Town Topics Newspaper, December 1, 2021

Page 1

C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

C-0,M-0,Y-92,K-0 Digital: Hex

C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex# Weichert Black Print: C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

C-0,M-0,Y-92,K-0 Digital: Hex Weichert Yellow Print: C-0,M-0,Y-92,K-0 Digital: Hex

Digital: Hex#

We i c h e

Digital: Hex

Specifications Weichert Black Print: C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

We i c h e r t R e a l t o r s Specifications

We i cRea he

Rea

Realtors Realtors Realtors Realtors Realtors

Closing Real Estate Services• Mortgage

Insurance

Closing Services

Realtors Realtors

ge iServices chert Realtors

e c i f i cVolume ations

Digital: Hex

We i cWe h eirct hReer ta lRt o e rasl t o rSsp e c i f i c a t S p e c i Sf ipc ea ct i of inc sa t i o n s

surance

Weichert Ye

S p e c i Print: fica C-0,M-0,Y-

Color Key

LXXV, 48 • Number singReal Services Estate Mortgage

www.towntopics.com • Closing Services Insurance

Color Key 75¢ at newsstands

Color Key

Westminster Students Send Petition to Rider With Multiple Concerns Weichert Black Print: C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

Weichert Yellow Print: C-0,M-0,Y-92,K-0 Digital: Hex

Wednesday, December 1, 2021

Weichert Black Print: C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

Weichert Yellow Print: C-0,M-0,Y-92,K-0 Digital: Hex

We i c hEstate ert Re Real “Slingshot” Spike in Princeton COVID Cases Esta Real Real Estate Weichert Black Print: C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

Weichert Yellow Print: C-0,M-0,Y-92,K-0 Digital: Hex

We i c h e r t R e a l t o r s

Specifications

p e cseeing i f i c a t i o daily, ns COVID-19 cases in Princeton, reported raised from “moderate” to “moderate to Sare weekly, and biweekly totals that compete with Princeton’s winter on November 29 by the Princeton Health high.” Department, approached the December “The past two weeks in Princeton we 2020 surge.” A petition signed by 130 students and 2020 highest weekly and biweekly totals Grosser went on to reflect on the unhave seen a very abrupt trend change • • • College of alumni of Westminster Choir of the pandemic. certainties still involved in confronting from where it appeared the Delta surge Rider University, expressing concerns the virus. “Although we have learned a The Princeton Health Department on was bottoming out and now we are seeabout inadequate facilities, decreasing tremendous amount during this pandemic Monday reported 35 new cases in the ing a slingshot trend back up again,” said enrollment, unfulfilled promises, and Harrison Street Park Tree about COVID-19 and how to best comprevious seven days and 56 cases in the Princeton Deputy Administrator for Health more, was delivered to Rider adminisDonations Inspired by bat the virus individually and as a comprevious 14 days. The highest seventration on Tuesday afternoon. and Community Services Jeff Grosser. Novel . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 day total of the pandemic was 39 in the “As a town we were averaging just about munity, the nature and justification for “We, the students of Westminster second week of December last year, with a case a day at our low point of the Delta COVID surges are still quite a mystery to Thomas Edison State Choir College (WCC), undersigned, are 66 as the highest 14-day total registered surge (middle/end of October). Now we epidemiologists,” he said, not the least of University Celebrates concerned about our education, our inContinued on Page 8 during the second and third weeks of that 50 Years . . . . . . . . . . . 9 stitution, the impact inadequate facilities month. have on our education, the value that our Performances • Insurance • Closing Services Estate •Local Mortgage In announcing this “significant increase degrees will hold upon graduation, and Mostly Live for Holiday in cases” the health department pointed the quality of support that we receive Season . . . . . . . . . . . 16 out that although cases are occurring in from the administration,” reads the openWith an emphasis on transforming research, education, and service,” said • Mortg Real Estate both vaccinated and unvaccinated indi- research into information for the benefit Princeton University Vice ing paragraph. PU Men’s Water Polo Dean for Innoviduals, “there is a substantial difference Tops Fordham in NCAA of society, Princeton University will be vation and Chemical and Biological EngiThe 22-acre choral college campus, Opener . . . . . . . . . . . 26 in the severity of symptoms in those who hosting its second annual innovation and neering Professor Rodney Priestley. “The located on Walnut Lane since the 1930s, are unvaccinated.” entrepreneurship conference online on University’s informal motto is ‘In the nabecame part of Rider in 1992. Four years Hun Boys’ Hockey Goes 3-1 • Closing • • • tion’s service and the service of humanity.’ Insurance Real Estate Services Mortgage Insurance Closing Services For the week ended November 26, December 1 and 2. ago, Rider announced it would sell WestIn Shady Side Tournament minster and its Princeton campus, sayPrinceton University reported 39 new Engineers, scientists, humanists, social We want to ensure that discoveries made To Start Season . . . . . . 32 ing the institution had been losing money. COVID-19 cases and on November 26 scientists, and business leaders will be in our labs and working spaces can befor humanity’s challenges, But the243CherryHillRoad.info controversial plan was$1,450,000 dropped Zoom to engage with each come solutions announced an increase in required test- gathering via Street.info month $885,000 34MayburyHillRoad.info $4,700 per month 34MayburyHillRoad.info $1,450,000 in 2017 after attempts to sell fell through, ing frequency, a 20-person limit on so- other in sharing discoveries and strate- and one way to do that is through entreand last year Rider absorbed Westmincial gatherings, and a tightening of the gies for fostering innovation to make a dif- preneurship, the creation of new ventures such as startup companies.” ster into its Lawrenceville campus. $1,100, mask mandate to require students to wear ference in confronting some of the great-117LeabrookLane.info He continued, “Through the Princeton $1,100,0 masks in all academic contexts for the est challenges facing the world in 2021. 117LeabrookLane.info “The move was made with promises to build a premier fine arts building, with rest of the semester. On Saturday, No“Our support for innovation aligns Innovation initiative, we hope that our Continued on Page 12 more practice rooms, teaching studios, vember 27, the campus risk status was with Princeton’s intertwined missions of performance facilities, dance studios, offices for music faculty, and accommodations for everyone taking courses in the FOR MO Westminster College of the Arts (WCA) FOR MOR In the Studio With the and Westminster Choir College,” the petiBeatles in This Week’s srom thePrinceton charm University, appeal ofsits a combines stunning home thatand combines the charm and appeal of versity, of sits a and stunning home that“As the charm appeal of tion per reads. we near$885,000 the end of the fall PRINCETON Book Review . . . . .40NorthHarrisonStreet.info . . 15 $4,700 $1,100,000 243CherryHillRoad.info month 34MayburyHillRoad.info 243CherryHillRoad.info $1,450,000 $4,700 per month 34MayburyHillRoad.info $1,450,000 loor ed this plan. home Architect in 2007 Kirsten with Thoft remodeled and fully renovated PRINCETON have yet to seethis what home in 2007 with this home in 2007 with with t Kirsten Thoft remodeled 2021 andsemester, fully we renovated In the heartPrinceto of dow ArtThe . . . . .renovations .of . . . the . . . 17home, In the117LeabrookLane.info heart ofIn downtown was promised.” enities. the character nomaintain expensethe to character carefully of maintain the character of the home, me, ions spare no. .expense to spare carefully the home, the heart of hom dow $1,100,000 In the heart of downtown Princeton a century old a century old home with old a spaciou The petition was spearheaded byextensive Berkshire Hathaway mouldings, ns throughout pocket make doors, itand both hardwood floors, and built-ins oth oors, hardwood floors, extensive built-ins throughout make it boththroughout make it both a century home a century olddetail home spaciou spectacular detail Marion Jacob, pursuing a graduate despectacular to with bothatraditiona Fox & FOR Roach Realtors . .20, 21 AN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO ENLANE.INFO spectacular detail t come true. spectacular detail to both traditiona 00 .info $1,165,000 102SnowdenLane.info $875,000 $1,125,000 102SnowdenLane.info $875,000 OR NDENLANE.INFO MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO gree in PLAN, master15JeffersonRoad.info choral conducting; and updated for today’ updated for today’s lifestyle. Custo updated for today’s updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Debbie-Ann Francis, a graduate student FO FOR MORE PHOTO an intimate family space and an en an intimate family s FOR MORE PH $999, $1,649,000 ets, ceiling, and pocket kitchen with cabinets, TON $1,649,000 $1,649,000an 83MountLucasRoad.info MORE PHOTO intimate family space and an ent inThe piano pedagogy. Jacob said she and anFOR intimate family s chen m with with original custom tin doors. cabinets, ceiling, andgourmet pocket doors. Thecustom gourmet kitchen $1,649,000 with custom cabinets, 83MountLucasRoad.info $999,0 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 22 $1,649,000 other students attempted to appeal express bar. om -filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful The great&the room that combines thelight-filled charm and appeal of rsity, tPrinceton, of downtown sits aabar. stunning Princeton, home athat few combines blocks from thehad Princeton charm University, of sits stunning home thatand combines the charm appeal of dme eautiful overlooks The great room great room with built-in bookcases beautiful bar. greatand room PRINCETON PRINCETON The PRINCETON spacious entrance hall opens i home that combines few the blocks the from charm Princeton and appeal University, of sits a and stunning home thata combines charm appealThe of The spacious spacious entra their concerns in the past, with little or PRINCETON Classified Ads . . . . . . 37 The spacious entrance hall opens in and fully renovated this home in 2007 with The entra old Kirsten home Thoft with remodeled a spacious and modern fully renovated open floor this plan. home Architect in 2007 Kirsten with Thoft remodeled and fullyinrenovated this home in 2007 with oor/ custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indoor/ led spacious and fully modern renovated open this floor home plan. in Architect 2007 with Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home 2007 with appliances, pantry an ea around to function porch. The an custom indoor/ doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indoor/ Instainless-steel the In heart of downtown a few bloc In the Princeton, heartPrinceton, of pantry downtown stainless-steel app carefully maintain theas character of the home, no response Rider administration. the of heart of appliances, downtown ablock few stainless-steel an r.raditional ns detail spare toMailbox no both expense traditional to carefully and modern maintain amenities. thefrom character The renovations of the home, nomaintain expense to character carefully of maintain the character of the home, the heart downtown Princeton, amodern few to carefully and maintain modern The of renovations the spare no expense to spare carefully the the home, stainless-steel appli and tons of storage with ahome, powder room complete the first floor. aInopens century old a home with adining spacious op . . . . throughout .the .amenities. . .character .along . . 13 make a century old home with a to formal room that a century old home with a spacious mode d extensive built-ins it both m th complete built-in cubbies the first and floor. tons of storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. aopens century to old adining spacious modern ope ors, re.and today’s hardwood lifestyle. floors, Custom extensive staircase built-ins and mouldings, throughout pocket make doors, itand both hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins “After feeling like we hadn’t been heard, Custom extensive staircase built-ins andand throughout mouldings, make pocket it both doors, hardwood floors, extensive built-ins throughout make it boththroughout make it both opens to aand formal ahome formal room that spectacular detail to with both traditional modern spectacular detail to both opens to a formal d spectacular detail to both traditional and mo spectacular detail to both traditional and modern outdoor entertainment space. A sep Eo PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO d an entertainer’s family space dream come true. we decided that$1,165,000 students really needed New 15JeffersonRoad.info Toand Us dream . an . . .entertainer’s . . come . . . 25true.$1,125,000 updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase a $999,000 102SnowdenLane.info 15JeffersonRoad.info 102SnowdenLane.info outdoor entertainment space. Alifestyl sepa outdoor entertainm updated for today’s updated for$875,000 today’s lifestyle. Custom stairca updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase an hower. a Just down the 9FairwayDrive.info hallway areJacob twosaidadditional bedrooms one $875,000 with a $1,125,000 outdoor entertainme a voice,” Tuesday. “We sat an intimate family space and an entertainer’s dre FOR MORE PHOTOS AND an intimate family space and an entertainer’ an intimate family space an ional e.opens walk-in bedrooms steam shower. with Just acabinets, down the hallway are two additional bedrooms onecustom withcabinets, a The gourmet kitchen with custom 83MountLucasRoad.info $999,000 drea an intimate family space and an entertainer’s $1,649,000 $1,649,000 ors. The into gourmet the family kitchen custom original tin ceiling, and pocket The gourmet kitchen with cabinets, Obituaries .doors. . . .room . one .into .with .The .with 35 us iling, entrance and pocket hall opens the gourmet family room kitchen with with original tin doors. cabinets, ceiling, and pocket doors. Thecustom gourmet kitchen with ub. These bedrooms share a cabinets, hall bath with athis BainUltra Jacuzzi tub. Retreat upstairs to to the the master master bed down and cranked outcustom petition, and heated -in bookcases & beautiful bar. The room Retreat upstairs bedr built-in pantry and bookcases enormous & beautiful island overlooks bar. the great light-filled room great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great room andfew appeal blocks of room from Princeton University, sitsThe agreat stunning home that combines thelight-filled charm and appeal of room Retreat upstairs to The spacious entrance hall opens into the family ainUltra ood built-in heated closets. Jacuzzi These tub. bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. eel lled appliances, great pantry with built-in and enormous bookcases island & beautiful overlooks bar. the The great room great with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great room PRINCETON The spacious entrance hall opens into the f The spacious entrance hal Retreat upstairs to The spacious entrance hall opens into the family we have been trying to get it out.” fireplace and the other with a wall o ing and porch areaarea to function anremodeled indoor/ modern in 2007 open with floor plan. Architect Kirsten Thoft and fully renovated this home in 2007 with Performing Arts .to. .function . . 16as om dining that and overlooks porch a wraparound porch. as an The indoor/ custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indoor/ stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous i fireplace and the other with a wall of stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enorm stom formal doors dining allow room for that dining overlooks and porch a wraparound area to function porch. as The an custom indoor/ doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indoor/ In the heart of downtown Princeton, a few blocks from Pr stainless-steel appliances, nd of the modern home, amenities. Thecomplete renovations spare no expense to carefully maintain the character of the home, stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous is fireplace and the o ith a powder room the first floor. spacious bedrooms, built-in bookcases, desks, window seata powder Prominent among the students’ conng e. with A separate a powder mudroom room complete with built-in the cubbies first floor. and tons built-ins of storage with a powder room complete the first floor. fireplace and the otplrow aopens century old a home with adining spacious modern open floor to formal dining room overlooks to formal room that overlook staircase make it both and mouldings, pocket hardwood floors, and extensive throughout make it both deat ertainment tons of storage space. along A. separate afeaturing mudroom room with complete built-in cubbies the firstalong and floor. tons of storage along with room complete the first floor. opens opensspectacular to a a formal room overlooks aaw opens to that athat formal Police Blotter . . doors, .with . . . spacious 10powder detail dining to both traditional and moderndining amenities. cases, has two desks, additional window seat featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat ainer’s dream come true. outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroo cerns isbedrooms, the state of the facilities they outdoor entertainment space. A separate mu The crown jewel of this home is the a. for today’s lifestyle. staircase outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom Theupdated crown jewel ofCustom this homeand ismouldin the outdoor entertainment spac way are twotwo additional bedrooms with a a ster allway bedroom are with additional en suite bedrooms walk-inone steam one with shower. Just primary down rehearsal the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a an intimate family space and ancrown entertainer’s jewel dream come The oftr use. Gill Chapel, their wer. stairs Just to the down master the hallway bedroom are with two en additional suite walk-in bedrooms steam one shower. with Just a down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a otom thebonus cabinets, family room with original tin ceiling, and pocket doors. The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, Real Estate . . . . . . . . 37 and closets. The two bedrooms sha a sitting area. The crown jewel of hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. ea agreat wall hall ofisland bath floor-to-ceiling with a BainUltra wood heated built-in Jacuzzi closets. tub. These bedrooms share agreat hallroom bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. andRetreat closets. two bedrooms sha Retreat upstairs toThe theto master bedroom with en upstairs the master bedroom wi enormous he room overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The Retreat upstairs to the master bedroom with en and performance space, is “acoustically Retreat upstairs to the ma The spacious entrance hall opens into the family room with These d thememories bedrooms other with ashare wall of acustom hall floor-to-ceiling bath with a BainUltra wood built-in heated closets. Jacuzzi These tub. bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. and closets. The tw fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceili erlooks as an indoor/ a wraparound porch. The doors allow for dining and porchand area tofriends. function as anThis indoor/ home truly has has oor to be created with family and closets. The tw stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous island overlo fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceilin Sports . . . .cubbies . . . . .and . . tons . 26ofwindow fireplace and the aother with defialong cient,” the petitionroom reads. “Students, ate ering first mudroom withbookcases, built-in with a powder complete the first floor. built-in bookcases, desks, window seat built-in desks, seat me eaturing isfloor. thebuilt-in third floor bookcases, which has desks, twostorage additional window seat spacious bedrooms, featuring opens to a formal dining room that overlooks wraparound The fenced in backyard with Ipe wo The fenced in backyard with Ipe woo rific riends. space This for home outdoor truly memories has to be created withbedrooms, family and friends. homedesks, trulywindow has seatThe stroll around town. pacious jewel of bedrooms, this home isfeaturing theathird built-in floor which bookcases, has two desks, additional window spacious featuring built-inThis bookcases, outdoor entertainment space. A separate with built The crown jewel ofhome this home is the third flo professors, visiting professors have allseat crown jewel of this home themudroom third floor w oms full and sitting area. The crown jewel of this isisafter the third floor wh ms om one withshare with en Topics suite a a walk-in steam shower. the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a of bath the Town . . bonus . .Just 5 down KICKING OFF THE HOLIDAY SEASON: The annual Palmer Square Tree Lighting was live again on Friday, going The fenced in back it all. With ample off-street parking The crown jewel of this ho The fenced in backy it all. With ample off-street parking ya and closets. The two bedrooms share a full . The two bedrooms share a full bath and a bonus sitting area. ad.info $1,347,500 th and closets. The two two bedrooms share afull full bath oor-to-ceiling dcars Jacuzzi tub. built-in closets. bedrooms share a hallon bath with a BainUltra tub. atwood home andThese stroll around town. commented how difficult it is toheated hear Jacuzzi in Retreat upstairs to the master bedroom with en suite walk and closets. The bedrooms share a bath virtual lastand year,friends. as the 32,000 lightstruly on the giant spruce tree lit up the evening sky. and Thethe event also featured musical and closets. The twowood bedro 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,00 fireplace other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling bu Ipe with wood family deck and offers friends. terrific This space home for truly outdoor has memories to be created with family This home has dhated with family and friends. This home truly has it all. With ample o 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,00 Town . . . . . . spacious . . . . 6 bedrooms, it all. With ample of the room. Thebuilt-in numerous ensembles hird window floor which seat hasTalk two additional featuring bookcases, desks,that windowperformances and a visit fromfamily Santa.and friends. This home truly has bywood Charles R. Plohn) deck The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood The injewel backyard withis(Photo Ipe deck offer rin backyard to with be Ipe created wood with deck offers and terrific friends. space This for home outdoor truly memories has seat to be created with parking leave the atfamily home and stroll around town. The fenced fenced in backyard with Ipe wood The crown of this home the third floordeck whichoffers has tw a memories full bath you and acan bonus sitting area.cars Continued on Page 10 The fenced in backyard wit it all. With ample off-street parking you can itit all. ample off-street parking you can 1,329,000 343JeffersonRoad.info th and closets. Theoff-street two bedrooms share a full bath andleave aleave bonu all. With With ample parking you can ample oll around off-street town.parking you can leave the cars at$1,347,500 home and stroll around town. 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,000

es

Mortgage

Insurance

Closing Services

RINCE TON COLLEC TION

Realtors

N COLLEC TION

Realtors

Re

Entrepreneurs and Innovators Gather For PU Conference, December 1 & 2

Realtors Realtors

PRINCE TON COLLEC TION

Rea

FO AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO

PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO

00

$1,649,000

$1,649,000

$1,649,000

PRINCETON PRINCETON

contact me:

it all. With ample off-street

ome decktruly offers hasterrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has

u can leave the cars at home and stroll around town. tact me: If you want your home featured, contact me:

If you want your home featured, contact me:

ant your home featured, contact me:

Beatrice Bloom

m Beatrice Bloom om.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

ice Bloom

Happy Hanukkah

pecialist, MBA, ECO-Broker oker Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker presentative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

Beatrice Bloom

-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com m.com | BeatriceBloom.com com cialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker nceton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker eton Office | 609-921-1900 Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker .com | BeatriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com nfo@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com 1900 609-577-2989 (cell) | Princeton Office 609-921-1900

| 609-921-1900 R900 PLAN, VISITPrinceton FOR 15LINDENLANE.INFO MOREOffice PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO

e | 609-921-1900 E.INFO TOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO

you IfIf you

The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific sp it all. With ample off-street parking you can leave the cars a

you IfIf you If you want

you want youIfwant want youryh IfIf you your

Bea Bea Beatrice

If you want your home fea

Beatrice Blo Beatrice Blo Beatrice Bloom SalesRR SalesSales Represen

Sales Representative/Princeton Sales Representative/ Sales RepresentativeR

609-577-2989 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@Be

609-57 609-577-2989 (cell 609-5 609-577-2989 (ce

Princeton Office | 60 Princeton

Princeton Offi Princeton Of Princ Prin

PRINCETON


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 2

Happy Holidays Town Topics

FESTIVAL OF TREES FESTIVAL OF TREES NOW January 9, 2022 NOW - January 9,9, 2022 NOW - January 2022

holiday exhibition exhibition featuring a Visit Visit ourour holiday featuring a spectacular displayexhibition of trees and mantels decorated Visit ourjuried holiday spectacular juried display offeaturing trees anda by creative forces in the community and vote for your and favorite! spectacular juried display of trees mantels decorated by creative forces in Tickets and details onby ourand holiday programs mantels decorated creative forces in the community vote for at www.morven.org/festivaloftrees21 the community and vote for your favorite! Morven Museum & Garden your favorite! 55 Stockton Street, Princeton, NJ Members visit for FREE, reserve your Wednesdays through Sundays, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ticketvisit andfor voteFREE, at morven.org. Members reserve your ticket and vote at morven.org.

Holidays

ON THE SQUARE

W E S TM I N S T E R CO N S E RVATO RY OF MUSIC

SCAN ME

Experience the gift of THIS SUNDAY, DECEMBER

5

ANNUAL MENORAH LIGHTING ON THE GREEN STARTING AT 4PM

All Season long SKATING ON THE SQUARE

EVERY THURSDAY - SUNDAY THROUGH FEBRUARY 27, 2022 *To inquire about private parties, please contact events@palmersquare.com

WEEKEND HOLIDAY MUSIC & STROLLING SANTA EVERY SATURDAY & SUNDAY | 12PM - 2PM

GREAT HOLIDAY PARKING GIVEAWAY EARN FREE PARKING CREDIT WITH EVERY TRIP THIS HOLIDAY SEASON. DOWNLOAD THE APP TO PARTICIPATE.

Please visit our website, scan the QR code & Download the Palmer Square App for more information! Allow our interactive map to be your handheld guide around the Square.

music MUSIC LESSONS FOR STUDENTS OF ALL AGES PURCHASE 4 LESSONS AT THE PRICE OF 3

RIDER.EDU/GIFTOFMUSIC


SPH-210181 Fall 2021 Leapfrog Ad 10.3333x16.qxp_SPH-210181 Fall 2021 Leapfrog Ad 10.3333x16 11/15/21 12:10 PM Page 1

WE’RE PROUD TO BE AMONG THE NATION’S SAFEST HOSPITALS For the third consecutive time, while continuing to deal with COVID-19, Saint Peter’s University Hospital has received an “A” grade for safety excellence. This demonstrates the unwavering commitment by our entire team to deliver the best care to the patients and families we serve. To learn more about Saint Peter’s University Hospital, call 732.745.8600 or visit saintpetershcs.com

Safely treating you better...for life. Sponsored by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen Note: The Leapfrog Group grades hospitals on data related to how safe they are for patients. For more information, visit www.hospitalsafetygrade.org

3 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

A repeat performance


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 4

TOWN TOPICS

THE PERFECT SOLUTION FOR YOUR HOLIDAY NEEDS — LET US CATER YOUR EVENT IN THE COMFORT OF YOUR OWN HOME!

Princeton’s Weekly Community Newspaper Since 1946

DONALD C. STUART, 1946-1981 DAN D. COYLE, 1946-1973 Founding Editors/Publishers DONALD C. STUART III, Editor/Publisher, 1981-2001 LYNN ADAMS SMITH Publisher

LAURIE PELLICHERO, Editor BILL ALDEN, Sports Editor

MELISSA BILYEU Operations Director

DONALD GILPIN, WENDY GREENBERG, ANNE LEVIN, STUART MITCHNER, NANCY PLUM, DONALD H. SANBORN III, JEAN STRATTON, WILLIAM UHL Contributing Editors

CHARLES R. PLOHN Advertising Director JENNIFER COVILL Sales and Marketing Manager

FRANK WOJCIECHOWSKI, CHARLES R. PLOHN, WERONIKA A. PLOHN Photographers

JOANN CELLA Senior Account Manager, Marketing Coordinator

®

USPS #635-500, Published Weekly Subscription Rates: $55/yr (Princeton area); $59/yr (NJ, NY & PA); $62/yr (all other areas) Single Issues $5.00 First Class Mail per copy; 75¢ at newsstands For additional information, please write or call:

GINA HOOKEY Classified Ad Manager

JEFFREY EDWARD TRYON Art Director

Witherspoon Media Group 4438 Route 27, P.O. Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528 tel: 609-924-2200 www.towntopics.com fax: 609-924-8818

VAUGHAN BURTON Senior Graphic Designer

Periodicals Postage Paid in Princeton, NJ USPS #635-500 Postmaster, please send address changes to: P.O. Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528

(ISSN 0191-7056)

CALL FOR RESERVATIONS

Princeton: 354 Nassau Street (609) 683-9700

Crosswicks: 2 Crosswicks Chesterfield Road (609) 291-5525 Pennington: 7 Tree Farm Road (609) 303-0625

LOOKING FOR MEMBERS: The Princeton Fire Department is short on firefighters, and invites those 16 and up to attend an informational event on December 7 at 7 p.m. on becoming a volunteer.

getforky.com

“It’s an oppor tunity to c l o s e l y w i t h s u r r o u n d Princeton Fire Department Holds Open House for New Volunteers come out, meet other vol- ing departments to assist

Volu nteer f ire depar tments nationwide are feeling the impacts of staffing shortages. According to the National Fire Protection Association, the number of volunteer firefighters in the United States has decreased 15 percent since 1984, yet the call volume has increased by ne arly 30 0 p ercent, leaving volunteer fire departments like Princeton in need of additional volunteers. That’s why the Princeton Fire Department is launching a full-scale recruiting effort, seeking candidates to join its Class of 2022 training program and become volunteer members. Residents 16 and older are invited to attend an Open House on Tuesday, December 7, at 7 p.m., at the Princeton Fire Department located at 363 Witherspoon Street.

Finding the right solution for you in

Family Law

Services are provided in the following areas: • • • • • • •

Divorce Custody and Parenting Time Marital Settlement Agreements Prenuptial Agreements Domestic Violence Child Relocation Issues Civil Unions and Domestic Partnerships

John A. Hartmann, III Chairman

Lydia Fabbro Keephart

Nicole Huckerby

• Claims of Unmarried Cohabitants/Palimony • Post Judgment Enforcement and Modification • Mediation • Appeals • Adoption • Surrogacy

Jennifer Haythorn

each other at large incidents. It also maintains a unique par tnership w ith Princeton University, which encourages employees to volunteer as firefighters during the work week under an Associate Membership program. “Our volunteer firefighters have a very deep connection with the Princeton community,” said Yeh. “The service they provide directly impacts people daily, which cu lt ivate s a n i ncre d ible sense of purpose.” The Open House event is free and registration is not required. No prior experience is necessary for those interested in joining the Princeton Fire Department. Approved applicants receive free training and firefighter certification. For more information, visit Princetonnj. gov/joinpfd.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin

Jillian Frost Kalyan

609-520-0900 www.pralaw.com

unteer members of the department, and learn about the training process that’s involved in becoming a volunteer firefighter,” said Michael Yeh, director of the Department of Emergency & Safety Services. O r g a n i z e d i n 178 8 , the Princeton Fire Department is one of the oldest fire companies in New Jersey. Last year, Council approved the hiring of six full-time, paid firefighters, ending the Princeton Fire D e p a r t m e n t ’s 2 32 - y e a r history as an all-volunteer fire department. The employment of paid firefighters helped to reduce the overall time commitment needed from the volunteer membership. According to Yeh, the P r i n c e to n F i r e D e p a r tment responds to hundreds of calls per year and works

*

989 Lenox Drive, Suite 101 Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 *Pellettieri Rabstein & Altman was selected to The Best Lawyers® Best Law Firms list. The Best Law Firms list is issued by U.S. News & World Report. A description of the selection methodologies can be found at https://bestlawfirms.usnews.com/methodology.aspx. No aspect of this advertisement has been approved by the Supreme Court of New Jersey.

Become a Volunteer Firefighter: The Princeton Fire Department will hold an open house on Tuesday, December 7 at 7 p.m. at its headquarters, 363 Witherspoon Street. The department seeks volunteers for its Class of 2022 training program. Ages 16 and up can apply; no experience necessary. Princetonnj.gov/joinpfd. Become a Member of the Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad (PFARS): An open house will be held Monday, December 13 at 6 p.m., at PFARS headquarters, 2 Mount Lucas Road. Pfars.org/volunteer. Holiday Gift Drive: Princeton Human Services seeks donors of gifts for the holidays for Princeton children in need; plus gift cards for parents. Visit princetonnj. gov for info. Donate Holiday Gifts and Food: The annual Santa Claus fly-in has been postponed again this year, but Princeton Airport’s lobby is the drop-off center for unwrapped gifts and canned and boxed food until Sunday, December 17 between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. Princetonairport.com. Free Walk-In COVID-19 and Flu Vaccine Clinics: Sponsored by the Princeton Health Department on December 1, 4-6 p.m. at Princeton Senior Resource Center, 45 Stockton Street. Children age 5 and older are welcome. On December 3 from 2-4 p.m., the Griggs Farm clubhouse is the site at 205 Griggs Drive. Appointments are recommended. Covidvaccine.nj.gov/en-US/. Skating on the Square: Palmer Square’s “eco-friendly” outdoor synthetic ice rink is back, located on Hulfish Street behind the Nassau Inn. The rink is open through February 27. Visit Palmersquare.com for more information.


IN PRINT. ONLINE. AT HOME. Subscription Information: 609.924.5400 ext. 30 or subscriptions@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

princetonmagazine.com

A GIFT OF A GROVE: Ronnie Ragen, center, and Princeton Councilmember Michelle Pirone Lambros, far left, gathered recently with members of Ragen’s family and the Princeton Shade Tree Commission to plant trees in memory of Ragen’s parents.

Harrison Street Park Tree Donations Inspired by Novel “The Overstory”

Princeton’s Shade Tree Commission is hoping that a recent tree-planting project honoring the memory of two former residents will inspire others to consider making similar donations. Ronnie Ragen and her brother and sister-in-law, Mark and Lisa Ragen,

recently gifted a grove of trees in Harrison Street Park, where a dense forest stood before the ravages of storms and the notorious emerald ash borer. The donation is under the aegis of the Commission’s Commemorative Tree program. The newly planted grove of Happida ze A mer ic an sweetgums, American yellow woods, and Cherokee Princess Florida dogwoods is arranged in a semi-circle, “to create a restful and welcoming nook in the park,” according to a press release by Commission member Alexandra Radbil. A Norway spruce was also installed, to replace an aging white pine that had served as a screen.

TOPICS

to the ash borer. That motivated me.” In fact, Princeton is losing its street and park trees “faster than the municipality can replant,” reads the release. “The causes are multiple: pathogen and insect attacks (bacterial leaf scorch on red and pin oaks, emerald ash borers on ashes); damage from extreme storms; widespread development; and the demise of aging trees. Unfortunately, Princeton’s natural asset of a mature urban forest is being depleted as many of its large, long-time canopy trees age and die out.” Ragen worked with Princeton arborist Taylor Sapudar on the planting project.

