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Volume LXXIV, Number 42

Fall Home & Design Pages 32-41 Pandemic is a Test of Survival for Garden, Montgomery Theaters . . .5 Council Puts Down Framework for New Human Services Hire . . . . . . . . 10 Family, Friends Pay Tribute to Dr . Stephanie Chorney . . . . . . . . . . . 12 PSO Presents Second Concert of Garden Chamber Music Series . . . . . . . . 20 NJ Theatre Alliance Presents Theatre and Civic Engagement . . . . . . . . 21 PU Men’s Hoops Alum Morales Heading to Spanish Pro League . . . . . . . . . .25 PHS Football Edges Bishop Eustace 18-17, Snaps 12Game Losing Streak . . .27

Reading Albert Camus: "Absurd Freedom" and The Plague . . . . . . . . 19 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .16, 17 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 24 Classified Ads . . . . . . 42 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 31 New To Us . . . . . . . . . 32 Performing Arts . . . . . 22 Police Blotter . . . . . . . 13 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 42 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

www.towntopics.com

Heated BOE Race Highlights Local Ballot For Election 2020 Eight candidates are vying for three positions on the Princeton Public Schools Board of Education (BOE) on the election 2020 ballot that, in addition to races for president, House of Representatives, and U.S. Senate, includes several local contests. Mark Freda, a Democrat, is running unopposed for mayor of Princeton, while incumbents David Cohen and Leticia Fraga, also Democrats, are running for two uncontested positions on Princeton Council. In Mercer County elections, Democrats Lucylle R.S. Walter and John A. Cimino are running unopposed for two spots on the Mercer County Board of Chosen Freeholders, while incumbent Democrat Paula Sollami Covello is the sole candidate on the ballot for Mercer County Clerk. In a contested Mercer County race, Republican Bryan “Bucky” Boccanfuso is challenging incumbent Democratic Sheriff John A. “Jack” Kemler. With three weeks to go until Election Day in this predominantly vote-by-mail election, many have already voted. Voters have the option of mailing in their ballots, returning their completed ballots to their polling place on Election Day, or placing their ballots in one of 15 secure drop boxes throughout Mercer County. Princeton’s is located at the municipal building at 400 Witherspoon Street. There will be five polling places in Princeton. Registered voters can also vote by provisional ballot in person on Election Day, but only disabled voters will be allowed to use a voting machine. The Princeton League of Women Voters is offering, at lwvprinceton.org/voter-information, a video showing how to correctly fill out, enclose, and seal a mail-in ballot. “To avoid problems, vote promptly and sign carefully and clearly; your ballot is accepted only if signatures match,” said Chrystal Schivell of the League of Women Voters. Mail-in ballots must be postmarked by November 3 and received within seven days. Dropped-off ballots must be received by 8 p.m. on November 3. In the Princeton BOE election, incumbents Beth Behrend, current Board president, and Michele Tuck-Ponder, current vice president, face challenges from Adam Bierman, Hendricks Davis, Jean Continued on Page 8

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Wednesday, October 14, 2020

COVID Cases Interrupt Back-to-School Plans Phase-in plans for bringing students from remote learning back into the classrooms met with some obstacles last weekend, necessitating a delayed re-entry for a number of students, as three students at Princeton Day School reported positive COVID-19 tests and students at Princeton High School and Johnson Park were exposed to the virus. A Johnson Park (JP) student and a Princeton High School (PHS) student, who live in a household where an individual has tested positive for COVID-19, will quarantine at home, and school officials are working with the Princeton Health Department in following up with contact tracing, quarantine measures, and disinfecting procedures as called for by state and local health departments. Students in the one potentially affected class at JP and their siblings will remain on remote learning for the entire week, allowing time for the classroom to be deep cleaned again and to ensure students are symptom-free. The PHS phase-in to on-site learning is scheduled for next Monday October 19, but the PHS student exposed to COVID-19 is a soccer player, and the district has suspended soccer practices and games for a week, according to Interim Superintendent Barry Galasso, who said he anticipated that the boys on the team would be able to return to school with

other PHS students on October 19. Galasso expressed optimism that the planned phased-in hybrid reopening can remain on track. “Despite the rain today, we had a very positive experience as we brought back cohorts in grades two through five for the first time since March,” he wrote in an email to Princeton Public School (PPS) parents and staff on Monday. “I would like to thank the staff for their dedication and continued professionalism, and I would like to commend par-

ents and students for their attentiveness to health protocols.” He continued, “Mask-wearing is crucial. So far we have had a successful reopening and while our medical experts tell us nothing is certain our prospects for continued hybrid learning appear to be good.” Princeton Day School (PDS) has also found the phasing-in process challenging this week with three students in grades nine-12 (Upper School) testing Continued on Page 7

Bike Boulevards Bring Opportunities For Bikers of All Ages and Abilities In promoting cycling as the best way to get around town, Democratic mayoral candidate Mark Freda hosted Princeton Bicycle Advisory Committee (PBAC) Chair Lisa Serieyssol on October 8 on Facebook Live. The discussion focused on the Princeton Bike Boulevards, a network of roads and paths that connects the community and creates a greenway with a variety of cycling loops around town. Freda noted that he had taken part in a tour on the bike boulevards a few weeks ago. “It was a ten-mile ride,” he said. “I was a little worried whether I’d do OK, but I did and it was a very pleasant experience.” Emphasizing the increased need for

bike and pedestrian infrastructure in town, particularly in the seven months since the start of the pandemic, Serieyssol noted that the boulevards were designed to go around the whole town, connecting different neighborhoods without the necessity of traveling on main streets. “These are low stress, low speed, low volume roads for the most part,” she said, “mostly going through residential areas with trails or side paths in some places.” There are many different loops ranging from a 16-mile fitness loop around the perimeter of town to the 4.5-mile town and gown loop in the center of town. Maps are available at Kopp’s and Jay’s bike shops Continued on Page 13

ELECTRIC EVENING: The Princeton Shopping Center, Sustainable Princeton, and NRG Energy hosted an electric vehicle and e-bike ride and drive event at the shopping center on Friday evening . Attendees share if they would consider getting an electric vehicle in this week’s Town Talk on page 6 . (Photo by Weronkia A. Plohn)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2020 • 2

Open letter to the Princeton community in support of Johnson, Lemon, Hare, and Bierman

I am writing as a PPS parent and private citizen only and not on behalf of, or authorized by, the board of education, of which I am an elected member. I believe that school board members have a duty, acting as private citizens, to encourage and support other dedicated individuals to serve as unpaid members of the board. I also believe that we have an excellent opportunity with the board of education election to advance student achievement for all children, restore trust in the board and make Princeton affordable again. The diverse “Slate” of Paul Johnson, Karen Lemon and Bill Hare, plus Adam Bierman are uniquely qualified to advance these important principles. These four candidates have outstanding backgrounds to fulfill the Policy, Planning and Oversight role of the board-in a fiscally responsible way. They will prioritize spending on that which is most important for the academic excellence and student experience that we desire for all our children. The “Slate” and Adam Bierman will work to expand and improve existing facilities first rather than construct or purchase expensive new facilities such as Westminster Choir College. School taxes continue to increase despite very large net savings from school closures and the schools now represent 49% of our property tax bill. Highlighted below are BoE spending decisions that I believe make our diverse community increasingly unaffordable without advancing our student achievement goals: Voting to hire Milone & MacBroom (M&M) at the cost of $140,000 to plan another Facilities Referendum and potentially purchase Westminster Choir College property after laying off teachers and staff in the 2019-2020 budget. Voting to hire EPIC as construction manager for the $27 million facilities plan while ignoring serious problems with a previous facilities referendum at PPS that was overseen by EPIC. The $27 million referendum projects are now significantly over budget with delays and problems in completing construction projects. Voting to spend $530,000 to construct an outdoor concession stand/bathroom at PHS despite Referendum projects over budget that now must draw upon Capital Reserves to complete. Also, failing to provide the community adequate time to develop a lower cost option for the bathrooms. Voting to purchase iPads, Chromebooks or expensive MacBook computers for all students rather than only for those who needed them. This approach had the potential to save $1.5 million. Voting to waste taxpayer funds on lawyers to develop a new board Communications Policy AKA a “GAG Order” to reduce transparency and community engagement by individual board members. Voting to increase taxes twice (Operating and Capital Budgets) this year while residents were suffering from the adverse economic and health effects of Covid-19. In contrast, the municipality amended its budget to eliminate a property tax increase. I know the commitment, temperament and energy it takes to serve as a school board member, and believe serving as a school board member is the most important public service role in our community. I hope that you will consider Paul Johnson, Karen Lemon, and Bill Hare the “Slate” and Adam Bierman to advance student achievement for all students, restore trust to the board and make Princeton affordable again. Thank you, Dan Daniel J. Dart Paid for by Daniel J. Dart, Farrand Road, Princeton, NJ for JOHNSON, LEMON, HARE for BOE, 18 Green Street, Princeton, NJ and ADAM BIERMAN FOR BOE, 193 Grover Avenue, Princeton, NJ


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“The Corkscrew Wine Shop is grateful for this community & wants to thank Princeton Township for all their support of local businesses throughout the pandemic! We are fortunate to be surrounded by passionate shop owners who work tirelessly to make this city a fantastic place to live & work.”

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“We are incredibly grateful for our strong community. Together we have rallied & together we will persevere! Please remember to THINK LOCAL FIRST as we enter the holiday shopping season. By spending locally, you will help keep the places you love to shop or eat open & thriving. Now is the time to keep Princeton magical! Your actions can make a difference!”

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getforky.com BACK TO NATURE: Friends of Princeton Open Space are holding two “Open Space Nature Walk + Talk” events on October 18 and 25 at 2 p.m. Ecological artist Susan Hoenig will show the outdoor installation of the “White Oak” and “American Chestnut Leaf” sculptures in the Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Friends of Princeton Open Space and Susan Hoenig collaborated on this project to draw attention to the value and beauty of native trees, which are critical to sustaining wildlife. Due to social distancing guidelines, registration is required at fopos.org. For questions, email info@fopos.org.

Finding the right solution for you in

Family Law

Food Assistance Program potatoes, and cucumbers. Donat ions of non -perThe deliveries will continue ishables like cans of soup, Continues at YMCA

Thanks to the suppor t of the NJ YMCA State Alliance and Seashore Fruit and Produce Company, the Princeton YMCA is delivering 324 Coronavirus Food Assistance Program boxes each week to families in the community. B oxes delivered ever y Monday include fresh produce, chicken, ham, cream c h e e s e, b u t te r, yo g u r t, cheese, eggs, milk, apples,

Services are provided in the following areas: • • • • • • •

Divorce Custody and Parenting Time Marital Settlement Agreements Prenuptial Agreements Domestic Violence Child Relocation Issues Civil Unions and Domestic Partnerships

John A. Hartmann, III Chairman

Lydia Fabbro Keephart

Nicole Huckerby

• Claims of Unmarried Cohabitants/Palimony • Post Judgment Enforcement and Modification • Mediation • Appeals • Adoption • Surrogacy

Jennifer Haythorn

beans, bags of rice, personal size cereal boxes can be dropped off at any time. The YMCA also asks neighbors to consider visiting with their children as a way to model the values of caring and responsibility. By taking part in donating, they will learn important life lessons and experience kindness in action. The Princeton YMCA is located at 59 Paul Robeson Place; princetonywca. org.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin

Jillian Frost Kalyan

609-520-0900 www.pralaw.com

through October 26, with assistance from Princeton University Athletics in delivering the boxes to the doors of those who need them. The YMCA encourages neighbors to visit the new “Take One Leave One” food pantry at the picnic table in the community garden located in the parking lot. Anyone in need can help themselves to items in the box.

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Blood Drive: Princeton University’s Carl A. Fields Center, 58 Prospect Avenue, is holding a blood drive Wednesday and Thursday, October 14 and 15, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Visit community.princeton.edu for details. Voting Information: All registered voters will receive a mail-in ballot. It can be dropped in a mailbox, in secure drop boxes including one at 400 Witherspoon Street, or can be taken to one of the select number of polling places; at least one per town. You can also vote by provisional ballet in person, although only disabled voters will be allowed to use a machine. If you haven’t received a voteby-mail ballot by now, call the Mercer County Clerk’s Office at (609) 989-6494 or 6495. For more information, visit nj.gov/state/elections. Flu Shot Clinics: Princeton is holding several flu shot clinics through November 14. All dates are subject to change due to COVID-19. Uninsured residents will be provided a free shot. For dates and locations, visit princetonnj.gov/events/ princeton-flu-clinic. National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day: On Saturday, October 24 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Mercer County residents can drop off unused and expired prescription drugs and e-cigarette devices (without batteries) at the lot across from the Mercer County Administration Building, 640 South Broad Street, Trenton. For more information, call (609) 278-715. Donors Sought for Holiday Gift Drive: Princeton’s Human Services department asks donors to donate gifts, or a gift card, for children, for the 22nd Annual Holiday Gift Drive. Visit princetonnj.gov/departments/human-services and donate by Friday, November 27. Call (609) 688-2055 for additional information.


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Get the best reachGet at the be HOLDING ON: The Princeton Garden Theatre, shown in pre-pandemic times, is hoping to eventually reopen. Like Montgomery Cinemas in Skillman and others that specialize in offbeat as well as some standard features, the Nassau Street movie house is suffering the economic effects of COVID-19. (Photo courtesy of Renew Theaters)

Pandemic is a Test of Survival For Garden and Montgomery Theaters

September 20, 2020 was supposed to be the culmination of the Princeton Garden Theatre’s 100th birthday celebration. But instead of marking the milestone, the Nassau Street movie house was quiet that day.

Suffering the effects of the pandemic, the Garden was closed to the public, as it has been since mid-March. COVID-19 has hit the movie industry especially hard. Though permitted to open as of last month, the Garden and the Montgomery Cinemas in Skillman, both of which offer offbeat, art-house films along with some carefully chosen mainstream fare, are hanging on and hoping to resume once the pandemic eases.

TOPICS

President of the New Jersey chapter of the National Association of Theatre Owners, Piechota said he has been as preoccupied with the statewide situation as he is with his own. “It’s a tough time,” he said. “I think in New Jersey we’re probably up to 16 theaters that are closing up, and probably more.” Keeping theaters closed for this long a period might make people afraid to attend once they reopen. “We’ve come out with CinemaSafe, which is a way to operate safely — you buy tickets online, and the computer knocks out seats in front, back, and next to you,”

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“We are planning to reopen. We are holding on, although W H EN YO U N E E D A D I S T I N C T I V E G I F T money is tight,” said Chris T H AT E X P R ES S ES YO U R S EN T I M EN T E FF O RT L ES S LY. Collier, executive director of Renew Theaters, which owns the Garden along with three others in Doylestown, Jenkintown, and Ambler, Pa. “We’ll be doing an end-of-year camT H E H A M I LTO N B U S I N E S S G I F T S D I V I S I O N 4 paign. We’re a nonprofit, so we have loyal donors and supporters. I don’t know how for-profit theaters are hanTown Topics is the only weekly paper that reaches EVERY HOME IN PRINCETON, Town Topics making is theitonly a tremendously weekly papervaluable that reach pro dling it.” toWn toPIcs neWsPaPeR • 4438 Route 27 noRth • KInGston,toWn nJ 08528 toPIcs • tel: neWsPaPeR 609.924.2200 • 4438 • Fax: Route 609.9 2 Not well. Regal Cinemas, the huge commercial chain, 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 recently announced plans to 609-924-5400 temporarily close all its theaters across the nation, including 11 in New Jersey, following a $1.6 billion loss due to the shutdown. With permission to be only 25 percent occupied and many production companies going straight to streaming services, the situation had become dire. The six screens at Montgomery Cinemas on Route 206 have been blank since movie theaters were ordered to close seven months ago. Bob Piechota, manager and owner of the Montgomery and another theater in Hillsborough, said he isn’t sure if and when he will be able to reopen. “I don’t know how we stand at this point,” he said. “As it • CUSTOMIZED GIFTS • SERVICE & SALES ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS • stands now, there’s no prod• EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION GIFTS & PROGRAMS • SPECIAL COMMISSIONS • uct. The whole movie business in general is really bad right • MILESTONE & PRESENTATION GIFTS • SPORTS TOURNAMENTS & TROPHIES • now. Major movies keep getting pushed back. We don’t play commercial movies; we play a lot of the offbeat. And the art movies were having problems already, because so much was going to streaming. It was so much cheaper to just FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT DIANA WILF sell them off to Netflix or Hulu or whatever, especially the DWILF@HAMILTONJEWELERS.COM • 609.524.6497 • HAMILTONFORBUSINESS.COM small budget ones.”

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Survival for Theaters Continued from Preceding Page

Piechota said. “We find safe ways to get around it, using partitions, doing a lot of cleaning, and everything else. But still, people are reluctant to go. That, plus a lack of available product, makes it hard.” At Renew Theaters, Collier and colleagues have been crunching the numbers to see how much longer the Garden can stay afloat. “We will need more support,” he said. “We were given the green light to do reduced seating in the beginning of September, but we realized we’d have to enforce social distancing. Then there is the fact that there is lack of new content out there. And the [Princeton] University has gone virtual, so the students aren’t coming. So we can’t see a scenario to reopen in 2020. If we opened now, we’d stand to lose three to four times more than if we stay closed.” The Garden’s online programming during the pandemic, including its virtual “Film 101” series, has gotten a positive response. The Princeton theater, in fact, has had the most virtual activity of Renew’s four houses. “But it’s not at all anywhere that we could compare to what our inperson operation would be,” said Collier. A lot of the films the Garden would want to show have been pushed into 2021. “For the art market stuff, they are even fewer and further between,” Collier said. “A lot of the things that make the Garden what it is — classic films, discussions, educational programming — we really need a larger audience for. We want a packed house. We can’t, at the moment, find the financial balance that would allow us to open just yet.” Renew has owned the Garden for five years, and Collier said the company is still getting the word out to those who are not familiar with the theater’s approach. “People who love film found us right away. But because it was a for-profit operation for so long, some might still not be aware of what we do,” he said. “We’re still trying to make people aware that we’re in line with things like the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter Theatre.” The Montgomery remains in flux. “It’s a tough time for the art product in general. This is kind of putting the nail in the coffin. But we’re going to hang in until December and see what happens,” Piechota said. While the most endangered by the pandemic, the Garden has more public support than any of Renew’s other theaters. “The love for the Garden has been wonderful,” said Collier. “We’re paying close attention to what films are becoming available, what safety precautions will have to be taken, and guidance from the state. We’re also looking at our reserves and seeing how long we can make it,” said Collier. “As a nonprofit, we are stewards of the support and money our patrons have given us. We don’t want to rush into anything. We want to make sure our people are safe.” As for that 100th anniversary, it hasn’t been forgotten. “This is not the way we wanted to spend it, but we are looking forward to celebrating number 101 when we reopen,” said Collier. “We’re going to make it and are looking forward to celebrating when we can.” —Anne Levin

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“Would you consider getting an electric vehicle?”

(Asked Friday at “Electric EVening at the Princeton Shopping Center”) (Photos by Weronika A. Plohn)

“I purchased an electric car about six months ago. I like that it doesn’t use gas, is very reliable, and has a long range so I can travel to Boston without recharging. It is amazing to think that you can travel without the use of fossil fuel.” —Al Cavallo, Princeton

Karen: “I came to this event because I am considering purchasing an electric vehicle. It is so much better for the environment and for global warming, and it makes you feel better about being a human being.” Shane: “I like that the car can park on its own. It also looks great and is very roomy.” —Shane Mayer with Karen Zemble, both of Princeton

Yina: “I have been an owner of an electric vehicle since 2013. There are so many things that I like about my car — its design, efficiency, and performance. The car is very roomy; you can use it as a truck or even fit a mattress inside and go camping.” Richard: “I would consider getting an electric vehicle, but not right away. I have a nice little BMW convertible that I enjoy driving, but once I get tired of that I would get an electric car.” —Yina Moore with Richard Woodbridge, both of Princeton

Matthew: “I got an electric vehicle last November because I got tired of spending money on my old gasoline car that needed to be constantly fixed. Going electric seems like a smart option to me, and I feel strongly about not using gasoline.” Janak: “I don’t drive the average electric car. The car that I drive doesn’t have doors — less doors is directly proportional to having more fun. I also don’t have to buy gas and ruin the world.” —Matthew McInerney with Janak Tull, both of Princeton

Len: “Our family is thinking about purchasing an electric vehicle. We found out that it is more affordable than we thought it would be, especially with all the government givebacks. The environmental factor is also very important to us.” Jeremy: “Yes, we especially like the way Tesla is designed.” Bella: “I really loved the feel of the drive that the car has” —Bella, Jeremy, and Len Bozzone, Edison


continued from page one

positive over the weekend. All Upper School classes have been shifted to remote rather than in-person and all athletics practices and games have been postponed or canceled at least through this Wednesday, October 14, when the situation will be reevaluated. The PDS Lower and Middle Schools continue as planned, according to PDS Headmaster Paul Stellato, with the three divisions operating separately with minimal contact. T he infected students, who were all asymptomatic, have been quarantined for 14 days, and extensive contact tracing is being implemented for those who were in close contact with the individuals, as PDS works closely with the Princeton Health Department in accordance with New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) guidelines. Emphasizing the collaborative work of the department and the local schools, Princeton Health Department Press and Media Communications Director Fred Williams noted, “Each positive case triggers actions by the schools and health department that protect the remaining students and tend to the family of the students (or staff) who are infected.” In an October 13 email he continued, “Cooperation between the schools and the parents has been good and the cooperation between the schools and the Princeton Health Department continues to be solid. In our joint effort to remain ahead of the curve in protecting our school students, staff, and teachers, we ask that Princeton residents help us to help the public by reporting their positive tests directly to the Princeton Health Department as soon as they are notified. This is especially helpful in cases involving students and others who interact regularly with others in a public setting.” Princeton Health Officer Jeff Grosser commented on the increase in COVID cases in Princeton over the past month. “Unfortunately what we have noticed with how quickly COVID spreads, a few new cases can quickly lead to many more,” he said. “With schools reopening and shifting from outdoor to indoor gatherings due to the colder temperatures, we are likely to see more cases. What we need to do to reduce disease transmission is what we have been encouraging residents to do since March; continue to physically distance from others, wear a mask, especially indoors, don’t leave your home if you are sick and continue to get adequate rest and exercise, and eat healthy. A strong immune system is key to fending off respiratory illnesses in the fall and winter.” The Princeton Health Department reported on Monday eight active COVID-19 cases in Princeton, with seven new cases in the previous seven days, 19 new cases in the previous 14 days, and 206 individuals who have recovered with isolation complete. Princeton has reported a total of 244 confirmed cases with 30 deaths, 18 confirmed COVID-related and another

12 probably COVID-related. The Health Department reports that the burden of COVID-19 (prevalence of cases) is currently 214 percent higher in Mercer County than in the municipality of Princeton, with Mercer C ou nt y’s m or t a l it y r ate 74.75 percent higher than Princeton’s. Of the Princeton deaths, 87 percent were registered in long-term care facilities, and the longterm care facilities/nursing homes accounted for 25.9 percent of the total number of people who tested positive for COVID-19 in Princeton. The average age of people who died of COVID-19 in Princeton is 85.5 years. Grosser pointed out that executive orders from N.J. Gov. Phil Murphy in March and April restricting patient visitation, requiring face masks for all staff, and mandatory testing of staff and patients ever y three to seven days had brought about major turning points in the long-term care centers’ battle against COVID. “T he past few months these facilities have done a great job implementing outbreak control mechanisms which have drastically cut down on new cases,” Grosser said. “Princeton began weekly meetings with both Princeton Care Center and Acorn Glen administration, head doctors, and nurse leadership on Apr il 22. These calls are still occurring on a biweekly schedule. Through our calls we have identified equipment shortfalls, reviewed CDC and state guidance, and improved communication and lessons learned between facilities.” In a comparison of the prevalence rate of COVID-19 per 10,000 people in selected Mercer County towns, P r inceton ran ks s econd lowest at 82.56, with West Windsor at 80.99, Hopewell Township at 108.65, Lawrence at 140.71, Hamilton at 205.96, East Windsor at 216.99, and Trenton at 370.50. —Donald Gilpin

Suppers Program Plans Virtual “Eat-Along” Event

Registration is now open for A Seat at the Table, a virtual eat-along event in support of The Suppers Programs, the Princeton-based nonprofit organization. Scheduled for October 29 from 6 to 7:30 p.m., A Seat at the Table honors The Suppers Programs’ mission and ongoing commitment to sharing information about the importance of eating whole foods for health, as well as supporting people in finding their own best way of eating to fuel their body and brain. “At Suppers, we feel that good health should be accessible to all,” said Suppers Executive Director Marion Reinson. “It is our goal to bring as many people as possible to the table virtually — to cook, eat, and learn.” “We are thrilled to give everyone the opportunity to eat along with us and meet the passionate people behind the Suppers Programs’ mission,” said Fiona Capstick, Suppers Board president, RN, DE, and certified integrative health coach at Duke Integrative Medicine. “During these uncertain times, it may be difficult for people to be able to rely on

the same health resources and activities of support and connection. They may be looking at their health with a new perspective and searching for better ways of eating.” The event offers a chance to hear from local farmers, community partners, Suppers Board Medical Adviser Dr. Adi Benito, and people who have experienced the ups and downs of discovering what it means to ‘eat for their health’ through the Suppers Programs. In addition to a full program, guests will have the opportunity to prepare a delicious, healthy dish alongside local celebrity chef Kim Rizk, owner of Jammin’ Crepes. People may opt to use their own ingredients or pre-order Suppersfriendly meal kits from Jammin’ Crepes and Terra Momo. Donations from the event will bring vital funds and support to The Suppers Programs’ virtual programming, operations, and services. A complete menu including recipe details and links to pre-order your Box to Table meal will be available at thesuppersprograms.org. To become a sponsor for the event, contact Marion Reinson at marion@thesuppersprograms.org or call (609) 4685283.

Montano, past president of Cupid’s Chase 5K Announces to race day. the Trenton Board of EducaRegistration for runners Under Armour Sponsorship

Community Options has announced a multiyear sponsorship by Under Armour for the Cupid’s Chase National 5K Series. Under Armour will be a participating sponsor and will be recognized as the exclusive participant shirt provider. Cupid’s Chase raises funds and awareness for Community Options, a national nonprofit that provides housing and employment for people with disabilities. Cupid’s Chase will take place in 33 cities on February 13, 2021 and is expected to draw over 5,000 runners through a combination of in-person and virtual races. “Cupid’s Chase has grown to be one of the most vibrant 5K series in the country,” said Robert Stack, president and CEO of Community Options. “Under Armour’s commitment to supporting communities makes them a natural fit for Cupid’s Chase.” As the exclusive participant shirt for Cupid’s Chase, Under Armor will provide all runners participating in-person and virtually with a top of the market performance shirt. Additionally, Under Armour will activate select retail locations to serve as packet pick-up spots for Cupid’s Chase events prior

is open now at cupidschase. org for both in-person and virtual events. Cupid’s Chase will take place in Princeton and numerous other cities throughout the country. Individual runners can sign up for $30. In consideration of uncertainties related to COVID-19, pricing for Cupid’s Chase 5K will remain static to ensure that runners are not penalized for late registration.

Three New Members Join LALDEF Board of Trustees

Princeton University Sociology Professor Miguel A. Centeno, Meals on Wheels of Mercer County CEO Sasa Olessi Montano, and prize-winning journalist Alberto VourvouliasBush have joined the board of trustees of the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund (LALDEF) this month. Centeno, vice-dean of Princeton’s School of Public and International Affairs and founder of the Princeton University Preparatory Program to help train lower income students in local schools, stated that he is joining LALDEF “because I need to be in the fight … Justice and decency don’t come cheap, and LALDEF is fighting the good fight for all of us.”

tion, Rider University adjunct professor, and founder of Latinas Unidas, said, “It is truly an honor for me to serve on the LALDEF board and help in any way I can to further the aspirations and goals of immigrants who seek refuge and opportunity in our country.” Vourvoulias, who teaches in the Program for Bilingual Journalism of the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, expressed his hopes in joining LALDEF. “Even in the best of times, the issues and communities that LALDEF addresses are otherwise underserved, underfunded, underrepresented, and under-noticed,” he said. “In a moment of crisis, like now, LALDEF is a critical lifeline — physical, social, and civic. We all must do our part.” Financial advisor Isabel Zisk and CPA Jonathan Lear joined LALDEF’s board earlier this year. “LALDEF is truly grateful that these five distinguished leaders in the community have chosen to join our board of trustees,” said LALDEF Board Chair Patricia Fernandez-Kelly. “Each one brings experience, cultural understanding, and a passion for LALDEF’s mission that will serve us and the immigrant community for years to come.”

