Town Topics Newspaper, November 30, 2022

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Outdoor Dining Extended; Bikes, Skateboards Banned On Some Local Sidewalks

Princeton’s sidewalks were the focus of two ordinances given public hearings at a meeting of Princeton Council Monday night, November 28. One ordinance extends outdoor dining for two more years, and the other amends the rules banning bicycles, roller skates, and skateboards from certain downtown sidewalks. Both were voted in unanimously.

Council also heard progress reports on the Princeton Business Partnership (PBP), an open house for the town’s Master Plan, and the Climate Action Plan that was adopted in 2019.

Before passing the outdoor dining ordinance, there was some discussion about whether some of the restaurants that began serving diners along sidewalks during the pandemic are encroaching too far into the public walkways. The ordinance requires “no less than ve feet” of space for pedestrians to pass. Municipal attorney Trishka Cecil said that the vefoot measurement could be seen as a minimum, but additional space can be required. Mayor Mark Freda stressed that the rule needs to be enforced.

The ordinance related to bicycles, skateboards, and roller skates is an amendment to the current regulation, regarding exactly where the prohibition is to be. Staff is working on a future ordinance “to make sure we cover not only them [bikes, skateboards, roller skates] but any vehicle we might be able to imagine in the future,” said Land Use Engineer Jim Purcell. The amended ordinance also includes scooters, he said.

Councilwoman Eve Niedergang asked if these vehicles are allowed on sidewalks outside the downtown streets speci ed in the amended ordinance. “There is no prohibition against riding on sidewalks outside of this district,” Purcell said. Mayor Freda commented that there is a big difference between a bicycle and a motorized vehicle traveling up to 20 miles per hour along the sidewalk. “It’s not a good experience for a child or an elderly person to have one of those zip up on them,” he said. “Those are just accidents waiting to happen and we need to pay attention to this all over town.”

In his brief update on the PBP, Executive Director Isaac Kremer told Council that the group has been working on logo selection, and recently assisted with the

Results Are Official, Winners Look Ahead

Election 2022 local results are official, following Mercer County Prosecutor Angelo Onofri’s investigation into an Election Day scanner failure and County Clerk Paula Sollami Covello’s certi cation of the vote tally ahead of the state’s November 26 deadline.

Onofri announced last week that his investigation determined that there was no criminal intent or vote tampering during the election. The problem, the investigation concluded, was a human error made in the programming of the voting machines by an employee of Dominion Voting Systems. The error prevented the machines from scanning.

“Despite this setback, on Election Day, all ballots were securely transferred to the Board of Elections office, where they were counted by a bipartisan group of commissioners on high-capacity scanners,” according to a press release from the county clerk’s office. “Every ballot that was cast on Election Day was counted, and the integrity of the election remained intact throughout the process.”

Sollami Covello expressed her appreciation to the prosecutor’s office, as well as the Board of Elections Commissioners and the Office of the Superintendent of Elections for their work to ensure the

reliability of the election process. “I am pleased there was no intentional criminal action that created this problem,” she said. “Election integrity is something I have worked hard to ensure and have taken great pride in over the past 17 years serving as Mercer County clerk.”

In a November 12 statement, Mercer County Executive Brian Hughes called for a “thorough public review of what went wrong with the voting and a “comprehensive overhaul of the elections process in

Mercer County.” He added, “We’ve got too many people in control and the quality of our elections has suffered as a result, undermining people’s faith in the democratic process.”

Princeton voters re-elected Democrats Michelle Pirone Lambros and Mia Sacks, running unopposed, to Princeton Council, and, in the race for three seats on the Princeton Public Schools (PPS) Board of Education (BOE), supported the three incumbents Susan Kanter, Dafna Kendal,

Bear Hunt in NJ to Resume December 5; No Princeton Bear Sightings Since August

For six days, from Monday, December 5 through Saturday, December, 10, New Jersey, for the rst time since 2020, will allow hunters to shoot bears on private and state-owned land in northwestern parts of the state — unless the Animal Protection League of New Jersey (APLNJ) and other opposition groups have their way.

On November 15, 2022, the New Jersey Fish and Game Council voted unanimously to approve emergency regulations amending the Game Code and adopting a new comprehensive black bear management plan “to control the black bear population and reduce the threat of dangerous

encounters between bears and humans through regulated hunting and non-lethal management measures.”

The Fish and Game Council vote was followed on the same day by approval by New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) commissioner Shawn LaTourette and action by New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy to rescind his 2018 executive order that banned bear hunts on state property.

“The facts on the ground have shown that we cannot rely on nonlethal methods alone to protect New Jersey residents

Continued on Page 16 Volume LXXVI, Number 48 www.towntopics.com 75¢ at newsstands Wednesday, November 30, 2022 “Seldom Told Stories of The Delaware River” 40-Mile Tour 5 Homelessness and Poverty In Mercer Are Focus of Panel Discussion 8 Local Ballet Teacher Reflects on Her Role In Rodeo 12 A November Farewell With Twain, Vonnegut, And Lake 20 Pozaric Comes Up Big as PU Men’s Water Polo Advances In NCAA Tourney 31 PDS Cross Country Star McCann, Hun Football QB Lainez Get the Nod as Top Fall Performers 34-35 Continued on Page 10
Continued on Page 14
Attendees share what
are looking forward to this holiday season in this week’s Town Talk on page 6.
Plohn)
LIGHTING UP THE NIGHT: A large crowd was on hand for the Annual Palmer Square Tree Lighting on Friday evening. The event also featured musical performances and a visit from Santa Claus.
they
(Photo by Charles R.
Art . . . . . . . . . . . . 26-27 Books 19 Calendar 28 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . 41 Holiday Magic 17 Mailbox 18 New To Us 29-30 Nonprofit Spotlight 21-22 Obituaries 39-40 Perfect Gift 2 Performing Arts . . . 24-25 Police Blotter 12 Real Estate 41 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Topics of the Town 5 Town Talk 6
Award-Winning Architect Barbara A. Hillier, AIA, Dies at 71 39
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WE’VE EARNED ANOTHER FULL THREE-YEAR ACCREDITATION

The Saint Peter’s Breast Center has always been on the front line in the battle against breast cancer. We’re proud that for the fifth straight time, we’ve earned a full three-year accreditation from the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), a program of the American College of Surgeons.

Saint Peter’s breast care team of experts in multiple specialties designs a customized treatment plan for each patient using the latest technology, medications and surgical procedures available.

Saint Peter’s Women’s Imaging Center, accredited by the American College of Radiology as a Breast Imaging Center of Excellence, offers mammography and other diagnostic breast services, including ultrasound, stereotactic biopsy and needle localization.

To learn more about Saint Peter’s Breast Center, call 732.339.7704 or visit saintpetershcs.com/breastcenter

Sponsored by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen

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Mill Hill Holiday Tour

Revives Trenton Tradition

This year’s Mill Hill Holiday House Tour is on Saturday, December 3, from 12-5 p.m. in the historic Mill Hill neigh borhood. Tickets are $20 and are available online, or on the day of the tour at Artworks, 19 Everett Alley, where there is ample parking within easy walking distance of Mill Hill.

The House Tour started more than 55 years ago. It is Mill Hill’s signature event and a Trenton holiday tradition.

Several homes in the neigh borhood will display special decorations, along with sea sonal music, refreshments, and cheerful conversation on stoops and sidewalks.

This year’s event will feature both indoor decor and outdoor entertaining, depending on the host’s preference. Owners of historic homes will welcome guests to view decorations, relax, mingle, and enjoy re freshments. The tour is held rain or shine.

Mill Hill’s 19th century

streetscape includes a variety of architectural styles, sizes, and ages. The tour is organized by the Old Mill Hill Society and residents of Mill Hill. Tour pro ceeds help finance grants to assist Mill Hill home and busi ness owners with maintaining the national historic landmark standards protecting the area’s unique architecture.

Children under 12 are admit ted free. Masking preferences are indicated by signage at each entrance, at the owner’s discretion. Visit trentonmillhill. org for more information.

Topics In Brief A Community Bulletin

Master Plan Open House: On Wednesday, November 30 between 4 and 7 p.m. at Princeton Public Library, the public is invited to stop by to learn about the Master Plan process, existing conditions, and highlights from public surveys. Share thoughts and ideas to help shape the future of the community. Visit engage.princetonmasterplan. org for more information.

Food and Gift Donation Center at Princeton Airport : Unwrapped gifts and canned or boxed food are accepted in the lobby through December 18, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., for distribution through the Mercer County Board of Social Services and FoodBank Network of Somerset County. Visit princetonairport.com for more information.

Join Boards, Commissions or Committees : The municipality is looking to fill vacancies with residents of Princeton who are willing to attend regularly scheduled meetings. Visit princetonnj.gov for more information.

Call for Land Stewards: Join the Friends of Princeton Open Space (FOPOS) for morning (9 a.m.-12 p.m.) or afternoon (1-4 p.m.) volunteer sessions under the guid ance of FOPOS’ Director of Natural Resources and Stewardship, to assist with critical restoration projects at the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Weekday and weekend sessions available. Visit fopos.org/getinvolved.

Caroling Around the Square : On Christmas Eve at 4:30 p.m., the public is invited to gather around the Palmer Square Green to sing holiday songs. The Christmas Eve Brass Band will lead the festivities, and Santa is expected. Free.

Blood Donors Needed: The American Red Cross needs blood and platelets to keep supplies from dropping ahead of the holidays. All types are needed, especially type O. Visit RedCrossBlood.org or call (800) 733-2767 for more information.

Survey on Food Waste and Organics : The municipality is considering changes to the residential waste collection system to contain costs and decrease the carbon footprint. A survey to share feedback is available at accessprinceton@princetonnj.gov.

Free COVID-19 Test Kits: Available at Princeton Health Department, 1 Monu ment Drive, Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. There is limit of four per household; you must reside in Princeton to get the kits.

Free Vision and Dental Services for Low Income Residents : The municipality is offering these services for low-income Princeton residents impacted by the pandemic. For application information, visit Princetonnj.gov.

Flu Shot Clinics : Several clinics are being held throughout the fall at different area locations. For a full list, email healthdepartment@princetonnj.gov.

Gas Leaf Blowers : Are now permitted through December 15 from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Mondays-Fridays and through 5 p.m. Saturdays. No use on Sundays.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 • 4 TOWN TOPICS Princeton’s Weekly Community Newspaper Since 1946 DONALD C. STUART, 1946-1981 DAN D. COYLE, 1946-1973 Founding Editors/Publishers DONALD C. STUART III, Editor/Publisher, 1981-2001 ® LAURIE PELLICHERO, Editor BILL ALDEN, Sports Editor DONALD GILPIN, WENDY GREENBERG, ANNE LEVIN, STUART MITCHNER, NANCY PLUM, DONALD H. SANBORN III, JEAN STRATTON, WILLIAM UHL Contributing Editors FRANK WOJCIECHOWSKI, CHARLES R. PLOHN, WERONIKA A. PLOHN Photographers USPS #635-500, Published Weekly Subscription Rates: $60/yr (Princeton area); $65/yr (NJ, NY & PA); $68/yr (all other areas) Single Issues $5.00 First Class Mail per copy; 75¢ at newsstands For additional information, please write or call: Witherspoon Media Group 4438 Route 27, P.O. Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528 tel: 609-924-2200 www.towntopics.com fax: 609-924-8818 (ISSN 0191-7056) Periodicals Postage Paid in Princeton, NJ USPS #635-500 Postmaster, please send address changes to: P.O. Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528 LYNN ADAMS SMITH Publisher
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HOLIDAYS IN THE CITY: The annual Mill Hill Holiday House Tour invites the public to see how residents of this historic Trenton neighborhood decorate for the holidays, inside and out. (Photo courtesy of Old Mill Hill Society)

Linda Mead drives over the Scudder Falls Bridge between Pennsylvania and New Jersey nearly every day. But until “Seldom Told Stories of the Delaware Riv er,” a mobile tour currently

available from D&R Green way Land Trust — of which Mead is president and CEO — she had never heard of its namesake.

“That was just one of the things I learned from work ing on this project,” said Mead, who directed and ed ited the self-guided 40-mile driving tour. Richard Betts Scudder was an early settler who purchased a parcel of land along the Delaware. In 1776, his grandson, Amos Scudder, helped guide Gen eral Washington’s troops to Trenton after crossing the river.

and Heather Callahan. All include photography, vid eos, artwork, and weblinks.

“If you’re taking the tour, you can start anywhere,” said Mead. “But ideally, you’d start at the south end in Bordentown or north end in Lambertville. As you drive along, it will give you direc tions. The story will talk to you about what you’re see ing, and how that relates to the Delaware River.”

Among the stories Mead and writer Amy Martin found particularly interesting was “Saved by the Marblehead ers: The Real Delaware

Scudder’s history is among the little-known facts in cluded in the audio tour, a partnership between D&R Greenway and TravelStorys GPS. The tour guides travel ers, via vehicle or armchair, along a route between Bor dentown and Lambertville.

“This is the sixth tour we’ve done. We’ve had walk ing tours and tours by kayak, among others. But this is the first driving tour,” said Mead. “It was, frankly, a much bigger challenge than we expected, because there were so many places to talk about. We had to figure out not only which ones to fea ture, but the easiest routes to reach them.”

Among the sites along the tour are Joseph Napoleon’s Point Breeze Estate in Bor dentown, recently preserved by D&R Greenway, the State of New Jersey and City of Bordentown; the Stoutsburg Sourland African American Museum in Skillman, on the National Historic Register; Lewis Island in Lambert ville, where fishermen have been pulling in shad for generations; and the Goat Hill Overlook, also in Lam bertville, from which George Washington surveyed the Delaware to make sure the boats his men had stashed on an island were hidden from sight before the his toric crossing of the river.

The stories were re searched and written by Su san Charkes, Brad Fay, Amy Martin, and Maria Stahl; and narrated by Mead, Martin,

“Seldom Told
Car
Continued on Next Page One-Year Subscription: $10 Two-Year Subscription: $15 Subscription Information: 609.924.5400 ext. 30 or subscriptions@ witherspoonmediagroup.com princetonmagazine.com IN PRINT. ONLINE. AT HOME. 5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 www.princetonmagazinestore.com Holiday season is almost upon us! Get your shopping done early at princetonmagazinestore.com. We have the latest and greatest gifts for any Princetonian! Loominous Design TOPICS Of the Town Laurent Chapuis Princeton Corkscrew This Holiday Season Shop Local in Princeton The joy of the holiday season is in giving. And the best gift you can give local businesses is your support. It’s easy to do in Princeton, where you’ll find unique and wonderful shops and restaurants around every corner. Share your finds on social media! #ShopSmall #ShopPrinceton PRINCETON BUSINESS PARTNERSHIP princetonbusiness.org $40 General $10 Students SERI ES 6PM & 9PM Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall Tue, Dec 13, 2022 TICKETS: PUC.PRINCETON.EDU | 609.258.9220
RIVER TALES: A view of the Delaware River from Goat Hill Overlook in Lambertville, part of the mobile and virtual tour of sites along the waterway, currently available from D&R Greenway Land Trust.
Stories of the Delaware River” Is a 40-Mile Tour, by
or Armchair

Crossing,” in which they discovered that Washington’s 1776 crossing took place with the crucial support of a multi-racial regiment from Marblehead, Mass.

To download the free TravelStorysGPS app and take the mobile tour, visit travelstorys.com/tours/. To access the tour from home devices, visit travelstorys.com/tours/ the-delaware-river.

“This tour will enrich everyone’s understanding and love of the Delaware River,” said Story Clark, founder and CEO of TravelStorysGPS,” in a press release. “Linda Mead and her team at D&R Greenway deeply understand the connection between people, land, and nature, and have an impressive track record for conserving land and interpreting it in ways that matter to communities and people.” —Anne Levin

Jewish Center Schedules Upcoming Talks and Events

The Jewish Center Princeton, 435 Nassau Street, is presenting several events, on varying topics, in December.

The first, “Uganda and the Jewish Question: The Story and Struggles of the Abayudaya Community,” will feature David Breakstone, executive director of the Yitzhak Center for a Shared Society, on Sunday, December 4 at 10:30 a.m. The in-person talk will be preceded by a light brunch starting at 10 a.m. Breakstone will share several stories of the ongoing struggle of the Black Jews of Africa — who they are, where they come from, how they live, and why Israel is so determined to keep them out.

Next, on December 6 at 8:15 p.m., “Great Minds Salon: Talking Trenton: The Good News, the Challenges, and the Process of Change” will feature Matt Wasserman and Sean Jackson talking about the future of the capital city. A Zoom link is provided at registration. Wasserman is a certified climate change professional who recently cofounded Community FoodCycle. Jackson is the CEO of Isles, the community development nonprofit based in Trenton. He previously served as state director for U.S. Senator Bob Torricelli and was senior vice president at Rosemont Associates, a public policy consulting and real estate development firm.

Rabbi Toba Spitzer of Congregation Dorshei Tzedek, West Newton, Mass., leads “God is Here: Reimagining the Divine” via Zoom on December 13 at 7:30 p.m., in person or via Zoom. She will draw on her new book of the same title, and the book will be available to the first 23 congregants who register and attend.

The Jewish Center’s Craft Fair is on Sunday, December 11 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the synagogue, which is located at 435 Nassau Street. The fair, and all events, are open to the public.

For security reasons, registration is required for all programs. Visit thejewishcenterofprinceton.org.

Question of the Week:

“What are you looking forward to this holiday season?”

(Photos by Charles R. Plohn)

Rollie:

Grace: “I’m looking forward to just spending time with my family. I am off at college, so it’s very nice to be home and be with the people I love.”

Eliza: “I am looking forward to spending time with my family and giving gifts to loved ones.”

Kathy: “I am looking forward to spending time with family, and holiday cheer.”

Diane:

Dale: “I’m

Dorothy: “Spending time with my grandchildren.”

—Diane

Nicholas: “We always look forward to being with our friends and family this time of year. And it has become even that more special, given everything that has happened over the last two-plus years. I think our kids have a really unique appreciation of what it means to be together for the holidays, which is great to witness.”

—Alexandra, Nicholas, and Nicholas Hilton Jr., Wyckoff

TOWN TALK©
A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.
“My son and daughter are home from their universities, so I am just very happy to have them home at the same time and be spending time with them.” —Rollie and Grace Cameron, Princeton “I’m looking forward to a lot of warm weather and lots and lots of parties.” looking forward to good health, and what they call Alcathons, and getting together with good friends, and the meals.” Jonsson, West Palm Beach, Fla.; Dale Yost, San Diego, Calif.; and Dorothy Plohn, Princeton
TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 • 6
Continued
Page
—Eliza Tilney-Sandberg and Kathy Xiang, both of Princeton
TOWN
Delaware River
from Preceding
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Homelessness and Poverty in Mercer Are Focus of Dec. 1 Panel Discussion

Breaking the cycle of poverty and eradicating homelessness in Mercer County will be on the agenda on Thursday, December 1 at 6 p.m. at Labyrinth Books on Nassau Street, with a panel of HomeFront experts leading the discussion.

“Our panel discussion will share important background on what poverty and homelessness look like right now right here in Mercer County and give insight on HomeFront’s innovative, family-byfamily approach to breaking the cycle of poverty,” said HomeFront CEO Sarah Steward, who will be moderating the event. “The HomeFront team will share why we do the work we do, the impact it has, and what we, as a community and as individuals, can do to support our neighbors.”

Panel members will include Celia Bernstein, CEO of Homes by TLC, a close partner of HomeFront, which develops affordable permanent housing in Mercer County; and Sheila Addison, director of the HomeFront Family Campus, which hosts 38 homeless families at a time, providing wraparound services to ensure that parents and their children have a unique plan specific to their needs.

Also on the panel will be Charles Wallace, director of Hire Expectations, HomeFront’s job training and high school equivalency prep program, which provides training opportunities, mentoring, and job placement; Catherine Cozzi, resource network director, overseeing HomeFront’s food pantries, FreeStore, Diaper Resource

Center, and Furnish the Future Program; and Chris Marchetti, director of Joy, Hopes, and Dreams, a HomeFront program that provides yearround supports for hundreds of kids in the community, with an emphasis on academic enrichment and tutoring.

The hour-long panel discussion will be followed by an open Q&A starting at 7 p.m.

“For over 30 years, HomeFront has been providing housing and support services like food, education, career support, and children’s programs for families in our community, lifting thousands of families out of crisis,” noted Steward, who served for seven years as HomeFront COO before becoming CEO on October 1, taking over from HomeFront founder Connie Mercer.

“Overall the goal of the panel is to show the comprehensiveness of our work,” said Homefront Marketing and Communications Specialist Jay Moschella. “At our core, our mission is to end family homelessness and, more importantly, give families the tools to break the cycle of poverty. Each family has different needs, and a plan needs to be created to aid them from crisis to stability.”

She continued, “HomeFront has 35 programs and services — many more than what will be represented at the panel. We hope that this discussion will inspire our community to help us assist local families in building long-term success.”

For more information or to get involved locally, visit

homefront.org, email getinvolved@homefrontnj.org, or call (609) 989-9417 x107.

—Donald Gilpin

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opening of Hamilton Home, Small Business Saturday, and the installation of holiday decorations in town. Planters and plantings on Nassau Street and contemplation of a restaurant week for 2023 were also mentioned.

Sustainable Princeton Executive Director Christine Symington’s status update on the Climate Action Plan cited a dip in greenhouse gas emissions during the pandemic. But there has been “a slight uptick” since COVID-19 has eased, she said. Emissions come mostly from the heating and cooling of homes, schools, and commercial buildings, she said. Another portion comes from transportation; a “small sliver” is from solid waste and waste water treatment.

The plan contains more than 80 actions and stipulates that a progress report is given every three years. The goal is to reduce greenhouse gas submissions 80 percent by the year 2050, with some interim goals. Solar installations have increased by 73 percent since 2019, “so that’s a bright spot,” Symington said.

Other positive actions include the town’s hiring of an open space manager, the preservation of the Lanwin tract, and the street tree inventory that is currently underway. Symington also praised the task force on food insecurity led by the Human Services department. “It gets food to where it needs to go rather than the landfill,” she said,

adding that the recent approval of cart-based solid waste collection will also help.

