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Volume LXXV, Number 47

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“Alternative Facts” Cited in Response by Task Force To SensibleStreets.org

Sourland Region Gets 10,000 New Trees . . . 5 Town Needs More Crossing Guards . . . . 10 Solar Panels Provide Clean Energy Lesson . . . . . . 16 George Harrison 20 Years After: Going His Own Way . . . . . .22 NJSO Concert Explores “A Woman’s Voice” . . 23 Theatre Intime Presents Much Ado About Nothing . . . . 26 PU Football Beats Penn To Clinch Share of Ivy League Title . . . . . . . 32 PHS Girls’ Soccer Falls In OT to Wayne Valley in State Group 3 Final . . 37

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Part Two of Readers’ Choice Awards Results . . . . . . 14 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 30 Classified Ads . . . . . . 43 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Music Review . . . . . . . 23 New To Us . . . . . . . . . 31 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 41 Performing Arts . . . . . 27 Police Blotter . . . . . . . . 6 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 43 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Theater Review . . . . . . 26 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

With the cancellation of last Saturday’s community meeting on permit parking, a work session on the subject, originally scheduled for Princeton Council’s Tuesday, November 22 meeting, was removed from the agenda. Council President Leticia Fraga addressed the situation in remarks at the beginning of the meeting, citing “a campaign of misinformation” recently aired by the group SensibleStreets.org that challenges the goals of the Permit Parking Task Force, on which Fraga serves along with Councilmembers Michelle Pirone Lambros and David Cohen. The task force was “really blindsided” just before the community meeting,” she said. “We felt we truly could not go on until we were able to respond to what’s being put out there, that is truly a lot of misinformation.” Fraga said the task force is regrouping. “Expect to be hearing from us,” she said. “We have been, for almost three years, soliciting feedback and hearing from the community. Ultimately our goal has been to improve the quality of life for many of our residents whose parking needs are not being met. That’s our ultimate goal. It’s still our goal, and we will continue with those efforts. But we felt at first we needed to respond to basically the alternative facts that are being put out there, that are alarming many of our residents who will benefit from the proposed changes we are presenting to Council.” The cancellation of the work session made for an unusually short meeting, during which some routine business was conducted. Council introduced six ordinances, one of which had to do with affordable housing, and another with the affordable housing overlay that reduces off-street parking requirements for developments in different areas of the town. The governing body also introduced ordinances having to do with the sanitary sewer system and the sewer storm system, plus the vacating of an unused municipal sanitary sewer easement at 100 and 101 Thanet Road. Council also introduced ordinances related to a full-stop intersection at Witherspoon and Spring streets, part of the redesign project for Witherspoon Street; the authorization of historic signs as accessory uses; and the updating of left-hand turn prohibitions on Chambers Continued on Page 12

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Prospect Ave. Recommended as 21st Historic District The Princeton Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) at their November 15 meeting voted unanimously to recommend the creation of the Prospect Avenue Historic District as Princeton’s 21st historic district. The recommendation will go to the Princeton Planning Board and Princeton Council for approval in the coming months. The proposed district, which includes 17 current and former undergraduate eating clubs, two residences, a monumental wall and gateway, and an apartment building, would extend from Washington Road to Murray Place. It would not include the academic buildings on the corner of Washington Road. “The historic district designation would bring a very important level of protection to Prospect Avenue,” said Clifford Zink, a historic preservation consultant and author of The Princeton Eating Clubs. Properties included in a local historic district require review by the Princeton HPC for any alterations or additions visible from the street. “The value of this district designation is not to freeze Prospect Avenue at some particular period, but rather to appropriately manage changes in the future so that they respect the historic significance

of the street,” Zink added. “You want to manage the changes appropriately so that any changes respect history.” The HPC resolution recommending the Prospect Avenue Historic District emphasizes the “unique and characterdefining streetscape comprised of stately structures in residential appearance,” the embodiment of “many aspects of significant American and local history,” primarily involving “the eating clubs of Princeton University and the people who fostered,

belonged to, worked for, associated with and even opposed them over seventeen decades since the 1850s even to the present day.” The resolution continues to mention that “of particular note and local interest throughout this history is the significance of Princeton-area African American service staff members at all the eating clubs, who should be acknowledged as the backbone of the clubs’ success.” The resolution also emphasizes “the Continued on Page 8

New Preschool Opens as PPS, YMCA, Community Housing Work Together

Fifteen children, ages 3 and 4, are attending a new free preschool classroom this fall at Princeton Community Village. Princeton Family YMCA CEO Kate Bech commented on the partnership of Princeton Public Schools (PPS), Princeton Community Housing (PCH), and the YMCA that launched the preschool in September. “It was a classic example of ‘It takes a village,’” she said. “Princeton can be a bit siloed, but this is a great example of what happens when we’re all working together to come up with solutions that work.” She pointed out that 13 or 14 of the 15

preschool students are residents in affordable housing, from families with low income. “This program is essential to them, and it’s great to get them in this early, for their learning and for the long-term trajectory of their education.” PPS’ sixth free preschool class, the new Crimmins Learning Center classroom at Princeton Community Village is using the same space where the YMCA has operated the Princeton Young Achievers after-school program since 2011. The preschool runs from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., and the after-school program operates until 6 Continued on Page 13

BANNER DAY: Members of the Princeton University football team celebrate after they defeated Penn 34-14 at Franklin Field in Philadelphia last Saturday to clinch a share of the Ivy League title. The Tigers ended up 9-1 overall and 6-1 Ivy to tie Dartmouth (9-1 overall, 6-1 Ivy) for the crown. It marked the fourth Ivy title in the last eight seasons for the program. For more details on the game, see page 32. (Photo by Mitchell Shields, provided courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021 • 2

Men’s Health 101 Thursday, December 2, 2021 | 6 p.m. Zoom Meeting Have you experienced erectile dysfunction (ED), urinary incontinence or are you a prostate cancer survivor? If you have questions about men’s health issues, DR. KAVEH KOUSARI, a board certified urologist from Capital Health – Urology Specialists, will review treatment options for ED and incontinence, share information about survivorship after prostate cancer treatment, and discuss related health topics.

This event will be taking place virtually using Zoom. Register online at capitalhealth.org/events and be sure to include your email address. Zoom meeting details will be provided via email 2 – 3 days before the program date. Registration ends 24 hours before the program date.

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Eating Well for Your Mind and Body Wednesday, December 8, 2021 | 6 p.m. Zoom Meeting Did you know that your food choices can affect your brain health? Join MINDY KOMOSINSKY, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator from Capital Health, to learn how our food choices can support a healthy brain. Other topics include mindful eating strategies and eating plans that help reduce dementia and the decline in brain health that often occurs as people get older. This event will be taking place virtually using Zoom. Register online at capitalhealth.org/events and be sure to include your email address. Zoom meeting details will be provided via email 2 – 3 days before the program date. Registration ends 24 hours before the program date.

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THE FAMOUS CROSSING: Reenactors will take their places, in military dress, to cross the Delaware River as George Washington did on Christmas night, 1776.

Two Chances to Watch Annual River Crossing

There are two opportunities this year to watch the annual reenactment of George Washington’s daring 1776 Christmas night crossing of the Delaware River. On Sunday, December 12 at 1 p.m., and on December 25, Christmas Day, at 1 p.m., several hundred reenactors in Continental military dress will listen to an inspiring speech by General Washington and then row across the river in replica Durham boats. At the December 12 event, there will be special colonialera activities and demonstrations throughout the historic village from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The cost is $8 for adults, $4 for children 5-11, and free for younger ones. The family rate is $20 for two adults and two children. Proceeds support future programs in the park. Visit WashingtonCrossingPark.org/cross-with-us for tickets. The 69th annual Christmas Day crossing, which is held from 12-3 p.m., is free. It is recommended that visitors arrive well before 1 p.m. to ensure a good place along the viewing line. River crossings are contingent upon safe conditions for participants. However,

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even if conditions do not allow for crossing, ceremonies, speeches and commemorative activities still occur. In addition to the live reenactment, the Friends of Washington Crossing Park will broadcast a short film on Christmas Day that captures scenes from the crossing reenactment. Many of the scenes in this 2020 film offer “up close and personal” perspectives that are impossible to get in person. The film will be broadcast at 10 a.m. on Christmas morning on the park’s Facebook page (facebook.com/washingtoncrossingpark). It is also available for viewing anytime on the park’s YouTube channel (www.bit.ly/ washingtoncrossingYT). Washington Crossing Historic Park is located at the intersection of routes 532 and 32 (River Road) in Bucks County, Pa.

MSF Food Bank Distributes More Turkeys This Year

Mercer Street Friends (MSF) Food Bank will distribute 6,600 Thanksgiving turkeys this year, up from 4,300 in 2020. James “Butter” Allen, food bank director, said, “Families seeking hunger relief, particularly around the holidays, know that Mercer Street

Friends and our partners throughout the county will be there for them. The increase in turkeys represents what we are seeing each day — families continue to be hungry and that doesn’t stop at holiday time.” In addition to the turkeys, Mercer Street Friends has been a beneficiary of support from corporations, businesses, schools, and religious institutions. Baskets, bags, and boxes filled with nonperishable items and traditional Thanksgiving sides — stuffing, gravy, cranberry sauce, green beans — have been donated to complete the Thanksgiving table and fill shelves in kitchens. Among those who have helped are United Way of Greater Mercer Count y; NRG; River Horse Brewing Company; ETS; Cenlar; The Foxmoor Communities; J&J Janssen Pharmaceuticals; Bloomberg; Weidel Realtors; St. Ann’s School; Titusville UMC; The Learning Experience; Mercer County Technical School; The College of New Jersey; Amerikick Princeton; Kindercare – Robbinsville; Buchanan, Ingersoll & Rooney; Makefield Agency; Bratton Estate & Elder Care; and Faith Baptist Church of Hamilton.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Become a Volunteer Firefighter: The Princeton Fire Department will hold an open house on Tuesday, December 7 at 7 p.m. at its headquarters, 363 Witherspoon Street. The department seeks volunteers for its Class of 2022 training program. Ages 16 and up can apply; no experience necessary. Princetonnj.gov/joinpfd. Holiday Gift Drive: Princeton Human Services seeks donors of gifts for the holidays for Princeton children in need; plus gift cards for parents. Visit princetonnj. gov for info. Donate Holiday Gifts and Food: The annual Santa Claus fly-in has been postponed again this year, but Princeton Airport’s lobby is the drop-off center for unwrapped gifts and canned and boxed food starting Friday, November 26 and ending Sunday, December 17 between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. Princetonairport.com. Free Walk-In COVID-19 and Flu Vaccine Clinics: Sponsored by the Princeton Health Department December 1, 4-6 p.m. at Princeton Senior Resource Center, 45 Stockton Street. Children ages 5 and older are welcome. On December 3 from 2-4 p.m., the Griggs Farm clubhouse is the site; 205 Griggs Drive. Appointments are recommended. Covidvaccine.nj.gov/en-US.

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Volunteers from Nonprofits and Municipalities Join Forces to Plant 10,000 Trees in Sourlands

In an unprecedented effort, a massive tree-planting project has helped save the Sourlands from the devastating effects of the invasive insect known as the emerald ash borer. This past year, a mix of volunteers and staff from nonprofits, land trusts, counties, and municipalities,

as well as private residents, have managed to get 10,000 new trees into the ground at the 90-square-mile Sourland region. “We’ve never done anything to this scale before,” said Carolyn Klaube, steward s h ip d ire c tor of t h e small, nonprofit Sourland Conser vancy. “But when we realized how many trees were dying because of the emerald ash borer, we knew we had to do something.”

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The New Jersey Forest service alerted the Conservancy in March 2020 that, due to the insects, the region could lose more than 1 million trees within the next few years. That number represents approximately one of every five trees throughout the region, according to a press release. It wasn’t just the emerald ash borer that caused havoc. In July, a tornado ripped through 230 acres of mature forest on Baldpate Mountain, already victim to the insects. Hurricanes Henri and Ida also left their mark, with flooding that “scoured streambeds and resulted in the loss of lives as well as serious damage to homes, farms, businesses, and natural areas throughout the region,” reads the release. “Trees help filter water, stabilize stream banks, and reduce stormwater runoff. The loss of 1 million trees is expected to exacerbate the effects of climate change, and could result in more serious flooding in the future.” The Conservancy reached out and received help from the Mercer Count y Park Commission, Hopewell Valley Open Space, The Watershed Institute, D&R Greenway, and Montgomery Friends of Open Space, among other organizations. Students from the College of New Jersey, Raritan Valley Community College, Princeton University, and Rutgers University pitched in. Seasonal interns were hired by the Conservancy for the first time, enlarging the staff by 30 percent. “Some of the areas losing trees are hard to access, so we trained the interns to be able to go into them,” said

Klaube of the group, which ranged from 18-35 years of age. “They were exceptional, every one of them. They really took things very seriously and were very thoughtful in their work. At one of our group plantings, where we planted 2,700 trees, they noticed that they had been planted too high. So they dug them out and replanted them. The level of caring and attention to detail was phenomenal.” Various grants aided the effort. The Currey Wilson Family Fund covered some of the work on deer protection. The New Jersey Nature Conservancy donated tree tubes, which are essential in riparian plantings.

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SAVING THE SOURLANDS: The destructive emerald ash borer is no match for the volunteers and staff from the Sourland Conservancy, who planted 10,000 trees over the past year to restore the forest and reduce the impact of ash decline caused by the insects.

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Trees Continued from Preceding Page

Pinelands Nursery offered technical expertise to volunteers who would like to propagate their own native seedlings. The Conservancy is partnering with Raritan Valley Community College to collect data on the restoration projects. “It is important to understand how effective our restoration projects are, and in order to do that, we need to collect and analyze data from our restoration areas,” said Klaube. The Washington Crossing Audubon Society is working with the conservancy to train volunteers to conduct bird surveys and record the impact of forest restoration on native and migratory populations. The region is one of 113 across the country to be designated a Continental IBA (Important Bird Area) macrosite by the National Audubon Society. Considering that some 2,000 trees were planted in the Sourlands last year, the fact that 10,000 went into the ground this year is impressive. “The cooperation with other municipalities and organizations is really a coming together that is so moving,” said Klaube. “People really cared a lot. They pitched in with what they could — trees, fencing, staff time, planting — all working together, and we were able to do something really great. That’s the message we have to move forward with. This is where we live; this is our forest. And we need to take care of it.” —Anne Levin

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On November 17, at 1:03 p.m., Princeton Police officers noticed a 43-year-old male from Philadelphia, Pa., walking in the area of McCosh Circle. His behavior was suspicious because he was carrying a pair of bolt cutters and walking towards a rear yard of a residence. In light of recent vehicle thefts, vehicle burglaries, and thefts of catalytic converters in the area, officers began to follow him. After a short interview, the man was placed under arrest for possession of burglar tools and other criminal offenses. Subsequent to the arrest, the suspect was searched and found to be in possession of a loaded handgun. He was transported to police headquarters, where he was charged with Unlawful Possession of a Weapon, Possession of a Weapon for Unlawful Purpose, Certain Persons Not to Have Weapons, and Possession of Burglar Tools. He was then transported to the Mercer County Correctional Center with a pending court date. Princeton residents are reminded to lock their vehicles and homes. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

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Arielle: “I know this past year was very hard for many people, but for us it was very good. Many positive changes happened in our lives. We got engaged, rescued a puppy, and bought our first house. We have a lot to look forward to next year, too.” Pablo: “We just got engaged a few weeks ago. I am very thankful for my fiancé and the life that we are building together.” — Arielle Romero and Pablo Fallas, Robbinsville

Ned: “I am thankful for teachers. Over the past year with COVID and everything I think teachers have put in a lot of extra work to make the year as good as it can be, and I think they did a great job.” Betaneya: “I am thankful for my family. They have supported me ever since I was born and they have always helped me get through the challenging times in my life.” —Ned Erickson and Betaneya Tsegay, Princeton

Raneem: “I am thankful to be back with my friends from the squash team. We are all very happy to be back at the campus this year and to see all of our friends again.” Andrea: “I am thankful for being healthy and happy and surrounded by so many wonderful people.” Elle: “I am thankful to be a member of the Princeton women’s squash team.” —Raneem El Torky, Alexandria, Egypt; Andrea Toth, Vancouver, Canada; and Elle Ruggiero, Malvern, Pa.

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architectural grandeur of the majority of the eating clubs,” describing the clubs as “a distinctive and a grand expression of the European and American revival styles prevalent in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.” Prospect Avenue was in the news earlier this fall as Princeton University faced local resistance to its plan to demolish three Victorian houses on the north side of the street and to move the 91 Prospect former Court Club building into their place in order to make room for a pavilion entrance to their new Environmental Sciences and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (ES+SEAS) complex. In an 11th-hour compromise before an October 21 meeting of the PPB, the University agreed not to demolish any buildings but to make room for the Cour t Club building on the north side of the street by moving one of the Victorian houses to a nearby site. The University’s revised plan, quickly approved by the PPB, also included an agreement to support the creation of the new Prospect Avenue Historic District. Princeton Prospect Foundation Board Chair Sandy Harrison, who along with Zink presented the formal nomination of the Prospect Avenue Historic District to the HPC, noted the support of all the eating clubs as well as the University, for the historic district designation. All the buildings in the proposed district are owned by the University or by the individual

eating clubs. “It should happen early next year,” Harrison said. Getting approval from the PPB and Princeton Council, he added, “seems to be a matter of going through the wheels of government and the bureaucratic process. The historic designation would make it less likely that anyone would do anything that would be destructive to the character of the street. They’d have to get approval for it.” He continued, “The eating clubs are unique. There isn’t anything like them. They’re worth preserving, and they are very impressive buildings — worth preserving architecturally, historically, and they’re very important to the University and to the town. The clubs will be around for a long time. They are integral to the life of the University.” Both Zink and Harrison commended the results of more than a year of discussion, negotiation, conflict, and eventual compromise with the University. “It’s really shown the value

and importance of citizen engagement,” said Zink. “The community brought values to the situation, the values of preserving histor y and preserving the visual as well as the cultural history of an iconic place like Prospect Avenue.” He continued, “As the University goes forward with continued expansion plans, hopefully from this Prospect Avenue experience the University will be more receptive to community input. That’s the hope we all have.” Harrison added, “I’m impressed with the town. There are some really smart, talented, passionate people in town who really cared about this issue. The town really cares about its history. The best outcomes are when the University and the town engage early on and when there’s a dialogue. We actually got to a very good outcome in the end, but it would have been better, less tense, more efficient if the University and the town had engaged earlier.” —Donald Gilpin

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021 • 10

Princeton Needs More Crossing Guards, And A Member of Council Steps Up

During the “announcements/reports” portion of the November 8 Princeton Council meeting, Councilmember David Cohen reported to his colleagues and the public that he had signed on as a crossing guard for the Princeton Police Department. His post, currently at Snowden Lane and Abernathy Drive, means one less police officer having to staff the town’s crossings and intersections as children make their way to and from local schools. Cohen urged others to follow his lead and consider taking on the morning and afternoon shifts, which pay $15 for 30 minutes and $22 for 45 minutes. “It’s really a feel-good activity,” he said. “The kids and parents are really appreciative.” Keeping the town staffed with crossing guards has been an ongoing challenge for the police department. Those who are hired have to be able to escort children across designated crossing zones, stop traffic efficiently in all weather conditions, be able to communicate with children and parents, report license plate number of vehicles that don’t slow down or stop where they should, report suspicious activity, report unsafe traffic conditions in school crossing zones, and more. Before being assigned to a post, crossing guards get a few hours of training and a packet of information with background on the specific duties involved. They get a physical to test hearing and vision. “Once you’ve passed

those two hurdles, you start on-the-job training, which is required, for 20 hours,” said Cohen, a few days after starting the job. “You start getting paid as soon as you start. It’s not volunteer work. It’s actually a decent wage — $30 an hour.” Cohen, a retired architect, has been considering becoming a crossing guard for a few years. “The issue really came to my attention through my work with the Pedestrian Bicycle Advisory Committee,” he said. “That committee gets concerned pleas from residents about intersections they think need a crossing guard. We ask police and they say, ‘We’re so understaffed. Every officer is doing it because not enough community members are doing it.’ So I have been really aware of the need.” B e c au s e of a f te r n o on meetings he frequently attends, Cohen assumed he didn’t have the time. But he arranged with Sergeant T homas Mu r ray, of t he police department’s traffic safety bureau, to work mornings, letting him know at the beginning of each week which afternoons he can be available. “Ever y shift helps,” Cohen said. Crossing guards get a raincoat, reflective vest, a baseball cap that says “crossing guard,” gloves if needed, and a stop sign, furnished by the police department. “I have always admired the PFARS (Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad) volunteers and the fire department volunteers, but felt that those kinds of commitments

NEW Y ORK CAMERA 173 Nassau Street - Princeton 609-924-7063 DECEMBER 3 & 5, 2021 7:30 PM FRIDAY 3:00 PM SUNDAY

ON THE JOB: Shown at his current post at Snowden Lane and Abernathy Drive, Councilperson David Cohen recently decided to take on a shift as a crossing guard. The town is looking to fill 10 more vacancies that are currently being covered by police officers. were beyond my capability,” said Cohen. “But this is really very doable. It’s something anybody can do with the training they give. It’s excellent, and it gives you confidence. The first day, I was kind of nervous. But I had been prepared.” Cohen experienced a challenge when a bicyclist was coming from one direction, and a school bus from the other direction. “You don’t want to stop the bus,” he said. “So I had to figure out when to have them enter the intersection. But I had been

trained for something like this, so it worked out okay.” Morning shifts are from 8-8:30 a.m. or 7:45-8:30 a.m. Af ternoons, guards work 2: 55 -3:25 p.m. or 3-3:45 p.m. Visit princetonnj.gov and type “crossing guard” into the search bar for more information. “This is something that is really needed and appreciated,” said Cohen. “I hope more people will consider doing it. It feels really good to have this way of serving the town.” —Anne Levin

Princeton University Orchestra MICHAEL PRATT conductor

David Del Tredici

Selections from Final Alice ALLISON SPANN ’20 soprano

Sergei Rachmaninoff

Symphony No. 2 in E Minor, Op. 27

Richardson Auditorium Alexander Hall FREE • Ticket Required Attendees must be fully vaccinated and masked at all times.

