Town Topics Newspaper, November 23, 2022

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Volume LXXVI, Number 47

New Version of A Christmas Carol Coming To McCarter . . . . . . . . 5 LALDEF Joins with Latinas Unidas, Expands Local Services . . . . . . . 8 Brian Hughes Seeks 2023 Re-Election for Mercer County Executive . . . . 10 Renowned Bach Chorus, Orchestra Perform at McCarter . . . . . . . . . 17 Princeton Football Loses 20-19 to Penn, Falling Just Short of Ivy Crown . . . 27 PU Men’s Water Polo Wins NWPC Title, Looking to Make Noise in NCAAs . . 28

Deadwood Creator David Milch’s Extraordinary Life Featured in This Week’s Book Review . . . . . . . 16 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-23 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 24 Christmas Tree Directory . . 26 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . 36 Healthy Living. . . . . 20-21 Home for the Holidays . . .12-13 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 35 Performing Arts . . . 18-19 Police Blotter . . . . . . . . 6 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 36 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

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Collection Contract Approved For Solid and Bulk Waste But Not Yet for Organics At its November 14 meeting, Princeton Council voted to approve a resolution authorizing a contract for solid waste and bulk waste collection, which goes into effect in the new year. But they held off on the bid for picking up organic waste, agreeing instead to look into less costly options. Princeton’s Engineer and Deputy Administrator Deanna Stockton told Council that the town’s current provider, Interstate Waste Services, was the only company to respond to the staff’s request for proposal, or RFP. For organic waste, they proposed a system priced at about $1.1 million a year. “That was too much,” Councilwoman Mia Sacks wrote in an email the day after the meeting. “So we’re looking into things like micro-haulers or community drop-off locations, and advocating for changes to state legislation that will make food waste disposal process more affordable and accessible to municipalities.” Staff, members of Sustainable Princeton, and a liaison from the Princeton Environmental Commission worked with DeFeo Associates, which had previously reviewed the town’s leaf and brush collection, to come up with an option for solid and bulk waste. The goals, Stockton told Council, were controlling costs, which escalated during COVID-19; expanding the service to include organics; and reducing carbon emissions. The sole bid came on October 19. Staff’s recommendation was to have solid and bulk waste collection only, with carts supplied by the contractor. Bulk waste is defined as trash too large to fit inside a cart, such as mattresses, desks, chairs, sofas, or other furniture. Residents can make reservations for bulk pick up on the town’s website, by email, or by phone. The link to make a reservation will go live on the website by February 1. The service was approved for a fiveyear period. Residences will get a new, 64-gallon cart, equipped with a chip linking the cart to a specific address. Those who wish to get rid of their existing carts can do so during the first weeks of the new program. Residents who want an extra 64-gallon cart can get one, but at an annual fee that is still to be determined. “This allows for more automated service in Princeton,” said Stockton. Continued on Page 7

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Wednesday, November 23, 2022

Opportunities Abound for Community Engagement With plans in coming weeks for an open house on the town’s efforts to rework its Master Plan, a discussion with industry leaders about the housing and climate crisis, and a forum on housing justice, this seems an especially opportune time for involvement in community issues. It is also a time when Princeton is looking for residents to volunteer for its boards, commissions, and committees. Covering a wide range including environmental issues, human services, historic preservation, permit parking, public art selection, and public transit — among several others — these groups require a time commitment of 8 to 10 hours a month, and form what Princeton Councilman Leighton Newlin called “the backbone of municipal engagement and government.” Other members of the governing body stress the importance of the “BCCs.” “We have a diverse population in Princeton, one that we are very committed to preserving and expanding,” said Councilwoman Michelle Pirone Lambros. “Having diverse representation on our boards, committees, and commissions is one way to assure we have truly representative government. Any community outreach initiatives that we undertake are much

more successful if we have more resident involvement.” Councilwoman Eve Niedergang said the town “benefits greatly from the input of a wide variety of residents with different viewpoints but a shared passion for making Princeton a great place to live and work.” Participation “gives our residents a front row seat in how key grassroots issues work their way up to policy-making, and to also understanding and advancing the community’s priorities.”

The open house devoted to updating the town’s Master Plan is Wednesday, November 30 at Princeton Public Library between 4 and 7 p.m. Members of the public can stop by during those hours to learn about the process, existing conditions, and highlights from recent public surveys. This is an opportunity to share suggestions and ideas on the future of the community. Visit engage.princetonmasterplan.org for more information. On Tuesday, December 6 at 7 p.m., a Continued on Page 7

Rubenstein Commons Opens at IAS, “Forum for Curiosity, Discovery, Critique” Described by Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) Director David Nirenberg as “a place whose beauty will stimulate contemplation and whose space will invite the dialogue necessary for questioning at its most profound,” the new Rubenstein Commons building has opened its doors for IAS members and visitors. Made possible through a gift from businessman and philanthropist David M. Rubenstein, the building is designed to have “a transformative impact on intellectual and communal life at IAS,” according to a November 15 IAS press release, and to provide “flexible gathering spaces

to support enhanced communication and collaboration among scholars,” and “an inviting social hub for the wider IAS community.” Noting the building’s “pools, roof gardens, and rooms dancing with light,” Nirenberg, who is a medievalist and intellectual historian and the Leon Levy Professor at IAS, stated, “With the opening of this forum for curiosity, discovery, and critique, we celebrate the Institute’s enduring commitment to the nourishment of the global collective intellect.” The 17,175-square-foot building, Continued on Page 9

FESTIVE FLAIR: Hamilton Jewelers on Nassau Street is just one of the many local businesses that are geared up and ready for the holiday season. (Photo by Weronika A. Plohn)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022 • 2

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3 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022 • 4

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TURKEY GIVEAWAY: From left, Trenton pharmacist Mehmed Ugur, Mayor Reed Gusciora, and Dr. Vedat Obuz were on hand at Lotus Clinics in Trenton on November 18 to donate 125 turkeys to Trenton families in need.

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With a significant price increase in t urkeys t his year over last year, Dr. Vedat Obuz, founder of Lotus W O O D - F I R E D S T A R TClinics, E R S and Mehmed Ugur, WINGS (6) HOUSE BUFFALO, ALABAMA WHITE OR SRIRACHA HONEY LIME FLATBREADS ow ner of Medical • SHORT RIB W/ SHAVED PARMESAN, CARAMELIZED ONIONS, FRESH Home SERVED W/ BLUE CHEESE SAUCE JALAPENO, HORSERADISH CREAM AND CALIFORNIA COMMON BBQ SAUCE Pharmacy, helped Trenton OCTOPUS W/ LEMONGRASS CREAM, BASIL INFUSED EVOO, • NEW HAVEN CLAM W/ FRESH GARLIC, HERBED BABY CLAMS, SHAVED RED PEPPER, PARSLEY AND EVOO PICKLED CUCUMBER AND RED ONION PARMESAN, CRUSHED families by giving away 125 • SMOKED BUFALA MOZZARELLA W/ SAN MARZANO TOMATOES, DRUNKEN LIGHT HAUS LAGER CLAMS turkeys on Friday, November GARLIC AND BASIL W/ ANDOUILLE SAUSAGE, GRILLED FLATBREAD 18, at Lotus Clinics in the R A W + S E A F O O D B capital A R city. *SHRIMP AND SALMON CEVICHE W/ MELON AND AVOCADO *“THE BETSY”CAPE MAY OYSTERS Inf lat ion, hu nger, and W/ MIGNONETTE AND UNION BOIL COCKTAIL SAUCE WILD CAUGHT JUMBO SHRIMP more have put thousands of W/ UNION BOIL COCKTAIL SAUCE COLOSSAL CRAB COCKTAIL W/ CREAMY DIJON SAUCE local families and residents DEVILED EGGS W/ DEBRIS TRIO (ONE EACH) • PULLED PORK W/ HORSERADISH CREAM AND MORE THAN Q BBQ SAUCE, • SMOKED PAPRIKA • LOBSTER AND LEMONGRASS CREAM

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who cannot afford a turkey meal this Thanksgiving. “We have become a large family and part of the entire community through senior pageants and holiday season activities,” said Obuz, an internist and pediatrician. “I know how difficult this time of year can be for so many of our neighbors. As families are gathering, we wanted to make sure they didn’t worry about basic necessities such as food.”

20 years. He established his practice, Lotus Clinics, in 1999 as a primary care clinic. Ugur opened Medical Home Pharmacy in 2009. With two locations in Trenton, the retail pharmacy specializes in compounding, individual strip packaging, free delivery and COVID-19 testing and vaccines. Medical Home Pharmacy has administered the largest number of COVID-19 vaccines in the Trenton area.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin

Master Plan Open House: On Wednesday, November 30 between 4-7 p.m. at Princeton Public Library, the public is invited to stop by to learn about the Master Plan CHOPPED SALAD ROMAINE, TOMATO, BRINE CURED OLIVE, CUCUMBER, RED IMPORTED SMOKED BUFALAprocess, AND JERSEY TOMATO CAPRESE conditions, and highlights from public surveys. Share thoughts and existing ONION, CHOPPED BACON AND BLUE CHEESE DRESSING W/ HONEY BALSAMIC GLAZE, PESTO DRIZZLE ideas to help shape the future of the community. Visit engage.princetonmasterplan. org for more information. THE BOIL JoinFRIEND Boards, Commissions, or Committees: The municipality is looking to fill A SE AFO O D B O IL IS A TRADITIO NAL S O CIAL EVENT B RINGING S getforky.com AND FAMILY TO GE THER FO R FINGER LICKIN’ G O Ovacancies D TIME S! with residents of Princeton who are willing to attend regularly scheduled SHRIMP, CRAB LEGS, CRAWFISH, CORN, ANDOUILLE LIL’ BOILmeetings. – SERVES 2-3Visit princetonnj.gov for more information. SAUSAGE AND POTATOES. SERVED W/ GARLIC BIG BOIL –Call SERVESfor 4-5 Land Stewards: Join the Friends of Princeton Open Space (FOPOS) for BUTTER, UNION BOIL COCKTAIL SAUCE AND UNION BOIL – SERVES 6-8 SPICY COCKTAIL SAUCE morning (9 a.m.-12 p.m.) or afternoon (1-4 p.m.) volunteer sessions under the guidance of FOPOS’ director of natural resources and stewardship, to assist with critical restoration projects at the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Weekday MORE and weekend sessions available. Visit fopos.org/getinvolved. SERVED WITH YOUR CHOICE OF ROSEMARY FRIES OR CUCUMBER DILL SALAD CORNMEAL-ENCRUSTED FRIED CHICKEN SANDWICH W/ SRIRACHA MAYO ELOTE BURGER – PLANT BASED “MEAT”LESS TOPPED W/Needed: MEXICAN BloodBURGER, Donors The American Red Cross needs blood and platelets to keep AND SWEET RELISH SLAW $12 (*GRILLED CHICKEN-ADD $2) STREET CORN SALAD WITH DICED AVOCADO, COTIJA CHEESE, SRIRACHA MAYO AND FRESH LIME - $15 supplies from dropping ahead of the holidays. All types are needed, especially type GOLDMAN TRIPLE HOG DOG — BACON, PULLED PORK, MORE THAN Q MUSTARD SAUCE, CREAMY SLAW AND PICKLED RED ONION - $12 UNION CHEESEBURGER – PATO. LAFRIEDA SHORT RIB AND BRISKET BURGER Visit RedCrossBlood.org or call (800) 733-2767 for more information. SERVED WITH HICKORY SMOKED BACON, AGED CHEDDAR CHEESE, CLASSIC FISH AND CHIPS — BEACH HAUS BEER-BATTERED COD, AVOCADO, BUTTER LETTUCE, TOMATO AND CRISPYon FRIED Food ONIONS - $15Waste and Organics: The municipality is considering changes Survey MALT VINEGAR, TARTAR AIOLI, MUSHY PEAS to the residential waste collection system to contain costs and decrease the carbon C H E F ’ S T A K E footprint. A survey to share feedback is available at accessprinceton@princetonnj.gov. TERRAPIN CRAB CAKE HANDMADE JUMBO LUMP CRAB W/ HONEY LEMON SKIRT STEAK W/ CRUISER MISO BUTTER GLAZE AND RED CHIMICHURRI Free COVID-19 Test Kits: Available at Princeton Health Department, 1 MonuSPRING MIX, PICKLED RED ONION, SHAVED PARMESAN AND CAJUN SAUCE W/ ROSEMARY FRIES AND WARMED KALE AND BACON SALAD REMOULADE W/ HOUSE CUT CHIPS AND CUCUMBER DILL SALAD ment Drive, Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. There is limit of four per household; you CATCH OF THE DAY TRUFFLED MASHED POTATOESmust AND PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND VEGETABLES HICKORY WOOD SMOKED CHICKEN THIGHS W/ SRIRACHA HONEY LIME reside in Princeton to get the kits. SAUCE W/ ROSEMARY FRIES AND CREAMY SLAW Free Vision and Dental Services for Low Income Residents: The municipality is offering these services for low-income Princeton residents impacted by the pandemic. For application information, visit Princetonnj.gov. Flu Shot Clinics: Several clinics are being held throughout the fall at different area locations. For a full list, email healthdepartment@princetonnj.gov. Gas Leaf Blowers: Are now permitted through December 15 from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Mondays-Fridays and through 5 p.m. Saturdays. No use on Sundays or Thanksgiving. Caroling Around the Square: On Christmas Eve at 4:30 p.m., the public is invited to gather around the Palmer Square Green to sing holiday songs. The Christmas Eve Brass Band will lead the festivities, and Santa is expected. Free. SHAVED KALE AND BRUSSELS, PARM, TOASTED ALMOND, PICKLED RED ONION W/ HONEY LEMON VIN

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5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022

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GOD BLESS US EVERY ONE: Back at McCarter Theatre after a three-year hiatus, a new production of “A Christmas Carol,” directed and adapted by Lauren Keating, opens December 7.

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New Version of “A Christmas Carol” Respects Tradition, Explores New Themes

In a large rehearsal room at McCarter Theatre, reminders of past productions of A Christmas Carol are stashed on shelves and piled in corners. There is the turkey (raw

and cooked versions) that Ebenezer Scrooge has delivered to the Cratchit family on Christmas morning. Bob Cratchit’s ledger, with scrawls by numerous actors who have played the role, is there. So are the wrapped presents, baskets of food, Scrooge’s bed, and the sofa from his nephew Fred’s parlor, all awaiting the return of the beloved play based on Charles Dickens’ 1843 novel. After an absence of three years, A Christmas Carol opens at McCarter on Wednesday, December 7 and runs through December 24.

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Adapted and directed by Lauren Keating, this version of A Christmas Carol respects much-loved past productions while taking on some new territory. A woman, actor Dee Pelletier, plays Scrooge (as a male character) for the first time. Keating’s additional casting pays particularly close attention to diversity, based on research she has done on London’s population during Dickens’ time. Scrooge’s journey through Christmas past, present, and future is still magical – but with some new emphases. “ We k now p eople are coming for the spectacle, and the spectacle is there,” said Keating, who directed the play in the past at the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis. “But we want this to be story-driven. I think a trap it can fall into is not coming from a place of story. We’re trying to move people with the story as well as everything else.” McCarter has been presenting productions of A Christmas Carol (with a three-year break during the pandemic) since 1980. Growing up in Sergeantsville, 39-year-old Keating saw the show every year starting when she was 5 years old. “It was our family tradition,” she said. “I loved it. So to get to come home and make this, through my specific lens, is really exciting.” The most recent version of the play, directed by Adam I m m e r w a h r, d eb u te d i n 2016. Keating didn’t see that production — she has been

busy in regional theater and off-Broadway, directing plays, films, and site-specific events, all with a commitment to work centered on marginalized voices. McCarter Artistic Director Sarah Rasmussen, with whom Keating worked in the past at the Guthrie Theater, had not seen McCarter’s most recent version either. “I never got to see it in person, but I know it was lovely. And of course, we want to carry on the tradition,” she said. “But Adam ( Immerwahr) has moved to the West Coast. Time moves on, and Continued on Next Page

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022 • 6

“A Christmas Carol” Continued from Preceding Page

key collaborators go on to new adventures.” When Rasmussen learned that Keating had moved to the local area with her family during the pandemic, things started to fall into place. “I had seen her version at the Guthrie and loved it,” said Rasmussen. “She has done some really thoughtful things. And when she told me she had grown up seeing A Christmas Carol here as a child, and it inspired her to be a director, it made sense.” Casting a woman in a role written for a man isn’t exactly new at McCarter. In former Artistic Director Emily Mann’s 2003 production of Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Blair Brown played the lead role of Prospero (as Prospera). Asked about casting a woman as Scrooge, Keating said it was simply a matter of finding the best person for the role. “It’s not why we’re doing it, but why not?” she said. “We saw a lot of people, and Dee was just the best. I see that this is perhaps unique now, but my hope is that this won’t be unique in the future.” Rasmussen said, “I think Lauren’s casting of a great actor for a great role is right on. It’s just a character played by a great actor. Dee is just wonderful. I think when we open up our minds a little about casting, you hear things in a new way. And that can be exciting.” Music and dance figure highly in the show, which has choreography by Emily Maltby. There is a cast of 21, including children mostly from the tri-state area. “There is something for everyone. This production was made with a lot of love and joy, and if you come and take the ride with us, you will hopefully feel that joy,” said Keating. “If you come as a family, it can be a touch-point throughout the year. That, to me, is a value you don’t get with other theatrical experiences on the whole.” —Anne Levin

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What are you thankful for?” (Photos by Weronika A. Plohn)

“I am thankful for so many things. I am the most thankful for my family and my three healthy grandsons that have been born in the last couple of years.” —Jeff Perlman, Princeton

“I am thankful for being alive. We lost so many people over the last two years; so many families lost loved ones. I also think it is important to connect the love that you have in your heart with the people that are around us, the community that we are in. We should love one another and forget about the disagreements.” —Veronica Crawford, Montgomery

Conor: “I have been gifted many opportunities this year that I am thankful for. Like today — I am thankful for spending this day in Princeton with Marcus.” Marcus: “I am thankful for the people in my life — friends and family. I go to college, so I met so many wonderful people this year. It is nice to connect with people again.” —Conor Finneran, Mahwah with Marcus Cook, Princeton

Police Blotter Man Dies from Injuries After Car Hits Tree

On November 8, at 1:52 p.m., a 2019 Hyundai Kona driven by Elmer Hsu, an 86-year-old male from Kendall Park, was traveling east in the eastbound lane of Princeton-Kingston Road. Hsu swerved to the right out of the eastbound lane and struck a tree located near the corner of PrincetonKingston Road and Riverside Drive. He was transported to Capital Health Regional Medical Center, where he succumbed to his injuries on November 13. The cause of the crash remains under investigation. The Police Department is requesting that anybody who witnessed the crash should contact Sgt. Michael Strobel at (609) 921-2100, ext. 1815.

a Princeton tradition!

Flor: “I am thankful for my family. We are having a big feast this Thursday for 31 people. I am especially thankful for my dad, who is going to cook it all.” Lis: “I am thankful for visiting my family with my kids. We are having a big family reunion after not being able to do so because of the pandemic.” —Flor Alvarado, Germantown, Md., with Lis Alvarado, Guatemala

Alma: “I am thankful for being alive. The last few years were so hard for everybody, and I appreciate the fact that I am here and in good health. Every moment counts.” Kailyn: “I am thankful for my family. I am going to see them all this Thanksgiving!” Stephanie: “I am thankful for being able to gather with my friends and family this weekend. We are also going to get our Christmas tree and decorate it.” —Alma Hernandez, Kailyn Cohen, and Stephanie Dulovic, all of Princeton


continued from page one

presentation over Zoom from Sustainable Princeton takes on the question of building and developing sustainably. Part of the Sustainable Minds Virtual Speaker Series, the event features Christina McPike, director of energy and sustainability for WinnCompanies (developer of The Alice on Terhune Road, which will have affordable and market rate units); and Ken Levenson, executive director of The Passive House Network. Visit sustainableprinceton.org for details. Saturday, December 10 is the date for the Housing Justice Forum at Princeton Public Library, which can be attended in person or via Zoom. Panel discussions will be held at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m., with an opportunity at 2 p.m. to connect with people who are working locally on housing and related efforts. Lunch will be provided. Discussions, focused on the Princeton area, are titled “How Did We Get Here?” and “What Can We Do?” Panelists include Sara Bronin, professor of planning and law at Cornell University; Jean Pierre Brutus, senior counsel with the Economic Justice Program, New Jersey Institute for Social Justice; and

Peter Kasabach, executive director of New Jersey Future. Matt Mieczko, Princeton University doctoral candidate in population studies and social policy, will serve as moderator. An Action Fair will provide access to a resource guide listing local organizations and initiatives. Visit Princetonlibrary.org for details. To find more information about joining boards, commissions, or committees, visit princetonnj.gov. “Most if not all of us who serve in elected office started out by first volunteering on a board, commission, or committee,” said Council President Leticia Fraga. “There is no better way to get to know our residents and the needs of our diverse communities.” “Mayor, Council, and municipal staff cannot possibly understand all issues on a granular level,” added Newlin. “BCCs, along with staff, act as a triage or filter to qualify issues and actions that inform and educate decisions that are considered and executed. Princeton is very fortunate to have advocacy through volunteerism that makes our municipality potent and capable of providing a high level of services to our residents.” —Anne Levin

Collection Contract continued from page one

“By using carts, we can also lessen personnel needs. It also results in fewer causes for workmen’s compensation claims.” Stockton and Land Use Engineer Jim Purcell stressed that the idea of a composting program has not been abandoned, and the town is committed to having one in place as soon as possible. “There are some roadblocks in the way,” said Councilwoman Eve Niedergang. “But there are good ideas being proposed, and hopefully we will get there.” —Anne Levin

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in October, following the announcement by the longtime LHT co -presidents, Eleanor Horne and Becky Taylor, that they intend to retire from the board at the end of 2022. The trustees also determined that a fulltime executive director is critical to the success of the LHT strategic plan. The trail board has long described itself as an entity created “by the community, for the community.” Under its new leadership, it will continue its community orientation and the development of the Lawrence Hopewell Trail as a much-loved community amenity. The Lawrence Hopewell Trail is anchored by two Bristol Myers Squibb campuses, the Educational Testing Service campus and Mercer Meadows Park. It serves Lawrence Township and the broader Hopewell Valley region, including Hopewell Township and Pennington and Hopewell Boroughs. It is a unique trail, initially launched through a corporate-driven community relations effor t that envisioned going beyond building a biking and walking trail connecting the com-

The Lawrence Hopewell Trail ( L HT ) Cor poration has announced changes in its leadership with its first executive director and a new chair and vice chair of its board of trustees. The LHT is a 20-plus mile biking and walking trail through Lawrence and Hopewell townships. After 20 years of operation as an all-volunteer working board, the LHT is moving to its next phase of service to the community with a new executive director, Lisa Serieyssol, who is well-known to the transportation and trail communities. She will work with LHT Board of Trustees, starting in December. Former Hopewell Tow nship Deput y Mayor David Sandahl and John R. Murray, who recently retired from Bristol Myers Squibb, will assume their new roles as chair and vice chair, respectively, on January 1. “We are thrilled that Lisa, an active transpor tation practitioner with a special focus on bicycling and trails, will become the first full-time professional for the Lawrence Hopewell Trail,” said Sandahl, a board leader and community volunteer. “She has an outstanding track record in public service, including leading Princeton to Silver Level designation as a bike-friendly community — the highest rating in New Jersey.” The LHT Board of Trustees elected Sandahl and

to enhance community interactions among residents, small and large businesses, the nonprofit sector, and governmental entities in the Lawrence and Hopewell Valley area. That approach was enthusiastically embraced by representatives of municipal, county, and state governments and community activists at the LHT’s very first meeting in 2002. Community support has grown with each passing year. As its executive director, Serieyssol will provide full-time professional leadership to the LHT with the full support and oversight of an active board of trustees. Most recently she served as the Greater Mercer Transportation Management Association’s program coordinator of the Safe Routes to Schools program for Mercer and Ocean counties. She continues her membership on Princeton’s Pedestrian and Bicycle Advisory Committee, which recently helped create more than 10 miles of bike boulevards in a loop connecting four elementary schools, the middle school, and high school in Princeton, among many other activities.