Asked what can be done to reach the plan’s goals, Symington stressed that there needs to be a continuation of the focus on equity.

“As we do all of the things we’ve laid out in the plan, we need to continue to do things in a way that makes the community better for everybody.”

She also mentioned the reworking of the town’s Master Plan. “I don’t think it can be overstated just how important the Master Plan is going to be in attaining our goals,” she said. “It’s going to determine how we build, where we build, and who is going to live in our community.”

An open house on the Master Plan is being held on November 30 from 4-7 p.m. Senior Planner Justin Lesko gave a brief update on preparations for the event at Princeton Public Library’s Community Room.

Members of the public are encouraged to drop in anytime during those hours and provide comments. Lesko said he hopes the reworked plan will be ready for release by early summer.

The next meeting of Council is scheduled for Monday, December 19 at 7 p.m.

—Anne Levin

FirstEnergy Corporation Helps Dvoor Farm Planting

FirstEnergy Corporation recently visited Hunterdon Land Trust’s (HLT) Dvoor Farm, where they helped plant 350 trees as part of the Walnut Brook stream restoration project.

The 13 employees, who are members of its Green Team and Women in Leadership program, joined several HLT volunteers, spending several hours planting trees in the riparian corridor beside the stream. The trees, ranging in height from one to three feet, were supported by posts and covered with plastic tubes to protect them from hungry deer.

FirstEnergy donated all the trees, tubes, and posts for the project.

The project aims to mitigate flooding at the Dvoor Farm and its downstream neighbors. It will stabilize the brook’s banks from erosion, create several vernal pools to better manage stormwater flow, and support the wildlife for years to come.

“This was an important next step after the stream restoration construction work was completed earlier this fall; the trees and shrubs we planted will expand the riparian corridor and therefore improve stream health, in addition to increasing biodiversity and providing crucial food and shelter for native wildlife,” said Emily Dunn, HLT’s stewardship program manager.

The native trees and shrubs planted were silver maple, Alleghany serviceberry, silky dogwood, spicebush, sweetgum, red chokeberry, sycamore, white

oak, swamp white oak, and highbush blueberry.

“FirstEnergy is committed to environmental stewardship and supporting the communities we serve,” according to a company statement. “Tree canopies have diminished significantly in the recent years, especially in lower income areas. FirstEnergy Green Teams, which focus on supporting sustainable initiatives, have joined forces with our Forestry personnel to manage our treeplanting program.”

The company’s Women in Leadership program aims to develop current and future women leaders for senior management positions and addresses the challenges of work-life balance. As part of

this effort, HLT staff, board members, and volunteers recently held a workday at the farm. The team installed live stakes — live cuttings from dogwood trees that, when installed in a streambank, will take root and grow into new trees over time.

Jersey.

“It’s truly

what we can accomplish by working together,” said Jacqueline Middleton, HLT’s interim executive director. “We are so grateful to FirstEnergy and our volunteers, who worked so hard to make this happen.”

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Local Ballet Teacher Kathleen Moore Reflects on Her Role in “Rodeo”

On October 16, 1942, the European touring company Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo premiered Rodeo at New York City’s Metropolitan Opera House. With its evocative score by Aaron Copland, realistic setting at an American ranch by Oliver Smith, and groundbreaking choreography incorporating American tap and folk dance steps by Agnes de Mille — who also danced the lead role — the ballet took a giant step away from Ballet Russe’s repertory of traditional, Russian classics. It left an indelible mark on dance and musical theater. This year marks the 80th anniversary of that premiere. Celebratory performances and discussions are underway in locations across the country. Rodeo was recently staged by Salt Lake City’s Ballet West, and events are planned for the coming spring and fall at New York City’s Library of the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center. The ballet tells the story of a feisty cowgirl who has trouble fitting in. Her love for one man (The Head Wrangler) is unrequited. But she finds happiness with another (The Lead Roper), after often humorous and touching attempts to find her way.

Among those with vivid memories to share is Princeton resident Kathleen Moore, who teaches at Princeton Ballet School, American Repertory Ballet, and Princeton University. When Rodeo was revived in the late 1980s by American

Ballet Theatre (ABT), Moore danced the lead role of the Cowgirl. She was coached, one-on-one, by de Mille, an experience she recalls with enthusiasm.

“In our rehearsals, she was always so full of energy, so vibrant,” she said of de Mille, who by then was in a wheelchair as a result of a cerebral hemorrhage suffered a decade before (de Mille died in 1993). “Timing was huge, and not just for the comedy. It’s so specific.”

In a subsequent email, Moore described the Cowgirl as “a character that was full of emotion — spunk, going after what she wanted, a bit fragile and yet often funny, and always ‘getting back on the horse,’ wanting to be loved. A person you rooted for. You cared about her.”

Moore was a member of ABT during the years that Mikhail Baryshnikov was the artistic director. He was “a huge fan” of de Mille,” she said. “He wanted her involved with the company. She came in with a small group of her own dancers and started working with us on a ballet called The Informer about the Irish resistance, with a girl and two guys. It was a big deal, and I worked with her so much on the creation of that. After that, they decided to revive Rodeo, which hadn’t been done for at least 10 years. They went back and recreated the original designs. They made the new backdrop of Oliver Smith’s gorgeous prairie, and we had new costumes.”

De Mille would run rehearsals from the front of the room. “She was weaker and somewhat infirm, but totally together and with it,” Moore said. “When she’d bang her big diamond on the mirror, you listened. She would spend 30 minutes just on how the cowboys turned and walked off stage. For me, in my role, when the curtain would go up, I would bring up my hand and look across this vast prairie. It’s a simple gesture. But she spent a lot of time on it. The character is looking for who she is and who she’s going to become. She’s feisty. She does all the boys’ stuff but never fits in. It was such an American theme — you can achieve your dream, which for her was not to be in the kitchen with her mom doing needlepoint.”

According to theater lore, Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein were at the opening performance of Rodeo. They asked de Mille to choreograph their new show, Oklahoma , which is credited with changing the trajectory of American musical theater. Her career was set.

Despite de Mille’s stature in dance and theater, she was approachable, and she and Moore developed a friendship. “I would go to her apartment, have lunch with her, or just sit by her bedside and talk,” Moore said. “I got married in 1988, and her husband had died right before that. She would talk about him a lot when I would go to see her.”

Rodeo remains relevant because its theme is timeless, Moore said. She valued humor, and the importance of being honest and direct about how a step is done. “There was no artifice in her work,” she said. “Theatricality, perhaps, but her choreography was movement that came from within, and often created a larger theme or statement than the individual step or phrase. This is eternally important.”

Lecture on Water Pollution Highlights Local Work

“Our Shared Waters – A History of Improving Water Quality Through Partnership” will be presented by Elizabeth Brown on Wednesday, January 18 at 7 p.m., via the Delaware River Greenway Partnership (DRBC). Free pre-registration is at bit.ly/sharedwaters Pollution in the Delaware River was recognized as a problem as early as the 1700s and caused waterborne illnesses and fish kills. Today, the Delaware River is cleaner than it was back then. But what is the backstory?

The history of the Delaware River Basin Commis-

sion is a story of shared water resource management, the benefits of which are enjoyed today. The river still faces challenges to its sustainability, and today the DRBC works to ensure water security for over 13 million people in four states.

The lecture will highlight the Delaware River Basin Commission’s work managing and improving our shared water resources, the state of our basin, and the many stakeholder groups and partners who support its continued sustainability now and for future generations.

Brown is the director, external affairs and communications for the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC). She brings over 15 years of experience and knowledge of the Delaware River Basin and the environmental field to her role. Most recently, she led the National Audubon Society’s Delaware River Watershed program. She holds a B.S. in biology from Muhlenberg College and a degree from the George Washington University Law School.

This talk, one in a series, open to the public and free of charge, is sponsored by

the Delaware River Greenway Partnership (DRGP) about different aspects of the cultural, recreational, and natural heritage of the Delaware River. An environmental nonprofit, DRGP supports the Delaware River Scenic Byway, the Lower Delaware Wild and Scenic River, the Delaware River Water Trail, and the Delaware River Heritage Trail.

Police Blotter

On November 26, at 3:02 p.m., a Witherspoon Street resident reported that several Amazon packages were stolen from the front of her apartment. The total value of the items is $191.97. The Detective Bureau is investigating.

On November 23, at 12 a.m., a North Harrison Street resident reported that an unknown person entered his residence through an unlocked window between the hours of 8 a.m. and 11:55 p.m. that day, and ransacked several rooms. The Detective Bureau is investigating.

On November 22, at 10:18 a.m., an Albert Way resident reported that a package containing a Mackage Nina winter hat, valued at $240, which was delivered to her apartment building, was stolen. The Detective Bureau is investigating.

On November 21, at 7:57 a.m., a Haslet Avenue resident reported her silver 2020 Range Rover valued at $55,000 was stolen from her driveway sometime between 5 p.m. on November 20, and 7 a.m. on November 21. The vehicle was later recovered in Allentown, Pa. The Detective Bureau is investigating.

Veni, Emmanuel

Veni, Emmanuel

An Advent Concert on the O Antiphons

On November 19, at 8:36 a.m., an individual reported that an unknown person pried open an exterior door using unknown means in an attempt to enter his Bayard Lane business without permission or authority to do so. The Detective Bureau is investigating.

Veni, Emmanuel

Veni Emmanuel

An Advent Concert on the O Antiphons

Sunday, December 4, 2022 2:30pm

Princeton University Chapel

On November 14, at 11:15 p.m., subsequent to a motor vehicle stop for failure to keep right, the driver, a 53-yearold female from Yardley, Pa., was arrested for Driving While Intoxicated. She was transported to police headquarters where she was processed, charged accordingly, and released to a sober adult.

Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 • 12 EVERYONE WILL NOTICE, BUT NO ONE WILL KNOW. Princeton’s Premier Facial Plastic Surgeon Eugenie Brunner, MD, FACS A Surgeon’s Hands, An Artist’s Eye, A Woman’s Touch Surgical Enhancements • Laser Skin Rejuvenation • Injectable Treatments Facelift and Neck Lift VariLite™ for Sun Damage Restylane® and Botox® Cosmetic 256 Bunn Drive, Suite 4, Princeton, NJ 08540 | 609.921.9497 BrunnerMD.com | @EugenieBrunnerMD THANK YOU FOR VOTING Best Plastic Surgeon Sunday, December 4, 2022 2:30pm Princeton University Chapel The Chapel Choir presents a program of music inspired by the Veni, Emmanuel An Advent Concert on the O Antiphons Sunday, December 4, 2022 2:30pm Princeton University Chapel The Chapel Choir presents a program of music inspired by the Great “O” Antiphons, the 9th century source of the beloved hymn “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel.” Featuring prayers and poetry by Joan Mitchell, CSJ, and artwork by Ansgar Holmberg, CSJ, from their book Praying the Advent Names of God Questions: naldrich@princeton.edu Veni, Emmanuel An Advent Concert on the O Antiphons Sunday, December 4, 2022 2:30pm Princeton University Chapel The Chapel Choir presents a program of music inspired by the Great “O” Antiphons, the 9th century source of the beloved hymn “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel.” Featuring prayers and poetry by Joan Mitchell, CSJ, and artwork by Ansgar Holmberg, CSJ, from their book Praying the Advent Names of God Questions: naldrich@princeton.edu Veni, Emmanuel An Advent Concert on the O Antiphons Sunday, December 4, 2022 2:30pm Princeton University Chapel The Chapel Choir presents
a program of music inspired by the Great “O” Antiphons, the 9th century source of the beloved hymn “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel.” Featuring prayers and poetry by Joan Mitchell, CSJ, and artwork by Ansgar Holmberg, CSJ, from their book Praying the Advent Names of God Questions: naldrich@princeton.edu
The
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Antiphons, the 9th century source of the beloved hymn “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel.” Featuring prayers and poetry by Joan Mitchell, CSJ, and artwork by Ansgar Holmberg, CSJ, from their book Praying the Advent Names of God Questions: naldrich@princeton.edu
Sunday, December 4, 2022 2:30pm Princeton University Chapel
Chapel Choir presents a program of music inspired by the
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Advent Concert on the O Antiphons
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The Chapel Choir presents a program
music inspired by the Great “O” Antiphons, the 9th century source of the beloved hymn “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel.” Featuring prayers and poetry by Joan Mitchell, CSJ, and artwork by Ansgar Holmberg, CSJ, from their book Praying the Advent Names of God Questions: naldrich@princeton.edu
MARKING A DANCE MILESTONE: Former ballerina and Princeton Ballet School faculty member Kathleen Moore starred in Agnes de Mille’s groundbreaking “Rodeo,” and worked with the choreographer, when it was revived in 1989. (Photo by Stephen Dolan)
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from a growing black bear population,” Murphy said. His decision was a change in course for him after he suspended bear hunting on state property in 2018, then in 2021 allowed the state’s bear management plan to expire, thus making bear hunting illegal throughout the state.

Doris Lin, animal rights attorney and legal director for APLNJ, which is filing a lawsuit to reinstate the ban, expressed her objections to Murphy’s initiative. “I’m extremely disappointed that the governor has broken his promise,” she said. “There is no bear emergency. The risk from hunting accidents is much greater than the risk from bears.”

In announcing his decision, Murphy cited a sharp recent increase in the number of bear sightings and encounters in the state. “While committed to ending the bear hunt, the data demands that we act now to prevent tragic bear-human interactions,” he said.

According to NJDEP, the hunt could be extended an additional four days, from December 14 to 17, if 20 percent of the estimated bear population is not killed during the initial six-day hunt.

Referring to “Murphy’s stunning reversal,” the APLNJ and others claim

that officials have not implemented trash management and other non-lethal programs that could have effectively reduced human-bear encounters and enhanced public safety.

Through November 21, 2022, the NJDEP had reported 2,156 sightings and complaints of bear damage and nuisance for the year, an increase of 203 percent over the same period in 2021. So far this year 70 incidents of bears demonstrating aggressive behavior have been noted in the state.

Most of New Jersey’s bear population resides in the northwestern section of the state, with Mercer County reporting only 22 sightings and complaints from January 1 to November 21, 2022, according to NJDEP. The 2022 bear hunt is confined to five black bear management zones, which start just north of Princeton and extend to the northwestern corner of the state. Princeton and the rest of the state are closed to black bear hunting.

Princeton Animal Control Officer Jim Ferry stated that there had been no bear sightings reported in Princeton since August. He described responding to a call at an apartment building on Lawrence Drive in August. “I witnessed and then chased away a black bear that was going through some garbage cans,” he reported. “All we did was observe and pass

out information about bringing in bird feeders and securing your trash.”

The most recent bear sighting reported in Princeton, later in August, was on Route 206 near Cherry Valley Road. “The bear was headed north into Montgomery,” Ferry said, adding that he thought there may have been two bears spotted in town this year. There were sightings reported near Herrontown Woods, at Tyson Lane and Poe Road, at Longview Drive and Hartley Avenue, and near Riverside School, as well as in Lawrence Township in the area of Mercer Meadows and Yeger Drive.

The Princeton Municipal website in August warned residents who might encounter a black bear, “Do not run from it; running may trigger a chase response. If you encounter a bear that is feeding, do not approach it, and slowly back away. A bear on a food source will aggressively defend it.”

More information on New Jersey’s black bears and bear management, new hunting regulations, and necessary safety precautions can be found at dep.nj.gov or BearSmartNJ.org. Black bear damage and nuisance behavior should be reported to the NJDEP’s 24-hour hotline at (877) 927-6337.

—Donald Gilpin

Saint Peter’s Hospital Awarded ‘A’ Safety Grade

Saint Peter’s University Hospital received an “A” Hospital Safety Grade from The Leapfrog Group for f all 2022. This national distinction celebrates Saint Peter’s achievements in protecting patients in the hospital from preventable harm and errors.

“This distinction belongs to the entire Saint Peter’s community,” said Leslie D. Hirsch, president and CEO of Saint Peter’s Healthcare System. “It is the collaborative effort of everyone involved from our clinical and ancillary services teams who care for our patients to our support team who keeps

our facilities and equipment clean and safe to everyone in between. Working together, they ensure that we achieve the highest safety standards and that these standards are maintained across all areas of the hospital’s operations. We’re proud to continually deliver quality medical care without compromise and the Leapfrog distinction assures patients that we are unwavering in our standards for quality and safety.”

The Leapfrog Group is an independent national watchdog organization with a 10year history of assigning letter grades to general hospitals throughout the United States, based on a hospital’s ability to prevent medical errors and harm to patients.

The grading system is peerreviewed, fully transparent, and free to the public. Hospital Safety Grade results are based on more than 30 national performance measures and are updated each fall and spring.

“I applaud the hospital leadership and workforce for their strong commitment to safety and transparency,” said Leah Binder, president and CEO of The Leapfrog Group. “An ‘A’ Safety Grade is a sign that hospitals are continuously evaluating their performance, so that they can best protect patients. Your hospital team should be extremely proud of their dedication and achievement.”

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 • 14 HOLIDAY KICK OFF WEEKEND WITH SANTA FREE FUN for the whole family! Santa visits December 11 & 12, 12-3pm Firepits with S’mores Choose the Perfect Tree & Wreath Winery Open 12-5pm Unique & Local Gift Baskets Send now to arrive in time for the Holidays. Wide selection to choose from. Visit the farm or shop.terhuneorchards.com 330 Cold Soil Rd, Princeton, NJ 08540 • (609) 924-2310 Farm Open Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat & Sun 9-5 www.terhuneorchards.com KICK OFF THE HOLIDAY SEASON FREE FUN for the whole family! Santa visits December 10 & 17, 12-3pm Firepits with S’mores Choose the Perfect Tree & Wreath Winery Open 12-5pm – Winery Weekend Music Series Holiday Classes: Wreath Making, Holiday Arrangements Unique & Local Gift Baskets Send now to arrive in time for the Holidays. Wide selection to choose from. Visit the farm or shop.terhuneorchards.com Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co. Peaceful Holiday Season Best Wishes for a 741 Alexander Rd, Princeton • 924-2880
SUSTAINING A STATE PARK: Two PowerPoint presentations are the highlight of Kingston Historical Society’s annual meeting on Tuesday, December 6 at 7 p.m., at Kingston Firehouse, 6 Heathcote Road. The public is invited in person or via Zoom to “D&R Canal State Park: Sustaining a Key New Jersey Asset.” The park is the core and unifying element of the Millstone Valley Scenic Byway Corridor, a mix of preserved natural areas, farmland, historic villages such as Kingston, and a major recreational resource for New Jersey. Admission is free. Visit Khsnj.org/ talk to request a link.
continued from page one
Bear Hunt
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and Debbie Bronfeld over chal lengers Margarita “Rita” Rafa lovsky and Lishian “Lisa” Wu.

Final counts in the BOE elec tion gave Kanter 4,946 votes (25.28 percent), Kendal 4,601 votes (23.51 percent), Bron feld 4,365 votes (22.31 per cent), Rafalovsky 3,496 votes (17.87 percent), and Wu 2,160 votes (11.04 percent).

The re-elected Board mem bers all expressed their appre ciation to the voters for their trust and confidence, and all expressed their enthusiasm at the prospect of continuing to represent the community in working in the best interests of all the students.

Kendal, the current BOE president, emphasized her commitment to equity and ex cellence at PPS. “Our schools are the pride of our commu nity and we serve most stu dents well,” she wrote in an email. “But we have to do more to help our students of color, students with special needs, and students from low income households to reach their full potential. Equity and excellence are the two main goals I will focus on during the next three years. We have to ensure that all students have access to higher level courses and extracurricular activities while maintaining the aca demic standards that place our school district among the top districts in the state.”

Kanter, the top vote-getter, saw the election as an affir mation of major initiatives the Board has been working on.

“The district’s new strategic

plan will help us to continue to ensure areas of excellence within our schools, while we focus on supporting our most vulnerable learners,” she stat ed. “This election confirmed that our community wants our Board to support this goal while continuing to plan for growth, maintain our facili ties, and focus on sustainabil ity initiatives. The Board must continue to support the social/ emotional health of our com munity, foster a better sense of connection and belonging, while focusing on improving academic outcomes for our di verse group of learners. I look forward to supporting strate gies with clear measurables to achieve these goals.”

Bronfeld also highlighted several of her priorities for the upcoming three-year term. “Moving forward, I will continue to speak my mind to ensure every student receives a free and equitable education,” she wrote. “My focus will be on a transparent budget; the continued health and wellness of our staff and student body; plans for future growth; sup port of safe and secure facili ties; and hiring, training, and retaining diverse staff for our district.”

She continued, “I hope that community members who might differ with what I bring to the table and what I sup port for our students will con tinue to share their ideas, and engage in healthy discussions on how we can all support an excellent education for every student that attends Princeton Public Schools.”

Rafalovsky, whose election bid fell 869 votes short, stat ed In a November 23 letter to

Hospital’s Breast Care Center Receives Local Support

On Saturday, October 22, the Rothwell and Henderson families and Pennington Qual ity Market hosted a one-day shopping event donating 5 percent of the day’s proceeds to Capital Health’s Center for Comprehensive Breast Care.

In its eighth consecutive year, more than $41,000 has been raised benefiting servic es and programs available to the women (and men) cared for at the Center. “It is with profound gratitude and appre ciation, Capital Health thanks the Rothwell and Henderson families, as well as Pennington

Quality Market for their con tinued commitment to patient care and for generously sup porting the Cancer Center.” said Al Maghazehe, president and CEO, Capital Health.

“My mother’s death from breast cancer 30 years ago taught all of us the impor tance of raising awareness to educate women on early breast care and benefit ser vices,” said Mike Rothwell of Pennington Quality Market. “And through early detection, my sisters Barbara and Terri were able to address their can cer diagnosis quickly and suc cessfully. So, for the Rothwell Family, supporting the Capital

Health Center for Comprehen sive Breast Care is deeply per sonal. We are proud to offer our support to recognize the valuable life-saving services they provide.”