PHOTO: VERONICA SPANN

music.princeton.edu orchestra.princeton.edu

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11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021 • 12

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“Alternative Facts” continued from page one

Street onto Nassau Street. The public hearings for these introductions are at the meeting on Monday, December 13, except for the affordable housing overlay, which is scheduled for Tuesday, December 21. Resolutions passed had to do with refunds and overpayments. A resolution to approve the renegotiation of the lease between the town and the office supply store Hinksons, at 28 Spring Street, was postponed. —Anne Levin

Nonprofit Opens New Home For People with Disabilities

Community Options, Inc. held a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony at a new home for people with disabilities in Montgomery Township on Monday, November 15. The New Jersey-based, national nonprofit develops housing and employment for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, supporting 5,000 people in OF THE WORLD! community-based services nationally. Four adults with disabilities will live at the newly renovated home. Among them is Kyle WE ARE ON TOP OF THE WORLD! Sarnecky, who helped cut the WE ARE ON TOP OF THE WORLD! ribbon along with Mayor Devra Keenan and other officials. or Voting Us Kyle had previously lived with g Company his mother, sister, and nephew. A heartfelt thanks to all that voted After his mother passed away, ear In A Row! Thank You For Voting Us Kyle was placed in a children’s nd Operated Shop local in Homestead store, curbside Princeton pick up available and/or Best Roofing Company home. When he graduated Thank You For Voting Us ROOFING For The9-10 Third Year In A Row! schedule private shopping Monday-Saturday am high school, he sought an adult Best Furniture Store, Best Outdoor Furnishing Store tal Co., Inc forBest Roofing Company before weand open. Complimentary gift wrapping! housing placement and chose mmunity for 25 years FLESCH’S ROOFING Best Specialty/Gift Store & Sheet Metal Co., Inc TIAL • HISTORICAL WORK For The Third Year In A Row! Community Options. alize in Family Owned and Operated “On behalf of MontgomWe specialize in 609.688.0777 es ✧ Metal and Cedar Roofing ery Township, I welcome FLESCH’S ROOFING and Roof Maintenance homesteadprinceton.com & Sheet Metal Co., Inc Community Options to our sured Serving the Princeton community for 25 years community,” said Mayor Keen300 Witherspoon Street | Princeton 609-394-2427 SERVICE • REPAIR WORK INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK an. “This type of housing is 4-2427 We specialize in Family Owned and Operated

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of the 2021 Best 50 Women in Business by NJBIZ. The Princeton resident and Boston University alum was honored at a virtual awards ceremony on October 25. T he award recognizes women who are shattering stereotypes, and the glass ceiling, with the signifi cant impacts they are making on New Jersey business and the community at large. Marchesi, a veteran of such Madison Avenue agencies as Grey, Saatchi & Saatchi, and Della Femina, was appointed as JK’s fi rst female CEO in 2019. She is responsible for driving JK’s strategic vision, nurturing its collaborative culture, and ensuring that the agency consistently delivers top-tier creative and strategic solutions. She joins a group of female award winners in senior leadership positions across a variety of industries and disciplines. Honorees were evaluated by a panel of independent judges on several criteria including career accomplishments, vision, and community service. “The proudest achievement of my career was becoming CEO of JK Design, knowing that the founders trusted me to help shape the agency— and had the confidence that I would take the right steps to move us forward,” said Marchesi. “As a woman, it is particularly meaningful and rewarding to be at the helm of a company, and I’m grateful for the opportunity to help nurture new generations of diverse talent. That’s the only JK Design’s Marchesi Named way we can continue to grow, elevate our work, and to To Best Women in Business to be valuable to our clients and Martha Marchesi, CEO of their own diverse employees JK Design agency in Hillsborand customers.” ough, has been named one near and dear to my heart, because I had family members who depended on this type of housing when I was growing up, and I worked in group homes while in college. This is an important community resource.” In addition to Mayor Keenan, remarks were given by Rajpal Bath of Gov. Phil Murphy’s Office, and Petra Gaskin, chief of staff for Senator-elect Andrew Zwicker. Somerset County Commissioner Paul Drake and Township Committee members Shelly Bell, Kent Huang, and Neena Singh also attended the event. “I want to thank our mayor and all of the government leaders for their support in helping us open this home,” said Maria Bowles, Community Options’ executive director for Somerset County. “Projects like this are great examples of publicprivate partnerships. People with disabilities want to live independently, and we are proud to be in a community that promotes inclusion.” The four-bedroom home was purchased by Community Options through an affordable housing partnership with Montgomery Township. The Township provided partial funding towards the down payment and for renovations to add accessible features. The partnership has allowed Community Options to open three homes in Montgomery Township in the past two years. The agency has partnered with over a dozen municipalities in New Jersey to develop new housing opportunities for people with disabilities.

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continued from page one

p.m. every day. “We are thrilled to see our shared vision come to fruition,” said Bech. “We know that there is a serious need in town for quality, accessible preschool for working families who cannot afford private options. We are proud to work together with our organizational partners to give 15 children a solid foundation on which to build their educational futures. It’s the best investment we could ever make.” PPS Supervisor of Preschool and Special Projects Valerie Ulrich approached the YMCA last year about possible classroom space. The district has offered preschool at Riverside and Johnson Park Schools for almost 20 years, using state funding to address “pockets of poverty.” Ulrich saw a growing need

for additional classrooms and additional funding. With 150 students registered for 75 available spots this past summer, space was prioritized for qualifying students from economically disadvantaged families, and a lottery was conducted for the few remaining spots. The state requires that school districts partner with qualified local child care providers, but many of the community’s early childhood learning providers could not meet all of the state’s stringent criteria. In 2019, however, the PPS partnered with the YWCA Princeton and successfully added three more classrooms to make a total of five. The addition of the Crimmins Learning Center brings the total to six. The PCH Development Corporation, an affiliate of PCH which owns and operates the Crimmins Learning Center, was eager to partner with the

YMCA and the PPS to launch the new preschool classroom. “We immediately embraced the idea,” said PCH Development Corporation Executive Director Ed Truscelli. “There was no hesitation at all. We thought that this would be a wonderful feature to have in the community, especially with the pandemic. It’s part of Princeton Community Housing’s mission to not just provide welcoming and affordable homes, but also provide support so that people can succeed, and the after-school program and now the PreK program are fundamental services that can help parents and families grow and thrive.” Bech emphasized the importance of the contributions made by PCH. “I can’t say enough about PCH and their volunteers,” she said. “The folks on their board and Ed Truscelli do such an amazing job of giving residents a positive, enriching opportunity for

OFF TO A FAST START: Fifteen 3- and 4-year-olds are part of Princeton Public Schools’ (PPS) sixth free preschool classroom, which opened this fall at the Crimmins Learning Center at Princeton Community Village — a collaborative initiative of PPS, Princeton Community Housing, and the Princeton Family YMCA. (Photo courtesy of Princeton Family YMCA)

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growth and learning in every aspect of their lives.” She continued, “It’s a real testimony to them that they value this enough that they say, ‘Absolutely! Let’s make this happen.’ That’s a real credit to them.” Leigh Zink, YMCA senior director of youth development and outreach, who oversees the program, agreed. “This is a great example of what creative thinking and collaboration can achieve,” she said. “We all share a passion for ensuring that children get the best start they can early in their lives.” Ulrich discussed some of the long-term benefits of preschool education. “It’s the one thing that we can do as a community that has heaps of empirical evidence of how it improves the lives of the economically disadvantaged,” she said. “Children who attend preschool are better prepared for kindergarten. They’re less likely to be held back or classified into special education. They’re more likely to go to college. They’re more likely to have higher paying jobs.” She added, “It’s a game changer for families. To be able to offer it for free while families work, it’s hard to quantify how impactful that is.” —Donald Gilpin

Boy Scout Troop 43 Christmas Tree Sale

Princeton-based Boy Scout Troop 43 has made several adjustments to accommodate the current pandemic. Determined to remain strong through challenging times, the 101-year-old troop has moved its meetings outside, conducted Eagle Board of Review sessions virtually, and most notably, offered no-contact purchase and free delivery at its annual Christmas tree and wreath sale. The sale, featuring Douglas fir trees and Canadian balsam wreaths, will take place at the YMCA lot at 59 Paul Robeson Place, and will be open for in-person shopping on Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sundays from noon to 3 p.m., from November 27 through December 19. Alternately, shoppers can now order online at troop43treesale.com, and receive free delivery in Princeton. Once purchase is completed, the customer will be contacted regarding weekend delivery options, and scouts will provide a fresh cut as desired upon arrival. Bright yellow posters displayed around town and flyers distributed in Princeton neighborhoods will feature a QR code that can be used for quick access to the shopping site.

“The Princeton community responded very positively to the offer to purchase online and receive free delivery last year, said Scoutmaster Jarod Sass. “This is the troop’s single annual fundraiser, which supports the group’s camping schedule and summer camp — it ensures that every member of our troop can participate fully in the program.” Pr inceton Boy Scout Troop 43, part of the Washington Crossing Council, offers the traditional Scouting experience for youth in the fifth grade through high school. Service, community engagement, and leadership development become increasingly important parts of the program as youth lead their own activities and work their way toward earning Scouting’s highest rank, Eagle Scout. Since its inception, more than 180 members of Troop 43 have earned the Eagle Rank, an achievement that is attained by less than 4 percent of all Scouts nationwide. For more information, visit princetontroop43.org. Inquiries can also be made via the Troop 43 Facebook page at facebook.com/princetontroop43.

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13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021

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READERS’

CHOICE

AWARDS!

Thank you for voting for your favorite local businesses and services! Town Topics is happy to announce this year’s Readers’ Choice Awards winners. The top three vote-getters in each category are named in alphabetical order below. Some are listed here, and the others were featured in last week’s issue.

Home Remodeler/Design Eastridge Design Freda Howard Interiors Tobias Design

Children’s Gym The Little Gym Princeton Family YMCA Tumbles

Realtor Ingela Kostenbader Heather Morley Donna Murray

Children’s Dance Lessons Arts Council Of Princeton Princeton Ballet Princeton Dance & Theater

ders C h Rea oic

wn Topics o T

Re

HVAC Ice Man Nass-Tech Mechanical Stellitano Heating & Air Conditioning

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Furniture Store Homestead Princeton Luxe Home Company Rider Furniture

Outdoor Furnishing Store Homestead Princeton Rider Furniture Ski Barn

ers

rd

HOME

e

ards 2021 Aw

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021 • 14

Congratulations to the winners of the

’ C h oice A w

a

Interior Designer Roofing Deborah Leamann Interior Design Accurate Roofing Freda Howard Interiors Karin Eckerson Interiors Flesch’s Roofing & Sheet Metal Co., Inc. Kitchen/Bath Designer Trenton Roofing & Siding Deborah Leamann Interior Design Jefferson Bath & Kitchen Senior Living Tobias Design Artis Senior Living Landscape Designer Amato’s Kale’s Nursery & Landscape Service Ronni Hock Garden & Landscape

Pediatric Group Delaware Valley Pediatrics The Pediatric Group Princeton Nassau Pediatrics

Greenwood House Morris Hall

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CHILDREN

RETAIL

Child Care/Preschool Nursery/Garden Designer Arts Council of Princeton The Burke Foundation Amato’s Early Childhood Center at Baumley Nursery YWCA Princeton Kale’s Nursery & Cherry Hill Nursery School Landscape Service

Bike Shop Halter’s Cycles Kopp’s Cycle Sourland Cycles


ders C h Rea oic

Jewelry Store Dandelion Hamilton Jewelers Village Silver e

ards 2021 Aw

SERVICES Auto Shop B & E Service Hopewell Motors Kingston Garage Cleaners Craft Cleaners Mayflower Cleaners Rocky Hill Cleaners Equestrian Center Hunter Farms Piedmont Riding Stable Unicorn Therapeutic Riding

MISC.

Animal Boarding/Day Care Camp Bow Wow Art Gallery HomeCare Veterinary Clinic Arts Council Of Princeton K9 Resorts of Hamilton Princeton Makes PU Art Museum n Top w To

Re

Specialty/Gift Store Classics Books & Gifts Homestead Princeton Miya Table & Home

PETS

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Florist Monday Morning Princeton Floral Design Viburnum Designs

Pet Training Heavenly Hounds Make Sit Happen Melita Wright of Promising Pups

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Consignment Elephant in the Room Greene Street Princeton Consignment

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15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021

Clothing & Accessory Store Hedy Shepard, Ltd. Highbar Boutique Rouge

’ C h oice A w

a

Dog Park Rocky Top Rosedale Dog Park (Pennington) Skillman Park Pet Groomer Angel Paws Camp Bow Wow Dapper Dog Pet Supply Concord Pet Food & Supplies Dogs & Cats Rule T and T Pet Supply

New Business inMotion Fitness & Wellness Studio One60 YWCA’s Burke Foundation Early Childhood Center Night Out McCarter Theatre Moonlight Yoga at Princeton Yoga Pinot’s Palette Pizza Conte’s Nomad Pizza Den Pizza Star Public Golf Bunker Hill Heron Glen Mountain View, Ewing


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021 • 16

Solar Panels Provide Clean Energy Lesson On Riverside Fourth Graders’ Field Trip

Riverside School fourth grade teacher Terry McGovern and Ted Deutsch teamed up with solar panel installers from Exact Solar last Friday to provide McGovern’s 17 students with an encounter with a genuine global challenge and a learning experience they won’t soon forget. “We were getting solar panels installed, and it was a great opportunity to educate the kids,” said Deutsch, whose two children went to Riverside and who lives

just across a field from the school. Deutsch contacted Riverside Principal Ebony Lattimer, who put him in touch with McGovern, who did not hesitate. “Clean energy is of interest to children,” said McGovern. “They were eager to listen to something that is a real world issue. This was a hands-on experience. They learned about electricity and how solar panels work.” The excitement of a field

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trip after 20 months of pandemic was also a significant attraction. As one fourth grader noted, “Mr. McGovern, it’s been a long time since we’ve been on a field trip.” After walking across the field —no bus necessar y — the students listened to a presentation by Michael Bloom, one of the Exact Solar installers. There were two workers on the roof installing panels, and there were solar panels on the ground that the kids could actually touch. The students watched a presentation by the installers highlighted by wires from the solar panels creating sparks and powering lightbulbs. They also noted the impact of shade on these effects. In fact, the first attempt to create a spark didn’t work until the students realized that they were blocking the sun by standing in front of the panels. They moved and the spark was created. There were many questions ranging from “How does a panel make electricity?” to “What happens at night?” Students discussed different energy sources, making connections with what they knew about climate change and learning how solar panels can provide an efficient source of energy and minimize costs. “I was impressed w ith the kids’ remarks and their knowledge of solar energy,” said McGovern, “but I wasn’t surprised. They have these conver s at ion s a n d h e ar about this at home. They

ELECTRICITY FROM THE SUN: Solar panel installers from Exact Solar prepare to create a spark and light a candle from the sun’s energy, as Riverside School fourth graders and their teachers look on during a field trip where the students learned about solar panels, clean energy, and climate change. (Photo courtesy of Sustainable Princeton) had prior knowledge about how to minimize their carbon footprint.” “It was fun,” he added. “The kids were fascinated. They were directly involved. It was a lesson which applied directly to their lives.” Deutsch was pleased to see the students’ level of engagement with the presentation and the whole experience. “Clean energy — I’m excited about this topic, and I like to get kids excited,” he said. “It’s a planetary challenge. We need big policy changes, but as individuals we have to do our part to address the climate change challenge. We need millions of individuals to lower their carbon footprints.” Deutsch pointed out that t h e s olar p a n els wou ld

Voted Best Furniture reduce their Store energy use by

about 80 percent, so that, along with federal and state tax credits, the cost of installation would pay for itself in a few years. Most people can get solar panels affordably, if their homes have access to enough sunlight, he said. The unfortunate loss of trees to the emerald ash borer recently put the Deutsch’s roofline in a better position for solar panels. In his ongoing quest for clean energy, Deutsch is looking forward to seeing his electric vehicles actually powered by the sun. S u s t a i n abl e P r i n c e ton Program Manager Jenny Ludmer, who also attended Friday’s presentation, applauded the valuable learning experience. “We were

thrilled with all the effort that allowed these children to gain firsthand experience with solar, and hope other homeowners are inspired to follow suit,” she said. “Rooftop solar isn’t for everyone, but it’s certainly one great way to support the goals of the Climate Action Plan and save a little money on your utility bills.” McGovern reflected on the lives that his students might be living in a world of cleaner energy in the future. “All these 9- and 10-year-olds will probably have homes, cars, and other things in the future that run entirely on solar energy,” he said. “These kids have developed a curiosity to learn more.” —Donald Gilpin

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17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021 • 18

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19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021 • 20

Mailbox Princeton Council Members Respond To “Sensible Streets” Misinformation

To the Editor: There has been a lot of misinformation circulating regarding the Permit Parking Task Force’s (PPTF’s) intended purpose and goals. We’d like to set the record straight. Our main goal is to give residents the ability to park on their streets in neighborhoods that are particularly impacted by competing pressures: homes that lack driveways, and businesses with patron and employee parking needs. In order to tackle this problem, we hope to have one type of resident permit, allowing for overnight parking, and be a uniform price throughout town, instead of the patchwork of different rules and different fees we have now. Our secondary goal is to better manage employee parking. We need to locate this parking on streets not subject to pressure from customer parking, while limiting the number of employees, so that residents and their guests can still park on their street. We would allow, in streets closest to commerce, some interspersed three-hour parking for patrons, but employee parking would not be allowed in these locations. Balancing the needs of the residents, patrons, and employees is no easy task — but the PPTF, after several years of research and work, has come to some recommendations which we have been sharing in community discussions. The employee permit we are looking to offer would not be a “commuter business subsidy,” rather we intend to replace existing free employee parking with paid employee permits. “Detrimental spillover to residential communities,” which opponents fear, is in fact already there. Our goal is to improve the balance to allow more spaces for residents to park on their own streets. Another piece of misinformation is that there will be a cost to Princeton residents associated with this program, a “taxpayersubsidized business parking scheme.” In fact, this program would be self-funded. Not only would the permit fees pay for the cost of the program, it would eliminate the need for residents to call the police department every time they need to park overnight, which is a burden on our staff and on the taxpayers. In addition to on-street employee permit parking, we are working on shared lot agreements, and hope to add more in the future, as with the agreement with Rider for parking on the Westminster campus. Soon, we plan to expand our transit options to convey employees, and residents, to many desired destinations around town. We are committed to better using existing infrastructure and services, and adding more as needed, but with affordability being a top priority, so that taxpayers are not additionally burdened. We hope that the residents who are opposed to this plan will come to understand that we are trying to better manage a situation that already exists. We hope that they will work with us to find near- and long-term solutions that will provide muchneeded relief to their neighbors and assure a vibrant walkable town. In a time when we face great political divisiveness, worsening climate change, and a persistent pandemic, we shouldn’t let solving our parking woes further divide us. MICHELLE PIRONE LAMBROS Princeton Councilwoman DAVID COHEN Princeton Councilman LETICIA FRAGA Princeton Council President

Sustainable Princeton Launches Landscaping Equipment Transition Fund

To the Editor: Sustainable Princeton is excited to announce that we have launched a Landscaping Equipment Transition Fund. The fund will assist small landscaping businesses operating in Princeton overcome the upfront capital costs of replacing their gas-powered equipment with less harmful, battery-powered equipment. We aim to raise $35,000 and begin distributing reimbursements to landscapers by January 1, 2022. If you are interested in contributing to this effort, please make your contributions via the donate tab on our website. We have raised nearly $13,000 so far and need your help to reach our goal. Over the past year, we have worked with many community partners on the Changing the Landscape: Healthy Yards = Healthy People/Cambiando el Paisaje: Jardines Sanos = Gente Sana project. The project was spurred by community pressure to eliminate the use of gas-powered landscaping equipment. Two-stroke gas-powered engines, which power most landscaping equipment, emit excessive emissions. These emissions are detrimental to landscapers’ health and contribute to poor local air quality and global climate change. The most egregious gas-powered equipment used by landscaping companies is leaf blowers. Early in the project, we learned that the cost to transition to battery-powered equipment, necessitated by restrictions on the use of gas-powered equipment, is a serious concern for landscapers. Small, minority-owned landscapers were especially concerned. Despite advocacy at the state level, no incentives exist to offset the upfront capital costs. This fund will provide a meaningful reimbursement to local small businesses that complete a simple application and submit proof of purchase of qualifying equipment. Details and the application will be available on Sustainable Princeton’s website. Please consider supporting this effort to improve the health of landscape workers and the environment. You can learn more about the Changing the Landscape Project at sustainableprinceton.org/current-projects. Look for the green “Donate” button in the upper right. Thank you. MOLLY JONES Executive Director, Sustainable Princeton

Giving Thanks This Weekend For Rescuer During Hurricane Ida

To the Editor: On the evening of September 1 Hurricane Ida was approaching. My husband and I were to meet good friends for dinner in Rocky Hill at 6:30. Around 6:15 we called our friends to cancel. As fate would have it, they were at the restaurant already. We live a short distance away, so we decided to go forward. We felt our big SUV could handle the rain. By 8:30, we asked for our check, overhearing various conversations about road closings, flooding, detours on Route 206, and general growing concern over the torrential rainfall. Route 518 was wet, but not flooded in the least. When we approached Route 206 we made the decision to continue going straight. As we neared Bedens Brook, the water was about a foot high. Driving slowly, it became higher rapidly and we decided to turn and go back toward Route 206. At that precise moment a tsunami of water came crashing against the side and bottom of our car, causing the engine to die.

The water was halfway up the doors of the car, preventing us from opening them. Our next thought was to open all the windows (just in case). Keep in mind it was pitch black and all this happened in less than 3 minutes. Realizing this had become a dangerous situation and while discussing our possible options, we noticed a man approaching our car in waist high water, wearing a hoodie and additional heavy duty rain gear, obscuring most of his face. Out of breath, he hurriedly stated we were in danger of the car rolling over. As he spoke, I recognized his voice. I exclaimed, “Darek?!” He said, “yes, who is this?” I said Susan and Frank, and with that, the car started to float. He commanded us to immediately climb out the window. My husband, who was driving, climbed out first and I then scooted over. As I poked my feet out the window Darek grabbed them, pulled me out, and then carried me the 30-40 yards back to dryer land where he had left his car. After getting us safely settled inside his car, he proceeded to go back into the turbulent flood waters to help other stranded people, some standing on top their cars, terrorized. By the time he finished his rescue work the flood waters had reached his shoulders. He drove us home. Upon saying good night, he continued to his own home where his wife and two children awaited him. When Frank and I came through our front door we realized that the serendipitous nature of what had just taken place had saved our lives. This amazing man’s name is Darek Kulikowsha, a Polish immigrant and local shop owner — an unsung hero of that fateful night. He and his wife chose America to live in and raise their children. My husband and I are so very grateful. God bless him and God bless America for attracting people like him from around the globe. Happy Thanksgiving to all. SUSAN PIZZI Mountain View Road

Parking Proposal Was Developed With Good Intentions, But Not With a Long View

To the Editor: Having lived in Princeton for 40-plus years, I have felt and seen the growing encroachment of traffic and parking into in-town residential neighborhoods. Some residential streets have become commuter thoroughfares and some have become clogged with “overspill parking” from the business district. The intensity of these changes comes not only from growth, but also from the lack of compensatory infrastructure to handle growth effectively. To address some of the parking issues in town, a task force was formed and charged with improving parking for residents in the Tree Streets and John Witherspoon neighborhoods where, for far too long, the streets have been clogged with “overspill parking” from downtown businesses and additionally, in the Tree Streets, from University graduate students. In the process of their work Jack Morrison, representing the Merchants Association, requested a surprisingly large number (between 500-800 last I heard) of subsidized parking spaces for in-town businesses as well as anonymity for the businesses involved. Giving way to these requests, a permit parking proposal was developed that pushes business parking into most in-town residential neighborhoods, slowly for now, but as Princeton grows with the clear intention of increasing the numbers parking on your streets. Between now and 2025, or in just three years, the population of Princeton is expected to grow 7-10 percent and that’s just the beginning of the expected expansion. I believe that those who have worked on this proposal have done so in earnest and with good intentions, but not with a long view or one that adequately protects in-town residential streets. There is a longer conversation to be had about what other planners, towns, and cities are doing to protect in-town neighborhoods, but for now I think that it is important for in-town neighborhoods to unite in support of all others. In neighborhoods where relief is needed let’s support that cause and in neighborhoods where relief has already been granted let’s work together to protect it. If we don’t unite now it is assured that all of our streets will be packed with cars — it’s just a matter of time. SUSAN JEFFERIES Jefferson Road

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To the Editor: I became friendly with Liz Fillo about six years ago while exercising on an adjacent bicycle at the gym. We had friends in common and I knew of her reputation as a singer and performer. I was organizing evenings for The Friends of Princeton Public Library that would be auctioned at our yearly gala, “Beyond Words.” I asked Liz if she would do a cabaret act with music from The Great American Song Book. She readily agreed and it was a wonderful evening. Two years later, she did one for Valentine’s Day which was a riff on traditional love songs, called “Love Actually.” What was so extraordinary about these evenings was both Liz’s incredible talent and her generosity in giving her talent to benefit the Library. She was an amazing woman and will be missed by all who knew her. AUDREY EGGER Co-Chair, Evenings and Events Friends of Princeton Public Library Coniston Court

