Town Topics Newspaper, December 7, 2022

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Experience the Holidays At Fonthill Castle and Mercer Museum 5 New Chief Charts PPD Path Forward in 21st Century Policing 9

Fitness Center at Princeton Health to Close 10 Ray Davies, The Beatles, and The World Cup Magic of the Summer of ’66 14

Sophomore Morton Emerging As Key Performer For PU Women’s Hoops 34

PDS Girls’ Hockey Aims To Keep on Winning Track as DeSimone Takes the Helm 40

Locals and Officials Make Progress Towards New Town Master Plan

Eager to weigh in on the issues most important to the future of their town, about 250 Princeton residents and others circulated through Princeton Public Library’s Community Room between 4 and 7 p.m. on November 30 for the rst public open session on the Princeton Master Plan.

The open house, hosted by the Princeton Planning Board, presented participants with four stations throughout the large room, one devoted to each of four key Princeton issues: housing, downtown, mobility, and open space and recreation.

Individuals were provided with information at each station and they were given the opportunity to respond in detail with ideas about how Princeton should address its biggest challenges. There were hundreds of conversations throughout the room during the more than three hours of the event, and visitors wrote out comments and questions, and noted their preferences on a series of maps at each station.

“A master plan is a community’s blueprint for its future,” stated the ier handed out by the meeting hosts. “A new master plan will enable Princeton to set policies and priorities that will guide its decisions over the coming years, from housing and business to mobility and climate change. It tries to answer such questions as: Where should new housing go? How can we reduce traffic to make traveling around town easier? What does the municipality need to thrive economically? What kinds of outdoor spaces does it need?”

The master plan project is guided by a steering committee of Princeton residents and business owners, appointed by the Princeton Planning Board and assisted by a team of planning, economic development, and public outreach consultants.

The planners are currently processing information collected at last Wednesday’s session, along with additional information from surveys conducted earlier this year and other public input. There will be more steering committee meetings, more technical meetings with staff, and other opportunities for public commentary in the coming months, including another community open house and another

New Businesses Bolster Local Economy

In downtown Princeton and the Princeton Shopping Center, effects of the pandemic and ongoing construction projects have been blamed for low numbers and more than a few retail and restaurant closings. But recent openings, and announcements of future openings planned by businesses and restaurants, are encouraging signs for the local economy.

“We have a whole bunch of businesses developing here,” said Isaac Kremer, executive director of the Princeton Business Partnership (PBP), formed last May to encourage the development of local businesses. “So the future looks bright.”

New eateries to open in recent months include Maman on Hul sh Street, offering coffee, baked goods, and light fare; Ani Ramen House at 140 Nassau Street; a tea/sushi/dessert spot at the former Dunkin’ Donuts at 49 Nassau Street; and Taim in Princeton Shopping Center. Maruichi, a Japanese food and deli chain that has locations in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Maryland, is planning to open in the former Panera Bread at 136 Nassau Street, which has been closed since before the pandemic.

The upscale clothing retailer Hermès plans to open in fall of 2023 at the former Ann Taylor site on Palmer Square. Signs on the window of the space next door indicate that clothing retailer Faherty will precede Hermès, with a spring 2023 opening planned. Charbellem Boutique is planning a shop on Witherspoon Street. The women’s clothing chain Johnny Was recently moved in to 69 Palmer Square West.

“Opening in Princeton really ts their

geography, which goes from Long Island to King of Prussia, Pa.,” Kremer said of Johnny Was. “Their decision was driven by Hermès. The retail strategy that I’ve found works best is one in which you have a high-end store like Hermès, but also things that are affordable for most people. It’s called fusion strategy, and it works really well when done right.”

Vacancies are being lled on Palmer Square. “We are pleased to welcome new retailers and restaurants to our

Princeton University’s Witherspoon Statue Is Focus of Discussion on Legacy of Racism

Ten feet tall and standing atop a sevenfoot-high pedestal, the cast bronze statue of John Witherspoon, sixth Princeton University president (1768-94) and a signer of the Declaration of Independence, now presides over the University’s Firestone Plaza near East Pyne Hall — but its days may be numbered.

Witherspoon (1723-1794), in the “heroic realistic” style statue created in 2001 by Scottish sculptor Alexander Stoddart, is depicted preaching at a lectern on top of

which rests an open Bible. Witherspoon was an ordained minister, a leading member of the Continental Congress, a founding father of the United States, and the only clergyman and only college president to sign the Declaration of Independence.

But he was also a slaveholder (as were the other rst nine presidents of Princeton University), and a petition to remove the statue, initiated by members of the University’s Department of Philosophy and signed by about 300 graduate students, is

Continued on Page 8 Volume LXXVI, Number 49 www.towntopics.com 75¢ at newsstands Wednesday, December 7, 2022
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ON THE HUNT: A self-guided scavenger hunt, including items in a festive tree, was among the activities at The Watershed Institute’s Holiday Open House on Saturday. The event also featured live music, crafts, local vendors, refreshments, and more. Attendees discuss their favorite things about the event in this week’s Town Talk on page 6. (Photo by Weronika A. Plohn)
Art 17-18 Books 13 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 32 Classifieds 44 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 13 New To Us 33 Obituaries 42-43 Performing Arts . . . 15-16 Police Blotter 6 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 44 Sports 34 'Tis The Season 19-31 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk 6
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Princeton Einstein Museum Receives $15,000 Donation

The Princeton Einstein Museum of Science has announced a $15,000 gift from the Stephen & Ann Jasperson Charitable Fund, which is focused on promoting science and creative opportunities for learning.

The contribution honors the teaching and research legacies of Stephen Jasperson, who received his Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University in 1968 and died in 2016.

Jasperson taught physics at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) in Worcester, Mass., for 39 years, and served as its physics department chair for a decade.

While his research focused on solid-state physics, he was primarily a teacher and science advisor at both the college and secondary school levels. He was a recipient of the WPI Board of Trustees Award for Outstanding Teaching. Later in life, Jasperson developed an interest in cosmology,

and traveled to observatories in the western U.S. He then developed and taught a course on astrophysics at WPI.

Plans for the Princeton Einstein Museum were announced in 2021. The goal is to create a boutique museum in Princeton that will feature hands-on science exhibits, a walk-in immersion theater, science-inspired overhead sculpture, and a history of Einstein’s life in the town. Visit princetoneinsteinmuseum.org for more information.

and canned or boxed food are accepted in the lobby through December 18, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., for distribution through the Mercer County Board of Social Services and Food Bank Network of Somerset County. Visit princetonairport.com for more information.

Join Boards, Commissions or Committees : The municipality is looking to fill vacancies with residents of Princeton who are willing to attend regularly scheduled meetings. Visit princetonnj.gov for more information.

Call for Land Stewards: Join the Friends of Princeton Open Space (FOPOS) for morning (9 a.m.-12 p.m.) or afternoon (1-4 p.m.) volunteer sessions under the guidance of FOPOS’ Director of Natural Resources and Stewardship, to assist with critical restoration projects at the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Weekday and weekend sessions available. Visit fopos.org/getinvolved.

Caroling Around the Square : On Christmas Eve, Saturday, December 24 at 4:30 p.m., the public is invited to gather around the Palmer Square Green to sing holiday songs. The Christmas Eve Brass Band will lead the festivities, and Santa is expected. Free.

Blood Donors Needed: The American Red Cross needs blood and platelets to keep supplies from dropping ahead of the holidays. All types are needed, especially type O. Visit RedCrossBlood.org or call (800) 733-2767 for more information.

Survey on Food Waste and Organics : The municipality is considering changes to the residential waste collection system to contain costs and decrease the carbon footprint. A survey to share feedback is available at accessprinceton@princetonnj.gov.

Free COVID-19 Test Kits: Available at Princeton Health Department, 1 Monument Drive, Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. There is limit of four per household; you must reside in Princeton to get the kits.

Free Vision and Dental Services for Low Income Residents : The municipality is offering these services for low-income Princeton residents impacted by the pandemic. For application information, visit Princetonnj.gov.

Flu Shot Clinics : Several clinics are being held throughout the fall at different area locations. For a full list, email healthdepartm ent@princetonnj.gov.

Leaf Blowers : Are now permitted through December 15 from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Mondays-Fridays and through 5 p.m. Saturdays. No use on Sundays.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 • 4 TOWN TOPICS Princeton’s Weekly Community Newspaper Since 1946 DONALD C. STUART, 1946-1981 DAN D. COYLE, 1946-1973 Founding Editors/Publishers DONALD C. STUART III, Editor/Publisher, 1981-2001 ® LAURIE PELLICHERO, Editor BILL ALDEN, Sports Editor DONALD GILPIN, WENDY GREENBERG, ANNE LEVIN, STUART MITCHNER,
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BOOK FESTIVAL PROCEEDS: The owners of jaZams Book and Toy Store on Palmer Square recently visited Princeton Public Library to present library staff with a check for $8,829.97, representing a portion of the proceeds from book sales at the October 8 Princeton Children’s Book Festival. The money will support materials, programs, and services for young people at the library. Pictured, from left, are Jennifer Podolsky, library executive director; Amanda Chuong and Mimi Bowlin, librarians; Joanne Farrugia, jaZams co-owner; Susan Conlon, head of the library’s Youth Services Department; Dean Smith, jaZams co-owner; and Martha Liu, librarian. The annual festival is presented by the library and is co-sponsored by jaZams.

Three Ways to Experience the Holidays At Fonthill Castle and Mercer Museum

With its dark, concrete walls, inlaid ceramic tiles, spooky hallways, and shelves of antique objects and books, Fonthill Castle in Doylestown, Pa., is a particularly atmospheric loca-

tion for evoking the feeling of holidays past. The castle, which is currently decorated for the holidays and open for visitors, was the home of Henry Chapman Mercer, an archaeologist, anthropologist, ceramicist, and scholar who lived from 1856 to 1930.

The neighboring Mercer Museum is filled with Chapman’s collections of some 50,000 tools and objects from pre-industrial America. This past Tuesday, the museum held its first open house in three years. “It has a long tradition in the community,” said Karina Kowalski, director of education and community services for Mercer Museum and Fonthill Castle. “Returning to this legacy program is very exciting for us.”

Medieval, and Byzantine architectural styles. Mercer designed the home as a showplace for his collection of tiles and prints. His collection of handmade ceramic tiles was designed at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. There are 44 rooms, 200 windows, and 18 fireplaces in the home.

According to the Mercer Museum and Fonthill Castle website, Mercer left his “castle for the new world” in trust as a museum of decorative tiles and prints. He gave life rights to the castle to his housekeeper and her

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Back at the architecturally distinctive — some might say eccentric — Fonthill, guided tours and “meander days” are available throughout the season. On weekdays, there are “Winter Wonderland” guided tours of the castle, showing off the holiday decorations while sharing the history of Mercer and the construction of the property. Tours take 60 minutes.

Holiday Lights Meander Days are on Saturdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., with time slots beginning every 10 minutes. The tours are offered through the end of December. Guides are stationed along the route to answer questions. Guided evening tours, which might be the best time to see lights in windows and on trees, are Thursdays in December and Wednesday, December 28, beginning at 5 p.m. (last tour is 6:45 p.m.).

“In the evening, it just glows,” said Kowalski. “We have fake candles all around, and we have added more outdoor lights than ever before. It just twinkles.”

Built between 1908 and 1912, the castle is considered to be an early example of reinforced concrete architecture. It is a mix of Gothic,

A DOYLESTOWN TRADITION: Fonthill Castle, the historic home of Henry Chapman Mercer, is festively decorated for the holidays. Tours are offered throughout the season. (Photo courtesy of Kevin Crawford imagery LLC)
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One-Year Subscription: $10 Two-Year Subscription: $15 Subscription Information: 609.924.5400 ext. 30 or subscriptions@ witherspoonmediagroup.com princetonmagazine.com IN PRINT. ONLINE. AT HOME. 5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 www.princetonmagazinestore.com Holiday season is almost upon us! Get your shopping done early at princetonmagazinestore.com. We have the latest and greatest gifts for any Princetonian! Loominous Design TOPICS Of the Town
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husband, who lived there and led occasional tours until she died in 1975. Since then, Fonthill has operated as a historic house museum, overseen by the Bucks County Historical Society.

Kowalski and colleagues extended hours for tours this year, and added the selfguided option. “We want people to be able to spend time seeing the trees and exploring,” she said. “We’re giving them more time to do that.”

Fonthill Castle is located at 525 East Court Street; the Mercer Museum at 84 South Pine Street. For more information, tour prices, and specific times and dates, visit mercermuseum.org.

Police Blotter

On December 2 at 1:18 p.m., an unknown individual approached a mail carrier on his route on Spruce Street and demanded that the carrier turn over the keys to the USPS vehicle, his cell phone, and mail bag. The suspect, who was wearing all black with a black, hooded sweatshirt with red lettering, then fled on foot and entered a silver sedan that was driven by another individual. The vehicle was last seen traveling east on Spruce Street. The investigation was turned over to the U.S. Postal Investigation Service.

On December 1 at 7:55 p.m., a Brickhouse Road resident reported that someone stole her bicycle, which was left locked to a bicycle rack in the vestibule of her building. The bike was taken sometime between November 22 and December 1. The Detective Bureau is investigating.

On November 28 at 11:16 a.m., subsequent to a report of an individual attempting to leave a Nassau Street retail store without paying for merchandise, the suspect, a 76-year-old male from Trenton, was located by patrol on Alexander Street and arrested. He was also found to have two outstanding warrants out of Princeton Municipal Court totaling $2,500. He was transported to headquarters where he was processed, charged accordingly, and transported to the Mercer County Correctional Facility.

Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

Meet New Chamber Board

At Networking Event

On Tuesday, January 24 from 5-7 p.m. at Mercer Oaks Catering, the Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber will hold an event introducing the current board of directors. “Meet the Board” will include information about the board’s direction for 2023. Passed hors d’oeuvres, pasta stations, beer, and wine will be provided.

The board is made up of executives from a variety of industries across New Jersey. At the event, members can network with them, renew past connections, and build new relationships.

Mercer Oaks is at 725 Village Road West in Princeton Junction. Tickets are $65 for members; $75 for others. Visit princetonmercerchamber.org for details.

Question of the Week:

“What was your favorite thing about the event today?”

(Asked Saturday at The Watershed Institute Open House) (Photos by Weronika A. Plohn)

“We had some gingerbread cookies and now are planning to do the scavenger hunt. We heard it was very fun.”

Kaylin: “I enjoyed myself a lot. It was nice to meet everyone — people were very friendly, and the environment is great.”

Korie: “Sharing a vendor table with my sister was lots of fun for me. I used to work at The Watershed, so it was nice to see some familiar faces and meet some new people as well. It was a great place to make some new connections too.”

TOWN TALK©
A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.
—Casper and Oscar Hrywniak, Titusville —Kaylin and Korie Vee, South Amboy “I liked doing the scavenger hunt with my mom and my aunt. We had lots of fun.” —Natalie Gross, Lambertville “The scavenger hunt was our favorite. We worked as a team and it was lots of fun. There were animals on the Christmas tree that you had to find. We also liked looking for the snake and the eel in the fish tank. It was challenging and great at the same time. Everyone won little turtle or butterfly toys too.” —Mark and Jack Fereshteh, Pennington Alia: “I made a card for Santa Claus. It has a Christmas tree and yellow star on top of it.” Benedict: “I liked looking at the water creatures in the tank. I also did some crafts with my sister. The cookies were delicious too!” —Alia and Benedict Zhang, Princeton
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downtown community,” said Palmer Square Vice President Lori Rabon, in an email.

“The increased interest and momentum in the Princeton area and Palmer Square is a true testament to the vibrancy of our town.”

Hamilton Home, an offshoot of Hamilton Jewelers, recently began operations at 33 Witherspoon Street. Arhaus, the furniture retailer, opened on Palmer Square East early this year. Across the street from Arhaus, work continues on the new location of Triumph Brewery, at what was for decades the town’s branch of the U.S. Post Offi ce. The glass doors are in place, but much work clearly remains to be done.

Councilwoman Michelle Pirone Lambros, the governing body’s liaison to the PBP, said the opening of the Graduate Hotel on Chambers Street, which is targeted for late next year, is attracting retailers to town.

“I think there is a positive impact of having a new hotel coming, even though the construction is painful for the short term,” she said. “Knowing we are doing a major investment in the streets and infrastructure is an attraction. So potential tenants see that.”

Kremer said the new hotel will spur additional investment. “An overnight guest spends 140 percent of what a day guest spends,” he said. “Retailers know this. My expectation is that we’re going to see more and more traveler/shoppers, and that’s a niche we’re going to cultivate and serve.”

one

survey. The Planning Board hopes to have a draft plan prepared by late spring 2023, followed by public hearings, and a fi nal plan by the summer.

“We’re about half way there,” said Justin Lesko, municipal senior planner and now acting planning director. “It’s really important to get as much of that input as possible so we can come to a realistic goal, a thoughtful goal, a vision for the future.”

Lesko was pleased with the turnout at the open house, and also commented on the level of engagement and the quality of input. “We have some big questions in Princeton, about parking, housing, open space, and downtown issues,” he said. “We had a lot of very thoughtful comments.”

Eager to get even more locals involved in the coming months, Lesko stated, “I urge residents get involved, whether they come to every Council and Planning Board meeting or whether they’ve never been to any. Maybe they’re new to town or haven’t had an interest so far, but we certainly welcome everyone.”

Besides the legal requirements necessitating an update of the current Princeton Master Plan that was put in place in 1996, Lesko emphasized the need for revisions. “A lot has changed since then,” he said, “both in the planning world in the way we do things and also obviously in the larger world.”

He continued, “Whether it’s the pandemic or the housing market or specifi c things to Princeton like consolidation, it’s really time to re-evaluate everything, and for us to do that we need to engage all 31,000 people in Princeton. I can tell you something, but I live over here on Witherspoon Street, and I might not see what happens over by one of the schools at pick-up time.”

He added, “We really need everyone to show us: ‘Here’s what’s going on in my neck of the woods, in my part of this 18-square-mile town. Where

I am here’s what’s happening. Here are my hopes and goals.’”

As planners and consultants and municipal officials continue listening and processing input from all segments of the town, Lesko sees the community moving towards certain areas of consensus. It’s too early to report any defi nitive results of the public input so far, but Lesko mentioned some recurring motifs.

“We always hear that Princeton needs more housing,” he said, “and people are becoming more open to modern ways of doing that. We’ve started seeing that people are preferring smaller lots for homes, smaller residences, duplexes and triplexes, and housing like that. People are saying there’s got to be something in between the general single-family housing and the big apartment buildings.”

Lesko also mentioned that he was eager to see the variety of ideas that people had for Princeton’s open space and for the downtown area.

Princeton Councilman Leighton Newlin noted, “I’m feeling very optimistic about the future of Princeton, especially under the current mayor and Council, and the care and concern with which elected officials and municipal staff are looking to advance equity in Princeton and to create more of a welcoming town. I think Princeton has a bright future ahead.”

Newlin praised Lesko, the town engineering department, and the planners for “coming out into the neighborhood and engaging people and asking people what they’d like to have.” He went on to point out that residents in all neighborhoods had responded in kind.

“Princeton is really blessed to have so many people volunteer on boards, commissions, and committees and take a great interest in the future of this town and how we elevate all citizens, because a high tide raises all boats and that’s what we’re going to accomplish,” Newlin added.

—Donald Gilpin

To celebrate the holiday season, Princeton United Methodist Church (PUMC) is holding several events. Most are available in person and online. The church is located at 7 Vandeventer Avenue. Mikayla Hamilton, Princeton Theological Seminary intern, is leading free study on Tuesday nights through December, and anyone can come to one or more of the sessions. Titled “Imagining Advent: A Meditative Reflection in Isaiah: historical context, spiritual practice, artistic response,” the sessions are held from 7-8 p.m. In an earlier session, Hamilton was encouraged by how everyone met her challenge to make an artistic response to the text. “From drawing stick figures to intricate mountain landscapes, the group has a wide range of artistic abilities,” she said. “We had such a rich discussion surrounding everyone’s art regardless of talent.”

“Room at the Inn,” a children’s pageant by DeLong and Antonucci, directed by Tom Shelton, will be on Sunday, December 11 at 5 p.m., online and in person. At Kingston United Methodist Church, 9 Church Street in Kingston an “All Ages Christmas Pageant” will be on Sunday, December 18, at 10:30 a.m., in person and via Zoom.

A free concert at PUMC, “Come Emmanuel,” is on Sunday, December 18 at 5 p.m., in person and online. It will feature the handbell, chancel, and youth choirs directed by Hyosang Park and Tom Shelton.

The Longest Night Service will celebrate Christ’s birth in a minor key, on Tuesday, December 20, 7 p.m. at PUMC, in person and online. Pastor Jae Hong will preach. PUMC will hold Christmas Eve services on Saturday, December 24 at 4 and 8 p.m., with the Rev. Jenny Smith Walz preaching. The Kingston church will offer a Christmas Eve service at 5 p.m., with the Rev. Erik Matson preaching.

For more information about any of the programs, call (609) 924-2613 or visit PrincetonUMC.org.

3, 1777 — with its signature educational event, “Experience the Battle of Princeton.”

The reenactment takes place at Princeton Battlefield State Park, 500 Mercer Street.

The event will begin at 9:45 a.m. with introductions and comments on the “Ten Crucial Days” campaign of 1776-77 that encompassed the battle. Members of the general public are urged to arrive at the site by 9:15 a.m.

A narrated reenactment of a portion of the Battle of Princeton will begin at 10 a.m. featuring reenactors portraying Crown and Continental forces. The reenactment will conclude by 11 a.m. Attendees will then have an opportunity to interact and converse with living historians and battle reenactors. At 11:30 a.m., the New Jersey Society, Sons of the American Revolution will join other hereditary organizations as well as representatives of legacy National Guard and British Army units whose antecedents fought at the battle in a wreath laying ceremony at the Memorial Grove behind the Colonnade on the battlefield.

Battlefield

Society

Plans Annual Day of Tribute

On Sunday, January 8, the Princeton Battlefield Society (PBS) will mark the 246th anniversary of Battle of Princeton — fought on January

Tours of the historic Thomas Clarke House, the only building on site remaining from the time of the battle, will also be offered beginning at 1 p.m.

Pre-registration for this program is required at pbs1777.org.

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United Methodist Church Plans Holiday Events HOLIDAY CELEBRATIONS: Children and adults will participate in the “All Ages” pageant at Kingston United Methodist Church on December 11 at 10:30 a.m. Additional events are held at Princeton United Methodist Church on Vandeventer Avenue.

New Police Chief Jonathan Bucchere Charts PPD Path Forward in 21st Century Policing

“Balance,” “fairness,” “relationships in the community,” and a “guardian” attitude are key words that recur throughout the discussion on policing with new Princeton Police Department (PPD) Chief Jonathan Bucchere, who was sworn into office at the November 14 Princeton Council meeting.

On Friday, December 2, at about 3 p.m., Bucchere, who takes pride in putting his words into action, could be found manning the school crossing at Witherspoon Street and Birch Avenue.

“We were short-staffed and a lot of school crossings had to be covered,” he said. “While I was out there working, at least three or four people who knew me stopped and thanked me and commented on the fact that I was out there doing the school crossing.”