The center provides a com plete range of breast care under one roof, from annual screenings and advanced di agnostics to genetic testing, leading-edge oncology care, and a high-risk breast cancer program. The center is ac credited by the National Ac creditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), a program of the American College of Surgeons. Visit capitalbreast. org for more information.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 • 16 Whole Earth Holiday Baked Goods Whole Earth Gift Cards New Jersey Artisan Foods Organic Chocolates & Truffles All-Natural Bath & Body Care Products Maine Balsam Mini Pillows & Neck Pillows Natural Baby Care Products CBD Bath Salts & Bombs • Catnip Fish-shaped Sachets Frankincense & Myrrh Resins for Burning Holiday Essential Oil Gift Packs Aromatherapy Bracelets • Pure Beeswax Candles Recycled Wrapping Paper & Gift Bags Handmade Ornaments • Freshly Roasted Nuts Organic Teas & Coffees • Chanukah Candles & Soaps Mini Scented Soaps & Lip Balms Soapstone Essential Oil Diffusers Wooden & Soapstone Soap Dishes Tree-free Journals • Recycled Paper Notebooks Eye Pillows: Lavender, Eucalyptus Lavender & Chamomile Pillows giftssimple this holiday season, celebrate with 360 NASSAU STREET • PRINCETON One-Year Subscription: $10 Two-Year Subscription: $15 Subscription Information: 609.924.5400 ext. 30 or subscriptions@ witherspoonmediagroup.com princetonmagazine.com IN PRINT. ONLINE. AT HOME.
WINTER PRODUCE: Hunterdon Land Trust’s Winter Farmer’s Market will open for three con secutive Sundays beginning December 4 at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street in Flemington. Among the vendors are Aquasprout Farms, a hydroponics farm located in Branchburg. Several new vendors and many returning favorites will be on hand. Visit hunterdonlandtrust.org for more information.
Election Results
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Town Topics that her concerns were shared by thousands of Princeton residents and that she had succeeded in raising public awareness about the schools’ “declining math pro ficiency scores” and “falling national rankings.” —Donald Gilpin
17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 Town Topics Holiday Magic Family Friendly, Great Service, Great Price, Great Selection Complimentary Refreshments Open 9-5 Friday-Sunday Thanksgiving to Douglas Norway Fraser Handmade roping Family Friendly, Great Service, Great Price, Great Selection Complimentary Refreshments Best Christmas Trees in Mercer County Two time State Grand Champion Winner Home of the St. Patricks Cathedral Wreath and Christmas Tree Open 9-5 Friday-Sunday Thanksgiving to Christmas 1312 Old York Road Robbinsville, NJ 08691 609-259-8122 • intrees.net OVER 2,000 TREES TO CHOOSE FROM 5-12’ Douglas fir, Canaan fir, Norway and Blue spruce, and white pine. Pre-cut premium Fraser Fir and Korean Fir Handmade wreaths, roping and grave blankets Family Friendly, Great Service, Great Price, Great Selection Complimentary Refreshments Open 9-5 Thanksgiving 1312 Old York Road 609-259-8122 Friday to Sunday 1312 Old York Road Robbinsville, NJ 08691 609-259-8122 • intrees.net OVER 2,000 TREES TO CHOOSE FROM 5-10’ Douglas fir, Canaan fir, Norway and Blue spruce, and white pine. Pre-cut premium Fraser Fir and Balsam Fir Handmade wreaths, roping and grave blankets Proudly Serving the Montgomery and Princeton Area for Over 36 Years! Landscape Design & Installation 609.924.6767 Sat 9am - 5:30pm Sunday 9am - 4pm Route 27, Princeton 2 miles north of Kingston • All natural handmade wreaths filled with berries • Beautiful poinsettias in all sizes • Ornaments, lights, & all the trimmings for your holiday needs 609.924.6767 Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm Sunday 9am - 4pm Route 27, Princeton 2 miles north of Kingston • Fresh cut Pennsylvania grown fraser, douglas, and concolor firs - up to 12’ • Daily fresh cut winter berry & American holly • All natural handmade wreaths filled with berries • Beautiful poinsettias in all sizes • Ornaments, lights, & all the trimmings for your holiday needs • Grave blankets made of all natural trimmings and berries Proudly Serving the Princeton Area for Over 38 Years! Proudly Serving the Montgomery and Princeton Area for Over 36 Years! Landscape Design & Installation 609.924.6767 Mon-Sat 9am - 5:30pm Sunday 9am - 4pm Route 27, Princeton 2 miles north of Kingston • Fresh cut Pennsylvania grown fraser and douglas fir - up to 12’ • Daily fresh cut winter berry & American holly • All natural handmade wreaths filled with berries • Beautiful poinsettias in all sizes • Ornaments, lights, & all the trimmings for your holiday needs Landscape Design & Installation Proudly Serving the Montgomery and Princeton Area for Over 36 Years! Landscape Design Installation Fresh cut Pennsylvania grown fraser and douglas fir up to 12’ Daily fresh cut winter berry & American holly Beautiful poinsettias in all sizes Ornaments, lights, & all the trimmings for your holiday needs S t a y c o z y + c r e a t i v e . Whether you're a beginner or an advanced artist, there's something for you at the Arts Council of Princeton Take a class or workshop in printmaking, pottery, sewing, Flamenco, fiber arts, painting... there are so many exciting mediums for you and your family to explore 7 0 + a r t i s t i c o p t i o n s a w a i t . W I N T E R S T U D I O S 102 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ Paul Robeson Center for the Arts S c h o l a r s h i p s a v a i l a b l e !

Thanking All Who Helped to Quickly Find Runaway Dog

To the Editor:

My husband and I (residents of Princeton for 56 years) had offered to dog sit for our neighbors while they vis ited their children and grandchildren over the Thanks giving weekend. We had been forewarned that their dog had gotten loose from his collar during a walk in the neighborhood the week before, and we were given the names of neighbors who had dogs and knew their dog, Clive, as well as the number of the police who they suggested we contact should we have this unfortunate experience while walking him.

I sent pictures of the calm and happy dog sitting in our house after a walk before I took him home again, trying to assure his owners that all was well. Unfortu nately, during one of the visits to our house, my husband inadvertently opened our porch door and Clive was out in no time (we thought our garden was perfectly fenced in!). Right away, I was contacting all our neighbors and had called a most friendly dispatcher at the police department to explain our dilemma. In no time, neigh bors were ringing our doorbell about where Clive had been sighted and were out searching for him, though they knew Clive was “treat aversive.” Golfers from the Springdale Golf Club also joined the search.

The hero of this tale is Travis Hall, whose kind and loving parents have always raised rescue beagles, and Travis has become known as the “neighborhood dog whisperer.” Right away, Travis was out with his dog Renzo and from somewhere Clive came running to see his friend Renzo and made our day and that of our neighborhood. We now have a new name for Clive, “Houdini!”

It is wonderful to live in such a neighborhood and have such a friendly police department, and we say, “thank you to you all.”

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 • 18 jazzatprinceton.com music.princeton.edu MONDAY 12.05.22 7.30 PM TAPLIN AUDITORIUM FINE HALL FREE UNTICKETED Jazz Small Groups X and A DIRECTOR Matthew Parrish WORKS BY Horace Silver Sam Rivers Fats Waller And more! PLAYERS Lukas Arenas ’26 Alto Sax Thomas Verrill ’25 Trombone Alex Egol ’24 Piano Mihir Rao ’26 Drums Matthew Parrish (Faculty) Bass DIRECTOR Ted Chubb WORKS BY Charles Fambrough Gigi Gryce Dizzy Gillespie And more! PLAYERS Milan Sastry ’26 Alto Saxophone Isaac Yi ’24 Tenor Saxophone Pranav Vadapalli ’25 Trombone Rohit Oomman ’24 Guitar Shlok Shah ’26 Piano Patrick Jaojoco GS Bass Ryder Walsh ’26 Drums Let Lucy’s do the cooking! visit us online for our menu: lucystogo.com Christmas is coming! Renata
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Ober Road

Peter Brooks and Brigid Doherty

Discuss “Use and Abuse of Narrative”

Peter Brooks and Brigid Doherty will talk about Brooks’ new book Seduced by Story: On the Use and Abuse of Narrative (New York Review of Books) on Wednesday, December 7 at 6 p.m. The event can

be attended in person at Labyrinth Books or via livestream; to register, visit labyrinthbooks.com.

David Shields calls Se duced by Story “A rhap sody to the partial suspen sion of disbelief that allows

us to immerse ourselves in novels, but simultaneously and most crucially, a bril liant intervention against the complete suspension of dis belief that allows a citizenry to succumb to conspiracy theories, false-flag narra tives, authoritarian fictions. An eloquent and triumphant culmination of Peter Brooks’ lifelong inquiry into the aes thetic and ethical intersec tion of literature, psycho analysis, law, and politics. Impossibly good.”

Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature at Yale, Brooks is the author of numerous books including The Melodramatic Imagina tion, Reading for the Plot, Psychoanalysis and Story telling, and Flaubert in the Ruins of Paris , as well as of two novels, World Else where and The Emperor’s Body

Doherty holds a joint ap pointment in German and art and archaeology at Princeton University. Her research and teaching fo cus on the interdisciplinary study of 20th-century art and literature, with special emphasis on the history of German modernism and on relationships among the vi sual arts, literature, and aes thetic and psychoanalytic theories. She is currently completing a book on con temporary artist Rosemarie Trockel’s “Rorschach Pic tures.”

Labyrinth Presents Writers on Writing

Hilary Plum and Adrienne Raphel will interview each other in “Two Writers on Writing: Considering Class, Play, Power, and Language in the Essay and the Poem,” on Tuesday, December 6, at

6 p.m. The event will be held at Labyrinth; to register for the livestream, visit laby rinthbooks.com.

Plum is the author of sev eral books, most recently the novel Strawberry Fields, winner of the Fence Mod ern Prize in Prose. Her po etry collection, Excisions , is forthcoming. She teaches fiction, nonfiction, editing, and publishing at Cleveland State University and in the NEOMFA program, and she serves as associate director of the CSU Poetry Center. Recent work has appeared in Granta, College Litera ture, American Poetry Re view, Fence, and elsewhere. Raphel teaches in the Writing Program at Princ eton University. She is the author of Thinking Inside the Box: Adventures with Crosswords and the Puz zling People Who Can’t Live Without Them and of the poetry collection What Was It For, winner of the Black Box Poetry Prize. Her essays, poetry, and criticism appear in The New York Times, The New Yorker, The Paris Review, Poetry, The New Republic, and The Atlantic, among other pub lications.

C.K.

Series, named after the late Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award-winning poet C.K. Williams, who served on Princeton’s faculty for 20 years. The program is free and open to the public, no tickets are required.

The Williams series show cases senior students of the Program in Creative Writing alongside established writers as special guests. Seniors who will be reading from their recent work are Yunxia Hallowell, Chaya Holch, Mel Hornyak, Sheherzad Jamal, Cassandra James, and Dani elle Jenkins. The studio is an accessible venue, and guests in need of access ac commodations are invited to contact the Lewis Center at LewisCenter@princeton.edu at least one week prior to the event date.

30, between 8 and 9 p.m. This virtual only event will be held via Zoom. For regis tration info, visit princetonli brary.libnet.info/event.

From the publisher: “An incisive and sympathetic examination of the case for ending the practice of im prisonment.”

Shelby is the Caldwell Titcomb Professor of Afri can and African American Studies and of Philosophy at Harvard University. He is the author of Dark Ghet tos: Injustice, Dissent, and Reform and We Who Are Dark: The Philosophical Foundations of Black Soli darity

Williams Series

Features Raven Leilani Best-selling novelist and National Book Foundation “5 under 35” honoree Ra ven Leilani, author of the Kirkus Prize-winning novel Luster, will read from her work at 5 p.m. on Decem ber 5 in the Drapkin Studio at the Lewis Arts complex on the Princeton Univer sity campus. Senior Ashira Shirali will host the event, which is part of the 20222023 C.K. Williams Reading

Leilani’s debut novel Lus ter was a 2020 New York Times Notable Book of the Year and named a best book of that year by NPR, Vanity Fair, O Magazine, Los An geles Times, Boston Globe , and other publications. She has been called “a major new talent” by USA Today and “a writer of exhilarat ing freedom and daring” by Zadie Smith in Harper’s Ba zaar Her writing has been published in Granta, The Yale Review, New England Review, The Cut and else where.

Library Hosting Virtual Event on Prison Abolition

African American Stud ies scholar and philosopher Tommie Shelby will discuss his new book, The Idea of Prison Abolition (Princ eton University Press) with James Forman Jr., professor of law at Yale Law School, on Wednesday, November

Forman attended Brown University and Yale Law School and then worked as a law clerk for Justice San dra Day O’Connor of the U.S. Supreme Court. While working as a public defend er in Washington, D.C., he co-founded the Maya Ange lou Public Charter School, an alternative school for youth who have struggled in school, dropped out, or have been arrested.

The program is presented in partnership with Princ eton University Press and with support from the Na tional Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, find ings, conclusions or recom mendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

TOWN TOPICS

is printed entirely on recycled paper.

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022
Books
609.688.0777 homesteadprinceton.com 300 Witherspoon Street Shop local in store, curbside schedule private shopping Monday-Saturday before we open. Complimentary HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS! Fun Ornaments & Holiday Decor Best Selling Nautical 3-D Wood Maps & Princeton Decor NJ Local Cookbooks & Made To Order Baskets Adorable Baby & Kid Gifts Handmade Pottery & Candles Holiday Masks, Soaps & Hand Sanitizers And Much, Much More. 609.688.0777 | homesteadprinceton.com 300 Witherspoon Street | Princeton Furniture • Gifts • Design For information on our upcoming Holiday Shopping Events, please visit us at www.homesteadprinceton.com Holiday Gift Ideas • Unique & Fun Ornaments / Holiday Décor • Best Selling Nautical 3-D Wood Maps • Princeton Décor • Made to order gift baskets for kids, grandparents, friends & family • Adorable baby & fun kid gifts • Handmade Pottery, Jewelry, Soaps, Candles • Corporate gifts • Complimentary Gift Wrapping and Much, Much More Best Furniture Store Best Home Remodeler/Design Best Outdoor Furnishings Shop • Give • Love Local 609.688.0777 homesteadprinceton.com 300 Witherspoon Street, Princeton

PEACE OF MIND Lisa & Maureen

“Caring for my mother who had begun to show signs of dementia was particularly difficult to manage from afar. She’d become fearful and anxious, and we knew it was time to find help. Initially, we found care at a community near her home, but the memory care wasn’t right for her cognitive level. She couldn’t connect with the other residents, felt alone, and was angry. Finally, the long distance became too much and I moved her closer to me. Maplewood had just what we needed. Their Tides program was the perfect solution. It provided just the right amount of structure and support and would be able to evolve with her as her needs changed. Mom maintains her independence but is reminded of dinner time or a workshop that is being held. To see her content and thoroughly engaged is a great relief. Maplewood cares about the dignity of its residents and it shows – the chef comes out to show her a plate of what is on the menu, there are fresh flowers, and beautiful linens on the table – all of these thoughtful details really make a difference.”

Maplewood Senior Living is dedicated to the care and well-being of our residents living with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. We offer two distinctive levels of memory care that address the unique needs of our residents. Tides™ at Maplewood Senior Living rises to meet your loved one right where he or she is, offering a level of assistance that’s just right.

Tides residents receive cognitively stimulating programming that promotes brain health, along with appropriate cueing, prompting and reminders, lifestyle coordination, and personalized programs that provide additional structure to help guide them through their daily lives.

Maplewood at Princeton One Hospital Drive, Plainsboro, New Jersey 609.285.5427 | MaplewoodAtPrinceton.com

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022
—Lisa , for her Mother, Maureen , Resident
Brighten the holidays for a child in need through our Red Stocking Drive! T h i s h o l i d a y s e a s o n , h e l p u s s u p p o r t a l l o f o u r v u l n e r a b l e c h i l d r e n a n d p r o v i d e h o p e f o r t h e n e w y e a r . C O N T A C T A R I A N A A T C B A R T O L O M E A @ C H S O F N J . O R G F O R M O R E I N F O R M A T I O N W W W C H S O F N J O R G S c a n to Donate Scan t o etanoD Make More Mentoring Moments Possible Volunteer Donate Enroll a Child IGNITE POTENTIAL IGNITE POTENTIAL www mercerbbbs org | 609 656 1000 Town Topics Nonprofit Spotlight 23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022

Performing Arts

“The 9/11 Memorial Performance Project” was selected for the Excellence in Devised Theatre Award, Region II, at the last virtual Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival. MCCC was the only community college among participants from two- and fouryear schools last winter to win a performance award.

“We are all really excited about our new production and we are hoping this provocative interactive collage catches the attention of the 2023 Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival,” said GazenbeekPerson. “Two representatives from the festival will be coming to see the show, and we hope for an invitation to the festival thereafter.”

Visit kelsey.mccc.edu or call (609) 570-3333 for more information.

Hopewell Theater Raises

Hopewell Theater is located at 5 South Greenwood Avenue in Hopewell. Details of its current season of performances are at Hopewelltheater.com.

Polarizing Politics is Topic

Of Dance Theatre Production

Mercer County Community College’s (MCCC) Academic Theatre and Dance Company presents “Us vs. Them, an Interactive Dance Theatre Collage” Friday and Saturday, December 2 and 3 at 7:30 p.m. at the Studio Theatre, CM 122 next to MCCC’s Kelsey Theatre in West Windsor. Tickets are $22 for adults and $20 for students, seniors, and children.

The theme is the current state of affairs. It is 2022 and the United States feels more divided than ever. Amid polarizing politics and the rise of social media, “we the people” are left only to what we know and to pick a side. But who is us and who is them?

Through a collage of movement and original songs, the performers take spectators on an interactive journey, with familiar faces aimed at making audience members

laugh and sympathize while giving them a chance to decide for themselves.

“We are living in very unusual times and ‘Us vs. Them’ explores this idea of taking sides in a beautifully collaborative fashion,” said Jody Gazenbeek-Person, coordinator of MCCC’s Academic Theatre and Dance Program.

Last winter’s Academic Theatre and Dance Company original work entitled

Funds

for

Artworks Trenton Hopewell Theater is raising funds for local arts and youth art programs this season, with a holiday donation drive for the nonprofi t Artworks Trenton. Now through December 31, Hopewell Theater patrons will have the option to add a $5 donation or more to their ticket purchase online or in person.

There will also be an option to donate directly through the donation drive webpage on Hopewelltheater.com.

Artworks Trenton promotes artistic diversity and fosters creativity, learning, and appreciation of the arts. Their goal is to make art an accessible experience for all. The nonprofi t holds exhibitions, workshops, events, and public projects, engaging connection with the Trenton community and beyond. With the help of donors and patrons, they can provide a year-round range of exhibitions and classes.

Speed Dating

Meet other classical music-loving singles for in your age group before enjoying a surround-sound holiday concert by the tenThing Brass Ensemble

Tuesday, December 13, 2022 | 7:00 PM Maclean House, Princeton University

Tickets and more information: puc.princeton.edu/do-re-meet @princetonuniversityconcerts

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 • 24
presented in partnership withThe Singles Group
INTERACTIVE DANCE: Jackson Jules of Trenton rehearses for “Us vs. Them, an Interactive Dance Theatre Collage,” December 2 and 3 at 7:30 p.m. at the MCCC Studio Theatre, CM 122, next to Kelsey Theatre on the campus of Mercer County Community College in West Windsor.
MERCER MUSEUM & FONTHILL CASTLE
IS ON

Trenton Film Festival

Seeks Submissions

Submissions are now open for the 2023 Trenton Film Festival, to be held in June of next year.

Filmmakers are welcome to submit short or featurelength films in all genres: drama and comedy, documentary, animated, experimental, spoken word or music video. The festival especially encourages applicants from New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and New York, as Q&A with the filmmakers is a valued feature of the festival.

Deadlines for submitting an entry are January 15; December 15 for early birds; and the late deadline is February 15 (different fees apply). To submit a film, click on FilmFreeway at filmfreeway.com/festivals, search for “Trenton Film Festival” and click the green Submit Now button.

For more information about the Trenton Film Society, visit trentonfilmsociety.org/.

“Chicken and Biscuits”

At Crossroads Theatre

In a limited engagement, Crossroads Theatre will present the comedy Chicken

and Biscuits, written by Douglas Lyons and directed by Lynda Gravátt, December 21-31.

Chicken & Biscuits is a story of love, forgiveness, and healing in a comedically complex Black family. The Jenkins clan is coming together to celebrate the life of their now-deceased father — hopefully without killing each other. Any hope for a peaceful reunion is shattered when a family secret shows up at the funeral.

Crossroads, which performs at the Arthur Laurents Theater of New Brunswick Performing Arts Center, will host a special New Years’ Eve performance and event on December 31 starting at 8:30 p.m., followed by a party with a one-hour open bar, live band, hors d’oeuvres, and dessert station. The party will take place upstairs in the large rehearsal room with floorto-ceiling windows offering the perfect view of the fireworks across the street at The Heldrich Hotel starting at midnight.

Tickets are $20-$135 per person. For the full schedule of performances and more information, visit Crossroadstheatrecompany.org.

Diverse Program of Works

At Princeton Dance Festival

New and repertory works are on the program of the 2022 Princeton Dance Festival, presented by Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Dance at the Berlind Theatre of McCarter Theatre Center, 91 University Place, December 2-4.

More than 50 students are performing in works by choreographers Ronald K. Brown, Davalois Fearon, Sun Kim, Michael J. Love, Susan Marshall, Rashaun Mitchell and Silas Riener, and Caili Quan, spanning tap, ballet, dance theater, West African/modern, and post-modern genres.

Shows are December 2 at 8 p.m., December 3 at 2 and 8 p.m., and December 4 at 2 p.m. The December 4 show is a relaxed performance. Tickets are $10-$17. Visit McCarter.org.

