rite II 5:00 PM: Choral Evensong or Choral Compline

WedneSdayS

5:30 PM: Holy Communion Rite II followed by Lenten Supper The Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector The Rev. Canon Dr. Kara Slade, Assoc. Rector Wesley Rowell, Lay Pastoral Associate 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 • www.trinityprinceton.org

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Worship Service in the University Chapel Sundays at 11am Rev. Alison Boden, Ph.D. Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel

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Wherever you are in your journey of faith, come worship with us First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ You are welcome to join us for our in-person services, Sunday Church Service and Sunday School at 10:30 am, Wednesday Testimony meetings at 7:30 pm. Audio streaming available, details at csprinceton.org. Visit the Christian Science Reading Room Monday through Saturday, 10 am - 4 pm 178 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ For free local delivery call (609) 924-0919 www.csprinceton.org • (609) 924-5801

Mother of God Joy of All Who Sorrow Orthodox Church 904 Cherry Hill Rd • Princeton, N 08525 (609) 466-3058 Saturday Vespers 5pm • Sunday Divine Liturgy 930am • www.mogoca.org

Kingston Presbyterian Church 2024 Lenten Season Schedule February Lenten Schedule

Ash Wednesday ~ Ashes to Go ~ Pastor Sharyl Dixon 7-8am & 12-1pm outside Kingston Deli, Route 27, Kingston, NJ Ash Wednesday Service ~ Kingston Presbyterian Church ~ February 14 7:00 PM ~ In person or read at home Call KPC for Materials

Lenten Sermon Series “Wandering Heart – Figuring Out Faith with Peter”

Sundays at 11:00 AM & on KPC’s YouTube Channel ~ February 18, 25, March 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31.

LENTEN RETREAT February 24”, 8:30AM -1PM Catching Our Breath in Lent Lunch Provided — Registration Required Email kingstonpresnj@gmail.com Lenten Bible Study, Wednesdays at 7pm on Zoom Call KPC for Information & Zoom Link

300 Years of Service God Community 1723 - 2023 4565 Route 27 to • PO Box& 148 • Kingston, NJ – 08528 609.921.8895 • kingstonpresnj@gmail.com www.kingstonpresbyterian.org • pastorsharyldixon@gmail.com

September-October 2023 Worship & Celebrations

Friendship Sunday, September 17th — 11:00 am


Della Gilligan is just a freshman but she has already proved to be a versatile per for mer for the Princeton Day School girls’ hockey team. “I was originally defense at the beginning of the year and then they switched me to forward,” said Gilligan. “It was a little nerve-wracking; we got through it.” Last Wednesday, Gilligan came through at the offensive end with a pair of goals, including the game-winner i n t he t h ird p er io d, as second-seeded PDS edged third-seeded Immaculate Heart Academy 4-3 in the semifinal round of the Librera Cup. Gilligan got PDS on the board with a goal midway through the first period. “I went hard to the net and was hoping for the best,” said Gilligan. “I just smashed it in.” The Panthers jumped out to a 2-0 lead in the second period on a goal by another freshman, Sammy Dandy, but Immaculate Heart responded with t wo unanswered goals to make it a 2-2 game heading into the third period. “They did score two quick ones on us but we just went back into the locker room and regrouped,” said Gilligan. “We came out strong again.” The Panthers forged ahead 3-2 on a goal by senior star Logan Harrison and then Gilligan struck again, poking in a shot in the middle of a scramble in the crease with 5:21 left in regulation. “Logan gave us some momentum,” said Gilligan. “I don’t really remember what happened on my goal, I just went hard to the net.”

Having split two previous meetings with Immaculate, topping the Blue Eagles 4-2 on January 24 before losing to them 4-2 on January 29, PDS realized it would take a hard effort to win the rubber match. “Going into the game, we knew we had to be on our A-game to beat them,” said Gilligan. “We were hyped from the morning.” PDS assistant coach Jade Meier acknowledged that the Panthers had to pick up their game to come through last Wednesday. “The last game was a little bit tougher for sure,” said Meier. “It was just about working hard and staying aggressive the whole game. I think in the last game we gave up two shorthanded goals.” Meier credited Gilligan with fighting hard to get her first goal. “That was a really gritty goal, those are the type of goals we have been trying to get more often; I think a lot of times we go for the super stylish shot,” said Meier. “Della has been a great addition along with Sammy and the other freshmen. She has been floating between forward and defense, she has the skill set for both. We use her in the ways we need to.” T he Pant hers showed their grit collectively in the third period as they built a 4-2 lead and then held off Immaculate Heart after it scored with 1:49 left in the third period and then pulled its goalie to get an extra attacker. “It was just to keep playing hard, we were definitely a little nervous,” said Meier. “I think going into the locker

to be a battle. That was what we told the girls and they came out strong in the third.” With PDS, now 10-5, facing top-seeded MorristownBeard in the Librera final on February 14 at Twin Oaks Ice R ink in Mor r istow n, Meier believes the Panthers can build on the win over the Blue Eagles. “We are on the playoff run, we are focusing on the next game,” said Meier, whose squad will also be competing in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) tournament later this month. “It is a great way to build momentum, especially coming into states. I think the things we have been doing throughout the season have really brought us to today. It is great to see their hard work paying off.” Gilligan is confident that PDS will keep focused down the stretch. “We have just got to keep the energy up, today the energy was going all day,” said Gilligan. “I also feel like we had some good communication on the ice which helped its figure out where other people were.” —Bill Alden

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FRESH APPROACH: Princeton Day School girls’ hockey player Hark Sandhu controls the puck in a game early this season. Freshman Sandhu helped second-seeded PDS defeat third-seeded Immaculate Heart Academy 4-3 last Wednesday in the semifinal round of the Librera Cup. The Panthers, who improved to 10-5 with the win, were slated to face top-seeded MorristownBeard in the Librera final on February 14. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

With point guard and leading scorer Gabby D’Agostino sidelined by appendicitis, it was next player up for the Hun School girls’ basketball team as it hosted Pennington last Wednesday in a MAPL Tournament Play-In game. “We had to step up for Gabby and play for Gabby,” said Hun sophomore guard Sam Jolly. “She put her heart out for this team and we wanted to make sure that we gave it back.” Jolly knew she had to step up in terms of ball-handling duties. “I had to move up more to point guard,” said Jolly. “We all shared the court. We all shared our roles and knew that we had each other on the court, so that was good.” The Raiders got off to a very good start as they jumped out to a 12-4 lead, draining four 3-pointers in the process. “Our game plan was to shoot as many as we can so that was whenever we could, take the open shot,” said Jolly, who made two 3-pointers in that stretch. “It worked in our favor in the beginning, putting up as many shots as we can and work for rebounds.” Things didn’t work out in Hun’s favor as the game unfolded with Pennington building a 41-30 halftime lead and pulling away to a 86-57 win. Despite falling behind, the Raiders kept battling, pushing the tempo and firing up 3-pointers to the end. “We didn’t want to give up,” said Jolly, who ended up with nine points against the Red Hawks. “Win or lose, we wanted to stay as fast as we can, pushing it up the court and everything. We played for each other to the end, we played for Gabby. She gave her heart out for this team. We wanted to make sure that we gave back as best we could.” After having played on the junior variety for much of last winter before a late promotion to the varsity, Jolly has stepped into a key role this year for Hun. “I h ad m e e t i n g s w it h coach (Sean Costello) and I understood my role this year,” said Jolly. “I think the biggest thing was understanding my role and how I can play, just pushing myself as much as I can. My main sport is softball so I just play this for fun. I give it my all as much as I can. I won’t let this team down.” Jolly, a star second basem a n a n d l e ad of f h it te r for the Hun softball team, makes time during the winter to hone her skills on the diamond. “It is fun, I like it,” said Jolly. “It is a lot of work, I manage. I play basketball for fun but it is the best conditioning, it keeps me active in the offseason. We are always in the weight room so it is getting stronger. I practice softball every weekend and twice a week so I keep the balance of everything.” Hun head coach S ean Costello credited his players with giving a strong effort in the absence of D’Agostino. “We did great, we had about two days to implement a different system of play,” said Costello. “We

