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Volume LXXIV, Number 2

HomeFront Week of Hope Begins January 20 . . . . . 5 Local Environmentalists Hoping for Ban on Plastic Bags . . . . . . . . . . 9 The Big Time Concert Reading Brings Stars to McCarter Theatre . . . . 10 PU Men’s Hoops Defeats Penn in Ivy League Opener . . . . . . 20 Hennessy Stepping Up for PHS Girls’ Basketball . . . . . . . . . . 24 Junior Star Gorman Helps PDS Boys’ Hockey Get Back on Track . . . . . . . 24

Abbie Danko Leading the Way for Hun Girls’ Swimming . . . . . . . . . . 25 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .18, 19 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 15 Classified Ads . . . . . . 30 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 28 Performing Arts . . . . . 13 Police Blotter . . . . . . . . 8 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 30 Religion . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6 Note: Stuart Mitchner’s Review Will Return Next Week

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BOE Reorganizes, Elects President, VP, Plans 2020 Agenda The Princeton Public Schools (PPS) Board of Education (BOE) elected Beth Behrend to her second year as president and Michele Tuck-Ponder as its new vice president at its annual reorganization meeting on Monday night. Susan Kanter, Dafna Kendal, and Debbie Bronfeld took the oath of office to begin new terms as BOE members. Kanter is new to the BOE. Kendal, who served from 2015 to 2018, and Bronfeld, who has been on the BOE since 2016, begin their second three-year terms. Behrend and Tuck-Ponder both were elected by 7-3 margins. Behrend was the only nominee for president but received three “no” votes, while Tuck-Ponder defeated Bronfeld for the vice president position. “Beth has worked tirelessly to make the Board a more collegial, collaborative, and effective governing body, and she has evidenced a great commitment to ensuring that every voice is heard,” said Board member Brian McDonald. “She has fundamentally changed our relationship with the community, she has fostered for more openness and transparency, and has actively worked to strengthen important relationships.” “It is an honor and a privilege to serve another year as your leader,” said Behrend. “I would like to thank all of my colleagues for their tireless dedication to our public schools. We are pleased to welcome new and returning members tonight who bring strong skills and experience to our team. I look forward to working collaboratively on our shared mission of preparing PPS students for lives of joy and purpose.” Board member Jessica Deutsch praised Tuck-Ponder’s focus on the need to “lead with our values.” “In my experience, Michele has held absolutely steadfast to this guiding principle, making her an exemplary presence at this table, one that lends naturally to the kind of leadership we continue to need,” Deutsch said. Climbing enrollments and the need for more classrooms will be one of the biggest challenges in 2020, and in September the BOE retained Milone & MacBroom, a planning and consulting firm specializing in work with public school districts, to validate enrollment growth and capacity data and to engage the Continued on Page 8

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Wednesday, January 8, 2020

Mayor Lempert Won’t Run For a Third Term Toward the end of her remarks at Princeton Council’s annual reorganization meeting on Thursday, January 2, Mayor Liz Lempert announced that she will not seek a third term. “I believe it is healthy for governments to change hands and for officials to pass the baton,” she said, adding, “This isn’t goodbye yet for me — a year is a long time and I look forward to a supercharged year with this energetic Council.” The meeting, which Lempert began by observing a moment of silence for recently deceased Rabbi Adam Feldman and prominent Princeton residents Daniel Harris, Eric Craig, and Irving Newlin, marked the swearing in of new Council members Michelle Pirone Lambros and Mia Sacks. Councilman David Cohen was sworn in as Council president. A few days after the meeting, Lempert reflected on her decision to step down when her term ends at the end of this year. She is ready to think about exploring other avenues, but would not say which. “There are a lot of issues I am passionate about, and I can see myself working on any one of those,” she said. “But I have no specific plans.”