He continued, “The best part of the job is building relationships. Policing is all about relationships, whether it be the community or the men and women of the department. It’s the most rewarding part of what we do.”

He described the model of 21st century policing that was introduced under former PPD Chief Nick Sutter and has taken hold in Princeton and across the country over the past seven years. “It’s really embracing the guardian mentality over the warrior mentality,” said Bucchere. “You can use a balanced approach to enforcement, and you do so under the guardian mentality, building relationships in the community. You’re not out there trying to arrest everyone and issue citations to everyone.”

Bucchere, who was born in Princeton, grew up in Hamilton, and graduated from The College of New Jersey before attending the State

was the main reason I decided to enter law enforcement,” said Bucchere. “He is a retired New Jersey state trooper and held the rank of major. When I graduated from the State Police Academy my brother presented me with my certification. He’s still the first person I call when I need advice or direction.”

Bucchere was promoted to PPD sergeant in 2007, lieutenant in 2016, captain in 2020, and chief on November 1, 2022, succeeding Chief Christopher Morgan, who announced his retirement in May after more than 25 years of service.

Bucchere has held every rank and served in or supervised every department of the Princeton Police. He said that the first month as chief of police had been challenging, but he noted, “There are a number of people who have reached out to me and offered their support. These same people are some of the best leaders I’ve ever worked with, and they continue to be mentors to me.”

Expanding on the idea of 21st century policing, a concept emerging from a presidential task force in 2015, Bucchere discussed the goal of changing policing for the better. “What they came up with was that police departments in America need to have legitimacy in the community,” he said. “Internally you do that through policy and oversight, and through the community you would do that through building relationships and being transparent with your policy. What we’ve tried to do ever since then is to be the best version of ourselves with that as a guide.”

On the question of enforcing the laws, Bucchere again highlighted the importance of balance. “There needs to be balance,” he said. “There needs to be fairness. Our officers need to understand that there’s more than one way to correct behaviors.

Let’s say, with regard to motor vehicle laws, if a warning can accomplish your goal of correcting behavior, then you’ve won because you’re balanced. You’re getting your point across, and if someone was speeding let’s say, the road might be safer after your warning.”

But a warning is not always the answer. “Not everybody is going to accept a warning and make a change,” he continued, “and that’s when you might have to write a speeding ticket and when you have to enforce laws. But if you do so to such a degree that you lack balance, then it can corrode the relationship you have with the community and it can lead to a variety of problems.”

He added, “We have to spend a lot of time and energy teaching our younger officers how to be balanced and to be guardians of the community.”

Building relationships with the community has been a major priority for the PPD. Bucchere explained why this outreach is so important. “Without relationships, you’re invisible in the community,” he said. “We have 48 officers now, and we want each of those officers to be known in the community and to have relationships because when you do that you are embedded in the community and you can really be a part of it. When you don’t have those relationships, you might be doing the job, but you’re essentially doing it alone.”

In the months and years ahead at the helm of the PPD, Bucchere has a number of particular items on his agenda. Preparing for a March 2023 on-site inspection by the New Jersey State Association of Chiefs of Police as part of the accreditation process will be a top priority in the early months of the new year. Other upcoming projects for the PPD may include the establishment of a community police academy, with weekly sessions highlighting areas of policing that the community might not know about; a virtual reality training system for the edification of the community; and creation of an awards committee.

Bucchere is also planning to revamp the department’s process and policies for recruiting and hiring new officers. The most recent recruitment effort yielded fewer candidates than the previous recruitment. “We have to reinvent how we recruit and make it more part of our daily job, rather than it being something that we do only when we have planned retirements,” he said. “The police department should mirror the community it serves. To that end I want to recruit heavily within Princeton.”

Bucchere wrapped up the interview by returning to the themes that form the foundation of his police work and his vision for the PPD. “We’re here to serve the people of Princeton as best we can and to continue to be a part of the community and to build relationships,” he said. “We need to be part of the community in order to make positive changes.”

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Fitness Center at Princeton Health To Cease Operations at End

Clients of Princeton Fitness & Wellness at Plainsboro were given a jolt when a letter from management dated November 28 informed them that the club will close at the end of the year to accommodate additional space requirements on the Princeton Medical Center campus.

Having recently completed a strategic plan, Penn Medicine Princeton Health decided that the space will be repurposed, possibly for such services as cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation and an ambulatory care center.

“It is with the heaviest of hearts that we notify you that Princeton Fitness & Wellness at Plainsboro must permanently close effective Saturday, December 31, 2022, at 4 p.m.,” reads a letter to members. “On November 16, 2022, we were notified by Penn Medicine Princeton Health that additional space is required on the Princeton Medical Center campus to meet the increasing demand for medical care and services. After a thoughtful and thorough strategic plan process,

of Year

Princeton Health determined it must repurpose the space currently used by the Fitness Center to better serve patients and the broader community.”

Representing Penn Medicine Princeton Health, spokesperson Andy Williams said the closing was unavoidable. “Repurposing the existing building instead of construction a new one will enable us to make a transition in months, as opposed to the year or more it would take to design and build a new structure,” he said in an email. “In addition, there is only one available parcel on the campus. In our redevelopment agreement with the township of Plainsboro, that land is designated for medical research.”

The center, which features an aquatics center, massage spa, a café, and other amenities, is located on the grounds of Princeton Medical Center. The Krogh Outpatient Rehabilitation site, which is housed at the fitness center, will remain in place.

Members can transfer to other locations operated by the company

Fitness & Wellness, including Princeton Fitness & Wellness in Princeton North Shopping Center, RWJ Hamilton Fitness & Wellness in Mercerville, or CentraState Fitness & Wellness in Freehold.

“We understand the disruption this may cause to your fi tness routine, so we are providing one month free to anyone who chooses to transfer their home club,” the letter reads. “In addition, we have extended offers to our staff to remain with the company. Our hope is that your favorite trainers, Pilates instructors, group fi tness instructors, and swim instructors will still be available so you can continue your training, classes, and swim routines, as well as continue to see the familiar faces you have grown accustomed to.”

The fi tness center, which has approximately 3,800 members, has been located on the Princeton Medical Center campus for the past decade. Memberships that are not terminated will automatically expire on December 31. Any remaining personal training, swim lessons, or Pilates sessions will be refunded within 30 days of the closing.

Martha Nussbaum

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gaining traction. It has been taken up by the Council of the Princeton University Commu nity (CPUC) Naming Commit tee, which will be holding “lis tening sessions” in the coming weeks to allow members of the University community to weigh in as it considers the petition.

“The committee’s work will be informed by rigorous re search, scholarly expertise within and beyond the Uni versity community, and input from the broad University community,” a University press release stated.

Witherspoon had “a com plex relationship to slavery,” according to the University’s Princeton and Slavery Project website. “Though he advocat ed revolutionary ideals of liber ty and personally tutored sev eral free Africans and African Americans in Princeton, he himself owned slaves and both lectured and voted against the abolition of slavery in

New Jersey,” the website states.

Initiators of the petition, philosophy graduate students Waner Zhang, Kathryn Rech, Brendan Kolb, and Giulia Weissman, wrote in The Daily Princetonian that an unof ficial committee of graduate students had been formed in early 2022 to address the issue of the statue.

“The basic line of reasoning we hit on as a committee was, we think the statue should be removed, because we believe it has an adverse impact on a major public university space by glorifying Witherspoon and holding him up as a model of humanity,” their statement in The Daily Princetonian reads.

“Because Witherspoon was a slave owner and an opponent of abolition, we believe this elevation of Witherspoon is more than inappropriate and can create a sense of disso nance with the University’s claim to be ‘in the service of humanity.’”

The petition asserts that the

statue honors the country’s and Princeton’s shameful history of racial discrimination, and the document calls for the statue to be removed and replaced by a plaque delineating both the positive and negative aspects of Witherspoon’s legacy.

“We believe that paying such honor to someone who participated actively in the enslavement of human beings, and used his scholarly gifts to defend the practice, is today a distraction from the Univer sity’s mission,” the petition states.

Controversy over the With erspoon statue arises in the context of local, University, and national concerns with the legacy of slavery — from Con federate monuments through out the South to names of pub lic buildings across the country to local reminders of slavery in the town of Princeton.

Princeton Public Schools removed Witherspoon’s name from its middle school two years ago, but Witherspoon Street remains as a major

artery and commercial and cul tural hub of the town.

For a number of years Princ eton University struggled with the legacy of its 13th president and the United States’ 28th president Woodrow Wilson, whose name was on the Uni versity’s School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA) as well as a residential college. After protests and opposition from a number of quarters and much deliberation, the Univer sity in 2020 removed Wilson’s name from the public affairs school and the residential hall and commissioned an abstract sculpture that communicated both Wilson’s positive accom plishments and contributions as well as his racist views and policies.

The CPUC Committee on Naming was created in 2016 to advise the University Board of Trustees in regard to the nam ing of buildings, programs, positions, and spaces at the University and recognizing in dividuals who would bring a di verse presence to the campus.

United Way Mercer

Adds to Board of Directors

United Way of Greater Mercer County (UWGMC) has announced the appoint ment of Caitlin Heymann, recruiting manager of talent

and the PALS organizations fundraising to support lo cal families impacted by ALS. She is also an active member of the Robert Wood Johnson Community Impact Alliance.

“The UWGMC Board of Directors is comprised of in dividuals from the business, academic, public service, and philanthropy sectors of the Mercer County commu nity,” said Rita Ribeiro, UW GMC board chair. “Caitlin’s skills and volunteer experi ence will enhance our ability to carry on the United Way mission and maximize our impact.”

For more about United Way of Greater Mercer County, visit uwgmc.org.

we continue to support and carryout United Way’s mis sion,” said Heymann, whose professional work centers on helping people find mean ingful careers through roles of increasing responsibilities at Robert Half. Previously, she held branch manage ment roles for JP Morgan Chase.

Heymann has volunteered for the last five years at UW GMC’s Strike Out Hunger Meal Packing Event to al leviate food insecurity. Ad ditional nonprofit volunteer roles include Joan Dancy

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STATESMAN, SCHOLAR, SLAVEHOLDER: The towering bronze statue of John Witherspoon, Princeton University’s sixth president and a signer of the Declaration of Independence, is the focus of controversy, as the University debates over a graduate student petition that calls for its removal and replacement with a plaque that delineates both positive and negative facets of Witherspoon’s life. (Princeton University, Denise Applewhite) Caitlin Heymann
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Noting That NJ Transit’s Preferred Dinky Alternative Has Major Flaws

To the Editor:

NJ Transit recently released their final report of the Princ eton Transitway Study, which proposed a couple different changes that the NJ Transit could make to the Dinky in order to increase its ridership numbers. The alternative preferred by NJ Transit would replace the current heavy-rail-only Dinky corridor with both a transit roadway — allowing buses as well as bikes and pedestrians to use the corridor — and a lightrail line. Furthermore, service frequency would be increased and new stations more accessible from town could be added.

In theory this sounds good; however, most of the service frequency increase would come from the buses — which would arrive every 10 to 15 minutes as compared to the light-rail’s 15 to 30 — and all of the proposed stations in town would be bus only and have the possibility to transport people directly to Princeton Junction without a transfer. Ba sically, NJ Transit is proposing to set up two services that transport people to the same place, but one — the bus — has frequent service near where people live and the other — the train — less frequent service where people do not. If NJ Transit were to implement this design, the newly installed light-rail line would have less ridership than the bus, and po tentially less than even the current Dinky service. NJ Transit would then ultimately decide that not having light-rail would be both easier and cheaper. Alternatively, they could build the roadway first and then realize that it would be a waste of money to create a competing rail line. Either way, Princeton would be left with a bus corridor, the least preferred alterna tive according to NJ Transit’s survey.

Clearly, rather than creating two parallel services, NJ Transit should either create two services that serve different goals — for example, a fleet of buses transferring people onto the Dinky as it is now — or create a single service. As residents find a bus-only solution unacceptable, the best alternative would be to extend rail service into town via a tram or streetcar (following the same route that NJ Transit wants to run buses on but with rails embedded into the roads); in addition to not being a bus, trams are generally agreed to be more efficient, environmentally friendly, and cheap in the long run than buses.

I am no engineer, and I am sure that there are issues with both these ideas, but whatever NJ Transit decides to do to the Dinky, they should not waste their money on creating two types of transit covering the exact same use case.

Poet Ilya Kaminsky To Join Lewis Creative Writing Faculty

Award-winning poet Ilya Kaminsky will join the Lewis Center for the Art’s Program in Creative Writing faculty at Princeton University in Jan uary. Selected by the BBC as “one of the 12 artists that changed the world,” Ka minsky has been appointed professor of creative writing and will be teaching under graduate poetry workshop courses starting with the spring semester.

Born in Odessa, in the former Soviet Union in 1977, Kaminsky arrived in the United States in 1993, when his family was grant ed asylum by the American government.

He is the author of Deaf Republic, a New York Times Notable Book for 2019, and Dancing in Odessa , as well as co-editor and co-transla tor of numerous books, in cluding Ecco Anthology of International Poetry

Deaf Republic , described by The New Yorker as “a contemporary epic that, like Homer’s Iliad , captures the sweep of history and the devastation of war,” opens in an occupied country in a time of political unrest. The story, told through 59 po ems, follows the private lives of townspeople encircled by public violence.

“We are immensely im pressed by Ilya’s accom plishment as one of the most prominent and cel ebrated artist-intellectuals on the contemporary liter ary scene,” said Yiyun Li, director of the Program in Creative Writing. “His award-winning work is a tes tament to his extraordinary imagination and humanity. His breadth of knowledge, his attention to poetry in the time of crisis, his dedication to translation, his pedagogi cal emphasis in approaching

poetry as ‘correspondences through the air,’ and his gen erosity of spirit will make him an invaluable addition to the creative writing com munity at Princeton.”

Second Sunday Poetry Reading at Princeton Makes

Princeton Makes, a Princ eton-based artist coopera tive, and Ragged Sky Press, a local publisher focused on poetry, will host a Second Sunday Poetry Reading on Sunday, December 11 at 4 p.m. The readings will take place

“The

Lindbergh Nanny”

Featured at Book Brunch

Mariah Fredericks will talk about her new novel, The Lindbergh Nanny , at a Princeton Public Library book brunch on Sunday, December 11 from 10:45 a.m. to 12 p.m.

She will be discussing the extensive research she used to write about the 1932 kidnapping of 20-monthold Charles Lindbergh Jr. A book signing will follow. Doors will open at 10:45 a.m. for coffee and pas tries. The talk will begin at 11 a.m. Please enter the Community Room via the doors on Hinds Plaza. While registration is requested to help plan for brunch, it is not required in order to at tend. To register visit Princ etonlibrary.org.

Publishers Weekly says, “Fredericks creates sus pense for even those famil iar with the case by suggest ing the real-life culprit had accomplices, thus render ing everyone a suspect.... Historical mystery fans and true crime aficionados will be well pleased.”

The December reading guez and Andrew Con douris. Their readings will be followed by an open mic available to up to 10 audi ence members who would like to read their original poetry.

Rodriguez works as a com munity organizer and her art and poetry are directly con cerned with healing through justice, reconciliation with her ancestry, and connec tion with her roots.

Fredericks was born and raised in New York City, where she still lives today with her family. Her novel Crunch Time was nominat ed for an Edgar in 2007. Her Jane Prescott series, set in 1910s New York, has twice been nominated for the Mary Higgins Clark Award. The event is co-sponsored by the library and the His torical Society of Princeton.

Derek Lidow Reading

At Labyrinth Dec. 8

Keller Center faculty mem ber Derek Lidow presents a fireside chat about his latest book, The Entrepreneurs: The Relentless Quest for Value at Labyrinth Books on December 8 from 6 to 7 p.m. Hosted by the Keller Center, the event is cospon sored by Labyrinth Books, the Princeton Public Library, and Princeton Tech Meetup. For further information, visit Princetonlibrary.org.

Condouris is a writer, as well as an English teacher at Trenton Public Schools. He graduated from Fairleigh Dickinson University’s MFA program, and has been pub lished online and in print in various literary magazines.

Gone Gone All Gone, his first collection of poems, came out this year.

Princeton Makes is a co operative comprised of 34 local artists who work across a range of artistic genres, including painting, drawing, stained glass, sculpture, tex tiles, and jewelry. Customers will be able to support local artists by shopping for a wide variety of art, including large paintings, prints, custommade greeting cards, stained glass lamps and window hang ings, jewelry in a variety of de signs and patterns, and more.

Ragged Sky is a small, highly selective cooperative press. Authors retain copy right and the press uses their experience and professional resources to support the au thor’s work through the edit ing, production, and design process. Ragged Sky Press has historically focused on mature voices, overlooked poets, and women’s perspectives.

For more information, visit princetonmakes.com.

According to Kaihan Krip pendorff, author of Driving Innovation from Within: A Guide for Internal Entre preneurs , “Lidow takes on the study of entrepreneur ship with a long historical lens, revealing compelling macro-patterns across time. A very enjoyable read.”

Lidow is a professor of the practice at the Keller Center for Innovation in Engineering Education at Princeton University. Along with The Entrepreneurs , he is the author of, among others, Startup Leadership: How Savvy Entrepreneurs Turn Their Ideas Into Suc cessful Enterprises . Lidow graduated summa cum laude from Princeton and received a Ph.D. from Stanford as a Hertz Foundation Fellow.

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Ray Davies, The Beatles, and the World Cup Magic of the Summer of ’66

In 1966, the victorious English team famously sang “Sunny Afternoon” in the baths after the World Cup final...

—from @The Kinks

Ray Davies calls it the “mystical fairy tale of ‘Sunny Afternoon’ and the World Cup” in his “unauthorized autobiography” X-Ray (Overlook Press 1995). After landing a song at the top of the charts the same month England’s team was at the top of the sporting world, Davies composed “Waterloo Sunset” the following spring, a British anthem for the ages that he would sing half a century later at the closing ceremony of the 2012 London Olympics.

Clips of the highlights from England’s 4-2 victory over West Germany can be viewed on YouTube, the same black and white images that Ray saw on his home set, including the moment when a beam ing Queen Elizabeth shakes hands with the captain of the British team before hand ing him the cup. In the aftermath of the Queen’s September 8 death, it’s moving to see her happily, unceremoniously caught up in the excitement of a cheering crowd 96,000 strong. Recalling the “magic” of July 30, 1966, Davies writes of himself and his band mates, “Patriotism had never been so strong. We were all war babies, we had all seen Hungary beat England when we were at primary in the early six ties.” When midfielder Bobby Charlton, considered one of the greatest players of all time, “buried his head in his hands as he fell to his knees and wept on the English turf,” Davies “felt like millions of others watching on television: I wanted to be next to him .....”

“Killing Off” the Beatles

Six days later, with England still on a World Cup glory high and Swinging Lon don the center of the pop culture universe, the Beatles released a World Cup of an al bum called Revolver and a single, “Yellow Submarine,” soon to become a pub singalong favorite, like “Sunny Afternoon.” In his preface to the World Cup passage, Davies makes special mention of the fact that “Sunny Afternoon” had replaced the Beatles’ “Paperback Writer” at No. 1 on the UK charts “after it had been there for just one week.” In an interview, he called it “one of the great joys of my life.”

In X-Ray, the gloves are off — “Nobody had ever killed a Beatles record off that quickly before.”

A revealing turn of phrase, “killed off,” especially in light of an earlier passage in X-Ray about the time the Kinks opened for the Beatles when audiences were known

to start screaming for the Fab Four even as lesser groups were trying to perform. Ray sets the scene as the Kinks are being rushed by the organizers, get on and get off, Paul and John are already peering from the wings, Lennon comes out and brazenly inspects Ray’s guitar, (“Is this yours?”), peers through the curtains at the screaming crowd, and when Ray nervously points out, “It’s our turn, you go on after us,” John rubs it in: “You’re just here to keep the crowd occupied until we go on. If you get stuck and run out of songs, we’ll lend you some of ours.”

Besides being captain of the football team at his secondary school in Muswell Hill, Ray was a track star and a boxer, and so he imagines the bell ringing for round one as the curtains open and on come the Kinks with the crowd still chanting “We Want the Beatles.” The chant hits Ray like a se ries of “swift punches to the head” and with each blow, he sees “a flash of white light” as happened during a boxing match with the school cham pion, a staccato night mare of white lights that left him reeling but still standing; in the spirit of his song “I’m Not Like Everybody Else” (“And I’m not gonna take it all lying down, ‘Cause once I get started I go to town”), he refused to let the ref stop the fight. This time his way of counterpunching the Beatles and the audi ence was to open with “You Really Got Me,” soon to become the Kinks’ first No. 1 hit and a rock legend. This frenzied, passionate precursor of Led Zeppelin, Punk, and Heavy Metal was powered to life with his younger brother Dave in the Davies’s front parlor, with Dave literally slashing the amp to produce maximum feedback, as he does now, the howl drowning out the “We Want the Bea tles” chant. “As soon as Dave played the opening chords,” Ray writes, “they were with us. It was as if we had taken the first round.” Even when the Beatles were play ing, some in the crowd were screaming “We want the Kinks.”

“Rain”: Summer of ’66

But let’s get real, there was no beating the Beatles three years later in the sum mer of 1966. And it wasn’t “Paperback Writer” that carried the day, it was the

B-side, “Rain,” which my wife-to-be and I were playing on jukeboxes from Venice to Athens during our summer-long hitchhik ing pre-marital honeymoon. Whenever we were waiting by the road, bereft of juke boxes, we tuned in “Rain” on my battered blue transistor radio — you had to hold it high to catch the song and Lennon’s gritty, searing vocal, the word “Rain” taken to the multisyllabic limit in the long, drawnout ecstasy of the chorus. Somehow it fit perfectly with the state of things that while England followed football to World Cup nirvana, the Beatles were away on a world tour, raising political tensions in Ja pan, causing riots in the Philippines, and coming home in time to release Revolver, the album now generally regarded as their greatest accomplishment.

Back to the Future

All these years later my old hitching partner and I are sitting side by side on the sofa watch ing the zany Ameri cans-in-England series Ted Lasso , where the misadventures of AFC Richmond have a comic energy that reminds us of the mad escapades of Ab Fab’s Edina and Patsy. And having al most given up on The Crown after the open ing episodes of the fifth season, we went back in time to see Lesley Manville’s brilliant turn as Princess Margaret, a mixture of pathos, sense and sensibility that re minded me of her Oscar-worthy perfor mance in Mike Leigh’s Another Year, a film, as Manville put it at the time, “about hearts and minds and heads and souls” and “the stuff of life.”

It was a pleasure to see Manville teaming up with another graduate of Mike Leigh’s school of hard knocks, Imelda Staunton, as the late, once and future Queen Eliza beth. And how great that the still faintly glowing embers of Margaret’s romance with Peter Townsend would be set to the music of Bloomington, Indiana’s Hoagy Carmichael singing his song of songs, “Stardust.”