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Heated BOE Race continued from page one

Durbin, and a slate including Bill Hare, Paul Johnson, and Karen Lemon. The three highest vote-getters will win election to three-year terms on the Board. The BOE candidates were asked by Town Topics to answer, in 150 words, the question “Why should the people of Princeton vote for you? ” Their responses follow: Beth Behrend School Board service is a big job, with a steep learning curve, requiring careful listening and thoughtful oversight, with students at the center. With two years in board leadership, I offer a proven, on-the-job record of progress: stabilized finances (from deficit to surplus), improved facilities, concrete steps toward equity (devices, broad-band for all, free Pre-K), data-based planning for rising enrollments — and strong administrative hires. As a 20-year resident, active volunteer and parent, I know our schools and community, bringing professional expertise in law and governance. I’m ready to hit the ground running, to work collaboratively to build on the positive

progress we’ve made — ensuring that our top-ranked public schools continue providing all of our children with an effective, equitable, and cost-effective education. I am confident, together, we can meet upcoming challenges. I would be honored to have your support in continuing this important work on behalf of our children. Adam Bierman E xcellent Affordable Schools. Education is in my family’s blood. I teach at DCNJ at-risk students in Trenton. I grew up in Princeton and went through the entire Princeton Public School system. My mother taught in Princeton Regional Schools for over 35 years, and my father was BOE president in the late ’60s/ early ’70s. My background and experience ( PDMC, Transit Advisory Committee, CWA Shop steward/lobbyist) can help prioritize spending on what is most important for our students. My priorities include stopping wasteful spending, using existing facilities more efficiently, and promoting more transparency between Board members and the public. In my opinion, the BOE at times behaves like a private club, blindly supporting the ill-conceived and grandiose

vision of past superintendents, and stifling any critical analysis or oversight. If elected, I will ask the hard questions, listen, and challenge the political forces that have dominated the BOE for years. Hendricks Davis We are at a critical juncture in America and the world. Public education has a key role in shaping the future and my background and experience will help t he BOE and P r inceton community. I’ve worked in and effectively led several education organizations : Princeton Seminary, Blairs tow n C e nte r - P r i n c e ton University, Public Schools, and Advocates for Children of New Jersey. I have years of leadership, management, and development experience to bring to the BOE. I tackle issues by working with all stakeholders to understand root causes (systemic/structural barriers) and enlist support to define and implement good solutions. I’ve guided organizations through processes of planning for change and growth and I’ve hired and supervised excellent staff. I look forward to helping identify the best person for PPS super intendent and working with them. I’m a 37-year resident-taxpayer and support excellent public education for all students. Jean Durbin My background in social work, policy, and law, and my community service, will serve the Board of Education well. If elected, I will work to help set goals, implement policy, and provide guidance to the administration

to enable them to deliver the best education possible for all of our kids. I will help recruit an experienced superintendent with strong management skills and a demonstrated record of advancing equity, access, and inclusion. I will support efforts to ensure that our children are known and feel valued and welcomed, and that we implement measurable steps to close the achievement and opportunity gaps. I will strive to keep costs down and support operational efficiencies as well as find new revenue streams. I will work to nurture our community’s support of and faith in our schools. Public education matters. Raising good citizens matters. I’d like my work on the Board to be for the betterment of our schools and community. Bill Hare I have previously served on the Board, and that will allow me to hit the ground running, with no learning curve. As a former chair of the Finance Committee, I know where to look for savings and how to reduce wasteful spending. As school taxes now account for 49 percent of our tax bills, creative thinking is needed to reduce spending without affecting the quality of instruction or reducing staff. Along with Paul Johnson and Karen Lemon, I will be able to work collaboratively with all board members to achieve the goals of affordability and educational excellence for all children. I ask for your vote and commit to be transparent and work in the best interests of all Princeton Public

School students. Paul Johnson I will never compromise my moral values and code, and play politics when it comes to our children and our community. I will uphold the values of this community and work tirelessly to ensure each child/family is served. I won’t hide behind uncertainties or shortcomings but rather implement necessary change to make our schools more equitable and affordable. I will spearhead the quest for diversity, affordability, and trust while continuing conversations with all our community members. I will bring a refreshing and unaccounted viewpoint to the Board. I am a proven leader with a strong voice and new ideas which will lead our school district into the future. I will work in conjunction with all Board members to ensure we continue to press forward never allowing for complacency of regression. I will continue to further the narrative without compromise until all our goals are met. Karen Lemon Paul Johnson, Bill Hare, and I have listened to the communit y and teachers and the opportunities they have shared to make Princeton Public Schools better. I do not believe that consistency and complacency of the BOE will address the issues of diversity, affordability, and trust the community has identified. Collaborative leadership and a commitment to listening, responsiveness, and transparency will move the district forward. My experience as a leader at AT&T and serving

on other boards will help guide me in creating a collaborative team to work together for students, parents, teachers, and community. I will be accountable to all voters. The Board of Education is not simply an oversight role. Board members must provide the leadership necessary to address systemic and pressing issues. Please vote for Johnson-LemonHare to address school affordability and put money back into the classroom to support all students. We can and must do better. Michele Tuck-Ponder I should be re-elected to the Board of Education because, for over 25 years, I have demonstrated thoughtful, responsive, effective, and caring leadership for the benefit of our town. From serving as a member of the Board of Education, in my roles as mayor and a Township Committee member, as commissioner on the Housing Authority of Princeton, and in volunteer board service including Morven Museum and Garden and Princeton United Methodist Church, I have been honored to contribute to my community in a myriad of ways. This service has provided me with a broad and inclusive perspective on the diverse needs of Princeton residents. If elected, I will continue to serve with integrity and honesty, with the goal of ensuring equity and excellence for all our children at the forefront of my decision-making, balanced with careful stewardship of tax dollars. —Donald Gilpin


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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 14, 2020 • 10

Council Puts Down Framework For New Human Services Hire

At its v ir tual meeting Monday night, October 12, Princeton Council voted to introduce an ordinance that would authorize the hiring of an outreach coordinator for the town’s Human Services Department. A public hearing on the issue will be held October 26. Several members of the community including Maria Fuega, Fern Spruill, Larry Spruill, and Tom Parker commented in favor of the ordinance, which creates a framework for the new position. Earlier in the day, Mayor Liz Lempert said the issue is one that Council has been talking about for a while. “This is one of our smallest departments, but it serves a critical function,” she said. “We’ve been leaning on them and counting on them during this [pandemic] crisis.” The full-time position is for someone who can help with the growing volume of cases handled by the department. Councilwoman Leticia Fraga said that even before the pandemic, Human Services was over-stressed. “Post-pandemic, there were many community partners coming together to meet the needs,” she said. “But it became evident that while we had all of these great resources, not everybody was aware of them. So all of those who needed them weren’t able to access them. We need another staff person to help work with the director and identify where those gaps are, and ensure we are doing a good job of getting whatever resources are available to everybody in

the community who needs them.” Council also voted in favor of introducing an ordinance providing for various capital improvements. The ordinance appropriates $1.7 million, and authorizes the issuance of $1.6 million in bonds or notes to finance part of the costs. This is the second part of an initial ordinance of $6 million that was approved last June for major projects that were either grant-funded or absolutely critical to move through, said Municipal Administrator Marc Dashield. “This second part is for items we need to get done this year,” he said, mentioning lights and sirens for police vehicles, replacement of a small trash truck, replacement of a street sweeper, and replacing two dump trucks for snow removal. Money is also needed to replace a part of the roof at Witherspoon Hall, for funds associated with the Safe Routes to School program, and remediation of the River Road Sewer Operating Site. Council approved a resolution for an amount not to exceed $19,800 hiring McMahon Associates for a Witherspoon Street Traffic Impact Study. The consultants will analyze the options for the road, which is currently one way between Nassau and Spring streets. The road can remain as it is, go back to two-way traffic, or be fully closed at certain times of day. “They will use available big data representing the traffic that was in operation prior to COVID, rather than using

COVID traffic volumes as a gauge for what to expect once life returns to the new normal,” said Municipal Engineer Deanna Stockton. “The study will take about six or seven weeks for a draft recommendation, which we’ll bring back to Council to consider.” Chief Financial Officer Sandy Webb gave a report on the state of budget revenue and expenditures, which have been impacted by the pandemic. The town’s sizable hit in parking revenues has been a major concern. Webb’s report covered the time period ending September 30. “My intent isn’t to say let’s make some hard decisions right now,” she said. “I hope things rebound, so some of what I’m reporting could change. We’ll continue to monitor through the end of the year.” In addition to parking, revenues for hunting, fishing, pool, and marriage licenses are down. Fees and permits are also below the levels in a normal year, though they could rise by the end of the year, Webb said. Municipal court revenues have dropped, but have begun to rebound. Sewer revenues are half of what was anticipated, but should go up because two revenues for two quarters will be collected next month. Parking in the municipal garage went from about $140,000 last January and February to a few months where only $2,000 was collected. “We got clobbered,” said Webb. “With street meters, we looked at a high of $135,000 in January and February for credit cards

down to $8,000 in April. For coins, for one month we went down to zero. So right across the board, we’re seeing significant reductions. The bottom line is that we’re looking at a $1.8 million shortfall.” Despite those numbers, the town is in a better position than a lot of other communities, she said. And some significant savings will be realized for municipal positions that haven’t been filled. “This is a work in progress,” Webb concluded. “We will keep an eye on this and update Council so we’re prepared going into the next budget year.” Council’s next meeting is Monday, October 19 at 7 p.m. The focus will be on transportation issues. —Anne Levin

Young Community Members Are Doing Their Part

A group of Princeton public school students have been active in local environmental causes, and are planning to keep the work going as the academic year begins. Isabel Tellez, currently a ninth grader at Princeton High School, wrote about the group’s activities in a recent press release. “Right now we would like to remind our peers that when we go back to school in October, we must remember to walk, bike or take the bus with masks,” she wrote. “Biking and walking are great ways to socially distance while getting to school.” Among the initiatives of the group was trash clean ups. “While driving down Washington Road to US 1, we got inspiration to do trash clean-ups around Princeton,” Isabel wrote. “Once we saw plastic bags and bottles along the fields, we knew that we

MAKING A DIFFERENCE: Members of the Middle School Green Team have worked hard to help keep the air clean and lower carbon footprints. had to take action. This waste could end up consumed by local wildlife, clog drains or pollute bodies of water. Our green team takes pride in the town that we live in and want to see it clean.” The group has also tackled lunch waste sorting education. “We worked on creating student awareness by making all-school announcements and putting up new signs in the cafeteria to educate students on how to properly sort their lunch waste,” Isabel wrote. “Sorting properly is always a challenge and it takes a lot of training, repetition, and supervision. We were fortunate to have parent support during lunch breaks and at special events. Custodians are also a big part of the effort because they provide the appropriate bins and they are in charge of the final disposal.” Transportation initiatives have also been on the group’s agenda. “Around January, we decided to focus on topics related to transportation, since this sector is the second largest contributor of greenhouse gas emissions in our town,

The Pennington School

according to Princeton’s 2018 greenhouse gas inventory,” Isabel wrote. “We ended up designing our own posters and launching an anti-idling campaign. We also hosted Walking Wednesdays, an initiative that encouraged students to make wise decisions on how to get to school. We promoted carpooling, biking, walking, or riding the bus. Sakrid Coffee sponsored Walking Wednesdays by providing hot cocoa on those special winter days.” Isabel added that it has been challenging to gather during the pandemic. “But some of us managed to go on an end of year trash clean up from PUMS to Palmer Square,” she wrote. “A few of us helped the Arts Council paint and decorate the structures that separate the new eating spaces along Witherspoon strEAT.” She concluded, “All of this work would have not been possible without the support of our principal Mr. Burr, the staff and PTO at PUMS, and Sustainable Princeton’s Jenny Ludmer who provided some of the ideas for us to carry out.”

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Family and Friends Pay Tribute To the Late Dr. Stephanie Chorney To her family, friends, and many colleagues on countless community projects, Stephanie Chorney was a born nurturer whose devotion to helping others defined her life. A pediatrician who worked at Princeton Medicine Princeton Health until retiring five years ago, Chorney died of breast cancer on September 29 at the age of 50. Admiration for her was such that Princeton Public Schools and the municipality issued a special proclamation in her honor, naming May 26, 2020 “Dr. Stephanie Chorney Day.” A list of causes to which she devoted time and energy, even when she was sick, includes the Princeton Green Schools Coalition, the Princeton Environmental Commission, Not in Our Town, the Arts

Council of Princeton, Corner House, the Breast Cancer Research Center, Arm in Arm, and numerous others. “I’m a little prejudiced, but she was a very, very caring person,” said Chorney’s father, Don Chorney. “She was involved, relentlessly, for what she believed in — healthy foods in the local schools, racial justice, the environment. While she was sick, she continued to pursue these things. She helped her neighbors and did it very gladly. She was a beautiful person inside and out, with a heart of gold.” Chorney met her husband Orlando Fuquen at an offcampus barbecue at Rutgers University in 1987. They were married for 25 years. Their son, Julian, was born in 2004.

“I’ve heard people describe her as ‘inspirational, car ing, passionate,’ and many other adjectives,” he wrote in an email. “To me, those qualities stem from her love for life, people (family, friends, community), and our planet.” Fuquen describes Chorney as a great listener with a creative side, known for her handmade jewelry and personalized greeting cards for many occasions — made, not surprisingly, out of recycled or reclaimed materials she would find and save. Alison Politziner worked on many political issues and food drives with Chorney, becoming a close friend in the process. “She just breathed beauty into everything she did,” Politziner said. “She and her son, Julian, were a

A LOSS TO SO MANY: Admired in the community as a friend and activist, Stephanie Chorney was honored a few months ago with a special celebration outside her home.

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really positive presence in front of McCaffrey’s, or at the West Windsor Farmers Market, working on different causes. She was someone who put her values into effect. She didn’t question how much time she spent with this or that. She was very generous with her time, and had good insight into things as well. She was always happy to jump in and get involved, even at times when she wasn’t feeling well.” Princeton Councilwoman Mia Sacks and Chor ney were longtime friends. The two co-chaired the Princeton Green Schools Coalition and worked to introduce composting into the schools, improve recycling, and change the food service provider to a healthier option. “Stephanie was a tireless advocate for the health of our children and our planet, and worked daily to ensure that our schools understood their central role in promoting both,” Sacks wrote. “She believed that our children’s health is one of the most important investments a community can make.” Speak ing about Chorney, Sacks said that even when she was sick, she was still taking care of everybody else. “She was helping the people in her life to get through her illness so they wouldn’t be too traumatized,” Sacks said. “She sent a letter to people saying very gently that she was switching to hospice, and what would be most helpful to her would be a card or letter about things they were working on. She scripted out a way for people to say goodbye.”

A not her f r iend, B ainy Suri, described Chorney as “a very caring, collaborative person who was bold with her leadership and had a lot of convictions. She took action. She was always very true to her beliefs of what was right. That was her only agenda.” Mayor Liz Lempert said in an email, “Losing Stephanie at such a young age is an unbelievably painful blow. She was a fierce environmental advocate in the schools and in the wider community, serving for a time on the Princeton Environmental Commission, and she will be deeply missed by so many. Our hearts go out to her family and loved ones.” Sacks regards her late friend as “my soul sister. At her memorial, I said she was the soul sister I had been looking for my whole life and I was happy to have her, even for a short time.” Chorney and Fuquen established a legacy foundation under her name. It can be accessed at stephaniechorney.org. “Ever yone that knew her will miss her,” Fuquen wrote. “She was someone who inspired and healed many, physically and emotionally. Those who did not know her will feel the impact she left through her philanthropic work and teachings. Before she died, she reflected on her life. She said, ‘Actually, I am in control of each day and I’m choosing to live, love, and help others as much as I can.’ That is a simple lesson all of us can take away and look to fulfill. She set the example.” —Anne Levin

Energy Assistance Available To Eligible Mercer Residents

Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes is reminding residents that assistance is available for energy costs for those who qualify is underway, but that applicants must adhere to certain COVID-19 restrictions. The County’s Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), offered in coordination with the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, is designed to help low-income families and individuals meet home heating and medically necessary cooling costs. This year, the LIHEAP application period is October 1, 2020, to July 31, 2021. Mercer County will continue accepting applications for the Universal Service Fund (USF) Program throughout the year. Residents who pay their own heating costs, and meet the income guidelines, may be eligible to receive financial assistance with their winter heating bill. Residents with medical conditions also may be eligible to receive cooling assistance. An eligibility chart can be found on the website mercercounty.gov. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the public may visit the Mercer County Office of Housing and Community Development, located at 640 South Broad Street, Trenton, by appointment only. If an in-person visit is necessary, clients can call (609) 3370933 or email heatingappt@ mercercounty.org to schedule an appointment. The County will continue to accept applications by regular mail, fax and email until July 31, 2021. Applications, forms and information are available at mercer county.gov.

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continued from page one

and online at the municipal website at princetonnj.gov. Serieyssol added that the boulevards are still a work in progress, with more signs and pavement mark ings coming soon to help guide cyclists. She noted that getting children to school and home safely has been a priority, with PBAC working in partnership with the Greater Mercer Transportation Management Association and with parents and school officials on the Safe Routes to Schools program. In the age of COVID, bicycles could be an important alternative to school buses, she suggested. “The school district has been getting feedback from parents about whether they will use the school bus system,” she said. “With COVID restrictions buses are reducing the number of passengers they can transport, and, if not a bus the kids will either be driven or walk or bike. To reduce the amount of traffic and backup that might happen with individual families driving kids to school, these bike routes are one of the solutions that families are looking at.” Freda described biking as “a great alternative, especially if you’re concerned with putting your child on the bus. You’re outside in the fresh air. It’s healthy. It’s a great idea.” S er ieyssol emphasized educational as well as health benefits. “If you’re active for 15 or 20 minutes walking or biking or maybe even on your scooter, your brain is actually functioning at a higher capacity,” she said. “You expend energy, and when you arrive at school you’ll be ready to sit down and learn. You’ll be more efficient.” She recommended that parents help their children plan their trips to school and elsewhere, riding with them the first time to ensure safety and awareness of traffic. In commenting earlier this year on the Safe Routes to Schools program, Princeton Council President David Cohen noted, “The kids love the independence of it. They love the environmentalism of it. This generation gets it.” In reflecting on possible long-term effects of the pandemic, Cohen added, “I hope people who have been getting out on their bicycles

will realize that they not only feel better but enjoy getting around that way. I hope this will accelerate a trend that has already been happening.” On her newly pr inted Princeton Bicycle Map, Serieyssol charted for Facebook Live watchers her loop of about 10 miles past most of the schools and around town. The route went out Rollingmead and Littlebrook, crossing Route 27 with great caution to connect with the beginning of Prospect Street, leading all the way back to Washington Road and Princeton University. Cyclists find their own way through the University campus — no bike boulevards there — to College Road near McCarter Theatre, a “bike and pedestrian road,” where there is a lane for traffic and wider avenues for bikes and pedestrians, then past the graduate college to Springdale, Battle Road, Olden Lane, through Marquand Park to cross Stockton Street and take an off-street trail down to Edgerstoune, past the Hun School on a trail through to Rosedale Road and Johnson Park School, then on what’s known as the Johnson Trolley Trail back to Elm Road, down Mountain Avenue, across Bayard Lane to Community Park, then back to the area of the middle school, the high school, and the center of town. “We think this map and these trails will be very useful to a lot of people,” said Serieyssol, pointing out that many other routes are available with connections to the Lawrence-Hopewell Trail, the canal path, West Windsor routes, and more. The approach of cooler days did not discourage Freda. “You can pretty much do biking year round here,” he said. “We don’t have winters the way we used to. There are plenty of chilly days, but not snow the way we used to, and once you get on your bike on cold days you get warmed up quickly. It’s not a big deal.” At a special Princeton Council meeting on transportation on October 19 at 7 p.m., the PBAC will make a presentation on Vision Zero, a policy that prioritizes the safety of all road users. At his next Facebook Live session at 2 p.m. on October 22, Freda will talk with recently retired Princeton Police Chief Nick Sutter. —Donald Gilpin

YMCA Announces Lessons dmoorehead@princetonym- the first session. Students On October 8, at 10:56 In Fencing and Swimming ca.org or by calling (609) can register for the class a.m., it was reported that

T he Pr inceton Fam ily YMCA is offering lessons for two sports that are ideal for social distancing: fencing and swimming. A s t h e w e at h e r g e t s colder and outdoor activities become less tenable, families will be looking for opportunities to keep their children active while remaining indoors. Yet, the ongoing COVID -19 pandemic makes indoor activities difficult. According to Chuck Hurley, a fencing instructor who has taught at the Princeton Family YMCA for about two decades, the three-foot-long swords used in fencing make the sport ideal for following the distancing guidelines touted by health officials. “This is a sport where, if it’s done properly, you’re not going to be much closer than 6 feet to your opponent,” Hurley said. “You don’t have to get right up in your opponent’s face – you’re almost operating within a social distancing sphere to accomplish this sport.” Hurley is of fer ing in troductory classes in the gym at the Princeton Family Y MCA’s facilities on Paul Robeson Place. The remaining class is Saturday, October 17, from 121:30 p.m. Students can lear n about the histor y of the sport, the different weapons used, equipment that will be required, and safety protocols that will be followed. After a registration period, the fencing program will then start on Tuesday, December 1. Fencing already requires a significant amount of safety equipment, including long pants, a jacket, a mask, and gloves. This season, Hurley says students will also be required to wear face masks under their fencing masks. “We’ll do everything as safely as possible because I don’t want to see anybody get sick,” he said. Interested students aged 10 and older should attend the introductory session, where more information about registration for the pro g r a m w i l l b e av a i l able. Questions regarding the fencing program can be directed to Derek Moorehead, sports, camp, a n d you t h d i r e c tor, at

497-9622, ext. 229. In addition to the fencing program, the Pr inceton Family YMCA is offering a variety of swim classes and other programs in its pool, which has been open to members for the past month. Group lessons (no more t han four s t udents p er group) recently began for kids ages 3-13, and private lessons will be available for students older than 5 years old. Students will be required to wear masks upon entering and exiting the pool area but will not wear masks inside the pool as there are potential drowning risks associated with wearing a mask while swimming. Instructors will wear a transparent face shield during their lessons. Any equipment used will be rotated out so there is no sharing, and all items will be sanitized after lessons. A complete safety FAQ can be found at princetonymca. org. T he Pr inceton Fam ily YMCA is also offering family swim nights every Friday night at either 5:30-6:30 p.m. or 6 :30 -7:30 p.m. Families can swim together in pods, playing games and working on swimming skills, during this time. Reservations can be made through the online reservation system. Finally, the Princeton Family YMCA’s Fall Lifeguard class is open and accepting new candidates. The classes will take place October 23, 24, and 25, and will include an online component that must be completed before

t hrough ht t ps : //t iny url. com/y5cvs2m4. Questions regarding the programs in the pool can be directed to Gary Burke, director of aquatics, at gar y @ princetonymca.org or by calling (609) 497-9622, ext. 223. “We know that being active is critical to a healthy body and mind,” said Princeton Family YMCA CEO Kate Bech. “More than ever, young people need opportunities to be physically active and to master new skills, which helps them grow in confidence too. We believe that safe programs such as these are ideally suited for children and youth during this difficult time.”

Police Blotter On October 12, at 11:54 a.m., a resident of Horner Lane reported that a male suspect was caught on surveillance footage stealing a political sign from the front lawn. On October 9, at 4:48 p.m., a woman repor ted that her wallet, which was left at a store in the Princeton Shopping Center, was s tolen. T he wallet con tained her ID, credit cards, and $150 in cash. A total of $3,870.04 in fraudulent charges were made before the credit cards were canceled. On October 9, at 1:19 p.m., it was reported that a female suspect entered a store on Palmer Square and stole a pair of sunglasses valued at $479.99.

13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2020

Bike Boulevards

two female suspects, both in their mid- to late-20s, stole two bottles of liquor each at a store on State Road and fled. The liquor was valued at $298.51. On October 6, at 7:23 a.m., a resident of Russell Road reported that, overnight on October 5, someone stole their 2017 BMW from the driveway. A wallet with ID, credit cards, and cash was in the vehicle. On October 4, at 12:44 a.m., a 20-year-old male from Plainsboro was charged with criminal mischief and disorderly conduct, subsequent to a 911 call reporting a disorderly group on Nassau Street. On October 2, at 12:42 p.m., a resident of Spruce Circle reported that someone posing as a government official attempted to extort money from them with an arrest warrant scam. The resident provided personal information before realizing it was a scam, but no monetary loss was suffered. On October 1, at 4:21 p.m., a resident of Gordon Way reported that someone applied for unemployment benefits using their information. Money was refunded to the state of New Jersey via an issued debit card before any monetary loss was suffered. O n S epte mb er 28, at 10:44 a.m., a resident of Green Street reported that someone applied for unemploy ment b enef it s of $18,538 using their personal information. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

Going Beyond: Climate Action and Economic Sustainability

Wednesday, October 21, 2020 | 7:00 - 8:30 PM Webinar: bit.ly/CAPeconomy How can we rebuild a local economy that works for everybody and advances Princeton’s climate action goals? Join us on October 21st to hear from our panelists about this critical issue. This program is the first of four in Sustainable Princeton's 2020-21 Great Ideas series that explores the additional benefits we get from taking action to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions and prepare for climate change. Thank you to our generous sponsor NRG Energy, Inc. and our partner Princeton Public Library.

BIKE BOOM: The pandemic has seen a dramatic increase in bicycling among all age groups in Princeton. Mark Freda, Democratic candidate for mayor, and Lisa Serieyssol, chair of the Princeton Bicycle Advisory Committee, discussed the current status of Princeton Bike Boulevards and other cycling matters in a Facebook Live event last Thursday. (Photo by Laurie Harmon)

sustainableprinceton.org

This event is free and open to the public.


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TIGER LILY AND DANDELION: The costumes are inventive, and the cars will be decorated as well at D&R Greenway’s Masquerade Parade 2020, to be held on Saturday, October 31.

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D&R Greenway’s response to the COVID-19 situation is to treat this crisis as an opportunity to engage the community on its preserves in new ways. This year, the traditional Masquerade Ball is being transformed into Masquerade Parade 2020. The drive-through experience, a safe alternative to trick-or-treating, will take place in daylight from 1-6 p.m. on Halloween afternoon, Saturday, October 31. The rain date is Sunday, November 1. In this unusual parade, themed “floats” will be positioned along the farm road on St. Michaels Farm Preserve, while decorated cars move past. Passengers are encouraged to create lively signs to the event theme of “I Love Land Because...” In paradegoer signs and on banners displayed with each float, originality and humor are particularly encouraged. A sign template will be available at drgreenway.org to enable completion of the theme phrase, “I love land because...” Photographers will capture signs and decorated cars, and the unique floats, in a photographic exhibit that will be available on D&R Greenway’s website after the parade, enabling free downloads. A u t h o r /a r t i s t P a t r i c k McDonnell, creator of the MUTTS comic strip, is creating a welcome to surprise paradegoers along the parade route. Sponsorships are available. Paradegoers are asked to pre-register in 15-minute time-slots to allow as many cars as possible to “proceed” in the parade at $25 per car, prepaid by credit card at drgreenway. org by October 26 or until the 300-car limit is attained.

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Registrations are first come, first served. Tax deductible donat ions suppor t D & R Greenway’s land preservation and stewardship mission. Cars are invited to wear “costumes.” Trick-or-treating will be in the form of themed goody bags filled with nature-oriented surprises. Instead of children at the door, families will cruise past floats. Social distancing will remain the norm, as passengers remain in cars. Vehicles will line up in the Hopewell Elementary School parking lot and enter St. Michaels Farm Preserve at the new Princeton Avenue entrance closest to town (Hopewell), circling past themed floats, and exiting from the original preserve parking lot on Princeton Avenue. Groups presenting parade floats include the Girl Scouts of America, Friends for the Abbott Marshlands, Fyrefly Yoga, and Princeton University Concerts. The float representing the town of Hopewell is being created by the Hopewell Police with assistance from the fire company. The Garden Club of Princeton will be stationed at the newly seeded Marchand Meadows, honoring former Princeton Mayor Phyllis Marchand and located in the footprint of the former St. Michaels Orphanage that stood there for a century. Mural artist Marlon Davila is working with high school youth from the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund’s FUTURO program, responsible for D&R Greenway’s new Delaware River Mural on Bordentown Beach. The students will present cultural interpretations about the meaning of land.

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BOE Incumbents Behrend and Tuck-Ponder are Committed to Meeting the Needs of All Students

To the Editor: As citizen volunteers elected to the Board of Education, it has been an honor to represent you in ensuring that our children receive an effective and equitable education, reflective of our community’s values. We feel obliged, however, as the incumbents in a competitive election, to address misinformation about the Board being circulated in the community. We write here as private citizens, not as a slate, and not on behalf of the Board. For the most objective source of information on candidate positions, visit the League of Women Voters website at VOTE411.org. In addition, we note: No financial information was “withheld” when the 2020-21 budget was approved on May 5. At the public hearing, the Board discussed (i) how COVID-related savings/costs were not yet known, (ii) the potential for future significant reductions in state aid, and (iii) the necessity of submitting a budget by the May 8 statutory deadline, based on the best available information at the time. Once the budget was submitted, the Board was unable to “revise” tax levies. Our Board is more “transparent” than most, with frequent public meetings (recorded and available on the district website), open committee meetings, and community forums on budget, planning, and enrollment. All Board members are encouraged to share their perspectives and most often do. To learn more about the Board’s work, please visit princetonk12.org/board. There is no “gag order” on Board member communication. Members are free to speak at Board meetings and as private citizens elsewhere, subject to N.J.S.A. 18A, which requires all speech to be accurate and not contain confidential information or compromise the Board. The Board has no plans to purchase the Westminster Choir College. The Board has been clear that its top priority in dealing with rising enrollments is to maximize the use of existing facilities and to carefully evaluate the potential of all district properties. The decision to purchase district-owned devices for every student is more cost-effective, equitable, and pedagogicallysound than allowing some students to use personal devices. Devices were purchased with five-year lease-financing at no additional cost to taxpayers. Private devices posed practical and cost issues with tech support, access to licensed software, and privacy — and cannot be used for standardized testing. Cheaper devices were considered but did not

Encouraging Residents to Weigh In on Proposed Changes at Princeton Ridge

To the Editor: “How many Princetonians does it take to change a light bulb? Three. One to change the bulb and two to wax philosophically about how great the old one was.” This was a joke told to us when we first moved to Princeton nine years ago. We’ve come to realize this sentiment is based on the careful and thoughtful consideration made to proposed changes in and about town. We appreciate Princeton’s Planning Board and their commitment to evaluate all regional planning, ensuring, “that all permitted development is designed so as to be as harmonious as possible with the surrounding neighborhood.” Residents of the Princeton Ridge have long appreciated the balance of nature, the unique geography and geology. Upton Sinclair wrote The Jungle here. This area has been a focus of the NJ Department of Environmental Protection and targeted in the Community Master Plan: “The preservation and protection of the natural environment must be an integral part of all plans and designs for improvements and changes in land use. Examples include rezoning of the Princeton Ridge.” This is why our community was rocked when we were informed of the proposed changes at the apex of the Ridge in a land-lease agreement between Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart and Princeton Soccer Academy. In the agreement, the school will remove 4.2 acres of grass, including 46 mature trees and replace it with nonpermeable artificial turf. PSA is looking to lease this complex and conduct practices, games, and tournaments, year-round, every day and every night until 9:30 p.m. Eleven diesel operated light towers are included in the proposal; loudly rumbling, belching smoke, and illuminating the

night sky. Stormwater runoff is certain to cascade down the Ridge into adjacent properties and disturb environmentally sensitive lands. No evaluation of toxic runoff has been conducted to assess the impact to our wetlands and waterways. The Princeton Environmental Commission states this plastic surface creates “an uninhabitable environment … that has far too many negative impacts on the environment, the PEC recommends the variance be denied.” What the residents cannot understand is the rational for such draconian measures in such a fragile ecosystem in the middle of a quiet, peaceful residential neighborhood. With no shortage of soccer fields in Princeton, why would we allow an out-of-town, non-tax-paying organization upend our quality of life with blinding lights and diesel generators running every night at the expense of Princeton residents? Why would we consider disturbing a delicate conservation zone with many threatened and endangered species who live and migrate on the Ridge? The Planning Board is holding a hearing this Thursday, October 15 via Zoom. We encourage Princeton residents to weigh in on this egregious overreach that negatively impacts the quality of life of Princeton residents. Instructions for how to access the meeting are posted on the home page of Princeton’s website and included here: https://princeton.zoom.us/j/92317363217. Webinar ID: 923 1736 3217. You voice is critical. Please join us Thursday at 7:30 p.m. MENAPACE, BIBRO, BANNETT, AND CHAN FAMILIES Heather Lane

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 14, 2020

Mailbox

Letters do not necessarily reflect the views of Town Topics Email letters to: editor@towntopics.com or mail to: Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528

match Apple in functionality, support, or resale value. This initiative provides high-quality remote learning to all students and advances equity by leveling the technology playing field. The Board implemented construction of the voter-approved PHS field restroom facility after extensive deliberation, consideration of alternate designs, and public input. The facility is handicapped-accessible, supports our commitment to gender equity, includes secure, all-season storage, and a small space for fundraising through concessions — and was approved by voters as the top athletic priority in the 2018 referendum. The Board’s essential role is student-centered. We are committed to focusing our board service on better meeting the needs of all of our students, now and into the future. BETH BEHREND Riverside Drive MICHELE TUCK-PONDER Laurel Circle

Thanking Community, Partners, Sponsors For Supporting Electric Vehicle Event

To the Editor: We want to express our sincere thanks to the Princeton Shopping Center and NRG Energy Inc. for their partnership in putting on a wonderful “Electric EVening at the Princeton Shopping Center,” an Electric Vehicle and E-bike Ride and Drive Event, last Friday evening. We were delighted that nearly 300 community members came out in masks to learn about the electric vehicle alternatives that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions. We also want to thank our many supporting collaborators without whom this event would not have been possible, including New Jersey Coalition of Automotive Retailers, Central Jersey Electric Auto Association, Apex Solar, Bryan Electric Co., the Princeton Health Department, Sourland Cycles, Princeton Bicycle Advisory Committee, Princeton Audi, Davis Hyundai, Scott Harvey Kia, and the Lawrence Township-Princeton Tesla. Addressing climate change requires us all to act. At Sustainable Princeton, we are sincerely grateful for the support of these partners to help empower community members with the knowledge of how to reduce our collective impact on the planet. SUSTAINABLE PRINCETON Continued on Page 18

"The culture you have created at Princeton Academy is tremendous. It has been everything we could have hoped for in a school. I can see the values and character that you aim to instill in the boys. We love it. Bravo!" - Paul T., PASH parent

Princeton Academy is the best school for boys (K-Grade 8) in Princeton, NJ! Join us for two exciting virtual events this October.

Virtual Open House Oct. 20 at 6:30 pm . Virtual Halloween Music Class Oct. 24 at 10:30 am REGISTER today at princetonacademy.org!