Lempert has been mayor since the 2013 consolidation of Princeton Borough and Princeton Township. Previous to that, she served for four years as a member of the Township Committee. She began her career as a journalist, but segued into politics after working on the presidential campaign of Barack Obama. Politics is in her blood — her mother was mayor of San Mateo, California, and one of her brothers was also an elected official. “My mother was a help to me, especially in the beginning of my first term,” she said. ”Also, she was on the school board when I was growing up. So I helped

her with her campaigns. I remember that when she was on the school board, she had to do one of the absolute worst things for any elected official, which was close one of the elementary schools. I knew how hard that was for her. We have really different personalities, and I never thought of myself as an elected official. But I guess I absorbed it without realizing it.” With her younger daughter off to college in the fall, Lempert and her husband, Princeton professor Ken Norman, will be empty nesters. “It will be a new chapter Continued on Page 8

Peace Coalition Plans Anti-War Rally, Voter Campaign, Multifaith Service

The Princeton-based Coalition for Peace Action (CFPA) announced Tuesday that a Rally for No War with Iran will take place from 12-1 p.m. this Saturday, January 11, at Hinds Plaza adjacent to the Princeton Public Library. Confirmed speakers so far include Zia Mian, physicist and co-director of Princeton University’s Program on Science and

Global Security; former fighter pilot Richard Moody; and CFPA Executive Director the Rev. Robert Moore. The CFPA has started the new year in high gear with a campaign to prevent war with Iran, its ongoing 2020 Peace Voter Campaign, and plans in place for a January 20 Martin Luther King Jr. Multifaith Continued on Page 9

THREE KINGS CELEBRATION: Lively flamenco dancing was a highlight of Sunday’s Fiesta del Dia de Los Reyes Magos, or Three Kings Day, festivities at the Arts Council of Princeton . Marking the end of the holiday season, Three Kings Day is celebrated throughout the world by several different cultures . Participants share what they learned at the event in this week’s Town Talk on page 6 . (Photo by Erica M. Cardenas)

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McCaffrey’s to Open New Hope Location

McCaffrey’s Food Markets has announced the opening of its newest Market on January 9 at 9 a.m. in New Hope, Pa. The New Hope location will be home to the fifth McCaffrey’s Food Market in Pennsylvania, and the seventh Market overall. The day will start with a ribbon-cutting ceremony followed by special sales throughout the store, tastings, and more. A state-of-the-art Food Market, the new McCaffrey’s will be staffed by food experts and offer what McCaffrey’s is famous for: exceptional produce, meat, seafood, cheese, deli, bakery, and floral, along with chef-inspired, gourmet prepared foods. Some highlights of the store include a gourmet sandwich station; hundreds of cheeses from around the globe; an extensive grocery selection; custom cakes; a gourmet Java Jim’s coffee bar; a beer garden with hundreds of craft beers; an indoor seating area; and hundreds of organic, local, and exotic product offerings. Also, McCaffrey’s New Hope will incorporate eco-friendly alternatives, as no single-use, plastic bags or straws will be available throughout the store. The new store is located at 300 West Bridge Street in the former Staples building. The store manager, Lou Campo, has more than 25 years of experience in the grocery industry and was the former manager of McCaffrey’s Princeton market. “We cannot express how thrilled we are to be open-

ing our newest market in New Hope,” says Jim McCaffrey, McCaffrey’s president. “We are looking forward to serving and immersing ourselves in this diverse and prominent town.”

Grand Opening hours are 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Regular business hours are Monday–Sundays, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. For more information, visit www. mccaffreys.com.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Town-Wide Brush Collection: Princeton’s Department of Public Works has started collecting Christmas trees and brush. Remove all decorations and lights from the tree, and do not put it out in a bag. Have everything out by 7 a.m. The collection continues through January 31. Free Flu Shots: Princeton’s Health Department will offer shots out of their office and select community events through February, to Princeton residents. Visit www.princetonnj.gov/health for details. Womanspace Needs Volunteers: Applications are being accepted for the Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Victim Response Teams, and will be accepted through February 1. For details, email dvrt@womanspace.org or call (609) 394-0136. Ice Skating: The three authorized locations for free ice skating are Smoyer Park pond, Community Park North pond, and Lake Carnegie between the Washington Road and Harrison Street bridges. A white flag means it is safe to skate; a red flag means it is not safe. Flags are located at all locations. For ongoing updates about ice conditions, follow Princeton Recreation on Twitter at @princetonrec or Facebook. Palmer Square is also hosting oudoor skating on Hulfish Street behind the Nassau Inn for a $10 fee, including skate rental. Actors Wanted : The Lawrence Headquarters Branch Library is hosting PlayFest, its annual one-act play festival, on Saturday, April 25, and needs actors to fill a variety of roles in the staged readings from the selected works of local playwrights. Auditions are February 26-March 2 at the library, 2751 Brunswick Pike. Contact James Damron at (609) 883-8291 or jdam-ron@mcl.org to schedule. Donate Handmade Items: The Lawrence Headquarters Branch Library is seeking donations of new handmade scarves, hats or mittens, for child to adult sizes, to be donated to HomeFront. Drop off at the library, 2751 Brunswick Pike, during the library’s open hours until January 11.