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“LALDEF (Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund) is in its adolescent years right now,” said Executive Director Cecy JimenezWeeast in a Monday phone interview. “It’s got a lot of potential to grow.” And that growth is evident in all facets of the nonprofit organization, which was founded in 2004 to defend the civ il r ights of L atin Americans in the Mercer County area and to promote their access to health care and education. Jimenez-Weeast described her goal of continuing to expand LALDEF’s legal services and education programs throughout the county and to increase its presence in Princeton in particular. LALDEF’s embrace of the Latinas Unidas organization, announced on November 22, will help to enhance that growth. “We are thrilled to welcome the Latinas Unidas program,” said JimenezWeeast. “Founded by our cur rent Board President Sasa Olessi Montano 30 years ago, the goal of that program is the support of new immigrants in the area, to help women coming in to connect with other women, and to learn about available ser vices. It is a suppor t group for women and families. The mission of Latinas fits the mission of LALDEF.” Latinas Unidas was originally bas ed in Trenton, then moved to the YWCA in Princeton in 2015. When it needed a home this year, Montano was eager to invite Latinas Unidas to join L A L D E F. B efore t a k i ng charge at LALDEF a year and a half ago, JimenezWeeast noted, she ran the Latinas Unidas program for 25 years. Looking forward to expanding their immigration legal services, LALDEF recently announced that their staff member Shelly Peskin has become a Department of Justice (DOJ) accredited representative and can represent individuals in immigration legal matters before the Department of Homeland Security. LALDEF’s legal services department now includes a supervising attorney, two DOJ-accredited representatives, and a legal services coordinator. The team makes sure that recent immigrants to Mercer County know their rights, have access to protective services, and can successfully navigate the complicated legal systems that lead to permanent status in the United States. Ji m enez -We e as t note d that LALDEF had added extra hours for legal screening, with evening as well as morning hours to meet the needs of their clients who are seeking consultations concerning their legal rights and options. “There’s a constant flow of clients,” said Jimenez-Weeast. “Screenings are in demand and we’re booked through December. We set up a client’s first screenings to determine if the client has a case that LALDEF can handle.” A s o f N o v e m b e r 21, L A L DE F had conducted about 55 legal screens since mid-October. Jimenez -Wee as t was

especially enthusiastic about LALDEF’s growing education programs. Taking over recently as FUTURO Program coordinator, Griselda Pachuca-Garcia, a first-generation graduate of Rutgers University, will be looking to carry on LALDEF’s work with area high school students — currently 42 juniors and seniors, 26 from Trenton, 16 from Princeton. LALDEF, with assistance from Mercer County Community College, recently hosted a workshop for students and their families who were completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). “We had a full house,” said JimenezWeeast. “It was fantastic. Next month our student participants will be visiting Stockton University, and in May they will be participating in a poetry slam where they will express their views as first and second generation students aiming for higher education.” Jimenez-Weeast added, “There’s lots of demand, and our goal is to increase the number of students in Princeton. We need to be

more visible in Princeton than we have been in the past because of the need there.” She went on to mention a number of grants received by L A L DE F recently in cluding a grant from the Pr inceton Area Community Foundation to address health disparities in Mercer County; a three-year grant from United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for comprehensive services to recent immigrants; a grant from the Mercer County OneStop Career Center to provide community work experience training; a grant from the New Jersey Department of Labor; and a grant from the Merancas Foundation. “It is my goal to make L ALDEF grow and become the main resource center for the Latino community, not just in Trenton but in all Mercer County,” said Jimenez-Weeast. “It has been a challenge, but LALDEF is equipped to deliver the services that our community deserves. It is so needed.” —Donald Gilpin

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come together, the great human brain can be improved because all brains, all humans benefit from talking to others. What the Commons is designed to do is to bring people together who are the great brains of our society, and have them interact; and also, people who visit can meet with scholars. So that’s really what it’s designed to do.” Intended as a building “with long-term architectural significance,” integrated with the surrounding landscape and campus, the Rubenstein Commons will serve as a gathering place for Institute scholars from the four IAS schools of historical studies, mathematics, natural sciences, and social science. Each year the IAS welcomes more than 200 of the world’s most promising post-doctoral researchers and scholars, who are selected and mentored by a

want Flower Show attendees Philadelphia Flower Show Announces “The Garden Electric” to channel the spirit of the

At a press conference November 18, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (PHS) shared artistic renderings and details for its lineup of activations and events coming to the 2023 PHS Philadelphia Flower Show, March 4-12 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. Tickets are on sale now at the lowest prices. As a special holiday promotion, PHS will extend this offer through December 31. Single adult tickets are $38.50 with additional best price options for students, children, and families. Tickets are available at tickets.phsonline.org. The 2023 Flower Show has taken the most popular aspects of the past two outdoor shows and incorporated the festival-style elements into the indoor event for the first time. This integration creates a familiar, yet fresh approach to activities for guests, in addition to the floral and garden exhibits. “The joy that we feel when engaging in something creative is what inspired the guest experiences for the 2023 F lower Show. We

9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022

permanent faculty of leaders in their fields. Present and past faculty and members have included 35 Nobel laureates as well as many Fields Medal winners, MacArthur Fellows, and Abel and Wolf prize winners. This year’s scholarly community comes from 36 countries and more than 100 academic institutions from around the world. A recent IAS press release noted the most recent faculty appointments of Bhargav Bhatt, one of the leading figures of the recent revolution in p-adic geometry, as well as Wei Ho, a visiting professor and the first director of Women and Mathematics, a program recr uiting and retaining women in mathematics and supporting female scholars at various stages of their careers. Other scholars joining IAS this year include Historical Studies Member Verena Krebs, whose research

concerns transcultural medieval and pre-modern Africontinued from page one can and global history and designed by Steven Holl Arwho looks to “push people chitects, contains meeting to re-think the importance rooms, an indoor/outdoor of African polities in a largcafe, a living room, offices, er pre-modern world”; and and a gallery of campus hisMathematics Member D. tory from Einstein to today. Dominique Kemp, who is purIt is located near the Instisuing the study of harmonics, tute’s flagship Fuld Hall, including waves and tides. where Einstein and others Sophie Lund Schroder have t hought, met, and has joined the IAS School exchanged ideas since the of Natural Sciences, as she early days of the IAS’s 92continues her work on binayear history. ry stars, pairs of stars that Blackboards of natural orbit each other in ways slate, a tradition for intelsimilar to the way the moon lectual exchange at the IAS, orbits Earth. School of Soline the interiors, while priscial Science member K-Sue matic glass breaks white Park is examining how collight into the spectrum, ilonization and enslavement luminating the interior with have shaped today’s legal natural light and color. institutions and practices, and will be working at IAS At the March 14, 2018 on her forthcoming book g rou ndbre a k i ng for t he about the history of the land Commons, Rubenstein, who system and how it produced is co-founder and co-chaira radicalized society in the man of the Carlyle Group United States. and an IAS trustee, stated, “by having the ability to In 2015, when he made his initial $20 million gift for the new building, Rubenstein emphasized the value of IAS as “a beacon for pure, unrestricted research,” and commented on the importance of the new Rubenstein Commons. “This new building is essential for the Institute to continue to provide a complete and rewarding experience for scholars from around the world who are investigating some of the most intriguing questions across sciences and humanities,” he said. “I am confident that this addition to the campus will be beneficial and energizing, and will result in GATHERING PLACE: The Rubenstein Commons at the Institute for Advanced Study has opened its highly productive visits for doors, promoting contemplation, communication, and collaboration among Institute members future Institute scholars.” and visitors. (Photo by Paul Warchol) —Donald Gilpin Rubenstein Commons

bright and exuberant gardens and get involved doing and making something that will be a lasting memory,” said PHS’s Director of Experiences and Engagement, Rebecca Schuchart. New activities include live music curated by SNACKTIME, a kids’ cocoon, “Design and Dine,” a walk-up “Bloom Bar” with wearable pieces of floral art, early morning tours, guided photography tours, “Family Frolic” dedicated to families with small children, “Fido Fr iday,” “F lower s A f ter Hours,” exotic butterflies, and an “Artisan Row.” Visit phsonline.org/theflower-show or email flowershowtickets@pennhort. org for more information.

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Brian Hughes Seeks 2023 Re-Election, Faces Competition for County Executive

Brian M. Hughes, Mercer County executive since 2004, has announced that he will be seeking re-election in 2023 for a sixth term. Speaking to a large gathering of supporters in the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local #269 union hall in Lawrence Township on November 14, Hughes highlighted accomplishments under his leadership over the past 19 years and emphasized the need for progress on future projects. “There are so many great things on the horizon for Mercer County, and that’s why I ask for your support,” he said. Among the initiatives that he looks forward to overseeing in the coming years are the Trenton-Mercer Airport’s new terminal, the Dam Site 21 and Moore’s Station Quarry Park developments, and the installation of electric vehicle chargers throughout

the county to keep up with hold. But there are so many demand. great things on the horizon for Mercer County. We are now past the depths of COVID, and with unemployment down and the business environment good, I want to see these through to fruition.” Hughes, 66, reminded the crowd that his fi rst term as county executive, 20042008, marked a shift in power from Republicans to Democrats in Mercer County government. “We know in politics and life that sometimes memories can be short, Brian Hughes so let me remind everyone,” He talked about his admin- he said. “Twenty years ago, istration’s accomplishments I took on the Republican during the pandemic and the machine and won. Since my opening up of possibilities in first election we have had the future. “We have all sol- stable, Democratic leaderdiered through the most seri- ship in Mercer County — at ous and personal crisis of our the county level and in local time — a global pandemic,” governments.” he said. “I feel it has denied He went on to emphasize me two years to advance his ability to work with leadprojects that have been on ers in both parties for the benefit of all. “I have worked cooperatively with all our elected officials, Democratic and Republican, to act in the best interest of Mercer County: to create jobs, build needed public improvements 741 Alexander Rd, Princeton • 924-2880 to our roads and facilities, to provide needed government services, to help our people and make Mercer County a place where we all want to live.” Among the accomplishments he noted under his leadership, Hughes cited the construction of the Mercer County Courthouse, the county’s largest public project in history and one that created 750 construction jobs; the preservation of more than

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5,700 acres of open space and farmland, more than 27 percent of Mercer County; and the county’s park system, which hosts more than two million visitors each year and “features some of the most unique programs in the state — horseback riding, tennis, a nature center, pickle ball, fi ve golf courses, a marina, and the recently acquired Hopewell Valley Golf Club.” Hughes, who was a Mercer County freeholder before becoming county executive, is a Princeton resident and the son of the late Richard J. Hughes, who served two terms as New Jersey governor and later became chief justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court. Hughes is likely to face serious challenges in his bid for the Democratic nomination for county executive. Former Trenton Mayor Douglas Palmer and Assemblyman Daniel Benson ( D-Hamilton) are both contemplating entering the race, according to New Jersey Globe. The Mercer County Democratic organization is expected to hold a nominating convention early next year, with the primary election scheduled for June, followed by the general election in November. “Across this county, people I meet share their praise for the quality of life here in Mercer,” Hughes told the November 14 gathering. “Our roads are in great shape, we stay on top of bridge repairs, our snowplows are timely, we’ve got a park system that’s second to none, our tax rate is steady, and our services are reliable. It’s a track record that I’m proud of and want to build upon.” —Donald Gilpin

Industry Leaders to Discuss how to make a financial case Climate and Housing Crisis for sustainable construction

Sustainable Princeton’s Sustainable Minds returns for the final session of 2022 in a virtual event on Tuesday, December 6 at 7 p.m. Ken Levenson, executive director of Passive House Network, and Christina McPike, director of energy and sustainability at WinnCompanies, will discuss sustainable construction and how it can address both climate change and provide people with a place to call home. “We know people in town care about this topic, and our team is very excited about it. The town is growing, and we need to push the envelope to ensure our housing stock helps us meet our climate action plan goals,” said Christine Symington, executive director of Sustainable Princeton. “Sustainable building concepts like U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED, Net Zero Energy, Passive House, and Enterprise Green Communities need to be deployed and embraced if we are going to avoid the worst impact of climate change.” This session is particularly unique because the Central Jersey chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) is partnering with Sustainable Princeton to offer continuing education credits to any licensed architects who attend. Topics to be covered include the fundamental process of designing energy-efficient, sustainable buildings (including and not limited to Passive House, net-zero and net-zero-ready buildings); the role that sustainable development plays in support of social equity and access; examples of

on budget-restricted projects; and the potential of the Inflation Reduction Act and other recent legislation to accelerate the development of energy-efficient and net-zero energy buildings. Visit sustainableprinceton. org to register for this free event, which is presented over Zoom.

Princeton Medical Center Gets “A” for Safety

Princeton Medical Center (PMC) received another “A” in the Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grades, a peer-reviewed rating published twice annually to evaluate hospitals on how well they protect patients from preventable errors, accidents, injuries, and infections. The Fall 2022 Hospital Safety Grades were recently released by The Leapfrog Group, an independent national watchdog organization. The grades are based on more than 30 performance measures related to outcomes such as hospital-acquired infections, surgical errors, and patient falls, as well as the systems that hospitals have in place to help prevent harm. “I want to commend the physicians and staff members who support care at the hospital, as well as the health care quality specialists at Penn Medicine Princeton Health who monitor our clinical performance,” said Princeton Health CEO James Demetriades. “The hospital safety grade is a comprehensive, evidence-based evaluation. Earning an ‘A’ takes a commitment to patient safety and continuous quality improvement throughout the organization.”

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022 • 14

Mailbox Thanks and Holiday Greetings From Kingston Postal Service Team

To the Editor: The U.S. Postal Service has been hard at work preparing for the holiday season since January. Rest assured, we’re holiday-ready and well prepared to deliver fast and reliable service to every address in Kingston and across America. USPS has made significant investments to ensure your holiday greeting cards and packages reach their intended destination on time. We’ve added 249 new package sorting machines across the nation which will allow us to process 60 million packages per day. This new equipment is part of $40 billion in new investments made under Delivering for America, our 10-year plan to achieve financial sustainability and service excellence. Additionally, we have the space we need to manage all packages and mail when they reach us. We’ve strategically expanded our footprint by 8.5 million square feet throughout the country to augment space shortages at existing postal facilities and we’ve deployed new technology on our workroom floors to make sure we can track and move mail and packages quickly and to get them on their way. The 650,000 men and women of the U.S. Postal Service pride ourselves on playing an important role in delivering the holidays for the nation. We’ve had more than 100,000 part-time employees convert to full-time positions since January 2021. And there is still time to join our team for the holiday season. Open seasonal positions are posted at usps.com/hiring. Thank you for continuing to support the Postal Service. Our Kingston Postal Service Team — Richard, Tari, Skip, and John — wish you a wonderful holiday season. RICHARD MICALLEF Postmaster Route 27, Kingston

BOE Candidate Rafalovsky Thanks Supporters; Says Community Should Work Together, Demand More

To the Editor: I’m humbled by the support and warmth of so many neighbors across the community who shared my concerns. Even though I didn’t win, I stood up for educational principles widely shared by thousands of Princeton taxpayers, and I was able to raise public awareness about Princeton Public Schools’ declining math proficiency scores, falling national rankings, and our disappointing performance across multiple equity indicators. My platform resonated with 3,485 voters (count as of November 21) who are unhappy with the status quo, placing me just 4 percentage points behind an incumbent. I hope this in itself sends a strong message to all members of the School Board — to whom I wish nothing but the best. The Board of Education and PPS leadership have a tough road ahead. This school year’s theme is Healing, Helping, and Hope. I welcome the opportunity to learn more specifics about how those ideals translate into improving Princeton High School (PHS) math scores (51 percent math proficiency at PHS); lower chronic absenteeism rates (47 percent of Black or African American and Hispanic or Latino American students are chronically absent from PHS,

58 percent of English language learners, and 63 percent of low-income students); and improve graduation rates for English learners, which dropped to 67 percent in 2020-21 from 88 percent in 2019-20. Furthermore, according to the consulting company hired by PPS, less than 20 percent of Latino PHS students feel that they belong, and less than 25 percent felt comfortable being themselves at school or that there was at least one adult who cared about them. As PPS leadership stated in last week’s letter to parents, every student deserves opportunities to be seen and to succeed. I couldn’t agree more. How will we get there? Our students deserve to see an action plan and a stakeholder communication plan. The current version of the district strategic plan does not address these areas of concern. How will we lift everyone up, as promised in the letter? Dear parents and caring community members: I hoped to lead the way on the School Board to demand district transparency and leadership accountability that taxpayers and PPS students deserve. The thousands of votes I received prove there are many of you out there that want this too. It’s now up to everyone that cares to work together, speak up at meetings, and demand more. RITA RAFALOVSKY Library Place

Offering Thanks to Princeton Council For Support of Dog-Friendly Endeavors

To the Editor: This Thanksgiving week, Princeton’s dog owners and the Princeton Dog Park Alliance want to offer their (belated) thanks to the Princeton Council. Last month, the Council unanimously passed an ordinance to establish future dog parks, launch a pilot off-leash program in Quarry Park, and plan for a temporary dog park in Community Park South. We want to thank Councilwoman Michelle Pirone Lambros and Council President Leticia Fraga, who had productive discussions with the Alliance. And we especially want to single out Councilwoman Mia Sacks for her leadership in bringing the ordinance to fruition. In addition to offering our applause and thanks, the Alliance stands ready to work hand-in-hand with the municipality on these dog-friendly endeavors. Dog parks are great for dogs and great for their owners. They help build community, which is another thing for which we can be thankful — all throughout the year. CALVIN CHIN Spruce Street LEANNE HUNTER Wiggins Street ROGER SHATZKIN Chestnut Street The writers are members of the Princeton Dog Park Alliance’s Board of Trustees.