Princeton Should Have Opportunity To Use Ranked Choice Voting

To the Editor: While we had plenty of close elections earlier this month, voter participation was disappointingly low. How can we motivate more voters to participate in our municipal elections? One answer is to use ranked choice voting which provides opportunities for more diverse candidates, allows voters to have real choices (without fear of a wasted vote), and ensures election winners receive a majority of the votes (over 50 percent). New Jersey towns, including Princeton, should have the opportunity to use ranked choice voting if they choose. We can make this happen by calling on our New Jersey legislators to support the “NJ Municipal Instant Runoff” bills (A 4744 and S 2992) and by asking for committee hearings to improve the bills. For example, we should increase the number of towns that qualify and apply them to many offices, not just mayoral races. I would love to see our local citizens and elected officials, too, join me in contacting our legislators. Here is an easy way to do it: https://p2a.co/Hgw6nE7. SUSAN COLBY Bunn Drive

Writing in Response to Sensible Streets’ Claims About Local Parking

To the Editor: Recently, a “community organization” named Sensible Streets has been spreading half-truths, misinformation, and heavily edited videos that aim to scare Princetonians into rejecting our Permit Task Force’s recommendations to town Council. Sensible Streets’ false assertions and dirty tactics are par-for-the-course into today’s politics, but I hope fellow residents will see through the group’s well-heeled interests. Sensible Streets claims that, “adding commercial parking creates narrower driving lanes with more traffic congestion and obstructed sight lines for cars and children.” However, parking on public streets is legal on almost every street in

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central Princeton. There are simply limits to the amount of time cars can park. By Sensible Streets’ reasoning all street parking should be eliminated. No birthday parties, church services, family gatherings, or funerals as the additional cars would make for an unsafe streetscape. In fact, some residents aligned with Sensible Streets argue for the elimination of all on-street parking for public safety and environmental reasons. Sensible Streets also claims that parking in front of your residence would be leased to companies like Lululemon and Starbucks, and even suggest on their website that there will be dedicated spots with signs. This claim is an outright falsehood! The folks behind Sensible Streets (they don’t publicly state who they are) want you to believe that the big corporations will benefit from the parking plan and pay their employees less as a result. However, limited low-cost parking permits would primarily help employees of local businesses like Labyrinth Books, Small World Coffee, jaZams, Olives, Mediterra, Corkscrew Wine Shop, and many others. All of these businesses are locally owned and operated and their owners pay significant taxes to the municipality (some for both their businesses and homes alike). I live in the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood and for as long as I have lived here we have been welcoming workers, contractors, church-goers, shoppers, vacationers, and all those who want to experience the richness of this town we love. Most of us in this neighborhood understand that the asphalt in front of our house is not our own personal property. We have been sharing it for decades. I simply ask our friends and neighbors in other parts of town to consider the Task Force recommendations on how to better share the publicly-owned asphalt adjacent to their property. In the end, I believe the proposed program will bring more equity and harmonization to the mess that we currently call parking in Princeton. I hope fellow residents will take the time to read the Task Force’s answers to common misconceptions at the municipal website: https://www.princetonnj.gov/FAQ. aspx?TID=43. FRANK (DEAN) SMITH Maclean Street

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Asking Council Members to Avoid Rushing to Opt-In to Cannabis Retail

To the Editor: The Princeton Cannabis Task Force (CTF) is holding a meeting on November 30 and plans to propose an ordinance to opt-in to allowing up to three retail cannabis dispensaries in town, possibly in areas where kids walk past and cycle to school. If a majority of town Council members vote for the ordinance, it becomes our town’s decision. Three members of the Council are on the CTF and have voiced support for an opt-in ordinance. I am one of many parents in town who have questioned the CTF’s rush into this program. There are several reasons we as town residents should all be concerned. First, according to a recent August survey in Princeton Perspectives, 60 percent of Princeton residents polled don’t even want dispensaries in town. Enough said. Shouldn’t we be sure that a sizable majority of residents want dispensaries in their neighborhood before rushing in? There is a petition from another local parent on Change.org against Princeton’s opt-in ordinance that received over 500 signatures from Princeton residents. The CTF has avoided mentioning this petition in their public statements. Second, opting in and promoting cannabis consumption in town goes against the town’s sustainability goals. The more cannabis we consume as a town, the more cannabis must be produced through an energy-intensive process that emits a surprising level of CO2 emissions. Cannabis is the most energy-intensive crop grown in the U.S. The CO2 emissions created to cultivate a single ounce of cannabis is equivalent to burning an entire tank of gasoline, per a March 2021 article in the journal Nature Sustainability. The reason for this is the 24-hour lighting, ventilation, and temperature control required for the product, which is largely grown indoors. The energy consumed is a big reason why cannabis costs over $300 an ounce. Third, and most importantly, cannabis dispensaries have generated unforeseen crime and safety concerns. Armed robberies of cannabis dispensaries have been increasing

Letters to the Editor Policy

Thursday, Nov 25, at 11am

dramatically nationwide this year. A notable armed robbery of a dispensary occurred this October in Bethlehem, Pa., where a dispensary worker’s life was threatened. And there are so many other serious considerations, largely around driver impairment and an increase in pedestrians/ cyclists killed by drivers testing positive for marijuana. But there simply is not enough space to share it all in this letter. In summary, the CTF and town Council members have not completed their due diligence on this issue, nor have they acknowledged several serious concerns that must be studied first before opting in. Further study would be worth avoiding unforeseen quality of life issues, and town legal/enforcement expenses. I urge other town residents who have concerns to contact the town Council before November 30. Thank you. DAVID JENKINS Leabrook Lane

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021

Remembering Liz Fillo For Her Talent and Generosity

Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

Paul Muldoon Launches The Story of a River His New Collection Discussed at Labyrinth

The Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Paul Muldoon will launch his 14th collection, Howdie-Skelp: Poems (Farrar, Straus and Giroux) on Wednesday, December 1 at 6 p.m. at Labyrinth Books. He will be introduced by fellow poet Michael Dickman. This is a hybrid event; vaccines and masks are required to attend in person; to register for the livestream, visit labyrinthbooks,com. This event is co-sponsored by Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts. A ‘howdie-skelp’ is the slap in the face a midwife gives a newborn. The poems include a remake of The Waste Land, an elegy for his fellow Northern Irish poet Ciaran Carson, sonnets that respond to the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, and a translation from the ninth-century Irish. Writing in The New York Times Book Review, Daisy Fried calls Howdie-Skelp, a “storm of slaps against piety, prudery, cruelty and greed .... Like many important poets before him, from John Milton to Tim Rice, Muldoon knows that sinners and villains are more interesting, maybe more human, than self-appointed good guys. Poems, for Muldoon, are occasions to plumb the language for a truth that’s abysmal: as in appalling, and as in deep.” Muldoon has taught creative writing at Princeton University for 30 years. He is the author of over a dozen collections of poetry, including Moy Sand and Gravel, for which he won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize, and Selected Poems 1968-2014.

Jordan Salama will talk about his new book, Every Day the River Changes : Four Weeks down the Magdalena (Penguin) on Tuesday, November 30 at 6 p.m. at L aby r int h B ooks. He will be joined by longtime Scientific American opinion editor Michael Lemonick. This is a hybrid event. Vaccinat ions and masks are required to attend in person; to register for the livestream, visit labyrinthbooks.com. An American writer of Argentine, Syrian, and Iraqi Jewish descent, Jordan Salama tells the story of the Río Magdalena, nearly one thousand miles long, in the heart of Colombia. A starred review in Publishers Weekly calls the book, “a mesmerizing travelogue .... Both complex and achingly beautiful, this outstanding account brims with humanity.” Salama’s work has ap peared in The New York Times, National Geographic, and Scientific American. L e m on ick, who te ach e s science writing at Princeton Universit y, was the longtime opinion editor at Scientific American, a former senior staff writer at Climate Central, and a former senior science writer at Time. He is the author of, among others, Echo of the Big Bang; Other Worlds : The Search for Life in the Universe; and Mirror Earth: The Search for Our Planet’s Twin. This event is cosponsored by Princeton University’s Prog ram in Jour nalism, Lewis Center for the Arts, and Department of Spanish and Portuguese.


George Harrison 20 Years After: Going His Own Way I’m a dark horse Running on a dark race course... —George Harrison (1943-2001) ccording to Glyn Johns, engineer and producer of the Beatles’ famously fraught Get Back sessions, “If I was ever going to write a book about George, I would print out every lyric he ever wrote, and I guarantee you would find out exactly who he was. Beginning with ‘Don’t Bother Me,’ it’s all there, as plain as plain can be.” In George Harrison: Behind the Locked Door (Overlook 2015), Graeme Thomson notes that “Don’t Bother Me” was “written out of sheer necessity” at a time when “the insatiable appetite of Beatlemania” was “really beginning to bite.” As someone who “would never be much inclined to float off and write about ‘newspaper taxis’ or ‘Maxwell’s silver hammer,’ “ and who was already “adept at writing about himself,” Harrison was “the first Beatle to write songs about being a Beatle.” So there he was, at 20, the youngest member of a band dominated by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, a compositional dynamo producing hit songs with titles like “Love Me Do,” “Please Please Me,” “Thank You Girl,” “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” “She Loves You,” and “From Me to You.” Laid up with a head cold while the Beatles were playing “a summer season in Bournemouth,” as he recounts in I Me Mine (Chronicle Books 1980, 2002), Harrison gamely sets about writing the first chapter of his own narrative, a subtext in song with a distinct point of view. While “Don’t Bother Me” is plotted around the standard she-left-me-on-my-own plotline, it comes across as a dispatch from the combat zone of Beatlemania by a singer with no interest in holding hands or making nice: “So go away, leave me alone, don’t bother me ... don’t come near, just stay away.” Before “Rubber Soul” In 1964, George’s second song, “You Know What to Do,” was, in Thomson’s words, “swiftly recorded and equally as swiftly rejected.” Although it’s sung with jubilant energy and has a more positive, loving message (“I’ll stay with you every day ... make you love me more in every way”), it wasn’t deemed good enough for a place on Beatles for Sale (1964) and doesn’t surface in the repertoire until the first volume of The Beatles Anthology some 30 years later. During this period (call it BRS for Before Rubber Soul), there was “never any suggestion that either Lennon or McCartney would,” as Thomson puts it, “deign to write with him.” Beatles producer George Martin saw him “as a kind of loner .... John and Paul had each other to play against, their collaboration was more of a competition. George was the sole guy, he had no one to work with.” Which proved to be a good thing, given the two strong, absolutely necessary songs George contributed to the universally acclaimed breakthrough album Rubber Soul

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(the original U.K. version, that is, not the truncated American issue). Thinking for Himself In the summer of 1965, Harrison had discovered — and been discovered by — the music of virtuoso sitarist and composer Ravi Shankar. Come October the Beatles were in the studio and George was playing the sitar on “Norwegian Wood.” While the unlikely appearance of the sitar was the most noticed innovation among many on an album praised by music critics like Chris Smith for reaching “beyond the confines of acceptable rock and roll techniques,” what stands out in the context of Harrison’s progress as a songwriter is “Think for Yourself,” with the title’s implicit reference to his emergence as a compositional force. He’s in charge from the first line (“I’ve got a word or two to say about the things that you do”), giving his version of the Beatles adventure in lines like “all those lies about the good things we can have if we close our eyes.” There’s a hint of future games in the next verse’s “do what you want to do and go where you’re going to ... cause I won’t be there with you.” Four years later he makes a dramatic exit from the Get Back sessions streaming this week in Peter Jackson’s threepart documentary. Here he’s singing, “I left you far behind” even as the band is brilliantly backing him, with harmonies from John and Paul, and Paul blasting away on fuzz bass. His second contribution, “If I Needed Someone,” is as much a statement as a love song (“If I had some more time to spend, then I guess I’d be with you my friend”). The playful reference to the D chord in I Me Mine (“If you move your finger around you get various little melodies ... and various little maladies”) goes along with the ambiguity of a lyric structured on a telltale “If.” He was about to commit to marriage with Patty Boyd, but as Jonathan Gould observes in Can’t Buy Me Love, it seems “a rueful rain check of a love song” directed “to the right person at the wrong time.” Losing and Finding Him Until a few years ago when it went missing, I had the 1980 hardcover edition of I Me Mine, which contains a patchwork memoir along with 80 lyrics, both in facsimile as written and typeset, with his comments about each, some short and some long and surprisingly open, eloquent, and moving, particularly the prefaces to “I Me Mine,” from the Beatles’ ill-fated Let It Be, and “The Art of Dying” and “My Sweet Lord”

from Harrison’s All Things Must Pass, the most acclaimed of all Beatles solo works. Although he composed these musings back in the late ’70s, they could have been written weeks before his death on November 29, 2001. But, as his wife Olivia has said, “There wasn’t a real divide between life and death for George.” “Handle With Care” I did my best to keep up with George’s solo work in the 1970s into 1980s, but after the wonder of All Things Must Pass, nothing really got my attention until “Handle With Care” came charging over the car radio in 1988. It took a few seconds to realize that the voice belting the opening lines was George Harrison’s. Been beat up and battered around Been sent up and I’ve been shot down You’re the best thing that I’ve ever found…. Just now I’ve been watching him on YouTube performing with his Traveling Wilbury brothers — Roy Orbison, Tom Petty, Bob Dylan, Jeff Lynne, and Jim Keltner. Clearly inspired and exhilarated by the company he’s keeping, he does some of his strongest ever singing and playing, alive with the joy of making music. He was 45. Another Level Next week, on December 8, it will be 41 years since the murder of John Lennon. He’d been dead almost 15 years when the three remaining Beatles got together to make “Free As a Bird,” their first release since the 1970 break-up. Using a demo Lennon had recorded three years before his death, Paul McCartney wrote words for a middle section that movingly complemented and fleshed out John’s uncompleted song. The vocal on the first bridge is by McCartney; the second shorter version sung by Harrison builds from the word “free” (“Whatever happened to the life that we once knew, always made me feel so free”) into a searing slide guitar solo that lifts the music and the message to another level. It’s a rich, savage, emotionally explosive piece of playing, delivered fervently, relentless in its intensity. In the memorial anthology, Harrison (Rolling Stone 2002), Greg Kot sees the “aching eloquence” of George’s playing as the song’s “crowning moment.” Five years later, on December 30,1999, Harrison was stabbed seven times in the chest by a mentally disturbed intruder, an attack given a vivid, firsthand account by his widow Olivia in Martin Scorsese’s

documentary, George Harrison: Living in the Material World. The effects of the attack, and his battles with cancer before and after it, can be felt in the power and depth of the last music of his life, most of it made when he knew he was dying. In his posthumous album, Brainwashed (2002), which was wrapped up by his son Dhani and Jeff Lynne, two of the most stirring performances are the instrumental “Marwar Blues,” and “Rising Sun.” All through Brainwashed, Harrison’s guitar work lilts and shines, every note a gem. His solos are like haikus or poems of a single impeccable stanza compared to the prosy dissertations of guitarists generally considered to be his superiors. “Any Road,” the album’s opening track, echoes the Wilburys’ “End of the Line,” where the message is “It’s all right,” except that, as with most of the lyrics on Brainwashed, the movement is in a terminal direction, with lines like “But oh Lord we pay the price with the spin of the wheel, with the roll of the dice.” In “Looking for My Life,” you are with a mortally wounded man staring into the abyss (“I had no idea that things exploded, I only found it out when I was down upon my knees looking for my life”), but the jaunty music crowds sorrow and self-pity out of the picture. “Stuck Inside a Cloud” is more personal (he compares songwriting to going to confession in I Me Mine), with its first lines, “Never slept so little, never smoked so much,” and there’s nothing muted about the emotion: Just talking to myself Crying as we part Knowing as you leave me I also lose my heart. There’s no morbidity in Brainwashed. If anything, Harrison makes a muse of death. The album ends with father and son chanting “Namah Parvarti,” a Hindu prayer hailing Shiva as the destroyer of all Karma. or all the changes George would go through in his career with and without the Beatles, the Indian connection, spiritually and musically, is the one he sustained until the moment his ashes were scattered at the holy site, Sangam. —— Portions of this column are taken from my piece on the 10th anniversary of George Harrison’s death, which began with his comment on the writing of “My Sweet Lord”: “Many people fear the words ‘Lord’ and ‘God’ – makes them angry for some strange reason.” With that in mind, I won’t spell out my mantra of eternal thanks for the Princeton Public Library (TGPPL), which once again came through, providing me with a revised 2002 edition of I Me Mine, as well as Graeme Thomson’s biography. —Stuart Michner

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New Jersey Symphony Orchestra Presents Concert Exploring “A Woman’s Voice”

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ew Jersey Symphony Orchestra launched the second of its online fall performances last Wednesday night with a multi-media presentation of 19th-century music. Recorded last May at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center and led by NJSO Music Director Xian Zhang, this concert focused on “A Woman’s Voice” in programmatic music, performance, and poetry. Although the Orchestra presented only three works, last Wednesday night’s performance was dense with text and backstories to the music, accompanied by poetry of local writers. Joining the Orchestra was one of opera’s great legends, soprano Renée Fleming. French composer G eorges Bizet’s four-movement suite L’Arlésienne (The Girl from Arles) originated as incidental music to a failed theatrical play. New Jersey Symphony Orchestra performed the third movement “Adagietto,” scored for strings alone. Under Zhang’s direction, the strings of the Orchestra began the movement introspectively; with a smaller than usual ensemble of strings, the violins reached the heights of phrases well, with an especially lean melody from the first violins. The performance of this piece was preceded by a reading of the poem “Elizabeth, NJ” by New Jersey poet and artist Michelle Moncayo. New Jers ey Sy mphony Orchest ra introduced Richard Wagner’s romantic Siegfried Idyll with the poem “Convergence” by New Jersey native, poet and educator Jane Wong. Wagner, one of the towering composers of the 19th century, composed the one-movement Idyll as a “Symphonic Birthday Greeting” to his wife at the time. Zhang and the Orchestra began the piece with the same light touch heard in the Bizet work, with more strings and the addition of winds and brass. A solo line from flutist Bart Feller soared above the orchestral palette, complemented by pastoral solo playing from oboist Alexandra Knoll. Clarinetist Pascal Archer also provided expressive solo passages as the strings gracefully maneuvered repeated melodies and rhythmic patterns. A quartet of principal string players presented melodic lines well punctuated by solo horn player

Christopher Komer, and conductor Zhang and concertmaster Eric Wyrick added a playful character to the music. Zhang brought the Idyll to a joyous close, aided by rich orchestration and playing of the German trumpets for which Wagner’s music is known. Although one of the great sopranos of recent times, Renée Fleming has not been known for performing the music of Wagner in her career — the guest artist commented that until Wednesday night’s concert, her last performance of Wagner was many years before. It was not hard to see why this world-class singer was drawn to Wagner’s Wesendonck Lieder, one of the composer’s great set of love songs. Composed in 1857, Wesendonck Lieder were settings of poems by Mathilde Wesendonck, with whom Wagner allegedly was having an affair while married to his first wife. Wagner purportedly saw himself in these poems — continually seeking the perfect love. The settings of these five poems represented the only vocal pieces of Wagner, for which he did not create his own text. hroughout the five Lieder, Fleming emphasized the Romantic aspects of the 19th-century poems, written with a woman’s voice by a poet with whom Wagner was clearly infatuated. Accompanied by solo violin, Fleming opened the set expressively telling a story from the protagonist’s childhood. Fleming’s lush top register well matched Wyrick’s sensitive solo violin playing, all nicely punctuated by the winds. The second song, “Stehe still!” was performed with more urgency from Fleming and the instrumentalists, with Alexandra Knoll’s solo oboe lines adding a touch of gentility. Violist Frank Foerster’s solo viola playing was featured in the later songs, with the orchestral accompaniment becoming haunting through emphasis on the lower strings. Throughout the set, Fleming maintained the phrases well, and was always in control of the emotional mood. Zhang, Fleming, and the Orchestra ended the song cycle and concert serenely, with a tapered closing horn — no doubt leaving the online audience even more eager to hear the Orchestra in person again. —Nancy Plum

AMERICAN REPERTORY BALLET presents

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New Jersey Symphony returns live to Princeton University’s Richardson Auditorium on Friday, January 14, 2022 at 8 p.m. Led by conductor Andrey Boreyko, this concert will feature music of Grieg, Stravinsky, and Adès, and will include guest piano soloist Vladimir Feltsman. Ticket information can be obtained by visiting the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra website at njsymphony.org.

World-Renowned Ballerina

Gillian Murphy to perform on Saturday, November 27 at 7:30 PM

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23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021

MUSIC REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021 • 24

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25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021 • 26

Much Ado About Nothing

THEATER REVIEW

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Theatre Intime Presents a Polished “Much Ado About Nothing”; First World War Becomes the Setting for Shakespeare’s Comedy

n Much Ado About Nothing Shakespeare has Balthasar, a musician, sing: “Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more; men were deceivers ever.” This worldweary comment, about the timelessness of dishonesty in relationships, would seem to offer directors latitude to reimagine the period in which this comedy is set. Princeton University’s Theatre Intime has presented (from November 12-21) a production that takes advantage of this dramaturgical license. Director Katie Bushman transplants the play — first published in 1600 — to the end of the First World War. This is clear as soon as the audience enters the theater. We hear popular songs of that period, including Irving Berlin’s “Alexander’s Ragtime Band” and, more thematically relevant, George M. Cohan’s “Over There.” Don Pedro, Prince of Aragon (portrayed by Alex Conboy) returns home from winning a battle. With him are two of his soldiers: Claudio (Harit Raghunathan) and Benedick (Solomon Bergquist). The play is set at the home of a noble, Leonato (Hank Ingham); he invites the soldiers to stay for a month. Leonato remarks that there is a “skirmish of wit” between his niece Beatrice (Cassy James) and Benedick. This is palpable as soon as the two characters are reunited onstage. Bergquist brings charismatic stage presence to Benedick. He effortlessly glides around the stage, often leaping on top of the bench (or occasionally hiding under it) as he confidently delivers the character’s suave, urbane dialogue. This is matched by James’ breezy but layered performance as the blithely acerbic Beatrice. Leonato’s description of that “merry war” establishes a central theme. On stage is a gazebo that is covered by a white drape, which makes it resemble a tent on a battlefield. The red flowers fastened to it could be drops of blood. Next to the gazebo is a bench, behind which more than one character hides to eavesdrop, as if on a reconnaissance mission. Claudio is in love with Leonato’s vivacious daughter Hero (Lauren Owens), and after complicated machinations (in which Don Pedro courts her on Claudio’s behalf, during a masquerade ball) a wedding is planned. Don Pedro also contrives for Benedick and Beatrice to discover their true feelings for each other. The wedding of Claudio and Hero is sabotaged by Don John, who is Don Pedro’s (illegitimate) brother. Through shrewd use of mistaken identity, Don John convinces Claudio and Don Pedro that Hero is unfaithful. At the altar Claudio publicly denounces Hero. Lana Gaige is pithy as the malevolent

Don John. Violent banging of fists is used to punctuate seething delivery of lines. A development of the play’s war motif occurs in the form of Claudio’s treatment of Hero, and her reaction to it (Owens makes the character’s devastation unmistakable). Hero faints, and several characters — especially an infuriated, protective Beatrice — rush to her prone body out of concern. At that moment she is a casualty of war, lying on the battlefield. Later the wedding’s officiant, Friar Francis (Teddy Feig), suggests that Hero’s family fake her death, to make Claudio feel remorse for his treatment of her. The director finds this aspect of the play — Claudio’s behavior toward Hero, for which he eventually is forgiven — to be problematic. “Why would a sympathetic character publicly slander his bride at the altar?” Bushman wonders rhetorically in a program note. “Why is he so easily duped by Don John in the first place? How can he be redeemed at the end?” Suggesting PTSD as a possible explanation, Bushman writes: “These questions came to mind while I was doing research on shell shock in the First World War for my senior thesis. When reading about the soldiers who returned home paranoid, haunted, and suicidal after witnessing the horrors of trench warfare, I realized a possible reason for Claudio’s betrayal.” While Bushman enjoys the “lighthearted comic

scenes,” she observes “a lot of tragedy present in this comedy.” Raghunathan’s performance supports this. Although Claudio is depicted as jovial in his early scenes, Raghunathan uses body language that suggests inner conflict. In contrast to Bergquist’s exuberant portrayal of Benedick, Raghunathan as Claudio keeps his hands reservedly behind his back, as though not entirely ready to reconnect with his pre-war world. His demeanor is edgy, always alert. In his delivery of Claudio’s anguished monologues — first when he suspects Hero is unfaithful, and later when he expresses deep remorse for cruelly misjudging her — Raghunathan places his hands over his heart. The corresponding vocal deliveries indicate short bursts of pain from a soldier who has learned to mask his emotions but cannot do so any longer. An additional explanation is subtly posited for Claudio’s willingness to suspect that Hero is capable of being unfaithful to him. Hearing “Over There” before the show makes it interesting to observe Claudio’s reaction to hearing Balthasar (Grace Rosenberg) sing “Sigh No More.” As Balthasar sings about the timelessness of infidelity, Claudio moves his body in rhythm, eventually singing along — clearly internalizing the song’s words. If Leonato’s home is a battlefield on which a war of romantic relationships is fought, then “Sigh

“MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING”: Theatre Intime has staged a reimagined “Much Ado About Nothing,” presented November 12-21 at the Hamilton Murray Theater. Directed by Katie Bushman, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy is transplanted to the era of World War I. Benedick (Solomon Bergquist, center left) and Beatrice (Cassy James, center right) have a bickersome courtship, which is jeopardized by an action taken by Claudio (Harit Raghunathan, left) at his wedding to Hero (Lauren Owens, second from left). Onlookers: Leonato (Hank Ingham, second from right) and Don Pedro (Alex Conboy, right). (Photo by Elliot Lee) For information about Theatre Intime’s upcoming productions call (609) 2585155 or visit theatreintime.org.