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WEEK OF HOPE: HomeFront art classes in ArtSpace, HomeFront’s art therapy room at the Family Campus, are just one of the many activities planned for the January 20-24 Week of Hope, when visitors can learn about HomeFront’s programs and volunteer opportunities that seek to impact the lives of local people who are trying to break the cycle of poverty. (Photo courtesy of HomeFront)

Week of Hope at HomeFront Offers Information, Volunteering Opportunities From Martin Luther King Day on January 20 through Januar y 24, HomeFront, w ith its headquar ters in Lawrenceville and its Fam-

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by an art class in the afternoon on the Family Campus; and an evening storybook session with children staying at the HomeFront Campus in Ewing, a temporary shelter for families experiencing homelessness. Wednesday, January 22 will be Basic Needs Night from 6 to 7:30 p.m., with volunteers ages 11 and older bringing new basic household and cleaning items to The 28 -year- old social the Lawrenceville headquarservice agency, which has ters to put together move-in become a national model kits for families who were www.princetonmagazinestore.com for helping families who are Continued on Next Page experiencing homelessness to become self-sufficient, is urging visitors to attend at least one of the week’s events that are designed to give the public insight into issues related to poverty in the region, the organization’s mission and programs, and a range of volunteer opportunities for people of all ages and skills. “We’ve found that MarFour-Course Wine Paired Dinner tin Luther King Day is a time when many commuThursday, January 16th | 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. nity members are looking for ways to come together to discuss new ways to create a brighter future,” said HomeFront Family Campus Volunteer Coordinator Catherine Cozzi, who is in charge of the Week of Hope. Cozzi cited the positive response since the inception of the Week of Hope three years ago, with many “people coming out to see what we do and to volunteer.” The first day of Week of Hope, January 20, is Tour and Paint Day, when visitors can join a bus tour of the city of Trenton from 10:45 to 11:15 a.m. and hear about HomeFront’s impact on the community, or take tours of HomeFront’s Shellfish are some of the most flavorful ingredients from the sea. Family Campus in Ewing. That afternoon, from 2 to Crab, lobster, clams, and mussels are versatile and delicious, 4 p.m., adults and children but are often just left to boil. We invite you to join us in a can participate in a group celebration of shellfish. Raise a glass and lift a fork, as we crack a mural painting experience in ArtSpace, HomeFront’s art claw and shuck a shell, to the best our local waters have to offer. therapy room at the Family Campus. visit mediterrarestaurant.com to purchase tickets Spring Into Action Day $69 per person (excludes tax and gratuity) on Tuesday, January 21 will feature a morning Diaper Resource Center interest meetFor more information, please call (609) 252-9680 ing, where those interested will learn how to participate MEDITERRA • 29 Hulfish Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 with the volunteer team which www.mediterrarestaurant.com meets regularly to ensure that diapers are provided for families who need them; followed

Of the Town

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ily Campus in Ewing, is presenting its annual Week of Hope. Local residents are invited to “come, learn, act, and impact the lives of local people who are trying to break the cycle of poverty.”

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Hope Week Continued from Preceding Page

formerly homeless and are now moving into their new homes. Expand Your Knowledge Day on Thursday, January 23 will include an infor m at ion a l, i nte r ac t ive open house at the Family Campus from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., where participants can learn about the 36 programs which make up HomeFront’s c om pr e h e n s i ve s e r v i c e s model. Up Close and Personal Day will wrap up the week on Friday morning, January 24, at the Family Campus from 10 a.m. to 12 noon, with HomeFront CEO Connie Mercer and Chief Operating Officer Sarah Steward leading a discussion and Q & A about HomeFront’s cur rent s t rateg ic goa ls, plans for the future, and potential impacts on the local community. “Dr. King once said, ‘Life’s most persistent and urgent question is ‘What are you doing for others? ’” Cozzi pointed out. “Working at HomeFront with our volunteers, I see our community does a tremendous amount for local families in need, and it’s truly wonderful.” For m or e i n for m at ion and registration, visit www. homefrontnj.org. —Donald Gilpin

