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Volume LXXV, Number 42

www.towntopics.com

No Date in Sight For Reopening Of Quaker Road

PCV Celebrates Construction of New Affordable Housing . . . 5 PU, YMCA Collaboration Benefits ESL Students and Researchers . . . . 8 Talk Marks 50 Years of Photography in PU Art Museum’s Collection . 10 Living In the Moment with Rimbaud, Dylan, and the Flyers . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 PU Football Defeats Brown, 5-0 Tigers Girding for Clash With 5-0 Harvard . . . . .30 Undefeated PHS Field Hockey Advances to MCT Semifinals . . . . . . . . . .35

Beloved Football Coach Steve DiGregorio Dies At 60 . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .24, 25 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 23 Classified Ads . . . . . . 42 New to Us. . . . . . . . . . 26 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 40 Performing Arts . . . . . 19 Police Blotter . . . . . . . 14 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 42 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

Motorists anticipating the reopening of Quaker Road between Province Line and Mercer roads may have a long wait ahead of them. Thanks to the ravages of Hurricane Ida last month, the scenic stretch favored by many drivers entering and exiting Princeton remains closed until a date to be determined. According to an update on the municipal website princetonnj.gov, the previously anticipated start date of October 18 has been postponed as the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) awaits authorization from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP). But repairs are expected to begin next week between Mercer Road and the Historical Society of Princeton located at Updike Farm at 354 Quaker Road. It is also anticipated that the NJDOT will begin work near the canal and Port Mercer to rebuild the towpath and road embankment. Princeton will replace the guiderail once the NJDOT work is completed. “A lot of agencies are involved,” said Princeton’s Municipal Engineer Deanna Stockton. “A stretch of the road embankment was washed away, so the guiderail is hanging in the air, which just isn’t safe.” Several spots on Quaker Road sustained significant damage during the September storm. The Princeton/Lawrence side of the bridge over the Delaware and Raritan Canal collapsed. Close to Updike Farm, repairs are needed on a pipe that goes from a ditch to the Stony Brook at three different locations. “That is being fixed by our contractor, so at least we’ll be able to open up between Mercer Road and Updike Farm once that’s done,” Stockton said. A sinkhole in the Lawrence Township portion of the roadway, approximately 10 feet by 10 feet, also needs repair. According to a prior update on Princeton’s website, a date for Lawrence to fill the sinkhole has yet to be determined. Before work on Quaker Road gets underway, the town is making repairs on Rosedale Road, which was also damaged during the storm. That work will start this week. “We will do that first, and then go to Quaker Road,” Stockton said. “We will keep updating the website as soon as we get information.” Visit princetonnj.gov for updates. — Anne Levin

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PU Offers Compromise Plan for Prospect Ave. Following several months of increasing resistance from the community — through multiple drawn-out Planning Board hearings, a rebuff from the Historic Preservation Commission, an online petition in opposition with more than 1,700 signatures, and widespread objections through public media — Princeton University has revised its controversial proposal for Prospect Avenue, as part of its planned Environmental Studies and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (ES+SEAS) complex. The original plan called for demolition of three Queen Anne Victorian houses on the north side of Prospect Avenue and removal of the 91 Prospect former Court Clubhouse across the street into their place in order to make room for a theorist pavilion and entrance to the new 666,000-square-foot complex. Criticism of the University plan has not questioned the importance and value of the ES+SEAS project, but it has objected strongly to the portion of the project that would have involved removal of the clubhouse building and demolition of the three Victorian houses, potentially jeopardizing Prospect Avenue’s streetscape, its history, and the culture of the community. Following recent discussions with Princeton Prospect Foundation (PPF) and

advice from the municipal staff, the University submitted an updated plan to the Princeton Planning Board (PPB) on Monday, October 18, for consideration at the Thursday, October 21 PPB meeting. The updated plan, according to Deputy University Spokesperson Michael Hotchkiss, involves relocating 91 Prospect to a site across the street but closer to the North Garage than the original proposal, with two of the Victorian houses in question (114 and 116 Prospect) remaining in place

and the third (110 Prospect) being relocated to a nearby site. “Subject to Planning Board approval, this revised location for 91 Prospect allows 114 Prospect and 116 Prospect to remain in place; 110 Prospect will be relocated by the University to a site near the rear of 114 and 116 Prospect,” Hotchkiss wrote in an October 19 statement. Clifford Zink, historic preservation consultant, author of The Princeton Eating Continued on Page 14

COVID Cases Down, As Princeton Prepares For Colder Weather, Upcoming Holiday Season

As the cold weather arrived last fall, activities moved indoors, holiday social gatherings proliferated, and the COVID-19 pandemic saw its greatest surge in cases. From December 12-18, 2020 Princeton registered its highest seven-day total of 39 new cases and, from December 8-20, 2020, its highest 14-day total of 66 new cases. This year’s weather, movement indoors, and holiday social gatherings are likely to resemble last year’s activity, but the pandemic may see only a slight rise in case numbers rather than a surge in the closing months of 2021, according to

health authorities. “From the national and local perspective, it appears cases of Delta have peaked,” said Princeton Health Officer Jeff Grosser. “Holiday travel and more indoor socializing as the weather gets colder will likely contribute to scattered localized outbreaks throughout the winter. That’s the general sense of what public health experts predict at least.” Expressing a mix of optimism and uncertainty, Grosser continued, “There is some concern that the rapid rise followed by a quick decline could rebound to a Continued on Page 12

SATURDAY IN THE PARK: The sunshine and warm weather on Saturday morning made for a lovely visit to Marquand Park, which hosted OAKtober, a celebration of the oak tree, at the Children’s Arboretum. Participants share what the Princeton parks mean to them in this week’s Town Talk on page 6. (Photo by Weronika A. Plohn)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 2

Lifestyle Strategies to Manage Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes Tuesday, November 2, 2021 | 6 p.m. Zoom Meeting Pre-diabetes is a condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Join DR. SHERI GILLIS FUNDERBURK, medical director for the Capital Health Diabetes Education Program, and MINDY KOMOSINSKY, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, as they discuss risk factors, normal glucose metabolism and changes in the body that can lead to pre-diabetes and diabetes, the relationship between food choices and blood glucose, and strategies for reducing your risk.

This event will be taking place virtually using Zoom. Register online at capitalhealth.org/events and be sure to include your email address. Zoom meeting details will be provided via email 2 – 3 days before the program date. Registration ends 24 hours before the program date.

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Surviving a Heart Attack: A Guide to Recovery Monday, November 8, 2021 | 6 p.m. Zoom Meeting Have you had a heart attack and are now wondering what to do next? Join registered nurse LAURIE BECK, supervisor of the Capital Health Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Department, and LONI PERESZLENYI, a licensed and registered dietitian, as they discuss the recovery process following a heart attack, including activity and nutrition recommendations.

This event will be taking place virtually using Zoom. Register online at capitalhealth.org/events and be sure to include your email address. Zoom meeting details will be provided via email 2 – 3 days before the program date. Registration ends 24 hours before the program date.

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WAYS TO VOTE IN THE 2021 ELECTION APPLY FOR A VOTE BY MAIL BALLOT If you are already registered to vote and would like to receive your ballot by mail, you must request your ballot by Tuesday, October 26, 2021. After that date, you must get your voteby-mail ballot in-person from your County Clerk, no later than November 1st at 3 p.m.

HOW TO RETURN YOUR MAIL IN BALLOT

Dear Princeton Friends, The November 2 election is right around the corner! It is crucial for New Jersey Democrats to turn out in big numbers this year. While the Princeton Council race is uncontested, there are many other reasons why you should vote in November: -There are contested elections for Governor, State Senate, General Assembly, Mercer County Surrogate, and Mercer County Board of Commissioners. -Princeton has a School Board Race in which 4 candidates are running for 3 seats. - There are three Public Questions on the Ballot. If you have received your mail-in-ballot and have not returned it, please mail it today!

Leighton Newlin

By Mail: It must be postmarked on or before 8:00 p.m. November 2 and be received by your county’s Board of Elections on or before November 8. By Secure Ballot Drop Box: Place it in the Drop Box in front of the Municipal Building at 400 Witherspoon St. or at the Princeton University Wawa/Dinky Station at 152 Alexander St. by 8 PM on election day, November 2. At the County Clerk: Deliver it in person to your county’s Board of Elections Office by 8:00 p.m. on November 2. *Note: Your mail in ballot cannot be returned to your polling place in this election!

IN-PERSON EARLY VOTING Early voting begins on October 23. The designated early voting location for Princeton is at Princeton Shopping Center, to the left of the Bagel Nook. Early voting will be open Saturday, October 23 through Sunday, October 31. Hours will be Monday-Saturday, 10:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m. and Sunday, 10:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m. No appointment is necessary.

IN-PERSON VOTING ON ELECTION DAY Vote on Tuesday, November 2 at your usual polling place, from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Accommodations will be made for voters with disabilities.

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Paid for by the Princeton Democratic Campaign 2021 PO Box 1537, Princeton NJ 08542

3 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

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TOURS OF DRUMTHWACKET: New Jersey’s official governors’ mansion on Route 206 has reopened for tours on Wednesdays, starting at 1 p.m. Pictured, from left, are the Drumthwacket Foundation’s current executive director Robyn Brenner and former directors Beverly Mills, Daphne Townsend, and Lisa Burdett Paine. Visit Drumthwacket.org for details. (Photo by Lorraine Persiani)

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Checks Mailed to Homeowners Princeton University con- Eligible homeowners will Under Settlement with University tributed $2 million in 2017 receive checks directly from

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Checks are being mailed out this week to about 625 Princeton homeowners under a 2016 settlement that ended litigation challenging Princeton University’s property tax exemptions. This is the fifth year of a six-year program. To be eligible to receive a payment this year, homeowners had to qualify for homestead benefits in 2017, which is the most recent year for which the fund received a list of homeowners who were paid homestead benefits by the state, and must continue to own the home. The 2021 aid payments w ill be approximately $2,350 per eligible home. Homeowners will have 90 days to deposit the checks and may use the funds for any purpose. Under the 2016 agreement

and agreed to contribute $1.6 million per year from 2018 to 2022 to a property tax relief fund. The fund, administered by the Community Foundation of New Jersey (CFNJ), distributes annual aid payments to Princeton homeowners who receive a homestead benefit under the New Jersey Homestead Property Tax Credit Act in the most recent year for which the fund received a list (prepared by the state) of homeowners who were paid homestead benefits. In each year of the program any excess funds after all eligible distributions have been completed will be donated to 101: Inc., a nonprofit organization, to provide need-based scholarships for graduates of Princeton High School attending post-secondary educational institutions other than Princeton University.

CFNJ starting this week. For fur ther information, call Joyce Jonat at CFNJ at (800) 659-5533, ext. 3010.

Holiday Market Days To Return in December

Princeton Merchants Association has announced t h at P r i n c e to n H o l i d ay Market Days will operate December 1-5. The deadline for retailers to sign up as a participating shop is Saturday, October 30. V i s i tor s to d o w n to w n stores and restaurants will be able to take advantage of special offers, surprises, and a chance to win prizes by collecting stamps in their Princeton Holiday Passport. The event is designed to increase foot traffic and revenue. For questions, email eventmanager@princeton merchants.org.

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Donate at The Jewish Center Princeton: Gently used fall and winter clothing and new underwear and socks for adults and children, along with gently used small appliances such as coffee makers, microwave and toaster ovens. 435 Nassau Street. Call (609) 921-0100 ext. 201 with questions. Free Walk-In COVID-19 and Flu Vaccine Clinics: On October 22, 5-9 p.m. at La Mexicana, 150 Witherspoon Street; on October 26, 5-7 p.m. at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street; on November 4, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. at Stone Hill Church, 1025 Bunn Drive; and on November 9, 12-2 p.m. at Witherspoon Hall, 400 Witherspoon Street. Voting Information: Early in-person voting for the upcoming elections is October 23-31 at any of Mercer County’s eight in-person early-voting locations, including at the Princeton Shopping Center to the left of the Bagel Nook; vote by mail by November 2; or vote in person on November 2. Visit “Elections” on mercercounty. org for information. Call for Land Stewards: On October 30, Friends of Princeton Open Space needs help with the Riparian Restoration Project in the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. No experience is necessary. Fopos.org/getinvolved. Holiday Gift Drive: Princeton Human Services seeks donors of gifts for the holidays for Princeton children in need; plus gift cards for parents. Visit princetonnj. gov for information.


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5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

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The Best & Worst Halloween Candies SHOVELS IN THE GROUND: Residents, staff, and board members who spoke at the virtual groundbreaking for new housing at Princeton Community Village are pictured, along with Mayor Mark Freda, far left, at the October 15 event.

Princeton Community Village Celebrates Construction of New Affordable Housing

U n a f fo r d a b l e h o u s i n g costs are nothing new in Princeton. As far back as 1967, it was prohibitive for many members of the population, particularly some who worked in local businesses, private homes, and at Princeton University, to

live in and around the town. That was the year that Princeton Community Housing (PCH) was founded by a group of faith-based and community organizations to balance out the town’s housing opportunities. The organization built the 35acre Princeton Community Village (PCV) on Bunn Drive in 1975 to provide low- and moderate-income housing in a mix of apartments and townhouses. PCH also manages rental homes — 466 in all — at other locations in town including Elm Court, Harriet Bryan House, Griggs Farm, and elsewhere.

TOPICS

garden plants are planned. T he new bu ilding w ill have an open porch and a new neighborhood pavilion for socializing. Units range from one to three bedrooms. Fu nding for t he project comes from the New Jersey Housing Mortgage Finance Association, the municipality of Princeton, and PCH’s ongoing capital campaign, which is about to go public. Some 40 different countries are represented by residents of PCV. “We have at least one refugee family per year,” said Jaeger. So many different languages are spoken.” PCV hosts Pr inceton Yo u n g A c h i e v e r s , a n Continued on Next Page

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Of the Town

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On October 15, a new building was added to the mix. At Princeton Community Village, ground was broken for 25 new affordable homes in a three-story building, for low, very low, and moderate income households. The project is part of Princeton’s affordable housing obligation determined by the state of New Jersey. “This is not simply a building project. It’s about building welcoming and affordable homes in a very good community,” said PCH Executive Director Ed Truscelli at the groundbreaking ceremony. Truscelli was among several speakers at the virtual event, including longtime residents, staff members, and PCH board members. “There is more of a need than ever right now,” said Catherine Jaeger, development and communications manager for PCH, in a recent conversation. “The lack of affordable housing in New Jersey has been apparent every year. New Jersey is usually ranked as the fifth or sixth most expensive state to live in. And since the pandemic, the loss of jobs — especially for working class families — has severely impacted housing.” The PCV project will incl u d e e n h a n c e m e n t s to the existing neighborhood as well as the new building. Improvements to the clubhouse; electric vehicle charging stations; bicycle racks ; a package pickup center; underground stormwater management ; and native landscaping including trees, shrubs, and rain

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 6

Affordable Housing Continued from Preceding Page

after-school program operated by the Princeton Family YMCA in the onsite Marcy Crimmins Center. This fall, a certified pre-school program that operates in collaboration with the Princeton Regional School System and the YMCA opened at the site. Among the speakers at the groundbreaking was Janki Raythatta, a recipient of a college scholarship that enables her to attend New York University. “This community is honestly what I’ve called home for about 18 years,” she said. “Princeton Community Village was built by a community of people who genuinely care for one another, a privilege I didn’t completely comprehend until I moved into the city for college.” Growing up at PCV, Raythatta took part in improvisation classes at the clubhouse. “It allowed me to build my confidence,” she said. “Acting classes were not something my parents could have afforded.” Susan O’Malley, PCV’s property manager for the past 25 years, said the community is unique. “It takes a village, and this village takes care of itself,” she said. It is estimated that the project will be ready in approximately one year. — Anne Levin

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What do the Princeton parks mean to you?” (Asked Saturday at Marquand Park) (Photos by Weronika A. Plohn)

Rebecca: “I appreciate the open space, shade from the shade trees, and places for people to come together. Parks are a safe place for kids to play and learn about different trees.” Helena: “The parks mean so much to me. I think for children, having trees in their lives is a wonderful thing and it makes Princeton a better place. During the pandemic Marquand Park was filled with people because it was the only place they could go to. It was very crucial, especially for children to have a space where they felt safe.” —Rebecca Flemer, Philadelphia, Pa., with Helena Bienstock, Princeton

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Rider University will reward entrepreneurial spirit with a full, four-year tuition scholarship in the 2022 Nor m Brodsky Business Concept Competition. The annual competition challenges high school students to present their innovative business ideas in front of a panel of judges, Shark Tank style, during a live finale. Seniors will compete for the grand prize of a full, four-year tuition scholarship, while juniors and sophomores will compete for cash prizes and the chance to automatically be entered into the senior competition when eligible. To enter, high school students must submit a 400word description of their business idea at rider.edu/ BrodskyCompetition by November 7. High school seniors must also apply by the Early Action deadline of November 15 in order to be eligible for the live finale. Students may pursue any major at Rider. A set of judges will review all entries and select the top five finalists from each group. Finalists will present their ideas live in front of a panel of judges at Rider on January 29, 2022. The winner will be selected the same day. The competition is sponsored by alumnus and entrepreneur Norm Brodsky ’64, the namesake of Rider’s business school, the Norm Brodsky College of Business, and his wife and business partner, Elaine. Brodsky launched eight successful businesses before he began sharing his strategies as the author of the “Street Smarts” column in Inc. magazine. For m ore i n for m at ion about the competition, contact Lora Hudicka, director of Rider’s Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, at lhudicka@rider.edu.

Jack: “I like the Riverside School park. It has all the fun stuff, the basketball court, and the swing.” Ben: “I like to play with the cars at Marquand Park.” Darren: “Princeton has lots of well-maintained parks with good options for nature walks, playgrounds, and different fields.” —Jack, Ben, and Darren Gorden, Princeton

Janoah: “I like to walk around Marquand Park and learn about different trees.” Tony: “The parks get people together instead of dividing them, and I think it is very important to have a place like that.” Janise: “The parks are well preserved with big trees, and it makes me very calm just to be so close to nature. I especially enjoy Marquand Park with the variety of trees that grow here.” —Janoah, Tony, Toviah, and Janise Wong, West Windsor

Laura: “We like coming to the arboretum and seeing the magnolia and redwood trees. Marquand Park has a very beautiful collection of trees and it is very special to have such a long stretch of green space in front of you.” Jonathan: “I just love being in the beautiful nature and spending time outdoors.” Jack: “I like being in the sandbox with no shoes on, playing with the trucks. And ginkgo trees are my favorite.” —Clara, Laura, Jonathan, and Jack James, Princeton


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Princeton U. and YWCA Collaboration Benefits ESL Students and Researchers A collaboration between YWCA Princeton and Princeton University will connect eight students from the YWCA Princeton’s English as a Second Language (ESL) Program with University language students who will offer one-on-one tutoring. Among the ESL students are: Marta, from Columbia, who graduated from a university there as an accountant but works in a different role in the United States. She joined the YWCA last year as a level 1 student and rarely misses a class. Also Jose, from Guatemala, who has moved from beginner level to level 4. He works in the community at jobs in landscaping and in restaurants, and hopes to give back to his country,

returning to teach English. Sophie, from China, worked in management, but in the U.S. stayed home to raise children. She wishes to return to work and wants to improve her intermediate level of English. They, and five others, are part of “Second Language Acquisition and Pedagogy,” through the Program for Community-Engaged Scholarship (ProCES), an academic program that connects the curriculum with Princeton University’s commitment to service. The course, through the German Depar tment for Princeton University students studying language acquisition, offers the tutoring as additional practice for the ESL students, who represent seven countries, and also

offers practical teaching experience to the college students. From the Y’s perspective, “the collaboration will be an incredible learning opportunity and a memorable experience for our ESL students on their language learning journeys,” said Heledona Katro, YWCA Princeton’s director of ESL and Literacy Programs. The goals for the collaboration are to help the Princeton students undertake their research, but also “to provide an extra learning opportunity for our students, to help them to realize their goals of working towards a better future, whether be it a job promotion, studying in college, get a better job, or being able to communicate with their children’s teachers,” she said. From his vantage point as

a University language instructor, James Rankin also sees the collaboration as an opportunity for all involved. “Learning a language is hard – but so is teaching it,” said Rankin in an email. “Princeton offers seminars and practical training in language pedagogy to graduate students in many of the languages taught here, but there are undergraduates who are also deeply invested in this as well, many of whom take part in volunteer ESL tutoring projects in the greater Princeton community. This course is designed for them. It’s meant to give them the conceptual tools that lead to effective language teaching, but also to provide mentored experience in putting these tools to use in practical ways.” “As a language instructor myself,” he said, “I think it’s essential to know the field.” Language acquisition has become an “enormously important” field of study over

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the last 30 years, he noted. It’s essential to know “how to apply these concepts in real situations, with real people. No research article or book can teach you that. I want to see the Princeton students learn how to listen, plan, and adapt as the tutoring sessions progress, and to see the YWCA students feel inspired, supported, and increasingly confident with their English.” Initially it was hoped the tutoring would be in person, but classes will be through Zoom this fall, said Katro. The eight students were selected based on a range of language levels and educational backgrounds, which could help Princeton students “to have access to a broader scale,” she said. Ages vary from young adults to students in their 50s. Katro said she was also mindful that the students, who often work full time and have families, could dedicate extra time for 10 weeks in a row. The class is listed as introducing students “to recent theories of instructed second language acquisition by way of critical reading and discussion, and to pedagogical practice in language teaching by way of participating in one-on-one ESL tutorials with community members, in collaboration with ProCES, during the semester.” Plans are for the Princeton students to share some customized digital learning tools in a new web application. Also being considered is a collaborative project with ESL teachers during the 2022 winter session, subject to COVID-19-related travel restrictions, according to the course description. —Wendy Greenberg

Young Professionals Summit Planned by Regional Chamber

On November 17 and 18, the Princeton Mercer Region Young Professionals will hold a virtual gathering with speakers, networking, and more. There will be two keynote speakers, virtual breakout rooms, small groups, and a chance to meet professionals from various industries. Speakers are Tracey C. Jones, who will present a motivational map to help navigate each of life’s three stages; and Vincent Matallo, who will talk about empowering individuals and teams with authentic communication skills to effectively seize opportunities and influence prospective clients. Day one is from 4 to 5:15 p.m. Day two runs from 9 to 11 a.m. Visit princetonchamber.org for more information.

Trenton Punk Rock Flea Opens at Farmers Market

On Friday, October 29, the Trenton Punk Rock Flea Market opens the Out of Step Offbeat Boutique and General Store at the Trenton Farmers Market, 960 Spruce Street in Lawrence Township. Halloween weekend is the official opening for the 700-square-foot space, featuring goods from nearly 100 small businesses. Included are specialty foods, oddball housewares, handmade pottery, vinyl and cassettes, T-shirts, hoodies, local art, handmade greeting cards, books, and more. The store is at the north end of the market. For more infor mation, v isit outofstepnj.com.

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The Laurel School of Princeton is an independent, co-educational day school for students in grades 1-12. Our evidence-based approach helps students discover their unique educational and social/emotional path by acknowledging the strengths, talents, and brilliance of people who learn differently. This empowers our students and helps them enjoy school and thrive developmentally.

ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS YEAR-ROUND Learn more at laurelschoolprinceton.org

SOCIAL MEDIA TILE / FAVICO The Laurel School of Princeton 800 North Road, Hopewell, NJ 08534 laurelschoolprinceton.org 609-256-3552


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SEE STORE FOR FINANCING DETAILS starti PREMIUM ULTRA $ $ Box Spring FREE! $ $ $ $ star ALL INCLUDE FREE DELIVERY AND FREE REMO $ $ WON’T LAST! Near McCaffrey’s, re y’ starting atat starting atany such errors. ting Saturday 10 - 6, Sunday 11TWIN QUE $Mattress S aturd ay 1 0 Boxreserved. Spring FREE! King $ King Mattress YOUR$ CHOICE! SAVE UP TO $500! s, starting at$ starting aterrors inBASES $ Full Mattress 1199 BASES $ BASES starting at starting at WON’T LAST! See store for details. © 2021 Simmons Bedding Company, LLC.. All rights Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. www.imagineadv.com. Although every precaution is taken, prices and/or specs may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct See store for details. A210913-003 FullFIRM Mattress 1199 ALL INCLUDE FREE DELIVERY AND ALL FREE REMOVAL OF YOUR MATTRESS! OR PLUSH $ King Mattress starting at OLD DELIVERY starting at King Mattress QUEEN MATTRESS ADJUSTABLE Full INCLUDE FREE AND FREE REMO TWIN QUEEN See store forFull details. 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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 10

Talk Marks 50 Years of Photography In University Art Museum’s Collection

When David H. McAlpin donated nearly 500 photographs to Princeton University Art Museum in 1971, and created an endowed professorship in photography at the University a year later, he launched the school on its way to having one of the most important university collections of photography. McAlpin, a 1920 graduate of the University, donated the personal collection he had amassed with his wife. It included works by his friends Alfred Stieglitz, Georgia O’Keeffe, Ansel Adams, and other landmark photographers. “Princeton is one of the few university environments

where photography is taken seriously as a topic of academic study and historical study,” said Katherine Bussard, the University’s Peter C. Bunnell Curator of Photography. Bussard will lead a virtual discussion about the legacy of McAlpin’s gift and the future of photography at Princeton on Thursday, October 28 at 5:30 p.m. The talk celebrates the depth and history of the collection, which has grown to over 20,000 photographs by more than 900 artists, forming a comprehensive history of the medium from the 1840s to the present. Part of the popularity of photography, Bussard said, is the fact that it has become such

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a big part of everyday life. “Photography is now so ubiquitous. We all carr y cameras of some sort, and we are forever snapping pictures in a way that goes far beyond what the Kodak company could have imagined when it debuted the first point-and-shoot,” she said. “I think there is this deep familiarity with photography. It has a relatability that I have seen, in my time here, that catapults all kinds of interest and conversations. There is a comfort level.” Bussard came to Princeton in 2013. She previously served as associate curator of photography at the Art Institute Chicago, and is the author of several books including Color Rush: American Color Photography from Stieglitz to Sherman, and Unfamiliar Streets: The Photographs of Richard Avedon, Charles Moore, Marta Rosler, and Philip-Lorca diCorcia. Her most recent exhibition and publication was “Life Magazine and the Power of Photography.” In addition to celebrating five decades of photography at the museum, her talk will pay tribute to the legacy of Bunnell, a former director of the museum and a ma-

jor influence in building the collection. Bunnell died on September 20. Bussard will also focus on the future. The museum is in the beginning stages of a massive renovation and rebuilding project, designed by architect Sir David Adjaye and expected to open in 2024. “This is a moment where I spend a lot of time thinking about what our new galleries can look like, what they should contain, and what stories they should tell,” Bussard said. “I’ll talk about the way photography will be a very important part of our new building. It’s a kind of convergence of past, present, and future in this moment, and I’m excited to convey that.” The new building offers a kind of blank slate to Bussard and the curators of other departments. “All of us at the museum are thinking about how to expand the collections on view, and how to put the collections on view in ways that are innovative and responsive to the moment, putting objects in dialogue in ways that maybe the previous building just didn’t suggest,” she said. “We have an incredible opportunity to imagine new ways of viewing art, and new ways to put art on view.” To attend Bussard’s talk, visit artmuseum.princeton. edu. — Anne Levin

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GRAND OPENING: On September 18, InMotion Fitness & Wellness officially opened its doors with a fundraiser to benefit the SAVE animal shelter. West Windsor Mayor Hermant Marathe is pictured with staff from the studio. Upcoming fundraisers include a benefit the Christina S. Walsh Breast Cancer Foundation and a food drive for local pantries. For more information, visit inMotionFW.com.