gave energy. We are going to be trying to turn teams over a lot so we are going to expend a lot of energy. I told them that at halftime that we had 18 minutes of practice that we haven’t been able to have doing that system. I think we will continue to get better at it and hopefully we will be ready for the next one.” Jolly gave the Raiders plenty of energy against Pennington. “Sam stepped up at the end of last year; she ended up starting in the last game that we played against Gill St Bernard and she played really well so she is totally capable,” said Costello. “Obviously Gabby is a true point guard. Sam and Anna [Schweer] did a great job trying to fit in her shoes a little bit.” H u n for w a r d s C e e Jay Thomas and Amira Pinkett also did a good job against the Red Hawks, scoring 15 and 13 points, respectively. “We played one way for a long time and they are very familiar w ith that,” said Costello. “Both are talented

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024

t here were some and more than capable With Freshman Gilligan Coming Up Big, room, Sophomore Guard Jolly Steps Up for Hun Girls’ Hoops, kids faces that were down. We of doing that consistently, so PDS Girls’ Hockey Makes Librera Cup Final knew that this was going Taking Bigger Role as Raiders Start Postseason Action that is the goal.”

With Hun having topped Hamilton West 58 -35 in the first round of the Mercer County Invitational last Monday and set to face Lawrenceville in the Prep A semifinals, Costello is looking for his squad to keep playing hard. “The focus is to get better at what we are trying to do now and turn it over less,” said Costello, whose team, now 10-10, will get a rematch with Pennington as it hosts the Red Hawks in the MCI semis on February 14. “We are trying to turn teams over and trying to get some early shots off. We had our moments when it worked and we had our moments when it didn’t work so we will just have to get a little better at it.” Jolly, for her part, believes Hun can produce some highlight moments as it wraps up postseason play. “It is, ‘keep going.’ We still have two more tournaments, so it is ‘keep pushing as hard as we can,’” said Jolly. “We will forget about this, tomorrow is a new day.” —Bill Alden

JOLLY GOOD: Hun School girls’ basketball player Sam Jolly, right, looks to unload the ball in recent action. Last Monday, second-seeded Hun defeated seventh-seeded Hamilton West 58-35 in the first round of the Mercer County Invitational. The Raiders, now 10-10, will host third-seeded Pennington in the MCI semis on February 14. In addition, Hun will be competing in the Prep A state tournament where it is seeded second and will host third-seeded Lawrenceville in the semis on a date to be determined. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) BOB

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Hun Boys’ Basketball: Sam Wright starred in a los ing cause as Hun fell 6258 to Pennington in the Mid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL) Tournament Play-In game last Thursday. Wright scored 22 points for the Raiders, who moved to 8-13 with the setback. Hun will now compete in the Prep A state tournament where it is seeded fifth and will play at fourth-seeded Peddie on February 15 in a quarterfinal contest. Boys’ Hockey: Jake Beck scored three goals but it wasn’t enough as Hun lost 6-5 to St. Joseph’s Prep (Pa.) last Friday. The Raiders, now 4-10, host St. John Vianney on February 14.

Lawrenceville Boys’ Basketball: Running into a buzz saw, Lawrenceville fell 88-59 to Blair Academy in the Mid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL) Tournament Play-In game last Thursday. The Big Red, who dropped to 2-13 with the defeat, will now compete in the Prep A state tournament where they are seeded sixth and will play at third-seeded Pennington in a quarterfinal contest on February 15. In addition, Lawrenceville is scheduled to host Steinert on February 14.

Girls’ Basketball: Anna O’Keefe led the way as fifthseeded Lawrenceville defeated fourth-seeded Trenton Central 66-35 last Monday in the first round of the Mercer County Invitational. O’Keefe scored 24 points to help the Red Hawks improve to 4-16. Lawrenceville will now host eighth-seeded Allentown in the MCI semis on February 14. In addition, Lawrenceville is slated to play at Northfield Mount Hermon School (Mass.) on February 17.

PDS

defeated seventh-seeded Hightstown 67-53 last Monday in the first round of the Mercer County Tournament. Snead tallied 24 points as the Red Hawks improved to 16-8. Pennington will now host third-seeded Nottingham in the MCT semis on February 14 with the victor advancing to the final on February 17 at WW/PNorth. The Red Hawks will also be competing in the Prep A state tournament where they are seeded third and will host Lawrenceville in a quarterfinal contest on February 15. Girls’ Basketball: Izzy Augustine came up big to help third-seeded Pennington defe at s i x t h - s ee de d WW/P-South 58-15 in the first round of the Mercer Cou nt y Inv itat ional last Monday. Augustine poured in 30 points as the Red Hawks improved to 11-10. Pennington will now play at second-seeded Hun in the MCI semis on February 14. In addition, the Red Hawks will be playing at Newark Academy in the Prep B state final on February 16.

Boys’ Basketball: Getting outscored 36-20 in the second half, 12th-seeded PDS fell 55-43 to 13th-seeded WW/P-South in the first round of the Mercer County Invitational last Monday. The Panthers, who dropped to 7-14 with the defeat, will next be in action when they compete in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Non-Public tournament, which is slated to start on February 23. Girls’ Basketball: A late rally fell short as PDS lost 4031 to Allentown last Friday. The Panthers outscored the Boys’ Hockey: Unable Redbirds 11-5 in the fourth quarter as they moved to to get its offense going, 3-14. PDS plays at Peddie fifth-seeded PHS fell 3-0 to fourth-seeded Notre Dame on February 15. in the in the Mercer County Tournament quarterfinals. Goalie Noah Vitulli made 35 saves in a losing cause as the Tigers moved to 5-12. PHS returns to action when it competes in the New JerB o y s ’ B a s k e t b a l l : sey State Interscholastic Sparked by Dwayne Snead, Athletic Association (NJsecond-seeded Pennington SIAA) state tournament.

PHS

Pennington

G irls’ Hockey : Cassie Speir starred as four thseeded PHS defeated fifthseeded Newark East Side 6-3 in the quarterfinals of the Annis Cup last Wednesday. Speir tallied four goals in the win for the Tigers. PHS went on to fall 11-1 to top-seeded Madison in the Annis Cup semis last Saturday as it moved to 2-10. Wrestling: Blase Mele and Kwabena Afrifah each posted three wins as PHS went 0-3 in a quad last Saturday, falling 55-18 to Holmdel, 3433 to Manalapan, and 39-30 to Long Branch. Mele went 3-0 at 138 pounds while Afrifah went 3-0 at 285 as the Tigers moved to 11-13 in duals. PHS wrestlers will now be competing individually in New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) District competition starting on February 17 at Middletown South.

Stuart Basketball: Taylor States and Myah Chennault each produced double-doubles as Stuart defeated Central Jersey College Charter 74-21 last Thursday. States tallied 28 points with 11 rebounds while Chennault contributed 13 points and 10 rebounds as the Tartans improved to 4-7. Stuart was slated to host Nottingham on February 13 to wrap up the season.