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No More” can be as much of a wartime propaganda song as “Over There.” Although Balthasar sings, “men were deceivers ever,” Raghunathan’s body language suggests that Claudio is interpreting the song to mean that both partners are capable of being dishonest — feeding his predisposition toward suspicion. Constable Dogber r y ( Ellie MakarLimanov) commands the local Watch, staffed by Verges ( Katie Hameetman) and the three Watchmen (Rilla McKeegan, Alison Silldorff, and Grace Rosenberg), all of whom move with an enthusiastic, almost child-like spring in their step. The Watch overhears Don John’s accomplices Borachio (infused with smugness by Katie Irelin) and Conrade (Avi Chesler) discussing his scheme, and extract a confession from them. The members of the Watch inform Leonato that Hero is innocent. Claudio (appropriately) is remorseful to discover how unjustly he treated her. He agrees to an odd condition that is placed on Leonato’s forgiveness: he must marry the daughter of Leonato’s brother Antonio, whom Leonato describes as “almost the copy of my child that’s dead.” Claudio is overjoyed when it is revealed that this “copy” is Hero herself. Despite the adversarial banter that has largely characterized their relationship, Beatrice and Benedick also affirm their love for one another. For now, a truce seems to have been declared in the “merry war.” Don John has been captured by the watchmen, but Benedick suggests that his punishment be decided later; he instructs the musicians, “Strike up, pipers.” There is celebratory dancing, with smooth choreography by Bergquist, letting the play end with a glossy tableau. The cast is ably rounded out by Alexis Maze (Ursula), Campbell Schouten (Margaret), Kenza Benazzouz (Antonia), and graphic designer Teddy Leane (Messenger and Sexton). Alison Silldorff’s elegant costumes evoke the 1910s while blending with Kat McLaughlin’s set design. During the masquerade scene Beatrice wears a green dress, and Hero a pink one — color-coordinating them with the flowers in Leonato’s garden. ushman’s thoughtful, layered approach to the material steers the (student-formed) cast and creative team toward decisions that result in a strong unity between the script’s themes and the production. The actors’ performances exude a high level of comfort with the material, and confidence in their interpretations of it. Much Ado About Nothing stands out as one of Theatre Intime’s best productions. —Donald H. Sanborn III

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followed by caroling. A limited number of seats will be provided for those who are not able to stand for the concert. Registrants may indicate on the sign-up form if they’d like seats reserved. In the case of inclement weather, a decision will be made by noon on December 8 regarding the service. Due to students’ exam schedules, there will not be a rain date.

Laquita Mitchell performs says Milanov. Voices Chorale NJ Returns To Live Performance at Trinity with the Princeton Sympho- M itch e l l e a r n e d p o s i -

The first live and livestreamed concert of Voices Chorale NJ since December 2019 is scheduled for Friday, December 17 at 8 p.m. Featuring works based on the poetry of E.E. Cummings, Robert Frost, Langston Hughes, Emily Dickinson, and more, this concert includes holiday music along with sounds to soothe the soul after a long time apart. Among the works on the program is Joan Szymko’s I Dream a World, based on Langston Hughes’ poem, imagining a world “where love will bless the earth and peace its paths adorn.” Sing Gently, composed by Eric Whitacre in March 2020, was written in a spirit to bring comfort to those who need it. Where Riches is Everlastingly is Bob Chilcott’s upbeat arrangement of a 16th century carol. Little Tree, based on a poem by E.E. Cummings, reflects the childlike wonder and excitement of dressing the Christmas tree, and Eight Days of Lights, by Judith Clurman, honors the Hanukkah celebration. The concert is designed to explore diverse music that brings people together, as individuals with different beliefs, traditions, and tastes. S i n g e r s a n d au d i e n c e members will wear masks, and there is a streaming option for those who cannot join in person. Tickets are $15-$25. Visit voiceschoralenj.org.

ny Orchestra at its Holiday POPS! concert on Tuesday, December 14 at 7:30 p.m. at Matthews Theatre, McCarter Theatre Center.

Laquita Mitchell

Mitchell sings Giacomo Puccini’s “O mio babbino caro” from Gianni Schicchi, Robert MacGimsey’s spiritual-inspired song “Sweet Little Jesus Boy,” and an arrangement of “This Little Light of Mine.” Conducted by Edward T. Cone Music Director Rossen Milanov, the program also includes dances from Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s opera The Snow Maiden and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker, plus Ralph Vaughan Williams’ “Fantasia on Greensleeves,” Johann Strauss Jr.’s “Blue Danube” waltz, and favorites including “Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson. “I’m excited to welcome Laquita Mitchell back to Princeton and have her be a part of our holiday celebration. Her performance will Soprano Mitchell Sings bring a poignancy to this At Holiday POPS Concert year’s program as well as Soprano and Westmin- a note of hope to carry us ster Choir College alumna through to the new year,”

tive reviews for her début as Bess in Porgy and Bess with the San Francisco Opera. She reprised the role with opera companies and orchestras nationwide and with Grange Park Opera in the U.K. and the Lithuanian State Symphony. She recently performed the title role in Tom Cipullo’s Josephine with Opera Colorado, as well as The Promise of Living, a concert program she conceived. She appeared in New York Philharmonic’s Bandwagon concerts and the Kauffmann Music Center’s Musical Storefront series in spring 2021, and performed with the Columbus Symphony and Rhode Island Philharmonic. Mitchell was soloist in the world première of Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Paul Moravec’s Sanctuary Road at Carnegie Hall with Oratorio Society of New York which was nominated for a 2021 Grammy for Best Choral Performance. In summer 2021, she was featured on Classical Tahoe’s 10th Anniversary Season as well as the Bard Music Festival. A native of New York City, and recipient of numerous awards including a 2004 Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions Grand Prize, a Sara Tucker Award, and First Prize Winner of the Wiener Kammer Oper’s Hans Gabor Belvedere Competition, Ms. Mitchell holds a Master of Music degree and the Professional Studies Certificate at the Manhattan School of Music, and completed undergraduate studies at Westminster Choir College. Children ages 5-17 are

On Wednesday, December 8 at 8 p.m., outdoor weather permitting, the Chapel Choir of Princeton Theological Seminary will present an outdoor “Carols of Many Nations” concert on the Seminar quadrangle, in front of the chapel. The concert is free, and registration is required. The event will include scripture lessons read in many of the languages represented by the Princeton Seminary community. The Chapel Choir will respond to these readings with carols from around the world. Some new songs added to the repertoire this year are Shawn Kirchner’s setting of the Kenyan song “Wana baraka,” and William Dawson’s setting of the spiritual “Behold the Star,” which will be directed by student conductor Otis Byrd. There will also be some perennial favorites, including Carolyn Jenning’s setting of the Chinese carol “Pengyou, ting” and a choral processional accompanying David Willcock’s arrangement of “O TOPICS Come, All Ye Faithful.” The public is invited to attend 30-minute program,

SITY

E G R A L E CREATIV E L B M E S EN TON PRINCE

“Carols of Many Nations” Outdoor Concert at Seminary

LIVE AND LIVE-STREAMED: Voices Chorale NJ performs its first in-person concert since the pandemic on December 17 at Trinity Church.

Vaccination is expected for all campus visitors and guests. Campus v isitors should be prepared to share their names, phone numbers, and email addresses at the event, should contact tracing be necessary. Registration will close on Sunday, December 5. Visit ptsem.edu/events/carols-ofmany-nations.

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›› Music Composed

and Arranged By: John Hollenbeck Sy Johnson Thad Jones Skip Martin Charles Mingus Sammy Nestico Billy Strayhorn Mary Lou Williams

›› Featuring New Works

by Princeton Composers and Arrangers: Justin Coon Evan DeTurk Anson Jones Alexander de Gorgoza Moravcsik Jimmy Waltman Isaac Yi

FREE ›› Ticket Required Reserve online at music.princeton.edu or call 609-258-9220. ›› Attendees must be fully vaccinated and masked at all times.

jazzatprinceton.com

music.princeton.edu

P R I NC E TO N S YM P H O NY O R C H E S T R A R O S S E N M I L A N O V , M U S I C D I R EC TO R

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Holiday Pops! Tuesday December 14 7:30pm Matthews Theatre, McCarter Theatre Center Rossen Milanov, conductor Laquita Mitchell, soprano

Enjoy festive orchestral favorites and holiday melodies!

• STREAMING THE SUGARPLUM FAIRY: Snowflakes come to life in New York City Ballet’s production of “George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker,” returning to Marquee TV for viewing from November 26-January 2. Filmed in 2019, the ballet features Megan Fairchild, Maria Kowroski, and Tyler Angle along with a cast of supporting dancers, more than 60 children, and a tree that grows from 12 to 40 feet. Tickets are $20. Purchase at welcome.marquee.tv/nutcracker or via in-app purchase for Apple and Android devices. (Photo by Erin Baiano)

Order Tickets Today!

princetonsymphony.org

609/258-2787 McCarter Box Office

Dates, times, artists, and programs subject to change.

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021

Performing Arts

welcome to attend the concert at half-price with purchase of an adult ticket. McCarter’s COVID-19 policies of masks/photo ID/proof of full doses of vaccination or proof of a negative COVID test result applies to all children, though a birth certificate may be substituted for a photo ID. Tickets range from $20$50 for adults and half-price for youths 5-17. Visit princetonsymphony.org or call (609) 258-2787.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021 • 28

Art

“GARDENS OLD AND NEW”: This work by Arsen Savadov and Georgii Senchenko is part of “Painting in Excess: Kyiv’s Art Revival, 1985–1993,” on view at the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University through March 13, 2022.

“LINE OF LIGHT”: This painting by Bill Jersey is part of “Sharing,” his exhibition with artists Laura Rutherford Renner, Heather Barros, and Larry Mitnick, on view at Artists’ Gallery in Lambertville December 9 through January 22.

“Sharing” on Display At Artists’ Gallery

Artists Bill Jersey, Laura Rutherford Renner, Heather Barros, and Larry Mitnick have announced the opening of their joint show, “Sharing,” on view December 9 through January 22 at Artists’ Gallery in Lambertville. The exhibit features paintings by the four artists. An opening reception is scheduled for Saturday, December 11, from 1 to 3p.m. “Sharing” invites viewers to pause, to see, to remember the beauty of the world that we share with you.

Residing in Hunterdon County, Jersey says, “I am surrounded by creeks, forests, fields, and hills — an abundance of scenes I want to capture or interpret on canvas. Over time, my paintings evolved from more realistic scenes of the natural world to more interpreted representations, using dramatic colors to evoke fresh perspectives. As a documentary filmmaker of many years, I learned to catch a moment in time and use it to tell a larger story. That is what I seek to capture in my paintings.”

Ren ner, f rom Colling swood, enjoys painting figures engaged in the experience of their environments. “Capturing these interactions in two dimensions is an exercise and a source of calm. I relish mixing pure colors, keeping my palette simple to create authentic observation,” she said. “The quiet engagement of brush to palette and brush to board provides meaning for me every day.” Renner, an occupational therapist for the past 27 years, is currently retired from work in public schools, and renews

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her full-time focus on painting. Barros, from Princeton, paints landscapes from life, and lately from screen shots captured from movies and videos. “My current favorite color is grey,” said Barros. “I enjoy mixing various greys with oil paints and using them in my storms and sandy terrains.” Mitnick, who lives in in Huntingdon Valley, Pa., has continuously painted throughout his career as an architect and educator. ”The ideas that inform my paintings and architecture are in a friendly conversation, exchanging insights gained from each,” he said. “I understand space to be more than an immense vacuum but the medium through which we inhabit the world. Spatial conditions are poetic structures that embody human experience of everyday objects, places, landscapes and the figure. My paintings try to catch the abstraction that lies behind appearances. In the end, emotions take hold as one is drawn into my paintings through the elements of form/space, color, and visual movement.” A r t is t s’ G a ller y is lo cated at 18 Bridge Street in Lambertville. Hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, visit lambertvillearts.com.

Ukrainian Artists are Focus of Zimmerli Exhibit

musical pieces composed in the 1980s and early 1990s, recreating the cultural atmosphere of the time. “This exhibition captures and celebrates a moment of remarkable transformation in the art scene in late-Soviet Kyiv,” said Martynyuk. “With the lingering devastation of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear catastrophe and imminent collapse of the Soviet Union, Kyiv was undergoing radical changes. Emerging Ukrainian art became a powerful agent in this transformation of the city from the provincial center of the Ukrainian Soviet Republic into a cultural capital.” Excessive in its expressive manner and color, Kyivan painting of the late 1980s and early 1990s produced a new quality in art, no longer defined by the dichotomy of official and unofficial art during the Soviet era (19221991). Such daring art had not been publicly visible since the avant-garde of the early 20th century. With some ideological restrictions lifted, artists were flooded with information on Western theories, from postmodernism to formalist abstraction. Simultaneously, Ukrainian artists discovered chapters of local history that had been suppressed or deleted, as well as their decades-long exclusion from the global library of art. Thus, allusions to antique ruins and other spoils of Western culture abound in Ukrainian painting. Oozing symbolic meaning, large-scale canvases ref lect their transitional moment, reconsidering the past and defining the future. “Painting in Excess” represents the culmination of an important international collaboration that brings together more than 60 works of art, the majority of which have never been exhibited in the United States. A selec-

tion of paintings and works on paper is drawn primarily from the Zimmerli’s Norton and Nancy Dodge Collection of Nonconformist Art from the Soviet Union, supplemented by loans from the Abramov ych Foundation, and a group of Ukrainian art collectors, facilitated by support from Tymofieyev Foundation. In addition, this is a rare opportunity to exhibit these 33 artists together, many of whom are the most well-known of their generation in Ukraine. Admission is free to the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers. The museum is located at 71 Hamilton Street in New Brunswick. For more information visit zimmerli.rutgers.edu.

Photography Exhibit in Historic Terhune Barn

The work of local photographer Eddie Dzik will be featured in an exhibition opening Sunday in Terhune Orchards historic barn on Cold Soil Road. Dzik will be available to discuss his work from 1-3 p.m. on Sunday, November 28. Dzik was raised in Lawrenceville. As a way to show his love for the outdoors and concern for environmental preservation, he began photographing both local and national parks to document their ever-changing landscapes. Currently, he has been assisting world-renowned National Geographic photographer Michael Yamashita, most recently working on the creation of NFTs (nonfungible tokens). Through his photography, Dzik strives to share his vision of nature in hopes to grow awareness of the beauty of our natural resources and remind others of the importance of protecting and preserving them. View Dzik’s portfolio at: eddiedzik.myportfolio.com.

The exhibition “Painting in Excess: Kyiv’s Art Revival, 1985–1993” explores the inventive new art styles by Ukrainian ar tists re sponding to a trying transitional period of perestroika (restructuring) during the collapse of the Soviet Union. On view at the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University through March 13, 2022, the exhibition highlights an explosion of styles, rediscovered histories, and newly found freedoms that blossomed against economic scarcity and ecological calamity, creating an effect of baroque excess. Organized by guest research curator Olena Martynyuk, Ph.D. with assistance from Julia Tulovsky, Ph.D., the Zimmerli’s curator of Russian and Soviet Nonconformist Art, “Painting in Excess: Kyiv’s Art Revival, 1985-1993” is accompanied by a catalogue of the same title, co-published with Rutgers University Press. An in-person exhibition reception is scheduled for EXHIBIT AT TERHUNE: Local photographer Eddie Dzik will disFebruary 26, 2022, with cuss his work on Sunday, November 28 from 1 to 3 p.m. in performances of Ukrainian Terhune Orchards’ historic barn on Cold Soil Road.


29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021

WINTER CLASSES: The Center for Contemporary Art in Bedminster is offering in-person and virtual art classes and workshops this winter for adults, teens, and children in a variety of media including oil and acrylic paint, pastel, watercolor, drawing, and ceramics.

Contemporary Art Center Offers Winter Classes

The Center for Contemporary Art in Bedminster is offering in-person and virtual art classes and workshops this winter for adults, teens, and children beginning January 10. Select classes will be offered in a hybrid format. Classes and workshops are offered for artists with all levels of expertise in a variety of media including oil and acrylic paint, pastel, watercolor, drawing, and ceramics. There are more than 60 winter adult classes including, Portrait Drawing, Watercolor Step-by-Step, The Power of Pastels, Introduction to Acrylics, Morning Oil Landscape, Watercolor Portraits of People and Animals, Evening Painting, and ceramics classes such as Beginner Wheel Throwing, and Wheel Throwing and Hand Building. New classes this winter include Intro to Oil Painting, Classical Portraiture, Drawing Like the Old Masters in Pen Ink, Introduction to Drawing, Tricolor and Colored Pencil Drawing, Introduction to Basic Sculpting Technique, Media Sampler, Art and Literature, Video Art, and The Art of Comedy. Winter workshops offer students the opportunity to try something new. Workshops include Pen & Ink Techniques, Needle Felting, The Behavior of Pigments, Watercolor for Absolute Beginners, Easter Pysanky Egg Dyeing, Birds and Bird Nests in Watercolor, Pastels Stepby-Step, and more. I n - p e r s o n cl a s s e s a r e available for teens and children. For children ages 5-8 in person classes include Mixed Media, Painting in Depth, Drawing in Depth, Glow in the Dark Art, and

Pottery. Students ages 9-11 can select from in person classes Drawing in Depth, “Painting in Depth, as well as Mixed Media, and Pottery. Teen offerings include in person classes Drawing Intensive, Pottery, Painting In Style, and a virtual class in “Cartooning.” I n -p er s on clas s e s w i l l also be offered for children with autism spectrum disorder and other special needs beginning January 24. Students will explore a variety of ar t projects specifically geared to their interest and ability both in two-and-three dimensional approaches. The Center for Contemporary Art is located at 2020 Burnt Mills Road in Bedminster. For more information or to register for a class, visit ccabedminster.org.

Area Exhibits Check websites for information on safety protocols. Ar t @ Bainbridge, 158 Nassau Street, has “Components in the Air / Jesse Stecklow” through January 2. artmuseum.princeton.edu. A r t i st s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Stillness / Motion” through December 5. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Annual Member Show 2021” December 4 through December 21. artscouncilofprinceton.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Mus eu m i n C adwa lader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, has “Painting the Moon and Beyond: Lois Dodd and

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Friends Explore the Night Sky” through April 29. Visit ellarslie.org for museum hours and timed entry tickets. Ficus Bon Vivant, 235 Nassau Street, has “Off the Beaten Path” through February 27. ficusbv.com. Gourgaud Gallery, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, has “Friends of Color” through November 29. cranburyartscouncil.org. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Bruce Beasley: Sixty Year Retrospective, 19602020” through January 9 and “What’s in the Garden” through August 1. Hours are Thursday through Monday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Timed tickets required. groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Princeton and Women’s Suffrage” and other online exhibits, as well as the “History@ Home” series. The museum is currently closed to the public. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “It’s Personal: The Art of Robert Beck” through January 2, “Daring Design” through February 6, and “Miriam Carpenter: Shaping the Ethereal” through March 20. michenerartmuseum.org. Mercer Museum, 8 4 S o u t h P i n e S t r e e t, Doylestown, Pa., has “Found, Gifted, Saved! The Mercer Museum Collects Local History” through April 10. mercermuseum.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “In Nature’s Realm: The Art of Gerar d Rutgers Hardenberg” through January 9 and the online exhibit “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898.” Open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. morven.org. Pr inceton Public Libra r y, 65 Wit herspoon Street, has “Love Thy Nature” and “Looking Micro, Seeing Macro: Pressed Flower Art” through January 3. princetonlibrary.org. Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has “Perspectives on Preservation: Capturing the Mountain Lakes Preserve from Up Close and On High” through December 6. The 254 Nassau Street location has “Mary Dolan Paintings” through December 7. smallworldcoffee. com.

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Suki Seokyeong Kang Thursday, December 2, 5:30 p.m. Join South Korean multimedia and performance artist Suki Seokyeong Kang—the Museum’s 2021 Sarah Lee Elson, Class of 1984, International Artist-in-Residence—for a discussion of her practice, which is inspired by Korean court dance and music.