Stoutsburg Museum Creates late 1800s; Put’s Tavern, a popular Sourland Mountain Resources for NJ Schools

Stoutsburg Sourland African American Museum ( SSA A M ) board member Kev in Burkman recently delivered a detailed, poster-sized map of Black history sites in the Sourland Mountain region to Village Elementary School as part of the museum’s educational outreach program. Montgomery, Hopewell Valley, Princeton, and Hillsborough school districts, as well as the Princeton Day School, also received copies of the map for classroom use. Burkman, an expert geographic information system (GIS) mapping analyst, used historical records to pinpoint 25 important Black history sites in central New Jersey. Locations include Stoutsburg Cemetery, one of the oldest African American cemeteries in the state, where local Black residents i nclu d i ng Revolut ionar y War and Civil War veterans were laid to rest beginning in the 1700s; Minnietown, a Hopewell community where African Americans and Native Americans lived until the

business owned by former slave Harry Put; the Higgins Farmhouse in Montgomery, which served as a stop on the Underground Railroad; and the National Historic Register-listed Mount Zion AME Church in Skillman, the current home of SSAAM. As the only African American histor y museum in central Jersey, SSAAM is committed to sharing the often-overlooked culture, experiences, and contributions of the state’s African American residents from slavery to the present day. “SSAAM is always eager to engage in educational outreach to our neighboring communities,” said Executive Director Donnetta Johnson. “Together we will build a broader engagement with and understanding of our rich history and shared future.” As part of its education program, SSAAM will provide copies of the map to schools, organizations, and local governments free of charge. Contact info@ssaamuseum.org for more information.

After Conce

After Noon Concert Series Thursdays at 12:30pm Princeton University Chapel

No performance, Thursday, October 21 due to Fall Recess at Princeton University. The After Noon Concert will resume as usual next Thursday at 12:30pm Performing October 28, 2021 James Roman St. Luke’s United Methodist Church Pittsburgh, PA

This service is open to the public for those fully vaccinated against Covid-19. Registration required for all events on campus at the door or in advance. To register in advance, use the QR code.

Thursdays a starting Sep

Prince Chape

Scan for pre-regis


It’s time to return to live performance. Your home for theater, music, dance, education, conversations, laughter, community, and memories that last a lifetime.

October 22 Dorrance Dance: SOUNDspace

October 29 Matthew Whitaker Quartet

As seen on “60 Minutes”

October 22 – November 6 Sugar Skull

A Día de Muertos Musical Adventure Digital Offering

November 5 The Moth

True stories, told live.

November 7 National Geographic Live: Secrets of the Whales Based on the Emmy Award-winning Disney+ spectacular

October 23 Chris Thile

Of Nickel Creek & Punch Brothers

November 6 Shake & Holla

Featuring North Mississippi Allstars and Rebirth Brass Band

December 7 – 12 What the Constitution Means to Me

We’re making sure your return to our theater will be safe, simple, and social. For a full listing of our events, performances, and classes, or to learn more about our COVID-19 policy, visit mccarter.org or call 609.258.2787.

Pulitzer Prize-finalist play, direct from Broadway

11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

Coming up at McCarter


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 12

COVID Cases Down continued from page one

plateau at a considerable level, which could be problematic. This is what we are keeping an eye on of course as we continue to navigate not only the upcoming holidays, but continue to work through the 2021-22 school year.” In an email Tuesday, he wrote, “Fortunately, Princeton has seen this considerable decline to levels we were observing back in early July (before the Delta surge). We are learning every day about how surges act from various variants and how we can continue to protect our residents through these changes.” The Princeton Health Department reported on Monday, October 18, a total of seven new COVID-19 cases in the previous seven days, 24 in the previous 14 days. Among Princeton residents, 81 percent of those 12 and over are vaccinated — 80 percent of those 18 and over, 98 percent of those 65 and over, and 100 percent of those age 80 and over, according to the health department. Grosser also pointed out the “exemplary vaccination rate” of 95 percent for Princeton residents from 12

to 17 years of age and the lowest vaccination rate (of those currently eligible) of 65 percent among Princeton’s 18- to 29-year-olds. “We have discussed the topic of protecting our most vulnerable throughout this pandemic,” Grosser wrote. “Of course it’s important to protect everyone, but it is extremely vital for those at greatest risk of severe COVID complications to get vaccinated. New statistics on the efficacy of COVID vaccines continue to emerge, but the overwhelming benefit is the ability of the vaccine to drastically reduce hospitalizations and deaths linked to COVID infections.” Grosser noted that he expected 5- to 11-year-olds to be approved for COVID vaccination soon. “Once that occurs, our office will be coordinating with local pediatric offices and Princeton schools to provide convenient clinic hours for families,” he said. Monday’s report from the New Jersey Department of Health noted the seven-day average for positive COVID-19 tests in the state at 1,307, down 7 percent from a week ago and down 31 percent from a month ago. The transmission rate for the state declined to 0.92 from

0.93 the day before, with any transmission rate below 1 indicating that the outbreak is not expanding, as each infected person is passing the virus to fewer than one other person. Booster doses of Moderna or Johnson & Johnson have not yet been approved for the general population, but health authorities expect approval for specific population groups within the next week. Pfizer boosters are currently available, at least six months after completion of the primary series, to help increase protection for: people 65 years and older and longterm care residents; people 50-64 with underlying medical conditions; people 18-49 with underlying medical conditions, depending on individual benefits and risks; and people age 18-64 who are at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission because of occupational or institutional settings. Examples of workers eligible for Pfizer booster shots include first responders, education staff, food and agriculture workers, manufacturing workers, corrections workers, U.S. Postal Service workers, public transit workers, and grocery store workers.

Princeton

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For the week ended October 15, Princeton University — with vaccination rates of 99 percent for undergraduates, 98 percent for graduate students, and 96 percent for faculty and staff (with a limited number of medical and religious vaccination exemptions granted) —reported a “low” campus risk status. The campus positivity rate was 0.07 percent with nine positive cases out of 13,634 tests. T h e P r i n c e ton P u bl i c Schools COVID-19 dashboard for the week ended October 15 reported five student cases — four at Princeton High School and one at Princeton Middle School — and no staff cases, and a cumulative total of 23 cases for the school year so far. As of Monday, all New Jersey school employees and state workers must show proof of COVID-19 vaccinations or be tested at least once or twice a week. The Princeton Health Department is offering clinics for COVID-19 and influenza vaccines on Friday, October 22 at La Mexicana, 150 Witherspoon Street, 5-9 p.m.; on Tuesday, October 26, at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 5-7 p.m.; on Thursday, November 4, at Stone Hill Church, 1025 Bunn Drive, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.; and on Tuesday, November 9, at Witherspoon Hall, 400 Witherspoon Street, 12-2 p.m. The COVID-19 vaccine is free to everyone, with or without health insurance. The influenza vaccine is free only to uninsured Princeton residents. If you have health insurance you need to bring your insurance card/information to receive the vaccine, and your insurance company will be charged. Mercer County COVID-19 vaccination clinics will take place on Thursday, October 21, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.at the CURE Insurance Arena (outside Gate C) in Trenton; on Friday, October 22, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., at the Trenton Farmers Market, 960 Spruce Street; on Monday, October 25, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at Millyard Park, 635 South Clinton Avenue (next to Roebling Market) in Trenton; on Tuesday, October 26, 10 a.m. -2 p.m., and on Thursday, October 28, 10 a.m.- 2 p.m., at the CURE Insurance Arena; and on Friday, October 29, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Trenton Farmers Market. Princeton University will continue to host COVID vaccination clinics at Jadwin Gym until mid-December. Pfizer clinics will take place on Wednesdays from 12-3 p.m. on October 20; November 3, 10, and 17; and December 1, 8, and 15. Moderna clinics will continue on Thursdays, from 12-3 p.m. on October 21; November 4, 11, and 18; and on December 2, 9, and 16. Members of the public, as well as the University community, are welcome to be vaccinated at the clinics. —Donald Gilpin

HONORING A HERO: Rider University is seeking funding to rename its veterans affairs office after the late Eugene Marsh, a veteran and alumnus. death spread, he received Rider to Rename Veterans Affairs Office for Eugene Marsh tributes from New Jersey’s

Rider University is nearly three-quarters of the way toward its $100,000 fundraising goal to renovate and rename the campus’ veterans affairs office for Eugene Marsh ’13, ’18, ’21, an alumnus and veteran who died in January from complications of COVID-19. If s u c ce s s f u l, t h e D r. Eugene Marsh Center for Veterans and Military Affairs would become the first space at the University to be named for a Black alumnus. Rider hopes to reach its goal before Veteran’s Day, November 11, in order to dedicate the space on November 6 during the University’s Homecoming. To date, the initiative has raised $70,725. Marsh’s life was one of triumph and tribulation. He was raised in South Carolina by a loving, illiterate foster mother in an era of segregation and he helped integrate his local high school. After serving in the Vietnam War, he later overcame joblessness and homelessness to establish his own construction company, helping restore the Statue of Liberty and earning an invitation to the White House. Nearing his 70s, Marsh earned his master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling at Rider. At the time of his death, he was 71 and working on his doctoral dissertation in educational leadership. As news of his

governor, Phil Murphy, and the PBS Newshour. Rider’s Board of Trustees awarded his doctorate posthumously in May. Marsh was known for his passion for using his education as a means to help other people and was particularly focused on mentoring and counseling veterans and Black people. The proposed Dr. Eugene Marsh Center for Veterans and Military Affairs will encompass both the Rider University Veterans Association Lounge as well as the coordinator’s office. As a veteran, Marsh spent a significant amount of time in Rider’s current Veterans Association Lounge and with the coordinator. Amounts raised in excess of the $100,000 goal will be allocated toward the Dr. Eugene Marsh E ndowed Scholarship, which will be provided to veteran and military-connected students at Rider with financial need. Similarly, if the $100,000 fundraising effort, which is scheduled to conclude November 1, falls short of its goal, all contributions will be allocated instead toward the scholarship. Gifts can be made to The Dr. Eugene Marsh Memorial Fund by visiting rider.edu/ eugenememorial. For more information contact Associate Director of Advancement Andrea Neale Jarvis at ajarvis@rider.edu or call (609) 896-5219.

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Prospect Avenue continued from page one

Clubs, and a leader in calling for compromise over the past months, expressed g rat if ic at ion at t he a n nouncement of the new plan and appreciation for the concerted community effort to resolve the conflict. “We’re pleased that the University has submitted a new plan that will preserve all four of the buildings on Prospect Avenue,” he said. “Thanks to all the efforts of the Princeton Prospect Fou ndat ion, sp ecif ic ally Sandy Harrison and Karl Pettit, and for all the community efforts, the petition, letters to the media, and often very eloquent public testimony at the public hearings. And thanks to the openness of the Planning Board, the planning staff, and the Historic Preservation Committee — and their openness to community input.” He added, “All that combined will result in a much better outcome on Prospect Avenue. In spite of the challenges along the way, it’s a good outcome for the community and the University and shows the benefits of working together.”

Zink mentioned that the PPF and the community are in the process of negotiating additional future benefits for the preservation of Prospect Avenue. In his statement Hotchkiss emphasized that “the new facilities will not only help the University fulfill its educational mission, but are indispensable to its ability to conduct breakthrough research and foster scientific and technological innovations that will benefit humanity and contribute to the prosperity of our state and nation.” He continued, “We appreciate the Planning Board’s thoughtful review of our application thus far and look forward to its consideration of our updated plan, which will ensure that the building at 91 Prospect will continue to be part of a vibrant Prospect Avenue and will facilitate the University’s important ES+SEAS project. We also appreciate the engagement of the PPF and other members of the community, and look forward to continuing to pursue our shared interest in preserving historic elements of Prospect Avenue.” —Donald Gilpin

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Saint Peter’s University Hospital Recognized for Stroke Treatment

Saint Peter’s University Hospital, a member of Saint Peter’s Healthcare System, has received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award for its commitment to ensuring stroke patients receive the most appropriate treatment according to nationally recognized, research-based guidelines. Stroke is the fifth cause of death and a leading cause of adult disability in the U.S. On average, someone in the U.S. suffers a stroke every 40 seconds, and nearly 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year. Early stroke detection and treatment are key to improving survival, minimizing disability and speeding recovery times. Get With The GuidelinesStroke was developed to assist healthcare professionals provide the most up-to-date, research-based guidelines for treating stroke patients. “Saint Peter’s is honored to be recognized by the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association for our dedication to helping our patients have the best possible chance of survival after a stroke,” said Maria Bartman, BSN, RN, CEN, stroke coordinator at Saint Peter’s and chair of Saint Peter’s Stroke Committee. “Get With The Guidelines-Stroke supports our teams in putting proven knowledge and guidelines to work on a daily basis to improve outcomes for stroke patients.”

Each year program participants apply for this recognition by demonstrating how their organization has committed to providing quality care for stroke patients. In addition to following treatment guidelines, par ticipants also provide education to patients to help them manage their health and rehabilitation upon returning home from the hospital. S a i nt Pe ter’s a ls o re ceived the Association’s Target: Stroke Honor Roll Award. To qualify for this recognition, hospitals must meet quality measures developed to reduce the time between the patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment w ith the clotbuster tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke. Earlier this year, Saint Peter’s achieved certification as a primary stroke center by The Joint Commission, d e m o n s t r at i n g t h at t h e hospital has consistently met qualit y metr ics and provided some of the best evidence-based care for its stroke patients. A primary stroke center is the first line of defense in diagnosing and treating stroke and preventing or minimizing permanent brain damage to the patient. Saint Peter’s was also the first hospital in New Jersey to be recognized as an AgeFriendly Health System by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, and this certification by The Joint Commission further emphasizes Saint Peter’s commitment to older adults.

Police Blotter On October 17, at 9:48 a.m., a resident of Princeton Kingston Road reported that, between 5 p.m. on October 16 and 9:45 a.m. on October 17, someone stole his 2013 Jaguar XJL from his driveway. The doors were unlocked and the keys were inside. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On October 17, at 3:54 p.m., a resident of Harriet Drive reported that someone entered both of his unlocked vehicles parked in the driveway, and stole his laptop from one of the vehicles. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On October 16, at 2:41 a.m., a 37-year-old male from Trenton was charged with DWI, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop on Washington Road for speeding. On October 14, at 12:24 p.m., a woman repor ted that her son’s Trek mountain bike, valued at $150, was stolen from Albert Way between October 8 and 11. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On October 13, at 2:42 a.m., a male entered a residence on Lawrenceville Road through a window and fled when the homeowner awoke and confronted him. The Detective Bureau is investigating.

On October 12, at 5:45 p.m., a resident of Meadowbrook Drive reported that someone filed for New Jersey Unemployment Benefits using his information. On October 11, at 12:04 p.m., the manager of a retail store on Palmer Square West reported that, on October 9, someone used a counterfeit $20 bill to make a purchase. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On October 9, at 3:02 a.m., a 43-year-old male from Hamilton was charged with DWI, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop on Mercer Street for speeding and careless driving. On October 8, at 8:06 p.m., a resident of Woodland Drive reported that someone used her personal credit card to purchase an iPhone 13 in the amount of $902.57. The Detective Bureau is investigating. On October 7, at 1:29 a.m., a 27-year-old female from Ewing was charged with DWI, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop on Nassau Street for speeding. On October 7, at 4:58 p.m., a woman reported that someone went into her backpack while she was on the 200 block of Nassau Street and stole a zip-lock bag containing various prescribed medications valued at $250. The Detective Bureau is investigating. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

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Niedergang is Right Council Candidate To Support All Constituents in Town

To the Editor: My name is Maya Wahrman. I am a social worker in training, getting my masters at Rutgers University, and working full time in refugee resettlement and serving English and Spanish low-income and under-insured clients through my clinical graduate work. I moved to Princeton nine years ago and graduated in 2016 from the University. I came to know the town of Princeton as a community that I wanted to contribute to and see flourish. Having worked locally with immigrant communities and getting to know my neighbors professionally and personally over the last decade, I know how important it is for Princeton to support our whole community. Knowing Eve Niedergang as a Councilwoman and as my close friend, I know she is the right candidate to support all the diverse constituents in our town. I have had the great fortune of knowing Eve Niedergang my whole life, as our families have been close friends since before I was born. When I moved to Princeton, Eve helped me with whatever I needed and took me in as a family member, introducing me to life in Princeton and as a New Jersey voter. I saw Eve’s commitment to Princeton, her knowledge and care toward all the different layers of our community. She has always showed me and everyone in my circle immense generosity and kindness of spirit, paired with a nuanced thoughtful approach to politics, from her own neighborhood and beyond. Watching Eve grow as Councilwoman over the past three years has been inspiring. I see her taking seriously every topic that comes before her, recognizing that all the issues her constituents hold dear are important and demand her attention. The care with which she treats her friends and the critical mind with which she approaches all topics of importance are both evident in how she educates herself on all the important issues we face together. Her work at The Watershed has increased her knowledge and commitment to sustainability and environmental justice, and she has educated herself on racial justice and every other issue that someone brings to her attention as important. I was particularly impressed by her commitment to affordable housing to ensure our town grows equitably and responsibly. She does not shy away from exploring or taking on the issues that her constituents find important. With each topic she carefully reflects and researches, ultimately developing and articulating her own value-driven platform for the best interest of our community. There are few people I trust in Princeton to take our issues and our community more seriously than Eve. I encourage you all to vote on November 2, or to capitalize on New Jersey’s early voting for the first time in history, and support Princeton’s present and future by casting your vote for Eve Niedergang and her running mate Leighton Newlin. Their slogan, “Smart Growth – Wise Choices” reflects their capability to advance our town responsibly and successfully. MAYA WAHRMAN South Stanworth Drive

Candidate Franceschi is Well-Informed, Well-Organized, and a “People Person”

To the Editor: I am writing to endorse Mara Franceschi’s candidacy for the Princeton School Board. Over several years, I had the pleasure of collaborating with her on the informational newsletter that accompanies the municipality of Princeton’s yearly tax bill. Essentially, she managed the project and was my editor. Her background in finance was critical to the success of that enterprise and will stand her in good stead in helping to oversee the Princeton Public Schools’ $96.4 million budget (which is almost 1 ½ times larger than the municipality of Princeton’s entire budget). She persuasively kept me on track and demonstrated an ability to identify key and essential facts from a welter of information. She is well-informed, well-organized, and very much a “people person.” She cares deeply about children and about their education. In short, she encompasses the best characteristics we would want in a Board of Education member. I hope you will join with me in giving her your unqualified support. ROGER SHATZKIN Chestnut Street

Noting That It’s Time to Rethink What Is Meant by Preservation

To the Editor: During Hurricane Irene my friend lost original artwork and books. During Hurricane Ida a friend lost irreplaceable family photos. Every resident of Princeton wants to preserve something, and this will get harder as storm flooding gets worse. This is why I have been so disheartened by the narrow use of the idea of “preservation” when debating Princeton’s future. I appreciate the desire to slow change and to preserve some buildings along Nassau Street and in the business district. But the amount of resources spent in the name of preservation is troublesome when what is needed is a plan to fix our stormwater issues in order to preserve our city. The devasting floods in Europe this summer were a warning to us. In a New York Times article, the mayor of a German village described how the small brook he used to play in as a child turned into a 33-foot river of water that swept his mother away. In an initial assessment of what happened, German officials noted that there was a lack of water retention reservoirs, too much impervious surface cover, and the fast-

Task Force Member Writes in Defense Of Cannabis Dispensaries in Princeton

To the Editor, I write this letter as a member of the Princeton Cannabis Task Force and, as importantly, a resident of the Princeton community for over 30 years who has raised four children in our town. Last spring I became aware that our Council was establishing a task force to explore the potential impact that the legalization of cannabis in New Jersey would have on our town. Council was looking for applicants interested in participating in this initiative. I was concerned about the complexity of this issue and the potential consequences it might have, and so I decided to apply for a seat on the committee, considering that this would be the best way to educate myself and address the questions I had. I sit on the committee with a diverse group of individuals represented by medical professionals, law enforcement, business owners, lawyers, and Princeton University among others, all appointed blind to any personal convictions. I have watched this group work exhaustively to research and share information around the important decision of whether to allow dispensaries in Princeton, including the impact that legalization has had on other states, and the approach that similar towns in New Jersey are taking. We made the decision to “opt out” of allowing dispensaries to operate in town as the deadline approached, in order to have time to make a fully informed recommendation to Council. I began this journey on the fence about whether it was the right decision to allow dispensaries in our town. I am not naive about the challenges we face moving forward, but I have come to firmly believe that our best choice is to allow the establishment of dispensaries in Princeton for the overarching reason that this will enable us to take firm control of the “roll out” of the new reality that cannabis is legal in New Jersey. We will discourage the operation of black market operators in town selling potentially dangerous product. We can award licenses to local, law abiding retailers who care about our town with the stated goal of working toward social reparation and justice. We can control the narrative by educating our youth, adults, and seniors about the safe use of a drug that is legal and will be available by delivery in our town anyway. We can teach our youth about the dangers of underage use on their

developing brains, and the consequences of using and driving. We can provide information on medical cannabis to those with mental and physical illness who could greatly benefit from its prescribed use. Please educate yourself, and challenge misinformation circulating on cannabis legislation and use. Consider that the decision to allow dispensaries in Princeton is the most enlightened approach for our community. Whether you are personally in favor of cannabis or against it, I believe we are better off being proactive on this since legalization has already happened, delivery will be available in Princeton, and licenses are being issued by neighboring towns. Let’s control our own narrative. COLLEEN EXTER Hun Road

Thanking Supporters, Sponsors of Successful Princeton-Blairstown Center Fundraising Event

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

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growing trees planted to harvest wood had roots that were too shallow to hold the soil. In other words, causes were linked to mismanagement and two officials were under investigation for “negligent homicide.” Our city needs a comprehensive strategic plan to make it climate change resilient. I love the idea of Princeton University bringing more brilliant engineers and climate scientists to campus as part of the ES+SEAS development plan. But if Princeton University doesn’t apply this expertise in their own backyard, what is the point? And for the rest of us, when it comes to stormwater issues, we need to think as a “we.” The millions spent to move a Victorian house does little to preserve Princeton when people will continue to lose precious heirlooms and struggle to preserve their homes due to increasing flooding. More importantly, the city had over eight water rescues this summer during Hurricane Ida, not to mention the deaths in adjacent towns. So, we need to add “preserving life” to how we think about preservation. In order to save the city as a whole, whatever development decisions are made now, and in the future, must embrace a more expansive definition of preservation. CAROLYN ROUSE Wheatsheaf Lane

To the Editor: On Friday, October 8, Princeton-Blairstown Center (PBC) held its sixth annual Links to Youth Golf Outing at the Fox Hollow Golf Club in Branchburg. A beautiful fall day drew 88 golfers and raised more than $75,000, which will support PBC’s award-winning Summer Bridge Program. Each year, Summer Bridge offers hundreds of students from Trenton and Newark a high-quality summer enrichment experience focused on social emotional learning and S.T.E.A.M. completely free of charge. In addition to the golfers who joined us for the day, many others supported the event by donating and/or bidding on items in the online silent auction. Our board members were also tremendous assets, stepping up to register or recruit foursomes and solicit auction prizes and sponsorships. Their efforts helped us surpass both our attendance and revenue goals! The winning foursome for the day, who scored an impressive six under par on the Fox Hollow course, included Mike Dawson of North Brunswick; Nichole Drakeford of Union; Antoine Johnson of East Brunswick; and Derek Simpkins of Ringoes. Three of the golfers in this year’s first-place foursome were returning golfers who were also part of last year’s winning team. Beyond the fun and excitement of the day, the event supports the mission of the Princeton-Blairstown Center to serve young people, primarily from historically marginalized communities, by nurturing their social-emotional skills through experiential, environmental, and adventure-based programming. Developing these skills enables participants to engage in self-discovery and transform their communities to create a more just world. PBC strives for a future in which young people exhibit personal resilience and compassion, embrace expanded possibilities for their lives and enact positive change within their communities and the world. Thanks to our event sponsors: AMSkier Insurance; Sarah & Mark Antin; Blue Ridge Lumber Company; Rev. Dr. Alison Boden and Rev. Walter Kerbel; Bryn Mawr Trust; Peggy and Russell DaSilva; Geeta Gavindarajoo and Bruce Ellsworth; New Jersey Institute of Technology - Martin Tuchman School of Management; Vishal Moni and Shankar Iyer; NRG Energy; Payday LLC; Kathy and Bruce Petersen; Rotary Club of Princeton Corridor; Suman Rao and Kaushik Arunagiri; Karen Richardson; Yvette Saeko Lanneaux, Esq. and Mr. Michael Nissan, Esq.; Tamara Simpkins Franklin; Dr. Sarah Tantillo; and Robin and Christopher Van Buren. We are also tremendously grateful to our Links to Youth cochairs, Heather Reilly and Derek Simpkins for their time, energy, and effort organizing and executing this successful event. PAM GREGORY President and CEO, Princeton-Blairstown Center Continued on Next Page

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Arguing That Greater Availability of Cannabis Will Come with Significant Costs

To the Editor: I’ve followed with interest some of the meetings of the Cannabis Task Force and some of the letters to the editor in Town Topics about bringing cannabis dispensaries to town. I’ve heard and seen a lot of arguments promoting, if not celebrating, this while downplaying the negative impact of recreational cannabis on young people and the community. Although I disagree with those promoting this overall perspective, I do believe they are sincere in their intentions, as am I. In today’s hyper-partisan environment, too often we impugn the motives of those who disagree with us. That being said, I think these overly sanguine perspectives often gloss over the main issue going forward which is that with greater availability will come significant costs and, most especially, unintended consequences. Let’s not delude ourselves. With greater acceptance and widespread distribution over time, there will be more and more underage consumption (and habitual use) in the same way that underage drinking is so high, despite the enacted laws and our best-intentioned educational efforts over the years (I wouldn’t be surprised if official survey data underreports these levels of usage amongst teens with both cannabis and alcohol). Research has clearly delineated the substantial adverse effects of cannabis upon the developing teenage and young adult brain. And, of course, this not only affects the teenagers themselves but also their extended families and friends. In my own family, my brother had to stage an intervention in order to get my nephew to attend a residential program for one full year in order to overcome his dependency on cannabis. He’s doing a lot better now, but, needless to say, this caused so much heartache and pain for my nephew and those who love him. As a result of increased distribution and availability, it’s likely that more and more families will be faced with this. And yes, there will be other unintended consequences relating to those adults who are at-risk and more prone to addictions, etc. CNN recently reported that a condition called cannabis hyperemesis syndrome is “on the rise in the United States, especially in states that have legalized marijuana,” where “habitual users of cannabis, including teenagers, are showing up in emergency rooms complaining of severe intestinal distress,” including vomiting that can last for hours on end. For these reasons, this is hardly something to celebrate or to rationalize away. I’m afraid that we may be in for a rather rough ride, whether the effects are more immediate, or 10-20 years down the road as cannabis becomes more widely distributed and accepted (like alcohol). I think overall we need a better strategy. Instead of providing more opportunities for people to get hooked on artificial recreational highs, we, as a society, should be putting our collective (liberal, conservative, and independent) heads and hearts together to figure out how to help people, young and old, come off of drugs and experience the real joys of clean and healthy living — that would truly be something for our community to strive for, be proud of, and celebrate! JEFFREY KINGSLEY Jonathan Dayton Court

Recent Get Out the Vote Appeal Letter Was One-Sided

To the Editor: While I applaud efforts to get more Americans involved in our electoral process, I was disappointed with the letter in your October 6 edition (“Urging Princetonians to Vote in Upcoming General Election”). The letter was essentially an appeal for local voters to vote the straight Democratic

ticket without any reasons given why voters should do so other than it was “crucially important” for New Jersey. My takeaway of the urgency the letter seems to call for is because Republicans want to deny American citizens their lawful right to vote. I am unaware of any Republican candidate on our local ballot who advocates such an opinion. I encourage voters to examine what the Republican ticket from top to bottom has dedicated itself to confronting and turning around: 1) Ever higher property taxes leading to lack of affordability; 2) A sputtering economy; 3) Unresponsive state bureaucracies such as the DMV; 4) Intrusive government regulation; and 5) An unemployment rate 35 percent higher than the national average. The letter invokes Thomas Jefferson as having warned Americans that “The price of liberty is eternal vigilance.” It was not that eminent slaveholder who is the source for the statement, but the prominent Civil War abolitionist Wendell Phillips who was a leading advocate for equal rights for all Americans, including women, Blacks, and indigenous Americans. That’s a position that I and the Republicans I know believe in. Bottom line: It’s time for a change. As governor, Jack Ciattarelli and his team will get New Jersey turned around and back on the path of prosperity for all. DUDLEY SIPPRELLE Chairman, Princeton Republican Committee Victoria Mews

Candidate Baglio is Dedicated to Enhancing Equity, Educational Outcomes for All Children

To the Editor: I write to express my enthusiastic support for Betsy Baglio’s candidacy for re-election to the Princeton Board of Education. I’ve known Betsy for years, ever since our kids started playing baseball and doing musical theater together at Princeton Middle School. When we evaluate Board candidates, we usually focus on their experience, their education, their values, and their moral commitments. All of this matters enormously, and in all of these categories, Betsy’s qualifications speak for themselves. Betsy is a Princeton graduate, an experienced teacher with a master’s in education, and the parent of two PPS children. She has dedicated her professional career and six years on the Board to enhancing equity and educational outcomes for all children. It’s hard to imagine a better resumé. But I want to focus here on the harder-to-measure qualities that aren’t evident from Betsy’s sterling record: Betsy’s unparalleled ability to listen, to facilitate discussion and consensus across areas of broad disagreement, and to inspire people to work together to get things done. Multimember decision-making bodies like our BOE are premised on the idea that a group of elected representatives is better equipped than a single individual to recognize, understand, and meet the needs and interests of its community. Deliberation is key to boards’ effectiveness: through discussion and the weighing of ideas, these groups screen out bad proposals and sharpen good ones. Not surprisingly, for such deliberation to be effective, communication and openness are key. In these areas, Betsy’s strengths are unmatched. As long as I’ve known Betsy, I’ve been struck by her ability to bring people together. People love being around Betsy. And who wouldn’t? She’s gregarious and endlessly enthusiastic. She knows a huge number of people, and because she listens so closely to everyone she speaks with, she remembers everything about their concerns and their lives. She’s an effortless leader, whether it’s organizing rides to practice or coordinating end-of-season gifts for unpaid, dedicated Little League coaches. She’s a natural at persuading people to get involved, and she’s equally gifted at attending to big and small details to make sure a project gets done: a born problem-solver. I’ve witnessed these talents firsthand in our interactions on the baseball bleachers, and I’ve witnessed them from afar in her deft work on the Board.