Thanking All Those Who Supported HIP’s Successful Annual Rent Party

To the Editor: Housing Initiatives of Princeton (HIP) held its annual Rent Party on Saturday, November 5 when our sold-out crowd of over 175 people gathered on a gorgeous night at the beautiful Updike Farmstead to help us “raise the rent” to assist low-income working families in our community. Through the generosity of our supporters — including the more than 80 event sponsors — HIP raised more than $90,000 which we will use to provide transitional housing with family-focused supportive services and emergency rental assistance to help individuals and families experiencing housing insecurity build toward a sustainable future. To learn more about what we do,

please visit our website at housinginitiativesofprinceton.org. We want to thank the amazing Rent Party Committee — Carol Golden, Kathleen Gittleman, Sue Cameron, Tamera Matteo, Lydia Pfeiffer, Tina Motto, and Wendy Kaczerski — who worked tirelessly to make the event so welcoming and fun! We were also so fortunate to work with Leanne Hunter of Updike, Emily’s Catering, and the fabulous Steve Johnson Band. Some of HIP’s staunchest supporters donated their services: Anne Fahey provided the beautiful invitations; Jammin’ Crepes, the delicious dessert; Kathy Klockenbrink, table decorations; and Emily Reeves, her photography. We at HIP are so grateful to our whole community, which truly came together — neighbor helping neighbor — to ensure our community remains diverse and vibrant! LIZ LEMPERT Chair, Housing Initiatives of Princeton Mercer Street

Dinky Rail Line Should Be Turned Into Transit Corridor with Bike, Pedestrian Access

To the Editor: I write in support of turning the Dinky rail line into a vibrant transit corridor, with bike and pedestrian access, and a new dedicated bus route that extends well into downtown Princeton. NJ Transit deserves credit for reviewing the corridor, seeking public input, and suggesting these very upgrades. Now, with so much competition for infrastructure funds, we need the support of elected officials — particularly at the state and federal levels — to make it happen. There is already enthusiasm on the ground. Our group, the Friends of the Dinky Corridor, recently launched a petition that has garnered signatures from folks around the Princeton area. You can read more about the effort here: https://chng. it/6vdsTnRy. As a resident of Princeton and a high school teacher in West Windsor, the existing Dinky line strikes me as a missed opportunity. My students have no safe way of walking or biking to Nassau Street, just a few miles from their homes. It’s a missed opportunity for Princeton’s business district as well. Consider this: 800 units of housing are currently under construction as part of the “W Squared” development at Princeton Junction. Those new residents will take one look at clogged Route 1 feeders like Washington Road and decamp to restaurants on their own side of the highway — and no amount of al fresco charm and artisanal ice cream is going to change their minds. What will change their minds is a more flexible rail-and-bus route that extends into downtown Princeton and runs every 10-15 minutes. It’s a win for diners, shoppers, and commuters too, as the NJ Transit proposal includes stops at the Carnegie Center office complex. Still, there’s more than just commerce at stake. We need infrastructure that benefits young people. That matters to them. Right now, even when there’s good infrastructure news coming out of Washington, the focus is on large-scale, multistate projects that hardly impact a teenager’s daily life. You can understand why young people might lose faith in the system. In the Trump years, “Infrastructure Week” turned into a kind of national joke because it would come and go and nothing happened. For teens, every week must feel like Infrastructure Week. All the lofty political rhetoric has done little to improve our suburban landscape, one that continues to neglect Americans who are too young to drive or who can’t afford a car. NJ Transit has offered a sound proposal to get more people, more quickly to the Northeast Corridor lines. And it can fill the Dinky transitway with bicyclists and pedestrians, commuters who live and work locally, and consumers who bring money — not congestion — to our downtown. Now is the time to fight for the upgrade. NJ Transit has made clear that, in the near future, it will cease to operate the 40-year-old Dinky train cars. In other words, this is not about getting stuck with the status quo. It’s about getting stuck with nothing at all. BRIAN LEVINSON Patton Avenue

Letters to the Editor Policy

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Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.


Yacovone and Glaude Discuss “Teaching White Supremacy” Library Live at Labyrinth is presenting Donald Yacovone and Eddie Glaude in Conversation about Yacovone’s new book Teaching White Supremacy: America’s Democratic Ordeal and the Forging of Our National Identity (Pantheon) on Wednesday, November 30

at 6 p.m. This event is part of Labyrinth’s and the Public Library’s joint programming and is cosponsored by Princeton University’s African American Studies Department and Humanities Council. For more information about the program or to register for the virtual

first since the Women’s Prize award-winning May We Be Forgiven. The event is inperson and will be held at the Princeton Public Library. The New York Times Book Review comments: “In this much-anticipated, wickedly funny and sharply observed political satire, Homes takes readers inside the homes and meeting rooms of a dyed-inthe-wool conservative with big plans for change. This novel of politics and family brings readers to the fault line of American politics, giving voice to the fears and fantasies of the old Republican plutocracy.” Homes is the author of 13 books, among them the best-selling memoir The Mistress’ Daughter; the novels This Book Will Save Your Life, The End of Alice, and Jack; and three short story collections. Days of Awe, The Safety of Objects, and

Things You Should Know. She also writes for film and television and teaches in the Creative Writing Program at Princeton University. Edwards is a legal historian whose research focuses

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A.M. Homes Talks About New Novel November 29

Labyrinth and the Princeton Public Library present novelist A.M. Homes will discuss her new novel The Unfolding (Viking) with historian Laura F. Edwards on Tuesday, November 29 at 7 p.m. The new novel is her

on the 19th-century United States. Her prize winning books include, among others, Scarlett Doesn’t Live Here Anymore: Southern Women in the Civil War Era.

Est. 1967

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022

Books

version, contact labyrinthbooks.com. Described by scholar and public intellectual Henr y Louis Gates as “the most profoundly original cultural history in recent memory,” Yacovone’s book reveals the systematic ways in which white supremacist ideology has infiltrated American culture. According to Gates, “If we want to understand the roots of our current culture wars and our current battles over the place of race in American history classes, this marvelous book is the place to start. Yacovone’s recovery of the long-buried roots of racist discourse in our children’s textbooks, is crucial to the creation of a long-deferred narrative of America’s multi-racial past, and our multicultural present and future.” Yacovone is the lifetime associate at Harvard University’s Hutchins Center for African and African American Research. His previous book is The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross, co-written with Henry Louis Gates Jr. He is the recipient of the W.E.B. Du Bois medal. Educator, author, and political commentator Glaude is the author of, among others, Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022 • 16

BOOK REVIEW

“Deadwood” Author David Milch Tells His Story In this century, and moment, of mania, Tell me a story. —Robert Penn Warren (1905-1989) avid Milch’s memoir Life’s Work (Random House $28) is a tour de force pulled together against all odds; as a work of literary art it’s worthy of comparison with modern American classics like Frank Conroy’s Stop Time, Fred Exley’s A Fan’s Notes, Patti Smith’s Just Kids and M-Train, and Bob Dylan’s Chronicles. Potential readers, however, are met with a blurb in bold type presenting “a profound memoir from a brilliant mind taking stock as Alzheimer’s loosens his hold on his own past.” As if to make up for the pairing of a flat phrase like “taking stock” with the notion that Milch is losing his hold on his past, the jacket copy closes with a line that sings — “a revelatory memoir from a great American writer in what may be his final dispatch to us all.” The catch is that the great writer’s magnum opus was actually a rhetorically rich, fabulously profane American classic called Deadwood, which was not only written but spoken, staged, choreographed, and constructed with contributions from numerous others, only to be shut down after three seasons by HBO, which had once given Milch the game-changing freedom to take language where networks and sponsors usually fear to tread. In Life’s Work, Milch describes how his thrust toward “ever more extreme varieties of language in their profanity or intricacy or strangeness” has been “to show, through the form of dialogue, the variety and ultimately the joy of the energy that’s given to us all as humans.” For Milch “the joy of the energy” drives both the story of his extraordinary life and his sweeping vision of community in a lawless American mining town in 1876. “The Deepest Gift” Although Milch’s prologue to Life’s Work begins in an Alzheimer’s no-man’sland (“I’m on a boat sailing to some island where I don’t know anybody. A boat someone is operating, and we aren’t in touch”), he returns to family and community in the book’s closing pages: “I still hear voices. I still tell stories. There is the voice in my wife’s head and the ones in my children’s heads. The deepest gift I think an individual can experience is to accept himself as part of a larger living thing, and that’s what we are as a family.” “They Were Alive” Although the memoir is dedicated to

D

Milch’s late brother Bob, the epigraph comes from “Tell Me a Story,” a poem by his surrogate father and literary guiding light at Yale, the novelist, poet, and critic Robert Penn Warren, one of mid-20thcentury America’s most distinguished men of letters. It was while helping Warren assemble an anthology (American Literature: The Makers and the Making) that Milch began to share his mentor’s belief in the immediacy of the tradition: “They were alive and their work was alive and he was sitting with them. That was the kind of immediacy his conversation with their work generated.” They meaning, among illustrious others, Melville, Twain, and the James family (Alice, William, and Henry), the subject of Milch’s first screenplay, which he and the anthology’s co-editor R.W.B. Lewis were pitching to the National Endowment and PBS when the phone rang with the news that Milch’s father had killed himself — and, in effect, the screenplay. His father’s last request, according to Milch, was “Don’t tell David until he’s done with his pitch.” Intimations of Huck Addressed as “Mr. Warren” throughout Life’s Work, Milch ’s second father eventually learned that Elmer Milch lived a double life — an este e m e d s u r g e on w h o was a compulsive gambler and an alcoholic. As Milch writes: “My brother was going to be a doctor, he had been selected for that, I had been selected to be the bum. A version of my dad separated into each of us” and “when I started to exhibit symptoms of degeneracy, it pleased my dad.” What did Warren make of his conflicted star student? For Milch “using drugs was a way to organize and structure a day. I loved heroin. I loved checking out.... The thing with acid was that it was a mixed message. You were loaded and you were transcendent, but with dope you were just loaded, which is all I ever wanted to be.” My guess is that Warren saw in Milch something comparable to Huck Finn’s visceral resistance to “being civilized,” and that at some point in their relationship, they talked about the scene in which Huck’s drunken “Pap” goes after him with a knife. While I don’t mean to compare the

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accomplished surgeon with the psychotic racist who fathered Huck, Milch must have been tempted to share with his surrogate father anecdotes about his actual father’s other life, such as the “sheer alcoholic blizzard” that blitzed David’s graduation weekend at Yale (“He would get meaner or nicer on the bottle depending on which way the wind blew”). Moving in Patterns It was while reading Milch’s account of the time his father introduced 5-year-old David to race track betting that I first began thinking of Huck. The paragraph that illuminated the connection for me begins, “When I was eight years old, I stole my first booze. There was always plenty of it in the house. I had compulsions I didn’t know what to do with.” For one, he became convinced that the grandfather he had been brought up to kiss as he lay in the coffin “used to take one step from his grave every night, and when he finally got to where I was, I would die. So I would keep him busy. I’d move in patterns.” This anecdote brought to mind Twain’s treatment of Huck’s haunted b oy h o o d , h i s m or b i d t houghts ( no wonder, when your knife-wielding father calls you “the a ng el of d e at h ” ) . A s for “moving patterns,” Milch makes his most consequential career move when, like Huck, he “lights out for the Territory.” Sipowicz and Swearengen Before heading for Deadwood, Milch crafted an urban epic called NYPD Blue, with help from co-author Steven Bochco and retired NYPD officer Bill Clark. Discussing his concept of the show’s central figure, police detective Andy Sipowicz, Milch quotes Mark Twain on the notion that any character he created “he was meeting for the second time because he met them first on the river.” One of the characters met “for the second time” was Milch’s father, whose explosiveness was transferred to Sipowicz. When Milch refers to Sipowicz as “in many ways a frightening character” made less frightening by “his idiosyncratic use of language and the islands of gentleness we see in him,” he could be talking about Deadwood’s eloquently profane antihero

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Al Swearengen. And just as another key influence on the shaping of Sipowicz was Dennis Franz, the actor who played him for 12 seasons, the same could be said of Ian McShane, the British actor whose epic portrayal of the cut-throat saloon owner is one of the glories of Deadwood. Deadwood and Moby Dick As much as I’ve admired Deadwood through the years, having seen all three seasons three times and the 2019 film twice, the notion that the show may be to series television what Melville’s Moby Dick is to American literature had never occurred to me until I read Life’s Work. If I’m seeing what Milch does with Swearengen and Deadwood as analogous to what Melville does with Ahab and Moby Dick, it’s probably because “Mr. Warren” was able to help Milch experience the great American writers as if they “were alive and their work was alive and he was sitting with them.” After describing his satisfaction with the pilot episode, Milch says “it felt worthy of Mr. Warren watching. He wasn’t there but it felt worthy.” Mr. Warren’s Poetry Early in Life’s Work, Milch writes: “Prior to Mr. Warren’s teachings, I thought of the whole idea of poetry as unmanly. My dad had a profoundly skeptical attitude in that regard. That was one of the gifts Mr. Warren gave me ... the recognition of poetry as not only honorable but manly. And it was as if an entire shell fell away.... And Mr. Warren’s unconflicted embracing of all of those emotional states was such a liberation.” n a May 27, 2019 New Yorker article, “David Milch’s Third Act,” when Mark Singer asks him whether Alzheimer’s “had given anything in return,” Milch speaks of “a continuous sense of urgency … an acute sense of time’s passage.” His suggestion “that time is ultimately the subject of every story” leads to a quote from Warren’s poem “Tell Me a Story,” lines that Milch has cited over the years “in classrooms, writers’ rooms, personal encounters, lectures, and interviews” and that now serve as an epigraph to the story of his life: Tell me a story. In this century, and moment, of mania, Tell me a story Make it a story of great distances, and starlight. The name of the story will be Time, But you must not pronounce its name. Tell me a story of deep delight. —Stuart Mitchner

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The Annual Guide to the Holidays and Winter in the Princeton Region

’Tis the Season will hit homes and area businesses on DECEMBER 7.

’Tisthe Season 2022 YOUR GUIDE TO THE HOLIDAY AND WINTER SEASON!

This exciting special edition full color booklet has become a Princeton tradition, showcasing our hometown highlights. ’Tis the Season will feature HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS — a day-by-day listing of area holiday events, and advertisers are guaranteed to have their events included.

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11/20/19 9:11 AM


TOPICS

A

Renowned Bach Chorus and Orchestra Perform in Princeton

rare musical gem came to Princeton last week when McCarter Theatre presented an international touring choral/orchestral ensemble. The Internationale Bachakademie Stuttgart is a foundation established in 1981 to research and perform the music of Johann Sebastian Bach and connect it to musical composition of today. Despite the focus on Bach, the organization has commissioned numerous works inspired by or rooted in the compositional style of the 18thcentury master and has been recognized for its international collaboration. The Bachakademie houses the Gächinger Kantorei chorus and Bach-Collegium Stuttgart orchestra, and both of these ensembles came to McCarter Theatre Center’s Matthews Theater last Wednesday night to perform Bach’s monumental Mass in B minor. Conducted by Bachakademie Artistic Director Hans-Christoph Rademann, the concert presented a work which has challenged choral ensembles for more than 250 years. Bach’s responsibilities as cantor at the Thomaskirche in Leipzig in the early 1700s required him to churn out service music at a seemingly unfathomable rate. In the last decade of his life, Bach began to expand a previously composed “Kyrie” and “Gloria” work into what became the Mass in B minor by adding a “Credo,” “Sanctus,” and “Agnus Dei” from music composed over a 25-year period. Bach completed the mass in 1749, but this work was not performed as a concert piece until the mid-1800s, more than a century after Bach’s death. The Gächinger Kantorei and BachCollegium performed the Mass in B minor drawing the soloists from the chorus, as would have been done in Bach’s time, and assigning some of the extended coloratura choral passages to solo concertists. Under Rademann’s direction, the performance brought together a clean and precise chorus and orchestra with four historically-informed and technically accurate vocal soloists. T h e “ Ky r i e” a n d “G l o r i a” o f Bach’s Mass were derived from the composer’s 1733 Missa Brevis. The 20-voice chorus of the Bachakademie began the tripartite “Kyrie” with solo concertists, adding singers as the movement progressed to a full choral sound through “terraced” dynamics. Pairs of Baroque oboes and flutes clearly brought out Bach’s counterpoint over a solid continuo foundation of cello, double bass, theorbo and portative organ. The “Christe eleison” featured soprano Magdalene Harer and alto Marie Henriette Reinhold in a well-blended duet, with Reinhold maneuvering well the lower passages of the music. Conducting from

memory, Rademann built a well-paced and dramatic arc through the “Kyrie” movement, effectively capturing the humility of the text. The four major sections of the Mass in B minor are comprised of alternating choruses and vocal solos and duets. The work is often performed with six soloists; the bass solos in particular cover such a wide vocal range that both a bass and baritone are employed. Bass Tobias Berndt showed particular richness in the lower passages of “Quoniam tu solus Sanctus,” with cleanly articulated runs. Berndt also found a lyrical style in a later section of the “Credo,” gracefully accompanied by a pair of well-tuned Baroque oboes. Alto Reinhold may have been the standout member of the vocal quartet, crisply and effortlessly conveying both creative ornamentation in “Laudamus Te” and the pathos and vocal weight of the closing “Agnus Dei.” This was a true Viennese mezzo-soprano sound perfectly suited for music of this time period. Soprano Harer consistently sang stylistically with little vibrato and with pure tone. Tenor Benedikt Kristjansson rounded out the quartet, singing with a light and clear sound. The members of the accompanying orchestra were unfortunately unidentified, but the ensemble uniformly paid clear attention to dynamics and accurate musical details. Bach assigned arias in this work to particular soloists accompanied by specific instruments matching the timbre of the solo voice; an oboe soloist tended to be matched with the alto, flute with soprano. Bass Tobias Berndt was accompanied in the final solo of the “Gloria” by a valveless horn with which the player was required to modulate the sound by changing the breath or mouth position. The accompanying horn solo to this aria was devilish in its intervallic skips, but the Bachakademie players were all up to the challenges of their instruments. onductor Rademann’s tempi were quick and spirited, and the 20-voice chorus well handled the vocal runs within the choral sections. Rademann had trained both chorus and orchestra in 18 th -century performance phrasing and dynamic techniques requiring great precision so as not to unravel, and both ensembles were expert in maintaining a historically-informed performance holding the audience’s attention until the final note. McCarter’s presentation last Wednesday night not only entertained the audience with high-quality performance but also gave a glimpse into what musical life might have been like in Bach’s time. —Nancy Plum

C

P R I N C E TO N S YM P H O N Y O R C H E S T R A R O S S E N M I L A N O V , M U S I C D I R EC TO R

Holiday

Pops!

Saturday, December 17 3pm and 6pm with Broadway’s Janet Dacal

— A Princeton Holiday Tradition! — Rossen Milanov, conductor Janet Dacal, vocalist Princeton High School Choir | Vincent Metallo, director Richardson Auditorium

TICKETS

princetonsymphony.org or 609 / 497-0020

Dates, times, artists, and programs subject to change. Accessibility: For information on available services, please contact ADA Coordinator Kitanya Khateri at least two weeks prior at 609/497-0020.

AMERICAN REPERTORY BALLET presents

Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Dance presents

featuring new + repertory works by Ronald K. Brown Davalois Fearon Sun Kim Michael J. Love Susan Marshall Rashaun Mitchell & Silas Riener Caili Quan

November 25-27 McCarter Theatre Center • Princeton

F E S T I VA L

December 11 Patriots Theater at the War Memorial Trenton DECEMBER 2022 2 8:00 p.m. 3 2 & 8:00 p.m. 4 2:00 p.m. •

Berlind Theatre McCarter Theatre Center Open to the public; tickets required arts.princeton.edu

with The Capital Philharmonic of New Jersey and Trenton Children’s Chorus

December 16-18 State Theatre New Jersey • New Brunswick with The ARB Orchestra and Princeton Girlchoir

arballet.org ETHAN STIEFEL, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR JULIE DIANA HENCH, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022

MUSIC REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022 • 18

Performing Arts

UNEXPECTED RHYTHMS: STOMP uses everything but traditional percussion instruments to create intriguing sounds. The group holds “Stomp Out Hunger” food drives at its upcoming performances. BRASS AMONG FRIENDS: The all-female tenThing Brass Ensemble from Norway performs an packaged goods from the eclectic concert at Richardson Auditorium on December 13 at 6 and 9 p.m. (Photo by Anna-Julia Granberg) list of requested items and receive 15 percent to a pertenThing Brass Ensemble Auditorium, the musicians a new series of social events formance as a thank you. To will be stationed throughout for music lovers that later in receive the 15 percent off Make Princeton Debut The all-female, 10-mem- the concert hall creating a the season will also include discount, patrons can use ber tenThing Brass Ensem- s ur rou nd - s ou nd music a l a Find Your Friends speed promo code STOMPHUNble, formed as a fun col- experience. This season’s friending session and an LG- GER when placing their ticklaboration between friends, Performances Up Close fo- BTQ+ Single Mingle facilitat- et orders. Patrons are asked spearheaded by celebrated cus on “leading ladies” — a ed by The Singles Group. For to then bring drop-off food trumpeter Tine Thing Hels- new generation of female more information, visit puc. or supplies in bins that will be placed in the lobby when eth, makes their Princeton musicians who are leading princeton.edu/do-re-meet. they attend the show. University Concerts (PUC) the charge as classical music STOMP Brings Latest Show debut Tuesday, December performance takes new diFor the list of requestrections. Every detail of this To State Theatre New Jersey ed items, visit STNJ.org/ 13, at 6 and 9 p.m. concert — including seating State Theatre New Jer- Event/STOMP. T he hour-long holiday configuration, a relaxed at- sey presents the internaprogram explores the musiR EPLENISH provides mosphere, and audience in- tional percussion sensation cal traditions of the winter teraction — is curated to fos- STOMP for three perfor- nonperishable foods and season — from the fjords of ter as direct an experience mances on Friday, Decem- necessities to a network of Norway, 18th-century Gerof the music as possible. ber 2 at 8 p.m.; and Satur- over 160 partner organimany, warm Italian Christzations throughout the 25 Tickets are $10-$40. Visit day, December 3 at 2 and 8 towns in Middlesex County mas and evergreen England, p.m. Tickets are $40-$98. to the sounds of Ukrainian puc.princeton.edu or call Ticket buyers can save 15 to ensure that all residents folk music, Czech fairy tales, (609) 258-9220. always have access to nutriDirectly prior to the 9 percent on tickets as part of tionally adequate food and and some contemporar y the STOMP OUT HUNGER American favorites in new p.m. concert, PUC also innecessities. vites attendees to connect Food Drive. arrangements. From its beginnings as State Theatre has partAs part of PUC’s Perfor- over a shared love of music a street per formance in nered with REPLENISH to mances Up Close series, in an inaugural Speed Dathost the STOMP OUT HUN- the U.K., STOMP has perwh ich br i ngs au d ie nce s ing event at 7 p.m., the first GER Food Drive. Patrons formed in more than 50 o n s t a g e a l o n g s i d e t h e of its kind within the music can drop off one or more of countries across the globe, musicians at Richardson industry. This event is part in front of more than 24 of the Do-Re-Meet program, the much-needed canned or

MERCER MUSEUM & FONTHILL CASTLE

million people. Created by Luke Cresswell and Steve McNicholas, the group has an ongoing show at New York’s Orpheum Theatre, a permanent London company, and North American and European tours. Throughout its life, the show has continued to change by creating new material; this year, it will incorporate two new pieces. The performers “make a rhythm out of anything we can get our hands on that makes a sound,” said Cresswell. A unique combination

of percussion, movement, and visual comedy, STOMP uses both household and industrial objects, which find new life as musical instruments in the hands of an idiosyncratic band of body percussionists. Synchro nized stiff-bristle brooms, Z ipp o l ig hte r s, wo o d e n poles, dustbins, tea chests, radiator hoses, boots, and hub caps are among the “instruments” they use. State Theatre New Jersey is at 15 Livingston Avenue in New Brunswick. Visit STNJ. org for more information.