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 14, 2020 • 16

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Mailbox Continued from Page 15

Candidate Durbin Has Vision to Make Community a Better Place For Everyone

To the Editor: We are writing a letter of support to endorse Jean Durbin for election to the Princeton Board of Education. My husband and I have only been in Princeton for six years, and we don’t have children yet, but we understand the importance of this race. Good schools translate to good communities, and a School Board member has a direct role in shaping the future of what Princeton Public Schools and the municipality will look like. We strongly believe Jean Durbin has the vision to make our community a better place for everyone. As members of the LGBTQ+ community, we look for someone that can speak on our behalf and look at issues through the lens of our community. I [Nick] see it first-hand as a fellow commissioner on Princeton’s Civil Rights Commission. I trust that if Jean has any questions or concerns on policy issues pertaining to LGBTQ+ youth, she will seek input from community members like ourselves. As community volunteers, we know that Jean is wellprepared for the role. Jean is the type of person that you wish would run for office, and we were elated when we heard the announcement. We first met Jean when she was president of the Princeton Community Democratic Organization (PCDO), and have since volunteered alongside her for campaigns for local representatives. Simply put, Jean shows up when help is needed, and this School Board race is a great example of her lending a hand to the community. We believe that Jean can unite the Board and make real progress on matters of equity, responsibility, and infrastructure. From the top of the ballot to the bottom, every choice is significant and should be treated with equal consideration. Local politics matter, and this is one of many important choices that will be on the ballot this November. I hope that voters in Princeton, regardless of their time spent here or connection to the Public Schools, listen to our endorsement for Jean Durbin. NICK DI DOMIZIO AND ROBERT PAGELS Nassau Street

Behrend, Tuck-Ponder Have Proven Record of Working With Community Partners to Support Students

To the Editor: This year, the School Board will face essential decisions for the future direction of our schools, most importantly the selection of our next superintendent. We are writing to support the re-election of Board President Beth Behrend and Vice President Michele Tuck-Ponder. Both have a proven record of working collaboratively with community partners to support our students, promoting equity while responsibly managing the finances of the district. The Board, under Beth and Michele’s leadership, has gone beyond rhetoric to implement programs that address equity. It has been proven that early intervention makes a difference in educational outcomes. Through partnership with the YWCA and grants from both the Burke Foundation and the state, free pre-K was expanded by 75 additional students with dual Spanish/English instruction. Remote learning was a challenge to many of our students who did not have home computers. Through the 1:1 Technology Initiative, funds were strategically redeployed from the existing district technology budget to ensure that all students have equal access to school programming in the pandemic. An anonymous grant of $250,000 funded the necessary broadband and hotspots necessary to deliver instruction. Through a successful partnership with SHUPP (Send Hunger Packing Princeton) and Princeton University, the Princeton Public Schools’ food service and transportation staff were able to provide three meals a day and fresh staples to 500 students and their families. Food boxes were delivered by staffed school buses, each week since the beginning of remote learning in March. This program

Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

continued throughout the summer as well as school year. School Boards are non-partisan overseers of the district. The past few months have brought never before seen challenges to our board. Beth and Michele have been able to lead with an approach of community collaboration and fiscal responsibility with an ever present eye on the wellbeing of all of our students. MOLLY CHREIN Ridgeview Road MARTHA LAND Westcott Road JULIE RAMIREZ Stone Cliff Road ROSS WISHNICK Edgerstoune Road

Noting That Something Must Be Done About Overhead Power, Cable Lines

To the Editor: Harrison Street becomes more unsightly week by week as more and more overhead power supply lines and telecom cables are installed, and the slightest burst of wind, rain, or snow causes power outages, sometimes lasting just a second (which is enough to disrupt computers, cable TV, and so on), but sometimes much longer. Something must be done, and here is an example of how New York City did it (The Atlantic, October 2020, page 68): “In early 1889, telegraph, telephone, and utility companies were given 90 days to get rid of all their visible infrastructure. New York’s industrial forest of utility poles was cleared, allowing some residents to see the street outside their windows for the first time. Underground conduits proved cheaper to maintain, and they could fit more bandwidth, which ultimately meant more telephones and more electricity.” That is the kind of firm action we need from our town government. AVINASH DIXIT Gordon Way

Resident Thanks Community Members Who Assisted Her After Fall on Franklin Avenue

To the Editor: On Sunday afternoon, October 4, I fell on Franklin Avenue. A young man approached and asked if I was OK. When he saw that I was not, he helped me to the nearest home and knocked on the door. The three residents came outside, gave me a chair, and then some paper towels to help with the bleeding. The young man, who I believe is a student at Princeton High, called an ambulance and all four good Samaritans stayed with me until it arrived. I want to thank everyone who very thoughtfully helped me that day. Please know how much I appreciate your kindness. My gratitude also extends to the Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad and Princeton police officer Pinelli, who quickly arrived on the scene. I wish I remembered everyone’s name so I could thank them in person but, unfortunately, I do not. I hope they see this letter and know how extremely grateful I am for all of their help. I feel very blessed to live in such a caring community. JOAN LEVIN Witherspoon Street

Writing in Response to Recent Letter Regarding Problems With Mail-In Voting

To the Editor: I would like to say a few words in response to Mr. Pyle’s recent letter regarding his problems with mail-in voting [“Noting That Mail-In Voting Can Have Too Many Problems For Such a Crucial Process,” Mailbox, October 7]. I would like to point out that this manner of casting a ballot has been with us and used successfully for many elections. Only recently, and as part of a concerted disinformation campaign, has its efficacy been called into question. Mr. Pyle is mistaken on several of his points. No. 1: If Mr. Pyle’s address has received a ballot for someone who does not reside there, it’s because that someone has neglected to inform the proper offices of her change of residence. As voters and citizens, it is up to us, not the government, to insure that our voter information is correct and up to date. No. 2: It is also up to us as individual voters and citizens to insure that our signatures are up to date. This is a vital part of our voting profile, no matter how we cast out ballot. If there is any question, go to the town hall and update your signature! No. 3: It’s up to each and every one of us to “follow directions exactly”! It’s not that difficult. No. 4: Especially now, in this time of COVID, it’s very possible that the poll workers you might encounter will be new to the job and going out of their way to perform a civic duty under much less than optimum conditions. In any case, this is another process entirely and is not comparable to mail-in voting in any way. Mr. Pyle is comparing the proverbial apples and oranges here. No. 5: See No. 4. No. 6: There is no law that a voter must use mail-in voting! If there is a disability of any kind, however, our current system of in-person voting with mail-in voting and early balloting provides the best possible combination of enabling factors to ensure that every voter, including the disabled, has the opportunity to cast his or her ballot. No. 7 and No. 8: In the end, we have to trust our local elected officials to ensure the physical integrity of our elections. It’s a major part of the job for which they were elected.

We are at far greater risk of losing out very fragile democracy from social media and partisan propaganda and from voter suppression than we are from any on-site meddling with individual ballots. We are in the greatest fight for this republic since its founding, and I would suggest that we keep our eyes firmly on the forest rather than Mr. Pyle’s trees. PAUL B. KELLEY Witherspoon Lane

Supporting BOE Candidates Behrend, Durbin, and Tuck-Ponder For Thoughtful, Inclusive Leadership

To the Editor: When our ballots arrived this week, we were excited to cast our votes for Beth Behrend, Jean Durbin, and Michele Tuck-Ponder for Princeton School Board, and hope you’ll do the same. We have worked closely with all three and know they will contribute thoughtful and inclusive leadership on behalf of our kids and our excellent public schools. As president and vice president of the School Board, Beth and Michele have led the Board with a focus on datadriven policymaking, fiscal prudence, and equity. In addition, they are good listeners and experienced community leaders. Together, they have stabilized school finances, improved facilities, and developed equity initiatives to address the stubborn achievement and opportunity gaps. Jean has been involved in the Princeton community in so many ways, including the Princeton Community Democratic Organization, the Civil Rights Commission, Littlebrook PTO, and Little League, always working to make our institutions more welcoming and more equitable. She is now running to add her energy and dedication to the Board, where she will bring critical legal, advocacy, and negotiation skills to bear on behalf of Princeton families and taxpayers. There are eight people running for three spots on the Board, and your vote will matter in shaping the future of our schools. Beth, Jean, and Michele bring exceptional skills from their professional experiences, a record of deep and meaningful community engagement, and are uniquely prepared to navigate the challenges and opportunities ahead. If you have not yet done so, we hope you will consider casting your vote for these three proven leaders. LANCE LIVERMAN Witherspoon Street HEATHER HOWARD Aiken Avenue

Books make it impossible to conLabyrinth Library Stream Talk by Sunstein and Shafir tinue regarding information

Cass Sunstein and Eldar Shafir will be discussing Sunstein’s new book, Too Much Information: Understanding What You Don’t Know in a L abyrinth Library Livestream event on Tuesday, October 20 at 6 p.m. To register visit crowdcast.io/e/cass-sunsteinand-eldar. Accord i ng to t he New York Times Book Review, “The book actually delivers something stranger and more interesting than the announced thesis: a tour of human biases that end up creating ‘behavioral market failures.’ Too Much Information doesn’t replace that generational certainty with a new one, but it does

disclosure as an uncomplicated good.” Harvard Law School professor Cass R. Sunstein was administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs in the Obama administration. He is the author of, among other books, The Cost-Benefit Revolution, How Change Happens, and Nudge. Eldar Shafir is professor of psychology and public affairs at Princeton University and the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs. A behavioral scientist and economist, he is the co-author of the book Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much.

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Living with the Absurd, from “The Plague” to “Dig a Pony” Is one, on the contrary, going to take up the heart-rending and marvelous wager of the absurd? —Albert Camus (1913-1960) lbert Camus presents this curious challenge in the “Absurd Freedom” section of The Myth of Sisyphus (1955). What interests me is the way he seems to be moving closer to the reader here, or maybe to himself, in contrast to the prosy, contradictory first half of the full proposition he offers (“Is one going to die, escape by the leap, rebuild a mansion of ideas and forms to one’s own scale?”). The key word for me is “heart-rending” (déchirant in French). The word shows up again, a form of it, in The Plague (1948) in reference to “the long, heart-rendingly monotonous struggle put up by some obstinate people” during “the period when the plague was gathering all its forces to fling them at the town and lay it waste.” The setting is Oran, Algeria, on the Mediterranean coast, where restrictions had been put in place preventing anyone from leaving. A Spirit of Lawlessness Reading The Plague in the wild and whirling weeks before the election isn’t the same experience it would have been back in March. Then the references to “a spirit of lawlessness,” with “fighting at the gates” wouldn’t have had the same impact. If I’d read the book in the spring, before the number of American deaths passed 200,000, I wouldn’t have been marking passages noting how as the death toll rose to five hundred a week “an element of abstraction, of a divorce from reality, entered into such calamities.” For the central figure in the narrative, Doctor Rieux, who sees death on a daily basis in Oran, one “grows out of pity when it’s useless”; the “feeling that his heart had slowly closed in on itself” is “his only solace for the almost unendurable burden of his days.” He wants to think that evils like the plague help men “to rise above themselves.” That’s a wager you can make, assuming that some form of empathy or urgency is being communicated by the powers that be. Otherwise “when you see the misery it brings, you’d need to be a madman, or a coward, or stone blind, to give in tamely to the plague.”

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The last time I wrote about Camus was in January 2017, a week before the Inauguration (“As D-Day Looms: Einstein, Kafka and Camus Sail to Sea In a Beautiful Pea-Green Boat”). I was doing my best to be upbeat, bringing in Edward Lear’s “The Owl and the Pussy-Cat,” one of the happiest poems ever written. But I couldn’t ignore the other Lear, Shakespeare’s mad king, who brings the world down on his head because he only hears what he wants to hear no matter how evil the source and when he hears something he doesn’t want to hear, even when it’s spoken by an angel, he banishes the angel, opens the door of his kingdom to evil, and is lost. I headed the piece with a quote from Einstein (“If at first an idea is not ab surd, then there is no hope for it”), looking for something positive, a semblance of hope, just a little, in spite of knowing it was unlikely that even a mind as large as Einstein’s could have room for human folly “comparable to what’s com i ng on January 20.” At a Distance It’s obv ious now that I won’t finish The Plague in time to do it justice. One of the most striking aspects of the reading experience is the way Camus carefully keeps you at a distance from any extended, close-up vision of the suffering. For the greater part of the narrative you’re given the long view, numbers, abstractions, speculations, two extraordinary sermons. The most moving moments are quiet passages like the one where Dr. Rieux “turns on his radio before going to bed for the few hours’ sleep he allowed himself. And from the ends of the earth, across thousands of miles of land and sea, kindly, well-meaning speakers tried to voice their fellow feeling, and

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A n d s o it ab ou n d s a n d ab ou n d s unbelievably on, from Governor Reagan to President Reagan, who took the oath of office on January 20, 1981, a little over a month after the killing of John Lennon. Meanwhile it was during Reagan’s presidency that my son grew up listening to Eddie Van Halen (1955-2020), a rock hero he says he misses more than anyone since David Bowie. Thus the two of us are sharing his favorite Van Halen songs on the anniversary afternoon of October 8, my copy of The Plague set aside as we listen to “Love Walks In,” — “And then you sense a change / Nothing feels the same /All your dreams are strange.” Further Aboundings The New York Times’ insistence on the style point of the formal “Mr.,” which first caught my eye when a reviewer referred to Meat Loaf as “Mr. Loaf,” surfaced, again with absurd effect, in Van Halen’s obituary. The use of “Mr. Van Halen” for a pyrotechnical player billed as “the Shredder Supreme” takes on comical traction in the context of his relationship with his superegomaniacal bandmate David Lee Roth. If you’ve recently revisited videos of Mr. Van Halen and Mr. Roth in full unfettered hairmetal glory, there’s much to savor in the quaint formality of Mr. Van Halen’s “smoldering personal and creative conflicts with Mr. Roth” that led the “colorful” singer to quit the band, and eventually thwarted a “proposed reunion with Mr Roth,” which “fell apart over the usual arguments. ‘I don’t think the guy was ever real,’ Mr. Van Halen said of Mr. Roth to Rolling Stone.” “Dig a Pony” ow I’m listening to Lennon again, his hymn to the undaunted, unhaunted imagination, the marvelous gamble, where you can dig a pony, penetrate any place you go, radiate everything you are, imitate everyone you know, indicate everything you see, because — “Everything has got to be just like you want it to.” Is it any wonder I relate to “the heartrending and marvelous wager of the absurd” that I borrowed from Camus? It could be at the top of every column. —Stuart Mitchner

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indeed did so, but at the same time proved the utter incapacity of every man truly to share in suffering he cannot see. ‘Oran! Oran!’ In vain the call rang over oceans, in vain Rieux listened hopefully; always the tide of eloquence began to flow.... ‘Oran, we’re with you!’ they called emotionally. But not, the doctor told himself, to love or to die together — ‘and that’s the only way. They’re too remote.’ “ As I mentioned, the most harrowing scene of suffering in The Plague comes much later, less than a hundred pages from the end. It describes the failed trial use of an anti-plague ser um on a dying child. Absurdity Abounds I began reading The Plague on Friday, October 9, John Lennon’s 80th birthday, planning to look for elements of the absurd in his lyrics for “Come Together” and “Dig a Pony,” two of his last songs w it h t h e B e at le s. As usual, the “best l a i d p l a n s” w e r e sidetracked by such things as the previous day’s wedding anniversary and before that, the death of Eddie Van Halen, not to mention the ongoing distraction of t he president’s bout with the virus. Put it all together in the context of Camus, the man who put the A-word on the map, and I have to go back to a letter from my future wife, sent to New Delhi from Los Angeles. Toward the end of the message, just before signing her name, she informed me that Ronald Reagan was running for governor of California, adding in large bold letters — “Absurdity abounds.” Those two words still say it all. Assuming it’s in the public domain, let’s put Absurdity Abounds on a digital billboard on Times Square, with a flashing yellow exclamation point added with each new year.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2020 • 20

MUSIC REVIEW

Princeton Symphony Orchestra Presents Second Concert of Garden Chamber Music Series

A SEAT at the Table October 29, 2020 6:00 p.m.

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rinceton Symphony Orchestra has found a way to make live music happen — on the grounds of Princeton’s Moven Museum and Garden. For the second time this fall, a small ensemble from the Symphony presented a concert from the porch of the Moven pool house, with an audience spaced out in 50 or so “pods” on the lawn as part of a “Chamber Music in the Garden” series. Despite a definite chill in the air last Thursday afternoon (and its effect on the wind instruments), the five principal wind players of Princeton Symphony were clearly delighted to be back in the performing arena — their first live performance in six months. As flutist Yevgeny Faniuk, oboist Lillian Copeland, clarinetist Pascal Archer, bassoonist Charlie Bailey and hornist Jonathan Clark played the hour-long program, Princeton Symphony made concertgoers comfortable on the grass with offers of blankets and plenty of room to see the concert. Chamber ensembles of strings or brass bring together instruments with similar sound palettes, but a quintet of winds offers a wide variety of orchestral colors and ranges. Jacques Ibert, composing in Paris in the first half of the 20 th century, wrote a number of short works for theatrical productions which often used for wind quintets because of space limitations. In 1930, Ibert pulled together three of these incidental pieces to create Trois pièces brèves, a concert triptych for wind quintet. The musicians of Princeton Symphony presented these three pieces as crisp music to match the fall air, with a uniformly chipper sound and clean melodies passed among the instruments. The five players demonstrated rhythmic precision, but that did not stop them from also exhibiting their own individual joie de vivre at being back on a concert stage. The musicians all showed well their solo capabilities, with instruments coming together in elegant duets of varying combinations. Hornist Clark was subtle in the first pièce, becoming more present in the third movement of Ibert’s set. Clarinetist Archer provided a birdlike solo in the third movement, and all players observed Ibert’s French style with elegant lifts at the ends of phrases. The quintet took the audience across the English Channel in the next set of pieces, with a performance of Malcolm Arnold’s Three Shanties for wind quintet, composed in 1943. Arnold, who lived through much of the 20 th century in England, maintained an extensive instrumental repertory, including music for brass and wind band. Each of his Three Shanties is based on an actual sea shanty — a folk song sung by sailors as they performed their physical labor onboard a ship — and the players of Princeton Symphony well captured the sea atmosphere. The first of Arnold’s Shanties was the

most familiar, based on the rollicking “What Shall We Do with a Drunken Sailor?” The quintet effectively executed the off-beat rhythms and quirky “drunken” nature of the piece, as well as the transition to a tango-like closing section. A lilting dance-like character marked the second Shanty, based on the early 19 th century tune “Boney was a Warrior.” Faniuk’s clean flute playing helped convey the raucousness of the closing movement, based on the early 20 th -century Massachusetts tune “Johnny Came Down to Hilo,” with Clark providing energetic accompaniment on the horn. Hungarian-American composer and conductor Denes Agay had a varied career as composer and conductor, as well as arranger for film and television. He wrote more than 90 books about music, including numerous compilations of piano music. His 1956 Five Easy Dances, set for woodwind quintet, musically captured dances popular Europe and Latin America throughout the 19 th and 20 th centuries. In Thursday af ter noon’s per for mance, the opening “polka” featured melodies passed among instruments and an overall tight ensemble sound. Flutist Faniuk led the second movement “tango,” as the players stretched the rhythms and sauciness of the dance. Particularly clean thirds between clarinet and oboe marked the fourth movement “waltz,” and the set closed with a bit of a big band sound to characterize the “rumba” on which Agay had based the music. Following a spirited arrangement of George Gershwin tunes set by Tony Esposito, the quintet closed the concert with what was probably the most serious work on the program — Samuel Barber’s one-movement Summer Music. Premiered in 1956, this piece set the relaxed languidness of summer for wind quintet. Barber well utilized the various colors of the wind instruments, creating unique pairings and exploiting registers not often heard. Introduced by horn and bassoon, Summer Music showed a wide palette of musical shadings, with haunting melodic passages from the oboe and clean chords from all players. Despite Barber’s insistence that the work is meant to evoke the atmosphere of summer — not the killing of mosquitoes — one could easily hear the “zapping” of summer bugs in the crispness of the instrumentalists’ playing. ike all performing arts organizations, Princeton Symphony Orchestra has been trying to make lemonade out of the lemons of a public health lockdown. The sight of people wending their way to pods with chairs, coats, and scarves was reassuring, and as the days become more chilly, the players of the Symphony deserve special kudos for pursuing high-quality performance in weather that might not be the best for their instruments. —Nancy Plum

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Princeton Symphony Orchestra will present its final Chamber Music in the Garden concert on Thursday, October 15 at Morven Museum and Garden. Featured in this performance will be a brass quintet performing music of John Williams, Jerry Goldsmith, and the Beatles. Princeton Symphony will also present a virtual concert on Sunday, October 18 at 4 p.m. featuring cellist Pablo Ferrández and music of Simon, Bach, and Shostakovich. Information about either of these concerts can be obtained by calling Princeton Symphony Orchestra at (609) 497-0020 or by visiting princetonsymphony.org.


New Jersey Theatre Alliance Presents “Theatre and Civic Engagement”; Panelists Include Paula T. Alekson of McCarter, Ryanne Domingues of Passage

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IN PRINT. ONLINE. AT HOME.

n partnership with the New Jersey Historical Commission, New Jersey Theatre Alliance presented Women in New Jersey Theatre: Theatre and Civic Engagement on October 8. Among the panelists were Dr. Paula T. Alekson, McCarter Theatre’s artistic engagement manager, and C. Ryanne Domingues, Passage Theatre’s artistic director. The panel also featured Dr. Jessica Brater, assistant professor of theater and dance at Montclair State University; and Amanda Espinoza, education and community engagement manager of Two River Theater Company in Red Bank. The Alliance’s deputy director, Erica Nagel, moderated the online discussion. “Community engagement is happening every time an audience member connects with a theater,” Brater asserts, when asked by Nagel to define “community engagement” and “civic engagement” as the terms pertain to theater. “It can also happen when a theater partners with a community organization.” “Civic engagement happens when a performance intersects with our role as citizens,” Brater continues, adding, “civic engagement asks artists, who are creating the performance, to move a step beyond community engagement, to a connection that prompts all involved to consider their role as citizens — and perhaps even to take civic action.” New Jersey Theater “We produce new plays and arts programming that resonate with, and reflect, our community. So community engagement is in [ Passage’s ] mission,” says Domingues, after Nagel asked the panelists to describe recent or current projects with which their theater has been involved. “We produce plays that reflect issues that we think are important to the Trenton community,” which she describes as “diverse” and “active”; and “we also create plays about the Trenton community,” Domingues continues, adding that, after performances, Passage includes “community dialogues, where … we’re bringing in professionals from local nonprofits to talk to people about [a given show’s] issue.” As an example Domingues points to The OK Trenton Project, which is being workshopped for a production next season. The play documents an incident in which “a group of students from a summer camp got together [and] created a statue called ‘Helping Hands.’” She adds, “We’re

having a reading of it this June, where we’re hoping community members will come out and give us their reactions.” “An anonymous police officer called The Trentonian and said that he thought that the sculpture … closely resembled a gang symbol, and needed to be taken down,” Domingues says. “The statue was taken down, and the play that we’re creating is about what happened afterward.” It “talks about police in Trenton, the mayor — how everybody in a community is part of the conversation,” Domingues adds. “We interviewed community members: police officers, students, [and] artists,” and all of the lines of dialogue “are taken verbatim.” Domingues also mentions a new musical, Group! Written by Aleksandra M. Weil (music), Eloise Govdare (lyrics), and Julia B. Rosenblatt (book), the piece is slated for a full production in 2022. It examines “six women who are part of a therapy group, dealing with different types of addiction. It takes place in Trenton.” Alekson discusses what she refers to as “McCarter’s ‘Greensboro’ community play reading project.” The project “grew out of our community play reading program, which had its roots partially in our … partnership with the Princeton Public Library.” She notes that McCarter and the library jointly present read-aloud events, including the Shakespeare Community Reading Group — which, she emphasizes, are free, “with no performance experience required or presumed.”

“THEATRE AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT”: In partnership with the New Jersey Historical Commission, New Jersey Theatre Alliance presented “Women in New Jersey Theatre: Theatre and Civic Engagement.” Among the panelists were McCarter Theatre’s Artistic Engagement Manager Paula T. Alekson (left) and Passage Theatre’s Artistic Director C. Ryanne Domingues. (Paula T. Alekson photo by Matt Pilsner; C. Ryanne Domingues photo by Claire Edmonds) To view “Theatre and Civic Engagement,” visit New Jersey Theatre Alliance’s Facebook page. To learn about future events visit njtheatrealliance.org.

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differences within ourselves, we become powerful,” she says. Two River Theater also emphasizes accessibility programming, which Espinoza emphatically applauds, having taught the Hunter Heartbeat Method (a Shakespearebased intervention that helps Autistic children with skills such as eye contact, and facial emotion recognition and production). “We went into the community and started working with 175 plus students, from kindergarten to the 30s,” she says, adding, “[We] started seeing people coming to the theater, because they understood what was going on and felt a part of it.” In addition to her work as a professor, Brater is a director whose current project is Florida! Written by Amanda Sage Comerford, and presented by West Orange-based Luna Stage (as part of their Voting Writes Project), the play will livestream October 15 at 8 p.m. on the company’s Facebook and YouTube pages. The play is inspired by the artists’ experiences working with Vote Forward to write to Florida voters. The Future; Effective Use of This Time “This is how theater has always been — a social activity, a civically-minded activity,” Domingues asserts. “I don’t think people have seen the end of live theater as a result of the pandemic.” Alekson notes that Sarah Rasmussen has succeeded Mann as McCarter’s artistic director. “Can you imagine starting your new job as an artistic director in the midst of a pandemic, wondering, ‘when will we open?’” Alekson remarks, adding, “It’s very exciting, in a very sad time.” Nagel asks the panelists what their suggestions would be for “using this time to develop as an artist.” Domingues replies, “It’s a great time for output, but I think it’s a really great time for input. When you read someone to greatly inspires you, you can’t help but create.” She notes the 24 Hour Plays series of “Viral Monologues,” which is available for viewing online. lekson, who has taught an adult class in solo performance, encourages artists to use online avenues such as social media to “start generating your art and putting it out.” She adds, “If you are excited to tell the story, there will be people who will be engaged by your excitement, and your passion.” —Donald H. Sanborn III

A

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Written by Emily Mann, Greensboro: A Requiem (1996) examines the murders of five anti-Ku Klux Klan demonstrators in 1979, in Greensboro, North Carolina. Like The OK Trenton Project, and Mann’s Execution of Justice, the play is a docudrama, crafted from interviews and courtroom transcripts. In November 2018 the community reading of Greensboro: A Requiem was held in McCarter’s Matthews Theatre. Alekson notes that it was intended as a “response to the white supremacist Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville” in 2017. Alekson shared a “family photo” of the reading’s participants, who “ranged in age from 10 to 85 … they were deeply moved, by both the story, and the experience of participating in the telling of the story.” Present at the reading was composer and lyricist César Alvarez, a Princeton University arts fellow. Born in Greensboro a year after the massacre, Alvarez is named after two of its victims. Through the connection with Alvarez, in 2019 there was a reading of Greensboro: A Requiem in Greensboro. It was the first program in a weekend of events commemorating the 40 th anniversary of the massacre. Espinoza highlights Crossing Borders, a festival that has been presented annually by Two River Theater since 2011. It is a celebration of new plays and music by Latinx theater artists. Espinoza credits Artistic Director John Dias for seeking to represent and engage with the “diverse voices” of Red Bank’s Latinx community. “Once we learn to celebrate our

Works by Mozart, Bartók, Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, and Debussy followed by a live Q&A with the musicians. Visit princetonuniversityconcerts.org to RSVP.

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21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2020

THEATER COMMENTARY


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2020 • 22

Performing Arts

VIRTUAL VIRTUOSITY: Cellist Pablo Ferrandez performs as part of an October 18 Zoom concert by the Princeton Symphony Orchestra. Prizew inner at the XV Vienna Symphony, and OrPSO Online Concert Includes Varied Program International Tchaikovsky chestre National de France,

Cellist Pablo Ferrández returns virtually to Princeton on the Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO)’s online concert broadcast Sunday, October 18 at 4 p.m. Fer randez is a soloist in Bach’s Cello Suite No. 1. A lso on the program are C arlos S i m on’s An Elegy : A Cry from the Grave, and Dmitri Shostakovich’s Chamber Symphony, an arrangement of his eighth string quar tet for string orchestra by Rudolf Barshai. Edward T. Cone Music Director Rossen Milanov conducts.

Comp et it ion and S ON Y Classical exclusive artist, Ferrández recently debuted at the Hollywood Bowl with the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Gustavo Dudamel. Other credits include the Bayersichen Rundfunk Symphony Orchestra under Daniele Gatti, Bamberg Symphony under Christoph Eschenbach, performances of Brahms Double Concerto and Beethoven Triple Concer to w it h A nne - S ophie Mutter, and appearances with the London Philharmonic, Israel Philharmonic, Rotterdam Philharmonic,

among others. Access to the virtual concert is $15 per unique device link, and includes the ability to participate in a live chat while watching. Following the broadcast, viewers receive on-demand access to the concert for one week. Visit princetonsymphony.org.

Gaten Matarazzo to Host 80’s Online Trivia Night

State Theatre New Jersey has announced actor Gaten Matarazzo — from the Netf lix hit ser ies, Stranger Things — as the host of ‘80s Online Trivia Night on

Wednesday, October 14 at 7 p.m. Proceeds raised support State Theatre’s Community Engagement pro grams. Known for his portrayal of Dustin on Stranger Things, Matarazzo began his career on Broadway starring in Priscilla Queen of the Desert, and later landing a role as Gavroche in Les Misérables. He’s been recognized by The Hollywood Reporter as one of the top 30 stars under the age of 30. Matarazzo is the host and executive producer of the Netflix hidden prank series, Prank Encounters. He also performs with his siblings Carmen and Sabrina in an ensemble band, Work in Progress. The band travels the country performing covers and originals. When he is not filming or touring the country with his band, the 18-year-old devotes his time to raising awareness about cleidocranial dysplasia — a condition that affects the development of bones and teeth. With the help of a Utah-based doctor, Matarazzo launched CCD SMILES, a foundation built to help families pay their children’s dental bills. He recently visited Capitol Hill to speak in favor of a new piece of legislation called the Ensuring Lasting Smiles Act (ELSA). This bipartisan legislation will provide insurance coverage to individuals born with congenital abnormalities or birth defects. ‘80s Online Trivia Night will feature questions on ‘80s pop culture, including movies like The Breakfast Club and Ferris Bueller’s Day Off; music groups like

A NEW HOST: Gaten Matarazzo of “Stranger Things” fame is the host of ‘80s Online Trivia Night at the State Theatre New Jersey on October 14. (Photo by Catie Lafoon) Run DMC and The Bangles; fashion trends like leg warmers and spandex; to nostalgic games and toys like Pac Man and Care Bears; and much more. Trivia Night will be composed of 50 multiple choice questions. The first-place winner gets bragging rights as well as a $150 State Theatre gift certificate and a State Theatre swag bag and the second-place winner gets a State Theatre swag

bag. Online Trivia Night will be hosted on Zoom on each participant’s desktop computer and played on the smartphone-based trivia game APP called Kahoot. Closed Captioning for Trivia Night can be made available by request by emailing info@ stnj.org, one week prior to the event. A minimum donation of $5 allows patrons to participate in the trivia challenge. To sign up, visit STNJ.org/ Trivia.

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“IN CONVERSATION”: Arts Council of Princeton executive director and ceramic artist Adam Welch will discuss his work with bricks, and “how their making is a reflection on labor and art,” with Timothy M. Andrews on Tuesday, October 20 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. via Zoom.

ACP “In Conversation” Series to Feature Welch

The Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) executive director and nationally acclaimed ceramic artist Adam Welch will be In Conversation with Timothy M. Andrews, art collector and supporter of the Arts Council’s Artistin-Residence program on Tuesday, October 20 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. This curated series of discussions is designed to celebrate and connect those who make art and those who love ar t. Bre a k i ng down the barriers between artist and art-appreciator, In Conversation delves into inspiration, studio practice, and ar tistic aspirations. Free registration is available on artscouncilofprinceton. org. “My work is about bricks and how their making is a reflection on labor and art,” said Welch. “The forming, design, documentation and intervention, explores history and material culture. Knowing Timothy Andrews our In Conversation will be fun and a totally unique experience. “W hen have you spent an hour looking and listening to people talk about bricks … and the meaning of life?” A nationally-acclaimed ceramic artist, Welch has participated in 37 solo or group exhibitions in the United States over the past ten years, including at the Arts Council of Princeton, MoMA PS1 and White Columns in NYC, and AIR Gallery in Brooklyn, with solo exhibitions at the Hunterdon Art Museum, Kean University, Princeton Day School,

and Northwestern College, and several curated, group, a nd i nv it at iona l ex h ibi tions throughout the United States. For more infor mation, visit artscouncilofprinceton. org.