My favorite of The Crown’s Elizabeths is the first one, as played by Claire Foy. I thought of her when reading Ray Davies in X-Ray describe watching the Corona tion on TV, at age 7, a ceremony young

Ray found arousing, or, as his older self words it, “very erotic ... it had something to do with all these old men in heavy cloaks paying homage to this young, beautiful woman at Westminster Abbey.” In fact, Davies was no stranger to the Royals even before he became Sir Ray, having played Buckingham Palace more than once; in their teens Princes Harry and William were known to be fervent Kinks fans; and in 2004 Queen Elizabeth presented Davies with a CBE, telling him, so he claimed, “I hope they catch the bas tards who shot you!” She was referring to his brush with death in New Orleans that January. Spokesmen for the Queen were quick to insist that Her Majesty would never have used “that sort of language.”

Missing Christine

After listening obsessively to the music of Stevie Nicks for a month while some times skipping over other songs on her Fleetwood Mac albums, the news of Chris tine McVie’s death sent me back to the “white album” and Rumors . Determined to focus on the uniqueness of Nicks, I’d missed out on the power and warmth of McVie’s singing and playing, especially on solo performances like “Songbird” and those inimitable harmonies when McVie, the girl from England’s Lake Country, teamed up with Arizona-born Nicks, the girl from the American desert.

Teammates

According to Rob Jovanovic’s biog raphy, God Save the Kinks , Ray Davies and singer Rod Stewart at tended the same school in Muswell Hill and were football teammates on the first eleven, Stewart running defense, Ray in midfield. Jovanovic says that although Ray and Rod were both passionate Arsenal fans, they were also both ex tremely “competitive.” In other words, “they hated each other,” said Kinks bassist Pete Quaife. That was long ago and far away. It’s safe to say that next Saturday they’ll both be watch ing when England plays France after moving to the quarter finals with a 3-0 victory over Senegal.

October saw the release of a super de luxe newly expanded, remixed, and re mastered box set of “Revolver.” A review in the Guardian mentions a bonus disc that includes “a jaw-dropping sequence of ‘Yellow Submarine’ work tapes” trac ing “the song’s evolution from a fragile, sad wisp sung by John Lennon” to Ringo Starr’s “boisterous stoner singalong.”

BOOK REVIEW
TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 • 14 Don’t forget to order Your Party and Cookie Trays for the Holidays Our full Holiday 2019 Catering Menu is now available online 22 Witherspoon Street, Princeton 609.921.1569 www.olivesprinceton.com Olives Gift Cards available in any denomination And stop by for a great dinner and the perfect gift. Don’t forget to order Your Party and Cookie Trays for the Holidays Our full Holiday 2019 Catering Menu is now available online And stop by for a great dinner and the perfect gift. And stop by for a great dinner and the perfect gift. Olives Gift Cards available in any denomination Don’t forget to order Your Party and Cookie Trays for the Holidays Our Full 2022 Holiday Catering Menu is now available online 22 Witherspoon Street, Princeton • 609.921.1569 • www.olivesprinceton.com Monday - Saturday 7:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m. • Sunday 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.

p.m.

Westminster Community Orchestra Presents Holiday Concert, Sing-along

The Westminster Community Orchestra, conducted by Ruth Ochs, will present their tenth annual family holiday concert on Wednesday, December 14 at 7:30 p.m. “Holiday Chestnuts and Sing-along” will take place in the Robert L. Annis Playhouse on the Westminster Choir College campus of Rider University on Walnut Lane.

While the performance is free, the orchestra will continue its long-standing tradition of accepting freewill monetary donations at the door to benefit and be distributed to area food pantries and service organizations.

The performance will feature holiday favorites such as Leontovich’s Carol of the Bells and Bernard’s Winter

Wonderland. The concert will also include RimskyKorsakov’s “Dance of the Tumblers” from The Snow Maiden, “Valse Lyrique” by Sibelius, Glazunov’s “Snow Variation” from The Seasons, Chase’s Christmas Favorites , and Bach’s “Gigue” from Orchestral Suite No. 3, as well as orchestra member Beth Gaynor LaPat’s Chanukah Songs. The audience is invited to join the orchestra in Finnegan’s C hristmas Sing-along.

Now in her 18th season as conductor and music director of the Westminster Community Orchestra, Ochs has led the orchestra in performances of major orchestral and choral-orchestral works, including symphonies by Beethoven, Brahms, Haydn, Mozart, Saint-Saëns, Shostakovich, and Tchaikovsky. Under her leadership, the

orchestra continues to feature ensembles and soloists from the Westminster Conservatory and highlight works by local and underrepresented composers.

Ochs holds degrees in musicology from Princeton University, orchestral conducting from the University of Texas at Austin, and music from Harvard University. She is currently a senior lecturer in the Princeton University Department of Music, where she is in her 21st season as the conductor of the Princeton University Sinfonia.

Now in its 38th season, the Westminster Community Orchestra is made up of professional and gifted amateur musicians from New Jersey and Pennsylvania. For more information, call (609) 9217104 or visit rider.edu

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 MERCER MUSEUM & FONTHILL CASTLE $40 General $10 Students SERI ES 6PM & 9PM Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall Tue, Dec 13, 2022 TICKETS: PUC.PRINCETON.EDU | 609.258.9220 Performing Arts
COMMUNITY MUSICIANS: Ruth Ochs conducts the Westminster Community Orchestra at a free concert on the Westminster campus. The “Holiday Chestnuts and Sing-along” concert is on December 14 at 7:30
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CHORAL

FAVORITES:

The Newark Boys Chorus School (NBCS) will present its holiday concert program, “Tis the Season,” on December 10 at 5 p.m. at Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street. The program features holiday songs and works written specifically for the NBCS Concert Chorus. NBCS is the only urban, independent boys’ chorus school in the country.  The concert is open to the public and will include a free-will offering. For more information, visit nassauchurch.org.

Performing Arts

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Roxey Ballet Collaborates With Lambertville Historical Society

The Roxey Ballet and the Lambertville Historical Society present “A Very Lambertville Holiday Celebration” on Wednesday, December 21 at 7 p.m. at Music Mountain Theater, 1483 Route 179, Lambertville.

This artistic collaboration between the two nonprofi ts will feature curated selections from a decade’s worth of local holiday music, previously featured on the historical society’s annual CD. The production will include new music and choreography along with last year’s favorites, and special guest appearances by Roxey Ballet alumni.

Since the destruction of the Roxey Ballet Company’s Black Box Theater in Lambertville during Hurricane Ida, the company has moved its headquarters to Frenchtown. The Roxey Ballet remains committed to providing arts to the region. The Mill Ballet School was also forced to move their studio from their Lambertville home due to the effects of the storm, and now provides rehearsal space to the Roxey Ballet at their new home in

OF THE SWEETS:  American

New Hope, Pa. After Hurricane Ida, Music Mountain Theater provided a venue for the company, and a new tradition born from the tragedy was made.

Visit roxeyballet.org for tickets and more information.

Capital Harmony Works Has Active Holiday Season

Trenton Children’s Chorus recently joined Westminster Symphonic Choir and the Orchestra of St. Luke’s at the Frank Sinatra School of the Arts for the New York Coity premiere of El Mesias , Mario Montenegro’s translation of Messiah. The chorus and Trenton Musicmakers make up Capital Harmony Works, which is based in Trenton.

On Sunday, December 11, the chorus will perform as part of American Repertory Ballet’s production of The Nutcracker, accompanied live by the Capital Philharmonic, at Patriots Theater at the War Memorial. Tickets are $25-$55.

Capital Harmony Works performs its Winter Concert on Thursday, December 15 at 5:30 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church, 801 West State Street, Trenton. Tickets are free.

For more information, visit capitalharmony.works.

Original Comedy About Scrooge Is On Stage at Kelsey Theatre

From December 9 through 11, MTM presents the comedy The Trial of Ebenezer Scrooge at Kelsey Theatre on the campus of Mercer County Community College. Toys for Tots gifts will be collected in the lobby before, during, and after the performances.

Playwright Mark Brown takes the “happily ever after” component of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol to an new level. The play begins when, just a year after his miraculous transformation, Ebenezer Scrooge reverts to his old ways. He indignantly

files suit against Jacob Marley and the ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future for breaking and entering, kidnapping, slander, pain and suffering, attempted murder and the intentional infliction of emotional distress. They all relive the night in question as all of the characters from A Christmas Carol take the stand.

Shows are Friday, December 9 at 7 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday, December 10 and 11 at 2 and 7 p.m.

Tickets are $22 for adults and $20 for students, senior citizens and children. Visit Kelseytheatre.org.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 • 16 After Noon Concert Series Thursdays at 12:30pm Princeton University Chapel Performing Dec 8, 2022 JAMES D. HICKS Califon, NJ This is the last performance of the Fall 2022 Term. The After Noon Concert Series will resume for the Spring Term beginning February 2, 2022. DIRECTOR Matthew Parrish WORKS BY Miles Davis Charlie Parker Sonny Rollins And more! PLAYERS Henry Freligh ’25 Alto Sax Elle Lazarski ’26 Alto Sax John Cureton ’26 Trumpet Artha Abeysinghe ’26 Trombone Isadora Knutsen ’25 Guitar Jarod Wille ’24 Piano Nikhil De ’23 Bass Noah Daniel ’23 Drums Jazz Small Groups 1 and Z TUESDAY 12 › 13 › 22 7:30 PM TAPLIN AUDITORIUM FINE HALL FREE | UNTICKETED DIRECTOR Miles Okazaki Classic jazz repertoire and contemporary compositions, with a variety of styles and improvisational approaches. PLAYERS Gabriel Chalick ’24 Trumpet Evan Deturk ’23 Alto Saxophone Jack Johnson II ’23 Tenor Saxophone Adithya Sriram ’24 Baritone Saxophone Noah Daniel ’23 Guitar Alexander Moravcsik ’23 Piano Chloe Raichle ’23 Bass Alexander Macarthur ’25 Drums jazzatprinceton.com music.princeton.edu Meet other classical music-loving singles for in your age group before enjoying a surround-sound holiday concert by the tenThing Brass Ensemble Tuesday, December 13, 2022 | 7:00 PM Maclean House, Princeton University presented in partnership withThe Singles Group Tickets and more information: puc.princeton.edu/do-re-meet @princetonuniversityconcerts Speed Dating PRINCETON UNIVERSITY conducted by DARCY JAMES ARGUE Creative Large Ensemble MUSIC COMPOSED and ARRANGED BY Toshiko Akiyoshi ✳ Patty Darling Eddie Durham ✳ Duke Ellington Benny Golson ✳ Bill Holman ✳ Quincy Jones Thad Jones ✳ Oliver Nelson ✳ Sy Oliver Nelson Riddle ✳ Billy Strayhorn ✳ Ernie Wilkins by Evan DeTurk ’23 Premiering New Work saturday DECEMBER 10, 2022 ✦ 8 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall $15 general ✳ $5 student music.princeton.edu jazzatprinceton.edu 41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton www.tortugasmv.com Available for Lunch & Dinner Mmm..Take-Out Events • Parties • Catering (609) 924-5143
LAND Repertory Ballet’s “The Nutcracker” is on stage this Sunday, December 11 at 3 p.m. at Patriots Theater at the War Memorial in Trenton, accompanied by the Capital Philharmonic of New Jersey and the Trenton Children’s Chorus. For tickets, visit arballet.org. (Photo by Eduardo Patino, NYC).

Mercer Museum Awarded Museums for America Grant

The Mercer Museum in Doylestown, Pa., operated by the Bucks County Histori cal Society (BCHS), recently received a grant to improve the care, management, and cataloging of 500 artifacts installed in its 1916 historic Central Court.

The museum was the recipi ent of an $111,907.00 match ing grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), a federal agency, in 2022 as part of IMLS’ Muse ums for America grant pro gram which will support the Mercer Museum’s aim of pre serving and providing access to the collections entrusted to its care.

The grant will allow the museum to fully perform an inventory, clean, catalog, and assess the condition of objects that are free-standing and sus pended from the ceilings and mezzanines of the Mercer Mu seum’s historic Central Court. A hydraulic lift will be used to survey the artifacts hanging in the core of the Mercer Muse um — unreachable otherwise from the ground. The survey is anticipated to be completed by 2024.

During this time, the grant

project team will photograph these artifacts and collections, assess lighting conditions, and conduct historical and contex tual research to inform future museum planning and enhanc ing the knowledge of museum staff and guests. In the future, data about the Central Court artifacts could enhance visitor engagement through an online catalog, as well as in person at the museum.

Henry Mercer’s unusual pre sentation of artifacts “wowed” visitors in 1916 when the mu seum opened, and Mercer’s vision continues to evoke surprise, awe, and curiosity among modern visitors. By thoroughly documenting and assembling historical informa tion on the nearly 500 artifacts in the museum’s core, this project works toward satisfy ing this curiosity and address ing any gaps in knowledge regarding the artifacts.

“This project will enable the museum to more fully document the Central Court collections, perform compre hensive up-close photography, and point us towards new and creative methods for delivering this content to future guests,” said Cory Amsler, the Bucks County Historical Society’s vice president of collections

and interpretation.

The Mercer Museum proj ect was one of 120 projects nationwide funded through IMLS’ Museums for America grant program in 2022. Of these 120 grants, only eight were for projects in Pennsyl vania. The matching portion of the Mercer Museum grant, $112,504.00, is being sup ported by community con tributions and the museum’s operating funds.

The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s libraries and muse ums. They advance, support, and empower America’s mu seums, libraries, and related organizations through grant making, research, and policy development. Their vision is a nation where museums and libraries work together to transform the lives of individu als and communities.

This project was made pos sible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

The Mercer Museum is lo cated at 84 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa. For more information, visit mercermu seum.org.

Trenton City Museum Presents “Curated by Trenton” Exhibit

The Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie presents “Curated by Trenton,” on view through January 22.

The exhibition’s lead cu rator — photographer, and Artworks Managing Director Craig Shofed — brought to gether five Trenton area cu rators — Lank, Buck Malvo, Heather Palecek, Brass Rab bit, and Habiyb Shu’aib — to mount the show, which fea tures works by more than 20 artists. Shofed said that, while not working within a single theme for the exhibition, the curators have “created a feast for the eyes.”

“These are the curators who have been doing interesting things in respective locations for the last few years,” said Shofed. “Each of them is in ventive in their way, each mak ing a special effort to highlight the talented art community in Trenton or discovering a hid den gem. None of them is un approachable, all are artists in their own right. I’m proud to be working with each one of them.”

The Trenton City Museum, housed in historic Ellarslie Mansion, is open to the public Fridays and Saturdays, 12 to

4 p.m., and Sundays, 1 to 4 p.m. The museum, located in Cadwalader Park, is accessed from Parkside Avenue and has plenty of parking. Admission is free. Donations to support the museum’s programs are appre ciated. For more information, visit ellarslie.org or call (609) 989-1191.

Artworks Trenton Hosts

“Red

Dot 10x10” Fundraiser

One of Artworks Trenton’s signature events, the “Red Dot 10x10 Fundraising Exhi bition,” enters its 12th year on December 10 with hopes of being bigger and better than before. Addison Vincent, ar tistic director of Artworks Trenton said, “During the pandemic, we utilized the in ternet and a virtual gallery to keep the 10x10 alive. We are carrying the virtual exhibition into this year’s event, learn ing that the popularity of the 10x10 was far reaching, and it gives people accessibility without having to be here in person. Whether someone is buying their first piece of orig inal art, or adding to their col lection, they will find a piece of art to fall in love with.”

Managing Director Craig Shofed spoke to the accessi bility for artists, “The 10x10 is an example of Artworks overall mission of making art accessible to everyone. Any one can participate in the exhibition, from refrigerator artists, budding artists testing the waters and showing their work for the first time, right up to the seasoned veteran, we accept all works created for the event, provided they fit the 10”x10” criteria.”

The works are all created specifically for Artworks. Works in oil, acrylic, mixed media, photography, pastel,

watercolor, and more can be found in this exhibition. Each artwork sells for $100, with $50 going to the artist, and $50 going to Artworks. In many cases, the artists choose to donate the full proceeds of the sale to Artworks, which is used for programming throughout the year.

Artworks Trenton members receive a one-hour preview and ability to purchase first,

starting at 5 p.m. on Decem ber 10. The opening recep tion and sale for the general public in-person and online will begin at 6 p.m. on De cember 10 and run through 9 p.m. Sales will remain open until January 7.

Artworks Trenton is located at 19 Everett Alley, Trenton. For more information, visit artworkstrenton.org.

open house

Colony / Dor Guez

Saturday, December 10, 1–4 p.m.

In photographs, installations, and a three-channel video, Guez mines archival photographs of Jerusalem to reveal the role photography played in telling the history and amplifying the symbolism of this place. Join the artist and Mitra Abbaspour, Haskell Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, for the exhibition’s opening.

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 Art
HISTORIC CENTRAL COURT: The Mercer Museum in Doylestown, Pa., has received a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services which will help with the care, management, and cataloging of 500 artifacts that are free-standing and suspended from the ceilings and mez zanines of its 1916 Central Court. “YELLOWSTONE RIVER”: This work by Alina Marin-Bliach is part of the “Members Holiday Art Exhibit and Boutique,” on view through December 18 at Gallery 14 Fine Art Photography, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell. Gallery hours are Saturday and Sunday from 12 to 5 p.m. or by appointment. For more informa tion, visit gallery14.org.
This event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970, with additional support from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts. Both images: stills from Dor Guez, Colony 2021. Collection of the artist. © Dor Guez. Courtesy of the artist and Goodman Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa; Dvir Gallery, Tel Aviv, Israel; and Carlier Gebauer Gallery, Berlin, Germany FREE ADMISSION 158 Nassau Street
“CURATED BY TRENTON”: This work by Asia Popinska is fea tured in the show curated by Buck Malvo, one of six cu rators of “Curated by Trenton.” The exhibition is on view through January 22 at the Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie in Cadwalader Park.
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experience,” adding that “Shiranie’s paintings are captivating and liberat ing at the same time.”

Perera and Hayes developed a plan for bringing Perera’s work to Nassau Street, with the exhibition “Shirankala” installed in mid-November in the lobby of Songbird Capital. The paintings in the show are large and mid-sized acrylics on canvas featuring abstract works and landscapes. Pere ra’s color palette is saturated and varied, with the works in the show ranging from a se rene sunrise in cool tones to a warm-hued graphic diptych rendered across two canvases.

As a self-taught artist who has cultivated her painting practice over the past six years, Perera said she has always been drawn to ex perimenting with color and texture. She pursued experi ments in jewelry design and gardening, before adding painting to her repertoire.

“Mixing new colors has always amazed me, even as a child,” said Perera. “I remember being captivated using different proportions of yellow and blue to create different shades of green.”

of Perera’s work. Visitors are welcome to schedule a studio tour and gallery visit at Shi rankala Art Gallery by calling (609) 331-2624.

To see more of Perera’s work, visit shirankala.com/ gallery.

Area Exhibits

Art@Bainbridge, 158 Nassau Street, has “Colony / Dor Geuz” December 10 through February 12. artmu seum.princeton.edu.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambert ville, has “Metamorpho sis: December” December 8 through January 1. An opening reception is on De cember 10 from 4 to 7 p.m. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com.

Art on Hulfish, 11 Hul fish Street, has “Samuel Fosso: Affirmative Acts” through January 29. artmu seum.princeton.edu.

the Marie L. Matthews Gal lery. drgreenway.org.

Friend Center for Engi neering Education, Princ eton University, has Ricardo Barros’ “An Entanglement of Time and Space,” through December 31. ricardobar ros.com/entanglement.

Gallery 14 Fine Art Pho tography, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “Holiday Art Exhibit and Boutique Sale” through December 18. Gal lery hours are Saturday and Sunday 12 to 5 p.m. or by appointment. gallery14.org.

Gourgaud Gallery, 23AA North Main Street, Cran bury, has “Beauty of the Earth” through December 28. cranburyartscouncil.org.

Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamil ton, has “Nightforms: Infi nite Wave” by Kip Collective through April 2, “Roberto Lugo: The Village Potter” through January 8, and “Fragile: Earth” through Jan uary 8, among other exhib its. Timed tickets required. groundsforsculpture.org.

Morven Museum & Gar den, 55 Stockton Street, has “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jer sey” through March and the online exhibits “Slav ery at Morven,” “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898,” and others. morven.org.

The Present Day Club, 72 Stockton Street, has watercolors and acrylics by Princeton artist David Meadow through Decem ber 16. For gallery hours, call (609) 924-1014. david meadow.com

Princeton University Library has “Records of Resistance: Documenting Global Activism 1933-2021” through December 11. li brary.princeton.edu

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has “Karen Wallo” through Jan uary 3. “Art Space” is at the 254 Nassau Street location through January 3. small worldcoffee.com.

“Shirankala”

Exhibit on View at Songbird Capital

“Shirankala,” an art exhi bition at 14 Nassau Street inside Songbird Capital, features 15 paintings by lo cal artist Shiranie Perera. The show is on view through January 31 and is open to the public on Saturdays from 1-6 p.m. Private tours are available by appointment on Thursdays and Fridays from 5-6 p.m. Call (609) 331-2624

to schedule an appointment. This exhibition, located on the first floor of the historic Bank & Trust Building, de veloped out of a fortuitous meeting between Perera and Jie Hayes, the founder of Songbird Capital. “When I walked into Shiranie’s gal lery/studio in Lawrenceville one late Friday afternoon in September, my plan was a 15-minute visit,” said Hayes. That visit ended up being two and a half hours of what Hayes calls a “mesmerizing

Perera is inspired by the landscape and botanicals of Sri Lanka, where she was born and raised, as well as by painters like Henri Matisse, Mark Rothko, and Jackson Pollock. These inspirations are evident in the canvases she creates. “My goal is to uplift people through my paintings,” she said.

As a small business owner, in 2021 Perera founded Shi rankala Art Gallery, located at 21 Craven Lane in Lawrencev ille. The exhibition at Songbird Capital is titled “Shirankala” to introduce the public to a range

Arts Council of Princ eton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Annual Mem ber Show” December 10 through December 22. An opening reception is on De cember 10 from 3 to 5 p.m. artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Fox & Roach, Realtors, 253 Nas sau Street, has “Intersec tion: Four Voices in Abstrac tion” through January 27. D&R Greenway Land Trust Johnson Educa tion Center, 1 Preserva tion Place, has “Land, Light, Spirit” through March 10 in

Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farm stead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and In novator’s Gallery,” “Princ eton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. Museum hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 12 to 4 p.m., Thursday to 7 p.m. princetonhistory.org

Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Walk This Way” through January 15, “(re)Frame: Community Perspectives on the Michen er Art Collection” through March 5, and “Walé Oyéji dé: Flight of the Dreamer” through April 23. michener artmuseum.org

Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, has “In Celebration of Old Trees” through December 11. ter huneorchards.com.

West Windsor Arts Cen ter, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “Off the Wall Holiday Market” and “Artists for Ukraine” through January 7. west windsorarts.org.

artist conversation

Samuel Fosso Thursday, December 15, 5:30 p.m.