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19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022

A POOH CHRISTMAS: Pooh, Piglet, Little Bunny, and the rest of the gang are on stage in the musical “A Winnie-the-Pooh Christmas Tail,” at Kelsey Theatre November 26 and 27. (Photo courtesy of Maurer Productions OnStage)

Pooh and Friends Perform In Kelsey Theatre Musical

Kelsey Players and Maurer Productions OnStage have planned a special oneweekend-only run of the musical production “A Winniethe-Pooh Christmas Tail” at Kelsey Theatre, on the campus of Mercer County Community College Saturday and Sunday, November 26 and 27 at 1 and 4 p.m.

Audience members are encouraged to bring new, unwrapped toys for donation to Toys for Tots, a program run by the United States Marine Corps Reserve that distributes toys to children in need. T he tale beg ins when C h r i s top h e r R o b i n a n d friends from the HundredAcre Wood share a story of a Christmas Eve a long time ago. Eeyore, the old gray donkey, who lives by

himself in the thistle corner of the Hundred-Acre Wood, has lost his tail. All seems lost until Winnie-the-Pooh and Piglet round up all their friends organize a search party. The show features songs and themes of caring, sharing, and the importance of friends. Tickets are $15 for adults and $12 for children, students and senior citizens. Visit Kelseytheatre.org.

BATTLING THE MOUSE KING: American Repertory Ballet’s production of “The Nutcracker” opens this weekend at McCarter Theatre before taking the show on the road to State Theatre New Jersey in New Brunswick and Patriots Theater at the War Memorial in Trenton next month. Shows at McCarter are 2 and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, November 25 and 26; and Sunday, November 27 at 1 p.m. Visit McCarter.org for tickets.

Princeton University Orchestra & Glee Club

ON TOUR AND ON CAMPUS: The Mercer County Community College Jazz Band, directed by Scott Hornick, had its debut holiday concert of the season on November 16 at MarketFair on Route 1. It was the group’s first performance there since 2019. More free shows are scheduled for November and December. p.m. MCCC faculty, in con- January 22, musicians will Free Holiday Concerts by Community College Musicians junction with the MCCC mu- play “Music from Venice to

The Mercer County Community College (MCCC) Jazz Band is performing free holiday favorites this season at local malls and on the campus at Kelsey Theatre. Additional concerts this season, at Kelsey Theatre, are by the MCCC music faculty and the MCCC Symphonic Band. Directed by Scott Hornick, the jazz band — composed of 13 MCCC students, faculty, and special guests — will play works by Wayne Shorter, Erroll Garner, George and Ira Gershwin, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Stevie Wonder, Kurt Weill, Ringo Sheena, and others. All selections feature improvisations by MCCC jazz students. The jazz band performs Wednesday, November 30, 6-7:30 p.m. at Princeton MarketFair; and Wednesday, December 7, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Quaker Bridge Mall before a final concert on Wednesday, December 14 at 7:30 p.m. in Kelsey Theatre, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. That concert will also be available via livestreaming. On December 13 at 7:30

Jazz Small Groups X and A

MONDAY 12.05.22 7.30 PM

sic club, will perform in Kelsey Theatre as part of a scholarship fundraiser for music students. The event will be livestreamed, and donations will be accepted both in person and online. Free of charge on December 21 at 7:30 p.m. is the MCCC Symphonic Band, directed by Lou Woodruff. The 45-member ensemble will present classics by Vivaldi, Sousa, and Strauss, plus a variety of pops and seasonal favorites. A traditional holiday sing-along will also be orchestrated. Reservations are required. For more information about these events, visit Kelsey. mccc.edu/events.

Capital Philharmonic Plans Chamber Music Series

The Capital Philharmonic of New Jersey has announced an inaugural series of four chamber programs at different locations in Trenton during the 2022-23 season. Musicians from the orchestra are preparing 60- to 75-minute performances of their own selections. Concerts are on Sunday afternoons at 3 p.m. On

New Orleans” at Passage Theatre, 205 East Front Street. Selections by Mozart, Scott Joplin, and the film Cinema Paradiso are planned. The February 12 concert is titled “Classics in Color,” to be performed by a brass quintet at St. Bartholomew’s Lutheran Church, 1746 South Clinton Avenue. Music for flute, oboe, and piano by composers of African American and Spanish heritage is on the program. On March 5, “Musical Fission, from Classical Sounds to Latin American Rhythms and Jazz” is at Trinity Cathedral, 801 West State Street. The program for a quartet of flute, piano, double bass, and drum set will include music of Vivaldi, Miguel Del Aguila, and other composers. The May 7 concert, “Cellisimo,” is at the 1867 Sanctuary, 101 Scotch Road in Ewing. It will be performed by a quintet of three cellos, piano, and clarinet, and include music of Bach, Shostakovich, Joplin, and others. Visit capitalphilharmonic. org /chamber for fur ther information.

After Noon Concert Series Thursdays at 12:30pm Princeton University Chapel

TAPLIN AUDITORIUM FINE HALL

_Michael Pratt_PUO CONDUCTOR _Gabriel Crouch_PUGC DIRECTOR DIRECTOR

DIRECTOR

Matthew Parrish

Ted Chubb

WORKS BY

WORKS BY

Horace Silver Sam Rivers Fats Waller And more!

Charles Fambrough Gigi Gryce Dizzy Gillespie And more!

PLAYERS

PLAYERS

Lyric and Stars

Lukas Arenas ’26 Alto Sax

Milan Sastry ’26 Alto Saxophone

Gustav Holst

Thomas Verrill ’25 Trombone

Isaac Yi ’24 Tenor Saxophone

Alex Egol ’24 Piano

Pranav Vadapalli ’25 Trombone

Mihir Rao ’26 Drums

Rohit Oomman ’24 Guitar

Matthew Parrish (Faculty) Bass

Shlok Shah ’26 Piano

Alexander Borodin

Polovtsian Dances George Walker

The Planets

friday _12.02.22_7:30P sunday _12.04.22_4:30P

Patrick Jaojoco GS Bass

Richardson Auditorium_Alexander Hall Tickets_$15 General_$5 Student

music.princeton.edu

Ryder Walsh ’26 Drums

jazzatprinceton.com

music.princeton.edu

FREE UNTICKETED

No performance on November 24. It is Thanksgiving Recess at Princeton University. The After Noon Concert will resume as usual next Thursday at 12:30pm Performing December 1, 2022 Mark Pacoe East River Catholics, New York, NY


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022 • 20

Town Topics

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@capitalhealthnj

Register online at capitalhealth.org/events and be sure to include your email address. Zoom meeting details will be provided via email 2 – 3 days before the program date. Registration ends 24 hours before the program date.

Achieve More with a Healthy Pelvic Floor Wednesday, November 30, 2022 | 6 p.m. Location: Zoom Meeting Are you experiencing pain in your pelvic area during sex, personal care, or urination/bowel movements? It’s time to advocate for yourself! Join KATHIE OLSON, clinical coordinator for Capital Health’s Center for Incontinence and Pelvic Health, to learn strategies for living your life without pelvic pain. Kathie will be joined by Capital Health Physical Therapists Natalia Ochalski and Felicia Taveira, who will discuss the benefits of pelvic floor physical therapy. All genders are welcome!

The Shoulder: Diagnosis and Treatment Thursday, December 1, 2022 | 6 p.m. Location: Zoom Meeting Many people experience shoulder pain, but it can be caused by a wide range of conditions. DR. JOSHUA HORNSTEIN, a board certified sports medicine orthopaedic surgeon and fellowship trained sports medicine physician at Rothman Orthopaedic Institute, will lead a discussion on the anatomy of the shoulder, common problems and injuries, and the latest treatment options.

ADDITIONAL UPCOMING HEALTH EDUCATION EVENTS: WHAT’S NEW WITH MEDICARE? Monday, December 5, 2022 | 2 p.m. Zoom Meeting

HOLISTIC APPROACH TO ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION Wednesday, December 7, 2022 | 6 p.m. Zoom Meeting

BABYSITTING CLASS Wednesday, December 28, 2022 | 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Capital Health – Hamilton 1445 Whitehorse-Mercerville Road Hamilton, NJ 08619

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022

FREE UPCOMING HEALTH EDUCATION EVENTS


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022 • 22

in Watercolor, Watercolor Trees, and Easter Pysanky Egg Dyeing. In person classes are available for teens and children. For children ages 5-8, classes include Mixed Media, Painting in Depth, Drawing in Depth, and, for children ages 6-8, Pottery. Students ages 9-11 can select from Art in 3 Dimensions, Drawing in Depth, Painting in Depth, and Pottery. Teen offerings include Drawing Intensive, Pottery, Collage Art, and Paper Sculpture and Light Boxes. In-person classes will be offered for children with autism spectrum disorder and other special needs beginning January 30. Students will explore a variety of art projects specifically geared to their interest and ability both in two- and three-dimensional approaches. The Center for Contemporary Art is located at 2020 Burnt Mills Road in Bedminster. For more information or to register for a class, “PARIS”: This work by John Petach of Stockton is a sample of visit ccabedminster.org or art to be found on the 28th Annual Covered Bridge Artisans Fall Studio Tour, a self-guided driving tour on November 25, 26, and call (908) 234-2345. WINTER ART CLASSES: More than 35 winter adult classes are offered at the Center for Con27 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. temporary Art in Bedminster. In-person, hybrid, and virtual art classes and workshops are also Covered Bridge Artisans offered for teens and children beginning January 17. Annual Fall Studio Tour craft and worked in unique, discuss new commissions, The 28th Annual Covered rural, historic studio set- and buy finished work. Over Bridge Artisans Fall Studio tings. This original concept the last 28 years, returning and acrylic paint, pastel, W heel T hrow ing, W heel Winter Art Classes at Tour, a self-guided driving of diverse, high-quality craft visitors have seen the artContemporary Art Center watercolor, drawing, and Throwing and Hand Build- tour located in the Dela- displayed in interesting en- ists’ work evolve and the ceramics. ing, and Advanced CeramThe Center for Contemware River Valley of lower vironments along a pleas- circle of exhibitors grow. There are more than 35 ics. New classes this winter porary Art in Bedminster is Hunterdon and Bucks coun- ant scenic driv ing route The group has a great depth offering in-person, hybrid, winter adult classes includ- include Drawing in Colored ties, will be held on Novem- continues to make the Cov- of variety with 22 artisans and virtual art classes and ing Portrait Drawing, Wa- Pencil, Combining Mediums, ber 25, 26, and 27 from 10 ered Bridge Artisan Tour a working in glass, jewelry, workshops this winter for tercolor Step-by-Step, The Art from the Start: Acrylic a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. It popular event. Visiting art- ceramics, photography, cast Painting, Digital Drawing, adults, teens, and children Power of Pastels, Morning will take place in eight pro- ists in their studios and at bronze, painting, weaving, beginning January 17. Se- Oil L andscape, Draw ing Photorealistic Drawing, and fessional artists’ studios in the group venue offers the bookbinding, woodworking, a Sculpture ceramics class. lect classes will be offered from Life, Artist Studio: public a behind-the-scenes quilting, and more. Winter workshops offer the Lambertville, Stockton, opportunity to see working in a hybrid or virtual format. Your Choice, Evening WaFor m or e i n for m at ion Sergeantsville, an Solebury, Classes and workshops are tercolor, Media Sampler, students the opportunity to studios, and provides a first- and a map, visit www.covPa., areas with 14 additional offered for artists with all Chinese Brush Painting, and try something new. Workartists at the Sergeantsville hand understanding of the eredbridgeartisans.com. A levels of expertise in a va- Evening Painting. Ceramics shops include Colored Peninspirations and techniques detailed map, connected to Firehouse Events Center. riety of media including oil classes include Beginner cil, Using Negative Space The idea for the tour start- that go into each work of Google maps, can be downloaded at coveredbr idge ed with a group of six area art. Visitors can tour the stu- artisans.com/maps-events. artists 28 years ago. Each was a professional in their dios, see work in progress,

Art

day with(out) art film screening Test (2013) Thursday, December 1, 7:30 p.m. On the Day With(out) Art, when arts organizations raise awareness of the AIDS crisis and honor those who have died, the Museum and the Princeton Garden Theatre invite you to a screening of Test (2013). The film follows a young gay dancer as he navigates free-spirited San Francisco in 1985. Introduced by film director Chris Mason Johnson and Museum Director James Steward.

Princeton Garden Theatre

“EK SAPHED HAATHEE — WHITE ELEPHANT”: This mixed media work by Terri Fraser is featured in “Intersection: Four Voices in Abstraction,” on view through January 27 at The Gallery at Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach, 253 Nassau Street. An artists’ reception will be held on December 4 from 2-5 p.m.

JUNCTION BARBER SHOP LATE THURSDAYS! This event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970, with additional support from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts. Scott Marlowe and Matthew Risch in Test (2013)

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“Leboone Lipone” Exhibit At The Pennington School

“DUET”: This 1987 work by Hughie Lee Smith is part of “Retrieving the Life and Art of James Wilson Edwards and a Circle of Black Artists,” on view through December 3 at the Arts Council of Princeton. A free panel discussion held in conjunction with the exhibition is on November 30 at 6:30 p.m. at Art on Hulfish, Palmer Square.

“Overlooked History of Black Artists” Panel Discussion

The Arts Council of Princeton will host a discussion on oral history and its significance to local race, art, and history on Wednesday, November 30 at 6:30 p.m. at Art on Hulfish, Palmer Square. The event, “Restoring the Overlooked History of Black Artists and Writers in Princeton and Trenton in the late 20th Century,” will feature panelists Shirley Satterfield, founder of the Witherspoon-

Jackson Cultural and Historical Society; Lawrence Hilton, collector of African American art and longtime member of the Trenton art and music community; Stephanie Schwartz, curator of collections and research, Historical Society of Princeton; Margaret O’Reilly, director, New Jersey State Museum, Trenton; and Aubrey Kauffman, Trenton artist/photographer and former president, Trenton Artists Workshop Association (TAWA).

The Silva Gallery of Art at The Pennington School presents “Leboone Lipone,” an exhibition of paintings by Ibou Ndoye, through January 10. Born in Dakar, Senegal, Ndoye has combined modernism and traditionalism to create a style unique to himself. Ndoye grew up as the oldest child in a family of four boys in the suburbs of Dakar. His mother made her living as a dressmaker while his grandmother worked as a tie-dye artist. Regularly surrounded by colorful African textiles and fabrics, Ndoye says he “socialized with art and cohabited with colors” from a very young age. “The mediums I use to create my paintings resonate with the stories; that is the reason why I paint on glass windows, carpets, canvases, and whatever the environment provides, Ndoye said. “Patterns, forms, motifs, lines, signs, colors, and scraps of fabric are part of the visual language that enables me to articulate the stories of the voiceless.” Embracing the shutdown

of the pandemic as a time for him to vigorously create, much of the work in this show was made during the past three years and is being shown to the public for the first time. Ndoye’s art is inspired by stories from an immemorial oral tradition and African street scenes. “Leboone Lipone” is a Wolof call and response word that means once upon a time. This expression is used by storytellers to engage the community in artistic conversations, which is what Ndoye’s work does in this show. The Silva Gallery of Art is located on The Pennington School’s campus at 112 West Delaware Avenue, Pennington. For more information, call (609) 737-4133 or email Gallery Director Dolores Eaton at deaton@pennington. org.

Area Exhibits Ar t@ Bainbridge, 158 Nassau Street, has “Alexis R o c k m a n : S h i p w r e c k s” through November 27. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Painting the Light” through December 4. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Art on Hulfish, 11 Hulfish Street, has “Samuel Fosso: Affirmative Acts” through January 29. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Retrieving the Life and Art of James Wilson Edwards and a Circle of Black

Artists” through December 3. artscouncilofprinceton.org. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices/Fox & Roach, Realtors, 253 Nassau Street, has “Intersection: Four Voices in Abstraction” through January 27. An artists’ reception will be held on Sunday, December 4, from 2-5 p.m. Friend Center for Engineering Education, Princeton University, has Ricardo Barros’ “An Entanglement of Time and Space,” through December 31. ricardobarros. com/entanglement. Gallery 14 Fine Art Photography, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “Holiday Art Exhibit and Boutique Sale” December 3 through December 18.. gallery14.org. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Nightforms: Infinite Wave” by Kip Collective November 25 through April 2, “Roberto Lugo: The Village Potter” through January 8, and “Fragile: Earth” through January 8, among other exhibits. Timed tickets required. groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and Innovator’s Gallery,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. Museum hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 12 to 4 p.m., Thursday to 7 p.m. princetonhistory.org. JKC Gallery, 137 North Broad Street, Trenton, has “Ara Oshagan: How the World Might Be” through December 2. jkcgallery.online. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Walk This Way” through January 15, “(re)Frame: Community Perspectives on the Michener

Art Collection” through March 5, and “Walé Oyéjidé: Flight of the Dreamer” through April 23. michenerartmuseum.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey” through March and the online exhibits “Slavery at Morven,” “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898,” and others. morven.org. The Present Day Club, 72 Stockton Street, has watercolors and acrylics by Princeton artist David Meadow through December 16. For gallery hours, call (609) 9241014. davidmeadow.com Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, has “Salvadoran Art: A Father and Son Exhibit” and “Uprooted Trees, Magicicadas, and Climate Change” through November 27. princetonlibrary.org. Princeton University Library has “Records of Resistance: Documenting Global Activism 1933-2021” through December 11. library.princeton.edu Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has “Perspectives on Preservation” through December 6. “Rupesh Varghese” is at the 254 Nassau Street location through December 6. smallworldcoffee.com. Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, has “In Celebration of Old Trees” through December 11. terhuneorchards.com. West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “Off the Wall Holiday Market” and “Artists for Ukraine” through January 7. westwindsorarts.org.

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022

This panel, free and open to the public, is held in conjunction with the Arts Council’s exhibition, “Retrieving the Life and Art of James Wilson Edwards and a Circle of Black Artists,” on view through December 3. Exhibition curators Rhinold L. Ponder and Judith K. Brodsky will moderate. The presentation will include video clips of interviews with Wendell T. Brooks and other artists, collectors, and community members. For more information, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Veni, Emmanuel

Veni, Emmanuel

An Advent Concert on the O Antiphons

An Advent Concert on the O Antiphons Veni, Emmanuel

Sunday, December 4, 2022 2:30pm Princeton University Chapel

An Advent Concert on the O Antiphons Veni Emmanuel Veni, Emmanuel Veni, Emmanuel

The Chapel Choir presents a program of music inspired by the Great “O” Antiphons, the 9th century source of the beloved hymn “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel.” Featuring prayers and poetry by Joan Mitchell, CSJ, and artwork by Ansgar Holmberg, CSJ, from their book Praying the Advent Names of God.

AnAn Advent Concert onon the OO Antiphons Advent Concert the Antiphons Sunday, December 4, 2022 Questions: naldrich@princeton.edu 2:30pm Sunday, December 4, 2022 2:30pm Sunday, December 4, 2022 Princeton University Sunday, December 4, 2022Chapel Princeton University Chapel

2:30pm 2:30pm Princeton University Chapel University ThePrinceton Chapel Choir presents a program of music inspired by the The Chapel Choir presents aChapel program of music inspired by the

“THE FOULANI FLUTE PLAYER”: This work by Ibou Ndoye is part of “Leboone Lipone,” on view at the Silvia Gallery of Art at The Pennington School through January 10.

Veni, Em

An Advent

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Questions: Questions: naldrich@princeton.edu Questions: naldrich@princeton.edu their booknaldrich@princeton.edu Praying the Advent Names of God.