“Art Against Racism” at West Windsor Arts Center

West Windsor Arts Council, in partnership with the African American Parent Support Group (AAPSG) of West Windsor-Plainsboro, is giving a voice to the Black Lives Matter movement locally through its participation in “Art Against Racism: Memorial.Monument.Movement.” “‘Art Against Racism’ was initially launched in 2019 to educate and engage the public about racial inequalit y a n d s o c ia l i nj u s t i c e through the visual ar ts,” said Rhinold Ponder, artist and founder of the new nonprofit organization of the same name. Heightened awareness of the BLM movement fueled by outrage over the murders of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor prompted Ponder to create a grassroots ar ts project called Memorial.Monument.Movement. Now unfolding on a groundbreaking video platform, Memorial.Monument. Movement is a virtual exhibition of BLM-inspired artwork — and a call to action. West Windsor Arts Council answered the call. “As an arts center, we believe that everyone has a seat at the table and everyone’s voice is impor tant,” said Aylin G re e n, e xe c ut ive d ire c tor of West Windsor Arts

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 14, 2020

Area Exhibits

Art

Council. “We invited artists and community members to share their stories on dozens of fabric squares sewn together to create one unifying installation.” Each fabric square reflects ideas and experiences about racism and sets intentions for an anti-racist society. The finished product will be unveiled during a special dedicat ion ceremony on Saturday, October 17, at 11 a.m. Artists and community members will share their stories during the event. L atoya Edwards, the West Windsor resident who leads the African American Parent Support Group of WW-P, will recount the day she was told she did not “belong” in a predominantly white neighborhood in Boston. It was decades ago, but it made a lasting impression. A powerful poem, “Abecedarian from a Jersey Girl of Color,” by retired educator, quiltmaker, and noted poet Gail Mitchell will be read. All are welcome to attend this socially distanced outdoor event, or watch it live on Facebook at facebook. com/westwindsorartscenter. “We are thankful to West Windsor Ar ts Center for their support and participation in this very timely community project,” said Ponder. He said he looks forward to the moment this work of ar t, a testimony to change, is seen hanging on the front facade of West Windsor Arts Center at 952 Alexander Road in Princeton Junction. For more infor mat ion, visit westwindsorarts.org.

Check websites for information on safety protocols. A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “In Our Nature” through November 1. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Art and Music: Touching Sound” through October 24. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 1:30-4:30 p.m. artscouncilofprinceton.org. D & R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place, has t he ongoi ng virtual galleries “Trail of Breadcr umbs : Nat ure in Fairytales” and “Portraits of Preservation: James Fiorentino Art.” The center is currently closed to the public. drgreenway.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City M u s e u m i n C ad w a lad e r Park, Park s ide Avenu e, Trenton, has “The Conversation Continues” and “On the Forefront: Trenton’s Junior 1, 1916,” both in the museum and online. Timed tickets required. ellarslie. org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “A Virtual Tour of Hamilton’s Princeton” and the “Histor y @ Home” ser ies. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Paint DTown” through October, “Syd Carpenter: Por traits of Our Places”

WILLOWOOD POTTERY SALE: Master Potter Caryn Newman is moving her Annual Holiday Sale of new handmade ceramics outdoors this year. Her pottery will be displayed outside of her Ewing studio at 7 Willowood Drive on Saturday and Sunday, October 17 and 18, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., or by appointment. “I have made good use of the quarantine with production of many new works in stoneware and porcelain,” said Newman. Safety precautions will be observed and visitors are required to wear masks and maintain social distancing. For more information, visit willowoodpottery.com, email caryn@willowoodpottery.com, or call (609) 203-7141.  October 16 through February 28, “Rising Tides: Contemporary Art and the Ecology of Water” through January 10, and “Fern Coppedge: New Discoveries” through April 18. The museum is now open to the public. michenerartmuseum.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Dreaming of Utopia: Roos evelt, New Jers ey” through January 24 and the online exhibit “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints Of New Jersey,

1761–1898.” Open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. morven.org. Phillips’ Mill, 2619 River Road, New Hope, Pa., has “91 s t A nnual Jur ied A r t Show” online through November 1. The mill is currently closed to the public. phillipsmill.org. We s t W i n d s o r A r t s Council, 952 Alexander Road, has the online exhibit “Art and Healing” through October 23. The center is currently closed to the public. westwindsorarts.org.

Artist Talk: Duane Michals Thursday, October 22, 5:30 pm Duane Michals is one of the great photographic innovators of the last century. In this live program, he will discuss metaphysics, personal identity, the nature of memory, photography, and filmmaking. In conversation with Museum Director James Steward. Stream it live – details on our website.

PUMPKIN PAINTING PARTY: Paint with your pod at Color Me Mine on Saturday, October 24 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the courtyard at the Princeton Shopping Center. Choose a Halloweenthemed (or other) piece, and paint outdoors under the covered walkway. $5 studio fees all day when painting a fall/Halloween item. Kids in costume get free studio fees. To ensure social distancing, reservations are required at princeton.colormemine.com.

Explore our virtual experiences at

artmuseum.princeton.edu Late Thursdays are made possible by the generous support of Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970.

TT_Duane Michals_FINAL.indd 1

Image courtesy Duane Michals

10/9/20 6:59 AM


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 14, 2020 • 24

Calendar Wednesday, October 14 8:30-9:30 a.m.: October Business Before Business v ir t ual net working, pre sented by Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber. Linda Czipo, president and CEO, C e nter for Non - P rof it s, speaks on “Collaborative Efforts and Trends Among For-Profits and Non-Profits During COVID-19.” princetonmercerchamber.org. 11 a.m.-6 p.m.: To help save the life of longtime resident Aiden Doyle, who has leukemia, a stem cell donor who is a match is sought by friends and family, who will be on Hinds Plaza with a member of the New York Blood Center to test possible donors. The self-test is done by swab. 100 test kits will be available. 6-7 p.m.: “Paths to Success” online series sponsored by Princeton Family YMCA, for students grade six and up. Cory L. Parks, vice president at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, is speaker. surveymonkey.com /r/ B77YKFF. 6 p.m.: Reading by translator/writer/researcher and Princeton University alumna Flora Thomson-DeVeau x and Creative Writing seniors Jimin Kang and Anna Yang, presented via Zoom. arts. princeton.edu. 6 p.m.: Conversation via Zoom with author/editor/ music scribe Selwyn Seyfu Hinds, presented by the Lewis Center for the Arts, w it h Pr inceton L ect urer in Creative Writing A.M.

Homes. arts.princeton.edu. 7 p.m.: 80s Online Trivia Night presented by State Theatre New Jersey, via Zoom. $5. STNJ.org/Trivia. Thursday, October 15 9:30-11 a.m.: Social Coffee via the Y WCA Princeton Area Newcomers and Friends, via Zoom. Visit ywcaprinceton.org/newcomers for more information. 11 a.m.: “When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story, 1776-1807,” presented by Philadelphia’s Museum of the American Revolution and sponsored by Princeton Senior Resource Center, via Zoom. Registration required, no fee. princetonsenior.org. 12 p.m.: Women in Development hosts its monthly roundtable v ia Zoom. The topic is “Not Your Average Appeal: 2020 Year End Campaigns.” Visit widmercer.org for link. 1-2 p.m.: “Real Estate: Ecommerce and the Implications on the Industrial Market,” presented by Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber. Panelists are Joseph S. Taylor, president and CEO of Matrix Development Group; and Kevin Webb of Langan Engineering & Environmental Services. princetonmercerchamber.org. 7 p.m.: William L. Kidder gives a virtual presentation on Washington’s crossing of the Delaware in 1776 and the 10 crucial days between December 25 and January 3 of that year. Reserve a spot by emailing dave @hunterdonlandtrust.org. Friday, October 16 10 a.m.: Women in Retirement 5th Anniversary Celebration, Princeton Senior Resource Center. princetonsenior.org.

11:45 a.m.: Cooking with Senior Chefs, presented by Princeton Senior Resource Center, with chef Jon Boot. Free, but registration required. princetonsenior.org. 3 p.m.: Transition to Retirement, Zoom event at Princeton Senior Resource Center, facilitated by Dave Roussell. princetonsenior.org. Saturday, October 17 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Communit y Far mers Market, Vaughn Drive Lot, West Windsor. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Tent sale on the green at Palmer Square by Highbar Boutique. Apparel, handbags, jewelry, and accessories. Part of a series of outdoor sales on the green. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Fall Fun Family Weekend at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Timed tickets must be purchased in advance at terhuneorchards.com. 11 a.m.: “Gerrymandering on New Jersey’s 2020 Ballot” is the topic of Represent New Jersey Chapter’s Zoom meeting, led by Jesse Burns of the League of Women Voters New Jersey. Register at https://bourls.com/wgEfh. 12-2 p.m. : Big Valley Bluegrass performs on the green at Palmer Square as part of Fall Music on the Square. 7:30 p.m.: “An Evening w i t h A l F r a n ke n ,” f a l l fundraiser via Zoom sponsored by P r inceton Senior Resource Center. Franken w ill discuss his time on Saturday Night Live and the Senate floor. $60. princetonsenior.org or (609) 751-9699. Sunday, October 18 9:30-11:30 a.m.: Virtual Open House at the Upper

Upcoming Events Please join us for our virtual events this fall! To register for an event and find out more information please visit spia.princeton.edu/events October 19 4:30 p.m.

What Were We Thinking: A Brief Intellectual History of the Trump Era Book talk with Carlos Lozada MPA ‘97, Pulitzer Prize winning critic and nonfiction book critic for The Washington Post and Julian Zelizer, the Malcolm Stevenson Forbes, Class of 1941 Professor of History and Public Affairs, Princeton University

October 21 1:30 p.m.

The Man Who Ran Washington: The Life and Times of James A. Baker III Book talk with Peter Baker, Chief White House Correspondent for The New York Times and author Susan B. Glasser, Staff Writer for the New Yorker Co-sponsored with the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library

School of The Pennington School. www.pennington.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Fall Fun Family Weekend at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Timed tickets must be purchased in advance at terhuneorchards.com. 12-2 p.m.: T he Polish Nannies perform on the green at Palmer Square as part of Fall Music on the Square. 3:30 p.m.: “A Taste of K abba la h,” Z o om eve nt sponsored by The Jewish Center Princeton. With Daniel Matt. Exploring essential teachings of Kabbalah. The second session is October. 25. Free. adulteducation@ thejewishcenter.org. 4 p.m.: Virtual concert by the Princeton Symphony Orchestra of works by Carlos Simon and Dmitri Shostakov ich ; also solo performance by cellist Pablo Ferrandez. Conducted by Rossen Milanov. $15. princetonsymphony.org. Monday, October 19 12:30 p.m.: Virtual seminar sponsored by the Center for Information Technology, “When Small Change Makes a Big Difference : Algorithmic Equity Among Similarly Situated Individuals.” University of Haifa law professor Tai Zarsky is the speaker. princeton.edu. Tuesday, October 20 6 p.m.: Cass Sunstein speaks on “Too Much Information: Understanding W hat You Don’t K now,” co-sponsored by Princeton University School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton Public Library, and Labyrinth Books. Registration is required. spia. princeton.edu/events. 7-8:30 p.m.: Arts Council of Princeton Executive Director and ceramic artist Adam Welch is “In Conversation” with Timothy M. Andrews in a virtual presentation. artscouncilofprinceton. org. 7:30 p.m.: Kingston Greenways Association Annual Meeting via Zoom. Rachel Mackow will present a program on deer-resistant native plants. RSVP to tari@ kingstongeenways.org. Wednesday, October 21 11 a.m.: Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children of Mercer and Burlington Counties hosts information session for potential advocates. RSVP by email to jduffy@casamercer.org. 6-7 p.m.: “Paths to Success” online series sponsored by Princeton Family YMCA, for students grade six and up. Ron Car ter, Deput y A ssistant Director, U.S. Marshall Service, is speaker. surveymonkey. com/r/B77YKFF. Thursday, October 22 8 p.m.: Great Minds Salon, “Environmental Advocacy in the Age of COVID-19: Challenges and Opportunities,” w ith Tirza S. Wahrman. Sponsored by The Jewish Center Princeton. Register to receive Zoom link by emailing adulteducation @ thejewishcenter.org. Friday, October 23 11:45 a.m.: “Medical Marijuana,” presented by Princeton Senior Resource Center on Zoom. Registered nurse Ken Wolski is the speaker. Free, but registration required. princetonsenior.org. 12 p.m.: “Healthcare Innovat ion in t he Capitol City,” part of the Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber’s

Trenton Economic Development Series. Greg Paulson, executive director of the Trenton Health Team, speaks. Opening remarks by Trenton Mayor Reed Gusciora. princetonmercerchamber.org. 12:30 -2 p.m.: Gotham City Network holds Zoom webinar about HomeWorks Trenton, an af ter-school residential program for marginalized girls. Natalie Tung is speaker. Reservations are required by emailing princetongotham@joshuazinder. com. Saturday, October 24 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Communit y Far mers Market, Vaughn Drive Lot, West Windsor. 10 a.m.-12 p.m.: Flu shot clinic at Stone Hill Church, 1025 Bunn Drive. Free for uninsured Princeton residents. (609) 497-7608. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Fall Fun Family Weekend at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Timed tickets must be purchased in advance at terhuneorchards.com. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Dispose of unneeded and expired prescription drugs at the parking lot across from Mercer County Administration Building, 640 South Broad Street, Trenton. Also drop off e-cigarette devices after batteries have been removed. Call (609) 278-7159 for more information. 11 a.m.-5 p.m.: Pumpkin Painting Party at Princeton Shopping Center. Choose a Halloween-themed or other piece, and paint outdoors under the covered walkway. $5 studio fees all day when painting a Fall/Halloween item. Kids in costume get free studio fees. Reservations are required at princeton.colormemine.com. 12-2 p.m.: Duo Kindred Spirit perform on the green at Palmer Square as part of Fall Music on the Square. Sunday, October 25 9-11 a.m.: Mindfulness in Nature: A Guided Sensor y Walk in the Forest, a workshop presented by Sustainable Princeton with Alex Crowley, nurse practitioner. To register, visit sustainableprinceton.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Fall Fun Family Weekend at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Timed tickets must be purchased in advance at terhuneorchards.com. 1-3 p.m.: Virtual Open House at The Pennington School’s middle school. To register visit pennington. org. 2 p.m.: In a Zoom event, Benjamin Balint, co-author of Jerusalem: City of the Book, will discuss unusual caretakers of Jewish library collections; Father Columba Stewart, executive director of t h e H i l l M u s e u m & Manuscript Library at Saint John’s University, will talk about rare early Christian and Islamic manuscripts ; and Bedross Der Matossian, associate professor of histor y at the University of Nebraska– Lincoln and president of the Societ y for Armenian Studies, will explore literary treasures of Ar menian Jer usalem. Register at BildnerCenter. Rutgers.edu. 3:30 p.m.: “A Taste of K abba la h,” Z o om eve nt sponsored by The Jewish C e nte r P r i n c e ton. Wit h D a n i e l M at t. E x p l or i n g essential teachings of

Kabbalah. This is the second of t wo sessions. 25. Free. adulteducation@ thejewishcenter.org. Monday, October 26 Recycling Tuesday, October 27 7 p.m.: “The Natural Web: Who Needs Plants?” Mary Ann Borge heads this virtual session sponsored by Sourland Conservancy on how plants support the animal species with which they coexist, and what benefit animals provide to plants in return. sourland.org. Wednesday, October 28 4-6 p.m.: Flu shot clinic at Witherspoon Hall, 400 Witherspoon Street. Free for uninsured Princeton residents. (609) 497-7608. 6-7 p.m.: “Paths to Success” online series sponsored by Princeton Family YMCA, for students grade six and up. Abi Shitta-Bey, high school math teacher a n d ST E M e d u c ator, is sp e a ker. s u r vey mon key. com/r/B77YKFF. Thursday, October 29 10 a.m.: NJ Conference for Women, a networking and educational event being held virtually. princetonmercerchamber.org. 7 p.m.: “The Case for Reparations for Descendants of Enslaved People,” a talk by local attorney Caroline Clarke, is a Zoom event presented by the Racial Justice Task Force of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Princeton. Register in advance. uuprinceton.org. Saturday, October 31 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Communit y Far mers Market, Vaughn Drive Lot, West Windsor. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Fall Fun Family Weekend at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Timed tickets must be purchased in advance at terhuneorchards.com. 12-2 p.m.: School of Rock Princeton performs on the green at Palmer Square as part of Fall Music on the Square. 6-9 p.m.: Beyond Pink Art Show at YWCA Princeton, 59 Paul Robeson Place. Ticket holders reserve an hour to view, and spend another hour to stay and sample food from the Jammin’ Crepes food truck. Masks are mandatory, social distancing is enforced. Includes a Zoom cocktail hour and artist interviews. ywcaprinceton.org/beyondpink. Sunday, November 1 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Fall Fun Family Weekend at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Timed tickets must be purchased in advance at terhuneorchards.com. 11 a.m.-6 p.m.: Beyond Pink Art Show at Y WCA Princeton, 59 Paul Robeson Place. Ticket holders reserve an hour to view and spend another hour to stay and sample food from the Jammin’ Crepes food truck. Masks are mandatory, social distancing is enforced. Includes a Zoom cocktail hour and artist interviews. ywcaprinceton.org/beyondpink. Wednesday, November 4 6-7 p.m.: “Paths to Success” online series sponsored by Princeton Family YMCA, for students grade six and up. Zara Northover Oly, ’08 sum mer Oly m pian and product manager at Quicken Loans, speaks. surveymonkey.com/r/


After Emerging as Key Player for PU Men’s Hoops, Point Guard Morales Heading to Spanish Pro League

J

ose Morales won’t be needing more leg room on his flight to Spain this month. Few fellow passengers would guess that the 5’9, 170-pound Princeton University graduate is heading there to start his professional basketball career, but he is following his heart. “That’s one thing I’ve wanted to do basically my whole life,” said Morales, a former Hun School standout who scored 261 points in his career with the Princeton men’s hoops program. “You grow up and everybody has a dream, everybody has certain jobs they want. For me, it was always being a pro basketball player. So to finally be able to do that was super exciting.” Last month, Morales signed a deal with Agrupacion Deportiva (AD) Cantbasket 04. The team plays out of Santander, Cantabria, in Spain. They play in the Liga Espanola de Baloncesto Aficionado (EBA), which is scheduled to begin in October and runs through May. “They’re known for their level of basketball over there,” said Morales of the Spanish pro league. “I don’t know too much about the league or how competitive it is, but I have done a little research and it seems like a pretty competitive league. There are a lot of guys in it that played Division I basketball at pretty high levels. There are guys that have gone from there to higher levels in Spain and other places around the world so it’s pretty competitive for sure.” In pro circles, Morales may have been overlooked by some because of his height and his supporting role for the Princeton men’s basketball team. He has had to overcome doubters before to help teams in a number of ways and is looking to do the same in Spain. “It’s not like I was at one point tall,” said Morales, a native of Miramar, Fla. “I’ve always been one of the smaller players on the floor, so it’s not anything new to me. I’m going to approach it the same way I always have. I’ll play harder than everybody else, I’m going to try to outsmart people, I’m going to try to use my quickness to my advantage, all the same things I’ve always done. Be a pest out there, use my height almost as an advantage. I’m a little closer to the ground than most people. I have to be the first on the floor for loose balls. I have to make certain plays that a guy my height can make and just play harder than everybody else.” Morales heads to the next level after establishing himself as a reliable player who mostly came off the bench for the Tigers. He started six games as a junior, but most of the time he was counted on for his reserve guard play. “For me, my four years was all about growth, not just in basketball, but as a

student and a man, and all these different ways I feel like I really matured in my time there,” said Morales, who earned a degree in psychology. “Coming in, I wanted to do everything. I wanted to break every record and win every game. That’s the mentality you take into a situation. I fell into my role and I felt I did my best in that role to help the team win.” Following the post-graduate year at Hun that came on the heels of leading Cardinal Gibbons to a 32-1 record and 5A state title in his home state of Florida, Morales worked his way into the Tigers lineup more each season and enjoyed his finest output as a senior. “At the end of the day, it was all about winning games for me, and whatever they needed from me, that’s what I wanted to give them,” said Morales. “My freshman year, that was the scout team. I was a killer on that scout team. As the years went by, I got a bigger role. Whatever I can do to help, that’s what I was willing to do, and I’ll take that wherever I go.” Producing a career in which he averaged 12.7 minutes per game, 3.3 points per game, and 1.3 assists per game, Morales is thrilled to get a shot a pro ball. “I didn’t put up incredible numbers in college so unlike some guys I had to put myself out there somewhat,” said Morales. “I had to put together some film and reach out to certain people and try to find an opportunity for myself. That’s how I came about getting it. I put a highlight tape together, put it out to a few guys that I know in the basketball community and it made its way over to Spain and somebody liked me enough to give me a chance.” Over the course of 201920 season that was cut short by the COVID-19 pandemic in March, Morales emerged as one of Princeton’s most efficient players. In 27 games, he shot a blistering 54 percent from 3-point range and was three assists away from having a 2:1 ratio in assists to turnovers (45 assists, 24 turnovers), and shot 80.8 percent from the foul line (21-of-26). He enjoyed career highs in points (10 vs. Columbia on March 6) and assists (six vs. Iona on December 17). “I’m so happy for Jose,” said Princeton head coach Mitch Henderson in a statement. “He brings energy, toughness, and moxie wherever he goes and I have no doubt that he will be all those things and more at his next stop in Spain. All Tiger fans will be following along closely and pulling hard for him at this next step.” Putting in consistent work over the years paid off for Morales as his ball-handling and shooting in particular took significant jumps in his final year. “It came down a lot to knowing my spots, knowing where I want to shoot it,

where I don’t, shot selection, and time in the gym,” said Morales. “I decided me and coach JJ (PU assistant Jonathan Jones), we were going to shoot every day, sometimes a couple times per day, and it paid off. Putting the work in, I was able to knock down a lot more shots this year. I’m going to miss that guy. I’ve been hitting him up for those shooting workouts so I can maintain this shooting percentage.” Morales has been looking forward to the opportunity to get back on the court since Princeton’s season was cut short due to the pandemic after the Ivy League regular season concluded. The conference tournament had yet to start when the Ivies and then the NCAA ended play. “Obviously myself and my team, we were really upset at the time about how everything went down,” said Morales. “I don’t think we really understood what was happening or what was going to happen with this pandemic. Looking back, they clearly made the right decision.” The Tigers were 14-13 overall, 9-5 in Ivy League play at the time. It was their best Ivy record since they went 14-0 in the freshman year for Morales, Richmond Aririguzoh, and Will Gladson. “It felt like we were playing really good basketball; we were going to be an issue for whoever we matched up against,” said Morales. “We really wanted that chance, especially for myself and my two fellow seniors, Richmond and Will. We really wanted to go out with Princeton basketball at the top of the league and giving our younger guys a chance to experience that March Madness, that NCAA tournament, the way it happened for us our freshman year. That was our goal. We didn’t get a chance to, but it was a great season. We put together a pretty good record for how young we were and how inexperienced we were. That was a pretty good team and I can’t wait to watch them over the next couple of years.” Since the end of the college season, Morales has been working to stay in shape and improve his skill set. “I want to improve in everything,” said Morales. “Fifty-four percent or whatever it was from 3, I want to be able to do the same thing off the dribble at the mid-range. I want to be able to finish better at the basket. On defense I want to be able to take more charges, find a way to get my team more possessions, everything on the defensive end. I want to be able to guard all different types of players. At 5’9, it makes it a little more difficult, but I have to find a way because that helps me stay on the floor. Finding different ways to guard bigger guards or finding ways to be able to hold my own if I do get switched onto the post. I really do want to get better at everything.”

Making big strides while at Princeton, Morales feels the biggest changes came in how he analyzed and saw the game. “When you play at Princeton, you hear ‘these are the smart guys,’ not super athletic or whatever, but they’re going to make the right plays,” said Morales. “I agree with that first part — everybody on our team was super smart and our coaches approached the game in a way that you have to be able to make reads and the game slows down for you, you see things differently. I don’t agree with the athletic part — we had some pretty freak athletes — but Princeton basketball really helped me in how I see the game. It slowed the game down for me and I see the floor better and I’m able to make certain reads that I didn’t even know existed coming out of high school. The game opened up for me playing at Princeton.” At Agrupacion Deportiva (AD) Cantbasket 04, Morales will be one of three international players on the Spanish team’s roster. Morales’s father was born and raised in Dominican Republic and his mother was born and raised in Puerto Rico. “Like most teams, you’re only allowed a certain amount of imports,” said Morales. “I’m actually playing as a Dominican. As a Dominican over there, you’re almost considered a semi-local. We have one guy from Canada and one from the U.S. Those are the other two foreign guys.” Having represented Puerto Rico as a junior player in high school, Morales has designs on someday representing the senior national team in the Olympics. Playing any level of professional basketball in a county of Spain’s reputation can help. “They’re pros,” said Morales. “Once you say you’re a pro, it doesn’t really matter — those guys can play. When you take into account the level of basketball that

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 14, 2020

S ports

GOING PRO: Jose Morales goes in for a layup against Columbia on March 6 in his senior season for the Princeton University men’s basketball team. Point guard Morales, a former Hun School standout who scored 261 points in his career with Princeton, is heading to play in the Spanish pro league for Agrupacion Deportiva (AD) Cantbasket 04 in Santander, Cantabria. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) Spain is known for, you can expect some pretty good basketball.” At first, Morales wasn’t sure he would get the chance to be a pro. With his college career over, Morales started the summer looking for a job. He ultimately gave that up when he signed his professional basketball contract and realized anything else would be a temporary post until he left for Spain. He’s

also putting graduate school plans on hold to defy the odds and give professional basketball a chance. “Just the idea of being in a new place, getting to explore the world while still playing the game, it’s nice,” said Morales. “Not really having to worry about much of anything else except playing basketball, it’s going to be really fun.” —Justin Feil

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PU Sports Roundup Princeton Men’s Soccer Receives Endowment Gift

Princeton Athletics announced last week the endowment of the head men’s soccer coaching position. The gift was made by an anonymous donor in honor of the leadership of Jim Barlow ’91, the program’s men’s head coach for the last quarter century, and in support of both the men’s and women’s soccer programs. The gift aligns with the Department of Athletics’ goals of securing endowments to provide long-term sustainable support and advancing the department’s mission of helping its student-athletes reach their peak potential as college student-athletes and in life. “It is with great enthusiasm and gratitude that we make this announcement,” said Princeton Director of Athletics Mollie Marcoux Samaan ’91, a former Princeton women’s soccer and hockey star. “Prov iding endow ment support for both our men’s and women’s soccer programs will allow us to continue to offer a world-class athletic and academic experience for our studentathletes. In addition, I could not be happier that it recognizes the outstanding contributions that Coach Barlow has made to Princeton soccer as a player, a coach, a friend, and a role model for all. Jimmy is a highly respected, values-based leader who models our departmental ‘be A Tiger’ values in everything he does.” The men’s and women’s soccer programs have been models for Princeton’s values, with Ivy League championships and NCAA Final Four runs for both combined with generations of alumni

who have benefited from the commitment to Education Through Athletics and Competitive Excellence. “I know I speak for all of the players, coaches, and alumni who are a part of the Princeton Soccer family when I say how grateful we are for this endowment,” said Barlow. “This gift will help fund crucial expenses of our programs — expenses that provide our studentathletes with such unique competitive and educational experiences. It is these experiences that prepare our st udent-at h letes for the challenges that will lie ahead and that provide them with a lifetime of incredible memories. The Friends of Soccer has been working hard for years to meet our annual expenses, and this gift is a tremendous boost to that process.” Barlow, who is known for his competitive spirit, his genuine love of the game, and his unwavering commitment to integrity, is in his 24th season as the head coach of men’s soccer at Pr inceton. A t hree -t ime first-team All-Iv y League selection and a CoSIDA n at i o n a l Ac a d e m i c A l l America himself, Barlow has led Princeton to six Ivy League championships and six NCAA tournament appearances (one each as a player and five each as the head coach). He was also the 1987 Ivy League Rookie of the Year and 1990 Ivy League Player of the Year. In 2018, Barlow became the Ivy League Coach of the Year after leading the Tigers to the league title and an NCAA appearance. His Coach of the Year Award made him the first, and only person in Princeton Athletics history to be named the Ivy Rookie of the Year, Player of the Year, and Coach of the Year. Barlow has been active with the U.S. National Team program, spending eight years as the head coach of the national U-15

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team. He is also a member of the New Jersey state high school athletics Hall of Fame. “I also realize that any gift in honor of my leadership is really a gift honoring the tremendous leadership of the Princeton Soccer and athletic depar tment staff, University colleagues who support our team and student-athletes and alumni with whom I have been blessed to work over the past 24 years,” added Barlow. “I am always quick to respond when asked what the best thing is about Princeton — it is the people, and I am so fortunate to have great and lasting relationships with so many of them.” Prior to Barlow, Princeton was coached by Bob Bradley ’80, who has gone on to, among other accomplishments, coach the U.S. men’s national team to a Group championship at the World Cup, become the only American ever to be a manager in the English Premier League and be a head coach in Major League Soccer. The Princeton men’s soccer program, which started in 1906, has won nine Ivy League championships and made 10 NCAA tournament appearances, reaching the NCAA Final Four in 1993. Women’s soccer became a varsit y spor t in 1980 and has since won 10 Ivy League titles and played in 13 NCAA tournaments, including reaching the NCAA Final Four in 2004. In addition to the endowment, Princeton soccer is looking forward to proudly u nvei li ng it s bra nd - new Roberts Stadium, with the newly built Myslik Field and new adjacent practice field scheduled to open in the summer of 2022. The new facility will be located next to t he Finney /Campbell

Fields near Princeton Stadium and Jadwin Gymnasium. The official name of the e n d ow m e nt w i l l b e a n nounced at a later date.

Princeton Rowing Alum Takes 6th at Europe Regatta

Former Princeton University men’s rower Fred Vystavel ’16 placed sixth in the coxless pair for Denmark last weekend at the 2020 European Rowing Championships. Romania’s Marius-Vasile Cozmiuic and Ciprian Tudosa took the gold in 6:26.52 over the 2,000-meter course followed by Croatia and

Italy on the medal podium. Vystavel and his partner Joachim Sutton crossed the finish line with a time of 6:40.87. “This was a great step forward for Fred and his teammate in their newly formed pair combination,” said Princeton men’s heavyweight head coach Greg Hughes. “We look forward to seeing him race to qualify for the Olympics in the spring. Currently we have Princeton rowers training and competing for seats on the United States, Australian, Great

Britain, and Danish Olympic teams. It is always exciting to see Princeton rowers compete at the highest level internationally.” Greta Jaanson ‘23 (Open Rowing ) was a spare for Estonia as was David van Velden (Men’s Lightweights) for the Netherlands in this event. It has been a banner fall for the heavyweight squad on the international water as Floyd Benedikter earned gold for Germany in the men’s eight final at the U-23 European Rowing Championships in September.