Local Sports Dillon Youth Hoops Recent Results

In action last weekend in the Boys’ 3rd/4th grade division of the Dillon Youth Basketball League, Milk & Cookies defeated Princeton

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Air 26-21. Zachary Johnson scored 12 points in the win while Leo Cronan tallied eight points in the loss. Tortuga’s Mexican Village posted a 32-21 win over Sportworld. Christopher Pepek led the way for Tortugas as he tallied 10 points. Nazir Rollins had eight points for Sportworld. Branning Collision Centers topped Princeton Supply 2510 as Evan Boyle scored 10 points in the victory. In the Boys’ 5th/6th grade division, Lependorf & Silverstein, P.C. defeated Locomotion 28-24 as Theo Henderson poured in 19 points to spark the victors. Theodore Hogshire contributed 15 points for Locomotion. Majeski Foundation defeated Jefferson Plumbing 40-34 as Nathan Stock scored 22 points. Alex Spies had 17 points for Jefferson in defeat. Ivy Rehab topped PBA #130 31-23. Malcolm Harris scored 18 points for Ivy Rehab while Hugh Kelly had 12 points for PBA. Alex Burger erupted for 20 points as Pizza Den won 35-22 over Mason Griffin & Pierson. Charles Crotty had five points for Mason Griffin. In the Boys’ 7th/8th grade Division, the Knicks defeated the Sixers 41-36. Quinton deFaria and Ai’Bree Green tallied 14 points apiece for the Knicks while Joe Vales scored 14 points for the Sixers. The Celtics edged the Nets 30-26. Asa Collins tallied 13 points in the win for the Celtics and Eli Salganik had 15 points for the Nets. As for the Girls’ 3rd/5th grade division, the Sun defeated Mystics 19-16 as Layla Bak scored eight points to lead the way. Caroline Win and Jaya Verma each had six points for the Mystics. Elizabeth Howes scored eight points to help the Sparks top the Liberty 2113. Lila Kaufman tallied seven points in a losing cause. In the Girls’ 6th-8th grade division, Carmela Crepezzi

scored 14 points as Homestead posted a 18-12 victory over Princeton Restorative Dental. Eme Moorhead scored 10 points in the loss for Princeton Restorative. Princeton Pettoranello Foundation edged Delizioso Bakery + Kitchen 21-18 in overtime. Madeleine Pepek scored 10 points for the victors while Claire McLeod, Isabella Gustus, and Romy Heuck each had four points in a balanced attack for Delizioso.

Princeton 5K Race Slated for March 16

The Princeton 5K is returning on March 16 for its 15th year. The event annually brings together athletes — young and old, big and small, fast and not so fast — to run or walk while supporting the Princeton High cross country and track programs. The in-person race starts in front of the Princeton Middle School at 217 Walnut Lane at 8:30 a.m. In addition to the 5K, there is a 300-meter kids dash for children under 10. To register and get more information on the event, log onto runsignup.com /Race/ NJ/Princeton/PrincetonNJ5K. T-shirts are guaranteed for those who register by February 25. Registration is also available in person on race day. The Princeton 5K is the largest annual fundraiser for the Princeton High School Cross Country Track and Field Booster (PHSCCTF) a 501(c)(3). All donations directly support the PHS boys’ and girls’ cross country and track teams.

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GOING WILD: Princeton High boys’ basketball player Jihad Wilder puts up a shot in recent action. Last Monday, senior forward Wilder scored eight points as eighth-seeded PHS fell 60-44 to top-seeded Hopewell Valley in the Mercer County Tournament quarterfinals. The Tigers, now 11-11, will next be in action when they compete in the upcoming New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) state tournament. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


Judith Curtis Adler Judith Cur tis Adler of P r i n c e ton, N e w J e r s e y, died at home on February 4, 2024 after a long battle with cancer. She was 84 years old. Judy grew up in Madison, NJ, the daughter of Harold Curtis, an engineer at Bell L abs, and Edit h Cur tis, a homemaker and teacher. She g raduated f rom Radcliffe College in 1961 with a BA in English Literature. After working briefly in Manhattan as an editor at Doubleday Publishing, Judy moved to Princeton with her then-husband Stephen Adler, and raised three children. In 1996, she met George Sprenger, her longtime partner, while square dancing. He was the love of her life. O ve r t h e ye a r s, J u d y worked as an editor, librarian, development officer, personal organizer, and (her favorite job) salesperson at Kitchen Kapers. She also volunteered for Community Without Walls and the Princeton Music Festival. However, she took greatest pride in her role as homemaker and mother of her three children. She was a joy to talk to, made everyday rituals festive, and brought playfulness and love to everything she did. Books, ideas, music, and beauty were central to Judy’s life. A passionate reader, Judy visited the Princeton Public Library weekly, at times even daily. She loved unique and beautiful things — be it Schubert’s Lieder or an exuberantly squeezable stuffed pig — and filled her home with books and objects that expressed herself, creating a Judy-like world in which loved ones felt embraced and protected. With her wide-ranging interests and insatiable curiosity, Judy delighted friends and family with her insights, quick wit, and openness to life. Judy spent almost every summer of her life in Drakes Isla nd, Ma i ne, clos e to where her father was born. She measured the ocean temperature each morning, swam daily in the icy water, and loved floating in the Little River and taking long walks on the beach. Following her wishes, her ashes will be scattered in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Maine.

John “Jay” Entwistle

million students. Jay served as Trustee of the Cotuit Library where the family maintains a summer residence. Jay also volunteered with the Catholic Medical Board aiding them in the acquisition and distribution of free medicines to Missionar y hospitals. An active equestrian, Jay organized a group of mounted volunteers to assist in maintaining the safety and security of NYC Parks. In 1995, with Parks Commissioner Henry Stern’s approval, the NYC Parks Auxiliary Mounted Patrol was founded and, to this day, patrols Central, Van Cortland, and Clove Lake Parks. Jay was the product of 16 years of Catholic education, graduating from St. Joseph’s University (Philadelphia) in 1954. Jay felt most strongly that it was those years that gave him the principles that forever guided his life. He also attended the Advanced Management Program at Harvard Business School. Jay enjoyed pursuing his athletic and many intellectual interests. An avid tennis player and downhill skier, he participated well into his late 80s. A lifetime reader, he was passionate about literature. Jay enjoyed memberships in the Wianno Club and Beach Club (Cape Cod), Hillsboro Club (Florida) and the Union Club and Harvard Club of NYC. Jay was a true Gentleman, a selfless person who always thought of others before himself. He had an abundance of wit and quiet charm. Though he will be sorely missed, his love and sense of decency will never be forgotten. A Memorial Mass at St. Ignatius Loyola Church, NYC, will be held on Saturday, April 6, 2024 at 11 a.m. Interment on Cape Cod will take place this summer. Gifts in Jay Entwistle’s honor can be made to Dancing Classrooms, Attention: Development, 1350 Avenue of Americas, Second Floor, New York, NY 10019 or online at dancingclassrooms.org.