It’s time to get your teeth cleaned. Once people discover us, they tend to stay put. It makes sense: most people choose their dentist very carefully—and the closer you look, the better we look. So check us out. Whether you need routine checkups or more comprehensive treatment, we’re confident you’ll want to be our patient for life. Kirk D. Huckel DMD, FAGD Kiersten Huckel DMD Shanni Reine-Mutch DDS

609-924-1414 www.PrincetonDentist.com 11 Chambers St., Princeton

Continued on Next Page

Of the Town

Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton NEW PRODUCTS ADDED WEEKLY!

www.princetonmagazinestore.com

“The new grove will provide multi-season interest: striking white flowers on the dogwood and the yellow wood in spring, a variety of colors in the fall, and fragrant leaves throughout the year on the sweetgum,” reads t he release. “T he flowers on all the trees are a source of food for pollinators, and the pods and seeds the trees produce are a food source for birds and mammals. Their placement and structure add visual interest and density to the park and serve as a buffer between the park and the road.” Ragen, the program director emerita of Trenton Music Makers, had been considering how to memorialize her parents, Irving and Sylvia Ragen, who lived in Princeton for six years after moving nor th from Florida. When she read The Overstory, Richard Powers’ novel in which characters confront the plight of the earth’s forest, she began to think about planting trees in their honor. “Reading the book was the catalyst,” Ragen said this week. “There is one vignette about a young man who makes a frantic effort to plant trees, only to discover, after he’s worked himself to the bone, that they are being planted to be cut down. The idea of planting something that I could be sure wouldn’t be cut down really struck me. Then, I heard from a friend that Princeton is going to lose 2,500 trees

COLD SOIL ROAD COLD SOIL PRINCETON, NJROAD 08540 COLD SOIL ROAD PRINCETON, NJ 08540 PRINCETON, NJ 08540

TRENTON FARMERS MKT TRENTON FARMERS SPRUCE STREETMKT TRENTON FARMERS MKT SPRUCE STREET SPRUCE STREET

APPLES APPLES APPLES

ENJOY EXTENDED FALL

ALL YOUR HOLIDAY APPLE APPLEVARIETIES VARIETIES NEEDS APPLE VARIETIES • Pies P IICCCCrisp P K K • Apple Y O K U YO• U R Cider Apple O W At 13 R O WNNN O V a n W • Fresh KirkProduce Pick Your Own Apples

Bountiful Crop this Season – Pick Daily 9am-5pm

McINTOSH McINTOSH McINTOSH JONATHAN JONATHAN JONATHAN EMPIRE EMPIRE EMPIRE EARLY FUJI EARLY FUJI EARLY FUJI REDDELICIOUS DELICIOUS RED At 13 REDMACOUN DELICIOUS MACOUN At 13 Van Kirk MACOUN GOLDEN DELICIOUS RRoad Van GOLDEN DELICIOUS O o K P i r E O k GOLDEN DELICIOUS STAYMAN WINESAP N P Roadad E D STAYMAN WINESAP N A OSSPeEptNe DAIILY 9 GRANNY SMITH STAYMAN WINESAP eptemDbeAr- LY 9-5 GRANNY SMITH m S e p temb berI-OL FUJI OccYttoob9e-r5 5 GRANNY SMITH e b r-Oct FUJI oberer CRIMSON FUJI CRISP OPEN FRIDAY CRIMSON CRISP GALA CRIMSON CRISP SATURDAY GALA HONEYCRISP GALAthe Farm Enjoy Wine Orchard AND SUNDAY HONEYCRISP HONEYCRISP 12-5pm Friday-Sunday 12-5pm 7 Days a Week LIVE MUSIC produce, Enjoy with hot fresh Family Fun Fall Weekends baked goods and wine SAT & SUN mulled wine,Family FamilyFun FunFall FallWeekends Weekends Saturdays and Sundays, 9/18-10/31 live music, Saturdays andSundays, Sundays, 9/18-10/31 s’mores, Saturdays 9/18-10/31 Advance Tickets and Required • www.terhuneorchards.com hot cocoaTickets Required • www.terhuneorchards.com Advance Advance Tickets Required • www.terhuneorchards.com with family & friends Farm Market Open Daily 9-6

Music & Firepits at the Winery

Farm Market MarketOpen OpenDaily Daily9-6 9-6 Farm Winery Open Fri-Sun,12-5 pm Winery Open OpenFri-Sun,12-5 Fri-Sun,12-5pm pm Winery WWW.TERHUNEORCHARDS.COM

www.terhuneorchards.com

5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

One-Year Subscription: $10 Two-Year Subscription: $15

Come for a cleaning. Stay for a lifetime.


e

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 6

Harrison Street Park Continued from Preceding Page

“I live just a few blocks from the park, which I knew was losing trees,” she said. “This just made such good sense. It’s been such a pleasure. It’s so quick to pay back, and I’m so looking forward to the spring for the blooming.” Anyone interested in memorializing people or events by donating trees should visit the Shade Tree Commission page found on the website princetonnj.gov. —Anne Levin

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“Do you think this holiday season will be different than last year?” (Photos by Charles R. Plohn)

Secret Jewish Commandos Are Topic of Public Talk

TRI-ZONE LASER TRI-ZONE LASER LIFT LIFT THANK YOU Brunner, MD, FACS READERS! EugenieEugenie Brunner, MD, FACS

AWARD: BEST PLASTIC SURGEON

her new,non-surgical exclusive, non-surgical Debuts herDebuts new, exclusive, procedure procedure

BEFORE AFTER AFTER BEFORE AFTER BEFORE

BEFORE AFTER

AFTER BEFORE

BEFORE AFTER

AFTER

A proprietary and procedure personalized procedure that utilizes SmartLipo or FaceTite, c A proprietary eT and i personalized te , that utilizes SmartLipo or FaceTite,

along with f illers andlasers non-invasive lasers for a total lift. non-surgical lift. ca l l if illers f dermal tnon-invasive . along with dermal and for a total non-surgical

Eugenie MD, FACS - Double Board Certif ied Facial Plastic Surgeon S Eugenie ur Brunner, g MD,Brunner, e FACS - o Double n Board Certif ied Facial Plastic Surgeon

NJ

A Surgeon’s Hands, An Eye, A Woman’s Touch A Surgeon’s Hands, An Artist’s Eye, A Artist’s Woman’s Touch Bunn Drive, Suite Princeton, NJ 08540 0854 256 Bunn 0 Drive,256 Suite 4 Princeton, NJ408540 609.921.9497 | BrunnerMD.com 609.921.9497 | BrunnerMD.com

In June 1942, Winston Churchill and his chief of staff devised an unusual plan: the creation of a new commando unit made up of Jewish refugees in the United Kingdom. Called “X Troop,” the unit was made up of a motley group of intellectuals, artists, and athletes from Germany and Austria. Many had lost their families and homes and would stop at nothing to defeat the Nazis. This top -secret unit is the subject of Dr. L eah Garrett’s in-person talk at Rutgers–New Brunswick on Thursday, December 9, at 7 p.m. Free and open to the public, the talk is based on her new book, X Troop: The Secret Jewish Commandos of World War II. Drawing on extensive original research, including interviews with the last surviving members, Garrett follows this band of brothers from Germany to England and back again, with stops at British internment camps, the beaches of Normandy, and the hellscape of Terezin concentration camp — the scene of one of the most dramatic, untold rescues of the war. The talk is sponsored by the Allen and Joan Bildner Center for the Study of Jewish Life at Rutgers University and will be held at the Douglass Student Center, 100 George Street, New Brunswick. All guests attending the event must be fully vaccinated and wear face coverings. Advance registration is required online at BildnerCenter.Rutgers. edu. The first 40 people in attendance at the event will receive a free copy of Garrett’s book. Garrett is the director of the Jewish Studies Center and director of Hebrew and Jewish studies at Hunter College, CUN Y. She has published four books, most recently Young Lions: How Jewish Authors Reinvented the American War Novel, winner of the 2017 Jordan Schnitzer Book Award for modern Jewish history and a National Jewish Book Award finalist. The Allen and Joan Bildner Center for the Study of Jewish Life connects the university with the community through public lectures, symposia, Jewish communal initiatives, cultural events, and teacher training.

“I have a feeling that there will be much more going on than last year. More people are out shopping and eating and more families are getting together and traveling to see each other. There’s a feeling of celebration in the air again.” —Anna Nikolaou, Princeton

“I think it’s going to be a little bit different this year because more people are getting together. I also think that we are going to have more snow this winter.” —Ismael Escamilla, Hillsborough

Letitia: “We’re excited to have our grandmother coming for the holidays. But, other than that, we will have a small gathering and be safe as we were last year.” Cara: “I’m very excited for my kids, because this will be our first holiday in Princeton. We moved here from Florida, so I’m hoping that they get to have some snow days and go sledding with friends.” —Letitia Lang, Franklin Township, with Cara Snyder, Princeton

Matthew: “It’s probably going to be the same as last year, because we’re going to keep it small and stay local with our immediate family.” —Matthew Trowbridge, right, with Webster Trowbridge-Cunningham, Rocky Hill

Skillman H HFurniture Quality

Used Furniture Inexpensive

New Furniture

Like us on facebook 212 Alexander St, Princeton Mon-Fri 9:30-5, Sat 9:30-1

609.924.1881

Jennifer: “I think it’s going to include more family, especially with the older family members being vaccinated.” Lee: “We’re using Thanksgiving as a measure as to how safe it is to gather this year.” —Jennifer, Jase, and Lee Lising, Blue Bell, Pa.


E MEDIUM FIRM

587 587

Queen Mattress, Sale Price

$$

PRINCETON PRINCETON SALE EXTENDED THROUGH SUNDAY 12/12!!!

FIRM

Summer Summer 657

FREE MATTRESS MATTRESS BOX

Queen Mattress, Sale Pric

MAT TRE SSE S L O W ETwin S T Size P R I C E$ WITH

$

Full Size King Size FIRM $ $

SPRING

397Size 487 Twin Full Size747 King Size

Buy The Mattress At Our Sale Price & Get The Matching Box Spring FREE!

Queen Mattress, Sale Price $ CLEARANCE F R CLEARANCE E E$397Size Twin Size King 487Full$747

657 S Summer

527 SALE 597 89 $ MATTRESS MATTRESS SALE PRINCET D E L I V E R$ Y!

$

$

F MATTR CLEARANCE

FIRM

See store for details.

ALL INCLUD

LUXURY Twin Size

PLUSH LUXURY

Queen Mattress, Sale Price

PLUSH PILLOWTOP Full Size King Size

MEDIUM FIRM 527 Queen Mattress, Sale Price

$

$

HEAVENLY $ 597 897V Queen Mattress, Sale Price BO PLUSH PILLOWTOP

Summer Summer

Queen Mattress, Sale Price

$727 $897 $997 INCLUDE 657 Bu MATTRESS SALE MEDIUM FIRM MEDIUM FIRM ALL MONTH TheLONG! best M pl $

FIRM

657 ummer

FMS-01

PLUSH LUXURY

Queen Mattress, Sale Price

LUXURY MEDIUM FIRM ALL

Queen Mattress, Sale Price

Queen Mattress, Sale Price

HEAVENLY

Queen Mattress, Sale Price

727 $ 897$ 997 587 587 CLEARANCE MATTRESS TWIN QUEEN FREE CLEARANCE FALL SALE MATTRESS SALE! $489 MATTRESSES $279 MATTRESSES FREE TTRESS SALE Twin Size Full Size King Size

Twin Size Full Size King Size

$ 527 597 897 $577 PRINCETON $

$

$

$

$

657

Twin Size Full Size King Size

987

$

Twin Size Full Size King Size

$

$ 777 877 1187 877 Sale$977 Queen Mattress, Price Mattress, Sale Price

$ $ Queen FMS-01

$

$

1287

$

At O Visit

Celebra Ge ALL INCLUDE FREE DELIVERY AND FREE REMOVAL OF YOUR OLD MATTRESS!

Twin Size Full Size King Size $

7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

EARANCE

AummeLE r MEDIUM FIRM

Queen Mattress, Sale Price

527

$

597

$

Twin Size Full Size King Size

Twin Size Full Size King Size

Twin Size Full Size King Size

$ 897Visit us 577online 657 at www.PrincetonMattress.com 987 777 at 877 1187 877 starting $

$

$

$

$

$

$ 977starting 1287 at

$

Bo

FREE FALL Summer Sale MATTRESS FALL FREE M AT T R E SS SA L E $ FMS-01

A210913-003

MATTRESS PRINCETON MATTRESS SALE

$ MATTRESS! ALL INCLUDE FREE DELIVERY AND FREE REMOVAL OF YOUR Size Twin Size $397 BTwin OOLD X 397 SPRING

$ The best place buy a mattress in Central New Full Size $487 Full Size 487Jersey. FIRM Visit ustoonline atMEDIUM www.PrincetonMattress.com B O X SPRING F FIRM P $ Buy The Mattress HUGE SELECTION OF ADJUSTABLE BASES! Mattress, Price King Size 747 King Size $747 Sale Celebrating 15 yearsQueen and over 10,000 customers! starting at LU B OSale XMattress S P R& I Queen NG At Our Price Buy The Queen Mat HURRY IN! Queen Mattress, Sale Price Ma TWIN QUEEN TOP-OF-THE-LINE CLEARANCE At Our Sale Price & MATTRES Get The Matching THESE PREMIUM ULTRA B O MATTRESSES X S P R I N G SAVINGS Buy The Mattress Get Matching BoxThe Spring FREE! FIRM OR PLUSH FIRM MEDIUM PLUSH LUXURY PILLOWTOP WON’T LAST! FIRMFIRM PLUSH LUXURY PLUSH PILLOWTOP PLUSH At Our Sale Price & Buy The Mattress $ Queen Mattress, Sale SAVE Price UP TO $500! See store for details. YOUR CHOICE! Box Spring FREE!Twin HUGE SELEC Twin Size 397 LUXURY LUXURY Size F FIRM HEAVENLY Twin SizeMEDIUM Full Size King Size Twin Size MEDIUM FIRM HEAVENLY Sale Price & Get The Matching Sale Price QueenMattresses Mattress, Sale Price At Our HURRY IN! Queen Queen Mattress, Sale Price QueenMattress, Mattress, Sale Price QUEEN MATTRESS Mattresses From Queen Mattress, Sale Price From Queen Mattress, Sale Price $ $ $ $ $ TOP-OF-THE-LINE See store for details. $ Y 527 527 597 897 577 Full Size Get The Matching 487 Box Spring FREE! THESE SAVINGS PREMIUM ULTRA $$ $ $$ $ $ $

587 Sale

FMS-01

A210913-003

279 $ $ M$ AT T R E SS CELEBRATING 657 7 FALL 6 $

MATTRESS SALE FALL 15 YEARS AND OVER MATTRESS M AT T R E SS $ FALL MATTRESS Box King Size 747 10,000 CUSTOMERS! 727 657 727 WON’T LAST! 657 1249 897 997 A 897 997 ASpring L LFREE! INC LU D E FREE D E LL IL V FALL FIRM OR PLUSH FREE 397 TWIN QUEEN $ BOX SPRING Full Mattress 1199 MATTRESSES starting $279 TWIN $489 487 FREE MATTRESS ADJUSTABLE TWIN QUEEN MATTRESSES Visit us online at $ $ $ TOP-OFTHE-LINE $ 747 B O X S P R I N$ G King Mattress 1599 MATTRESSES BASES MATTRESSES 489 1539 599 $ 279 MATTRESSES PREMIUM UL TRA TOP-OFTHE-LINE LUXURY PLUSH PILLOWTOP FALL $ TWIN QUEEN us online AND at www.PrincetonMattress.com Visit us online at Visit www.PrincetonMattress.com ALL INCLUDE FREE DELIVERY FREE OF YOUR OLD$ MATTRESS! TWIN QUEEN CLEARANCE TOP-OF-THE-LINE MEDIUM FIRM HEAVENLY $ REMOVAL

587 Sale

Sale

$ Twin Twin Size Size Full Size King Size $ $ $ 527 597 $897

Sale

Sale Summ starting at

See store forFull details. Twin Twin Sizeat Size King Size TwinSize Size Full FullSize Size King KingSize Sizestarting

starting at See store for details.

starting at atstarting at $$ $$ $$ $$ $ $ $$ $ SAVE TO $500! 527 597 897 577 987 777 877 $$1287 1187 877 977 $starting 1287 577 YOUR 657 CHOICE! 987 777 UP$$657 877 1187 877 977 QUEEN MATTRESS $ RWBS-01 Buy The Mattress RWBS-01 King SizeINCLUDE ALL INCLUDE FREEREMOVAL DELIVERY OF AND FREEOLD REMOVAL OF YOUR OLD MAT TRESS! ALL FREE DELIVERY AND FREE YOUR MAT TRESS! starting at starting at At Our Sale Price & HUGE SELECTION OF ADJUSTABLE BASES! Buy The The Matching Mattress starting at starting at Get RWBS-01 A210712-003 RWBS-01 A210712-003 At Our Sale Price HUGE SELECTION OF X ADJUSTABLE BASES! Box Spring FREE!& B O SPR ING e Mattresses From Queen Mattress, Sale Price ALL MONTH LONG! MATTRESSES MATTRESSES FMS-02 PREMIUM ULTRA TOP-OF-THE-LINE Get The Matching $ See store for details. RY PLUSH PILLOWTOP YOUR SAVE UP TO $500! Full Mattress 301 N.CHOICE! Harrison St. Box Spring FREE! FIRM HEAVENLY FIRM OR PLUSH PREMIUM ULTRA starting atDAY! OPEN starting atEVERY Queen Mattress, Sale Price Buy The Mattress From Queen Mattress, Sale Price QUEEN MATTRESS HUGE SELECTION OF ADJUSTABLE (Princeton Shopping Center See store forYOUR details. B O X S P R I N G $ TWIN Monday Friday 10 - BASES! 7 HUGE SELECTION OF ADJUSTABLE BASES! CHOICE! SAVE UP TO $500! FIRM OR PLUSH YOUR CHOICE! SAVE UP TO $500! King Mattress ADJUST starting at starting at Near McCaffrey’s, TOP-OF-THE-LINE Saturday 10 6, Sunday 11 -4 At Our Sale Price & M QUEEN MATTRESS Size YOUR Twin Size Full Size KingMATTRESSES Size Twin Size Full Size King Size QUEEN MATTRESS TWIN QUEEN starting at CHOICE! SAVE UP TO $500! Buy The Mattress Next to Ace Hardware) TOP-OF-THE-LINE BASE $ $ $ $ $ $ PREMIUM ULTRA FINANCING AVAILABLE! Twin TwinSize Size Full FullSize Size King KingSize Size

Sale Summer1249 $$

BOX SPRI N G

Full Size

Twin Size Full Size King Size

FREE 27 489

FRE

279 FREE

FIRM OR PLUSH ULTRA MATTRESSESPREMIUM MATTRESSES $ $ AT T R E SS MEDIUM FIRM FALL 279 489 OR PLUSH 1199FIRM CLEARANCE TOP-OFTHE-LINE S $897 $ MATTRESS SA AT TR E SS 997 1599 TOP-OF-THE-LINE PREMIUM ULTRA $279 $997 MATTRESS SALE S $ PRINCETON PRINCETON 97 PREMIUM ULTRA HURRY IN! $279877 $ $ 87 MATTRESSES 777 1187 877 977 1287PLUSH TWIN FIRM Matching At Our OR Sale Get Price The & PREMIUM ULTRA Princeton, NJ 08540 HURRY IN! MATTRESSES 489

FREE

BOX SPRING

Sale Sale $

1539 Summer MATTRESS 1249 $FREE 279 MATTRESS $1249 279 489 $1249 1249

Twin Size Full SizeMATTRESS Kingstarting Size QUEEN at

SA L E

657

$ THESE SAVING A 1199 WON’T LAST

PERSONAL CHECKS ACCEPTED $ $ $ 877 977 OR 1287PLUSH TWIN QUEEN MATTRESSES FIRM OR PLUSH FIRM M CLEARANCE $SAVE $U FIRM PLUSH YOUR SAVE UP TO $50 F RMATTRESSES E E OR R EM O VA L ALL O F YO R FREE O LD MCHOICE! AT TGet R E SFREE S ! Box Spring FREE! The Matching HUGE SELECTION OF ADJUSTABLE BASES! MATTRESSES THESE SAVINGS 609.924.0004 -OFTHE-LINE INCLUDE DELIVERY AND REMOVAL OF YOUR YOUR CHOICE! UP TO $500! OF YOUR OLD MAT TRESS! YOUR CHOICE! SAVE UP TO $500! $ CELEBRATING BOX SPRING E YOUR CHOICE! SAVE UP TO $500!$ Box Spring MATTRESS FREE! QUEEN See store FOR for FINANCING details. DETAILS Full Mattress LARGE SELECTION QUEEN MATTRESS EMIUM UL TRA www.PrincetonMattress.com Full Mattress 1199 SEE STORE WON’T LAST! QUEEN MATTRESS FM 15 YEARS AND OVER QUEEN MATTRESS FMS-02 PrincetonMat tress.com HUGE SELECTION OF ADJUSTABLE BASES! Mattress.com Buy The Mattress $ $ starting at starting at See store for details. A211011-002 OF RM OR PLUSH E-OFFull Mattress THE-LINE Full Mattress $1199 10,000 CUSTOMERS! 301 St. At OurN. SaleHarrison Price$ & HURRY IN! KingSAVE Mattress 1599 starting at Mattress starting at ADJUSTABLE 00! King Twin Size Full Size King Size HOICE! UP TO $500! THESE SAVINGS $TRA EMIUM UL Get The Matching TEMPUR-PEDIC (Princeton Shopping Center $ King Mattress 1599 ADJUSTABLE BASES QUEEN MATTRESS Box Spring FREE! King Mattress $ McCaffrey’s, $ starting at RM OR WON’T Near starting at starting at $ BASES $PLUSH 00! starting at LAST! $ See store for details. Full Mattress 1199 $ Mattress 1199 TWIN QUEEN HOICE!Full SAVE UP TO $500! to Ace Hardware) $ starting at startingNext at Full Mattress starting at Mattress starting at $ TWIN MEDIUM FIRMADJUSTABLE ALL INCLUDE FREE DELIVERY AND FREE REMOVAL OF YOUR OLD MATTRESS! QUEEN MATTRESS Full QUEEN King Mattress 1599 $ 9 BASES MATTRESSES MATTRESSES Queen Mattress, Sale Price Princeton, NJ 08540 starting at at King Mattress 1599 ALL INCLUDE ANDstarting FREE REMOVAL OF YOUR OLD MATTRESS! $ ADJUSTABLE FMS-02 $ FREE DELIVERY MATTRESSES MATTRESSES TWIN Mattress 9Mattress $ ADJUSTABLEKing starting at starting at 1199 BASES FMS-02 $ $ 301 N. Harrison St. 9

ze King Size

7

1187

$

starting at

MATTRESS SALE

1249 1249 1539 599 1539 599 PRINCETON 279 489 MATTRESS 1539 599 657 M $1539 $AND $ 1199 ALL INCLUDE FREE DELIVERY ALL INCLUDE FREE DELIVERY FREE REMOVAL OF YOUR OLD MATTRESS! 599 1539 PRINCETON 1599 PRINCETON $1539 TOP-OFTHE-LINE PRINCETON ALL INCLUDE FRE MATTRESS PRINCETO 609.924.0004 TON TOP-OFTHE-LINE PREMIUM ULTRA MATTRESS 609.924.0004 PRINCETO MATTRESS PREMIUM ULTRA FIRM OR PLUSH TON RESS PRINCETON PRINCETON FIRM OR PLUSH $$ MATTRE $1249 $837 $ $ 1249 RINCETON RESS 1249 777 897 997 MATTRE MATTRESS 609.924.0004 777 1199 837 897 997 MATTRESS 1199 1539 599 RINCETON ATTRESS PRINCET $ $ 1599 1539 599 1599 $$ $1539 $599 ATTRESS 1249 1249 MATTR 1249

1199 $ $ $ $ 1599 1249 $ $ 1599 477 597 887 SALE 1199 SALE $1539 $599 1199 $ $ 1249$279 $489 ALL INCLUDE FREE D 1599 $ $ starting at TWIN 599 QUEEN 609.924.0004 King Mattress 1599 ALL INCLUDE FREE D ALL INCLUDE FREE FREE REMOVAL OF YOUR OLD MATTRESS! OPEN EVERY DAY! 1249 $ $ 1539 $ DELIVERY AND BASES $ $ MATTRESSES 301 N. Harrison St. (Princeton Shopping Center MATTRESSES MATTRESSES Mattress 1599 9 ADJUSTABLE OPEN EVERY DAY! 279 489 $ www.PrincetonMattress.com $ $

© 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, LLC.. All rights reserved. Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. www.imagineadv.com. Although every precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specs may occur in print. We reserve the right to correctA any210712-003 such errors. A210712-003

starting at

starting at FMS-02

HUGE SELECTION ADJUSTABLE BASES! Monday -OF Friday 10 - 7 HUGE SELECTION OF ADJUSTABLE BASES! FMS-02 Near Shopping McCaffrey’s, (Princeton Center Saturday 10 - 6, Sunday -4 DELIVERY AND FREE REMOVAL OF YOUR OLD MATTRESS! Monday - Friday 10 - 7 11occur BASES Harrison St. King © 2021 Simmons301 Bedding N. Company, LLC.. All rights reserved. Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. www.imagineadv.com. Although every precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specs mayat in print. We reserve the right to corr starting Twin Size Full Size Size OPEN EVERY DAY!HUGE SELECTION OF ADJUSTABLE BASES! Next to Ace Hardware) Near McCaffrey’s, Saturday 10 6, Sunday 11 4 $ (Princeton Shopping FINANCING AVAILABLE! $ $Center $ Monday - Saturday 10 - 7 FMS-02 477 MATTRESS! 597Next 887 N. Harrison St. OF YOUR RWBS-02 to Ace Hardware) DELIVERY AND301 FREE REMOVAL OPEN EVERY DAY! TOP-OF-THE-LINE PERSONAL CHECKS ACCEPTED NearOLD McCaffrey’s, Sunday 11 - 4 FINANCING AVAILABLE! (Princeton Shopping Center Monday - Friday 10 - 7 PREMIUM Next toSaturday AceULTRA Hardware) PERSONAL CHECKS ACCEPTED © 20 Near McCaffrey’s, OPEN EVERY DAY! 10 - 6, Sunday 11 - 4 FINANCING AVAILABLE! 301 Harrison FIRM OR PLUSH YOUR CHOICE! SAVE UP TOSt. $500! Princeton, (Princeton Shopping NextN. to Ace Hardware) OPEN EVERY DAY! Monday Friday 10 7 PERSONAL CHECKSCenter ACCEPTED NJ 08540 FINANCING AVAILABLE! (Princeton Shopping Center YOURQueen CHOICE! SAVE UP TO $500! Mattress, Sale Queen Sale Price Queen Mattress, Sale Price Queen Mattress, Sale Price Monday -$500! Friday 10 -7 YOUR CHOICE!Mattress, SAVE UP TOCHECKS FMS-02 PERSONAL ACCEPTED QUEEN MATTRESS Princeton, NJPrice 08540 Near McCaffrey’s, Saturday 10 - 6,DETAILS Sunday 11 - 4 SEE STORE FOR FINANCING Near McCaffrey’s, 10 - 6, Sunday 11 - 4 QUEENSaturday MATTRESS QUEEN MATTRESS (Princeton Shopping Center Next to Ace Hardware) © 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, LLC.. All rights reserved. Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. www.imagineadv.com. Although every precaution is taken, errors inAce prices and/or specs may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any STORE such errors.FOR Next to Hardware) PLUSH LUXURY PLUSH PILLOWTOP A210913-003 SEE FINANCING DETAILS 609.924.0004 FINANCING AVAILABLE! FIRM FINANCING AVAILABLE! LUXURY MEDIUM FIRM HEAVENLY Near McCaffrey’s, www.PrincetonMattress.com SEE STORE FOR FINANCING DETAILS PERSONAL CHECKS ACCEPTED Princeton, NJ 08540 © 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, LLC.. All rights reserved. Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. www.imagineadv.com. Although every precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specs may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors. A210913-003 www.PrincetonMattress.com SEE STORE DETAILS Queen Mattress, Sale Price Queen Mattress, Sale Price Queen Mattress, Sale Price FOR FINANCING Queen Mattress, Sale Price PERSONAL CHECKS ACCEPTED © 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, LLC.. All rights reserved. Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. www.imagineadv.com. Although every precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specs may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors.

Mattress TOP-OF-THE-LINE E TOP-OF-THE-LINE PREMIUM ULTRA Mattress E PLUSHPrinceton, NJ 08540 LUXURY FREE PLUSH PILLOWTOP PREMIUM ULTRA FIRM FIRM OR PLUSH INCLUDE FREE DELIVERY AND REMOVAL 301 N. Harrison St. Princeton, NJ 08540 FIRM OR PLUSH LUXURY MEDIUM FIRM HEAVENLY 301 N. Harrison St. INCLUDE FREE DELIVERY AND FREE REMOVAL www.PrincetonMattress.com RWBS-02

609.924.0004 www.PrincetonMattress.com $ 301 Harrison Princeton, NJ 08540 YOUR CHOICE! SAVE UP TOSt. $50 NextN. to Ace Hardware) $

609.924.0004

starting at starting atTO $500! (Princeton Shopping Center SAVE UP Full $ www.PrincetonMattress.com $ Mattress $1199 YOUR $ starting at CHOICE! QUEEN MATTRESS $$ $ ADJUSTABLE Princeton, NJ 08540 starting at Near McCaffrey’s, Full Mattress $ $ Twin Size Full Size King Size Twin Size Full Size King Size Twin Size Full Size King Size Twin Size Full Size King Size QUEEN MATTRESS King Mattress 1599 Full BASES to Ace Hardware) Twin Size Full SizeMattress King Size Twin Size Full Size King Size Twin Size Full Size King Size Twin Size Full Size King Size ADJUSTABLE Next $ $ $ $ $ SEE STORE FOR $ FINANCING $ DETAILS www.PrincetonMattress.com at $877 at 609.924.0004 $647 $777 587 $587 727 1077$727 1147 777 877 1267 877 $1147 977 1347 starting 1077 647 777 777 1267 877 977starting 1347 King Mattress $ BASES ALL INCLUDE FREE DELIVERY AND FREE REMOVAL OF YOUR OLD MATTRESS! Princeton, King Mattress www.PrincetonMattress.c ADJUSTABLE NJ 08540 ALL INCLUDE FREE DELIVERY AND FREE REMOVAL OF YOUR OLD MATTRESS! 609.924.0004 BASES Visit online at www.PrincetonMattress.com 301 N. Harrison St. ALLusINCLUDE FREE DELIVERY AND FREE(Princeton REMOVAL OF YOUR OLD MATTRESS! OPEN EVERY DAY! ALL INCLUDE FREE DELIVERY AND FREE REMOVAL OF YOUR OLD MATTRESS! Shopping Center $ www.PrincetonMattress.c $ McCaffrey’s, FullNearMattress 1199

by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. www.imagineadv.com. Although every precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specs may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors.

A210712-003

A210913-003

SEE STORE FOR FINANCING DETAILS

by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. www.imagineadv.com. Although every precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specs may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors.

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

A210913-003

© 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, LLC.. All rights reser ved. Produced by IMAGIN $ $ $

A210913-003 © 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, LLC.. All rights reser ved. Produced by IMAGIN

© 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, LLC.. All rights reserved. Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. www.imagineadv.com. Although every precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specs may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors.

RWBS-02 © 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, LLC.. All rightsever reser ved. Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. w w may w.imagine ding Company, LLC.. All rights reser ved. Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING , INC. w w w.imagineadv.com. Although y precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specs occu FMS-01

Next to Ace Hardware) Visit online at N. Harrison St. ALL INCLUDE DELIVERY AND REMOVAL OF YOUR OLD MATTRESS! G U E S T FREE B E Dus SPRINCETON I N S301 TO Cwww.PrincetonMattress.com KFREE FFull OR I M NJ MMattress E D OPEN I AT EEVERY D EDAY! LIVE R Y 1199 ! OPEN EVERY DAY! Princeton, 08540 $ A211011-002

RWBS-02

Monday - Saturday 10 - 7 Sunday 11 - 4

ding Company, LLC.. All rights reser ved. Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING , INC. w w w.imagineadv.com. Although ever y precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specs may occu

FMS-01

King Mattress 1599 $ MATTRESS King Mattress Princeton Shopping Center, 301 N. Harrison St., Princeton 1599

PRINCETON

LDS-02

FINANCING AVAILABLE! PERSONAL CHECKS ACCEPTED

MATTRESS PRINCETON

A211011-002

(Princeton Shopping Center Monday - Saturday 10 - 7 Monday - Friday 10-7 609.924.0004 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, Near© McCaffrey’s, Sunday 11 - 4 All Saturday 10-6,LLC.. Sunday 11-4 rights reser ved. Produced www.PrincetonMattress.com SEE STORE FOR FINANCING DETAILS 301 N. Harrison St. Next to Ace Hardware) OPEN EVERY DAY! FINANCING AVAILABLE!

b

ALL INCLUDE FREE DE

© 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, LLC.. All rights reserved. Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. www.imagineadv.com. Although every precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specs may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors.

A210712-003

(Princeton Shopping Center CHECKS ACCEPTED NJ 08540 Monday - Friday 10 - 7 (Next to AcePrinceton, Hardware Near McCaffrey’s Food PERSONAL Market) Near McCaffrey’s, Saturday 10 - 6, Sunday 11 - 4 609.924.0004 Next to Ace Hardware) RWBS-02 609.924.0004 • princetonmattress.com FINANCING AVAILABLE!

PERSONAL CHECKS ACCEPTED ALL INCLUDE FRE Princeton, NJ 08540 FINANCING AVAILABLE Open Every Day! PERSONAL CHECKS ACCEPTED 609.924.0004 LDS-02 Mon. Fri. 10am 7pm Monday - Saturday 10-6 www.PrincetonMattress.com SEE STORE FOR FINANCING DETAILS Princeton Sat. 10am - 6pm Sunday 11 - 4 Sun. 11am - 5pm SEE STORE FOR FINANCING DETAILS

MATTRESS PRINCETO www.PrincetonMattress.com

SEE STORE FOR FINANCING DETAILS

© 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, LLC.. All rights reserved. Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. www.imagineadv.com. Although every precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specs may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors.

A210712-003

MATTRE PRINCET

© 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, LLC.. All rights reserved. Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. www.imagineadv.com. Although every precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specs may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors.

A210816-004

© 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, LLC.. All rights reser ved. Produced by IMAGINE ADV


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 8

COVID “Slingshot” Spike continued from page one

which mysteries, he later added, is the new Omicron variant that recently emerged in South Africa and is rapidly spreading across the globe. Grosser emphasized the importance of the continuing drive for vaccinations, including boosters. “We are beginning to understand waning immunity from the COVID-19 vaccines after six to nine months of your initial series, which is why there is a big push for eligible individuals to receive their booster doses in order to restore their initial protection,” he said. Grosser pointed out that COVID-related hospitalizations for Princeton residents are low and that the vaccine has succeeded in sharply reducing serious complications from the COVID-19 virus. The vaccination rate for Princeton residents age 12 and over, as of November 16, is 82 percent, with booster rates now over 33 percent for those eligible (over age 18) and “increasing at a relatively high rate,” according to Grosser. The Princeton Health Department has not received statistics from the state on vaccination rates for the 5- to 11-year-old population, but Grosser noted that local pediatricians, the Princeton University vaccine clinics, and the health department clinics report as much or more interest from the 5to 11-year-old group as there was for the 12- to 17-year-old age group, in which, according to the health department, 97 percent have received at least one dose. The Princeton Health Department, Princeton University, and Mercer County are all

hosting COVID-19 vaccination clinics in the coming weeks. Registering for an appointment through the state scheduling system at covid19.nj.gov or by calling (855) 568-0545 is recommended, but in most cases not required. Princeton Health Department clinics will take place on Wednesday, December 1, at the Princeton Senior Resource Center, 45 Stockton Street, from 4 to 6 p.m. and on Friday, December 3 at Griggs Farm, 205 Griggs Drive, from 2 to 4 p.m. Princeton University will host Pfizer clinics open to the general public as well as University students, faculty, and staff on Wednesdays, December 1, 8, and 15 and January 5, from noon to 6 p.m., and Moderna clinics on Thursdays, December 2, 9, and 16, 12 noon to 3 p.m. Mercer County, in partnership with Capital Health, will hold COVID-19 vaccination clinics at the CURE Insurance Arena, Gate A /South Broad Street entrance on Thursday, December 2, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Monday, December 6, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Tuesday, December 7, noon to 6 p.m.; Monday, December 13, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Tuesday, December 14, noon to 6 p.m.; Thursday, December 15, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and also pediatric-focused clinics on Thursday, December 9, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Tuesday, December 21, noon to 6 p.m. Mercer County clinics will also take place in a heated tent next to the Trenton Farmers Market, 930 Spruce Street in Lawrence, on Friday, December 3, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Friday December 17, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., with a pediatric-focused clinic scheduled for Friday, December 10, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

On the subject of the Omicron variant, Grosser noted that in the next week or two, as more people throughout the world are exposed to the variant, more evidence will be available as to whether the current vaccines will combat the Omicron variant effectively. “Currently there are no confirmed cases of the Omicron in New Jersey,” he said, “however, as we have learned throughout the pandemic, we have to be prepared for it to be here.” He continued, “The good news behind these new variants of concern is that physical distancing, face masks, hand washing, and improved ventilation will continue to work. We are anxiously awaiting news from the CDC and N.J. Department of Health on how (if at all) this new variant changes our existing public health strategies.” Grosser concluded his November 30 email on a philosophical note. “Throughout the pandemic there have been so many adjustments to our daily lives, and our outlook on the pandemic,” he wrote. “We are once more working through new infections of the pandemic, breakthrough infections, booster vaccinations, pediatric vaccinations, surges of cases, etc. We need to continue to look out for one another as we navigate the pandemic. “Help your neighbors, help your school staff, help your local businesses, help your community. We have all observed many negative byproducts of this pandemic like increased stress, fatigue, depression and more. But there are positives as well, and we need to remind one another of that from time to time.” —Donald Gilpin

THE PARADE IS BACK: The 2021 Hunterdon County Holiday Parade is set for Sunday, December 5 at 5 p.m. There is still time for businesses and nonprofits to participate in the event, which takes place in Flemington and features the Hunterdon Central Regional High School Marching Red Devils and Saint Ann’s of Hampton Pipes and Drums, as well as pre-parade entertainment. Ronald McDonald will make an appearance in the Big Red Shoe Car. For information on how to participate, attend, or volunteer, visit hunterdonchamber.org.