NATIONAL STAGE: Former Princeton University wrestling star Matt Kolodzik ’20, left, defeats Cornell’s Hunter Richards in February to help the Tigers top the Big Red 19-13 on the way to winning their first Ivy League crown since 1986. Last weekend, Kolodzik placed sixth in the 65-kilogram (143-pound) freestyle weight class at the U.S. Senior Nationals in Coralville, Iowa. Fellow Tiger Leonard Merkin ’21 and Princeton assistant coach Nate Jackson also competed in the event with Merkin taking third in the 67-kilogram (148-pound) Greco-Roman class and Jackson placing second in the 86-kilogram (190-pound) freestyle class. The 2020 Wrestling World Championships are set for December 12-20 in Belgrade, Serbia, and the U.S. Olympic Trials have yet to be rescheduled ahead of the Tokyo Olympic Games after initially being scheduled for April 2020 at Penn State. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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After playing for the Princeton High football program as a freshman in 2017, Richie Valme took a two-year hiatus from the sport. Com ing into t h is fall, Valme decide it was time to get back on the gridiron. “I came back because I wanted to help us win,” said Valme. Last Saturday, running back/linebacker Valme did just that, playing a key role as PHS rallied from a 10-0 fourth quarter deficit against visiting Bishop Eustace to pull out a dramatic 18-17 win in overtime, snapping a 12-game losing streak. Valme rushed for 122 yards on 17 carries, including a 43-yard touchdown jaunt in the fourth quarter and a three-yard run for the gamewinning two-point conversion in OT as the Tigers improved to 1-1. Although PHS had ab sorbed a 42-6 loss to Robbinsville in the season opener on October 2, Valme and his teammates were confident they could get on the winning track. “We know that we are getting better,” said Valme. “We know that the Friday game was not going to determine the game today.” Even though Tigers trailed 10-0 with less than nine minutes left in the fourth quarter, they were not fazed. “We remembered that we did so much hard work so we are not going to give up now,” said Valme. Valme got things going for PHS, breaking loose for a dazzling 43-yard TD run,

zig-zagging through and past the Bishop Eustace defense as PHS narrowed the gap to 10-7 with 8:17 left in regulation. “I was just trying to score, I was just trying to finish this,” recalled Valme. “I didn’t want to lose, that is all that was on my mind.” Wit h 33 s econds lef t, Demsi Ramirez hit a 24-yard field goal to make it 10-10, capping a 35-yard scoring march and forcing overtime. Bishop Eustace got the first possession of overtime and cashed in, taking a 17-10 lead after a touchdown pass and a converted extra point. Showing their character and resolve, the Tigers responded with a looping 23yard touchdown pass from Jaxon Petrone to a leaping Everaldo Servil. With the game in the balance, PHS decided to go for a two-point conversion and gave the ball to Valme, who burst into the end zone to give the Tigers the 18-17 triumph. “They said can you run it and I said yeah I can do it and I did,” said Valme, recalling the final play that clinched the program’s first w in since beat ing Wes t Windsor/Plainsboro 22-19 on October 12, 2018. In reflecting on his emergence as a star performer, Valme said it came down to diligence and encouragement from the PHS coaches. “It is hard work, I was able to get the opportunity because I was working hard,” said Valme as some of his teammates were chanting

M-V-P, M-V-P in the raucous postgame celebration. “I want to thank coach [Charlie] Gallagher and all of the coaching staff that helped me do this.” Gallagher, for his part, is thrilled to have Valme back. “Any time you get a 43-yard run for a touchdown, it is going to be awesome,” said Gallagher “He is fast, he is quick. He got 122 yards today and we are real proud of that. He is doing an awesome job. He took off his sophomore and junior year and we missed him because he was a really good football player. We are just glad that he is on the team now.” Even though the Tigers found themselves trailing 10-0 at halftime, Gallagher sensed his squad wasn’t going to fold. “We felt like the game was 0-0; we thought we were still in it, we liked what we were doing at the time,” said Gallagher. “We felt like we were in the game. We started running the ball very well. Our passing was way off, that was a focus when we came into the second half because we know that Jaxon is really a good quarterback. We just needed to get him into some rhythm.” In opting for a field goal attempt in the waning moments of regulation instead of a go-ahead touchdown, Gallagher put his faith into junior Ramirez. “I was t hin k ing about

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 14, 2020

Valme’s Running Powers Late Rally for PHS Football As Tigers Top Bishop Eustace 18-17 in OT, Snap Skid

COMEBACK KIDS: Princeton High quarterback Jaxon Petrone (No. 8) relays the play in the huddle last Saturday as PHS hosted Bishop Eustace. The Tigers rallied from a 10-0 fourth quarter deficit to pull out a dramatic 18-17 win in overtime, snapping a 12-game losing streak. PHS, now 1-1, plays at Pitman on October 16. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) going for a touchdown but I said to myself, we have an opportunity if we can kick this field goal,” said Gallagher. “Demsi has never kicked field goals before in his life, nor a PAT. He was one-forone on the PATs and then he was one for one on the field goals so what a great opening for him.” In OT, Gallagher feared that his team’s opportunity for a win may be slipping away when Bishop Eustace took the lead. “Preferably I would have went on offense but because they were at the 40 with the personal foul, we figured we would push them farther back,” said Gallagher. “Credit to those guys, they just marched right down the field, four plays and they were in the end zone. That was a little bewildering

because I know at the end of the game when we kicked that field goal, they were stunned.” But when PHS stunned the Crusaders with the quick strike from Petrone to Servil, Gallagher decided that his team could march in for the win. “I was hey you know what, why go any farther, it was OK let’s end the game right now,” said Gallagher. “It was can we pick up three yards. We were very successful in the second half being able to get some yardage so what would stop us from getting three yards. We wanted to ride that momentum. It was a great throw by Jaxon and a great catch by Everaldo. We think really highly of a lot of our guys.” Gallagher is hoping that the victory can be the impetus for more success in

the coming weeks. “With all of this craziness with the COVID, you take it week by week,” said Gallagher, whose team plays at Pitman on October 16. “I know we have really struggled. We struggled with some numbers and stuff like that. We have some kids out here that are just doing a really great job. We had a couple of kids fall off because of the COVID thing but our numbers are actually better than I thought they would have been. We have a lot of seniors and a lot of juniors and we are going to ride them the rest of the year.” Valme, for his part, is primed for a good ride. “This win means a lot but it is still nothing,” said Valme. “We have still got to win more. We are still hungry.” —Bill Alden

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With Junior Star Weir Exploding for Six Goals, PHS Field Hockey Cruises Past Robbinsville 7-1 Olivia Weir sharpened her field hockey skills by competing against boys in her native South Africa. “I started playing when I was 10 in South Africa and I moved here two and half years ago,” said Weir, a junior forward on the Princeton High field hockey team. “In South Africa, boys can play which is really different. The game is a little bit slower here because in South Africa we play on astroturf, so that is definitely a change.” Last Thursday, Weir came out at full speed against Robbinsville, tallying six goals to help PHS post a 7-1 win over the Ravens and improve to 3-0. In reflecting on her outburst, Weir credited her teammates with setting her up. “We are doing an amazing job finding each other in the circle,” said Weir, reflecting on her outburst which PHS head coach Heather Serverson believes is a single-game school record. “We just know where everyone is. I was just in the right spot.” Even Weir was taken aback by the fact that she might have achieved a school record. “Wow, that’s really amazing,’’ said Weir. “I didn’t realize that, but it all goes to the team because I really

couldn’t do it without them. We just work so good together.’’ After a shaky first few minutes, PHS set the tone for the rest of the game as senior star and co-captain Shoshi Henderson and Weir banged home goals within a 4:18 stretch of the first period to give the Tigers a 2-0 lead. “We have been speaking about coming out very strong from the start,” said Weir. “The beginning was a bit rough but we all came together and said we are going to do this and we are going to play as a unit.” It didn’t take Weir long to fit in with the PHS unit upon her arrival from South Africa. “It was definitely a change coming here but it has been very nice,” said Weir. “I love playing with everyone, everyone is super supportive.” Having dealt with an injury that caused her to be sidelined for most of the 2019 campaign, Weir was chomping at the bit to come up big this fall. “Over this whole quarantine thing, I have been trying to be in the best shape possible,” said Weir, who has tallied nine goals and two assists through the first three games of the season. “I think when you are

SIX SHOOTER: Princeton High field hockey player Olivia Weir, right, heads upfield in recent action. Last Thursday, junior star forward Weir tallied six goals to help PHS defeat Robbinsville 7-1. The Tigers, who improved to 3-0 with the win, play at Hopewell Valley on October 15 before hosting Allentown on October 20. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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injured, you can take it for granted. I just was able to realize how much I actually love the sport. PHS head coach Serverson loves having Weir back on the field. “Olivia is very explosive, she gets a good read on the play; she sees the open space, she knows where to go,” said Serverson. “She is thinking a play ahead which is what great players do and then she has that wonderful shot on goal. She has been playing very well for us. She was injured last year so I wasn’t quite sure if she would be able to come back as strong.” Weir has formed a potent one-two punch with co-captain Henderson, who ended up with a goal and an assist against Robbinsville. “They are very similar in the sense that their speed is similar, their reach is similar and the way the play is very similar,” said Ser verson. “They just have that great connection on the field even though they don’t play any other sports together.” With PHS having tallied 17 goals and yielding only two in winning its first three games, Serverson is surprised with how well things have been going. “I am so impressed with the way that they have been playing, we didn’t have a preseason so we didn’t have any familiarity at all on the field,” said Severson. “We are still not where I would like us to be but they are just playing so well. They are just so happy to be out here. Honestly, we don’t even care if we win and I am not just saying that. They are so happy to be able to play games and I think that is what’s happening.” While the scoring output is turning heads, the Tigers have been just as impressive on the defensive end, led by junior goalie Frankie deFaria and junior co-captain and star defender Grace Rebak. “Frankie is solid back there, she is a great athlete in the pads; she is very steady and she is very calm,” said Serverson of deFaria, who made six saves against the Ravens. “She is an anchor with Grace. She is a beast, we love her. Grace is always solid. She is very patient, she is working on some new skills. She has been a great leader back there. She is one of our captains this year so she has really stepped up in that sense with communication and helping out the younger players.” The squad’s positive communication and joy at just being on the field is giving Serverson the sense that it could be a special fall for the program. “It is the spirit of the team, the way they are connecting on the field, the energy at practice,” added Ser verson, whose team plays at Hopewell Valley on October 15 before hosting Allentown on October 20. “Everything is different, they are just grateful.” Weir, for her part, is grateful to be a part of that process. “It is a new team; we don’t know each other as well but as time goes by we are getting more comfortable playing with each other,” said Weir. “We know where everyone is, it is getting better from here.” —Bill Alden

Sparked by Bell’s Skill, Leadership at Goalie, PHS Boys’ Soccer Shuts Out Steinert 3-0 Jared Bell found himself under fire as the Princeton High boys’ soccer team hosted Steinert last Wednesday. The PHS senior goalie held the fort as the Spartans generated a number of scoring opportunities and had the Tiger defense on its heels for much of the first half. But utilizing the bonds he has developed with his defense, Bell helped PHS thwart Steinert and kept the Spartans scoreless as the Tigers clung to a 1-0 lead at halftime on a goal by senior star Nick Petruso. “We really managed to pull through with communication,” said Bell. “Almost every kid on our defense I think of as a leader. They are always talking, they are setting a good example.” In the second half, PHS played some very good soccer, tacking on goals by Richard Wegmann and Andrew DeLuca in pulling away to a 3-0 triumph even as it lost Petruso to a leg injury just after halftime. “After Nick went out, then we really know we had to step up and that mentality really set in,” said Bell, who ended up with three saves in the victory. As a battle-tested senior, Bell has stepped up to make his voice heard on the field. “From my sophomore year to now, I have definitely developed as a communicator on this team,” said Bell, who posted 12 shutouts in 2019 during his junior campaign. “It is really necessary for our back four and myself to really give instructions to the middle third and the front third.” In addition, Bell has developed technically as well. “It is gradual, it is a process,” said Bell. “With COVID, it was a little tough to find training and games to play. I try to play as much as I can.” Bell loves playing with the PHS back four of fellow seniors James Novak, Ethan Parker, Dylan Parker, and Simon Sheppard. “With all four of my defenders, I have been playing with them since I was eight years old,” said Bell. “I have been best buddies with them for years.” PHS head coach Wayne Sutcliffe acknowledged that his squad wasn’t at its best in the early stages against Steinert. “We weren’t happy about them dictating the play in the first half for the most part,” said Sutcliffe. “It seemed like we couldn’t do anything well or right, aside from Nick converting on that goal.” A t h a l f t i m e , S u tc l i f fe t weaked his for mation to help get the Tigers in rhythm. “We made some changes positionally,” explained Sutcliffe. “We put Breno [Azevedo] back alongside with Rafa [Davis Grandi] as a holding center mid. That worked out well. I just think it was our level of urgency, just getting to the ball quicker, winning the duels, and winning the headers. Then the soccer will take care of itself, so that was our message at half.” Sophomore forward Weg-

mann showed some urgency, tallying a goal and an assist in the second half. “That is what he is capable of; he has got breakaway speed, he can isolate defenders one versus one and make something dangerous happen,” said Sutcliffe. “He has some gifts that other guys don’t in terms of his speed plus he is a good player. It was great for Richard.” In Sutcliffe’s view, his back line is capable of doing some big things. “They are all seniors along with Jared and Rafa in front of them,” said Sutcliffe. “There is a familiarity and there is a history. They have all been on this team for a number of years. They have a lot of minutes together. They have to keep working hard to meet the tests of some of these teams that we are going to face.” Having Bell as the last line of defense is comforting for Sutcliffe. “Jared has been great; we have discussed some goals that we want to try to achieve as a team defensively,” said Sutcliffe. “He has taken an extra amount of responsibility.” Sutcliffe was pleased to see his squad take things to a higher level down the stretch against Steiner t.

“The second half is the best we have played overall,” said Sutcliffe. “I am happy about the response today to a poor first half. It was not a good first half, not acceptable. More i m p or t a nt l y, we p l aye d well, we had some clinical finishes. I couldn’t be happier with our effort.” With PHS playing a limited schedule due to COVID-19 concerns, Sutcliffe wants to see maximum effort every time out. “We are going to play 11 CVC (Colonial Valley Conference) games and then a sectional tournament,” said Sutcliffe, whose team dropped to 2-1 with a 3-2 loss to Robbinsville last Saturday, and plays at Notre Dame on October 14 and at Hopewell Valley on October 17. “We are treating ever y match like it is a postseason tournament game. We are trying to build that.” Bell and his teammates are determined to make the most of this fall. “We are just happy that we have a season; it was looking like we weren’t going to have one,” said Bell. “Every minute we are on the field we are grateful. I feel this is really our year. During freshman year on the freshman team, we had an undefeated season. This should be one of our biggest years as a program.” —Bill Alden

BELLWETHER: Princeton High boys’ soccer goalie Jared Bell leaps to make a stop against Steinert last Wednesday. Senior star Bell made three saves in the contest to help PHS defeat the Spartans 3-0. The Tigers, who dropped to 2-1 with a 3-2 loss to Robbinsville last Saturday, play at Notre Dame on October 14 and at Hopewell Valley on October 17. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


Eve n t houg h t h e Hu n School girls’ soccer team has a 2020 schedule that is limited to five games due to COVID-19 concerns, Jenn Barrett is seeing plenty of intensity from her players. “The girls like to have the goal and they like to have something to work towards; we are definitely practicing as though we have a full season,” said Hun head coach Barrett, who guided the Raiders to a 4-11 record last fall in her debut season at the helm of the program. “ We r e a l l y h a v e t h e

mindset that our goal is to achieve competitive greatness. We are trying to shift the culture to almost look forward to the really hard games because that is what is going to make you better. True athletes want to play the best teams.” Hun boasts some good athletes at forward in junior Olivia D’Aulerio and sophomore Oluwatooni Olaleye. “We are really young this year, we have a lot of good, young talent which is amazing,” said Barrett, whose team fell 6-1 to Princeton

HEADY PLAY: Hun School girls’ soccer player Chloe Hill heads the ball in a game last season. Senior defender Hill is helping to spearhead the Hun back line this fall. The Raiders, 0-2, are next in action when they host Pennington on October 24. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Day School last Saturday to move to 0-2 and is next in action when it hosts Pennington on October 24. “Right now I am looking at Olivia up top and Toni who is awesome. Both of them have incredible speed and a great eye for the goal. They are very, very hard workers and work very well together.” In the midfield, sophomore Riley Hayes, freshman Mackenzie Turner, junior Kiki Mauer, senior Anna Hyson, and freshman Olivia Spektor bring skill, savvy, and a good work rate. “Right now I have Riley in the midfield as well as Mackenzie, who is very, very good,” said Barrett. “Kiki is also in the midfield. We have some other people sporadically in there like Anna who is also going to play some midfield. Olivia is a freshman to look for. I think we are going to have a much more offensive mindset. These kids all play a lot of competitive soccer. The soccer knowledge they bring and just their speed and effort is going to be very, very helpful for us.” Newcomer Zoey Palmer is already making an impression at goalie with her competitiveness. “We have a great freshman goalkeeper in Zoey,” said Barrett. “She is excellent with her hands; she is very aggressive. She is really good on saving breakaways and when to come out. Her positioning is very good, she has really fit in well.” Along the back line, the trio of senior Chloe Hill, sophomore Maya Zeruld, and senior Abby Trimble will be counted on to hold the fort. “They are very solid defensively,” said Barrett. “They have good control of the game and that will shine through.” Even with the shortened schedule and no prep or county tournament in 2020, Barrett believes her players can get a lot out of this fall, on and off the field. “I think they realize in the long run that this is going to be a really good experience for them because they just appreciate to be out there together,” said Barrett. “Hopefully when this is all over and they can come back next year and not have all of these rules, they are going to be much more appreciative and gracious. They are handling it really well, just modeling those behaviors of how to deal with this and to be resilient.” —Bill Alden

Sedgley Enjoys Memorable Senior Day, Helping PDS Boys’ Soccer Edge Hun in OT Will Sedgley skinned both of his knees but that didn’t stop him from stepping up as the Princeton Day School boys’ soccer team hosted the Hun School last Friday. With the local rivals knotted in a scoreless tie in the second half, Sedgley battled to tally the first goal of the contest, blasting a shot off of Hun goalie Alex Donahue and then slotting the rebound into the back of the net with 19:43 remaining in regulation. “My goal came from pressing the guy who had the ball; I had the run to the line and I tried to pull it back but no one was there,” said Sedgley. “I was a little upset about that, I used it to drive me on. I should have scored on the first shot but I got the rebound. It was the first goal for me in a while. I have to score more. I was playing center back in the first half. I wanted to get more attacking so I moved to the midfield.” The game went into overtime as Hun got a goal by Hector Suriel with 2:05 remaining in the half to force t he extra session. PDS, though, pulled out the win as senior defender Aidan McChesney scored on a header with 3:55 left in the first overtime to give the Panthers a 2-1 victory. Heading into overtime, Sedgley and his teammates were determined to come through. “We are all a little deflated, we had a talk in the huddle before that got us going,” recalled Sedgley as he unraveled the tape covering both of his knees. “We had a game against Hillsborough that went to OT (a 0-0 tie on October 5). We had a lot of chances, we thought we should have won in OT so we wanted to not let that happen again. We fought and we get the goal ultimately.” Breaking through with the victory was important for the Panthers, who improved to 1-2-1. “It is the first win of the s e as on, we t hou g ht we should have beat Hillsborough,” said Sedgley. “In the other two games, against Monroe we didn’t play well (a 7-1 loss on October 1) and then against Gill St. Bernard’s (a 4-2 loss on October 7) we fought but we couldn’t win. They are a good team, they are ranked No. 3 in the state. We were happy with how we fought in that game but it was good to get the first win of the season, especially with some tough games coming up.” PDS was fired up for the fight with Hun as it was honoring its Class of 2021. “It is important that we won on Senior Day; last year we los t on S en ior Day and the seniors were unhappy with that and we didn’t want that to happen to our class this year,” said Sedgley, whose fellow seniors on the squad include Trevor Kunk le, A nt hony Cucchi, Jacques Hughes, Fabio Yales, Alexander Liu Nowakoski, Mark Santamaria, Stephen Chukumba, Hector Capeilleres, and McChesney. “We have a big class and we wanted to celebrate

everyone. We have all been together since freshman year. Most of us were on the JV team that was undefeated and then most of us went to varsity sophomore year so we have grown up together. We are all really happy to get this win together.” PDS head coach Ollie Hilliker knew that his squad was in for an intense encounter against its local rival. “Every season it is back and forth, real close games; it is usually a one-goal game, it is always very close,” said Hilliker. “It is a good rivalry when both teams get up for the game.” Overcoming a flat start, PDS got going down the stretch of the game. “We star ted poorly, we were disappointed with how we started,” said Hilliker. “We only started playing once we scored. They made a mistake and Will capitalized and got the goal and then we started to play the game. We started to put the intensity up, we had four more chances to score real quick. On a different day, we should have scored four goals there and been clear and finished but we weren’t and they battled back.” Hillier credited Sedgley with giving the Panthers a spark. “Will was very good; he is a solid player on the team,” said Hilliker. “He was actually playing at the back. We moved him back up the field to have his creativity in there. It was a game-changing play from him to make the difference. Stepping up to make that goal but also before and after that, constantly getting the ball and creating opportunities.” As the contest went into overtime, Hilliker was looking for his team to generate scoring opportunities. “It was just go and get the game; it is golden goal so

there is no plan of making this last 20 minutes,” said Hilliker. “Let’s get in, get it done and make an all-out attack on the game and don’t hold anything back. Fortunately they did. We put pressure on them straight away which I think was really good and we finished the game off.” Focusing on the rest of the season, Hilliker wants his players to show that attacking mentality every time they step on the field. “Normally you try to work to peak into the postseason, there is no postseason to peak for so it is right now,” said Hilliker, whose team is slated to host Pennington on October 17 and then play at Moorestown Friends on October 19. “It is every day, and I think that is something these guys really have to get into. They need to play each game like it is the last. You never know when stuff could get shut down and turned off at any point. You have to treat every game like you might not get another one in the season. It is about being competitive and bringing everything from the start of the game and treating it like it is your last game. If they get that, then the performances will come with it.” Sedgley, for his part, is primed for more big performances this fall. “After our bad record last year (5-12), we just want to have a winning record,” said Sedgley. “We are happy that we are having a season, I know that Lawrenceville isn’t having a season, they are our big rival. Obviously we would prefer a tournament but we are just happy that we are able to play some games. We have 11 games, which is a lot more than I was expecting. I think Hun is only playing five or six games, so it is good that we are playing so many games.” —Bill Alden

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 14, 2020

Hun Girls’ Soccer Still Bringing the Intensity Despite Having Limited Season Due to COVID

IMPOSING HIS WILL: Princeton Day School boys’ soccer player Will Sedgley controls the ball in recent action. Last Friday, senior defender/midfielder Sedgley tallied a goal to help PDS defeat Hun School 2-1 in overtime. The Panthers, now 1-2-1, are slated to host Pennington on October 17 and then play at Moorestown Friends on October 19. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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w i t h s op h o m or e J a m e s w ith a personal best of McDonald coming in 32nd 21:01 over the 5,000-mein 18:34. As for the Raider ter course. girls, sophomore Sophia Burton placed 19th in the girls’ 1-2-3 race, posting a Football: Marco Lainez time of 21:54. triggered the offense as Hun defeated Paramus Catholic High 46-20 last Saturday. G irls’ Soccer : Megan Quarterback Lainez threw Rougas starred as PHS defour touchdown passes to feated Robbinsville 2-0 last help the Raiders improve Saturday. Sophomore forto 2-0. Hun hosts Malvern Girls’ Soccer: Kirsten ward Rougas tallied both Prep (Pa.) on October 17. Boys’ Soccer : Hector Ruf came up big to help PDS goals in the contest with Suriel scored a goal but it defeat Hun School 6-1 last goalie Moji Ayodele making wasn’t enough as Hun fell Saturday. Sophomore star three saves in posting the 2-1 at Princeton Day School Ruf tallied three goals with shutout. The Tigers, now in overtime last Friday. Ju- senior standout Kelly Beal 2-0-1, host Notre Dame on nior Suriel tallied with 2:05 chipping in two as the Pan- October 14 and Notre Dame left in regulation to force OT thers improved to 2-1. PDS on October 17. Girls’ Tennis: Sweeping as the Raiders dropped to hosts Bishop Eustace on Oc1-1. Hun plays at Life Center tober 15 before playing at the three singles matches, Pennington on October 17 PHS defeated Notre Dame Academy on October 14. G i r l s’ Te n n i s : A n n a and at Moorestown Friends 4-1 last Saturday. Eva Lependorf posted a straight-set Schweer provided a high- on October 19. Girls’ Tennis: Emmy De- win at first singles with sislight as Hun fell 4 -1 to Princeton Day School last morre posted a straight-set ter Bella Lependorf followWednesday. Schweer post- win at first singles as PDS ing suit at second singles ed a straight set win at sec- defeated the Hun School and Lucia Marckioni doing ond singles as the Raiders 4-1 last Wednesday. Other so at third singles. PHS, now dropped to 2-1. Hun hosts victors for the Panthers in 6-0, plays at Ewing on OcStuart Country Day in Oc- the match included Neha tober 15, hosts Hightstown tober 17 and plays at Pen- Khandkar at second singles on October 17, and plays at along with Hannah Van Lawrence High on October nington on October 21. 19. Cross Country : Harry Dusen and Hayden Masia at first doubles and Sophie Carter starred as Hun competed in the Central Jersey Zhang and Emily Zhu at secXC Shootout last Saturday ond doubles. PDS, now 4-0, at Thompson Park in James- plays at Stuart Country Day burg. Junior Carter placed on October 15. Girls’ Cross Country: fourth in the boys’ 1-2-3 race, clocking a time of Emily McCann led the way Field Hockey: Morgan 16:23 over the 5,000-me- to help PDS defeat MooreJohn and Catherine Martin stown Friends 19-39 last ter course. Classmate Xavier each scored goals as Stuart Silverio took 31st in 18:30 Friday. Freshman McCann placed first for the girls edged Bordentown 2-1 last Thursday. Lily Harlan picked up assists on both goals to PERSONAL PAPERWORK help the Tartans improve to SOLUTIONS...AND MORE, INC. 2-0-1. Stuart plays at the During these challenging times we are actively supporting our clients Hun School on October 17.

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Out of concern for the safety and well-being of the community, Mercer County Community College (MCCC) and the MCCC Foundation Athletics Committee have

decided to reschedule the college’s Inaugural Athletics Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony to June 12, 2021 at Trenton Country Club. Originally scheduled for November 2020, the induction ceremony will honor three of the college’s national championship teams and 15 individuals who have made exceptional contributions as players, coaches, or administrators to MCCC’s more than half-century of sports excellence. All proceeds from the event will go toward vital scholarship support for MCCC’s student athletes and improvement of the college’s athletic facilities. In response to the rescheduling, two anonymous local donors have launched a Matching Gift Challenge to triple all gifts (including the popular “Name Your Scholarship” donations) made to the Athletics Hall of Fame campaign from now through December 31, 2020. For ever y dollar contributed, the anonymous donors will contribute a dollar, up to $10,000 per donor, with a goal of raising $30,000 in total. Donations to the MCCC At h l e t i c s H a l l of Fa m e campaign are fully tax deductible. The impact to the student athletes will be tripled for gifts made by December 31. For example: $10 becomes $30, which covers the registration fees for one student; $200 becomes $600, which covers the tuition for a three-credit course; and $800 becomes $2,400, which covers fulltime tuition for one semester (12 credits). Gifts can be made online at mccc.edu/hof. Any checks mailed to the MCCC Foundation should be marked “Athletics Hall of Fame Match.” The MCCC Vikings are members of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) Region XIX and the Garden State Athletic Conference (GSAC ). Mercer’s storied athletics history includes 14 national championship teams (8 in

men’s soccer, 4 in women’s tennis, and 2 in men’s basketball), with almost 250 student athletes achieving NJCAA All-American status and hundreds more gaining Region XIX and GSAC honors. In addition, over the past decade more than 50 Viking student athletes have been recognized as NJCAA Academic All-Americans. The MCCC Athletics Hall of Fame was created to honor exceptional teams and outstanding individuals. For questions about the event or to learn more about supporting the MCCC Athletics Hall of Fame, contact Tatiana Dodge at dodget@ mccc.edu.

Princeton Athletic Club Holding Winter 6K Dec. 5

The Princeton Athletic Club ( PAC ) is holding its annual Winter Wonder Run 6K on December 5 over the Institute Woods course.

The run starts at 10 a.m. from the Princeton Friends School and the event is limited to 200 participants. The run will be chip timed. All abilities are invited, including those who prefer to walk the course. Online registration and full details regarding the event and race protocols are available at www.princetonac.org. The entry fee is $35 up to three weeks prior to the race and includes a T-shirt. From 21 days to 72 hours prior (online only), the entry fee goes up to $40, including a T-shirt. Sign up at the event will be $55 if space is available, credit card only. The PAC is a nonprofit, all-volunteer running club for the community that promotes running for the fun and health of it and stages several running events each year.

RECORD PACE: Princeton Day School boys’ cross country star Gunnar Clingman shows his form as PDS defeated visiting Moorestown Friends 23-33 last Friday. Senior Clingman took first in the race and broke his own course record with a time of 17:27 over the 5,000-meter layout. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Dr. Stephanie K. Chorney Dr. Stephanie K. Chorney died peacefully in Princeton, NJ, on September 29, 2020, at age 50. She is the daughter of Don Chorney and the late Doris Chorney. Stephanie leaves her legacy to her husband Orlando, son Julian, father, sister Alison Yowell, as well as extended family, friends, and colleagues. Stephanie was a graduate of Rutgers University and Temple Medical School. She was a licensed pediatrician, with her last position being at Penn Medicine Princeton Health Hospital, where she worked on the pediatr ic floor. Stephanie was a strong advocate for the arts, health, education, equality, sustainability, and Jewish communit y effor ts. From being the co-chair of the Princeton Environmental Commission to encouraging the Princeton Public Schools to concentrate on healthy meals, to placing separate

trash and recycle containers dispersed throughout the tow n, she made her mark. To honor her for significantly contributing to the community, Princeton Township declared May 26, 2020 Dr. Stephanie Chorney Day. She was a wonderful wife, mother, daughter, sister, aunt, and friend to everyone. Stephanie led by example that coordination, collaborat ion, and com munication help us unite toget her. Her resilience inspired others as she fearlessly stood up for what she believed in and gave tireless effort to aid many. Stephanie was a beautiful person inside and out with a heart of gold and will be missed by all. We love you, Stephanie, and you will always be remembered and never forgotten. In lieu of flowers, cont r ibut ions c a n b e made t o w a r d s h t t p s : // w w w. stephaniechorney.org/howto-donate-instructions.

Alvin Gordon, most recently residing with his wife Felice Gordon at Windrows senior community, died at home at the age of 91 on September 28. He and Felice previously resided at 48 Woods Way in Princeton for 48 years and moved to Windrows in 2018. Prior to 1970, they lived in East Brunswick. Their younger children, Joel and Neil, both attended Princeton High School. Mark, their oldest child (deceased in 2018), attended East Brunswick High School. Alvin was born on April 11, 1929 to Bernard and Mary Gordon in New York Cit y. His sister G inger, who lives in Teaneck with her husband Jim, was his only sibling. He attended Stuyvesant High School in Manhattan. He subsequently attended Queens College, and then transferred to the City College of New York. He earned his degree in civil engineering, graduating from CCNY with honors. A lv in and Felice married in 1952. They lived in Queens for two years and then moved to East Brunswick, where he met his future business partner Sanford Nacht. Together, they fou nde d A ls a n Mas ons, a masonr y and concrete firm, which experienced a decade of growth and success during the 1960s. Alvin and Sandy transitioned Alsan into commercial real estate development during the 1970s. He took a break from business in 1979, and then ser ved a t wo -year ter m as t he president of t he Princeton Jewish Center. In 1982, he created Gordon Construction, which was focused on building

Frances married her handMemorial contributions may be sent to the Jewish some childhood sweetheart, Noel, on September 23, Center of Princeton. 1961. They spent 59 loving years as the very best of friends. They enjoyed cruises, traveling around the U.S. and Caribbean, and her favorite vacation spot Hilton Head, SC. When they weren’t traveling, they enjoyed going to Flyers hockey games, the local theatre, dining out, and relaxing by their pool. One of her true passions was Genealogy. She was active in the Central Jersey Genealogy Society. She their newsletter, Frances Young Goeke published and took several research Frances Young Goeke, 78, trips all over the U.S. and of Lawrenceville, passed one to England with her away peacefully on Thurs- husband and parents. Over day, October 8th. several years she worked on She was born on May 17, her own, and assisted others 1942 in Trenton, NJ; daugh- in their family ancestry. ter of the late Frank and Mil“Aunt Fran” to many, she dred Young. She is survived will be remembered for her by her loving husband of 59 devotion to her family and years, Noel; a brother and friends. Whether it be a Girl his wife, George and Connie Scout patch, a school play, a Young of Ewing Twp., NJ; religious event, a soccer or sister-in-law, Wilma Goeke basketball game, she was alof Virginia ; t wo nieces, ways the first in line to help Lorraine Ellerth and her and support the people she husband Dan, Georgette loved. She had a special Jung and her husband Tom; bond with her niece Danione nephew, Alan Goeke ella, whom she babysat from and his wife Lynn; and her birth; she never missed a great-nieces and nephews, basketball game and always Andrew, Jocelyn, Jackson, wore her team colors. Jimmy, Shelby, Maxwell, Fu nera l s er v ice s have and Daniella. been completed under the Frances attended Sacred coordination of Blackwell Heart School and graduated Memor ia l Hom e, 21 N. from Cathedral High School Main Street, Pennington, in 1960. She started work NJ. www.blackwellmh.com for the State of NJ in 1960 In lieu of flowers, please and retired as a Principle con s i d e r a d on at ion to Administrative Assistant the Dementia Society of to the Attorney General in A m er ic a, P O B ox 60 0, 1999 after 39 years of serDoyle s tow n, PA 18901. vice. www.dementiasociety.org.