All these skills make Betsy uniquely well-suited to serve on a decision-making body. She listens. She understands where others are coming from and communicates that understanding to others, an essential tool in building consensus. She sizes up problems quickly and accurately, comes up with feasible solutions, and eagerly rolls up her sleeves to see those solutions executed. Her optimism and can-do attitude are irresistible. She is, in short, an ideal member of our Board. I urge readers to join me in re-electing Betsy to another term. JANE MANNERS Wheatsheaf Lane

BOE Candidate McDonald Builds Consensus and Leads By Example

To the Editor: We write to wholeheartedly endorse Brian McDonald for re-election to Princeton’s Board of Education. We have worked with Brian as nonprofit board members and share his commitment to the Princeton community, sustainability, and the environment. Brian’s service to local nonprofits, particularly McCarter Theatre, Sustainable Princeton, and The Watershed Institute, has been exemplary. From his collaborative nature, to his ability to listen and analyze, to his deep knowledge on matters of governance, finance, and planning, Brian builds consensus and leads by example. He is also a hard worker and fulfilled his 2020 Earth Day Pledge to collect and dispose of at least 1,000 pounds of trash from Princeton’s streets, sidewalks, and wooded areas. As a member of the School Board, Brian’s advocacy for sustainability has been instrumental in moving the district towards sustainable and cost-saving solutions for facilities. We believe Brian’s 26 years of service to our town, our fellow residents, and the town’s children has been outstanding, and we hope you will join us in voting to elect him to a second term on the Board of Education. Whether you vote by mail, early, or on November 2, please vote for Brian McDonald in Column H. YAMILE SLEBI Battle Road FRAN PRICE Birch Avenue DAVID R. HILL Newlin Road Continued on Next Page

Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

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Council Candidate Newlin Will Work Tirelessly for the People of Princeton

To the Editor: For 35 years I’ve had the pleasure of watching Leighton Newlin grow from a small business entrepreneur into a community activist, and now with great hope a candidate for Princeton Council. As his nephew I’ve been able to experience his wisdom and compassion, for the betterment of all, firsthand and have been able to absorb the knowledge he has bestowed upon me. There is no better person for a seat on Council, as he will work tirelessly for the people of Princeton to make sure that the needs and best interests of its people will be the main priority of the town Council. My uncle knows the importance of seeing the good in people and being able to listen to them, and more importantly fighting to represent them when needed. That was why he was able to be a beacon of hope as he helped those that he worked with reacclimate to society in transitioning back to society. It’s with that same determination and understanding that will help guide him on Council as he works to do what’s best for the town. My uncle was one of eight residents who met weekly to help advise Council on why the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood deserved to be Princeton’s 20th historic district. He brought to fruition the first ever Witherspoon-Jackson Welcome Weekend, where the members of the community came together to beautify their properties and the neighborhood while also introducing and reintroducing neighbors to each other. For 24 years he has been a leading voice as a member of the Princeton Housing Authority board, with 19 of those years being the board chair. One of his main concerns is that rising taxes and affordability are forcing many low- and moderate-income families out of Princeton. He fears that, on its current trajectory, Princeton may lose it diversity, historic identity, and most importantly its soul, both figuratively and literally, in the not-so-distant future if the cost to live here remains unchecked. This venture into the political realm is the natural next step for a man who has dedicated his life to community and public service, and only wishes to continue to work to make sure that the town that he calls home will be a town that continues to support equity, diversity, and good governance. He may not have all the answers at the moment, but I assure you that no stone will go unturned for him to find answers and solutions to the problems we will face. As he and his running mate Eve Niedergang’s campaign slogan states, “Smart Growth — Wise Choices,” you can trust that he will do what’s best for the town, and there is no doubt in my mind this is a job that Leighton can and will succeed at, with the backing of the Princeton community. This is why I ask you to join me in voting for Leighton Newlin for Princeton Council. ANTOINE NEWLIN Redding Circle

Mara Franceschi Will Work to Make Children’s Educational Experiences Better

To the Editor: As private citizens, we are writing to support Mara Franceschi for the Board of Education. We were fortunate to have worked closely with Mara on the PTO Executive Board at Johnson Park (JP), where she served as the treasurer for four years and co-president for three years. As treasurer, we witnessed Mara work tirelessly to ensure that the PTO budgets were judiciously set and executed. She questioned expenses, collaborated to find cost-saving measures, and established tight controls. Mara also worked hard to ensure that all children benefited equally from the fundraising efforts of the JP PTO. Mara’s dedication and passion for the children, the teachers, the families, and the community led her to the elected role of co-president of JP, where she continued for three years. As co-president, Mara governed in an ethical and transparent way, drawing on the talents of the JP community and bringing everyone together to help enhance the experience of all children at JP. We personally know that Mara’s financial acumen and governance expertise are deep and impressive. She is highly competent and will work hard to tackle the budget and facilities needs issues. Mara doesn’t take things for granted — she questions policies and procedures and will ensure that before important decisions are made the community is involved and all voices are heard. We believe Mara has excellent integrity, understands her fiduciary responsibilities, is transparent, and will work to make all our children’s educational experiences better. The School Board must be objective, understand financial implications, and work to achieve reasonable goals. In a time when the district is tackling long-term growth initiatives and addressing strategic issues such as equity, wellness and health, and innovative improvements, we believe that it is of paramount importance to have someone with Mara’s strengths, talents, and tenacity on the Board. Please join us in voting for “F” for Franceschi for the Board of Education on November 2. SUE BOWEN Stone Cliff Road MILENA DELUCA Hunt Drive

the street on Prospect. Not one word of protest from these people, proving that the protests are not about historical preservation, but rather just one more self-absorbed attempt to block the University. This protest is just like the ill-founded attempt to delay the move of the Dinky Station several years ago, which based on hysteria, was also merely an attempt to impede. The three old derelict buildings in question proved for many reasons to be unsuitable as family homes and were turned into equally unsuitable offices. Owned by the University, on University land, the University has every right to do what they want to without negotiating with people who have no legal right or standing. The University has the same rights as the owner of the iconic brick cottage two blocks away. A beautiful home that received no attention from the historical preservationists. This is a cause du jour, nothing more. JILL D. SCHREIBER Prospect Avenue

Books

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

Mailbox

Noting That Preservationists Ignored Teardown of Brick Cottage on Prospect

To the Editor: While the so-called historical preservationists were wringing their hands about three old useless buildings on Prospect Avenue, they totally ignored the teardown last week of a beautiful iconic brick cottage two blocks down

Barkan and Mangone “Black Bodies, White Gold” Discuss Eating, Drinking Subject of Labyrinth Event

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Leonard Barkan and Renaissance specialist Carolina Mangone will be talking about Barkan’s book, The Hungry Eye: Eating, Drinking, and European Culture from Rome to the Renaissance (Princeton Univ. Press) on Tuesday, October 26, at 6 p.m. To register for the Labyrinth Books Livestream event, visit labyrinthbooks. com. According to Mary Ann Caws, author of Creative Gatherings: Meeting Places of Modernism, Barkan’s book is a “totally extraordinary convivium in magnifi cence, like a high feast of historical art superintelligence, philosophical disquisition, and supreme wit, all laid out with an abundance of gobsmacking visible stuff from Pompeii to the High Renaissance. Thingness gets to meaning, visual gets to verbal, dinner gets to the Last Supper, and we leave feeling we’d like more.” Barkan is professor of comparative literature at Princeton University. His books include Mute Poetry, Speaking Pictures; Unearthing the Past: Archaeology and Aesthetics in the Making of Renaissance Culture; and Satyr Square: A Year, a Life in Rome. Mangone is assistant professor of art and archaeology at Princeton and the author of Bernini’s Michelangelo. This event is co-sponsored by Princeton University’s Department of Art and Archaeology and Humanities Council.

Anna Arabindan-Kesson and her Princeton University colleague artist, art historian Chika Okeke-Agulu, will be discussing Arabindan-Kesson’s new book, Black Bodies, White Gold: Art, Cotton and Commerce in the Atlantic World (Duke Univ. Press) on Wednesday, October 27 at 6 p.m. This event is cosponsored by Princeton University’s Humanities Council and the African American Studies and Art & Archaeology Departments. To register for this online event, visit labyrinthbooks.com. Lisa Lowe, author of The Intimacies of Four Continents, comments: “Beautifully conceived, consummately researched, and effectively presented, Black Bodies, White Gold makes an important contribution to art history, African American and Black diaspora studies, American studies, and British Empire studies.” Arabindan-Kesson is an assistant professor of African American and Black Diasporic art at Princeton University with a joint appointment in the Department of Art and Archaeology. Her forthcoming monograph is called An Empire State of Mind: Plantation Imaginaries, Colonial Medicine and Ways of Seeing. Okeke-Agulu is a professor in the African American Studies and Art and Archaeology Departments at Princeton. He is the author of Postcolonial Modernism: Art and Decolonization in Twentieth-Century Nigeria; and, with Okwui Enwezor, Contemporary African Art Since 1980.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 18

BOOK REVIEW

Living In the Moment with Arthur Rimbaud, Bob Dylan, and the Philadelphia Flyers

D

escribed as “the gun that almost killed Arthur Rimbaud,” a 7mm six shooter purchased by his lover and fellow poet Paul Verlaine in July 1873 sold at Christie’s in November 2016 for 435,000 euros, more than seven times the estimate, according to the November 30 Guardian. So why would an “unknown bidder” pay a small fortune for the gun that almost killed Rimbaud, who was born on October 20, 1854, and died 120 years ago on November 10, 1891? Because we’re talking about a legend, a star, an action hero of literature who gave up poetry for good at the age of 21. As it happened, Verlaine was in a drunken delirium at the time and no more capable of doing away with Rimbaud than he was of helping Bob Dylan write “You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go” (“I been shootin’ in the dark too long ... Relationships have all been bad / Mine have been like Verlaine’s and Rimbaud’s”). Rimbaud and Rambo Verlaine’s gun was sold three weeks after Donald Trump was elected president. Remember those flags and yard signs showing Trump as a bazooka-wielding Rambo? It’s possible that some super rich supporter bought the gun as a souvenir for the Donald, not that he’d want anything soiled by the hands of a poet. In fact, Rimbaud not only rhymes with Rambo, he was symbolically present at the birth. When David Morrell first conceived the hero of his 1972 novel First Blood, he intended the name of the character to rhyme with the surname of the poet, aware that the title of Rimbaud’s Season in Hell fit with the horrific POW experiences he imagined his Rambo enduring and from which sprang the blockbuster film franchise starring Sylvester Stallone. The OED extends the implicit Rimbaud connection, defining Rambo as a term “commonly used to describe a lone wolf who is reckless, disregards orders, uses violence to solve problems, enters dangerous situations alone, and is exceptionally tough, callous, raw and aggressive.” Creating a Visionary Writing in May 1871 to his teacher and friend George Izambard, the 17-year-old Rimbaud declares, “I want to be a poet and I am working to make myself a visionary.” Arrogantly patronizing a valued teacher, he adds, “you won’t possibly understand, and I don’t know how to explain it to you. To arrive at the unknown through the disordering of all the senses, that’s the point.”

Rimbaud expands on the idea in a letter to his friend Paul Demeny: “The poet makes himself a visionary through a long, prodigious and rational disordering of all the senses. Every form of love, of suffering, of madness; he searches himself, he consumes all the poisons in him, keeping only their quintessences. Ineffable torture in which he will need all his faith and superhuman strength, the great criminal, the great sick-man (malade), the accursed, — and the supreme Savant! For he arrives at the Unknown! Since he has cultivated his soul — richer to begin with than any other!... and even if, half crazed, in the end, he loses the understanding of his visions, he has seen them! Let him be destroyed in his leap by those unnamable, unutterable and innumerable things: there will come other horrible workers (travailleurs): they will begin at the horizon where he has succumbed.” Even as he’s imagining a visionary future, R imbaud s eems to foresee his retirement from poetry less than four years later (“let him be destroyed”), a possibility also suggested when he inserts the word “rat i o n a l ” ( r a i s o nné ) between “prodigious” a nd “ d is order i ng.” After he stopped writing poetry, Rimbaud followed an itinerary seemingly suited to exotic ambitions, traveling to Java in the Dutch East Indies, Cyprus, Yemen, and then living out his last decade in Abyssinia, where the Abyssinian maid plays her dulcimer “singing of Mt. Abora” in Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s visionary adventure “Kubla Khan.” The grim last year of Rimbaud’s life described in Edmund White’s biography Rimbaud: The Double Life of a Rebel (Atlas 2008) has at least one cheerful sequence. In July of 1891, with cancer giving him only months to live, he returned home from the hospital in Marseilles and for the first few days “surprised his mother and sister by cracking jokes all the time and reducing them to tears of merriment.” He’d also brought back an Abyssinian harp, “which he played in the evenings.”

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Intensely “In the Moment” I was going to begin this column with Bob Dylan’s Poetics: How the Songs Work (Zone 2019) by Timothy Hampton, who devotes the better part of a chapter (“Absolutely Modern”) to Rimbaud’s impact on Dylan. But choosing between Verlaine’s gun and a book by a professor of comparative literature and French whose previous work was Fictions of Embassy Literature and Diplomacy in Early Modern Europe, I went for the gun. Hampton opens Dylan’s Poetics with an epigraph from the poem “To a Reason” in Illuminations — “A drumbeat from your finger releases all sound, and a new harmony begins.” In the chapter featuring Rimbaud, Hampton singles out the “famous axiom, ‘One must be absolutely modern,’ “ before quoting John Ashbery on how Rimbaud’s investment in the present moment involves for him “the acknowledging of the simultaneity of all of life, the condition that nourishes poetry at every second.” Rimbaud’s “modernism” means living and writing so intensely in the moment that the “drumbeat” from his fi nger in May 1871 can be felt in October 2021. After citing additional lines from Illuminations (“these poems will be made to last .... Poetry will not accompany action but will lead it”), Hampton talks about projecting art into action: “For Rimbaud, as poet, the shaping of action comes materially, through the poetic resources of rhythm and form. The visionary experience overtakes the entire sensorium, recalibrating how we process phenomena.” Hampton repeats the word “sensorium” in reference to the way Dylan, in his own “pop modernist moment,” will “expand the sensorium of the songwriting self to include the diverse material put in play by the new media culture” of postwar America. The same word comes round again in the next paragraph’s reference to the “visionary mode” breaking with the “brute phenomena of everyday experience as it recombines or transforms elements from the sensorium into some new artifact.”

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Rimbaud in Philadelphia Last Friday, in an immense, brilliantly lit “sensorium” of total unremitting sound, action, and sensation, I shared “the simultaneity of life” with thousands of screaming, chanting people doing what the flashing digital feed commanded (MAKE NOISE). And so I thought of Rimbaud. Of all the poets and writers of the 19th and 20th centuries, or perhaps any century, the “Absolutely Modern” poet who believed in the prodigious disordering of all the senses made sense in that prodigious soundscape, with its fire-breathing Jumbotron. Yes, it was Opening Night at the Wells Fargo Center for the Philadelphia Flyers, known in their Stanley-Cupwinning prime as “the Broad Street Bullies” for their “unmatched toughness and tenacity,” regularly “pushing the limits of the rulebook” and backing it up with “literal punches” when the situation deemed it necessary. A “Savage Side Show” Opening at random my battered, beaten but unbowed New Directions paperback of Illuminations, I immediately find lines in “Side Show” written at the same pitch as the hockey arena’s blaring, glaring inthe-moment intensity: “Very sturdy rogues ....What ripe men! Eyes vacant like the summer night, red and black, tricolored, steel studded with gold stars; faces distorted, leaden, blanched, ablaze; burlesque hoarsenesses! The cruel strut of flashy finery! Some are young, — how would they look on Cherubin? —endowed with terrifying voices and some dangerous resources.” After references to “the most violent Paradise of the furious grimace,” Rimbaud imagines the sturdy rogues enacting “heroic romances of brigands and demigods, more inspiring than history or religions have ever been .... Eyes flame, blood sings, bones swell, tears and red trickles flow. Their clowning or their terror lasts a minute or entire months.” At the end, Rimbaud writes: “I alone have the key to this savage side show.” Dylan’s Vaudeville n Dyan’s Poetics, Hampton refers to the San Francisco news conference in December 1965 when Dylan was asked, “What poets do you dig, Bob?” Dylan answered, without hesitation, “Rimbaud,” then, “Smokey Robinson, W.C. Fields, Allen Ginsberg, Charlie Rich. The association of poetry with vaudeville, comedy, circus acrobats, soul music and country can only come under theSELECTIONS sign of Rimbaud.” OF DISTINCTIVE —Stuart Mitchner WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES

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19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

Performing Arts

“ABBA THE CONCERT”: A tribute to the famous Swedish band is Friday, October 22 at 8 p.m. in the State Theatre in New Brunswick. Singing the famous songs including “Mamma Mia,” “S.O.S.,” and “Money, Money, Money” are The Visitors, a tribute band also from Sweden. Tickets are $29-$69. Visit STNJ.org.

Princeton University Glee Club collaborative concerts during across eras, cultures, and In Concert with Harvard, Yale the fall semester. Last year, traditions in addition to re-

The Princeton University Glee Club will take part in a benefit concert, virtually and in person, with the glee clubs from Harvard and Yale universities, on Friday, October 29 at 7:30 p.m. The concert, titled “Hand in Hand,” is streamed online, but each choir will be performing for live audiences from their home venues. Princeton’s club will sing at Richardson Auditorium, and admission is free. For more than a century, chor uses from Har vard, Princeton, and Yale universities have celebrated their friendship with a season of

the Princeton University Glee Club continued to honor this tradition at a time of extraordinary change and challenge with a series of two virtual benefit concerts titled “Hand in Hand.” During the concert, the livestream audience will have the opportunity to make an optional donation to Save the Music, a national nonprofi t working towards equity in music education, supporting music programs in public schools in the choirs’ local communities of New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Connecticut. The concert will feature a range of choral works from

21/22

cently composed works, and will conclude with the “Football Song” medleys from each school. The performance from Princeton will feature two new choral projects extracted from the Glee Club’s membership — the Sea Shanty Choir, performing music on a maritime theme, and Alegría, a group devoted to Latin American/Latinx choral music, conducted by the new Glee Club choral associate Mariana Corichi Gómez, Princeton University Class of 2021. Advanced tickets are available through music.princeton. edu or call (609) 258-9220. Continued on Next Page

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 20

Performing Arts Continued from Preceding Page

BACK ON STAGE: Capital Philharmonic of New Jersey brings works by American composers to BEATLES HOMAGE: “The Fab Four: The Ultimate Tribute” brings renditions of classic Beatles the War Memorial in Trenton, marking its return to the theater since the pandemic. songs, with costume changes representing different phases of their career, to State Theatre New Jersey in New Brunswick on Friday, October 28 at 8 p.m. The tribute concert has been arts and music organizaPeter Boyer’s Ellis Island: Capital Philharmonic Presents performed in countries across the world. Tickets are $24-$54. The theater is at 15 Livingston tions, we feel as if we’ve reThe Dream of America cel“The Dream of America” Avenue. Visit STNJ.org. ally weathered a storm. Our ebrates the historic AmeriCapital Philharmonic utmost priority has been on can immigrant experience New Jersey (CPNJ) returns Youth Orchestra Announces be exposed to extensive per- YOCJ also welcomes back to Trenton’s Patriots The- and the American dream. ensuring the health and New Season, New Conductor formance repertoire and be David Kim, concertmaster safety of our musicians and The work includes actors ater at the War Memorial The Youth Orchestra of inspired by professional art- for The Philadelphia Oron Saturday, October 23 at and projected historical im- our audience. Regrettably, Central Jersey (YOCJ) be- ists. Integral to the partner- chestra, who will play the we lost two players to COages from the Ellis Island 7:30 p.m. with “The Dream ship, the PSO has expanded Beethoven Violin Concerto of America,” first presented archives. Seven actors from VID during the epidemic and gins the 2021- 2022 season its assistant conductor posi- with the YOCJ Symphonic with rehearsals and perforthey will be missed. But our Passage Theatre Company four years ago and brought recite reminiscences of new spirits have been buoyed by mances resuming safely in tion to include leadership of Orchestra on Sunday, Januback by popular demand. A mericans from Poland, the continuing support of person, along with a range YOCJ’s Symphonic Orches- ary 23, 2022 at the Yvonne The performance launchTheater, Rider University. Greece, Belgium, Hungary, so many patrons and by the of activities throughout the tra. es the orchestra’s 2021/22 Kim has previously collabo“From our first meeting Ireland, Russia, and Italy. anticipation the relaunching year. season after suspending its rated with YOCJ through with Kenneth Bean, our Written in 2002, Ellis Is- of classical orchestra music In addition, as part of its performances at the War performances and master staff and students felt an inland: The Dream of Amer- in Trenton.” ongoing partnership with Memorial in March 2020. classes. stant connection. He brings ica has been performed by For tickets, visit capital- the Princeton Symphony “The musicians and I are major American orchestras. Master classes w ill be philharmonic.org or call the Orchestra (PSO), YOCJ wel- a wealth of knowledge and absolutely delighted to be reThe orchestra will open (609) 656-3224. Subscrip- comes Kenneth Bean, assis- youth orchestra experience; available for woodwinds, turning to the stage,” said the concert with two oth- tions for CPNJ’s entire sea- tant conductor for PSO, as but most of all, he brings a brass, and percussion as Music Director/Conductor er 20 th century American son are available at a sav- its new Symphonic Orches- warmth and love for stu- well as string players, the Daniel Spalding. “It has dents. We are so excited latter led by Kim. works: Liberty Fanfare by ings of 33 percent off single tra conductor. been a long 20 months. We to have Kenny as our SymUpcoming concerts are John Williams and Appa- price tickets. The par tnership is the were able to come together phonic Orchestra conductor December 7 at 7 p.m. at lachian Spring by Aaron formalization of an ongoIn keeping with current for several outdoor perforand to continue our part- Prince of Peace Lutheran Copland. safety and health practices, ing relationship established mances and a recording sesnership with the Princeton Church in West Windsor, through the PSO’s BRAVO! “What a great way to reall patrons must show proof sion, but walking out onto Symphony Orchestra” said and January 23 at 3 and 7 the Patriots Theater stage start our series at the War of full vaccination for CO- Education Program, which Phillip Pugh, YOCJ artistic p.m. at Rider University’s will really feel like we are Memorial,” said board presi- VID-19 before entering the encourages young musi- director. Yvonne Theater. cians and their families to dent Gloria Teti. “Like many War Memorial. coming home.”

art making

Pastels

Thursdays, October 28–November 18, 8 p.m. The Art Museum is partnering with the Arts Council of Princeton to provide free weekly pastel drawing classes, taught over Zoom by Barbara DiLorenzo. With an emphasis on using soft pastels to blend and create rich colors, each week’s lesson will be inspired by works in the Museum’s collections.

Stream it live artmuseum.princeton.edu

LATE THURSDAYS! This event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970. This program, including live closed-captioning, is made possible by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Curtis W. McGraw Foundation. Robert S. Duncanson (American, 1821–1872), Untitled (Landscape) (detail), late 1850s. Princeton University Art Museum. Museum purchase, Kathleen Compton Sherrerd Fund for Acquisitions in American Art and Mary Trumbull Adams Art Fund

MY BELOVED: Masha (Cathy Liebars, left) explains to her brother Vanya (DJ Holcombe, right) that the young man in the middle, Spike (Michael O’Hara), is not her driver, he’s her “beloved” in ActorsNET’s Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike. The comedy by Bucks County playwright Christopher Durang opens October 22 and runs until November 5 at 635 North Delmorr Avenue in Morrisville, Pa. For tickets, Visit actorsnetbucks.org.


21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

Art

“LE ANTICHITA ROMANE”: This work is part of “Piranesi on the Page,” now on view in the Ellen and Leonard Milberg Gallery of the Princeton University Library. Visit library.princeton.edu/ Piranesi for reservations. (Photo by Brandon Johnson)

“Piranesi on the Page” Exhibit reserve 50-minute viewing Keller, and Nancy Shill. All At Princeton University Library slots on Thursdays between art is for sale.