Joint Effort Safe Streets Topics Roundtable” discus- & Associates, a national Hosts “Hot Topics” Zoom sion with Princeton commu- higher education search

The Joint Effort Princeton Safe Streets Program will be hosting a “XMAS Holiday Community Hot Topics Zoom & Recognition Reception” on Wednesday, December 8 from 5-7 p.m. This virtual community meeting is a continuation of Joint Effort’s community work of engaging the Princeton community around social equity accountability and the future of the town. The agenda will include a community recognition and “Passing of the Baton Fireside Chat” with the last two Black Princeton Town Council members, Lance Liverman and Dwaine Williamson, and the newly-elected Council member, Leighton Newlin. There will also be a “Princeton Future Hot

nity leaders on “hot topics” like social equity, cannabis, parking, affordable housing, Princeton Public Schools, Andrew Koontz not running for re-election, the Witherspoon Street Corridor, and much more. To get the Zoom link, contact John Bailey at (720) 629-0964 or email johnbailey062@gmail.com.

Pennington Montessori School PremierSchool Early Childhood Education Montessori School nn Montessori

Early Childhood Education Education arly Childhood 6 Weeks thru Kindergarten

MCCC Board Announces

Search for New President Call to schedule The Mercer County Coma tour! mu n it y College ( MCCC )

Pennington Montessori School

Academic Curriculum Board of Trustees has anKindergarten Call to schedule nounced the start of the Kindergarten 6O9.737.1331 Call to schedule search for the college’s sevMusic-Spanish-Outdoor Education a tour! culum enth president, following Dr. a tour! Premier6O9.737.1331 Early Childhood Education culum Jianping Wang’s decision to retire next summer. 6O9.737.1331 -Outdoor Education Education T he search com m it tee -Outdoor 6 Weeks thru Kindergarten Academic Curriculum Music-Spanish-Outdoor Education

Call to schedule a tour!

will work with R H Perry

firm, to identify candidates and select finalists. On the committee are MCCC faculty, staff, students, board members, and key community and MCCC Foundation stakeholders. The college community will have an opportunity to meet and learn more about the finalists at open forums in March. Finalists will be reviewed by the Board of Trustees, which will select and hire the next president from that group. More information about the presidential search and the Presidential Leadership Profile is available on the MCCC Presidential Search webpage at mccc.edu. For best consideration, applications and nomination should be received by December 13, 2021.

Pennington Montessori School 6O9.737.1331

Pennington Montessori School Premier Early Childhood Education Premier Early Childhood Education

6 Weeks thru Kindergarten 6 Weeks thru Kindergarten Call to schedule a tour! Academic Curriculum Academic Curriculum 6O9.737.1331 Music-Spanish-Outdoor Education Music-Spanish-Outdoor Education

Call to schedule a tour!

6O9.737.1331

“The child is both a hope and a promise for mankind.” ~ Maria Montessori aa hope hope and and aa promise promise for for mankind.” mankind.” ~ Maria Montessori ~ Maria Montessori 4 Tree Farm Road, Pennington www.penningtonmontessori.com ~ Maria Montessori 4 Tree Farm Road, Pennington admissionsinfo@penningtonmontessori.org 4 Tree Farm Road, Pennington www.penningtonmontessori.com www.penningtonmontessori.com admissionsinfo@penningtonmontessori.org admissionsinfo@penningtonmontessori.org 4 Tree Farm Road, Pennington

“The child is both a hope and a promise for mankind.”

Now Accepting Applications 4 Tree Farm Road, Pennington • www.penningtonmontessori.org www.penningtonmontessori.com cepting Applications Applications admissionsinfo@penningtonmontessori.org admissionsinfo@penningtonmontessori.org cepting Now Accepting Applications Now accepting applications for the 2022-2023 school year. to apply “The childVisit is bothusa at hopewww.penningtonmontessori.org and a promise for mankind.” ~ Maria Montessori


Thomas Edison State University (TESU), a leader in transforming the lives of its adult students as well as the field of adult education, will be kicking off its 50th anniversary celebrations on Wednesday, December 1, with the initiation of its Edison Speakers Series. TESU celebrates University Day on December 1 each year to commemorate the day the college was granted university status in 2015. In an era when traditional colleges and universities are being challenged and are forced to question their identities and their role and purpose in society, TESU has been way ahead of the curve from its inception. According to the resolution that established the school in 1972, it was created “to enable individuals to receive academic recognition for skills and knowledge acquired in a variety of ways and would permit New Jersey residents to complete part or all of their work toward a baccalaureate or associate degree without formal attendance at a campus.” TESU is one of the state’s public institutions of higher learning funded by the state in the same way as Rutgers, The College of New Jersey, and others, but it is the only public college in the state that is designed specifically for working adults. The average age of its approximately 15,000 students is 34. Since 1972 T E SU has grown from offering correspondence courses and

just one associate degree to leadership in online education and more than 100 areas of study with associate, bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees. TESU has awarded a total of more than 65,000 degrees. In a November 29 telephone conversation, TESU President Merodie A. Hancock reflected on the school’s unique past, present, and future. “We were really designed to say ‘Think out of the box,’” she said. “Back in the ’70s there was this movement saying, ‘Wait a minute. We realize that people often learn things outside of the classroom. If they want to go back to college as adults do they have to relearn it all? Can’t we tease out what types of college-level learning they have already undergone and then let them learn only what’s missing?’” Many people who served in the military, Hancock noted, had taken college courses before being transferred, then were unable to use the credits they had earned. “And they’d start over and over, and they could never get ahead,” she said. “These people who had served their country and others would constantly find themselves back at zero.” So TESU aimed to stop that and developed what Hancock, who has been TESU president since 2018, described as “a weird model, especially where public education has become more tuition-based. The online model cuts the tuition cost

for students. Our model is ‘Let’s look at what you know and let’s figure out what you don’t know,’ and a lot of times what they don’t know is the theory. We have elected officials who don’t have degrees. They certainly understand the working of local governments or state governments, but what they might not understand is the theory that that’s based on.” Hancock continued, “We can say, ‘Now what you need to learn is the theory, but you have the application. Let’s get right to that piece that’s missing for you.’ Our job has been to cut the cost of education, which I tell the state repeatedly. ‘You need to support Thomas Edison because our job is to save students from having to buy more of our goods.’” She went on to describe the fundamental contrast between TESU and most colleges and universities. “A traditional student comes in and first and foremost on their minds are academics and a college education, and colleges are trying to organize internships and to fit some real-life experience into their education. But Thomas Edison is the opposite. We have students who often chose to go straight into the work force or into the military and some who had to go straight to work. Whether by desire or need, Thomas Edison students’ career is first. Their profession is first and now they’re looking at bringing in education to accelerate that.” Hancock emphasized the TESU students’ commitment to earning their education and their degree. “Our students are very aware that

they need this degree, that they want this degree, that they want to get everything out of it,” she said. “Both their time and their money are incredibly valuable to them.” Many TESU students are also working in the field in which they are studying, and, Hancock said, “They hold us accountable for real and relevant information. They want everything they’re paying for with their time and money, and they want the degree. Having the opportunity to get it is huge for them.” Hancock further stressed the value of that degree. “You’re going to want to be promoted,” she said she tells her students. “And you’re going to want to be promoted into jobs that are not as well defined as the one you were first hired into as an incoming junior person, and that’s when you’re going to be happy you have critical thinking skills, that you’ve learned the fuzzy logic, that you’ve learned to write well, to persuade well, to make a cogent case.” S h e c o n t i n u e d , “ Yo u need to have skills that are resume-relevant, that will help you get your next job, but we also have to make sure that we’re building the whole, that you have that degree that’s going to help you get through and be successful in the long term. A degree matters. It may not matter to you in one certain year of your life, but over a lifetime it matters. It progresses you and makes you a stronger citizen, a stronger employee. “And we all know the social and economic benefits

9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

Thomas Edison U. Celebrates 50 Years Of Dynamic Leadership in Adult Education

Merodie A. Hancock in job security, retirement and health benefits, citizenry, and longevity of relationships. You can tie numerous benefits to the actual degree beyond just getting the skills.” TESU is looking ahead to “a new era in talent and economic development” and to continuing to create “relevant academic pathways for successful working adults,” said Hancock, who noted that TESU is partnering with businesses and other organizations and institutions to help them to get their workers on the path towards college degrees. “We want to continue to open those doors, so the doors to the next stage can open,” she said. The health professions and career ladders there are a particular focus for TESU. “Many people are starting entry level jobs in health care,” said

Hancock. “How do we help create career ladders, accelerated pathways to earn nursing degrees?” She continued, “Thomas Edison was created to help people move up, hard-working people. And we plan to take that to the next level. We’re celebrating our 50th birthday and we’re excited about that.” At the December 1 Edison Speaker Series event, Hancock will moderate a discussion among three distinguished panelists who will explore the ways top employers are identifying, preparing, and retaining diverse talent for the workforce of today and tomorrow. The public is invited to join the virtual event via Zoom at 10 a.m. Visit tesu. edu for details and registration. —Donald Gilpin

VA Benefits 101 Presented by Shira Yerike, Director of Marketing for Veteran Care Services If you’re a veteran or surviving spouse, you may be eligible to receive additional assistance for assisted living or home care. Many veterans, families and agencies are unaware of the details or what questions to ask. Come learn about the VA Aid and Attendance (A&A) and Housebound allowance—and see if you qualify to receive an additional payment with your monthly VA benefits.

Join us for a FREE Educational Webinar Wednesday, December 15th 10:00 - 11:00 a.m.

To Register TheArtisWay.com/TownTopics

Virtually Hosted by Artis Senior Living of Princeton Junction: 861 Alexander Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 Check out our other nearby community in Yardley, PA.


continued from page one

rehearse in the space are unable to hear well and adjust, resulting in pitchy and unpolished rehearsals and performances.” The petition also says Gill Chapel is not large enough to accommodate Westminster’s Sy mphonic Choir, one of nine choirs based at the school. The Symphonic Choir records and performs with major orchestras and internationally famous conductors. Water damage and a ceiling leak are mentioned, as are pianos for students that “do not reflect a conservatory-level department.” The performance Yamaha piano in Gill Chapel “is clearly not maintained. For a piano used in performance, that is unacceptable,” it reads. Rider’s Yvonne Theater is unsuitable for opera performances, the petition complains. “The acoustics require that students over-sing or force

themselves, potentially leading to injury, in order to be heard. Artists in the field rely on acoustics, not electronic amplification.” R ider has not met its obligations to “preser ve, promote, and enhance the existing missions of WCC’s purposes, programs and traditions and ensure its separate identity,” the petition says, citing a lack of photos or memorabilia in Gill Chapel or the Fine Arts building. “Westminster Choir College is the only choir college in the world,” it reads. “It is a full-fledged institution with over 90 years of high-level music making, performances, and prominent alumni, and yet, it is not easy to find on the Rider University website. It is treated as a small music department or an afterthought.” Jacob said Westminster students are sometimes able to use the facilities on the Princeton campus, “but it’s really as a last resort. And some students are allowed

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co. We Install Quality Aluminum Triple Track Storm Windows

741 Alexander Rd, Princeton • 924-2880

Thinking of selling your home? Call me! JUDITH BUDWIG

Sales Associate Cell: 609-933-7886 | Office: 609-921-2600 judith.budwig@foxroach.com

253 Nassau St, Princeton NJ 08540

to do recitals there, but it’s complicated.” The petition requests a response from Rider administration by December 15. “It is imperative that the administration address our concerns listed above, and provide adequate facilities or make Westminster’s Princeton campus available for full academic use immediately for Westminster Choir College and its students, faculty, and staff,” it says. Kristine Brown, Rider’s associate vice president for marketing and communications, issued a statement on the petition. “We welcome all feedback from students on their experience at Rider. Given the opportunity to investigate and respond to such concerns, we are extremely confident in our ability to resolve them to the satisfaction of students, faculty, and staff,” it reads. “Ensuring our facilities meet or hopefully exceed expectations is a constant focus. That’s why we worked closely with industry experts to create or adapt practice rooms, performance spaces, classrooms, and more on the Lawrenceville campus, including the same acoustic consultants who worked on Hillman Performance Hall on the Princeton campus. “This fall, audiences have enthusiastically greeted new recordings by Westminster choirs and their long-awaited return to live performance. We are fully dedicated to maintaining the high level of artistry and musical expression that makes such events — and Westminster’s unique legacy — possible.” —Anne Levin

Police Blotter On November 24, at 12:42 a.m., a 31-year-old male from Princeton was charged with DWI, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop for speeding on Nassau Street. On November 23, at 6:14 p.m., police were dispatched to Moore Street and Park Place on a report of criminal sexual contact. A woman stated that she was walking south on Moore Street and crossed Park Place, and when she was on the sidewalk on the southwest corner of the intersection a man approached her from behind and grabbed her buttocks. The suspect then ran west on Park Place. The suspect was described as a Hispanic male, in his 30s, 5’4 tall with a medium to heavy build. He was wearing a dark colored beanie style winter hat, a white surgical mask, and a navy blue jacket. Anyone who may have witnessed the incident or has additional information is asked to contact Det. Don Mathews at (609) 921-2100, ext. 2137. On November 22, at 1:11 p.m., a caller reported that a customer rented a vehicle from his car rental business on Alexander Street on October 18 and has yet to return it. The customer claimed to have lent the car to a friend and he has been unable to contact him. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On November 22, at 5:38 p.m., a resident of Butternut Row reported sending $7,227.60 worth of bitcoin to what she thought was a financial investment com-

pany for crypto currency. She later realized it was a scam. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On November 20, at 2:47 p.m., it was reported that an unattended bike was stolen from a bike rack on Witherspoon Street between 9:15 a.m. and 1:40 p.m. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On November 19, at 9:45 a.m., a woman repor ted that $50 and spare keys were stolen from her unlocked vehicle on Gordon Way between 8:45 a.m. on November 18 and 9 a.m. on November 19. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On November 18, at 4:29 p.m., a woman repor ted that her coworker used her iPhone without her permission when it was unattended at their place of work on Witherspoon Street, to send himself nude photos of her. On November 17, at 2:45 p.m., it was reported that someone stole a 16” Makita chainsaw and battery, val-

ued at $400, from a shed located in Herrontown Woods. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On November 16, at 7:56 a.m., a woman repor ted that someone entered her unlocked vehicle parked on Hamilton Avenue and stole a men’s blue sport coat valued at $20. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On November 13, at 5:39 p.m., a 53-year-old female from Canada was charged with defiant trespass after she entered and remained on a property on N. Harrison Street without permission after she was previously told she was not welcome. On November 12, at 11:47 a.m., a resident of Longview Drive reported that she received a threatening call f rom an u n k now n male who verbally threatened to kill her. She had a possible suspect, and the Detective Bureau is investigating. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

Available for Lunch & Dinner Mmm..Take-Out 41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton www.tortugasmv.com

Events • Parties • Catering (609) 924-5143

Specialists

2nd & 3rd Generations

MFG., CO.

609-452-2630

GIA and EGL Certified Diamonds

Pre-Holiday Sale

GIA and EGL Certified Diamonds

We Buy Gold, Silver & Diamonds!

Diamond Remounts, Jewelry & Watch repairs Done On Premises

299635

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 10

Westminster Students

50% OFF

DIAMONDS AND GOLD

WATCH 30% OFF ALL SALE WATCHES WE CARRY MOVADO AND CITIZEN ECO DRIVE WATCHES

NEW LOCATION: 3550 Route 27, Suite 5 - Kendall Park 732.329.2811 • www.bellejewelry.net

Monday~Friday: 11am-4pm Closed Sunday Store Store Hours:Hours: Monday - Friday: 10:30am to 5:00pm••Saturday: Saturday: 11am-3pm 10:30am to •4:pm • Closed Sunday


11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

Thank you to our customers for voting us

Best Pizza

We could not have reached this accomplishment without our dedicated employees and customers. Thank you from the owners of Conte’s

Serving the Princeton community for over 80 years, and we will continue to serve you another 80 years and more.

Now serving gluten-free pizza, pasta, beer & vodka! Mon – 11:30-9 · Tues-Fri – 11:30-10:30 · Sat – 4-10:30 · Sun – 4-9

339 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ 08540 (609) 921-8041 • www.contespizzaandbar.com


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 12

PU Conference continued from page one

impact goes beyond Princeton as a university and extends to New Jersey, the broader Northeast region, the nation, and indeed the world.” Highlights of the two-day virtual gathering, titled Engage 2021, which is free and open to everyone, will include a conversation with the inventor Marian Croak, Google vice president of engineering and a 1977 Princeton University graduate; presentations by an array of Princeton professors and others focusing on the growing innovation ecosystem in New Jersey and the tri-state area; and guidance on finding funding for research and entrepreneurship. A showcase of University faculty experts will discuss their discoveries, such as a new technology to prevent smartphone theft, new anticancer therapies, personalized medicine, early detection of autism and other neurobehavioral conditions, clean and inexpensive lithiumion battery recycling, electric bandages, and more. Panelists from industry and from Princeton and other universities will discuss emerging technologies in decarbonized transportation, cancer research, quantum computing, wireless communications, and artificial intelligence in bioengineering. “Our vision is for Princeton to be a catalyst for a diverse, inclusive, and human-centered high-tech hub for the entire

tri-state region,” said Andrea Goldsmith, dean of Princeton University’s School of Engineering and Applied Science and one of the conference’s keynote speakers, as quoted in a press release from the Princeton University Office of Engineering Communications. Princeton University Dean for Research Pablo Debenedetti noted that this event, which includes the 13th Celebrate Princeton Innovation showcase, will feature many Princeton faculty innovators, as well as a wide range of visiting participants. “The varied and inclusive programming and the presence of faculty, students, alumni, entrepreneurs, and industry and government representatives reflect the vitality of Princeton’s research, innovation, and entrepreneurship continuum,” he wrote in a November 29 email. As part of the Engage 2021 event, Princeton University Chemistry Professor Mohammad Seyedsayamdost will receive the Dean for Research Award for Distinguished Innovation for the creation of a method for discovering new anti-infective agents, including drugs that treat bacterial, viral, and fungal infections. Seyedsayamdost, the cofounder of the startup Cryptyx Bioscience, will give a talk at the conference. Engage 2021 will also feature a conversation between Goldsmith and Keller Center for Innovation in Engineering Education Director Naveen Verma on developments and opportunities

for innovation in New Jersey; a keynote address by Edward Felten, the cofounder of blockchain technology startup Offchain Labs and a Princeton University professor emeritus of computer science and public affairs; a startup showcase of academic scientists and engineers raising venture funds for companies; and a panel discussion on the benefits of joining a startup accelerator, and how to choose the right accelerator and create a strong application. “We are working to broaden access to entrepreneurial training to greater numbers of people, including to those from backgrounds that historically have been underrepresented in research and entrepreneurship,” said Priestley. “We’ve created a number of new programs, including a new National Science Foundation Innovation-Corps Northeast Hub, which you can learn more about at Engage 2021.” Goldsmith, who is a professor of electrical and computer engineering and has founded two companies related to her expertise in wireless technology, added, “This conference will enable all of us to make a positive difference — engineers, scientists, humanists, social scientists, business leaders, and startup enablers — to engage with each other in fostering innovation that strengthens society.” For further information and free registration for the conference, fi nd “Engage 2021” at princeton.edu. —Donald Gilpin

221 WITHERSPOON STREET 609.921.8160 M-F 10-6 / S 10-5 / FREE PARKING HILTONSPRINCETON . COM

Fewer, better gifts —

Food Baskets Delivered To Households in Need

For many years, Trenton Area Soup Kitchen (TASK) has worked to distribute Thanksgiving meals to hundreds of households through its Thanksgiving at Home program, funded by the Geltzer Family Foundation. In addition to a large grocery distribution and TASK’s traditional Thanksgiving meal, TASK aimed to put 300 more Thanksgiving meals in the hands of households throughout Trenton. “Every fall, we reach out to the community for help and every year they come through to help TASK provide Thanksgiving meals to our neighbors and patrons. Whether it’s donating items like turkey and juice, or volunteering to help compile baskets or working on distributing the meals, we have always relied on our donors and volunteers to help make this program happen,” said Jaime Parker, TASK’s director of programs and services. “While we offer a Thanksgiving meal at TASK, we know that those who can celebrate at home don’t always have the means to do so. The Thanksgiving at Home program makes it possible.” With supply chain hiccups and the rising cost of food, the Farm Bureau estimates that the cost of a Thanksgiving meal has risen 5 percent in the past year. And where TASK used to rely on dozens of volunteers, over multiple days, to help sort donations, build baskets and help hand them out to patrons, the pandemic has forced the nonprofit to limit volunteer help and

SPECIAL DELIVERY: Amazon delivers a special Thanksgiving basket to Trenton Area Soup Kitchen patron Barbara, courtesy of the TASK “Thanksgiving at Home” program. change its distribution model in order to ensure everyone’s safety. “Last year, we started making deliveries to people’s homes. Our goal was to let them know when we would arrive and be able to leave the delivery in a safe, contact-free way,” said Parker. “But it was really tough on us. Planning the routes, coordinating the drop offs and making the deliveries ourselves was really hard, to say the least.” This year, TASK received a call from Erin Hall, GM administrative assistant at Amazon. Amazon’s warehouse in Robbinsville was looking for ways for the company to help. Amazon has worked with TASK for years, as a donor and hiring drive host as part of the Work Preparedness program. Hall was intrigued by TASK’s need for support with logistics and deliveries for the Thanksgiving at Home program. “A m a z o n i s a g l ob a l

this holiday season, celebrate with

simple gifts Whole Earth Holiday Baked Goods Whole Earth Gift Cards New Jersey Artisan Foods Organic Chocolates and Truffles All-Natural Bath and Body Care Products Maine Balsam Mini Pillows and Neck Pillows Natural Baby Care Products Frankincense and Myrrh Resins for Burning Holiday Essential Oil Gift Packs Aromatherapy Bracelets • Pure Beeswax Candles

OUR SIGNATURE CASHMERE SWEATER FOR MEN IS UNIQUE M ONGOLIAN EASY ,12 GAUGE

FIBRE COMBED FROM

GOATS , SPUN INTO

YARNS , KNITTED IN SCOTLAND ON OVERSIZED NEEDLES .

ALL THIS IS INTENDED TO MAKE THE

SOFTEST , LIGHTEST - WEIGHT GARMENT

Recycled Wrapping Paper and Gift Bags Handmade Ornaments • Freshly Roasted Nuts Organic Teas and Coffees Soapstone Essential Oil Diffusers Wooden and Soapstone Soap Dishes Tree-free Journals • Recycled Paper Notebooks Lavender-scented Eye Pillows Eucalyptus Eye Pillows Lavender and Chamomile Pillows

POSSIBLE ,

AND EXCLUSIVELY OURS IN THE WHOLE WORLD

360 NASSAU STREET • PRINCETON

company that sets local roots in the communities where our customers and employees live and work,” said Hall’s colleague, Brian Perez, general manager at Amazon’s fulfillment center in Robbinsville. “We are very proud of our footprint in New Jersey and the great work our team has done for communities and organizations across the state. The latest of example of this is our partnership with TASK. It is an honor to support such a great organization by delivering Thanksgiving meals to families that need them.” From there, a new partnership was born. On Thursday, November 18, Amazon employees from the Robbinsville warehouse arrived at TASK to help pack and make deliveries. Working alongside TASK staff, Amazon helped to load boxes into their trucks and successfully made more than 60 deliveries to community members in Trenton.


Mailbox Parking Solution Must Be Reviewed by All Neighborhoods and Not Harm Residents

To the Editor: “Alternative facts” and “campaign of misinformation” were phrases used in the Town Topics last week to describe the push-back the group received to their proposed permit parking plan from Princeton’s residential community, in part represented by the volunteer organization Sensible Streets. The Princeton Parking Task Force’s (PPTF) strategy of dismissing concerned residents in such a condescending manner through the use of cheap, derogatory, language to invalidate opposition is offensive. While on the attack, the PPTF are asking for town unity. These behaviors are completely contradictory. We live in a larger community with a broader set of opinions. Council members are elected to represent the entire community, not only those who agree with the PPTF. Many residents pointed out deep flaws in the plan, yet no compromises were made to the content. This sends the message that the PPTF doesn’t value the rest of our community, surely this is not how leaders behave in a democratic society. Let’s address the parking plan’s content: Public streets are not private, they’re public and don’t belong exclusively to residents. This argument is often repeated by Council members. Streets are indeed public, but the argument is flawed. What would explain the existence of parking rules, meters, and parking zones? Following PPTF’s logic, there should be no parking rules whatsoever, it should be free for all. But this isn’t the case. Parking rules exist for many valid reasons. Adjusting parking rules to whatever you like, for whatever reasons, because “it’s a public street” is an empty argument. In the proposed plan, the cost of parking for business employees will be less on residential streets than in parking garages. How would this plan discourage business employees who pay for more expensive monthly parking from parking on residential streets? The proposed parking plan will supposedly pay for itself. If it suddenly costs residents to pay or be fined, it will most certainly affect the resale value of our home properties, especially those that have no/limited parking spaces. Values of homes located in the Western Section with parklike streets will also be impacted. Visitors and residents will lose the picturesque streets once they are packed with cars. Residents will have to deal with the pollution, litter, and noise that congestion inevitably brings. In the end, the parking plan would impact all Princeton residents because quality of life issue and property value depreciation will not be limited to half-mile radius. Who benefits from the current proposed plan? Business owners who will need to spend less on employee parking and the town that will be collecting the permit fees and fines from residents, businesses, contractors, and all other visitors. Perhaps this is the reason there are two business owners on the PPTF and incomplete representation of residents from all Princeton neighborhoods. Whatever the parking solution, it must be reviewed with all Princeton neighborhoods collaboratively and should not harm residents. RITA RAFALOVSKY Library Place

To the Editor: As the season of giving surrounds us, Princeton residents might be looking for ways to make a difference in our community by shopping local, supporting nonprofits, and volunteering their time for a worthy cause. There are two organizations, right here in your backyard, that rely almost entirely on volunteers – the Princeton Fire Department (PFD) and Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad (PFARS). The PFD is one of the oldest fire companies in New Jersey. Dating back to 1788, it relies on surrounding departments to help respond to hundreds of calls per year. Statistics show that the number of volunteer firefighters in the United States has decreased 15 percent since 1984, yet the call volume has increased by nearly 300 percent, leaving volunteer fire departments like Princeton in urgent need of additional volunteers. Down the street in its new, state-of-the-art facility, PFARS is an independent, nonprofit, volunteer-led organization which provides emergency medical and technical rescue services to Princeton and the surrounding communities. At PFARS, high school and college-age members find it a great way to complement their pre-medical education, and even to help them decide which path to pursue. There’s a real camaraderie among all of our EMTs and firefighters. They share a sense of duty and that pull to serve. Why volunteer? Most of our volunteers say they want to serve because of the deep satisfaction that comes from helping people in need. If the pandemic has allowed you a more flexible schedule, and you have a desire to serve the Princeton community, you may find that our local volunteer fire department or emergency services squad can provide you with one of the most rewarding experiences of your life. Mark your calendar for two upcoming events. Join us at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, December 7 for an Open House at the Princeton Fire Department located at 363 Witherspoon Street. The next week, there is an opportunity to visit the Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad on Monday, December 13 at 6 p.m., at 2 Mount Lucas Road. Meet other volunteers and learn more about our free training programs and path to certification. There has never been a better time to join these organizations and truly make a difference in your community. We hope to see you there. MICHAEL YEH Director, Department of Emergency & Safety Services Monument Drive SHAWN GALLAGHER Chief, Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad Mount Lucas Road

Wondering What Benefit Proposed Parking Plan Will Have for Local Homeowners

To the Editor: We have a lot of smart people in this town, but every time Council wants to do a new project, they spend our tax money to hire an outfit from outside to do our thinking for us. This latest scheme they want to shove down our throats really has a lot of us scratching our heads. Those of us who live near the high school have gotten used to sharing our street parking with the students for years. God forbid these kids walk a half a mile! Soon we will be sharing our streets with the increase in cars from the new housing on Franklin Avenue. Now we are being told that we will have to include the merchants as well? And we can pay for the “privilege” of parking in front of our own homes. Someone will be driving around with a surveillance camera making sure that we toe the line or pay dearly. We bought our houses with the understanding that we had street parking, and this will likely lessen their value. So far, I am at a loss as to what the benefits would be for us as

homeowners. The real hardship for the merchants is that they can no longer park on Wiggins and Witherspoon streets. The beautiful sycamore tree at the end of my driveway makes backing out a challenge for some of my elderly friends. I’m blind, and I swear I could probably back out of this driveway better than most of my friends, only four of whom have actually admitted to hitting the poor tree. Needless to say, many of them prefer to park on the street. Once we start down this road of paid residential parking, there will be no turning back. Let’s all put our heads together and come up with a viable alternative such as shuttling people from underutilized already existing parking lots, paid incentives for carpooling, underground parking — there must be a better solution. SUE TILLETT Moore Street

Broad Parking Permit Plan in Residential And School Zones is Unsafe for Children

13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

Volunteers Needed for Fire Department And Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad

To the Editor: There’s a lot been said and written about the proposal to extend permit parking into additional residential areas of our town. While the community concerns regarding inefficient use of existing parking, rights of residents, fees and taxation, and other points all have a place in the discussion and need to be addressed, what has been missing from some of the discussions has been the safety of our children who transverse these areas on their way to school, sometimes as unaccompanied minors. This proposal includes areas that overlap the existing school zone (pre-K - 12) and the YWCA Burke Early Childhood Center in our community. Many of these roads are busy during commuting times and need free parking to contribute to safe passage of both motor vehicles and children in these areas. This proposal doesn’t uncover existing spaces, it is simply reconfiguring these areas to allow additional traffic where it already makes sense to prohibit parking and, as a consequence, limit traffic flow for better access to our local public schools and community centers. As our town grows, we must not lose sight of protecting our intown residential streets where our children play and go to school. Simply drawing a half-mile radius to address commercial needs is in this case reckless and potentially dangerous. I appeal to all our community members and the Parking Permit Task Force to reconsider these plans. Keep Princeton beautiful and safe. ASHLEY PEREIRA Jefferson Road

Thanking All Who Contributed to Success of Annual Book Sale

To the Editor: After a two-year hiatus, the Friends of the Princeton Public Library held another successful Annual Book Sale from November 12 to 14, and we were delighted to welcome back members of our local community and visitors from far afield. All the proceeds raised go towards the purchase of books and other media in the library collections. We would like to thank our colleagues and Friends at Princeton Public Library, our hard-working volunteer cohort at the sale, and our wonderful team of volunteers whose dedication throughout the year is the key to a successful sale. Lastly, we would like to thank the Princeton community who generously provide us with book donations and support our Book Store and sales as loyal customers. To find out more about the Book Store and donating books, please go to princetonlibrary. org/booksales. HELEN HEINTZ Chair, 2021 Annual Book Sale CLAIRE BERTRAND Friends Book Sale Manager Friends of the Princeton Public Library

LAW OFFICE LAW OFFICE LAW OFFICE LAW OFFICE OF OF OF LAW OFFICE OF LAW OFFICE OF OF ALISANDRA B.B. CARNEVALE, ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE,LLC LLC ALISANDRA CARNEVALE, LLC

OF OF ALISANDRA B.B. CARNEVALE, LLC OF ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC ALISANDRA CARNEVALE, LLC ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC ALISANDRA B. CARNEVALE, LLC • Family Family Law • •Family Law Law FamilyLaw Law • Family •• Family Law •• Divorce Divorce •• ••Family Divorce Law TRANSACTIONS Law •Family REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS Law REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS Divorce • •Family REAL ESTATE • Divorce • Divorce • Wills/Living Wills/POA •Wills/Living Wills/Living Wills/POA • Real EstateWills/POA Transactions • Wills/Living • Divorce Divorce • Divorce • Wills/POA • Wills/Living Wills/POA • WILLS/LIVING WILLS/POA •Municipal WILLS/LIVING WILLS/POA • Wills/Living Wills/POA • WILLS/LIVING WILLS/POA (Buyer/Seller) • Municipal Court/ Traffic • Court/ Traffic • Municipal Court/ Traffic • Wills/Living Wills/POA • Wills/Living Wills/POA • Municipal Court/ Traffic Wills/Living Wills/POA • Municipal Court/ Traffic Violations • Municipal Court/ Traffic & Criminal Violations •& MUNICIPAL COURT/ •Criminal Last Will & Testament • MUNICIPAL COURT/ & Criminal Violations • MUNICIPAL COURT/ & Criminal Violations • Criminal Municipal Court/Traffic Traffic Violations •Criminal Court/ Traffic & Violations •& Municipal Court/ • Municipal Expungements TRAFFIC AND CRIMINAL • Expungements TRAFFIC AND CRIMINAL • Living Will & Criminal Criminal Violations Expungements & Violations TRAFFIC AND CRIMINAL •• Expungements Expungements • & Criminal Violations VIOLATIONS • Expungements (Healthcare Proxy Directive) • Real Estate Transactions VIOLATIONS •• Expungements Real Estate Transactions Expungements • VIOLATIONS Real Estate Transactions • Real Estate Transactions •• Real Estate Transactions Expungements •Estate Power ofTransactions Attorney • Real Real Estate Estate Transactions •• Real Transactions 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3683 Phone • Real Estate Transactions 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3687 fax 609.737.3687 fax 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3687 fax 609.737.3683 Phone 609.737.3687 fax 609.737.3687 fax alisandracarnevale@gmail.com alisandracarnevale@gmail.com 609.737.3683 Phone alisandracarnevale@gmail.com 609.737.3687 fax alisandracarnevale@gmail.com 609.737.3687 fax www.abcarnevalelaw.com alisandracarnevale@gmail.com 609.737.3687 fax www.abcarnevalelaw.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com alisandracarnevale@gmail.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com alisandracarnevale@gmail.com 609.737.3687 fax alisandracarnevale@gmail.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com

AlisandraB. B.Carnevale, Carnevale,Esq. Esq. Alisandra Alisandra B.Carnevale, Carnevale, Esq. Member NewJersey Jersey Bar Alisandra B. Carnevale, Esq. Member ofofNew Bar Alisandra B. Esq. Member of New Jersey Bar Member New Jersey Bar Alisandra B. Carnevale, Esq. Alisandra B.Carnevale, Carnevale, Esq. Member ofof134 New Jersey BarM Alisandra B. Esq. www.abcarnevalelaw.com www.abcarnevalelaw.com South outh ain S Street treet || P Pwww.abcarnevalelaw.com ennington nJ 08534 08534 alisandracarnevale@gmail.com 134 S M ain ennington ,, nJ Member of New Jersey Bar Member of New Jersey Bar Member of New Jersey Bar 134 outh M MEsq. ain S Street treet || P Pennington ennington,, nJ nJ 08534 08534 Alisandra134 B. Carnevale, SSouth ain

www.abcarnevalelaw.com 134 South Main Street | Pennington , nJ 08534

Member New Jersey BarM 134 outh M ain S Street treet ennington nJ 08534 SSM outh || PPennington ,, nJ 08534 134 ofS134 outh ain Sain treet | Pennington , nJ 08534

134 South Main Street | Pennington, nJ 08534


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 14

Books

whole new crop of fans.” Steven Roberts has been a journalist for more than 50 years. He is the author of My Father’s Houses and From This Day Forward, co-written with Cokie Roberts. He is the chief political analyst for the ABC radio network, a professor of journalism and politics at George Washington University, and a nationally syndicated columnist. Hartman is a sophomore at Princeton University pursuing a bachelor of arts degree in history, with a certificate in history and practice of diplomacy.