Stream it live artmuseum.princeton.edu

LATE THURSDAYS! This event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970. This program, including live closed-captioning, is made possible by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Curtis W. McGraw Foundation. Image: Courtesy of the artist


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021 • 30

Mark Your Calendar TOWN TOPICS Thursday, November 25 7:15 a.m.: Registration begins for Lambertville Two Town Turkey Trot at Lambertville House, 32 Bridge Street. The 5k/walk race, which follows, goes through New Hope and Lambertville and benefits Fisherman’s Mark and Lambertville Chamber of Com merce. Lambertvillechamber.com. 10 a.m.: Thanksgiv ing Day Walk in the Mapleton Preserve/D&R State Park. Free but registration is required at (609) 683-0483. Fpnl.org. Friday, November 26 2 and 7:30 p.m..: American Repertory Ballet performs The Nutcracker at McCarter Theatre, 91 University Place. Arballet.org. 5-6 p.m.: Palmer Square Tr e e L i g h t i n g . P a l m ersquare.com. Saturday, November 27 10 a.m . : Wr e at h a n d Sleighbell Sale, Howell Living History Farm, 70 Woodens Lane, Hopewell Township. Bring canned goods for donation. Howellfarm. org. 12-2 p.m.: Courtney’s Carolers serenade shoppers on Palmer Square, and Santa strolls. Palmersquare.com. 2 and 7:30 p.m.: American

Repertory Ballet performs The Nutcracker at McCarter Theatre, 91 University Place. Arballet.org. 2 and 8 p.m.: “The Evolut ion of Joni Mitchell ” at Hopewell T heater, 5 S o u t h G r e e nwo o d Ave nue, Hopewell. $40- $45. Hopewelltheater.com. 3 p.m.: Roxey Ballet’s The Nutcracker at Villa Victoria Theatre, 376 West Upper Ferry Road, Ewing. Roxeyballet.org. 6-7:30 p.m.: Fear of Dancing performs rock at Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street. Free. Smallworldcoffee.com. Sunday, November 28 12-2 p.m. : Har monics Quartet performs at Palmer Square, while Santa strolls. Palmersquare.com. 1 p.m.: American Repertory Ballet performs The Nutcracker at McCarter Theatre, 91 University Place. Arballet.org 3 p.m.: Roxey Ballet’s The Nutcracker at Villa Victoria Theatre, 376 West Upper Ferry Road, Ewing. Roxeyballet.org. 8 p.m.: Compline service by candlelight at All Saints’ Church, 16 All Saints’ Road. Drawn from roots in the early church, adapted for use in

current tradition. Free and open to all. Tuesday, November 30 11 a.m.-5 p.m.: Blood dr ive at Mercer Cou nt y Community College Student Center, Room SC104, West Windsor. Make an appointment at mccc.edu/blood or call (800) 933-2566. Wednesday, December 1 6 p.m. : Paul Muldoon reads Howdie-Skelp: Poems in a hybrid event presented by Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau Street. Introduced by poet Michael Dickman. Labyrinthbooks.com. Thursday, December 2 6 p.m.: Leah DeVun and Roland Betancourt, “The Shape of Sex: Nonbinary Gender from Genesis to the Renaissance.” Hybrid event pre s e nte d by L aby r i nt h Books, 122 Nassau Street. Labyrinthbooks.com. 7 p.m. : “A Civ i l War Christmas,” virtual presentation by historical reenactor Michael Jesberger, sponsored by Mercer County Library System. Register by emailing hopeprogs @ mcl. org. Friday, December 3 4:30 p.m.: “The Coffin Ship: Life and Death at Sea during the Great Famine.” Lecture by Cian T. McMahon,

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presented by Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts. Online, free, registration required. Princeton.zoom.us. 7 p.m.: “Prelude to a Carol: Dickens Creates a Christmas Classic,” at Kingston Presbyterian Church, 4565 Route 27, Kingston. Oneperson show where Charles Dickens tells the behind-thescenes tale of creating A Christmas Carol. HistoricExperience.com/Prelude. 7:30 p.m.: Princeton University Orchestra conducted by Michael Pratt performs at Richardson Auditorium. The program includes Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 2 in E Minor, and selections from David Del Tredici’s Final Alice, with soprano Alison Spann ’20. Free. Music. princeton.edu. Saturday, December 4 12-2 p.m.: Courtney’s Carolers serenade shoppers on Palmer Square, and Santa strolls. Palmersquare.com. 12-3 p.m.: Unveiling of 29 plaques on the Heritage Tour in the WitherspoonJackson historic district. Each plaque will be unveiled and discussed during an outdoor walk. Free. Meet at Hinds Plaza outside Princeton Public Library to begin the tour. A reception will be held following the tour at Studio Hillier, 190 Witherspoon Street. Princetonwjhcs.org. 12-5 p.m.: The Mill Hill Holiday House and Window Tour, rain or shine, in Trenton’s Mill Hill neighborhood. View special decorations through front windows or on the sidewalks and gardens”. Music, refreshments. Begin at Artworks, 119 Everett Alley. $20. TrentonMillHill.org. 4 p.m.: Sensory-friendly performance of Roxey Ballet’s The Nutcracker, at Eagle Fire Hall, 46 North Sugan Road, New Hope, Pa. Roxeyballet.org. 7 p.m.: Princeton Boychoir’s fall concert, “Sing for Joy!” streams at Westrickmusic.org. $15. Program r a n g e s f rom H a n d el to Broadway. Sunday, December 5 12-2 p.m. : Har monics Quartet performs at Palmer Square, while Santa strolls. Palmersquare.com. 1 p.m.: Sensory-friendly performance of Roxey Ballet’s The Nutcracker, at Eagle Fire Hall, 46 North Sugan Road, New Hope, Pa. Roxeyballet.org. 3 p.m.: Princeton Boychoir’s fall concert, “Sing for Joy!” streams at Westrickmusic.org. $15. Program r a n g e s f rom H a n d el to Broadway. 3 p.m.: Princeton University Orchestra conducted by Michael Pratt performs at Richardson Auditorium. The program includes Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 2 in E Minor, and selections from David Del Tredici’s Final Alice, with soprano Alison Spann ’20. Free. Music. princeton.edu. 4 p.m.: The Capital Philharmonic performs holiday

favorites at Patriots Theatre at the War Memorial, Trenton. Capitalphilharmonic. org. 4 p.m.: Annual Menorah Lighting on the Nassau Inn patio, 10 Palmer Square. Music and celebrating, open to all. Palmersquare.com. 5-7 p.m.: Holiday Jam and Toy Drive at Palmer Square, with performances by Princeton University students. Palmersquare.com. Monday, December 6 Recycling Tuesday, December 7 3 p.m.: “Mindfulness and Holiday Stress,” Zoom event with Carolyn Schindewolf of Penn Medicine Princeton Health Community Wellness. Presented by Mercer Cou nt y L ibrar y System. Email hopeprogs @msl.org to register. 7 p.m.: LLL Presents Stephen Roberts and Jack Hartman discussing the book Cokie — a Life Well Lived. Livestream event presented by Labyrinth Books. Labyrinthbooks.com. 7 p.m. : O p e n Hou s e, Princeton Fire Department, 363 Witherspoon Street. The department seeks candidates for the Class of 2022 volunteer training program. For residents ages 16 and older. Pr incetonnj.gove / joinpfd. Wednesday, December 8 8 p.m.: The Chapel Choir of P r i n c e to n T h e o l o g i cal Seminary presents its “Carols of Many Nations” concert. Free outdoor event (weather permitting). Registration necessary. Ptsem. edu/events. Thursday, December 9 6 p.m.: “Quilting Through the Centuries: Women’s Life and History in America,” Zoom event with Hannah Gaston. Presented by Mercer County Library System. Email hopeprogs.mcl.org to register. Friday, December 10 6 p.m.: The Princeton Singers perform at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street. Christmas music and readings by candlelight. Princetonsingers.org. Saturday, December 11 12-2 p.m.: Princeton University’s Tiger Tones sing at Palmer Square, while Santa strolls the square. Palmersquare.com. 1 and 5 p.m.: American Repertory Ballet performs The Nutcracker at Patriots Theater at the War Memorial, Trenton. Arballet.org. Sunday, December 12 12-2 p.m. : Har monics Quartet performs at Palmer Square, while Santa strolls. Palmersquare.com. 1 p.m.: Reenactment of Washington Crossing the Delaware at Washington Crossing Park. With special activities and demonstrations from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $20 for family of four, or $8 for adults and $4 for kids 5-11 (free for younger ones). Visit WashingtonCrossingPark.org/cross-with-us for tickets.

Monday, December 13 7 p.m.: “Christmas and the Winter Solstice,” program presented by Mercer County Library System via Zoom. Jef f Kampf from Lifelong Cognition is the speaker. Email hopeprogs@ mcl.org to register. Tuesday, December 14 9 a.m.-9 p.m.: Vir tual Shopping Day, Long Hill House Prints & Whimsy, Hillsborough. Choose gifts with help from staff, have them wrapped and ready for drive-through pickup. Longhillhouse.com. 7:30 p.m.: Princeton Symphony Orchestra Holiday POPS! Concert at McCarter Theatre, 91 University Place. Conducted by Rossen Milanov, with soprano Laquita Mitchell. $25-$90. Princetonsymphony.org. Wednesday, December 15 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meeting. Princetonlibrary. org. Thursday, December 16 6:30 p.m.: Virtual discussion of the book The Exiles by Christine Baker Kline, led by University of Massachusetts professor Maria John. Sponsored by the Historical Society of Princeton and Princeton Public Library. Princetonhistory.org. Friday, December 17 8 p.m.: Voices Chorale NJ performs at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer S t re e t ; a ls o available to stream. Works based on the poetry of E.E. Cummings, Robert Frost, L angston Hughes, Emily Dickinson, and others; holiday music. $15-$25. Voiceschoralenj.org. Saturday, December 18 12-2 p.m.: Spiced Punch entertains at Palmer Square, while Santa strolls. Palmersquare.com. Sunday, December 19 12-2 p.m.: Spiced Punch entertains at Palmer Square, while Santa strolls. Palmersquare.com. Monday, December 20 Recycling Wednesday, December 22 7 p.m.: “A Very Lambertville Holiday Celebration,” at Music Mountain Theatre, 1483 NJ 179, Lambertville. A collaboration between the Roxey Ballet and the Lambertville Historical Society; music and dance. Roxeyballet.org. Saturday, December 25 1 p.m.: The 59th annual r e e n ac t m e nt of G e or g e Washington’s annual Christmas Day crossing of the Delaware River, at Washington Crossing Park, routes 532 and 32 in Washington Crossing, Pa. Free. WashingtonCrossingPark.org.

well loved and well read since 1946


I

t has been called “the best kept secret in town.” The Morven Museum Shop at 55 Stockton Street, next to Morven Museum & Garden, is filled with a selection of delightful items in a wide price range. With the holidays fast approaching, it is the perfect place to find a special gift. The selection is indeed a treasure trove of surprises for friends and family, and all in a variety of styles and signature specialties.

IT’S NEW To Us

The shop itself is a fascinating piece of history. Dating to 1844, the building was formerly Morven’s Wash House. “The concept of the shop is to carry on Morven’s mission and to promote New Jersey culture and history and the Morven Garden,” explains Hospitality Manager and Buyer Kathy O’Hara, who has been with the shop since it opened in 2005. Signature Items Many items in the shop have a relationship to Morven, the historic former home of Richard Stockton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and later home to five New Jersey governors from 1946 to 1981. The house is now a museum, and features permanent and rotating exhibits exploring the history and culture of New Jersey. “Some of our gifts are historically oriented, and others can serve as a guide to the museum’s changing exhibitions,” says O’Hara. “We also develop our own Morven signature items, including scarves, stationery, notecards, and books.” After having been closed for several months during the COVID-19 pandemic, the shop is now fully open. State regulations and safety precautions are in effect, and masks are currently worn in the shop. “D ur ing t he height of COVID, we also had a lot of events outdoors,” adds Debra L amper t-Rudman, Morven’s curator of education and public programs. Outdoor events will continue w ith Mor ven’s up coming “Festival of Trees” fundraiser, “Winter Garden Party,” to be held December 2 at 6 p.m. The outdoor party will feature fire pits, lights, hot drinks, and refreshments, she points out. “Morven’s 16th ‘Festival of Trees’ is an annual highlight of the holiday season, and showcases a collection of trees and mantels displayed throughout the museum and galleries,” says Lampert-Rudman. “Thousands of holiday ornaments

and decorations can be seen throughout the museum and outdoors.” Numerous trees decorated by various organizations and garden clubs are now on display through January 9. Also, adds Lampert-Rudman, “December programming around this year’s ‘Festival of Trees’ includes holiday wreath workshops, virtual story times, and an at-home baking contest.” Hostess Gifts Baking kits will be available at the Museum Shop, notes O’Hara, as well as embroidery and craft kits. Customers will find an array of items suitable for many occasions, including a large selection of hostess gifts. Picture frames, pottery, trays, vases, umbrellas, clocks, candles, and candlesticks are char m ingly displayed, along with scarves, accent pillows for every season, and beautifully-packaged soaps. In addit ion, t here are playing cards, note cards, and greeting cards, as well as bird houses and books. Many of the books focus on New Jersey and American history, and a number of gifts are Morven-related, including a Morven jigsaw puzzle and magnets. Among the holiday items are two signature Morven Christmas ornaments: one, a silver image of Morven, and the second, an image of Morven on an enamel ornament. Both are boxed. There is also a duck decoy ornament, relating to Morven’s current “In Nature’s Realm” exhibit. A selection of holiday gifts is expected soon, adds O’Hara, and will include assorted Christmas pillows, ornaments, candles, and various decorative items. The festive holiday atmosphere is enhanced by a Christmas tree, decorated with various seasonal ornaments. The shop’s jewelry selection is a continuing highlight and always one of the most popular exhibits for customers. From delicate to dramatic, the array of bracelets, necklaces, earrings, and pins is an intriguing addition to the shop’s overall display. Leaf Designs “We have a full range of jewelry, and a lot is nature-inspired,” points out O’Hara. “Our jewelry selection is always a big drawing point for customers — as a gift for others or something for themselves.” There are many pieces with leaf designs, and one especially attractive and versatile pin can be worn both as a stunning pin or as a striking pendant on a chain. Children’s items are always fun during the holidays, and a variety of toys; books; piggy banks in assorted colors; and a charming tea set, with

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teacups, creamer, and sugar, are all displayed. Gifts for men are also available, including a selection of handsome clocks, and an intriguing gold magnifying glass, with feathershaped handle, among other items. Indeed, gifts for ever y taste and lifestyle are all offered — really something for everyone on your list, including yourself! Your favorite tea drinker will enjoy the “Teacup and Teapot For One” in assorted designs. Other ideas include a handsome hammered pewter tray with leaf accent design, botanical prints, coasters, placemats, and a lovely vase in the always popular blue and white design. Crannies and Cubbies The appealing arrangement and array of the gifts is one of the pleasures of visiting the shop. Items are conveniently displayed, with intriguing nooks, crannies, and cubbies revealing still more hard-to-resist treasures. “With each season, we try to have a different look in the shop, with different items,” points out O’Hara. “This is a pleasure for me. I enjoy buying for the store — who doesn’t like to shop? — and I have gotten to know what the clients like.” “ T h e y r e a l l y s e e m to like everything across the board,” she adds. “Sometimes a group will come in together, and one person sees something she or he likes, and then everyone

A Princeton tradition!

wants it. The power of suggestion! We have many regular customers too, who like to come in and see what’s new. “I enjoy helping them with the wonderful variety of items we have, and we also have a great staff here, who all contribute to make this such a special place.” Biggest Day “Also, in some ways, especially during COVID, we have reinvented ourselves,” says O’Hara. “We have added virtual programs, and outdoor events. We plan more events in January. “In addition, this past September, we had ‘Smithsonian Museum Day’ in connection with the Morven exhibit. It was the biggest day for the shop, with more than 200 visitors!” Many people who visit the Morven Museum exhibits then come into the shop, she reports. Those who are members of the Museum have a regular 10 percent discount at the shop, and on Sunday, November 28 through December 5, there will be a 10 percent discount for all visitors (including non-members) and 15 percent for members. Keeping prices within an affordable range, while offering quality products, is very important for O’Hara.

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021

Gifts In All Styles and For All Occasions Are on Display at The Morven Museum Shop

A TRUE TREASURE: “Customers are enjoying coming in again. They really like to see things firsthand. We also have online shopping, but many of our customers have fun coming into the shop and enjoying the in-store atmosphere.” Debra LampertRudman (left), curator of education and public programs at Morven Museum, and Kathy O’Hara, hospitality manager and buyer for The Morven Museum Shop, are enthusiastic about the shop’s treasure trove of gifts. They are shown at Morven’s annual “Festival of Trees” holiday event.

T

There really is something he Mor ven Museum for every pocketbook, with Shop is open Wednesitems starting at $5, many day through Sunday, within the $20-$25 range, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ( 609 ) on up to $75-plus. All the 924-8144, ext. 103. Webproceeds go to support Mor- site: morven.org. ven’s programs and events. —Jean Stratton

Gather Together and Give Thanks

Est. 1967


Tiger Football Thumps Penn to Earn Share of Ivy Title, Savoring Roller-Coaster Journey with Raucous Celebration

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s evening descended on Philadelphia last Saturday, the Princeton University football team held an impromptu party in one corner of venerable Franklin Field. After thumping Penn 3414 to earn a share of the Ivy League title, Princeton players, coaches, family and friends mobbed each other on the turf with the revelry including bear hugs, countless cell phone photos, cigar smoke wafting into the air, and dumping buckets of water on Tiger head coach Bob Surace. The Tigers ended up 9-1 overall and 6-1 Ivy to tie Dartmouth (9-1 overall, 6-1 Ivy) for the crown after having last season canceled by the league due to ongoing COVID-19 concerns. It marked the fourth league title in eight seasons for the program, which came into the game ranked 20th nationally in the AFCA Coaches Poll. Princeton senior quarterback and co-captain Cole Smith, who passed for 214 yards and rushed for 69 and a touchdown in the win over the Quakers, savored the moment of triumph as the celebration went on around him. “This means the absolute world; we came out with a goal, we wanted to win the Ivy League and we have done it,” said Smith. “I do not have enough words to describe coach Surace, the entire coaching staff, the team around the team, every single player, the guys that took the year off all the way to the freshmen. This is a special, special group. I am beyond honored to be part of it.” Senior linebacker Jeremiah Tyler echoed those sentiments as he reflected on the team’s long and winding road to the title. “It is crazy, that is the reason why we took this whole year off,” said co-captain Tyler, who was one of 17 “super seniors” who didn’t

enroll in school last year so they could have one more Princeton campaign. “I am glad to see that our hard work came to fruition. All of the time, all of the sweat and the blood and tears that we shared has finally paid off and there is no better feeling than right now.” A drenched but grinning coach Surace noted that the championship was the end result of a process that began a day after Princeton ended its 2019 season by beating Penn 28-7. “It was awesome, they worked really hard, you think about the journey, the date November 24, 2019 is when we started this,” said Surace, holding a cigar. “You had some coaches added and some players there were in high school but the majority of players in that room that date were there when this started. It has been such a journey through the good, keeping the faith when we didn’t know what was going to happen. It is a testament to their character and resilience.” In the victory over Penn, the Tigers showed that character, overcoming a 7-3 second quarter deficit to reel off 28 unanswered points in building a 31-7 lead and breaking the game open. “It started with the defense, the turnovers and the pick 6 there,” said Smith of the second quarter outburst which included a five-yard touchdown run by backup quarterback Blake Stenstrom, a 34-yard interception return by Matt Winston for a TD, an 18-yard Philly Special pass from receiver Dylan Classi to running back John Volker, and a one-yard TD plunge by Smith. “They put us in great field position and that kickstarted us. We just kept on going, foot on the gas, foot on the gas.” Tyler, who helped spearhead that defensive effort with five tackles, created the unit with sticking to its

defining

game plan. “We just had to put it on them because they are a good team,” said Tyler, known affectionately as “JT” throughout the program. “We just had to stay disciplined and continue to strive forward and worry about how we were playing, that is all you can do. You can’t worry about how they are going to do it. You have to execute what you are going to do and that is what we did.” Surace never doubted that the Tigers would come through despite falling behind in the first quarter. “It was still early in the game, I looked over and JT was all smiles,” said Surace. “They knew there was a lot of game left, we just had to tighten some things down.” Like Smith, Surace credited the defense with turning the tide against the Quakers. “Sam [Wright II] had three or four sacks, he had a great year; Matt Winston was on the pick 6,” said Surace. “I just thought we played with great energy on defense all year and, for the most part, very good discipline. Offensively, it was a little more of a grind at times, we have got to improve our run game. We threw it incredibly well. In situations like the second half where we are going to be more run-oriented, we weren’t as good.” The Tigers persevered through a number of tough situations this fall in producing an unforgettable campaign. “You think about the Monmouth game (a 31-28 win on October 9 which saw Princeton overcome a 21-6 third quarter deficit), it seems like it was eons ago it is a really good team, we just kept fighting.” said Surace. “It just felt that way, even the Columbia game (a 24-7 win on October 2 in game that saw the Tigers clinging to a 10-7 lead entering the fourth quarter), to put it away in the second half.

Design

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TITLE RUN: Princeton University quarterback Cole Smith runs past a Yale defender. Last Saturday, senior star and co-captain Smith passed for 214 yards and ran for 69 yards to help Princeton defeat Penn 34-14 and clinch a share of the Ivy League title. The Tigers wentSELECTIONS 9-1 overall and 6-1 Ivy to tieOF DISTINCTIVE Dartmouth (9-1 overall, 6-1 Ivy) for the crown. It marked the fourth league title in eight seasons for the program. by Frank Wojciechowski) WOODS, FINISHES(Photo AND STYLE

They are very together. A “There was more at stake, living the dream and then couple of coaches, people 17 guys took the year off.CUSTOM everybody going to work,” INSPIRING DESIGNS that were at the game at I thought about how I live said Tyler. Yale, and they were saying my life. I don’t need to wear “I just admire the grind I have never seen a team so a mask inside 7-Eleven, but that we all have and how MANAGEMENT together.” there isPROJECT no way you can get everybody was selfless, that COVID. If it meant decreasThe Tigers were thrilled to was a big TO thing on this team. FROM CONCEPT COMPLET be back together this season ing my chance by half a per- Nobody got the big head and didn’t want to miss a was above the team. EveryafterDISTINCTIVE the disappointment of cent, I OF DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF SELECTIONS having the 2020 campaign moment with them. We all body was for the team and WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES took that mindset.” canceled. that is what I enjoy.” In Tyler’s view, from the “There is a gratefulness DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF After achieving the dream INSPIRING DESIGNS DESIGNS moment CUSTOM Princeton arrived at of the Ivy title last Saturday, that INSPIRING we are back;CUSTOM you take AND STYLESit is no wonder that the Tipreseason camp it displayed away somethingWOODS, that some- FINISHES MANAGEMENT mindset. bodyPROJECT loves and MANAGEMENT they getPROJECT a a winning gers enjoyed that triumph FROM CONCEPT TOhere COMPLETION FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION chance to do it INSPIRING again, that “It was getting for with such gusto. CUSTOM DESIGNS DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF like DISTINCTIVE OF finally is pretty cool,” said Surace.SELECTIONS our first practice, —Bill Alden WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES PROJECT MANAGEMENT

DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF INSPIRING CUSTOM DESIGNS FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES INSPIRING CUSTOM DESIGNS WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES

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back with a goal from Jen Estes assisted by Gabi Juarez and Caroline Noonan. “We concede the gametying goal and two minutes later, we take the lead again, and then you’re fighting again for it,” said Driscoll. “The game could have switched at that moment when it was tied, 1-1, and it didn’t. We took the lead again and that’s when I thought we were going to figure it out and find a way to get it across the line.” Bright’s second goal of the game was a heartbreaker. There were less than two minutes left in regulation when TCU tied it and sent the game into overtime. “You know normally when that happens and you concede, the odds are typically in favor of the team that scored last because momentum swings in their favor,” said Driscoll. “You could visibly see the wind go out of our sails a little bit, but the one thing about this team and we got back together before overtime started, and you could hear the spirit of the group, you could hear that we weren’t done and they gave what they have.” The Tigers gave everything that they had. Princeton was not at full strength after tricaptain and center midfielder Emma Davis began to cramp 80 minutes into the game. Exemplifying the squad’s resolve, she went back into the game twice, but could not continue. “What more could you ask for than that?” asked Driscoll. “She’s literally the embodiment of giving absolutely everything you have. It was depicted by her in that moment when she came off the field. I gave her the biggest hug and said, thank you and I’m so proud of you.” The Tigers were down one of their top players and did not have the momentum after the late goal, but they still had a chance to advance if they could get one goal in overtime. “One of the things I’ve learned about Princeton student-athletes in general, and this particular team, is you should never count them out because they have a resolve in

them,” said Driscoll. “These kids are always testing, whether it’s on the field or in the classroom or on the basketball court or on the tennis courts or in the pool. You name it, kids are always tested at such a significant level that their resolve is massive. And so it’s amazing to watch what they do when their backs are against the wall.” Princeton and TCU played a scoreless 15 minutes of the first overtime. Bright scored in what was the 106th minute of play to end the Tigers’ run. TCU went on to lose to Rutgers in the Sweet 16 on Sunday in a penalty shootout. “I couldn’t ask more from my players,” said Driscoll. “They fought valiantly. We had a couple of moments where we made some mistakes and we still found ways to get out of those challenges. And then we created some opportunities where we could potentially get another goal and it just didn’t come. We also thwarted a number of their chances.” The season ended the Princeton careers of nine seniors. They played an integral part in leading the Tigers to one of their best seasons in program history. “The best senior classes in my opinion have one thing in common — that’s selflessness,” said Driscoll. “Teams are molded based on senior classes. I don’t care what any coach says, I firmly believe when you’re tough at the top of your pyramid, they are your captains, they are your seniors, and if your seniors do not buy in and embrace and respect the role that they’re given, you have an issue.” They had the added task of leading a Tigers team that had the difficulty of trying to return from a year in which they did not play or practice together due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the Ivy League canceling last year’s season. “What these kids did was remarkable; every kid that put on an Ivy League uniform across the league,” said Driscoll. “What they did speaks volumes of all those student-athletes who had something taken away from them last fall.