BIRDS OF A FEATHER READ TOGETHER: It’s almost Christmas in 1815, and studious Lord Arthur de Bourgh (Tyler Eisenacher) meets bookish Mary Bennet (Charlotte Kirkby) in the library at Fitzwilliam and Elizabeth Darcy’s estate in ActorsNET’s production of “Miss Bennet: Christmas at Pemberley.” The familyfriendly holiday comedy, written in 2016 by Lauren Gunderson and Margot Melcon, picks up two years after Jane Austen’s classic novel “Pride and Prejudice” left off. Performances are December 2-18 at the Heritage Center Theatre, 635 North Delmorr Avenue, Morrisville. For tickets or additional information, visit actorsnetbucks.org.

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 DIRECTOR Matthew Parrish WORKS BY Miles Davis Charlie Parker Sonny Rollins And more! PLAYERS Henry Freligh ’25 Alto Sax Elle Lazarski ’26 Alto Sax John Cureton ’26 Trumpet Artha Abeysinghe ’26 Trombone Isadora Knutsen ’25 Guitar Jarod Wille ’24 Piano Nikhil De ’23 Bass Noah Daniel ’23 Drums Jazz Small Groups 1 and Z TUESDAY 12 › 13 › 22 7:30 PM TAPLIN AUDITORIUM FINE HALL FREE | UNTICKETED DIRECTOR Miles Okazaki Classic jazz repertoire and contemporary compositions, with a variety of styles and improvisational approaches. PLAYERS Gabriel Chalick ’24 Trumpet Evan Deturk ’23 Alto Saxophone Jack Johnson II ’23 Tenor Saxophone Adithya Sriram ’24 Baritone Saxophone Noah Daniel ’23 Guitar Alexander Moravcsik ’23 Piano Chloe Raichle ’23 Bass Alexander Macarthur ’25 Drums jazzatprinceton.com music.princeton.edu Persons requiring special assistance or accommodations are asked to contact Princeton Pro Musica two weeks in advance. Call (609) 683-5122 with questions or requests for assistance. Programs made possible in part by funds from:
Joseph Parrish baritone Featuring seasonal treasures from Handel, Bach, Bonds, Brandau, and more! Visit princetonpromusica.org or scan QR code for tickets
Heather Phillips soprano
FEAST OF CAROLS SCAN FOR TICKETS
Ryan J. Brandau, Artistic Director TAP AND MORE: Princeton University students rehearse for a new rhythm tap dance work by Michael J. Love, to be featured at the 2022 Princeton Dance Festival. (Photo by Codey Babineaux)

Exhibit at Trenton Free Public Library

The Trenton Artists Workshop Association (TAWA) and the Trenton Free Public Library will present the exhibition “PANDEMICA: Images of a Potential Future” at the Trenton Free Public Library December 7 through January 28. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, December 8 from 5 to 7 p.m.

“PANDEMICA: Images of a Potential Future” features work by Addison Vincent, a freelance artist and curator from Lower Bucks County, Pa. Vincent is the artistic director at Artworks Trenton, a visual arts center promoting artistic diversity by fostering creativity, learning, and appreciation of the arts. He studied art history and business administration at the University of Hartford and began his art career shortly after graduating with honors in visual communications from Gibbs College in 1999.

The media in Vincent’s work ranges from photography, digital manipulation, and mixed media to more classical art methods such as acrylic and oil painting. He has completed many works on a commission basis for both private parties

and businesses, stage productions, and short stories, while presenting his original works in galleries across Pa., N.J., and N.Y. He is the recipient of the Art Educators of New Jersey John J. Pappas Recognition Award, and the New Jersey Governor’s Award in Arts Education for 2020 and 2021, for his work with AENJ and Youth Art Month.

The PANDEMICA series was created early in the pandemic when society halted, sheltered in place, and the future was uncertain. It started as an Instagram project, a way to be creative and stay connected with the world outside of the family unit. Ordinary motions in extraordinary times. According to the artist, if we have learned anything from this go-round with a global pandemic, it should be that we need to carefully look at what we are doing to this small rock hurdling through space. Will we have time to adapt to our rapid advancements, or will we be a part of the next mass extinction event?

TAWA is a Greater Trenton nonprofit organization and has a 40-year history organizing exhibits in such venues as the New Jersey State Museum, Trenton City

Museum, Artworks Trenton, Prince Street Gallery in New York City, and more.

The Trenton Free Public Library is located at 120 Academy Street and is located in the Creek2Canal Trenton Arts District. Hours are Mondays through Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., and Friday and Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information on the library, call (609) 392-7188.

More information on the Trenton Artists Workshop Association can be found on the organization’s Facebook page.

Gallery 14 in Hopewell Hosts Holiday Art Exhibit, Boutique Gallery 14 Fine Art Photography Gallery in Hopewell continues it season of exhibits with a special “Members Holiday Exhibit and Boutique” December 3 through December 18. The opening on Saturday, December 3 will be at noon. There will also be an artist meet and greet on Sunday, December 4 from 1 to 3 p.m..

The exhibit will include fine art photographs both on the walls and in the artists bins along with many smaller gift items including calendars, note cards, purses, scarves, and jewelry

accessories. There will also be items for sale from the “Watercolor Women of Gallery 14” exhibition.

The exhibit will feature works by all of the member artists: John Clarke, Pennington; Alice Grebanier, Branchburg; Larry Parsons, Princeton; Charles Miller, Ringoes; Philip “Dutch” Bagley, Elkins Park, Pa.; Martin Schwartz, East Windsor; Joel Blum, East Windsor; John Strintzinger, Elkins Park, Pa.; Mary Leck, Kendall Park; Barbara Warren, Yardley, Pa.; David Ackerman, Hopewell; Bennett Povlow, Elkins Park, Pa.; and Alina Marin-Bliach of Princeton Junction.

“We all are very excited to be sharing our work with in-person viewers within the comfort of our gallery, after a year of only showing works virtually,” said Gallery member Charles Miller. In addition to the exhibit, artists will also have portfolios of work available for viewing.

Gallery 14 is located at 14 Mercer Street in Hopewell, and is open on Saturday and Sunday from 12 to 5 p.m. Appointments can also be made by email to galleryfourteen@yahoo.com to view the show at other times. For more information, visit gallery14.org.

Hopewell Tour Des Arts

Hosts Holiday Open House

For 15 years, the Hopewell Tour Des Arts has been a champion of art and community in Hopewell. That mission expands this holiday season with the creation of a brand-new event.

In conjunction with Downtown Hopewell, the Hopewell Tour Des Arts is set to feature area artists at various locations across downtown as shoppers explore the borough during Small Business Saturday, December 3-4.

“We wanted to create an event that celebrates the season while also highlighting the amazing individuals that make Hopewell a special place to visit and to call home,” said organizer Erika Rachel. “This holiday season, we can think of no better reason to shop downtown, as attendees can knock out some early Christmas shopping while partaking in a day of levity and holiday cheer.”

Participating locations include: Gallery 14 at 14 Mercer Street, which willl have a holiday boutique of fine art photography and gifts from 12 to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday; Morpeth Contemporary and Frame Studio, 43 West Broad Street, which will host a group show from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, along with a Holiday Reception from 6 to 8 p.m. and from 12 to 5 p.m. Sunday; and Highland Design Farm, 159 Van Dyke Road, which will open their studios from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday. Featured artists include Erika Rachel,

The Hopewell Tour Des Arts has been connecting diverse and accomplished artists with the community since its founding in 2007.

“Artistically, commercially and historically, we believe in the Hopewell story,” Rachel said. “Every opportunity we have to celebrate it is another opportunity to build a brighter future for the boro. We hope area residents come out for the Holiday Open House and partake and participate in this celebration of our community and the holiday season.”

For more information, visit hopewelltourdesarts.com.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 • 26 Shop local schedule before HOLIDAY Best Selling NJ Local 609.688.0777 | homesteadprinceton.com 300 Witherspoon Street | Princeton Furniture • Gifts • Design • Furniture • Barnwood • Gift & Décor 609.688.0777 homesteadprinceton.com 300 Witherspoon Street Princeton Shop Local • Give Local Love Local Art
“LOCK HOUSE”: Martin Schwartz is one of the member artists exhibiting work at the Gallery 14 Fine Art Photography “Members Holiday Exhibit and Boutique,” on view December 3 through December 18. An artist meet and greet is on December 4 from 1 to 3 p.m. “BLUE CENTER HALL”: This work by Catherine Suttle is part of “Intersection: Four Voices in Abstraction,” on view through January 27 at The Gallery at Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach, 253 Nassau Street. An artists’ reception will be held on Sunday, December 4 from 2-5 p.m. “CAREFREE BIKE RIDE”: This work by Addison Vincent is featured “PANDEMICA: Images of a Potential Future,” on view at the Trenton Free Public Library December 7 through January 28. An opening reception is on Thursday, December 8 from 5 to 7 p.m. “PANDEMICA” Susan MacQueen, Nina Belfor, Ric Stang, and James Dashcund.
well loved and well read since 1946

“Land, Light, Spirit” Exhibit

At Marie L. Matthews Gallery

D&R Greenway Land Trust’s exhibition “Land, Light, Spirit” features artwork that illuminates the connection between person and place, a bond with landscape that is both individual and spiritual: It might be a quality of light, a time of day or season — reasons extend through time, borne out through experience.

Featuring artists Paul Rick ert, Eve Ingalls, Suzanne Ding er, Gail Bracegirdle, Nancy Long, and Ernest Schwiebert, the exhibit is on view Sunday, December 4 through March 10 in the Marie L. Matthews Gallery at D&R Greenway’s Johnson Education Center, 1 Preservation Place. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. weekdays.

The public is invited to a holiday art reception on De cember 4 from 2 to 4 p.m. where guests can meet the artists. At 4 p.m., author Ar thur Cola will share some in teresting facts he uncovered while researching and writ ing his new novel, Murder at Point Breeze. Following his talk, poets Lois Marie Har rod, Maxine Susman, Dave Worrell, and other surprise guests will present a reading portraying the drama of the book with settings in Borden town and Princeton.

Books are available for purchase, and the author will be on hand to sign books throughout the reception.

Artwork on view includes watercolor, oil and acrylic paintings, sculpture, and em bossed archival giclee prints.

For more information, visit drgreenway.org.

Talk on Forgotten Maps

At PU’s Fine Hall Lab

On Monday, December 5 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m., Pro fessor Richard J.A. Talbert of the History Department and Ancient World Mapping Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill will outline the attraction and importance of the “Late Ottoman Turkey in Prince ton’s Forgotten Maps, 18831923” exhibition, which is being launched a century af ter the Smyrna Fire and the establishment of the Turkish Republic. He will highlight the key role of the German cartographers Heinrich and Richard Kiepert and its long-lasting impact. Kiepert maps of Asia Minor (Turkey) remained the basis of those made by the Ottoman gen eral staff, as well as by the British, German, Greek, and Italian armies during and after World War I. The talk with be both in person and online.

Talbert will also trace how he gradually became aware of all these rare, long-for gotten maps, and shares his experiences in searching for them. He also explains how Princeton University Library’s holdings and ex pertise have proven crucial to the creation of this dis play at Princeton University Library.

An Introduction by Tsering Wangyal Shawa, geograph ic information systems and map librarian, Peter B. Lew is Library, Princeton Univer sity, will precede the talk. The talk will be held in the Fine Hall Visualization Lab and will be followed by

a reception in the Maps and Geospatial Information Cen ter during which in-person guests will be able to view the maps. Registration is re quested at libcal.princeton. edu/event/9924868.

Arts Council of Princeton

Unveils

New Community Mural

The Arts Council of Princ eton (ACP) unveiled a new community mural recently in downtown Princeton titled Somatic Pause . Designed and installed by artist Dave DiMarchi, this immersive, multimedia public art piece can be found on the side of Village Silver on Spring Street.

Fashioned after both the artist’s workspace and print editions he created dur ing his current ACP Anne Reeves Artist-in-Residen cy, Somatic Pause invites Princeton to contemplate the transformational power of rest, and how time chang es each of us.

Somatic Pause — a wheat pasted, painted, and col laged installation — is an ephemeral one. Meant to change over time, the mu ral will be exposed to harsh winter weather, early spring rains, and glaring sun, each doing its own work to fade, soften, tear, and mar its surface. Change is the con stant.

DiMarchi is a queer, mul tidisciplinary printmaker and artist working in print making, papermaking, and sculptural book forms. He engages in a relentless material practice, nurtur ing ideas into singular and editioned works. As a mul tidisciplinary artist, he has exhibited works on paper, installations, and books in the U.S. and internation ally. He maintains a small collaborative studio and art space in New Hope, Pa., and teaches printmaking, pa permaking, and book forms extensively throughout the New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania area. This fall, he was chosen as the ACP Artist-in-Residence, which will allow him to continue to explore collage-based multi media and print works. View more of his work at @9in handpress or 9inhandpress. com.

This is the ACP’s eighth rotating mural on Spring Street. In July of 2020, when most of town was shut down due to COV ID-19 regulations, the Arts Council team painted their first mural in this location,

Stronger Together, as a message of support and solidarity. Since then, the rotating approach has al lowed the ACP to showcase local artists, making Spring Street a new destination to enjoy colorful and thoughtprovoking public art.

DiMarchi’s work will be on view on Spring Street until spring 2023, when a new mural will take its place.

For more information, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Area Exhibits

Art@Bainbridge, 158 Nas sau Street, has “Colony / Dor Geuz” December 10 through February 12. artmuseum. princeton.edu.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Painting the Light” through December 4. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvil learts.com.

Art on Hulfish, 11 Hulfish Street, has “Samuel Fosso: Af firmative Acts” through Janu ary 29. artmuseum.princeton. edu.

Arts Council of Prince ton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Retrieving the Life and Art of James Wilson Edwards and a Circle of Black Art ists” through December 3. artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Fox & Roach, Realtors, 253 Nassau Street, has “Intersection: Four Voices in Abstraction” through Janu ary 27. An artists’ reception will be held on Sunday, De cember 4, from 2-5 p.m.

D&R Greenway Land Trust Johnson Education Center, 1 Preservation Place, has “Land, Light, Spirit” De cember 4 through March 10 in the Marie L. Matthews Gallery. A holiday art reception is on December 4 from 2 to 4 p.m. drgreenway.org.

Friend Center for Engi neering Education, Princ eton University, has Ricardo Barros’ “An Entanglement of Time and Space,” through December 31. ricardobarros. com/entanglement.

Gallery 14 Fine Art Photography, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “Holiday Art Exhibit and Boutique Sale” De cember 3 through December 18. An artist meet and greet is on December 4 from 1 to 3 p.m. gallery14.org.

Gourgaud Gallery, 23A-A North Main Street, Cranbury,

has “Beauty of the Earth” De cember 4 through December 28. A reception is on Decem ber 4 from 1-3 p.m. cranbury artscouncil.org.

Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamil ton, has “Nightforms: Infi nite Wave” by Kip Collective through April 2, “Roberto Lugo: The Village Potter” through January 8, and “Frag ile: Earth” through January 8, among other exhibits. Timed tickets required. grounds forsculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farm stead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and Innova tor’s Gallery,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. Museum hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 12 to 4 p.m., Thursday to 7 p.m. princeton history.org

JKC Gallery, 137 North Broad Street, Trenton, has “Ara Oshagan: How the World Might Be” through December 2. jkcgallery.online.

Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Walk This Way” through January 15, “(re)Frame: Community Perspectives on the Michen er Art Collection” through March 5, and “Walé Oyéji dé: Flight of the Dreamer” through April 23. michener artmuseum.org

Morven Museum & Gar den, 55 Stockton Street, has “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey” through March and the online exhibits “Slavery at Morven,” “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898,” and oth ers. morven.org.

The Present Day Club, 72 Stockton Street, has watercol ors and acrylics by Princeton artist David Meadow through December 16. For gallery hours, call (609) 924-1014. davidmeadow.com

Princeton University Li brary has “Records of Resis tance: Documenting Global Activism 1933-2021” through December 11. library.princ eton.edu

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has “Per spectives on Preservation” through December 6. “Rupesh Varghese” is at the 254 Nas sau Street location through December 6. smallworldcof fee.com.

Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, has “In Cel ebration of Old Trees” through December 11. terhuneor chards.com.

West Windsor Arts Cen ter, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “Off the Wall Holiday Market” and “Artists for Ukraine” through January 7. westwindsorarts.org.

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 9 Hulfish Street, Palmer Square HALO PUB Espresso From 11 am HALO PUB Ice Cream To 11 pm HALO PUB Espresso From 11 am UNTIL: Sun -Thu 10:00, Fri-Sat 11:30 FROM: 12:00 every day Local family owned business for over 40 years Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com Taking care of Princeton’s trees
“SOMATIC PAUSE”: The Arts Council of Princeton adds to their public art presence in Princeton with a new mural on the corner of Spring and Witherspoon streets. Designed and installed by ACP’s current artist-in-residence Dave DiMarchi, it is a large-scale adaptation of DiMarchi’s exploration in collage-style printmaking, painting and digital techniques. PAINT WITH SANTA: On Sunday, December 4 from 9-11 a.m., children can paint a special cookie plate for Santa at Color Me Mine, located at the Princeton Shopping Center. Santa will make the rounds to help young painters, pose for pictures, and sing seasonal favorites. Registration is required at princeton. colormemine.com or call (609) 581-9500. “POINT BREEZE APPLE ORCHARD”: This work by Nancy Long is featured in “Land, Light, Spirit,” on view December 4 through March 10 at the Marie L. Matthews Gallery at D&R Greenway Land Trust’s Johnson Education Center. A holiday art reception is on December 4 from 2 to 4 p.m.

Mark Your Calendar TOWN TOPICS

Wednesday, November 30

6 p.m.: Labyrinth Books and Princeton Public Library present Donald Yacovone and Eddie Glaude in conversation of Teaching White Supremacy: America’s Democratic Ordeal and the Forging of Our National Identity. At Labyrinth, 122 Nassau Street, and online. Labyrinthbooks.com.

6-7:30 p.m.: The Mercer County Community College Jazz Band performs at Princeton MarketFair, 3535 U.S. Route 1. Free.

8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Country Dancers presents a contra dance at Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive. Bob Isaacs with Raise the Roof. $10 (free for 35 and younger). Princetoncountrydancers.org.

8 p.m.: Author Tommie Shelby is in conversation with Yale University professor James Forman about Shelby’s new book The Idea of Prison Abolition in a virtual event presented by Princeton Public Library. Register at Princetonlibrary. org.

Thursday, December 1

10 a.m.: The 55-Plus Club of Princeton meets at the Jewish Center Princeton, 435 Nassau Street. “The Risks of Election

Believability (or Lack Thereof)” is the topic, presented by Rebecca Mercuri. To join online, visit Princetonol. com/groups/55plus. Free.

7 p.m.: Joseph Grabas presents “Owning the River: Water Rights and Boundaries,” an online lecture presented by Delaware River Greenway Partnership. Register at bit.ly/grabasriver.

8 p.m.: Patti LaBelle performs a holiday concert at the State Theatre New Jersey, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. $49-$209. Stnj.org.

Friday, December 2 12-5 p.m.: Fine Art and Artistic Crafts Holiday Bazaar, The Artists of Bristol Gallery, 216 Mill Street, Bristol, Pa. Artistsofbristol. com.

6-9:15 p.m.: Open Mic in the Community Room of Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Hosted by the library and the Einstein Alley Musicians Collaborative. All are welcome to perform or just listen. Princetonlibrary.org.

8 p.m.: Princeton Dance Festival, from Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts, at McCarter’s Berlind Theatre, 91 University Place. Works by Ronald K. Brown, Susan Mar-

shall, Caili Quan, Rashaun Mitchell and Silas Riener, Davalois Fearon, Sun Kim, and Michael J. Love. $12$17. McCarter.org.

Saturday, December 3

10 a.m.: Holiday WreathMaking Workshop at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Led by Pam Mount. $50 includes wreath or basket, decorative supplies. Pre-register at terhuneorchards.com.

12-5 p.m.: Fine Art and Artistic Crafts Holiday Bazaar, The Artists of Bristol Gallery, 216 Mill Street, Bristol, Pa. Artistsofbristol. com.

12-5 p.m.: Mill Hill Holiday House Tour, Mill Hill neighborhood, Trenton. Several homes in this historic district will feature holiday décor, inside and outside, rain or shine. $20. Trentonmillhill.org.

12-5 p.m.: Kick off the Holiday Season Weekend at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Activities for the whole family. Wine tasting from 12-5 p.m.; live music from 1-4 p.m. Terhuneorchards.com.

12-2 p.m.: Jersey Harmony Chorus entertains on Palmer Square. Palmersquare.com.

12:30-5:30 p.m.: Off

the Wall Holiday Market Sunflower Weekend, with sunflower-themed artwork available for purchase; a percentage goes to artists for Ukraine. At West Windsor Arts Council, 952 Alexander Road. Westwindsorarts.org.

2 and 8 p.m.: Princeton Dance Festival, from Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts, at McCarter’s Berlind Theatre, 91 University Place. Works by Ronald K. Brown, Susan Marshall, Caili Quan, Rashaun Mitchell and Silas Riener, Davalois Fearon, Sun Kim, and Michael J. Love. $12-$17. McCarter. org.

2-5:30 p.m.: A Christmas Carol Read-Aloud at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Presented by the library and McCarter Theatre. Princetonlibrary. org.

4 p.m.: Westminster Concert Bell Choir conducted by Kathy Shaw, fall concert at Rider University’s Gill Chapel, Route 206, Lawrence Township. Rider.edu.

7:30 p.m.: Hopewell Valley Chorus holiday concert, “Oh What Fun!,” with audience singalong, at St. James Church, 115 East Delaware Avenue, Pennington. $12$15. Email hopewellvalleychorus@gmail.com or call (609) 477-9382 to reserve.

Sunday, December 4 10 a.m.: David Breakstone of the Yitzhak Navon Center for a Shared Society presents a talk, “Uganda and the Jewish Question: The Story and Struggles of the Abayudaya Community,” in person at The Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street. Thejewishcenter.org.

11 a.m.-4 p.m.: Open Studio Tours at The Art Station, 148 Monmouth Street, Hightstown. Tour the historic building, view art, and meet the artists. Light refreshments will be served. Artstationstudios.com.

12-2 p.m.: The Princeton Tigertones serenade shoppers on Palmer Square. Palmersquare.com.