“The Shape of Sex” Discussed at Labyrinth

LLL Hosts Tribute To Cokie Roberts

Journalist Stephen Roberts and his grandson Jack Hartman will discuss Cokie – a Life Well Lived (Harper $27.99) on Tuesday, December 7 at 7 p.m. This is an online event in the Labyrinth and Library Livestream Series, cosponsored by Labyrinth Books and the Princeton Public Library. To register visit labyrinthbooks.com.

A starred review in Publishers Weekly calls Roberts’ biography “A moving testimony of the remarkable life and legacy of his wife, trailblazing journalist Cokie (1943–2019). Through depictions of her faith, family, work, writing, and friendships, Roberts shares engrossing anecdotes about his partner from their over 50 years together .... This loving tribute is likely to gain the celebrated journalist a

Leah DeVun and fellow historian Roland Betancourt will be talking about DeVun’s book, The Shape of Sex: Nonbinary Gender from Genesis to the Renaissance (Columbia Univ. Press $35), on Thursday, December 2 at 6 p.m. This is a hybrid event. Vaccinations and masks are required to attend in person; to register for the live-stream, visit labyrinthbooks. com. According to Susan Stryker, executive editor of TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly, The Shape of Sex “brilliantly realizes the promise of transgender studies and nonbinary frames of reference to provide compelling reinterpretations of gender and bodies not just in the present but also in the distant past. Through deep archival research, erudite textual scholarship, and dazzling methodological turns, DeVun shows how the figure of the nonbinary body has been central to Western theological, philosophical, legal, and scientific thought regarding proper social and cosmological order for more than two millennia.” DeVun is associate professor of history at Rutgers University. She is the author of Prophecy, Alchemy, and the End of Time: John

of Rupescissa in the Late Middle Ages. Betancourt is professor of art history at the University of California Irvine. His most recent books are Byzantine Intersectionality: Sexuality, Gender, and Race in the Middle Ages, and Performing the Gospels in Byzantium: Sight, Sound, and Space in the Divine Liturgy. This event is cosponsored by Princeton University’s Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies.

— WE BUY — BOOKS, BOOKS, BOOKS Also Buying: Antiques, Collectibles, Jewelry, Postcards, Ephemera, Pottery, Prints, Paintings, Old Glass, etc. ESTATE CONTENTS

Downsizing/Moving? Call Us.

609-658-5213

PUBLICATION OF NOTICE FOR DEMOLITION IN A HISTORIC DISTRICT Date: November 24, 2021

NOTICE Notice is hereby given that on the 20th day of December at 4:00 P.M., via electronic zoom meeting, the Princeton Historic Preservation Commission will hold a hearing on the application of the undersigned, at which time and place all interested persons will be given an opportunity to be heard. Please click the link below to join the webinar: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84507798186 Or One tap mobile : US: +13017158592,,84507798186# or +13126266799,,84507798186# Or Telephone: Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): US: +1 301 715 8592 or +1 312 626 6799 or +1 646 558 8656 or +1 253 215 8782 +1 346 248 7799 or +1 669 900 9128 Webinar ID: 845 0779 8186 International numbers available: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kdG9YOR0n9 Location of Premises: 974 Mercer Road, Block 10102, Lot 11 (Zone R-1, 2HP-2021) Princeton, New Jersey 08540 Nature of application: To demolish existing aging structure and rebuilding of a single story garage on the existing footprint. All documents relating to this application are on file in the Office of Historic Preservation in the Municipal Complex, 400 Witherspoon Street and are available for inspection on the municipal website (www.princetonnj.gov), 10 days prior to the meeting date. Bruce and Marcia Willsie

A DEDICATED FINANCIAL TEAM WITH PRINCETON ROOTS Our approach is simple: we partner with you, one-on-one, to help you achieve your goals. We deliver world-class wealth management, a full array of insurance services, and stateof-the-art banking to keep you informed and in control. It’s what you can expect from Bryn Mawr Trust. 47 Hulfish Street, Suite 400 | Princeton, NJ 08542

609.683.1022 • bmt.com BANKING • WEALTH MANAGEMENT • INSURANCE Deposit products offered by Bryn Mawr Trust, Member FDIC. Products and services are provided through Bryn Mawr Bank Corporation and its various affiliates and subsidiaries. Insurance products are offered through BMT Insurance Advisors, a subsidiary of Bryn Mawr Trust. ©2021 Bryn Mawr Trust

INVESTMENTS & INSURANCE: NOT A DEPOSIT. NOT FDIC - INSURED. NOT INSURED BY ANY FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AGENCY. NOT GUARANTEED BY THE BANK. MAY GO DOWN IN VALUE.


Reading “The Beatles Get Back”

“T

hough I don’t pretend to understand what makes these four rather odd-looking boys so fascinating to so many scores of millions of people, I admit that I feel a certain mindless joy stealing over me as they caper about uttering sounds.” So says Brendan Gill in his review of A Hard Day’s Night in the August 22, 1964 New Yorker. As an example of mindless joy, he mentions “a lady of indubitable intelligence” who told him that the Beatles “make her happy in the very same way that butterflies do; she wouldn’t be surprised if, in a previous incarnation, the Beatles had been butterflies.” A more mindfully memorable response came from the Village Voice’s Andrew Sarris, who dubbed A Hard Day’s Night “the Citizen Kane of juke box musicals.” Another Beatles Landmark Fifty-seven years later here they are again alive and well in The Beatles Get Back, which could be called the Citizen Kane of rock documentaries. Lord of the Rings director Peter Jackson has carved a landmark out of 60 hours of film and 150 hours of audio, much of it transcriptions of conversations among the Beatles during the making of the album that would be released more than a year later as Let It Be. While I have yet to see Jackson’s three-act epic, I’ve been enjoying the book (Callaway Arts & Entertainment $60). It’s a massive volume, 250-plus pages brimming with digitally scanned and restored frames from the original footage, along with photography by Linda McCartney and Ethan A. Russell. By far the book’s most fascinating feature is the in-the-moment sensation of “being there.” Reviewing Get Back in Variety, Chris Willman was impressed by how much of the dialogue “reads like it could be adaptable into an off-Broadway play, full of dark comedy and rich insight about what can and can’t emerge out of ego and compromise among longtime partners approaching a crossroads.” Paging “Citizen Kane” Although this monumental four-star reality show transcends the theatrical analogy, Get Back actually does have something central in common with Citizen Kane, which is driven by a quest for the meaning of “rosebud,” the word Kane uttered with his last breath. In Get Back the quest is for the perfect setting for a live farewell performance, and the mystery word that eludes everyone until the moment of truth is “rooftop.” There the play ends, with London skies as the backdrop and London police looking on as John Lennon takes a rushed bow and ad libs, “I’d like to say thank you on behalf of the group and ourselves, and I hope we’ve passed the audition.” My main problem with Get Back, the book, concerns the cover. The image

well loved and well read since 1946

Rider

Furniture

“Where quality still matters.”

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

I have in mind — an atmospheric London variation on Rene Clair’s Sous les Toits de Paris, the embattled Beatles up on the rosebud rooftop of 3 Saville Row playing, a luminous halo overhead — is out of the question of course. All I really want is something as striking as the Rubber Soul, Revolver, and Abbey Road album covers, not the dull, who-cares-any-more cop-out on Let It Be. Yet the same set of four glorified yearbook photos (Class of ‘69) is reprised on Get Back’s glossy wrap-around jacket and again on the opening page. Trapped in Twickenham If a plot can be extracted from what happened in the Beatles’ world in January 1969, the first act would have them struggling to adjust to an alien setting, Twickenham Film Studios in Richmondupon-Thames, where they spend too much time slogging through frustratingly petty, silly, going-nowhere conversations about how to stage and record their farewell performance. A playwright versed in the theatre of the absurd might make a comedy of the situation, or maybe a paranormal parable taking into account the fact t h at J oh n L e n n on and George Harrison have been dead since 1980 and 2001, respectively. As it happens, John, then 28, and especially George, at 25, play active, vivid, consequential roles in this existential drama, even though Paul McCartney has the most to s ay ( and R ingo Starr the least, since he was not mic’d). Still, it’s George who creates the definitive crisis by announcing, suddenly, as if out of nowhere, that he’s leaving the band, thus precipitating the move from the cavernous confines of Twickenham to Apple’s cozy basement studio, where, as John Harris puts it in his preface to Act Two, the solution for a finale “lies four stories above.” Wouldn’t you know, it’s McCartney who intuits a key component of the eventual solution when everyone else is still squabbling about what and how and where. Says Paul, maybe they “should do the show in a place we’re not allowed to do it. You know, like we should trespass, go in, set up and then get moved — that should be the show.... Getting forcibly ejected, still trying to play your numbers, and the police lifting you...” Making Something My first time through Get Back, I enjoyed collaboration-in-action passages like the one when Paul calls on the others for help with the lyric for “Get Back,” the song

they close out the rooftop recital with, a message for the benefit of the hovering bobbies. Numerous exchanges recall the banter between Hard Day’s Night’s “oddlooking” purveyors of mindless joy, as when George is working on “Something.” He’s looking for the right word to complete the line “Something in the way she moves attracts me like ... “ Like what? “a moth to candlelight?” John tells him “Just say whatever comes into your head each time: ‘Attracts me like a cauliflower’ until you get the word, you know.” After John offers “grabs me like a monkey on a tree,” George abruptly decides he doesn’t “like moths,” Paul says, “It’s a lovely image, a moth,” George sings “attracts me like a pomegranate,” then it’s George and John singing “attracts me like a moth to granite” before George returns to “pomegranate,” John to “cauliflower, and all three join in singing the song “as it stands.” The answer to the riddle of the rhyme is “attracts me like no other lover” when “Something” finally surfaces in August 1969. George’s first A - side single tops the charts, ultimately inspiring over 150 cover versions, including one by Frank Sinatra, who called it “the greatest love song of the past 50 years.” “Only a Northern Song” On January 7, six days before George announces he’s leaving the band, he and John and Paul are d i s c u s s i n g w h a t ’s been going wrong. When Paul says “it doesn’t really matter as long as the four of us notice it,” George snaps, “I’ve noticed it all right!” After Paul’s lame comeback that he’s “for not just noticing it but putting it right,” George says, “I think we should get a divorce.” Without missing a beat, John says, “Who’d have the children?” And Paul says “Dick James,” the managing director of Northern Songs, because of course the Beatles’ children are their songs, which James has in custody. It’s the Beatles in a heartbeat, another update of A Hard Day’s Night, spoiled a bit when Paul rambles nervously on about how “silly” it would be for them to split, since they’re “all just theoretically agreeing with it, but not doing it, you know.” On January 13, George does it. And he does it after Dick James drops in for a visit that same day. Writing about Harrison last week, I learned for the first time what his composition “Only a Northern Song” actually refers to, with cranky lines like “You may think the chords are going wrong

but they’re not / I just wrote it like that.” The point is it doesn’t really matter what chords he plays or words he says, since “it’s only a northern song,” and if you think “the harmony is a little off and out of key,” you’re right because the song’s not really his, it belongs to bald, bespectacled, middle aged executive Dick James, who arrives wishing everyone a Happy New Year. After George thanks him for a holiday present (“Very nice glasses, those”), Paul says “I didn’t get any glasses,” James says, “You did you know,” and it’s like a reprise of a scene with the fussy adults trying to manage the “boys” in A Hard Day’s Night. With nothing more to say, Paul sits down at the piano and escapes into playing “The Long and Winding Road,” as if to caption the story of their lives. “I’m Leaving” Later the same day, while they’re rehearsing “Get Back,” Paul tells George the guitar is “conflicting” with what he’s singing: “And then I’m trying to sing louder to get over the guitar.” Still later, as they move on to “Two of Us,” Paul repeatedly goes over the “on our way back home” passage with both John and George. According to the transcript, when John “plays loud guitar,” Paul says “Could you just stop playing for a minute, John.” John says, “Yes, all right, Paul!” Paul tries to break the tension with a bit of playful theatre, “Thank you. Shall we go for lunch?” John plays along, putting on a posh accent, “Is it lunch already? ” Meanwhile George may be thinking of all the times Paul’s told him “to just stop playing,” so that he could be advised what to play and how to play it. John is playing a Chuck Berry guitar riff when George suddenly says, “I’m leaving...” John stops playing. “What?” George finishes his sentence: “... the band now.” John: “When?” George: “Now.” Six days later the band’s back together in the Apple studio, George is saying “This is the nicest place I’ve been for a long time,” and Paul agrees. Soon they’ll be up on the roof, discussing the possibilities, and you’ll be smiling because George walked out as they were working on the line, “We’re on our way back home.” In the Field ’m remembering the “four odd-looking boys” romping in an open field to the full-tilt frenzy of “Can’t Buy Me Love,” which is where A Hard Day’s Night picks you up and runs off with you. Poet/critic Geoffrey O’Brien remembers walking into the theater “as a solitary observer with more or less random musical tastes” and coming out “as a member of a generation sharing a common repertoire with a sea of contemporaries, strangers, who suddenly seemed like family.... The world became, with very little effort, a more companionable place.” — Stuart Mitchner

I

WE BUY HOMES! • Save On Commission Cost • Cash Deal / 30 Day Closing • No Home Inspection • Fair Market Value

152 Witherspoon St., Princeton, NJ Phone: 609.924.7111 Fax: 609.924.7199 www.rbhomesonline.com

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

BOOK REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 16

Performing Arts

HOLIDAY SPECTACULAR: “Cirque Dreams Holidaze” comes to the State Theatre New Jersey December 8 and 9 at 8 p.m. The Broadway-style musical infused with contemporary circus artistry brings a cast of holiday storybook characters to life with ballerinas, nutcrackers, penguins, reindeer, aerialists, carolers, jugglers, and more. Tickets are $40-$98. Visit STNJ.org. from 12-2 p.m. on Saturday PIANIST STEWART GOODYEAR: His recital on December 19, at McCarter Theatre, is among the and Sunday, December 18 musical highlights of the holiday season. and 19. Palmersquare.org. Pianist Stewart Goodyear plays selections from The Nutcracker, among other works, at McCarter Theatre, 91 University Place, on SunTraditionally, the local perHarmonics Quartet ser- Street, Trenton. Arballet.org. day, December 19 at 3 p.m. forming arts calendar ramps enades shoppers at Palmer The Capital Singers of Tren- McCarter.org. up during the winter holiday Square Sundays, December 5 ton perform “Winter Songs —Anne Levin season. These cultural celebra- and 12, from 12-2 p.m. Palm- XV: The Messiah” at Sacred tions are especially meaningful ersquare.com. Heart Church, 343 South Lewis Center for the Arts this year, signifying a return to Capital Philharmonic of Broad Street, Trenton, on Presents Aspiring Comics pre-pandemic days — at least New Jersey performs holiday Sunday, December 12 at 4 Jersey Jokers, a night of for now. While some events are favorites on Sunday, Decem- p.m. Capitalsingers.org. comedy led by comedian still available online or sched- ber 5 at 4 p.m. at Patriots Princeton Pro Musica is at and Princeton University uled to be performed outdoors, Theater at the War Memorial, Patriots Theater at the War Arts Fellow Maysoon Zayid most are planned for theaters Trenton. Daniel Spalding con- Memorial, Trenton, on Sun- and her “Art of Standup” and concert halls. Most require ducts, and Gianine Campbell day, December 12 at 4 p.m. students as they take their proof of vaccinations, and re- is guest soprano. Capitalphil- “Comfort and Joy to the final exam live, is set for quire masks be worn. harmonic.org. World” features Handel’s Mes- Monday, December 6 at 7 Following is a list of holidayHoliday Carillon Bell Music siah and Bach’s Mass in B mi- p.m. at the Wallace Theater, themed arts events scheduled can be heard outside Cleve- nor. Princetonpromusica.org. in the Lewis complex. Adfor the local area: land Towner at the Graduate Princeton Symphony Or- mission is free. Princeton University Or- College of Princeton Univer- chestra’s Holiday POPS ! Zayid is a comedian, acchestra, at Richardson Audi- sity on Sunday, December 5 Concert is at McCarter The- tress, writer, and disability torium on the campus Friday, at 1 p.m. atre on Tuesday, December advocate. She is a graduate December 3 at 7:30 p.m. The Chapel Choir of Prince- 14 at 7:30 p.m. Rossen Mi- of Arizona State University and Sunday, December 5 ton Theological Seminary has lanov conducts, and soprano and a 2021-23 Princeton at 3 p.m., conducted by Mi- planned a free outdoor event, Laquita Mitchell is soloist. Arts Fellow. Zayid is the cochael Pratt. Soprano soloist “Carols of Many Nations,” to Princetonsymphony.org. founder/co-executive prois Alison Spann ’20. On the be performed Wednesday, Westminster Community ducer of the New York Arab program are works by Rach- December 8 at 8 p.m. on the Orchestra from Westminster American Comedy Festival maninoff and David del Tredi- campus, 64 Mercer Street. Conservatory performs “Holi- and The Muslim Funny Fest. ci. Music.princeton.edu. Register at ptsem.edu/events. day Chestnuts,” led by Ruth She was a full-time on-air Roxey Ballet performs a The Princeton Singers come Ochs, at the Robert L. Annis contributor to Countdown NEED A LAUGH?: Maysoon Zayid, actress, comedian, writer, sensory-friendly version of to Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Playhouse on the Westminster with Keith Olbermann and and disability advocate, is one of nine comics at the Lewis The Nutcracker at Eagle Fire Street, Friday, December 10 Choir College of Rider Uni- a columnist for The Daily Center on December 6. (Photo by Michelle Kinney) Hall, 46 North Sugan Road, at 6 p.m. Christmas music is versity campus, 101 Walnut Beast. She has appeared on 60 Minutes, CNN, ABC New Hope, Pa., Saturday and on the program, with readings Lane. (609) 921-7104. News, and Oprah Winfrey Sunday, December 4 and 5, at by candlelight. PrincetonsingVoices Chorale NJ is at Networks. Zayid had the 1 p.m. Roxeyballet.org. ers.org. Trinity Church, 33 Mercer most-viewed TED Talk of Princeton Boychoir streams The Tiger Tones of Princ- Street, and also available via 2014 and was named One a holiday concert, “From eton University serenade livestream, on Friday, DecemHandel to Broadway,” Sat- shoppers at Palmer Square ber 17 at 8 p.m. “I Dream a of 100 Women of 2015 by Princeton University Chapel urday, December 4 at 7 p.m. Saturday, December 11 from World” has works based on the BBC. As a professional comeand Sunday, December 5 at 3 12-2 p.m. Palmersquare.com. poetry by E.E. Cummings, dian, Zayid has sold out p.m. Westrickmusic.org. American Repertory Ballet Robert Frost, Emily DickinCourtney’s Carolers ser- performs The Nutcracker Sat- son, Langston Hughes, and top New York clubs and has enade shoppers at Palmer urday, December 11 at 1 and others. Voiceschoralenj.org. toured extensively in the U.S. and abroad. She was a Square Saturday, December 4 5 p.m. at Patriots Theater at Spiced Punch serenades headliner on the Arabs Gone from 12-2 p.m. Palmersquare. the War Memorial, Lafayette shoppers at Palmer Square Wild Comedy Tour and The com. Together Live Tour. She appeared alongside Adam Sandler in You Don’t Mess with the Zohan and has written for Glamour magazine. She limped, as she puts it, in New York Fashion Week and is a recurring character on General Hospital. She is the author of the best-selling memoir Find Another Dream and is collaborating with Scholastic Magazines on a comic book series. Registration is required at tickets.princeton.edu. All guests are required to be fully Advent Concert “My Spirit Rejoices” Sunday, December 5 at 2:30 p.m. vaccinated against COVID-19 and to wear a mask when inMessiah Sing doors. The performers will Monday, December 6 at 7:30 p.m. be unmasked and socially General Admission $5, All Students Free distanced from the audience Candlelight Service of Lessons and Carols BROADWAY IN NEW BRUNSWICK: The musical “Anastasia,” starring Kyla Stone, comes to the when performing. This event Wednesday, December 8 at 7:30pm State Theatre New Jersey Friday-Sunday, December 3-5. From the Tony Award-winning creators may not be suitable for chilPlease visit chapel.princeton.edu for more information of “Ragtime,” and inspired by the film “Anastasia,” the show transports audiences from the dren under 16 years of age. twilight of the Russian Empire to Paris in the 1920s as a brave young woman sets out to dis- For more information, visit This service is open to the public for those fully vaccinated against Covid-19. Registration required arts.princeton.edu. for all events on campus at the door or in advance. To register in advance, use the QR code. cover the mystery of her past. (Photo by Jeremy Daniel)

Local Performances Mostly Live For the Current Holiday Season

Christmas Concerts


17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

Art

interest in traditional art, she said, and “is not looking to reach the art community.” Rather, she seeks “interaction with the general public” and hopes that her work will encourage her viewers to reflect on their own experiences. Svetvilas does not favor any one medium. She calls herself a “conceptual artist” and says the concept she wants to illustrate determines the medium she will use. She has presented her installations at the annual College Art Association conference, CUNY Hunter College, and Stony Brook University. She has exhibited at the Denver International Airport, Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning, Brooklyn Public Library, Westbeth Gallery, the Islip Art Museum, Princeton University, and the Center for Collaborative History, among others. More information about Svetvilas is available on her website at chanikasvetvilas.com. The gallery is located in the Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van Doren Street, Plainsboro. For more information, visit plainsborolibrary.org.

Annual “Red Dot” Fundraising Exhibition at Artworks Trenton

“INTERNALIZED”: Work by artist Chanika Svetvilas is now on view at the Plainsboro Public Library gallery. An artist’s talk and opening reception for the exhibit, “What I Have Learned (Fill in the Blank),” will be held on Saturday, December 4, from 1-3 p.m.

Plainsboro Library Exhibit Inspired by Pandemic

An exhibit of work by Chanika Svetvilas, who describes herself as “an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary artist,” opens at the Plainsboro Public Library gallery on Wednesday, December 1. Svetvilas is scheduled to give an artist’s talk on Saturday, December 4, at the opening reception, scheduled for 1-3 p.m. The show, which runs run through January 26, features 50 oversize (36” x 24”) charcoal drawings — and some collage — created during the pandemic. Each piece has its own title, and collectively the series is entitled “What I Have Learned (Fill in the Blank).”

The Princeton Junction artist said that the work in the show represents her response to the ongoing isolation of the pandemic, especially in its earlier days. She has tried to illustrate “satirically the disparities and inequities brought to light” during the nation’s experience of COVID-19. Included in the exhibit are the artist’s representations of the Black Lives Matter movement, a response to George Floyd’s murder, pandemic charts, images of masking, and depictions of her own experience. The artist explains that she “uses narrative as a way to share experiences to disrupt stereotypes and to reflect on contemporary issues and cultural identity.” She has little

The public is invited to the annual Artworks Trenton “Red Dot” fundraising exhibition, opening December 11, to put their red dot on the art that they love. An opening reception is December 11 from 6 to 8 p.m. Over 100 Trenton area and regional artists have created artworks on 10” x 10” canvases. The work is dynamic, diverse, and all created especially for Artworks. Professional, teacher, and student artists have created works in oil, acrylic, mixed media, photography, pastel, watercolor, and more. E ach ar t work sells for $100, with the funds raised going to support Artworks. In addition, the exhibition will also be available for viewing and purchasing online as of December 11 at 6 p.m. The online gallery will be up until January 8. For further information and to view the exhibition, visit artworkstrenton.org.

SPECIALIZING IN THE SALE & PURCHASE OF FINE JEWELRY, DIAMONDS, WATCHES AND COLLECTIBLES Appointments Encouraged oakgem.com 39 Bridge Street Lambertville, NJ 08530 609.300.6900

4 via Sunset Palm Beach, FL 33480 877.355.9500

Continued on Next Page

author conversation

Picture Ecology Thursday, December 9, 5:30 p.m. The new book Picture Ecology: Art and Ecocriticism in Planetary Perspective presents art historical criticism within an ecological context, from 11th-century Chinese painting to contemporary photography. Editor Karl Kusserow will discuss with Subhankar Banerjee, Director, Center for Environmental Arts and Humanities, University of New Mexico. Cosponsored by Labyrinth Books, Princeton.

Stream it live

“TIDEWATER”: Works by Larry Mitnick (shown here), Laura Rutherford Renner, Heather Barros, and Bill Jersey are featured in the new exhibit “Sharing,” on view at Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street in Lambertville, December 9 through January 22. For more information, visit lambertvillearts.com.

LATE THURSDAYS! This event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970. This program, including live closed-captioning, is made possible by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Curtis W. McGraw Foundation.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 18

Art Continued from Preceding Page

“OPEN CALL”: This work by Linda Gilbert is part of the exhibit opening on Monday, December 6 at Gourgaud Gallery in Cranbury. The show features works in a variety of styles and sizes in several different mediums by many artists. the arts in the community. The opening on Saturday, 12th Annual “Open Call” Exhibit at Gourgaud Gallery Cash or a check made out December 4 will be at noon. Gourgaud Gallery in Cranbury presents its 12th annual “Open Call” exhibit, on view Monday, December 6 through Tuesday, December 28. Admission to the gallery is free. The show will feature several different mediums (paintings, drawings, photography), in a variety of styles and sizes, created by many different artists. Admission to the gallery is free. As part of the nonprofit Cranbury Arts Council, the Gourgaud Gallery donates 20 percent of art sales to the Cranbury Arts Council and its programs that support

to the artist is accepted as payment. The gallery is located in Town Hall, 23-A North Main Street in Cranbury. Hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit cranburyartscouncil.org for more information.

Gallery 14 Holiday Art Exhibit and Boutique

The Gallery 14 Fine Art Photo g raphy G a l ler y i n Hopewell continues its season of exhibits with a special “Members Holiday Exhibit and Boutique” from December 4 through December 18.

There will also be an artist meet and greet on Sunday, December 5 from 1 to 3 p.m. The exhibit will include fine art photographs both on the walls and in the artist’s bins along with many smaller gift items including calendars, note cards, purses, scarves, and jewelry accessories. There will also be items from the “Watercolor Women of Gallery 14.” The exhibit will feature works by all the member artists: John Clarke, Pennington; Alice Grebanier, Branchburg; Larry Parsons,

Princeton; Charles Miller, R ingoes ; Philip “Dutch ” Bagley, Elkins Park, Pa.; Martin Schwartz, East Windsor; Joel Blum, East Windsor; John Strintzinger, Elkins Park, Pa.; Mary Leck, Kendall Park; Barbara Warren, Yardley, Pa.; David Ackerman, Hopewell; and Bennett Povlov, Elkins Park, Pa. Gallery 14 is a co-op gallery of like-minded artists who want to promote photography as a fine art medium. Each artist has their own style and approach to working photographically, everything from traditional images to highly manipulated or abstract works. This exhibit will include the full range of photographic possibilities. “We all are very excited to be sharing our work with in-person viewers within the comfort of our gallery, after a year of only showing works virtually,” said Miller. In addition to the exhibit, the artists will also have portfolios of work available for viewing. Gallery 14 will be offering an ongoing series of exhibits featuring individual members as well as guest artists. For more information, visit gallery14.org. Gallery 14 is located at 14 Mercer Street in Hopewell and is open on Saturday and Sunday from 12 to 5:00. Appointments can also be made to view the show at other times.

NEW Y ORK CAMERA 173 Nassau Street - Princeton 609-924-7063 DECEMBER 3 & 5, 2021 7:30 PM FRIDAY 3:00 PM SUNDAY

Princeton University Orchestra MICHAEL PRATT

conductor

David Del Tredici

Selections from Final Alice ALLISON SPANN ’20 soprano

Sergei Rachmaninoff

Symphony No. 2 in E Minor, Op. 27

Richardson Auditorium Alexander Hall FREE • Ticket Required Attendees must be fully vaccinated and masked at all times.

Tell them you saw their ad in

music.princeton.edu orchestra.princeton.edu

PHOTO: VERONICA SPANN

Oriel Homes

We Buy Homes for Cash All cash transaction Fair market value No real estate agent fees Easy and quick closing No inspection

Orlando

curated by tilda swinton

Inspired by Virginia Woolf’s revolutionary novel, eleven artists consider gender and the fluidity of human experience.

Exhibition opening Saturday, December 4 On view through Sunday, January 23

Contact Alex at 609-216-8260 or at info@orielhomes.com for more information. FREE ADMISSION

11 Hulfish Street

Exhibition organized by Aperture, New York. Orlando is made possible, in part, with the support of Slobodan Randjelović and Jon Stryker. Left: Lynn Hershman Leeson, Rowlands/Bogart (Female Dominant), from the series Hero Sandwich, 1982. Courtesy the artist and Bridget Donahue, New York. Right: Jamal Nxedlana, FAKA Portrait, 2019. Courtesy the artist


“Master Class Artists” Exhibit at Arts Council

Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 The Arts Council of Princ- p.m. For more information, eton will present an exhibi- call (609) 924-8777 or visit tion of new paintings and artscouncilofprinceton.org. drawings by artists from the Painting and Drawing Master Class instructed by Charles David Viera. This exhibition will be offered in the Lower Gallery December 4 through Check websites for inforJanuary 29, and the public is invited to an artists’ recep- mation on safety protocols. tion on Saturday, December A r t @ B a inbr idge, 158 4 from 3 to 5 p.m. Nassau Street, has “Com“These students are from ponents in the Air / Jesse a special class that the Arts Stecklow” through January Council is now adding to their 2. artmuseum.princeton.edu. regular schedule of classes, A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 and it’s for artists that still Bridge Street, Lambertville, appreciate a structured class has “Stillness / Motion” environment,” said Viera. through December 5. Gallery “These artists have worked hours are Thursday through for three months to create a Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. wonderful exhibition that in- lambertvillearts.com. cludes a variety of represenArts Council of Princtational and expressionistic e to n , 102 Wit h er sp o on paintings. The range of ideas Street, has “Annual Memand creativity that these art- ber Show 2021” December ists represent makes for an 4 through December 21. impressive and exciting ex- artscouncilofprinceton.org. hibition.” Ellarslie, Trenton’s City “Master Class Artists” will M u s e u m i n C a d w a l a d e r feature works from Mer- Park, Parkside Avenue, Trencer and Hunterdon county ton, has “Painting the Moon ar t ists K. Chasalow, M. and Beyond: Lois Dodd and Babich, M. Kalvar, L. Lang- Friends Explore the Night sner, A. Meisel , L. Berlik, Sky” through April 29. Visit S. B ershad, P. Hut t ner, ellarslie.org for museum R. Piccione, and E.Lange hours and timed entry tickThe Arts Council of Princ- ets. eton is located at 102 WithFicus Bon Vivant, 235 er sp o on St ree t. G a l ler y Nassau Street, has “Of f hours are Monday through the Beaten Path” through

Area Exhibits

February 27. ficusbv.com. Gourgaud Gallery, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, has “Open Call” December 6 through December 28. cranburyartscouncil.org. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Bruce Beasley: Sixty Year Retrospective, 19602020” through January 9 and “What’s in the Garden?” through August 1. Hours are Thursday through Monday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Timed tickets required. groundsforsculpture.org. Histor ical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Princeton and Women’s Suffrage” and other online exhibits, as well as the “Histor y @ Home” ser ies. T he museum is currently closed to the public. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestow n, Pa., has “It’s Personal: The Art of Robert Beck ” through January 2, “Daring Design” through Februar y 6, and “Miriam Carpenter: Shaping the Ethereal” through March 20. michenerartmuseum.org. Mercer Museum, 84 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Found, Gifted, Saved! The Mercer Museum Collects Local History” through April 10. mercermuseum.org.

Furniture • Gifts • Design 609.688.0777 | homesteadprinceton.com 300 Witherspoon Street | Princeton

Clean for the Holidays!

Serving the Princeton area for over 25 years

Residential Cleaning Fully Insured

Renata Z. Yunque, owner/manager

For immediate attention, call the Princeton Renata for all your housecleaning needs.

Mobile: 609.203.0741

cleanhousehappyhouse@gmail.com

THE FUND FOR

FALL 2021 LECTURE SERIES

DECEMBER 3

“The Coffin Ship: Life and Death at Sea during the Great Famine” with CIAN MCMAHON, introduction by Paul Muldoon Free and open to the public All events take place at 4:30 p.m. via Zoom; registration required For more information about these events and the Fund for Irish Studies visit fis.princeton.edu The Fund for lrish Studies is generously supported by the Durkin Family Trust and the James J. Kerrigan, Jr. ’45 and Margaret M. Kerrigan Fund for lrish Studies.

Princeton Estate Sales LLC presents:

REFURBISHMENT SALE The Center of Theological Inquiry is refurbishing Luce Hall for its 40th Anniversary. The estate sale offers a unique opportunity to buy quality classic furnishings for your home, office, or meeting rooms. December 9th-12th The Center of Theological Inquiry 50 Stockton Street, Princeton • 9am-4pm WWW.PRINCETONESTATESALES.COM

Classes for

Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced & Professional Dancers “SEASONAL BEAUTY”: Artist Carol Sanzalone is exhibiting a series of colorful paintings in the dining room at Bell’s Tavern, 183 North Union Street in Lambertville, through December. Inspired by images throughout the Delaware Valley and beyond, Sanzalone’s paintings emphasize the visual changes of color and texture and focus on the beauty of each season. Bell’s Tavern is open for dinner daily from 5 to 9 p.m.