Joh n “Jay” E nt w is t le, of Manhattan and Cotuit, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, April 15, 1932– February 4, 2024. Jay was born in Trenton, New Jersey, to John T. and Margaret C. Entwistle. He leaves his most beloved wife of 61 years Jean (Lyons) and sons John J. Jr. of San Francisco and Daniel J. of New York City. Jay was a Veteran of the United States Air Force, on active duty from 1954 to 1957, honorably dis charged with the rank of Captain. Following military service, Jay joined Johnson & Johnson where he served in senior management positions for 33 years. Upon retirement from Johnson & Johnson, Jay joined his wife’s shared work-space company as a principal. In 2000, Daniel J. Entwistle took over the business and Jay continued to serve as Secretar y and Treasurer for the next 16 years. The Company’s success was very much attributable to Jay’s competency. After 59 years, Jay retired from commercial activities but never stopped working for others. Jay lived a life of loyalty and service and was active in many charitable organizations. Among them, Campaign Chair and subsequently President of United Way of Princeton, NJ. He served as Board Chair of Rebecca Kelly Dance Company and then for over 25 years a Board Member, Treasurer, Karla Alexandra and Vice-Chair of Dancing Ratliff-Britt Classrooms, an organization Karla was born in Quilthat brings formal dance instruction into NYC public pué, Chile, on October 22, schools, teaching over a half 1985, as Javiera Alejandra Hidalgo Coronado. She was brought to her home on Bertrand Drive in Princeton, New Jersey, by her parents, Henry and Heide Ratliff, at 5 weeks of age. She was joyANTIQUES & USED FURNITURE fully greeted by her brothers, Daniel and Thomas. From the beginning, Karla’s Antiques • Jewelry • Watches • Guitars immense care and love radiated to all around her, buildCameras • Books • Coins • Artwork ing the ever-growing circle Diamonds • Furniture • Unique Items of happiness in her life and to those who knew her. Over 30 Years Experience Daniel Downs, Owner

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Karla attended the Waldorf School of Princeton f rom preschool t hrough eighth grade. She flourished in Princeton High School where her gifts of caring and unconditional k indness (and beautiful voice) allowed her to nav igate through the different elements of the school, from the PHS Choir to the many different social groups (including the football team). Many of her student friendships and connections followed her throughout her life. In high school, she met the love of her life and future husband Michael Britt. Karla graduated high school in June 2004, and because of her many connections with peers and faculty was presented with “the Golden Key Award” (an award for meritorious service based solely upon demonstrated service, positive character and leadership). Karla continued her education at Wesley College in Dover, Delaware, where she graduated in 2008 with a Bachelor in Nursing Science degree. After graduation, she started her career at Princeton Medical Center, which she continued throughout her life. She started as an inpatient nurse at Princeton House Behavioral Health. Her natural capacity in working not only with patients, but also with staff, advanced her to the position of Nursing Coordinator of Outpatient Services at Princeton House. Karla’s determination in her work with infection control during the COVID pandemic brought her commendations for excellence. Many of Karla’s favorite memories are of the summers she spent with her family and friends in Aquinnah on Martha’s Vineyard. She loved socializing, swimming, diving, and working at the Aquinnah Shop. While on the Vineyard she developed many friendships with members of the Wampanoag community. Later in life, Karla connected with her biological family members in Santiago, Chile. She developed a close and loving relationship with her biological sister, Priscila Prezmita Coronado. The greatest treasure in Karla’s life was the family she created with her high school sweetheart Michael Britt. Karla and Mike were married May 22, 2010, and were joined by their son Henry Eugene on December 10, 2015. The love and harmony of their marriage was exemplary. Both Karla and Mike were active and loving parents in raising their beloved Henry. Karla was unexpectedly taken on January 29, 2024. She is survived by her husband Michael Everett Britt, her son Henry, her parents Henry and Heide Ratliff, and the families of her brother Daniel and his wife Hattie, as well as her brother Thomas and his wife Elizabeth. Michael’s family including his mother Susan and the families of his brother Jon and his wife Julia, as well as his sister Naomi and her husband Trenell, mourn her passing. Karla leaves behind 10 nieces and nephews between the Ratliff and Britt families. Karla’s viewing was held on Friday February 2, 2024 at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer

Avenue, Pr inceton, New Jersey, 08542. Her funeral was held on Saturday February 3, 2024 at All Saints’ Church, 16 All Saints’ Road, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. An Educational Fund will be established for her 8-year-old son Henry. Donations can be made to https:// gofund.me/0bd7e093.

Dorothy K. Moore Dorothy K. “Dot” Moore, born in 1925 on March 19, St. Joseph’s Day as she liked to say, passed away peacefully in her home, surrounded with love on the morning of February 6, 2024 at the age of 98. Born and raised in Chicago, Illinois, daughter of Theodore and Anna Stone, she was the oldest of four children. Her childhood was marred by scarlet fever and measles that left her blind in one eye for life and interrupted her schooling for months at a time. But she overcame these early challenges to live a life full to the brim with energy, curiosity, vigor, intelligence, generosity, and a practical but positive attitude. She met her beloved husband James (Jim) Moore on a blind date in 1948 and they were married a year later on her parents’ 25th wedding anniversary. Their marriage was a union of deep affection and remained so until Jim died from Alzheimer’s disease in 2000. They had a son Michael in 1950, adopted another son, Kevin, in 1953, and 10 years after that were happily surprised with the birth of a daughter, Kathleen. Dot was an exemplary wife, mother, aunt, and grandmother who, in addition to her own children, also raised her niece Susan for two years, parented two daughters of a friend who died from cancer, provided day care for two Down syndrome children, and later in life in Alabama raised her grandson Brian for three years. Dorothy seems to have had only one lifelong regret — not finishing college. She had loved the courses she took in her 20s, excelling at math, but circumstances and patterns of culture at that time kept her from completing the degree. However, she remained sharp with numbers and even became the treasurer for St. Vincent de Paul Society in Princeton at age 91! In the intervening years her work outside the home included her role as executive secretary to Sears & Roebuck’s top buyer for nursery stock for the entire country and teaching a combined 3rd /4th grade at a Catholic school for a couple years. From 1971 until retiring 23 years later at age 69 she was a teachers’ aide in Huntsville, Alabama — doing all sorts of clerical work and much more for Weatherly Elementary School’s teachers and staff including substitute teaching. Beyond that she was ever busy with volunteer activities for a diverse range of organizations including the

Foundation for International Cooperation through which she traveled the world and fostered cross-cultural understanding, CASA, the Opera Company of Huntsville, and her Catholic churches in Chicago, Huntsville, and then Skillman, NJ, where she was a Eucharistic minister and religious education teacher. She enthusiastically participated in the Grandpals program at her grandson Becket’s Littlebrook Elementary School and served on several committees at Stonebridge, her NJ retirement community. Her hobbies beyond her volunteer activities include camping, gardening — freezing and canning the vegetables, card games — from bridge and canasta to rummy and solitaire, reading, using her computer, making greeting cards, remembering everyone’s birthday, celebrating family, hosting parties, sewing, singing, being with children, appreciating nature, politics, and investing in the stock market. Daisies were her favorite flower. Though hampered by arthritis and other aches and pains, she was still very active, engaged, and independent until her mid-90s — attending daily mass, counting her steps, drinking a glass of red wine daily, driving her car (not just to buy her wine at Trader Joes!), beating the family in games of cards, traveling, organizing many committees, living her faith, and looking for the best in all around her. She truly saw herself as being a “lucky camper.” Her family is very grateful for the vibrant, supportive Stonebridge community. They, the residents and staff who embraced her, made it a warm, safe, and joyful home for two decades. The family would also like to acknowledge the parish of St. Charles Borromeo and the St. Vincent de Paul Society where faith, friendship and service enriched her life, as well as the excellent care of Dr. Shanahan, and the beautiful aides of Zenith Home Care who treated her tenderly in her last chapter. She is survived by her sister Mary Lippa, son Kevin, daughter Kathleen ( Peter Tovar), grandsons Andy and Brian Moore and Becket Tovar, along with many other deeply loved godchildren, cousins, and friends. A mass of Christian burial will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, February, 24 at St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church in Skillman, NJ. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in her honor to the Alzheimer’s Association (alz. org), The Seva Foundation, a global eye care organization (seva.org), or a charity of your choice. She will be greatly missed.