Leah McDonald Receives Corner House Award

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T he award recognizes someone who exemplifies the work of Marie L. Matthews, who devoted so much of her talents, time, and volunteerism to Corner House and its mission. The benefit will be held March 27 at the Chauncey Center. As a 25-year Princeton resident, McDonald has served many nonprofits in leadership roles, including Corner House Foundation. She joined the Corner House Foundation Board in 2008 and served as treasurer from 2010-2014. She led several important initiatives that strengthened the Foundation, including the retention of a new accounting firm, significant improvement in oversight and management of the Foundation’s endowment, and re-establishing the Foundation’s Investment Committee. In 2016, McDonald joined the Advisory Board and remains an active member today. She continues to assist in the annual direct mail campaign and the annual Spring Benefit, both of which are crucial in assuring continued success in fulfilling the Corner House mission.

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What did you learn at today’s celebration?” (Asked Sunday at the Fiesta del Dia de Los Reyes Magos, Three Kings Day, event at the Arts Council of Princeton) (Photos by Erica M. Cardenas)

“Dia de Los Reyes is celebrated on January 6 to celebrate the Three Wise Men. Just like today’s celebration, we celebrate these traditions in Mexico by having special cake, dancing, and giving gifts.” —Georgina Ramirez, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico

Virginia: “Rosca is a type of cake and eaten on Three Kings Day. If you get a piece with a baby figure, it means you are the king or queen of the day!” Adri: “This was the first time I saw a flamenco dance. I didn’t realize it was related to Three Kings Day.” —Virginia Tomat, Lawrenceville with Adri Tomat-Kelly, New York City

“I learned there is a plastic baby in the cake, and if I get it, it’s going to be a good year! I also learned the celebration around the three kings and gift giving, and being with family and community.” —Aliya Khan, Mickleton

Adelaide: “The celebration was a nice way to introduce my son to our family Portuguese culture, and it’s making him realize that Christmas hasn’t ended yet. I think he wants to start flamenco lessons soon!” —Henry and Adelaide da Silva Cicero, Princeton

“These are the three wise men who came to bring presents to baby Jesus.” —Charo Scott, Princeton


7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

Concierge Medicine

There’s a new trend in healthcare, and it’s gaining momentum in our area. By Sarah Emily Gilbert (Originally published in Princeton Magazine) Dr. Barbara A. Brown (left) and Dr. Lynne B. Kossow of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine.

F

or the past few years, Dr. Lynne B. Kossow and Dr. Barbara A. Brown of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine have offered their patients far more than the traditional primary care practice. Most doctors see 25-30 patients a day for an average of 15 minutes, but Drs. Kossow and Brown see six to eight patients a day for up to an hour. In addition to providing treatment for acute illnesses, the doctors act as their clients’ healthcare coaches through Lifestyle Medicine, a scientific approach to patient wellness by effecting changes in areas such as diet, physical activity, and stress management. With the current shortage of primary care physicians and the abundance of high volume practices, this type of individualized attention is rare. However, by switching to a concierge format, doctors like Kossow and Brown are able to practice medicine that consists of this broad-spectrum care. Concierge medicine, also known as retainer-based medicine, is an umbrella term for private medical care wherein patients pay an out-of-pocket fee in exchange for enhanced care. Born in the 1990s, concierge medicine was once thought of as a service for the wealthy that charged patients a lofty fee for luxury medicine. In recent years, it has evolved to accommodate patients across all income brackets, leading to expanding interest among patients and their primary care doctors. According to a survey released by the American Academy of Private Physicians at the AAPP 2015 Fall Summit, more than 45 percent of 862 independent physicians would consider a concierge or similar membership model in the next three years. This may be due in part to our aging population needing increased and varied medical services, leading to an imbalanced patient/doctor ratio. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act has increased the number of insured patients, putting a further strain on primary care doctors. As a result, physicians are often unable to dedicate enough time to each patient. In the hopes of increasing both job and patient satisfaction in a financially sustainable way, primary physicians like Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are looking toward concierge medicine. “Where conventional medicine is failing is in the prevention and reversal of chronic diseases that are becoming an epidemic in the United States today,” explain the doctors. “The current insurance model is built upon a problembased economic reimbursement that encourages doctors to address medical problems very quickly. This leads to most doctors rushing to see 25-30 patients per day in order to make ends meet…This is not how we have ever practiced. We always want to have the time to address the root cause of diseases that are preventable today.” Lifestyle Medicine is a 21st century approach to healthcare that consolidates the very best characteristics of traditional medicine with the profound impact of lifestyle behaviors on health. As our program grew, it became readily apparent to us that integrating Lifestyle Medicine into our internal medicine practice was the best way for us to continue to provide exceptional care. We feel that the concierge model is the only way to effectively do that.