Princeton University Library now presents its newest exhibition in the Ellen and Leonard Milberg Gallery, “Piranesi on the Page,” which tells the story of how Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720-1778), the foremost printmaker in 18th-century Europe, made the book the center of his artistic production. The exhibition is open to the public through a reservation system. Celebrating Princeton University’s collection of Piranesi works, the exhibition draws from the Library’s Special Collections including Graphic Arts, Numismatic, and Rare Books; the Marquand Library of Art and Archaeology; and the Princeton University Art Museum. The exhibition also features a number of loans from national and international collections, including several works that will be on display for the first time. The exhibition is curated by Heather Hyde Minor, professor of art history at the University of Notre Dame and Carolyn Yerkes, associate professor of early modern architecture at Princeton University. Members of the public can

3 p.m. and 6 p.m., and Fridays through Sundays between 12 p.m. and 3 p.m. Please note that all visitors must be fully vaccinated and wear face coverings. The gallery and restrooms are wheelchair accessible. For m or e i n for m at ion about the exhibition or to book your visit, go to library. princeton.edu/Piranesi.

“Points Of View” Art Show at Prallsville Mills

The seventh annual “Points of View,” an art show and sale featuring five local artists, will once again be presented at the Saw Mill, part of Prallsville Mills, located at 33 Risler Street in Stockton. The show will begin with an opening reception on Friday, October 22 from 7 to 9 p.m. It continues Saturday, October 23, and Sunday, October 24, from 12 a.m. to 5 p.m. Parking is free and abundant. Entrance is in the red barn building. Look for the banners and flags. All COVID-19 precautions will be adhered to, and masks will be provided. Showcasing their work are Ilene Rubin, Jeanne Chesterton, Jim Bongartz, Armor

Chesterton and Rubin have been creating art shows in the Bucks County area since 2014, and are pleased to be having this year’s show after a pandemic hiatus. A few of the aspects that they like so much about the “Point of View” art show are that their art, along with that of Bongartz, Keller, and Shill, complements each other, while individually they are visually vastly different. All are award-winning artists, and all bring a unique voice and inter pretation to the visual world around them. At the same time, each in their own way offers a large array of paintings, each one professionally created and available for one weekend only. For more infor mation, email JeanneChesterton @ gmail.com or Ilene @ IleneRubin.com.

Fifty years ago, David H. McAlpin, Class of 1920 and friend to Alfred Stieglitz, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Ansel Adams, made a landmark gift of photographs to the Museum. Join us for a discussion about the legacy of this foundational gift and the future of photography at Princeton.

Stream it live artmuseum.princeton.edu

LATE THURSDAYS! This event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970. This program, including live closed-captioning, is made possible by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Curtis W. McGraw Foundation. Ansel Adams (1902–1984; born San Francisco, CA; died Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA), Alfred Stieglitz, An American Place, New York, 1939. Princeton University Art Museum. Gift of David H. McAlpin, Class of 1920. © The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust

IS ON

Town Topics a Princeton tradition! est. 1946

Celebrating 50 Years of Photography Thursday, October 28, 5:30 p.m.

Continued on Next Page

“TUESDAY AFTERNOON”: This painting by Ilene Rubin is featured in “Points of View,” an art show and sale featuring five local artists, running October 22 to 24 at the Saw Mill, part of Prallsville Mills in Stockton.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 22

Art Continued from Preceding Page

“SKY FALL”: Works by artist Erin Delsigne, shown here, and award-winning photographer Edwin Torres will be featured at a “Third Thursdays” presentation and artist talk at MCCC’s James Kerney Campus Gallery in Trenton on October 21 from 7 to 8 p.m. The public is invited in person or via Zoom.

“HOOT’S MILL”: Artsbridge’s Distinguished Artist Series event on October 21 at 7 p.m. will feature award-winning Bucks County artist Dean Thomas in an open forum discussion and demonstration of the woodblock printing process.

Artsbridge Artist Series Features Dean Thomas

Aw a r d - w i n n i n g B u c k s County artist Dean Thomas will demonstrate multicolor woodblock printing at Artsbridge’s Distinguished Artist Series on Thursday, October 21 at 7 p.m. For the first time since the pandemic began, the meeting will be held in person at Prallsville Mills, 33 Risler Street in Stockton. The open forum discussion and demonstration of the woodblock printing process will include initial drawing, block preparation, palette selection, carving tools and techniques, and final printing.

Thomas graduated from Glassboro State College in 1983, and launched right into his decades-long career as a professional artist. Initially working as a printmaker in New Jersey, he produced over 100 hand-engraved plates for monotype and colored prints– using watercolor to hand color each print. His small editions of Southern New Jersey landscapes and village scenes were widely exhibited in New Jersey and Philadelphia — where he was an exhibiting member of the Philadelphia Watercolor Club. In 1994 he moved to Boulder, Colo., where the vast

Jazz Vespers An Interfaith Experience of Poetry, Music, & Quiet Centering

landscape inspired him to paint exclusively in watercolor. After a year, he returned to the New Hope, Pa., area for its rich heritage in the visual arts. For the last 20 years, he has been working in Bucks County and exhibiting throughout the region. In this period, Thomas transitioned from watercolor to oils. An avid backpacker, fly fisherman, and kayaker, Thomas’ strong and deeply rooted connection to the natural world drives him to paint. “It is my sincere desire that my love for the outdoors, seen through my paintings, will have a profound effect on others – keeping them connected to the natural world as well,” he said. This event is free and open to the public. Artsbridge requests that attendees be vaccinated and wear a mask while inside the mill. For more information, visit artsbridgeonline.com.

“Third Thursdays” Artist Talks Return to MCCC’s Kerney Gallery

Wednesday, Oct 27, at 8pm Princeton University Chapel Jazz Vespers is an interfaith experience of poetry, music, and quiet centering, featuring jazz clarinetist Audrey Welber, pianist Adam Faulk, and members of the Chapel Choir. Come to listen, to speak, and to rest. All are welcome.* Program continues: Nov 1 7, Feb 16, Mar 16, & Apr 20.

*This service is open to the public for those fully vaccinated against Covid-19. Registration required for all events on campus at the door or in advance. To register in advance, use the QR code.

“Third Thursdays,” the monthly photography presentation and artist talk at Mercer County Community College’s (MCCC’s) James Kerney Campus (JKC) Gallery at 137 North Broad Street in Trenton, will take place on October 21 from 7 to 8 p.m. This month’s focus is on the award-winning photography of Edwin Torres and film collage artist Erin Delsigne. The show is curated by Heather Palecek and Habiyb Shu’Aib and the public is invited. Hosted by Michael Chovan-Dalton, director of JKC Gallery, the event will take place in person and on the Zoom conferencing platform. To register, visit JKCGallery.online or email JKCGallery@mccc.edu. “Last semester’s ‘Third Thursday’ monthly events at JKC attracted a growing contingent of fine art photographers and members of

the public,” said ChovanDalton. “There is a palpable sense of excitement during these sessions as the artists display their work and explain their motives and inspirations. The question and answer sessions are an amazing educational experience for everyone.” Delsigne, aka Film Collage Artist, is most known for her instant film collages using Polaroid and Fuji Instax film to create psychedelic landscapes and surreal portraiture. Delsigne earned her education from Humboldt State University and Cal State Long Beach; studying photojournalism, black and white film, and digital and commercial photography. Film Collage Artist was born in 2018 when Los Angeles based artist Delsigne created her first instant film collages to bridge the gap of understanding her battle with Lyme disease. Her work is captured on a custom converted Mamiya Universal Press with a Rezivot back; allowing her to photograph with i-Type, Sx-70 and 600 Polaroid films. More about Delsigne can be found at filmcollageartist.com. Torres is an award-winning photographer preoccupied with uncovering stories about family life and disenfranchised communities. He graduated from Colby College with a degree in American studies, which sparked his intellectual curiosity about history, current events and the representation of cultures in a variety of media. Born in the Hunts Point neighborhood of the Bronx and raised in a Puerto Rican family, Torres developed a love for his vibrant community and works to serve as one of the voices from within. His work has been published in The New York Times, Vice, The Atlantic, The New York Daily News, T he A mer ican Prospect, ProPublica, The GroundTruth Project, and Leica Blog. More about Torres can be found at edwintorrespf.com/ homepage.

Area Exhibits Check websites for information on safety protocols. Ar t@ Bainbridge, 158 Nassau Street, has “Gathering Together / Adama Delphine Fawundu” through October 24. artmuseum.princeton. edu. A r t ists’ G a l ler y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Birds and Beetles” through October 31. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Talk to Me” through November 20. artscouncilofprinceton.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, has “Trenton’s Treasures: A Retrospective of Watercolors by Marge Chavooshian and Robert Sakson” through November 14. Visit ellarslie.org for museum hours and timed entry tickets. Gallery 14 Fine Photography, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “Members Welcome Back Exhibit” through October 24. gallery 14.org. Gourgaud Gallery, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, has “Small Paintings” through October 31. cranburyartscouncil.org. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Rebirth: Kang Muxiang,” “Bruce Beasley: Sixty Year Retrospective, 1960-2020,” and other exhibits. Hours are Thursday through Monday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Timed tickets required. groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Princeton and Women’s Suffrage” and other online exhibits, as well as the “History@ Home” series. The museum is currently closed to the public. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has

“It’s Personal: The Art of Robert Beck” through January 2, “Daring Design” through February 6, and “Miriam Carpenter: Shaping the Ethereal” through March 20. michenerartmuseum.org. Mercer Museum, 84 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Found, Gifted, Saved! The Mercer Museum Collects Local History” through April 10. mercermuseum.org. Mor p e t h C on te m p o rary, 43 West Broad Street, Hopewell, has “Robert Beck: Recent Work” through October 31. morpethcontemporary.com. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “In Nature’s Realm: The Art of Gerard Rutgers Hardenberg” through January 9 and the online exhibit “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898.” Open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. morven.org. New Hope Arts Center, A-Space Gallery, 2 Stockton Avenue, New Hope, Pa., has “Same Thing Only Different: New Paintings and Drawings by Charles David Viera” through October 31. newhopearts.org. Phillips’ Mill, 2619 River Road, New Hope, Pa., has “92nd Juried Art Show” through October 31. Hours are 1 to 5 p.m. daily. phillipsmill.org. Plainsboro Public Library Art Gallery, 9 Van Doren Street, Plainsboro, has “Life Before the Pandemic: Will It Return?” through October 27. plainsborolibrary.org. Pr inceton Public Librar y, 65 Witherspoon Street, has “Love Thy Nature” and “Looking Micro, Seeing Macro: Pressed Flower Art” through January 3. princetonlibrary.org. Small World Coffee, 254 Nassau Street, has works by Shorty Rose through November 2. smallworldcoffe.com. West Windsor Arts Center, 953 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “WellBeing Ourselves: Reflect, Reimagine, Connect” through October 23. westwindsorarts. org.


Wednesday, October 20 4 : 30 p.m. : “T he S urprising Birth of Latin Literature,” Zoom lecture by Princeton University professor Danie Feeney, presented by Princeton Journeys. Free. Events4.princeton.edu. 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meeting. Princetonlibrary. org. Thursday, October 21 10 a.m.: “Indoor Cook Talks: Simple Slow Cooker and One Pot Recipes,” at L aw r e n c e H e ad q u ar te r s Branch of Mercer County Librar y, 2751 Brunswick Pike. Registration required at hopeprogs@msl.org. 1 p.m.: Jonathan DekelChen speaks on the new online exhibit “Jewish Agriculturism in the Garden State,” virtual event sponsored by the Allen and Joan Bildner Center at Rutgers. Free. Register at BildnerCenter. Rutgers.edu. 1 p.m.: Princeton Graveyard Tour, virtual event led by Eve Mandel and sponsored by Mercer Count y Librar y L aw rence Headq u ar ter s Br a n ch. E m a i l hopeprogrs @ mcl.org to register. 6-7 p.m.: Y WCA Princeton’s Breast Cancer Resource Center hosts the Beyond Pink Art Show with paintings, sculpture, and photography created and inspired by local breast cancer survivors. Held virtually. $40. All proceeds support the center. Ywcaprinceton. org/beyondpink/. Friday, October 22 10 a.m.-8 p.m.: Grand opening event at Ovation at Riverwalk active adult community in Plainsboro. RSVP at (609) 537-8000 or ovationatriverwalk.com. 6-9 p.m.: “A Return to Art,” works by New Jersey artists at the GfK building, 1060 Route 206. Ticketed reception with wine, appetizers and music. Montgomeryartscouncil.org. 7 p.m.: Capital Singers of Trenton holds a season preview concert at Sacred Heart Church, 343 South Broad Street, Trenton. Capitalsingers.org. 7 p.m.: “Acme Halloween: Plan B,” Acme Screening Room outdoor location, 204 North Union Street, Lambertville. Shorts and feature films, also live entertainment. Lot opens 6 p.m. $40 per car. Acmescreeningroom.org. 7:30 p.m.: Parsons Dance at NJPAC, 1 Center Street, Newark. NJPAC.org/dance. 8 p.m.: ABBA The Concert, at State Theatre, Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. Tribute to the Swedish band by The Visitors, also from Sweden. $29- $ 69. STNJ.org. Saturday, October 23 9 a.m.-3 p.m.: “Hope is in the Bag,” one-day shopping event at Pennington Quality Market to raise funds for Capital Health Center for Comprehensive Breast Care. Celebrity baggers,

g ive aw ays, r af f l e s, a n d more. 25 NJ Route 31. Capitalhealth.org/hope. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.: “A Return to Art,” works by New Jersey artists at the GfK building, 1060 Route 206. Montgomeryartscouncil.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Fall Family Fun Weekend at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Barnyard animals, adventure barn, hay bale and corn mazes, pony rides, play area, live music, pick-yourown apples and pumpkins, and much more. $11 online. Terhuneorchards.com. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.: Familyfriendly train show about the Pacific Southern Railroad, fundraiser for Rocky Hill Community Services. At 26 Washington Street, Rocky Hill. A 4,000-foot layout with trains, buildings, bridges, cars, mountains, and more. Show times on the hour, 45-minute shows. $10 (under 5 free). Pacificsouthern.org. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.: Apple Butter Making at Rockingham Historic Site, Route 603 between Kingston and Rocky Hill. By Hearth to Hearth Cookery. Visitors can participate. Rockingham.net. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.: Floral Pop-Up at Princeton MarketFair. A class on floral design will be held at 10:30 a.m. and 12 p.m. Register at eventbrite.com. 10 a.m.-8 p.m.: Grand opening event at Ovation at Riverwalk active adult community in Plainsboro. RSVP at (609) 537-8000 or ovationatriverwalk.com. 2-5 p.m.: Pop-Up Beer Garden with Old Heights Brewing Company at the Arts Council of Princeton, 105 Witherspoon Street. $ 85. Ar tscouncilofprinceton.org. 7 p.m.: American Repertory Ballet performs at the New Brunswick Performing Arts Center. Works by Ethan Stiefel, Amy Seiwert, and Ryoko Tanaka. Visit arballet.org or call (732) 7458000. 7-10 p.m.: Café Improv at the Arts Council of Princeton. $1- $2. 102 Witherspoon Street. Artscouncilofprinceton.org. 7:30 p.m.: New Jersey Capital Philhar monic at Pat r iot s T he ater at t he War Memorial, 1 Memorial Drive, Trenton. “The Dream of America.” Capitalphilharmonic.org. Sunday, October 24 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Fall Family Fun Weekend at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Barnyard animals, adventure barn, hay bale and corn mazes, pony rides, play area, live music, pick-yourown apples and pumpkins, and more. $11 online. Terhuneorchards.com. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.: “A Return to Art,” works by New Jersey artists at the GfK building, 1060 Route 206. Montgomeryartscouncil.org. 11:45 a.m.: “Bless the Pets,” Rabbi Andrea Merow holds this outdoor event at

The Jewish Center Princeton, 435 Nassau Street. All are invited, with or without pets. RSV P required by emailing info @thejewishcenter.org with course code BlessThePets, by October 22. Also at 11:45, donate gently used fall and winter clothing and small appliances, separated by size in bags and boxes. 12-3 p.m.: Some Assembly Required, live music on the green at Palmer Square. Palmersquare.com. 2 p.m.: American Repertory Ballet performs at the New Brunswick Performing Arts Center. Works by Ethan Stiefel, Amy Seiwert, and Ryoko Tanaka. Visit arballet.org or call (732) 7458000. 7 p.m.: Lake Street Dive performs at McCarter Theatre. $70-$225. Mccarter. org. Monday, October 25 Recycling Tuesday, October 26 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.: “SHETEK” annual conference, presented virtually for women and allies in technology featuring national tech experts, entrepreneurs, and trailblazers. https//bit.ly/ SheTek2021. 6 p.m.: Leonard Barkan a nd C arol i na Ma ngone, The Hungry Eye: Eating, Drinking, and the Euro pean Culture from Rome to the Renaissance. Online event presented by Labyrinth Books. Register at labyrinthbooks.com. Wednesday, October 27 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.: “SHETEK” annual conference, presented virtually for women and allies in technology featuring national tech experts, entrepreneurs, and trailblazers. https. /bit.ly/ SheTek2021. 7 p.m.: “Emotions and Mindfulness: A Sampler,” free webinar presented by Ruth B. Goldston. To get the Zoom link, email ruth. goldston@gmail.com. Thursday, October 28 7: 3 0 a .m .- 5 :15 p.m . : Virtual NJ Conference for Women, presented by Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber. Networking, speakers, breakout sessions, prizes, raffles, and more. Princetonmercer.org. 12 p.m. : “P r i n c e ton’s Gargoyles and Grotesques,” walking tour at Princeton University, sponsored by the Historical Society of Princeton. Princetonhistory.org. 5 : 30 p.m. : “C elebrating 50 Years of Photography,” lecture by Princeton A r t Mus eu m Curator of

OCTOBER

Photography Katherine A. Bussard, live via Zoom. Artmuseum.princeton.edu. 6-7 p.m.: “Sugar Skull” watch party, at the Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street. Collaboration with McCarter Theatre. Celebrating Dia de los Muertos. In-person, family-friendly screening. Free but registration required at Artscouncilofprinceton.org. 7 p.m.: Screening of Poltergeist at Hopewell Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell. Part of Halloween “Fright Fest.” Hopewelltheater.com. Friday, October 29 7: 3 0 a .m .-2 : 3 0 p.m . : Virtual NJ Conference for Women, presented by Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber. Networking, speakers, breakout sessions, prizes, raffles, and more. Princetonmercer.org. 4:30 p.m.: “Seamus Heaney’s Late Poems,” pres ented by t he Fu nd for Irish Studies at Princeton University. Virtual webinar with Nicholas Allen of the University of Georgia. Registration required. Arts.princeton.edu. 5 :15 - 6 p. m . : A n n u a l Hometown Halloween Parade, b e g i n n i ng on t he green at Palmer S quare and making its way to the Princeton Family YMCA. Palmersquare.com. 5:30-6:30 p.m.: NonProfitConnect Impact Awards, honoring Shirley Satterfield, ProBono Partnership, and Investors Bank. Desserts provided by The Gingered Peach. Nonprofitconnectnj. org. 7: 3 0 p.m . : “ H a n d i n Hand,” a virtual and in person benefit concert with the glee clubs from Princeton, Yale, and Harvard universities. Princeton club performs at Richardson Auditorium. Free. Advance tickets at music.princeton.edu. 8 p.m.: Screening of The Shining at Hopewell Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell. Part of Halloween “Fright Fest.” Hopewelltheater.com. Saturday, October 30 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Fall Family Fun Weekend at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Barnyard animals, adventure barn, hay bale and corn mazes, pony rides, play area, live music, pick-yourown apples and pumpkins, and much more. $11 online. Terhuneorchards.com. 12-2 p.m.: Fall Music Series at Palmer Square presents SunDog Country. Palmersquare.com.

THE GLEE CLUBS OF PRINCETON, HARVARD & YALE

n i d han and h E F IT L BEN F IRT UA P P O RT O V D SU E -A N N A L IV O N C E RT IN N DAT I O U AL C C FO CHOR THE MUSI E SAV

7:30 pm Friday

October 29, 2021

Featuring Glee

Club, Chamber Choir, Shanty Choir,

and two new ensembles — the Sea

and Alegría (Latin American and Latinx music)

free

Conductors Gabriel Crouch and Mariana Corichi Gómez

Richardson Auditorium Alexander Hall Tickets available online or at the door. Attendees must be fully vaccinated and masked at all times.

music.princeton.edu

Cultivating Emotional Balance FREE Introductory Webinar October 27, 7 pm

Memo from:

Ruth B. Goldston, Ph.D. NJ Licensed Psychologist

M

uch of the distress we experience in daily life is emotional, and we’ve all developed strategies for managing those feelings. Still, many of us often experience strong feelings like anger, sadness/depression and fear/anxiety which are unpleasant and often destructive to ourselves and our relationships. Learning about what your emotions are actually telling you— and often, it’s not what you think—combined with acquiring skill in mindfulness practice--even if you think you’ve tried it and “failed--can lead to a happier and more satisfying life. In this 1-hour free presentation, you will get a taste of the course I will be offering online starting in November, “Cultivating Emotional Balance (CEB).” Please join me on Wednesday October 27, via Zoom at 7 pm to find out more. If you are interested in participating, please go here to send me an email, and I will send you the Zoom link. Sneak peek: Find out how the Dalai Lama inspired CEB www.ruthbgoldstonphd.com/how-ceb-came-to-be

Dr. Ruth Goldston is a NJ licensed psychologist practicing in Princeton. This course combines her longstanding interests in applying emotion science to psychotherapy, and in mindfulness practice as an important tool for managing difficult emotions.

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

Mark Your Calendar TOWN TOPICS


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 24

Taste of the Good Life

A

at Princeton Windrows

Come and experience our unique, vibrant, and welcoming community. Enjoy the expertise of our caring and dedicated staff, our beautiful 35-acre campus, a rich selection of services and amenities, and maintenance-free lifestyle that make us truly different by design.


25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

A Window on Windrows Illuminating a facet of life at Windrows

Our Culinary Experience At Princeton Windrows, dining is an opportunity to enjoy the company of friends, neighbors, and family, in a beautiful setting. Our welcoming and attentive staff will serve you exceptionally prepared meals in a host of dining venues. Tiger Café - Enjoy a sumptuous lunch and dinner in a casual, no-reservation-required setting. The Nassau Room - An elegantly appointed dining room serving full-course dinner and Sunday Brunch. Al fresco dining is available. The Princeton Room - A stately formal dining room with enhanced dress code. A private dining room accomodating fifteen guests is also available. Dine at Home with Complimentary Delivery - Our complete daily menu is available for you to enjoy within the comfort and convenience of your home.

Resident Catering Services - Host a private function in one of the dining venues and share our Culinary Experience with your friends and family.

Your Dinner is Ready!

Love People, Cook Them Good Food - Mark Caravella, Director of Culinary Services

Executive Chef, Mark Caravella joined Princeton Windrows in 2018. Formally trained at the Culinary Institute of America, Hyde Park, NY and Napa Valley, CA , Mark honed his passion at The Palace Hotel, Manhattan, NY and Metedeconk National Golf Club. His philosophy is to create an international culinary experience utilizing local and sustainable ingredients.

A resident-owned and managed 55-plus independent living condominium community Princeton Windrows Realty, LLC | 2000 Windrow Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 609.520.3700 | www.princetonwindrows.com | All homes located in Plainsboro Township. Photo depictions of life at Windrows may be prior to the current social distancing and Covid-19 guidelines directed by the State of New Jersey.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 26

Lambertville’s Music Mountain Theatre Offers Year-Round Musical Productions

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i n ny B r e n n a n h a s loved the performing arts all her life. A dancer in high school and college, she later ran a children’s theater program in Bucks County, founded the downtown Performing Arts Center in Lambertville, then operated the Washington Crossing Open Air Theater. She is now one of the founding directors of Music Mountain Theatre in Lambertville. A New Jersey native, Brennan moved to Bucks County as an adult, and at one point, in between various theatre enterprises, owned a restaurant in Doylestown, Pa.

IT’S NEW To Us

But theater was always her passion, and when her 10-year-old son Jordan expressed a desire to perform, he began to participate in several Bucks County children’s theater programs. “I began running the children’s theater program,” she says. “The kids loved to perform, but there wasn’t always the right training.” Theatrical Pursuits Jordan’s early interest in performing has continued over the years, and after graduating from college with a BFA in dance, he returned to Lambertville, and joined his mother in various theatrical pursuits. “In 2000, we founded the Downtown Performing Arts Center, and had classes in theater, dance, acting, and musical theater,” reports Brennan. “We also started to do performances with older teens and adults. “In addition, for seven

years, we leased the Washington Crossing Open Air T heater. T h is increas ed our audiences, and by then we felt we had established ourselves as a performing company, and we wanted an indoor space.” They were able to find a suitable location at 1483 Route 179, and the existing warehouse was transformed into a theater. We were able to fund it with donations from companies, individuals, and grants,” she explains, “and in 2017, we opened Music Mountain Theatre. Our plan was to offer musicals, plays, concerts, and children’s productions.” The good news is that, after closing in March 2020 due to COVID-19, the theater has now fully reopened. “We are beginning to produce some of the shows that we had to cancel during the virus,” notes Brennan. “The theater has a new air filter system throughout the building, daily cleaning procedures, and hand sanitizers. At the moment, our masking policies follow CDC recommendations, and in an abundance of caution, masks are required at all performances.” Special Connection There is really nothing like a live performance, when that special connection between actors and audience is established. Always a powerful experience, it is perhaps even more important in our high-tech world of today, when although the myriad of electronic devices can create widespread communication, there is a whiff of impersonality. Face-to-face is so often missing. Of course, it is especially welcome after the isolation so many experienced during the height of the pandemic.

CHILDREN’S THEATER PERFORMANCES EVERY SATURDAY 11AM AND 1 PM

In addition to its current performances, Music Mountain Theatre is celebrating the significance of a theatrical Lambertville landmark: St. John (Sinjin) Terrell’s Music Circus, the country’s first theater-in-the-round under a tent. From 1949 to 1970, the Music Circus’ productions enthralled audiences from all over the area. It was located near the current Music Mountain Theatre, and the proximity is meaningful. “We have memorabilia in our theater from the Music Circus, and many people still recall those wonderful performances,” says Brennan. “Music Mountain Theatre is here to bring back that energy, excitement, enchantment, and create memories for a new generation.” She is delighted that today’s audiences are enjoying Music Mountain Theatre’s current productions, with its repertory company of talented amateur actors. “We were surprised how quickly audiences responded after COVID, and how wonderful the word-of-mouth has been,” reports Brennan. “They are really so supportive, and one of the best things we have here is that our 20 to 25 performers — singers, dancers, and actors — in the company are from the area.” All Ages T he at t ract ive t heater seats 250, and the productions are presented yearround on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Evening performances are Friday and Saturday, matinees on Saturday and Sunday. “We are so pleased that the audiences are all ages, from kids to retired people. We have very popular children’s productions, and our

audiences love these.” Performances for young audiences include Frozen Jr., Cinderella, Alice in Wonde rla nd , T he Lion King, E xper ience Kids, Pinocchio, Robin Hood, 101 Dalmatians Kids, It’s the Great Pumpkin, and A Charlie Brown Christmas, among others. The main stage’s season has included such popular musicals as Into The Woods, Anything Goes, Carousel, Dracula, and A Christmas Carol. Noises Off, the entertaining British comedy, is also on the program. “The musicals are very popular,” says Brennan. “Mama Mia was a big hit when we did that, and all the Rodgers and Hammerstein shows are favorites. Also, every year, we do the musical version of A Christmas Carol, and people love that. We also have a Big Band holiday concert production, which is an annual favorite.” The schedule for the rest of the year includes: On the Main Stage (Friday, Saturday, and Sunday): The Mystery of Edwin Drood, through October 31; Elf, November 5 through November 21; A Christmas Carol, November 26 through December 12; and Holiday Concert, December 17 through December 19. In the Children’s Theatre: It’s the Great Pumpkin, October 23 and 30; Frosty and Rudolph, November 13, 20, and 27; and Babes in Toyland, December 4, 11, and 18. Subscription Gala Brennan has worked hard to keep ticket prices affordable at $25, $23 (seniors and military), and $10 for children’s theater. There is also a subscription plan for five, 10, or 15 performances, offering savings, and special programs just for subscribers.