12-5 p.m.: Kick off the Holiday Season Weekend at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Activities for the whole family. Wine tasting from 12-5 p.m.; live music from 1-4 p.m. Terhuneorchards.com.

12:30-5:30 p.m.: Off the Wall Holiday Market Sunflower Weekend, with sunflower-themed artwork available for purchase; a percentage benefits Artists for Ukraine. At West Windsor Arts Council, 952 Alexander Road. Westwindsorarts.org.

1 p.m.: Carillon concert at Princeton University’s Graduate Tower; listen from outside the building. Arts. princeton.edu.

1-4 p.m.: Holiday Open House at Hopewell Public Library, 13 East Broad Street, Hopewell. Hot cider, holiday treats, kids’ activities. Redlibrary.org/events.

NOVEMBERDECEMBER

2 p.m.: Princeton Dance Festival, from Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts, at McCarter’s Berlind Theatre, 91 University Place. Works by Ronald K. Brown, Susan Marshall, Caili Quan, Rashaun Mitchell and Silas Riener, Davalois Fearon, Sun Kim, and Michael J. Love. $12$17. McCarter.org.

3 p.m.: Boheme Opera presents Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel at Kendall Theater, College of New Jersey, Ewing. With the Princeton Boychoir. $15$50. Bohemeopera.org.

5 p.m.: Hunterdon Holiday Parade, Main Street, Flemington. Featuring Hunterdon Central Regional High School Marching Red Devils; police, fire, and rescue squads; and more. Hunterdonchamber.org.

7:30 p.m.: Martina McBride brings “The Joy of Christmas Tour 2022” to the State Theatre New Jersey, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. $49-$129. Stnj.org.

4 p.m.: Westminster Concert Bell Choir conducted by Kathy Shaw, at Rider University’s Gill Chapel, Route 206, Lawrence Township. Rider.edu.

Monday, December 5 Recycling

4:30-5:30 p.m.: Richard J.A. Talbert presents a talk, “Late Ottoman Turkey in Princeton’s Forgotten Maps, 1883-1923” at Fine Hall Visualization Lab, Princeton University, and also online. Register at libcal.princeton. edu/event/0024868.

5 p.m.: Reading by Raven Leilani, author of Luster, at Drapkin Studio, Lewis Arts complex on the Princeton University campus. Free. Part of the C.K. Williams Reading Series, presented by the Program in Creative Writing at the University. Arts.princeton.edu.

7 p.m.: Author Gayatri Sethi shares segments from her book Unbelonging, on the themes of anti-racism, identity, and belonging, at this Continuing Conversations on Race event via Zoom. Register for link at princetonlibrary.org.

Tuesday, December 6

3 p.m.: Historic Paper Quilling Workshop at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Led by April Zay, founder of Hummingbird Arts. $10$20. Includes access to the Festival of Trees from 2-3 p.m. Morven.org.

6 p.m.: Hilary Plum and Adrienne Raphel are at Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau Street, and online, with “Two Writers on Writing: Considering Class, Play, Power, and Language in the Essay and the Poem.” Labyrinthbooks.com.

7 p.m.: Sustainable Princeton’s “Sustainable Minds” discussion, over Zoom, is about the climate and housing crisis, with industry leaders. Open to all. Sustainableprinceton.org.

7 p.m.: A staged reading

of An Iliad is performed in the Community Room of Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, by Vivia Font of the Princeton Actors Collective and Ameet Doshi. Princetonlibrary.org.

7 p.m.: Kingston Historical Society’s annual meeting is at Kingston Firehouse, 6 Heathcote Road, Kingston; also on Zoom. Following the meeting, there is an illustrated presentation, “The D&R Canal State Park: Sustaining a Key New Jersey Asset.” khsnj.org/talk.

8:15 p.m.: The Jewish Center Princeton’s Great Minds Salon presents Matt Wasserman and Sean Jackson via Zoom, in “Talking Trenton: The Good News, the Challenges, and the Process of Change.” Thejewishcenter.org.

Wednesday, December 7 3 p.m.: The movie Elvis is screened in the Community Room of Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org.

5:30 p.m.: Holiday story time with the Princeton Storytelling Circle held in the Stockton Education Center at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Starts with a selfguided tour of the Festival of Trees. $15-$25. Morven. org.

6 p.m.: Peter Brooks and Brigid Doherty are at Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau Street, with Brooks’ Seduced by Story: On the Use and Abuse of Narrative . Also presented online. Labyrinthbooks.com.

6:30-8 p.m.: Mercer County Community College Jazz Band performs at Quakerbridge Mall, 3320 U.S. Route 1. Free.

6:30 p.m.: Open Archive: Princeton Maps, in the Discovery Center of Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Explore examples of historical maps of Princeton and beyond for local history and genealogy research. Also digital maps, including the Princeton University Library’s collection. Princetonlibrary.org.

7-8:30 p.m.: Wednesday Night Out: The Lenape and Their Ancestors in Hopewell Valley, at Hopewell Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell. Redlibrary.org/ events.

Thursday, December 8

6 p.m.: Author Derek Lidow presents a fireside chat about his latest book

The Entrepreneurs: The Relentless Quest for Value at Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau Street. Presented by Princeton Public Library and Labyrinth Books. Princetonlibrary.org.

6:45 p.m.: Learn public speaking with Mercer’s Best Toastmasters Club, Lawrence Community Center, 295 Eggert Crossing Road, Lawrence Township. Mercersbest.toastmastersclubs. org.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 • 28
Get the scoop from

Array of Handcrafted Items and Art-Related Gifts Offered at Princeton University Art Museum Store

Discover art in all its beauty, diversity, and myriad forms at the Princeton University Art Museum Store.

This small shop at 56 Nassau Street is a treasure trove — a cornucopia of gifts. It offers the original creations of regional artists and artisans, as well as art-related gifts of all kinds.

Mia Hebeb from New York offers elegantly sculptured gold-plated earrings and necklaces, expertly crafted.

Superb Quality

Wolf knows many of the artists, and also attends a series of shows during the year to view new creations.

exhibits. One is at Bainbridge House at 158 Nassau Street and the other, Art on Hulfish, is at 11 Hulflsh Street.”

on diversity — in all areas. “I am part of the advisory group of DEIA — diversity, equality, inclusion, accessibility. Our mission and the University’s mission is to expand diversity and inclusion in all ways, including in art.”

Opened at its current site on Nassau Street and Palmer Square in 2019, it was previously located on campus in the Princeton University Art Museum. Now closed, the museum is being totally rebuilt, with plans to reopen in 2024.

“The focus of the store is on supporting regional artists, featuring their work in glass, ceramic, wood, metal, textiles, and jewelry,” explains Allie P. Wolf, the store’s buyer and manager of wholesale and retail operations. “In addition, we have Princeton University Museum-related items, including museum catalogs and books.”

Youngest Customers

Reaching out to the youngest customers is also part of the store’s purview. “Our children’s selection is both entertaining and educational, with books, games, puzzles, and more, all aimed at helping them learn about art and engage their imagination,” says Wolf.

With an extensive background in retail, including in a series of shopping malls, Wolf joined the Art Museum Store in 2018. Living in many places — from Baltimore to Boston, and Tampa, Fla., to Sydney, Australia, she has had exceptional experience and understanding of retail and marketing.

“What is unique here is the relationship to art in so many ways,” she points out. “We share ideas with museums across the country, and we have relationships with the artists whose work we present.”

The work of more than 100 regional artists is featured, and includes the original creations of Dan and Jill Burstein of Hopewell Stained Glass, Bryan Weitz’s ceramic platters with their gorgeous colors and unique curving configuration, and the beautiful reverse painted glass (eglomise) of Mary Mayhew.

The very popular jewelry selection offers earrings, rings, bracelets, and necklaces in styles from delicate to dramatic. Customers will find striking gold cuff bracelets with sterling sliding beads, gold rings with sliding baby pearls, and gold bracelets with a delicate “crochet” design.

Ashka Dymel, working from Brooklyn, N.Y., is known for her contemporary mixed metal pieces in geometric and architectural styles with gemstones, and

“I get very excited over the quality and designs of the work we see from our artists,” she says. “We go to events at the Flemington Craft Show, and in Philadelphia and New York. We probably go to 10 a year along the East Coast. It’s a wonderful chance to see such superb quality and the latest creations.

The interesting and eclectic selection at the store is engagingly presented. Although the shop is small, the setting is inviting and uncrowded. Glass and wood pieces and textiles are prominently displayed. Silk and cashmere scarves, wool hats, fingerless gloves, handbags, and totes are all available.

Wooden bowls in all shapes, sizes, and styles are specialties, and the glass items, also in an array of shapes, sizes, and styles, are exquisitely designed and fashioned.

Project watches with their distinctive architectural and design motif are also available, as are coasters, candles, and calendars, many with an art theme.

The diverse collection continues with desk accessories, notebooks with art-related covers, and stationery. Coloring books for children and adults feature art themes, and books, also for adults and children, are always in demand. A Children’s History of Art introduces art and artists to young readers, and a number of books relating to art as well as Princeton Art Museum publications and catalogs are featured.

In Person

Customers have been enjoying the current location of the store, says Wolf, and they have been especially glad to return after the shop was closed for several months in 2020 due to COVID-19.

“We are very encouraged,” she reports. “We have customers not only from Princeton and the area but also from Philadelphia and New York. People often find us online, and then come in to see us in person. We also continue to offer online shopping opportunities.

“It’s really been good, and we keep getting new people coming in as well as our longtime customers. They really seem to like everything in our selection.

“They will also love our location during the holidays when everything looks so beautiful with all the lights and decorations. We are right across from the tree at the Nassau Inn.”

In addition, she points out, “I want people to know that during the time the museum is being rebuilt, we have two galleries with rotating

Prices at the store cover a wide range, with items from $12 and $15 to much more. Jewelry starts at $40, and Wolf notes that the average amount spent by most customers is $29. There is also a membership program, offering yearround discounts. In addition, shipping and complimentary gift wrapping are available.

Nonprofit

The store is a nonprofit business, and all sales support the museum and the operation of the store. As its mission statement points out: “Proceeds support the museum’s core goal of bringing art into everyday life through fostering close and sustained looking, rich interpretive experiences, and educational programming.”

Wolf also points out the museum’s increased focus

Being part of such a unique store is a pleasure for Wolf, and she also appreciates being surrounded by a very experienced staff. “I love our staff. Our entire museum store staff is amazing,” she says. “They are all extremely knowledgeable and are very helpful to customers. It’s total teamwork with us. We all work together. It’s a wonderful opportunity to be part of something so special and to be able to introduce those — including children, who may be new to it — to the wonderful world of art.”

Hours are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Thursday, Friday, and Saturday 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. For more information, call (609) 258-5600 or visit princetonmuseumstore.edu.

artist performance

Dor Guez   Thursday, December 8, 5:30 p.m.

Artist Dor Guez considers how art, architecture, photography, music, and monuments can shape the identity of a place. In his lecture-performances, Guez shares historical photographs from the past century in Palestine and Israel, one of the most frequently photographed geographies in the history of the medium. This interactive performance is hosted in conjunction with the exhibition Colony / Dor Guez, opening at Art @ Bainbridge on Saturday, December 10.

Art on Hulfish

IT’S NEW
29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022
To Us
Left: Dor Guez. Right: Dor Guez, Lilies of the field #1, Jerusalem, Mosque El-Aksa, 2019–20. Collection of the artist. © Dor Guez. Courtesy of the artist and Goodman Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa; Dvir Gallery, Tel Aviv, Israel; and Carlier Gebauer Gallery, Berlin, Germany This
made possible in part
of
with
support
CREATIVE CHOICES: “We are set apart by the fact that we are the Princeton University Art Museum Store, and by our focus on regional artists and their handcrafted items. We are also a point of reference for information about the museum.” Allie P. Wolf, left, the store’s manager of wholesale and retail operations, is shown with staff members, from left, Hatice Cam, Michael T. Banks, Regina Massaro, and Stephanie Ronquillo.
event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming,
by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class
1970,
additional
from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.
FREE ADMISSION 11 Hulfish
Street
41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton www.tortugasmv.com Available for Lunch & Dinner Mmm..Take-Out Events • Parties • Catering (609) 924-5143

Professional Pampering and Soothing Solutions

Metropolis Spa Salon is a success story!

When so many businesses come and go these days, seemingly in a flash, Metropolis has a spe cial story to tell. Opened in the Princeton Shop ping Center in 1993, it has evolved from a small, fledg ing operation into a flourish ing spa and salon, where cli ents can choose one service or have a total hair and body experience.

the Magic of Metropolis Spa Salon IT’S NEW

Fifty-two employees — in cluding hairstylists, estheti cians, massage therapists, and makeup artists — are on hand to ensure each cli ent’s best look and complete satisfaction.

Owner Theresa Carr pro vides a thorough training program for all the staff as well as a continuing educa tion program with work shops and seminars on the latest techniques and treat ments.

“We have continuing train ing for our staff in all areas,” she points out.

Special Brand

The relaxing sensation be gins upon arrival, with the soothing sight of a flowing waterfall in the large front window. Entering the attrac tive sophisticated, yet com fortable, spacious setting offers one a preview of the experience ahead.

“We wanted service to be more of a focus, and have people know that besides getting quality attention, they would also feel relaxed while they are here, and re juvenated when they leave,” emphasizes Carr. “It should be a very positive experi ence. “We have designed a truly luxurious setting, where your every need is pampered in the most natu ral and relaxing atmosphere. Forget the hectic routine of daily life while you relax and enjoy our extensive services. You need mental and physi cal relaxation in this stress ful world. Our spa offers this opportunity. This isn’t a luxury anymore, it’s a basic necessity.”

New Look

To enhance the experience, Metropolis has undergone an extensive renovation, which began on the main floor, re ports Operations Director Elisa Migliacci.

popular, and many are or ganic products.”

If the renovation is refresh ing the Metropolis look, its many services can certainly refresh the customers’ look. Whether it’s a new hair cut or color, a rejuvenating mas sage or body treatment, soothing pedicure for tired toes, a manicure with the latest in nail art, or a glam orous makeup application, any or all of these are guar anteed to provide a new look and even a new outlook!

So often when one looks good, one feels good, and that is the goal of the Me tropolis staff.

“Customer service is key,” points out Carr. “We want to be a place when if people have had a hard day, they’ll think to call Metropolis and know it’s a place where they will indeed feel and look good. This is our biggest priority and pleasure.”

Where to begin? Metropo lis offers such an array of “balm for the body” that any choice is bound to be beneficial. Massage, facials, and body treatments can all complement a great new haircut (whether classic or cutting edge) and color.

sessment of each individu al’s skin condition in an ini tial consultation. “There is a customized facial treatment for every skin condition, and the esthetician will deter mine what is most suitable for each individual.”

always been a priority at Metropolis, and this is evi denced with manicures and pedicures, reports Carr. “Ev erything is sterilized with special solutions, and it is medical grade.”

Purification System

available in special contain ers, and can be a delightful teacher’s gift for $10.”

“Sip & Shop”

TOPICS

Certainly, the staff is up-to-date on all the latest advances and services for hair, skin and body care. Moreover, they continue to provide customers with their special brand of service in a relaxing and rejuvenating atmosphere.

“Our renovation is re freshing our look,” she says. “And, now the spa, which is downstairs, is undergoing its renovation. In addition, we have greatly expanded our retail section with a variety of high quality hair and skin care items, and wellness life style brands and personal products. These are all very

Facials and massages are known stress relievers, and customers have the choice of many different facial treat ments, whether for teenage skin problems or aging skin issues for mature clients.

Customized Treatment

Both women and men en joy the benefits of facials, and Carr explains that the estheticians provide an as

“AquaDerm is a special facial treatment, and pro vides exceptional results,” she continues. “It is a fluidbased infusion with vitamins that exfoliates, hydrates, and brightens the skin. It is a new version of microderm abrasion.”

Massage and body treat ments offer many opportu nities to relieve aches and pains, enhance skin tone, and relax and rejuvenate. There are many choices for many conditions.

Other services include face and body waxing and spray tanning, as well as tanning products.

Fashion Statement

The Metropolis hairstylists can create the perfect look for each client as they take into account facial structure and hair texture. A new cut and color may be just the thing for the holidays and the new year.

Color is a major part of hair maintenance today, and as Carr points out, it is a fashion statement now, often changing with the sea sons. And, while it is still used to cover gray, color variations attract more and more younger people to try out a new color and a new look.

“Our color technicians are very knowledgeable and understand the chemis try in color,” she says. “We use the high quality L’Oreal Elite hair products, and also, there have been such advances in technology with safer, improved color formu lations.

“Among the techniques, Bayalage is very popular. It is a hair painting tech nique, basically another way of highlighting. In addition, we offer color correction for people who may have made a mistake trying it on their own, and we also have treat ments for thinning hair and other conditions.”

Makeup applications are favorites for brides and for those attending special events and parties, and in addition, eyelash extensions and eyelash tinting are often in demand.

Safety for customers has

“During COVID, when we were closed for sever al months, we installed a state-of-the-art air purifica tion system, which actually scrubs the air four times a day,” says Carr. “This is the latest, most advanced tech nology. We want to have the safest environment for our customers and staff.”

She is very happy that cus tomers have been returning since Metropolis reopened. They are from the Princeton area and beyond, and many have been coming since Me tropolis opened.

“We have many loyal cus tomers who have actually become friends,” notes Carr. “Even second generation clients are coming now — grown children of our origi nal clients. This is a special kind of loyalty that we have acquired. It is personal rela tionships.

“In addition, we have many new clients all the time. We actually get 100 new customers every week. Some find us online, but there is also a lot of word-ofmouth and lots of referrals from clients.”

As they continue to return, customers are delighted with the expanded retail section, where they can find an ex tensive selection of products for all their hair and body needs.

“It is really a one-stop shopping opportunity, when you include our services and our retail products,” says Mi gliacci. “We offer an array of skin and hair supplies, in cluding such brands as Skin Ceuticals and Cinq Mondes, a French product exclusive to us in the area.

“In addition, we have hair supplies of all kinds, such as handcrafted hair jewelry, other designer jewelry, highend candles, and wonderful bath products. Bath bombs, which are actually bath balms, are both soothing and exfoliating. These are

“We want to be sure to in vite everyone to our special ‘Sip & Shop’ holiday recep tion on Monday, December 5 from 5 to 8 p.m,” says Migliacci. “We will have a wonderful selection of prod ucts at discounts, a repre sentative from SkinCeuticals will be doing complimentary skin scope sessions, and re freshments include wine and cheese. It is a great way to see our new lines and holi day kits.

“I also want to let every one know about our new app. This provides all the latest up-to-date informa tion regarding services, products, as well as a way to make an appointment. it is the easiest and fastest way to find out what is happen ing at Metropolis.”

The spa salon offers gift certificates for any amount, and they can also be com bined for several services. This will be an especially welcome holiday gift, and is a wonderful way to in troduce someone who has not enjoyed the benefits of a facial or massage, or to treat them to a new haircut or color.

Carr is proud of seeing Metropolis evolve during its 29 years into a special place, known for high-end services and exceptional quality.

“I have been fortunate to cultivate my own business, and I am grateful to all our clients for helping this to happen,” says Carr. “The knowledge and experience of our staff, the continuing education, the excellence of our services, and the high quality of our product lines all set us apart. I believe there is no other spa salon like ours in the area.”

Metropolis is open Monday and Satur day 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Friday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Call (609) 683-8388 for further infor mation or visit metropolis spa.com

Highlight
To Us TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 • 30
METROPOLIS MAGIC: “We are always elevating our services for the benefit of our customers. They know they can count on us to offer quality services in a special environment,” says Theresa Carr, owner of Metropolis Salon Spa, who is looking forward to the Metropolis “Sip & Shop” holiday open house on Monday, December 5. Shown is the front area of the salon, and in the background the newly expanded retail section.
Dates, times, artists, and programs subject to change. Accessibility: For information on available services, please contact ADA Coordinator Kitanya Khateri at least two weeks prior at 609/497-0020. TICKETS princetonsymphony.org or 609/ 497-0020 Holiday Pops! Holiday Pops! Saturday, December 17 3pm and 6pm with Broadway’s Janet Dacal
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Pozaric Delivers OT Game-Winner Against Fordham As PU Men’s Water Polo Advances in NCAA Tourney

Roko Pozaric has scored a few big goals in his young water polo ca reer, but his latest one came in a big moment on a huge stage.

The Princeton University men’s water polo sophomore star scored the game-winner to help the Tigers edge thenNo. 3 Stanford 11-10 in a regular season contest on October 23. Pozaric had a big goal in his native Croa tia ’s junior national cham pionships a year before he came to Princeton. And Sat urday, he scored the gamewinner with three seconds left in the second overtime to lift Princeton to an 1110 win over Fordham in the NCAA tournament opener at DeNunzio Pool.

“ This,” said Pozaric, “ is definitely the most important game so far that I scored the deciding goal in.”

The victory sends Prince ton up against third-ranked Southern California (18-6) in the next round of the NCAA tournament on December 1 at the Spieker Aquatics Complex in Berkeley, Ca lif. The Tigers are 27-5 and carry confidence into the matchup even though they will be underdogs to every one outside of the program’s minds. The victor of that matchup will face UCLA in a semifinal contest on Decem ber 3 at the Spieker pool.

“A few years ago it was un realistic for any East Coast team to beat any West Coast team,” said Pozaric, a 6’3 native of Zagreb, Croatia. “ Now things have changed. Last year, we beat some of them, Santa Clara and Pep perdine and Cal Baptist and Irvine. This year we took a step forward. We beat San ta Barbara and Stanford, which was ranked No. 3 at the time. Winning a national championship is definitely possible.”

Pozaric ’s arrival certainly has helped. He was named Northeast Water Polo Con ference (NWPC) Rookie of the Year in 2021 after leading Princeton with 68 goals, 41 assists, 41 steals, and 105 sprint wins. This year, he was named NWPC Player of the Year and leads the team with 61 goals, 47 steals, and 91 sprint wins and sits fourth with 37 as sists, but his biggest aspira tions in his second collegiate season were for the team.