NEAR MISS: Princeton University women’s soccer player Aria Nagai dribbles the ball upfield in a 2-0 win over Vermont in the first round of the NCAA tournament on November 12. Last Friday, sophomore midfielder Nagai picked up an assist in a losing cause as Princeton fell 3-2 to TCU in overtime in the second round of the NCAA tourney. The defeat left the Tigers with a final record of 15-3-1. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Rutgers University played host to two major landmark moments in the Princeton University women’s soccer season in 2021. Both visits showed just how good the Tigers were this year. Back on September 5 in just the fifth game of the season, the Tigers rallied for a 4-3 overtime win over a Rutgers team then ranked ninth in the country. On the heels of a 1-1 tie with then-No. 8 ranked Georgetown, it set expectations high for the remainder of the year. Princeton did not disappoint over the course of a memorable season that ended at 153-1 overall after a 3-2 double overtime loss to fourth-seeded Texas Christian University (TCU) on Friday at Rutgers. The Tigers were less than two minutes away from extending a season that had included a second-place finish in the Ivy League, a home NCAA tournament game that they won, and the third-most wins in a season in program history on the heels of a full year away from competition. “I absolutely adore the group, I love the group,” said Princeton head coach Sean Driscoll. “That’s what makes losing so difficult because I wanted to keep the season going. As I said to them Thursday in training, I want to keep it going because I don’t like the idea of not having a tomorrow with you guys, that’s all it comes down to.” Princeton came out strong against TCU, which won their first-round game, 8-0, in a show of power against Prairie View A&M. The Tigers built a 7-4 shot advantage in the first half, and led 1-0 at halftime on a goal in the 36th minute by Lily Bryant after a takeaway and assist from Aria Nagai. “It was almost a picture-perfect first half,” said Driscoll. “We outshot them 7-4 and forced their keeper to make three good saves in the first half. I thought the kids did a good job of understanding the game plan and how to go about it and executing it. I was really happy with that.” Princeton kept TCU in front of them, and worked tirelessly in the midfield. The resulting Horned Frog turnovers gave the Tigers more opportunities to attack, and they had the better of the scoring chances overall in the first 45 minutes. “I felt we did a really good job of negating some of their strengths,” said Driscoll. “And one of their strengths is penetrating passes in the midfield. They create all sorts of challenges with their movement of their front three as well as their middle three is really good. The other thing they really do well is they set play and use their two center backs to quarterback their team and set their offense.” Using a smaller rotation to stick with TCU’s athleticism, the Tigers began to fatigue over the second half. Princeton held TCU’s attack at bay until there were just 20 minutes left in regulation. The first of three goals by Horned Frog star Messiah Bright broke a scoreless stretch by the Tigers defense that had spanned their previous six games, including their 2-0 win over Vermont in their NCAA opener. Princeton came right

A lot of Power 5s played last fall and last spring. Everyone played last spring except for the Ivies. Everyone got a head start on what their team would look like in the fall. We went based on a really good group of skillful student-athletes, passionate student-athletes. Make no mistake, we had to start very far behind everyone else. To make up the ground that they did, to play with the energy that they did, to show the resolve that they did, it was truly remarkable.” The Tigers started to feel better as they got back together in August. There was a feeling of gratitude and excitement to resume playing. “You could feel it in preseason there was such a joy of being around each other,” said Driscoll. “There was no hierarchy in place. It was all of us together, back together for the first time in effectively almost two years.” P r i n c e t o n’s p o t e n t i a l emerged through the season. They were unbeaten against Top 10 teams until the TCU game. They returned from the year off with a resolve and worked to earn an NCAA home game and fi nish with 15 wins. “I do think we lost some things in that year, but we also gained some things like a true, unabated hunger to represent our University,” said Driscoll. “That would not have happened without the time away because of COVID. The silver lining was you take a bunch of passionate, driven, talented female soccer players, and you take away something they love for almost two years, and then you give them an opportunity to go do it again, watch out. And that’s what we saw.” — Justin Feil

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021

PU Women’s Soccer Falls in OT to TCU in NCAAs But Defeat Can’t Diminish Memorable Campaign

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Junior Guard Langborg Providing a Spark off the Bench As PU Men’s Hoops Now 4-1 After Edging Oregon State

Ryan Langborg came off the bench in the early going for the Princeton University men’s basketball team as it hosted Marist last Wednesday and didn’t waste any time making an impact. Entering the contest with 15:56 left in the first half, junior guard Langborg drained a three-pointer 58 seconds later. That bucket was a harbinger of things to come as Langborg ended up tallying a career-high 14 points to help Princeton pull away to an 80-61 victory. “We had a good game plan, we were trying to get the ball inside,” said Langborg. “If we get the ball inside to Keeshawn [Kellman], Mason [Hooks] and Tosan [Evbuomwan] and they make something happen and they crash on those guys, we move and we knew we would be open and get good shots. We like getting the ball inside and getting it back out and swinging it around for a good three. They fell tonight so I just kept taking them.” In reflecting on his performance, Langborg credited defense with leading to offense. “Once we kind of got comfortable as a group defensively, getting into our gaps and that sort of thing,” said Langborg. “We started to mesh together a lot better and it kind of came across. When our points per possession got low and we started playing good team defense, that is when we went on our run.” After making 20 appearances as a freshman in 2019-20 and averaging 4.4 points a game, Langborg is feeling a greater comfort level on the court this season. “I think I have gotten a lot more confident since freshman year,” said Langborg, who scored eight points off the bench last Sunday as Princeton edged Oregon State 81-80 in improving to 4-1. “Taking a year off, I got to get a lot of work in on my own. I missed being with the guys. Now having to be a leader on the team as a junior, I have to be that guy that people can look to as an example and make sure that I hold that role and make shots.” With the Ivy League canceling the 2020-21 season due to ongoing COVID-19 concerns, Langborg used the time away to focus on b e com i ng a m ore wel l rounded player. “I really hit the weight room, I wanted to put some weight on,” said Langborg, who is contributing 10.8 points and 3.2 rebounds a game. “I put 15 pounds of muscle on, just got a lot of shots up and worked on my handle. Jaelin [ Llewelly n ] might need some help sometimes or Ethan [Wright] or whoever so it is being a secondary ball handler, doing that sort of thing and making sure that I am in the right shape for the season this year.” P r i nce ton h e ad coach Mitch Henderson liked the way his team muscled up on defense against Marist. “It really showed up in Asheville Friday night

against South Carolina (a 66 - 62 win on November 12), instantly it didn’t feel like to me a team that had taken a year off,” said Henderson. “It was just playing really hard and competing. This team has that and I am going to try and tap into it as much as possible. I was really pleased tonight, that is a really good one-on-one team. The Tigers are getting some really good play from Langborg. “If you watched us the last few games, he is in the game all of the time,” said Henderson. “We have had a lot of really good shooters in the program but his shot is just absolutely beautiful. He is such a smart player. Tosan and Ryan are two of our best passers, they see so much. He is such a good player. I asked him to really work on his defense since he got back and he has made it a huge priority. He made really tough plays all weekend and then again today. He is playing great. It looks like he is having fun and it is fun to watch.” It has been fun for Henderson to see junior forward Keeshawn Kellman’s development. “I have never coached anyone like him, his physicality is next level; he is a physical specimen and an unbelievably hard worker,” said Henderson, who got 11 points and four rebounds against Marist from the 6’9,

235-pound Kellman. “He has just been away and out for so long. We really want him to get back to that and get him that confidence. We developed a little bit without him, we have to get used to having him back inside. Mason has been terrific too, giving us some real key minutes inside.” With Princeton playing at Monmouth on November 24 before hosting Fairleigh Dickinson on November 28, Henderson likes the insideout game this team has been displaying in its encouraging start. “I think we are a very good shooting team, now we have those three guys inside,” said Henderson, referring to Evboumwan in addition to Kellman and Hooks “We have a lot of different things we can do but the guys seem to be fine with it. Everyone wants to play but they really seem to understand how to get things done.” Langborg believes that team chemistry has helped produce that versatility. “Coach talks about togetherness all of the time, I think we have a really good group,” said Langborg. “We are very adaptable. Once we see something, I think we are able to change our mindset and are able to guard a lot of different teams. Going into league, it will only help us in being able to adapt to those teams.” — Bill Alden

RESERVE STRENGTH: Princeton University men’s basketball player Ryan Langborg guards a foe in game earlier this season. Last Wednesday night, junior guard Langborg scored a careerhigh 14 points off the bench to help Princeton defeat Marist 8061. On Sunday, he chipped in eight points as the Tigers edged Oregon State 81-80 in improving to 4-1. In upcoming action, Princeton plays at Monmouth on November 24 before hosting Fairleigh Dickinson on November 28. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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The energy and spirit was great.” Barlow credited his seniors with triggering that energy and spirit. “A lot of those guys took a year off to try and prepare for this,” said Barlow, whose senior group included Jack Roberts, Sam Morton, Kazu Shigenobu, Moulay Hamza Kanzi Belghiti, Kevin O’Toole, Frankie DeRosa, Alex Charles, Michael Osei Wusu, Rowan Pierson, and Truman Gelnovatch. “It meant so much to them and they drove the mentality of the group, they drove the culture, they pushed the team along. In times we hit rough patches, they were still believing that we could get it done. They were still trying to set the tone. Those guys are going to leave a legacy for the younger guys for a lot of their traits.” Senior midfielder/forward O’Toole is leaving a special legacy, tallying seven goals and nine assists this fall as he was named the Ivy Offensive Player of the Year for the second time in his career. “He just wants to go out and do his job ; there is such an awesome joy that he plays with,” said Barlow of O’Toole. “You could tell when he is out there, how much fun he is having. To go through the first half of the year not scoring a goal and then to emerge as one of the best at tacking players in the country in the second half was a testament to his ability to stay focused, not get discouraged and keep pushing it. In the biggest games of the year, he was at his best.” With a group of returners that includes such All-Ivy performers as Lucas Gen, Daniel Diaz-Bonilla, Malik Pinto, Issa Mudashiru, and Walker Gillespie, Barlow believes that Princeton can build on its 2021 championship campaign. “Everything is different

I

on one and we didn’t,” said Barlow. “We knew that it was going to come down to a couple of plays in front of both goals. To their credit, their guy [Brandon] Knapp did a really good job on a ball that deflected to him, just turning and shooting right at the top of the box and hit it low in the corner. It was a really good finishing. I certainly think we had opportunities to finish that were probably better looks than that one but just didn’t find a way to finish it off.” While the loss to the Red Storm was disappointing, Barlow was proud of what his team accomplished this year in returning to action after the 2020 season was canceled by the Ivy League due to ongoing COVID-19 concerns. “After getting off to a 4-5 start, no one would have predicted that we could have gone unscathed and unblemished through the league,” said Barlow. “It was a great tribute to the leaders on the team and every guy on the team to be able to do that. It is a really, really hard league to win, there are a lot of good teams. The breaks went our way this year and we capitalized on it. The guys showed the strength, the will and the motivation to continue pushing for every one of those games we considered to be a championship game.” The squad showed some swagger as it went on its run to the Ivy title. “I would say this group was very confident; the energy, excitement, and confidence that they projected going into every Ivy League game was special,” said Barlow. “The energy on the bench in those games was special. The guys just believed that they were going to get it done. They were ultra-competitive and determined.

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In late September, the Princeton University men’s soccer team lost a hardfought 1- 0 bat tle to St. John’s. Last Thursday, Princeton got a rematch at St. John’s in the first round of the NCAA tournament and the Tigers were primed to turn the tables on the Red Storm. “The last couple of games were really hard to grind out results; we had stretches during those games where I thought we played well but I think the guys were so determined to win the league and get through the league unbeaten,” said Princeton head coach Jim Barlow, whose team came into the NCAA game at 12-5 overall and 7-0 Ivy and riding an 8-game winning streak. “At times it was more about competing than it was about putting the best soccer out there. At times we were able to do both. We had stretches down the stretch where I thought we were really connected, defending as group, moving the ball well and creating chances. I think there was a lot of confidence going into the tournament.” Barlow knew it wouldn’t be easy to overcome St. John’s. “They are just so hard to score on, they concede so few goals,” said Barlow. “They are big, they are athletic. It is a tough matchup. We didn’t create many chances in the first game against them and I don’t think they did either. It was a pretty competitive game with neither team able to generate many chances.” The NCAA contest turned out to be competitive but with same result as the Red Storm won 1-0, finding the back of the net at the 43rd minute and holding off the Tigers from there. “I think this game both teams created a little more real chances than in the first game, they capitalized

and you hope for the young guys that they don’t think we went 7-0 and we can expect this every year,” said Barlow. “It is a special year and it takes a lot of things going your way to win the league. It was a fun run for sure. It was great to see the guys get a championship after such a long layoff.” —Bill Alden

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Robert E. ̃A Life ̃ Thursday December 2, 2021 4:30 p.m. OH BOY: Princeton University men’s soccer player Kevin O’Toole dribbles past a foe in recent action. Senior star O’Toole, who was named the Ivy League Offensive Player of the Year this season as he helped Princeton go 7-0 in league play, saw his brilliant career come to an end as the Tigers fell 1-0 at St. John’s in the first round of the NCAA tournament last Thursday. Princeton ended the fall with an overall record of 12-6. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021

PU Men’s Soccer Falls to St. John’s in NCAA Opener, But Perfect Ivy Campaign Made for Unforgettable Fall


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021 • 36

With Senior Evans Looking to Go Out a Winner, PU Men’s Hockey Learns Lessons in Tough Weekend

Although their 2020-21 season was canceled by the Ivy League due to COVID-19 concerns, Finn Evans and his teammates on the Princeton University men’s hockey team still made progress. “We were just skating at local rinks around New Jersey and working out,” said senior forward Evans, who was enrolled in school and living in the Princeton area with some of his teammates last school year. “We were brought back in the spring and we were able to skate and work out. That was good, the freshmen were here. It brought us closer together as a group. I think it shows this year. We are all really tight, everyone is contributing.” That group effort had been reflected in scoring balance across the team’s lines. “It is nice this year, in previous years it has been a top-heavy contribution,” said Evans. “The great thing about our lineup this year is that you look throughout the lineup and it is evenly spread right through. I think the theme of our team is that it doesn’t matter who scores. It is all just working hard and playing the game.” Last Friday against visiting St. L aw rence, Evans contributed an assist and a goal as Princeton overcame an early 2-0 deficit to build a 4-2 lead over the Saints with 14:38 left in the second period. Evans set up the first goal, feeding Nick Seitz who banged home the pass. “It was just a great play by my linemate, Nick Seitz,” said Evans. “I have been playing with [Adam] Robbins and Seitz pretty much for most of the year now. I think we are starting to get that chemistry. Seitz has really improved his game, he is a horse out there. I just chipped it down in the corner and he did the rest himself and took it to the net. I can’t take much credit for that one.” On his goal, the fourth of the evening for the Tigers, Evans cashed in a good feed from the blue line. “I just saw the defense dip a little bit, one of freshman defensemen, Noah de la Durantaye, made a great pass up behind me and I just saw the open ice,” said Evans, a 6’4, 206-pound native of Toronto, Ontario.

“I went five hole. I had my teammate to the left and he was letting me know we had a 2-on-0 but I was taking it the whole way.” The play of the Tigers, though, dipped from there as St. Lawrence tallied four unanswered goals to pull out a 6-4 win. “It was an unfor tunate ending tonight, I think we have a lot more to give and we should be a lot better at the end of the game,” said Evans. But I think it is better to get this stuff out of the way early, five, six games in. From a game like this you have got to learn to win in college hockey, it doesn’t matter who you are playing. Every single night is going to be an absolute battle right down to the end.” Despite the setback, Evans believes the Tigers are heading in the right direction. “My first two years we were learning that the hard way, it seemed like we were up every game going into the third and we let it slip away,” said Evans. “At least through the first couple of games this year, we kind of hammered that away and we have been pretty good. It slipped on us tonight. You just have to take it in stride, there is nothing we can do about it now. I believe in every single guy in that room and I hope they feel the same about me.” While Evans is ready to impart advice to the team’s younger players, he wants everyone to speak up when necessary. “If any of the younger guys ask me, I will help them out as much as I can but I want them to yell at me if I make mistakes,” said Evans. “I want that confidence in all of our guys. It is not just going to be the seniors winning a championship this year, it is the whole group.” Princeton head coach Ron Fogarty likes the confidence Evans is displaying this season. “Finn is playing well, he is doing what we need from a senior forward,” said Fogarty of Evans, who tallied two goals and an assist a day later as Princeton fell 8-3 to Clarkson to move to 3-3-1 overall and 2-2 ECAC Hockey. “He plays a big game, he has got great reach. He was good tonight.” Fogarty, however, didn’t like the way the night ended

for the Tigers. “We lost the game, we had control of it,” said Fogarty. “That one hurts a lot. You go up by two goals, you have to keep playing hard and going after it.” Spending too much time in the penalty box helped lead to the loss for the Tigers. “With four power plays against and the penalty killing, you are using Finn a lot, you are using Christian [O’Neill] a lot and [Liam] Gorman in that group,” said Fogarty. “They start to get tired because they are exerting heavy minutes. We roll four lines and once you have those power plays against, it is taking away from the momentum when you roll the lines every 30-35 seconds. Staying out of the box is the biggest takeaway I have from tonight.” Looking forward, Fogarty wants his team to focus on playing its game. “We have just got to be boring with monotonous, good hockey and not try to create stuff that isn’t there and just take what is given,” said Fogarty, whose team hosts a two-game set against RIT on November 26 and 27. “At the end there we tried to force stuff and there were two plays that came back and bit us. We will get better but that is a tough one right there, for sure. Our season is like this game, a little dip, then playing well, then a dip. There are a lot of good things that can come out of it, unfortunately we didn’t get the win. We could have shored up a lot of things and we will learn from it for sure.” Evans is confident that good things are on the horizon for the Tigers this winter. “Every guy has come to the rink everyday looking to make the team a better team, it is not about who is on what line, it is just a group effort,” said Evans “In my first t wo years here, we weren’t winning teams. All we want as seniors is to be on a winning team. At the end of the day, whoever is going to score, it just comes down to winning games. That is all we want to do this year. It is a lot more fun in the locker room when we are winning than when we are losing.” —Bill Alden

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ON BOARD: Princeton University men’s hockey player Finn Evans (No. 16) battles a St. Lawrence player for the puck along the boards last Friday at Hobey Baker Rink. Senior forward Evans tallied a goal and an assist in a losing cause as Princeton fell 6-4 to the Saints. The Tigers, who lost 8-3 to Clarkson last Saturday to move to 3-3-1 overall and 2-2 ECAC Hockey, host a two-game set against RIT on November 26 and 27. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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PU Sports Roundup Women’s Lax Coach Sailer To Retire after 2022 Season

leadership her senior year. Follow ing graduation and a three-year stint as a teacher and coach at Choate Rosemary Hall School, Sailer spent one season each as an assistant at Massachusetts (1985) and Penn (1986) before taking over at Princeton. The Princeton Athletics Department will do a full, national search in the spring of 2022 to identify the best person to lead Tiger women’s lax moving forward.

Tiger Women’s Hoops Falls to Rhode Island

Abby Meyers starred in a losing cause as the Princeton Universit y women’s basketball team fell 61-53 at Rhode Island last Saturday. Senior Meyers scored a career-high 22 points but it wasn’t enough as the Rams snapped Princeton’s 25-game winning streak in games stretching back to 2019-20, which had been the longest streak in the NCAA. The Tigers will look to get PU Women’s Hockey back on the winning track Falls at Cornell Unable to get its offense when they host Maine on going, the Princeton Univer- November 28. sity women’s hockey team fell Princeton Wrestling 2-0 at Cornell last Saturday. Falls at Iowa The Tigers, now 5 -2-1 Jack DelGarbino providoverall and 5 -2-1 ECAC ed a highlight as the 21st Hockey, host non-confer- ranked Princeton University ence foe Northeastern for a wrestling team fell 32-12 at two-game set on November No. 1 Iowa last Friday in its 26 and 27. first dual match of the 2021Tiger Men’s Cross Country 22 campaign. Sophomore DelGarbino Takes 23rd at NCAA Meet Ed Trippas set the pace pinned Tony Cassioppi in his as the Princeton University match at 285 pounds. Other men’s cross country team victors for Princeton against finished 23rd at the NCAA the Hawkeyes included junior Championships last Satur- Quincy Monday at 157 and freshman Luke Stout at 197. day in Tallahassee, Fla. The Tigers are slated to Princeton senior star and Australian Olympic steeple- compete in the Cliff Keen chaser Trippas took 67th Invitational from December individually in a time of 3-4 at Las Vegas, Nev. 29:51.1 over the 10,000-me- Princeton Men’s Squash ter course. Sophomore An- Tops Williams thony Monte was 97th in a With eight of nine wins time of 30:08.0 to round c o m i n g i n t h r e e - g a m e out the Tigers inside the sweeps, the third-ranked top 100. Princeton University men’s Princeton finished with 567 squash team completed a points as a team, one point weekend sweep of matches behind Georgetown and sev- with a 9-0 victory over No. en ahead of Southern Utah. 14 Williams last Sunday in Northern Arizona placed first, Jadwin Gym. earning its fifth NCAA title in A day earlier, Princeton the last six years. started the season by edgPU Cross Country Star Max ing fifth-ranked Virginia 5-4 84th in NCAA Women’s Meet in Jadwin. The Tigers are next in acCapping off a superb debut season for the Princeton tion when they play at RochUniversity women’s cross ester on December 5. country team, Fiona Max PU Women’s Squash finished 84th at the 2021 Defeats Stanford NCA A D iv is ion I Cros s Continuing its hot start, Country Championships last the third-ranked Princeton Saturday in Tallahassee, Fla. University women’s squash Sophomore Max, a native team defeated Stanford 9-0 of Bend, Ore., who didn’t last Monday. compete in 2020 as the Ivy The Tigers, who improved League canceled the season to 4-0 with the win over the due to COVID-19 concerns, Cardinal, return to action crossed the finish line in a when they host The Contime of 20:25.1 over the stable from January 8-9. 6,000-meter course.