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024

Obituaries

She is sur vived by her partner George Sprenger; her children Jessica Adler Kuznick, Victoria Adler, and Anthony Adler; her grandchildren Amelia Kuznick, Isabel Kuznick, Tessa Kleinmuntz, and Julian Kleinmuntz; her sister Jean Flanders; and her ex-husband Stephen Adler. In lieu of flowers, donations in the memory of Judy Adler can be made to the Princeton Public Library. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, February 17, 11 a.m., at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, in Princeton, NJ.

Rider

Furniture “Where quality still matters.”

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024 • 32

TOWN TOPICS

CLASSIFIEDS

To place a classified ad, please call:

Deadline: Noon, Tuesday

tel: (609) 924-2200 x10 • fax: (609) 924-8818 • e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience • Fully Insured • Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only): (609) 356-9201 Office: (609) 216-7936 Princeton References • Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 tf

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 tf

STORAGE UNIT FOR RENT 10 minutes north of Princeton in Skillman/Montgomery. 10x21, $200 discounted monthly rent. Available now. https://princetonstorage.homestead. com or call/text (609) 333-6932. 03-13 HOME HEALTH AIDE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified and experienced. Live-in or live-out. Driver’s license. References available. Please call Cindy, (609) 227-9873. 02-28

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Licensed and insured Residential and commercial Carpet cleaning and upholestry Pressure and soft washing • Area rugs Strip and wax floors • Sanitizing Water damage • Grout cleaning 01-17-25 THE MAID PROFESSIONALS: Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Residential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404. 05-29

February 6, 2024

Public Notice Take notice that Hopewell Valley Vineyards has applied to the Director of the Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control for a Winery Outlet license for the premises situated at Tino’s Artisan Pizza, 4428 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ, 08528. Objections, if any, should be made immediately in writing to the Director of the Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control, P.O. Box 087, Trenton, NJ 08625-0087. Hopewell Valley Vineyards 46 Yard Rd. Pennington, NJ 08534

CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Wednesday morning delivery. If interested, please call 609.924.2200 x 30 or email melissa.bilyeu@towntopics.com

An Equal Opportunity Employer 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528

Seeking nice apartment walking distance to town. Ideal tenant: mature, great finances, no pets. Using Zillow & RE agents but no luck, so trying word of mouth. Please phone (240) 330-7343. 02-28 HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-11-24 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-24

MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf

LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience • Fully Insured • Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only): (609) 356-9201 Office: (609) 216-7936 Princeton References • Green Company HIC #13VH07549500

PostͲSuper Bowl Surge: with Beatrice Bloom Spring Selling Season Kicks Off in Real Estate Market

As the confetti settles from the Super Bowl festivities, a different kind of excitement emerges in the real estate market. Like clockwork, the postͲSuper Bowl period often sees a surge in homeowners eager to list their properties in anticipation of the spring selling season. This year is no exception, as I've observed a notable uptick in inquiries and calls from homeowners looking to capitalize on the momentum.

The timing makes sense. With the Super Bowl marking the unofficial start of the spring season, homeowners are primed to take advantage of increased buyer activity and favorable market conditions. Whether motivated by a desire to upgrade, downsize, or relocate, sellers understand the strategic importance of entering the market at this opportune moment.

If you've been contemplating selling your home, now is the time to act. Don't miss out on the heightened interest and competitive offers. Reach out to your trusted real estate professional to discuss your options and position yourself for success in this dynamic market.

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECOͲBroker Princeton Office 609Ͳ921Ͳ1900 | 609Ͳ577Ͳ2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

tf


8 PRINCETON AVE PRINCETON

!

Set in one of Princeton's most prestigious neighborhoods, within a short walk to town, the University and other cultural venues, this classic Federalist home embodies the community's history of sophistication. A grand, inviting Set in onewith of Princeton's prestigious hallway a fireplacemost opens to the spacious neighborhoods, within arooms short walk to town,for the the most living dining suitable et inUniversity one and of Princeton's most prestigious and other cultural venues, this classic elegant entertaining. Builtwalk in a period of skilled eighborhoods, within a short to town, the Federalist home embodies the community's craftsmanship, these well-proportioned rooms history of other sophistication. A venues, grand, inviting University and cultural this classic have high deeptomoldings hallway with a ceilings, fireplace opens the spaciousand other ederalist home embodies the the community's living and dining suitable most sought after rooms details. Firstforfloor rooms flow entertaining. Built in aA period of skilledinviting istoryelegant of sophistication. grand, seamlessly into one another and onto a large craftsmanship, these well-proportioned rooms allway with aceilings, fireplace opens toand the spacious porch, warm weather entertaining. have highfacilitating deep moldings other This dining important home has a circular ving and rooms for flow thedriveway most sought after details. Firstsuitable floor rooms seamlessly into one and large and is located onanother almost an acrea of land with a legant entertaining. Built in a onto period of skilled porch, facilitating warm weather entertaining. three car garage and is waiting for a new owner raftsmanship, these This important homewell-proportioned has a circular driveway rooms to make it their own. and is located on almost an acre of land with a

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ave high ceilings, deep moldings and other three car garage and is waiting for a new owner oughtto make afterit their details. First floor rooms flow own. Offered at $2,450,000 eamlessly into one another and onto a large at1073 $2,450,000 PRINCETON KINGSTON ROAD orch, Offered facilitating warm weather entertaining. his important home PRINCETON has a circular driveway nd is located on almost an acre MARKETED BYof land with a MARKETED hree car garageMARKETED and is waiting for aBY: new owner BY Judith Stier Judith Stier Robin Wallack o make it their own. Sales Associate Broker Associate Sales Associate Cell: 609.462.2340 Direct 609.240.1232 Direct Line: Line: 609.240.1232 Offered at $2,450,000 robin.wallack@foxroach.com com 253 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540

71 WOODMONT DRIVE LAWRENCEVILLE

137 BEDENS BROOK ROAD SKILLMAN

www.robinwallack.com

Listed by Robin Wallack • Broker Associate • Cell: 609-462-2340 • robin

foxroach.com

253 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024

THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR EXPERIENCE!