“ I like raising the team goals,” said Pozaric. “ From last season, I think we ’ ve come pretty far. Our primary goal last season was to win our conference, whereas this season we really believe that we can compete for a nation al championship. Changing team goals was the biggest difference from last year.”

Pozaric is a year more comfortable with his Princ eton teammates. He made a significant move from Croa tia to the Tigers last year.

“ Guys on the team were definitely great and helped me with transitioning to the U.S.,” said Pozaric. “ It was probably easier than I expected it to be. Just hav ing a team, a group of guys supporting you and wanting to help you with everything,

like selecting courses, and practices and everything, and also having one Croa tian and two Serbian players, speaking your own language — Croatian and Serbian are similar — so speaking your home language helps a lot to not feel as homesick.”

Pozaric started swimming when he was young, but af ter a few years of it he start ed looking for more. While he has maintained his sprint speed — he was fourth in the 50-meter freestyle at the 2019 World School Swim ming Championships in Brazil — he found everything he wanted in water polo. He showed talent from the be ginning in fifth grade.

“ When I started out, I was playing pretty well,” said Pozaric. “ I was part of the youth national team, the U-15 and later U-17 when we went to world champion ships in Georgia.”

As a high school sopho more, Pozaric made a major decision to pursue playing in college in the United States.

It ’s a hard path, though a few of his club teammates had done the same and found West Coast programs.

Antonio Knez, the Princeton senior goalie, is the only other Croatian player for the Tigers. Pozaric started to reach out to gauge inter est from American schools.

“ I made my own CV and put up a highlight video on YouTube,” said Pozaric. “ I was reaching out to every coach in the U.S. Not many of them responded.”

Princeton head coach Dustin Litvak was tipped off about Pozaric ’s interest and ability by Alex Bowen, a U.S. national team mem ber who was practicing with Pozaric s Croatian club.

Bowen ’s brother had played water polo for Princeton.

“ He recommended me to Dusty which I think was re ally important for me coming to Princeton,” said Pozaric.

Bringing in the speedy, physically imposing Po zaric seems a no-brainer for Princeton when looking back. And he was thrilled to attend a school with such a great academic reputation. He had only heard about the academic side of Princeton, and with the chance to also play water polo, it was the perfect fit.

“It was not a hard decision where I wanted to come,” said Pozaric. “ I definitely wanted to come here.”

Making the move has come with sacrifices. Pozaric doesn ’t have a great chance to make the Croatian na tional team while at school.

Players in professional leagues in Croatia or around Europe are considered more seriously for those spots.

I definitely could have stayed,” said Pozaric. “I was invited for youth national championships, U-20, that was played in Prague last summer. But I couldn ’t go because I had to come to Princeton to train with the team. If I had stayed, who knows what would have hap pened? But I don’t regret my decision at all.”

Pozaric returned to Croatia on his winter break and last summer. Working with his club helped him get a jump on his training com ing into his second year at Princeton. He is an ambas sador for Princeton now.

“ It ’s a lot of work but it ’s worth it,” said Pozaric. “ When I visit back home, they are definitely curious and ask me questions about how I like it in the U.S., about Princeton, about wa ter polo in general.”

Pozaric has met his aca demic and athletic chal lenges. He is leaning toward majoring in economics with a certificate in entrepreneur ship. Water polo wasn ’t as big a change as the academ ic demands. The game was much like it is in Croatia.

“There’s a small difference in rules, but not a big deal,” said Pozaric. “ It was easy to accommodate that. It ’ s more goals per games and maybe slightly less physical, but not as much difference as I expected it to be. Water polo transition was not that hard. Both went pretty well for me. I ’ m really happy for that.”

Pozaric will be even happi er if the Princeton team can achieve its national title as pirations. The Tigers opened the NCAA play with a hardfought win over Fordham. They also beat them early in the season by a goal.

“ It was completely differ ent,” said Pozaric. “ Earlier in the season the game was not as meaningful as this one today. Both teams, we and them, improved tremen dously from when we played at the beginning of the sea son so it was a completely different game. They ’ re a great team and luckily it ended up well for us.”

Pozaric credited Princ eton ’s togetherness and defense for making the dif ference in the tight game. Sophomore Vladan Mitro vic and senior Keller Malo ney led Princeton with three goals apiece, Pozaric had two while junior Pierce Ma loney, junior George Caras and senior Ryan Neapole tallied one apiece. Freshman goalie West Temkin made 10 saves against Fordham.

“It’s an incredible feeling,” said Pozaric. “ We were pre paring all week for this game and luckily it turned out well. I don ’t think we played as well as we played our con ference finals last week, but luckily we ended up with a win.”

As time ran down in the second overtime, the Tigers turned to Pozaric for the game-winner, and he pro duced an incredible moment, delivering one of the biggest goals of his career on a big stage.

“ It was an amazing feel ing to end the game with a game-winner,” said Pozaric. “ We did a really good job with our timeout play. The right side really pulled the goalie so I had a pretty open shot for the goal.”

S ports
31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022
MAKING A SPLASH: Princeton University men’s water polo player Roko Pozaric fires the ball last Saturday as Princeton hosted Fordham in an NCAA tournament opening round contest. Sophomore star Pozaric tallied the winning goal in the second overtime as Princeton prevailed 11-10. The Tigers, now 27-5, will face third-ranked Southern California (18-6) in the next round of the NCAA tournament on December 1 in Berkeley, Calif. The victor of that matchup will face UCLA in a semifinal contest on December 3 at Berkeley. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)
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After Making it to NCAA Wrestling Final Last Season, PU Senior Star Glory Determined to Take the Next Step

Patrick Glory was miserable as he took in the 2021 NCAA Wrestling Championships from his living room.

“Sitting and watching the NCAA tournament on the couch in the middle of the COVID in that 2021 year was really hard,” said Princeton University wrestling star Glory, who had competed in the 2019 NCAA Championships as freshman, taking sixth at 125 pounds.

“I had a lot of really long conversations with the coaches and just being like hey man, this is awful, this is really hard to watch. Your prime kind of going by and there is nothing really to do about it.”

Fueled by that frustration, Glory did something about it this past March, making the NCAA finals at 125 where he fell 5-3 to Michigan grad student and former Rutgers star Nick Suriano.

Competing with a chip on his shoulder helped thirdseeded Glory in his NCAA run which saw him post a 13-5 win over secondseeded Vito Arujau of Cornell in the semis, avenging an earlier defeat to Arujau in the Eastern Intercollegiate Wrestling Association (EIWA) final.

“It was really good to come back and send a message,” said Glory, Princeton’s first NCAA finalist since 2002. He was joined in the finals by classmate Quincy Monday, who advanced at 157.

“It is always about proving people wrong. People didn’t think that I could get to that

point so it was beneficial in that way. I didn’t get to fully send the message so there is work to be done.”

Looking forward to his senior campaign, Glory is looking to send that final message.

“The vibe in the room is work hard, do everything right, get your schoolwork done, lean on your brothers and sisters,” said Glory, who posted a 20-2 record last winter. “Now that we have the women’s program that is up and coming, they are in there with us. It is a lot of hard work. We had multiple guys in the room this morning getting private workouts in. We have yoga, active recovery that people are taking really seriously. We have a lot of momentum going into this year and I think you are going to see that on the wrestling mat.”

Glory got the 2022-23 season off to a good start, winning the 125-pound title Princeton Open earlier this month as he topped No. 22 Dylan Shawver 11-9 in the fi nal. Currently ranked No. 2 nationally at 125, Glory is slated to be back on the mat this Sunday as the Tigers have duals against Michigan State and Wisconsin at the Prudential Center in Newark.

As Glory looks to take the next step this year, he analyzed the tape of his NCAA loss to Suriano to get a better sense of what he needs to do to get over that final hump.

“I am really bad at watching myself lose but I finally

did at the beginning of the summer,” said Glory. “I wanted to break the barrier and just watch it. It wasn’t anything he really did, it was more what I didn’t do. In hindsight, that is OK, you learn from experiences like that. I really think that if I had had prior experience in the national finals, I would have wrestled differently. It is hard to really prepare for that.”

A key to Glory’s preparation this season is dealing with having a target in his back as he looks to advance to the national final for a second straight year.

“Pressure is something I have struggled with in the past in high school and even in middle school,” said Glory. “I have now realized that the way that you win is not by thinking about winning but more so in the process of doing everything right on a daily basis. I feel like that is what has helped me, to not put these matches on a pedestal and give them more grandeur than they actually are. It is just focusing on ‘what does my week look like, how does this week set me up for success in March?’ By breaking it down and making it more granular, it helps to keep from stressing about the pressure. If you know you did everything right, you can trust in the process and your technical abilities and mental abilities.”

The bonds Glory has developed with his classmates on the squad have inspired

him to get the most out of his ability.

“The Class of 2023 is the best thing that has ever happened to me,” said Glory. “We are the best of friends, we trust each other with everything on the wrestling mat and outside of the wrestling mat. We are really brothers, and that translates. We wrestle better because of the relationship that we have with each other. When I think about why am I doing this, I don’t think it is really about me. It is more so for my teammates and my classmates specifically because I know what sacrifices have been made. Knowing that makes you want to go for battle for them even more.”

Helping the Princeton squad rise up the ladder nationally has also been a motivating factor for Glory.

“I don’t even know if I can put into words how proud I am to be part of this team,” said Glory.

“I know that it wasn’t always this way. I got really emotional after the semifinals last year because I knew how much had gone into that moment, from the 2002 Tigers that were just trying to get a set of 10 guys to compete to now having two national finalists. The trajectory that coach [Chris] Ayres and all of the coaches

laid out for me and for us when I was getting recruited was actually being accomplished which is incredible.”

A native of Randolph who starred in high school at the Delbarton School in Morristown, Glory is proud to be representing his home state.

“Going from the state tournament in Atlantic City to competing in Jadwin every weekend has been amazing,” said Glory, a two-time New Jersey state champion (120/126). “The support from the New Jersey wrestling community has been unreal. I would not have ever predicted that the situation would have worked out this way. I was blessed to be able grow up in a state like New Jersey because there are some states that don’t have the same level of wrestling technical ability and coaching — everything that goes into the sport. I am really blessed to be a part of it.”

For now, Glory is savoring his current situation. “I am trying to bask in every second, it feels like every day is fl ying by; we are already through midterms in the fall semester,” said Glory. “I know I am going to miss it once I am gone. It is a culmination of 22 years of dedication to the sport with the love, blood, sweat, and tears.

I am just trying to enjoy it as much as I can. That is something that I struggled with in the past with cutting weight and a lot of training. There is adversity in school and there are injuries. In the past, I was always pessimistic about it.

I couldn’t wait for wrestling season to be over but this year I am really working hard to make it so that I appreciating being here and appreciating the process and appreciating the ability to compete because I know it is going to be gone soon.”

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 • 32
LAST SHOT AT GLORY: Princeton University wrestler Patrick Glory, top, controls a foe in a bout last season. Senior star Glory, who advanced to the NCAA final at 125 pounds last March, is primed to produce a big final campaign for the Tigers. Glory, who won the title at 125 in the Princeton Open earlier this month, is slated to be back on the mat this Sunday as the Tigers have duals against Michigan State and Wisconsin at the Prudential Center in Newark. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)
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PU Sports Roundup

PU Women’s Hoops Falls at No. 16 Texas

Kaitlyn Chen starred in a losing cause as Princeton fell 74-50 at No. 16 Texas last Sunday. Junior guard Chen tallied a team-high 15 points and three assists for the Tigers, who moved to 3-2 with the defeat.

Princeton plays at Maine on December 2 and at Towson on December 5.

Princeton Women’s Hockey Goes 1-1 at Nashville Event

Issy Wunder came up big as the 14th-ranked Princeton University women’s hockey team topped No. 9 Cornell 3-2 in a shootout last Sunday to wrap up play in the Smashville Showcase in Nashville, Tenn.

Freshman forward Wunder assisted on a third period goal by Sarah Fillier as Princeton forged ahead 2-1. Cornell responded with a goal minutes later to force overtime. Neither team scored in the extra session and the Tigers prevailed on the seventh round of the shootout when Wunder scored the clinching goal. The contest will count officially as a tie.

On Friday, Princeton started play in the event by falling 4-1 to No. 8 Northeastern 4-1 with Wunder scoring the lone goal for the Tigers.

Princeton, now 4-5-1 overall, resumes ECAC Hockey play this weekend when it heads north to play at RPI on December 2 and Union on December 3.

PU Men’s Hockey

Splits with RIT

David Jacobs, Liam Gorman, and Nick Seitz each had a goal and an assist to help the Princeton University men’s hockey team defeat No. 20 RIT 5-0 last Saturday in the finale of a two-game set.

Sophomore goalie Ethan Pearson made 23 saves in earning the shutout as the Tigers improved to 3-6 overall.

Princeton started the weekend falling 5-3 to RIT on Friday as Liam Gorman, Matt Hayami, and Jack Cronin scored goals in a losing cause.

In upcoming action, Princeton hosts Clarkson on December 3 and St. Lawrence on December 3.

Princeton Football Has 16 Named All-Ivy

Led by seven first-team All-Ivy selections, including three unanimous choices, the Princeton University football team placed 16 players on the 2022 All-Ivy League team, the league announced last week.

Senior offensive lineman Henry Byrd, senior receiver Andrei Iosivas, and junior linebacker Liam Johnson were each unanimous first-team selections, while senior receiver Dylan Classi, senior linebacker Matthew Jester, senior defensive back Michael Ruttlen Jr., and senior defensive back CJ Wall also earned first-team recognition.

Junior offensive lineman Jalen Travis, junior quarterback Blake Stenstrom, senior tight end Carson Bobo, and junior linebacker Ozzie Nicholas were second-

team selections, while senior offensive lineman Connor Scaglione, freshman running back Ryan Butler, senior defensive lineman Uche Ndukwe, senior punter Will Powers, and sophomore kick returner AJ Barber each earned honorable mention.

The 16 All-Ivy League honorees is tied for secondmost at Princeton since 2013.

Senior linebacker Cole Aubrey was also named Academic All-Ivy and CSC All-District Team. Aubrey contributed 18 tackles, four for a loss, and two sacks.

Princeton went 8-2 overall and 5-2 Ivy this fall, tying for second place with Penn as Yale (8-2 overall, 6-1 Ivy) won the league crown.

PU Football Star Receiver Iosivas Named Finalist for Payton Award

Princeton University senior star wide receiver Andrei Iosivas has been named a finalist for the Stats Perform FCS (Football Championship Subdivision) Walter Payton Award.

The Payton Award, which was first presented in 1987 and in its 36th season, is named for legendary Chicago Bears running back Walter Payton, who starred at Jackson State as part of his Hall of Fame career. Affectionately known as the Heisman of the FCS, its past recipients include future NFL standouts Steve McNair, Tony Romo, Brian Westbrook, Jimmy Garoppolo, Cooper Kupp, and Trey Lance.

Iosivas led the Ivy League in receptions (66), receiving yards (943), and touchdown catches (seven) while being ranked ninth in the FCS in receiving yards and 14th in receptions per game (6.6) and 16th in receiving yards.

The 6’3, 200-pound senior from Honolulu, Hawaii, ended his Princeton career ranked sixth all-time in receiving yards (1,909), 12th in receptions (125), and third in touchdown catches (16).

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022
LONDON CALLING: Princeton University men’s basketball player Ryan Langborg heads to the hoop in a game earlier this season. Last Saturday, senior guard Langborg scored a team-high 17 points to help Princeton defeat Northeastern 56-54 in the final of the London Basketball Classic at the Copper Box Arena. Tiger senior forward Tosan Evbuomwan, a native of Newcastle, England, added 13 points in the final and was named the tournament MVP. Princeton, now 4-2, hosts Cairn on November 30, plays at Drexel on December 3, and then hosts Lafayette on December 6. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)
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PDS Cross Country’s McCann, Hun Football QB Lainez Earn the Nod as Town Topics’ Leading Fall Performers

Emily McCann hit the road this summer as she looked to take things to a higher level this season for the Princeton Day School girls’ cross country team.

Junior McCann ramped up her weekly running mileage like never before in her preseason training.

“This summer, I put in a lot of miles,” said McCann, who also stars in ice hockey for the Panthers. “Last year I didn’t have a training plan. This summer, I had a specific training plan and basically I crossed off mileage every day and got up to 50 miles per week and an 11mile long run, which was the longest. It wasn’t a lot of workouts, it was just building base mileage, and I think that’s really where I changed this year versus last.”

First-year PDS head coach Mike Mazzei was impressed with how McCann thrived with her increased workload.

“Some kids can’t handle that mileage and some kids get injured when they go up in miles, but she’s a strong runner and strong athlete,” said Mazzei. “I tested the waters a bit with her and she was doing good with the 40mile weeks — so let’s go to 45. Then we bumped her up to 50, then we kind of went down from there. It was kind of like a pyramid. We had her go up to 50, then we trimmed her down to 40-45. Then we got into the season and kept her around 35-40.

I think that good summer base — which I think is important for them — and using that as a springboard into the season was really what made her good this year.”

McCann was very good this fall, producing a string of impressive performances. She placed first in both the XC Fall Classic at Thompson Park and the Jerry Hart Cross Country Invitational and took fourth at the New Balance Shore Coaches Invitational in the early going.

In late October, McCann took third in the Mercer County Cross Country Championships.

“It was a little slower race, but there was a lot of headwind,” said McCann reflecting on her performance that day.

“It wasn’t really about time today, it was about racing.” said McCann. “Last year I got eighth. My goal was to get top seven this year. Getting third boosted my confidence a lot and makes me feel good.”

Capping her stellar campaign at the Prep B state championships in early November, McCann placed second individually in a time of 20:15 over the 5,000-meter course to help PDS take first and earn the program’s firstever Prep team title.

“This season, I pretty much met my goals so far,” said McCann, whose also placed 13th in the New Jersey State Interscholastic

Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Non-Public A group meet. “I went sub-19:00, that was my big goal.”

Mazzei credited McCann with using her work ethic and talent to produce a breakthrough season.

“It is amazing how she has performed, she was already a star of the program,” said Mazzei of McCann. “I feel like this year she took it to a new level. I was really happy to see that. She was always a good runner, now she is starting to get to that elite in the state. I have coached good runners and I wanted to make them great. Emily was the first person I had who was already great who I could help reach an elite level.”

Turning those miles into a championship campaign makes McCann the choice as the Town Topics’ top female performer of the fall season.

Top Male Performer

Marco Lainez III had an off day when the Hun School football team fell 10-8 to Malvern Prep (Pa.) on Halloween 2020.

Star quarterback Lainez threw four interceptions that day and blamed himself for the defeat.

“I was probably the sole reason we lost that game,” said Lainez. “I walked off that field and said, ‘I never want to feel like this again.’ So I devoted as much time as I could to winning. I just

wanted to win every game.”

Lainez hasn’t had many off days since then as Hun went 8-0 in 2021 and then produced a 9-0 campaign this fall.

The 6’3, 225-pound Lainez, an Iowa commit, saved his best for last this fall in his senior season.

Lainez finished the fall with career highs of 2,182 yards passing and 23 touchdown passes. He also rushed for 573 yards and five TDs.

In assessing his progress, Lainez attributes it, in part, to being smarter with the ball.

“I took care of the ball more,” said Lainez. “Then this year they wanted me to push the ball to our playmakers more instead of last year when it was take what they give me. This year, it was ‘let’s see if we can push it down the field more to these guys because we have a lot of weapons.’ I was taking calculated risks where as my sophomore year it was just naïve risks and I’d just throw it. I definitely think the growth mentally and emotionally helped the physical side.”

Hun head coach Todd Smith credits Lainez with showing growth as a person.

“As a leader, he’s stepped up and taken over that role,” said Smith. “I think the kids look up to him. He commands the huddle and they respect him and love him and that’s great. From an Xs and Os standpoint, he’s taken his game to another level.”

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Smith also points to Lainez’s dedication to film study and being able to apply his new knowledge on the field as another key to his success. Since that 2020 Malvern game, the 6’3, 225-pound quarterback has thrown just five interceptions in two seasons total, including only two as a junior.

Looking ahead, Lainez is determined to apply himself in the same manner at the next level.

former of the fall.

Top Newcomers

Naomi Lygas was pumped up to join the Princeton High girls’ volleyball team this fall.

“It is exciting, my whole volleyball career, I was looking forward to doing it,” said freshman Lygas. “I want to be a leader, but I don’t have a problem listening to other people. I feel like working as a team is the most important part.”

(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

rounded play,” said Lygas. “Even if I am not on the front row, I am working hard on the back row, just trying to be the best I can wherever I am.”

Producing a superb debut season with her sparkling play at the net as the Tigers reached new heights, Lygas gets the nod as the top female newcomer.

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“I just want to do whatever it takes to see how good I can become mentally, physically, and emotionally,” said Lainez. “I also can’t wait to learn around those guys who are already there. Those guys are really talented. It’s a blessing to just being in the room with them, going in there and learning and being teammates with the guys and also seeing how good I can become. It’s just a great opportunity.”

Whatever happens, Lainez won’t soon forget the guys he played with at Hun.

The dynamic Lygas emerged as a leading performer for PHS right from the start of the season, contributing a team-high 10 kills and five digs in a 2-1 win over WW/P-South in her high school debut.

It didn’t take long for Brian Donis to make an impact in his first season for the Princeton High boys’ soccer team.

Moving up to the varsity this fall, sophomore forward Donis scored three goals in the team’s home opener as PHS defeated WW/P-N 5-0.

“It is amazing, I can’t even believe it myself,” said Donis, reflecting on his hat trick. “It was because of the team’s work that we got the win, that is very important. I am just very happy for the team.”

Donis acknowledged that the transition to the varsity level was challenging.

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“There are so many guys in that locker room that I just love to death and they push me in certain ways that you can’t find anywhere else,” said Lainez. “ I ’m going to miss being around the guys and competing with them in practice and then going to war with them. That ’s the best part — when you step in the huddle and there ’ s 10 sets of eyes on you and you’re all sharing one goal.”

For using his arm and legs to help Hun achieve the goal of another prefect season, Lainez is the top male per-

Lygas kept killing it for the Tigers, ending up with a team-high 189 kills. Her heroics helped PHS go 215, winning the Burlington County Scholastic League (BCSL) tournament and advancing to its first-ever New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) sectional final along the way.