Questions: naldrich@princeton.edu

Sunday, Decemb 2:30pm Princeton Univer


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022 • 24

Mark Your Calendar Town Topics Wednesday, November 23 8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Country Dancers present a contra dance at Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive. Sue Gola & Mind the Gap. $10. Princetoncountrydancers.org. Thursday, November 24 10 -11 : 3 0 a . m . : T h e Friends of Princeton Nursery Lands hold their annual Thanksgiving Day Walk in Mapleton Preser ve, 145 Mapleton Road, Kingston. Led by Karen Linder, with a theme of birds. Fpnl.org. Friday, November 25 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: “Tr im Your Home for the Holidays,” at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Trees and wreaths; barnyard animals, farm trail, and more. From 12-5 p.m., Terhune celebrates Holiday Wine Trail Weekend. Terhuneorchards.com. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Covered Bridge Artisans 28th Annual Fall Studio Tour, self-guided at studios in Lambertville, Stockton, Sergeantsville, and Solebury, Pa. Coveredbridgeartisans.com. 2 and 7:30 p.m.: American Repertory Ballet performs The Nutcracker at McCarter Theatre, 91 University Place. $35-$65. Mccarter.org. 2-3:30 p.m.: The PSO Brass Quintet performs at the Hulfish Street Skating Rink in advance of the Palmer Square tree lighting. Free. 5 - 6 p.m.: A nnual tree lighting in Palmer Square. The band Don’t Call Me Francis and the Flying Ivories will play; holiday singalong; Santa appearance, and more. Palmersquare. com. Saturday, November 26 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: “Tr im Your Home for the Holidays,” at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Trees and wreaths; barnyard animals, farm trail, and more. From 12-5 p.m., Terhune celebrates Holiday Wine Trail Weekend. Terhuneorchards.com. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Covered Bridge Artisans 28th Annual Fall Studio Tour, self-guided at studios in Lambertville, Stockton, Sergeantsville, and Solebury, Pa. Coveredbridgeartisans.com. 12-2 p.m. : Har monics Quartet entertains on Palmer Square. Palmersquare.com. 1 and 4 p.m.: A Winniethe-Pooh Christmas Tail at Kelsey Theatre, Mercer County Community College, West Windsor. Musical production; audiences encouraged to bring a new, unwrapped toy for Toys for Tots. $12-$15. Kelseytheatre.org. Sunday, November 27 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: “Tr im Your Home for the Holidays,” at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Trees and wreaths; barnyard animals, farm trail, and more. From 12-5 p.m., Terhune celebrates Holiday Wine Trail Weekend. Terhuneorchards.com. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Covered

Bridge Artisans 28th Annual Fall Studio Tour, self-guided at studios in Lambertville, Stockton, Sergeantsville, and Solebury, Pa. Coveredbridgeartisans.com. 12-2 p.m.: Courtney’s Carolers entertain on Palmer Square. Palmersquare.com. 1 p.m.: Holiday WreathMaking Workshop at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Led by horticulturalist Louise Senior. $45-$55 including one wreath. Morven.org. 1 and 4 p.m.: “A Winniethe-Pooh Christmas Tail” at Kelsey Theatre, Mercer Count y Communit y College, West Windsor. Musical production; audiences encouraged to bring a new, unwrapped toy for “Toys for Tots.” $12-$15. Kelseytheatre.org. 1 p.m.: Carillon concert Princeton University’s Graduate Tower; listen from outside the building. 2 p.m.: American Repertory Ballet performs The Nutcracker at McCarter Theatre, 91 University Place. $35-$65. Mccarter.org. 3-4 p.m.: Faoilean, a local Irish Trad Trio, presents music from their forthcoming debut album at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org. Tuesday, November 29 7 p.m.: Labyrinth Books and Princeton Public Library present A.M. Homes discussing The Unfolding: A Novel, with historian Laura F. Edwards, at the library, 65 Wit herspoon St reet. Princetonlibrary.org. 7:30 p.m.: The Atelier@ Large of Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts presents “Conversations on Art-Making in a Vexed Era,” with actor Jonathan Majors and poet Paul Muldoon, at James Stewart Film Theater, 185 Nassau Street. Free. Arts.princeton.edu. Wednesday, November 30 6 p.m.: Labyrinth Books and Princeton Public Library present Donald Yacovone and Eddie Glaude in conversation of Teaching White Supremacy: America’s Democratic Ordeal and the Forging of Our National Identity. At Labyrinth, 122 Nassau Street, and online. Labyrinthbooks.com. 6-7:30 p.m.: The Mercer Count y Communit y College Jazz Band performs at Princeton MarketFair, 3535 U.S. Route 1. Free. 8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Country Dancers presents a contra dance at Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive. Bob Isaacs with Raise the Roof. $10 (free for 35 and younger). Princetoncountrydancers.org. 8 p.m.: Author Tommie Shelby is in conversation with Yale University professor James Forman about Shelby’s new book The Idea of Prison Abolition in a virtual event presented by Princeton Public Library. Register at Princetonlibrary.org. Thursday, December 1 7 p.m.: Joseph Grabas

presents “Owning the River: Water Rights and Boundaries,” an online lecture presented by Delaware River Greenway Partnership. Register at bit.ly/grabasriver. 8 p.m.: Patti LaBelle performs a holiday concert at the State Theatre New Jersey, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. $49-$209. Stnj.org. Friday, December 2 12-5 p.m.: Fine Art and Artistic Crafts Holiday Bazaar, The Artists of Bristol Galler y, 216 Mill Street, Bristol, Pa. Artistsofbristol. com. 6-9:15 p.m.: Open Mic in the Community Room of Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Hosted by the library and the Einstein Alley Musicians Collaborative. All are welcome to perform or just listen. Princetonlibrary.org. 8 p.m.: Princeton Dance Festival, from Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts, at McCarter’s Berlind Theatre, 91 University Place. Works by Ronald K. Brown, Susan Marshall, Caili Quan, Rashaun Mitchell and Silas Riener, Davalois Fearon, Sun Kim, and Michael J. Love. $12$17. McCarter.org. Saturday, December 3 10 a.m.: Holiday WreathMaking Workshop at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold S oil Road. L ed by Pam Mount. $50 includes wreath or basket, decorative supplies. Pre-register at terhuneorchards.com. 12-5 p.m.: Fine Art and Artistic Crafts Holiday Bazaar, The Artists of Bristol Gallery, 216 Mill Street, Bristol, Pa. Artistsofbristol.com. 12-5 p.m.: Kick off the Holiday Season Weekend at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Activities for the whole family. Wine-tasting from 12-5 p.m.; live music from 1-4 p.m. Terhuneorchards.com. 12-2 p.m.: Jersey Harmony Chor us enter tains on Palmer Square. Palmersquare.com. 12 : 30 - 5 : 30 p.m. : O f f the Wall Holiday Market Sunflower Weekend, with sunflower-themed artwork available for purchase; a percentage goes to ar tists for Ukraine. At West Windsor Arts Council, 952 Alexander Road. Westwindsorarts.org. 2 and 8 p.m.: Princeton Dance Festival, from Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts, at McCarter’s Berlind Theatre, 91 University Place. Works by Ronald K. Brown, Susan Marshall, Caili Quan, Rashaun Mitchell and Silas Riener, Davalois Fearon, Sun Kim, and Michael J. Love. $12-$17. McCarter.org. 2-5:30 p.m.: A Christmas Carol Read-Aloud at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Presented by the library and McCarter Theatre. Princetonlibrary.org. 4 p.m.: Westminster Concert Bell Choir conducted by

NOVEMBERDECEMBER Kathy Shaw, fall concert at Rider University’s Gill Chapel, Route 206, Lawrence Township. Rider.edu. 7:30 p.m.: Hopewell Valley Chorus holiday concert, “Oh What Fun!,” with audience singalong, at St. James Church, 115 East Delaware Avenue, Pennington. $12$15. Email hopewellvalleychorus @gmail.com or call (609) 477-9382 to reserve. Sunday, December 4 10 a.m.: David Breakstone of the Yitzhak Navon Center for a Shared Society presents a talk, “Uganda and the Jewish Question: The Story and Struggles of the Abayudaya Community,” virtually and in person at The Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street. Thejewishcenter.org. 12-2 p.m.: The Princeton Tiger Tones serenade shoppers on Palmer S quare. Palmersquare.com. 12-5 p.m.: Kick off the Holiday Season Weekend at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Activities for the whole family. Wine-tasting from 12-5 p.m.; live music from 1-4 p.m. Terhuneorchards.com. 12 : 30 - 5 : 30 p.m. : O f f the Wall Holiday Market Sunflower Weekend, with sunflower-themed artwork available for purchase; a percentage benefits Ar tists for Ukraine. At West Windsor Arts Council, 952 Alexander Road. Westwindsorarts.org. 1 p.m.: Carillon concert with holiday music at Princeton University’s Graduate Tower; listen from outside the building. 1-4 p.m.: Holiday Open House at Hopewell Public Library, 13 East Broad Street, Hopewell. Hot cider, holiday treats, kids’ activities. Redlibrary.org/events. 2 p.m.: Princeton Dance Festival, from Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts, at McCarter’s Berlind Theatre, 91 University Place. Works by Ronald K. Brown, Susan Marshall, Caili Quan, Rashaun Mitchell and Silas Riener, Davalois Fearon, Sun Kim, and Michael J. Love. $12$17. McCarter.org. 3 p.m.: Boheme Opera pres ents Hu mperdinck ’s Hansel and Gretel at Kendall Theater, College of New Jersey, Ew ing. With the Princeton Boychoir. $15$50. Bohemeopera.org. 7:30 p.m.: Martina McBride brings “The Joy of Christmas Tour 2022” to the State Theatre New Jersey, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. $49-$129. Stnj.org. 4 p.m.: Westminster Concert Bell Choir conducted by Kathy Shaw, at Rider University’s Gill Chapel, Route 206, Lawrence Township. Rider.edu. Monday, December 5 Recycling 7 p.m.: Author Gayatri Sethi shares segments from her book Unbelonging, on the themes of anti-racism, identity, and belonging, at

this Continuing Conversations of Race event via Zoom. Register for link at princetonlibrary.org. Tuesday, December 6 3 p.m.: Historic Paper Quilling Workshop at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Led by April Zay, founder of Hummingbird Arts. $10$20. Includes access to the Festival of Trees from 2-3 p.m. Morven.org. 6 p.m.: Hilary Plum and Adr ienne R aphel are at Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau Street, and online, with “Two Writers on Writing: Considering Class, Play, Power, and Language in the Essay and the Poem.” Labyrinthbooks.com. 7 p.m.: Sustainable Princeton’s “Sustainable Minds” discussion, over Zoom, is about the climate and housing crisis, w ith industr y leaders. Open to all. Sustainableprinceton.org. 7 p.m.: A staged reading of An Iliad is performed in the Community Room of Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, by Vivia Font of the Princeton Actors Collective and Ameet Doshi. Princetonlibrary.org. 8 :15 p.m.: The Jewish Center Princeton’s Great Minds Salon presents Matt Wasserman and Sean Jackson via Zoom, in “Talking Trenton: The Good News, the Challenges, and the Process of Change.” Thejewishcenter.org. Wednesday, December 7 3 p.m.: The movie Elvis is screened in the Community Room of Princeton Public Librar y, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org. 5:30 p.m.: Holiday story time with the Princeton Storytelling Circle held in the Stockton Education Center at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Starts with a self-guided tour of the Festival of Trees. $15$25. Morven.org. 6 p.m. : Pe ter Bro ok s and Brigid Doherty are at Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau Street, with Seduced by Story: On the Use and Abuse of Narrative. Also presented online. Labyrinthbooks.com. 6 : 3 0 - 8 p. m . : M e r c e r Count y Communit y College Jazz Band performs at Quaker Bridge Mall, 3320 U.S. Route 1. Free. 6:30 p.m.: Open Archive: Princeton Maps, in the Discovery Center of Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Explore examples of historical maps of Princeton and beyond for local history and genealogy research. Also digital maps, including the Princeton University Library’s collection. Princetonlibrary.org. 7-8:30 p.m.: Wednesday Night Out: The Lenape and Their Ancestors in Hopewell Valley, at Hopewell Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell. Redlibrary.org/ events. Thursday, December 8 6 p.m. : Aut hor Derek Lidow presents a fireside chat about his latest book

The Entrepreneurs : The Relentless Quest for Value at Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau Street. Presented by Princeton Public Library and Labyrinth Books. Princetonlibrary.org. 6:45 p.m.: Learn public speaking with Mercer’s Best Toastmasters Club, Lawrence Community Center, 295 Eggert Crossing Road, Lawrence Township. Mercersbest.toastmastersclubs. org. 7 p.m.: “George Washington’s Winter Encampments and the Winning of American Independence,” virtual program presented by Mercer County Library System. Lecturer is Steven Elliott from Rutgers University. Email hopeprogs @mcl.org to receive a link. Friday, December 9 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: The Hunterdon County Rug Artisans G uild holds its mont hly m e e t i ng at t h e R ar it a n Township Police Depar tment building, 2 Municipal Drive, Flemington. Guests welcome. Hcrag.com. 5 -10 p.m.: A Cappella Night at Princeton Public Librar y, 65 Witherspoon Street. Vocal groups form Princeton’s four high schools perform at this teens-only event co-sponsored by Corner House. Princetonlibrary. org. 6:30 p.m.: Holiday Arrangement and Wine Tasting at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Owners Pam Mount and Reuwai Mount Hanewald host this workshop that includes container, greens, flowers, decorative items, and a flight of wine. $45. Register at terhuneorchards.com. 7:30 p.m.: The Choirs of Westminster Choir College present “An Evening of Readings and Carols: 30th Anniversary.” At Princeton University Chapel. Rider.edu. Saturday, December 10 10 a.m.: Family Holiday A r r a n g e m e nt Wor k s h op at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Pam Mount shows families how to create a festive arrangement with greens, flowers, berries, and other decorative items. $30 for one adult and participating child. Registration and pre-payment required. Terhuneorchards.com. 11 a.m.: Housing Justice Forum at Princeton Public Library’s Community Room. Panels and discussions with people working locally on housing and related efforts. Lunch provided. Also available online. Free. Princetonlibrary.org. 12-2 p.m. : Har monics Quartet entertains on Palmer Square. Palmersquare.com. 12-5 p.m.: Celebrate the Holiday Season Weekend at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Activities for the whole family, winter wonderland, barnyard animals, and more. Visit with Santa from 12-3 p.m. Wine tasting from 12-5 p.m.; live music from 1-4 p.m. Terhuneorchards.com.


Ten Crucial Days Tours Retrace the Revolution

NEW TO THE BOARD: Robt Martin Seda-Schreiber, chief activist of the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice, is shown at left with new board member Rasheed Newson at the organization’s headquarters on Stockton Street. L os A ngeles and joined as my world view. I was so Bayard Rustin Center Welcomes Rasheed Newson the entertainment industry. inspired by my community-

Author, writer, television producer, and Black queer activist Rasheed Newson has joined the board of directors of the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice, a community activist center, educational bridge, and dedicated LGBTQIA safe-space in Princeton. Newson’s debut novel, My Government Means to Kill Me, tells a queer comingof-age story following the personal and political awakening of a young, gay, Black man in 1980s New York City. After work for many nonprofits, Newson moved to

Highlights of his career include time spent on Lie to Me, The Chi, and Narcos, among other drama series. He now serves as executive producer of Bel Air, which is airing on Peacock. He lives with his husband and their two children in California. “I wrote Bayard Rustin into my novel, because I revere and adore him,” Newson said. “Mr. Rustin’s legacy of embracing intersectionality and fighting for equality for all oppressed populations remains a guiding light for progressive advocates and is a constant in shaping my own work as well

building conversation held at the beautiful safe-space the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice has built that I am equally honored and humbled to share that I am joining the Center’s board of directors.” T he a n nou ncem ent of Newson’s addition to the BRCS J board was made at the Center’s Stockton Street headquarters during his recent book-signing and communit y-building conversation. This event was a live continuation of the virtual broadcast, the “Social Justice Power Hour” which aired every weeknight for

On December 4, 10, and January 7, the “Traversing the Ten Crucial Days Bus Tour” will be offered by Tencrucialdays.org, starting and ending at Washington Crossing, Pa. Guests spend the days retracing the December 25, 1776 crossing of the Delaware River, and the December 26-January 3 American and British military engagements at Trenton, Princeton, and areas in between. His tor ic al inter preters Larry Kidder, author of Ten Crucial Days: Washington’s Vision for Victory Unfolds; and Roger S. Williams, state historian for the New Jersey Society, Sons of the American Revolution, will tell the story of these 10 days that changed the apparently expiring American Revolution. Events are discussed in the context of the local, strategically important central New Jersey town, villages, and farms. These locales were occupied by people of diverse backgrounds, with varying relig ious pract ices such as Quaker, Presbyterian, and A nglican ; and w it h

complex views on loyalty to the revolution or the king. The guides will discuss how the terrain, weaponry, and weather influenced the ways the battles were fought, and how the lives of the local people were disrupted by them. For more information, visit tencrucialdays.org.

YWCA St. Nicholas Project Seeking “Santas and Elves”

Longtime community advocate Jill Jachera has been helping YWCA Princeton support local families during the holidays since 2000. Initially known as YWCA Adopt-a-Family, the initiative was inspired by the kindness Jachera’s husband’s family received when he and his family immigrated from Cuba to the United States as a child. Over the years, Jachera has enlisted the help of local donors, businesses, and families that have made giving back part of their holiday traditions. In 2001, the annual toy and food drive was renamed the St. Nicholas Project in memory of her nephew, Nichols Nutile, who passed away unexpectedly. “We’re thankful to have the opportunity to relieve some of the financial strains families in our community face during the holidays,” said Tara O’Shea, Y WCA Princeton’s director of childcare. “We truly appreciate Jill Jachera and her family’s continued support of our organization and the families we serve.” “T h is proj e c t is w hat Christmas is all about,” said Jachera. “It could not be possible without our generous Santas who adopt these

families and make their children’s wishes come true. Many of our Santas have been involved in the project since the beginning, making it a part of their family’s holiday tradition. I am grateful for their continued support.” Par ticipating families create wish lists, including toys, food, and clothes. Each year, local individuals, families, and businesses go above and beyond to fulfill these wishes, and provide gift cards to McCaffrey’s Food Market. Those interested in suppor ting the St. Nicholas Project should contact Jachera at jill.jachera @ gmail. com to be matched with a family or coordinate other contributions. All donations will be delivered to YWCA Princeton on December 14.

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022

over two years during the pandemic. Guests have included Valerie Jarrett, Patton Oswalt, Keisha Blain, Pa. Senator-elect John Fetterman, Gavin Grimm, Ibram X. Kendi, Wayne Brady, Billy Porter, Rep. Malcolm Kenyatta, Robert Jones Jr., Billy Eichner, Kiese Laymon, Shannon Watts, Cecilia Muñoz, Jill Sobule, and Adam Gopnik, among others. Visit rustincenter.org for more information.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022 • 26

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Squandering Late Lead in Crushing 20-19 Loss to Penn, Princeton Football Falls Agonizingly Short of Ivy Crown

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s Princeton University linebacker Liam Johnson raced 92 yards down the sideline with a fumble recovery for a touchdown in the third quarter against visiting Penn last Saturday, it felt like a championship moment. J o h n s o n ’s j a u n t g a v e Princeton a 19-7 lead in the season finale with the Tigers needing a win to clinch a share of the Ivy League title with Yale, which edged Harvard 19-14 earlier in the day. “It comes down to little things; running to the ball, we put our namesake on that,” said junior star Johnson. “Princeton defense runs to the ball, I was just the right man in the spot.” But over the rest of the game, it was Penn who did the little things, rallying to a 20-19 win as it scored a TD with five seconds left to dash Princeton’s title hopes before a crowd of 6,028 at Princeton Stadium. The outcome on Saturday left both Princeton and Penn at 8-2 overall and 5-2 Ivy with Yale earning the league crown outright as it ended up 8-2 overall and 6-1 Ivy. “We lost the big play battle and that is what it comes down to,” said Johnson, who made 11 tackles in the defeat. “You can win the whole game but a blocked punt, an interception, letting down on

those fourth downs for us on the defense. It comes down to those big plays. When you don’t win those big plays, you lose the game.” On Penn’s late scoring march, which saw it drive 72 yards in 17 plays, the Quakers converted three fourth downs, including the winning score which came on a fourth and five when Aidan Sayin hit Trey Flowers for five-yard TD pass. “We always talk about 2-minute periods, trying to keep them in bounds, the top-down mentality,” said Johnson. “We had a couple of stops, we stayed strong but it came down to the little things.” While the Tigers didn’t surrender any chunk plays on that drive, it couldn’t get off the field as Penn methodically gained a few yards at a time. “It was similar to the Yale game (a 24-20 loss on November 12); when you let up those three yard plays, those four yard plays, you let them to third down and short,” said Johnson. “It is just easier for the offense to convert on those downs so getting them to second and long is really important. We failed to do that at the end of the game.” Princeton quarterback Blake Stenstrom summed up the bitter disappointment felt by the Tigers in the wake

of the defeat. “It is tough for sure; it is probably the toughest moment of my career so far,” said Stenstrom, who connected on 25-of-34 passes for 252 yards with a touchdown and an interception against Penn. “The biggest thing I think about is the seniors on the team, guys who have put their life on hold to come back for a fifth year.” Being so close to the title made the setback hurt even more. “You are one play away, one point away; it is really tough,” said Stenstrom. “It is crazy, it is football, it is a game of inches. It is a game of one play, it is a game of seconds. That is the brutal part of this game.” In the early stages of the contest, it was Princeton who was making the big plays. The Tigers jumped out to a 6-0 lead with 10:24 left in the first quarter as Stenstrom hit Andrei Iosivas with a 23-yard TD pass. Princeton, though, missed the extra point, in the first pivotal special teams lapse of the day by the Tigers. Early in the second quarter, the Tigers capped an 11-play, 80-yard scoring march as freshman running back Ryan Butler rushed four yards for a TD. Princeton failed on a two-point conversion attempt. “We had chances to take

ORANGE CRUSHED: Princeton University linebacker Liam Johnson races upfield as he made a 92yard touchdown return of a fumble recovery to give Princeton a 19-7 lead over Penn last Saturday in its season finale. Johnson’s heroics went to naught as the Quakers rallied for a 20-19 win, dashing Princeton’s hopes for a share of the Ivy League title with Yale, which edged Harvard 1914 earlier in the day. The Tigers ended the fall at 8-2 overall and 5-2 Ivy. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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a bigger lead early and we didn’t — it came back to haunt us,” said Princeton head coach Bob Surace. In a second quarter sequence that will haunt Surace, the Tigers failed to convert on a fourth and one at the Penn 16-yard line on its next possession after the TD drive and later had a punt blocked which was returned for a touchdown as Penn narrowed the gap to 12-7 at halftime. “They only had 45 yards at the time, the things that we didn’t get fixed — field goal and punt protection — came back to haunt us,” said Surace, reflecting on the blocked punt. “That is on us as coaches, we have got to be better at that. The players have to tighten up. We worked on it a lot and just didn’t get it fixed.” In one of the toughest moments of his coaching career, Surace vehemently protested as he believed that Penn got off its final play after the play clock had expired. “It was on zero, they missed a call, it happens,” said Surace, who drew an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty, sprinting on the field to holler at the officials in the wake of the Quaker TD. “It is not the first one or the only one in the game. It just happened to be in an inopportune time.”