Legendary Hall of Fame Princeton University women’s lacrosse head coach Chris Sailer has announced that the 2022 season — her 36th year as head coach at Princeton — will be her final season guiding the program. A three-time NCAA champion, 15-time Ivy League champion, and five-time Ivy League Tournament champion, Sailer’s coaching career at Princeton began in 1987. Two years later, she had the Tigers in the NCAA semifinals for the first time in program history. Four years after that, in 1993, she guided the Tigers to their first-ever national final appearance. In 1994, she took the next step as the Tigers defeated Maryland, 10-7, in College Park to claim the program’s first national championship. She guided the Tigers to backto-back NCAA titles in 2003 and 2004. Her 418 career wins entering this season are No. 6 all-time among women’s lacrosse head coaches across all Div isions and No. 5 among active head coaches. Inside Division I, she is No. 2 among active head coaches in wins (behind Navy head coach Cindy Timchal, who has 535 wins). Among head coaches to spend their entire career at one institution, she ranks No. 2 all-time in w ins behind on ly Missy Foote who won 422 games at Division III Middlebury from 1978-2015. Over the course of her career, Sailer has earned three National Coach of the Year awards, seven Regional Coach of the Year honors, and three Ivy League Coach of the Year selections. In 2008, she received the Diane Geppi-Aikens Memorial Award, presented by the IWLCA for lifetime achievement in cont r ibut ion to women’s lacrosse. In 2008, she was inducted into the U.S. Lacrosse Hall of Fame and in 2018 Chris Sailer Trail was constructed at the U.S. Lacrosse National Hall of Fame. Other Hall of Fame inductions for Sailer include the New Jersey Lacrosse Foundation killman Hall of Fame (2011), Eastern H Pennsylvania Lacrosse Hall H urniture of Fame (2003), Haverford INVENTORY High School Athletics Hall REDUCTION of Fame (1998 ), Harvard ½ OFF Varsity Club Hall of Fame ITEMS (1997), MOST and New England L ac r o s s e H a l lQuality of Fa m e (1996). Used Furniture In her time at Princeton, 212 Alexander St, Princeton Sailer has seen 105 players Mon, Wed-Fri 10:30-4, Sat 10:30-1 earn first-team All-Ivy se609.924.1881 lections and 27 receive Ivy League Player or Rookie of the Year honors. Tigers have THE VLADINATOR: Princeton University men’s water polo player been named All-American Vladan Mitrovic gets ready to unload the ball in a game earby the IWLCA 98 times, lier this season. Last Sunday, freshman star Mitrovic scored five have been chosen as three goals to help 13th-ranked Princeton defeated No. 19 St. Tewaaraton Award finalists Francis-Brooklyn Terriers 9-6 in the final of the Northeast Waand in 2003 Rachel Becker ter Polo Conference (NWPC) Tournament at DeNunzio Pool. The became the first Ivy Leaguer Tigers, now 25-7, will host Fordham (24-6) on November 28 in — male or female — to win the first round of the NCAA tournament. The victor will play the Tewaaraton Award. at UCLA on December 2 in a second opening-round game. The A 1981 graduate of Har- national semifinals and championship game are slated for Devard, Sailer captained both cember 4 and 5 at the Speiker Aquatics Center in Los Angeles, the lacrosse and field hock- Calif. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) ey teams in Cambr idge. She was a two-time firstAvailable for team All-Iv y selection in Lunch & Dinner lacrosse and was a member Mmm..Take-Out of the U.S. National Team. Sailer received the Radcliffe Events • Parties • Catering 41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton Alumni Association Award www.tortugasmv.com (609) 924-5143 for athletic excellence and

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When it was over, Megan Rougas embraced Sophia Lis on the field as they consoled each other. Although the two senior stars for the Princeton High girls’ soccer team were upset in the wake of the squad falling 2-1 in overtime to Wayne Valley in the state Group 3 final last Sunday afternoon at Kean University, that sadness couldn’t take away from what the Tigers accomplished this fall. Utilizing a blend of skill and togetherness, PHS enjoyed a dream season this fall, advancing to the state final for the first time in program history and ending the campaign with a 21-3 record. While her eyes were reddened from tears, Rougas managed a smile in reflecting on how the fall unfolded for the Tigers. “Unexpected is the word I would use,” said standout midfielder and co-captain Rougas. “I have seen so much talent pass through this school, with players like my sister (Lauren), and Sophia’s sisters (Taylor, Devon). I think we were the underdogs this year. We took everything we could. We took giant steps, we did exactly what we needed to do to get to where we needed to be. We made it to the top, somehow, some way. I could not be prouder of these girls.” The Tigers expected a battle from Wayne Valley, the Passaic County champions, who entered the final at 21-3 and riding a 16-game winning streak. “We knew coming in that this was going to be a really tough game,” said Rougas. “They combine, they play the feet, they are really fast, they go end line to end line. Their two top goal scorers are D-1 commits. We know they are a great team. We watched a lot of game film, we prepared and we did everything that we needed to do.” Wayne Valley didn’t waste any time showing that skill, taking a 1-0 lead just 85 seconds in the contest, scoring off a corner kick. Battle-tested PHS, though, was unfazed by the early deficit, tying the contest just over 10 minutes later on a goal by Lis. “We know how it feels; we have played Hopewell, they score first, that’s OK,” said Rougas.

“We know exactly how to come back from that. I think we did a really, really great job.” It was no surprise that the Lehigh-bound Lis netted the tying tally. “She is genuinely my idol, I could not be more proud,” said Rougas of her classmate and close friend who scored 38 goals this fall, the second highest single-season total in CVC history behind the 65 scored by Steinert’s Lisa Gmitter in 1982. “You will see four girls on her and two seconds later, she has the ball going into goal. She is amazing. I am so happy I was able to have a couple of years with her because of injuries and everything.” Over the second half, PHS had to hold the fort as Wayne Valley had a lot of possession and generated a number of scoring opportunities. Tiger goalkeeper Moji Ayodele made some key saves to keep the contest tied, ending up with 12 saves on the day. In the overtime, Wayne Valley finally broke through as Izzy Rathjen knocked in a rebound off the crossbar at the 88th minute. Rougas was proud of how the Tigers battled to the end. “We had a lot of grit and we always keep our heads up no matter what,” said Rougas. “That is something that is so unique about this team.” It didn’t take long for Rougas to sense that there was something special about this PHS team. “It was the first one against Robbinsville, leaving the field having it 5-0,” said Rougas referring to the season-opening win. “It is always a close game with them. We were like this could be it, this could be the year.” PHS head coach Dave Kosa was thrilled with what his squad accomplished this year. “I am extremely proud of the season we had and all of the hard work that we put in,” said Kosa, who was in his first season as the program’s head coach after serving as an assistant the last six years. “This is the state final and for us to get down 1-0 right off the bat maybe we were nervous, whatever it was. We did battle back and we tied it. We had our chances. That is a great team over there. We had the fight for 88 minutes or so, I couldn’t be more

proud of our girls.” Kosa credited his group of seniors with setting the tone for the program’s unprecedented run. “The seniors were phenomenal, they are going to be sorely missed,” said Kosa, whose Class of 2022 included his daughter, Annie Kosa, and Naomi Bazar in addition to Lis, Rougas, and Ayodele. “Their leadership and just bringing everybody together; it has been a special season. For us to lose it like this is heartbreaking but that is soccer. As we look back on it, we are going to be more and more proud of the special season that we had.” Rougas, for her part, will have only smiles as she looks back on the 2021 campaign. “I have never had such close teammates in my life,” said Rougas. “I have been in this program for four years and these girls are basically my sisters. We spend all day, every day together and I could not be more grateful for that opportunity.” —Bill Alden

37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021

PHS Girls’ Soccer Falls Just Short in State Group 3 Final; Battling to the End in 2-1 Overtime Loss to Wayne Valley

PEAKS AND A VALLEY: Princeton High girls’ soccer player Megan Rougas, center, battles for the ball in a game this season. Last Sunday, senior star Rougas and PHS made the program’s first-ever state final appearance and fell just short of the crown as they lost 2-1 in overtime to Wayne Valley. The Tigers finished the fall with a final record of 21-3. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Fueled By Yet Another Clutch Goal from Senior Star Lis, PHS Girls’ Soccer Edged Lacey in OT to Make State Final Sophia Lis appeared exhausted as the Princeton High girls’ soccer team prepared to go into overtime against Lacey Township in the state Group 3 semis last Wednesday. As the PHS players stood in a huddle around Tiger head coach Dave Kosa getting their final instructions before starting the extra session as the foes had played to a scoreless stalemate, a red-faced senior star forward Lis sat on the bench, gulping Gatorade and catching her breath. Having battled a pesky Lacey defense on its pockmarked grass field as she made run after run to goal, Lis had plenty of reason to be spent. “I think the grass has a really bad effect on my legs, I have always found that,” said Lis. “But the playing field is even for everybody. It was hard for me to get over that but this is what we have worked so hard for t he whole season so I might as well give it everything I have got this game and see how it plays out.” Minutes into OT, Lis gave PHS the win, making a run down the flank and dipping the ball over the Lacey goalie. “I won the ball and I just turned and dribbled down the sideline,” said Lis, recalling the winning tally. “I have been finding this whole season, I have been doing a lot of sideline work. So using my speed I just ran to the corner and took a shot to see if maybe a rebound could be found or it could find the back of the net. I was fortunate that this time, it did.” Seconds later, Lis was mobbed by her teammates as they sprinted across the field to hug her. “It was crazy, every game has been so unexpected this season,” said Lis

“It is well deserved. It is a crazy feeling to be in the finals now.” The Lions gave PHS a tough game, utilizing their home field advantage to get the better of play during much of the contest. PHS goalie Moji Ayodele was tested a number of times, making several diving stops in recording nine saves. “Lacey is such a great team; it is always hard going into these games where we don’t know our competition,” said Lis “We didn’t know the teams they play, so it is hard to make a comparison of what you should expect. I am so proud of the effort my team put in to keep it 0-0 and keep going into overtime which we haven’t done a lot this season.” While Lis was frustrated as Lacey thwarted a number of her runs, she was determined to keep firing away. “If I keep trying my best, eventually one of the chances will go in,” said Lis, who nearly scored in the waning seconds as a volley just missed the mark. “I know my teammates are there for me if there is a rebound because that is also something we are big on, getting that rebound. So as long as I put it up in the air only good things can happen. That was my thought process and not let the other misses effect it.” PHS head coach Dave Kosa implored his team to keep trying their best. “Lacey is a solid team, they were first to the ball,” said Kosa. “I just told our girls, keep on hanging in there. They play in the tough Shore conference, I knew it was going to be a battle. All of their games were really close games against top -notch teams in the state. We just kept hanging in there and hanging in there. The soccer gods were a little kind

to us with a couple of posts they hit.” As the game headed into OT, Kosa felt his team was poised to come through. “I thought we were confident,” said Kosa. “Just looking at the girls at halftime, it is we are in a battle. We were feeling a little bit down about ourselves. I tried to pump them up a little bit for the second half and we played better. I think we could have played even better and more aggressive but give credit to them, they controlled the majority of the play. We just hung in there and with somebody like Sophia, you are never out of it.” But in the end, L acey couldn’t control Lis. “She is big time, one of the best I have seen around,” said Kosa of Lis, noting that the Lehigh-bound standout scored the winning goal in the sectional quarterfinals (a 1-0 win over Robbinsville), the sectional semis (a 3-1 win over Colts Neck) the sectional final (a 2-0 win over Hopewell) before her heroics against Lacey. “She left it all out in the field. T hey are marking her, they are holding her. She gets by one, there is another, she gets by a second, there is a third. They had a great center back she anticipated really well. We just kept on plugging along, plugging along and that is what you have to do when you get to this point.” The brilliance of Lis this fall has been the product of an arduous and sometimes painful process. “She wants it, she expects great things,” said Kosa of Lis, who ended up scoring her 38th and final goal of the campaign last Sunday as PHS lost 2-1 to Wayne Valley in the Group 3 final, giving her the second highest single-season total in CVC history behind the 65 scored by Steinert’s Lisa Gmitter in 1982.

SO BRILLIANT: Princeton High girls’ soccer player Sophia Lis heads to goal in state tournament action. Senior star and Lehigh-bound Lis helped fuel an unprecedented postseason run for PHS as it reached the state final for the first time in program history. Lis tallied nine goals in the squad’s postseason run, including the winning goals in the sectional quarterfinal, semis, and final and Group 3 semis. She tallied the one goal for the Tigers in a 2-1 overtime defeat to Wayne Valley in the Group 3 final in Sunday, giving her 38 for the season, the second highest single-season total in CVC history behind the 65 scored by Steinert’s Lisa Gmitter in 1982. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) “She has worked so hard to get to this point. She sat out her sophomore year with an injury the entire year. That was so tough for her. She is just a great team player. She keeps putting us on her back and continues to lead us in pretty much every game. In every big game she rises. It is really a tribute to her because a lot of the teams game plan for her and she still scores. She is going through two, three, four people.” Making it to the state final was a great thing for Kosa and his players. “It is amazing, it hasn’t sunk in yet because we kept on concentrating on each game,” said Kosa. “They were talking the entire season that there was

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more to play. We don’t want this to end so for us to continue, it just means everything for the program. For all of the good teams Princeton had had in the past, we are there.” Lis, for her part, won’t soon forget her final campaign for the Tigers. “It has been so unexpect-

ed, especially as a final hurrah for senior year,” said Lis. “I couldn’t have asked for a better team to do this with. I am really proud and happy with our efforts.” And PHS couldn’t have asked for anything more than they have gotten from Lis this season. — Bill Alden

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captain last year, and he came to the meet to cheer on us. He was talking about it’s not about what you think, it’s about what you do. He said each of us have to do what we have to. That message was really important to me throughout the race.” The PHS girls placed 16th in the meet won by Cherokee High as junior Robin Roth was their top finisher in 73rd in 20:12. Sophomore Kyleigh Tangen ran 20:19 for 80th and junior Lucy Kreipke took 85th in 20:25. Freshman Florica Eleches-Lipsitz was 97th in 20:44 and senior Ryan Vaughey closed out the scoring for the girls in 141st in 22:13. Junior Clare Johnson ran 22:19 for 144th. “The guys and girls team came from very different backgrounds,” said Smirk. “The girls’ team was way more experienced in championship racing, but not nearly as deep. It’s a smaller squad. The guys team was unproven but hungry with a lot of depth. They each found their own unique path to being successful to make it to the Meet of Champions. They really met that challenge of being on the same page with what our goals were and being true to themselves as teams. It was an impressive thing to be involved with as a coach.” The PHS boys had raised their expectations significantly after finishing fifth at sectionals last year. They won the Central Jersey Group 4 sectional meet this year to qualify for the state Group meet opportunity, where they placed fourth and earned one of the eight wild card spots to the MOC. The legwork for that jump was made over the summer. “We all pulled in the same direction at the same time,” said Smirk. “However much the commitment was to the summer training for individuals, it was the trust and belief in each other and the commitment to pushing each other to become better every day that

was the other half of the equation.” Nakaya was hindered in his training after last year’s cross country season. While an 800-meter time trial gave reason for optimism in the winter, Nakaya could not finish out the winter indoor track season or compete last spring after an adverse reaction following his COVID-19 vaccination. He did not return to running until July and then a foot injury set him back until the preseason. His return helped to spark the team. “He became this anchor for us,” said Smirk. “It was like, if Kento is doing it, we can do it. He kind of set that tone for our team. I would argue he’s kind of our emotional core. He believed in our team and the work that we were doing. When he believed, everybody else did too. He’s been that kind of stoic, quiet leader that led by example and got better every week. I think that set the tone for us as a team.” The Tigers gained confidence through the season. They were strong in Colonial Valley Conference meets and performed well at the Shore Coaches Invitational with a third-place finish in the B Division. “Everyone is a lot faster from last year, and as a team we’re getting way better,” said Nakaya. “Workouts that we have, let’s say we do a threshold workout, all those times are faster than last year. And because of that training we’ve been doing, that’s where we gained a lot of confidence as a team. Shore Coaches really boosted our confidence at Holmdel, where we ran Meet of Champs and groups. That meet was good for us to know where we are compared to other teams and know our current positions. That was great.” Coming into the state tournament phase of the season, the PHS boys were anxious to prove that they were better than predicted in the preseason. The Tigers took each New Chef, Christine

GUTTING IT OUT: Princeton High boys’ cross country runner Kento Nakaya heads to the finish line at the Mercer County championship meet in late October. Last Saturday, senior Nakaya helped PHS place sixth at the Meet of Champions at Holmdel Park. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Kento Nakaya’s third and final season on the Princeton High boys’ cross country team has gone better than he could have dreamed. The PHS senior produced arguably the best race of his career at the perfect time as the Tigers placed sixth at the Meet of Champions at Holmdel Park on Saturday in a meet won by Union Catholic. The finish ties the third-best placing in PHS boys’ history. The 2016 team won MOC, and the 2017 team placed fourth, while the 1974 Tiger boys also placed sixth. “As a PHS cross country team, we didn’t qualify for Meet of Champions for three years,” said Nakaya, who was the Little Tigers’ third finisher Saturday. “I’ve never qualified to Meet of Champs in my life. I wasn’t expecting a lot from the meet. I was very surprised to be on the podium getting sixth place, and very happy to be there.” Nakaya is one of two seniors in the PHS boys’ top seven. They will be without their other senior, Addison Motto, when the Tigers compete at the Nike Regionals in Bowdoin Park, N.Y., on November 27 as a springboard to a potential nationals spot next year. Nationals are not being run this season, and it will be the final race for Nakaya, who expects to return to his native Japan for college following graduation. “I really want to thank my teammates for helping make my senior year great,” said Nakaya, who moved from Japan to Princeton in sixth grade. “I obviously had a lot of fun with working out with them and getting sixth at the Meet of Champs.” The PHS girls’ squad also competed at the Meet of Champions. It’s the only time other than 1985 that both Princeton teams reached the Meet of Champions together. In 1985, it was Eva Klohnen in 25th individually who paced the PHS girls to a ninth-place team finish while Nathaniel McVey-Finney who took 41st to lead the Tiger boys to 12th place. “It’s huge,” said PHS head coach Jim Smirk. “When I took over both programs in 2016, we talked about getting to the point where we were all on the same page. We could have elite individuals, we could be elite teams, but we wanted to be on the same page of what it meant to be successful. This was our first real test of that this year, and I thought we did an amazing job of it.” Nakaya was one of four of Princeton’s top five finishers who went faster at Holmdel than they had the week before there in the Group 4 state championships. Junior Andrew Kenny took 23rd place in 16:14 over the 5,000-meter course while junior Marty Brophy was 71st in 16:52 and Nakaya was 75th in 16:56. Motto ran 17:05 for 93rd and junior Zachary Deng clocked 17:12 for 105th place to close out the scoring. Sophomore Max Dunlap was just behind in 17:16 for 109th and freshman Charles Howes came in 113th in 17:19 for an outstanding overall team performance. “There’s definitely something about our mentality right there because it is the last meet of the season,” said Nakaya. “We literally had to make it count. Dan DiLella, he was a

step in stride until they landed in sixth on Saturday. “For sectionals, I was more nervous than excited because we’re trying to make it to groups and Meet of Champs eventually,” said Nakaya. “But (Saturday) for Meet of Champs, I think there was more excitement compared to nervousness. I think all my teammates were excited for Meet of Champs because they’ve never run it. It was the first experience for every one of us to run the Meet of Champions so I think everyone was excited when we lined up. We ran a good race.” The squad will be looking to return and place higher next year at the MOC, and they have aspirations to qualify for nationals. The Tiger girls also are looking to build on this season. They had a faster average at the MOC than they did at groups, and will return with major meet experience. “We’re going to be a better team for it,” said Smirk. “We’re graduating one senior out of our top seven, our No. 5 girl, Ryan. That experience is going to pay off huge. We already started talking about the steps for next year. Some of the hunger that the boys had last year that paid off, I think you’re seeing it transfer over to the girls team with what’s our next step and how do we get better? How do we grow? How do we put ourselves in a better position next year? There were good lessons to learn. It was a tough race, definitely the toughest race we had all year. I thought they fought hard and I’m looking forward to them putting themselves in a position next year to be there again.” — Justin Feil

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021

PHS Boys’ Cross Country Takes 6th at MOC As Senior Nakaya Produces Stellar Performance

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021 • 40

Local Sports Wilberforce Cross Country Races in Meet of Champions

Racing in the NJSI A A (New Jersey Interscholastic Athletic Association) Meet of Champions last Saturday at Holmdel Park, the Wilberforce School cross country team produced some superb performances. As for the boys, junior Jeremy Sallade and sophomore Caleb Brox made the meet as individual entrants. Sallade ended up placing 91st at the MOC in a time

of 17:03 over the 5,000-meter course while Brox took 125th in 17:29. T he Wilber force g irls’ squad, which prev iously won the Non-Public B Group meet, placed 18th in the team standings at the MOC. Freshman Gwen Mersereau finished 94th individually in a time of 20:37 to lead the squad while classmate Adeline Edwards was just behind, taking 96th in 20:43. Cherokee won the girls’ team title with a score of 117 with Wilberforce coming in at 416.

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PDS Girls’ Cross Country: Competing in her first NJSIAA (New Jersey Interscholastic Athletic Association) Meet of Champions, Emily McCann placed 68th in the girls competition last Saturday at Holmdel Park. PDS sophomore star McCann covered the 5,000-meter course in a time of 20:07. She had qualified for the MOC by taking 12th individually in the Girls Non-Public A meet on November 16 at Holmdel, clocking a time of 20:06.

WILD RIDE: Players on the Alizio Sealcoating Broncos celebrate after they prevailed in the championship game of the Senior Division of the Princeton Junior Football League (PJFL) earlier this month. The Broncos edged the UOA Jets 41-34 in the title game. Pictured, from left, are Ezra Lerman, Hudson Naso, Jaden Bartley, Eli Salganik, Nolan Maurer, Will Arns, Ari Rosenblum, Charlotte Rieger, and Manuel Tellez. The coaches, from left, are Jesse Lerman and Chris Rieger.

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Joan Legg Schreyer April 22, 1929 – November 16, 2021

Joan Legg Schreyer, 92, of State College, PA, (formerly of Princeton, NJ and Buffalo, NY) passed away on Tuesday, November 16, 2021. Wife of the late William “Bill” Allen Schreyer, former CEO of Merrill Lynch; daughter of the late William Bardgett and Gladys (McDonald) Legg. Joan was born in Buffalo, NY, on April 22, 1929 and grew up in the Buffalo area. She attended Sullins Academy in Bristol, VA, and Mary

Washington College in Fredericksburg, VA. She met her husband in 1951 and they were married on October 17, 1953. Shortly after they were mar r ie d, Joa n a nd B i l l moved to Wiesbaden, Germany, while he was serving his ROTC commitment with the Air Force. After returning to the states, they moved back to Buffalo for Bill to return to work at Merrill Lynch. In 1968 they settled

Joan and Bill strongly believed in higher education and were the lead benefactors for the Pennsylvania State University’s Schreyer Honors College. She was predeceased by her fraternal grandparents T. Arthur and Maud (Bardgett) Legg; her maternal grandparents William Frederick and Ida ( S chwable ) McDonald; her parents; her husband in 2011; and her son-in-law, Rodney Frazier, in 2015. She is survived by her daughter, Dr ueA nne Bardgett Schreyer of State College, PA; grandchildren Kelly Frazier and her fiancé Michael Zalewski of State College, PA; and Charles Frazier and his wife Ariana Ramos of San Diego, CA. Celebrations of Joan’s life will be held in Princeton and State College in the new year. Joan will be interred with her husband in a private service. In lieu of flowers, donations can be sent to the Schreyer Honors College at http://raise.psu.edu/ schreyer. Arrangements are under the care of Koch Funeral Home, State College. Online condolences may be entered at www.kochfuneralhome. com or visit us on Facebook. Obituaries Continued on Next Page

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Obituaries

in Princeton, NJ, where they lived for 45 years. Joan was the quintessential party planner and gift giver. She annually made her renowned brandied cranberries for friends and family over the holidays. For years she made her famous sour cream coffee cakes for the annual Princeton Hospital Auxiliary Christmas Bazaar. She chaired both the Car Raffle and the Dinner Dance for the annual Hospital Fete. She was an active member of the Junior League, was on the board at Nero Psychiatric Institute, was a patron at Morven, and was a longtime member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Princeton. Joan was a member of many distinguished clubs, including The River Club in New York, NY; The Metropolitan Club and T he Georgetown Club in Washington, DC; Skibo Castle in Dornoch, Scotland; Annabel’s, The Mark’s Club, Harry’s Bar, and Les Ambassadors in London, England; The Saturn Club and The Buffalo Country Club in Buffalo, NY; The Nassau Club, Springdale Golf Club, The Present Day Club, and Bedens Brook Club in Princeton, NJ; Eldorado Country Club in Indian Wells, CA; Old Baldy Club in Saratoga, WY; The Bay Head Yacht Club and The Manasquan River Golf Club near Mantoloking, NJ; and Centre Hills Country Club in State College, PA. During Bill’s career at Merrill Lynch, Joan had the honor of meeting several U.S. Presidents, many foreign dignitaries, and Pope John Paul II. Their travels took them to every continent, except Antarctica.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021 • 42

Obituaries Continued from Preceding Page

Martha Rivkin Martha Rivkin, a teacher at the Community Park School in Princeton from 2000-2015, passed away unexpectedly in October. Martha was devoted to the school children in Princeton. She taught children in all grade levels and also worked in the Special Needs Program. After school she loved to garden in her extensive yard on Rosedale Road. There was nothing that brought Martha more joy than the happiness of others, whether it was one of her students receiving a good grade or achieving a significant milestone. Martha’s legacy is one that will be carried forward by all who knew her and were the recipients of her love and care. Martha retired five years ago and was attending to her family’s business interests in Lewes, Delaware, where she lived for the past five years. She loved being close to the beach and her family. Martha’s father, Joe Muckerman, a West Point grad,

moved his family every two years. This followed military protocol. Martha lived in a variety of spots while growing up including the Panama Canal Zone, Key West, Fort Leavenworth, San Pedro, and Alexandria, Virginia. Martha graduated from Mount St. Mary’s College with a teaching degree. She then worked as a trader/analyst in the commodities business in Washington, D.C., before moving to Princeton when she married Harold Rivkin. Martha is survived by her son Joseph Champlin, who is married to Anna and lives in Fredrick, Maryland. Martha was anticipating, with much excitement, the birth of her first grandchild.