Nigerian-Cameroonian artist Samuel Fosso is one of the most compelling photographers working in self-portraiture today. Samuel Fosso: Affirmative Acts is the first museum survey of his work in the United States. Fosso and Princeton Professor Chika Okeke-Agulu, curator, artist, and director of the Program in African Studies, discuss Fosso’s photography practice, life experience, and the series presented in the exhibition. Reception to follow.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 • 18
“SHIRANKALA”: An exhibition of works by Shiranie Perera is on view through January 31 at Songbird Capital, 14 Nassau Street, on Saturdays from 1 to 6 p.m. or by appointment.
LEFT: Samuel Fosso, Tati—Le Chef qui a vendu l’Afrique aux colons 1997. The Walther Collection, New York / Neu-Ulm. © Samuel Fosso. Courtesy the artist; Jean Marc Patras, Paris; and The Walther Collection RIGHT: Samuel Fosso, 70’s Lifestyle 1976–78, printed 2022. Museum purchase, Carl Otto von Kienbusch Jr. Memorial Collection Fund. © Samuel Fosso. Courtesy the artist and Jean Marc Patras, Paris Samuel Fosso: Affirmative Acts is curated by Princeton University Professor Chika Okeke-Agulu with Princeton students Silma Berrada, Class of 2022; Lawrence Chamunorwa, doctoral student; Maia Julis, Class of 2023; and Iheanyi Onwuegbucha, doctoral student. Organized by the Princeton University Art Museum in collaboration with The Walther Collection. This event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970, with additional support from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts. FREE ADMISSION 11 Hulfish Street Visit us at 56 Nassau Street or shop online at princetonmuseumstore.org 609.258.5600
on
your purchases. Discover one-of-a-kind pieces
by expert regional
in
unexpected gifts for everyone on your list. Necklace by Ashka Dymel; Rialto Coupe glasses by Sir/Madam; Mug by Rich Brown
Become a Museum member and enjoy a special discount
all
handcrafted
artisans, with works
glass, ceramics, textiles, and jewelry— gorgeous and
ONLINE
Preceding Page
www.towntopics.com Art Continued from

’Tis the Season

holiday happenings

HOLIDAY MAGIC GOING ON NOW:

SKATING ON THE SQUARE: Through February 26 at Palmer Square’s “eco-friendly” outdoor synthetic skating rink located on Hulfish Street Behind the Nassau Inn. Open skate Thursday-Friday, 4-7 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 12-3 p.m. and 4-7p.m. Special hours on holidays and the week between Christmas and New Year’s Day. $10 cash per person/$12 plus fees with credit card. Bring your own skates or borrow theirs (skate rental included in ticket price). Tickets sold at the door only. No reservations. All skaters/guardians must sign an electronic waiver to be eligible to participate. palmersquare.com/event/ skating-on-the-square.

WEEKEND HOLIDAY ENTERTAINMENT:

CAROLERS ON THE SQUARE: Every Saturday and Sunday through December 18 from 12-2 p.m. While you’re here shopping, dining, and crossing off all the gifts on your list you just might run into carolers singing acappella and Santa strolling from corner to corner in Palmer Square. December 10: Harmonics Quartet; December 11:

Courtney’s Carolers; and December 17 and 18: Spiced Punch. palmersquare.com/ events

Wednesday, December 7

CASA FOR CHILDREN INFORMATION SESSION: At CASA for Children of Mercer & Burlington Counties, 1450 Parkside Avenue, Suite 22, Ewing, (609) 4340050; casamb.org. Information session for prospective volunteers. CASA for Children is a nonprofit organization that recruits, trains, and supervises community volunteers who speak up in Family Court for the best interests of Mercer County children that have been removed from their families due to abuse and/or neglect and placed in the foster care system. 9-10 a.m.

FESTIVAL OF TREES: At Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street. (609) 924-8144; morven.org. Annual juried collection of ornamental trees and mantels displayed throughout the museum’s galleries. $10. On view Wednesday-Sunday through January 8. 10 a.m.4 p.m.

HOLIDAY STORY TIME: With the Princeton Storytelling Circle held in the Stockton Education Center at Morven, 55 Stockton

Street. Starts with a selfguided tour of the Festival of Trees. $15-$25. Morven. org. 5:30 p.m.

“A CHRISTMAS CAROL”: At McCarter Theatre, 91 University Place. (609) 258-2787; mccarter.org. Follow Ebenezer Scrooge on a magical journey through Christmas past, present, and future. $35 to $65. 7:30 p.m.

Thursday, December 8

SHOP EVENING AT HOMESTEAD PRINCETON: Join us for a beverage and light snack and pick up your favorite gifts. Visit with friends while we wrap. With your purchase, enter to win a holiday raffle of our best-selling Frasier Fir candle, holiday dish towel, and more (a $75 retail value). 300 Witherspoon Street. 5-7 p.m.

FONTHILL CASTLE GUIDED EVENING TOURS: Delight in the splendor of a historic guided evening tour at Fonthill Castle decked out for the holidays. Fonthill Castle was the home of Henry Chapman Mercer and an early example of reinforced concrete architecture. Discover Mercer’s renowned ceramic tiles during these 45-minute guided historic tours of the castle’s

unique rooms and artifacts. Mercermuseum.org/holidays. 5-7:30 p.m.

“A CHRISTMAS CAROL”: At McCarter Theatre, 91 University Place. (609) 2582787; mccarter.org. Follow Ebenezer Scrooge on a magical journey through Christmas past, present, and future. $35 to $65. 7:30 p.m.

Friday, December 9

HOLIDAY ARRANGEMENT AND WINE TASTING: At Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Owners Pam Mount and Reuwai Mount Hanewald host this workshop that includes container, greens, flowers, decorative items, and a flight of wine. $45. Register at terhuneorchards.com. 6:30 p.m.

“THE TRIAL OF EBENEZER SCROOGE”: At Kelsey Theatre, Mercer County Community College. Kelsey. mccc.edu. 7 p.m.

“A CHRISTMAS CAROL”: At McCarter Theatre, 91 University Place. (609) 2582787; mccarter.org. Follow Ebenezer Scrooge on a magical journey through Christmas past, present, and future. $35 to $65. 7:30 p.m.

AN EVENING OF READINGS AND CAROLS: 30th ANNIVERSARY: Presented by The Choirs of Westminster Choir College. At

Princeton University Chapel. Rider.edu/arts. 8 p.m.

Saturday, December 10

HOLIDAY LIGHTS MEANDER DAYS: Delight in the splendor of historic Fonthill Castle decked out for the holidays, and tour at your own pace. Fonthill Castle was the home of Henry Chapman Mercer and an early example of reinforced concrete architecture. mercermuseum. org/holidays. 10 a.m.-7:30 p.m.

FAMILY HOLIDAY ARRANGEMENT WORKSHOP: At Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Pam Mount shows families how to create a festive arrangement with greens, flowers, berries, and other decorative items. $30 for one adult and participating child. Registration and pre-payment required. Terhuneorchards.com. 10 a.m.

“THE TRIAL OF EBENEZER SCROOGE”: At Kelsey Theatre, Mercer County Community College. Kelsey. mccc.edu. 2 and 7 p.m.

HARMONICS QUARTET: Entertains on Palmer Square. 12-2 p.m.

HOLIDAY SEASON WEEKEND FESTIVITIES: At Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Activities for the whole family, winter

wonderland, barnyard animals, and more. Terhuneorchards.com. Visit with Santa from 12-3 p.m.; wine tasting from 12-5 p.m.; live music from 1-4 p.m.

“A CHRISTMAS CAROL”: At McCarter Theatre, 91 University Place. (609) 258-2787. mccarter.org. Follow Ebenezer Scrooge on a magical journey through Christmas past, present, and future. $35 to $65. 1 and 7 p.m.

OFF THE WALL HOLIDAY MARKET: At West Windsor Arts Council, 952 Alexander Road. Artists for Ukraine Weekend with puppet making demo, Ukrainian pastries, and more. Westwindsorarts.org. 12:305:30 p.m.

“THE NUTCRACKER”: Presented by Princeton Youth Ballet, choreographed by Risa Kaplowitz, at Princeton High School Performing Arts Center, 16 Walnut Lane. $25. Recommended for ages 4 and up. Princetonyouthballet.org. 4 p.m.

AN EVENING OF READINGS AND CAROLS: 30th ANNIVERSARY: Presented by The Choirs of Westminster Choir College. At Princeton University Chapel. Rider.edu/arts. 8 p.m.

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022
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Fees and/or pre-registration required for some events. Additional dates/ performances may not be listed here. Please see event website for full details.
TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 • 20 30TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION DECEMBER 9 & 10 8 P.M. | PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CHAPEL AN EVENING OF Readings Carols AND WESTMINSTER CHOIR COLLEGE OF RIDER UNIVERSITY PRESENTS Westminster Choir College of Rider University’s popular holiday concert returns featuring performances by the Westminster Chapel Choir, Westminster Symphonic Choir, Westminster Jubilee Singers, Westminster Concert Bell Choir and the Westminster Choir. RIDER.EDU/ARTS For tickets, visit:

Sunday, December 11

HOLIDAY LIGHTS MEANDER DAYS: Delight in the splendor of historic Fonthill Castle decked out for the holidays, and tour at your own pace. Fonthill Castle was the home of Henry Chapman Mercer and an early example of reinforced concrete architecture. mercermuseum.org/ holidays. 10 a.m.-7:30 p.m.

“WASHINGTON’S LANDING IN NEW JERSEY’: Depicted by reenactors, historians, and others, telling the story of the crossing and the march to Trenton through the eyes of those who lived it. Wcpa-nj.com/landing. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

OFF THE WALL HOLIDAY MARKET: At West Windsor Arts Council, 952 Alexander Road. Artists for Ukraine Weekend with puppet making demo, Ukrainian pastries, and more. Westwindsorarts.org. 12:305:30 p.m.

“A CHRISTMAS CAROL”: At McCarter Theater, 91 University Place. (609) 258-2787; mccarter.org. Follow Ebenezer Scrooge on a magical journey through Christmas past, present, and future. $35 to $65. 1 and 5:30 p.m.

work or after school drop off. Get a sweet breakfast treat, visit with friends while your gifts get wrapped. With your purchase, enter to win a holiday raffle of our bestselling Frasier Fir candle, holiday dish towel, and more (a $75 retail value). 300 Witherspoon Street; homesteadprinceton.com. 8:30-11 a.m.

EXPLORE HYGGE AND THE ART OF COSINESS: “ Food, Holistic Strategies, and Seasonal Tips,” presented by Vanessa Young of Thirsty Radish and sponsored by Mercer County Library System via Zoom. Email hopeprogs@mcl.org to receive a link. 7 p.m.

Wednesday, December 14

Host Your Next Special Event at One of our Beautiful and Historic Locations — Charming Palmer Square or Scenic Kingston Along the Banks of the Millstone River Terra

Host Your Next Special Event at One of our Beautiful and Historic Locations — Charming Palmer Square or Scenic Kingston Along the Banks of the Millstone River

Host Your Next Special Event at

PERSONALIZED ORNAMENT DAY: At Homestead Princeton, 300 Witherspoon Street. Come and purchase a personalized ornament made for you, your friends, and family. These ornaments are wood and painted with calligraphy letters. It’s a keepsake gift for years to come. 2-5 p.m.

“THE NUTCRACKER”: Presented by Princeton Youth Ballet, choreographed by Risa Kaplowitz, at Princeton High School Performing Arts Center, 16 Walnut Lane. $25. Recommended for ages 4 and up. Princetonyouthballet.org. 12 and 4 p.m.

CARILLON CONCERT: At Princeton University’s Graduate Tower; listen from outside the building. 1 p.m.

“THE TRIAL OF EBENEZER SCROOGE”: At Kelsey Theatre, Mercer County Community College. Kelsey. mccc.edu. 2 and 7 p.m.

COURTNEY’S CAROLERS: Serenade shoppers on Palmer Square. 12–2 p.m.

“MY DANCING DAY”: The Raritan Valley Choral Society a concert of seasonal songs performed by The Raritan Valley Choral Society at the Church of Saint Charles Borromeo, 47 Skillman Road, Skillman. $10 at the door; holiday cookie extravaganza. Masks strongly encouraged. Raritanvalleychorus.org. 3 p.m.

One of our Beautiful and Historic Locations — Charming Palmer Square or Scenic Kingston Along the Banks of the Millstone River Terra

(609) 252 - 9680 29 Hulfish Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 mediterrarestaurant.com

(609) 497-1777 4484 Route 27, Kingston, NJ 08528 enoterra.com

(609) 252 - 9680 • 29 Hulfish Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 mediterrarestaurant.com (609) 497-1777 • 4484 Route 27, Kingston, NJ 08528 enoterra.com

Host Your Next Special Event at One of our Beautiful and Historic Locations — Charming Palmer Square or Scenic Kingston Along the Banks of the Millstone River 8/24/22 12:49 PM

8/24/22 12:49 PM

HOLIDAY SEASON WEEKEND FESTIVITIES: At Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Activities for the whole family, winter wonderland, barnyard animals, and more. Terhuneorchards.com. Visit with Santa from 12-3 p.m.; wine tasting from 12-5 p.m.; live music from 1-4 p.m.

“THE NUTCRACKER”: Performed by American Repertory Ballet at Patriots Theater at The War Memorial, Trenton. Arballet.org. 3 p.m.

Tuesday, December 13

SHOP MORNING AT HOMESTEAD PRINCETON: For moms, dads, and anyone that needs to get gifts before

RELAXED PERFORMANCE OF “A CHRISTMAS CAROL”: While open to everyone, relaxed performances are designed to serve individuals on the autism spectrum, those with cognitive or developmental disabilities, or other sensory sensitivities. At a relaxed performance, the play is performed at the same high quality as always, with the light and sound levels adjusted slightly to create a more sensory-sensitive environment. Volunteers are on hand to assist parents and caregivers, a family restroom is available, and there are designated activity and quiet areas in the lobby. Relaxed performances are a “shush-free” zone where patrons are free to talk and leave their seats throughout the performance, as well as bring their own snacks, fidgets, and communications devices with them to their seats. Most of all, a relaxed performance is a

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21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022
’Tis the Season Continued from Page 19 (609) 497-1777 4484 Route 27, Kingston, NJ 08528 enoterra.com (609) 252 - 9680 29 Hulfish Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 mediterrarestaurant.com Host Your Next Special Event at One of our Beautiful and Historic Locations — Charming Palmer Square or Scenic Kingston Along the Banks of the Millstone River Terra Momo FP_1-20.indd 1 8/24/22 12:49 PM (609) 497-1777 4484 Route 27, Kingston, NJ 08528 enoterra.com (609) 252
Continued
- 9680 29 Hulfish Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 mediterrarestaurant.com
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Momo
1 8/24/22 12:49 PM (609) 497-1777 4484 Route 27, Kingston, NJ 08528 enoterra.com (609) 252 - 9680 29 Hulfish Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 mediterrarestaurant.com
Momo FP_1-20.indd 1 8/24/22 12:49 PM (609) 497-1777 4484 Route 27, Kingston, NJ 08528 enoterra.com (609) 252 - 9680 29 Hulfish Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 mediterrarestaurant.com
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23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 A M ERI CAN RE PERTO RY BAL L E T presents November25- 27 McCarterTheatreCenter • Princeton December11 PatriotsTheaterattheWarMemorial Trenton withTheCapitalPhilharmonicofNewJerseyandTrentonChildren’sChorus December16- 18 StateTheatreNewJersey • NewBrunswick withTheARBOrchestraandPrincetonGirlchoir arballet.org ETHANSTIEFEL,ARTISTICDIRECTOR JULIEDIANAHENCH,EXECUTIVEDIRECTOR

HOLIDAY MENU

APPETIZERS

Stuffed Clams $8.99 per lb

Clams Casino $12.99 tray

Clams Oreganata $12.99 tray

Mussels White or Red $13.99 tray

Oysters Florentine $14.99 tray

Artichoke Spinach Crab Dip $14.99 1/2 pt

Shrimp Cocktail (18-20 per lb avg.) $28.99 per lb

Coconut Shrimp $29.99 per lb

Gravlax $39.99 per lb

House-Smoked Salmon $39.99 per lb

Baby Crab Cakes $39.99 per lb

DIPS & P Â T É S

Jose’s Salsa $4.99 1/2 pt

Jose’s Guacamole $6.99 1/2 pt

Smoked Tuna Pâté $9.99

Montauk

Smoked

SEAFOOD SALADS

Seafood Ceviche $18.99 per lb

Jumbo Shrimp Salad $29.99 per lb

Fruits de Mer $29.99 per lb

Grilled Octopus Salad $29.99 per lb

Lobster Salad $ MP

SEAFOOD PLATTERS

House-Smoked Salmon $54.99

House-Smoked Fish (assorted) $59.99

Shrimp Cocktail (40 count) $59.99

Shrimp Cocktail & Crab Claws (20/25 count) $69.99

Have a special holiday occasion? Give us a call to inquire about custom seafood platters.

HALF PANS

each pan serves 4-6 people

Mussels & Garlic (approx. 2.5 lbs) $34.99

Fish Taco Tray (8 tacos) $35.99

Seafood Paella (approx. 2.5 lbs) $44.99

Shrimp Creole (approx. 2 lbs) $44.99

Buffalo Calamari (approx. 2 lbs) $44.99

RAW BAR (half doz.)

Oysters on the Half Shell

East Point, Cape May, NJ $14.99

Savage Blondes, P.E.I. $17.99

Tuxedo Point, P.E.I. $17.99

Moonstone, RI $18.99

Beausoleil, New Bruns., CAN $18.99

Sweet Necks, Massachusetts $18.99

Pemaquid Point, Maine $20.99

Clams on the Half Shell

Little Necks, Middle Necks & Top Necks, Cape Charles, VA $6.99$8.99

MAIN DISHES

Salmon Burgers $8.99 each

Lemon Crusted Tilapa $6.99 each

Crab Cakes $10.99 each

Korean Spice Salmon $11.99 each

Lobster Tail $15.99 each

Cioppino Nassau $17.99 per lb

Shrimp Creole $17.99 per lb

Stuffed Atlantic Salmon $29.99 per lb

SOUPS & CHOWDERS

Mushroom Bisque $8.99 pt

Butternut Squash $8.99 pt

New England Clam Chowder $8.99 pt

Manhattan Clam Chowder $8.99 pt

Blue Point She-Crab Chowder $8.99 pt

Lobster Bisque $9.99 pt

SIDE DISHES (per lb.)

Garlic Smashed Potatoes $9.99

Mashed Sweet Potatoes $9.99

Grilled Vegetables $9.99

Roasted Brussels Sprouts $9.99

Creamed Spinach $9.99

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 • 24 The BEST GIFT EVER! Learn to Fly at the Princeton Flying School PRINCETON AIRPORT INTRODUCTORY FLIGHT $ 249 Princeton Airport, 41 Airpark Road, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 609-921-3100 www.princetonflyingschool.com Get Your Gift Certificate at www.princetonflyingschool.com This Holiday Season Shop Local in Princeton The joy of the holiday season is in giving. And the best gift you can give local businesses is your support. It’s easy to do in Princeton, where you’ll find unique and wonderful shops and restaurants around every corner. Bella Boutique Miya Table & Home Tipple & Rose Johnny Was Share your finds on social media! #ShopSmall #ShopPrinceton PRINCETON BUSINESS PARTNERSHIP princetonbusiness.org Shop our famous seafood platters, extensive oyster selection, delicious seafood apps, entrées, caviar & more! Scan to place your order online or order by phone at 609-921-0620. 256 Nassau St., Princeton, NJ 609-921-0620 • @nassaustreetseafood www.nassaustreetseafood.com
1/2 pt
Clam Dip $9.99 1/2 pt
Salmon Pâté $9.99 1/2 pt
Smoked Salmon Tartare $9.99 1/2 pt
Order by Dec. 20th • Free Parking Behind Ivy Inn!
25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 82 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08542 www.nassaudiner.com | Follow Us @NassauDiner Our curated classics are made from scratch and elevated with fresh, quality ingredients. Classic Comfort Foodwith a Sophisticated Style &
27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022
Holidays at Fonthill Castle is generously sponsored by:
TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 • 28 Wishing all a Bright & Healthy Holiday Season and a Happy New Year! From the entire Witherspoon Media Group Team Support Local! ON THE SQUARE Holidays All season long CHECK OFF ALL YOUR SEASONAL TO-DOS HERE! THE SQUARE IS YOUR ONE-STOP-SHOP FOR MAKING HOLIDAY MEMORIES, AND PICKING OUT ONE-OF-A KIND GIFTS FOR YOUR LOVED ONES! DECEMBER 20 MENORAH LIGHTING STARTS AT 4PM NOVEMBER 19, 2022 - FEBRUARY 26, 2023 EVERY THURSDAY & FRIDAY | 4PM - 7PM EVERY SATURDAY & SUNDAY | 12 - 3PM & 4 - 7PM SKATING ON THE SQUARE *To inquire about private parties, please contact events@palmersquare.com NOVEMBER 26, 2022 - DECEMBER 18, 2022 EVERY SATURDAY & SUNDAY | 12PM - 2PM WEEKEND HOLIDAY MUSIC & STROLLING SANTA ARTS COUNCIL OF PRINCETON & PALMER SQUARE EVERY SUNDAY DECEMBER 4-18 | 11AM - 1PM DECEMBER DIY WORKSHOPS SCAN ME DECEMBER 24 CHRISTMAS EVE CAROLING STARTS AT 4:30PM HOLIDAY HOURS Open 12/23 until 7 p.m. Open Christmas Eve until 5 p.m. 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds 609-252-9797 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Burmese rubies and emeralds 609-252-9797 Montgomery Rudolph’s Burmese On Sale 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Burmese rubies and emeralds On Sale NOW 25% OFF 609-252-9797 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds On Sale NOW 25% OFF 609-252-9797 1325 Montgomery Rudolph’s Burmese On Sale NOW 609-252-9797 HOLIDAY HOURS Open 12/23 until 7 p.m. Open Christmas Eve until 5 p.m. 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds On Sale NOW 25% OFF 609-252-9797 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds On Sale NOW 609-252-9797 1325 Route 206 Montgomery Shopping Skillman, Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies 25 609-252-9797 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds On Sale NOW 609-252-9797 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Burmese rubies and emeralds On Sale NOW 609-252-9797 1325 Route 206 Montgomery Shopping Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and 25 609-252-9797 HOLIDAY HOURS Open 12/23 until 7 p.m. Open Christmas Eve until 5 p.m. 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds On Sale NOW 25% OFF 609-252-9797 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds OFF 609-252-9797 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds % OFF 609-252-9797 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds % 609-252-9797 HOLIDAY HOURS Open 12/23 until 7 p.m. Open Christmas Eve until 5 p.m. 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ On Sale NOW 25% OFF 609-252-9797 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds 609-252-9797 Montgomery Rudolph’s Burmese On Sale 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds 609-252-9797 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ OFF 609-252-9797 1325 Montgomery Rudolph’s Burmese On Sale NOW 609-252-9797 HOLIDAY HOURS Open 12/23 until 7 p.m. Open Christmas Eve until 5 p.m. 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds On Sale NOW 25% OFF 609-252-9797 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds On Sale NOW 25% OFF 609-252-9797 Montgomery Rudolph’s Burmese On Sale 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds On Sale NOW 25% OFF 609-252-9797 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds On Sale NOW 25% OFF 609-252-9797 1325 Montgomery Rudolph’s Burmese On Sale NOW 609-252-9797 On Sale NOW 25% OFF Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds HOLIDAY HOURS Open 12/23 until 8 p.m. & Christmas Eve until 5 p.m. Open on MONDAYS! 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center • Skillman, NJ HOLIDAY HOURS Open 12/23 until 7 p.m. Open Christmas Eve until 5 p.m. 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds On Sale NOW 25% OFF 609-252-9797 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds On Sale NOW 25% OFF 609-252-9797 Montgomery Burmese On Sale 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds On Sale NOW 25% OFF 609-252-9797 1325 Route 206 North Montgomery Shopping Center Skillman, NJ Rudolph’s radiance: Burmese rubies and emeralds On Sale NOW 25% OFF 609-252-9797 1325 Montgomery Rudolph’s Burmese On Sale 609-252-9797 Woolverton Inn Bed & Breakfast 6 Woolverton Rd. • Stockton, NJ 08559 609-397-0802 • www.woolvertoninn.com Beautiful Wedding, Elopement and Honeymoon Packages Ideal setting for offsite meetings and retreats Warm up by the fire and enjoy the pastoral setting…. Woolverton Inn Bed & Breakfast 6 Woolverton Rd. • Stockton, NJ 08559 609-397-0802 • www.woolvertoninn.com The perfect choice for a relaxing winter getaway... Private entrance cottages with fireplaces and jetted tubs Beautiful wedding, elopement and proposal packages BreakfastPackages getaway... tubs getaway... Woolverton Inn Bed & Breakfast 6 Woolverton Rd. • Stockton, NJ 08559 609-397-0802 • www.woolvertoninn.com Beautiful Wedding, Elopement and Honeymoon Packages Ideal setting for offsite meetings and retreats Warm up by the fire and enjoy the pastoral setting…. Woolverton Inn Bed & Breakfast 6 Woolverton Rd. • Stockton, NJ 08559 609-397-0802 • www.woolvertoninn.com The perfect choice for a relaxing winter getaway... Private entrance cottages with fireplaces and jetted tubs Beautiful wedding, elopement and proposal packages Woolverton Inn Bed & Breakfast 6 Woolverton Rd. • Stockton, NJ 08559 609-397-0802 • www.woolvertoninn.com Beautiful Wedding, Elopement and Honeymoon Packages Ideal setting for offsite meetings and retreats Warm up by the fire and enjoy the pastoral setting…. Woolverton Inn Bed & Breakfast 6 Woolverton Rd. • Stockton, NJ 08559 609-397-0802 • www.woolvertoninn.com The perfect choice for a relaxing winter getaway... Private entrance cottages with fireplaces and jetted tubs Beautiful wedding, elopement and proposal packages Woolverton Inn Bed & Breakfast 6 Woolverton Rd. • Stockton, NJ 08559 609-397-0802 • www.woolvertoninn.com Beautiful Wedding, Elopement and Honeymoon Packages Ideal setting for offsite meetings and retreats Warm up by the fire and enjoy the pastoral setting…. 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29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 Tickets are on sale now at P R I N C E T O N Y O U T H B A L L E T T h e N u t c r a c k e r
December 10th | 4 pm December 11th | 12 pm & 4 pm Princeton High School Performing Arts Center 16 Walnut Lane, Princeton, NJ $25 $35 (plus service fee) princetonyouthballet.org
Choreography by Risa Kaplowitz | Adapted by Talin Kenar
The premier home cleaning West Windsor, Hopewell, Robbinsville, Pennington, Est. NEW CUSTOM The premier home cleaning company in Mercer County Now serving Princeton, Lawrenceville, West Windsor, Hopewell, Robbinsville, Pennington, Washington Crossing and more! Est. in 2015 NEWDISCOUNT:CUSTOM 10% OFF First Deep Clean Saves You Time • Safety First • Only the Best Quality Seamless Communication • Cash Free Payment Taking Great Pride in our Work, and the Special Touches that Count! TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 • 30