After getting off to an 8-0 start, ending the season with a pair of losses was hard to take. “Any loss is tough, it sucks,” said a subdued Surace, wincing with his eyes closed at times as he fielded postgame questions. “The guys work really hard, they played hard. We were a little bruised at the end of the year and some young guys stepped up. It is Ivy League football, it is the way this league is. Week in, week out, the margin for error is really, really thin. We won some of those games early and weren’t able to do it at the end of the year.” In his post mortem on the loss, Surace sought to put things in a larger perspective. “Life is not fair, right. Disappointment is part of life and so are the celebrations,” said Surace. “You deal with disappointment, you deal with it the best you can. You show up tomorrow for a banquet as a team and you are brothers. One play, one way or another, doesn’t change who they are. It stinks because you want to get your name, your team on a banner. It didn’t happen, it is sad. It is more sad that some guys are going to leave us and you don’t get to coach them again.” On a day when the program celebrated its seniors,

Surace tipped his hat to the squad’s Class of 2023. “They won 35 games, the guys that took the COVID year,” said Surace. “It is the most in Princeton history, tied with last year’s group. It will sting, losing the last two, but it is just an amazing group of people that was fun to coach.” Looking ahead, Surace will seek to learn from the stinging defeat to Penn. “After any game after a win or lose, you are always talking about corrections,” said Surace. “There are certainly things each week that you have to correct. There are plays from this game that we will take into the offseason.” Johnson, for his part, vowed to take the disappointment from Saturday and use it as inspiration for the 2023 campaign. “This is the best possible motivation to come back and keep it going,” asserted Johnson. “I think it is just keeping in the back of your head when you are doing those extra reps and when you are pushing yourself to the limit. I know I am going to come back as a different player and a lot of kids on this team are going to come back as different players.” —Bill Alden


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022 • 28

After Dominating in Winning 2nd Straight NWPC Title, No. 8 PU Men’s Water Polo Shooting for NCAA Crown

T he Pr inceton University men’s water polo team pulled off a historic repeat, but there are bigger goals ahead. Last Sunday, No. 8 Princeton captured the Northeast Water Polo Conference (NWPC) championship with a 13-8 win over No. 18 St. Francis Brooklyn in Providence, R.I. to repeat as conference winners for the first time in program history. The Tigers will open the NCAA tournament play by hosting Fordham in Opening Round Game 1 on Saturday at DeNunzio Pool. The winner will play Southern California on December 1 in Berkeley, Calif., in the NCAA Opening Round Game 2. The trip to the NCA As gives the Tigers, now 265, a chance to add to their 12-game winning streak that includes a win over once-No. 1 Stanford. “The biggest thing for us is going to be staying healthy and staying hungry and understanding we have a great opportunity not just to win the conference this year but do something that’s never been done before and compete for a national championship,” said Princeton head coach Dustin Litvak. “That’s really motivating the guys.” P r i n c e ton s t a r te d t h e weekend with a 12-7 NWPC semif inal w in over host Brown on Saturday followed by the strong performance in the title game against St. Francis. In the final, Princeton jumped out to a 3-0 first

quarter lead on goals by Ryan Neapole, Roko Pozaric and Yurian Quinones. Neapole scored another goal to start the second quarter, and the Tigers used strong goalkeeping from Antonio Knez to sustain their lead while getting goals any time St. Francis started to whittle away at Princeton’s advantage. Vladan Mitrovic, Joan Coloma, George Caras, and Keller Maloney also scored in a balanced attack. “We knew if we played to our ability, we’d have a really good shot,” said Litvak. “I think we have a really deep team this year and that enabled us to rotate a lot of players in and out of games. And we only had to play two games this weekend instead of some teams having to play three. We’re just a little deeper than St. Francis. I think that paid off in the end. We expected to play well. We’re really happy for the guys that they were able to get it done and keep playing.” One of the keys to Princeton’s conference dominance and a reason it has a realistic chance to make some noise in the NCAAs is the squad’s deeper roster. The Tigers boast five sophomores who returned with experience after playing plenty in their first season in 2021, and this year’s first-year players have been essential to adding depth to a good core of upperclassmen. A freshman quartet has helped offset the graduation loss of three Tigers from a year ago.

“The first-years come in usually in the best shape becaus e t hey’re play ing all summer with their club teams or high school teams through Junior Olympics or whatever competition they have, whereas our older guys are behind a desk all summer with internships or jobs or studying,” said Litvak. “We got four players from some of the best programs in the country and they were big contributors for their teams, and they stepped up right away.” The depth and experience have meshed together through the season in which Princeton tied its 2021 record w ith 26 w ins. T he Tigers were 10-0 in conference, but also gained attention outside of the league and East Coast. In their third weekend, they lost a pair of one-goal games to California teams (9-8 to No. 6 UC Davis on September 17 and an 8-7 loss in double overtime No. 12 UC Irvine on September 18) and sandwiched a tough loss to Pepperdine between wins over No. 8 UC Santa Barbara (11-6 on October 16) and No. 12 Loyola Marymount (12-9 on October 20). The win over LMU kicked off the 12-game winning streak that had them top then-No. 3 Stanford, 11-10, in the Santa Clara Invitational on October 23. “Before that, the loss to Pepperdine really reset us, we looked back at the film and we just didn’t play,” said Litvak. “We were very lethargic and the energy

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ALL HANDS ON DECK: Princeton University men’s water polo head coach Dustin Litvak (kneeling) makes a point to his players earlier this fall. Last Sunday, No. 8, Princeton defeated No. 18 St. Francis Brooklyn 13-8 in the Northeast Water Polo Conference (NWPC) championship game. The Tigers, now 26-5, will host Fordham on November 26 in the NCAA Opening Round Game 1. The victor will then face Southern California on December 1 in Berkeley, Calif., in the NCAA Opening Round Game 2. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) wasn’t t here. Maybe we overlooked them a bit, but a credit to them — they played really well. But it kind of woke us up. We focused ourselves. We said, we’re more capable than this and we can’t waste our opportunities, especially when we’re out in California against teams we don’t normally get to play. We carried that momentum into our next tournament and had a couple really great games and I thought we were playing our best water polo of the year going into the Stanford game. More than anything it just proved that the work that the guys are putting in every day is paying off. We’re not just a team that’s capable of competing in our conference or competing on the East Coast, but we really can compete with anybody.” Pozaric scored with 13 seconds left to upend Stanford to give Princeton its first win over the Cardinal in 11 tries. “Stanford for a long time was No. 1 in the country this year,” said Litvak. “I think they started out 17-0 or something crazy before they lost to UCLA and us. But their only losses other than us are to the big four schools — UCLA, Cal, SC. It shows we’re not just talking, we’re actually capable of doing it. It doesn’t mean anything now. We’re going to end up playing Fordham next week and they’re a great team and we’re really going to have to focus on what we need to do to stop them. But I think it’s given us confidence for sure.” What has helped Princeton throughout the season has been the development of its defense. The Tigers have been stingy on defense which has taken pressure off its offense. In the NWPC last weekend, Brown had just two goals in the first half while St. Francis only managed one. “We’ve made huge growth this entire year; our first weekend all the way back in the beginning of September at Navy, we went 3-1 but we got absolutely smashed by Cal (22-7 on September 4),” recalled Litvak. “Even in the games we were winning, we were giving up double digit goals for the most part with one exception. We really pride ourselves on defense, and that just didn’t show in the first weekend. The second weekend, when we went 5-0 at home our

defense started to lock in. And even when we went out to California to play UCLA and Davis and Irvine, even though we lost all three games, our defense was so much better and we were missing some pretty important players that didn’t make the trip. But you could see the progress already and it just continued. Obviously our last California trip — culminating in a win over Stanford — you can’t do much better than that.” The defense has become a reliable piece that the Tigers will depend on in NCAA play as Princeton has become better as a unit together. “It’s a combination of a lot of things; I think our team communication has gotten a lot better,” said Litvak. “We don’t practice at all from the end of April until we get back together at the end of August, so we have a huge gap where everybody else in the country is practicing outside of the Ivies. So it’s going to take us some more time to develop chemistry and learn from our mistakes and build that cohesiveness, and for the new guys to learn and adjust to what our system is because wherever they came from is probably a different system. And then it was just figuring out which pieces fit best together and then guys fully committing to understanding if everyone does their job on the defensive end we can have success even if we’re not shooting the ball well that day. Also we have two tremendous goalies (Knez and West Temkin) that if we do make mistakes, they’re almost always there to save us.” The offense continues to progress, making Princeton a more dangerous team. The Tigers have a plethora of potential goal scorers, and have used them all lately. Eight different players scored in the N WPC title game; seven different players notched goals in the semifinal win.

“Our centers are doing a good job with positioning,” said Litvak. “Our attack for the most part has been very successful in that we’re drawing a lot of ejections. I think we’re being patient and doing a good job making the extra pass and exposing weaknesses or opening the defense in various ways. We just have to finish our opportunities. That’s where we can be a little better. When we do draw those 6-on-5s, we have to be better than 20 or 30 percent when we get to these better teams. But our defense has been solid, so that’s helped. But I do think our attack has been successful. It just doesn’t always show up on the scoreboard.” Litvak is hopeful that the Tigers can be more effective when they have a man advantage. Princeton will need strong play at both ends aga i n s t re ve nge - m i n de d Fordham. The Tigers edged Fordham, 13-12, on September 11. Princeton hosts them again, this time for the chance to extend the season and make further history. “Defensively we’re playing really, really well; that is important,” said Litvak. “Offensively, I think we can play better. Against a team like Fordham that has a tremendous amount of firepower it’s going to come down to getting stops. We played them earlier this year and it was a one-goal game. They brought in grad transfers and they’re a very internationally heavy team and have a lot of talent. They do a nice job with them. For us, it’s just going to be focusing on continuing to play well in the defensive end, that’s where we can frustrate other teams, and then hopefully we’ll be a little better on offense.” —Justin Feil

IS ON


While millions of Americans will be headed home for the Thanksgiving holiday this week, the Princeton University men’s basketball team is jetting across the Atlantic Ocean to play in the London Basketball Classic. After falling to Hofstra (8377 on November 7) and Navy (74-73 on November 11) to start the season, Princeton will be bringing a two-game winning streak into its battle of Britain, having topped UMBC and then topping Marist 62-55 last Saturday. Tiger head coach Mitch Henderson likes where his team is at as it goes across the pond to an event which will see it face Army on November 24 in the opener with the victor advancing to the final against either Northeastern or Manhattan on November 26. “We played really well, we needed a game where we came unstuck on making some shots,” said Henderson, referring to the win over UMBC which saw Princeton shoot 57.8 percent from the floor (37-64) and 63.2 percent from the three-point line (1219). “We guarded well, that is where we made the difference. We did the same thing on Saturday, we were able to guard. We didn’t play great on Saturday, that is a tough one on the road. John Dunne is a terrific coach. Those are really good wins.” Princeton sorely needed those wins after the setbacks to Hofstra and Navy. “We got off to a little bit of a tough start but it was really a learning experience,” said

Henderson. “I am happy that the schedule is the way that it is. Hofstra is very good, that was a really great game for us to start off with and similarly with Navy. Those were really great learning opportunities for us.” The Tigers have been getting some really good play from junior guard Matt Allocco, who scored 19 points against Navy and then followed that up with 18 in the win over UMBC and 14 against Marist. “Matt is such a good scorer but we haven’t asked him to do that here at Princeton,” said Henderson of Allocco, who is now averaging 14.0 points and 6.3 rebounds a game. “He is a big-game shotmaker. He made a couple of threes there on Saturday where we were really struggling. The game was hanging in the balance. He had a terrific night against Navy. As much as his helping and scoring, he is an incredible leader. He is always the same. He is always all-in, positive, hard changing, and hard working. We are really happy to have him on our team.” Henderson is happy to have senior forward Keeshawn Kellman in the starting lineup after he was hampered by injury over much of his career. “We are thankful and happy about the fact that he is playing, it changes us in so many different ways,” said Henderson of the 6’9, 240-pound Kellman, who is averaging 14.8 points and 5.0 rebounds a game, teaming with senior star Tosan Evbuomwan in the paint. “It makes the other team have to adjust accordingly, we

are still learning about how to play like that. I am thankful for the opportunity that we are getting to play the two big guys together and to play the two big guys separately when they are in there alone.” The trip to London will be a homecoming for Evboumwan, a native of Newcastle, England. “We were really looking for these tournaments called MTEs (multi-team events) to play in and this one came around,” said Henderson, noting that the games will be Princeton’s first regular season games ever played outside the U.S. “Tosan’s family has never seen him play in person since he has been a student so this is the opportunity for him and for us to go over there and play in front of his family and friends.” Henderson sees the journey as a special opportunity for all of his players. “It is cool, it is just a great experience for the guys,” said Henderson, noting that the team’s itinerary will include some tournament functions and a bus tour. “They are excited, we have a lot of people coming to watch us.” While Henderson wants his players to enjoy the sights, the focus of the trip will be taking care of business. “You bring your show on the road, you are going to another country and it is a tournament as well,” said Henderson. “The goal is to go over there and be champs, that is where our mindset is.” —Bill Alden

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022

Getting on Winning Track by Topping UMBC, Marist, PU Men’s Hoops Flying High Heading into London Event

HEADING HOME: Princeton University men’s basketball player Tosan Evbuomwan drives to the basket in recent action. Last Saturday, senior star Evbuomwan tallied 11 points with six rebounds and five assists to help Princeton defeat Marist 62-55. Evbuomwan, a native of Newcastle, England, is heading home this week as the Tigers, now 2-2, will be competing in the London Basketball Classic. The Tigers will face Army on November 24 in the opener of the tournament with the victor advancing to the final against either Northeastern or Manhattan on November 26. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022 • 30

PU Men’s Hockey Drops Two to Quinnipiac, But Tigers Buying Into Focus on Toughness After losing its first three games of the season, the Princeton University men’s hockey team got on the winning track with a pair of shutout wins over Yale and Brown. “The first couple of weeks at Harvard and home with Cornell and Colgate, I was trying to find out what the identity was of our players and now I know their identity,” said Princeton head coach Ron Fogarty, whose team blanked Yale 3-0 on November 11 and edged Brown 1-0 a day later. “Now it is just building upon it and getting better. We are tough to play against, not just gritty. Our turnover ratio for full possession turnovers in the defensive zone has dramatically decreased where we are not giving second chances. That was a primary focus coming into the season, being quicker on our outlets and getting out of our zone.” Princeton displayed its toughness against last Friday evening as it hosted No. 4 Quinnipiac, falling 4-1 to the high-powered Bobcats despite outshooting them 23-18. “It was just clog the neutral zone, finish checks, and just be back on top of the third guy, they are a heavily skilled team,” said Fogarty, who got a third period goal from sophomore defenseman Noah de la Durantaye in the defeat. “I thought we did a really good job of that. They haven’t been held to 18 shots all year or five in one period. I thought we played well tonight.” Princeton fought hard to generate shots against Quinnipiac but didn’t get the bounces. “It was getting to the net, they do a good job of playing very strong in front of

[Yaniv] Perets,” said Fogarty. “We knew we had to get shots and traffic in the third. We wanted to get to two. It was going to the net and getting in the red zone. That was one of our keys, it was good to get that last one there. The shots were right there, it was a back and forth game We had a couple good looks early. Spencer [Kersten] just missed one giving over his glove in the first period. They are a really good hockey team and we are emerging to be a very good hockey team.” In Fogarty’s view, the Tigers have plenty of room to grow with a lineup on Friday that included seven freshmen and three sophomores. “It is a youthful team,” said Fogarty. “We are playing a team with 10 players having played over 100 games and our top guy is at 67. We are a young team, we need to keep learning.” A night later, Princeton played hard again, falling by the same 4-1 margin to the Bobcats in Hamden, Conn., as it moved to 2-5 overall and 2-5 ECAC Hockey. “I like what we are doing,” said Fogarty, whose team will play a two-game set at RIT this weekend with contests slated for November 25 and 26. “Our guys are showing a lot of determination. They are trying to set a legacy for the next 100 years to close the 100 years here in Baker with what we have done and where we need to go. They are playing really hard and they have stuck with it. Our guys have really bought in, there is a collaboration with the staff and players on where we want to get to and it is showing already.” —Bill Alden

PU Sports Roundup Women’s Volleyball Falls To Brown in Ivy Semis

Melina Mahood starred in a losing cause as the secondseeded Princeton University women’s volleyball team fell 3-0 to third-seeded Brown in the Ivy League postseason tournament semifinals last Friday in New Haven, Conn. Senior star Mahood tallied a match-high 16 kills but it wasn’t enough as Brown prevailed 25-18, 28-26, 30-28. The Tigers finished the fall with a 21-4 overall record. Along the way, Princeton went 13-1 in Ivy action to tie Yale for the league regular season title.

Tiger Women’s Hockey Falls 1-0 to Clarkson

Unable to get its offense g oi n g, t h e 15t h -r a n ke d Princeton University women’s hockey team lost 1-0 to No. 10 Clarkson last Saturday afternoon at Hobey Baker Rink. The Tigers, now 4-4 overall and 2-4 ECAC Hockey, head south to play in the Smashv ille Showcase in Nashville, Tenn. where they will face Northeastern on CHEN UP: Princeton University women’s basketball player Kaitlyn Chen, right, heads to the November 25 and Cornell hoop in recent action. Last Wednesday, junior guard Chen tallied 19 points with four rebounds and three assists to help Princeton edge Fordham 70-67. The Tigers, now 3-1, play at Texas on on November 27. November 27. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) Men’s Cross Country Places

30th at NCAA Championships

Connor Nisbet led t he way as the Princeton University men’s cross countr y team placed 30th at the NCAA Championships last Saturday in Stillwater, Okla. Junior Nisbet played 114th individually, covering the 10,000-meter course in a time of 30:21.2 Northern Arizona won the team title with a score of 83 with Princeton coming in 712 in taking 30th.

Princeton Wrestling Falls at Indiana

Nate Dugan provided a highlight as the Princeton University wrestling team fell 22-13 at Indiana last Friday in its opening dual meet of the season. Junior Dugan won a 12-4 major decision over Drayton Harris at 184 pounds. Other victors for Princeton in the dual included senior Quincy Monday at 157, sophomore Blaine Bergey at 165, and sophomore Luke Stout at 197. In upcoming action, Princeton will face both Wisconsin and Michigan State on December 4 at the Prudential Center in Newark.

Tiger Men’s Swimming Defeats Cornell, Penn

NO QUIT: Princeton University men’s hockey player Noah de la Durantaye brings the puck up the ice in recent action. Sophomore defensemen de la Durantaye scored the lone goal for Princeton as it fell 4-1 to No. 4 Quinnipiac last Friday night. A day later, the Tigers lost 4-1 in a rematch with the Bobcats to move to 2-5 overall and 2-5 ECAC Hockey. The Tigers will play a two-game set at RIT this weekend with contests slated for November 25 and 26. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Raunak Khosla starred as the Princeton University men’s swimming teams topped Cornell 211-89 and Penn 185-115 in action last weekend in Ithaca, N.Y. Senior Khosla placed first in the 200-yard butterfly and helped the 200 medley relay to victory. The Tigers, now 4-1, return to action when they host their annual Big Al Invitational from December 2-4 at DeNunzio Pool.

PU Women’s Swimming Falls to Cornell, Penn

Suffering defeat for the first time this season, the Princeton University women’s swimming teams fell 179 -121 to Cor nell and

Penn 154-145 in action last weekend in Ithaca, N.Y. The Tigers, now 3-2, return to action when they host their annual Big Al Invitational from December 2-4 at DeNunzio Pool.

Princeton Women’s Squash Defeats Stanford in Opener

Posting five 3-0 wins, the No. 5 Princeton University women’s squash team defeated Stanford 8-1 last Friday in Washington, D.C.

The Tigers won all of the matches from positions 2-9 in getting their season off to a good start. Princeton will next be in action when they play at Columbia on January 13.


Although the Princeton High g irls’ soccer team ended its season by losing 2-0 to Manalapan in the first round of the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Central Jersey Group 4 sectional tournament, Dave Kosa believed the score didn’t reflect how his squad battled. “We played really well, a couple of things didn’t go our way,” said PHS head coach Kosa, reflecting on the effort he got from 11thseeded PHS as it battled a sixth-seeded Manalapan squad that ended up advancing to the sectional final. “We had a goal called back on an offsides on a direct kick which you don’t normally see. On the second goal, the ball went out on the touchline, we thought it was ours. They scored on a corner. You take those two things and maybe it is 1-1 instead of 2-0. What we take out of it is that when we are playing our best, we can hang with the best teams.” PHS didn’t play its best down the stretch as it lost six straight games to finish the fall with an 8-8-2 record, struggling to find the back of the net. “We had a lot of injuries, we have five, six girls on the sidelines, that hurts,” said Kosa. “Throughout the season, even when were 8-2-2, we weren’t scoring a lot. We would win 2-1, 1-0.” Kosa was proud of how his players stuck with things as they dealt with adversity.