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 14, 2020

Obituaries

renovation projects in New York City. The company was successful, and as it grew, Alvin invited his previous partner Sandy to join him. Felice joined Gordon Construction as the director of marketing in the late 1980s. The company continued to operate until the mid 1990s, when Alvin and Felice decided to retire. Alvin and Felice enjoyed traveling abroad and in the United States. They also loved folk dancing and playing on their tennis court that they had built at their Princeton residence, where Alvin also played with his friends. Alvin and Felice enjoyed listening to classical music and Broadway show tunes. They attended performances at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, the New York City Ballet, and other venues including McCarter Theatre in Princeton. At the age of 44, Alvin successfully undertook the challenge of climbing with a group expedition to the summit of Grand Teton mountain in Wyoming. He and Felice also enjoyed participating in a book club in their later years. Alvin is survived by his wife Felice and by his sons Joel and Neil. In addition, he is also survived by his daughters-in-law Patricia Gordon and Anna Pegler G ordon, as well as h is grandchildren Bernard, Rebecca, Dora, Eli, and Talia Gordon, Maya and Naomi Pegler- Gordon, and four great-grandchildren. He is also survived by his sister Ginger and her husband Jim, as well as Ginger’s three sons Jeremy, David, and Benjamin.

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Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton UNIQUE GIFTS! www.princetonmagazinestore.com The Mercer Oak, set of 4, 35mm colored film prints, by John Rounds

Preaching Sunday, Oct 18, 2020

Rev. Alison L. Boden, Ph.D. Dean of Religious Life and of the Chapel


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2020 • 32

New Homes, Additions, Renovations, Restorations Highlight the Varied Projects of Period Architecture

D

esigns that stand the test of time… Custom quality designs dedicated to providing style with a statement… Designs that are unique and yet appropriate to the surrounding landscape… This is the hallmark of Period Architecture.

IT’S NEW To Us

Opened in 2010 in Malvern, Pa., by co-founder and President Joseph Mackin Jr. and co-founder and Vice President Jeffrey Dolan, the firm is known for its ability to work in a number of different styles and periods of architecture. It can create designs rooted in time-honored traditions that will accommodate 21st-century lifestyles. “Our goal is to remain an advocate for enduring architectural design and create beautifully livable spaces for our clients,” explains Jessica Fogle, associate principal and marketing director. “Working with the existing landscape allows a new home to look and feel as if it has always

been there. In homes with unique features, finding cohesion with the surroundings is imperative to ensuring a timeless design.” High Quality The firm’s diversified projects include new homes, renovations, restorations, additions, barns, and property planning. The main focus is residential work, but it has also designed custom commercial buildings and event centers. Restoration and renovation account for the majority of the designs. A historic, high quality design aspect that is appropriate to modern lifestyles is appealing to many clients, points out Mackin. “Our clients appreciate quality of craftsmanship, beautiful millwork, and blending classic details with modern technology and comforts like open kitchens and large master suites. Specifically, there is more emphasis on a need for outdoor living like covered porches, terraces or even ‘follies’ (decorative structures in a garden or backyard) in the landscape to get outside and enjoy nature, no matter the weather.” “It always takes creativity to combine modern technology with enduring design,” he

continues, “and we appreciate our clients’ vision and trust in our process.” Accommodating clients’ special requests and specific needs is another specialty of Period Architecture, adds Dolan. And that can include cozy niches for their fourfooted companions. “Clients are always looking to customize their spaces for their everyday lifestyles,” he repor ts. “For many, that means incorporating pet-friendly areas like dog showers in mudrooms, specific spaces for crates, even a separate kitchen to prepare dog food. “In other homes, we have added fully-equipped spas with saunas, cold plunge pools, steam showers, and massage rooms. When given the opportunity, clients enjoy dedicating a whole room to a hobby like an art studio or toy train exhibition.” Regional Styles Period Architecture’s work is seen along the East Coast and beyond, with the majority of projects in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. Other designs, however, are visible from Connecticut to Florida and Ohio and Indiana to Wyoming, and other states.

www. pe r i od architectu reltd .com

CUSTOM DESIGN: “Period Architecture considers the character of a region to unite architectural traditions of the past with contemporary lifestyle and technology. Our clients are looking for timeless design, and our designs transcend period styles and trends.” The architects at Period Architecture, 53 Church Road in Malvern, Pa., are proud of the variety and high quality of their work, including such projects as the state-of-the-art residential interiors and exteriors shown here. “What is great about our process is that the planning and research into the area allows us to easily blend our design to match our regional styles,” points out Fogle. “The project we designed in Wyoming was a barn-like

structure, so we could take cues from our experience on the East Coast and apply those methods of design with a slight twist.” As in all areas of life today, COVID-19 is a factor at Period Architecture, and the emphasis on operating virtually has become the norm. “Thankfully, with access to virtual technology, we have been able to continue to present and communicate with clients regularly,” says Fogle. “Meetings via Zoom are becoming the new normal, and with the digital rendering technology we’ve always utilized, it’s easier than ever for clients to visualize what their finished space will look like without having to make the trip into our office.” “Our business has remained steady throughout 2020,” adds Mackin. “We are keeping our eyes and ears open to changes that may be on the horizon for home design. This year has given us a glimpse into what work/ life balance may look like in the future. We think there will be a renewed importance of dedicated workspaces, like home offices, since modern technology makes working from home more convenient. “Smart home technology has really taken off in the last few years. Clients now have the ability to control their entire home with their phone or by speaking to a device. It’s becoming a new standard in modern living.” Extensive Experience Working with clients and helping them to realize their dream is the architects’ greatest pleasure, observes Dolan, and their extensive experience is very important in overcoming any hurdles along the way. “Acquiring official approval from local commissions, townships, or county review boards for construction of new homes or renovations can seem daunting to some clients,” he explains. “But since we have been in business for 10 years, we have built the relationships and know what to do to ease this part of the process.” The company has established an outstanding reputation in its field and has received awards from such organizations as the Pennsylvania Historic Preservation,

West Chester Bricks & Mortar, Society of American Registered Architects, and Fine Homebuilding. It has been recognized regularly with regional home tours. Its designs have also been published in New Old House, Period Homes, Elle Decor, and Equestrian Living magazines. Period Architecture is affiliated with The American Institute of Architects, The American Institute of Architects Philadelphia Chapter, The Athenaeum of Philadelphia, Institute of Classical Architecture & Art, and Society of American Registered Architects. Inventive Designs The firm’s inventive designs, whether historical, transitional, or contemporary, continually attract new clients. With people traveling less and spending more time at home, the desire for a congenial atmosphere that integrates family life, entertaining, and indoor and outdoor living will only increase. “Our clients are what set us apart from other architectural firms,” says Fogle. “We love and appreciate working with clients who have a vision and allow us to translate and expand upon it to create something truly unique. By listening to their wants and needs, we are able not only to create a beautiful space but build a team of professionals to take their project through to the finish line. Our collaboration doesn’t stop at design; we ensure that our clients have the best builders, interior designers, landscape architects, and craftsmen to bring their vision to life. “I love the technical side of what we do,” she continues. “It’s like a puzzle. Finding a way to combine the client’s vision with the site or existing structure is one piece; but also ensuring that the look and style conform to regional styles can be another piece to figure out. “Our office environment is really collaborative. We always look forward to working together, and we are supportive of one another and each project. We love what we do!” or further information, call (610 ) 719-0101. Visit the website at www.periodarchitectureltd. com. —Jean Stratton

F


33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2020

Fall Home & Design Town Topics

Akin Care Senior Services

An Aging in Place Plan is not for “old” people. Did you know that, although Americans are healthier and living longer than ever before, seniors are outliving their ability to drive safely by an average of 7 to 10 years? They drive less after dark, during rush hour or in bad weather, and avoid difficult roads such as highways and intersections. How many of us have thought of, or planned for even this one eventuality? An Aging in Place Plan is created to help individuals choose where they want to reside and the lifestyle they wish to have as they age. That includes incorporating ideas about the services, care, and support one might need as life changes over time. Aging in place doesn’t mean just not moving. The goal of anyone wanting to age in place should be not just to maintain quality of life, but to thrive where ever you want to be. In order to do that, a good plan focuses on what is most meaningful to you and should cover possible adaptations to your home, finances, future care and other items, and should be

created as early as possible. As with any good plan, it should be maintained over time. Who needs an Aging in Place Plan? Creating a plan is for you, right now! If you haven’t retired yet you have time to think about your needs, research your options, and put together a plan that fits you and your family. If you have retired, putting the time into creating a plan will help you remain in control of your life. Building a plan will prepare you to deal with the issues you’ll encounter down the road and ease some of the concern the ones you love will experience. For those us caring for a parent or someone we love, an Aging in Place Plan is for us too. You can be the most helpful by planning with them to ensure their needs are met and wishes respected. It will also help you provide the level of care that is right for them and show your respect to them by ensuring their dignity is kept intact and their needs are met. For more information call Akin Care Senior Services at ( 609 ) 450 - 8877. 303 Witherspoon Street, Princeton; akincare.com.

Baths Etc ...

Baths Etc.

Baths Etc. is a familyowned and operated bath and kitchen showroom serving New Jersey since 1985. In cooperation with our supply house, Vernon’s Penn Supply, we aim to meet and surpass our customers’ expectations with exceptional service and unique product lines. We have been helping our clients design the bathroom of their dreams. No project is too big or too small. We of fer a var iet y of products from American Standard, TOTO, Omega, California Faucets, and Jaclo, just to name a few. Our knowledgeable sales staff looks forward to assisting you in any future project, hand-in-hand with your contractor or plumber of choice. Located in the Ellsworth Shopping Center, behind t h e P r i n c e to n J u n c t i o n Train Station. Call for an appointment or show room walk through! 33 Princeton Hightstown Rd, Princeton Junction; (609) 799-5777; bathsetc.com.

Black Bear Builders

Black Bear Builders is a full-service residential construction firm, specializing in additions and large-scale alterations. We offer designbuild services for interior

alterations and small-medium size additions. We also work with top architects on larger-scale additions and custom homes. Black Bear Builders was established in 2010 and we currently have 10 employees, including seven fulltime carpenters. We utilize trusted subcontractors and local suppliers to help ensure that our culture of personal service is emphasized throughout the construction process. We understand that both the quality of the construction and the process are paramount to delivering a successful project and have hundreds of satisfied customers that can attest to our level of service. We are located in Pennington, and the bulk of our work is in the Princeton market. We pride ourselves on having good relationships with Princeton municipality and adhering to local building regulations. The principal, Matthew Bonacci, apprenticed under Harry Williams at williams-BUILDER for eight years before starting Black Bear Builders. Matthew is a lifelong resident of Hopewell Township and earned a business degree f rom B oston College in 1999. Please feel free to visit

our Houzz.com page to see more photos of our work. 23 Route 31 North, Pennington. (609) 730-0700; blackbearbuilders.com ; info @ blackbearbuilders.com.

Bogy Construction

Bogy Construction is a New Jersey-based general contractor specializing in new construction, additions, and home residential renovations in the Princeton and surrounding areas. Founded in 2004, t he company has produced over 150 new construction, additions, and renovation projects. With Bogy Construction, you get personal involvement with the company’s owner in each and every project. With a longtime p e r m a n e n t c r e w, B o g y Construction provides you the flexibility, cost effective solutions and hands-on attention to detail that result in a high quality product and customer satisfaction every time. Regardless of the size or complexity of the project, we work closely with the homeowners every step of the way. We take care of all the details, including professional design, architectural drawings, permitting, and everything else needed to deliver a final product that doesn’t just meet customer

expectations but exceeds them. Our best testimony, in addition to the number of years in business, is from our former clients. We are proud to have earned the reputation of a reliable, accessible, and accountable construction company that delivers high quality in a timely fashion. 21 M o n tg o m e r y Av enue, Rocky Hill. ( 609 ) 917-0154;bogyconstruction. com; bogyconstruction@yahoo.com.

Cane Farm Furniture

Welcome to Cane Farm Furniture, home of artisancraf ted reproductions of authentic vintage furniture, custom-made pieces, and one-of-a-kind accessories for your home — all destined to become your heirlooms. Cane Farm Furniture custom creates rustic furniture and accessories. Although weekdays are spent creating special-order pieces in our workshop, we are happy to meet by appointment during the week so we can give you and your design team our full attention. Cane Farm Furniture offers the largest inventory of Windsor chairs and country dining tables compared

Now introducing kitchen cabinetry by Omega! Let us guide you with confidence and expertise. We want the best for your home, so we offer the best! Call our showroom today!

33 Princeton-Hightstown Road, Princeton Junction | 609.799.5777 • bathsetc.com Mon-Fri 10-5 Sat 10-3 | By appointments only

Continued on Next Page


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2020 • 34

ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential Residential && Commercial Commercial ELECTRICAL ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR CONTRACTOR www.cifellielectrical.com

CIFELLI CIFELLI

www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com Renovations

CIFELLI ELECTRICAL ELECTRICAL INC. INC.

Renovations Service Panel Upgrades Renovations

ELECTRICAL INC. Service Panel Upgrades

Paddle Service PanelFans Upgrades Residential & Commercial Paddle Paddle Fans Fans Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential & Commercial Cifelli Electrical Inc. ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Cifelli Electrical Inc. Cifelli Electrical Inc.

ELECTRICAL INC. Cifelli Electrical Inc.

Authorized Authorizeddealer dealerfor forsales, sales, Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer for sales, installation and startup installation andfor startup Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer forsales, sales, Authorized dealer Authorized dealer for sales, installation and installation andstartup startup installation and startup installation and startup installation and startup installation and startup

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Renovations Lic #11509A Renovations Lic #11509A Renovations Service Panel Bonded and Insured Lic #11509A #11509A Service Panel Lic Bonded and Insured Service Panel Upgrades Bonded and and Insured Insured Service Panel Bonded Upgrades Upgrades Upgrades Serving Princeton and surrounding surroundingareas areas Paddle ServingFans Princeton and Paddle Fans Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Paddle Fans ServingFans Princeton and surrounding areas Paddle Interior Interiorand and Interior and Interior and Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting Lighting Exterior

Fall Home & Design Continued from Previous Page

to any other store in the area. Our unique and special pieces include ironwork, lamps, historic toys, china, aviation art, famous Campanelli prints, gifts, and accessories. Every piece we sell demonstrates 17th- and 18th-century American construction details, materials, and finishes. Speak to us about translating your vision into furniture you’ll want to pass down through the generations. We’ll meet with you and your designer or architect to help you choose from our large selection of oneof-a-kind pieces. Visit our showroom to custom-order designs from our preferred manufacturers or a traditional design interpreted by one of our cabinetmakers in your choice of sizes, wood /materials, and finishes. When you peruse our store, you will discover quality, custom-made furniture with an early American and Colonial design. Visit us for upholstery services. 99 Route 519 (KingwoodStockton Road), Rosemont. ( 609 ) 397- 0 60 6 ; i n fo @ canefarmfurniture.com; canefarmfurniture.com.

Cifelli Electric

609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238

www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com Lic #11509A Lic Lic #11509A #11509A Lic #11509A Bonded and Insured Bonded Insured Bonded and and Insured Insured Bonded and

Serving Princeton and surrounding areas

ServingPrinceton Princeton and and surrounding surrounding areas areas Serving surrounding areas Serving Princeton and

Cifelli Electrical Inc., located in Princeton, has been serving Princeton and surrounding areas in Mercer, Somerset, and Hunterdon counties for the past 30 years. Specializing in both residential and commercial services, installations, and repairs. The needs of every customer are important to us at Cifelli Electrical Inc.

Our goal of providing quality residential and commercial services combined with honesty has made us the first choice of many residential and commercial clients in Central New Jersey. You can count on us to take care of your electrical needs today! (609) 921-3238; cifellielectrical.com.

Cranbury Design Center

You’ve decided it’s time to renovate your kitchen. What are the key considerations to making sure the finished product checks off all the boxes on your wish list? Many of our clients are working from home and looking for their kitchen spaces to do double duty as learning centers for their children, or home office spaces for themselves. Once design goals are decided, it helps to select a few conceptual pictures to understand the style and “look and feel” you want to achieve. Appliance choices will be needed before a conceptual design can be done. For example, the type of hood venting you use will depend on how large and where the cooktop or stove is located. Are you using an appliance hood, or going for a custom wood hood look? Will the kitchen cabinets will be one color, or a mix of two? Perhaps the island will be a dark color, or even wood, and the perimeter cabinets will be white. Countertop colors and the type of material — quartz, granite, marble, wood, or even metal tops are all popular right now and can help create a timeless design. Lighting, backsplash tile and layout, hardware, and paint

colors complete the list of items to consider. Cranbury Design has the project management team to help you with all your kitchen design decisions. We can also work with you and your building contractor to design and help you make tile, plumbing fixture, and color selections. We can safely work with you as you get started on your design project! Call us for a virtual design review today. 145 West Ward Street, Hightstown. ( 609 ) 448 -5600 ; cranburydesigncenter.com.

Dewey’s Upholstery Shop

refinishing surfaces. We are proud to provide the highest quality products at affordable rates for every style and need. Our team handles upholstery repair for both indoor and outdoor furniture, and we also specialize in color matching. Specialty finishes are available, such as fringes, brad finishes, tassels, and other customized looks. Our shop has a very large selection of fabrics in stock at affordable prices. We also provide window treatments for both residential and commercial customers, working with blackout blinds, shades, Roman shades, pleated shades, and curtains. Our shop also specializes in cornices, skylight shades, Austrian shades, balloon shades, Venetian blinds, wooden blinds, canopies, awnings, cloud shades, flags, and jabots. Our team of experts prov i d e s a nt i q u e f u r n i t u r e refinishing and repair for residential and commercial customers. We also do furniture restoration and hand-rubbed finishes using env ironmentally fr iendly products. We repair and refinish couches, infants’ furniture, chairs, dining room and living room furniture, outdoor furniture, settees, heirlooms, and chaise lounges. Our professional staff is here to assist you in finding the perfect fit and fashion. 33 Station Drive, Princeton Junction. ( 609 ) 799-1778 ; deweysupholsteryshop.com.

Dewey’s Upholstery Shop has been family-owned and operated since 1944. Brothers Joe and Scott grew up in the shop watching their dad perfect his craft. They say learning the trade came naturally and they benefited from a hands-on approach that Mr. Weingart emphasized was key. Scott and Joe began working at the store with their father regularly in the early 1970s. The boys then took over the business from their father after he passed in 2011, and are proud to carry on the family name today. Specializing in furniture refinishing and upholstery services, our second-generation, local company is ver y detail- or iented and strives to achieve the look you have been searching for! We will always work directly with you to get a customized look. Dewey’s Upholstery has served all residential and Flesch’s Roofing & commercial customers in Sheet Metal Co., Inc. the Mercer County area for Voted Best Roofing Commore than 70 years with pany in the 2017, 2018, and the finest upholstery and Continued on Page 38

License # 13VH04549200

• 15+years residential new construction, additions and home renovations • Princeton area local small business • Custom construction, personalized service with one on one customer involvement • Full service contractor including designs, architectural drawings, permitting • Dedicated permanent crews

ROCK BOTTOM LANDSCAPING & FENCING LAWN CARE | OUTDOOR LIVING SPACES | LANDSCAPE DESIGN DRIVEWAYS | OUTDOOR KITCHENS | STONE WORK | RETAINING WALLS

BELLE MEAD, NJ | 732-873-6780 W W W. R O C K B O T T O M L A N D S C A P I N G . N E T

• Owner operated

609-917-0154 • 215-932-5900 bogyconstruction@yahoo.com 21 Montgomery Ave., Rocky Hill NJ 08553


35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2020

PENNINGTON, NJ 6 0 9 • 7 3 0 • 07 0 0

www.blackbearbuilders.com

PRINCETON BEDROOM ADDITION


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2020 • 36

Town Topics

Elements of Design Dewey’s Upholstery Shop Princeton’s Oldest Upholstery Shop

Redefining

Design

DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES INSPIRING CUSTOM DESIGNS PROJECT MANAGEMENT FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION

Specializes in Custom Upholstery and Window Treatments. Expert provider of antique furniture refinishing for more than 70 years. 33 Station Drive Princeton Junction, NJ 08550 (609) 799-1778 deweys1944@gmail.com deweysupholsteryshop.com

48 West Broad Street • Hopewell, NJ 08525 • p: 609.466.1445 • tobiasdesignllc.com

G L EN FR I ES A S S O C I AT E S ARCHITECTS & LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS 505 Mercer Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 | Call us at 609-924-8700 or visit glenfries.com www.bespokerealestate.com/listing/614-sagg-main-street-sagaponack/


Elements of Design

DESIGN. EXPERTISE. STYLE. 195 Nassau Street, Suite 25, Princeton NJ 08542 609.977.5872 www.fredahoward.design

Start your kitchen or bath project—virtually!

As many of us are working from home together, why not begin planning your upcoming kitchen or bath project. You’d be surprised how much you can accomplish working remotely with one of our design professionals. Visit us at cranburydesigncenter.com/ VirtualDesign to get started. We are here for you!

(609) 448-5600 145 W. Ward Street, Hightstown NJ www.cranburydesigncenter.com Town Topics Luxury Living 10092020.indd 1

10/9/20 9:55 PM

37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2020

Town Topics


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2020 • 38

Fall Home & Design Continued from Page 34

Peroni’s Upholstery

obsessed with the fine details that go into beautiful furniture

Since 1979, we have provided our customers with customized upholstery and drapery for the home and office.

212 Hazel Avenue, Ewing, NJ 08638

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2019 Town Topics Readers’ Choice Awards. For all your roofing, flashing, and gutter needs. You can count on our family owned and operated business to put more than 25 years of experience to work for you. We are dedicated to your complete satisfaction and we strive to meet all of your needs quickly and efficiently. Our workmanship speaks for itself. (609) 503-4407; fleschsroofing. com.

Freda Howard Interiors LLC

Freda Howard Interiors LLC is a full service, client focused residential interior design practice providing cutting edge solutions for interior design dilemmas. They provide clear communication of the design process every step of the way — each design phase is executed with the intention of keeping the project on budget and within code. The practice works with a vast professional network with a collective 60+ years’ experience. From architects and builders, to artists and painters —they have every step of the design process covered! An avid traveler, Freda brings her experience living on three continents to her interior design practice by using her uncanny ability to step into a client’s life to design the interior spaces of their dreams. She believes that a client’s home should reflect who they are, the way they live, and include the things they love. Fre d a e ar n e d t wo i n terior design degrees at

Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) in New York City, where she also earned her Architectural Color Specialist Certificate. She studied small business economics at Stockholms Universitet in Stockholm, Sweden, and holds a degree in economics from Rutgers University. Freda is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) and the Interior Design Society (IDS), and is actively involved in several community causes. Her practice is based in Princeton. (609) 977-5872; fredahoward.design.

Glen Fries Associates Architects, LLC

Glen Fries Associates offer a full spectrum of design services to clients across the country from our office in Princeton. Our projects range from primar y residences in both city and suburb, to beachfront second homes along the East Coast, to mountain retreats in Colorado, Montana, and California. Though our major focus has been residential, we have also designed restaurants, commercial and corporate offices, public spaces and retail stores. We specialize in projects that integrate site and context and seek to create an enduring design that respects the vernacular within a classical framework. We work to incorporate new technologies as they emerge and to develop solutions that minimize our impact on the environment. For each project, we can provide all phases of planning, design, and construction super vision, including obtaining all building permits and documents. In

many locations, we have established long-term working relationships with contractors and consultants with whom we work well. 505 Mercer Road, Princeton. (609 ) 359-0087; gfries @ glenfr ies.com ; glenfr ies. com.

Jefferson Bath and Kitchen

You’re i n go o d ha nds with Jefferson Bath and Kitchen. Creating beautiful bathrooms since 1989, our knowledge and experience make working with us an easy and enjoyable process. Our showroom, open by appointment, has a selection of fixtures and faucets that you won’t see at other area showrooms. We focus on high-end, quality, unique products from smaller, lesser know n manufacturers like Jaclo, Toto, and Stone Forest. To expand and complement our showroom, we also offer a carefully curated selection of products on our website, jeffersonbathandkitchen.com. If you’re looking for that one - of-kind piece, this is the place. We also specialize in bathroom remodeling. Jill Jefferson-Miller and her husband, David Miller will manage your remodeling project from design through completion. They’ve been managing projects together for over 16 years, and their coordination and organization are invaluable assets to any client who chooses to work with them. Let our experience be the creative solution for your next remodeling project. Our showroom is open

Family Owned and Operated

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Visit our showroom today!

Hours: Fri. 10-5; Sun. 1-5 and andby byappointment appointment Hours:Only Fri.&&Sat. Sat.miles 10-5;is 1-5 Where Rosemont? 20 from Princeton!

Hours: Fri. & Sat. 10-5; Sun. 1-5miles andfrom by appointment Where is Rosemont? Where is Rosemont? 6 miles from New Hope 10 Flemington Hours: & Sat. 10-5; Sun. 1-5 and by appointment Where is Rosemont? Where is Rosemont? Hours:Fri. Fri. &Only Sat. 10-5; 1-5 and appointment Where is Rosemont? 6 miles from New Hope 10 miles fromby Flemington Only 20 miles from Princeton! Hours: Fri. & Sat. 10-5; Sun. 1-5 and by appointment Where is Rosemont? 20 miles from Princeton! Rte.Only 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5 miles N. of Stockton) 20 miles from Princeton! Where is from Rosemont? is Rosemont? OnlyWhere 20 miles Princeton!

Only 20 miles Princeton! Rte. 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5 miles N. ofFlemington Stockton) miles from New Hope 10 miles from 66miles from New Hope 10 from Where is from Rosemont? •miles www.canefarmfurniture.com Only 20 from Princeton! 6609-397-0606 miles from New Hope 10 miles miles fromFlemington Flemington 6Rte. miles from New Hope 10 miles from Flemington Only 20 miles from Princeton! 6609-397-0606 miles from New Hope 10 miles from Flemington 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5 miles N. of Stockton) • www.canefarmfurniture.com Only 20 miles from Princeton! Rte.519, 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5 miles N. Stockton) Only 20 miles from Princeton! miles from New Hope 10 miles from Flemington Rosemont, NJ (1.5 miles N.of of Stockton) Where is Rosemont? Rte. 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5 miles N. of Stockton) 6 miles from New Hope 10 miles from Flemington 6 miles6Rte. from New Hope 10 miles from Flemington 609-397-0606 • www.canefarmfurniture.com Rte. 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5 milesfrom N. ofFlemington Stockton) 6609-397-0606 miles from New• Hope 10 miles www.canefarmfurniture.com 6609-397-0606 miles from New Hope 10 miles Rte. 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5 milesfrom N.ofofFlemington Stockton) 609-397-0606 • www.canefarmfurniture.com Rte. 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5 miles N. Stockton) • www.canefarmfurniture.com 609-397-0606 • www.canefarmfurniture.com Rte. 519, NJ miles N. of N. Stockton) 20Rosemont, miles from Princeton! Rte. Only 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5 miles of Stockton) Rte. 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5 (1.5 miles N. of Stockton) 609-397-0606 • •www.canefarmfurniture.com 609-397-0606 www.canefarmfurniture.com 609-397-0606 • www.canefarmfurniture.com 609-397-0606 • www.canefarmfurniture.com 6 miles from New Hope 10 miles from Flemington www.canefarmfurniture.com 6609-397-0606 miles from New •Hope 10 miles from Flemington

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Continued on Next Page

Shingles ✧ Metal

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Continued from Previous Page

by appointment, Monday through Friday and some weekends. Our website is always open and Jill can always be reached at jill@jeffersonbathandkitchen.com.

Lisa Tobias, Tobias Design, LLC

Lisa Tobias is the owner and head designer for Tobias Design, LLC, based in Hopewell. She’s been in business for over 16 years. Lisa and her staff pride themselves on working with their clients to design kitchens, bathrooms, or other home space that reflect their personalities and needs. The outcome is a unique transformation of space. No two projects are ever alike. They believe the process needs to be as enjoyable as the final product. “We at Tobias Design have created a formalized, documented approach to achieve this goal. In the end, we want each of our clients to walk away as a ‘Yes because” referral for us, not a ‘Yes but.’ We go out of our way to meet that high standard,” says Tobias. Lisa’s business, Tobias Design, has been recognized by the Best of Houzz, an online design platform for homeowners, since 2014 for the highest honor — “Best of Customer Service” category. Tobias Design won a Chrysalis Award last year honoring the finest remodeling projects as well as a NARI Award for Remodeling. Tobias Design has been named Town Topics Readers’ Choice Best Kitchen and Bath Designer for the past two years. Lisa is a member of the National Kitchen and Bath Association

(NKBA), National Association of Professional Women (NAPW), Princeton Chamber of Commerce, National Association of Renovators Industry (NARI), and CLIPPs (Certified Living in Place Professional). If you’re looking to redesign that aging kitchen or bath, stop by and see the staff at the Tobias Design showroom located at 48 West Broad Street, Hopewell, or email them at info@tobiasdesignllc.com. (609) 4661445; tobiasdesignllc.com.

Maplewood at Princeton

L o c a te d i n d o w n to w n Plainsboro on the Penn-Medicine Princeton Health Campus, Maplewood at Princeton brings a unique, exciting, and innovative new choice to seniors in Middlesex County. With resort-style amenities, unmatched services, innovative programming, and priority access to world-class care, you will enjoy the lifestyle you deserve at Maplewood at Princeton. In your new community, you w ill exp er ience t he peace of mind offered by our unwavering commitment to providing an exceptional level of service and care. Whether you are considering Assisted Living or Memory Care, you’ll find that every detail of our modern senior living community has been carefully considered — from sun-drenched amenity spaces, to on-site health care and wellness activities, to fresh, locally sourced dining, and more. Best of all, Maplewood at Princeton’s innovative approach to care and close proximity to Penn-Medicine Health offer you the benefit of a full continuum of care and access to the latest

research, training, and advancements in medical care, and much more. Maplewood at Princeton is scheduled to open Summer 2021. To find out more, contact us today at (844) 3510363 or visit MaplewoodatPrinceton.com.

Peroni’s Upholstery

We have over 40 years in business! Since 1979, Peroni’s Upholstery, a family owned and operated business, has been providing quality customer service and the highest quality craftsmanship. We specialize in residential and commercial upholstery. When you want to put together that custom look, our Design’s Corner Showroom lets you find the perfect fabrics and flooring to make your home reflect your style and taste. From a custom home to the designer office, we’ve got you covered. Peroni’s Upholstery offers the expertise and attention to detail necessary to create the perfect accessory for your home or business. Whether we are giving a new look to a treasured antique or creating the ultimate seating experience, our goal is to take your ideas and make them a reality — quickly and affordably. Our custom upholstery and reupholstery services are exactly what your home or business needs to appear more lively and true to your unique taste. From cabinet refinishing to banquette room upholstery, we can customize and repair it all! Our team of experts and creative designers is also proud to offer sleek and elegant window treatments and personalized solutions to enhance the interior aesthetic of your home. Whether you are in the process of

remodeling your kitchen or desire to add window treatments for sliding glass doors in the living room, Peroni’s Upholstery will help determine the perfect designs and material for your space. Our consultative process is designed with you and your home in mind since we strive to make the entire experience easy and convenient for you while never compromising on quality materials or attentive customer service. If you require custom drapery for uniquely shaped windows or are curious about energyefficient treatment solutions, our team of professionals is always readily available to help. Serving Mercer County and Bucks County, Pa., as well as the surrounding areas. 212 Hazel Avenue, Ewing; (609) 538-8855; peronisupholstery.com.