PHS head coach Patty Manhart was thrilled to have Lygas on the squad.

“It is so nice to have that player who you can rely on so if you are in a slump or you need that fire, you have the person you can go to who can figure it out and rack up those points,” said Manhart.

Lygas, for her part, enjoyed bringing her competitive fire to the Tigers.

“I would say I bring well

“It has been a bit difficult,” said Donis. “The first game against Trenton (a 1-0 on September 8) was very eye-opening; it just showed me to wake up and just play faster.”

Over the summer, Donis had an eye-opening experience, competing for the Princeton FC Barcelona team that won the 16U final in the US Youth Soccer (USYS) 2022 National Presidents Cup tournament in July.

“After having a great

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AHEAD OF THE PACK: Princeton Day School girls’ cross country runner Emily McCann displays her form in a race this fall. Junior star McCann had a breakthrough season for PDS, placing first in both the XC Fall Classic at Thompson Park and the Jerry Hart Cross Country Invitational, third in the Mercer County Championships, fourth at the New Balance Shore Coaches Invitational, and 13th in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Non-Public A group meet. She capped her stellar campaign by taking second in Thank you to our customers for voting
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summer, I have lots of con fidence with the boys,” said Donis. “PFC Barca was amazing and to play with some of the guys on the Princeton High team, I think we are all connected. It re ally helps us on the field.”

Donis ended up helping the Tigers a lot, tallying a team-high six goals along with two assists.

PHS head coach Wayne Sutcliffe saw Donis as a spark for his team which ended the fall with an 8-8-1 record.

“Brian had a really good season, he had a really good first half, finding his form,” said Sutcliffe. “The more minutes you play at this level in big games, you can’t buy that. You are just going to get better from that.”

For displaying superb form in his first varsity campaign for PHS, Donis is the top male newcomer.

Top Coaches

Sarah Hibbert wasn’t sure what to expect from her Princeton High girls’ tennis team as it headed into the 2022 cam paign.

“We have got five new fac es in the lineup and seven people in different positions from last year,” said PHS head coach Hibbert, who guided the Tigers to a 13-3 record in 2021 and a spot to the Central Jersey Group 3 semifinals. “It will be a bit of a year for learning and growth.”

With PHS getting off to a 10-1 start in regular season action, Hibbert liked the growth shown by her squad early on.

“They have all clicked and have had fun getting started with the matches and every thing,” said Hibbert.

While the squad didn’t click in the Mercer County

Tournament as the Tigers finished seventh, Hibbert believed that competition would steel PHS for the state tournament.

“I think this will give us really good experience go ing into states, we will see what happens,” said Hib bert. “Hopefully this expe rience will help them get a little more prepared.”

Good things happened for PHS as it competed in the New Jersey State In terscholastic Athletic As sociation (NJSIAA) Group 3 Central Jersey sectional. In the semis, the Tigers avenged their lone defeat to that point, a 3-2 loss to WW/P-North in late Septem ber, by topping the Northern Knights 4-1.

“I think it was a little bit of experience and motiva tion from last time,” said Hibbert, reflecting on the win in the rematch. “We were disappointed with the way it ended. It was a very close match, it could have gone either way. It was dis appointing after that 3-hour battle to wind up losing it 3-2 in a third set tiebreak and 7-5 third set. We knew we had the potential to win that. We were just hoping that we could use it for the motivation today and come out fired up and play our best tennis.”

PHS kept playing well, edging Red Bank Regional 3-2 in the sectional final and then nipping Shawnee 3-2 in the Group 3 state semis. The Tigers’ state run ended with a 5-0 loss to powerhouse Montgomery in the final.

“Overall we are thrilled, coming into the season we were like we will still beat the teams we were expected to but we are probably going to have a tough time with some of the stronger ones,” said Hibbert, whose team

ended the fall with a 15-3 re cord. “The girls have really stepped up and have worked hard. They have had some great results. Just to make it here and have the win in the semis and be Group finalists in a year with five new play ers is great.”

Guiding her revamped squad to a sectional title and the state final makes Hibbert the top coach of a female team.

Pat Quirk sensed that his Hun School boys’ soccer team could be something special this fall.

“With the 12 or 13 kids who are coming back, they all have great experience here,” said Hun head coach Quirk, who guided the Raid ers to a 10-7 record in 2021.

“They all got into games last year at the varsity level. Win ning a couple games and be ing close in some of the big ger games gives them more confidence but we know it is a whole new season.”

In late September, Hun made a big statement with a 3-0 win over perennial power Pennington.

“We knew that we could hold them,” said Quirk in assessing his program’s first win over the Red Hawks since 2010. “I know we are a little bit better than last year and we have guys who expe rience from last year coming back. We said look we are not going to back down, we are going to play scared. It is tough not to play scared against that team because they are a powerhouse. They have a lot.”

Hun brought a 9-2-2 re cord into the Mercer County Tournament, earning the second seed.

“We believe in these guys, we have been in some close games and we have pulled them out,” said Quirk, look ing ahead to postseason play. “We found a way to win and that is what good teams do and I would say these guys are a pretty good team.”

The Raiders went on to lose a close 1-0 contest to Pennington in MCT semis and then fell 4-0 to the Red Hawks in the Prep A state semis.

Heading into its season finale against Peddie, Hun was in the running for one more title.

“It is Senior Day, it is a celebration,” said Quirk. “It is a chance to win backto-back Mid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL) titles, which we haven’t done in a long time.”

The Raiders did just that, defeating the Falcons 3-0 to earn that MAPL champion ship repeat and finish the season at 12-4-2.

For guiding his squad to a higher level and a second straight league title, Quick is the choice as the top coach of a male team.

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022
AIR RAID: Hun School quarterback Marco Lainez III fires a pass in a 2021 game. Senior star and Iowa commit Lainez had career highs of 2,182 yards passing and 23 touchdown passes this fall to help the Raiders go 9-0 for the program’s second straight perfect season. He also rushed for 573 yards and five TDs. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) INSTANT HIT: Princeton High girls’ volleyball player Naomi Ly gas hits a serve in a match this season. Freshman standout Ly gas made an immediate impact for PHS, leading the team with 189 kills. Lygas helped PHS go 21-5, winning the Burlington County Scholastic League (BCSL) tournament and advancing to its first-ever sectional final along the way.
After Noon Concert Series Thursdays at 12:30pm Princeton University Chapel Performing Dec 1, 2022 MARK PACOE East River Catholics, New York, NY Performing Dec 8, 2022 JAMES D. HICKS Califon, NJ TOWN TOPICS is printed entirely on recycled paper.
(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

After Struggling Through Bumpy Ride Last Winter, PDS Boys’ Hockey Determined to Bounce Back

Joining the high-powered Gordon Conference last winter and making its de but in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic As sociation (NJSIAA) NonPublic state tournament, the Princeton Day School boys’ hockey team took its lumps.

PDS went 6-7-6 overall, falling 3-2 to St. John Vian ney in the first round of the Non-Public state tourney to end the season on a down note.

As the Panthers have hit the ice to prepare for the 2022-23 campaign, they are showing a hunger to excel.

“One thing they all talked about during our individual exit interviews last season was just practicing with more intensity and more purpose and that has been pretty evident so far,” said PDS head coach Scott Ber toli. “It is early and there is always an excitement that comes with that. It has been pretty intentional on the part of the older kids. They recognize in some respects they underachieved and we underachieved last year.”

In Bertoli’s view, this year’s squad could achieve a lot.

“As the coach of a program, I recognize opportunities or windows for significant suc cess and I feel like this is one of them where the pieces are in place,” said Bertoli.

“We really need to empha size a few things and a lot of them are the things the kids talked about in the exit interviews.”

PDS has a lot of good pieces at forward in a group of battle-tested veterans that features senior Rosheen Nis sangaratchie, junior Riley Schmidt, junior Liam Jack son, senior Ryan Vandal, se nior Oliver Hall, senior Ace Ewanchyna, and sophomore Wyatt Ewanchyna.

“That is where we have our depth and where we are most improved,” said Bertoli, whose forward unit will also include senior Nick Bruno, sophomore Colton Simonds, and trio

of promising freshmen in Brady Logue, Jake Harri son, and Filip Kacmarsky. “We return so many kids, we have very capable forwards. The reality is that our fourth line, whatever that ends up being, is going to be stron ger and more talented than what our third line was last year so that is encouraging. As a group, they look big ger, they look faster. The intensity and the urgency in practice is there. The key is always can you sustain that.”

The Ewanchyna brothers exemplify the sense of ur gency Bertoli is seeing from his players.

“Ace played a lot over the summer and looks like a dif ferent player from last year; he is the fastest kid on the ice and has looked like a pretty dynamic player,” said Bertoli. “I could see him re ally ramping up his produc tion, he is a kid that is likely going to play in every situ ation because of his speed. Wyatt is very good. They are different types of players. He wants to win, he wants to compete, and he wants to learn. He plays on a very good club team, he is one of their go-to guys. He wants to be that guy for us even as a sophomore. They are both bigger and stronger and faster than last year and that adds up to boding well for themselves and the team.”

Juniors Han Shin and Connor Stratton will be goto players on the defensive unit along with seniors Cole Fenton and Will Brown.

“Han and Connor play the most minutes because they are power play guys,” said Bertoli, adding that sophomore Hart Nowakos ki, sophomore Max Guche, and freshman Hubert Shin should also see time at de fenseman. “We have guys like Cole and Will who took lot of pride in being defen sive players. They typically pair well with Connor and Han. We encourage them to push the play and they usu ally complement that with

defensive-minded play.”

At goalie, junior Mason Watson and sophomore Cal vin Fenton are battling for playing time.

“Mason is a big athletic kid, when his positioning is on and his angles are on, it is just hard to get the puck past him,” said Bertoli. “Cal vin is just a really athletic kid. He recovers well, always seems to make the second and the third save. As a team you don’t want to be going up those second and third opportunities but you have a kid that has the abil ity to do it and thrives on it. I am sure they both want to be the starter. We are in a really good spot there.”

With PDS opening the season by playing at Ber gen Catholic on December 8 and then hosting Christian Brothers Academy on De cember 13, Bertoli believes that getting off to a hot start will be critical for his squad.

“Having some success right out of the gate against these top teams and proving to our selves that we have the depth and the mindset to play with these top groups that we play against night in, night out is key,” said Bertoli. “You look at our schedule, there is no game that I can circle and say here is an opportunity to play some kids that I normally wouldn’t play. We figured that out quickly last year. That isn’t in the cards anymore, which is great. I want our kids to be challenged. They recognize at the end of the day, given the competition, if you don’t show up, you are not going to have success.”

If the Panthers can develop that winning mindset early on, they could experience a lot of success this winter.

“We recognize the oppor tunity here that if things fall our way and we get some bounces and have some success early, we can have some home ice games in the Gordon playoffs and the state playoffs,” said Bertoli. “There is a real possibility that we can be playing into March and having some re ally, really big games.”

Producing Solid Effort at Shady Side Tournament, Hun Boys’ Hockey Gets Major

As the Hun School boys’ hockey team headed into the Shady Side Academy (Pa.) Thanksgiving Classic last weekend, Ian McNally feared that his squad might not be up to speed.

“When people asked me in the fall, ‘how is the team go ing to be?’ I said I genuinely didn’t know. I am not sure, we will see,” said Hun head coach McNally. “There have been years where I know we are going to stink or we are going to be very good. This is one I wasn’t sure. I was a little worried about this week.”

Showing skill and tenac ity, Hun held its own, going 1-3 with two of the losses coming in shootouts. The Raiders fell 2-1 to St. Fran cis (Pa.) in a shootout on Fri day and then topped Blythe Academy (Canada) 3-2 and lost 4-3 in a shootout to Shady Side in action on Sat urday. They wrapped up the event with a 5-3 loss to Fort Erie (Canada) on Sunday.

“We have some new guys and we hung in there with some pretty decent teams,” said McNally, whose team is now 2-3, having topped Father Judge High (Pa.) 4-0 in its season opener on No vember 16 before compet ing in the Shady Side event. “That is the reason we go to this. All of the teams there are more like the Pennsyl vania model, they are play ing in the fall. They are two months into their season. It was great. We could have won all four games, it was good to see that.”

Hun got a good contribu tion over the weekend from junior newcomer forward Justin Laplante, who tallied two goals and two assists in the tournament.

“We had a kid last year,

Jolt

of Confidence

Seth Kaplan, who was a power forward and Jus tin has turned out to be a clone,” said McNally, not ing that two other newcom ers, juniors Charles-Etienne Jette and Ryan Levesque, have also given a lift to the forward unit. “He is strong, he is fast. He just played for the Hun football team this fall and he contributed there. He can shoot, he can skate.”

Laplante has quickly de veloped a connection with senior co-captain Elian Es tulin.

“Elian has got points in every game so far,” said McNally. “He is wearing a C on his jersey, he has taken on some of that leadership too. Those two not know ing each other up until two weeks ago have bonded. They found some chemistry this weekend.”

Returning junior Brendan Marino showed his offensive skill over the weekend.

“Brendan has a wicked lacrosse shot and he has translated that to hockey,” said McNally, who noted that veteran senior Josh Sosner also performed well at Shady Side. “He scored twice this weekend, they were just bullets. Shots from far away that went in and out quick. He has nice little snap shot and he scored a couple of big ones. We have two lines right now that are pretty decent — we can roll with anybody.”

Lacking depth at defense man, seniors Mark Gall and Scott Richmond have been converted from forward to the blue line.

“Not that he had any expe rience but Mark took it on, he is one of our captains,” said McNally. “He gave it

the old ‘I will do anything for the team’ response and he has been awesome. It is totally unnatural to him, he is figuring it out as it goes. The other guy doing that is Scott. He hasn’t that much varsity experience and it was the same thing, ‘if you need me, I will try it.’”

Battle-tested senior Vin cent Gregoire will be count ed on to spearhead the de fensive unit.

“We will lean heavy on a few guys,” said McNally. “Vincent is going to have to log a lot of minutes, he is up for it so far.”

At goalie, senior cocaptain Stephen Chen and junior transfer Julien Arse neault give Hun two good options between the pipes.

“Stephen is on another planet, he looks very, very solid right now,” said Mc Nally of Chen, who had 39 saves against St. Francis and 33 stops against Shady Side.

“There are pockets where guys develop at the right time and this is Stephen’s time. Julien had a couple of weeks of practice and we gave him one period in the Father Judge game. He was pretty cold going into this tournament and he was awe some.”

In the wake of Hun’s per formance at the tournament, McNally believes his squad could do some awesome things this winter.

“We have two first lines and when you have Stephen in the net, you have a chance to win,” said McNally, whose team hosts Devon Prep (Pa.) on November 30 and the Haverford School (Pa.) on December 2. “We were out chanced and outshot and we are winning every third pe riod, that is a pretty unique thing. This is a year where we are going to have that ability, we can sneak out wins on any night.”

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 • 36
GETTING UP TO SPEED: Princeton Day School boys’ hockey player Ryan Vandal races up the ice in action last season. Senior forward Vandal figures to be a key offensive contributor for the Panthers this winter. PDS opens its 2022-23 campaign by playing at Bergen Catholic on Decem ber 8 and then hosting Christian Brothers Academy on December 13. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) ON THE MARK: Hun School boys’ hockey player Mark Gall, right, goes after the puck in a game last season. Senior co-captain Gall has moved to defenseman this winter and has been a spark on the blue line for the Raiders. Hun, now 2-3, hosts Devon Prep (Pa.) on November 30 and the Haverford School (Pa.) on December 2. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)
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Buoyed by Inside-Out Balance, Upbeat Mentality, Hun Boys’ Basketball Primed to Excel this Winter

Although the Hun School boys’ basketball team has only been practicing for a few weeks, Jon Stone is already feeling good about his squad.

“It has been great, we are probably further along than we normally are on chemistry,” said Hun head coach Stone, who guided the Raiders to a 14-10 record last winter as it reached the semifinals of both the Mid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL) and Prep A state tournaments. “It is just a good group of guys, it has been fun.”

Hun boasts a very good

group of guards led by postgraduate Dan Vessey and senior Anthony Loscalzo.

“Anybody with that kind of experience that he has and all of his talent; he is just solid as a rock for us,” said Stone of the sharpshooting Vessey, who has committed to attend Army West Point and play for its men’s basketball program. “He has been handling the ball quite a bit for us too.

Anthony is looking great with his ability to shoot, handle the ball, and just compete.”

The Raiders have depth in the backcourt to be

competitive with junior Malachay Kelly and sophomore A.J. Mickens.

“Malachay is playing really, really well. He is a new junior, he could start when all is said and done if we go with three guards,” said Stone, who will also be using senior Mike Jolly and junior Matt Land at guard. “He is in a similar mode to those other two guys, he is a little shorter like Loscalzo but he can really shoot. He is a good ballhandler and he is probably our best on-ball defender. They are all point guards, they can all handle the ball and shoot. A.J is about 6’4 so he is not in the same mold. He is a little more versatile. He can play up to power forward if I need him to with that size but he is really a guard.”

At forward, transfer Symeon Efstathiou, a native of Athens, Greece, is bringing size and versatility to the squad.

“Symeon has a lot of skill; he really, really likes to pass but he can rebound, and he can block shots,” said Stone of the 6’9 Efstathiou, who has committed to attend Brown and play for its men’s hoops team. “He can score, he can shoot threes. His ability to pass is probably one of his greatest assets. He is your prototypical European player.”

Senior forward Anthony Aririguzoh should be a big asset in the frontcourt for Hun this winter.

“He is looking great; he is a really strong defender, rebounder so he is pretty versatile himself,” said Stone of the 6’6 Aririguzoh. “His ability to pass is underrated and his shooting has really come around. Scoring is low on this list of what he brings to the table but he is still going to score plenty for us this year along with his defense, his rebounding, and his assists.”

Stone believes that senior Ethan Gross and sophomore Drae Time will bring some good things to the paint as well.

“Ethan is coming along really nicely, he is 6’7 and is really mobile,” said Stone. “His length really helps us on defense and he has the ability to run the floor and rebound the ball. He has been a real asset so far doing those things. Drae has been a real pleasant surprise. He actually played on the freshman team last year and was pretty dominant. He grew a little bit over the summer, he is all of 6’5 and weighs 225. He is a football player but he didn’t play a ton of football this year. He is a specimen physically and has been playing really, really well for us.”

With Hun once again facing a gauntlet of tough foes, Stone believes his team is primed to do well.

“We lost some of our more vocal leaders, the communication piece from a vocal standpoint is going to be big,” said Stone, whose team was slated to start the 2022-23 season by playing at St. Benedict’s on November 29 before hosting the Haverford School (Pa.) on December 1 and then competing in the Coaches vs. Cancer event at the Blair Academy on December 3 and 4.

“We have had some guys start to step up in that. We lost a lot of rebounding with Jack [Scott] in particular along Toby [Thornburg] and Isiaha [Dickens]. We have got to replace those things this year. We are excited to start as usual.”

With Costello Taking Helm of Hun Girls’ Basketball, Raiders Embracing Change Heading into 2022-23 Season

As Sean Costello has taken the helm of the Hun School girls’ basketball team this winter, his players are embracing change.

“It has been great, they are doing awesome,” said Costello, the successor to Bill Holup, who guided the program for 23 seasons. “It is all new. It is new system, new process, new practices, new terminology. They have been super receptive with a lot of energy.”

Costello, who previously built the Shipley School (Pa.) girls’ hoops team into a formidable program, is bringing a lot of energy to the court as well.

“I am excited, it is a really good group of kids so it has been good for me,” said Costello, who also serves as Hun’s co-director of athletics with Tracey Arndt. “It is fun to start over kind of. I had built up something at Shipley — it was years and years in the making. Now I get to do something similar here.”

The foundation of what Costello is building at Hun will feature an exciting brand of basketball.

“I certainly like to play uptempo, but having coached at a couple of different levels I have learned that you have to coach to your team,” said Costello. “We will try to play fast but we will certainly have some other things that will play to our strengths. We are definitely trying to install some things that long term will come into play in terms of our spacing and our pace of play.”

Hun will be looking

for postgraduate Emily O’Dwyer, who hails from Ireland and junior Anna Schweer to get things up to speed in the backcourt.

“Emily is a very strong player, she is kind of a combo guard,” said Costello, who will also be using freshman Addie McNally, freshman Victoria Lubaczewski, and junior Michaela Pestano at guard. “She plays on the ball a little bit, she plays on the wing. She is a really good shooter. She is a good player. Anna has been on the team for three years, she is a good athlete.”

In the frontcourt, sophomore Amira Pinkett gives the Raiders athleticism and versatility.

“Amira has a really high ceiling, she will play a little three (small forward), a little four (power forward), depending on who else we have on the floor,” said Costello. “We have some good guards and some good wing play, all of those kids will compete for time.”

Senior forward Sasha Moise should provide some good inside-out play for Hun.

“Sasha has been great, she is certainly will be someone that we will rely on a bit,” said Costello. “One thing I have been focusing on with her is not just being an interior player. You will see her facing the basket a little more and getting inside and out.”

The Raiders boast some depth in the paint with junior Lauren Larkin and senior Tylr Neely.

“Lauren played a little

bit last year,” said Costello. “Tylr hasn’t been playing basketball but came out this year. She is a big lacrosse player. She is a strong kid who has really helped us immediately. I think she is going help us quite a bit on the inside. She is the biggest kid we have and is a good athlete.”

In Costello’s view, Hun has the potential to have a good season as long as the players get on the same page.

“I think it is just continuing to grow and learning each other’s strengths,” said Costello. “A big part of what we are focusing on right now is our defensive energy and our rebounding. I think that has all been really good early on. Our ability to grow and our offensive efficiency is what will really determine how we do. I think we will be good because we have some good athletes and we will compete. If we get better and more efficient on the offensive end, we will have quite a bit of success.”

No matter how much success the Raiders have, they will bring a lot of intensity to the court.