“To our credit, we hung in there,” said Kosa. “In the beginning we beat some pretty good teams. I think our youth was a factor, the fact that we are asking four or five or six freshmen to play lots of minutes. The way the schedule was set up, we are playing three games in a week so we wore down. We hung in there in the beginning and then we were wearing down towards the end of the season.” The Tigers suffered a key loss early in the fall when ju n ior m idf ielder C as ey Serxner was sidelined for the season due to a leg injury “C a s e y w i l l b e b a c k healthy next year, that was a main reason why we didn’t score,” said Kosa. “She was the focal point of a lot of what we do — she is great distributor and goal scorer.” The squad’s seniors, Sofia Mauger, Hilary Chessler, Lucia Salvato, Rowan Gilmore, Evie Kirby, Julia Tharney, and Sofia Jaffe, did a lot of good things over the years. “They put forth great commitment and dedication to the program,” said Kosa. “When they were freshmen, I had them on the JV team and it was nice to see the progress. Last year, they enjoyed going to the state final and getting that experience and this year they helped us to be really competitive. We are definitely going to miss them.” A pair of juniors, Holly

Howes and Alysse Kiesewetter, made big progress this fall, getting named as Mercer 33 recipients and selected for the Central Jersey Top 20 by the New Jersey Girls Soccer Coaches Association. “Holly really took it to the next level, knowing that she was going to be the main scorer,” said Kosa, who got some good play this fall from freshmen Romy Johnson, Kacey Howes, Clara Burton, Quinn Gallagher, and Leila Hodgett along with sophomores Marina Zaldarriaga and Ava Tabeart and junior Brielle Moran. “A lot of teams were keying on her and she was still able to score nine goals. Alysse was playing from a back position but when we needed offense, she would move up to outside mid and scored eight goals. Some of them were big-time goals. She was so versatile. I call her our lock down defender because when she was on the back line, nobody was scoring on her side. They are two great competitors and had great seasons for us.” Kosa believes that the Tigers are poised for a great season in 2023. “I think we are going to be back in the thick of things,” said Kosa. “I am real excited for it, we are going to have an awesome senior class next year. We had seven or eight really good freshmen that got a lot of time this year and contributed. I think these next couple of years are going to be exciting for us.” —Bill Alden

While PHS Boys’ Soccer Struggled Down the Stretch, Future Looks Bright for Squad Stocked with Young Talent Getting off to a 7-1 start this fall, the Princeton High boys’ soccer team appeared to be on the way to another banner season. But getting hit with a rash of injuries and plagued by a lack of scoring punch, PHS limped home to finish with an 8-8-1 record, falling 3-0 to Howell in the first round of the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Central Jersey Group 4 sectional in its season finale. Despite the late season slump, PHS head coach Wayne Sutcliffe enjoyed the ride this fall. “It is a young team; Ryan (assistant coach Ryan Walsh) and I had the most rewarding experience working with them every day with their quality, their perseverance, and their honesty,” said Sutcliffe. “They are all good players, they are just a little young. It was a great season, you are dealt these things.” Unfor t u nately, dealing w it h i nj u r ie s b e c a m e a theme of the 2022 campaign. “We had a plethora of injuries; at one point late in the season, we had four starters injured and those four guys were perhaps the most experienced players,” said Sutcliffe, who lost his

top returning scorer Richard Wegmann to injury before the season even started and saw such stars as Felipe Matar Grandi, Nick Matese, and Emanuel Noyola sidelined by knocks at times this fall. Sutcliffe credited a trio of battle-tested seniors, Leo George, Jack Serxner and Noyola, with holding things together. “In their four years, they spent so much energy and effort and they contributed a lot to the team,” said Sutcliffe of the three senior standouts. “They were the three who started and they have been with the team s i nce f re s h ma n s e as on. Along the way, whether it was injury or transfer or club commitment, they were the three who finished. I just want to thank them for all of their hard work and effort. It was a pleasure working with them.” With its younger players showing their skill, PHS was a pleasure to watch this fall as it featured a possession game. “Between the 18-yard boxes, I only saw one team that I thought was really better than us,” said Sutcliffe. “It is just in the attacking 18, we couldn’t find the quality. That is through no fault of anyone. It is experience.”

The team’s contingent of young players which featured sophomores Brian Donis, Archie Smith, Azariah Breitman, Matthew Chao, and goalie Nicholas Holmelund along with junior standouts Patrick Kenah, Brandon Urias, Matthew Kim, James Reynolds, Matese, and Matar Grandi got some hard-earned experience this fall. “We have had other teams which were comprised of sophomores or juniors who had some challenges in a particular season and then the next season they did really well,” said Sutcliffe. “I am thinking about the 2014 team that won everything but the state final. In 2013, those kids were just taking it on the chin, they were a year older and a year better the next fall.” Sutcliffe believes that a similar thing could happen next fall for PHS as the players never wavered in their commitment this season while weathering the challenges they faced. “T he chemistr y at the end was fantastic, it was as good as it has ever been,” said Sutcliffe. “The camaraderie, chemistry, and work rate were phenomenal. They were so much fun to work with, they never got discouraged. They are going to be a great team next year.” —Bill Alden

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022

After Producing a Good Start with Some Tight Wins, PHS Girls’ Soccer Got Hurt By Injury in Homestretch

JACK SHOW: Princeton High boys’ soccer player Jack Serxner boots the ball in a game this fall. Senior defender Serxner starred for PHS as it went 8-8-1 this season. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

KEY PERFORMER: Princeton High girls’ soccer player Alysse Kiesewetter, right, marks a foe in a game this fall. Junior defender/midfielder Kiesewetter starred at both ends of the field for PHS as it went 8-8-2 this fall. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022 • 32

PDS Boys’ Soccer Displayed Fight to the End, Making Dramatic Rally in Non-Public Tourney Loss When the Princeton Day School boys’ soccer team fell behind 3-0 at St. Rose in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Non-Public B South Jersey quarterfinals earlier this month, it would have been understandable if it threw in the towel. Instead, PDS scored three straight goals to make it a 3-3 game late in the second half. While the Panthers ended up losing 4-3, PDS head coach Brian Thomsen was proud of the way his squad battled to the final whistle. “The boys have always had fight,” said Thomsen, who got goals from Raag Desikan, Yaseen Mousa, and Aaron Herscovici in the loss as his team ended the fall with a 3-11-4 record. “They have been very unlucky with the outcomes.” Despite the paucit y of wins as it played a challenging schedule, the PDS players didn’t get discouraged. “If you look at who we played against, we had one of the tougher schedules in the area,” said Thomsen. “I am not very happy about the record itself. But from a culture standpoint and everything, when you see the boys with the record that they have, you would think that they would stop caring

about coming to practice and the practices would get worse and worse. The boys actually didn’t want it to end; it was pretty close in that last game, we almost did it.” The team’s senior group — which included Joaquin Rodr iguez, John Mazzarisi, Jared Sandberg, Shay Bhens, Oliver Hall, Julian Liao, and Michael Zebrowski along with Desikan and Herscovici — had a positive impact on the team culture. “Ni ne g uys le av i ng is tough to swallow; they are a group that I feel very close to personally, four of those kids play for the soccer club that I run,” said Thomsen. “You are going to be losing classes no matter what happens. You want those kids back but the reality is that it creates opportunities for other kids.” The squad’s three senior captains, midfielder Rodriguez, goalie Mazzarisi and defender Desikan, are leaving a special legacy. “Joaquin is somebody we are really going to miss, his leadership was fantastic,” said Thomsen. “He is a guy that people really love to play with. He is very skilled, very technical, a lot of fun to watch. It is cool because you get to see how awesome of a leader he is off the field as well. You get to see him

interact with the boys as they approach the field and the locker room. It is nice to see that come to fruition. John has always had big games. I am hoping John finds a place to go to make an impact at the college level. If he doesn’t, he had a really, really good high school career. Raag played very well in the back.” PDS has a good foundation in place with sophomores Todd Devin, Oren Yakoby, Max Schragger, Hart Liu Nowakoski, and Henry West along w ith juniors Gyan Gautam and Mousa. “You lose John but then you get Oren, who is really good,” said Thomsen. “Oren is a very good keeper and it is going to be exciting to see how he does. We have Todd coming back. The juniors are a good glue group. Max surprised a lot of people, he really defined the left back role for us this year. We had a transfer, Henry, come in and he is primed to have a good season.” Thomsen believes his returning group could have a very good season next fall. “We had a banquet last Monday, there was table of nine seniors and you had 10 guys on the other side who were sophomores. and juniors,” said Thomsen. “I tell you what, I would go to bat with those 10 guys any day of the week. I am excited for the future.” —Bill Alden

Youthful PDS Girls’ Soccer Showed Flashes of Brilliance But Ultimately Fell Short of Earning Title Opportunities For Chris Pettit, this fall ended up being the “nearly” season for his Princeton Day School girls’ soccer team. Competing in three postseason tournaments, PDS showed flashes of brilliance but fell short of playing for a title, advancing to the Prep B state semis, the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) NonPublic A quarters, and losing on a late goal in the Mercer County Tournament quarterfinals. While Panther head coach Pettit, whose team ended up with a 12-7 record, would have liked to see his young squad play for a championship, he saw plenty of progress. “There were a lot of positives,” asserted Pettit. “Shelby [Ruf] did great in goal, we tightened it up defensively and we gave a lot of minutes to our freshmen. We improved in certain areas that we worked on. We didn’t really give up many goals from corners and we scored a lot of corners. Things like that were positives.” In a 3-2 overtime loss to Rutgers Prep in Prep B semis, PDS produced one of its best efforts of the fall. “We were winning 2-1 for a good portion of the second half and they scored with the last kick of the game,” said Pettit, who got two goals from junior star Adriana Salzano in the defeat. “We ran out of steam a little bit and we were hanging on for the last few minutes of extra time with a couple of minutes away from it going to penalties, and they scored again. On the bus going there and from the moment we started warming up, you could see the girls were laser-focused.

They really embraced that underdog mentality. We talked a couple of weeks after that game and talked about how do we bring that every weekend. It was a good game.” A week later, the Panthers brought their A-game, defeating Mount St. Mary’s 5-0 in the Non-Public opener. “That was bright spot and a little bit of an anomaly on the season,” said Pettit, reflecting on a contest which saw Salzano score two goals with junior Abby Weed chipping in a goal and an assist and senior Kirsten Ruf and freshman Julianna Hartman each adding a goal. “We got a clean sheet and scored quite a lot of goals. It was very comfortable. It was how a few other games should have gone this year, but we just couldn’t consistently get that done. All season long, coach [Seraphine] Hamilton and I were expecting or waiting for it to click. The possession was always good, the defensive shape got better as the season wore on. We stopped giving up goals through individual mistakes. We just needed to find that method of scoring and you hope when that Mount St. Mary’s game happened, you are OK, it was clicked. We felt good about it, we were confident.” Pettit felt good about his senior group which included Grace Romano, Kirsten Ruf, Beatriz Saldana, and Paris Smith. “The main two seniors were Grace and Kristen, they were both captains; on the field and off, they really were outstanding,” said Pettit. “They organized a lot of team building, social events, and charity events. They were outstanding in that. On the field, they showed a lot

of senior leadership as well. There were games where it was tight or it was frustrating, and they set the standard for the rest. That really started in preseason and carried on throughout. The senior leadership from those two was really good.” Looking ahead to next fall, Pettit is expecting good leadership from a trio of juniors, Tochi Owunna, Salzano, and Weed. “I think Dre is going to come out on fire, it is her senior year, her last chance to shine,” said Pettit of Salzano, who led the Panthers with 12 goals this fall. “For people like Dre, this year wasn’t a success with no title. People like Dre, Abby, and Tochi — those are the ones I am really excited to see as seniors next year with the more mature cast around them.” In addition to that trio of junior standouts, PDS boasts a number of promising young players including freshmen Ella McLaren, Mackenzie Brodel, Emma Burns, Sara Teryek, Ariana Ananthan, and Hartman along with sophomores Sophie Zhou, Reese Overman, Aulani Daniels, and Shelby Ruf. “We are only really losing two starters, albeit in pivotal positions,” said Pettit. “We know already who we have. There are definitely people waiting in the wings for bigger roles.” In Pettit’s view, that core of returners has the potential to play for titles. “There is a lot to build on — 12-7 is an improvement on our record from last year,” said Pettit. “There was lots of growth for the young players and because we are not losing too many seniors, we should be in a stronger position to really make a statement next year. My hope coming in is that we can do that.” —Bill Alden

IN TOUCH: Princeton Day School boys’ soccer player Todd Devin dribbles the ball in a game this fall. Sophomore Devin was a standout this fall for PDS as it went 3-11-4 and advanced to the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Non-Public B South Jersey quarterfinals. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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GETTING HER KICKS: Princeton Day School girls’ soccer player Adriana Salzano kicks the ball in recent action. Junior star Salzano scored a team-high 12 goals this fall to spark the PDS attack. The Panthers posted a final record of 12-7, advancing to the Prep B state semifinal and the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) NonPublic A quarters. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


Growing up in soccer-mad England, Jay James May fell in love with the game at an early age. “We all play, it is like a religion with the approach to it and how you feel about it,” said May. “Every time you have a break you are out playing football. You are on the field as much as you can. I played a lot as a teenager.” In his 20s, May devoted his energy to academics, matriculating to the University of Sussex, where he was awarded a trio of prizes, including highest-ranked student in its School of English. He later earned his master’s degree and Ph.D. at the University of York. May then got into education, teaching worldwide, beginning in his native England before teaching in Spain and China for 10 years. During his five-year stint teaching in China, May made his debut coaching soccer. “China is where I really started coaching because they had a gap for it at the school,” said May. “I coached our house team, the schools are divided into houses and you get a quarter of the population.” Coming to Princeton this past summer to teach English at the Princeton International School of Mathematics and Science (PRISMS), May took on a labor of love, becoming the head coach of its boys’ soccer team. At the outset, May wasn’t sure what he had in terms of the talent on hand. “It was hard to gauge; our training pitch is very lumpy so it is hard for them to sort of really show off their skill,” said May. “We had one boy who plays club soccer and we worked on skills a lot.” The Falcons made an inauspicious debut, losing 6-2 to the Lawrenceville School freshman team in its season opener. “What happened in the last 10-15 minutes is that the boys ran out of puff,” said May. “They were just dead on their feet; Lawrenceville pushed us off the ball. It was a case of putting out fires after the Lawrenceville game. It was, ‘right, you are getting pushed off the ball too easily and you are tired, so we have to work on strength and fitness. At the same time that we have to be working on your skills.’” Bouncing back, the Falcons improved their skills and fitness, ended up with a final record of 2-3-2. A tactical tweak by May helped get the squad on the right track. “I introduced them to a flexible formation with a 3-4-3 with the two guys on the side of the four,” said May, whose coaching staff included fellow faculty members Zachary White, Dane Kang and Weijing Wang. “They have to run all over the field basically. They have to support the attack. They have be part of a solid five on defense; in some ways in that formation, it is the most important role. We don’t have any specialists in that sense, the boys that have played that role and done really well with it. May views a 1-1 tie with New Jersey United Christian Academy (NJUCA) in its third game as a turning point for PRISMS. “We established our defensive solidity; we had played

the formation a few times and then we started focusing more on how to use the ball,” said May, whose squad went on to post a pair of wins over the Wilberforce School (2-1 and 2-0) and then lost 1-0 in a rematch with the Lawrenceville freshmen and had a 2-2 tie with the Princeton Day School JV team in its finale. “At this age or level, they have a tendency to just kick it away like it is a hot potato when they receive it. We were trying to instill in them receiving the ball, shielding it with your body and passing it off, actually playing the game. That was the first time where they started doing it and you could see the confidence growing.” The squad responded positively to May’s approach. “To be fair to the boys, they have taken that on board; it is no good trying to do it if they are resistant to it,” said May, whose team trained on campus and played its home games at the Farmview Fields. “We would do an extended training everyday by at least half an hour. They are smart boys. I tried to appeal to the mathematical nature of the kids, trying to explain things in terms of systems. On the pitch, we would do some board work and get them into the classroom so they could see the shape, the movement and the permutations.” A quartet of seniors — Oliver Gao, Henry Li, Kevin Ya, and Toby Sun — worked hard in their final campaign for the PRISMS program. “Oliver is your top man, he really puts his heart and soul

into it,” said May. “He really cares about the other boys and he works hard. On the pitch, he is not the most talented player but he certainly improved himself this season and grew in confidence. He is an absolute warrior. He has been kicked in the face, he has been elbowed in it twice. He doesn’t leave anything out there, he works his socks off. Kevin is the all-time top scorer here. He leads by example, the boys look up to him. He probably has the most talent of the lot. Henry and Toby are good players, solid players.” May is looking for sophomore Massi Ravotto, who led the Falcons with four goals this fall, and goalie Edward Cheng to be the cornerstones of the squad going forward. “Massi has raw talent, he has got the weaknesses that boys of age will have where boys keep the ball too long and want to do everything himself,” said May. “He comes from a good place so I am working on that with him. He is going to be important for us. Edward improved a lot, we have really had to work with him on his communication. He has good reactions, he is a good shot stopper. We are still trying to instill his communication and using the box, being brave and coming out in crosses. He improved hugely and that 1-nil game against Lawrenceville, he kept us in the game so we had a chance to nick it.” In May’s view, the future is bright for the program. “We are really happy with the progress we made,” said May. “We will have spring

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022

Bringing English Mindset to PRISMS Boys’ Soccer, Coach May Helped Falcons Make Major Improvement

INTERNATIONAL FLAIR: Princeton International School of Mathematics and Science (PRISMS) boys’ soccer player Oliver Gao shows his form in a game this fall. Senior Gao helped lead the way as the PRISMS squad went 2-3-2 under new head coach Jay James May. (Photo provided courtesy of PRISMS) training. Throughout the summer for the time that I am here, I will offer training to the boys who are around. It is a case of keep going, they know what is expected of them now. It is a really nice group, we got a few decent freshmen this year. Our captain will be probably picked from the sophomore group. We are looking good for the future.” The progress made by the Falcons this fall has helped spread the love of the game at the school. “We have a morning announcement every day where the school gathers together and the roar that goes up when the soccer team reports a victory,” said May. “They are really united and it lifts the spirits. The competition is good for the kids at the end of the day.” — Bill Alden

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022 • 34

Record-Breaking Effort by Ukraine’s Veretska Highlighted HiTOPS Princeton Half Marathon Setting the pace at the 10th annual HiTOPS Princeton Half Marathon, Kanato Goto placed first of 1,383 finishers in the November 13 event. Princeton resident Goto, 33, covered the challenging 13.1 mile course in a time of 1:11.07. But perhaps t he most emotional and historic performance at the race was produced by Valentyna Veretska, who recently came to the U.S. from Ukraine. Veretska was the first women’s finisher and third overall, clocking a time of 1:18.06 to set a new female course record. Veretska, 32, is an accomplished runner and is ranked 444th in the world of female runners. One of her many accomplishments in the sport include winning the Jerusalem Marathon one month to the day after fleeing Ukraine, wearing borrowed gear and without her coach (and husband). Her husband and daughter were on the sidelines in Princeton

to cheer her on. After the race, she posted a heartfelt message on her social media account. “Finally my first steps in sports life in USA are made,” wrote Veretska. “It’s a cold rainy day today, but that didn’t stop it. The competition was great! Friendly almost family atmosphere, s upp or t t hroughout t he race track, many new acquaintances and a lot of kind words in support of Ukraine. Princeton you will forever be in my heart. First place with a record of a race for not an easy track.” Additional histor y was made by Amy Read, 28, of Pennington, who set the a new nonbinary course record with a time of 1:52:43, besting the previous mark of 2:24.28 set in 2019. The event drew runners from 36 states and participants from Canada, Germany, Sweden, Belgium, and Mexico. The local Princeton community played a large role in the event’s success led by the following: the

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Municipality of Princeton and Mayor Mark Freda, Princeton Police, Princeton Health Department, Princeton University, the Princeton Clergy Association, Princeton Public Works, Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad, Princeton Fire and Police, Mercer County Sheriff’s Office, Fire Police Officers, Westminster Choir College Security, Medcycle, volunteer coordinator Clare Millington, the race volunteers, and race director Courtney Newman. HiTOPS is a Princetonbased 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that fosters strong and healthy young people of all identities by prov id i ng i n clu s ive a n d youth-informed sex education and LGBTQ+ support for young people throughout the Greater Mercer Area. HiTOPS has worked to reduce health risks, promote healthy relationships, and build affirming and inclusive communities for almost 35 years. — Bill Alden

Local Sports

Rec Department Holding Sign Up for Dillon Hoops

The Princeton Recreation Department is now taking registrations for the 2023 Dillon Youth Basketball League. The Dillon Youth Basketball League is a storied program for the Princeton community that is entering its 51st season. The league consists of both games and clinics. It is open to boys and girls in grades 4-10 who are Princeton residents and non-residents who attend school in Princeton. The Dillon season will take place from January-March 2023 and games will be held Saturday mornings at the

Hun School. The program is a recreational league intended for players of all skill and experience levels. “Dillon Basketball” is about playing the game the right way, teamwork, and having fun. To register, log onto register. communitypass.net/princeton under “2022/2023 Winter Sports Programs.” Registration is open until January 2 or until divisions are at capacity. More information can be found online at princetonrecreation.com.

Princeton Athletic Club Holding 6K Run on Dec. 3

The Princeton Athletic Club will be holding its annual Winter Wonder Run at the Institute Woods on December 3. The 6,000-meter run starts at 10 a.m. from Princeton Friends School and is limited to 200 participants.