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024 • 34

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Amanda works diligently to ing a powerful marketing and referral program for princetonaddress.com As a Princeton native, I love sharing my knowl- ensure clarity throughout the home buying, selling, luxury listings. edge of and passion for this beautiful, culture rich, and rental process. With her home renovation exand historic community. I have been specializing in perience, a keen eye for interior design and staging listing and selling homes and estates in the Princ- experience she helps put you in the best position ®� eton area for over 30 years and I value all my past to succeed in your real estate dream, whether that est. 1946 and current client relationships. I love the real es- be a first home buyer purchase, buying, flipping, or tate business and look forward to guiding new cli- renting. Amanda relocated from the U.K. in 2015 with ents through this challenging market. Stay well and children who attend local schools, including Peddie stay optimistic. state • Mortgage • Insurance • Closing Services and the Princeton Public Schools, for which she is a local volunteer and co-president of the Princeton Beatrice Bloom Education Foundation. If you are relocating from Princeton Residential Specialist near or far Amanda can help you navigate the New Weichert Realtors Real Estate Jersey home buying process, the community, and 350 Nassau Street, Princeton • Mortgage • Insurance • Closing Services Real Estate the lifestyle. Always discreet and confidential, she O: (609) 921-1900 | M: (609) 577-2989 is in a unique position to support, guide, and direct info@beatriceBloom.com you through the myriad of information and processbeatriceBloom.com 2nd & 3rd Generations MFG., CO. 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Thecustom gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, updated for l updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom casRoad.info 5,000 $999,000 15JeffersonRoad.info 9FairwayDrive.info $1,125,000 $1,165,000 102SnowdenLane.info 15JeffersonRoad.info $875,000 $1,125,000 102SnowdenLane.info $875,000 updated fortoday’s today’s updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom uilt-in antry and bookcases enormous & beautiful island bar. the great light-filled room great with bookcases & beautiful The great&room dfew appeal blocks of room from Princeton University, sitsThe a stunning that combines thelight-filled charm and appeal of room with FOR MORE PHOTOS ed el appliances, great pantry with built-in andoverlooks enormous bookcases island &home beautiful overlooks bar.room the The greatbuilt-in room great built-inbar. bookcases beautiful bar. 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Retreat upstairs toopens theupstairs master bedr fireplace and the oth beautiful es, and The enormous room overlooks the great room with bookcases & beautiful bar. The Retreat to The spacious entrance hall into family mudroom floor. with cubbies and oflight-filled storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. aturing erooms ispantry thebar. built-in third floor bookcases, which has two window seat spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Retreat upstairs to The spacious entrance hall opens into the family to a formal dining room that overlooks aro n replace closets. and These the bedrooms other with adesks, share wall of aadditional hall floor-to-ceiling bath with abuilt-in BainUltra wood built-in heated closets. 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A separate mudroom The jewel of home ismudroom tw The dditional crown jewel of bedrooms, this home featuring thebath built-in floor bookcases, two desks, additional spacious seat bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat Retreat or-to-ceiling tub. spacious wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share asitting hall bath withhas a BainUltra heatedwindow Jacuzzi tub. outdoor entertainment space. A separate upstairs to the master bedroom with en Thecrown crown jewel ofthis this home isthe the eJacuzzi two bedrooms full bath and athird bonus area. itional master bedrooms bedroom one withshare with en suite a a walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a The crown jewel of th and closets. The tw and closets. 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This home truly has and The crown jewel of this home the third floor wh sharetown. a memories full bath and acan bonus sitting area. The fenced in backya it all. With ample off-street parking yo 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,0 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com me eck truly offers has terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has The fenced in backy it all. With ample off-street parking itbedrooms all. With oy and closets. The two bedrooms share aample full bath an Road.info 47,500 $1,329,000 343JeffersonRoad.info th and closets. The two share a full tme all.and With stroll ample around off-street town.parking you can leave the cars at$1,347,500 home and stroll around town. 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“Combines Knowledge and Experience with a Touch of Human Kindness”

“Combines Knowledge and Experience with a Touch of Human Kindness”

nceton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECOͲBroker Beatrice Bloom If you want your home featured, contact me: 7Ͳ2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom Beatrice Bloom

Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

$1,649,000 $1,649,000

If you want your home featured, contact me: Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

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PRINCETON


28 AUDUBON LANE, PRINCETON 7

6/2

6448 sq ft

2 acres

Designed by Denise Vokolos & built by Palomar Builders, every inch of this home speaks of unparalleled quality & style. 10' ceilings throughout the first floor, curved and barrel arch doorways, coffered ceilings, custom oversized crown mouldings, decorative columns and mahogany wood inlays are just some of the special features you’ll find in this one-of-a-kind home. The backyard is a true paradise, featuring a saltwater swimming pool with a built-in spa, surrounded by professionally landscaped gardens & a quartzite stone patio. An outdoor kitchen, covered porch, Walpole pergola, Sonos sound system & an outdoor fireplace creating the perfect outdoor living space. Offered at $3,450,000

Helen SHERMAN Broker Associate

HELEN SHERMAN, BROKER ASSOCIATE C 609.915.1216 | O 609.924.1600 helen.sherman@foxroach.com princetonnjproperties.com

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024

A Stunning Showcase of French-Inspired Architecture


est. 1946

IN PRINT. ONLINE. AT HOME.

®

IN PRINT. ONLINE. AT HOME.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024 • 36

Town Topics a Princeton tradition!

Corcoran Sawyer Smith Princeton Office at the Courtyard 190 Nassau Street, Princeton O: (609) 737-1500 Hopewell Valley Office 2 Route 31 South, Hopewell O: (609) 737-1500 From cutting-edge new developments along the Hudson River to historic stone farmhouses along the Delaware River, Corcoran Sawyer Smith represents some of the most extraordinary properties in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Through strategic partnerships with both Hudson Place Realty and Weidel Real Estate, Corcoran Sawyer Smith is building upon 100+ years of loyalty, trust, and respect earned through exceptional local service. The firm is armed with 250+ passionate and dedicated professionals based in advantageously placed offices throughout New Jersey and Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Corcoran Sawyer Smith is backed by the best talent in technology and design and supported by the industry-leading powerhouse Corcoran. Corcoran boasts a global network and unrivaled standards in real estate branding and advertising. Together, we bring an intimate market knowledge and local fluency, which provides our clients with an excepOne-Year Subscrip tional market edge

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Rocco D’Armiento Subscription Infor Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices 609.924.5400 e Fox & Roach, REALTORS or 253 Nassau Street, Princeton subscriptions O: (609) 924-1600 | M: (267) 980-8546 witherspoonmediag One-Year Subscription: $20 rocco.darmiento@foxroach.com Two-Year Subscription: $25 princetonmagaz Rocco is a full-time residential and commercial RealtorSubscription workingInformation: from Philadelphia to the Jersey Shore. He works with and luxury homes, 609.924.5400 ext.residential 30 commercial sales or and leases, as well as rentals. After college, Rocco became the owner of Cranbury subscriptions@ Paint witherspoonmediagroup.com & Hardware in Cranbury until 2004. Rocco had over 200 commercial accounts, giving him great princetonmagazine.com insight into the commercial business world. He was also heavily involved in master planning and zoning and was a board member of the Cranbury Business Association for 30+ years. Because of this experience, he understands the construction of homes and what it takes to repair and maintain a home of any age. Inspired by his own entrepreneurial spirit, Rocco began his real estate career in 2004. Having this past experience with historic homes in the Cranbury and surrounding areas, real estate quickly grew to be a great fit for him. Combine that with his familiarity with the New Jersey and Bucks County, Pa., areas on account of growing up in both, he can offer his clients a wealth of knowledge in both states and a clear picture on commuting between the two. Rocco will now be expanding his business footprint for buyers and sellers to Long Beach Island and the Jersey Shore area on a more regular basis. Whether it be a beach house for yourself, investment, or a summer rental — Rocco can help! Rocco’s reputation and success are direct results from the referrals of his past clients, colleagues, and friends who trust and believe that he has a commitment to each and every one of them.