G. Christopher Baker Chris died at home with his family by his side on November 3, 2021, after a lengthy illness at the age of 77. He was born in Annapolis, Maryland, on March 4, 1944. He attended St. Paul’s Grammar School and Princeton High School and received his undergraduate degree from Notre Dame University, and JD degree from Rutgers Law School Newark. Chris was in the first group of U.S.

Peace Corps volunteers and served in Tanzania, East Africa. Before attending Rutgers Law School, Chris worked at United Progress Incorporated, a community-based nonprofit created by President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society to eliminate poverty. A f ter graduating f rom Rutgers Law School, Chris clerked for Justice Frederick W. Hall of the Supreme Court of New Jersey. He was Vice President of Schatzman Baker where he developed an expertise in zoning and planning law, real estate development law, and business law. Chris enjoyed reading, music, travel, and spending time with his family and friends. He is sur v ived by his wife, Bonnie, of 52 years; his daughter, Rachel Morris and two grandchildren, Ella and Brendan Morris; and his siblings Kathleen Baker of Nashville, Tennessee; Michael Baker and his wife Alynn of Bricktown, N.J.; Stephen Baker and his wife Phyllis of Alexandria, Virginia; and Joanna Baker Wandelt of Watertown, Connecticut and many nieces and nephews. Chris was a loving husband, father, and grandfather and will be missed. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Women of the Dream (a 501(c)3), 69 Cypress Pointe Road, Mt. Holly, New Jersey 08060 or Gift of Life Donor Program, 401 3rd Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19123. Arrangements are under the direction of The MatherHodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

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Mary-Alice O’Neil Lessing Evans, 94 of Princeton, NJ, Skillman, NJ, and Chebeague Island, ME, passed away August 12, 2021 at her home at Stonebridge of Montgomery, NJ. Born in Har tford, CT, Mary-Alice was the youngest daughter of Joseph Carter and Marie Dyer O’Neil. She was affectionately known as “Tink” to her family and friends. Tink was a graduate of Smith College, and received Master’s degrees from Rutgers University and Middlebury College. She was a Spanish and French teacher for over 20 years at Princeton Regional Schools. She adored her students and they always inspired her. Tink enjoyed collaborating with her colleagues and dearly missed their interactions after she retired. Even in retirement Tink continued to teach a Spanish class at Stonebridge and attended an informal French conversation group. She loved pursuing new skills. In recent years, painting became a new passion and a talent that she shared with her late daughter and other relatives. Tink was an energetic daily-walker (with anyone

Mary (Maria) Balestrieri Mary (Maria) Balestrieri, 83, of Princeton, died Friday, November 19, 2021, at Brandywine Living, Princeton. Born in Princeton, she was a lifelong resident. Mary worked for many years at the First National Bank of Princeton, Princeton University Firestone Library, and Landau. She was a member of St. Paul’s Church and a devoted supporter of Catholic Charities. Daughter of the late Salvatore and Maria Balestrieri, she is survived by her brother

John and several nieces and nephews. Her siblings, Louis, Sal, Dominick, and Fanny, predecease her. Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated on Tuesday, November 23, 2021, at St. Paul’s Church, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton. Burial followed in the Princeton Cemetery. Arrangements are under the direction of the MatherHodge Funeral Home. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to St. Paul’s Church.

Religion Candlelit Service of Compline Set For All Saints’ Church

On Sunday, November 28 at 7 p.m., All Saints’ Church will present a quiet and candlelit service of Compline. Compline, traditionally an ancient expression of the Daily Office, is drawn from roots in the early church, and has been adapted for use in our own tradition. This brief service of 30 minutes will feature the plainsong melodies which have graced church walls for centuries, as well as anthems and hymns, by harkening to the season of Advent, a time of expectation, renewal and hope. The setting will be offered in candlelight, and will feature an extended quiet organ meditation. There will also be a small bag of takeaway refreshments and an opportunity to light a votive candle in remembrance or honor of a loved one. This service is free and open to all who long for a quiet center. All Saints’ Church is at 16 All Saints’ Road.

First Sunday of Advent

Sunday Worship Service

Thursdays at 12:30pm Princeton University Chapel

No performance on November 25. It is Thanksgiving Recess at Princeton University. The After Noon Concert will resume as usual next Thursday at 12:30pm Performing December 2, 2021 Tyrone Whiting

Mary-Alice O’Neil Lessing Evans

who could keep up with her), a voracious reader, a New York Times crossword puzzle aficionado, a parishioner of All Saints’ Church, a daily member of Stonebridge coffee group (bring your own cup), and with her boundless energy and love of the outdoors she spent every summer of her life at her family’s home in Maine! Predeceased by her beautiful daughter Anne Carter Lessing (Welsh), her beloved husband of 50 years Robert Lessing, her second husband Dr. Thomas Evans, her good friend Lou Gambaccini, her sister Edith, and two brothers Bud and Nate. Her memory will forever live on in her three daughters and sons-in-law, Jane and Victor Fasanella of Robbinsville, NJ, Amy and David Dudeck of Hamilton Square, NJ, Susan and Michael LaVoie of Modest Town, VA, her many grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and her plethora of cherished friends and colleagues. A private memorial service will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home of Princeton, NJ.

This service is open to the public for those fully vaccinated against Covid-19. Registration required for all events on campus at the door or in advance. To register in advance, use the QR code.

Sunday, November 28, at 11am Princeton University Chapel Preaching this Sunday Otis B. Byrd, Jr., Chapel Intern Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton, NJ Music performed by the Princeton University Chapel Choir. Nicole Aldrich, Director of Chapel Music & University Chapel Choir, and Eric Plutz, University Organist

This service is open to the public for those fully vaccinated against Covid-19. Registration required for all events on campus at the door or in advance. To register in advance, use the QR code.


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A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

MASON CONTRACTORS

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06-22 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf SKILLMAN MOVING SALE 31 Fountayne Lane. Saturday November 27 from 9:30-3. Continental mix of furnishings, tables & chairs, sectional sofa, carpets, decorative accessories, kitchen items, Lucite showcase, Bernhardt, costume jewelry including sterling. Too much to list! Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. COVID protocol in place, please wear a mask. 11-24 ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 11-24-4t ONE DAY HAULING: We service all of your cleaning & removal needs. Attics, basements, yards, debris & demolition clean up, concrete, junk cars & more. The best for less! Call (609) 743-6065. 11-24

227-9873.

(609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396.

tf CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius (609) 466-0732 tf HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf PRINCETON-GRACIOUS STUDIO APARTMENT on estate with magnificent gardens. Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time. Elegant furnishings, big windows, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, walk-in closet, kitchenette, large bath, AC, WI-Fi. Very private, separate entrance, parking. Great as an office, too. (609) 924-5245. 08-11-tf HOUSECLEANING: By experienced Polish lady. Good prices. References available. Please call (609) 310-0034. 11-10-4t

11-17-3t SENIOR GENT SEEKS NEW HOME: Semi-retired (fully vaccinated) desires lodging in private home. Food fringees too! Call Charlie (732) 216-3176. Email cr@exit109.com 11-24-3t JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Comamercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-09-22 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06-22

“The home is a place where we

show our children that we can communicate, learn and succeed together." —Farshad Asi

RESTORE-PRESERVE-ALL MASONRY

Mercer County's oldest, reliable, experienced firm. We serve you for all your masonry needs.

BRICK~STONE~STUCCO NEW~RESTORED Simplest Repair to the Most Grandeur Project, our staff will accommodate your every need!

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

Call us as your past generations did for over 72 years!

Complete Masonry & Waterproofing Services

Paul G. Pennacchi, Sr., Historical Preservationist #5. Support your community businesses. Princeton business since 1947.

609-394-7354 paul@apennacchi.com

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021 • 44

AT YOUR SERVICE A Town Topics Directory

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner Home Repair Specialist

609-586-2130

Scott M. Moore of

MOORE’S CONSTUCTION HOME IMPROVEMENTS LLC carpenter • builder • cabinet maker complete home renovations • additions 609-924-6777 Family Serving Princeton 100 Years. Free Estimates

Erick Perez

Fully insured 15+ Years Experience Call for free estimate Best Prices

BLACKMAN

LANDSCAPING FRESH IDEAS

Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Stone Walls and Terraces FREE CONSULTATION

PRINCETON, NJ

609-683-4013

A Gift Subscription!

TREE SERVICE

Offer good while supplies last

Stacking available for an additional charge

TREE TREESERVICE SERVICE Trees & Shrubs

609-466-6883 Trimmed, Pruned, and Removed Trees & Shrubs Stump Trimmed, Grinding &Removed Lot Clearing Pruned, and

609-466-6883

HD

PAINTING & MORE

A Tradition of Quality (609)737-2466

Serving the Princeton Area since 1963 Find us on Facebook and Instagram

(Benjamin Moore Green promise products)

Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Comamercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-09-22

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

tf

SKILLMAN MOVING SALE 31 Fountayne Lane. Saturday November 27 from 9:30-3. Continental mix of furnishings, tables & chairs, sectional sofa, carpets, decorative accessories, kitchen items, Lucite showcase, Bernhardt, costume jewelry including sterling. Too much to list! Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. COVID protocol in place, please wear a mask. 11-24

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22

Trees & Shrubs I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06-22

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 11-24-4t

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22

Locally Owned & Operated for over 20 year

House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

SENIOR GENT SEEKS NEW HOME: Semi-retired (fully vaccinated) desires lodging in private home. Food fringees too! Call Charlie (732) 216-3176. Email cr@exit109.com 11-24-3t

Trimmed, Pruned, and Remo Stump Grinding & Lot Clear

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

HOUSE

PERSONAL CARE/ CHILD CARE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: Looking for employment, live in or out. Full time or part time. References available. Please call Cynthia, (609) 227-9873. 11-17-3t

609-466-688

BRIAN’S

Locally Owned & Operated for over 20 years!

609-466-2693

EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 977-9407. 11-17-3t

TREE SERVIC BRIAN’S 609-466-6883

Seasoned Premium Hardwoods Split & Delivered $225 A cord / $425 2 cords

Stump Grinding & Lot Clearing

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

Owned & Operated for over 20 years! Trees & Shrubs Locally Owned &Locally Operated for over 20 years! Trimmed, Pruned, and Removed

CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

HOUSECLEANING: By experienced Polish lady. Good prices. References available. Please call (609) 310-0034. 11-10-4t

BRIAN’S BRIAN’S

FIREWOOD SPECIAL

Stump Grinding & Lot Clearing

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22

CALL 609-924-2200 TO PLACE YOUR AD HERE

American Furniture Exchange

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

ONE DAY HAULING: We service all of your cleaning & removal needs. Attics, basements, yards, debris & demolition clean up, concrete, junk cars & more. The best for less! Call (609) 743-6065. 11-24 OFFICE FOR RENT: 900 SF 2 miles north of downtown Princeton, 4599 Rt. 27 in Kingston with two private offices & 500 SF. 2nd floor walkup, central air, great light, large windows. $1,425 includes heat. Linda Fahmie, KW Realty (609) 610-4730. 11-10-3t HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius (609) 466-0732 tf HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf PRINCETON-GRACIOUS STUDIO APARTMENT on estate with magnificent gardens. Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time. Elegant furnishings, big windows, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, walk-in closet, kitchenette, large bath, AC, WI-Fi. Very private, separate entrance, parking. Great as an office, too. (609) 924-5245. 08-11-tf

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf SKILLMAN MOVING SALE 31 Fountayne Lane. Saturday November 27 from 9:30-3. Continental mix of furnishings, tables & chairs, sectional sofa, carpets, decorative accessories, kitchen items, Lucite showcase, Bernhardt, costume jewelry including sterling. Too much to list! Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. COVID protocol in place, please wear a mask. 11-24 ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 11-24-4t ONE DAY HAULING: We service all of your cleaning & removal needs. Attics, basements, yards, debris & demolition clean up, concrete, junk cars & more. The best for less! Call (609) 743-6065. 11-24


45 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021

Service that’s as elevated as your standards. N OT H I N G C O M PA R E S

1345 Gypsy Hill Road

1212 Township Line Road

5 br l 3.3 ba l 8,120 sf | Designed for Entertaining | Finished Walkout Lower Level | Sport Court

7 br | 8.2 ba | 7,707 sf | 21.83 ac | Guest House & Apt | Detached Garage & Workspace | Pond

L O W E R G W Y N E D D, PA K U R F I S S .C O M / PA M C 2 0 1 0 2 9 0 $ 2 , 3 9 5 ,0 0 0 Douglas Pearson c. 267.907.2590 Ryan Cortez c. 215.800.6874

C H A L F O N T, PA K U R F I S S .C O M / PA B U 2 0 0 8 9 4 6 $ 3 , 4 9 5 ,0 0 0 Sky Kiziltug c. 484.690.4448 Douglas Pearson c. 267.907.2590

The Residences at Rabbit Run

50 Dunkard Church Road

3 br | 3.1 ba | 3,700 sf | Elevator | $300K in Upgrades | $100K Toward Closing

5 br l 5.3 ba l 9,394 sf | 35.89 ac | Country Estate w/ 19-Stall Barn | Custom-Built Home

N E W H O P E , PA K U R F I S S .C O M / PA B U 2 0 0 9 8 3 2 Douglas Pearson c. 267.907.2590

STO C K TO N , N J K U R F I S S .C O M / N J H T 1 0 6 8 1 0 Cary Simons c. 484.431.9019

$ 1 ,6 5 0,0 0 0

$ 2 , 8 5 0,0 0 0

49 Frankenfield Road

9 Van Sant Road

4 br l 3.1 ba l 49.5 ac l Country Retreat l Updated Farmhouse l 2 Barns l Pool

4 br l 4.2 ba l 5,593 sf l 2.15 ac | Breathtaking Views l Custom-Built Home

T I N I C U M T W P, PA K U R F I S S .C O M / PA B U 2 0 0 0 6 7 8 Cary Simons c. 484.431.9019

N E W H O P E , PA K U R F I S S .C O M / PA B U 2 0 1 1 2 3 2 Cary Simons c. 484.431.9019

$ 2 , 2 4 9,0 0 0

$ 1 , 3 9 5 ,0 0 0

Under Contract

50 South Union Street 4 br | 2.1 ba | 2,195 sf | .17 ac | Meticulously Maintained | Additional Lot Available LAMBERTVILLE, NJ K U R F I S S .C O M / N J H T 2 0 0 0 3 4 8 Amelie Escher c. 609.937.0479

NEW HOPE

$ 1 , 1 2 5 ,0 0 0

40 Coryell Street 3 br | 1.1 ba | .06 ac | Secret Garden | Sleeping Porch | Antique Charm LAMBERTVILLE, NJ K U R F I S S .C O M / N J H T 2 0 0 0 4 0 6 Amelie Escher c. 609.937.0479

| R I T T E N H O U S E S Q U A R E | C H E ST N U T H I L L | B R Y N M AW R K U R F I S S .C O M 8 7 7. 5 8 6 .0 4 3 3

© 2021 Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. SIR® is a registered trademark licensed to SIR Affiliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

$ 4 0 5 ,0 0 0


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021 • 46

Rider

American Furniture Exchange

Furniture 30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items

“Where quality still matters.”

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

with Beatrice Bloom FOOD DRIVE THANKSGIVING

Weichert Princeton is hosting a Food Drive to benefit Arm in Arm and we would love to have your support in collecting Thanksgiving staples. You can either stop by our office at 350 Nassau Street (next to Whole Earth) or I can come to your house/porch to pick up your donation! Just contact me via cell or text at 609Ͳ577Ͳ2989. I appreciate your consideration!

OFFICE FOR RENT: 900 SF 2 miles north of downtown Princeton, 4599 Rt. 27 in Kingston with two private offices & 500 SF. 2nd floor walkup, central air, great light, large windows. $1,425 includes heat. Linda Fahmie, KW Realty (609) 610-4730. 11-10-3t HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius (609) 466-0732 tf HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf PRINCETON-GRACIOUS STUDIO APARTMENT on estate with magnificent gardens. Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time. Elegant furnishings, big windows, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, walk-in closet, kitchenette, large bath, AC, WI-Fi. Very private, separate entrance, parking. Great as an office, too. (609) 924-5245. 08-11-tf HOUSECLEANING: By experienced Polish lady. Good prices. References available. Please call (609) 310-0034. 11-10-4t EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 977-9407. 11-17-3t

with Beatrice Bloom FOOD DRIVE THANKSGIVING

Weichert Princeton is hosting a Food Drive to benefit Arm in Arm and we would love to have your support in collecting Thanksgiving staples. You can either stop by our office at 350 Nassau Street (next to Whole Earth) or I can come to your house/porch to pick up your donation! Just contact me via cell or text at 609Ͳ577Ͳ2989. I appreciate your consideration! Downtown Lawrenceville The word “magnificent” immediately comes to mind when describing this 3 bedroom, 4 ½ bath Victorian, built in 1894, and beautifully renovated in 2012. With restored original and new hardwood floors throughout the home, and recessed lighting in virtually every room, no detail has been overlooked. The gourmet kitchen has quartz counters, a Subzero refrigerator, a Fisher-Paykel twodrawer dishwasher, a sink garbage disposal and a suite of Wolf appliances. An alcove with pocket doors has become a pantry with its own Subzero wine fridge. Each bedroom has its own bathroom and every bathroom has been tastefully designed and updated with marble tile flooring and walls, high efficiency Toto ADA-compliant toilets, and Rohl imported German-made metal hardware. The rooms are filled with light. Five-inch crown moldings adorn the living room, dining room and most bedrooms, and similar moldings surround every entryway. Every door in this home is 5/4 solid wood with classic glass doorknobs. And so much more! What truly makes this home one of a kind is the indoor regulation length 75-foot heated, salt water, concrete and tiled lap pool, surrounded by a mahogany deck and fieldstone walls. Only a short stroll to The Lawrenceville School and The Gingered Peach Bakery, this Lawrenceville gem truly must be seen to be fully appreciated! Price Upon Request.

Office - (NJ) 866-201-6210 ext 1563 (PA) 888-397-7352 Cell - 732-829-3577 Email: mbrownkrausz@gmail.com Licensed in New Jersey and Pennsylvania

Marna Brown-Krausz, CRS®, SRES® Sales Associate - REALTOR®

eXp Realty®

PERSONAL CARE/ CHILD CARE/COMPANION AVAILABLE: Looking for employment, live in or out. Full time or part time. References available. Please call Cynthia, (609) 227-9873. 11-17-3t SENIOR GENT SEEKS NEW HOME: Semi-retired (fully vaccinated) desires lodging in private home. Food fringees too! Call Charlie (732) 216-3176. Email cr@exit109.com 11-24-3t JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Comamercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-09-22 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-06-22 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area LAW FIRM ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT:

(PRINCETON, NJ) Two lawyers seek experienced parttime Assistant approximately 15-20 hours per week to work in a friendly office environment in downtown Princeton. Free on-site parking. Responsibilities include scheduling appointments, office organization, filing, document preparation, calendar control & client billing. Prior law office experience is preferable. Secretarial experience & proficiency with Word & Excel are essential. Required attributes include ability to work independently, careful attention to detail, excellent telephone skills, ability to prioritize & manage multiple tasks, professional demeanor, sound judgment & a “can do” attitude. Hours flexible. Vaccination required. Provide resume & salary requirement to dfbrent@gmail.com; (609) 6830033. 11-17-3t

PRINCETON CHARTER SCHOOL A US Department of Education Blue Ribbon School serving students in grades K-8 seeks qualified applicants for the following 2021-2022 positions: LUNCH SERVICE MANAGER SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS All applicants for the substitute teacher position must hold a substitute teacher certification or the relevant NJ certification. Interested candidates should send a cover letter, resume and copies of NJ certificate(s) to: Head of School, Princeton Charter School, 100 Bunn Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540, or to pcsof fice@princetonchar ter.org. Princeton Charter School is an equal opportunity employer. Deadline for application is December 6, 2021. Must be a resident of New Jersey or willing to relocate. For more school information visit our web site at www. pcs.k12.nj.us. 11-17-3t

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE: Experience, strong references, & clean driving record required. All properties are non-smoking. Email resume to office@roipd.com 11-10-3t

IS ON

CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE

Witherspoon Media Group

Wednesday morning delivery. If interested, please contact Gina Hookey at classifieds@towntopics.com

Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

· Newsletters · Brochures · Postcards · Books An Equal Opportunity Employer 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528 609-924-2200

· Catalogues

Witherspoon Media Group · Annual Reports Witherspoon Media Group Custom Design, Printing,

For additional contact: Custom Design, Printing, Publishing andinfo Distribution Publishing and Distribution melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com · Newsletters

· Newsletters

· Brochures · Brochures

· ·Postcards Postcards · ·Books Books Catalogues · ·Catalogues Annual Reports · ·Annual Reports For additional info contact:

For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

witherspoonmediagroup.com

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400


Move-in-ready homes available, featuring $300,000 in upgrades

Limited offering: $100K in additional upgrades on select homes Don’t Miss the Final Phase of This Exclusive Gated Community Featuring lush landscaping and exquisite architecture, this beautifully developed community is ready to welcome you home. These 3,600-square-foot exclusive homes pair open floor plans with elegant finishes to provide all the privacy, space, and luxury you could want.

Final Phase of Construction! In-person tours available by appointment. Starting at $1,575,000. 215.862.5800 | RabbitRunCreek.com Rte. 202 (Lower York Road) & Rabbit Run Drive, New Hope, PA

COMMUNITY FEATURES • Full Basement • Two-Car Rear Garages • Maintenance-Free Lifestyle • Open, Contemporary Floor Plans • Private Gated Community • Private Elevators

47 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2021

YOU’RE READY, WE’RE READY.


PRESENTING

56 Carson Road, Lawrence Twp. Marketed by: Beth J. Miller $759,000

5 Cloverleaf Court, Medford Twp. Marketed by: Linda Pecsi $539,000

NEWLY PRICED

40 Copper Penny Road, Raritan Twp. Marketed by: Kenneth “Ken” Verbeyst $685,000

28 Elm Ridge Road, Hopewell Twp. Marketed by: Michelle Needham $674,000

PRESENTING

15 Erdman Avenue, Princeton Marketed by: Debra Foxx $625,000

128 Laurel Road, Princeton Marketed by: Yuen Li Huang $1,765,000

NEWLY PRICED

From Princeton, We Reach the World.

3 Mayfarth Terrace, Plainsboro Twp. Marketed by: Terebey Relocation Team/John Terebey, Jr. | $509,888

83 Riverside Drive, Princeton Marketed by: Chihlan “Lana” Chan | $999,000

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 foxroach.com

© BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

From Princeton, We Reach the World. 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 Princeton Office Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com Princeton, NJ ||253 foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.