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “In Nature’s Realm: The Art of Gerard Rutgers Hardenberg” through January 9 and the online exhibit “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898.” Open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. morven.org. P r i nc e ton P ubl ic L i b r a r y, 65 Wit h er s p o on Street, has “Love Thy Nature” and “Looking Micro, Seeing Macro: Pressed Flower Art” through January 3. princetonlibrary.org. S ma l l World Cof fee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has “Perspectives on Preservation: Capturing the Mountain Lakes Preserve from Up Close and On High ” through December 6. The 254 Nassau Street location “DNNERWARE”: This work by R. Piccione is part of “Master Class Artists,” on view in the Lower has “Mary Dolan Paintings” Gallery at the Arts Council of Princeton December 4 through January 29. An artists’ reception through December 7. smallworldcoffee.com. will be held on Saturday, December 4 from 3 to 5 p.m.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 20

10 Bayard Lane #1, Princeton Marketed by: Roberta Parker $895,000

1270 Bear Tavern Road, Hopewell Twp. Marketed by: Jennifer Tome-Berry $4,349,000

24 Belmont Circle, Mansfield Twp. Marketed by: Terebey Relocation Team/Sunny Sharad $899,900

56 Carson Road, Lawrence Twp. Marketed by: Beth J. Miller $759,000

51 Columbia Avenue, Hopewell Twp. Marketed by: Alison Covello $425,000

40 Copper Penny Road, Raritain Twp. Marketed by: Kenneth “Ken” Verbeyst $685,000

6 Gulick Road, Princeton Marketed by: Robin L. Wallack $950,000

128 Laurel Road, Princeton Marketed by: Yuen Li Huang $1,765,000

From Princeton, We Reach the World From Princeton, We Reach the World © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway

© BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway


sm

sm

of P R I N C E T O N of P R I N C E T O N

30-32 Leigh Avenue, Princeton Marketed by: Nicole Wolf $880,000

184 Mansgrove Road, Princeton Marketed by: Yuen Li “Ivy” Huang $1,599,500

Open House Sun 12/5 1-4pm 3 Mayfarth Terrace, Plainsboro Twp. Marketed by: Terebey Relocation Team/John Terebey, Jr. $509,888

8 Players Lane, Lawrence Twp. Marketed by: Rocco D’Armiento $4,500,000

536 State Road, Princeton Marketed by: Yuen Li Huang $1,245,500

5 Mimosa Court, South Brunswick Twp. Marketed by: Vaishali Senjalia $600,000

60 Ridgeview Avenue, New Providence Boro Marketed by: Kathleen Murphy $569,000

1 Winged Foot Court, Montgomery Twp. Marketed by: Debra Foxx $769,000

253 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 253Nassau Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 253 Street | 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com 609-924-1600 Princeton, NJ | foxroach.com

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

FEATURED LISTINGS


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 22

Mark Your Calendar TOWN TOPICS Wednesday, December 1 6 p.m. : Paul Muldoon reads Howdie-Skelp: Poems in a hybrid event presented by Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau Street. Introduced by poet Michael Dickman. Labyrinthbooks.com. Thursday, December 2 6 p.m.: Leah DeVun and Roland Betancour t, The Shape of Sex: Nonbinary Gender from Genesis to the Renaissance. Hybrid event pre s e nte d by L aby r i nt h Books, 122 Nassau Street. Labyrinthbooks.com. 7 p.m. : “A Civ i l War Christmas,” virtual presentation by historical reenactor Michael Jesberger, sponsored by Mercer County Library System. Register by emailing hopeprogs @ mcl. org. Friday, December 3 4:30 p.m.: “The Coffin Ship: Life and Death at Sea during the Great Famine.” Lecture by Cian T. McMahon, presented by Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts. Online, free, registration required. Princeton. zoom.us. 7 p.m.: “Prelude to a Carol: Dickens Creates a Christmas Classic,” at Kingston Presbyterian Church, 4565 Route 27, Kingston. Oneperson show where Charles Dickens tells the behind-thescenes tale of creating A Christmas Carol. HistoricExperience.com/Prelude. 7:30 p.m.: Princeton University Orchestra conducted

by Michael Pratt performs at Richardson Auditorium. The program includes Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 2 in E Minor, and selections from David Del Tredici’s Final Alice, with soprano Alison Spann ’20. Free. Music. princeton.edu. Saturday, December 4 12-2 p.m.: Courtney’s Carolers serenade shoppers on Palmer Square, and Santa strolls. Palmersquare.com. 12-3 p.m.: Unveiling of 29 plaques on the Heritage Tour in the WitherspoonJackson historic district. Each plaque will be unveiled and discussed during an outdoor walk. Free. Meet at Hinds Plaza outside Princeton Public Library to begin the tour. A reception will be held following the tour at Studio Hillier, 190 Witherspoon Street. Princetonwjhcs.org. 12-5 p.m.: The Mill Hill H ol i d ay S t r ol l, r a i n or shine, in Trenton’s Mill Hill neighborhood. View special decorations through front windows or on the sidewalks and gardens. Music, refreshments. Begin at Artworks, 119 Everet t A lley. $20. TrentonMillHill.org. 4 p.m.: Sensory-friendly performance of Roxey Ballet’s The Nutcracker, at Eagle Fire Hall, 46 North Sugan Road, New Hope, Pa. Roxeyballet.org. 5-7 p.m.: Santa Drive-Thru, at Kingston Volunteer Fire Company, 8 Heathcote Road, Kingston. Santa, Mrs.

Available for Lunch & Dinner Mmm..Take-Out 41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton www.tortugasmv.com

Events • Parties • Catering (609) 924-5143

Claus, and firefighters will be on hand. Donation of a non-perishable food item is encouraged for local food banks. Register at ( 609 ) 681-6792 or email EFrederick@harborchase.com. 7 p.m.: Princeton Boychoir’s fall concert, “Sing for Joy!” streams at Westrickmusic.org. $15. Program r a n g e s f rom H a n d el to Broadway. 7-11:30 p.m.: Salsa Sensation dance presented by Central Jersey Dance Society at Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. No partner needed. Proof of vaccination required. $10$15. Centraljerseydance. org. Sunday, December 5 12-2 p.m. : Har monics Quartet performs at Palmer Square, while Santa strolls. Palmersquare.com. 1 p.m.: Sensory-friendly performance of Roxey Ballet’s The Nutcracker, at Eagle Fire Hall, 46 North Sugan Road, New Hope, Pa. Roxeyballet.org. 1 p.m.: Holiday Carillon Bell Music, presented by Princeton University outside the Cleveland Tower, Graduate College. Free. 2-3:30 p.m.: Free Zoom webinar sponsored by the Coalition for Peace Action, w it h A mbassador S eyed Hossein Mousavian, former spokesperson for Iran’s nuclear negotiating team. Free. Pre-registration required. Peacecoalition.org. 3 p.m.: Princeton Boychoir’s fall concert, “Sing for Joy!” streams at Westrickmusic.org. $15. Program r a n g e s f rom H a n d el to Broadway. 3 p.m.: Princeton University Orchestra conducted

DECEMBER

by Michael Pratt performs at Richardson Auditorium. The program includes Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 2 in E Minor, and selections from David Del Tredici’s Final Alice, with soprano Alison Spann ’20. Free. Music. princeton.edu. 4 p.m.: The Capital Philharmonic performs holiday favorites at Patriots Theater at the War Memorial, Trenton. Capitalphilharmonic.org. 4 p.m.: Annual Menorah Lighting on the Nassau Inn patio, 10 Palmer Square. Music and celebrating, open to all. Palmersquare.com. 5-7 p.m.: Holiday Jam and Toy Drive at Palmer Square, w ith performances by Princeton University students. Palmersquare.com. Monday, December 6 Recycling 7 p.m.: “Jersey Jokers,” presented by the Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Theater at Princeton University’s Wallace Theater in the Lewis Arts complex. Free. Students of Maysoon Zayid take their final exam live. Registration required. Arts.princeton.edu. Tuesday, December 7 3 p.m.: “Mindfulness and Holiday Stress,” Zoom event with Carolyn Schindewolf of Penn Medicine Princeton Health Community Wellness. Presented by Mercer Cou nt y L ibrar y System. Email hopeprogs @msl.org to register. 5 p.m.: Fall Student Reading, presented by Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts program in Creative Writing, at Chancellor Green Rotunda on the campus. Free. Registration required. Arts.princeton.edu.

James Madison Program Initiative on Politics and Statesmanship An America’s Founding and Future Lecture

Robert E. ̃A Life ̃ Thursday December 2, 2021 4:30 p.m. James Stewart Film Theater 185 Nassau Street

Free and open to the public

jmp.princeton.edu/events

ALLEN C. GUELZO

Director of the James Madison Program Initiative on Politics and Statesmanship and Senior Research Scholar in the Council of the Humanities

JAMES M. MCPHERSON

George Henry David ’86 Professor Emeritus of History

At this event, Allen C. Guelzo, award-winning Civil War historian, will speak about his new book, Robert E. Lee: A Life. The New York Times praised the book as, “A deeply researched character study…Guelzo’s fine biography is an important contribution to reconciling the myths with the facts.”

7 p.m. : L L L P re s ent s Stephen Roberts and Jack Har t man discussing t he book Cokie — a Life Well Lived. Livestream event presented by Labyrinth Books. Labyrinthbooks.com. 7 p.m. : O p e n Hou s e, Princeton Fire Department, 363 Witherspoon Street. The department seeks candidates for the Class of 2022 volunteer training program. For residents aged 16 and o l d e r. P r i n c e to n nj.g ov / joinpfd. Wednesday, December 8 5-7 p.m.: Joint Effort Safe Streets hosts “Hot Topics” Zoom vir tual communit y meeting, including discussions with the last two Black Council members, Lance Liverman and Dwaine Williamson, and new Councilman Leighton Newlin. Several topics will be covered. To get the link, email John Bailey at johnbailey062@ gmail.com. 8 p.m.: The Chapel Choir of P r i n c e to n T h e o l o g i cal Seminary presents its “Carols of Many Nations” concert. Free outdoor event (weather permitting). Registration necessary. Ptsem. edu/events. Thursday, December 9 5:30 p.m.: Author conversation : “Picture Ecology: Art and Ecocriticism in Planetary Perspective,” pre s e nte d by P r i n ce ton University Art Museum online. Editor Karl Kusserow, curator John Wilmerding, and photographer/writer Subhankar Banerjee are on the panel. Free. Artmuseum. princeton.edu. 6 p.m.: “Quilting Through the Centuries: Women’s Life and History in America,” Zoom event with Hannah Gaston. Presented by Mercer County Library System. Email hopeprogs.mcl.org to register. Friday, December 10 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Hunterdon County Rug Artisans Guild monthly meeting, at Raritan Township Police Depar tment building, 2 Municipal Drive, Flemington. Hcrag. com. 6 p.m.: The Princeton Singers perform at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street. Christmas music and readings by candlelight. Princetonsingers.org. Saturday, December 11 12-2 p.m.: Princeton University’s Tiger Tones sing at Palmer Square, while Santa strolls the square. Palmersquare.com. 1 and 5 p.m.: American Repertory Ballet performs The Nutcracker at Patriots Theater at the War Memorial, Trenton. Arballet.org. Sunday, December 12 12-2 p.m. : Har monics Quartet performs at Palmer Square, while Santa strolls. Palmersquare.com. 1 p.m.: Reenactment of Washington Crossing the Delaware at Washington Crossing Park. With special activities and demonstrations from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $20 for family of four, or $8

for adults and $4 for kids 5-11 (free for younger ones). Visit WashingtonCrossingPark.org/cross-with-us for tickets. Monday, December 13 6 p.m . O p e n H o u s e , Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad, 2 Mount Lucas Road. Residents ages 16 and older are invited to meet the squad and learn how to become a volunteer emergency medical technician and help support the local Princeton community. Pfars. org/volunteer. 7 p.m.: “Christmas and the Winter Solstice,” program presented by Mercer County Library System via Zoom. Jef f Kampf from Lifelong Cognition is the speaker. Email hopeprogs@ mcl.org to register. Tuesday, December 14 9 a.m.- 9 p.m.: Virtual Shopping Day, Long Hill House Prints & Whimsy, Hillsborough. Choose gifts with help from staff, have them wrapped and ready for drive-through pickup. Longhillhouse.com. 7: 3 0 p.m . : P r i n c e to n Symphony Orchestra Holiday POPS! Concert at McCar ter T heatre, 91 University Place. Conducted by Rossen Milanov, with soprano Laquita Mitchell. $25 - $90. Pr incetonsy m phony.org. Wednesday, December 15 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meeting. Princetonlibrary. org. 7:30 p.m.: Westminster Community Orchestra of Westminster Conservatory presents “Holiday Chestnuts” at Robert L. Annis Playhou s e, We s t m i n s ter Choir College, Walnut Lane. Conducted by Ruth Ochs; m u s i c by L e roy A n d e r son, Tchaikovsky, Borodin, Vaughan Williams, others. $10 suggested donation. (609) 921-7104. Thursday, December 16 6:30 p.m.: Virtual discussion of the book The Exiles by Christine Baker Kline, led by University of Massachusetts professor Maria John. Sponsored by the Historical Society of Princeton and Princeton Public Library. Princetonhistory. org. Friday, December 17 8 p.m.: Voices Chorale NJ performs at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer S t re e t ; a ls o available to stream. Works based on the poetry of E.E. Cummings, Robert Frost, L angston Hughes, Emily Dickinson, and others; holiday music. $15-$25. Voiceschoralenj.org. Saturday, December 18 12-2 p.m.: Spiced Punch entertains at Palmer Square, while Santa strolls. Palmersquare.com. Sunday, December 19 12-2 p.m.: Spiced Punch entertains at Palmer Square, while Santa strolls. Palmersquare.com. Monday, December 20 Recycling


Health and Fitness

Call today for a

FREE CLASS! *some exclusions apply

William P. Boxer, MD, FACP

William P. Boxer, MD, FACP

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

D, FACP D,me orFACP mine Town Topics

William Boxer,your MD, FACP Direct primaryP. care......in home or mine Direct primary care......in your your home home or mineor mine Direct primary care......in Pennington, NJ • 609-293-3904 • www.DrBoxerAtHome.com Pennington, NJ • 609-293-3904 • www.DrBoxerAtHome.com

William P. Boxer,• MD, FACP Pennington, NJ • 609-293-3904 www.DrBoxerAtHome.co Direct primary care......in your home or mine Pennington, NJ • 609-293-3904 • www.DrBoxerAtHome.com

Barre • Zumba Les Mills • Yoga Strength • Cardio Personal Training Nutrition Coaching

William P. Boxer, MD, FACP William P.care......in Boxer, FACP Direct primary yourMD, home or mine

BoxerAtHome.com pme today! or mine BoxerAtHome.com Town Topics Readers’ Choice Award Winner: Best New Business Best Gym • Best Yoga Best Trainer: Marci

6 0 9 -3 5 6 - 0 4 3 2

WWW.INMOT IONF W.CO M

William P. Boxer, MD, FACP William P.P. Boxer, MD, FACP William P. Boxer, MD, FACP Direct primary care......in your home or mine William Boxer, MD, FACP

Pennington, NJ • 609-293-3904 • –www.DrBoxerAtHome.com Limited availability signhome up today! Direct primary care......in your or mine Pennington, NJ • 609-293-3904 • www.DrBoxerAtHome.com

William P. Boxer, MD, FACP

William P.care......in Boxer, FACP Pennington, NJ • 609-293-3904 •MD, Direct primary your home or mine Direct primary care......in your home or mine Limited availability –www.DrBoxerAtHome.com sign up today! Direct primary care......in your home or mine Pennington, NJ • 609-293-3904 ••–www.DrBoxerAtHome.com Limited availability sign uphome today! Direct primary care......in your home ortoday! mine Pennington, • 609-293-3904 •sign www.DrBoxerAtHome.com Pennington, NJ •NJ 609-293-3904 Limited availability –www.DrBoxerAtHome.com up Direct primary care......in your or mine Pennington, NJ • 609-293-3904 • www.DrBoxerAtHome.com Pennington, NJ • 609-293-3904 • www.DrBoxerAtHome.com

“CONSCIOUS EATING” & “ECO FRIENDLY” Flatbreads, Tacos, Salads, Our Famous Street Spuds, Chili, Fresh Juices, and Teas. Catering Available’ Flatbreads, Tacos, Salads, Paninis,Teas and Catering

The Trenton Farmers Market Call 609-955-1120 TO ORDER 960 Spruce Street Lawrence Township, New Jersey www.ladyandtheshallot.com Wed: 11-2 • Thurs and Fri: 11-4 Sat 10-4 • Sunday 10-2

The Trenton Farmers Market 960 Spruce Street Lawrence Twp, NJ Now Open Sunday for Brunch ladyandtheshallot.com Wed-Fri 11-3 • Saturday 10-3 • Sunday 10-2


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 24

Town Topics

Holiday Magic

The BEST

AMERICAN REPERTORY BALLET presents

GIFT EVER! Learn to Fly at the Princeton Flying School

December 11

Patriots Theater at the War Memorial

Trenton

December 17-19 State Theatre New Jersey

Family Owned and Operated

New Brunswick FLESCH’S ROOFING INTRODUCTORY FLIGHT $199 Family Owned and Operated

Sheet Metal Get Your& Gift Certificate at Family Owned andCo., Operated Inc FLESCH’S ROOFING FLESCH’S Serving the Princeton community forROOFING over 25 years www.princetonairport.com FLESCH’S ROOFING & Sheet Metal Co., Inc INSTITUTIONAL • HISTORICAL WORK Family Owned and Operated &• RESIDENTIAL Sheet Metal Co., Inc Tickets: Serving the Princeton community for 25 years & Sheet Metal Co., Inc

FLESCH’S ROOFING ARBALLET.ORG We specialize in FLESCH’S ROOFING & Sheet Metal Co., Inc FLESCH’S ROOFING FLESCH’S ROOFING FLESCH’S ROOFING & Sheet Metal Inc WeCo., specialize in & Sheet Metal Co., Inc FLESCH’S ROOFING FLESCH’S ROOFING FLESCH’S ROOFING & Sheet Metal Co., Inc & Sheet Metal Co., Inc FLESCH’S ROOFING FLESCH’S Serving the Princeton community for overProudly 25 years Serving the Montgomery and Princeton Area for Over 36 Years! Slate ✧ROOFING Copper ✧ Rubber FLESCH’S ROOFING FLESCH’S ROOFING FLESCH’S ROOFING FLESCH’S ROOFING & Sheet Metal Co., Inc

Princeton Airport, 41 Airpark Road, ServingOwned the Princeton community for over 25 years Family Operated Family Owned and and Operated INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK Princeton, New Jersey 08540 Serving the Princeton community for over 25 years INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK Family Owned Family and Operated 609-921-3100 Owned and Operated INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK Proudly Serving the Montgomery and Princeton Area for 39N@princetonairport.com Family Owned and Operated Family Owned and Operated PRINCETON Family Owned and Operated Slate ✧ Copper ✧ Rubber www.princetonairport.com AIRPORT Serving the Princeton community for over 25Family years Owned and Operated Family Owned and Operated FamilyOwned Owned and Operated Family and Operated Proudly Serving thethe Montgomery and Princeton Area for Over Years! ✧ Metal Cedar Roofing Shingles TUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • the HISTORICAL WORK Serving Princeton community for over 25and years Proudly Serving Montgomery and Princeton Area for36Over 36 Ye

Family Owned and Operated & Sheet Metal Co., INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL •over HISTORICAL WORK Serving the Princeton community for 25 years Serving the Princeton community for over 25Inc years Family Owned Operated & Sheet Metal Co., Inc FLESCH’S ROOFING & Sheet Metal Co., Inc INSTITUTIONAL •Co., RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK Family Owned and and Operated & Sheet Metal Co., Inc & Sheet Metal Inc FLESCH’S ROOFING Family Owned and Operated ✧ Metal and Cedar Roofing Shingles Serving the Princeton community for over 25the Serving the Princeton community for 25years years & Sheet Metal Co., Inc INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK & Sheet Metal Co., Inc & Sheet Metal Co., Inc INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK Serving Princeton community for over 25 years Serving the Princeton community for 25 years FLESCH’S ROOFING & Sheet Metal Co., Inc Serving the Princeton community for over 25 years Serving the Princeton community for over 25 years specialize in INSTITUTIONAL •We RESIDENTIAL • for HISTORICAL WORK Serving the community 35 years Serving thePrinceton Princeton community 25 years INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK & Sheet Metal Co., Inc FLESCH’S ROOFING Serving the Princeton community forfor over 2525 years INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • for HISTORICAL WORK FLESCH’S ROOFING Serving the Princeton community years FLESCH’S ROOFING INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL •over HISTORICAL WORK INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK FLESCH’S ROOFING & Sheet Metal Co., Inc Serving the Princeton community for over 25 years INSTITUTIONALFamily • INSTITUTIONAL RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK Owned and Operated • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK We specialize in Serving the Princeton community for over 25 years Family Owned and Operated Family Owned and Operated INSTITUTIONAL •Rubber RESIDENTIAL • •HISTORICAL WORK INSTITUTIONAL •for RESIDENTIAL HISTORICAL WORK &Metal Sheet Metal Co., Inc Slate ✧ Copper ✧Owned & Sheet Metal Co., Inc Serving the Princeton community over 25We years specialize in Family and Operated INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK & Sheet Co., Inc THANK FOR VOTING US community BEST ROOFING COMPANY We specialize We in THANK YOUROOFING FORYOU VOTING COMPANY THREE YEARS YOU FOR VOTING US BEST ROOFING COMPANY FOUR YEARS IN A ROW BEST COMPANY TWO YEARS INin Aspecialize ROW Family Owned and Operated INSTITUTIONAL RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK &THANK Sheet Metal Co., Serving the Princeton over 25community years Serving the•for Princeton for 25 years INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • Inc HISTORICAL WORK Family Owned and Operated Slate ✧ Copper ✧ Rubber We specialize in FLESCH’S ROOFING ✧ Metal and Cedar Roofing Shingles Serving the Princeton community for over 25 years Slate ✧ Copper ✧ Rubber FLESCH’S ROOFING specialize in FLESCH’S ROOFING FLESCH’S ROOFING ✧We Copper ✧ Rubber • Fresh Serving the Princeton community over 25 years FLESCH’S ROOFING Family Owned andfor Operated We in Roofing cut Pennsylvania grown fraser Slate Copper ✧Slate Rubber Family Owned andspecialize Operated We specialize in Family Owned and✧ Operated Slate Copper Rubber & Sheet Metal Co., Inc Family Owned and Operated FLESCH’S ROOFING ✧ Metal and Cedar Shingles We also do We also do TUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK We specialize in Proudly Serving the Montgomery and Princeton Area for Over 36 Years! & Sheet Metal Co., Inc FLESCH’S ROOFING & Sheet Metal Co., Inc ✧ Metal and Cedar Roofing Shingles and douglas firgrown - up tofraser 12’ TUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK ✧ Metal and Roofing Shingles • Cedar Fresh cut Pennsylvania grown fraser • Inc Fresh cut Pennsylvania grown fraser & Sheet Metal Co., Inc Family Owned and Operated Slate ✧ Copper ✧ Rubber & Sheet Metal Co., FLESCH’S ROOFING • Fresh cut Pennsylvania We also do Metal and Cedar Roofing Shingles Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Family Owned and Operated Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Slate ✧ Copper ✧ Rubber Slate ✧ Copper ✧ Rubber We specialize in ✧Copper Metal and Cedar Roofing Shingles FLESCH’S ROOFING FLESCH’S ROOFING FLESCH’S ROOFING & Sheet Metal Co., Inc Family Owned and Operated and douglas - up to12’ 12’ Serving the Princeton community over 25 years Serving the community for 25 Slate ✧ ✧ Rubber and douglas fir fir -firup FLESCH’S ROOFING FLESCH’S & Sheet Metal Co., Inc Family Owned and Operated Serving the Princeton community forROOFING over Gutter 25 years Serving the Princeton Princeton community for over over 25 years yearsfor and douglas - to up to 12’ & Sheet Metal Co., Inc • Daily fresh cut winter berry & work and Roof Maintenance FLESCH’S ROOFING Family Owned and Operated ✧ Metal and Cedar Roofing Shingles Serving the Princeton community for over 25 years Slate ✧ Copper & Sheet Metal Co., Inc & Sheet Metal Co., Inc INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK • Daily fresh cut winter berry & & Sheet Metal Co., Inc INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK ✧ Metal and Cedar Roofing Shingles FLESCH’S ROOFING We specialize in ✧ Metal and Cedar Roofing Shingles Family Owned and Operated ✧ Metal and Cedar Roofing Shingles Serving the Princeton community for over 25 years FLESCH’S ROOFING • Daily fresh cut winter berry & & Sheet Metal Co., Inc INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK Serving the community forROOFING over years Metal & Sheet Co., Inc INSTITUTIONAL • Princeton RESIDENTIAL • 25 HISTORICAL WORK American holly • Daily fresh cut winter berry & FLESCH’S We specialize in Serving the community for over 25years years American holly Serving thePrinceton Princeton community forSlate 25 INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL •Rubber HISTORICAL WORK MAKE SURE YOUR ROOF & Sheet Metal Co., Inc We specialize in FLESCH’S ROOFING ✧ Copper Serving the Princeton community for over 25 years FLESCH’S ROOFING ✧ Shingles Fully Insured American holly Serving the Princeton community for 25 years INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK & Sheet Metal Co., Inc & Sheet Metal Co., Inc Fully Insured FLESCH’S ROOFING Serving the Princeton community for over 25 years FLESCH’S ROOFING American holly INSTITUTIONAL RESIDENTIAL ••HISTORICAL WORK INSTITUTIONAL • •RESIDENTIAL HISTORICAL WORK for over 25 years &Sheet Metal Co., Inc Serving the community INSTITUTIONAL •Sheet RESIDENTIAL •ESTIMATES HISTORICAL WORK Rubber ✧Inc Shingles •years All natural wreaths filled wreaths filled • Allhandmade handmade INSTITUTIONAL •forCedar RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK & Metal Co., Slate ✧ Copper ✧Princeton Rubber & Sheet Metal Co., Inc Metal and Roofing FREE • QUALITY SERVICE •natural REPAIR WORK Serving the Princeton community over 25 years Serving the Princeton community for over 25 IS READY FOR SANTA! INSTITUTIONAL •forRESIDENTIAL • •HISTORICAL WORK Sheet Metal Co., Inc Slate ✧ Copper ✧and Rubber & Sheet Metal Co., Inc All natural handmade wreaths filledfilled Serving the Princeton community over 25 Roofing years THANK YOU& FOR VOTING US BEST ROOFING COMPANY We specialize in We specialize in BEST ROOFING COMPANY TWO YEARS IN A ROW Metal Cedar • All natural handmade wreaths with berries INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK Serving the Princeton community for over 25 years Fully Insured Serving the community for 25 years THANK YOU FOR VOTING US community BEST ROOFING COMPANY specialize We in berrieswith BEST ROOFING COMPANY TWO YEARS INin Aspecialize ROW berries INSTITUTIONAL •We RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL INSTITUTIONAL •Princeton RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK Serving the Princeton for over 25in years the Princeton community forRoofing 25 WORK years with INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK We specialize in WeServing specialize 609-394-2427 ✧ Metal and Cedar Shingles

Family Owned and Operated

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US BEST ROOFING COMPANY TWO YEARS IN A ROW

INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK ✧ ✧ Serving the Princeton community for 25 years

INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US BEST ROOFING COMPANY TWO YEARS IN A ROW THANK YOU FOR VOTING US BEST ROOFING COMPANY TWO YEARS IN A ROW LIC#13VH02047300 INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL HISTORICAL WORK We •We also do berries We also do We also do ✧ also do Slate Copper ✧ Rubber ✧ We also do •with Beautiful poinsettias in all sizes INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL HISTORICAL WORK INSTITUTIONAL ••RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK ✧ ✧ Slate ✧ Copper ✧ Rubber We also We also docut We also do Slate✧ ✧ Copper ✧Gutter Rubber & Sheet Metal Inc work and Roof Maintenance INSTITUTIONAL •Gutter RESIDENTIAL •Co., HISTORICAL WORK work and Roof Maintenance Gutter work and ✧do Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Gutter work and •also Beautiful poinsettias in allin sizesfraser We do •Beautiful Fresh Pennsylvania grown Slate & ✧ Copper ✧ Rubber Sheet Metal Co., Inc • poinsettias We also do ServingGutter the Princeton community for 25 years • Ornaments, lights, & allMaintenance theall sizes ✧ Metal and Cedar Roofing Roof Maintenance Shingles work and Roof Maintenance Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Gutter work and Roof Roof Maintenance Serving the Princeton community for 25 years ✧ and✧work Cedar Roofing and douglas fir - up Maintenance to• 12’ ✧ Metal andShingles Cedar Roofing Shingles Gutter and Roof FREE ESTIMATES • Metal QUALITY SERVICE REPAIR WORK ✧ trimmings for your holiday needs • Ornaments, lights, & all the Metal and Roofing Shingles work and Roof Maintenance INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL Slate ✧✧✧ Copper ✧Cedar Rubber Fully Insured ✧WORK Gutter ✧ ✧

We also do Roofing FLESCH’S ROOFING We specialize inCedar Metal and Shingles FLESCH’S ROOFING Slate Copper Rubber We specialize in We also do • Beautiful poinsettias in all sizes SlateWe Copper Rubber work and Roof Maintenance Slate ✧Gutter Copper We specialize in We also do specialize in Wedo also do We also We specialize in We also do We also do Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Gutter and Roof Maintenance Slate Copper Rubber We specialize in Metal and Cedar Roofing Shingles Rubber ✧ Shingles We also do •work Ornaments, lights, & all the Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Slate Copper Rubber We specialize in Metal and Cedar Roofing Shingles Gutter work and Roof Maintenance • Ornaments, lights, & all the INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK Slate ✧ Copper ✧ Rubber Fully Insured Gutter work and Fully Insured Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Fully Insured • Daily fresh cut winter berry & trimmings for your holiday needs Metal and Slate ✧ Copper trimmings for your holiday needs Gutter work and Maintenance trimmings for yourRoof holiday needs ✧ Metal and Cedar Shingles Fully 609-394-2427 FREE ESTIMATESFREE •Shingles QUALITY SERVICE • Cedar REPAIR WORK We specialize in SERVICE LIC#13VH02047300 ✧Insured Metal and Roofing ESTIMATES •Copper QUALITY Slate ✧Insured Fully Insured American holly Roofing Roof Maintenance ✧ Metal and Cedar Roofing Shingles We specialize in ✧ Metal and Cedar Roofing Shingles Fully Insured Fully Fully Insured REPAIR WORK 609.924.6767 Cedar Roofing Slate ✧ Copper Rubber Shingles FREE ESTIMATESFREE • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK 609-394-2427 Fully Insured ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE Fully Insured Slate✧ ✧ Copper Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK Rubber ✧ Shingles Fully Insured • All natural handmade wreaths filled Fully Insured Fully Insured Rubber ✧WORK Shingles 609.924.6767 609-394-2427 Sunday 9am - 4pm Fully Insured Fully SERVICE Insured REPAIR Metal and Cedar Roofing FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY WORK 609.924.6767 Rubber ✧ Shingles with berries•• REPAIR 609-394-2427 Metal and Cedar Roofing LIC#13VH02047300 FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE REPAIR WORK We specialize in Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm 609 609-394-2427 and Cedar Roofing• REPAIR FREE ESTIMATES • Metal QUALITY SERVICE WORK Fully Insured Mon-Sat 9amMon-Sa - 5:30p FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE REPAIR Metal •and Cedar WORK Roofing Sunday 9am - 4pm Fully Insured Route 27, Princeton We specialize in Sunday 9am - 4pm • Beautiful poinsettias in all sizes 609-394-2427 LIC#13VH02047300 We also do 609-394-2427 We also do Slate ✧ Copper We also do We specialize in We also do 2 miles north of Kingston also do Sund 609-394-2427 We also do LIC#13VH02047300 We also do609-394-2427 WeWe also do We also do We also do We also do We also do We also do We also do We also do We also do Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Gutter work and We also do 609-394-2427 Route 27, Princeton Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Gutter work and FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK Slate ✧ Copper FREE ESTIMATES •Rubber QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK • Ornaments, lights, & all the We also do ✧ Shingles We also do We also do We also do Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Route 27, Princet Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Gutter work and Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Gutter work and Slate ✧ Copper Roof Maintenance We also do 2 miles north of Kingston Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Gutter work and Landscape Design & Installation Roof Maintenance trimmings for your holiday needs Roof Maintenance 2 miles northRoute of Kings We also do We also do Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Gutter work and Roof Maintenance FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK Gutter work work and Roof Gutter andMaintenance Roof• Maintenance Metal and Roof Maintenance Rubber ✧ Shingles We also do 609-394-2427 Gutter work and Roof Maintenance LIC#13VH02047300 FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE REPAIR WORK Fully Insured 609-394-2427 2 miles n LIC#13VH02047300 Rubber ✧ Shingles Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Roof Maintenance Fully Insured Fully Insured Gutter work and Fully Insured Gutter work andLandscape Roof Maintenance Cedar Roofing Fully Insured Fully Insured Gutter FREE workESTIMATES and Metal and Fully Insured Design & Installation Fully Insured Fully Insured 609-394-2427 • Metal QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK LIC#13VH02047300 and FREE ESTIMATES • Insured QUALITY SERVICE Landscape Design & Installation Fully 609.924.6767 Roof Maintenance Fully Insured 609-394-2427 FREE ESTIMATESFREE • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK LIC#13VH02047300 Fully Insured ESTIMATES • Insured QUALITY SERVICE Fully Insured Fully Insured Fully Fully Insured Roof Maintenance REPAIR WORK Cedar Roofing Fully Insured Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm Fully Insured FREE ESTIMATESFREE • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK Fully Insured 609-394-2427 Landscape Design & Installation REPAIR WORK Cedar Roofing ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE 609.924.6767 ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK FREE ESTIMATES •FREE QUALITY • REPAIR WORK Sunday 9am - 4pm 609-394-2427 FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • SERVICE REPAIR WORK FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE Fully Insured FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK 609-394-2427 Fully Fully Insured REPAIR WORK Fully Insured Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm • Sunday 9am - 4pm 609-394-2427 Fully Insured Insured Fully Insured REPAIR WORK 609-394-2427 LIC#13VH02047300 We specialize in 609-394-2427 609-394-2427 Route 27, Princeton FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK 609-394-2427 LIC#13VH02047300 We specialize in FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK 609-394-2427 FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK Route 27, Princeton; 2 miles north of2 Kingston miles north of Kingston LIC#13VH02047300

LIC#13VH02047300

LIC#13VH02047300

LIC#13VH02047300

LIC#13VH02047300

LIC#13VH02047300

LIC#13VH02047300 LIC#13VH02047300

LIC#13VH02047300 LIC#13VH02047300

609-394-2427

LIC#13VH02047300 LIC#13VH02047300

LIC#13VH02047300

609-394-2427 609-394-2427 Slate ✧ Copper 609-394-2427 We also do 609-394-2427 FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE REPAIR FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK •Landscape 609-394-2427 Rubber ✧ We also do DesignWORK & Installation FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE WORK FREE ESTIMATES •Rubber QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK • REPAIR ✧ Shingles Shingles FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK LIC#13VH02047300 LIC#13VH02047300