PHIL HOLT

08540 (Hopewell Township)

on almost 7 acres was brought to life by builders of Lasley Brahaney. The striking primary make up a 90 degree curve that doesn’t fully cherry cabinetry and rolling barn doors bring include a 20-foot high family room with a spiral of its own where corner windows light up the windows, as well as your choice of an office or generously sized bedrooms with access to a long, casual entertaining and hours of play.

“THE ARC” DESIGNED BY PHIL HOLT

Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (Hopewell Township)

Simply called “The Arc”, this visionary modern residence on almost 7 acres was brought to life by Princeton-schooled architect Phil Holt and the master builders of Lasley Brahaney. The striking primary spaces of the home lined with floor-to-ceiling glass walls make up a 90 degree curve that doesn’t fully reveal itself until you are invited inside. Maple flooring, cherry cabinetry and rolling barn doors bring warmth and movement to the expansive spaces, which include a 20-foot high family room with a spiral staircase and views of the pool. The main suite is in a wing of its own where corner windows light up the bedroom and the spa-like bath wrapped in clerestory windows, as well as your choice of an office or gym. An open-air loft study is upstairs along with 3 generously sized bedrooms with access to a long, curving balcony. The basement is finished and ready for casual entertaining and hours of play.

“THE ARC” DESIGNED BY PHIL HOLT

THE PRIDE OF PRINCETON’S BATTLE ROAD

BROKER ASSOCIATE

BARBARA BLACKWELL, BROKER ASSOCIATE

bblackwell@callawayhenderson.com Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 the market in general, call. errors, omissions, prior sale or withdrawal without notice.

c 609.915.5000 | o 609.921.1050 | bblackwell@callawayhenderson.com callawayhenderson.com | 4 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

12 Battle Road | Princeton, New Jersey 08540 | callawayhenderson.com/NJME2006388 NEW PRICE $2,850,000

“THE ARC” DESIGNED BY PHIL HOLT

4750 Province Line Road | Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (Hopewell Township) callawayhenderson.com/NJME2017460 | $2,950,000

For more information about properties, the market in general, or your home particular, please give me a call.

Each office is independently owned and operated. Subject to errors, omissions, prior sale or withdrawal without notice.

Simply called “The Arc”, this visionary modern residence on almost 7 acres was brought to life by Princeton-schooled architect Phil Holt and the master builders of Lasley Brahaney. The striking primary spaces of the home lined with floor-to-ceiling glass walls make up a 90 degree curve that doesn’t fully reveal itself until you are invited inside. Maple flooring, cherry cabinetry and rolling barn doors bring warmth and movement to the expansive spaces, which include a 20-foot high family room with a spiral staircase and views of the pool. The main suite is in a wing of its own where corner windows light up the bedroom and the spa-like bath wrapped in clerestory windows, as well as your choice of an office or gym. An open-air loft study is upstairs along with 3 generously sized bedrooms with access to a long, curving balcony. The basement is finished and ready for casual entertaining and hours of play.

Overlooking Princeton University’s Graduate College and serving as the elegant cornerstone of one of the town’s most prominent residential streets, this stately house looks as if it were plucked from Embassy Row. Built for former Congressman and the 93rd Mayor of NYC, The Honorable George B. McClellan, Jr., the entry hall features the same marble tiles used in Grand Central Station. While some interior spaces are magnificently adorned with carved marble mantles, delicate picture molding and fanciful hardware, the overall scale is surprisingly livable and welcoming. The library is completely enveloped in burnished wood, perfect for reside evenings, while the adjoining sunroom is a morning delight. Architect Glen Fries oversaw a renovation of the outdoor terraces and the kitchen, done in timeless, yet period-appropriate, white with chef-level appliances. Several connecting rooms comprise the main suite with 2 full baths, an office and a dressing room with the prettiest view of the sweeping back lawn. A 1-bedroom apartment, dubbed Dove Cottage, is located atop the 3-car garage, ready for guests or on-site help. From the Sherle Wagner powder room to the spotless basement’s wine cellar and vintage clothes dryer, there are storied treasures to discover at every turn!

Simply called “The Arc”, this visionary modern residence on almost 7 acres was brought to life by Princeton-schooled architect Phil Holt and the master builders of Lasley Brahaney. The striking primary spaces of the home lined with floor-to-ceiling glass walls make up a 90 degree curve that doesn’t fully reveal itself until you are invited inside. Maple flooring, cherry cabinetry and rolling barn doors bring warmth and movement to the expansive spaces, which include a 20-foot high family room with a spiral staircase and views of the pool. The main suite is in a wing of its own where corner windows light up the bedroom and the spa-like bath wrapped in clerestory windows, as well as your choice of an office or gym. An open-air loft study is upstairs along with 3 generously sized bedrooms with access to a long, curving balcony. The basement is finished and ready for casual entertaining and hours of play.

4750 Province Line Road | Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (Hopewell Township) callawayhenderson.com/NJME2017460 | $2,950,000 BARBARA BLACKWELL, BROKER ASSOCIATE c 609.915.5000 | o 609.921.1050 | bblackwell@callawayhenderson.com callawayhenderson.com | 4 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

BARBARA BLACKWELL, BROKER ASSOCIATE c 609.915.5000 | o 609.921.1050 | bblackwell@callawayhenderson.com callawayhenderson.com | 4 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

For more information about properties, the market in general, or your home particular, please give me a call.

Each office is independently owned and operated. Subject to errors, omissions, prior sale or withdrawal without notice.

For more information about properties, the market in general, or your home particular, please give me a call. Each office is independently owned and operated. Subject to errors, omissions, prior sale or withdrawal without notice.

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022

Mark Your Calendar Town Topics

Wednesday, December 7

3 p.m.: The movie Elvis is screened in the Community Room of Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org.

5:30 p.m.: Holiday story time with the Princeton Sto rytelling Circle held in the Stockton Education Center at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Starts with a self-guided tour of the Festival of Trees. $15$25. Morven.org.

6 p.m.: Peter Brooks and Brigid Doherty are at Labyrinth Books, 122 Nas sau Street, with Brooks’ Seduced by Story: On the Use and Abuse of Narra tive. Also presented online. Labyrinthbooks.com.

6:30-8 p.m.: Mercer County Community Col lege Jazz Band performs at Quakerbridge Mall, 3320 U.S. Route 1. Free.

6:30 p.m.: Open Archive: Princeton Maps, in the Dis covery Center of Princeton Public Library, 65 Wither spoon Street. Explore ex amples of historical maps of Princeton and beyond for local history and genealogy research. Also digital maps, including the Princeton Uni versity Library’s collection. Princetonlibrary.org.

7-8:30 p.m.: Wednesday Night Out: The Lenape and

Their Ancestors in Hopewell Valley, at Hopewell Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell. Redlibrary.org/ events.

Thursday, December 8 5 p.m.: Martha Nussbaum discusses her book Justice for Animals at a hybrid event at McCosh 50, Princ eton University. Humanities. princeton.edu.

6 p.m.: Author Derek Lidow presents a fireside chat about his latest book The Entrepreneurs: The Relentless Quest for Value at Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau Street. Presented by Princeton Public Library and Labyrinth Books. Princ etonlibrary.org.

6:45 p.m.: Learn public speaking with Mercer’s Best Toastmasters Club, Lawrence Community Center, 295 Egg ert Crossing Road, Lawrence Township. Mercersbest.toast mastersclubs.org.

7 p.m.: “George Washing ton’s Winter Encampments and the Winning of Ameri can Independence,” virtual program presented by Mer cer County Library System. Lecturer is Steven Elliott from Rutgers University. Email hopeprogs@mcl.org to receive a link.

Friday, December 9 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: The

Hunterdon County Rug Arti sans Guild holds its month ly meeting at the Raritan Township Police Depart ment building, 2 Municipal Drive, Flemington. Guests welcome. Hcrag.com.

5-10 p.m.: A Cappella Night at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Vo cal groups from Princeton’s four high schools perform at this teens-only event cosponsored by Corner House. Princetonlibrary.org.

6 p.m.: The Princeton Singers perform at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street. “Star in the East” by Steven Sametz features Emily Mann as guest reader. $20-$40. Princetonsingers.org.

6:30 p.m.: Holiday Ar rangement and Wine Tast ing at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Own ers Pam Mount and Reuwai Mount Hanewald host this workshop that includes con tainer, greens, flowers, dec orative items, and a flight of wine. $45. Register at terhu neorchards.com.

8 p.m.: The Choirs of West minster Choir College present “An Evening of Readings and Carols: 30th Anniversary.” At Princeton University Chapel. Rider.edu/arts.

Saturday, December 10 10 a.m.: Family Holiday

Si

ha rt ha Muk herjee

Arrangement Workshop at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Pam Mount shows families how to create a festive arrangement with greens, flowers, berries, and other decorative items. $30 for one adult and participat ing child. Registration and pre-payment required. Ter huneorchards.com.

10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Trenton Punk Rock Flea Market at Cure Insurance Arena, 81 Hamilton Avenue, Trenton. More than 500 artists, mak ers, small businesses, food trucks, scavenger hunts, live music, live tattoos, and more. $15. Trentonprfm.com.

11 a.m.-3 p.m.: Housing Justice Forum at Princeton Public Library’s Community Room and online. Panels of experts discuss the hous ing crisis in America. Reg istration for in-person at tendance has closed; visit princetonlibrary.org for the livestream link.

12-2 p.m.: Harmonics Quartet entertains on Palmer Square. Palmersquare.com.

12-5 p.m.: Celebrate the Holiday Season Weekend at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Activities for the whole family, winter won derland, barnyard animals, and more. Visit with Santa from 12-3 p.m. Wine tasting from 12-5 p.m.; live music from 1-4 p.m. Terhuneor chards.com.

12:30-5:30 pm: Off the Wall Holiday Market, West Windsor Arts Council, 952 Alexander Road. Art ists for Ukraine Weekend with puppet making demo, Ukrainian pastries , and more. Westwindsorarts.org. 4 p.m.: Princeton Youth

Sunday, December 11

10 a.m.-3 p.m.: At Wash ington Crossing State Park in Titusville, “Washington’s Landing in New Jersey” is depicted by reenactors, his torians, and others, telling the story of the crossing and the march to Trenton through the eyes of those who lived it. Wcpa-nj.com/ landing.

10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Trenton Punk Rock Flea Market at Cure Insurance Arena, 81 Hamilton Avenue, Trenton. More than 500 artists, mak ers, small businesses, food trucks, scavenger hunts, live music, live tattoos, and more. $15. Trentonprfm.com.

10:45 a.m.: Mariah Fredericks talks about her new novel, The Lindbergh Nanny , at a book brunch in the Community Room of Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princ etonlibrary.org.

11 a.m.-2 p.m.: Hanukkah Craft Fair at The Jewish Cen ter Princeton, 435 Nassau Street. Thejewishcenter.org.

12-2 p.m.: Courtney’s Carolers serenade shoppers on Palmer Square. Palm ersquare.com.

12-5 p.m.: Celebrate the Holiday Season Weekend at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Activities for the whole family, winter wonder land, barnyard animals, and more. Visit with Santa from 12-3 p.m. Wine tasting from 12-5 p.m.; live music from 1-4 p.m. Terhuneorchards. com.

12 and 4 p.m.: Princeton Youth Ballet presents The Nutcracker, choreographed by Risa Kaplowitz, at Princeton High School Performing Arts Center, 16 Walnut Lane. $25.

12:30-5:30 pm: Off the Wall Holiday Market, West Windsor Arts Council, 952 Alexander Road. Art ists for Ukraine Weekend with puppet making demo, Ukrainian pastries , and more. Westwindsorarts.

1 p.m.: Carillon concert from Princeton University’s Graduate Tower; listen from outside the building. Arts.

3 p.m.: The Raritan Val ley Choral Society performs “My Dancing Day,” a con cert of seasonal song, at the Church of Saint Charles Borromeo, 47 Skillman Road, Skillman. $10 at the door; holiday cookie ex travaganza. Masks strongly encouraged. Raritanvalley

3 p.m.: American Reperto ry Ballet presents The Nut at Patriots Theater at the War Memorial, Lafay ette Street, Trenton. With the Capital Philharmonic, conducted by Daniel Spald ing; and Trenton Children’s Chorus. Arballet.org.

5 p.m.: “Room at the Inn,” a children’s pageant by De Long and Antonucci, direct ed by Tom Shelton, in per son and online at Princeton United Methodist Church, 7 Vandeventer Avenue. Princ

Monday, December 12

4:30-6 p.m. “Meet the Su perintendent” in the lobby of Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princeton Public Schools Superintendent Carol Kel ley holds open office hours. Princetonlibrary.org.

Tuesday, December 13

1 p.m.: “Book Flood” in the newsroom of Princeton Public Library, 65 Wither spoon Street. Based on the Icelandic tradition of Jolabo kaflod, attendees and library staff gather to discuss their favorite recent books and find their next great reads. Princetonlibrary.org.

7 p.m.: “Explore Hygge and the Art of Coziness: Food, Holistic Strategies, and Seasonal Tips,” pre sented by Vanessa Young of Thirsty Radish and spon sored by Mercer County Library System via Zoom. Email hopeprogs@mcl.org to receive a link.

7 p.m.: Rabbi Toba Spitzer presents a talk about her book God is Here: Reimagining the Divine, in a virtual event from The Jewish Center Princeton. Thejewishcenter.org.

7:30-9 p.m.: The Prince ton Recorder Society meets at Kingston Presbyterian Church, 4498 Route 27, and on Zoom. For more informa tion, contact jtanne1200@ gmail.com

Wednesday, December 14

7 p.m.: Photographer Ricardo Barros presents a slide talk, “Growing a Unicorn Habitat,” at The Watershed Institute, 31 Ti tus Mill Road, Pennington. Presented by the Princeton Photography Club.

7:30 p.m.: Mercer Coun ty Community College Jazz Band performs at Kelsey Theatre on the college campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. Free.

7:30 p.m.: Westminster Community Orchestra pres ents “Holiday Chestnuts and Sing-along” at Robert L. An nis Playhouse, Westminster Choir College, Walnut Lane. Conducted by Ruth Ochs. Free; donations accepted for food pantries and service or ganizations. Rider.edu/arts.

8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Country Dancers presents contra dance; Sue Gola with Mind the Gap, at Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monu ment Drive. $15. Princeton countrydancers.org.

Thursday, December 15 10 a.m.: The 55-Plus Club of Princeton meets at The Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street, and via Zoom. John Kastellec, a professor in the Department of Politics at Princeton University, will speak on “Making the Su preme Court: The Politics of Appointments, 1930-2020.” To join online, visit prince tonol.com/grounds/55plus. Free with a suggested dona tion of $5.

11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.: Princ eton Mercer Regional Cham ber’s Women in Business Holi day Brunch, at Springdale Golf Club, 1895 Clubhouse Drive. Princetonmercer.org.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 • 32
TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J.,
DECEMBER December 14, 2022 5 to 6:15 p.m., Richardson Auditorium Copies of The Song of the Cell: An Exploration of Medicine and the New Human will be handed out to the first 400 attendees. Visit lectures. princeton.edu for more information. Co-Sponsored by IN CONVERSATION WITH
Emeritus, Princeton
Professor of Molecular Biology and Public Affairs, Emeritus
SHIRLEY TILGHMAN President
University;
LOUIS CLARK VANUXEM LECTURE Pioneering Oncologist; Researcher; and Pulitzer Prize winning Author
dd

An independent business since the early 1900s, Freedman’s Jewelers was originally established in Trenton. It was purchased by Sidney Cohen in 1937, and in 1954, it moved to the Ewing Shopping Center, 962 Parkway Avenue. A year later, Bob Cohen, Sidney’s son, joined the business.

be the third generation of Cohens to own and operate Freedman’s.

“Your jewelry needs will remain in good hands with Brian,” reports his father.

“He has three decades of experience and is very knowledgeable.”

A full service jewelry store, Freedman’s carries a high quality precious and semi-precious selection, including rings, earrings, pendants, bracelets, and necklaces.

emeralds, sapphires and rubies, along with opals, turquoise, and the always classic pearls in a variety of colors and sizes are all on display.

many years, and he is happy his son will carry on that tradition.

It has been his mission to provide people with the best quality jewelry and the best service that he can offer. He is also proud that his sister Beverley Levenson has been his colleague in the store for many years.

who liked coming into a shop where they knew they would be treated well,” he points out. “I enjoy people and talking with them. Interaction is important, and I think our clients have appreciated that, and also the fact that we are a small independent family business.

loved ones. I hope that these moments and memories will be made unforgettable with a special piece of jewelry.”

The Cohens opened a second location in 1993 at the Pennington Shopping Center, its current site. This move expanded the clientele, with more customers coming from Hopewell, Pennington, Princeton, Lawrenceville, and Bucks County, Pa.

“Word-of-mouth built our business,” explains current owner Bob Cohen. “We have had many loyal customers over the years, and many are friends.

“When I joined the business, I really learned by doing. This is the best experience.”

Good Hands

Now after 67 years in the business, Cohen has decided to retire at the end of Febru-

Customers have relied on the store to provide just the right piece of jewelry for a special moment, whether an engagement, wedding, anniversary, birthday, graduation — and more.

“People want jewelry for different reasons,” says Cohen. “Some like to wear beautiful jewelry to adorn themselves, others want to pass it on as an heirloom to the next generation. Also, it depends where they are in life financially regarding what they can afford.

“Of course, a piece of jewelry can evoke memories of a special moment in time, or a special person. These are all reasons why it can be so important to so many people.”

Many Styles

Over the years, Freedman’s has offered choices in many styles and price

Gold and sterling silver continue to be in demand, adds Cohen. “People will always want gold and silver. Rings, bracelets, earrings, and pendants are very popular. Gold and silver are durable, but it also depends on how you wear it; that is, if it gets hard use. For example, if you garden a lot and wear your ring or bracelet, that will be harder on it. It makes a difference.”

Also available are selections of tanzanite in beautiful shades of blue and violet and the currently very popular larimar with its aqua coloring reminiscent of the sea. Both are offered in many styles.

Interestingly, charm bracelets and ankle bracelets are still sought after, and Freedman’s has a nice selection. Some things never go out of style!

Men’s jewelry is also available, including chains and bracelets, as is a variety of watches.

Substantial Savings

If you want a Christmas gift for a special person, a Valentine or birthday remembrance — or something for yourself — this is the time to visit Freedman’s. Substantial savings, from 20 percent to 70 percent, are available now through February.

In addition, Freedman’s has always offered repairs, whether changing a watch battery on-site while you wait, replacing a watchband, or a complex repair of rings and necklaces. This has been a great service for customers, and Cohen attended classes in jewelry repair early in his career.

Cohen is proud to have continued the tradition of his family business over so

“Our customers have been men and women of all ages,

“It has been my honor to help create magical moments for you and your

Current store hours, which will be subject to change, are Wednesday through Saturday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. For further information, call (609) 737-3775. Website: freedmansjeweler.com.