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Heidi Joseph Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Fox & Roach, REALTORS 253 Nassau Street, Princeton O: (609) 924-1600 | M: (609) 613-1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com Heidi is experienced in all aspects of the sales process and has been recognized for her sales performance each of the eight years she has been a realtor. Her prior career in financial services, marketing, and sales, and her legal background, uniquely qualify her to help you reach your real estate goals — whether selling your home, finding a new one, or looking for investment properties. Rosaria Lawlor Coldwell Banker Realty 10 Nassau Street, Princeton O: (609) 921-1411 | M: (609) 658-5773 rosaria.lawlor@coldwellbankermoves.com Rosaria was born in New York, lived in Italy for a while, and then her family returned to the U.S. and settled in New Jersey. Rosaria excelled in school, and her love of math and proficiency in accounting served her well when she became vice president and controller of an electrical construction company in New Jersey. Always a numbers person, Rosaria now analyzes the facts and her skills and experience provide her real estate clients with the necessary perspectives when selling or buying a home. Because of the many years in her former job, Rosaria developed the knowledge to diplomatically interact with many different people and cultures. This position also prepared Rosaria to be a strong and effective negotiator as well. Rosaria loves real estate, and that is evident in her interaction with her clients and the support she provides to them even in the most challenging of situations. Licensed both in New Jersey and Pennslyvania, Rosaria is a Relocation Specialist, a Luxury Home Marketing Specialist, a Luxury Property Specialist, a Certified Residential Specialist, a Seller Representative Specialist, and more.

\]`e]]Re]`YW\U Q][ Amanda Botwood Real Estate Salesperson

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Princeton, NJ 08542

O 609.710.2021

Amanda J. Botwood is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws.


37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024

Rosaria Lawlor, CLHMS, CRS, SRS, ABR, SFR Sales Associate Certified Luxury Home Marketing Specialist Licensed in NJ and PA

“We highly recommend Rosaria. We have worked with her twice and wouldn’t hesitate to do so again. She really excels at her job as she is detail oriented and knowledgeable about the value of a property and the process of buying and selling. She’s as hands-on as you need her to be, but not imposing. She has great insights and you can be sure she has your best interests in mind. She is resourceful and willing to find the answers to your questions. She is a true professional and has established relationships with the best of the industry...Rosaria is also a sweet person, but don’t let her good manners fool you, she is tough during negotiations! We feel fortunate to have worked with her.” L.H.

Coldwell Banker Realty 10 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08542 Coldwell Banker Realty 10 Nassau St. (609) 658-5773 mobile Princeton, NJ 08542 (609) 921-1411 office

Considering a kitchen or bath renovation project? Cranbury Design Center listens to your ideas and then uses color drawings of your space to help make your vision a reality. We assist with design decisions, cabinet, countertop and hardware selections, and finishing touches like backsplash tile and paint colors. Call us or visit us online to get started on your remodel. We look forward to meeting you!

(609) 658-5773 Rosaria.Lawlor@cbmoves.com mobile (609) 921-1411 office rosarialawlorfinehomes.com Rosaria.Lawlor@cbmoves.com

rosarialawlorfinehomes.com

Rosario Lawlor 6th.indd 1

8/25/23 2:50 PM

SHOP AND CONSIGN WITH US!

renovation project?

Welcome to Gilded Home! Long-time Princeton residents Kirk & Sandy Williamson, Proprietors.

Considering a kitchen or bath renovation project?

uses color drawings of your space to help make your vision a reality. Cranbury Design Center listens to your ideas and then uses color drawings of your space to help make your vision a reality. nd hardware selections, and finishing touches like backsplash tile and We assist with design decisions, cabinet, countertop and hardware selections, and finishing touches like backsplash tile and your remodel. lookCall forward to meeting you! paintWe colors. us or visit us online to get started on your remodel. We look forward to meeting you!

(609) 448-5600 145 W. Ward Street, Hightstown www.cranburydesigncenter.com Custom Kitchens, Baths and Renovations

(609) 448-5600 145 W. Ward Street, Hightstown Furniture  Lighting  Wall Art www.cranburydesigncenter.com

Home Decor andAccessories  and more! Custom Kitchens, Baths Renovations gilded-home.com  215-693-2926 24 Summit Square Center Langhorne, PA 19047


Charlie has been serving the Princeton community for 25 years

FLESCH’S ROOFING For All Your Roofing, Flashing & Gutter Needs

• Residential & Commercial • Cedar Shake • Shingle & Slate Roofs

• Copper/Tin/Sheet Metal • Flat Roofs • Built-In Gutters

• Seamless Gutters & Downspouts • Gutter Cleaning • Roof Maintenance

609-394-2427

Free Estimates • Quality Service • Repair Work JOSEPH HOBART WEISS

LIC#13VH02047300

Architecture, Planning, Design

Little did I know that when I moved to the U.S. I would find my ideal career that perfectly complemented my skill set and personality. Based on my analytical skills and financial acumen, I can read market data and translate into appropriate strategies for acquiring a new property or work in partnership with a seller to prepare their home for sale and achieve the best deal. A strong knowledge of the surrounding communities guarantees I am wellpositioned to serve clients across a wide area at different price points, styles, and sizes of homes. I demonstrate high levels of empathy, authenticity, and energy enabling me to support my clients during their transaction, making it as stress-free as possible. Strong communication skills combined with being a great listener ensure that I am clear about my clients’ goals, able to skillfully negotiate on their behalf and build meaningful relationships with other agents, attorneys, and vendors and tap into that reliable network when needed. A strong work ethic and high regard for my relationships mean past clients return again and again. As an active member of the Princeton community, I am a board member and treasurer for the Princeton Education Foundation, having also been an active PTO member for Princeton Public Schools. I am also a member of the Princeton Present Day Club and a regular at Lifetime Athletic Club. I live in Princeton with my husband, two teenage daughters, and our dachshund “Larry.” We love the area and everything it has to offer. The restaurant and café culture, museums, cosmopolitan cities, beaches, and even skiing all at our doorstep makes it a great place to live! Robin L. Wallack Broker Associate Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, Fox & Roach, REALTORS Princeton Home Marketing Center 253 Nassau Street, Princeton O: (609) 683-8505 | C: (609) 462-2340 robin.wallack@foxroach.com robinwallack.com Robin’s experiences in the workplace and the community are both extensive and intensive. She spent many years working as assistant to the director of Career Services at Princeton University. Robin served on the Princeton Regional Board of Education for six years as both president and vice president. Robin also served as vice president of the Mercer County Board of Education, as a Princeton Civil Rights Commissioner, and as a member of the Site Plan Advisory Board. Robin says, “Real estate is a process, and I will be with you every step of the way. For me, real estate is deeply rooted in relationships. Even after you close on your house, you can always feel free to call me for advice, for help, for information. As one of my customers once said, ‘Once we work with you, we’re velcroed together forever!’ I will be there for you, both as you change and as your real estate needs change. I recognize that ‘home’ means different things to different people and my success is predicated on knowing what my customers expect, and then showing you those homes that meet your specific needs.”

Witherspoon Media Group Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

· Newsletters · Brochures

Check out our new website: www.jhwarchitect.com or call us at 609 921-0744

· Postcards · Books

Clare Mackness, Broker Associate

· Catalogues

Certified Pricing Strategy Advisor & Accredited Buyers Representative

· Annual Reports

NJ Realtors® Circle of Excellence Sales Award® 2021, 2022 and 2023 Member of Mercer County Top Producers Association

Witherspoon Media Group Witherspoon Media Group

For additional info contact:

Custom Design, Printing, melissa.bilyeu@ Custom Design, Printing, Publishing Distribution witherspoonmediagroup.com Publishing and and Distribution

· ·Newsletters Newsletters Brochures · ·Brochures Postcards · ·Postcards Books · ·Books · Catalogues

· Catalogues

LOCAL REAL ESTATE HANDLED WITH CARE Entrust your property to a real estate professional who understands the importance of handling your investment with care and dedication. Built on a foundation of trust and integrity, my services are characterized by transparency, honesty, and unwavering dedication to my clients. With a deep understanding of the local market dynamics and a vast network of contacts, I offer unparalleled insight and global exposure for your property.