Gutter work and Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Roof Maintenance

Slate ✧ Copper

LIC#13VH02047300 LIC#13VH02047300

LIC#13VH02047300 LIC#13VH02047300

Metal 609-394-2427 Metal and and 609-394-2427 609-394-2427 609-394-2427 Cedar Roofing Cedar Roofing

LIC#13VH02047300 LIC#13VH02047300

LIC#13VH02047300 LIC#13VH02047300


A

Colonial-era inn still fulfilling its purpose: s e r v i n g c u s to m e r s high quality dinners, celebrating weddings, hosting banquets — and more. This is a rarity today, and all the more reason for it to be acknowledged and commemorated. With changing tastes and customs, and altered communit y st yles and landscapes, changes come along quickly, almost before we know it. The Cranbury Inn,

IT’S NEW To Us

located at 21 Main Street in Cranbury, has stood the test of time, and continues to offer its customers the highest standards of service and cuisine. Its history is a story in itself. In the mid-18th century, taverns were built in the Cranbury area to meet the needs of travelers passing through the region, often on their way from New York to Philadelphia, or in the opposite direction. What is now The Cranbury Inn has been functioning as a place to eat and drink since at least 1750. “Five to a Bed” During its early history, the Inn served as an overnight stop for travelers, although with the stipulation “no more than five to a bed,” points out Gay Ingegneri, who with her husband Tom, has owned the Inn since 1992. In fact, its history permeates the Inn, from its physical structure to the display of Colonial era “long guns” on the walls, to vintage spinning wheels and an 1890s cash register in the lobby to large murals of Colonial stage coaches, rendered by painters during the WPA work projects program during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Four or iginal wagon wheels have been fash ioned into ceiling lights in the original 1750s section of the Inn, and on a wintry evening, an enclosed fireplace in the lounge evokes memories of Colonial travelers sitting in the same location more than 270 years ago. It has also been said of the Inn that, from time to time, it has been haunted by friendly spirits. The Inn has been the focus of renovation and additions over the years, reports Tom Ingegneri. “Our oldest original tavern was built in the 1750s, and our other original tavern was built in 1765. The innkeeper’s house was built across the front of these two original taverns in 1800. The main dining room was built around 1932, and various changes to the kitchen area occurred in the 1900s.” In 1903, fire destroyed the Inn’s “big barn,” and during their tenure the Ingegneris decided to build a spacious new barn, known as “The Legacy,” which was completed in 2006. “O u r n e w b a r n i s a n 18th century-style timber f rame, seven - bay D utch

barn,” explains Gay. “It is a 3,200-square-foot, 200plus seating dining room, used for a la carte dining and special occasions, such weddings and banquets.” Cranberry Towne Now that this project has been completed, The Cranbury Inn seats 400, with several dining rooms, including one small private enclave, just for two, suitable for celebrating a special moment, such as an engagement or anniversary. As an important site during the Revolutionary War, the Inn continued to serve food, drink, and lodging to customers, including possibly George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the Marquis de Lafayette, all of whom were in Cranbury, then known as Cranberry Towne, with their troops. The Inn’s historic role continued before and during the Civil War, when it was said to be a stop on the Underground Railroad. “A converted flue space in the oldest section of the Inn is allegedly a runaway slave hiding place,” explains Gay. The Inn has been host to many famous people over the years, including international visitors such as Madame Chiang Kai-shek and her full entourage, the Prince and Princess of the Netherlands, and the entire City Council of Moscow. And, adds Gay, its famous Princeton neighbor Albert Einstein often enjoyed a visit to the Inn to drink beer and speak German with his friend and then-innkeeper Adrian van Ravesteyn. In 1994, Paramount Pictures featured scenes of the interior and exterior of the Inn in the movie I.Q., and actors, including Walter Matthau and Meg Ryan, and the film crew were at the Inn several days. Justice of the Peace Unique in so many ways, the Inn is also unusual in that it has its own liquor store, observes Gay. “The location of the liquor store once served as the telegraph office and also the office of the justice of the peace. Since Prohibition, it has been the liquor store and the Cranbury Inn’s wine cellar. “In 1919, Judge Joseph Thomas Wincklhofer bought the Inn, and he was the last justice of the peace and the last innkeeper to live at the Inn. As justice of the peace, he held court every Tuesday evening in what is now the Lafayette Tavern Room (the Taproom), and he performed many weddings in front of the fireplace while his wife played the piano. The Wincklhofers’ living room is now the main historic lobby of the Inn. “The tradition of wedding ceremonies being performed at the Cranbury Inn in front of the fireplace continues to this day. Generations of people in Cranbury have been married at the Inn, and in fact, we have had four weddings of grown children whose parents were married here too.” Over the Inn’s 270-plus histor y, there have been many owners of the establishment. When Tom and Gay Ignegneri purchased the Inn, it was a new adventure

for them. Each had had previous careers: Tom in business in New York City, and Gay as a nurse. And in addition, they were parents of four children. When they initially came to Cranbury, Gay ran the Cranbury Market for several years. When the opportunity arose to become the Inn’s innkeepers, they were ready to take on this new challenge. “I said this would be the first time in my life that I’d get to see my husband in the daytime,” says Gay. “I thought it was time for us to be together. It really has been a surprise how I fell in love with this place. I wasn’t expecting to fall in love with it, but I did!” 47 Years “I enjoy everything about it,” she continues. “I love being with all the people — our staff and the customers. Many of the customers are regulars and have become friends. And we have a wonderful, capable staff, including our excellent chef and kitchen staff, and one of our servers has been here 47 years! “It really is about the people. We have customers from all over the area, including many from Princeton, of course, and others travel long distances to be with us. We are always extremely busy over the holidays, and in addition to regular dining, we have many groups and private parties. We also do a lot of banquets, weddings, bar mitzvahs, and other occasions for large groups to gather.” As it has for ever yone and everything, COVID-19 presented a problem for the Inn’s business, but now signs of improvement are evident. “We follow all the rules and safety precautions,” notes Gay, “and all our staff wear masks. We are encouraged and hope for better times after everything that people have been through. I also look forward to adding more staff, so that we can once again be open seven days for lunch and dinner.” C u r r e n t l y, t h e I n n i s open for dinner 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, and for Sunday brunch 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and Sunday dinner 2 to 8 p.m. The Inn has always been noted for its fine dining, emphasizing quality within a reasonable price range. “Our food is cooked to order, with the freshest ingredients, special recipes, including my mom’s cranberry relish, and everything is locally sourced, when possible,” points out Gay. “We have the highest quality filet mignon, which is a signature dish. It is extremely popular, and so is our meatloaf, made with top sirloin. It is real comfort food! “Seafood is always popular with customers, and our burgers, also made with top sirloin, are favorites too.” All the Trimmings Among the Inn’s other popular entrees are grilled herb-marinated breast of chicken, chicken artichoke sauté, roast turkey with all the trimmings, sea scallops, pan -seared salmon, and roasted duckling. Appetizers include potato

IN THE MIDST OF HISTORY: Shown is the historic Colonial era Cranbury Inn. As owners and innkeepers Tom and Gay Ingegneri point out, “The Inn is really its own entity, with a history and stories to tell. We are just its stewards. It is a joy to own such an historic, well-loved entity. We think of it as a home away from home for our guests, and we are proud to be its stewards. We especially love to see the young people and students visit and become interested in its history.” pancakes, jumbo shrimp cocktail, Cranbury Inn crab cakes, and soup du jour, including three-cheese onion soup. The Inn is noted for its delicious hearty soups. Desserts top off the dinner, and whether it is New York cheesecake, apple pie, carrot or chocolate cake, or ice cream, it is guaranteed to please the palate. The Inn’s Sunday brunch has many fans, drawing diners from all over the area. Its buffet-style brunch table offers a mix of hot and cold breakfast and dinner foods, and champagne, orange juice, coffee, and tea (hot or ice) are all available. Among its features are an omelet station, eggs Benedict, Belgian waffles, bacon and sausage, corned beef hash, and Danish, scones, muffins, and bagels, including lox and cream cheese.

Complete Selection The carving station offers prime rib, beef tenderloin, baked ham, and turkey. Chafing dish choices feature hot chicken, fish, and pasta selections. A dessert table includes pies, cakes, cookies, puddings, and seasonal fruit. The Inn has a complete selection of wine, beer, and spirits to accompany every meal. Prices cover a range, with appetizers from $3.50, salads $7.50 and up, entrees beginning at $19 (hamburgers are $12 and up), and desserts from $4.50. The complete Sunday brunch is $35. Though the Inn is up to-date and modern in all its accoutrements and accommodations, including its handicapped-accessible bathrooms, at the same time its warm, welcoming ambiance, attractive decor, with

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

Fine Dining, Friendly Service and History All Come Together at The Cranbury Inn

each room capturing a feeling of history, gone now but not forgotten, make this a special place in every way. heir association with the Inn continues to be an ongoing pleasure for the Ingegneris. They reflect on their years at the Inn, commenting, “Over The Cranbury Inn’s 270-plus history, there have been many owners of this establishment. As the current owners, we realize that our time here is only a small segment in the life of The Cranbury Inn, past, present, and future. We realize that we are the stewards of the Inn, and that The Cranbury Inn really belongs to ‘the people.’” Re s e r v at i on s a r e r e c om m e nde d. For f u r t h er i n for m at i on, c a l l ( 609 ) 655 -5595. Website : thecranburyinn.com. —Jean Stratton

T

END OF YEAR SALE


Benefiting From Rigorous Regular Season Slate, PU Men’s Water Polo Tops Fordham in NCAA Opener

T

he Princeton University men’s water polo team had some options when it set up its schedule this year. The Tigers could have looked at their less experienced roster after a year off from competition and scheduled to build momentum against East Coast teams. Instead, they challenged themselves from the get-go against a parade of talented West Coast squads and the resulting reward is a trip to the second opening-round game of the NCAA tournament. “To me, it was worth the risk,” said Princeton head coach Dustin Litvak. “Otherwise we’d end up playing the same teams we always play every weekend. If that was going to be the reality, it was almost going to be better that we’d end up just practicing. If we ended up getting a ‘no’ on our two California trips, I was fine with just practicing through those weekends. Thankfully it worked out and we were able to go out there and play a lot of great teams at a lot of great pools.” L a s t S a t u r d a y, t h i n g s worked out very well for the Tigers as 10th-ranked Princeton pulled away from 16thranked Fordham for a 17-8 win in the first openinground game of the NCAAs. It is the program’s first NCAA

win since 2011. The Tigers will play at No. 1 UCLA in the second opening-round game of the NCAA tournament Thursday. “We want to compete and we want to play with confidence,” said Litvak. “If we do that, we give ourselves a chance.” Princeton has built confidence after facing a rigorous regular season schedule. The Tigers played Cal twice, took on Stanford, Pepperdine, San Jose State, Pacific, UC Irvine, California Baptist, and Loyola Marymount sprinkled in with East Coast top-20 teams like Bucknell, Harvard, St. Francis, and Navy. “There’s a reason that we had such an ambitious schedule – playing Cal twice, playing UOP, going out to California and playing LMU, Pepperdine and Irvine within 24 hours all at three different locations, San Jose State, and on and on,” said Litvak. “We played several top 10 teams this year – Stanford as well. It was to really prove to ourselves that we can compete with anyone. The only way to know that is to do it. We competed with Cal twice, we competed with San Jose State. There’s been maybe two games all year where we didn’t show up to play. I think for us, having that schedule to fall back

on, having played some of these teams, it’s not going to be the first time we see a highly ranked team. That’s important.” Princeton’s win over Fordham was its program record 26 th of the season against just seven losses. The Tigers also beat Fordham, 13-6, early in the season to finish off their own Princeton Invite. “This is a whole week to prepare for one team,” said Litvak. “I thought we had a good amount of film on them and were able to really dial in and focus on what they like to do and try to figure out how to stop some of their better players. I was really happy we were able to prevent No. 6 and No. 8 from scoring, two of their three leading scorers. That was something we talked about throughout the week and before the game so that was key.” Princeton also used its solid depth to stretch an early lead. The Tigers built a 4-1 lead after the first quarter and they maintained a threegoal edge at halftime. It was a 10-6 game before the Tigers scored five straight goals to close the third quarter. “We had opportunities before that,” said Litvak. “We were a little tight and forced some things early on and

I

’ L T IFE OU

SKI, SNOWBOARD GEAR & APPAREL September – March

LAWRENCEVILLE

years

ID

LIV

N

E

Your families winter source for quality brands, the best gifts & the hottest styles

SHREWSBURY

S

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 26

S ports

PREMIUM OUTDOOR FURNISHINGS April – August

PARAMUS

WAYNE

SKIBARN.COM

MAKING A SPLASH: Princeton University men’s water polo player Roko Pozaric fires the ball in a game earlier this season. Last Saturday, freshman star Pozaric scored four goals to help 19thranked Princeton defeat No. 16 Fordham 17-8 in the opening round of the NCAA tournament. The Tigers, now 26-7, will face No. UCLA on December 2 in Los Angeles in the second opening-round game of the tournament with the victor advancing to the semis on December 4. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) didn’t really give ourselves enough time to attack them appropriately and give them a chance to make a mistake where we could open things up. We were forcing things early. When we settled down a bit, that helped. And then they started to get tired and a few of their key players got in foul trouble and we were really able to open things up in transition and we knew if we could just keep going and going, it would eventually pay off.” In the matchup against UCLA, the Tigers will take on a team that has gotten hot at the right time. The Bruins come off winning the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation championship as the No. 3 seed. They are 19-3. “They’re obviously really talented, really disciplined, really well coached, and really deep,” said Litvak. “The biggest challenge for us is not to succumb to the nerves and give them too much credit. We have to have confidence.” Litvak served as an assistant at UCLA for the men’s and women’s water polo teams before moving to Princeton three years ago. “There’s nobody on this (UCLA) team that I coached or recruited because my last couple of years at UCLA were on the women’s side,” said Litvak. “But I’m obviously very familiar with the entire program and Adam (Wright) and the entire staff and the facility of course. We’re just happy to be playing. After going through an entire season apart and then having almost a brand new team to be honest, it’s been such a pleasure to coach these guys and go to work every day. I’m just excited to have another opportunity to work with them for another week.” Freshman star Roko Pozaric led the way for the Tigers against Fordham with four goals. Sophomore Pierce Maloney had three goals and junior Keller Maloney was one of three Tiger players with two goals apiece. The four-goal effort continued the strong debut collegiate season for

Pozaric, the Northeast Water Polo Conference Rookie of the Year. The lightningfast Croatian had 62 goals and 40 assists in the regular season. “None of that — his talent or speed — was a surprise,” said Litvak. “The biggest surprise is how quickly he adapted to our system. We play a completely different system than he’s used to in Croatia and from his team, and the American culture and school and everything else. It’s not uncommon to have someone come in from somewhere else and not want to change anything and just completely do the same thing they’ve always done. His adaptability and coachability has been incredible from day one.” Keller Maloney returned from taking a gap year with his brother, sophomore Pierce Maloney, to earn First-Team All-Conference acclaim after leading the Tigers in scoring with 65 goals and finishing second to Pozaric with 37 assists. The junior enjoyed a career year. “We have so many guys that are very capable of scoring the ball,” said Litvak. “Keller’s numbers have jumped, but it’s really just consistent and diligent preparation on his part.” Princeton did not know exactly how it would look upon its return with so many new parts and players moving into bigger roles. The squad tried to stay in contact over the year off while the Ivy League banned competitions through the winter. It returned hungry and found plenty of motivation together. “Guys that previously were questioning whether they wanted to continue playing water polo or not with the academic rigors of Princeton and other opportunities,” said Litvak. “When you have something taken away from you that you think is within your control all the time and all of a sudden is not in within control, you give it greater value knowing it could be taken away from you and it’s not completely your choice. That reset the group.”

Princeton has received strong leadership from Billy Motherway, Mitchell Cooper, and Wyatt Benson. The three senior captains have set a standard that Litvak is hopeful that his younger players can emulate in future seasons. They allowed Litvak to shift his energies this year. “I’ve put a lot more trust and faith in those guys and we make a lot of collective decisions on a lot of different situations that maybe previously I would have tried to take too much control over myself,” said Litvak. “It was a reset for myself too.” Princeton had to overcome not having the sort of time in the pool together last year that many other college teams did. The Tigers played catch-up against a challenging list of opponents, and their season-long experience has put the squad in a better position as it enters the NCAA tournament. “The inexperience thing was knowing we have two freshman classes basically,” said Litvak. “Our sophomores who played good minutes, didn’t see any pool time last year as far as games. They were able to train, that was it. We have four sophomores and five in our freshman class who this year was the first time they ever played a game. They have to get that experience. Last weekend was great because we had a packed house for Northeast Water Polo Conference (NWPC) Championships. We had a phenomenal crowd and playing in that environment hopefully will replicate what we’ll see out in California.” Princeton has been preparing all year for this opportunity. The Tigers are looking to add to their record-setting win total and advance to the Final Four that will be held at UCLA from December 4-5. “We’re happy to be representing our conference and the Ivy League and the East Coast really,” said Litvak. “We have a great squad. We’re playing well and we’ll see what happens.” —Justin Feil


Tosan Evboumwan was sidelined when the Princeton University men’s basketball team played at Monmouth last Wednesday, and he was missed. Princeton built a 46-39 halftime lead against the Hawks but faltered down the stretch, falling 76-64, lacking the inside presence and playmaking ability that the 6’9, 215-pound junior forward Evboumwan brings to the table. Last Sunday, Evboumwan, a native of Newcastle, England, returned to the lineup as the Tigers hosted Fairleigh Dickinson University and he certainly made a difference. Evboumwan tallied a careerhigh 19 points to go along with eight rebounds and five assists as Princeton topped FDU 89-79. “It is great to be back and playing with my teammates,” said Evboumwan. “We got a win after the loss to Monmouth. It was tough to watch and not be out there. I am glad to be back.” Princeton head coach Mitch Henderson was certainly glad to see Evboumwan back in action. “Tosan scored and did very well but he can be so much better and he knows it,” said Henderson, whose team improved to 5-2 with the win. “His discipline is where he is going to be great. He has got to get his rhythm back. We are glad to have him back. I wasn’t supposed to play him that many minutes but we needed him.” The Knights made things hard on Princeton, hitting eight three-pointers in the first half to trail by just 3836 at halftime. After Princeton forged ahead 73-55 with 5:54 left in regulation, FDU went on a 16-7 run to narrow the Tiger lead to 80-74. “I thought FDU played really well,” said Henderson. “We took multiple shots by them. We needed great performances in order to win that game.” In addition to Evboumwan’s effort, Henderson got great performances from senior guard Ethan Wright, who had a career-high 29 points

and 10 rebounds, with junior Ryan Langborg tallying a career-high 16 points. Henderson marveled at the rebounding prowess of the 6’4 Wright, who is averaging a team-high 8.0 rebounds a game. “Ethan’s rebounding number could be in the top 50 in the country and he is the third tallest guy on the team,” said Henderson of Wright, who hit 7 of 12 three-pointers against FDU. “He is an unreal rebounding guard. I would hope people come to watch our games just to watch him rebound. It is a treat. I am yelling at him a lot and he takes the yelling but I think he can do more. He can constantly improve. It is getting to the point where he is putting us on his back with his shooting. We needed it bad, they were making every shot.” Wright, for his part, credited his teammates with helping him on the glass and the perimeter. “Our bigs, guys like Tosan, are the ones who have the hard job of boxing out the big guys and then my job is coming in and clean it up,” said Wright, who is leading the Tigers in scoring average with an average of 15.3 points. “Shooting is all about confi dence. My teammates and coaches have been telling me to shoot ever since I set foot on campus. We have guys who attract a lot of attention in the middle, and that puts me in a good position. I am going to keep shooting with confidence if they keep putting me in those positions. Today the shots were going in.” Evboumwan, who leads the Tigers in assists with 29, enjoys getting his teammates in position to score. “It just working and practicing with the coaches and these guys in practice every day,” said Evboumwan, who is averaging 11.5 points and 5.5 rebounds a game. “They do a good job of moving and getting open. When you have guys around you who can make shots, that makes it a bit easier.” W h ile Henders on was

Available for Lunch & Dinner Mmm..Take-Out 41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton www.tortugasmv.com

Events • Parties • Catering (609) 924-5143

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

MASON CONTRACTORS RESTORE-PRESERVE-ALL MASONRY

Mercer County's oldest, reliable, experienced firm. We serve you for all your masonry needs.

BRICK~STONE~STUCCO NEW~RESTORED Simplest Repair to the Most Grandeur Project, our staff will accommodate your every need!

Call us as your past generations did for over 72 years!

Complete Masonry & Waterproofing Services

Paul G. Pennacchi, Sr., Historical Preservationist #5. Support your community businesses. Princeton business since 1947.

609-394-7354 paul@apennacchi.com

pleased with the team’s shooting, he is looking for better play at the defensive end. “I have been pleased at points with the defense but we have some standards and some goals that we set for ourselves internally and we have got to meet those in order to reach our goals,” said Henderson. “It is December — now we have a really tough slate before we hit exams and then we don’t play for a while. It is time to make their move right now. We can’t wait until the end of the month, it has got to go right now.” The emphasis on defense makes sense to Evboumwan. “We are trying to get better but as coach said it is time for your defense to come along and really lock in and have that be a priority every game and meet the goals that we set as a team,” said Evboumwan. “It is definitely time for us to do that, that is how we become a great team.” With the Tigers playing at Hofstra on December 1 before hosting Drexel on December 4 and Bucknell on December 7, Henderson will be looking for a sense of urgency. “We play a very good, tough Hofstra team, that spanked us two years ago here, on the road on Wednesday,” said Henderson. “We have got to get tougher and better on the defensive end if we want to be good.” Evboumwan, for his part, believes the Princeton team can develop into something special. “I think we can be really good; our offense is good, the way we move the ball and look for each other,” said Evboumwan. “So it is really the defense that has to come along and become consistently good. The main emphasis is to be consistent there.” —B ill Alden

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

Sparked by Evboumwan’s All-Around Play, PU Men’s Basketball Defeats Scrappy FDU

TRIPLE THREAT: Princeton University men’s basketball player Tosan Evboumwan dribbles to the hoop in a game earlier this season. Last Sunday, junior forward Evboumwan scored a career-high 19 points and added eight rebounds and five assists as Princeton defeated Fairleigh Dickinson 89-79. The Tigers, now 5-2, play at Hofstra on December 1 before hosting Drexel on December 4 and Bucknell on December 7. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Featuring products that are distinctly Princeton UNIQUE GIFTS!

www.princetonmagazinestore.com


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 28

With Meyers Thriving in Role of Go-To Scorer, PU Women’s Hoops Routs Maine 82-43, Now 5-1 Abby Meyers knows that she has to be a go-to offensive player for the Princeton University women’s basketball team this winter. After playing a supporting role to such stars as Bella Alarie and Carlie Littlefield in the past, it is time for Meyers to carry more of the scoring load. “As a senior, I have gotten a lot of trust from my coaches and teammates, which I really value and appreciate,” said Meyers, who averaged 9.4 points a game in the 2017-18 and 6.3 points in 2019-20. “I almost have the green light and that is something that not many people are lucky enough to have. I am working really hard on my game. My teammates are looking for me. In the end, we need the scorers to score. I really want to try and internalize that role, being a good scorer for our team. We need it.” Last Sunday against visiting Maine, Meyers displayed her offensive game, tallying a game-high 21 points as the Tigers pulled away to an 8243 win in improving to 5-1. “Getting 100 shots a day is really key to keeping your shot good,” said Meyers, a 6’0 native of Potomac, Md., who is now averaging a team-best 17.7 points a game this season. “It is just having fun with and not overthinking it. I think a lot of our players in the beginning started to overthink stuff because there is a year off. They pictured a lot of things, like I am going to do this, this, and this. It is

just going in with no expectations and having a short term memory and playing the best that you can.” Despite the year off as the Ivy League canceled competition due to COVID-19 concerns, the stingy Tiger defense hasn’t missed a beat, yielding just 47.2 points per contest. Against Maine, the Tigers gave up only four points in the first quarter. “It is trusting the process, obviously we lost a lot of good, tall players inside so there was some uncertainty as to how our defense was going to be this year,” said Meyers. “With six, seven games, I think that our defense has really proven itself. We are undersized but we have carried over the principle of our Princeton defense.” The Tigers have also proven to be fast starters, outscoring foes by a combined 49 points (100-51) in first quarters this year. “A lot of the time, we just try and bring the energy in the first quarter and that kind of shocks the other team and they miss shots,” said Meyers. “We got into a groove, it is not ever a goal to keep them under 10 in a quarter. In the end, the goal is to keep them under 40 points but we gave up three extra. It is a good start.” Princeton head coach Carla Berube likes the way her team has been coming out of the gate. “You want to start off the game on a great note and set the tone of how it is going to

be for the next 30 minutes,” said Berube. “It took us a little bit of time to get going. I think we relied on our defense; it got us some better opportunities on the break. It was just making plays for each other.” The Tiger defense has been a constant. “Our goal is to keep them under 40 which did not happen,” said Berube. “It was a great defensive effort. We did a really great job of taking away what they really wanted to do; their motion offense, the running and cutting that they were doing, they usually get a lot of backdoor options. I thought we were pretty dialed in defensively. I think our offense took a little time to warm up but once we did, I think we got some good opportunities.” Berube credited Meyers with cashing in on her opportunities. “Abby Meyers is a good option for us,” said Berube. “She can post up, she has great length at the guard position. She can certainly take you outside and hit threes. She is great at transition as well, she scores really well at the rim. She makes plays for her teammates as well. She is just an all-around great offensive player.” Freshman Paige Martin and sophomore Kaitlyn Chen provided some offense off the bench for the Tigers against Maine with Morton tallying eight points in 11 minutes and Chen chipping in seven points. “Paige showed us that in the preseason as well so it is

now finally coming together in games when the bright lights on,” said Berube. “She has got a great frame and a good offensive arsenal too. We are excited that she is stepping up and giving us some really important minutes. Kaitlyn is such an exciting player, she has a great ability to go by opponents and make plays for her teammates. She can also finish inside.” With Princeton playing at No. 22 Florida Gulf Coast on December 1 and at Fordham on December 5, the Tigers face some exciting tests ahead. “It has been really difficult so far, we are heading down to Florida Gulf Coast, they are a top 25 team,” said Berube. “It is going to be a real challenge. I think we are prepared as much as we can, we will give our best effort down there. Then we are at Fordham, we have a tough road ahead.” Meyers, for her part, believes that a special team chemistry will help the Tigers get through those challenges. “The team this year is really close, we got to know each other a lot in the offseason with the extra year to just meet over Zoom and try to meet in person if possible,” said Meyers. “The team this year has really just run with it. There is a new, fun attitude that we are bringing to our practices and sometimes our coaches are just like focus, keep the jokes for later off the court. The team is really meshing well. We are all equals on and off the court and that is what we try to emphasize.” —Bill Alden

SHOOTING STAR: Princeton University women’s basketball player Abby Meyers puts up a shot in a game earlier this season. Last Sunday, senior guard Meyers scored a game-high 21 points to help Princeton defeat Maine 82-43. The Tigers, now 5-1, play at No. 22 Florida Gulf Coast on December 1 and at Fordham on December 5. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

We now serve gluten-free pizza and pasta!

Open Daily 339 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ 08540


With the Princeton University women’s hockey team having not scored in its previous two games heading into its contest against Northeastern last Saturday, Maggie Connors and her teammates came out firing. The 10th-ranked Tigers outshot the visiting No. 4 Huskies 15-6 in the first period. “After last night’s game, we really regrouped,” said junior forward Connors, referring to a 2-0 loss to Northeastern last Friday. “We wanted to come out strong and really push the pace, knowing that they are a very fast team, respect to them.” Even though the game was knotted in a 0-0 tie after the first with Northeastern goalie Aerie Frankel coming up big to repel Princeton, the Tigers were confident they would break through. “We stuck together, we knew that it was going to come if we keep putting pucks on net,” said Connors. “She is an amazing goalie, we had to keep pushing.” After the Huskies took a 1-0 lead with 6:38 left in the second period, Connors got a puck in the back of the net in the waning moments of the frame, stealing the puck from Frankel and flipping it past her. “I just wanted to forecheck, I knew I was the closest there,” said Connors, whose tally was her eighth goal of the year and the 99th point in her Princeton career. “Her back was to me so I don’t think that she knew I was coming. I was able to

just lift her stick and get the puck. Then I was heading to the net and I saw two coming at me so I would not have had time to get it to my forehand. I have played against her and shot against her before, she is a little bit of a shorter goalie so it was maybe going up top. I got a little lucky there.” The Tigers were unlucky as Northeastern responded with a goal 20 seconds later to take a 2-1 lead into the third period and tacked on another tally early in the third to earn a 3-1 victory. As one of the most battletested players on a young Princeton squad, Connors is looking to carry the offensive load for the Tigers, who moved to 5-4-1 overall with the loss to the Huskies. “This year is entirely different we have such a big turnaround in our team,” said Connors, a native of St. John’s, Newfoundland, and Labrador who has played for the Canadian national program. “I think we are really coming together. We are a little bit of a younger team. I want to push the pace on offense and try to get as many shots as I can. My linemates have been great so far this year. We have to work a little more on our offense and when that gets going, I think we will do really well.” As Connors approaches the 100-point milestone, she is grateful for the help of her teammates over the years. “It brings so many memories of the different teams at Princeton I have played with,” said Connors.

“I wouldn’t be able to do it without my linemates in the past and the team that surrounds me. It is definitely exciting but I think there are a lot of people to thank if that happens.” Princeton head coach Cara Morey was excited by how her team came out flying on Saturday. “They were amazing, the girls played so hard right off the bat,” said Morey. “We decided that we were just going to take it to them today and see where we could get. To outshoot them like 15-6 in the first period was incredible.” Morey credited Connors with playing very well this year as she is the player on the squad with more than two goals this season. “I think we need more people to step up and produce because we are relying on Maggie right now,” said Morey. “I don’t know how she scores from the goal line like that every time — it is her bread and butter. Maggie is elite and she can score goals. That is a piece we are missing, we need people to step up and bury goals.” Senior goalie Rachel McQuigge has been stepping up for the Tigers with a goals against average of 1.57 and a save percentage of .953. “Rachel has been outstanding, she has a lot of maturity to her game now,” said Morey of McQuigge, who had 28 saves against Northeastern on Saturday. “She battles in the net, she gives us a chance to win every

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

Junior Star Connors Providing Offensive Punch As PU Women’s Hockey Battling Tough Foes

99 AND COUNTING: Princeton University women’s hockey player Maggie Connors fires the puck in recent action. Last Saturday, junior forward Connors scored the lone goal for 10th-ranked Princeton as it fell 3-1 to No. 4 Northeastern. The tally marked the 99th point for Connors in her college career. The Tigers, now 5-4-1 overall, play a two-game set at Providence on December 3 and 4. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) single game and that is all we can ask of her.” As Princeton plays a twogame set at Providence on December 3 and 4, Morey is confident her squad will keep battling. “I think our season is better than that record sounds; we lost three of the games to top five teams in the country, Quinnipiac was No. 5 and Northeastern is at No. 4,” said Morey. “To come in and tie Colgate and beat Q-pac, there are re-

ally big wins in there. We are looking to go 4-0 down the stretch before we break for Christmas. It is such a young team, and every day they are getting better and better. We just have to keep working who we are as a team, what is our identity, how we play and just take it to the next teams that we have coming up.” Connors, for her part, is confident that the Tigers will keep getting better and better. “I don’t think there is any reason for us to hang our

heads, it is definitely a different year,” said Connors. “It is a little bit of a disadvantage; we didn’t play last year and a lot of teams were able to play. We have some injuries right now and things and we started the season a little bit later but I have high hopes for this group so I am excited. It was definitely a tough weekend for us but I think we are going to regroup and we are going to be ready to play the next four games.” — Bill Alden

’Tis the Season…DELIZIOSO Bakery+Kitchen enjoys giving gifts, especially to our customers!

Now Serving Soup!

EVERY MONDAY IS SENIOR DAY ENJOY 10%OFF At Delizioso Bakery+Kitchen we offer a variety of delizioso treats. Join us for breakfast, lunch, or a perfect cup of roasted coffee.

205 Witherspoon Street, Princeton 609-921-CAFE • deliziosobakerykitchen.com

STUDENTS: Show your student ID and take 15% off. Whatever your choice is, our generous portions will leave you happy and full WE CATER FOR ALL OCCASIONS.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 30

Having Been Around Hobey Baker Rink for Years, N.J. Native Walton Starring for PU Men’s Hockey Pito Walton has been around Hobey Baker Rink for around a decade. Grow ing up in nearby Peapack, Walton played in youth hockey games at the historic rink. Going on to star at the Lawrenceville School, Walton was in the stands to watch Princeton University games. Now as a junior defenseman for Princeton, Walton relishes the chance play on a daily basis in the storied building. “It was a real privilege to come here and it is a dream come true,” said Walton. “I came here to games when I was at Lawrenceville. When I was a kid, I played mite games here.” Last Saturday, Walton was all over Baker Rink, helping Princeton produce a superb defensive effort as it battled RIT to a scoreless stalemate through regulation before losing 1-0 in overtime and moving to 3-5-1 overall. “We defi nitely put an emphasis on our d-zone, making sure that we focused,” said Walton, reflecting on the contest which came on the heels of a 5-4 loss to RIT on Friday evening. “We are just focused on staying connected in the dzone and making sure that we are communicating, knowing that we are really a positionally-sound team. When pucks are turned over, we are going to pounce on them and get it going the other way.” Walton has a good thing going in his partnership with freshman Noah de la Duranantaye as the two have emerged as a reliable defensive pair for the Tigers. “He is a really great player, he makes it really easy to play with for me,” said Walton of de la Duranantaye. “We communicate a lot on the ice. We have been able to develop some good chemistry throughout the beginning of the year here and we are looking forward trying to get better every game.” With Princeton not getting to play last winter as the Ivy League canceled completion due to COVID-19 concerns, Walton tried to make the most of the layoff. “You can find a way every minute, every moment to take a step in the right direction,” said the 6’2, 192-pound Walton, who has two goals and five assists so far this season. “I think that is what our team tries to do and what I try to do. I came to school in the spring and we practiced, it was good.” Princeton head coach Ron Fogarty saw the defensive performance on Saturday as a step in the right direction for the Tigers. “The product we showed on the ice we can move forward with, it gives us opportunity to win games in the future,” said Fogarty. “The direction we are going of run and gun, we scored 15 over four games but gave up 23. That is a recipe for disaster. We got a lot more manageable game tonight. We got a lot of scoring opportunities and just missed. There will be a bigger light at the end of the tunnel if we continue to play that way.” The defensive pairing of Walton and de la Duranantaye helped Princeton

manage things around the blue line. “It is growing,” said Fogarty of the duo. “Pito is having a great year, he is in better shape than pre-pandemic. Noah is a rink rat who loves the game and is a student of the game. He is always conversing, you can grow and be a really good defensive partner if you know what the other player is doing.” Junior goalie Aidan Porter did well against RIT, making 20 saves on the evening. “The goalie tonight was going to benefit from our defensive structure because there was more importance to it,” said Fogarty. “We gave him easier looks for the saves, there wasn’t a lot of extended zone time that we had over the last three games, Clarkson (an 8-3 loss on November 20), St. Lawrence (a 6-4 loss on November 19), and last night’s game with RIT. That is what we have to do and be more patient with our scoring chances.” In Fogarty’s view, Princeton showed patience all over the ice. “The attention to detail is better and then once we got the puck we supported well,” said Fogarty “We had a lot of clean exits. Everyone had to do their job and if everyone’s doing their job, everything is flowing better, everything looks better. There are no stagnant times getting caught in your zone or turnovers on the blue line. A lot of guys did really good things tonight.” With the Tigers hitting the road next weekend to resume ECAC Hockey action with games at Union on December 3 and at RPI on December 4, Fogarty is looking for his squad to build on the progress they made on Saturday. “The structure defensively is a positive moving into next weekend,” said Fogarty. “We know we are going to score goals. It is tough to lose that one because everybody was doing their job and making it easier on the team. If the nights were fl ipped, I would be more concerned but this is a step in the right direction for sure.” Walton, for his part, believes that the Tigers can get the job done. “It is not the outcome we wanted,” said Walton. “We just have to take it one step at a time. Practice is important for us, focusing on the details. We know that we are a good team. We just need to piece it together in one game and give a full 60 minutes of effort.” — Bill Alden

Rider

Furniture “Where quality still matters.”