“They are really into it, they have been working really, really hard,” said Costello. “They were putting in some work on their own in the fall. As soon as we have gotten started they have been really good, they have been doing everything we ask of them and we have been pushing them really hard. I think we are going to be an exceptionally hardworking group of kids and we are going to get better as the season goes on.”

37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022
DAN THE MAN: Hun School boys’ basketball player Dan Vessey goes up for a shot in game last season. Post-graduate guard Vessey figures to trigger the offense for Hun this winter in his final campaign with the program. The Raiders were slated to start the 2022-23 season by playing at St. Benedict’s on November 29 before hosting the Haverford School (Pa.) on December 1 and then competing in the Coaches vs. Cancer event at the Blair Academy on December 3 and 4. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)
— Bill Alden
MO BETTER: Hun School girls’ basketball player Sasha Moise heads to the hoop in a game last season. Senior forward Moise will be counted on to provide production and leadership this winter for Hun. The Raiders tip off their 2022-23 season by playing at George School (Pa.) on November 30 and will then compete in the Peddie School Invitational Tournament from December 2-4. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY conducted by DARCY JAMES ARGUE Creative Large Ensemble MUSIC COMPOSED and ARRANGED BY Toshiko Akiyoshi ✳ Patty Darling Eddie Durham ✳ Duke Ellington Benny Golson ✳ Bill Holman ✳ Quincy Jones Thad Jones ✳ Oliver Nelson ✳ Sy Oliver Nelson Riddle ✳ Billy Strayhorn ✳ Ernie Wilkins by Evan DeTurk ’23 Premiering New Work saturday DECEMBER 10, 2022 ✦ 8 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall $15 general ✳ $5 student music.princeton.edu jazzatprinceton.edu Local family owned business for over 40 years Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com Taking care of Princeton’s trees TOWN TOPICS is printed entirely on recycled paper.

Rec Department Holding Sign Up for Dillon Hoops

The Princeton Recreation Department is now taking registrations for the 2023 Dillon Youth Basketball League.

The Dillon Youth Basketball League is a storied program for the Princeton community that is entering its 51st season. The league consists of both games and clinics. It is open to boys and girls in grades 4-10 who are Princeton residents and non-residents who attend school in Princeton.

The Dillon season will take place from JanuaryMarch 2023 and games will be held Saturday mornings at the Hun School. The program is a recreational league intended for players of all skill and experience levels. “Dillon Basketball” is about playing the game the right way, teamwork, and having fun.

To register, log onto register.communitypass. net/princeton under “2022/2023 Winter Sports Programs.” Registration is open until January 2 or until divisions are at capacity. More information can be found online at princetonrecreation.com.

Princeton Athletic Club

Holding 6K Run on Dec. 3

The Princeton Athletic Club will be holding its annual Winter Wonder Run at the Institute Woods on De-

The 6,000-meter run starts at 10 a.m. from Princeton Friends School and is limited to 200 participants.

All abilities are invited, including those who prefer to walk the course. A portion of the proceeds benefits Princeton High Fencing Team, whose members will assist on the event crew.

Online registration and full details are available at princetonac.org.

The Princeton Athletic Club is a nonprofit running club for the community. The club, an all-volunteer organization, promotes running for the fun and health of it and stages several running events each year.

Town Topics Sports Wins 2 NJSPJ Awards

Town Topics Sports Editor Bill Alden has won two 2022 New Jersey Society of Professional Journalists ( NJ-SPJ ) Excellence in Journalism Awards.

Alden was awarded first place for the Best Sports Feature in the Garden State Division for his story, “ PU Grad Student Snyder Headed to Tokyo Paralympics, Moving to Triathlon After Dominating Swimming Event,” published on August 25, 2021.

He earned second place in the same category for his story, “Espousing Values of Kindness, Always Doing Your Best, Beloved Coach DiGregorio Touched Countless Lives,” published on October 20, 2021.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 • 38
Local Sports
STEEL CURTAIN: Members of the Tamasi Shell Steelers are all smiles after they defeated the DZS Clinical Cardinals 35-25 in the (ages 11-14) earlier this month. Pictured, oach Jesse Lerman, Koby Smith, EJ Edwards, Jaden coach Ezra Lerman, Miles Oakman, coach Jeffery CHIEFS OF STATE: Members of the Petrone Associates Chiefs enjoy the moment after they topped the Woodwinds Bengals 2818 in the championship game of the Princeton Junior Football League (PJFL) Juniors division (ages 8-10) earlier this month. Pictured in the front row, from left, are Jax Cherian, Nate Shackney, Sam Frole, Ethan Friedlich, Corrine Lesnik, Nathan Besler, and Jagger Kapoor. In the middle row, from left, are Noah Kusminsky, Luke Branagh, Christian Barr, Hudson Hanley, Jayden Morelli, and Alexander Shah. In the back row, from left, are coaches Jim Barr, Dan Hanley, and Jon Besler. ON THE TROT: Princeton High boys’ cross country star Marty Brophy heads to the finish line in a race this fall. Last Thursday, senior Brophy placed first of 1,684 finishers at the annual Princeton Trinity Turkey Trot, covering the 5,000-meter course in a time of 16:42.58. Wilberforce School distance running junior standout Caleb Brox took third in 17:26.20. Former Pennington School and current Brown University cross country/ track star Emily Moini was the first female finisher, placing 21st in a time of 19:33.53. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)
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Obituaries

world, visiting Egypt, Kenya, Turkey, Denmark, Portugal, Spain, Morocco, Chile, Ven ezuela, Mexico, Israel, the UK, France, Switzerland, Italy, their beloved Venice three times, China, and Japan. They always took a winter week to visit the en chanted island of Anguilla where they had spent their honeymoon.

Their life was full of trav el, entertaining, Broadway shows, movies, and dances where Barbara starred with her beautiful, spins, dips, and curls. Her all-time fa vorite movie was the 1984 film Flashdance, with its musical scores, photogra phy, and storyline that so closely paralleled her own life story of unconventional routes to success.

Architect Barbara A. Hillier, AIA

Architect Barbara A. Hillier died peacefully on November 21, 2022 from Alzheimer’s disease. She was 71 years old and in residence at Brookdale in Dublin, Pa.

Barbara was born in Phil adelphia, Pa., on June 20, 1951, the first of two chil dren for Colman and Shirley Feinberg. Her parents had a thriving men’s clothing store where Barbara, as a young woman, helped out as a salesperson.

From an early age, she demonstrated a knack for drawing and an innate ar tistic talent. Despite her natural skill and drive to succeed, academic advisors continuously pushed Bar bara towards cosmetologyrelated roles. However, her aspirations were higher. Barbara enrolled at Temple University, where she re ceived a BA in Psychology. Wanting to nurture her artis tic talent, she decided short ly after graduation to enroll at Beaver College, now Ar cadia University, where she studied Art and Interior De sign, earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree.

In 1978, with the coun try in recession, Barbara reputedly sent 138 letters to architectural firms in the Philadelphia Region. One of those letters landed on the desk of a young architect in Princeton, J. Robert Hillier. So impressed with the letter, he called Barbara in for an interview. She claimed that Hillier was the only respon dent to her letters.

Barbara’s senior thesis at Beaver was a proposed ca sino for Philadelphia’s Fair mont Park. The design did not appeal to Hillier, but he could not get over Barbara’s passion for design and her communication of it. Hillier asked General Manager Joe Bavaro to also interview her, and his determination was they should hire Barbara, “not because of her pretty face” and not until there was a project for an interior designer. That project soon came along with a call from the Los Angeles Dodgers to transform their Vero Beach training camp into a confer ence center when the team

was not there. Barbara was hired. From that point on Barbara began winning in terior design commissions and the firm expanded its services to include interior design.

In 1984, Barbara asked if she could open the firm’s first branch office in Phila delphia. The answer was “yes,” but only if she had a large enough project to war rant it. Barbara learned of a large company that was re locating from New York to Philadelphia. While the Fa cilities Manager, a Princeton resident, originally refused to meet with Barbara, she finally persuaded him by of fering to connect with him on the train for his commute home. Barbara won the proj ect and was able to open the Philadelphia office.

The new office took on the creation of corporate head quarters for Vanguard, Mo torola, Bell Atlantic, Bristol Myers Squibb, and Merck. It also took on educational work for Temple University, the Wharton School, and several private secondary schools including the unique Solebury School near New Hope, Pa. For Solebury, Barbara created the stun ning Abbe Science Center which won design awards from the National Cedar Council, the New Jersey and Pennsylvania AIA, and the extremely prestigious Pennsylvania AIA Silver Medal which is awarded by discretion only to a project far above all the entries in a particular year.

Bob Hillier and Barbara were married in 1986, as a working relationship turned into a love story. Together, they built their magnificent Autretemps on the banks of the Delaware River. Barbara became a dedicated home maker with her home cook ing, her vegetable garden ing, and entertaining. She had the amazing ability to turn away from the practice on Friday afternoon and en joy her own time over the weekend, including reading the New York Times cover to cover.

Barbara loved to travel, so before she and Bob started a family, they traveled the

Back at the office, it be came quite clear that Bar bara was more interested in architecture than interior design. Pennsylvania had a historic “craft” law that said after working for an archi tect for 10 years, you could undertake a three-year in ternship and then take the architectural licensing ex ams without the usual re quired architectural degree. Barbara took on that chal lenge and started taking the exams, but she kept failing the site planning exam. Bob helped her through her third and “must pass” site planning exam by forcing her to build a topographic site model out of sheets of cardboard to better under stand site grading. In 1992, Barbara became a licensed Architect!

In 1993, after a wonderful trouble-free pregnancy, Bar bara delivered a beautiful daughter, Jordan Rebecca, and took a full year off to properly begin her daugh ter’s life. Soon after, she retired from the Philadel phia office, and joined Bob in Princeton, balancing her new career as a wonderful Mom — helping out in class es at Buckingham Friends school and taking Jordan to riding lessons when she turned 5, and training her two beloved Vizslas Zoe and Chance (and later, Suri and Bowie, who filled Barbara’s final years with endless joy). Barbara’s dedication to Jor dan’s equestrian activities went above the call of duty, with early morning drives to horse shows, the assur ance that Jordan had the right outfit, and the constant search for the perfect horse for Jordan to own. Barbara continued to attend horse shows with Jordan through 2021. There was always one guaranteed way to make Barbara smile — and that was to talk about Jordan. As Jordan grew, Barbara stayed deeply engaged in her life, and was Jordan’s best cheerleader, confidant, and role model, teaching her the importance of having a career, but that being a mom was above all else.

After her extended mater nity leave, upon returning to the Princeton office, Barba ra organized a very talented and design-dedicated studio for special projects with both great design challenges and opportunities. Barbara’s attitude about design was to challenge the conventional through the creation of to tally new forms that better met the client’s needs and aspirations while still re specting concepts of Place, Community, History, and Culture.

In 2003 Barbara won an in teresting project for Becton Dickinson. The corporation was housed in two buildings, separated by a beautiful and treasured lawn at its entry drive. Management felt that the groups in the two sepa rated buildings should be talking more and working together. They proposed an employee services center be tween the two buildings to bring people together with its central dining function plus other services. Rather than building it upon the great lawn, Barbara pro posed a building under the lawn that would break out of the ground in the rear with views to the woods beyond. The building was honored by design awards from the New Jersey and Pennsylva nia, AIA Chapters, and, un expectedly, it received the prestigious Chicago Ath enaeum National Award for architectural excellence.

In 2007, Barbara and Bob were working on the Master Plan for the Las Colinas de velopment in Irving, Texas, of which one element was a Convention Center being de signed by a New York firm. One day Barbara got a call from the director of con ventions asking if Barbara would design the Conven tion Center instead. In her usual way Barbara explored alternatives to the large flat boring boxes that defined most convention centers. She created a vertical con

vention center that soared 170 feet into the Texas sky with convention rooms at different levels, all con nected by amazing escala tors and with expansive terraces protected from the hot Texas sun. The design minimized its land consump tion, and the center had a huge visual presence from the highways to the Dal las airport. The building has won every imaginable award including several for its sustainability and struc tural finesse. It is also fully booked far into the future.

With the completion of this and other major proj ects, Barbara resigned from the firm and spent two years at Princeton Uni versity’s School of Architec ture, achieving her lifelong cherished goal: a Master’s Degree in Architecture. Her happiness on the day they draped the hood over her shoulders was second only to the day Jordan was born.

Barbara then set her sights on the “Renaissance” of Witherspoon Street with an updating of its historic structures and the provision of housing for those who help the town of Princeton function and thrive, but can not afford to live there. That “Renaissance” is to begin construction in 2023.

Thus, was completed an amazing career of mother hood, service, leadership, sophistication, artistic cre ativity, and passion.

Princeton’s First Tradition Worship Service in the University Chapel Sundays at 11am

Barbara is survived by her husband, J. Robert Hillier and their daughter Jordan Hillier Adams, husband Dr. Alex Adams, and grand daughter Sela Jane. She is also survived by her step son, James Baldwin Hillier, wife Shari, and three stepgrandchildren. She is also survived by her brother, Dr. Bruce Feinberg, his wife Iris, and their four children.

The family wants to thank the remarkable staff at Brookdale Dublin for their gentleness and thoughtful care of Barbara during her stay in their facility. Special thanks to Natalie, Dana, Jessica, Jesse, and Chefs June and Teresa.

Burial in Princeton Cem etery will be private for the family. There will be a me morial service and celebra tion of Barbara’s life at the Princeton University Chapel on January 6, 2023 at 11 a.m. Funeral arrangements are by Mather-Hodge Fu neral Home of Princeton, N.J.

Barbara was very passion ate about finding a cure to Alzheimer’s disease, from her Dad’s diagnosis through to her own struggles with the disease. In lieu of flow ers, and in Barbara’s honor, contributions may be made to Alzheimer’s Association, Delaware Valley Chapter, which can be accessed through alz.org/delval.

Guest Preaching Sunday, December 4, 2022 Rev. Judy Fentress-Williams ‘84, Ph.D. Virginia Theological Seminary, Alexandria, VA

Music performed by the Princeton University Chapel Choir with Nicole Aldrich, Director of Chapel Music and of the University Chapel Choir, and with Eric Plutz, University Organist. The Chapel Choir will perform works by J. Edmund Hughes, Douglas Byler, Ēriks Ešenvalds.

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30,
2022
Obituaries Continued on Next Page

Tung-Ching Lee, 81, of Princeton, NJ, peacefully passed away Tuesday, November 22, 2022 at Capital Health Regional Medical Center, NJ.

Tung-Ching was born on October 28, 1941 in Chongqing, China. Always a scholar, he graduated Summa Cum Laude from Tung-Hai University in Taichung, Taiwan, received his Master’s in Food Science and PhD in Agricultural Chemistry from University of California, Davis, and Certified Nutrition Specialist from the U.S. Certification Board for Nutrition Specialists, New York, NY. He taught and did research in Food Chemistry at University of Rhode Island for 15 years, and at Rutgers University for 28 years before retiring in 2017.

Tung-Ching received several awards and honors through his work, including Fellow

from the International Academy of Food Science and Technology, “Board of Trustees Award for Excellence in Research” and “Sustained Research Excellence Award” from Rutgers University, Fellow from the American Chemical Society, Fellow of Institute of Food Technologists, and “The Research Scientists of the Year” award from the University of Rhode Island, just to name a few. He also received several research grants, developed several patents, and authored/co-authored more than 260 research papers in review journals and proceedings, and more than 30 books in the area of biotechnology, food science and technology, nutrition, food safety, microbiology, and other related fields.

True to his profession, one of Tung-Ching’s hobbies was food: eating food, reading about food, cooking food,

finding new restaurants, etc. He was also an avid traveler, visiting every country and continent except for Australia and New Zealand. Reading was another passion of his, as newspapers, magazines, and books were always surrounding him, and a newspaper or two were always in his satchel when he left the house.

Tung-Ching is survived by his wife of 52 years, I-Wen Yeh, his son Jan, daughter Irene, brother Toney Lee, and sister Gina Hsu, as well as several nephews, nieces, and extended family.

A private funeral was on Saturday, November 26. A public memorial service is on Saturday, December 10, 2022 at 11 a.m. at Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton, NJ. Burial will follow the memorial service.

Flowers can be sent to Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton, NJ, for the December 10 memorial service.

November 25 from the effects of melanoma.

Patricia was born in Boston in 1934 and attended Charlestown High School, where she was known for playing piano and her involvement in the Acting Club. She was an exceptionally bright student and graduated early at the age of 16. After graduation she worked at Shawmut Bank in Boston until she married Andrew Cahill in 1955.

Pat and Andy lived in Providence, RI, Endicott, NY, and Huntington, NY, before settling in Princeton, NJ in 1965 where they raised their five children and lived for almost 40 years.

During their 47 years of marriage Pat and Andy enjoyed many opportunities to travel — trips with friends, IBM Golden Circle Awards (honoring Andy as a top salesperson), and especially visiting family in places like London, Hong Kong, and Paris. They also enjoyed entertaining and many of their friends were associated with their long and active membership at Springdale Golf Club. Along with golfing, Pat was an avid reader, enjoyed tennis, paddle tennis, and in her later years was known as a formidable opponent both at the bridge table and on the bocce court.

few of Princeton’s landmark buildings such as Lower Pyne (corner of Nassau and Witherspoon Streets), which led to its transformation from old bus station to the home of Hamilton Jewelers in 1985.

Pat is pre-deceased by her husband of over 47 years Andrew Cahill, her parents Daniel and Mary (Harrington) Doherty, and brothers Daniel and Francis Doherty. She will be missed by her remaining siblings, Marilyn Scanlon and Vinny Doherty, her children Peter and Diane Cahill, Andy and Janet Cahill, Chris and Carrie Cahill, Mary Pat (Cahill) Rose and Carolyn Cahill, and 10 grandchildren Brian and wife Allison, Dana, Michael and wife Kelly, Kelsey

and husband T.J., Nicholas and wife Tina, Kati, Ali, Catherine, Christine, Jack and great-granddaughter Madison Marie.

Pat truly enjoyed the last years of her life with many friends at Stonebridge at Montgomery and her family would like to thank the staff of the Assisted Living Unit for the wonderful care she received in her last months.

Services were held at Mather-Hodge Funeral Home on Tuesday, November 29, with burial and blessing following at Princeton Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the St Jude Children’s Hospital which Pat supported for years (stjude.org ).

Patricia Marie Cahill

Patricia Marie (“Pat”) Cahill, 88, of Skillman, NJ, formerly of Princeton, NJ, passed away in her home at Stonebridge on

In the late 1970s Pat became a real estate agent, which suited her well as she loved looking at houses and exploring Princeton and the surrounding area. She spent many years with NT Callaway Real Estate on Nassau Street where she worked with great friends and found success primarily in retail sales but also sold a

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 • 40 Princeton’s First Tradition Worship Service in the University
11am Rev. Alison Boden, Ph.D. Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel Rev. Dr.
Thames
Dean
Religious Life and the
DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES Wherever you are in your journey of faith, come worship with us First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ You are welcome to join us for our in-person services, Sunday Church Service and Sunday School at 10:30 am, Wednesday Testimony meetings at 7:30 pm. Audio streaming available, details at csprinceton.org. Visit the Christian Science Reading Room Monday through Saturday, 10 am - 4 pm 178 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ For free local delivery call (609)
www.csprinceton.org • (609) 924-5801 S unday S 8AM | Holy Communion RITE I 8:30AM | Common Grounds Café 9:30AM | Church School & Adult Forum 10:30AM | Holy Communion RITE II 5PM | Choral Evensong, Compline or Youth Led Worship ONLINE www.towntopics.com The Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector, The Rev. Canon Dr. Kara Slade, Assoc. Rector, The Rev. Joanne Epply-Schmidt,
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Chapel Sundays at
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of
Chapel
924-0919
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Tung-Ching Lee
Obituaries Continued from Preceding Page
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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2022 • 42 WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage
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Morris Hall Senior Care Communities • St. Joseph’s Skilled Nursing & Long Term Care • St. Mary’s Assisted Living • Grace Garden Assisted Living Memory Care • Morris Hall Meadows at Lawrenceville Skilled Nursing Serving The Community – Together 9704326-02 Located in Lawrenceville, NJ • For more information, please visit us at www.morrishall.org or contact us at mhadmissions@morrishall.org or 609-895-1937 Campus Shared with St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center St. Mary’s Assisted Living Grace Garden Memory Care Assisted Living St. Joseph’s Skilled Nursing Morris Hall Meadows Skilled Nursing 3rd month 10% discount Waived community fee for St. Mary & Grace Gardens - a $2,500 value. **excluding Morris Hall Meadows** 9704326-02 Located in Lawrenceville, NJ • For more information, please visit us at www.morrishall.org or contact us at mhadmissions@morrishall.org or 609-895-1937 Campus Shared with St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center St. Mary’s Assisted Living Grace Garden Memory Care Assisted Living St. Joseph’s Skilled Nursing Morris Hall Meadows Skilled Nursing 2nd month 20 % discount 3rd month 10% discount Waived community fee for St. Mary & Grace Gardens - a $2,500 value. **excluding Morris Hall Meadows** 9704326-02 • St. Joseph’s Skilled Nursing Center
Morris Hall Meadows Skilled Nursing • St. Mary’s Assisted Living, • Grace Garden Memory Care • New Palliative Care Unit at St. Mary’s Morris Hall Senior Care Communities includes: 9704326-02 Located in Lawrenceville, NJ • For more information, please visit us at www.morrishall.org or contact us at mhadmissions@morrishall.org or 609-895-1937 Campus Shared with St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center St. Mary’s Assisted Living Grace Garden Memory Care Assisted Living St. Joseph’s Skilled Nursing Morris Hall Meadows Skilled Nursing 2nd month 20 % discount 3rd month 10% discount Waived community fee for St. Mary & Grace Gardens - a $2,500 value. **excluding Morris Hall Meadows** St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center Salutes our Nursing Staff! Thank you for your dedication, hard work and compassion every day and especially during the COVIC-19 pandemic. 2381 Lawrenceville Road | Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 609-896-9500 | www.slrc.org Specialized Services • Short Term Rehabilitation • Respite Care • Palliative Care • Hospice Care