The entry fee is $35 until November 11, including the optional T-shirt. The fee increases after November 11. Same day registration will be limited to credit card only – no cash – and space available. This event is chip timed. All abilities are invited, including those who prefer to walk the course. A portion of the proceeds benefits Princeton High Fencing Team, whose members will assist on the event crew. Online registration and full details are available at princetonac.org. The Princeton Athletic Club is a nonprofit running club for the community. The club, an all-volunteer organization, promotes running for the fun and health of it and stages several running events each year.

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FAST COMPANY: The top three female finishers in the HiTOPS Princeton Half Marathon are all smiles after the race which took place on November 13. Pictured, from left, are Sarah Walker (3rd place), Valentyna Veretska (1st), and former WW/P-South and Cornell track and cross country star Caroline Kellner (2nd). Veretska, who recently came to the U.S. from Ukraine, set a new female course record with her time of 1:18.06. Princeton resident Kanato Goto placed first of 1,383 finishers in a time of 1:11.07. (Photo provided by HiTOPS)

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A. Rice Lyons A. R ice Lyons, 93, of Princeton died peacefully in her home on October 31, 2022. She was born Hannah Rice on July 4, 1929, in Brooklyn to Morris Rice (a shortening of Reiser when he came through Ellis Island) and Lena (Rothman) Rice, and was the only child of their marriage, though she had several half-sisters. She was not called Hannah as a child, and was registered in school as Anita, learning only as a teenager that Anita was not her birth name. She was called Rice as a first name starting in junior high, where all the kids were known by their last names. That stuck permanently for her. R ice mar r ied her high school sweetheart, Mymon Goldstein, in 1949. They moved to Princeton, where he received his Ph.D. in psychology, then to Denver, where their first two children were born. Another job took them to Bloomington, Indiana, and finally another to Lawrence Township, NJ, in 1960, where their third child was born. Rice began work at Princeton University in the mid-1960s, landing after a few years at the Office of Population Research as its department administrator. She and Mymon divorced in the early 1970s, and he died in 2004. Rice married Terry Lyons in 1973, and they moved to Princeton in 1975. Rice and Terry (still of Princeton) divorced in the late 1980s. She spent the rest of her working career at the OPR until her retirement in 1994, and remained a Princeton resident for the rest of her life. Rice was a vibrant member of many circles who thrived on community and par ticularly on br inging

people together to do the things she loved. She taught folk dancing for decades, with a particular emphasis on getting people to dance for the first time, and to enjoy dancing as much as she did. She incorporated folk dance into events she led at elementary schools and into LAFF (Life After Forty-Five), a class she developed and taught for years at Princeton University. She became a published poet later in life, and turned to teaching poetry at the Princeton senior center in 2000, which she did until her death. She was an involved member of the Princeton Unitarian church, where she led New Year’s Day poetry readings for years. She was a lifelong knitter, a lover of classy movies and TV shows (especially British mysteries), an enthusiastic poker player, an entertaining charades player, and a great cook. She was always the best storyteller in the room, usually adding a little embellishment to make the story more fun. And she was a loving and playful grandmother. She is survived by her children Julia Goldstein (George Kostic ) of Toronto, Nina Goldstein ( Robert Anderson) of Ann Arbor, and Amy Goldstein (Owen O’Donnell) of Princeton, and her grandchildren Evan O’Donnell and Leanne O’Donnell. The family wishes to thank the invaluable Claudette Wright, Rice’s devoted caregiver of her last five years. There will be a memorial service at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton in early 2023. M e m or i a l c o n t r i b u t i o n s may be made to the UUCP or the Pr inceton Senior Resource Center.

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Barbara Marion Hynds Johnson, 93, died peacefully on November 4, 2022. Barbara was born on January 26, 1929 in New Haven, CT. She graduated with a BS in Elementary Education from New Haven State Teachers College (now Southern Connecticut State University) in 1950. As a student she served as a member of a delegation to the Connecticut State Legislature to petition for the upgrade of the college to a university to be located at the new Hamden campus. After graduation Barbara taught kindergarten and reading readiness at Truman School, where both she and her mother had been students. Barbara mar r ied John Johnson in 1951, moving with him and their newborn son to Pittsburgh in 1955 when he joined the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Atomic Power Department. In 1955 they moved to Princeton, NJ, where he was assigned to work at the Princeton University Project Matterhorn, the University’s fusion program. He ultimately joined the University’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for the rest of his working career, enabling her to raise a family in Princeton and contribute to many community activities. Barbara was a charming hostess when John regularly invited colleagues home for dinner on little notice and she often took charge of the companion’s program at physics conferences and meetings. She was especially proud of teaching an English conversation class to young professional women during a stint at Kyoto University Plasma Physics Laboratory. Barbara served as a volunteer for the Princeton Hospital auxiliary, co-chairing the rummage sale. She was president of the Princeton High School scholarship committee (now the 101 club) and was a strong supporter of the school’s music program, helping to raise money for the choir’s European trips. Barbara was president of both the Princeton University League and the Princeton Women’s Club and served as president, program committee chairman, and member of the scholarship committee of Women’s College Club of Princeton which provides financial assistance to female graduates of local high schools. She was a longtime member and served as chair of the program committee for The Present Day Club. Barbara faithfully served the Princeton United Methodist Church as president of its women’s society, rummage sale chair, member of the m emb er sh ip com m it tee, and church Lay Leader. She chaired the committee that organ i zed and executed PUMC’s sesquicentennial anniversary.

Nancye Allen Fitzpatrick Nancye Alfriend Allen left us in this world on November 9th to join her loving husband Jim, at the wonderful age of 100. Nancye’s devotion and commitment to the betterment of children: her own, her grandchildren, those she taught, and especially those in need were a constant gift to all she impacted. Mother, teacher, mentor, friend — witty and wry to the very end. Nancye was born in Hebron in rural South Central Virginia in 1922, the third daughter of James Aubrey Allen and Mamie Allen nee Baird. It was a simpler world and a farming life she entered. Her family kept chickens, pigs, and a few cows, owned and operated a diesel-powered sawmill deep in the woods and a local country store that doubled as a mail stop on the Norfolk and Western railroad tracks that ran by their lane with occasional haunting whistles. As a family they attended the small Presbyterian church ministered by Reverend Hugh F i t z p at r i c k ; w h o wo u l d later marry Nancye to his son Jim, a childhood friend since the age of 6. When that local boy, at the age of 17, enlisted, went off to war as a bomber pilot and became a prisoner of war, Nancye started writing letters to him hoping it would help him survive his days of captivity. Little did she imagine that Jim would become her husband and life partner for 66 years. When Jim returned from

Germany, Nancye was teaching high school in Virginia. Over the next few years, he asked her three times to accept his proposal for marriage, and as we know three times is the charm, so they married in 1950. Rural Virginia was soon left behind for the canyon walls of New York City. Nancye bore her first two children on the Upper West Side — Karen 1951 and Hugh 1952 — before relocating to Princeton, NJ, in 1953; chosen so they could raise a family in a college town. They soon built a home in a field on Rosedale Road. 1954 saw her second son Allen arrive and in 1959 her third son Dudley. All of her children carry her maiden name and all feel their deep roots in Hebron soil. Nancye was the consummate mother. Fierce to defend, clear with moral lessons, quick to console and hug, and always cooking up a storm. It was a well fed, busy, and safe household but if you ever sneaked the cookie jar, she had eyes in the back of her head! Once her children were off to school, it was time for Nancye to retur n to teaching: grammar lessons at the kitchen table were no longer enough. Her college years at Longwood State Teachers College and her early teaching positions in Virginia placed her in a long line of family teachers including her mother Mamie, who taught in a one room schoolhouse (often to boys who were older than she), and her two sisters Mary Dudley and Louise, who were also teachers in Virginia. She restarted her career in New Jersey, first as a substitute in the Princeton school system, then full time in the newly built John Witherspoon Middle School. She had a great run there; her students loved her for her support and her ability to challenge them at their level — she wanted the best from all and for all. Nancye always had a soft spot in her heart for those in need. She served for many

years on the Board of the New Grange School. She mentored and tutored in the Trenton After School Program and supported the Princeton YMCA, The Trenton Children’s Chorus, Centurion Ministries, and was an elder at Nassau Presbyterian Church. Later years were spent traveling with Jim on business as they visited clients, researched companies, and attended conferences worldwide. She enjoyed walking, exploring the cities, and bringing home gifts for her many grandchildren. Nancye loved to make good friends and be with people. Her warmth and genuine interest in others always came through. Gatherings at 486 Rosedale Road with friends and family were ribald; full of amazing food at Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year’s Day, Easter, birthdays, or for any reason, really. She loved to share her food and home with others. Her legacy in this regard has been assumed by the rest of the well-fed Fitzpatrick clan — four children, 12 grandchildren, 20 greatgrandchildren, and perhaps expanding even further. Jim fondly dubbed her “T he Ros e of Ros e da le Road” and she was. Witty to the end, wry with a wink and a smile, always active either digging in her garden, mowing her lawn, preparing food, volunteering in Trenton, walking until her knees played out after 100 years; she will be dearly missed but never forgotten. Rest in Peace Nancye — Jim is ready and waiting for you! A service of remembrance and celebration will be held Saturday, December 10 at 11 a.m. in the Nassau Presbyterian Church in Princeton, New Jersey. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Centurion Ministries. Arrangements are under the direction of MatherHodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

Princeton’s First Tradition

Worship Service in the University Chapel Sundays at 11am

Preaching Sunday, November 27, 2022

Natalie Harvey Chapel Seminarian

Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton, NJ Music performed by the Princeton University Chapel Choir with Nicole Aldrich, Director of Chapel Music and University Chapel Choir, and with Eric Plutz, University Organist.

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022

Obituaries

During their 69 years of marriage, Barbara and John were blessed with the opportunity to travel extensively in Europe, Asia, Australia, New Zealand, and North America. She loved visiting with old friends, forging new friendships, and spending time with family. Barbara is pre-deceased by her husband of over 69 years, John Lowell Johnson, and her parents, Frederick Ender and Amelia Rita McDermott Hynds. She will be missed by her children, Lowell and Michelle Johnson, Lesley Johnson-Gelb, Jennifer and David Goodall, seven grandchildren, and one great-granddaughter. A service in celebration of the lives of Barbara and John Johnson will be held at Princeton United Methodist Church on Saturday, January 28 at 2 p.m. Barbara wishes that any memorial gifts made in her name be directed to the Scholarship Fund of the Women’s College Club of Princeton. Arrangements under the direction of the MatherHodge Funeral Home, Princeton.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022 • 36

to place an order:

“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS

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MasterCard

The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon

THE MAID PROFESSIONALS: Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Residential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404. 03-29-23

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

HOUSECLEANING: By experienced Polish lady. Good prices. References available. Please call (609) 392-5960. 11-23

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription!

HOUSE FOR RENT: One-of-a-kind spacious dairy barn conversion with Princeton address, on private estate. Open floor plan, 3 BR, 2 bath, breathtaking 2nd floor versatile room. Fireplace, 2-car garage, central air. Includes lawn maintenance & snow removal. No pets, smoke free, $3,500. Available November 1. (609) 731-6904. 11-30

Irene Lee, Classified Manager

Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10 circulation@towntopics.com tf

• Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF • 25 words or less: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. WE BUY CARS IN YOUR BASEMENT? THE MAID PROFESSIONALS: Sell with a TOWN TOPICS Garageand annual • 3 weeks:YOGA $40.00 • 4 weeks: 6 Mead month discount rates available. AND MEDITATION: Ex- $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 •Belle Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Resiclassified ad! pert Private Instruction in Princeton. (908) 359-8131 dential & commercial. Free estimates. • Ads with lineHspacing: $20.00/inch • all bold face type: $10.00/week Singles or small group. Also baseball Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; Ask for Chris References upon request. (609) 218ANDYMAN–CARPENTER:

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf

LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 11-30 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience • Fully Insured • Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 356-9201 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References • Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 tf HOUSE FOR RENT: One-of-a-kind spacious dairy barn conversion with Princeton address, on private estate. Open floor plan, 3 BR, 2 bath, breathtaking 2nd floor versatile room. Fireplace, 2-car garage, central air. Includes lawn maintenance & snow removal. No pets, smoke free, $3,500. Available November 1. (609) 7316904. 11-30

specific conditioning and training for pitchers and position players. 609921-5257 or phoran12@outlook.com. 11-23

THE PRINCETON WRITING COACH - a professional writer, editor, and university teacher - delivers expert learning, writing, and editing services tailored to your interests, goals, and needs. Specialties: tutoring; school/college application essays; ESL writing; and writing for publication. Outstanding references. For a free consultation, call or text 908-420-1070 or email princetonwritingcoach@gmail.com. 11-23 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 tf HANDYMAN, PAINT, YARDWORK, DETAIL CARS, ETC. Call John at (609) 865-0338. 11-23 LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23 CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732 tf

Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-12-23 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-23 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GET TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

EXPERIENCED ELDER CARE for your loved one. Compassionate caregiver with 16 years experience will assist with personal care, medication, meals, drive to medical appointments, shopping. Many local references. Call or text (609) 9779407. tf RETIRED PGA GOLF PROFESSIONAL LIQUIDATING HUGE GOLF COLLECTION. TAX WRITE-OFF: BUY COLLECTION, DONATE TO JUNIOR GOLF! WIN-WIN!

• 40 sets Ping Eye II. New inbox, 1980-89, square grooves, plus-no plus. Made in 1989. • 75 Ping limited edition Scottsdale, new Dale head putters. Made 1995. • McGregor limited edition woods, irons and putters. • Curtis Strange, new, limited edition irons with rack. • www.101golfsolutions.com. Click on “clubs”. • 1960 Frank Paradise custom cue stick (rare). • 10 1960s vintage watches, Omega Seamaster, Longines, Concord, Wittnauer, Bulova. • New Martin guitars, D-41 and D-16, purchased 1990. New, never used, still in cases. • Carlos Irizarry painting, Dec 9, 1969. Call Art: (917) 714-7929. Willing to barter. 11-23

“Forever on Thanksgiving Day, the heart will find the pathway home." —Wilbur D. Nesbit

classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 11-30 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience • Fully Insured • Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 356-9201 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References • Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 tf

2279, (609) 323-7404.

03-29-23 HOUSECLEANING: By experienced Polish lady. Good prices. References available. Please call (609) 392-5960. 11-23 YOGA AND MEDITATION: Expert Private Instruction in Princeton. Singles or small group. Also baseball specific conditioning and training for pitchers and position players. 609921-5257 or phoran12@outlook.com. 11-23 THE PRINCETON WRITING COACH - a professional writer, editor, and university teacher - delivers expert learning, writing, and editing services tailored to your interests, goals, and needs. Specialties: tutoring; school/college application essays; ESL writing; and writing for publication. Outstanding references. For a free consultation, call or text 908-420-1070 or email princetonwritingcoach@gmail.com. 11-23 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 tf HANDYMAN, PAINT, YARDWORK, DETAIL CARS, ETC. Call John at (609) 865-0338. 11-23

Specialists

2nd & 3rd Generations

MFG., CO.

609-452-2630

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

WATER WATER EVERYWHERE! Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

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Call A. Pennacchi and Sons, and put that water problem to rest!

Mercer County's oldest waterproofing co. est. 1947 Deal directly with Paul from start to finish.

609-394-7354

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

Over 70 years of stellar excellence! Thank you for the oppportunity.

apennacchi.com

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022

www.princetonmagazinestore.com

AT YOUR SERVICE A To w n To p i c s D i r e c t o r y

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BLACKMAN FRESH IDEAS LANDSCAPING Innovative Design FREE CONSULTATION

PRINCETON, NJ

609-683-4013

Trees-shrubs-perennials Native Plants Erick Perez

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

Fully insured 15+ Years Experience Call for free estimate Best Prices

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Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner Home Repair Specialist

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A. Pennacchi & Sons Co.

PRESIDENTIAL ROOFING & CONTRACTING

Established in 1947

WATER WATER EVERYWHERE! Let's rid that water problem in your basement once and for all! Complete line of waterproofing services, drain systems, interior or exterior, foundation restoration and structural repairs. Restoring those old and decaying walls of your foundation.

Call A. Pennacchi and Sons, and put that water problem to rest!

Mercer County's oldest waterproofing co. est. 1947 Deal directly with Paul from start to finish.

609-394-7354

Over 70 years of stellar excellence! Thank you for the oppportunity.

apennacchi.com

Presidential Roofing & Contracting Raul Torrens Customer Care Lic #13V11853500

Scott M. Moore of

MOORE’S CONSTUCTION HOME IMPROVEMENTS LLC carpenter • builder • cabinet maker complete home renovations • additions 609-924-6777 Family Serving Princeton 100 Years. Free Estimates

TR

Seasoned Premium Hardwoods Split & Delivered $240 A cord / $450 2 cords Offer good while supplies last

Stacking available for an additional charge

60

BRIAN’S TREE SERVICE 609-466-6883

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Trimmed, Pruned, and Removed Stump Grinding & Lot Clearing

LocallyOperated Owned & Operated for for overOver 20 years! 25 years! Locally Owned and

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Raul@Presidentialrandc.com

Locally Owned & Op

PRESIDENTIALRANDC.COM

HOUSE

A Tradition of Quality

PAINTING & MORE

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Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

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The premier home cleaning company in Mercer County Saves You Time • Safety First • Only the Best Quality Seamless Communication • Cash Free Payment Now serving Princeton, Lawrenceville, West Windsor, Hopewell, Robbinsville, Pennington, Washington Crossing and more! Est. Taking Great Pride in our Work, in 2015 and the Special Touches that Count!

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T

Trimm Stum

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HD

BR

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Serving the Princeton Area since 1963 Find us on Facebook and Instagram

Daniel Downs Owner

icanFurnitureExchange r e m A WANTED ANTIQUES & USED FURNITURE 609-306-0613

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CALL 609-924-2200 TO PLACE YOUR AD HERE

Serving All Of Mercer County


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022 • 38

Publishing and Distribution

· Newsletters

WITH GRATITUDE: THANKSGIVING 2022 with Beatrice Bloom In the spirit of the Thanksgiving holiday, I would like to express my thanks to all my clients, colleagues and friends. As the saying goes, “It’s not joy that makes us grateful but gratitude that makes us joyful.” I am grateful for every individual that I connect with each day. I appreciate the support and loyalty of my friends and clients. I am also thankful for the dedication and contributions of my colleagues who share their time, ideas and talent throughout the year. To my readers, thank you for allowing me to share my thoughts and opinions with you every week. Wishing all of you a Thanksgiving filled with peace, joy and love.

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECOͲBroker Princeton Office 609Ͳ921Ͳ1900 | 609Ͳ577Ͳ2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

LOOKING TO BUY vintage clothing for period costume. 1980s and earlier. Few pieces to entire attic. Men, women and children. Call Terri: 609-851-3754. 11-23 CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius: (609) 466-0732 tf ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 04-06-23 HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf

Family Owned and Operated Charlie has been serving the Princeton community for 25 years

FLESCH’S ROOFING For All Your Roofing, Flashing & Gutter Needs

• Residential & Commercial • Cedar Shake • Shingle & Slate Roofs

• Copper/Tin/Sheet Metal • Flat Roofs • Built-In Gutters

• Seamless Gutters & Downspouts • Gutter Cleaning • Roof Maintenance

609-394-2427

Free Estimates • Quality Service • Repair Work

Employment Opportunities · Brochures in the Princeton Area · Postcards · Books

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT WANTED Princeton-based writer and consultant seeks part-time assistant to help with communication apps, schedules, paperwork, etc. Flexible hours - on-site and remote. Call or text 908420-1070 or email princetonwritingcoach@gmail.com. 11-23

· Catalogues ONLINE

Witherspoon Media Group www.towntopics.com · Annual Reports Witherspoon Media Group

Custom Design, Printing, For additional contact: Custom Design, Printing, Publishing andinfo Distribution Publishing and Distribution melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com · Newsletters

· Newsletters

· Brochures · Brochures

· ·Postcards Postcards · ·Books Books Catalogues · ·Catalogues Annual Reports · ·Annual Reports For additional info contact:

For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@

melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com witherspoonmediagroup.com

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400 LIC#13VH02047300

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton NEW PRODUCTS ADDED WEEKLY!

www.princetonmagazinestore.com


Listed by Robin Wallack • Broker Associate • Cell: 609-462-2340 • robin.wallack@foxroach.com

GIVING THANKS WHERE THANKS ARE DUE!

As the holiday season approaches, I want to offer sincere thanks to all of you who enrich my life — family, friends, clients, customers, colleagues, and especially the intrepid Diane Arons.

I Couldn’t Do It Without You!

PRINCETON OFFICE / 253 Nassau Street / Princeton, NJ 08540 609-924-1600 main / 609-683-8505 direct

Visit our Gallery of Virtual Home Tours at www.foxroach.com A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2022

www.robinwallack.com


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Marketed by: Agent 29 Winthrop Lawrence Twp. $620,000 Marketed by: AgentName Name Marketed by:Road, Agent Name $000,000 Marketed by: Heidi Joseph $000,000 $000,000 foxroach.com/NJME2017300

Street | Princeton, 253253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 253Nassau Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ NJ O:O:609-924-1600 | foxroach.com 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com O: 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com ©2022 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH LLC. Affiliates, LLC. Hathaway Berkshire Hathaway ©2022 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire HathawayHathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, Berkshire ® ® HomeServices andBerkshire Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.Housing Equal Housing Opportunity. Information verified or ©2022 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary ofthe HomeServices ofHomeServices America, Inc.,symbol a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and aoffranchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the HomeServices and the Hathaway are registered service marks HomeServices of America, Inc. Equal Opportunity. Information not Berkshire verifiednot orHathaway guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation ® If your home isofcurrently listed a Broker, thisOpportunity. is not intendedInformation as a solicitation Equal Housing not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation HomeServices symbol are registered serviceguaranteed. marks of HomeServices America, Inc.with