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

PU Sports Roundup Princeton Football Has 16 Make All-Ivy

In the wake of winning a share of the Ivy League title, the Princeton University football team had 16 members named All-Ivy, the conference announced last week. The Tigers’ 16 All-Ivy selections were second most in the league behind Dartmouth (17). Princeton and Dartmouth tied for the league title as both squads went 9-1 overall and 6-1 Ivy. “With so many outstanding players in our league, I’m so happy for our players that were selected All-Ivy,” said Princeton head coach Bob Surace. “In addition to being terrific players, they were all excellent leaders.” Princeton’s First-Team AllIvy picks were senior Henry Byrd, senior Reily Radosevich, senior Collin Eaddy, senior Jacob Birmelin, senior Carson Bobo, senior Samuel Wright II, senior Jeremiah Tyler, senior James Johnson, senior Trevor Forbes, and junior Will Powers. Byrd and Radosevich were on the offensive line that helped anchor a high-powered offense that ranked first in the Ivy League in scoring (33.4), second in passing offense (265.5), second in passing efficiency (147.0), and third in total offense (392.4). Running back Eaddy rushed for 477 yards in eight games, registering 10 touchdowns before suffering a season injury against Dartmouth on November 5. His 10 rushing touchdowns were third in the conference and gave him 28 in his remarkable stint that saw him also surpass 2,300 rushing yards (2,315). Receiver Birmelin was a unanimous selection as he paced the league in receptions (64), seven more than second place. He was second in receiving yards (78.4) and fifth in allpurpose yards (89.4) per game. Tight end Bobo caught 17 passes for 147 yards, adding two touchdowns. He was also an excellent blocker for the offense that was among the best in the Ivy League. Princeton’s defense was one of the best in the FCS as it allowed the second fewest first downs (149), was third in rushing defense (73.2), eighth in team sacks per game (3.3), and ninth in total defense (274.1). Defensive lineman Wright set career highs in tackles for loss with 13 and sacks with 11.5. Both totals were tied at the top of the league. He was named Ivy Defensive Player of the Week following the Penn contest where he contributed six tackles, 3.5 for loss with a personal-best three sacks along with three more quarterback hurries and two forced fumbles. Star linebacker Tyler’s week continues to get better. One day after being named a Buck Buchanan finalist, the senior captain was a unanimous First-Team All-Ivy selection. Tyler led the squad in solo tackles (49) and total tackles (58), contributing six tackles for loss and six pass breakups. Linebacker Johnson was right behind Tyler, securing 40 solo tackles and 53 total tackles. He produced six tackles for a loss while snagging

TACKLING MACHINE: Princeton University star linebacker Jeremiah Tyler corrals a ball carrier in action this fall. Last week, Tyler was named as a finalist for the 2021 Stats Perform Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) Buck Buchanan Award. The Buck Buchanan Award is presented to the FCS National Defensive Player of the Year. The award, in its 27th season, is named for Buchanan, a legendary Hall of Fame defensive lineman who starred with the Kansas City Chiefs and played collegiately for Grambling State. Tyler produced a team-high 58 tackles this season, adding seven for a loss as Princeton went 9-1 overall and 6-1 Ivy League, to tie Dartmouth for the league title. The senior captain also had two sacks, a fumble recovery for a touchdown, and six pass breakups. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) two pass breakups. Johnson was also named Academic All-Ivy Safety Forbes set a new career high with 25 solo tackles, corralling 33 total. The senior captain also had a new personal best with six passes defended and had an interception in the Harvard victory. Punter Powers was outstanding for Princeton as he led the conference in net average (43.8). One third of his punts were over 50 yards with nine going inside the 20-yard line. Princeton had three players named Second-Team All-Ivy in senior David Hoffman, junior Andrei Iosivas, and junior Uche Ndukwe. Hoffman was part of the offensive line unit that helped quarterback Cole Smith place first or second in the conference in eighth different categories. Receiver Iosivas was third in the Ivy League in yards (703), fourth in touchdowns (five), yards per reception (17.1), and ninth in receptions (41). He shattered his career highs in receptions, receiving yards, touchdowns, and yards per reception. Despite only playing in six games, Defensive lineman Ndukwe finished tied for seventh in the league in sacks (six) and tied for ninth in tackles per loss (9.5). He put up at least one sack and tackle per loss in five of his six outings. Seniors Smith, Dylan Classi, and Delan Stallworth were Honorable Mention All-Ivy honorees. QB Smith led the conference in yards per attempt (8.5) and was second in total offense (278.8), passing efficiency (148.5), passing yards (2,570), passing yards per game (257.0), yards per completion (12.8), completion percentage (66.8), and completions per game (20.1). He was a two-time Ivy Player of the Week pick this season. Receiver Classi had a banner year, setting new personal marks in receptions (35) and yards (621) while also adding three touchdowns. He ranked in the Ivy top 10 in yards, yards per reception (17.8) and yards per game (62.1). Cornerback Stallworth added 27 tackles in six games this season, while also defending two passes.

Cross Country’s Vigilante Named Vigilante’s squad won three of the eight meets they enMid-Atlantic Coach of the Year

After leading the Princeton University men’s cross country team to an Ivy League Heptagonal championship and a win at the NCAA Mid-Atlantic Regional, Princeton men’s cross country head coach Jason Vigilante has been named USTFCCCA (U.S. Track & Field and Cross County Coaches Association) Mid-Atlantic Coach of the Year. The selection is the third of Vigilante’s career, going with Coach of the Year honors earned in 2017 and 2018.

tered this season. After opening the 2021 campaign with a win at the Lehigh Invitational, Princeton went on to win an Ivy League championship with a team score of 28 points and five of the top nine finishers at Heps on its home course at West Windsor. The Tigers followed that up with five of the top 11 finishers at the Mid-Atlantic Regional at Lehigh to win that meet and earn an automatic bid to the NCAA Championships.

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years

After Noon Concert Series Thursdays at 12:30pm Princeton University Chapel

Performing December 2, 2021 Tyrone Whiting, Director of Music

at Church of St. Martin-in-the-fields (Episcopal), Philadelphia, PA, will play works by Bach, Dupré, and Guilmant. This is the last performance of the Fall 2021Term. The After Noon Concert Series will resume for the Spring Term beginning January 27, 2022.

This service is open to the public for those fully vaccinated against Covid-19. Registration required for all events on campus at the door or in advance. To register in advance, use the QR code.


The 2021-22 season will mark the dawn of a new era for the Princeton Day School boys’ hockey team. While the storied program has established itself as a traditional power, winning state Prep and county titles and posting some memorable victories over Mid-Atlantic Hockey League foes like Lawrenceville and Hun, it is branching out this winter to join the Gordon Conference and compete in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) state Non-Public tournament for the first time. PDS head coach Scott Bertoli is fired up about the program’s new path. “I feel like the expectation and hope that it will be a normal, uninterrupted season — it lends itself right from the get-go to get really excited about being back on the ice,” said Bertoli, who guided his team to a 4-1-1 record last year in an abbreviated season. “Every game we are going to play this year is a league game or a conference game. That is exciting.” The Gordon Conference which includes such formidable foes as Delbarton, Don Bosco, Bergen Catholic, and Seton Hall Prep, among

others, will provide some stern tests for the Panthers. “Personally I think it is awesome, it is a perfect fit for us,” said Bertoli, whose team fell 3-2 to Pope John in its Gordon debut last Monday. “We have had relationships with many of those top programs for years. I think it puts our kids in a good situation on a number of fronts. As much as we attempted to and have had a success against the boarding schools, there was a physical disadvantage because they are older. Some of those schools are bringing in post-grads. They focus on developing those kids whereas our focus is on the ninth graders. We inject ninth graders into our roster and those programs have kids two, three, four years older and six inches taller.” PDS has brought in some exciting players this season with the arrival of Wyatt Ewanchyna, Ace Ewanchyna, Liam Jackson, and Rosheen Nissangaratchie. “Wyatt is a new freshman. Through the first two and a half weeks and the first two scrimmages, he has shown he is a kid that can play,” said Bertoli. “Ace came through PDS middle school and went to

Lawrenceville. He transferred back this year and is a junior. Those are two kids that should step in offensively. They play the game the right way and understand the responsibility in all three zones. Liam is a sophomore and is a very good player. He may end up being our most complete player. He has got a way about him, he understands the game, he plays hard. He has very good offensive instincts and ability. Rosheen transferred from Delbarton. He is a very good player. He is complete, he plays both ends of the rink.” A quartet of veterans, senior Adam Teryek, junior Ryan Vandal, junior Oliver Hall, and sophomore Riley Schmidt, figure to provide some offensive production as well. “We are looking to these four to take on bigger and expanded roles, especially offensively,” said Bertoli, who got goals from Teryek and Hall in the loss to Pope John. “They all have the ability to generate offense and be on the scoresheet on a regular basis.” As for the defensive units, sophomores Connor Stratton and Han Shin will have a big role.

“They are definitely the two that will play the most minutes,” said Bertoli. “They have both gotten bigger and stronger. They were very good as freshmen; I am expecting bigger and better things this year.” Bertoli is also expecting some good work on the blue line from senior Chris Babecki, junior Will Brown, and junior Cole Fenton. “Chris is a forward/defenseman,” said Bertoli. “I think we will start him on the back end to solidify things there. Will and both players have looked to have improved. The big thing for both of them is confidence with the puck.” Senior star goalie Timmy Miller is poised for a big final campaign. “Timmy is back for his senior year, he looks awesome; we have had some great goaltenders here and to me, he is as good as we have had,” said Bertoli, noting that the squad has two solid backup goalies in sophomore Mason Watson and freshman Calvin Fenton.

“He is big, he understands the game, he is such a good kid, and he is a competitor. He had a ton of success last year, he played five games but I think his goals against was just outstanding. He will be our starter and will play most of our games in net. We are pretty comfortable with what we have backing Timmy up this year.” In Bertoli’s view, his squad can be outstanding at both ends of the ice. “I anticipate us being strong defensively, we did a really nice job last year; our goals against was really low, I think it was sub two,” said Bertoli. “So with Timmy and a group of five retuning defensemen and some new pretty talented freshman in there, I expect us to be good back there. Up front we are balanced. We don’t have an elite level scorer like we have had in the past. It is having two or three of the guys kind of step through and be the guy on the power play and be the guy who can be out there in

critical minutes when you need a goal. It is just figuring out what that combination is because I don’t expect it to fall on one or two guys. Through preseason, we have been really good on the rush and have scored some nice goals.” In order to be really good on offense, the Panthers will need to show some grit. “We are really harping on these guys, they can’t be onedimensional and just live off the rush,” said Bertoli, whose team plays the Hun School on December 1 at the Ice Land Rink and then hosts St. Augustine on December 7. “It is exciting but for any type of sustained success, you have got to eat minutes up and the puck cannot be in their end the majority of the game. They can’t just play in the rush, they need to engage and battle. I tell the kids year in, year out, you should work hardest in the offensive zone, that is where you should just be relentless and pursue the puck.” —Bill Alden

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

Joining Gordon Conference, Debuting in State Tourney, PDS Boys’ Hockey Primed for Memorable Campaign

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT!

EASTRIDGE DESIGN 2021 Town Topics Readers’ Choice Award winner BEST HOME REMODELER/DESIGNER

HAN SOLO: Princeton Day School boys’ hockey player Han Shin gets ready to fire the puck up the ice in a game last winter. Sophomore defenseman Shin figures to be a key performer for PDS this winter. The Panthers, who open their 2021-22 season by falling 3-2 to Pope John, play the Hun School on December 1 at the Ice Land Rink and then host St. Augustine on December 7. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Princeton | 609 921-2827 | eastridgedesign.com

American Furniture Exchange

Family Owned and Operated Charlie has been serving the Princeton community for 25 years

FLESCH’S ROOFING

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

For All Your Roofing, Flashing & Gutter Needs

• Residential & Commercial • Cedar Shake • Shingle & Slate Roofs

• Copper/Tin/Sheet Metal • Flat Roofs • Built-In Gutters

• Seamless Gutters & Downspouts • Gutter Cleaning • Roof Maintenance

609-394-2427

Free Estimates • Quality Service • Repair Work

LIC#13VH02047300


Things were pretty bleak last w inter for t he Hun School boys’ hockey team as it only got to play three games due to COV ID -19 concerns. “There was a lot of anticipation for last year; you have these little windows where you can be pretty competitive and I think last year seemed like the pinnacle of one,” said Hun head coach Ian McNally. “Everybody was very excited to play and then we didn’t; the air came out.” Understandably, the Hun squad was very excited to start the 2021-22 season by heading to Pittsburgh, Pa., last weekend to compete in the Shady Side Academy Thanksgiving Classic where it played more games in three days than it did all season, going 3-1 at the event. “Once we got on the ice here this season, the excitement was very high,” said McNally. “People started looking around, saying wait a minute, we are going to be pretty good. The whole point of doing this tournament was to feel like we were hitting the ground rolling in December instead of it taking a couple weeks for you to get going. That is what we got out of it.” After losing 5-2 to host Shady Side last Friday to open the season, Hun rebounded with a 7-2 win over the Bly th Academy (Ontario). “We scored three or four goals early on in the first

period, it changed the whole game,” said McNally, who got two goals and two assists from Elian Estulin in the win with Seth Kaplan chipping in a goal and four assists. We have a pretty strong first line for sure and they broke free. They put up a bunch of points.” Building on that win, Hun posted two more wins, topping St. Francis (N.Y.) 2-1 and then defeating Hoosac School (N.Y.) 4-1 to end the weekend at 3-1. “It just kept going, we played St. Francis and that was a closer game,” said McNally. “We played Hoosac who tied Exeter last week and plays Avon Old Farms next week. They are a legit independent New England team and we beat them. We got to learn how to win in different ways in all of the different games. We had to fight to preserve leads in the third period so I think it will be very beneficial to our team.” The squad’s top line of senior Riley Frost, junior Estulin, and post-graduate Kaplan should provide plenty of firepower this winter. “Riley is back, he got hurt his sophomore year and didn’t get to play his junior year,” said McNally. “He has been waiting to explode here I think. He did very well last weekend and the same thing with Elian who played for us a freshman and was good. Now he is a junior and he is big and strong and he is

showing what he can do here too. Seth, who put up 10 points this weekend, was at Mo-Beard and he is doing a post-grad year. He realized he needed a little more before going off to college.” Two newcomers, postgrad Ryan Croddick and sophomore Brendan Marino, should give the Raiders some more scoring. “Ryan is committed to Princeton for lacrosse as a goalie; he played at Rumson Fair Haven last year and he is a good hockey player,” said McNally. “T here is anot her k id Brendan who is from Ontario, he is also a high end lacrosse kid.” Hun features a pair of high - end defensemen in post-grad Nick Dimatos and senior Christian Clover. “Nick has got offensive skills, I think we are able to win because he decided to also be a very good defensive player,” said McNally of Dimatos, a stalwart for the Hun program over the last few seasons who was granted an extra year at the school due to the unique circumstances surrounding COVID. “I think this is a year for him to feel like he is a big part of whether we win or lose ever y game. In one game at Shady Side, he scored both of our goals. The other one on defense is Christian, he is much more defensive-minded. He is our typical heavy hitter, blocking shots where Nick is the offensive guy.”

BREAKING THE ICE: Hun School boys’ hockey player Nick Dimatos skates in a 2019 game. Postgraduate defenseman and co-captain Dimatos will be leading the blue line unit for the Raiders this winter. Last weekend, Hun started its season by going 3-1 in the Shady Side Academy Thanksgiving Classic in Pittsburgh, Pa. In upcoming action, the Raiders host Princeton Day School on December 1 and St. Joseph’s Prep (Pa.) on December 2. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) The Raiders boast some depth along the blue line. “We have plenty of kids who could be defensemen, of the six who played this weekend, Josh Ouellette is the one who will stand out more,” said McNally. “He came last year and didn’t get to play much. He scored a couple of goals, he is strong and fast.” The pair of senior Jack Borek and junior Stephen Chen will be sharing goaltending duties. “They are both good, I think they will rotate unless

SPACE FOR LEASE

MONTGOMERY COMMONS

Route 206 & Applegate Dr | Princeton, NJ | Somerset County

Suites Available: 830, 1006, 1660 SF (+/-)

• VERIZON FIOS AVAILABLE & high-speed internet access

Friday

UNIVER

SITY

y Darcy u ct e d b

ember › 10 Dec

James A

2021 › 8

rium › n Audito

o

Richards

rgue

P

er Hall

Alexand

›› Music Composed

and Arranged By: John Hollenbeck Sy Johnson Thad Jones Skip Martin Charles Mingus Sammy Nestico Billy Strayhorn Mary Lou Williams

›› Featuring New Works

by Princeton Composers and Arrangers: Justin Coon Evan DeTurk Anson Jones Alexander de Gorgoza Moravcsik Jimmy Waltman Isaac Yi

15’

OFFICE

4’

4’-7”

• Prestigious Princeton mailing address

• 219 Parking spaces available on-site with handicap accessibility

(609) 924-5143

E G R A L E CREATIV E L B M E S EN M TON PRINCE

Cond

• Premier Series suites with upgraded flooring, counter tops, cabinets & lighting available

Events • Parties • Catering

41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton www.tortugasmv.com

OFFICE & MEDICAL

• Built to suit tenant spaces with private bathroom, kitchenette & separate utilities

In McNally’s v iew, the opening weekend helped solidify the bonds among the players that should make a difference for Hun. “It is a different vibe right now; it is a very good chemistry that I haven’t seen in very many teams and I think that is going to carry us,” said McNally, whose team hosts Princeton Day School on December 1 and St. Joseph’s Prep (Pa.) on December 2. “The offense is there naturally; we have had good hockey players but everybody is going to share for sake of winning. I think this weekend it was nice to see it. Everybody was very happy on the ride home as a result.” — Bill Alden

there is a reason not to,” said McNally. “They both played really well over the weekend. I think they like each other and having a quality person to be around.” Playing good defense will be a key to success for the Raiders this winter. “I think our ability to play a desperate defensive game will be a difference,” said McNally. “Usually we have out highpowered three or four kids every year who are happy to score goals and if we are better than a team we win. This weekend we showed each other even in a tough game, we have the ability to get the win in the gritty ways.”

Available for Lunch & Dinner Mmm..Take-Out

12’-10”

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 32

Enjoying Big Opening Weekend at Shady Side Classic, Hun Boys’ Hockey Displays Potential As It Goes 3-1

SUITE 721 | 830 SF (+/-)

908.874.8686 | LarkenAssociates.com Immediate Occupancy | Brokers Protected No warranty or representation, express or implied, is made to the accuracy of the information herein and same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of rental or other conditions, withdrawal without notice and to any special listing conditions, imposed by our principals and clients.

FREE ›› Ticket Required Reserve online at music.princeton.edu or call 609-258-9220. ›› Attendees must be fully vaccinated and masked at all times.

jazzatprinceton.com

music.princeton.edu


A year ago, the Hun School boys’ basketball team started its preseason training outdoors on the school’s tennis courts as it wasn’t allowed to practice in the gym due to COVID-19 concerns. As Hun got ready to tip-off its 2021-22 campaign by playing powerhouse St. Benedict’s on November 30, the Raider players were savoring the chance to be going through their paces inside the Shipley Pavilion. “I think any way you cut it, we are so much further along than we were last year,” said Hun head coach Jon Stone who guided the Raiders to an 8-2 record in their abbreviated 2021 campaign. “It is the thrill of playing every day, it has been great, the guys are really excited, as am I.” Senior guard Jack Scott, who is headed to Princeton University next year to follow in the footsteps of his father, Joe Scott, a former hoops star and coach for the Tigers, is primed for a great season. “Jack formally committed to the process at Princeton; he had a really big summer,” said Stone. “It is a little bit of everything, he sees the floor really well, he is a really good passer. He has continued to grow, he is 6’5 now so just his size as a guard is a tremendous asset at both ends of the floor. Offensively, he has the ability to finish around the rim. Defensively, he can guard bigger players and guards.” Scott’s main partner in the backcourt figures to be his

classmate, Dan Vessey. “Dan is looking really good as well too, he just continues to do the things he has done in the past,” said Stone. “He is a gym rat, he is so steady and he is just pure scorer. He has the ability to score in multiple ways, more than just shooting the ball and yet he does so many other little things that you don’t realize. He understands the game.” Junior newcomer Anthony Loscalzo should also star on the perimeter. “The only other pure backcourt guy we have is Anthony,” said Stone “He is very steady, he is arguably as good a shooter as Dan. He is steady, he doesn’t make a lot of mistakes. He shoots it extremely well.” Versatile post-graduate Mo Toure will be a swing player for the Raiders. “Mo is 6’5 and is what I would call a big wing,” said Stone. “He is a guard/forward as opposed to a pure guard. He is so long, he is ridiculously athletic. Those two things give him the ability to play up front as well as a guard.” In the frontcourt, a trio of returners, junior Anthony Aririguzoh, senior Isiaha Dickens, and senior Toby Thornburg, give Hun skill and experience. “Anthony has improved a ton this summer as well; from the first game last year, compared to now, his improvement is tremendous,” said Stone.

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

Boasting a Blend of Veterans, Talented Newcomers, Hun Boys’ Basketball Primed for Stellar Campaign

“He is becoming more versatile, he is becoming more skilled; his length and athleticism is something. Dickens is physical inside and he is just so solid for us on the offensive end in terms of decision-making and passing ability. He is a solid rebounder obviously as well. Toby’s biggest strength is his versatility. He can play inside he can play outside. He can guard inside and outside and plays really hard.” A pair of juniors, Ethan Gross and Logan Howland, will provide depth in the paint. “Ethan is a 6’7 lefty, he is really long and has good speed and quickness for somebody his size,” said Stone. “We have as newcomer, Logan, who played football this year. He is a 6’8, 255. He gives us a physical presence. and he is incredibly unselfish. He is very similar to Dickens in many way with the physical presence and ability to pass. His ability to rebound is tremendous.” G et ting unselfish play across the board will be a key for Hun as it faces a gauntlet ON GUARD: Hun School boys’ basketball player Dan Vessey, right, guards a foe in a 2019 game. of formidable foes this winter. Senior guard Vessey is looking to have a big final campaign at Hun. The Raiders were scheduled to tip off their 2021-22 season by hosting St. Benedict’s on November 30. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) “We start with St. Benedict’s so we better be ready to go,” said Stone. JUNCTION BOARDING “The key often for us is our Specializing in BARBER TRAINING ability to jell quickly; we have classical more returners than other LESSONS SHOP dressage riding years. But we still have some 33 Princeton-Hightstown Rd SALES new faces that we have to get Ellsworth’s Center into the fray and the mix and Family owned and operated over 35 years (Near Train Station) just be jelling from an overall Just 3 miles from downtown Princeton team sense. I think that tends to always be our biggest key. Outstanding boarding facilities We do have some good balTues-Fri: 10am-6pm; Visit us online at www.DresslerStables.com ance.” Sat 8:30am-3:30pm or call 609-915-2636 —Bill Alden

799-8554


experience with the top level opponents that we had. She was able to play against some of the top teams in the state. She was getting playing time, which was nice. She and Leila will be sharing the one and two guard.” Junior Emily Ix figures to get a lot of playing time this winter. “Emily has been looking great, she is a great athlete and is just an awesome allaround kid with her participation in school, she is in every club,” said Leith of Ix who also stars in field hockey and lacrosse. “She has played basketball the last two years, she played a little bit last year. She worked all summer, she came to the workouts that we had. She is really looking awesome, I am really excited about her and I think she is excited about playing a formative role on the team.” Leith is looking for sophomore Isabel Milley to play a key role for the Tartans. “Isabel practiced with us last year, she was invited to come to games but she was hesitant because of COVID,” said Leith. “She is a tremendous athlete. Once you point her in the right direction and show her some small things she is able to pick them up real quickly.” Lauren Richey is another Tartan player who is poised

to show her skills this winter. “Lauren transferred in her sophomore year and has been basketball kid, she is a gym rat,” said Leith. “She is a great shooter. I think this year she is coming into her own. She has changed who she is defensively. She is going to hit a fair amount of 3s. She is a reliable kid and will have a large role this year.” With Stuart slated to start its 2021-22 campaign by hosting Springside Chestnut Hill (Pa.) on November 30, Leith believes his squad should keep getting better and better as the winter unfolds. “Defense is going to be a cornerstone for us, it is setting realistic expectations and achieving them and then setting new ones,” said Leith. “From practice 1 to practice 12, the growth has been so significant that we have actually raised our expectations. Before it was like we will see where we end up at the end of the season. We are not going be a top 15 team in the state. We didn’t have that expectation at the start but all of a sudden it is can we be one of the best teams around locally. That is a possibility now. Things have to continue to progress in that direction. If the group jells in the way they have trended toward so far this year, it is going to be a real fun season.” — Bill Alden

Hun Field Hockey : Having helped Hun go 8-8-1 this fall after it went 1-6 in 2020, senior Ashley Jones and sophomore Ava Olender have been named First-Team AllMid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL) performers. Junior Abby O’Brien received honorable mention.

Local Sports Princeton Athletic Club Holding Winter 6K Dec. 4

The Princeton Athletic Club ( PAC ) is holding its annual Winter Wonder Run 6K on December 4 over the Institute Woods course. The run starts at 10 a.m. from the Princeton Friends School and the event is limited to 200 participants. All abilities are invited, including those who prefer to walk the course. Online registration and full details regarding the event and race protocols are available at princetonac.org.

The PAC is a nonprofit, all-volunteer running club for the community that promotes running for the fun and health of it and stages several running events each year.

Bailey Basketball Academy Offering Winter Programs

T he B ailey B asketball Academy ( BBA) has announced the schedule for its upcoming winter hoops programs. Parents and players will have an oppor tunit y for competitive travel play, indiv idualized instr uction, skills development, and fundamentals as well as league play. BBA is led by former Princeton Day School girls’ hoops coach and Philadelphia 76ers camp director and clinician, Kamau Bailey. The BBA winter program will include two competitive boys travel teams (secondfifth grade and sixth-eighth grade ), weekly practices and Shot King Shooting Program and Player Development Skill Sessions for

elementar y through high school players (boys and girls). BBA programs stress fundamentals and team play with emphasis on ball handling, shooting, passing, footwork, speed, agility, movement with and without the ball, one on one moves, defense, and other skills There will be BBA meet and greet registration and workou t s at t h e S t u ar t Country Day School gym for interested players and parents for the BBA Shot King Shooting Session and Player Development Skill Sessions on December 1 from 6-7:15 p.m. (second-fifth grade) and 7:15-8:30 p.m. (sixth-eighth grade) and for BBA Travel Teams on December 3 from 6 -7:15.p.m. (second-fifth grade) and 7:15-8:30 p.m. (sixth-eighth grade). Parents can sign their players up for hoop programs for boys and girls all ages throughout the month of December. For more infor mation, contact Kamau Bailey at (917) 626-5785 or kamau. bailey@gmail.com.

Available for Lunch & Dinner Mmm..Take-Out Events • Parties • Catering

41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton www.tortugasmv.com

(609) 924-5143

Town Topics a Princeton tradition! ®

est. 1946

221 WITHERSPOON STREET 609.921.8160 M-F 10-6 / S 10-5 / FREE PARKING HILTONSPRINCETON . COM

Fewer, better gifts —

HALO Ice Cr

WASHINGTON CROSSING: Stuart Country Day School basketball player Leila Washington brings the ball upcourt in a game last season. Sophomore guard Washington figures to emerge as a star for Stuart this winter. The Tartans were slated to start their 2021-22 campaign by hosting Springside Chestnut Hill (Pa.) on November 30. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co. We Install Quality Aluminum Triple Track Storm Windows

741 Alexander Rd, Princeton • 924-2880

New Chef, Christine

Order a g

HALO HALO FÊTE Ice Cream Ice Cream Pâtisserie OrderStreet, a graduation cake! 5 Hulfish Palmer Square

CAKES ARE CAKES BACK! OCCASION 240.8147 5 Hulfish St. 921.1710

New Chef, Christine

Winter Menu

Over the last few seasons, the St uar t Countr y Day School basketball team featured a formidable insideoutside punch. With the pair of Ariel Jenkins and Laila Fair dominating in the paint and guards Nia Melvin and Aleah James starring on the perimeter, Stuart won three state Prep B titles from 2018-20 and advanced to the Mercer County Tournament final in 2020 for the first time in program history. With that quartet having graduated and Jenkins playing at Georgetown, Fair at St. Joseph’s, James at LIU, and Melvin opting not to play at the college level despite a number of offers, the Tartans will have a radically different look this winter. “Everyone is excited, we have a lot of new faces,” said Stuart head coach Justin Leith, who guided Stuart to a 7-6 record last winter in an abbreviated season. “We have either inexperience or freshmen. It has been fun though as a coach, you are coaching different things, going back to more basic stuff. Even in a short amount of time, I am seeing them reaping the benefits of repetition. They are starting to get an understanding of the game which is exciting.” As a result of the graduation losses, the Tartans will be employing an up-tempo style featuring interchangeable parts. “We are tiny, we don’t have a backcourt or a frontcourt, we are just guards,” said Leith, who also lost valuable performers Catherine Martin and Molly Lagay to graduation. “As a coach, I have always preached that we don’t have a system and then plug players into it. We coach who we have so we are able to be creative. My first year we had size and I know we had a year where we had no size at all. We adjust and we play to our kids’ strengths.” Sophomore guard Leila Washington is poised to become a strong player for the Tartans. “Leila is going to be our best player this year I believe, she is the most athletic and most experienced player,” said Leith. “She is a year-round player, she plays AAU and everything. It was difficult for her last year, just jumping into playing. We had three girls rostered now on D-1 teams with full scholarships and Nia had plenty of offers. That is a huge challenge coming from eighth grade. This year, it is the other side where she is being more vocal. She has taken on a leadership role which I think is fun for her. It is fun to watch someone grown so much.” It is fun for Leith to have guard Gabby VelazquezGonzales returning to the court after she opted out of last season “Gabby is back, she is looking good,” said Leith, noting that senior guard Lauren Klein is currently sidelined due to injury and may be back later in the season. “She worked out all season last year, her family had concerns with COVID. She is in good shape and looking good. She brings the most

Winter Menu

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 34

Losing Stellar Group of Seniors to Graduation, Stuart Hoops Will Be Featuring Bevy of New Faces

F Pât

TIS' THE SEASON FOR OrderLIGHT a& LOVE g radua COZY & BRIGHT IN GORGEOUS COLORS THAT WILL SURELY WARM THEIR HEARTS (AND YOURS!)

OCCASION

5 Hulfish St. 9

WE'RE HERE FOR YOU & ALL OF YOUR GIFTING NEEDS THIS HOLIDAY SEASON.


Dr. Allen H. Kassof Dr. Allen H. Kassof, 90, of Princeton, died on November 22, 2021 of heart failure. He was the founding director of the International Research & Exchanges Board (IREX), which administered the foremost exchanges of scholars with the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe during the Cold War. He headed IREX from 1968 to 1992. In 1991 he founded the Project on Ethnic Relations (PER) in anticipation of the serious interethnic conflicts that were to erupt following the collapse of Communism. As president of PER from 1992 to 2005 he led negotiations and mediated ethnic conflicts in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. PER’s greatest impact was in Romania. He played an essential role in preventing Romania from experiencing

women to study there before they were first admitted as undergraduates in 1969), referring to himself tonguein-cheek as Princeton’s “first dean of women.” In 19781979 he served as a member of President Jimmy Carter’s Com m is sion on Foreig n Language and International Studies. To all of his interactions, whether on the world stage or at the kitchen table with good friends, he brought perspective shaped by coming of age in a time of American optimism and honed by decades of world travel. His self-assurance and sense of humor put everyone at ease. He had a joke (usually off color) for every occasion and a ridiculous nickname for almost everyone. His own nickname, bestowed with great affection by his family, was “Big Al.” A devoted and enthusiastic husband, father, grandfather, and uncle, “Big Al” showered us all with love and generosity. He and his wife — the former Arianne Scholz, whom he married on Valentine’s Day, 1953 — were legendar y for their hospitality, hosting family, friends, and colleagues from all over the world in their Princeton home. He maintained that tradition even after Arianne died in 2013, seven months after their 60th anniversary. He was an avid photographer and technology enthusiast, a Fellow of Princeton’s Forbes College, a Friend of the Institute for Advanced Study, and an active member of the Harvard Club of Princeton, the Old Guard of Princeton, and Community Without Walls.

He spent the last several years of his life with his partner, Trudy Glucksberg. After her sudden death in May 2021, his health declined precipitously. In accordance with his wishes that he leave his house “feet first,” he died surrounded by family in the home he loved and that had been the site of so many lively gatherings. He is survived by his sister R hoda Kassof- Isaac ; dau g hter s A n n ie, A rle n Hastings (Tom), and Anita (Josh Neiman); grandchildren Deja Kas sof, Sara (Dan Hayes-Patterson) and Kevin Hastings, and Sophie and Daniel Neiman; greatgranddaughter Jordan Carroll; nephew Jeffrey Isaac (Sophie Clarke); and greatnephew Elias Isaac. In addition to Arianne, he was predeceased by a grandson, Julian Harned. A memorial service will be scheduled in spring/summer 2022. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Princeton Public Library (princetonlibrary. org); or to PER’s successor organization, the Council for Inclusive Governance (CIG), by check to 2 Hillside Road, Newtown PA 18940, with “in memory of Allen Kassof’’ in the memo.