CURTAIN GOING UP!: “Music Mountain Theatre is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to enrich, educate, and entertain our community through the study, performance, and appreciation of the arts in a welcoming and inclusive environment. We provide affordable theater, and the audiences love our live performances.” Ginny Brennan (center), one of the founding directors of Music Mountain Theatre, is shown with co-artistic directors Louis Palena (left) and Jordan Brennan. The theater is now open and ready for audiences. “We have an annual Subscription Gala for the subscribers, a big party,” she adds. “We offer ‘Mount y’ awards for the performers, and the subscribers get to vote for them. They love this!” She is very happy to be involved in the work she loves and be able to share it with so many others. “I love being around the theater. I like the social aspect, meeting the audience and the performers. It makes me proud to present the community with talented actors and good quality, affordable entertainment. “Of course, the biggest challenge is getting a full house, and doing all the marketing, but again, the word- of-mouth has been so great. It is important to keep people aware of our programs and continue to get the word out. “It is also so important to us to have a welcoming atmosphere. I give a welcoming talk before the show, and I greet the audience as they come in. The actors will also come out and talk with the audience after the production. And, we have a concession stand in the lobby.” Theater School Brennan is proud of the stage crew and box office personnel, and observes that Music Mountain Theatre is also

set apart by its nonprofit status and by its theater school Monday through Thursday, and the summer camp. “In addition, we have classes for special needs students, both children and adults, including those with autism and Down syndrome. They respond wonderfully. My special needs classes mean a lot to me for many reasons. I worked for a time as a job coach for special needs students, and always found it rewarding and fun. When I opened the studio in 2001, several of the students I worked with joined the class, and two of them are still with me. “We are proud of the new acting class for students on the autistic spectrum as part of our community outreach program, and one of our future goals is to form a company for special needs teens and adults.” For those who love theater, Music Mountain Theatre is a special place. It is wonderful to have quality performances for all ages at affordable prices. “I like to say that we are not a community theater, but a theater for the community,” says Brennan. “Thank you to all who support the arts!” usic Mountain Theatre can be reached at (609) 397-3337. Website : musicmountaintheatre.org. —Jean Stratton

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Town Topics

The Arts Council of Princeton

The Arts Council of Princeton has partnered with Old Hights Brewing Company to bring a pop-up beer garden right to Downtown Princeton on October 23 from 2 to 5 p.m. Old Hights’ balanced, hand-crafted beers are derived from the finest, locally sourced ingredients. Sip unlimited brews from a custom handmade ceramic beer stein, enjoy live local tunes by Dan Kassel, and spend an afternoon in a celebration of community. M a k i n g t h e e ve nt e ve n more special, the ACP was chosen by Old Hights as a “Donation Beer,” meaning that they have developed, brewed, and named a beer after yours truly — try it here first! Funds raised will help the Arts Council in fulfilling its mission of “Building Community through the Arts” by continuing and expanding community education programs for LGBTQ+ teens, at-risk youth, and underserved families and seniors. By supporting this event you help make high quality arts programming available and equitable for all, regardless of means. For more information and tickets, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Cherry Grove Farm

We are so excited to be able to say that our muchanticipated Cow Parade will be happening according to plan this year on November 6 from 1 to 6 p.m. featuring vendors, food and beverages, music, kid activities, and last but not least, Cherry Grove Farm cows dressed to the nines in foliage. Come attend this year’s event and enjoy snacks and oddities from local vendors, music provided by This Old House (1 to 4 p.m.), pumpkin and mask decorating activities for kids (pumpkin included!), and a bonfire to round out the night. Tickets for entry are $15 per car. Masks are required for all indoor areas, though optional outdoors. A Sanitation Station will be available for use, as well as outdoor toilets. Cher r y Grove Far m is located at Route 206 and Carter Road in Lawrenceville. For more information, visit cherrygrovefarm.com.

Concordia Chamber Players

On November 14 at 3 p.m., Concordia Chamber Players will be performing at Trinity Episcopal Church in Solebury, Pa., with a program that has the harp strongly

featured throughout and includes Lou Harrison’s Duo for cello and harp; Henriette Renié’s Trio for harp, violin, and cello; and the Jacques Ibert Trio for the same instrumentation. For the first time, we introduce dance into one of our chamber concerts with dancers Antoine Hunter and Zahna Simon from California’s only Black deaf-led professional dance company. For more information and tickets, visit concordiaplayers.org/tickets.

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

Fall arts & EvEnts

Flemington Fine Artisans Show

This curated show and sale on Sunday, November 7, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. will feature a selection of 35 local artists bringing work in jewelry, ceramics, glass, home décor, fiber art, oneof-a-kind clothing, woodwork, painting. and more. At the Stangl Factory, 4 Stangel Road in Flemington; free admission and parking. For more information, visit FlemingtonFineArtisans Show.com.

Kelsey Theatre

Intermission is over! It’s time to take your seats. 2021-2022 s e as on s ub scriptions and Kelsey Kids COW PARADE: Cherry Grove Farm on Route 206 in Lawrenceville will host its popular event featuring cows dressed to the nines, food, live music, kids activities, and more on Saturday, Continued on Page 29 November 6 from 1 to 6 p.m.

Saturday, October 23, 2021 2-5pm

We're bringing a pop-up beer garden right to Downtown Princeton! Join us at the Arts Council of Princeton to sip Old Hights beers (including a brew created especially for the ACP!) from a custom ceramic stein, enjoy live local tunes, and spend an afternoon in celebration of community. Tickets available now! Visit artscouncilofprinceton.org to learn more.

Paul Robeson Center for the Arts 102 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 609.924.8777 artscouncilofprinceton.org


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 28

Fall arts & EvEnts Town Topics

II S E C ,, H M A R T IA MR L LH K JJI CO AS R RT T TI C ST TD III C CR ED DCII TR RO ER C ,T TO O RI C MEII C C HEE E LLDLLJE EO D D OK K II C C

Concordia Concordia Chamber Chamber Players Players

Annual Cow Parade November 6th from 1 - 6pm. Local Vendors, Music, Food, and Activities for kids! Come celebrate with us this year at our outdoor event.

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TICK ET L II N AT C O N R D II A E TS S IO ON N NE EC O ATN C CO OR NDC CIO O AP PELLRAY AY ER RRS SG.. O OR RG G T I CTOPICS K ETTI C S KOE N E LAT A1RP5D L. 4AY S0.8O OL R RNAT AT T H E D O O R • 2 8 6 .. 6 0 O T H E D O O R • 2 1 5 . 4 8 6 6 0 8 0 O R AT T H E D O O R • 2 1 5 . 4 8 6 . 6 0 8 0 Please Please see see our our website website for for our our latest latest Covid-19 Covid-19 safety safety policy. policy. Please see our website for our latest Covid-19 safety policy.

ROSSEN MILANOV Music Director

Fall

FOR PRINCETON

Take in the cooler weather as you walk, shop, dine & enjoy live music all season long! There’s always something going on!

ER D R O AY!

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Thursday November 4 7:30pm Matthews Theatre, McCarter Theatre Center 2021

Evan WILLIAMS / The Dream Deferred Wolfgang Amadeus MOZART / Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 15 in B-flat Major, K. 450 Franz SCHUBERT / Symphony No. 4

Spend Sunday from 12PM-3PM rocking through the decades ONE LAST TIME! SCAN ME

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Dates, times, artists, and programs subject to change.

SUNDAYS

THIS SUNDAY, 10/24 Some Assembly Required Be sure to also check out the live model fashion event & photo booth while you’re here! Please visit our website, scan the QR code & Download the Palmer Square App for more information!


Fall Arts & Events Continued from Page 27

shows go on sale October 24, single shows on sale November 1. Visit kelseytheatre.org or call (609) 570-3333.

Martin Center for Dance

Martin Center for Dance offers a full complement of classes for both in person and online attendance to local students as well as dance lovers across the U.S. and Europe. We are dedicated to continuing our excellent training for all of our dancers in this difficult time. World-class training is the hallmark of our faculty. We pride ourselves in the care we take to focus on each individual to ensure a good physical workout with personal attention to detail. This is what makes our training so special. Each class is carefully choreographed with our student’s dance spaces in mind to ensure safe and fulfilling classes, improve technique, build strength, and inspire artistic growth. Dancers taking classes in person enjoy our spacious studios with the comfort of knowing we are creating the safest space possible for in person dancing. With ballet classes for children age 3 and above, adult ballet

class for all levels, and our innovative Adult Contemporary Movement classes for anyone wanting to just move, we are dedicated to providing the best dance training in the region and a nurturing and exciting dance community for all to enjoy. For more information, visit MartinBartonArts.com, email DouglasMartinArts@gmail. com, or call (609) 937-8878.

New Hope Arts

Fall exhibitions: “New Talent” through November 9; “Works in Wood Juried Exhibition” November 20 through January 2022. 2 Stockton Avenue, New Hope, Pa. For more information, call (215) 862-9606 or visit newhopearts.org.

Pinot’s Palette

Join us at our Princeton wine and paint studio, the best BYOB wine and paint venue in New Jersey. With our motto, “Paint. Drink. Have Fun,” we deliver a world-class experience to our painters. No art skills are necessary. Our dedicated artists will lead you step-by-step from blank canvas to a finished painting that will amaze you. Sign up for group paint classes with friends or make it a date night. Bring friends, snacks, and wine! 127 Village Blvd (Forrestal Village), Princeton; (609)

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Princeton Symphony Orchestra Wosner Plays Mozart

Shai Wosner brings masterful artistry to Mozart’s Piano Concer to, K. 450 on Thursday, November 4, 7:30 p.m. in the Matthews Theatre at McCarter Theatre Centre. His perfor mance is bookended by Ev a n Wi l l ia m s’ T he Dream Deferred, inspired by the Langston Hughes poem “Harlem,” and Franz Schubert’s “Tragic” Symphony No. 4. For tickets and COVID-19 policies, visit princetonsymphony.org or call the McCarter Box Office at (609) 258-2787.

Sounds of Sinatra

Celebrate the sounds of Sinatra on Sunday, November 7 at the Nassau Inn! Beginning at 11 a.m. until 2 p.m., enjoy a musical tribute to Frank Sinatra including a live performance by Frank, Dean, and Marilyn! A delicious breakfast buffet will be served following a fascinating chat by two Frank Sinatra authorities, author and producer Chuck Granata of Siriusly Sinatra and NYU Professor of Cinema Studies Dana Polan. For ticket info and registration email sand3737@ gmail.com.

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29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

Fall arts & EvEnts Town Topics

Order Your Tickets Now!

Intermission is Over! 609-570-3333 or e-ticket at www.kelseytheatre.net

It is almost time to take your seats!

Kelsey Theatre announces November opening – stay tuned for more information. www.kelseytheatre.org

Pinot’s Palette Princeton

127 Palette Village Blvd Pinot’s Princeton

Princeton, NJ 08540 127 Village Blvd Princeton, NJ 08540 609.285.5102 609.285.5102 princeton@pinotspalette.com princeton@pinotspalette.com www.pinotspalette.com www.pinotspalette.com

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Fall Exhibitions until November 9

Works in Wood Nov. 20

New Hope Arts 2 Stockton Ave, New Hope, PA newhopearts.org 215 862 9606


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 30

S ports

No. 17 PU Football Defeats Brown 56-42, Now 5-0; Setting Up Showdown with Undefeated, No. 16 Harvard

A

fter the Princeton University football team overcame Brown 56-42 last Saturday, Bob Surace tipped his hat to Bear quarterback E.J. Perry. “We have gone against some really good offensive players in my 12 years and even the four years that I played; E.J. is the best opponent I have gone against in this league at quarterback,” said Princeton head coach Surace of Perry, who passed for 331 yards and five touchdowns while rushing for 82 yards in a losing cause. “He had a great game. I told him after the game, it is not just his performance, it is the leadership, and the competitiveness.” Fortunately for Surace, his quarterback, senior Cole Smith, produced a career performance in guiding the Tigers to victory, hitting on 25 of 27 passes for a career-high 476 yards and four TDs to help Princeton improve to 5-0 overall and 2-0 Ivy League. He was later named the Ivy League Offensive Player of the Week. “It was just like with them; it was a really, really good job by our coaches schemewise and then a great job by the players executing,” said Surace of Smith, whose passing yards total in the game was the second most in Princeton history behind the 501 piled up by Bob Holly against Yale in 1981.

“Cole did the same thing, there were some real small windows on some of those throws and the receivers did a great job getting them. I was doing the proud dad thing because my son A.J. was 14 for 16 [for Notre Dame High] and he only played a half. I said to him I was hoping you would be near A.J.’s stats but you put him to shame.” In the early stages of the contest, it looked like the proud Princeton defense, that had given up only seven points in the first three games, was going to contain Perry as the Tigers led 14-0 going into the second quarter. But Surace knew better with former Princeton offensive coordinator James Perry, E.J.’s uncle, at the helm of the Brown program. “Their style of play and ability to score quickly puts stress on you,” said Surace, noting that Brown had been down 33-0 to Bryant on October 2 before scoring 29 straight points in a 3629 loss. The Tigers found themselves under a lot of stress in the second quarter as Brown reeled off 21 points. “We had a hard time with our contain; E.J. did a great job of getting out of potential sacks and getting out of the pocket,” said Surace. “He broke some tackles. He threw the ball well. Some

of the throws, he threw it into small windows. James is a great coach and has a great scheme. E.J. is playing well, their whole offense is.” Clinging to a 28-21 lead at halftime, Surace urged his players to stay in the moment. “This game was a track meet and you can’t panic, you have to stay in that one play at a time and be disciplined,” said Surace. “To the players’ credit, they did a really good job with that. It is hard thing to do. It is easy for me to say but for a 20-year-old kid it is a hard thing to do.” Senior running back Collin Eaddy did a great job, rushing for 130 yards and four TDs on 15 carries. “That was his Michael Jordan game, he got sick during the week,” said Surace, referring to the famous game where a flu-stricken Jordan scored 38 points in Game 5 of the 1997 NBA Finals against the Utah Jazz. “On Wednesday and Thursday we kept him in his dorm room, just to not spread it. With COVID era you are going to test him so fortunately it wasn’t COVID but he had a bad flu. Even Friday, he was sweating all over the place. He has just been so strong with tough runs. He had a couple of openings and he was able to get into space for some long ones. He is so consistent. He

just looks like he is having fun out there.” Princeton’s receivers had a lot of fun against Brown as senior Jacob Birmelin made 11 catches for 175 yards, senior Dylan Classi made five receptions for 146 yards and one touchdown and junior Andrei Iosivas had six catches for 140 yards and a pair of TDs. Classi and Iosivas set new career singlegame highs in yards while Birmelin surpassed 100 career catches. “They are so well balanced — when they had to make dynamic catches, they did,” said Surace. “When they got the ball on short routes, they fought for extra yards. They were a couple of balls in tight coverage where Cole put it in perfectly and it still took a really good catch to come down with it. They block; they really do a good job with each other of reaching their full potential.”

The Tiger defense, though, will need to do a better job in the Ivy stretch drive. “We have to tighten things up,” said Surace. “In the Columbia game (a 24-7 win on October 2) the defense picked up the offense and played magnificent while we had a few struggles, it took a little time. We were not precise on some of the details. This week in particular we had to tighten some things up, we are going against some great players. E.J. is one of the better quarterbacks to ever play in our league. Against him, you have to play better than we did. We are going to have to improve.” With Princeton hosting Harvard (5-0 overall, 2-0 Ivy) on October 23 in a critical league clash, Surace knows his squad is facing a great challenge. “They are always a terrific team, they are recruiting tremendous players,” said

Surace, whose team is now ranked No. 17 in the AFCA Coaches’ Poll with Harvard at No. 16. “Tim [Murphy] is going to go in the Hall of Fame as a coach. They have a great staff. It is the challenge that you love. From the little bit I have seen of them, this is as good as any Harvard team I have seen.” In order to overcome the powerful Crimson, the Tigers will need to take care of the little things. “We are going to have to pick up our level of detail, discipline, and technique,” said Surace. “We are playing hard, I watched the game film last night and our effort has been tremendous. We are playing together, they are having fun out there. You don’t have to be perfect, have you got to pick it up to where we are minimizing some of the mistakes we are making.” —Bill Alden

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AIR SHOW: Princeton University football quarterback Cole Smith fires a pass in a game earlier this season. Last Saturday, senior Smith passed a career-high 476 yards and four touchdowns as Princeton defeated Brown 56-42. Smith was later named the Ivy League Offensive Player of the Week. The No. 17 Tigers, now 5-0 overall and 2-0 Ivy, host No. 16 Harvard (5-0 overall, 2-0 Ivy) on October 23.


Lexi Hiltunen’s chip shot in double overtime last Saturday against Columbia kept the Princeton Universit y women’s soccer team in the Ivy League championship hunt. It also earned the Princeton sophomore for ward a spot at the bottom of a dogpile of her teammates following the dramatic 1-0 win over the Lions on Saturday night at a wet and cold Class of 1952 Stadium. “The pain of the dogpile was taken away by the fact that I was warmed up,” said Hiltunen. “It was a little comforting.” Hiltunen makes it no secret she does not like the cold. While other teammates got in their first semester on campus last spring, she remained in West Palm Beach, Fla., and took classes online in part because of the warmer weather at home. She has already broken out a winter coat to get around campus. A steady rain made the cold more miserable Saturday and made controlling the ball on the slick field difficult for all. Hiltunen was glad to end the game when she took a long pass over the top from freshman Lily Bryant and sent it over the charging goalie for the lone goal of the game. “I was honestly just wanting to go shower and be warm,” said Hiltunen. “I don’t do well in the cold. Lily played the ball, and I was thinking, if I shoot maybe she’ll miss it or rebound it like she had been. We just had to do everything to put it away. It was just ‘go forward, go forward’ was our tactics. I saw her step out of the goal and I was like, ‘I’ll take my shot for it.’” The win came after a critical second-half save by former Princeton Day School star goalkeeper Grace Barbara, who finished w ith 10 saves. The Tiger senior deflected away a low shot after a quick giveaway and centering pass to keep the

game scoreless. “That was an insane save by Grace,” said Hiltunen. “She’s just amazing at hyping up the team altogether. Her making that save put more perspective on we really needed to finish this game out.” Hiltunen then made the most of her chance in the second overtime to keep Princeton in second place in the Ivy League, one loss behind Brown, which stopped the Tigers, 3-1, the week before Columbia. “The thing about this team is that I can honestly say they put forth incredible effort all the time,” said Princeton coach Sean Driscoll after improving to 10-2-1 overall and 3-1 in Ivy. “That’s never a question with them. For us, it often comes down to execution in certain areas of the field, but I can never fault these kids for their effort. It’s a really good group of incredibly talented players but also very, very driven and willing to do what it takes to get a win.” After its final non-conference game against Lehigh s c h e d u l e d for Tu e s d ay, Princeton has another key Ivy game when it plays at No. 16 Harvard (9-1-1 overall, 3-1 Ivy) on October 23. The teams are tied for second, and both are in contention for a possible at-large bid to the NCAA tournament even without an Ivy crown. Harvard just lost for the first time this season, falling 1-0 to Brow n last Saturday, while Princeton returned to its winning ways. “I think it does add a lot of motivation,” said Hiltunen. “We have to keep building on what we’re trying to do with the team. Hopefully it won’t rain and we can possess the ball a little better. If we are given the chance to play the way we play, I think it’ll be a great game.” Hiltunen is one of the new players who have come on lately for the Tigers. She

did not have the chance to play as a freshman when the Ivies canceled all fall sports due to the COVID-19 pandemic. She has worked to adjust to the college game this year just like the firstyear players. “I hadn’t played in a game in two years when we first started the season,” said Hiltunen. “It was really hard. I was definitely challenged physically just not having game fitness or consistently playing in games that are as straining as the ones we’re playing in right now. I had a pretty rough start with that, as well as getting your touch back and feel with the ball. You can practice as much as you want to, but game type situations you can’t really simulate unless you’re playing a game. I think I struggled personally with the adjustment.” While having started twice this season, Hiltunen has come off the bench most of the time. She has scored three goals in the last four games. She also added an assist in a 6 -1 win over Bucknell on September 28. “In general it’s difficult to be a freshman,” explained Driscoll. “If you talk to those firstyear kids in the program, it is a roller coaster ride and there is a learning curve. It’s very rare to just walk in and hit the ground run-

ning and have everything go perfectly. We have kids who started off really well and tailed off, and kids that started off slowly and progressed. You have to be really, really mentally tough to get through that first year.” Hiltunen has spent the season adjusting to her role for an attack that has only been shut out once this season. The 26th ranked forward recruit in the Top Drawer S occer Class of 2020, Hiltunen has started to come on for the Tigers at just the right time. “My fitness has drastically improved,” said Hiltunen. “And I’m just getting used to the team because I’ve never played with anyone on this team before. You have to understand what kind of players you’re playing with, who’s on the field at a certain time, and what you can do with those par ticular players. That’s been a really big adjustment for me, especially with my position relying on a center mid that I can play with. And we rotate quite frequently because we have incredible depth.” The depth has paid off allaround for the Tigers. Princeton has had 13 different goal scorers this season provide a total of 34 goals. It makes it hard on opponents to figure out how to defend all of the different weapons the Tigers can deploy. Princeton has been sending out waves of attackers and it has seen the approach wear down opponents as it has tallied 21 second half goals this season.

“It is hard when you have a lot of talented kids fighting for time and they’re trying to do their best when they are out there and give you something, and they have t he mot ivat ion a nd t he drive,” said Driscoll. “It’s a dangerous combination. I’m a huge fan of sharing the goals and assists and the more involved, the better.” Hiltunen didn’t enter the Columbia game until midway through the first half, then remained in until halfway through the second half. She came back in during the overtime. Hiltunen has been happy to get a chance to contribute in her first collegiate season no matter when she gets into games. “It didn’t really affect me a lot,” said Hiltunen. “I didn’t come in with expectation I’d be playing a lot. I just knew we had an insane team. When I go in I make an effort to make an impact in any way I can. I personally like how we rotate. I think it keeps fresh legs on and each player brings something different and it tends to work really well when we switch it up on teams.” Princeton’s on-field improvement is only one part of the development of the team. Hiltunen believes the biggest growth this season has come off the field. The Tigers finally have gotten the chance to come together this year after the pandemic disrupted their 2020 season.

“I’ve never been a part of a team that is so familyoriented,” said Hiltunen. “We do everything together. There’s no problems on our team between players, no drama, nothing off the field that hurts us. Bringing that onto the field is what I think really makes a difference for our team. I’ve been on plenty of teams where off the field has really caused a big problem. The culture of our team is just so strong, especially this particular group of girls. It’s incredible.” It all starts with the oldest members of the team. They knew exactly what their young teammates were missing out on when their season was canceled last year, and they have set the tone for this year’s Tigers group to return with a successful season. “I go back to the chemistry of the team, the attitude of the senior class and the fact that it has welcomed this group with open arms and that has allowed these first-years and sophomores to have a feeling like they belong on the team,” said Driscoll. “If you’re going to get the best out of anyone, they have to feel like they belong. I think that group of seniors and our captains have done a fantastic job of that. I think that’s why Lexi is flourishing – she’s feeling more comfor table, more at ease, and I think that is happening across the board with a number of kids.” —Justin Feil

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

With Hiltunen Tallying Game-Winning Goal In Double OT, PU Women’s Soccer Tops Columbia, Stays Alive in Ivy Race

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Senior O’Toole Rises to the Occasion with 2 Goals As PU Men’s Soccer Tops Columbia, Now 3-0 Ivy Kevin O’Toole has demonstrated a knack for rising to the occasion for the Princeton University men’s soccer team in the heat of Ivy League competition. The senior forward had tallied a goal and two assists in Princeton’s first two Ivy contests this season as the Tigers defeated Dartmouth 3-2 and Brown 3-1. L as t S at urday agains t visiting Columbia, O’Toole took things to a higher level,

scoring two goals to help Princeton pull away to a 3-0 win over the Lions as it improved to 6-5 overall and 3-0 Ivy. O’Toole and his teammates brought a sense of urgency into the clash with the Lions. “We know every game is incredibly hard in the Ivy League, you can’t take any game for granted,” said O’Toole, a 5’10, 165-pound native of Montclair, and the

Ivy Offensive Player of the Year in 2018. “It is basically seven championship games, that is how we approach every game in the Ivy League.” The Tigers came out playing hard, generating some early scoring opportunities. “I think our possession was strong coming out of the gate, there is always a concerted effort to get a goal really early in the game,” said O’Toole.