—Jean Stratton

Longtime Freedman’s Jewelers in Pennington Will Close After Nearly 70 Years in Business IT’S NEW To Us 33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 THE TEST OF TIME: “We have been known for our personal attention, always ready to help customers with advice if they want it. They know that they could count on the quality of our products and our service.”
LAW OFFICE OF ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC 134 South Main Street | Pennington, nJ 08534 Family Law Divorce Wills/Living Wills/POA Municipal Court/ Traffic & Criminal Violations Expungements Real Estate Transactions Member of New Jersey Bar 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3687 fax alisandracarnevale@gmail.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com LAW OFFICE OF ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC 134 South Main Street | Pennington, nJ 08534 Family Law Divorce Wills/Living Wills/POA Municipal Court/ Traffic Criminal Violations Expungements Real Estate Transactions Alisandra B. Carnevale, Esq. Member of New Jersey Bar 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3687 fax alisandracarnevale@gmail.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com • REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS • WILLS/LIVING WILLS/POA • MUNICIPAL COURT/ TRAFFIC AND CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS LAW OFFICE OF ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC Street | Pennington, nJ 08534 • Family Law • Divorce Wills/Living Wills/POA Municipal Court/ Traffic & Criminal Violations Expungements Real Estate Transactions 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3687 fax alisandracarnevale@gmail.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com LAW OFFICE OF ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC 134 South Main Street | Pennington, nJ 08534 Family Law Divorce Wills/Living Wills/POA Municipal Court/ Traffic & Criminal Violations Expungements Real Estate Transactions Alisandra B. Carnevale, Esq. Member of New Jersey Bar 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3687 fax alisandracarnevale@gmail.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com LAW OFFICE OF ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC 134 South Main Street | Pennington, nJ 08534 Family Law Divorce Wills/Living Wills/POA Municipal Court/ Traffic Criminal Violations Expungements Real Estate Transactions Alisandra B. Carnevale, Esq. Member of New Jersey Bar 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3687 fax alisandracarnevale@gmail.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS • WILLS/LIVING WILLS/POA MUNICIPAL COURT/ TRAFFIC AND CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS LAW OFFICE OF ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC 134 South Main Street | Pennington, nJ 08534 Family Law Divorce Wills/Living Wills/POA Municipal Court/ Traffic & Criminal Violations Expungements Real Estate Transactions Alisandra B. Carnevale, Esq. Member of New Jersey Bar 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3687 fax alisandracarnevale@gmail.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com • Real Estate Transactions (Buyer/Seller) • Last Will & Testament • Living Will (Healthcare Proxy Directive) • Power of Attorney LAW OFFICE OF ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC 134 South Main Street | Pennington, nJ 08534 • Family Law • Divorce • Wills/Living Wills/POA • Municipal Court/ Traffic & Criminal Violations • Expungements • Real Estate Transactions Alisandra B. Carnevale, Esq. Member of New Jersey Bar 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3687 fax alisandracarnevale@gmail.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com LAW OFFICE OF ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC 134 South Main Street | Pennington, nJ 08534 • Family Law • Divorce • Wills/Living Wills/POA • Municipal Court/ Traffic & Criminal Violations • Expungements • Real Estate Transactions Alisandra B. Carnevale, Esq. Member of New Jersey Bar 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3687 fax alisandracarnevale@gmail.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com • REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS • WILLS/LIVING WILLS/POA • MUNICIPAL COURT/ TRAFFIC AND CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS LAW OFFICE OF ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC 134 South Main Street | Pennington, nJ 08534 • Family Law • Divorce • Wills/Living Wills/POA • Municipal Court/ Traffic & Criminal Violations • Expungements • Real Estate Transactions Alisandra B. Carnevale, Esq. Member of New Jersey Bar 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3687 fax alisandracarnevale@gmail.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com 25 Rt. 31 South, Suit 3 Pennington, NJ 08534 (Pennington Shopping Center) 609-737-3775 Freedman’s Jewelers RETIREMENT SALE Going on Now! Established Over 50 Years SAVE 20% TO 50% OFF Call for Store Hours Specialized Services for Seniors and Their Families, Busy Professionals PERSONAL PAPERWORK SOLUTIONS...AND MORE, INC. Our expert services include: • Personal accounting (Bill payment/check writing) • Household financial management • Tax preparation (Assembly & analysis of financial information for tax purposes) • Income & expense management • Healthcare cost administration During these challenging times we are actively supporting our clients providing the following services as “your virtual home office.” To talk with us about our services and how we can help you or your loved one during this challenging time please call (609) 371-1466 or email us at info@ppsmore.com. www.ppsmore.com
Bob Cohen, owner of Freedman’s
Jewelers,
is shown with his sister and colleague Beverley Lev-
enson
in the Pennington store, which will close in February.

After Riding the Bench Last Winter for PU Women’s Hoops, Sophomore Morton Emerging as a Key Performer for Tigers

In an unlikely twist, Paige Morton will be the best Paige on the court when the Princeton University women’s basketball team plays at UConn’s Gampel Pavilion on Thursday.

UConn star Paige Bueck ers is out for the season after tearing her ACL in August while Morton has made a big move in her second year at Princeton. The sophomore forward has started every game for the Tigers after playing just six minutes per game in her first year.

“ It ’s definitely been a change since last year,” said Morton. “My teammates have been really supportive and they make me feel con fident out there. They always have my back. That ’s been something that ’s really been helpful for me as I take on a new role.”

Morton has given the Ti gers some versatility with the ability to use her 6’3 size to go bigger this year, something they didn ’t use last year as much following the graduation of Bella Ala rie and Taylor Baur in 2020. Morton ’ s improvements since last year landed her in the starting lineup from the outset of the season.

“ Paige has a really great skill set,” said Princeton head coach Carla Berube.

“ She ’s got a great frame. She ’s able to step out a little bit and hit some mid-range jumpers. She has a lot of dif ferent finishes on the inside, which keeps the defense back on their heels. She ’ s strong and gotten stronger and more confident. She ’ s playing with a little more aggressiveness than she did last year. I think she under stands the college game a little more than she did her first year. She ’s been really, really important at the be ginning of the season. And the whole fall she was one of our best players in practice every day. That ’s why she earned the starting nod.”

Morton opened the year with a career-high 13 points in a win over Temple, and she established a career high in rebounds with five against Villanova in her sec ond start. She is settling into her larger role this year.

“ It ’s super exciting to be out there,” said Morton. “ Last year I got to watch more than play so to have the opportunity to learn a lot last year and then ap ply what I ’ ve learned to the games this year has been fun and exciting.”

Morton was a 1,000-point scorer at Oak Knoll Acade my in her hometown, Sum mit. After a stellar career, she took a gap year when the Ivy League did not play in 2020-21. She trained on her own, coached basketball, and served as social media director focusing on photog raphy and videography for the AAU program Unity Leg ends Basketball. When she came to Princeton for her freshman season in 2021, she played a season-high 13 minutes against Temple and hit for a season-high nine points against Brown as she began to adjust to the col lege game.

“ Getting physically stron ger was something really important to me, being a post player,” said Morton.

“ It helped me a lot with ev erything — playing defense, getting rebounds, boxing out, going to the hoop. And then also my commu nication, that was a huge change from high school always having to talk to my teammates and talk through everything, call out screens and players and all the ac tions on the court. That was a big adjustment, as well as the spacing on the court on offense. That was different from high school — learning the spots I need to get to on the floor to be most success ful is something I ’ ve finally figured it out after watch ing it. Also the pace of the game, it ’s much faster. And just always being ready at all times was something I had never needed to do before.”

After the season, Morton continued to develop her game. She worked on her shot with coaches to make it more consistent and de velop more range. She also focused on getting stronger after getting a taste of the level of physical play in col lege in her first year. Berube says it was a combination of improvements that propelled Morton into the starting line up, and credits her offseason work for helping her take an other step.

“ I kind of just focused on myself and working hard and trying to improve as best I could,” said Morton. “ I feel like I got a lot more confidence coming into the season. Over the summer I worked to get stronger physi cally and I think that helped. I always wanted to have a bigger role on the team than I did freshman year and I’m happy about that. It’s worked out in my favor.”

Morton has raised her level of defensive play and gives the Tigers size inside to discourage other teams from attacking the basket. She is contributing on the offensive end as well. She runs the floor well and she sets screens to free up team mates. She is averaging 6.0 points and 2.0 rebounds per game in just about 17 min utes per game.

“ She ’s been great, she ’ s doing everything we ’ re ask ing her to do,” said Berube.

“The one thing with Paige is she ’s naturally an intro vert. And with our defense you have to be talking all the time and communicat ing consistently. She ’s done a much better job with that and getting more comfort able with that. I think it ’ s getting better with every game. We can go big or go small and put Ellie (Mitchell) at the five (center), so hav ing different lineups depend ing on what we want to do or what we see from other teams, that makes us more versatile.”

Morton is looking to continue her development through the next three months of the season. She would like to be able to help the team even more as they finish the non-confer ence schedule and open Ivy League play.

“ I think I can focus on my jump shot, being a threat more from the 3-point line and at the foul line,” said Morton. “ And also my com munication — making sure I ’ m on the same team as all my teammates on the defensive end because we pride ourselves so much on defense. We’re always work ing every day on getting bet ter in that way. Also my post moves down low, trying to be more creative with my shot selection and being able to go right and left equally as good.”

Princeton posted a 65-51 win at Maine last Friday and then topped Towson 71-54 on Monday. The Tigers, now 5-2, will now turn their at tention to a high-profile game at UConn on Decem ber 8, where Berube played for legendary coach Gino Auriemma.

“It’s a great challenge and it’s also a great opportunity to play in a really great envi ronment, a place that loves their women ’s basketball,” said Berube. “Gampel is like another home to me. It ’ s been a long time since I ’ ve been on the court there, but it ’ ll be special to be back home and coaching on the floor that I spent so much time and learned the game of basketball. It ’s not going to be about me, it’s going to be about our two teams. We want to compete as hard as we can and play 40 minutes of Tiger basketball. We ’ re looking forward to the expe rience and the game and the challenge that’s ahead of us.”

This game is admittedly special for the team, not just Berube. Princeton has never played UConn in its program history. The Huskies played in the national title game last year while Princeton was a point away from advancing to the Sweet Sixteen, fall ing 56-55 to Indiana in an NCAA second round contest.

“ It ’s just really exciting,” said Morton, who had six points and four rebounds against Towson. I think our team thrives on being the underdogs. Last year we feel like we were un derdogs for the majority of March Madness. I think that is what really excites us as a team. I think we ’ re all super excited to go out there and try our hardest and see what happens. I think we have enough confidence in each other to go be successful.”

The contest will bring an other challenge in the post for Morton. She has been squaring off against a num ber of talented interior play ers each night.

“ Honestly it ’s really fun to go head to head with an other post,” said Morton. “ We plan out what type of defense we’re going to guard them before the game — like fronting them, playing nor mal post defense, or help ing out and doubling with the guards. The guards help me a lot with doubling some of the posts. It ’s really fun. You have to be more creative with your shots and also look to rip by them in the high post. I look for advan tages I might have against other posts and try to exploit

them, and I try to take away their tendencies.”

Princeton retains its defen sive focus and is sorting out its offense that graduated leading scorer Abby Meyers. The Tigers have three play ers — Kaitlyn Chen (14.1), Julia Cunningham (13.1), and Grace Stone (10.7) — averaging double-digit points followed by Mitchell and Morton. In the win over Maine, the top trio was just on its averages with Chen scoring 15, Cunningham 13, and Stone 10. Cunningham led the way in the win over Towson as she scored 13.

“ The season is still on the early side, so we ’ re still try ing to figure some things out and some different lineups and different ways we want to score the basketball and put it in the hands of play makers and players that feel comfortable in that role,” said Berube after the win Fri day. “It’s a work in progress, but I think we ’ re in a good spot and looking forward to the game at Towson.”

The UConn trip will be the fourth game in a row on the road for Princeton. The Tigers are 2-1 at home and 3-1 on the road. Princ eton will next play at Jadwin Gym on Sunday when they host Delaware in a welcome home game.

“It’s been really crazy,” said Morton. “We’ve been travel ing so much. It’s been great for our team as far as bond ing and spending lots of time together. We have a lot of fun off the court, especially all the time on the bus and the plane. As far as chemistry, it’s been really good for us.”

—Justin Feil

S ports
TURNING THE PAIGE: Princeton University women’s basketball player Paige Morton handles the ball in the paint in a game earlier this season. Last Monday, sophomore forward Morton tallied six points to help Princeton defeat Towson. After playing just six minutes a game off the bench last season, Morton has emerged as a key contributor for the Tigers this winter, averaging 6.0 points and 2.0 rebounds in starting all seven games. Princeton, now 5-2, plays at UConn on December 8 before hosting Delaware on December 11. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)
TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 • 34
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With Freshman Forward Jacobs Catching Fire, PU Men’s Hockey Heating Up, Winning 2 of Last 3

It took a while for David Jacobs to start producing this winter in his freshman season on the Princeton Uni versity men’s hockey team.

Though the first eight games of his college career, Jacobs had just one as sist. But catching fire after Thanksgiving, he has tallied two goals and two assists in his last three appearances.

“I think it is just growing every day and trying to get more and more comfortable out there,” said Jacobs, a 5’10, 180-pound native of Needham, Mass. “I have great teammates so it is great playing with them. We work hard every practice and I am just trying to get better every day.”

Last Saturday, Jacobs dis played his growth, getting a goal and an assist in a los ing cause as a late Princeton rally fell short in a 5-4 loss to St. Lawrence.

The Tigers jumped out to a 1-0 lead on a goal by Nick Seitz then fell behind 2-1 early in the second period.

Jacobs evened up the game at 2-2, blasting a one-timer into the back of the net with 11:08 left in the second pe riod. The Saints responded with three unanswered goals to lead 5-2 midway through the third period. After St. Lawrence got hit with a five-minute major penalty, the Tigers scored two goals to narrow the gap to 5-4 but couldn’t get any closer

as they moved to 4-7 overall and 3-6 ECAC Hockey.

In reflecting on his goal, Jacobs credited it to some scrappy play.

“We were just hound ing the puck and we had a nice reload,” said Jacobs.

“[Adam] Robbins kicked it down and it popped out and I came over the top. It was a little 2-on-1 with [Spencer] Kersten in there and I shot it glove side.”

Getting the five-minute major in the third, Prince ton focused on hounding the puck all over the ice.

“With the power play, we knew we had to turn it on there,” said Jacobs. “We were down three goals and we had to make something happen. We got two goals. We were hoping for the third but we will build off that.”

Jacobs picked up an assist on Princeton’s fourth goal, helping to set up a tally by Jack Cronin.

“I was in the bumper there; Robbins gave it up to me and I was thinking about shooting,” said Jacobs. “I saw the top guy kind of col lapse, so I knew Pito [Wal ton] was there. I chopped it to him and he found 19 in his sweet spot there and he let it go.”

The tight contest with the Saints exemplified the inten sity Jacobs is finding in his first taste of ECACH play.

“That is the great thing

about playing in the ECAC, there is never going to be a night that is free,” said Ja cobs. “Every team is good, every team can beat every team. When there are three points on the line, we are all going head-to-head 100 percent every time.”

Heading into the St. Law rence game, Princeton head coach Ron Fogarty was hop ing his squad could build on an encouraging 6-2 win over Clarkson one night earlier.

“We had a great game last night and we were probably on for 90 percent of the time tonight,” said Fogarty. “For those 10 percent times, it was just in the back of the net with tips and backdoor play. The guys know it wasn’t a full 60 minutes of consistent effort.”

Fogarty credited his guys with giving a great effort on the third period power play.

“It was big and we capi talized on it but that is the energy that we expect to have for the 60 minutes,” said Fogarty. “We had didn’t have that energy all game. With eight minutes left to go in the third period because we have a power play then all of the energy was there and we were jumping on our toes. That has to be continuing through the whole game.”

The lapses in energy kept Princeton from getting a weekend sweep.

“It is just a wasted oppor tunity today, it is a big op portunity to get three points on a homestand,” said Fog arty. “If we played like we did last night throughout the 60 minutes then we would get the result.”

With Princeton having topped RIT 5-0 on Novem ber 26 to bring some mo mentum into last weekend, Fogarty believes his young squad is headed in the right direction.

“I think you see how we are playing,” said Fogarty. “It is up-tempo and we are getting chances. You see lapses of consistency in the second period and the be ginning of the third but I like where this team is going.”

Fogarty likes the produc tion he has been getting re cently from Jacobs and his linemates.

“The Robbins, Jacobs, Seitz line is playing really well, they have been con sistent and creating scoring opportunities,” said Fogarty. “David is very relentless on the forecheck. He puck pro tects very well. That was a great shot on his goal, he helped create plays in the third period.”

With Princeton hosting Union on December 9 and RPI on December 10, Fog arty is looking for his play ers to be relentless.

“We have to make sure that we play 60 minutes, tonight’s game was unchar acteristic of how we have been playing,” said Fogarty.

“It could be a great learning experience, using today as a reference point for next week of what we need to do period in and period out.”

Jacobs, for his part, is primed to keep piling up the points.

“I am moving my feet, sticking to what I do best, hounding pucks and play ing the o-zone,” said Jacobs.

“I think the line I am on is starting to connect a bit bet ter as well and we have been creating offense lately.”

PU Wrestler Monday Determined to Leave Legacy, Applying Lessons Learned from Run to NCAA Final

In his debut season for the Princeton University wrestling team in 2018-19, Quincy Monday qualified for the NCAA championships at 157 pounds but the trip to Pittsburgh turned out to be a downer.

With his inexperience showing, Monday lost all of his matches. Looking for redemption, Monday made the NCAAs as a sophomore and was seeded fifth but didn’t get to compete as the event was canceled as a re sult of the global pandemic. In 2021, Monday had no chance to make the NCAAs as the Ivy League scrapped its winter season due to on going COVID-19 concerns.

Those disappointments fu eled Monday’s motivation as he competed last winter.

“To have that get canceled and not get that chance and get a win and do my thing at nationals set a fire under me for sure,” said Monday, who won his first Eastern Inter collegiate Wrestling Associa tion (EIWA) title on the way to qualifying for the NCAA championships

Once in Detroit for the NCAAs, a fired-up Monday got some redemption, mak ing it to the final where he fell 9-2 to Northwestern’s Ryan Deakin.

“It was just really exciting, I was grateful to be there and be able to be at nationals and get rolling,” said Mon day, who was joined in the finals by classmate Patrick Glory, who made it at 125, giving Princeton its first two NCAA finalists since 2002. “We had a lot of energy and momentum going into it, be ing able to have that oppor tunity to be able to go back and compete.”

Advancing to the final along with Glory helped make the experience even more memorable.

“I just remember some of my best moments from that trip to that tournament was me and Pat in the back with our coaches and our train ers,” said Monday, who end ed the season with a 24-4 record. “We were all just back there having a good time, getting ready. It was good energy. It was a fun experience to be able to do that with each other. We fed off of each other.”

Bringing energy into

senior year, Monday is ranked No. 1 nationally at 157. Last Sunday, Monday posted a 5-0 win over No. 15 Chase Saldate of Michi gan State in the Garden State Grapple at the Pru dential Center in Newark.

The Tigers, who fell 38-3 to Wisconsin and 21-15 to Michigan State in the event to move to 0-3, host Rutgers on December 11.

Monday believes that the lessons learned from last year’s NCAA run should help him take the next step up the podium.

“It is just sharpening up a lot of technical stuff,” said Monday, a native of Chapel Hill, N.C. “A really big jump I made in my sophomore year was mental. Reaching the finals and having that experience under our belts now, we approach it differ ently. We are just working to get back there. It is sharp ening up everything we are doing in all of the areas we wrestle. It is being intention al with my hands for me, es pecially in the hand fight. I came in and learned to hand fight in the first few years of college. Now I definitely want to be more intentional in moving guys and putting them where I want them to go.”

The influence of Glory has helped Monday move up the ladder.

“Pat was kind of the top guy in high school, I was good but he was a top-10 recruit,” said Monday. “He came in firing and that really helped me reach the next level, just seeing somebody in the room who was doing those things. I was like if he is doing it, why can’t I. I think we have been feeding off each other’s energy for a long time. It definitely helps bring everybody to a higher level.”

Another key influence on Monday has been his fa ther, Kenny Monday, a leg endary wrestler who was a gold medalist at the 1988 Olympics, a silver medalist at the 1992 Olympics, and the NCAA champion at 150 in 1984.

“His influence can’t be overstated; when you have someone of that high level of a wrestler, an Olympic champ and a lot of other accolades in your life, you

can’t not be influenced by them,” said Monday. “His mentality and his discipline and the way he goes about approaching the sport defi nitely had an effect on me. A lot of people ask me if I feel pressure because of that but I see it as an opportu nity. I don’t really see it as a negative, like I can’t fill these shoes. I am going to do it in my own way. I am going to do it on my own path and in my own right. I am just grateful to get that from him.”

As Monday looks to make another big run in the NCAAs, he is utilizing dis cipline to keep from being complacent this season.

“I think there is a target on my back because of mak ing the finals,” said Monday.

“I still see names in the way that I want to go get, I feel like I am still hunting these guys down. There are guys who I have rivalries with. There are guys I have wres tled since and they have a win over me. There are guys I still have my eye out for. I am still excited about these matches. I will have no problem getting up for these matches.”

Monday is excited to see what he and his fellow se niors can achieve this win ter.

“I am extremely proud of what my class has done, I think we saw this coming,” said Monday. “When we first came in, we looked at each other and the energy that we brought. The team had a few all-Americans and leaders to look up to like [Patrick] Brucki and [Matt] Kolodzik when we are freshmen. They were the guys that showed us how to lead and we have been able to step into that role. I am extremely proud of my class. We are family and I think we definitely helped the program reach another level, jump off, and keep elevating.”

Over the next few months, Monday is primed to take his wrestling to another level.

“I really want to go out and put a stamp on my legacy and what I want this season to mean to me,” said Monday.

“I am going to be more in tentional in my matches and how I approach each match. I want to make a statement ev ery match. I don’t just want to skate by and get to the last tournament. I am trying to close this chapter out the right way.”

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 • 36
JACOBS LADDER: Princeton University men’s hockey player David Jacobs goes after the puck in a game earlier this season. Last Saturday, freshman forward Jacobs tallied a goal and an assist in a losing cause as a late Princeton rally fell short in a 5-4 loss to St. Lawrence. The Tigers, now 4-7 overall and 3-6 ECAC Hockey, host Union on December 9 and RPI on December 10. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) WINNING THE DAY: Princeton University wrestler Quincy Monday, top, controls a foe in a match last season. Senior star Monday, who advanced to the NCAA final last March at 157 pounds, is primed for a big final campaign with the Tigers. Last Sunday, Monday, ranked No. 1 nationally at 157, posted a 5-0 win over No. 15 Chase Saldate of Michigan State in the Garden State Grapple at the Prudential Center in Newark. The Tigers, who fell 38-3 to Wisconsin and 21-15 to Michigan State in the event, to move to 0-3, host Rutgers on December 11. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)
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Princeton Football Star Johnson Named Bushnell Award Finalist

Princeton University football star Liam Johnson has been named a finalist for the Bushnell Cup for Ivy League Defensive Player of the Year.

Junior linebacker Johnson, a 6’0, 220-pound native of Moorestown, led Princeton and ranked fourth in the Ivy League in tackles (90). Johnson averaged 13 tackles per game over the final two weeks of the season and scored two touchdowns during the year, including a 92-yard fumble return against Penn in the season finale. He averaged 9.9 tackles per Ivy game, the thirdbest mark in the league.

Harvard defensive lineman Truman Jones is the other defensive finalist. Harvard running back Aidan Borguet and Yale quarterback Nolan Grooms are the offensive finalists.

The award winners will be announced on December 12 at the famed New York Athletic Club.

PU Women’s Hockey Falls 4-1 to Union

Maggie Connors scored the lone goal for the Princeton University women’s hockey team as it fell 4-1 at Union last Saturday afternoon.

The Tigers, now 5-6-1 overall and 3-5 ECAC Hockey, will play a two-game set at Mercyhurst next weekend with games slated for December 9 and 10.