Alice S. Keizer Alice S. Keizer, 103, of Cornwall, PA, formerly of Princeton, NJ, passed away peacefully November 12, 2021, at Cornwall Manor. Born August 26, 1918 in Council Bluffs, IA, she was a daughter of the late Frank and Charlotte Schley. Alice attended Iowa State University where she received a Bachelor’s Degree. She served on various committees in the Methodist Church in Princeton, NJ, where she lived from 1941-1992. She took an active role there volunteering in her community. She taught inner-city children to read, she housed Vietnamese

refugees in her own home, and she helped to settle those families. After she moved to Cornwall in 1992, she was a member of the Cornwall Methodist Church, where she played in the bell choir. She volunteered at Cornwall Manor where she was involved with the gardening club as a leader and a member. Surviving are her sons, Richard (Sharon) of MN, and Alan (Susan) of the U.K.; and her two grandchildren, Vivian and Shelby. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Eugene; and two children who passed in infancy. Due to the pandemic, there will be no services. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made in her memory to the Alzheimer’s Association, 225 N. Michigan Avenue, Fl. 17, Chicago, IL 60601. Arrangements by Cremation & Burial Society of PA, Inc. Obituaries Continued on Next Page

PERSONAL PAPERWORK SOLUTIONS...AND MORE, INC. During these challenging times we are actively supporting our clients providing the following services as “your virtual home office.”

www.ppsmore.com

S

Skillman H HFurniture INVENTORY

Our expert services include: • Personal accounting killman H

50% OFF MOST ITEMS

½ management OFF • Income & expense MOST ITEMS • Healthcare cost administration

REDUCTION

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

Obituaries

the horrors of ethnic conflict that affected so many of its neighbors. His extraordinary breadth of vision and humanitarianism enabled him repeatedly to accomplish the seemingly impossible by bringing together antagonistic majority government officials, minority representatives, opposition leaders, security authorities, and human rights activists, and helping them find nonviolent ways to reconcile major differences. He was born in New York City to Morris and Sophia ( née Baron ) Kassof, and the family took up chicken farming in Toms River, New Jersey, where he grew up. He credited his childhood on the farm for the pragmatism that was his hallmark skill as a negotiator. In a 1999 oral history with Carnegie Corporation of New York, he said, “I learned ver y early that if you didn’t feed or water the chickens they died, and it did not matter how good your ideas were; there was an absolute and fundamental necessity just to get certain things done in the real world.” He received his B.A. from Rutgers University in 1952, and in 1960 he earned his Ph.D. in sociolog y from Harvard University, where he studied at the Russian Research Center. He taught sociology at Smith College and was recruited in 1961 to join the sociology faculty at Princeton University. He remained on the Princeton facult y until 1973, serving as an assistant dean of the college from 1965 to 1968. He supervised Princeton’s Critical Languages Program ( which brought

H financial urniture • HouseholdF management (Bill payment/check writing)

INVENTORY • Tax preparation REDUCTION

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES DIRECTORY OF Quality

Used Furniture

212 Alexander St, Princeton

Mon, Wed-Fri 10:30-4, Sat 10:30-1

609.924.1881

(Assembly & analysis of financial information for tax purposes)

Quality

To talk with us about our services and how we can help you or your loved Used one duringFurniture this challenging time please call (609) 371-1466 212 Alexander St, us Princeton or email at info@ppsmore.com. Mon, Wed-Fri 10:30-4, Sat 10:30-1 Specialized Services for Seniors 609.924.1881 and Their Families, Busy Professionals

RELIGIOUS SERVICES

Sunday 8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I 9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following

SundayS Tuesday

12:00 Communion p.m. Holy Eucharist 8:00 am Holy Rite I

9:30 am Adult Formation Wednesday

5:30 am p.m.Holy Holy Eucharist with Healing 10:30 Communion Rite IIPrayer

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

5:00 pm Choral Compline 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church

All services are in person and streamed online. Join us at www.trinityprinceton.org 216 Nassau Street, 214 Nassau Street,Princeton Princeton

214 Nassau Street, Princeton Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. The Rev. Paul Jeanes III, 11:30 Rector, Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30and p.m. Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 5:00 p.m. Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 The Rev. Canon Dr. Kara Slade, Assoc. Rector, Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. The Rev. Joanne Epply-Schmidt, Assoc. Rector, Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 • www.trinityprinceton.org

ONLINE

www.towntopics.com

Princeton’s First Tradition

Worship Service

in the University Chapel Sundays at 11am Rev. Alison Boden, Ph.D.

Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel

Rev. Dr. Theresa Thames

Associate Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel

Must be fully vaccinated against Covid-19 to attend.

Registration required for all you eventsare on campus. Wherever you are on your journey of faith, For more information, visit chapel.princeton.edu always welcome to worship with us at:

First Church of Christ, Wherever you are in your journey of faith, Scientist, Princeton come worship with us

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ ¡Eres siempre bienvenido!

Christianare Science Room Services heldReading in the Church

Our 178 Nassau Street, Princeton following the appropriate protocols 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 Sunday Church Service and Sunday School at 10:30 am, Wednesday Testimony meetings at 7:30 pm Visit the Christian Science Reading Room Monday through Saturday, 10 am - 4 pm 178 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ For free local delivery call (609) 924-0919 www.csprinceton.org • (609) 924-5801

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 10:00 a.m. Worship Service

During 10:00 this timea.m. of COVID-19 crisis, Witherspoon is finding new Children’s Sunday School and Youth Studydoors may be closed, ways to continue our worship. WhileBible our sanctuary Bible Classes church is open and we willAdult find new avenues to proclaim the Gospel and to (Acontinue multi-ethnic congregation) as one faith community! 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365

Join us for worshipwitherspoonchurch.org on Facebook Live every Sunday at 10:00 a.m. Recorded and live stream sermons can also be found on our website - witherspoonchurch.org Join our mailing list to receive notices of our special services, bible study and virtual fellowship. During the COVID-19 crisis our church office is closed, however, please email witherspoon@verizon.net or leave a message at our church office and a staff member will get back to you. Church office: (609) 924-1666


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 36

Obituaries Continued from Preceding Page

Mary Ann Pirone

Mary Ann Pirone, 91, of Princeton passed away on Saturday, November 27, 2021 at home surrounded HOPEWELL • NJ HIGHTSTOWN • NJ by her loving family. She was born in Pettoranello Del Molise, Italy, and moved to Princeton, NJ, in 1947. On 609.921.6420 609.448.0050 September 13, 1952, she pride ourselves We prideon ourselves being aon small, being personal, a small, and personal, serviceand oriented servicefamily oriented business. familyWith business. five generations With five generations of of We pride ourselves on being a small, personal, and married Domenico Pirone at experience,experience, we are here weto are help here guide to help you through guide you the through difficultthe process difficult of process monument ofservice monument selection. selection. We pride ourselves We pride on ourselves beingonaon small, being a small, and personal, service and oriented servicefamily oriented business. family With business. five generations With five of of pride ourselves being a personal, personal, and service oriented family business. With five generations of generations encourage WeWe encourage you to make you antoappointment, make ansmall, appointment, with no obligation, with no obligation, to discuss the to discuss many options the many available optionsto available you. to you. St. Paul’s Church in Princexperience, wewe are here toguide help guide you through the difficult process of selection. experience, experience, we are here to are help here help you through guide you the through difficult the process difficult of monument process monument monument selection. oriented family business. With five generations of experience, We We pride pride ourselves ourselves We We pride pride on on ourselves ourselves being being aabeing on on small, small, being being personal, personal, aato small, small, and and personal, personal, service service and and oriented oriented service service family family oriented oriented business. business. family family With With business. business. five fiveof generations generations With With five five generations generations of of selection. of of We pride ourselves on a small, personal, and service oriented family business. With five generations of eton. She was a lifelong We encourage you to make an appointment, with nowith obligation, discuss the the many options available to you. We encourage We encourage you to make you an tohere appointment, make anhere appointment, with nothrough obligation, obligation, totodiscuss to many options the many available options to available you. to you. We pride ourselves on being ano small, personal, service experience, experience, experience, experience, we we are are here we we to toare are help help here guide guide to to help help you you guide through guide you you the the through through difficult difficult the the process process difficult difficult of of discuss process monument process monument of of monument selection. monument selection. selection. selection. experience, we are here help guide you the difficult process ofand monument selection. We We pride pride ourselves ourselves on on THAN being being aatosmall, small, personal, personal, and andthrough service service oriented oriented family family business. business. With With five five generations generations of of parishioner and member of ITS EASIER ITS THAN EASIER YOU THINK YOU TO THINK MAKE TO THE MAKE PERFECT THE PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL we are to help guide you through difficult process of We We encourage encourage We We encourage encourage you you to tohere make make you you an to toappointment, appointment, make make an anand appointment, appointment, with with operated no no obligation, obligation, with with no no obligation, obligation, to to discuss discuss the the to to discuss discuss many many options options the theSutphen many many available available options options to to available available you. you. to you. you. Family owned by Doug Sr. We encourage you toan make anhere appointment, with no obligation, to the discuss the many options available to you.to experience, experience, we we are are here to to help help guide guide you you through through thegenerations difficult difficult process of of monument monument selection. selection. oriented family business. With fivethe of experience, ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE THE process PERFECT MEMORIAL the Altar Rosary Society at We We encourage encourage you you to to make make an an appointment, appointment, with with no no obligation, obligation, to to discuss discuss the the many manyPERFECT options options available available to to you. you. ITS EASIER ITSTHAN EASIER YOU THAN THINK YOUTO THINK MAKE TO THE MAKE PERFECT THE MEMORIAL MEMORIAL monument selection. and son Doug Sutphen Jr., who have both been St. Paul’s Church. She was a ITS ITS we EASIER EASIER ITS ITS THAN THAN EASIER EASIER YOU YOU THAN THAN THINK THINK YOU YOU TO TO THINK THINK MAKE MAKE TO TO THE THE MAKE MAKE PERFECT PERFECT THE PERFECT PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL MEMORIAL MEMORIAL ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE THE PERFECT MEMORIAL are here to help guide you through theTHE difficult process of ITS ITS EASIER EASIER THAN THAN YOU YOU THINK THINK TO TO MAKE MAKE THE THE PERFECT PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL member of the Italian Amerraised in the cemetery monumentbusiness selection. and understand ican Sportsman Club Lady

We encourage you to make an appointment, with no obligation,

the fine details of a delicate time.

Auxiliary. Mary Ann was a pride ourselves We prideon ourselves being aon small, being personal, a you small,toand personal, service and oriented servicefamily oriented business. family With business. five generations With five generations of of We encourage make an appointment, with noyou obligation, towe discuss theon many options available to homemaker and loved being We pride ourselves being a small, personal, and experience,experience, we are here to are help here guide to help you through guide you the through difficultthe process difficult of process monument ofservice monument selection. selection. We pride ourselves We pride on ourselves beingonaon small, being a small, personal, service and oriented service family oriented business. With business. five generations With five of of pride ourselves being a personal, personal, and service oriented family business. With five generations of generations to discuss theand options available tofamily you a mother and grandmother. encourage WeWe encourage you to make you antoappointment, make ansmall, appointment, with nomany obligation, with no obligation, to discuss the to discuss many options the many available optionsto available you. to you. experience, wewe are here toguide help guide you through the difficult process of selection. experience, experience, we are here to are help here to help you through guide you the through difficult the process difficult of monument process monument of monument selection. selection. oriented family business. With five generations of experience, We We pride pride ourselves ourselves We We pride pride on on ourselves ourselves being being a a on on small, small, being being personal, personal, a a small, small, and and personal, personal, service service and and oriented oriented service service family family oriented oriented business. business. family family With With business. business. five five generations generations With With five five generations generations of of of of Predeceased by her parWe pride ourselves on being a small, personal, andobligation, service oriented family business. With available five generations of We encourage you to make an appointment, with no to discuss the many options to you. Sutphen Memorials Inc. has A.L. Duryee Monuments We encourage Weexperience, encourage you to make you an tohere appointment, make anhere appointment, with nothrough obligation, with obligation, to discuss the to many the many available options to available you. to you. We pride ourselves on being ano small, personal, andoptions service experience, experience, experience, we we are are here we we to toare are help help here guide guide to to help help you you guide through guide you you the the through through difficult difficult the the process process difficult difficult of of discuss process monument process monument of of monument selection. monument selection. selection. selection. experience, we are hereTHINK help guide you the difficult process ofWith monument selection. We We pride pride ourselves ourselves on on THAN being being aatosmall, personal, personal, and andthrough service service oriented oriented family family business. business. With five five generations generations of of ITS EASIER ITS THAN EASIER YOU YOU TO THINK MAKE TO THE PERFECT THE PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL been helping families design has been in Hightstown, NJ to We We encourage encourage We encourage encourage you you to to make make you you an to to appointment, appointment, make make an ansmall, appointment, appointment, with with no no obligation, obligation, with with no no obligation, obligation, to toMAKE discuss discuss the the to to discuss discuss many many options options the the many many available available options options to available available you. you. to you. you. WeWe encourage you toan make an appointment, with no obligation, to discuss the many options available to you.to

we are experience, here towe help guide you through the difficult process of experience, we are are here here to to help help guide guideWith you you through through thegenerations difficult difficult process of of monument monument selection. selection. family business. fivethe of experience, ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE THE process PERFECT MEMORIAL ITSoriented EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE monument selection. ITS ITS we EASIER EASIER ITS ITS THAN THAN EASIER EASIER YOU YOU THAN THAN THINK THINK YOU YOU TO TO THINK THINK MAKE MAKE TO TO THE THE MAKE MAKE PERFECT PERFECT THE THE PERFECT PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL MEMORIAL MEMORIAL ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE THE PERFECT MEMORIAL ITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE are here to help guide you through the difficult process of bronze memorials for five next to Cedar Hill Cemetery.

fine granite andTO since and located We We creates encourage encourage you you to to make make an an appointment, appointment, with with no no obligation, obligation, to to1909 discuss discuss the the many manyis options options available available to to you. you. ITSand EASIER ITSTHAN EASIER YOU THAN THINK YOU THINK MAKE TO THE MAKE PERFECT THE PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL

THE PERFECT MEMORIAL

THE PERFECT MEMORIAL Full monument display and generations in the Greater ITS ITS EASIER EASIER THAN THAN YOU YOU THINK THINK TO TO MAKE MAKE THE THE PERFECT PERFECT MEMORIAL MEMORIAL

monument selection. THE PERFECT MEMORIAL WePrinceton encourage you make an appointment, obligation, Area. Wetopride storefront towith help no guide you ourselves being a small throughout the to selection We encourage you tomany make an appointment, with noyou obligation, toon discuss the options available boutique-type, personal and process. to discuss the many options available to you service-oriented business.

ITS EASIER THAN TOMAKE MAKE EASIER THANYOU YOU THINK THINK TO ITSITS EASIER THAN YOU THINK TO MAKE THE PERFECT THE PERFECTMEMORIAL MEMORIAL THE PERFECT MEMORIAL

ents Felix and Giulia (Pinnelli) Pirone; sisters Alberina Procaccini and Caroline Pirone; and brothers Domenic Tamasi and Umberto Pirone; she is survived by her daughter Dana M. Pirone; son and daughterin-law Mark A. and Susanne Pirone; five grandchildren K at her i ne a nd Ju lia n ne Garrity, and Caroline, Peter, and Christopher Pirone; s i s t e r E v e l y n Ta m a s i ;

brother Ralph Pirone; and many extended family. Visitation w ill be held on Wednesday, December 1, 2021 from 5-8 p.m. at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08542. Funeral will begin at 9 a.m. on Thursday, December 2, 2021 at the funeral home. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10 a.m. at St. Paul’s Church, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542. Burial will follow in the Princeton Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association at alz.org.

Herbert H. Hagens Herbert H. Hagens, 99, of Princeton, NJ, crossed the Threshold on Friday, November 26, 2021 at Stonebridge at Montgomery. Herbert was born in Princeton, NJ, on July 1, 1922 and was a lifelong resident. His father, Henry Hagens, was an early practioner of biodynamic farming and gardening. His mother, Emmy Hagens, was a Waldorf teacher. Herbert attended the Rudolf Steiner School in New York City and graduated from the Hun School in Princeton. He

was a member of the Class of 1945 at Princeton University. After serving as a Navy offi cer in World War II, he married Velva A. Hagens (nee Helms) in East Randolph, New York. In 1950 they moved back to the family home on Lower Harrison Street in Princeton where they raised their two sons. With his background in electrical engineering and acoustics Herbert established Hagens Recording Studio, Inc. in 1952. The business began with music recording, record cutting, and sound and fi lm mixing. It expanded to full scale video postproduction and incorporated the advances in digital technology. His two sons continue to operate the company. Herbert was a member of the Anthroposophical Society in America and hosted the activities of the Princeton Group for many years. He took a special interest in supporting the Waldorf School of Princeton and produced a series of videos about Rudolf Steiner’s approach to education and the art of eurythmy. Herbert was predeceased by his wife, Velva Hagens (October 7, 1997). He is sur vived by his son and daughter-in-law Herbert O. and Adelaide B. Hagens of Kingston, NJ, his son Peter R. Hagens of Princeton, and a cousin Inge Karl of Berlin, Germany. Fu nera l s er v ice s were held on Tuesday, November 30, 2021 at the Kimble Funeral Home, Princeton, NJ. Reverend Liza Marcato of The Christian Community Church officiated. Burial will take place in East Randolph, NY.

Second Sunday of Advent

Sunday Worship Service

Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton NEW PRODUCTS ADDED WEEKLY!

Sunday, December 5, at 11am Princeton University Chapel Guest Preaching this Sunday HEATH W. CARTER, Associate Professor of American Christianity, Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton, NJ Music performed by the Princeton University Chapel Choir. Nicole Aldrich, Director of Chapel Music & University Chapel Choir, and Eric Plutz, University Organist

This service is open to the public for those fully vaccinated against Covid-19. Registration required for all events on campus at the door or in advance. To register in advance, use the QR code.

www.princetonmagazinestore.com


“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS

VISA

MasterCard

The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-09-22

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 977-9407. 11-17-3t

Irene Lee, Classified Manager

• Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. PERSONAL CARE/ CARE/COMPANION PRINCETON • 25 words or less: $15.00 • each add’lCHILD word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. AVAILABLE: Looking for •employment, live in$72.00 or • 3 weeks: $40.00 • 4 weeks: $50.00 6 weeks: • 6 month and annual discount rates available. out. Full time or part time. References Please call Cynthia, (609) • Ads with lineavailable. spacing: $20.00/inch • all bold face type: $10.00/week HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22

HOUSECLEANING: By experienced Polish lady. Good prices. References available. Please call (609) 310-0034. 11-10-4t EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 977-9407. 11-17-3t PERSONAL CARE/ CHILD CARE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: Looking for employment, live in or out. Full time or part time. References available. Please call Cynthia, (609) 227-9873. 11-17-3t HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06-22 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius (609) 466-0732 tf HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

PRINCETON-GRACIOUS STUDIO APARTMENT on estate with magnificent gardens. Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time. Elegant furnishings, big windows, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, walk-in closet, kitchenette, large bath, AC, WI-Fi. Very private, separate entrance, parking. Great as an office, too. (609) 924-5245. 08-11-tf SENIOR GENT SEEKS NEW HOME: Semi-retired (fully vaccinated) desires lodging in private home. Food fringees too! Call Charlie (732) 216-3176. Email cr@exit109.com 11-24-3t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 12-29-5t

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon MOVING SALE: 75 Woosamonsa Road, Pennington. Friday 12/3 & Saturday 12/4 from 9:30-3:30. Antiques! Americana, folk art, face jugs, fine china, artwork, jewelry, toys. Much more! Park in neighboring field. For photos visit evelyngordonestatesales. com 12-01 HOUSECLEANING: By experienced Polish lady. Good prices. References available. Please call (609) 310-0034. 11-10-4t

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

227-9873.

11-17-3t HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

FOR RENT

CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius (609) 466-0732 tf

269 Raymond Road Princeton NJ 4 Bedroom three bath Large executive ranch on four scenic acres Privacy with a running brook and park-like setting

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

SINGLE FAMILY HOME

PRINCETON-GRACIOUS STUDIO APARTMENT on estate with magnificent gardens. Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time. Elegant furnishings, big windows, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, walk-in closet, kitchenette, large bath, AC, WI-Fi. Very private, separate entrance, parking. Great as an office, too. (609) 924-5245. 08-11-tf SENIOR GENT SEEKS NEW HOME: Semi-retired (fully vaccinated) desires lodging in private home. Food fringees too! Call Charlie (732) 216-3176. Email cr@exit109.com 11-24-3t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 12-29-5t JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-09-22 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22

2400 SF multi-level across from the Princeton Shopping Center

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE INVESTMENT Medical/Legal/Professional with 1BR/ 1Ba rental apartment 7 private offices with a waiting area.

1OO Canal Pointe Boulevard, Suite 120 • Princeton NJ 08540 Each office is independently owned and operated

Hector Olaya BROKER ASSOCIATE Luxury l Commercial

IN PRINT. ONLINE. AT HOME.

MOVING SALE: 75 Woosamonsa Road, Pennington. Friday 12/3 & Saturday 12/4 from 9:30-3:30. Antiques! Americana, folk art, face jugs, fine china, artwork, jewelry, toys. Much more! Park in neighboring field. For photos visit evelyngordonestatesales. com 12-01

Cell: 609.575.9597 • Office: 609-987-8889 Fax: 609-987-8750 • hectorolaya@kw.com

ONLINE

www.towntopics.com

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

MASON CONTRACTORS RESTORE-PRESERVE-ALL MASONRY

Mercer County's oldest, reliable, experienced firm. We serve you for all your masonry needs.

BRICK~STONE~STUCCO NEW~RESTORED Simplest Repair to the Most Grandeur Project, our staff will accommodate your every need!

Call us as your past generations did for over 72 years!

Complete Masonry & Waterproofing Services

One-Year Subscription: $10 Two-Year Subscription: $15

Paul G. Pennacchi, Sr., Historical Preservationist #5.

Subscription Information: 609.924.5400 ext. 30 or subscriptions@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

609-394-7354 paul@apennacchi.com

princetonmagazine.com

Support your community businesses. Princeton business since 1947.

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35

37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

to place an order:


REDUCTION

50% OFF MOST ITEMS 2nd & 3rd Generations

Quality

Used Furniture

MFG., CO.

609-452-2630

212 Alexander St, Princeton

Mon, Wed-Fri 10:30-4, Sat 10:30-1

609.924.1881

Rider

American Furniture Exchange

Furniture 30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items

“Where quality still matters.”

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

> ã͛Ý d ½» Z ½ Ýã ã ͘​͘​͘ & î½ù , Äç»» « ã®ò®ã® Ý ãÊ Ä¹Êù ã ,Êà ,ĂƉƉLJ ,ĂŶƵŬŬĂŚ͊ dŚŝƐ LJĞĂƌ͕ ,ĂŶƵŬŬĂŚ ďĞŐĂŶ ŽŶ EŽǀĞŵďĞƌ Ϯϴ ĂŶĚ ůĂƐƚƐ ƚŚƌŽƵŐŚ ĞĐĞŵͲ ďĞƌ ϲ͘ ĞůĞďƌĂƟŶŐ ,ĂŶƵŬŬĂŚ ǁŝƚŚ ĨĂŵŝůLJ ĂŶĚ ĨƌŝĞŶĚƐ ŵĞĂŶƐ ŚŽŶŽƌŝŶŐ ƚƌĂĚŝƟŽŶƐ Ăƚ ŚŽŵĞ͕ ĨƌŽŵ ůŝŐŚƟŶŐ ƚŚĞ ŵĞŶŽƌĂŚ ƚŽ ƉůĂLJŝŶŐ ŐĂŵĞƐ ĂŶĚ ĞĂƟŶŐ ƚŽŐĞƚŚĞƌ͘ ,ĞƌĞ ĂƌĞ ƐŽŵĞ ŝĚĞĂƐ ĨŽƌ ĨĂŵŝůLJ ,ĂŶƵŬŬĂŚ ĂĐƟǀŝƟĞƐ ƚŚĂƚ ĞǀĞƌLJŽŶĞ ĐĂŶ ĞŶũŽLJ͕ ĨƌŽŵ ƚŚĞ LJŽƵŶŐĞƐƚ ĐŚŝůĚƌĞŶ ƚŽ ƚĞĞŶĂŐĞƌƐ ĂŶĚ ĂĚƵůƚƐ͘ Ύ Ύ

Ύ

Ύ

ĞĐŽƌĂƚĞ ƚŚĞ ƚĂďůĞ͗ ĚĚ ĨĞƐƟǀĞ ƚŽƵĐŚĞƐ ƚŽ LJŽƵƌ ƚĂďůĞ ƐƵĐŚ ĂƐ ĚĞĐŽƌĂƚĞĚ ŶĂƉŬŝŶƐ ĂŶĚ ƚĂďůĞ ƌƵŶŶĞƌƐ͕ ŚĂŶĚ-ĐƌĂŌĞĚ ƉůĂĐĞ ĐĂƌĚƐ͕ ĂŶĚ ƐƉĂƌŬůŝŶŐ ďůƵĞ ŐůĂƐƐĞƐ͘ /z ŵĞŶŽƌĂŚ͗ <ŝĚƐ ǁŝůů ĞŶũŽLJ ŵĂŬŝŶŐ Ă ƐĂŶĚ Ăƌƚ ŵĞŶŽƌĂŚ͘ >ĂLJĞƌ ĚŝīĞƌĞŶƚ ĐŽůŽƌƐ ŽĨ Ăƌƚ ƐĂŶĚ ŝŶ ŐůĂƐƐ ũĂƌƐ͘ ƌĂŌ ƐƚŽƌĞƐ ĐĂƌƌLJ ƚŚĞ ŵĂƚĞƌŝĂůƐ Žƌ ƌĞĂĚLJ-ŵĂĚĞ ŬŝƚƐ͘ ,ĂŶŶƵŬĂŚ ĐŽŽŬŝĞ ĐƌĂŌ͗ ^ƚĂƌƚ ǁŝƚŚ ŵĂŬŝŶŐ ƐƵŐĂƌ ĐŽŽŬŝĞƐ ǁŝƚŚ ĐŽŽŬŝĞ-ĐƵƩĞƌƐ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ ƐŚĂƉĞ ŽĨ ŶƵŵďĞƌƐ ϭ-ϴ͕ ƉůƵƐ ^ƚĂƌƐ ŽĨ ĂǀŝĚ Žƌ ĚƌĞŝĚĞůƐ͘ ĂĐŚ ƉĞƌƐŽŶ ĚĞĐŽƌĂƚĞƐ ĐŽŽŬŝĞƐ ǁŝƚŚ ďůƵĞ ĂŶĚ ǁŚŝƚĞ ŝĐŝŶŐ͕ ĞĚŝďůĞ ƉĂŝŶƚ ĚĞĐŽƌĂƟŶŐ ƉĞŶƐ͘ dŽƉ ǁŝƚŚ ƐƉƌŝŶŬůĞƐ ĂŶĚ ĐŽůŽƌĞĚ ƐƵŐĂƌ͘ ,ŽŵĞŵĂĚĞ ĐŚŽĐŽůĂƚĞ ĐŽŝŶƐ͗ DĂŬĞ LJŽƵƌ ŽǁŶ ĐŚŽĐŽůĂƚĞ ĐŽŝŶƐ͕ Žƌ ͞ŐĞůƚ͘͟ ƌŽƉ ƐŵĂůů ĐŝƌͲ ĐůĞƐ ŽĨ ŵĞůƚĞĚ ĐŚŽĐŽůĂƚĞ ŽŶƚŽ ǁĂdžĞĚ ƉĂƉĞƌ͘ ĞĨŽƌĞ ƚŚĞ ĐŚŽĐŽůĂƚĞ ŚĂƌĚĞŶƐ͕ ĚĞĐŽƌĂƚĞ ƚŚĞ ĐŽŝŶƐ ǁŝƚŚ ŵŝŶŝ DΘDƐ Žƌ ĐƌƵƐŚĞĚ ĐŽŽŬŝĞƐ͘

tŝƐŚŝŶŐ LJŽƵ ůŝŐŚƚ ĂŶĚ ũŽLJ ĨŽƌ LJŽƵƌ ĨĂŵŝůLJ ƚŚŝƐ ,ĂŶƵŬŬĂŚ͊

^ĂůĞƐ ZĞƉƌĞƐĞŶƚĂƟǀĞͬWƌŝŶĐĞƚŽŶ ZĞƐŝĚĞŶƟĂů ^ƉĞĐŝĂůŝƐƚ͕ D ͕ K- ƌŽŬĞƌ WƌŝŶĐĞƚŽŶ KĸĐĞ ϲϬϵ-ϵϮϭ-ϭϵϬϬ ͮ ϲϬϵ-ϱϳϳ-Ϯϵϴϵ;ĐĞůůͿ ͮ ŝŶĨŽΛ ĞĂƚƌŝĐĞ ůŽŽŵ͘ĐŽŵ ͮ ĞĂƚƌŝĐĞ ůŽŽŵ͘ĐŽŵ

Skillman H HFurniture

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, INVENTORY etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 921REDUCTION 7469. 10-06-22

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

½ OFF MOST ITEMS

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, ENGINEERING: Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, Quality old toys, military, books, cameras, SRI International is accepting silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars resumes for Advanced Computer Scientist in Princeton, NJ. Work with & musical212 instruments. I buy Alexander St, single Princeton a broad array of advances in artificial items to entire appraisMon,estates. Wed-FriFree 10:30-4, Sat 10:30-1 intelligence, applications of artifi als. (609) 306-0613. cial intelligence to computer vision, 609.924.1881 06-30-22 human behavior analytics including gaze tracking, facial tracking and expression recognition, pose and gesTOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS ture recognition, visual tracking and GETS TOP RESULTS! human machine collaboration. Mail Whether it’s selling furniture, finding resume to SRI International, Attn: a lost pet, or having a garage sale, Gloria Peña, 201 Washington Road, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! Princeton, NJ 08540. Must reference Ref. ACS-AS. We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your 12-01 ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; LAW FIRM classifieds@towntopics.com ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT: tf (PRINCETON, NJ) ESTATE LIQUIDATION Two lawyers seek experienced partSERVICE: time Assistant approximately 15-20 I will clean out attics, basements, hours per week to work in a friendly garages & houses. Single items office environment in downtown to entire estates. No job too big or Princeton. Free on-site parking. Resmall. In business over 35 years, sponsibilities include scheduling serving all of Mercer County. Call appointments, office organization, filing, document preparation, calendar (609) 306-0613. control & client billing. Prior law office 06-30-22 experience is preferable. Secretarial experience & proficiency with Word WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR & Excel are essential. Required atA FORMER PRINCETONIAN? tributes include ability to work independently, careful attention to detail, excellent telephone skills, ability to A Gift Subscription! prioritize & manage multiple tasks, professional demeanor, sound judgment & a “can do” attitude. Hours Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; flexible. Vaccination required. Procirculation@towntopics.com vide resume & salary requirement tf to dfbrent@gmail.com; (609) 6830033. 11-17-3t WE BUY CARS

Used Furniture

PRINCETON CHARTER SCHOOL A US Department of Education Blue Ribbon School serving students in grades K-8 seeks qualified applicants for the following 2021-2022 positions: LUNCH SERVICE MANAGER SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS All applicants for the substitute teacher position must hold a substitute teacher certification or the relevant NJ certification. Interested candidates should send a cover letter, resume and copies of NJ certificate(s) to: Head of School, Princeton Charter School, 100 Bunn Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540, or to pcsof fice@princetonchar ter.org. Princeton Charter School is an equal opportunity employer. Deadline for application is December 6, 2021. Must be a resident of New Jersey or willing to relocate. For more school information visit our web site at www. pcs.k12.nj.us. 11-17-3t

IS ON

Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon MOVING SALE: 75 Woosamonsa Road, Pennington. Friday 12/3 & Saturday 12/4 from 9:30-3:30. Antiques! Americana, folk art, face jugs, fine china, artwork, jewelry, toys. Much more! Park in neighboring field. For photos visit evelyngordonestatesales. com 12-01

CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Wednesday morning delivery. If interested, please contact Gina Hookey at classifieds@towntopics.com

H

HOUSECLEANING: By experienced Polish lady. Good prices. References available. Please call (609) 310-0034. 11-10-4t

“Home is a magnet that lures

back even its most abstracted children. But whether tomorrow or years from now, I cannot guess."

An Equal Opportunity Employer 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528 609-924-2200

—Kate Morton

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co. We Install Quality Aluminum Triple Track Storm Windows

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

741 Alexander Rd, Princeton • 924-2880

New Chef, Christine

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

H HALO FÊTE Ice Cream Pâtisserie OrderStreet, a graduation cake! 5 Hulfish Palmer Square

CAKES ARE CAKES BACK! OCCASION 240.8147 5 Hulfish St. 921.1710

New Chef, Christine

Winter Menu

Insist on … Heidi Joseph. Winter Menu

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021 • 38

Skillman H HFurniture INVENTORY

Specialists

O

OC


Move-in-ready homes available, featuring $300,000 in upgrades

Limited offering: $100K in additional upgrades on select homes Don’t Miss the Final Phase of This Exclusive Gated Community Featuring lush landscaping and exquisite architecture, this beautifully developed community is ready to welcome you home. These 3,600-square-foot exclusive homes pair open floor plans with elegant finishes to provide all the privacy, space, and luxury you could want.

Final Phase of Construction! In-person tours available by appointment. Starting at $1,575,000. 215.862.5800 | RabbitRunCreek.com Rte. 202 (Lower York Road) & Rabbit Run Drive, New Hope, PA

COMMUNITY FEATURES • Full Basement • Two-Car Rear Garages • Maintenance-Free Lifestyle • Open, Contemporary Floor Plans • Private Gated Community • Private Elevators

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2021

YOU’RE READY, WE’RE READY.


Eating Well for Your Mind and Body Wednesday, December 8, 2021 | 6 p.m. Zoom Meeting Did you know that your food choices can affect your brain health? Join MINDY KOMOSINSKY, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator from Capital Health, to learn how our food choices can support a healthy brain. Other topics include mindful eating strategies and eating plans that help reduce dementia and the decline in brain health that often occurs as people get older.

This event will be taking place virtually using Zoom. Register online at capitalhealth.org/events and be sure to include your email address. Zoom meeting details will be provided via email 2 – 3 days before the program date. Registration ends 24 hours before the program date.

@capitalhealthnj

Food Addictions: Symptoms and Management Wednesday, December 15, 2021 | 6 p.m. Zoom Meeting Do you or someone you know think you have a food addiction? You’re not alone! Food addiction can be a serious health challenge for many people, so join DR. ARVIND BHASKER from Capital Health – Behavioral Health Specialists to address your questions and concerns. Topics include the signs and symptoms of food addiction, the shortand long-term consequences, and the treatment options that are available to get you on the path to better health. This event will be taking place virtually using Zoom. Register online at capitalhealth.org/events and be sure to include your email address. Zoom meeting details will be provided via email 2 – 3 days before the program date. Registration ends 24 hours before the program date.

@capitalhealthnj