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“We always look to get one in the first 10 minutes and that was what we did; maybe it wasn’t inside the first 10, it was 15 or something like that.” In getting that first goal at the 15:36 mark of the first half, O’Toole curled in a volley into the top corner of the net. “It was a cut back from Ryan Clare; he was going to lay it back for me,” said O’Toole. “I saw the keeper a bit off his line and I just tried to hit it as hard as I could far post and it was fortunate for it to go in.” A desperate Colu mbia came out firing in the second half, fighting hard for possession and putting the Tigers on their heels. “Their season depended on it; we knew the results from the first two games and that they were going to come out flying to save their season,” said O’Toole. “We weathered the storm a bit. We were lucky to get one on the break in the second half.” As storm clouds gathered over the Class of 1952 Stadium and the wind picked up, O’Toole tallied his second goal on an assist from Michael Osei Wusu. “I saw Mike making a good run through so I just tried to get it through to him in space,” said O’Toole. “I saw one center back and I tried to beat him to the spot. Mike put a great ball across to me.” Playing some tight defense and getting a goal from Osei Wusu with 13:04 left in regulation, the Tigers were able to pull away from Columbia. “It is tough in Ivy League games to get big leads, we

know leads can be fragile,” said O’Connor. “We were at Dartmouth with a two goal lead and they came back at 2-2. We knew we had to really lock in and be keen about defending in the waning stretches of the game.” While O’Toole is keen to excel whenever he takes the pitch, he relishes Ivy competition. “I try to put up some stats in every game but there is something special about the Ivy League games that brings out the best,” said O’Toole, who now has three goals and five assists this season to give him 11 goals and 14 assists over his Tiger career. “A lot of the seniors took the year off for these moments. I did myself as well. This is our last shot to win it. That is why we play, that is why we are here.” Princeton head coach Jim Barlow knew that the Lions would present some problems for his squad. “It was a different kind of challenge, Columbia spreads you out, they are a possession team,” said Barlow. “I think we are used to having the ball a little more than we had it against them. We know that if you take breaks defensively they are good at switching it from one side to the other. The early goal helps, Kevin took it well.” Barlow credited his team with holding the fort defensively in the second half. “They don’t want to go 0-2-1 to start the league, we knew they were going to come out flying,” said B arlow, not ing t hat h is back three of Stephen Duncan, Lucas Gen, and Issa

Mudashiru came up big in the win. “It was a little shaky for a while but we weathered it. We did it without giving away any really good chances and then we created some of our own.” It was not surprising for Barlow to see O’Toole convert his scoring chances. “It has been a good couple of weeks for him,” said Barlow of O’Toole. “We have been using him up front a little more now, giving him some freedom to go find the ball and he has been doing that really well.” With Princeton returning to league action when it plays at Harvard (4-4-3 overall, 0-2-1 Ivy) on October 23, Barlow is confident that his squad will keep playing well in Ivy action. “They are into it, they are focused, they believe,” said Barlow, whose team is currently atop the league standings, just ahead of Yale (5-4-3 overall, 2-0-1 Ivy). “Ever y game is like an Ivy League championship and that is how they are approaching it. The winning helps because it just makes the next game that much more important and that much more urgency to get it right in training.” O’Toole, for his part, believes that Princeton will maintain that sense of urgency. “I think the recipe has been working, we have just got to keep drilling home that every game is a championship game,” said O’Toole. “That is how we are going to approach Harvard on Saturday.” —Bill Alden

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RISING TO THE OCCASION: Princeton University men’s soccer player Kevin O’Toole goes after the ball in a game earlier this season. Last Saturday, senior star O’Toole scored two goals to help Princeton defeat Columbia 3-0. O’Toole, the Ivy League Offensive Player of the Year in 2018, has three goals and three assists in three Ivy contests this fall. The Tigers, who improved to 6-5 overall and 3-0 Ivy with the win, return to league action when they play at Harvard (4-4-3 overall, 0-2-1 Ivy) on October 23. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


Be kind. Fight for justice, especially for those who can’t fight for themselves. Whatever you are doing, do it to the best of your ability. Do the right thing every day. Those were the core principles that guided Steve DiGregorio and are just some of his qualities that family and friends are reflecting on in the wake of DiGregorio’s death on October 12 at age 60 after a valiant fight against cancer. D iG regor io, k now n to all as “Digger,” was a bighearted, good-natured, and tough-minded football coach whose influence was felt by a number of programs. He ser ved 13 years as an assistant coach for the Princeton University football team, several years as an assistant at Princeton High, and was a star player and later award-winning head coach for his alma mater, Nutley High. DiGregorio also had coaching stints at Hobart College, Allegheny College, and Paramus Catholic. Before starting his coaching career, DiGregorio starred for Muhlenberg College and has been inducted into the school’s Athletic Hall of Fame. His influence extended far beyond the gridiron as he helped create the “Derek’s Dreams” charity after his middle son, Derek, was diagnosed with a rare neuromuscular disease, ataxiatelangiectasia, or A-T. The cause of fighting for a cure to that disease hit at the heart of his existence as it

involved his beloved family, wife Nadia, and their sons, Zack, 26, Derek, 24, and Aaron, 22. PHS football head coach Charlie Gallagher, who had DiGregorio on his staff as an assistant from 2014-16, saw the beloved coach’s death as leaving a big void. “It is a huge loss, he was a great family guy,” said Gallagher of DiGregorio, whose life was celebrated at a moving funeral mass held Monday at the Saint Paul Parish in Princeton. “He was a man’s man, he really was. He always treated us with great respect. We had fun on the sidelines. We had a great 2014 season and it was awesome to have him be part of that. He was definitely a big part of it and we haven’t been to the playoffs since. He definitely did a great job, it is very sad.” DiGregorio had a great influence on Gallagher’s professional development. “He was a damn good coach,” said Gallagher, noting that DiGregorio was commuting to PHS practices from Nutley High where he was teaching AP government courses. “He was serious but you know what I loved about him, I love that he let me spread my wings a little. I have seen some older coaches, they want to come in and bam, bam, do it my way. He said Charlie give me the defense and I am going to work this and offensively I am going to give you feedback and tips. He never said you re-

ally got to do it this way or it is not going to work. He never put ultimatums out or anything like that.” Princeton University football head coach Bob Surace had a deep connection with DiGregorio, having played for him at Princeton in the late 1980s, turning to him for advice over the years as he went up the coaching ladder, and then hiring him this past summer to serve as a consultant for the Tigers. “The thing about Steve was that he was the perfect coach, he was tough on you but he cared,” said Surace. “He always believed in his players. He would always push you, no matter what. As I got to be a good player, he pushed me to be even better. I respected that. He is the one in my ear, you are a great player, you can make this block. He was such a stickler for details but then the second I graduated, he became a mentor. He knew I wanted to go into coaching and he was a trusted advisor in terms of what my next step was going to be.” It was a no-brainer for Surace to bring in DiGregorio as a consultant this summer. “The three, four months that we were side by side were some of the best times I have ever spent from a learning perspective,” said Surace, noting that DiGregorio was named New Jersey Coach of the Year in 2020 after guiding Nutley to a 6-0 record in his final campaign at the helm of the program.

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

Espousing Values of Kindness, Always Doing Your Best, Beloved Coach DiGregorio Touched Countless Lives

DIGGING IN: Members of the DiGregorio family, from left, Aaron, Nadia, Derek, Steve, and Zack, share a laugh with legendary coaches, from left, John Thompson III, Jason Garrett, and Pete Carril at a 2015 event at Conte’s Pizza to raise money to fight ataxia-telangiectasia, known as A-T. Beloved football coach Steve DiGregorio, known as “Digger” to his players and many friends, passed away last week at age 60 after a valiant battle with cancer, sparking sadness and fond memories from the countless people he touched on and off the gridiron. (Photo by John Dowers) “It is like having my dad there, a longtime coach in my ear who isn’t afraid to tell me the truth. I have always leaned on him. When he retired from high school, I was going to lean on him even more and I did up until when his cancer came back and he had to go to the hospital.” Not being physically able to be on the field didn’t stop DiGregorio from contributing to the Tiger program. “Even when he was in the hospital, he was watching film and sending me notes,” said Surace. “He was a close friend.” As his Princeton squad prepared to play Brown last Saturday, Surace took time out to discuss DiGregorio’s

core values of kindness, fighting for justice, and doing the right thing with his players as an inspiration for dealing with the challenges ahead this fall and those down the road. “We talked a lot about what he meant and the messages he would send me,” said Surace. “I have a bunch of 18 -22-year- olds who are going to go on and be very successful, but you are not really successful if you are not doing those three things.

It doesn’t matter how much money you make or what you do. His leadership was always there, even in that moment he is teaching and he is leading. There are 130 football players who heard that message and maybe it impacts one of them. All it has to do is impact one to make a difference, that is how he led his life.” And there can be no question that DiGregorio made a difference in countless lives, on and off the football field. —Bill Alden

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 34

PU Sports Roundup Tiger Men’s Water Polo Loses to Pacific

George Caras and Pierce Maloney scored two goals apiece in a losing cause as the 12th-ranked Princeton University men’s water polo team fell 14-8 to No. 7 Pacific last Monday night in Stockton, Calif. In upcoming action, the Tigers, now 16-4, play at second-ranked Cal on October 20 and then compete in the Julian Fraser Memorial Tournament from October 22-24 in San Jose, Calif.

Tiger Women’s Cross Country 1st at the Princeton Invitational

Fiona Max set the pace as the Princeton University women’s cross country team finished first at its Princeton Invitational last Saturday at the West Windsor Fields. Fre sh ma n Ma x place d first individually, covering the 6,000-meter course in a time of 21:16.4. Tiger freshman Lucca Fulkerson took seventh in 21:44.2 while junior Abby Loveys (21:49.6) came in eighth. In the team standings, Princeton posted a score of 39 with Dartmouth taking second at 99. The Tigers will be hosting the Ivy League Heptagonal Championships on October 30 at West Windsor Fields.

Tiger Men’s Cross Country 7th at the Princeton Invitational

Duncan Miller led t he way as the Princeton University men’s cross country team finished seventh at its

Princeton Invitational last Saturday at the West Windsor Fields. Sophomore Miller took 22nd individually, clocking a time 24:58.6 over the 8,000-meter course. Freshman Harrison Witt was next for Princeton, taking 27th in 25:10.6, while senior Fahd Nasser was 33rd in 25:17.9. In the team standings, Villanova placed first with a score of 32 with Princeton coming in at 188 in taking seventh. A day earlier, another group of runners from the men’s squad placed seventh in the Pre-Nationals in Tallahassee, Fla. Senior star and 2020 Olympic steeplechaser Ed Trippas was the top finisher for Princeton, claiming 39th in a time of 23:41.7 over the 8,000-meter course. Just behind Trippas was Tiger senior Kevin Berry, who was 41st in a time of 23:43.7. Northern Arizona placed first in the team standings with a score of 64 with Princeton posting a 271 in taking seventh. The Tigers will be hosting the Ivy League Heptagonal Championships on October 30 at West Windsor Fields.

PU Women’s Tennis Dominates ITA Regional

Daria Frayman came up big for the Princeton University women’s tennis team as it wrapped up play at the 2021 Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) Women’s Nor t heaster n Super Re gional Championships last Monday at its Lenz Tennis Center. Junior Frayman topped freshman teammate Victoria Hu 7-6 (11-9), 6-0 in the

singles final. Frayman then combined with classmate Grace Joyce to top Yesica De Lucas/Jayden Nielsen of St. John’s 6-4, 1-6, 10-6 in the doubles final. The Tigers are next in action when they compete at the University of Georgia Fall Invitational, beginning on October 22.

Princeton Women’s Golf Takes 1st at Delaware Event

Led by Tiffany Kong, the Princeton University women’s golf team took first at the Lady Blue Hen tournament last weekend at the Rehoboth Beach Country Club in Rehoboth Beach, Del. Junior Kong placed first i n d i v i d u a l l y, c a r d i n g a score of five-over 221 for the three-round event with freshman teammate Victoria Liu one stroke behind in second and sophomore Karen Kim coming at +7 to tie for third. In the team standings, Princeton posted a score of +27, 11 strokes better than runner-up Harvard. T he v ictor y concludes the fall season with Princeton taking top-three team finishes in all four events, coupling the Delaware event title with a win in the Princeton Invitational in the team’s last event last month.

Tiger Men’s Golf 3rd at Howard Event

Max Ting starred as the Princeton University men’s golf team took third at the Howard Bison Invitational at Woodmont Country Club in Rockville, Md. Junior Ting tied for fourth individually with a 12-over 228 for the three-round event which ended last Monday.

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In the team standings, Bucknell took first at +58 with William and Mary second at +59 and Princeton posting a +62 in taking third.

Tiger Men’s Hockey Names its Captains

Three veteran leaders will serve as captains for the Princeton University men’s ice hockey team this season as head coach Ron Fogarty announced the team’s captains for 2021-22 last week. Senior defenseman Matthew Thom will wear the “C” as captain, joined by senior forwards Luke Keenan and Christian O’Neill who will each serve as alternate captains for the Tigers this season. “Every team is reliant on its leadership group, and that is especially true this season,” said Fogarty. “With 10 newcomers, we will be looking to our veterans to lead the way. We’re fortunate to have Matthew, Luke, and Christian at the forefront of our leadership group. They set great examples on and off the ice, and there will be no questions about the expectations that go along with being a Princeton men’s ice hockey player. These three set a great tone, joined by their classmates who have won some big games during their time at Princeton. Their energy has been great during preseason, and I look forward to that excitement level rising as we get closer to opening night.” Thom, a native of Oakville, Ontario, has played in 89 games on t he blue line for the Tigers, posting 25 points — including backto-back seasons with nine points. A member of Princeton’s 2018 ECAC Tournament title team, Thom brings a wealth of postseason experience to the team. Keenan, a native of Courtice, Ontario, is a veteran of 97 games played and enters the season with 30 career points — including a careerhigh 18 points in 2019-20 which ranked third on the Tigers. He has five career assists in postseason play. jazzatprinceton.com

POPPING UP: Princeton University field hockey player Sammy Popper controls the ball in recent action. Last Sunday, junior star Popper scored the winning goal in overtime as 16thranked Princeton defeated No. 5 Penn State 3-2. Two days earlier, the Tigers posted another dramatic win, edging Cornell 3-2 in overtime on a tally by freshman star Beth Yeager. Princeton, now 8-5 overall and 4-0 Ivy League, heads to New England for a showdown at No. 12 Harvard (11-1 overall, 4-0 Ivy) on October 23. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) O’Neill, who hails from Westwood, Mass., has skated in 53 games over his two seasons on the ice with the Tigers, entering 2021-22 with 16 points. In 2019-20, O’Neill had a career-high 10 points including two goals in Game One of the ECAC Playoffs at Dartmouth. Princeton opens the 202122 season at Army West Point on October 30.

Princeton Field Hockey Elevates Rizzo to Associate Head Coach

Dina Rizzo has been elevated to associate head coach for the Princeton University field hockey team, the program announced last week

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October 27, 2021

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Rizzo, who is in her sixth year at Princeton, is a member of the U.S. Field Hockey Hall of Fame, having been inducted in 2016 after a playing career that saw her make 157 appearances for the U.S. national team and play in the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing. She also won an NCAA championship at Maryland, with Tiger head coach Carla Tagliente as her teammate. “Dina is such an integral part of our program,” said Tagliente. “She has earned everyone’s respect through her work ethic, her de meanor, the way she carries herself, and the way she cares for every athlete in our program. She is exactly the kind of person you want to represent you, and I’m thrilled that she is now the associate head coach.” Rizzo’s coaching career s aw h er s p e n d t i m e at UMass, helping the pro gram into the national Top Ten, before going back to her alma mater and helping the team to NCAA titles in 2010 and 2011. She came to Princeton with Tagliente in 2016 and has helped the Tigers to three Final Fours and the 2019 NCAA championship game. “I am honored to work with our exceptional student-athletes and incredible young women at such an elite institution,” said Rizzo “I take great pride in doing my part to influence and enhance the development of leadership and the resulting character it reveals. It is humbling for me to be recognized in such a way by coach Tagliente. I embrace the opportunity and its added responsibility to further serve our student-athletes.”

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Delaney Keegan and her teammates on the undefeated and second-seeded Princeton High field hockey team knew they were in for a battle when they hosted 10th-seeded Hun in the Mercer County Tournament quarterfinals last Friday. “I do think they wanted to come for us,” said PHS sophomore forward Keegan of the clash against the upset-minded crosstown rival. “They definitely were hungry for a really competitive game.” Things were very competitive in the first half as the foes played to a scoreless stalemate. “They were tough to break down,” said Keegan. “They put up a great fight.” At halftime, the Tigers focused on playing more as a unit. “Our forward line and midline were not connecting so we talked about it,” said Keegan. “In the end it was just a matter of playing as a team and playing as one together.” PHS got things together as senior star and Rutgersbound Weir scored to put the Tigers up 1-0 with 9:52 left in the third quarter. Minutes later, Keegan took a feed from Weir and banged it home. Returning the favor, Keegan set up Weir for the third and final goal of the contest with 1:14 left in the third as the Tigers never looked back, prevailing 3-0 and improving to 13-0. PHS was slated to face third-seeded Princeton Day School in the MCT semis on October 19 with the victor advancing to the title game in October 21 at Lawrence High. In reflecting on her goal, Keegan credited Weir with setting her up. “I definitely think that

Olivia gave me the great opportunity and my team connected on the passes,” said Keegan. “It was really nice to just take an open shot and not hesitating. It felt good when I hit it.” Keegan felt good about feeding Weir for the final goal on the contest. “Working as a team and not taking the ball yourself helps your team more than being selfish in the circle,” said Keegan. “I think that connecting and working together goes a long way.” After being sidelined for most of 2020 due to a leg injury, Keegan is relishing the chance to help PHS this fall. “Working harder in the offseason and working harder with my teammates definitely helps,” said Keegan. “We have been working together a lot. I also play club with Princeton Field Hockey.” PHS head coach Heather Serverson realized that upset-minded Hun would be a hard team to beat. “We knew they were a strong team because we scrimmaged them early on,” said Serverson. “Hun did a great job of moving to the ball and we weren’t ready for that.” The Tigers did a better job in the second half. “We just needed to move to the ball, we were assuming that it was going to go through,” said Serverson. “We weren’t reading the fact that their defense was playing so well and stepping up and we just needed to start doing the same thing. Once we did, we were winning the ball.” As usual, leading scorer Weir gave PHS a spark.

“That always seems to get things going for us when someone scores a goal,” said Serverson of Weir, who now has 33 goals and 10 assists this season. “Isn’t that the way with every team, she definitely got things started.” Keegan has shown a knack for getting things started, having tallied six goals and a team-high 14 assists this fall. “Delaney does a great job, she sees the field, she has got great stickwork, and she has got great passing,” said Serverson. “She is a good, complete player. She was injured last year so we didn’t really know what she was capable of. She is a great player and she makes everyone around her look good.” The Tigers will now play another good team in PDS, who brings a 12-3 record into the semifinal clash. “I look for ward to any challenge we can get, especially moving into the state tournament,” said Serverson. “We really need to be pushed to our limits so we can see what our flaws are and can tighten up our ship a little bit.” In Keegan’s view, surviving the challenge posed by Hun should pay dividends for PHS. “It pushed us to work harder,” said Keegan. “Hun putting up a fight really gave us a wake-up call.” —Bill Alden

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BIG HIT: Princeton High field hockey player Delaney Keegan hits the ball in a game earlier this season. Last Friday, sophomore forward Keegan tallied a goal and an assist as second-seeded PHS defeated 10th-seeded Hun 3-0 in the Mercer County Tournament quarterfinals. The Tigers, now 13-0, were slated to face third-seeded Princeton Day School (12-3) in the MCT semis in October 19 with the victory advancing to the final on October 21 at Lawrence High. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Deming Comes Through With Goals in Crunch Time, Helping PHS Boys’ Soccer Stun Notre Dame in OT Owen Deming brought some extra emotion to the field for the Princeton High boys’ soccer team as it hosted undefeated Notre Dame last week. “It was a huge senior day, we are playing against Notre Dame and they are a really tough opponent,” said senior midfielder Deming, reflecting on the October 12 contest. “I haven’t beaten them in my high school career so when I came out here, I really wanted to beat them.” In early stages of the clash, Deming focused on his defensive responsibilities. “Defensively we were just trying to lock down their center midfielders and their attacker Denny Bensch,” said Deming. “We did really well, we were up 2-0 in the first 15 minutes.” PHS kept that 2-0 lead heading into the second half but the Irish rallied, scoring three unanswered goals in a 13-minute stretch of the second half to forge ahead 3-2 with 4:52 left in regulation. “We kind of dropped in and let them keep pinging balls in,” said Deming. “When we got down 3-2, I was pretty mad.” Deming turned that anger into a spectacular finish, scoring the tying goal with 2:29 left in the second half to force overtime and then notched the winning tally midway through the first extra period as PHS edged Notre Dame 4-3 in overtime. “I am a center defensive mid so I usually just hold back,” said Deming. “When we were down, I was like, we need a goal so I decided I need to get up.” On his first tally, Deming opportunistically slotted in a rebound. “I saw the ball coming in and I saw our player Patrick Kenah going up for the header,” recalled Deming.

“I was like no one else is behind him so I just stood there and it bounced to me and it just dropped to my foot. It was a pretty sweet connection.” Heading into OT, the Tigers felt they had the edge over the Irish. “We have been in two overtime games this season,” said Deming. “We were definitely prepared, Notre Dame hasn’t been in one. We knew what to bring to the table.” Minutes later, Deming was in the right place at the right time on his game-winner. “Once again I just stood there because I thought it was going to bounce and it bounced to me,” said Deming, whose tally set off a raucous celebration as fans streamed into the field from the stands and the football team ran over from practice to join in. With PHS having entered the game mired in a 0-2-1 skid, it badly needed a victory. “It was a bad stretch, everyone was really hungry to get a win today,” said Deming. “We really needed to bounce back and get back into winning. This is huge momentum for the MCTs and states. This is one of the best teams in the CVC, if not the best. Being able to beat them is amazing.” PHS head coach Wayne Sutcliffe saw his team’s hot start against Notre Dame as a huge plus. “We did a lot of preparation in relation to seeing Notre Dame play and the way they play so tactically we had a plan,” said Sutcliffe, who got early goals from Emanuel Noyola and Nicholas Matese. “It helps so much when you can get two good early goals and make a statement that way.” Notre Dame, though, made a statement of its own with the late rally.

“You have to expect that; a team with that much talent is going to press, they are going to string passes together once they get one,” said Sutcliffe. “It is a matter of trying to figure it out and solve the problem.” Deming proved to be the key problem-solver for the Tigers. “It was the best game I have seen Owen play in his days here,” asserted Sutcliffe. “He was winning duels, his passing percentage was really high and he scored two great goals.” Sutcliffe and assistant coach Ryan Walsh kept their faith in PHS even as the Irish took the lead. “When Notre Dame went up 3-2, Walsh and I didn’t lose any belief and I don’t think they lost any belief,” said Sutcliffe. “The last goal gave us momentum and then we adjusted a couple of tactical things in the extra time period. Credit to the guys for pulling off plays.” With PHS starting action in the Mercer County Tournament where it is seeded third and will host a first round contest on October 21 between the winner of the play-in game between the Princeton Day School and Ewing, Sutcliffe believes his team is on the right track for a big postseason run. “We are in a good place,” said Sutcliffe, whose team edged WW/P-South 1-0 last Saturday in improving to 8-22. “You just have to believe, I am just so proud of the team and their resilience. They believe, it is a special group. Since we started in the preseason, they have had a little mojo.” Deming is looking to produce a special ending to his PHS career. “There are a few weeks left in our season and our careers as high school soccer players,” said Deming. “We just want to live it up while we can, have the best time we can and the best season.” —Bill Alden

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

Sophomore Keegan Emerging as Key Playmaker As Undefeated PHS Field Hockey Makes MCT Semis

COMEBACK KID: Princeton High boys’ soccer player Owen Deming boots the ball in recent action. Last week, senior midfielder Deming scored the tying goal and winning tally as PHS edged Notre Dame 4-3 in overtime, coming back from a late 3-2 deficit. The Tigers, who defeated WW/P-South 1-0 last Saturday to move to 8-2-2, start action in the Mercer County Tournament this week. PHS is seeded third and will host a first round contest on October 21 between the winner of the play-in game between the Princeton Day School and Ewing. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 36

PHS Football Loses 38-10 to Camden Catholic, But Johnson Puts on a Show for Homecoming Crowd It was Friday night lights time for the Princeton High football team as it hosted Camden Catholic for Homecoming. A n ove r f l ow, r au c o u s crowd had packed the stands around the PHS turf field by the 7 p.m. kickoff last Friday on an unseasonably warm October evening with fans spilling into the hill overlooking the end zone. As Tiger senior receiver/ cornerback Jaiden Johnson took the field, he was pumped to give the fans something to cheer about. “T h e at m osph ere w as amazing, I am glad to see everybody here,” said Johnson. “Last year we didn’t have it because of COVID. I just love it; the support from the school.” After Camden Catholic jumped out to an 8-0 lead, Johnson got the throng on hand buzzing, making a 40-yard reception down the sideline on a bomb from Jaxon Petrone and later kicking a 46-yard field goal as the Tigers cut the deficit to 8-3. “We have been working on it every single day in practice,” said Johnson, recalling his spectacular catch. “We have been getting better and it transitioned into the game. We want to

keep doing that as much as possible.” Johnson and fellow senior star receiver Everaldo Servil have developed a good connection this fall with senior quarterback Petrone. “On the offseason, me, Everaldo [Servil] and him have just been working together,” said Johnson, who came into Friday averaging 15 yards per catch. “The chemistry has shown. I am just glad to be out here and be with the guys.” In booting the field goal, Johnson displayed skills developed from his time with the PHS soccer program. “I did play soccer so I have a background and I just focused,” said Johnson, who switched to football last fall. “We work on it during practice and it happened in the game. I am just happy that it went through the uprights.” W hile PHS kept working hard after that scoring march, it couldn’t hold off the powerful Irish who pulled away to a 38-10 win. “We knew they were a good team but we were not intimidated,” said Johnson. “It was come out here and be the underdogs.” The Tigers showed they weren’t intimidated, producing a 75-yard fourth quarter drive that culminated with

J-TRAIN: Princeton High football player Jaiden Johnson races upfield in a game earlier this fall. Last Friday night, senior star Johnson made three catches for 48 yards and kicked a 46-yard field goal in a losing cause as PHS fell 38-10 to Camden Catholic. The Tigers, now 1-6, host Cinnaminson (1-6) on October 23. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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a 15-yard TD run by senior fullback Jason Ling. “It was nice, I am glad,” said Johnson. “It was nice to see Jason score, he has been working hard.” Johnson has been working hard all fall, starting at receiver and cornerback and handling all of the kicking and punting duties. “I just play as much as I possibly can, I am a team player if coach wants me in, I will go in, whatever it is,” said Johnson. “I know what to expect this year. I worked with my dad, we have been grinding to this day. If I have the opportunity at the next level, I would definitely play.” PHS head coach Charlie Gallagher was glad to see program get the opportunity to resume its annual Homecoming night game. “It was really great to get back at it,” said Gallagher. “I am really happy about the game, it was an entertaining game.” Gallagher was entertained by Johnson’s heroics on the first quarter drive. “I think it was 40 yards on that play, that was impressive,” said Gallagher. “He has a heckuva leg. My man, Jaxon Petrone, called it. He said coach get some points on the board, I was about to go for it on fourth down. It was a long field goal and he said we got it. It was a good deal.” It was very good for PHS to finish the night with the scoring march. “That was really important, just stressing the idea of finishing the game on a positive note,” said Gallagher, who fist-bumped each player one by one as they came off the field after the score. “We had a great crowd, you score a touchdown at the end and get that little bit of an eruption which is going to make the guys feel good going into the evening.” Gallagher felt great about Ling’s TD. “I am very happy for him, I am glad,” said Gallagher. “I gave him a little hug at the end. Jason is a captain so the expectations are high. He needs to play well all of the time. It was really good to see that.” Johnson has been giving the Tigers an all-out effort. “I think he might have took off for two plays,” said Gallagher of Johnson. “He is the only player who plays every play.” With PHS, now 1-6, hosting Cinnaminson (1-6) on October 23, Gallagher believes his squad will keep playing hard. “Our guys are healthy which is awesome and they are all in; they are all doing a great job,” said Gallagher. “We have a great core group of seniors, they are all doing a really nice job for us. As long as those guys are healthy and they want to keep playing football, we will keep scheduling games.” Johnson is look ing to make the most out of his final games for the Tigers. “It is play as hard as we possibly can, especially for the seniors,” said Johnson. “We need to be leaders to the underclassmen, show by example and let the tradition go on.” —Bill Alden