Tiger Women’s Swimming Wins Big Al Invitational

Heidi Smithwick came up big to help the Princeton University women’s swimming team win its annual Big Al Invitational at DeNunzio Pool last weekend.

Freshman Smithwick placed first in the 50-yard freestyle and 100 butterfly, fourth in the 100 free, and helped the Tigers win both the 200 free and 400 free relays.

In the team standings, Princeton piled up 1,080.50 points to edge runnerup Utah, who tallied 999 points.

The Tigers are next in action when they host LaSalle on January 7.

Princeton Men’s Swimming Prevails at Big Al Invitational Raunak Khosla led the way as the Princeton University men’s swimming team took fi rst at its annual Big Al Invitational at DeNunzio Pool last weekend.

Senior standout Khosla placed fi rst in the 200-yard individual medley, 400 IM, and 200 butterfly.

Princeton had a winning team score of 1,178.50 points with Utah coming in second at 875.

In upcoming action, the Tigers host LaSalle on January 7.

PU Field Hockey’s Yeager Named Mid-Atlantic Player of the Year

Adding another honor to her resume, Princeton University field hockey star Beth Yeager has been named the National Field Hockey Coaches Association (NFHCA) Mid-Atlantic Regional Player of the Year.

Sophomore forward, Yeager, a 5’7 native of Greenwich,

Conn., is the third Princeton player to be named MidAtlantic Player of the Year, along with former Tiger standouts Katie Reinprecht (2012) and Clara Roth (2019).

The NFHCA honors a Player of the Year from five different regions.

Yeager led the Ivy League in goals (17) and points (32) while leading Princeton to a 13-5 overall record and a 7-0 Ivy League season and the NCAA tournament. Princeton’s Ivy title was the 27th all-time for the program.

Yeager has already been a two-time Ivy League Offensive Player of the Year, a two-time unanimous firstteam All-Ivy League selection, a two-time All-Region selection, and a 2021 firstteam All-American, with the 2022 All-American teams to be announced on December 15. Yeager is also a member of the United States National Team.

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PU Sports Roundup
TROJAN WAR: Princeton University men’s water polo player Keller Maloney gets ready to unload the ball in recent action. Last Thursday, senior star Maloney scored three goals as Princeton fell 11-8 to Southern California in the opening round game three of the NCAA tournament. The loss to the Trojans left the Tigers with a 27-6 record, setting the program mark for most wins in a season. Along the way, Princeton defeated Stanford for the first time in program history, won the Northeast Water Polo Conference (NWPC) tournament for the second season in a row, and defeated Fordham in an NCAA opening round contest. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)
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Boys’ Hockey, Believes Tigers Can Build on Last Season’s Success

Rik Johnson underwent a trial by fire last winter when he joined the Princeton High boys’ hockey program as an assistant coach.

“It was exciting, at first I was a little apprehensive,” said Johnson, who had played for the Monmouth University club hockey team and in men’s leagues but had never coached before. “I observed and I was able to learn a lot different ways to approach things.”

This season, Johnson will be getting the chance to ap ply those lessons as he is taking the helm of the PHS program, succeeding head coach Dave Hansen.

“There is a learning curve for sure, learning everything you need to know as the head coach,” said Johnson. “My personal philosophy is for the players to try not to make the same mistake twice. Three, four practices in now, we are trying to scratch those off the list. I am trying different things out, seeing what works.”

The PHS players are re sponding well to their new leader.

“Brian (PHS Athletic Di rector Brain Dzbenski) said he was looking for some body from a head coaching perspective that was going to be around so there was continuity for the kids,” said Johnson, who is taking over a program that went 16-5-3 last winter and advanced to the Mercer County Tourna ment final. “It is positive, they are great kids, they are helpful. It is great roster, we

have got 15 returning play ers.”

Johnson is expecting a great senior year from star forward and captain Cooper Zullo (39 goals, 32 assists in 2021-22).

“Cooper is doing his thing, he is doing a great job as a leader,” said Johnson. “He is going to be our captain again this year. He is great with ushering in the new kids and leading the group. I think last year was a little bit of a shock to him when he was named captain; that caught him off guard, but he grew into it. He is so good. The one thing I added last year in working with him was hit the net. He has im proved on that.”

A trio of key seniors — Ethan Garlock (11 goals, 16 assists), Gabe Silverstein 10 goals, 14 assists), and Julian Drezner (8 goals, 12 assists) — should be hitting the net a lot this winter.

“Ethan is going to be an assistant captain, he is a very big player, I am trying to get him to play a little more physical,” said John son. “His skill set is finetuned. He is not a rah-rah guy, he brings a quiet game and a quiet demeanor to the team. Gabe’s game looks like it is improving. It looks like he has worked on his shoot ing quite a bit. He is going to be an assistant captain, he is another one who is a great locker room guy that rallies the troops. Drezner is a great role player and an all-around good guy. He is like an EMT off the ice —

he is a great human. These guys are class acts.”

Sophomore Brendan Be atty (13 goals, 20 assists) is bringing class and skill as he looks to build on a superb debut campaign.

“Lacrosse is his main sport but his hockey game is right there,” said Johnson, who will also be using junior Charles Ross (1 goal, 4 as sists), Andrew Benevento (1 goal, 2 assists), senior Nico Vitaro (2 goals, 3 assists), and freshman Ryan Garlock, Ethan’s younger brother, at forward.

“If he needs to be physi cal, he will be. If he needs to use finesse, he can. He reminds a little bit of a Peter Forsberg (former NHL star), where he can go around you or through you.”

On defense, junior Gra ham Baird (2 goals, 4 assists) should be tough to get around.

“Graham should be lead ing the way, he was with the team last year and is very sound, very smart,” said Johnson. “He is a quiet guy, he is not a big talker or anything. He plays the game well, he knows that game. He is nice and sound on defense.”

Joining Baird on the blue line will be junior Mike Prete, junior T.T. Zhao (3 goals, 8 assists), sophomore Jack Zimet (1 goal, 5 as sists), junior Ois in Odell (1 goal, 2 assists), and sopho more Ed Zhao (4 assists).

“Mike is going to be de fense; T.T. plays club, when I have him, he going to be top

two, top four defense,” said Johnson. “Jack grew over the summer, his game was improving over the course of last season. In practice so far this season, it looks like he can find his way into the top four. Oshin is a role player, he minimizes mis takes which is nice. Ed is another d-man.”

At goalie, senior Ryan Friedman (21 saves in 1 game in 2021-22) is primed to step into a starting role between the pipes.

“Ryan has improved his game tremendously from last year when he was learn

ing how to skate in goal,” said Johnson, who has a back-up goalie in sopho more Noah Vitulli. “So far this season, his athleticism has shown in practice. He gets better at each practice. His glove is good. There is a second goalie, Noah, who has been away from the game and played when he was younger.”

With PHS having lost 7-2 to Notre Dame in the 2022 MCT final and then losing 8-5 to Randolph in the first round of the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJ

SIAA) Public B tourney to end last season on a down note, the Tigers are deter mined to do better in post season play this winter.

“It is playing the same game as we played last year and following that path; I have told them if we are faster, stronger, and smarter than the other teams, that is a good way to win,” said Johnson. “We are starting with Notre Dame, all I have to say is look who we are playing. Our theme this sea son is unfinished business.”

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 • 38
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To
Helm of
Monday, December 12, 2022 7:30 p.m. Princeton
Chapel Messiah Sing Join us for a community sing-along of this magnificent classic with student and alumni soloists, University Organist Eric Plutz, and instrumental ensemble. Bring your own score or borrow one at the door. Admission is free.
All
16
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DOWN LOW: Princeton High boys’ hockey player Cooper Zullo skates around a goalie in action last season. Senior star forward and captain Zullo is primed for a big final campaign. PHS opens its season by facing Notre Dame on December 12 at the Mercer County Park rink. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)
University
Questions: naldrich@princeton.edu December 11, 2022 | 4:00 pm
Saints Church
All Saints Road
Princeton, New Jersey 08540
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After PHS Swim Teams Dominated Last Winter, Tigers Primed to Keep Rolling in 2022-23 Season

Featuring depth, talent, and a positive chemistry, the Princeton High boys’ and girls’ swimming teams both produced dominant perfor mances last winter.

Each squad placed first in the Mercer County champi onship meet with the boys going on to win the Public B Central Jersey sectional title and making it to the Public B state final on the way to a 14-1 record. The girls, for their part, went 111, advancing to the North 2 Group B sectional semis.

Heading into the 2022-23 campaign, PHS head coach Carly Misiewicz knows that her boys’ squad will have a bull’s eye on it.

“Something I stressed to them at the beginning of the season was that the tar get is definitely on our back this year,” said Misiewicz. “There is that pressure, if you want to call it that, to repeat.”

Buoyed by its upbeat men tality and bonds among the swimmers, Misiewicz be lieves the squad will be un fazed by such pressure.

“I think the guys are more than willing and up to the challenge,” said Misiewicz. “They are such a good group. They mesh so well, they all get along with each other so well. They are re ally the definition and the perfect version of whatever I could ask for in a team with the way they treat each oth er and the way they all talk to each other. They hang out with each other outside of their swimming.”

Senior Daniel Baytin is primed to be the best ver sion of himself in his final season for the Tigers.

“Daniel is really ready, I think he is really excited; I have really seen him mature from his freshman year until now,” said Misiewicz, noting that Baytin plans to keep swimming at the college level. “When we had our first day of practice, once I gave my spiel, I said to the seniors, ‘If you guys want to say anything feel free to get up because this is the first time that we are all here to gether.’ Daniel got up and the way that he spoke was so eloquent. You could just see the passion for swimming and for the high school team and just the friendships and the bonds he has built. High school has truly showed him this is why I want to swim college as well because that team atmosphere from high school is something you don’t get from club.”

Another key senior, Julian Velazquez, has displayed a passion for the sport and the team over the last four years.

“Julian is looking good, he is also somebody I can put in anything,” said Misiewicz. “Whether it is fly, back, in dividual medley, 50, or 100 free all the way up to the 500, he is somebody who is also just so versatile and always willing to swim a dif ferent event too.”

With a deep lineup featur ing juniors Zach Guan and Henry Xu along with sopho mores David Brophy, Daniel

Guo, David Zu, and Jaiden Xu, Misiewicz has plenty of talent and versatility at her disposal.

“We were very young last year, which is very nice,” said Misiewicz. “Kids that were in B or C lanes with us last year have improved tremendously in the last six to seven months, someone like Jaden Jung or Matias Da Costa. I am excited to see what they do. They fo cused a little more on club, they are in the weight room now. They have beefed up a little bit. It is nice to see that they took the initiative of it as well.”

With PHS starting the sea son with a meet at Steinert on December 8, the Tigers are focused on producing another stellar winter.

“They are very excited and very much looking forward to the year and looking for ward to repeat and hopefully getting a little bit further,” said Misiewicz.

Despite some key gradua tion losses, Misiewicz is ex cited about her girls’ team.

“We have a lot of girls returning, the solid core is definitely there,” said Mis iewicz, whose group of vet erans includes seniors Bea trice Cai and Annie Zhao along with juniors Kyleigh Tangen, Lauren Girouard, Courtney Weber, Nora Chen, and Jesse Wang and sophomores Sabine Ristad, Rachel McInerney, and Lola Sofia Jimenez.

Standout senior Cai has been a solid performer throughout her career.

“Beatrice is our main senior this year for sure,” said Misiewicz. “Whether she goes in the 500, in the sprints, the fly, freestyle, IM, backstroke — literally we can throw her in abso lutely anything. She also just has such a great mind set. She truly understands how important it is to just focus on this is a team thing right now and I am going to put myself aside.”

Misiewicz sees her strong junior class as a key to the team’s success this winter.

“I am so happy to have the whole crew back, they just have so much fun with it,” said Misiewicz, who ex pects freshman Annie Fla nagan to be a good addition to the PHS crew. “Courtney, Kyleigh, and Lauren can also swim so many different events. That is why we can cause so much damage as a team because of the fact

that I feel like I can put my girls in 10 different lineups. That is so great.”

With that kind of flexibility in her lineups, Misiewicz be lieves her girls’ squad can do some damage when it gets to the postseason.

“The girls are very excit ed that we are in a differ ent section,” said Misiewicz, noting that PHS girls have been moved to Central Jer sey sectional this year from North 2. “Looking at who is

in our section, it is ‘hey, we have got a really good shot at this.’ From there, we will see what happens.”

In view of the positive vibe around her squads, Misie wicz is expecting a lot good things to happen this winter for her swimmers.

“I am really very much looking forward to it,” said Misiewicz. “You can’t help but feel a little confident.”

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022
HEY BRO: Princeton High boys’ swimmer David Brophy displays his freestyle form in a race last season. Sophomore Brophy figures to be a key contributor for the Titers this fall. PHS starts its 2022-23 campaign with a meet at Steinert on December 8. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)
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With DeSimone Moving into Head Coaching Role, It Should be Business as Usual for PDS Girls’ Hockey

Julie DeSimone is confident that the Princeton Day School girls’ hockey team won’t miss a beat as she takes the helm of the program.

Having served as an assistant coach for PDS over the last four seasons, DeSimone brings continuity as she succeeds previous head coach John Ritchie.

“We have such a good coaching team and even under John, it was so collaborative, it didn’t feel like there was hard, fast hierarchy,” said DeSimone. “It was a nice transition, just continuing to work with Mike [Adams] and Jaimie [Davis] and having Shavonne [Leacy] on board as well. That has been a huge advantage, she has been fitting in really well. We have all always divided and conquered. We are just continuing that model that was set up under John. We were kind of a united force, I don’t think it has been that big of a shift.”

DeSimone and her staff are determined to keep the program on the winning track that saw it go 14-6 last winter, capturing the Prep state title and advancing to the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) state final in the process.

“We are really happy with how we ended the season last year and we want to keep building on that success,” said DeSimone. “It was really fun. We are really happy about how we built the program and the success we have had over the last few years. The returning players are definitely excited to get back to competing against those teams we played last year and what we did. We are well-positioned to do that again.”

The dynamic one-two punch at forward of sophomore Eibhleann Knox (14

goals, 11 assists in 202122) and junior captain Logan Harrison (18 goals, 13 assists) should help the Panthers be very competitive this winter.

“Eibhleann is looking great, she had two goals yesterday and Logan had a hat trick in our scrimmage,” said DeSimone. “They are playing really well together. They are playing club hockey together so personally they are getting closer as well.”

The pair of junior standout forwards Emily McCann (11 goals, 8 assists) and Lily Ryan (4 goals, 12 assists) figure to provide plenty of production as well.

“We always love to support her in her running, that is her main sport,” said DeSimone of McCann, a cross country star who placed first at the XC Fall Classic and took second in the Prep B state meet, helping the Panthers win the team title. “She is so dedicated to hockey and is just a good team player. She always works so hard. We are excited to have her back, we know to give her some space to shift gears. She is certainly up and running. Lily is great. She has so much energy, she works so hard every single shift. As she grows into her role and now as an upperclassman, I am really excited about what we are going to see from her this year and next.”

DeSimone is excited to see what senior assistant captain Claire Meehan (11 goals, 8 assists) and sophomore Grace Ulrich (1 assist) do this winter.

“Claire is looking great, she works so hard as a center,” said DeSimone, who will also be using freshman Brynn Dandy at forward.

“She really is able to transition offensively and defensively. She is a really stable player for us. Grace is a

goalie as well but she will be mostly playing out for us this year. She was hurt last year so we are excited to have her back at full speed.”

At defenseman, seniors Nora Appleby (2 goals, 4 assists) and Lauren Chase (11 goals, 16 assists), will be leading the way.

“I am really happy with Nora’s growth in the last couple of years; she has really stood out as a leader on the team and is actually one of our captains this year,” said DiSimone, noting that junior Isabel Cook, sophomore Aerin Bruno and freshman Mariana Lee will also be seeing time on the blue line.

“We will be looking for her and Lauren to lead the way in the defensive end. We benefit from Lauren rushing the puck as well and always being a consistently strong defensive player.”

Junior transfer Brigid Milligan is bringing some strong play at goalie to the program.

“Brigid has really just jumped right in and had a really good transition,” said DeSimone. “She has been strong in practice, we are looking forward to having her.”

With PDS hosting Cranford on December 9 in its season opener, DeSimone believes her squad has the potential to be very strong.

“We need to work on scoring chances, that has always been something we need to improve on,” said DeSimone. “That is something we will really look at and look to work on. I think it is also really making sure that we are setting the competition level for every game. There is such a variation in the teams that we play so we need to make sure that we are working hard every game and that we are getting something out of every one of those games.”

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 • 40
CHASING SUCCESS: Princeton
brings the puck up the ice in
a
final
on December 9 in its season
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Day School girls’ hockey player Lauren Chase
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PDS hosts Cranford
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by Frank

Stuart Country Day 7126 last Monday. Matthews scored 22 points in the victory for the Red Hawks, now 4-0. Over the weekend, Pennington won the Peddie School Tip-off Tournament, topping St. Benedict’s 5849 in the final on Sunday as Matthews tallied 24 points. The Red Hawks play at the Academy of New Church (Pa.) on December 7.

Local Sports

Rec Department Holding Sign Up for Dillon Hoops

The Princeton Recreation Department is now taking registrations for the 2023 Dillon Youth Basketball League.

Hun Pennington

Boys’ Basketball : Symeon Efstathiou and Anthony Loscalzo starred as Hun defeated Springfi eld Commonwealth Academy (Mass.) 66-61 last Sunday in the Coaches vs. Cancer event at Blair Academy. Efstathiou contributed 19 points, nine rebounds, and five assists in the win while Loscalzo tallied 21 points with four assists for the Raiders, now 2-2. Hun hosts the Pennington School on December 7 before competing in the Peddie School Invitational Tournament from December 9-11.

Girls’ Basketball : Wrapping up play at the Peddie School Tip-Off Tournament, Hun fell 82-66 to Lake Forest Academy (Ill.) last Sunday. The Raiders, now 1-3, host the Hill School (Pa.) on December 7, play in the She Got Game Classic on December 10 and 11 at The St James in the Washington, D.C., area and then host Germantown Friends Academy (Pa.) on December 13.

Boys’ Hockey : Sparked by Elian Estulin, Hun defeated the Haverford School (Pa.) 6-0 last Friday. Senior star forward Estulin tallied a goal and two assists to help the Raiders move to 4-3. Hun hosts St. Joseph’s Prep (Pa.) on December 7 and Holy Ghost Prep on December 9.

Boys’ Basketball : Coming up just short in a highscoring affair, Pennington fell 117-116 to the host Kiski School (Pa.) last Sunday in a consolation game at the Kiski School Tournament. The Red Hawks, who moved to 0-3 with the loss, play at the Hun School on December 7 and will then compete in the Peddie School Invitational Tournament from December 9-11.

Girls’ Basketball : Morgan Matthews starred as Pennington defeated

The Dillon Youth Basketball League is a storied program for the Princeton community that is entering its 51st season. The league consists of both games and clinics. It is open to boys and girls in grades 4-10 who are Princeton residents and non-residents who attend school in Princeton.

The Dillon season will take place from January-March 2023 and games will be held Saturday mornings at the Hun School. The program is a recreational league intended for players of all skill and experience levels. “Dillon Basketball” is about playing the game the right way, teamwork, and having fun.

To register, log onto register. communitypass.net/princeton under “2022/2023 Winter Sports Programs.” Registration is open until January 2 or until divisions are at capacity. More information can be found at princetonrecreation.com.

Incentive Matching Plans (SIMPLE); and Defined Benefit Pension plans.

age 59.5) are subject to ordinary income tax. Other qualified retirement accounts include Simplified Employee Pension Plans (SEP); Savings Incentive Matching Plans (SIMPLE); and Defined Benefit Pension plans.

Is It Better to Save in a Qualified Retirement Account?

Is It Better to Save in a Qualified Retirement Account?

The conventional wisdom is yes, but the common rationale is often based on unrealistic assumptions. For instance, the ending after-tax value in a 401(k) or IRA is usually compared to the after-tax value of a non-qualified account invested in bonds or cash. However, retirement accounts are often invested in stocks and long-term stock appreciation is subject to lower tax rates than bonds or cash (capital gains versus ordinary income tax rates). Even so, when comparing a qualified retirement account (e.g., a 401(k) or IRA) to a non-qualified account invested in stocks, in most cases, the after-tax value of a 401(k) or IRA will be higher.

The conventional wisdom is yes, but the common rationale is often based on unrealistic assumptions. For instance, the ending after-tax value in a 401(k) or IRA is usually compared to the after-tax value of a non-qualified account invested in bonds or cash. However, retirement accounts are often invested in stocks and long-term stock appreciation is subject to lower tax rates than bonds or cash (capital gains versus ordinary income tax rates). Even so, when comparing a qualified retirement account (e.g., a 401(k) or IRA) to a non-qualified account invested in stocks, in most cases, the after-tax value of a 401(k) or IRA will be higher.

Reference Guide for 401(k) Plans 401(k) plans can be established to allow for pre-tax contributions, after-tax Roth contributions, safe harbor matching contributions, and additional discretionary profit sharing contributions. A financial advisor and Third Party Administrator (TPA) can work with the employer to develop a plan that best fits the employer’s goals and budget. Well designed plans can help owners and key personnel maximize retirement contributions as well as attract and retain talented employees. Employer contributions to the plan and any other costs are deductible business expenses.

Reference Guide for 401(k) Plans 401(k) plans can be established to allow for pre-tax contributions, after-tax Roth contributions, safe harbor matching contributions, and additional discretionary profit sharing contributions. A financial advisor and Third Party Administrator (TPA) can work with the employer to develop a plan that best fits the employer’s goals and budget. Well designed plans can help owners and key personnel maximize retirement contributions as well as attract and retain talented employees. Employer contributions to the plan and any other costs are deductible business expenses.

Since [1950] Conte’s has become a Princeton destination; a great old-school bar that also happens to serve some of New Jersey’s best pizza, thin-crusted and bubbly. The restaurant hasn’t changed much since then; even the tables are the same. It’s a simple, no-frills space, but if you visit during peak times, be prepared to wait well over an hour for a table.

41 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022
BOSTON STRONG: Stuart Country Day School field hockey senior star Lily Harlan is all smiles last month as she signed a National Letter of Intent to attend Boston University and play for its Division I field hockey program. Star forward Harlan, a four-year starter for Stuart, tallied a team-high 20 goals and 10 assists this fall for the Tartans as she passed the 100-point mark in her high school career. Pictured with Harlan, from left, are Stuart Director of Athletics Frances Lyons, field hockey assistant coach Sara Wagner, assistant coach Jenna Bendinelli, head coach Missy Bruvik, and Head of School Julia Wall. (Photo provided courtesy of Stuart Country Day School)
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Chaim “Hymie” Schreiber, 90, of Princeton, NJ, died peacefully at his home sur rounded by his wife and three children on November 30, 2022. He had just cel ebrated his 90th birthday with his family.