Raynor Woodworking and Building Co.

Custom building, renovations, and cabinetry. Founded on craftsmanship, quality, and dedication. Raynor Woodworking and Building Co. has been serving clients in the Greater Princeton area, and its surrounds, since 1980, and has built their reputation on three things: quality, a commitment to working one-on-one with clients, and taking on all projects from conception through to completion. So whether you are interested in building a new home, renovating an existing property, or need fine woodworking or cabinetry, you will get the same level of time and attention from R ay nor Woodwork ing. 8 Herbert Road, Robbinsville. ( 609 ) 259-7285 ; raynorwoodworking.com.

Rock Bottom Landscaping & Fencing

With fine attention to detail, unparalleled craftsmanship, a high level of integrity and friendly service all at a fair price, Rock Bottom Landscaping is one of New Jersey’s premier residential and commercial landscape service providers. (732) 8736780; Rockbottomlandscaping.net.

Russell Roofing and Exteriors

Russell Roofing and Exteriors — the commercial and home exterior contractors that service all aspects of your exterior needs from roofing, windows, and doors to siding, gutters and masonry. If you are like most home or commercial property owners, you don’t buy a new roof or replace siding every week. The need for roof or exterior repair or replacement is — hopefully — a rare occasion. So how do you make the right choice when selecting an exterior contractor? Simple … work with a company that boasts over 25 years of quality services and craftsmanship. You are our neighbors and friends. At Russell Roofing and Exteriors, we have pride in the work we do and it

shows in almost every neighborhood in the Delaware Valley. We encourage you to contact us to discuss your needs — from exterior cleaning and emergency repair to enhancing curb appeal with an exterior renovation, Russell Roofing and Exteriors will offer you free consultation, inspection, and estimate to help you make the best decision for your home or commercial property. 812 State Road, Suite 106, Princeton. (888) 567-7663.

Tindall & Ranson Plumbing, Heating & AC

Tindall & Ranson is your LOCAL expert in plumbing, heating, air conditioning, geothermal and home energy audits. Located in Central Jersey, we service the entire Greater Mercer County New Jersey area. We’re dedicated to providing you with quality service and information — whether you’re a valued returning customer or new to our family! From routine service and maintenance to emergency repairs, to installation or replacement, and energy efficiency — you can rely on Tindall & Ranson to keep your family’s home comfort needs as our utmost concern. 800 Alexander Road, Princeton. (609) 897-9770; tindall ranson.com.

Specialists

2nd & 3rd Generations

MFG., CO.

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RUSSELL ROOFING & EXTERIORS

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If it’s Russell, it’s Right! Guaranteed!

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2020

Fall Home & Design


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2020 • 40

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41 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2020

Top Notch Medical Care On Your Doorstep Delivering on a reputation for providing excellent care, upscale service, engaging programs and an unparalleled, vibrant living experience, Maplewood Senior Living is proud to introduce its newest assisted living and memory care community, Maplewood at Princeton. Located on the Penn Medicine Princeton campus. Opening Summer 2021

833.269.1016 | MaplewoodAtPrinceton.com One Hospital Drive | Plainsboro, New Jersey


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 14, 2020 • 42

to place an order:

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HOUSECLEANING AVAILABLE by Polish lady. Please call Monika for a free estimate. (609) 540-2874. 09-30-4t

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BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-15-21

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000

HOUSE FOR RENT: Nestled on historic country estate. Princeton address in Lawrence Township. 3 BR, LR/DR w/fireplace, eat-in kitchen, garage, laundry, hardwood floors. Includes lawn & snow maintenance. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $2,400. Available now. (609) 731-6904. 10-14-3t

Irene Lee, Classified Manager tf

throughout the 2pm world nowTuesday and forever. • Deadline: • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, card, or check. your credit service! High skill levels in ESTATE LIQUIDATION Cash, S&J CLEANING SERVICES: Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us. indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, SERVICE: Free estimates referenc07-15-21 • 25& available words or less: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. St. Jude, worker of miracles, pray for I will clean out attics, basements, deck work, power washing & genes. Cande Villegas, House cleaning us. St. Jude, helper of the hopeless, CREATIVE CLEANING eral on the spot fix up. Carpentry, garages• &6 houses. Single itemsannual discount rates available. • 3 weeks:pray$40.00 • 4prayer weeks: 6 weeks: $72.00 month and I BUY ALL •KINDS of Old or Pretty service provider. cande.villegas99@ for us. Say this 9 times a $50.00 SERVICES: tile installation, moulding, masonry, yahoo.com, (609) 310-2797. General day. By the 9th day your prayer will Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, to entire estates. No job too big or • Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inch • all bold face $10.00/week T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www. All around cleaning services small. In business over 35 type: years, etc. costume jewelry, evening bags, fancleaning for Residential, Apartment & be answered. Publication must be Office spaces.

09-30-3t STRING LESSONS ONLINE: Violin/Viola lessons. Fiddling, Traditional & Suzuki Methods. Ms. D., Master Of Music, violin/viola pedagogy. Teaches all ages/levels, in Princeton area since 1995. FREE INTRO LESSON until 11/4. Call (609) 924-5933; cldamerau@yahoo.com 10-14

promised. Thank you, St. Jude. PM 10-07-3t

cy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469.

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 10-07-4t

09-30-21

HOUSE FOR RENT: Nestled on historic country estate. Princeton address in Lawrence Township. 3 BR, LR/DR w/fireplace, eat-in kitchen, garage, laundry, hardwood floors. Includes lawn & snow maintenance. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $2,400. Available now. (609) 731-6904. 10-14-3t

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, masonry, etc. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www. elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com It’s time for deck rehabilitation & refinishing! You may text to request one of my job videos from my projects & receive it by text or email. STAY SAFE. tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

CREATIVE CLEANING SERVICES: All around cleaning services to fit your everyday needs. Very reli able, experienced & educated. Weekly, biweekly & monthly. Please call Matthew/Karen Geisenhoner at (609) 587-0231; Email creativecleaningservices@outlook. com 09-23-8t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 09-23-8t

SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES: Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 08-12/10-28

serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-15-21 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription!

Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs

Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

DO YOU HAVE ITEMS YOU’D LIKE TO BUY OR SELL? Consider placing a classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf S&J CLEANING SERVICES: Free estimates & available references. Cande Villegas, House cleaning service provider. cande.villegas99@ yahoo.com, (609) 310-2797. General cleaning for Residential, Apartment & Office spaces. 09-30-3t STRING LESSONS ONLINE: Violin/Viola lessons. Fiddling, Traditional & Suzuki Methods. Ms. D., Master Of Music, violin/viola pedagogy. Teaches all ages/levels, in Princeton area since 1995. FREE INTRO LESSON until 11/4. Call (609) 924-5933; cldamerau@yahoo.com 10-14

“I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, gratitude is always possible, and feeling good starts at home." —Emma Wright

CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

tf

Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations

elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com It’s time for deck rehabilitation & refinishing! You may text to request one of my job videos from my projects & receive it by text or email. STAY SAFE. tf

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON

HANDYMAN: General duties at

HOUSECLEANING AVAILABLE by Polish lady. Please call Monika for a free estimate. (609) 540-2874. 09-30-4t ST. JUDE’S NOVENA: May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and preserved throughout the world now and forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us. St. Jude, worker of miracles, pray for us. St. Jude, helper of the hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day. By the 9th day your prayer will be answered. Publication must be promised. Thank you, St. Jude. PM 10-07-3t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 10-07-4t

to fit your everyday needs. Very reli able, experienced & educated. Weekly, biweekly & monthly. Please call Matthew/Karen Geisenhoner at (609) 587-0231; Email creativecleaningservices@outlook. com 09-23-8t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 09-23-8t HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21 SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES: Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 08-12/10-28

Lawn & Landscape Services

• Innovative Design • Expert Installation • Professional Care 908-284-4944 • jgreenscapes@gmail.com License #13VH06981800

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

MASON CONTRACTORS RESTORE-PRESERVE-ALL MASONRY

Mercer County's oldest, reliable, experienced firm. We serve you for all your masonry needs.

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

BRICK~STONE~STUCCO NEW~RESTORED

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

Simplest Repair to the Most Grandeur Project, our staff will accommodate your every need!

Call us as your past generations did for over 72 years!

Complete Masonry & Waterproofing Services

Paul G. Pennacchi, Sr., Historical Preservationist #5. Support your community businesses. Princeton business since 1947.

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

609-394-7354 paul@apennacchi.com

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $24.80 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $63.70 • 4 weeks: $81 • 6 weeks: $121 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


tOWN tOPICS CLASSIfIEDS GEtS tOP rESULtS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-15-21 EStAtE LIQUIDAtION SErVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-15-21 WHAt’S A GrEAt GIft fOr A fOrMEr PrINCEtONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CArS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf DO YOU HAVE ItEMS YOU’D LIKE tO BUY Or SELL? Consider placing a classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf S&J CLEANING SErVICES: Free estimates & available references. Cande Villegas, House cleaning service provider. cande.villegas99@ yahoo.com, (609) 310-2797. General cleaning for Residential, Apartment & Office spaces. 09-30-3t StrING LESSONS ONLINE: Violin/Viola lessons. Fiddling, Traditional & Suzuki Methods. Ms. D., Master Of Music, violin/viola pedagogy. Teaches all ages/levels, in Princeton area since 1995. FREE INTRO LESSON until 11/4. Call (609) 924-5933; cldamerau@yahoo.com 10-14 PrOfESSIONAL BABYSIttEr Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, masonry, etc. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www. elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com It’s time for deck rehabilitation & refinishing! You may text to request one of my job videos from my projects & receive it by text or email. StAY SAfE. tf CArPENtrY/ HOME IMPrOVEMENt in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf HOUSECLEANING AVAILABLE by Polish lady. Please call Monika for a free estimate. (609) 540-2874. 09-30-4t St. JUDE’S NOVENA: May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and preserved throughout the world now and forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us. St. Jude, worker of miracles, pray for us. St. Jude, helper of the hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day. By the 9th day your prayer will be answered. Publication must be promised. Thank you, St. Jude. PM 10-07-3t

rOSA’S CLEANING SErVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 10-07-4t HOUSE fOr rENt: Nestled on historic country estate. Princeton address in Lawrence Township. 3 BR, LR/DR w/fireplace, eat-in kitchen, garage, laundry, hardwood floors. Includes lawn & snow maintenance. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $2,400. Available now. (609) 731-6904. 10-14-3t CrEAtIVE CLEANING SErVICES: All around cleaning services to fit your everyday needs. Very reli able, experienced & educated. Weekly, biweekly & monthly. Please call Matthew/Karen Geisenhoner at (609) 587-0231; Email creativecleaningservices@outlook. com 09-23-8t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 09-23-8t

AT YOUR SERVICE A Town Topics Directory

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner Home Repair Specialist

~ Pool Repairs & Rebuilds

609-586-2130

~ Pool Openings ~ Pool Closings ~ Weekly Service

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

609-466-2693

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

EStAtE LIQUIDAtION SErVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-15-21 WHAt’S A GrEAt GIft fOr A fOrMEr PrINCEtONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CArS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf

LANDSCAPING FRESH IDEAS

Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Stone Walls and Terraces FREE CONSULTATION

609-683-4013

Erick Perez

Fully insured 15+ Years Experience Call for free estimate Best Prices

A Tradition of Quality

SUPErIOr HANDYMAN SErVICES: Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 08-12/10-28

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-15-21

Since 1955

PRINCETON, NJ

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21

tOWN tOPICS CLASSIfIEDS GEtS tOP rESULtS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

Call Anytime to Schedule • 908-359-3000

BLACKMAN

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

HOME rEPAIr SPECIALISt: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. Of PrINCEtON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21

SWIMMING POOL SERVICE

43 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 14, 2020

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. Of PrINCEtON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21

Highest Quality Seamless Gutters. Serving the Princeton area for 25 years Experience and Quality Seamless Gutters Installed

(609)737-2466

3 Gutter Protection Devices that Work! Free estimates! All work guaranteed in writing!

Easy repeat gutter cleaning service offered without pushy sales or cleaning minimums!

Serving the Princeton Area since 1963

609-921-2299

BRIAN’S BRIAN’S Find us on Facebook and Instagram

FIREWOOD SPECIAL

PAINTING

TREE SERVIC TREE SERVICE 609-466-6883

Seasoned Premium Hardwoods Split & Delivered $225 A cord / $425 2 cords

TREE SERVICE BRIAN’S

Offer good while supplies last

Stacking available for an additional charge

HD

HOUSE & MORE

House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish (Benjamin Moore Green promise products)

609-466-688

Trees & Shrubs 609-466-6883

Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

Trimmed, Pruned, and Removed Hector Davila Stump Grinding & Lot Clearing 609-227-8928 Trees & Shrubs

Trimmed, Pruned, and Removed Locally OwnedStump & Operated for &over years! Grinding Lot 20 Clearing Locally Owned & Operated for over 20 years!

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

Trees & Shrubs

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

Trimmed, Pruned, and Remo American Furniture Exchange Stump Grinding & Lot Clea

Locally Owned & Operated for over 20 yea 30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area


2016

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 14, 2020 • 44

DO YOU HAVE ITEMS YOU’D LIKE TO BUY OR SELL? Consider placing a classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

HOUSECLEANING AVAILABLE by Polish lady. Please call Monika for a free estimate. (609) 540-2874. 09-30-4t

S&J CLEANING SERVICES: Free estimates & available references. Cande Villegas, House cleaning service provider. cande.villegas99@ yahoo.com, (609) 310-2797. General cleaning for Residential, Apartment & Office spaces. 09-30-3t

ST. JUDE’S NOVENA: May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and preserved throughout the world now and forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us. St. Jude, worker of miracles, pray for us. St. Jude, helper of the hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day. By the 9th day your prayer will be answered. Publication must be promised. Thank you, St. Jude. PM 10-07-3t

STRING LESSONS ONLINE: Violin/Viola lessons. Fiddling, Traditional & Suzuki Methods. Ms. D., Master Of Music, violin/viola pedagogy. Teaches all ages/levels, in Princeton area since 1995. FREE INTRO LESSON until 11/4. Call (609) 924-5933; cldamerau@yahoo.com 10-14

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 10-07-4t

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

HOUSE FOR RENT: Nestled on historic country estate. Princeton address in Lawrence Township. 3 BR, LR/DR w/fireplace, eat-in kitchen, garage, laundry, hardwood floors. Includes lawn & snow maintenance. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $2,400. Available now. (609) 731-6904. 10-14-3t

HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, masonry, etc. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www. elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com It’s time for deck rehabilitation & refinishing! You may text to request one of my job videos from my projects & receive it by text or email. STAY SAFE. tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

CREATIVE CLEANING SERVICES: All around cleaning services to fit your everyday needs. Very reli able, experienced & educated. Weekly, biweekly & monthly. Please call Matthew/Karen Geisenhoner at (609) 587-0231; Email creativecleaningservices@outlook. com 09-23-8t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 09-23-8t

We Buy Homes for Cash All cash offer Fair market value No real estate agent fees Easy and quick closing No inspection Contact Rona at 732-887-5893 or at info@orielhomes.com for more information.

Brian Wisner

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21 SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES: Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 08-12/10-28 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-15-21 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-15-21

Broker Associate | Luxury Collection C: 732.588.8000 O: 609.921.9202

Brian Wisner

Broker Associate | Luxury Collection

of Princeton

Brian Wisner E : bwisner19@gmail.com

Broker Associate | Luxury Collection W : BrianSellsNJ.com C: of732.588.8000 Princeton O: 609.921.9202

343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540

Lic: 1432491

E : bwisner19@gmail.com W : BrianSellsNJ.com

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

Lic: 1432491

LET’S TALK REAL ESTATE... Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

2016

S&J CLEANING SERVICES: Free estimates & available references. Cande Villegas, House cleaning service provider. cande.villegas99@ yahoo.com, (609) 310-2797. General cleaning for Residential, Apartment & Office spaces. 09-30-3t STRING LESSONS ONLINE: Violin/Viola lessons. Fiddling, Traditional & Suzuki Methods. Ms. D., Master Of Music, violin/viola pedagogy. Teaches all ages/levels, in Princeton area since 1995. FREE INTRO LESSON until 11/4. Call (609) 924-5933; cldamerau@yahoo.com

Lic: 1432491 Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

GET READY FOR SPRING COLOR WITH FALL PLANTING While you’re getting your lawn and landscaping ready for the winter months, it’s also a great time to plant some perennials that will fill your garden with spring color. You can choose to plant a variety of low maintenance plants and bulbs in the fall. Hardy bulbs: Hardy bulbs such as crocuses, tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, and irises can be planted in late October or early November. Mixing varieties of bulbs with different bloom times will create a variety of spring blooms. But make sure you wait until spring before planting tender bulbs such as gladiolus and dahlias. Perennials flowers: There are a number of hardy and long-lasting perennial flowers that are perfect for northeast climates and for various kinds of soils. Some common popular perennials include coneflowers, daylilies, peonies, and lavender. These versatile blooms work well in either borders or garden beds. If you have your front porch decorated with autumn chrysanthemums, remember these can also be planted and will bloom again the following year.

Wednesday morning delivery for small Princeton route. If interested, please contact Gina Hookey at classifieds@towntopics.com

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, masonry, etc. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www. elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com It’s time for deck rehabilitation & refinishing! You may text to request one of my job videos from my projects & receive it by text or email. STAY SAFE. tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf HOUSECLEANING AVAILABLE by Polish lady. Please call Monika for a free estimate. (609) 540-2874. 09-30-4t ST. JUDE’S NOVENA: May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and preserved throughout the world now and forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us. St. Jude, worker of miracles, pray for us. St. Jude, helper of the hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day. By the 9th day your prayer will be answered. Publication must be promised. Thank you, St. Jude. PM 10-07-3t

10-07-4t tf

CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE

10-14

For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188.

W : BrianSellsNJ.com Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

2016

tf

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

Lic: 1432491 E : bwisner19@gmail.com

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC:

: BrianSellsNJ.com BrokerWAssociate | Luxury Collection 343 Nassau St. NJ 08540 C:Princeton, 732.588.8000 O: 609.921.9202

Consider placing a classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

A Gift Subscription!

Brian E : Wisner bwisner19@gmail.com

C: 732.588.8000 O: 609.921.9202

343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

DO YOU HAVE ITEMS YOU’D LIKE TO BUY OR SELL?

HOUSE FOR RENT: Nestled on historic country estate. Princeton address in Lawrence Township. 3 BR, LR/DR w/fireplace, eat-in kitchen, garage, laundry, hardwood floors. Includes lawn & snow maintenance. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $2,400. Available now. (609) 731-6904. 10-14-3t

An Equal Opportunity Employer 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528 609-924-2200 ext. 10

THE PRESENT DAY CLUB 72 Stockton Street Princeton NJ 08540 Club Manager Job Opening The Present Day Club seeks an enthusiastic, organized and detail-oriented Club Manager to oversee club operations, including staffing, events, and clubhouse maintenance. The Club Manager reports to the President of the Board. Founded in 1898 and housed in a historic building close to Princeton University, Princeton Theological Seminary and downtown Princeton, the Present Day Club continues to serve as a vibrant social hub for approximately 300 women in the greater Princeton area. The Club’s signature event is its popular weekly luncheon featuring acclaimed speakers on a wide variety of subjects, and it also offers its members day trips, theatre trips, parties, and special interest groups.

Qualifications: The successful candidate will be highly detail-oriented and able to manage competing priorities and multiple deadlines while remaining calm and courteous. A bachelor’s degree is preferred, but a minimum of an associate’s degree is required. Proficiency in Microsoft Office and Internet applications is a must. Experience with membership databases, bulk email marketing programs and basic website design is highly desirable. Must have experience in club management, office management, facility management or similar. Knowledge of inventory control, food sanitation and health and safety regulations and grounds maintenance is a plus. Must be able to work a flexible schedule, including some weekends. Must be able to commute to the Princeton clubhouse and have a valid driver’s license. Application Procedure: Send resume and cover letter to presentdaymanagersearch@gmail.com Job Type: 60% time (25 hrs.) to start, may increase post-pandemic. Salary: $27,000-$30,000 for a 25 hour work week. Website: www.presentdayclub.org

Princeton Charter School 100 Bunn Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 A public school serving 424 students in grades K-8 Seeks qualified applicants for the following 2020-2021 position: IN-PerSoN SuPPort / AIDe Monday through Friday 8:00 AM – 2:00 PM Immediate opening 2 years college and prior experience managing and supervising children ages 5- 14 preferred.

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Princeton Office 609-921-1900 | 609-577-2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

Submit applications to pcsoffice@princetoncharter.org or via mail to Gail Wilbur, PCS, 100 Bunn Drive, Princeton, NJ, 08540


Town Topics

www.robinwallack.com Listed by Robin Wallack • Broker Associate • Cell: 609-462-2340 • robin.wallack@foxroach.com

ALL TREATS NO TRICKS!

65 Moores Mill Mount Rose Rd, Hopewell $735,000

CO

SO MIN ON G

7 Symmes Court, Cranbury $895,000

49 Scott Ave, Princeton Junction $555,000

19 Madison St, Princeton $935,000

PRINCETON OFFICE / 253 Nassau Street / Princeton, NJ 08540 609-924-1600 main / 609-683-8505 direct

Visit our Gallery of Virtual Home Tours at www.foxroach.com A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC

45 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 14, 2020

MEET THE TOP AGENTS!


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 14, 2020 • 46

CANNOT BE REPRODUCED AT THIS PRICE

WYNFIELD HALL

Wynfield Hall is an exceptional example of old world craftsmanship and details not found in comparably priced homes today.This masterpiece was built with the concept of “green” construction and sophistication as a fusion of the best of both worlds. Sited on 3.8 Solebury acres,Wynfield Hall is over 7,000 square feet of luxurious living space that offers 4 bedrooms and 4.2 baths.The nucleus of the home is the Artisan crafted staircase that leads to the rotunda and sleeping quarters.The infrastructure is concrete and steel wrapped in the finest of millwork and designer finishes.The walnut library is the perfect respite to find solitude, and yet, just a few feet from the family quarters. The well equipped kitchen was designed for a master chef and the caterer’s prep area contains a commercial grade “walk in” refrigerator for the ultimate entertaining.The house has radiant heat throughout, including the 2nd floor, garage, basement and snow melt terraces.The air-conditioning has 6 zones.This is a home that needs to experienced...the upgrades and unique features are too numerous.The rear yard is ideal for al fresco dining while listening to the cascading waterfall.Wynfield Hall not only offers the design aesthetic of a discerning buyer, but the coveted classicism of a bygone era. $1,695,000

STARVIEW

It is refreshing to come across a contemporary home that offers all of the amenities desired by today’s buyer and still maintain its architectural allure. The home, set on a large open lot, allows for a pool or tennis court or just open space for family functions. The interior boasts the open floor plan and vaulted ceilings that are in demand today. A large stone fireplace is the anchor of the Great Room that flows seamlessly into the well equipped modern kitchen. The 2nd level offers guest and family bedrooms with a communal open space, perfect for an office, homework area or reading nook.The finished basement is ideal for large scale entertainment or a home theater. Starview is one of those homes that enjoys the open surrounding land and the twinkling stars above. $949,000

Art Mazzei

Art@addisonwolfe.com Cell: 610.428.4885

550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • AddisonWolfe.com • 215.862.5500


47 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 14, 2020

SPACES AVAILABLE FOR RENT ONLY

SETTLEMENT AT CANE FARM

The “Settlement at Cane Farm” is a unique collection of workshops for those Artisans looking for a pastoral setting within 15 minutes of New Hope and 5 minutes to Stockton, NJ.The various spaces range from a small storage unit to expansive spaces ideal for professional offices, craftsmen, limited retail or galleries of all sorts. The Rosemont Post Office is the nucleus of the “Settlement” which draws traffic on a regular basis.The “Settlement” is like no other rental community in the area and offers a peaceful coexistence with your staff, clients and Artisans with nature herself. RENTAL PRICE VARIES DEPENING ON UNIT SIZE - CALL FOR MORE DETAILS

FRENCHTOWN INVESTMENT

Fantastic Frenchtown investment opportunity! Award winning renovation of the Worman Mill! Two major, contiguous, residential and retail properties, 9 Trenton Avenue, “Worman Mansion”, and 15 Trenton Avenue, “Worman Mill”, are in pristine condition, with excellent income potential.#9 Trenton Avenue, is a Victorian farmhouse, fully renovated and offers three charming residences ranging in size from 1 bedroom/1 bath, 2 bedrooms/2 baths, 3 bedrooms/2 baths. All have wonderful vintage details, beautiful wide plank floors, and lovely, groomed outdoor living spaces overlooking a winding brook. 2 and 3 bedroom units have washers/dryers and dishwashers.#15 Trenton Avenue, is a large renovated mill offering 3 spacious, light filled residences, ranging in size from 3 bedrooms/1 bath, 2 bedrooms/1 bath, 3 bedrooms/1.5 baths. These units have versatile open floor plans, beamed ceilings, sisal, tile and wood flooring,~washers/dryers and dishwashers. The mill also boasts a large salon/retail space (Euphoria) on the street level, with great traffic exposure, plenty of parking and groomed outdoor living spaces. Total annual rental income $163,200. $995,000

Laurie Madaus

Laurie.Madaus@gmail.com Cell: 203.948.5157

550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • AddisonWolfe.com • 215.862.5500


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 14, 2020 • 48

STONEY HILL OVERLOOK

Welcome to 16 Stoney Hill. A rare opportunity to own a 12-acre estate in downtown New Hope.This well-appointed home has been completely updated. As you enter this stately home, you will come into the wide foyer with a private office and half bath to your right. Up a few stairs you come to the great room that has a marble fireplace, cathedral ceilings, custom millwork and expansive windows looking out to your private oasis.The kitchen is completely upgraded with a chef’s heart in mind. Featuring white cabinets with a grey island, beverage bar with a wine refrigerator, marble countertops and new appliances throughout.The kitchen also has a large eat in area with French doors to your covered pavilion with blue stone patio and large outdoor fireplace. The Bluestone patio wraps around the front of the house providing expansive vistas of the property. The is also an additional guest house with addition and a 2 car garage. This property has 2 approved building lots that just have to be recorded. $2,295,000

BELLE MEAD MANOR

Welcome to Belle Mead Manor. This executive home is nestled on 6.56 acres surrounded by protected woodlands. This stunning 5900 square foot home is perfect for entertaining and enjoying your own private oasis. This brick front home features an extra large 3 car garage, huge pool, large treks deck, extensive landscaping and paver patio complete with outdoor speakers, and tons of lighting throughout the property so you can enjoy the beauty from inside and outside year around. The gourmet eat-in kitchen featurs a Viking range, side by side Kitchen Aid refrigerator, double ovens and a warming drawer. This home also has a whole house generator. Come see what one of the most sought after streets in Belle Mead has to offer. $1,295,000

Nick Esser

Nick@addisonwolfe.com Cell: 646.745.5460

550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • AddisonWolfe.com • 215.862.5500


176 Parkside Drive, Princeton, NJ To pass through the gates into the courtyard where a fountain trickles under a canopy of sycamores, is to be swept to another time and place. It’s hard to believe such a majestic home began as a barn 120 years ago, part of the Drumthwacket Estate. Today, clean lines and modern finishes, like a state-of-the-art Boffi kitchen, are just the right counterpoint to authentic barn doors and wood beams rising up to meet a 26-ft ceiling. The core of the house is open and dramatic with a huge fireplace anchoring one side. The kitchen seamlessly clad in walnut was designed for a chef. A mezzanine library leads up to the top level with 3 bedrooms, two sleek baths, and a family room. The main structure opens to 2 finished wings, offering 3 more bedrooms, two baths, home office, exercise, and recreational space. 2+ acres with plenty of space for a pool. $3,950,000

51 Grasmere Way, Princeton, NJ Located in a leafy enclave just off of Princeton’s most picturesque winding road, close to a selection of renowned schools and recreational opportunities, this all brick house has no shortage of space or style. Every room is airy and generous in scale, especially the open kitchen and twostory family room. A handsomely detailed study crowned with a barrel vaulted ceiling overlooks the stone spa with waterfalls. An amazing stone terrace with meadow views runs the length of the house. The 4/5-bedroom floor plan offers ultimate flexibility with a main level suite, as well as a finished basement. $2,200,000

265 Herrontown Road, Princeton, NJ The possibilities at this scenic 3.3-acre property are endless! The simplest is to move right into the well-built ranch and enjoy it as it is with hardwood floors, a bright and open living/dining room and a big deck. You may also opt to expand and add a bedroom or two to supplement the existing three. Finally, buyers with big dreams may choose to start with a clean slate and build brand new. No matter what, the deep level lot with its sweeping front lawn and backyard shrouded in privacy can accommodate all your outdoor wishes - a pool, vegetable garden, or hammock strung between two tall trees. $735,000

Barbara Blackwell Broker Associate 4 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

(609) 921-1050 Office (609) 915-5000 Cell bblackwell@callawayhenderson.com For more information about properties, the market in general, or your home in particular, please give me a call.

Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.

49 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2020

Three Great Princeton Options


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 14, 2020 • 52

Barbara Blackwell Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty 4 Nassau Street, Princeton O: (609) 915-5000 bblackwell@ callawayhenderson.com princetonaddress.com With unparalleled industry knowledge, experience, and local expertise, I’m the Princeton Real Estate expert you’ve been looking for. Whether you’re buying or selling, I can help you get the best deal. Just looking? That’s OK. Use my website all you like, but you’ll have to create a free account to unlock all the best search features. Once you sign up, you’ll be able to save listings, save your search criteria, get automated email updates for new homes matching your saved search criteria, and more. Good luck on your house hunt! I hope to hear from you soon.

Beatrice Bloom Princeton Residential Specialist Weichert Realtors 350 Nassau Street, Princeton O: (609) 921-1900 M: (609) 577-2989 info@beatriceBloom.com BeatriceBloom.com Beatrice’s strong sales and excellent negotiation skills stem from her earned MBA degrees in finance and international business and a lucrative career on Wall Street as a bond trader. Her international upbringing as well as her foreign language skills offer a unique service for an all-inclusive clientele. Whether you’re moving to, moving within, or moving from Princeton, Beatrice is your best resource for real estate. Her professionalism, dedication, and the added value of Weichert All-Under-One-Roof is

161 Matthew Circle SOLD

your guarantee fort a stress-free make the most informed real home buying and selling experi- estate decision of their lives. I ence. have been called realtor of the year by my clients. I am always by their side as a counselor or Rocco D’Armiento consultant. I help my clients in Commercial and Residential ways other agents will not or Realtor cannot. Don’t settle for average Berkshire Hathaway service in today’s demanding HomeServices Fox & Roach, real estate market. You need the REALTORS® best and most knowledgeable. 253 Nassau Street, Princeton My practiced negotiation skills have helped my clients achieve O: (609) 921-1600 the price and terms they are exM: (267) 980-8546 pecting and bring their home or rocco.darmiento@foxroach. property to a successful closing com with side-by-side involvement As a successful professional and peace of mind. who is strong and focused, I try to go above and beyond for my clients so that they can achieve Lorraine Eastmann their real estate goals. I do this Berkshire Hathaway by helping to make the purchase HomeServices Fox & Roach, or sale of their home or business REALTORS® a very rewarding experience. For 6319 Lower York Road, those planning to buy or sell a New Hope, Pa. home/business, my character, O: (215) 862-3385 knowledge, and credibility helps M: (310) 766-2076 prospective buyers or sellers lorraineeastman@verizon.net

570 Hollow Road COMING SOON

Maureen Troiano NJAR® Circle of Excellence 2013-2019

* Top Ten GCI Producer Coldwell Banker Princeton Office 2018 Multi-Million Dollar Club International Diamond Society

10 Nassau Street • Princeton • 609-921-1411 609-240-7554 mobile • 609-688-4807 • direct 862-345-2220 fax

©2020 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.