1st Doubles Team of Marckioni, Kim Provides a Highlight As PHS Girls’ Tennis Loses in State Group 3 Semifinal Lucia Marckioni and Sophia Kim have accomplished a lot over the years playing at first doubles for the Princeton High girls’ tennis team. The pair of seniors won the first doubles title at the Mercer County Tournament in 2019 and 2021 and went undefeated in 2020 but didn’t have the chance to defend their MCT crown as the event was canceled due to COVID-19 concerns. Despite all of their success, Marckioni and Kim hadn’t been part of a sectional team title winner. Last week, they added that line to their resume, posting a 7-5, 7-5 win over Sabrina Chang and Kirthi Chigurupati to help PHS edge WW/P-N 3-2 in the Central Jersey Group 3 sectional final and earn a spot in the state Group 3 semis for the first time since 2018. Last Thursday, PHS headed to Mercer County Park for the semis and battled hard before falling 3.5-1.5 to Tenafly. Marckioni and Kim provided a highlight in the defeat as they came through with a 6-1, 7-5 win over Tenafly’s Zoe Han and Liliana L a Pera. For Marckioni, advancing to the state semis was particularly meaningful as a senior. “We weren’t on varsity freshman year and sophomore and junior year the team lost in the semifinals,” said Marckioni. “This year we were able to win the final and to come here. It is such a way to end.” Kim, for her part, saw it as a special ending. “It is an honor,” said Kim. “It is our first time senior year, closing it off on a good note.” In their match against Tenafly, the pair worked hard to close the deal in a hard-fought second set. “We know that we could do it and we were just focusing on what are we good

at, volleys for me, groundstrokes for Lucia,” said Kim. “It was just playing our game. We are good at coming back. Even though we are down, we tell ourselves, we are still in it. Our mental game is strong.” Marckioni never doubted that she and Kim would come through. “I thought we could stick it out, we are always able to gain back the points that we lost,” said Marckioni. “It just shows how good we are and what we can achieve.” While it was disappointing for PHS to come up short collectively against Tenafly, Marckioni was proud to go out on a high note in state play. “It is obviously unfortunate for the team, it was not what we wanted,” said Marckioni. “At least me and Sophia can leave here saying we did it, we could have kept going.” PHS head coach Sarah Hibber t wasn’t surprised to see Marckioni and Kim prevail. “First doubles has been a highlight and a strength for us this year,” said Hibbert. “It was a tight match but they really played gutsy tennis at the end to hold out the 7-5 win there.” Hibber t also got some gutsy play from her second doubles pair of Ashley Chen and Monica Li, who fell 6-1, 6-4 to Kay Considine and Sujin Park, and Eva Lependorf at first singles as her match with Megan Yi was declared a draw after Li won the first set 6-4 and the second set was knotted at 5-5. “Second doubles tried to come through,” said Hibbert. “With their momentum from the other day, they rallied. They fought hard and fell a little bit short at the end. Eva was playing great, she battled back. I honestly thought that set was going her way when she was climbing back but unfortunately,

they stopped play due to lack of time which was a little frustrating.” Although the final result against Tenafly was frustrating, winning the sectional title was a great achievement for the Tigers. “It is nice, especially with this group of seniors to be able to win the sectional title against a tough county,” said Hibbert. “We avenged our loss to Hightstown [in the sectional semi] and then we were able to hold on to the win over North [in the final] who is another strong team. They have pulled together as a team. They have gutted it out and unfortunately today, it just didn’t go our way.” In the wake of the state run, Hibbert was looking for a strong finish as the Tigers wrapped up regular season play. “They definitely saw some good tennis today and hopefully that can help us with the matches left,” said Hibbert, whose team fell 4-1 to WW/P-South last Monday to move to 9-3 and plays at Robbinsville on October 20 and at Trenton Central on October 22. “Overall, they put up a good fight today. We came up a little bit short and we will hope for a good end of the year.” Kim, for her part, will be savoring her final weeks on the court with Marckioni. “I am going to miss this, playing with Lucia,” said Kim. “We have gotten so close to each other, playing four years in a row. We have that unspoken communication.” —Bill Alden

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WINNING PARTNERSHIP: Lucia Marckioni, left, and Sophia Kim celebrate the Princeton High girls’ tennis team’s run to the Central Jersey Group 3 sectional title. The pair of seniors Marckioni and Kim starred at first doubles as PHS earned its first sectional crown since 2018. PHS fell 3.5-1.5 to Tenafly in the state Group 3 semis last Thursday at Mercer County Park. Marckioni and Kim provided a highlight in the defeat with a straight-set win. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


P r i nce ton Day S cho ol girls’ tennis first singles star Neha Khandkar knew she was facing a challenge when she played Pingry’s Anika Paul in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Non-Public A team final last Thursday at Mercer County Park. A week earlier, Khandkar had lost 6-3, 6-3 to Paul when the teams met in a regular season match won by undefeated Pingry 5-0. Coming into the rematch, Khandkar tweaked her strategy. “My approach was to hit high to her backhand because it as the weaker stroke off her two groundstrokes; her forehand is really solid and aggressive,” said Khandkar. “It was just to keep mixing up the pace and not let her get into a rhythm.” While Khandkar battled hard, she never found her rhythm, falling 6-1, 6-1 to Paul as PDS lost 5-0 again to Pingry. “It was sort of the same honestly,” said Khandkar reflecting on the setback. “It could have gone a lot better but at least I had a strategy going in.” It marked the end of a superb debut for the Panthers as they had won the

South Jersey Non-Public A sectional team final in their first-ever appearance in the competition “It is amazing, we get to literally make history, we get a plaque at the school,” said Khandkar. “We were pretty confident going into the sectionals. It was this area where we knew it would be a little harder. We know most of these schools, we have played a lot of them before in regular school matches so we sort of had a sense. It was the first time, so it was a new experience.” The Panthers took that experience into state Prep B tourney which started last Sunday and saw Amy Zhou advance to the final at third singles with Sophie Zhang and Jackie Baranski making it at first doubles “I think this is exactly the kind of match practice we need for Preps,” said Khandkar, whose semifinal match at first singles in the Prep B tourney was suspended and will be concluded on October 19 with the finals set for the next day. Over the years, Khandkar has put in a lot of practice to improve her game. “I think my serve placement has gotten a lot better, it has dropped a little bit in consistency but I think that is OK,” said Khandkar.

MAKING HISTORY: Princeton Day School girls’ tennis player Neha Khandkar hits a forehand in the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Non-Public A team final last Thursday at Mercer County Park. Junior star Khandkar fell at first singles as PDS lost 5-0 to Pingry. It marked the end of a superb debut as the Panthers had won the South Jersey Non-Public A sectional team final in their first-ever appearance in the competition. On Sunday, the Panthers started play in the state Prep B tourney and saw Amy Zhou advance to the final at third singles with Sophie Zhang and Jackie Baranski making it at first doubles. The Panthers, who sit second in the team standings behind Montclair Kimberley Academy, will wrap up play in the event on October 20. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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“I am sacrificing the consistency a little bit for placement and power. I have solidified my touch a lot at the net.” Khandkar’s mental toughness has helped made her a solid player. “I think it comes from my parents, they have always been very quiet,” said Khandkar. “They are never the kind of parents who cheer in the stands. It is this quiet thing in my head and I translate that.” PDS head coach Michael Augsberger credited Khandkar with fighting hard in defeat. “Neha battled, it came down to holding her serve,” said Augsberger. “She is really mentally strong. In a match like that, you just look for her to continue thinking through the match and do anything she can.” The PDS doubles teams of Baranski and Zhang along with the second doubles pair of Stella Ringblom and Eshaa Doshi ran into some tough matches as they both fell in straight sets. “They hit really smart volleys at us, the toughest place to field a volley is at your feet and that is where they continued to go after us all day,” said Augsberger. “That is why the match takes only 50 minutes because they would hit that spot all of the time. It was tough for us to pick that up, it is tough for anybody to pick that up.” In Augsberger’s view, the matchup with powerhouse Pingry was a good learning experience for the Panthers. “We are really proud that we made it this far,” said Augsberger, whose team moved to 8-6 in dual match play af ter losing 5 - 0 to WW/P-North last Monday in a regular season contest. “There is always another level above you in tennis. It is good for them to be exposed to that even if you are the state champions, there is always a higher level. They are No. 1 for a reason and they proved it today.” PDS was looking to bounce back in the Prep B tourney. “What is really interesting about tennis is that even though you may go in feeling good or feeling favored in another level of tournament than here, the feeling that you have after losing a match this tough can linger,” said Augsberger. “Even though we should feel confident given our history and the regular season and how good we know we are, we have to nip it in the bud to have them feeling good again.” But no matter how the season ends up for the Panthers, their success in the Non-Public A tourney will leave them feeling good about the 2021 campaign. “We are so proud to be the first sectional title winner in the long history of our prestigious school,” said Augsberger. “We get such support from the athletic staff and from the school. They are really proud of us too. You always want to play the best and our schedule reflects that and coming into this reflects it. There is no shame in going out to this team and losing.” —Bill Alden

Buoyed by O’Brien’s Steady Play on Back Line, Hun Field Hockey Advances to MCT Quarters This past spring, Abby O’Brien emerged as the go-to finisher for the Hun School girls’ lacrosse program, tallying a team-leading 70 goals. But playing in her junior season for the Hun field ho cke y s q u ad t h is fa l l, O’Br ien has as su me d a much different role, developing into a top defender for the Raiders. “As the center back, I am the last line of defense there,” said O’Brien. “I want to do absolutely everything I can to keep that ball out of the goal.” Juggling the two sports helps O’Brien excel no matter what end of the field she is patrolling. “I definitely enjoy having this role, it is a great balance to do both,” said O’Brien. “There are a lot of the same technical things with spacing and things like that so it is really cool to be able to have one in the air and one on the ground.” Playing at second-seeded Princeton High in the quarterfinals of the Mercer County Tournament last Friday, the 10th-seeded Raiders did a lot of good things as they held undefeated and secondseeded Princeton High to a scoreless stalemate in the first half. “I think our defense played well, we did everything that we could to try to save those goals,” said O’Brien of Hun, who edged seventh-seeded Allentown 2-1 in the first round last Wednesday to earn a shot at the Tigers. “They have some really talented at tackers. T hat was a great goal of ours. We didn’t want to just defend, we were trying to pounce on them. That is what we were doing really well.” In the third period, PHS pounced on the Raiders, scoring three unanswered goals but Hun kept fighting to the final horn as it ended up falling 3-0. “We kept that throughout the whole game,” said O’Brien, referring to the defensive effort. “I feel like we gave our all, 100 percent of the time. We finished all four quarters and I think that is all you can ask.” In O’Br ien’s v iew, t he Raiders are in synch this fall. “I think the biggest thing our team has done throughout

the season is to be able to connect more together,” said O’Brien. “I think that is what has helped with our success quite honestly.” Hun head coach Tracey Arndt realized her team faced a big challenge in trying to contain high-powered PHS. “We knew that Princeton was very strong, we knew that they were on a streak that is remarkable and admirable,” said Arndt. “We knew we weren’t necessarily getting a shutout, obviously those are always goals. We knew we could keep it tight.” Arndt credited O’Brien and sophomore goalie Norah Kempson with keeping things tight at the defensive end. “I have to give credit to Abby O’Brien our center back, she doesn’t get enough credit because she is so steady,” said Arndt. “She had a defensive save that was in the beginning of the game that could change the trajectory. Norah, our goalie, played out of her mind.” The Raiders, though, didn’t have the firepower to break down the Tiger defense. “We don’t have the depth, we have a small team to begin with,” said Arndt. “We just needed a little bit of a more sustained attack … but they are finishers and they are winners and we are too. They just really know how to put it away.”

Hav ing come into t he game riding a four-game winning streak, Hun was disappointed to taste defeat against PHS. “We have a lot to be happy about and be grateful about,” said Arndt, noting that the team posted a total of four wins over the last two seasons combined. “Thankfully, they are hungry for more. They are upset with the loss which means they know there are areas we could have improved. We will just take it and learn.” Hosting the Blair Academy in the opening round of the state Prep A tournament on October 20, Hun will look to apply those lessons. “These are the games we need, we can pretend that we are as good as we are in practice and then we face those teams and you really know,” said Arndt, whose team ran into a very good squad last Saturday, falling 8-1 at the Hill School (Pa.) in moving to 6-6-1. “I always love to play top quality teams because it gets us to understand where we want to go. Our girls really want to go to this level so we are going to keep working. I have got a great group.” O’Brien, for her part, is proud of the great progress she has seen this year. “We are just trying to improve our program and keep going up from there,” said O’Brien. “That is what we have done all season. Last year was my first year at Hun and this year we have improved insanely. It is honestly kind of astonishing to me.” —Bill Alden

37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

Khandkar’s Mental Toughness Proves to be an Asset As PDS Girls’ Tennis Made History in Non-Public A

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Making Switch to Field Hockey from Tennis, Ix Developing into an Offensive Threat for Stuart

Emily Ix spent her first two falls at Stuart Country Day School playing tennis. This year, however, junior Ix decided to make a change and joined the Stuart field hockey program. “I love tennis and I really love team sports,” said Ix,

who stars for the Stuart lacrosse team in the spring, having scored a team-high 37 goals in the 2021 campaign. “A lot of my friends play field hockey and I love Miss Bruvik [field hockey head coach Missy Bruvik]. I got a lot out of tennis and I feel

like a lot of my game in tennis translates to my game in field hockey so that has been really helpful.” It hasn’t taken Ix long to develop a comfort level in her new sport. “When I first started playing, the rules were a little

QUICK LEARNER: Stuart Country Day School field hockey player Emily Ix dribbles the ball in a game earlier this season. Junior Ix, who took up field hockey this year after playing tennis the last two falls, has emerged as a scoring threat for Stuart. Last Wednesday, Ix tallied two goals to help the sixth-seeded Tartans top 11th-seeded WW/P-S 4-1 in the opening round of the Mercer County Tournament. Stuart, which fell 3-2 to Princeton Day School in the MCT quarters last Friday to move to 10-3-2, will continue postseason play when it hosts a state Prep B semifinal contest on October 22. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

different,” said Ix. “My dribbling and stick skills have improved a lot. Lacrosse is my main sport probably and a lot of the same girls play lacrosse so I was able to fit right in. It has been great with the team.” Last Wednesday, Ix displayed her newly-developed skills, scoring two goals to help sixth-seeded Stuart defeat WW/P-South 4-1 in the opening round of the Mercer County Tournament. “Today was my first tourn a m e n t g a m e a c t u a l l y, which is really exciting,” said Ix. “It has been a lot of buildup over the course of the season. We were really excited to compete and show how much we have improved since the start of the season. Our team bonds are really strong going into this game. I feel like a lot of the hard games that we have played over the season have helped coming up to this.” Ix’s first goal came on a feed from classmate Lily Harlan as Stuart took a 2-0 lead five minutes into the contest. “I saw that the right side of the cage was open and I just did a hard push,” said Ix. “Lily is my best friend and we play other sports together and I feel like we have a lot of team chemistry. She always finds the open girl, her assists are really great.” The Pirates rallied, scoring a goal midway through the second quarter to make it a 2-1 game at halftime. “South is a very talented team so we were prepared for a tough game,” said Ix. “I feel like coming into the second half we were really confident about our team and we knew that we were going to keep the momentum going.” The Tartans regained the momentum, scoring two unanswered goals to pull away to the win. Ix tallied the final goal of the day in the first minute of the fourth quarter, banging home a pass from Isabel Milley.

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“I think the passing is the strongest point of our game,” said Ix. “We were really confident in ourselves that we could pull through. Our offensive line works really well together. I think we know our strengths and our weaknesses.” Stuart head coach Bruvik liked her team’s strong start against WW/P-South. “We came out strong, I thought we moved the ball and controlled the ball well,” said Bruvik. “We just kept it on our sticks and made the right passes at the right time and finished. It was a great start.” Later in the contest, the Tartans showed some great resilience in overcoming the Pirates. “West Windsor counter-attacked, it is tournament time and momentum is going to change and it was how do we counteract that,” said Bruvik. “I am really pleased with the third and fourth quarters that we were able to put the ball in.” Bruvik is very pleased to have Ix join her squad. “She put down her tennis racket and said she was going to try it and I thought this is awesome because I just know her natural abilities,” said Bruvik. “She is so coachable, she asks great questions. She works so hard to be in the right position at the right time. She has been a finisher for us. She can run end line to end line so we were able to put her in the midfield and teach her as she is going. She is learning every day and keeps building on those skills. It has been great to

watch and that is all a tribute to her and her work ethic.” Stuart also got some good work from Milley and Harlan in the win as Milley tallied a goal and an assist and Harlan chipped in a goal and two assists. “Isabel always has a good game, she is intense, said Bruvik. “She has the natural instincts, she is a natural athlete. Lily is firecracker up on attack. She is the spark that ignites our offensive end of the field but she also plays good defense. She brings that passion which I also think ignites everybody else. She brings out the best in everybody. They all can feel her passion and they want to do it together.” W h i l e S t u a r t fe l l 3 -2 on a last second goal to third-seeded Princeton Day School in the MCT quarters last Friday, the Tartans, now 10-3-2, are still in the hunt for the state Prep B title. “I think as long as we continue to have this kind of resilience whether we are up or we are down and just keep playing to the end, that is what a tournament run is all about,” said Bruvik, whose team is seeded first in the Prep B tourney and will host a semifinal contest on October 22. In the view of Ix, the Tartans will keep playing hard to the end. “I am really excited for the future of our team, we have a very young team,” said Ix. “We definitely have a lot of mental toughness and I feel like we really want to win. Going in we are really excited to play some harder teams.” —Bill Alden

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Football: Marco Lainez starred as Hun defeated Hill School (Pa.) 40-0 last Saturday. Star quarterback Lainez connected on 11 of 13 passes for 190 yards and four TDs in the first half for the Raiders, now 5-0. Hun plays at Cheshire Academy (Conn.) on October 23. Boys’ Soccer: Sparked by William Zeng, Hun edged the Hill School (Pa.) 2-1 last Saturday. Zeng had a goal and an assist as the Raiders improved to 7-5. In upcoming action, Hun will be starting play in both the Mercer County Tournament and the state Prep A tourney. The Raiders are seeded eighth in the MCT and are slated to host ninth-seeded Lawrence High in a first round contest on October 21. G i r l s’ S o c c e r : R i l e y Hayes had a big game to help Hun defeat the Hill School (Pa.) 5-1 last Saturday. Hayes scored three goals for the Raiders as they improved to 8-2-1. Hun will be starting action next week in both the Mercer County Tournament and the state Prep A tourney. The Raiders are seeded sixth in the MCT and are slated to host 11th-seeded Hightstown in a first round contest on October 21. Girls’ Tennis: Amanda Francis provided a highlight as Hun competed at the state Prep A tournament last Friday. Junior Francis took second at first singles, falling to Pingry’s Anika Paul 6-1, 6-0 in the final. In upcoming action, the Raiders host Hopewell Valley on October 20, play at Notre Dame on October 21, host

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ney. The Red Raiders are seeded first in the MCT and will host a first round game on October 21 between the winner of the play-in game between Nottingham and WW/P-South. In addition, Pennington will be hosting Lawrenceville on October 20 to start play in the Prep A tourney.

PHS Girls’ Volleyball: Shakthi Sreenivas played well in a losing cause as PHS fell 2-0 (25-19, 25-19) to Montgomer y last Friday. Sreenivas had eight assists, one kill, and one dig for the Tigers, who dropped to 126. PHS hosts Florence on October 26.

Local Sports Princeton Junior Football Recent Results

In action last Sunday in the Senior Division (ages 11-13) of the Princeton Junior Football League (PJFL), the Alizio Sealcoating Broncos rallied to edge the Sunoco Steelers 4140. Ezra Lerman threw touchdown passes to Jaden Bartley and Ari Rosenblum for the Broncos. Lerman also ran for a score and Barley scored on an interception return. For the Sunoco Steelers, Charlie Baglio had four TD passes and ran for another while Max Caruso made two TD receptions. The Greenleaf Painters Raiders defeated the Tamasi Shell Vikings 41-20. Andrew Spies threw 3

TD’s to Truman Arshan, Joe Poller and Mathew Brophy in the win. Jacob Reese returned two interceptions for TDs. For the Vikings, Kobe Smith made a touchdown catch and rushed for another while Langsdon Hinds made a TD reception. The UOA Jets defeated the McCaffrey’s Packers 40-32. Lee Miele threw two TD passes to Raymond Buck, ran for a TD, and received a TD from Ryan Von Roemer for the Jets. Raymond Buck also threw a TD pass to Gavin Levine in the win. For the Packers, Michael Bess Jr. had a TD reception and pass while Quinton deFaria threw TD passes to Milo Molina and Andrew Foreman. In Juniors (ages 8-10) games, the La Rosa Ravens defeated the Petrone Associates Broncos 30-18. The Ravens scored five touchdowns, including one on a run by Jack Bailey, TD passes from Ilan Siegel to Braiden Kelly and Alex Spies, and interception returns by Alex Spies and Ilan Spiegel. Leo Miele had three rushing TD’s for the Broncos. The Christine’s Hope Raiders defeated the DZS Clinical Gold Steelers 28-19. Ryan Ewing and Cooper Casto ran for touchdowns for the victors and Teagan Levy added two touchdown receptions from Casto and Sebastian Murdoch. For the Steelers, Grayson Babich scored a running TD, and Henry Ambra threw a TD pass to Will Schmitt. Alessandra Petta scored the third touchdown with a run around the end. In other Junior action, the Princeton Global Jets edged the Corner House Packers 1312. Miles Oakman caught two touchdowns from John Monica for the Jets with Monica scoring the decisive extra point. Hudson Hanley and Connor

Donohue scored for the Corner House Packers. The Trattoria Procaccini Chiefs defeated the Princeton Global Black Steelers 26-6. Dylan Chambers had two touchdown runs for the Chiefs with Lucas Martinez throwing a touchdown pass to Patrick Demareski and Theo Henderson adding a rushing touchdown. For the Black Steelers, George Rieger connected with Bryce Davison on a TD pass for their lone score. In the Rookie division (ages 6-8), the COE Smiles Red Chiefs defeated the PBA 130 Patriots 42-21. Aiden Spies scored three touchdowns for the Chiefs with Nathan Besler, Robert DeSimone, and Alberto Catarrivas also adding TDs in the win. For the Patriots, Matthew Shaleheda scored two touchdowns and Dylan Merse added a third. The COE Smiles Chiefs defeated the PBA 130 White Patriots 28-14. Brady Goldsmith scored two TDs for the victors with Christopher Pepek and James Armstrong adding one score apiece. Weston Rosenbaum scored a pair of TDs for the Patriots.

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

Hun

Lawrenceville School on Boys’ Soccer: Unable to October 23, and then play get its offense going, PDS Pennington on October 26. fell 6-0 to Hopewell Valley last Monday. In upcoming action, the Panthers, now 6-9, will start action in the Mercer County Tournament where they are seeded 14th and were slated to host 19th -seeded Ew ing in a Football: Peyton Cosover play-in round game on Octriggered the offense as tober 19 with the victor to L a w r e n c e v i l l e d e f e a t e d play at third-seeded PrincPeddie 27-20 last Saturday. eton High on October 21 in Cosover passed for 234 a first round contest. Girls’ Soccer: Adriana yards and three touchdowns for the Big Red, now 2-4. Salzano scored the lone Lawrenceville hosts the Kent goal for PDS as it fell 4-1 School (Conn.) on October to Hopewell Valley last Monday. In upcoming action, the 23. Field Hockey: Kiera Duffy Panthers, now 7-5-2, will and Taylor Hill starred as start action in the Mercer top-seeded Lawrenceville Count y Tournament this defeated eighth-seeded Rob- week where they are seeded binsville 5-1 in the Mercer seventh and will host 10thCounty Tournament quar- seeded Lawrence in a first terfinals last Friday. Duffy round game on October 21. and Hill each had a goal and an assist in the win for the Big Red. Lawrenceville, now 9-4, is slated to play four t h - s eeded L aw rence High in the MCT semifinals on October 19 with the vicBoys’ Soccer: Gabe DiPitor advancing to the final on erro scored the lone goal as October 21 at Lawrence. Pennington edged LaSalle High (Pa.) 1-0 last Monday. In upcoming action, the Red Raiders, now 11-1, will start play in the Mercer County Tournament and the state Prep A tourney. The Red Fiel d H o c ke y : Jady n Raiders are seeded first in Huff came up big as third- the MCT and will host a first seeded PDS edged sixth- round game on October 21 seeded Stuart Country Day between the winner of the 3-2 in the Mercer County play-in game between HamTournament quarterfinals ilton West and Trenton. Girls’ Soccer: Sparked last Fr iday. Junior Huff scored a last-second goal to by Morgan Kotch, Penninghelp the Panthers improve ton defeated Paul VI 4-1 to 12-3. PDS was slated to last Saturday. Kotch tallied face second-seeded Princ- two goals and an assist as eton High in the MCT semis the Red Raiders improved on October 19 with the vic- to 9-2-2. Pennington will tor advancing to the title start action this week in the game on October 21 at Law- Mercer County Tournament and the state Prep A tourrence High.

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BRINGING THE MOJO: Princeton High girls’ soccer goalie Moji Ayodele, right, leaps to thwart a shot in recent action. Last Saturday, senior Ayodele made two saves to earn the shutout as PHS defeated WW/P-South 7-0 to improve to 12-1. Senior Megan Rougas tallied three goals and an assist in the victory while classmate Sophia Lis contributed two goals and two assists. PHS will be starting play in the Mercer County Tournament this week where they are seeded third, and will host 14th-seeded Ewing in an opening round contest on October 21. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 40

Obituaries

Steve DiGregorio S te ve D i G re g or io – a man defined by his humor, strength of character, loyalty, and devotion to those closest to him – has passed away after a courageous battle against cancer. He was 60 years old. Known to everyone who knew him simply as “Digger,” he was a man whose heart was filled with love and laughter. In the end he died the way he lived – surrounded by those he loved the most, smiling and joking, connecting with all of those lucky enough to be his friend. A man born to be around people, he loved to poke fun at those closest to him and have them poke fun at him. He spoke with a deep, husky voice in a quick, determined cadence, punctuating a large number of his sentences with his unique, ever-present laugh. Digger was at his core a family man, whether that be his nuclear family, the extended family group the

DiGregorios formed with the Levy and Giles families, or the widely extended family of former football players whom he coached and the army of friends he picked up along the way. He was most especially an integral part of two football worlds, that of Nutley High School, where he played and later was the award-winning head coach, and at Princeton University, where he coached for 13 seasons and to whose staff he had just returned. He often spoke of his love for every player he knew who wore the Nutley or Princeton uniform, and in turn they loved him back just as much. Dozens of them reached out to him during his illness, which brought him an irreplaceable joy and a reaffirmation that his life’s work had been impactful and purposeful. More than anyone else, though, he held his deepest possible love for his wife of 30 years, Nadia, and their three boys: Zack, Derek, and Aaron. To see the DiGregorio family up close is to feel the love that emanated in an impossible-to-miss fashion. The family was constantly laughing, constantly having fun, often making fun of each other, all in an endless support of each other, even when faced with obstacles most families could not have handled at all, let alone with the strength and determination of the DiGregorios. Derek was born with a disease so rare that nobody in the family had ever heard of it before the diagnosis. After the enemy was given a name, Ataxia-Telangiectasia, and an accompanying grim prognosis, Digger mo-

bilized family and friends to combat the disease, through fundraising events, awareness, education, and anything else that might help as part of what they named “Derek’s Dreams.” When the DiGregorios called, everyone answered, and the result was an unprecedented wave of money to research treatments and possible cures. Wherever the family would go, Derek would be there as well, even in his wheelchair when he could no longer walk, and their collective inspiration has been awesome. Digger was the adopted son of Silvio and Rose Mary DiGregorio, to whom he referred as “the greatest people who ever walked the earth.” He grew up in Nutley, where he was a defensive end on the high school football team he would one day coach. From there, he attended Muhlenberg, and he would eventually be inducted into the school’s athletic Hall of Fame. His first job after graduating in 1983 was in the Caldwell, N.J., school district, and it was there that he met Nadia Hubal. They would marry in 1991 and raise their three children in Princeton, where Digger first coached in 1987, after stops at Hobart and Allegheny. All three children graduated from Princeton High School. Zack graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, where he played on the sprint football team. Derek attends Mercer County Community College, and Aaron is in his final semester at Franklin & Marshall, where he has been a member of the track and field team.