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

NZ E

LE

V

L

c 609.454.1436 o 609.921.1050 cmackness@callawayhenderson.com 4 Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08542

R

O

E

Experience the difference of working with a real estate agent who treats your property as if it were their own. Selling your home with care and confidence!

B

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024 • 38

Family Owned and Operated

Clare Mackness Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty 4 Nassau Street, Princeton O: (609) 921-1050 | (609) 454-1439 cmackness@callawayhenderson.com

Circle of Excellence

· Annual Reports

· Annual Reports For additional info contact:

For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

Sales Award

2023

4428C Route 27, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400


E G A

#1 Coldwell banker Princeton

76 Stetson Way Princeton - $2,488,888 6 Beds/5 Baths/Studio/Pool

66 High Ridge Road Skillman - $1,985,000 5 Beds/5.5 Baths/Pool

1 Coventry Farm Lane Princeton - $825,000 2 Beds/2 Baths/2 Car Garage

E: HeidiHartmannHomes@gmail.com W: HeidiHartmannHomes.com Cell/Text: 609-658-3771 *For the 10th consecutive year according to GCI

Heidi A. Hartmann Sales Professional

10 Nassau St. Princeton 609-921-1411

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024

* T N


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024 • 40

CONGRATULATIONS

2023 NJ REALTORS® CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE WINNERS BRONZE

Jessica Leale

Lisa LeRay

Anthony McAnany

Deborah Melicharek

Heather Morley

Dale Michele Parello

Cynthia L. Rosen

Kimberly Storcella

Ivy Wen

BRONZE

Iris Nitzan

Hopewell Valley 609-737-9100 · Princeton 609-924-1600 · Princeton Junction 609-799-2022 · Robbinsville 609-890-3300 A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC

ROCCO D’ARMIENTO As a successful professional who is strong and focused, I try to go above and beyond for my clients so that they can achieve their real estate goals. I do this by helping to make the purchase or sale of their home or business a very rewarding experience. For those planning to buy or sell a home/business, my Rocco D’Armiento character, knowledge and credibility helps prospective buyers or sellers make the most informed real estate decision of their lives. I have been called realtor of the year by my clients. I am always by their side as a counselor or consultant. I help my clients in ways other agents will not or cannot. Don’t settle for average service in today’s demanding real estate market. You need the best and most knowledgeable. My practiced negotiation skills have helped my clients achieve the price and terms they are expecting and bring their home or property to a successful closing with side by side involvement and peace of mind.

Recognitions:

Recent Sales:

NJ REALTORS® Circle of Excellence Platinum Award with over $30 million in sales

33 N Main St., Cranbury, NJ Sold for $715,000

Top 1/2% of Realtors in surrounding areas

12 Beechtree Ln., Plainsboro, NJ Sold for $825,000

#1 Single Agent in the BHHS Princeton Office

83 W Shore Dr., Pennington, NJ Sold for $1,138,481

President's Circle Award

1 Coneflower Ln., Princeton Junction, NJ Pending at $625,000

Five Star Real Estate Agent Award Since 2012

4 Hope Ct., Hillsborough, NJ Pending at $925,000

Member of Pennsylvania & New Jersey Board of Realtors Member of Middlesex & Mercer County Board of Realtors Member of National Association of Realtors

38 Witherspoon St., Princeton, NJ Active Offered at $125,000 2608 Mount Holly Rd., Burlington, NJ Active Offered at $325,000

Thinking of Buying or Selling a Home or Commercial Property? Call me today!

267-980-8546 | RoccoSellsHomes.com

253 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ 08540 609.924.1600 www.foxroach.com

Visit our Gallery of Virtual Home Tours at www.foxroach.com A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC


2023 NJ REALTORS® CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE WINNERS GOLD

PLATINUM

Sharif M. Hatab

Yuen Li “Ivy” Huang

John A. Terebey

Lavanya Boopalam

Chihlan “Lana” Chan

Rocco D’Armiento

Nicolas DiMeglio

Michael Gerstnicker

Debbie Lang

GOLD

Teresa Cunningham

GOLD

SILVER

Kin (Ken) Lee

Donna M. Murray

Michelle Needham

Surekha Raghuram

Shani Dixon

Freddie “Fred” Gomberg

Janet “Jan” Rutkowski

Kameesha Saunders

Vaishali Senjalia

Nina A. Cestare

Kathleen Goodwine

SILVER

Maria Garcia-Herreros

SILVER

BRONZE

Helen H. Sherman

Brian A. Smith

Lisa Candella-Hulbert

Hopewell Valley 609-737-9100 · Princeton 609-924-1600 · Princeton Junction 609-799-2022 · Robbinsville 609-890-3300 A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC

41 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024

CONGRATULATIONS


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024 • 42

Congratulations to our 2023 NJ Realtors® Circle of Excellence Sales Award® Recipients

Erin McManus-Keyes

Maria DePasquale

Megan Gülick

Susan Thompson

PLATINUM

PLATINUM

PLATINUM

Irene Perello

Leda Duif

Arpita Mendez

Mark Jacobson

PLATINUM

PLATINUM

Dylan Mader

Elisabeth Kerr

GOLD

GOLD

GOLD

Daniel Konuch

Francine Lauri

Joseph Sisti

SILVER

SILVER

SILVER

James Alvarez

Janine Berger

BRONZE

BRONZE

Johanna Restrepo

Mary Warshefski BRONZE

GOLD

SILVER

Christine Mariano

David Tucker

BRONZE

Meredith Foster BRONZE

BRONZE

BRONZE

Lynda Schreiber

Marge Crimmins

BRONZE

BRONZE

Preeti Poddar

Richard Basili

BRONZE

BRONZE

Flemington Office 405 US Highway 202, Flemington o. 609.737.1500

Hopewell Valley Office 2 Rte 31 S, Pennington o. 609.737.1500

Hoboken Office 132 Washington St, Hoboken o. 201.420.7393

Hunterdon Bucks Office 34 Coryell St, Lambertville o. 609.737.1500

Jersey City Office 242 10th St #6, Jersey City o. 201.653.8000

Princeton Office 190 Nassau St, Princeton o. 609.737.1500


Top 5 brokerages listed below

$ 37.1 mm

$ 40.5 mm

$ 94 million

$ 133.8 million

Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty • $ 257.2 million

$ 100 million

2023 MLS-LISTED SALES IN PRINCETON

In a Transitioning Real Estate Environment, Marketing Matters Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty is the only local firm with the power of a global network that offers professional photography, video, floor plans, 3D tours, copywriting, and drone imaging, as well as exclusive PR, advertising, and social media opportunities—for all listings. And our top-producing, expert agents are truly the best in the business. Thinking of selling? It’s not too late. Contrary to the headlines, our local market remains very active in many segments and inventory is critically needed. DON’T JUST PUT YOUR HOME ON THE MARKET. GET IT THE ATTENTION IT DESERVES.

Nothing compares.

CALLAWAYHENDERSON.COM

Source:Trendgraphix 01/2024. Each office is independently owned and operated.

4 NASSAU STREET | PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08542 | 609.921.1050

43 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2024

$ 200 million

#1 Market Share in Princeton


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VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DA Office: 609.924.1600 APPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DA APPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DA Mobile: 609.613.1663 APPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DA heidi.joseph@foxroach.com APPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DA APPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DA APPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DA APPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY VALENTINES DA APPY VALENTINES DAY HAPPY 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XOXO

I just love this town!

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

BERKSHIRE

Fox & Roach, REALTORS

HATHAWAY HomeServices

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