Chaim was born in Durban on September 27, 1932 to Jo sef and Taube Schreiber, the first of two sons. His parents had emigrated from Poland via Mandate Palestine in the face of rising antisemitism. Chaim grew up in Johannes

burg and studied engineer ing at a technical college, initially working alongside his father in a locksmith and window business. Drawing from his surname Schreiber, which means ‘scribe’ in Ger man, he had an ambition to manufacture ballpoint pens in South Africa. He estab lished the Scribe Pen Com pany and established a rela tionship with BIC in France, a business that his younger brother, Bennie, went on to manage. For a short time thereafter, he was a direc

tor at his father-in-law’s im port business, before turning his energy back to his own pursuits. Subsequently, he founded a manufacturing business, which produced medical syringes and sup plies. This flourished for a number of decades, before selling it to the American Hospital Supplies Corpora tion.

Chaim married Gaby Hirsch on June 21, 1959 and they recently celebrated their 63rd wedding anniversary. They had three children, Co lin, Karen, and Jacqui and lived in Johannesburg until February 1978, when they emigrated to Princeton in the wake of political unrest in South Africa. They made Princeton their home and have lived in the same house for 43 years. He was devoted to his seven grandchildren, who live in America and the United Kingdom. Chaim was especially proud as he wit nessed them growing into in dependent young adults and receiving a university educa tion, something he strongly valued.

Soon after settling in Princ eton, Chaim audited classes in history and world religion at Princeton University. He read and thought deeply, al ways seeking to understand politics and world events in all their complexity. Until the end of his life, he continued to read his favorite maga zine, The Economist, from cover to cover and newspa pers from around the world. He was always happy to ar gue and debate with family. He filled his days with his passion for road cycling, or ganizing and leading bike rides until the age of 88. He took pleasure in the me ticulous planning of routes, which are still enjoyed by his friends at both the Princeton and Morris area Freewheel ers. Chaim cultivated a huge repertoire of jokes, which he shared throughout his life. Chaim’s friends and family often remarked on his ency clopedic recall and ability to share a joke for every occa sion, no matter how irrever ent.

He was loved deeply and

will be hugely missed by his wife, Gaby; his children, Colin (Sandy), Karen (Gary Lubner), and Jacqui (Peter Miller); his grandchildren, Sam, Hannah, Julia, Jordan nah, Max, Sydney, and Jack; his large extended family; and his many friends.

Funeral arrangements are by Orland’s Ewing Memorial Chapel. For condolences, please visit the obituary page at OrlandsMemorialChapel. com.

service, Sandy was awarded both the Air Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross.

After the war, Sandy met his first wife, Grete, who had come to the United States from Norway right after the war, at International House in New York City. They soon traveled around the country finding jobs together and spent the winter of 1949 in Jackson, Wyoming, where Sandy skied. Thereafter, Sandy and Grete moved to Middlebury, Vermont, where Sandy attended Middlebury College on the G.I. Bill and graduated in the Class of 1953. His first child, Chris tine, was born in 1950 in Middlebury. He went on to Vermont Medical School in Burlington, Vermont, gradu ating in 1957. His second child, Kim, was born in Burl ington in 1954.

that if after he died anyone who knew him personally remembered a good moment with him, that was all he

William Fullerton (Sandy) Otis, Jr.

William Fullerton (Sandy) Otis, Jr. died at home on November 28, 2022, at the age of 97 after a fall. He was alert, talkative, and lucid right to his end.

Sandy was born on October 16, 1925 in Kansas City, Mis souri. In September of 1940 he entered St. Paul’s School in Concord, New Hampshire. He excelled in sports at St. Paul’s, and in his senior year was Secretary of his Form.

Sandy was permitted by St. Paul’s to graduate in De cember 1943 along with two friends, Frank Vickers and Mike McClanahan, in order to enlist in the United States Army Air Corps to fight in World War II. Sandy and Frank Vickers were sent to England and fought as tail gunners in B-25s. Unfor tunately, Vickers was shot down and killed on a mis sion. Sandy’s plane was also shot down on one occasion but he parachuted out over Holland, survived, and was back at the air base within 36 hours. He completed 34 combat missions. For his war

Sandy did his internship and residency at Albert Ein stein College of Medicine, which he completed in the summer of 1959. He then took his family to Europe for 14 months. The family lived the winter in Lech, Austria, and the rest of the year in a small town on the southern coast of Spain.

Sandy started his psychiat ric practice in 1962 at The Carrier Clinic, a psychiatric hospital in Belle Mead, New Jersey, where he was a prac ticing psychiatrist until 1977. He was most proud of intro ducing group therapy to the Clinic. In 1978-79, Sandy and Grete moved to Zurich where Sandy studied to become a Jungian analyst at the Jung Institute. On their return to Princeton Sandy had a pri vate practice until 1992.

After his retirement from private practice Sandy au dited several courses a se mester at Princeton Univer sity for over 20 years. He traveled to town every day on his motorcycle and loved being in town, often using the library to do his studies. For decades he also met with a small group of older men ev ery morning for two hours at Bon Appétit. When the pan demic ended that, he contin ued to meet with the group on Zoom until shortly before his death.

After the death of his first wife in 1999 Sandy married Daniela Bittman. For many years Sandy and Daniela trav eled to Europe every summer for over two months, staying at an apartment above a barn in Switzerland, as well as places they found in the Dordogne region of France. He loved to travel around Switzerland and hiked many mountains in the Alps.

Sandy always said that he was one of the luckiest men alive and that he enjoyed his life tremendously. He famous ly said that his 80s were the best decade of his life. When he had a motorcycle accident in his 90th year, things start ed to get more difficult. He said he was particularly lucky to have a second marriage to Daniela. They were devoted to each other. She took won derful care of him, especially and completely at the end of his life.

Sandy is survived by his wife Daniela Bittman, his son and daughter-in-law Kim and Loraine Otis, his grand daughter Anna Otis, his stepson Jonathan Bittman and his wife, Sarah Jeffrey and daughter, Bodil. Sandy was also predeceased by his daughter, Christine Otis.

At Sandy’s request there will be no service. He asked

died at home on November 29, 2022 after valiantly bat tling stage 4 lung cancer for over eight years. She is sur vived by her husband, John Warren, and her sons Patrick (Jolene) and Philip (Ruth) and four grandchildren, Oliver, Ethan, Wes, and Ayelet.

Maryann was born on No vember 11, 1954 in Newark, New Jersey, the daughter of Laura and Joe Stocki. She was predeceased by her brother, Raymond Stocki, and her parents. Maryann grew up in New Jersey and Virginia, graduating from Hopewell Valley High School. She attended Trenton State, now The College of New Jer sey, where she earned a BA in Education with a minor in Art History. She modeled for Ford Models, ran a daycare out of her home, and worked for many years at Princeton University’s library, among other occupations.

Maryann loved her family, her pets, and animals in gen eral, especially birds, dogs, and horses. She enjoyed working in her garden — par ticularly with the family’s first bird, Boo, walking around on the grass next to her — and knew a lot about flowers and other plants. She was a de voted music fan (especially David Bowie) and she loved to dance. She was a huge Phillies fan (shoutout to Jay son 2008!) and never missed her sons’ Little League games. Maryann adored cof fee, gummy bears, and lico rice. She loved Eaglesmere, the Jersey Shore, and Cape Cod, and visited many times over the years. Her para dise was sitting in a beach chair watching the sun set over the bay. She cherished family holidays and gave the most thoughtful, beautifully wrapped gifts; she frequently sent lovely cards. The house in Princeton that she shared with John and where she raised Pat and Phil is decorat ed with the photos she chose and the curtains she sewed. The family enjoyed walks to and from town for the Christ mas tree lighting and visits to Thomas Sweet and Halo Pub. In recent years, her greatest pleasure was playing with her grandchildren.

Maryann will be remem bered for her wonderful, dis tinctive laugh, wearing a tur tleneck and holding a mug. A memorial will be held early in 2023.

The family wishes to thank Dr. Peter Yi and the entire team that supported Maryann and the family during her ill ness. Donations in Maryann’s honor may be made to your local animal shelter.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 • 42 Preferred by the Jewish Community of Princeton because we are a part of it. Member of KAVOD: Independent Jewish Funeral Chapels Serving All Levels of Observance 609-883-1400 OrlandsMemorialChapel.com 1534 Pennington Road, Ewing, NJ JOEL E. ORLAND Senior Director, NJ Lic. No. 3091 MAX J. ORLAND Funeral Director, NJ Lic. No. 5064
Chaim “Hymie” Schreiber
Obituaries
Warren Maryann Stocki Warren Preaching Sunday, December 11, 2022
Rev. Dr. Theresa Thames Associate Dean of Religious Life and of the Chapel, Princeton University Music performed by the Princeton University Chapel Choir with Nicole Aldrich, Director of Chapel Music and of the University Chapel Choir, and with Eric Plutz, University Organist. The Chapel Choir will perform works by Robert G. Farrell, Geonyong Lee, and Daniel Nelson. in the
Princeton’s First Tradition Worship Service
University Chapel Sundays at 11am

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FREEDMANS JEWELERS IN PENNINGTON IS RETIRING!

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AFTER 40 YEARS IN BUSINESS, Franco’s Custom Tailoring and Dry Cleaning (1241 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville) is selling! Excellent location, excellent business model. If interested in making an offer, please call (609) 883-9721 or (609) 9374178.

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Commercial/Residential

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HOUSE FOR RENT: One-of-a-kind spacious dairy barn conversion with Princeton address, on private estate. Open floor plan, 3 BR, 2 bath, breathtaking 2nd floor versatile room. Fireplace, 2-car garage, central air. Includes lawn maintenance & snow removal. No pets, smoke free, $3,400. Available now. (609) 731-6904. 12-21

THE MAID PROFESSIONALS:

Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Residential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404. 03-29-23

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST:

Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130

12-14

FREEDMANS JEWELERS IN PENNINGTON IS RETIRING!

Liquidating all furniture, fixtures, displays, computers, a large safe, cash register and more! If interested, please call (609) 737-3775.

12-07

CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC

Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188.

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CLASSIFIEDS “un” to place an order: tel: 924-2200 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: Irene Lee, Classified Manager VISA MasterCard • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday•Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $15.00•each add’l word 15 cents•Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. •3 weeks: $40.00•4 weeks: $50.00•6 weeks: $72.00•6 month and annual discount rates available. • Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inch•all
Ext. 10 Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35 CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 • 44 PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540 609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com ©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation. Insist on … Heidi Joseph. “A house becomes a home when you can write, ‘I love you’ on the furniture." —Author Unknown from Dust If You Must A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947 WATER WATER EVERYWHERE! Let's rid that water problem in your basement once and for all! Complete line of waterproofing services, drain systems, interior or exterior, foundation restoration and structural repairs. Restoring those old and decaying walls of your foundation. Call A. Pennacchi and Sons, and put that water problem to rest! Mercer County's oldest waterproofing co. est. 1947 Deal directly with Paul from start to finish. 609-394-7354 Over 70 years of stellar excellence! Thank you for the oppportunity. apennacchi.com Local family owned business for over 40 years Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com Taking care of Princeton’s trees MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609)
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LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING &
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WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609)
ext 10 circulation@towntopics.com MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call
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10;

etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469.

10-12-23

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06-28-23

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS

GET TOP RESULTS!

Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

ESTATE LIQUIDATION

SERVICE:

I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613.

06-28-23

WE BUY CARS

Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131

Ask for Chris

EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver with 16 years experience will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 9779407.

AFTER 40 YEARS IN BUSINESS, Franco’s Custom Tailoring and Dry Cleaning (1241 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville) is selling! Excellent location, excellent business model. If interested in making an offer, please call (609) 883-9721 or (609) 9374178.

12-21

KARINA’S HOUSECLEANING: Honest. Reliable. Looking for house cleaning. Best prices. Week days only. English speaking. Call for estimate. (609) 858-8259.

tf

THE MAID PROFESSIONALS:

Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Residential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404.

03-29-23

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST:

Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130

tf

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection.

01-25

NEED YOUR FOOD SCRAPS

PICKED UP? Everything on your plate...meat, bones, fish, everything! Call or text The Compost Man! Rates start at $20/month. (609) 955-0924.

12-14

FREEDMANS JEWELERS IN PENNINGTON IS RETIRING!

Liquidating all furniture, fixtures, displays, computers, a large safe, cash register and more! If interested, please call (609) 737-3775.

12-07

CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC

Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188.

04-06-23

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER:

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A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10 circulation@towntopics.com

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tf

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609)

HOUSE FOR RENT: One-of-a-kind spacious dairy barn conversion with Princeton address, on private estate. Open floor plan, 3 BR, 2 bath, breathtaking 2nd floor versatile room. Fireplace, 2-car garage, central air. Includes lawn maintenance & snow removal. No pets, smoke free, $3,400. Available now. (609) 731-6904. 12-21

45 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 CALL 609-924-2200 TO PLACE YOUR AD HERE A Town Topics Directory AT YOUR SERVICE FREE CONSULTATION PRINCETON, NJ 609-683-4013 BLACKMAN LANDSCAPING Innovative Design Trees-shrubs-perennials Native Plants FRESH IDEAS Erick Perez Fully insured 15+ Years Experience Call for free estimate Best Prices Scott M. Moore of MOORE’S CONSTUCTION HOME IMPROVEMENTS LLC carpenter • builder • cabinet maker complete home renovations • additions 609-924-6777 Family Serving Princeton 100 Years. Free Estimates BRIAN’S TREE SERVICE 609-466-6883 Locally Owned & Operated for over 20 years! Trees & Shrubs Trimmed, Pruned, and Removed Stump Grinding & Lot Clearing FIREWOOD SPECIAL Seasoned Premium Hardwoods Split & Delivered $240 A cord / $450 2 cords Offer good while supplies last Stacking available for an additional charge LocallyOwnedandOperatedforOver25years! BRIAN’S TREE SERVICE 609-466-6883 Locally Owned & Operated for over 20 years! Trees & Shrubs Trimmed, Pruned, and Removed Stump Grinding & Lot Clearing 609-915-2969 Serving the Princeton Area since 1963 Find us on Facebook and Instagram (609)737-2466 A Tradition of Quality HD HOUSE PAINTING & MORE References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices Hector Davila 609-227-8928 Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish (Benjamin Moore Green promise products) Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman Specializing in the Unique & Unusual CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available 609-466-2693 CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance James E. Geisenhoner Home Repair Specialist 609-586-2130 AmericanFurnitureExchange WANTED ANTIQUES & USED FURNITURE 609-306-0613 Antiques • Jewelry • Watches • Guitars • Cameras Books • Coings • Artwork • Diamonds • Furniture Unique Items Over 30 Years Experience Serving All Of Mercer County Daniel Downs Owner The premier home cleaning company in Mercer County Now serving Princeton, Lawrenceville, West Windsor, Hopewell, Robbinsville, Pennington, Washington Crossing and more! www.brightshinemaids.com 609.806.5082 • Info@Brightshinemaids.com Est. in 2015 NEWDISCOUNT:CUSTOMER 10% OFF First Deep Clean Saves You Time Safety First Only the Best Quality Seamless Communication Cash Free Payment Taking Great Pride in our Work, and the Special Touches that Count! PRESIDENTIAL ROOFING & CONTRACTING Presidential Roofing & Contracting Raul Torrens Customer Care PRESIDENTIALRANDC.COM 609-578-8810 Raul@Presidentialrandc.com Lic #13V11853500 We Will Keep All Your Roofing Needs Covered! I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture,
12-21 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?
MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon
JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience
Fully Insured • Free Consultations
LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf
Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 356-9201 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References • Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 tf
BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals.
TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call
306-0613.
WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris
9217469. 10-12-23
(609) 306-0613. 06-28-23
(609)
06-28-23

Weekend Winter Home Maintenance Tasks

Winter is only weeks away so it’s the perfect time to get your home ready for snow and ice season. Early preparation is key to make sure you have everything in place before winter temperatures and storms arrive. Here’s a quick checklist of items that you can tackle over a weekend:

Check for leaks: Make sure your home stays warm and cozy by checking for leaks and drafts near your windows and doors. Adding some insulation, replacing caulk or weatherstripping, and covering your windows with heavier curtains can keep your home warm and save on heating bills.

Reverse your ceiling fans: Change the switches on your ceiling fans so that they move clockwise, which creates an updraft that moves the warm air down from the ceiling into the room. This tip may save on heating bills.

Gather your snow supplies: Now is the time to pull out your snow shovels and make sure you have pet safe ice melt for your sidewalks and driveways. If you have a snow blower, make sure it’s in good working condition.

Turn off outside faucets: Drain sprinkler systems, disconnect any garden hoses, and turn off outside faucets to prevent winter freezing.

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO Broker Princeton Office 609 921 1900 | 609 577 2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver with 16 years experience will assist with personal care, medi cation, meals, drive to medical ap pointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 9779407.

AFTER 40 YEARS IN BUSINESS, Franco’s Custom Tailoring and Dry Cleaning (1241 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville) is selling! Excellent location, excellent business model. If interested in making an offer, please call (609) 883-9721 or (609) 9374178.

12-21

KARINA’S HOUSECLEANING: Honest. Reliable. Looking for house cleaning. Best prices. Week days only. English speaking. Call for esti mate. (609) 858-8259.

12-21

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

A Gift Subscription!

Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10 circulation@towntopics.com

MOVING?

TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT?

Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396.

LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gut ter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years ex perience. (609) 271-8860.

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON

Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience • Fully Insured • Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 356-9201 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References • Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 tf

HOUSE FOR RENT: One-of-a-kind spacious dairy barn conversion with Princeton address, on private es tate. Open floor plan, 3 BR, 2 bath, breathtaking 2nd floor versatile room. Fireplace, 2-car garage, central air. Includes lawn maintenance & snow removal. No pets, smoke free, $3,400. Available now. (609) 731-6904. 12-21

THE MAID PROFESSIONALS:

Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Resi dential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404. 03-29-23

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST:

Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting,

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Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH, ROCKY HILL, SEEKS PART-TIME PARISH ADMINISTRATOR

Responsible for

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 • 46 FLESCH’S ROOFING • Residential & Commercial • Cedar Shake • Shingle & Slate Roofs • Copper/Tin/Sheet Metal • Flat Roofs • Built-In Gutters • Seamless Gutters & Downspouts • Gutter Cleaning • Roof Maintenance For All Your Roofing, Flashing & Gutter Needs Free Estimates • Quality Service • Repair Work 609-394-2427 Family Owned and Operated Charlie has been serving the Princeton community for 25 years LIC#13VH02047300
deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs.
list
my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft
www.princetonmagazinestore.com Artwork by Nicole Steacy Holiday season is here! Get your shopping done early at princetonmagazinestore.com. We have the latest and greatest gifts for any Princetonian!
Punch
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(609) 586-2130 tf
running church of fice & parish administrative tasks. Required: familiarity with Quicken, Google Doc, spreadsheets, web sites, word processing, etc. Personal skills: ability to multi-task, be proac tive, support Vicar and parish. 8-10 hrs a week, max 15 hrs. Salary $20 /hr. Must be in church office 4 hours one weekday/wk, day TBD. Email of fice@trinityrockyhill.org or call (609) 921-8971. 12-14 www.towntopics.com ONLINE Witherspoon Media Group For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution · Newsletters · Brochures · Postcards · Books · Catalogues · Annual Reports 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 Witherspoon Media Group For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution · Newsletters · Brochures · Postcards · Books · Catalogues · Annual Reports Witherspoon Media Group For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution · Newsletters · Brochures · Postcards · Books · Catalogues · Annual Reports 609-924-5400 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 Witherspoon Media Group For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution Newsletters 609-924-5400 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 Weekly Inserts only 10¢ per household. Get the best reach at the best Town Topics is the only weekly paper that reaches EVERY HOME IN PRINCETON, making it a tremendously valuable product Reach 11,000 homes in Princeton and surrounding Town Topics puts you in front of your target customer than what it would cost to mail a postcard. Please contact us to reserve your sPace •Postcards •8.5 •Flyers •Menus •Booklets etc... We can almost toW n to PI cs ne Ws Pa P e R • 4438 Route 27 n o R th • KI n G ston , n J 08528 • tel: 609.924.2200 • Fax: 609.924.8818 Weekly Inserts only 10¢ per household. Get the best reach at rate! Town Topics is the only weekly paper that reaches EVERY HOME IN PRINCETON, making it a tremendously valuable product with unmatched exposure! Reach 11,000 homes in Princeton and surrounding towns. Town Topics puts you in front of your target customer for less than what it would cost to mail a postcard. Please contact us to reserve your sPace now! •Postcards •8.5″ x 11 •Flyers •Menus •Booklets etc... We can accomodate almost anything! toW n to PI cs ne Ws Pa P e R • 4438 Route 27 n o R th • KI n G ston , n J 08528 • tel: 609.924.2200 • Fax: 609.924.8818 • www.towntopics.com Weekly Inserts only 10¢ per household. Get the best reach at the best Town Topics is the only weekly paper that reaches EVERY HOME IN PRINCETON, making it a tremendously valuable product with Reach 11,000 homes in Princeton and surrounding Town Topics puts you in front of your target customer than what it would cost to mail a postcard. Please contact us to reserve your sPace We can accomodate almost anything! toWn toPIcs neWsPaPeR • 4438 Route 27 noRth • KInGston nJ 08528 • tel: 609.924.2200 • Fax: 609.924.8818 WEEKLY INSERTS START AT ONLY 10¢ PER HOUSEHOLD. WEEKLY INSERTS START AT ONLY 10¢ PER HOUSEHOLD. Get the best reach at the best rate! Get the best reach at the best rate! • Postcards • 8.5x11” flyers • Menus • Booklets • Trifolds • Post its • We can accomodate almost anything! Reach over 15,000 homes in Princeton and beyond! Town Topics puts you in front of your target customer for less than what it would cost to mail a postcard! • Postcards • 8.5x11” flyers • Menus • Booklets • Trifolds • Post its • We can accomodate almost anything! Reach over 15,000 homes in Princeton and beyond! Town Topics puts you in front of your target customer for less than what it would cost to mail a postcard! Princeton | 609 921-2827 | eastridgedesign.com REFINED INTERIORS
47 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022 HEIDI A HARTM AND SELLERS INCETON 771 MANN CONNECTING BUYERS AND SELLERS AT ALL PRICE POINTS IN PRINCETON (609) 921 1411 W: HeidiHartmannHomes.com E: HeidiHartmannHomes@gmail.com C: 609 6 HEIDI A CONNECTING BUYERS AND SELLERS AT ALL PRICE POINTS IN PRINCETON 10 Nassau Street Princeton (609) 921 1411 W: HeidiHartmannHomes.com E: HeidiHartmannHomes@gmail.com C: 609 HEIDI A CONNECTING BUYERS AND SELLERS AT ALL PRICE POINTS IN PRINCETON W: HeidiHartmannHomes.com E: HeidiHartmannHomes@gmail.com C: 609 658 3771 HEIDI A HARTMAN CONNECTING BUYERS AND SELLERS AT ALL PRICE POINTS IN PRINCETON 10 Nassau Street Princeton (609) 921 1411 W: HeidiHartmannHomes com E: HeidiHartmannHomes@gmail.com C: 609 658 3771 HEIDI A. HARTMANN CONNECTING BUYERS AND SELLERS AT ALL PRICE POINTS IN PRINCETON C: 609 658 3771 HEIDI A. HARTMANN S S C: 609 658 3771 HEIDI A. HARTMANN NECTING AND SELLERS RICE POINTS NCETON •
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