18 Stout Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 The Rocco D’Armiento Team welcomes Tara O’Connor, “Miss LA” LIVE from Los Angeles, back home to Princeton. Growing up in the area and going to The Hun School of Princeton, Tara specializes in the highend luxury markets. With over 30 years of combined experience and over $70 M in sales last year, Rocco and Tara deliver customer service excellence in the home buying and selling processes. Success results from their dedication and loyalty to clients, their around-the-clock work ethic and their need to always do what is right and in their clients’ best interests. Clients become friends and family to them, relationships built for longevity, not one transaction. When you are thinking of buying or selling your home, call The Rocco D’Armiento Team. Serving NJ and PA, residential and commercial. Rocco Darmiento

Licensed in NJ & PA Residential & Commercial Sales Cell: 267-980-8546 | Direct: 609-924-1600 x7307 Email: Rocco.Darmiento@foxroach.com Website: www.RoccoSellsRealEstate.com

Tara O’Connor

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ 08540 | 609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

The D’Armiento Team Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Fox & Roach, REALTORS 424-332-7222 | Cell: 424-332-7222 Email: tara.oconnor@foxroach.com

Born and raised in Bucks County, Pa., I always wanted to own a home on Main Street in New Hope, Pa. After 20 years in Southern California working as a photographer, I returned to my roots and made my dream come true. I feel very fortunate to live in this scenic, award-winning Delaware River town. Filled with decades of history and noted for being home to dozens of notable artists and writers, I would say “ Bucks County is the new Hamptons.” Throughout my career as a photographer, I always found a way to build trust and bring out my clients’ best self in their photos. Now, as a realtor, I use that skill to both help my clients find homes that connect to their heart or list their home with ease and confidence in my innate ability to sell. My background in sales, art, style, and design coupled with my love for research give me the edge to be a five-star agent to my clients. As someone who knows the profound joy of making her own dreams come true, I am excited to help others achieve theirs. If Pennsylvania is not your state of choice and you’re looking to cross the bridge to New Jersey, I’m happy to cross with you. I have a license in N.J., too! Nick Esser Addison Wolfe Real Estate 500 Union Street, New Hope, Pa. O: (215) 852-5500 M: (646) 862-4290 nickesser@icloud.com Heidi Joseph Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Fox & Roach, REALTORS® 253 Nassau Street, Princeton O: (609) 924-1600 M: (609) 613-1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com Heidi is experienced in all aspects of the sales process and has been recognized for her sales performance each of the seven years she has been a realtor. Her prior career in financial services, marketing and sales, and her legal background, uniquely qualify her to help you reach your real estate goals — whether selling your home, finding a new one, or looking for investment properties. Rosaria Lawlor Coldwell Banker Realty 10 Nassau Street, Princeton O: (609) 921-1411 M: (609) 658-5773 rosaria.lawlor@ coldwellbankermoves.com Rosaria was born in New York, lived in Italy for a while, and then her family returned to the U.S. and settled in New Jersey. Rosaria excelled in school, and her love of math and proficiency in accounting served her well when she became vice president and controller of an electrical construction company in N.J. Always a numbers person, Rosaria now analyzes the facts and her skills and experience provide her real estate clients with the necessary perspectives when selling or buying a home. Because of the many years in her former job, Rosaria developed the knowledge to diplomatically interact with many different people and cultures. This position also prepared Rosaria to be a strong and effective negotiator as well. Rosaria loves real estate, and that is evident in her interaction with her clients and the support she provides to them even in the most challenging of situations. Licensed both in N.J. and Pa., Rosaria is a Relocation Specialist, a Luxury Home Marketing Specialist, a Luxury Property Specialist, a Certified Residential Specialist, a Seller Representative Specialist and more. She is a true professional.

Laurie Madaus Addison Wolfe Real Estate 500 Union Street, New Hope, Pa. O: (215) 852-5500 M: (203) 948-5157 laurie.madaus@gmail.com Laurie Madaus’ integrity and work ethic deliver a level of service that is at the forefront of today’s real estate market. Her professionalism and knowledge of the Bucks County, Pennsylvania and Hunterdon County, New Jersey markets has secured the trust of her clients and the respect of her colleagues. Utilizing cutting-edge marketing and technology to ensure that her clients’ properties get the exposure they deserve, Laurie offers a unique and knowledgeable perspective on the river valley market areas. Laurie approaches her clients with individual focus and a drive to understand their needs beyond the purchase or sale of real estate. In turn, her clients value her constructive creative energy and ability to transform even the most challenging transactions into pleasurable experiences. One should seek a partner and consultant when considering to buy or sell a home, and in that role Laurie has shown a lengthy record of achievement and continues to exceed her clients’ expectations. Laurie has a love and sincere appreciation for Bucks and Hunterdon counties, their abundance of stunning vintage homes, horse farms, and estates and recognizes the value of and understands historic architecture having owned and renovated several vintage homes. She specializes in luxury properties, historic houses, farms, estates, charming country homes and riverfront cottages. Art Mazzei Addison Wolfe Real Estate 500 Union Street, Pa. O: (215) 852-5500 M: (610) 428-4885 art@addisonwolfe.com Getting to know me … I guess that when I was in my childhood, the first makings of a realtor developed. My father was a contractor and nothing to me was more exciting than visiting a new home under construction and the smell of pine. However, life took a different turn and I started a 30-year career teaching high school English in the New York School System. While I graded compositions and listened to Richard the III rant about a “kingdom for a horse,” I reflected on my past and knew that salesmanship needed to be in my future. Thus, my real estate career began and somehow I managed to juggle my educational career with the world of “metes and bounds.” During this time I rose to the No. 2 position in a prominent real estate firm in Bucks County and by the time I retired, I had risen to the No. 1 sales position in a company of 80 agents. Today, I am a partner in Addison Wolfe Real Estate, an agency that claims 50 fellow realtors on its roster and an impressively large market share for the Center City to Bucks County to Lehigh Valley demographics. I would have to say that part of my success is my years in education … working with daily problems, adjusting to personalities, and developing a level of patience that only 30 years in the classroom can provide. Working with you would be my pleasure and developing a reciprocity of understanding with each other would also be a significant part of our relationship. I assure you that I will not bore you with the introspection


Diane Turton Realtors 1216 3rd Avenue, Spring Lake M: (732) 859-7808 cnapp@dianeturton.com cindynapphomes.com Always keeping her clients in mind, Cindy loves to help both buyers and sellers through some of the most important transactions and transitions in their lives. For empty nesters, first-time home buyers, and buyers looking for the perfect beach house, investment property, or just a change of space, having an experienced and passionate real estate advisor to help you navigate the process is key! With invaluable skills gained from years of experience mixed with her local expertise, Cindy brings un-

estate sales experience, Helen has consistently ranked as a top agent in the greater Princeton area. Helen’s dedication and tenacity has awarded her awards/memberships with the Mercer County Circle of Excellence, BHHS Fox and Roach Realtors President’s Circle, 5 Star Real Estate Agent from satisfied clients and customers, a Luxury Collection Specialist, as well as a leadership/board position with the Mercer County Top Producers Association. Helen’s philosophy to treat each client individually has resulted in a strong referral business. With in-depth knowledge of the real estate market Helen’s approach has proved to be a great success over the years.

Sales Associate ABR, ePRO, SRES

Looking for a Beach House? Selling and Renting Homes Along the Jersey Shore.

Spring Lake • Sea Girt • Manasquan Avon • Brielle • Belmar • Lake Como Bradley Beach • Wall Township

Brian Wisner Associate RE/MAX of Princeton 343 Nassau Street, Princeton O: (609) 921-9202 M: (732) 588-8000 bwisner19@gmail.com As a RE/MAX agent, I’m dedicated to helping my clients find the home of their dreams. Whether you are buying or selling a home or just curious about the local market, I would love to offer

my support and services. I know the local community — both as an agent and a neighbor — and can help guide you through the nuances of our local market. With access to top listings, a worldwide network, exceptional marketing strategies and cuttingedge technology, I work hard to make your real estate experience memorable and enjoyable. I look forward to the opportunity to work with you. Please don’t hesitate to contact me today!

S OLD I N 1 0 DAYS

Maureen Troiano Coldwell Banker Realty 10 Nassau Street, Princeton O: (609) 921-1441 M: (609) 240-7554 Maureen.Troiano@ coldwellbankermoves.com Maureen is licensed in New Jersey and Pennsylvania and has more than 20 years’ experience in the real estate business. She is also a Certified Relocation Specialist.

Robin L. Wallack Broker Associate Platinum Level Circle of Excellence Award Five Star Professional Award Winner Berkshire Hathaway Tara O’Connor HomeServices Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach, REALTORS® HomeServices Fox & Roach, Princeton Home Marketing REALTORS® 253 Nassau Street, Princeton Center 253 Nassau Street, Princeton O: (609) 921-1600 O: (609) 683-8505 M: (424) 332-7222 C: (609) 462-2340 tara.oconnor@foxroach.com www.robinwallack.com Robin’s experiences in the workHelen Sherman place and the community are both Broker Associate extensive and intensive. She spent Berkshire Hathaway many years working as Assistant to HomeServices Fox & Roach, the Director of Career Services at REALTORS® Princeton University. Robin served 253 Nassau Street, Princeton on the Princeton Regional Board of Education for six years as both O: (609) 924-1600 President and Vice President. RobM: (609) 915-1216 in also served as Vice President of helen.sherman@foxroach.com the Mercer County Board of Eduhelensherman.foxroach.com cation, as a Princeton Civil Rights With over 28 years of real Commissioner, and as a member of the Site Plan Advisory Board. Real estate is a process, and I am with you every step of the way. For me, real estate is deeply rooted in relationships. Even after you close on your house, you can always feel

Cindy Napp

free to call me for advice, for help, for information. As one of my customers once said, “Once we work with you, we’re velcroed together forever!” I will be there for you, both as you change and as your real estate needs change. I recognize that “home” means different things to different people and my success is predicated on knowing what my customers expect, and then showing you those homes that meet your specific needs.

“Ne w Hop e...the Ne w Hampton s” 25 Creek Run

Rabbit Run Creek – Where the Hamptons meet The Delaware in a private enclave of luxury and bucolic charm! This stunning gated community is located just minutes from the center of the renowned river towns of New Hope, Pennsylvania and Lambertville, New Jersey.

$1,795,000 | New Hope, Pennsylvania 3B | 3.5B | 5,513SF

C 310-766-2076 O 215-862-3385 lorraine.eastman@foxroach.com DiscoverBucksCounty.com 6319 LOWER YORK RD | NEW HOPE, PA 18938

Call me for more info on Global Luxury and how I can help you sell your home. Rosaria Lawlor, CLHMS, CRS, SRS, ABR, SFR NJ Realtors Circle of Excellence 2018 Certified Luxury Home Marketing Specialist CBGL Certified Luxury Property Specialist Certified Relocation Specialist Licensed in NJ and PA 10 Nassau Street Princeton, New Jersey 08542 Office 609 921-1411 Cell 609 658-5773 EFax 973-387-3441 www.RosariaLawlorFineHomes.com Rosaria.Lawlor@cbmoves.com Rosaria@RosariaLawlorFineHomes.com

1216 3rd Ave, Spring Lake, NJ 07762 Office: 732-449-4441 Mobile: 732-859-7808 cnapp@dianeturton.com www.cindynapphomes.com www.coldwellbankerluxury.com

53 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 14, 2020

of a Hamlet, but I can guaran- matched consideration to every tee you that I will be more of client’s personal needs. a salesman than Willy Loman. An award-winning realtor, she is backed by one of the largest Mercer County Top Producers brokerages along the Jersey Shore. Sellers appreciate the topproducersmercercountynj. level of service Cindy and her com If you’re searching to find a team at Diane Turton, Realtors realtor, your journey ends here. offers and can be confident that Since 1987, Top Producers has the marketing, exposure, and atconsisted of the best realtors in tention they will receive is second all of Mercer County real estate. to none. The only thing she is more pasThis team of realtors isn’t your average group of realtors. As Mer- sionate about than real estate is cer County real estate experts, the area she serves. Earning her each realtor in our group has title as the Jersey Shore real earned the prestigious Circle of estate expert, her clients conExcellence Award, as well as pro- sider her the go-to source for duced at least $5 million in sales, everything Jersey Shore, from restaurant recommendations to or averaged 17 units annually. building resources and everything When you work with a realtor in between. Cindy serves on sevfrom Top Producers, you’re get- eral committees and offers her ting a realtor who lives, breathes, talents to a wide range of local and loves real estate. The houses volunteer organizations throughfor sale in New Jersey that are out the year. handled by each of these 71 A connoisseur of all the differagents are given a great amount ent options at the Jersey Shore, of love, care, and dedication. Cindy has the insight on availThese Top Producers aren’t able homes that range from $10 only committed to your real million waterfront mansions to estate needs, but they are also $300,000 starter homes and will committed to the community. At work with you to find the best the end of each year, the Mercer fit for your budget and lifestyle. County Top Producers donate She understands that every Jermoney to local charities, such as sey beach town has a different Women’s Space, Wounded War- nuance; from the whimsical lure riors, Toys for Tots, and the Mer- of Ocean Grove to the exubercer Street Friends Food Bank. ant energy of Belmar to the enIf you are looking to buy or sell dearing flavor of Spring Lake, a home, be sure to call one these and so on. With such a variety top agents in your area today! of choices, Cindy will work intimately with you to identify what YOU need. Cindy Napp


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 14, 2020 • 54

Introducing … 68 Library Place, Princeton, NJ

“Home is where the heart can laugh without shyness. Home is where the heart’s tears can dry at their own pace."

—Vernon Imagine living in a magnificent estate built during the Gilded Age, ideally located just one block from theBaker center of Princeton. Walk to nearby McCarter Theatre, the train, shops and many restaurants! The preeminent architect of his day, Richard Morris Hunt - the designer of the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty, the Breakers, in Newport, RI and the facade of the Museum of Natural History - designed this home as a gift to the first president of the Princeton Theological Seminary in 1882. Miss Fine started her school on the third floor of this home in 1897. This grand brick home has been brought into the modern era by its current owners. The grand 6500+ square foot, 3-story home, with 6+ bedrooms, 6 bathrooms, 9 fireplaces, and the original lead glass oversized windows has an engaging front porch where you can enjoy cocktails with friends or read a book enjoying a cup of coffee. Very gracious rooms, including the library, living room and dining room have maintained their original charm with intricate plaster ceiling medallions, chestnut pocket doors, Heidi Joseph millwork and dramatic 12+ foot high ceilings. The central partAssociate, of the home is the newly renovated chef’s kitchen with a gazebo, breakfast room addition. Sales REALTOR These rooms are accentuated by the many windows and views from all angles and a 2-sided river rock fireplace which connects to the family room and Office:This 609.924.1600 wet bar. The brick exterior has been completely repointed. home sits majestically on a manicured .79 acre corner lot. The current owners were Mobile: 609.613.1663 presented with the Historical Society of Princeton’s Historic Preservation Award in 2003. Insist on … Heidi Joseph. Offered at $2,250,000 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com ®

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

Heidi Joseph, JD, SRES

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

Sales Associate, REALTOR® Cell 609-613-1663 Heidi.Joseph@foxroach.com

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540 609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com ©2019 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.


Helen H. Sherman

Real Estate with Real Results REDUCED PRICE 5279 Province Line Road Princeton, NJ 08540 $3,500,000

PENDING 15 Augusta Court Skillman, NJ 08558 $1,080,000

SOLD 22 Perrine Circle Perrineville, NJ 08535 $1,350,000

SOLD 660 Pretty Brook Road Princeton, NJ 08540 $1,875,000

Helen H. Sherman Broker Associate/Realtor 609-683-8507 direct 609-915-1216 mobile helen.sherman@foxroach.com www.HelenSherman.com

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ 08540 | 609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

55 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 14, 2020

HS


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 14, 2020 • 56

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57 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 14, 2020

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“Help and Expertise When It Counted”

Realtors “A True Professional” Realtors Real Estate

17LeabrookLane.info $1,100,000 Specifications

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243CherryHillRoad.info We i c h e r t$4,700 R e aper l t omonth rs

40NorthHarrisonStreet.info $885,000

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34MayburyHillRoad.info $1,45

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$1,649,000

$1,649,000

the heartPrinceton, of downtown few blocks from Princeton University, stunning the home thatand combines the charm and appeal of he heart of In downtown a few Princeton, blocks froma Princeton University, sits a stunning homesits thata combines charm appeal of a century home with a spacious modern open floor plan.Thoft Architect Kirsten remodeledthis and fullyinrenovated ntury old home with aold spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten remodeled andThoft fully renovated home 2007 with this home in 2007 with spectacular detail toand both traditional and modern amenities. Thenorenovations nomaintain expensethe to character carefully of maintain the character of the home, ctacular detail to both traditional modern amenities. The renovations spare expense to spare carefully the home, updated for today’s staircase and mouldings, pocket doors, floors, and extensive built-ins ated for today’s lifestyle. Customlifestyle. staircaseCustom and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, andhardwood extensive built-ins throughout make it boththroughout make it both MORE PHOTOS ANDand FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO ntimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come9FairwayDrive.info true. dream anFOR intimate family space an entertainer’s come$1,165,000 true. 3MountLucasRoad.info $999,000 15JeffersonRoad.info $1,125,000 102SnowdenLane.info $875

“Exceptional Service”

CETON $1,649,000 spacious entrance hall opens into the room tin ceiling, pocket The cabinets, The spacious entrance hallfamily opens intowith the original family room with and original tin doors. ceiling, andgourmet pocket kitchen doors. with Thecustom gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, nless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous island overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great heart of downtown Princeton, a few blocks from Princeton University, sits a stunning home that combines the charm and appeal of stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous island overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases &room beautiful bar. The great room ury to old a home with adining spacious modern open floor plan. a Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 with ns formal that overlooks wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch to function an indoor/ opens to room aand formal room that overlooks a wraparound porch. custom doors allowarea for dining and as porch area to function as an indoor/ cular detail to both traditional moderndining amenities. The renovations spare no expense to carefully maintain theThe character of the home, oor entertainment space. A separate mudroom with cubbies and tons built-ins of cubbies storage along with a powder complete the first floor. d for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors,built-in hardwood floors, and extensive throughout it both outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom with built-in andmake tons of storageroom along with a powder room complete the first floor.

Realtors

“Superb Knowledge of the Local Housing Market”

mate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true.

eat upstairs to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a

Retreat the master with endoors. suiteThe walk-in steamwith shower. Just down hallwayheated are two additional acious entrance hall opensupstairs into the family room with originalbedroom tin ceiling, and pocket gourmet kitchen custom cabinets, lace and the other a wallto ofisland floor-to-ceiling woodgreat built-in These bedrooms share agreat hall bath with the a BainUltra Jacuzzi tub. bedrooms one with a ss-steel appliances, pantrywith and enormous overlooks the light-filled room closets. with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The room fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. to a formal dining room that overlooks a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indoor/ rcrown entertainment A separate with built-in tonstwo of storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. built-in bookcases, desks, jewelspace. of this homemudroom is the third floorcubbies whichand has additional spacious bedrooms, featuring window seat • • •

Realtors

Real Estate Mortgage Insurance Services • Mortgage • the Real Estate Insurance Closing Services The crown jewel of •this home isand floor which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks,Closing window seat closets. two bedrooms full bath athird bonus sitting area. upstairs toThe the master bedroom withshare en suitea walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a

“Combines Knowledge and Experience with a Touch of Human Kindness”

The twowood bedrooms share a bedrooms full bathshare anda hall a bonus area. ce and the otherand with aclosets. wall of floor-to-ceiling built-in closets. These bath with sitting a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub.

Rea

fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has own jewel of this home is the third floor which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat fenced in backyard with Ipe the wood deck offers terrific outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has .osets. With ample off-street leave at home and stroll space aroundfor town. The two The bedrooms shareparking a full bath you and acan bonus sitting area.cars

218GallupRoad.info 343JeffersonRoad.info $1,548,000 it all. With $1,329,000 ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at$1,347,500 home and stroll around154ChristopherDrive.info town.

nced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has With ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town.

If you want your home featured, contact me:

If you wantReal your Estate home featured, contact me: • Mortgage • Insurance

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43EttlCircle.info $1,350,000 / $7,000

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Insu

Beatrice “She hasBloom thePRINCE experience and knowledge, the right network, PRINCE TON CO TON COLLEC TION Beatrice Bloom | | Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 and| 609-921-1900 is(cell) committed to making it happen.” 609-577-2989 | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com Princeton Office If you want your home featured, contact me:

Beatrice Bloom Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

609-577-2989 (cell) info@BeatriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

BeatriceBloom.com Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

Princeton | 609-921-1900 FOR MOREOffice PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO

Seller Review

PRINCETON

$1,649,000

In the heart of downtown Princeton, a few blocks from Princeton University, sits a stunning home that combines the charm and appeal of “Beatrice soldwith oura house inmodern a very open difficult market. WeThoft had our houseand listed another top selling a century old home spacious floor seller’s plan. Architect Kirsten remodeled fully with renovated this home in 2007 with spectacular detail to both traditional and modern amenities. The renovations spare no expense to carefully maintain the character of the home, updated today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket We doors, hardwoodwith floors, and extensive throughout make it both agentforfor six months and did not receive any offers. re-listed Beatrice andbuilt-ins we received multiple 117LeabrookLane.info $1,100,000 40NorthHarrisonStreet.info $885,000 kLane.info $1,100,000 $885,000 243CherryHillRoad.info $4,700 per month 34MayburyHillRoad.info $1,450,000 an intimate family40NorthHarrisonStreet.info space and an entertainer’s dream come true.

offers. Her pricing acumen and strategies were invaluable; her team is superb and her responsiveness

The spacious entrance hall opens into the family room with original tin ceiling, and pocket doors. The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous island overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great room aretoqualities you room will that not overlooks see in other realtors. WeThe give her doors the highest opens a formal dining a wraparound porch. custom allow for recommendation.” diningFOR and porch areaPHOTOS to function AND as an FLOOR indoor/ PLAN, V MORE FOR MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO FORalong MORE ANDcomplete FLOORthe PLAN, VISIT 15LINDEN FOR MORE PHOTOS AND space. FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO outdoor entertainment A separate mudroom with built-in cubbies and tons of storage withPHOTOS a powder room first floor.

PRINCETON PRINCETON Retreat upstairs to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam PRINCETON shower. Just down the hallway are $1,649,000 two additional bedrooms one with a N $1,649,000

Buyer Review

fireplace Princeton, and the otherfew with a wallfrom of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi In the combines heartPrinceton, of downtown Princeton, a Princeton few from Princeton University, In the heart of downtown a few blocks from University, sitstub. a stunning homesit t n the heartPrinceton, of downtown blocks Princeton University, stunning home that the charm and appeal of blocks downtown a few blocks froma Princeton University, sits a stunning homesits thata combines the charm and appeal of a century old home with a spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten a century old home with a spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and century home with a spacious modern open floor plan.Thoft Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeledthis and fullyinrenovated this home in 2007 with ome with aold spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten remodeled and fully renovated home 2007 with Theboth crown jewel ofand this home is the thirdThe floor which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat spectacular detail both traditional and modern amenities. The renovations spectacular detail to both traditional and modern The renovations spare no expense to spar care pectacular detail toand traditional amenities. renovations nomaintain expense to character carefully maintain thetocharacter of amenities. the home, ail to both traditional modern amenities.modern The renovations spare no expense to spare carefully the of the home, and closets. The two bedrooms share a full bath and a bonus sitting area. updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors, updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, andhard ext pdated for today’s Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout make it both ay’s lifestyle. Customlifestyle. staircase and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout make it both “Beatrice Bloom is the real estate agent that everybody involved with aspace property transaction is come hoping FOR MORE PHOTOS ANDand FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO an intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true. an intimate family an entertainer’s dream true. 83MountLucasRoad.info $999,000 9FairwayDrive.info $1,165,000 FOR MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO ly space and an entertainer’s dream come true. n intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come$1,165,000 true. asRoad.info $999,000 9FairwayDrive.info 15JeffersonRoad.info $1,125,000 102SnowdenLane.info $875,000 The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has

for. Ultra-professional handling of all details of the transaction, vast knowledge of the market and the

PRINCETON $1,649,0 The spacious entrance hall opens into the family room tin ceiling, pocket The The spacious entrance hall opens intowith the original family room with and original tin doors. ceiling, an itinto all.the With ample off-street parking you leave cars The at home and stroll with around town. $1,649,000 ntrance hall opens room with tin ceiling, and pocket doors. gourmet kitchen custom cabinets, he spacious entrance hallfamily opens into the original family room withcan original tinthe ceiling, and pocket doors. The gourmet kitchen custom cabinets, appliances, pantry andwith enormous island overlooks theisland light-filled great room with built-in b Instainless-steel the & heart of downtown Princeton, a few blocks from Princeton University, sits a stunning homeoverlooks that combines thelight-filled charm and appeal stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous the gre ppliances, pantry and enormous island overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases beautiful bar. The great room wn Princeton, a few blocks from Princeton sits a stunning homeoverlooks that combines thelight-filled charm and appeal tainless-steel appliances, pantryUniversity, and enormous island the greatof room withto built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The greatKirsten room aopens century old home with adining spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 wa a formal room that overlooks a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining th a spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 with opens toan aand formal dining room that overlooks a wraparound porch. custom d al dining that overlooks a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for diningdoors and porch area to function as indoor/ spectacular to both traditional modern amenities. Theas renovations spare no expense to carefully maintain theThe character the hom pens to room aand formal room that overlooks a wraparound porch. custom allow fordetail dining and porch area to function anwith indoor/ oth traditional moderndining amenities. The renovations spare no expense to carefully maintain theThe character of the home, outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom cubbies and tons built-ins of storage alongof with a updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors,built-in hardwood floors, and extensive throughout make it bo nment space. A separate mudroom with cubbies and tons built-ins of cubbies storage along with a powder complete the first floor. entertainment space. separate style. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors,built-in hardwood floors, and extensive throughout it both utdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom with built-in andmake tons of storageroom along withoutdoor a powder room complete theAfirst floor. mudroom with built-in cubbies and tons o

complex details of every phase of the sale and purchase. Deeply connected to local decision makers, an intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true.

contractors, sellers and buyers as well and peer agents alike. Even in a possibly conflicted dual agency

e and an entertainer’s dream come true.

Retreat upstairs to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway a to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Justyour downhome the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a room Retreat to the master endoors. suiteThe walk-in steamwith shower. Jusb The contact spacious entrance hall opensupstairs into the family with originalbedroom tin ceiling, and pocket gourmet kitchen custom cabine Ifdoors. you want featured, me: Retreat to the master with en suite walk-in steamwith shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with awith hall opensupstairs into the family room with originalbedroom tin ceiling, and pocket The gourmet kitchen custom cabinets, fireplace and the other with a wall ofisland floor-to-ceiling wood built-in These bedrooms share agreat hall stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous overlooks the light-filled great room closets. with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The ro ees, other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These be pantry and enormous island overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great room

situation, we alwaysBeatrice felt represented in an advantageous fashion. We would recommend Beatrice Bloom Bloom

replace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms a hall withoverlooks a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. opens share to a formal diningbath room that a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indo g room that overlooks a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indoor/ outdoor entertainment space. A separate with built-in tonstwo of storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. The crown jewel of this homemudroom is the third floorcubbies whichand has additional spacious bedrooms, featuring space. A separate with built-in tonstwo of storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. built-in of this homemudroom is the third floorcubbies whichand has additional spacious bedrooms, featuring bookcases, desks, window seat The crown jewelshare of this full home isand theathird floor which has two additional spacious and closets. two bedrooms bath bonus sitting area. crown jewelshare of this home isand theathird floor which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, window seat Retreat upstairs toThe the master bedroom with en suiteadesks, walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with ehe two bedrooms a full bath bonus sitting area. Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a The twowood bedrooms share a bedrooms full bathshare anda hall a bonus area. fireplace and the otherand with aclosets. wall of floor-to-ceiling built-in closets. These bath with sitting a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi t nd aclosets. The twowood bedrooms share a bedrooms full bathshare anda hall a bonus area. with wall of floor-to-ceiling built-in closets. These bath with sitting a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created wit ackyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home haswhich has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, The crown jewel of this home is the truly third floor s home is the third floor which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat The fenced in backyard with Ipe the wood deck offers terrific outdoorwindow memo it all. With ample off-street parking leave cars at home and stroll space aroundfor town. and closets. The twowith bedrooms share a full bath you and acan bonus sitting area. he fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created family and friends. This home truly has esedrooms off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town. share a full bath and a bonus sitting area. 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,000 343JeffersonRoad.info $1,347,500 it all. With ample off-street 43EttlCircle.info parking you can$1,350,000 leave the cars at home and stroll arou Road.info 343JeffersonRoad.info $1,548,000 / $7,000 per month all. With $1,329,000 ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at$1,347,500 home and stroll around154ChristopherDrive.info town. The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly h d with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has it all. With ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town. reet parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town.

without hesitation and without reservations.” 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

If you want your home featured, contact me:

If you want your home featured, contact me: If you want your home featured, contact me:

Beatrice Bloom Beatrice Bloom

Beatrice Bloom

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

| BeatriceBloom.com Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

If you want your home featured, contact me:

If you want your home featured, contact me: If you want your home featured, contact me:

Beatrice Bloom

Beatrice Bloom Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

Beatrice Bloom

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

| BeatriceBloom.com Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, M Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

Princeton | 609-921-1900 FOR MOREOffice PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO

Princeton | 609-921-1900 FOR MOREOffice PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLA


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 14, 2020 • 58

Social distancing

Gloves Quarantine

Hand Sanitizer shelter-in-place Schooling from home

H H H

Heidi A. Hartmann Call / Text 609.658.3771 E: HeidiHartmannHomes@gmail.com W: HeidiHartmannHomes.com

Thinking of a move? Let's chat!


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4 NASSAU STREET | PRINCETON, NJ 08542 609.658.3880 cell | 609.921.1050 office CallawayHenderson.com

59 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 14, 2020

SALES OFFICE NOW OPEN


INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

MERCER STREET • PRINCETON Ira Lackey, Jr $1,599,000 C allawayHenderson.com/id/NJME302458

SNOWDEN LANE • PRINCETON Janet Stefandl $1,399,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/NJME302346

MAIN STREET • LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP David M Schure $1,200,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/NJME302568

INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

Realtor® owned ARROWHEAD CT • MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP Jennifer Dionne $1,150,000 C allawayHenderson.com/id/NJSO113832

LEIGH AVENUE • PRINCETON Susan L ‘Suzy’ DiMeglio $899,000 C allawayHenderson.com/id/NJME301574

PRINCETON KINGSTON ROAD • PRINCETON Susan A Cook $799,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/NJME302772

INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

LEIGH AVENUE • PRINCETON Susan L ‘Suzy’ DiMeglio $760,000 C allawayHenderson.com/id/NJME302302

BULLOCK DRIVE • PRINCETON Janet Stefandl $725,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/NJME302368

CRAVEN LANE • LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP Gina Marie Spaziano $674,900 CallawayHenderson.com/id/NJME302430

INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

CHERRY HILL ROAD • MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP Laura A Huntsman $645,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/NJSO113834

PALMER SQUARE WEST • PRINCETON Susan Hughes $450,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/NJME302926

STONERISE DRIVE • LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP Susan A Cook $320,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/NJME302950

LAMBERTVILLE 609.397.1974 MONTGOMERY 908.874.0000 PENNINGTON 609.737.7765 PRINCETON 609.921.1050

CallawayHenderson.com

Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.

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Town Topics Newspaper, October 14, 2020  

The October 14 issue of the Town Topics Newspaper

Town Topics Newspaper, October 14, 2020  

The October 14 issue of the Town Topics Newspaper

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