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When Digger left Princeton after the 2000 season, he returned to the high school level, coaching first at Paramus Catholic and then at Nutley while also teaching U.S. Government at Nutley. In his final season as the head coach at Nutley, he was named the New Jersey high school football Coach of the Year. He was inducted into the Essex County Football Hall of Fame in 2000. During his career, he would coach seven players who would go on to play in the NFL, including one, Jason Garrett, who would also become an NFL head coach. He would a l s o co ach t h e c u r r e nt Princeton head coach, Bob Surace, when he was an undergraduate. In addition to his immediate family and friends, he is survived by his sister Lynda and her children, his niece Allison and nephews Jack and Alex, as well as his aunt Carol Palkowetz and many cousins who were a huge part of his life beginning in his childhood. S teve D iG re gor io w as a loving, caring, wonderful, passionate man with a gigantic heart and boundless spirit. He will live on in the hearts of all of those to whom he meant so much. Visitation and Mass of Christian Burial were held on Monday, October 18, 2021 at St. Paul’s Church, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542. Burial was in Princeton Cemetery. Arrangements are under the direction of The MatherHodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

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from 1986-2004. After a career spanning 40 years at Princeton Hospital, he retired at age 75. Born in Philadelphia on July 23, 1935, to Morris and Bella Broad, he graduated as the president and top of his class at West Philadelphia High School. He went on to graduate at the top of

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Sunday Worship Service

Sunday, October 24 at 11am Princeton University Chapel

This service is open to the public for those fully vaccinated against Covid-19. Registration required for all events on campus at the door or in advance. To register in advance, use the QR code.

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES DIRECTORY OF ESTATE CONTENTS

Downsizing/Moving? Call Us.

609-658-5213

Subscription Information: 609.924.5400 ext. 30 or subscriptions@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

princetonmagazine.com

Preaching this Sunday

Rev. Dr. Theresa S. Thames

Associate Dean of Religious Life and of the Chapel Princeton University Music performed by the Princeton University Chapel Choir. Nicole Aldrich, Director of Chapel Music & University Chapel Choir, and Eric Plutz, University Organist

RELIGIOUS SERVICES

Sunday 8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I 9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Tuesday 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist SUNDAYS

9:00 am — Adult Formation Wednesday

5:30 p.m. Holy with Healing 10:00 am — Eucharist Holy Eucharist II Prayer

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

11:00 am — Coffee Hour

33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org

5:00 pm — Compline

St. Paul’s Catholic Church All services are online. St. Join Paul’s Catholic Church Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton us216 at Nassau www.trinityprinceton.org

214 Nassau Street, Princeton Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30and p.m. Sunday:The 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 5:00 p.m. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector, Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. TheMass Rev. Canon Dr. Kara Slade, Assoc.atRector, in Spanish: Sunday 7:00 p.m. The Rev. Joanne Epply-Schmidt, Assoc. Rector, Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 • www.trinityprinceton.org

ONLINE

www.towntopics.com

Princeton’s First Tradition

Worship Service

in the University Chapel Sundays at 11am Rev. Alison Boden, Ph.D.

Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel

Rev. Dr. Theresa Thames

Associate Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel

Must be fully vaccinated against Covid-19 to attend.

Registration required for all you eventsare on campus. Wherever you are on your journey of faith, For more information, visit chapel.princeton.edu always welcome to worship with us at:

First Church of Christ, Wherever you are in your journey of faith, Scientist, Princeton come worship with us

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ ¡Eres siempre bienvenido!

Christianare Science Room Services heldReading in the Church

Our 178 Nassau Street, Princeton following the appropriate protocols 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 Sunday Church Service and Sunday School at 10:30 am, Wednesday Testimony meetings at 7:30 pm Visit the Christian Science Reading Room Monday through Saturday, 10 am - 4 pm 178 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ For free local delivery call (609) 924-0919 www.csprinceton.org • (609) 924-5801

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 10:00 a.m. Worship Service

During 10:00 this timea.m. of COVID-19 crisis, Witherspoon is finding new Children’s Sunday School and Youth Studydoors may be closed, ways to continue our worship. WhileBible our sanctuary Bible Classes church is open and we willAdult find new avenues to proclaim the Gospel and to (Acontinue multi-ethnic congregation) as one faith community! 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365

Join us for worshipwitherspoonchurch.org on Facebook Live every Sunday at 10:00 a.m. Recorded and live stream sermons can also be found on our website - witherspoonchurch.org Join our mailing list to receive notices of our special services, bible study and virtual fellowship. During the COVID-19 crisis our church office is closed, however, please email witherspoon@verizon.net or leave a message at our church office and a staff member will get back to you. Church office: (609) 924-1666

41 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

Dr. Bernard Broad

his class as an undergraduate and at Temple Medical School. After graduating he became a commissioned officer in the U.S. Public Health Service. A resident of Princeton since 1986, he was a former resident of Levittown, PA. He was respected and adored by his family, colleagues, patients, and everyone that had the privilege of knowing him. He was known and admired for his witty sense of humor, friendly demeanor, and generosity and empathy towards others. His breadth of knowledge calmed, advised, and impacted so many people. Growing up in West Philadelphia, he was an avid Philly sports fan, and his children followed suit and frequently got together to watch Eagles and Sixers games. He also loved traveling, being outdoors, playing golf and tennis, reading mystery novels, trying new cuisine, and constantly sharpening his knowledge on medical research, current affairs, and in all other facets. Above all else, he enjoyed the simple and beautiful life he shared with his wife and children. He never missed a single one of his children’s sporting events, music recitals, or other milestones. He poured his heart and soul into creating the best life possible for his family and being a source of light for everybody around him. Bernard is sur vived by his wife Peggy Broad; his c h i l d r e n Fo s te r B r o a d , Carter Broad, Danny Broad (Sarah), Audrey Broad, Michelle DeRosa (Greg), Terri


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 42

to place an order:

“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS

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MasterCard

The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. FALL IS HERE! Have a yard sale & clear out some unwanted items Make sure to advertise in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

COLLEGE APPLICATION ADVISING

CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL

: Is your student facing a mountain of college admission essay questions and unsure of how to start the climb? They’re not alone — and I can help you navigate the chaos. As a former Princeton University Admission Offi cer, I know what attracts colleges to students. My process helps students write original, thoughtful essays that stand out. Visit www. collegeessayexcellence.net or contact caroline@ collegeessayexcellence.net (609)-356-2714

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius (609) 466-0732 tf HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240.

HOUSECLEANING: Professional cleaning service. Experienced, references, honest & responsible. Reasonable price. Call Teresa (609) 424-7409 for free estimate. 09-29-6t JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-09-22

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22

MOVING OVERSEAS SALE: Furniture: sleigh bed, sofa bed, rocking chair & more. Small appliances (including mechanical sewing machine), x-country skis, vintage clothing, dancewear, games, garden tools, CDs, DVDs & more. 4259 Province Line Road, Princeton (between Rosedale & Route 206). Saturday. October 23, 10:003:00. 10-20

Irene Lee, Classified Manager

• Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. WHAT’S A GREATthan GIFT FOR • 25 words or less: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater 60 words in length. A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? COMMUNITY RUMMAGE SALE: MOVING SALE: Saturday 10/23 • 3 weeks: $40.00 • 4 weeks: $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. Friday, October 22nd 8am-5pm, & from 2:30-4:30 pm. Households, Asian Collections, Furniture, Garden Sunday, October 24th from 9:00amA Gift Subscription! • Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inch • all bold face type: $10.00/week Sculptures, Plants/flowers, Tools, 20’ 12:00pm (NOT Saturday). Items for the house, yard, kids, hobbies, sports; also children’s books, clothing, & small furniture. Located at Congregation Kehilat Shalom, 253 Griggstown Road, Belle Mead (off Route 206 or River Road, just north of Princeton). 10-20 YARD SALE: Saturday, October 23, starting 8 am. 25 MacLean Street, (between Witherspoon & John). Full size refrigerator, household goods, collection of Pashmina scarves & wraps, indoor sunroom furniture, counter stools, winter coats, shoes, artwork, frames & much more! 10-20 MOVING OVERSEAS SALE: Furniture: sleigh bed, sofa bed, rocking chair & more. Small appliances (including mechanical sewing machine), x-country skis, vintage clothing, dancewear, games, garden tools, CDs, DVDs & more. 4259 Province Line Road, Princeton (between Rosedale & Route 206). Saturday. October 23, 10:003:00. 10-20 MOVING SALE: Saturday 10/23 from 2:30-4:30 pm. Households, Asian Collections, Furniture, Garden Sculptures, Plants/flowers, Tools, 20’ Ladders & more. 55 Marion Road East, Princeton. (609) 213-3835. 10-20 KARINA’S HOUSECLEANING: Full service inside. Honest and reliable lady with references. Weekly, bi-weekly or monthly. Call for estimate. (609) 858-8259. 09-29-4t

09-29-4t COTTAGE FOR RENT: 1 Bedroom/1 Bath guest house on a large property in Princeton. Use of pool, parking. Prefer someone with gardening knowledge. $1,700 per month, utilities included. (609) 712-7620.

tf

10-06-3t

HOUSECLEANING:

PRINCETON-GRACIOUS STUDIO APARTMENT on estate with magnificent gardens. Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time. Elegant furnishings, big windows, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, walk-in closet, kitchenette, large bath, AC, WI-Fi. Very private, separate entrance, parking. Great as an office, too. (609) 924-5245.

Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 873-3168. I have my own PPE for your protection.

08-11-tf

Independent with 10 years of experience. Trustworthy, Polish woman with car & basic communicative English, is looking for full-time job. Please text Mira (215) 983-3201.

2 BEDROOM CONDO SHARE: Available Oct. or Nov. Master BR suite in 2 BR condo. Good for grad student or professional. Share w/female music teacher with 1 year lease or possible school year. $1,100/mo. plus utilities. Great location, 2 miles from PU. Public transportation, pool & tennis. Call (609) 706-2209. cldamerau@ yahoo.com 10-20 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396.

09-08-8t CAREGIVER/ LIVE-IN ASSISTANT:

09-22-6t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 10-06-4t

tf

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-21-22 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 921-7469. 10-06-22 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-30-22 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

“Heart thoughts are profound,

hindsight aches and hope is obscure. I’m craving a great adventure -- one that leads me back home." —Donna Lynn Hope

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf FALL IS HERE! Have a yard sale & clear out some unwanted items Make sure to advertise in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifi eds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf COMMUNITY RUMMAGE SALE: Friday, October 22nd 8am-5pm, & Sunday, October 24th from 9:00am12:00pm (NOT Saturday). Items for the house, yard, kids, hobbies, sports; also children’s books, clothing, & small furniture. Located at Congregation Kehilat Shalom, 253 Griggstown Road, Belle Mead (off Route 206 or River Road, just north of Princeton). 10-20 YARD SALE: Saturday, October 23, starting 8 am. 25 MacLean Street, (between Witherspoon & John). Full size refrigerator, household goods, collection of Pashmina scarves & wraps, indoor sunroom furniture, counter stools, winter coats, shoes, artwork, frames & much more! 10-20

Ladders & more. 55 Marion Road East, Princeton. (609) 213-3835. 10-20

KARINA’S HOUSECLEANING: Full service inside. Honest and reliable lady with references. Weekly, bi-weekly or monthly. Call for estimate. (609) 858-8259. 09-29-4t COLLEGE APPLICATION ADVISING : Is your student facing a mountain of college admission essay questions and unsure of how to start the climb? They’re not alone — and I can help you navigate the chaos. As a former Princeton University Admission Officer, I know what attracts colleges to students. My process helps students write original, thoughtful essays that stand out. Visit www. collegeessayexcellence.net or contact caroline@ collegeessayexcellence.net (609)-356-2714 09-29-4t COTTAGE FOR RENT: 1 Bedroom/1 Bath guest house on a large property in Princeton. Use of pool, parking. Prefer someone with gardening knowledge. $1,700 per month, utilities included. (609) 712-7620. 10-06-3t PRINCETON-GRACIOUS STUDIO APARTMENT on estate with magnificent gardens. Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time. Elegant furnishings, big windows, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, walk-in closet, kitchenette, large bath, AC, WI-Fi. Very private, separate entrance, parking. Great as an office, too. (609) 924-5245. 08-11-tf

Specialists

2nd & 3rd Generations

MFG., CO.

609-452-2630

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

MASON CONTRACTORS RESTORE-PRESERVE-ALL MASONRY

Mercer County's oldest, reliable, experienced firm. We serve you for all your masonry needs.

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

BRICK~STONE~STUCCO NEW~RESTORED

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

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Paul G. Pennacchi, Sr., Historical Preservationist #5. Support your community businesses. Princeton business since 1947.

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

609-394-7354 paul@apennacchi.com

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


43 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

Redefine domestic bliss. N OT H I N G C O M PA R E S

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36.87 ac | Plumstead Township | Pastella - Burns Custom Builder | Land is available for $1.4M

For the modern-design enthusiast, “Meadowlark” is an opportunity to create a one-of-a-kind home outside of Carversville. Using the services of nationally recognized, locally based design-build firm, PASTELLA | BURNS, the buyer will have the pleasure of living in a clean-lined, organic residence that borrows from both classic mid-century architecture and the vernacular barns of the region.

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$ 4 , 3 9 5 ,0 0 0

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5 br | 5.1 ba | 4,550 sf | 6.3 ac | LEED-certified | Superbly Built | Lot is $400,000 A world away from typical newer construction, this privately situated, custom residence is on 6.3 acres high above the historic Delaware River canal, perfectly located for walking and bicycling as well as for easy access to Princeton, Philadelphia, and train service to New York and beyond. WA S H I N G TO N C R O S S I N G , PA K U R F I S S .C O M / PA B U 5 1 9 3 0 4 Douglas Pearson c. 267.907.2590 Skylar Kiziltug c. 484.690.4448

$ 2 ,0 4 9,0 0 0

Arthaus

7 Meadowbrook Court

2 br | 2 ba | Avenue of the Arts Neighborhood | Gourmet Kitchen | Parking Included

3 br | 3.1 ba | 3,700 sf | Gated Community | Elevator | Designer Finishes | 2-Car Garage

P H I L A D E L P H I A , PA K U R F I S S .C O M / PA P H 9 2 2 9 3 0 Douglas Pearson c. 267.907.2590

N E W H O P E , PA K U R F I S S .C O M / PA B U 5 2 3 2 1 6 Douglas Pearson c. 267.907.2590

$ 3 ,6 5 6 , 2 0 0

3505 River Road

$ 1 , 5 1 0,0 0 0

50 South Union Street

4 br | 2.1 ba | 3,776 sf | .97 ac | Pre-Revolutionary Stone Manor House | River Views

4 br | 2.1 ba | 2,195 sf | .17 ac | Backyard | Natural-Light | Meticulously Maintained

LU M B E R V I L L E , PA K U R F I S S .C O M / PA B U 5 2 2 0 7 2 Eleanor Miller c. 215.262.1222

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$ 7 8 0,0 0 0

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© 2021 Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. SIR® is a registered trademark licensed to SIR Affiliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

$ 1 , 1 2 5 ,0 0 0


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 44

YOU’RE READY, WE’RE READY. Move-in-ready homes available, featuring $300,000 in upgrades

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Final Phase of Construction! In-person tours available by appointment. Starting at $1,575,000. 215.862.5800 | RabbitRunCreek.com Rte. 202 (Lower York Road) & Rabbit Run Drive, New Hope, PA

COMMUNITY FEATURES • Full Basement • Two-Car Rear Garages • Maintenance-Free Lifestyle • Open, Contemporary Floor Plans • Private Gated Community • Private Elevators


A Littlebrook Gem RENOVATED-UPDATED-WELL MAINTAINED

307 Shadybrook Lane - Princeton $1,395,000

This transitional colonial split is situated on almost an acre lot and is located around the corner from Littlebrook Elementary. An architect's hand help create a feeling of spaciousness by re-arranging staircases, flipping the kitchen and dining rooms, adding oversized windows and glass doors topped with impressive trim and crown moldings. This impeccable 5 bedroom, 3 full bath property comes complete with a chef's kitchen, a fireplace, and a finished basement with tremendous home office potential.

H H H

Heidi A. Hartmann Call / Text 609.658.3771 E: HeidiHartmannHomes@gmail.com W: HeidiHartmannHomes.com

10 Nassau Street Princeton NJ 609-921-1411

Thinking of a move? Let's chat!

45 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

w Ne g tin s i L


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021 • 46

2 BEDROOM CONDO SHARE: Available Oct. or Nov. Master BR suite in 2 BR condo. Good for grad student or professional. Share w/female music teacher with 1 year lease or possible school year. $1,100/mo. plus utilities. Great location, 2 miles from PU. Public transportation, pool & tennis. Call (609) 706-2209. cldamerau@ yahoo.com 10-20

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY–PROFESSIONAL All phases of home improvement. Serving the Princeton area for over 30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius (609) 466-0732 tf

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 873-3168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 09-08-8t CAREGIVER/ LIVE-IN ASSISTANT: Independent with 10 years of experience. Trustworthy, Polish woman with car & basic communicative English, is looking for full-time job. Please text Mira (215) 983-3201. 09-22-6t

çù ÙÝ͗ > ÙÄ ãÊ ÊÃÖÙÊÃ®Ý with Beatrice Bloom ®Ä ^ ½½ ÙÝ͛ D Ù» ã

Ɛ ǁĞ ĞŶƚĞƌ ŵŝĚ-ĨĂůů͕ ŝŶǀĞŶƚŽƌŝĞƐ ŽĨ ŚŽŵĞƐ ŽŶ ƚŚĞ ŵĂƌŬĞƚ ƌĞŵĂŝŶ ůŽǁ ĂĐƌŽƐƐ ƚŚĞ E:-Ez ŵĞƚƌŽ ƌĞŐŝŽŶ͘ WŽƚĞŶƟĂů ďƵLJĞƌƐ ƌĞŵĂŝŶ ĨƌƵƐƚƌĂƚĞĚ ďLJ ƚŚĞ ůĂĐŬ ŽĨ ŚŽƵƐĞƐ ĂŶĚ ƚŚĞ ƐƉĞĞĚ ŽĨ ƐĂůĞƐ͘ /ƚ ƐĞĞŵƐ ƚŽ ŵĂŶLJ ďƵLJĞƌƐ ƚŚĂƚ ĂƐ ƐŽŽŶ ĂƐ ƚŚĞLJ ƐĞĞ Ă ůŝƐƟŶŐ ƚŚĞLJ ůŝŬĞ͕ ƚŚĞ ŚŽƵƐĞ ŝƐ ƐŽůĚ ďĞĨŽƌĞ ƚŚĞLJ ŚĂǀĞ Ă ĐŚĂŶĐĞ ƚŽ ƚĂŬĞ Ă ĐůŽƐĞƌ ůŽŽŬ͘ /Ŷ ƚŚŝƐ ƚLJƉĞ ŽĨ ŵĂƌŬĞƚ͕ ŝƚ͛Ɛ ĐƌƵĐŝĂů ĨŽƌ ďƵLJĞƌƐ ŶŽƚ ƚŽ ŐĞƚ ĐĂƵŐŚƚ ƵƉ ŝŶ ĮŶĚŝŶŐ ƚŚĞ ͞ƉĞƌĨĞĐƚ͟ ŚŽƵƐĞ͘ /ƚ͛Ɛ ďĞƩĞƌ ƚŽ ƐƚĂƌƚ ďLJ ĚĞĐŝĚŝŶŐ ǁŚĂƚ LJŽƵ͛ƌĞ ǁŝůůŝŶŐ ƚŽ ĐŽŵƉƌŽŵŝƐĞ ƚŽ ĮŶĚ Ă ŚŽƵƐĞ ƚŚĂƚ ǁŝůů ďĞ Ă ŐŽŽĚ Įƚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ ŝƐ ŽŶĞ ŬĞLJ ĨĂĐƚŽƌ͘ zŽƵ ŵĂLJ ŶĞĞĚ ƚŽ ůŽŽŬ Ăƚ ŚŽƵƐĞƐ ďĞůŽǁ LJŽƵƌ ďƵĚŐĞƚ ŝŶ ŽƌĚĞƌ ƚŽ ďƵLJ͘ ĞŝŶŐ ŇĞdžŝďůĞ ŽŶ ůŽĐĂƟŽŶ ŝƐ ĂůƐŽ ƐƵŐŐĞƐƚĞĚ͕ ĞƐƉĞĐŝĂůůLJ ŝĨ LJŽƵ͛ƌĞ ůŽŽŬŝŶŐ ŝŶ ĂƌĞĂƐ ǁŝƚŚ ĞdžͲ ƚƌĞŵĞůLJ ůŽǁ ŝŶǀĞŶƚŽƌŝĞƐ͘ ŽŶƐŝĚĞƌ ĞdžƉĂŶĚŝŶŐ LJŽƵƌ ƐĞĂƌĐŚ ƚŽ ĚŝīĞƌĞŶƚ ŶĞŝŐŚďŽƌŚŽŽĚƐ Žƌ ŶĞĂƌďLJ ƚŽǁŶƐ͘ zŽƵ ŵĂLJ ĂůƐŽ ŚĂǀĞ ƚŽ ƚŚŝŶŬ ĂďŽƵƚ ŚŽƵƐĞƐ ƚŚĂƚ ĂƌĞ ŶŽƚ ƚƵƌŶ-ŬĞLJ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ tŚŝůĞ Ă ƚŽƚĂů ĮdžĞƌ-ƵƉƉĞƌ ŵĂLJ ŶŽƚ ďĞ ĨŽƌ ĞǀĞƌLJŽŶĞ͕ ƚĂŬĞ Ă ƐĞĐŽŶĚ ůŽŽŬ Ăƚ ŚŽƵƐĞƐ ƚŚĂƚ ŶĞĞĚ ƐŽŵĞ ǁŽƌŬ͘ dŚĞ ŬĞLJ ŝƐ ƚŽ ƌĞŵĞŵďĞƌ ƚŚĂƚ ďƌŽĂĚĞŶŝŶŐ LJŽƵƌ ƐĞĂƌĐŚ ŵĂLJ ŽƉĞŶ ƵƉ ŶĞǁ ƉŽƐƐŝďŝůŝƟĞƐ͘

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC Offering professional cleaning services in the Princeton community for more than 28 years! Weekly, biweekly, monthly, move-in/move-out services for houses, apartments, offices & condos. As well as, GREEN cleaning options! Outstanding references, reliable, licensed & trustworthy. If you are looking for a phenomenal, thorough & consistent cleaning, don’t hesitate to call (609) 751-2188. 10-06-4t HOUSECLEANING: Professional cleaning service. Experienced, references, honest & responsible. Reasonable price. Call Teresa (609) 424-7409 for free estimate. 09-29-6t JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-09-22

Family Owned and Operated Charlie has been serving the Princeton community for 25 years

FLESCH’S ROOFING For All Your Roofing, Flashing & Gutter Needs

• Residential & Commercial • Cedar Shake • Shingle & Slate Roofs

• Copper/Tin/Sheet Metal • Flat Roofs • Built-In Gutters

• Seamless Gutters & Downspouts • Gutter Cleaning • Roof Maintenance

609-394-2427

Free Estimates • Quality Service • Repair Work

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area DIRECTOR,

NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT (#6554): Master’s deg in Business Analytics, Educ, or rel field relevant to dvlpmt of products for educational or workforce environments + 3 yrs exp. Use lean methodology, agile dvlpmt, design thinking to manage product dvlpmt processes. F/T. Educational Testing Service. Princeton, NJ. Send CV to: Ritu Sahai, ETS, 660 Rosedale Rd, MS-10J, Princeton, NJ 08541. No calls/recruiters. 10-20

RESEARCH USER SPECIALIST

(#6574): Master’s deg in Information, Human-Comp Interaction, Comp Sci, Cognitive Sci, a graphic/info or web design field, or rel field + 3 yrs exp. Use usability testing; dsgn presentations; storyboarding; & prototyping to lead UI/UX aspects of UX research and associated IT interface, dsgn, wireframing, and documentation. May telecommute from any location in continental USA. F/T. Educational Testing Service. Princeton, NJ. Send CV to: Ritu Sahai, ETS, 660 Rosedale Rd, MS-10J, Princeton, NJ 08541. No calls/recruiters. 10-20

DIRECTOR OF MUSIC, P/T: A small, progressive church in Princeton needs an organist/pianist to play for worship services on Sundays & other special occasions, as well as to conduct a choir when Covid permits. Call Carol at (609) 6584221 or email resume to ccprinceton.org 10-13-3t

LEGAL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT: Central New Jersey law firm is seeking a motivated and organized legal administrative assistant. The ideal candidate will have a minimum of 2 years law office experience. Responsibilities will include document preparation and effectively communicating with clients. This is a parttime position with a flexible four-hour day, starting late morning. We offer a competitive salary and an excellent opportunity for someone looking for part-time administrative work. Must be fully vaccinated with proof of vaccination. Please email resume to stesta@pralaw.com. 10-06-3t

Rider

Furniture “Where quality still matters.”

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Wednesday morning delivery. If interested, please contact Gina Hookey at classifieds@towntopics.com

LIC#13VH02047300

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

A CLASSIC GEM Great location on Madison Street. Gracious home with elegant architectural details. This 3 bedroom and 1 ½ bath home has a surprisingly open floor plan. Large eat-in kitchen and adjacent laundry. Has central air conditioning. The 20 x 42 foot unfinished third floor has creative possibilities for an additional bedroom/office plus storage. Parking for three cars in the rear of the property. Easy walking distance to the university, shops, and center of town. New Price $999,000. www.stockton-realtor.com

An Equal Opportunity Employer 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528 609-924-2200

American Furniture Exchange

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area


47 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2021

PRESENTING

PRESENTING

17 Basin Street, South Brunswick Twp. Marketed by: Terebey Relocation Team/John A. Terebey $619,999

12 Brophy Drive, Ewing Twp. Marketed by: Judith Budwig $368,000

PRESENTING

84 Franklin Corner Road, Lawrence Twp. Marketed by: Freddie Gomberg $399,999

6 Gulick Road, Princeton Marketed by: Robin L. Wallack $950,000

NEWLY PRICED

PRESENTING

From Princeton, We Reach the World. 16 Rosedale Lane, Princeton Marketed by: Judith Stier | $1,650,000

20 Sherbrooke Drive, West Windsor Twp. Marketed by: Linda Kinzinger | $735,000

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

From Princeton, We Reach the World. 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 Princeton Office Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com Princeton, NJ ||253 foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.


INTRODUCING KATIES POND ROAD • PRINCETON $8,500,000 Norman T ‘Pete’ Callaway • 609.558.5900 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME2000029

INTRODUCING HOPEWELL AMWELL ROAD • HOPEWELL TWP $3,500,000 Joan Loraine Otis 908.415.3062 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME2006034

WESTCOTT ROAD • PRINCETON $2,250,000 Norman T Callaway, Jr • 609.647.2001 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME2001478

NEWLY PRICED ROSEDALE LANE • PRINCETON $1,750,000 Sylmarie ‘Syl’ Trowbridge • 917.386.5880 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME2003522

VICTORIA MEWS • PRINCETON $1,600,000 Michael Monarca • 917.225.0831 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME310018

RESERVOIR ROAD • HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP $1,495,000 Jennifer E Curtis • 609.610.0809 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME2004380

INTRODUCING WINANT ROAD • PRINCETON $1,200,000 David M Schure, Grant Wagner • 609.577.7029 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME308860

INTRODUCING HOAGLAND DRIVE • MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP $800,000 Clare Mackness • 609.454.1436 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJSO2000045

INTRODUCING STATE ROAD • PRINCETON $695,000 Martha Giancola • 609.658.1969 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME2000235

INTRODUCING SERGEANTSVILLE ROAD • DELAWARE TWP $689,900 Michelle Blane • 908.963.9046 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJHT2000029

INTRODUCING MARIGOLD COURT • SOUTH BRUNSWICK TWP $550,000 Wendy Neusner • 609.234.3355 Ca l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJMX2000001

PALMER SQUARE WEST • PRINCETON $439,000 Donna S Matheis • 609.947.2547 C a l l awayHenders on.com/id/NJME313790

CallawayHenderson.com 4 NASSAU STREET | PRINCETON, NJ 08542 | 609.921.1050 Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.