Concierge medical practices come in various forms, including those that reject insurance plans all together, but this is not the case for Princeton Lifestyle Medicine. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown accept insurance for all covered medical services. In addition, their patients pay an annual fee of $1,500 for the Lifestyle Medicine Concierge program, which gives them access to an elevated level of care. Trained at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine at Harvard Medical School, the doctors are at the vanguard of their field, having lectured about their practice development model at The Institute of Lifestyle Medicine Conference in 2015. They are also members of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and the American College of Physicians. They are among the first physicians to become board certified in Lifestyle Medicine, as well as maintaining their board certifications in internal medicine. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown’s practice is unique in that it offers patients comprehensive conventional medical care combined with lifestyle counseling. Patients interested in a natural approach to disease prevention are provided in-depth, individualized coaching based on their needs. The doctors can assist with everything from quitting smoking to creating a manageable diet and exercise plan. According to the doctors, this is an evidence-based practice that has been shown to prevent, reverse, or slow down heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, diabetes, dementia, and some cancers. The concierge model offers Princeton Lifestyle Medicine patients additional benefits including access to the doctors’ emails, cell phone numbers, and private phone line, extended patient office visits, a one-hour consultation, and same or next day appointments. As a result, patients see Drs. Kossow and Brown not only as accomplished medical doctors, but health advocates, mentors, and even friends. “Our practice structure allows us to spend more time educating our patients about what may be going on with them medically,” the doctors explain. “We are better able to work with them as partners in their care and advocate for them with their specialists or if they are in the hospital. We provide tremendous support and guidance to them and their caretakers or family. We are happy to have this enhanced communication with our patients. It allows us to make social visits when they are hospitalized at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro so that we can stay in close touch while they are receiving care.” Concierge practices like Princeton Lifestyle Medicine focus the healthcare system on its most vital component: the patient-doctor relationship. The model emphasizes quality care instead of quick care, benefitting both parties. Dr. Brown and Kossow are now board certified as specialists in the practice of Lifestyle Medicine and are the only physicians in the Princeton area who are board certified in both Internal Medicine and Lifestyle Medicine. As leaders in both concierge and Lifestyle medicine, it comes as no surprise that Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are at the forefront of this effort, bringing Princeton into the future of healthcare.

The Princeton Lifestyle Medicine Concierge Program is $1,500 per year. The fee can be paid monthly, quarterly, biannually, or annually, and credit cards are accepted as payment. All medical services are billed through the patient’s insurance company as usual. Princeton Lifestyle Medicine is located at 731 Alexander Road, Suite 200 in Princeton, New Jersey. For more information call 609.655.3800 or visit www.princetonlifestylemedicine.com. — Paid Advertisement —


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020 • 8

Mayor Lempert continued from page one

for me in a lot of respects,” she said. In the meantime, she has a full plate. “I feel extremely fortunate to have been mayor at such a time of momentous change for Princeton,” she said. “It started with consolidation, but there have been other challenges we faced over the past several years. There is the big issue of how we plan for and manage our growth. How do we prepare for climate change? How do we make sure we’re being good global citizens, reducing emissions? And how do we retain what is unique and special about Princeton as we change and modernize?” L emper t has been im pressed by the interest students have shown in local politics. “I do feel, in a lot of ways, that this is the golden age of local government,” she said. “I see it in the interest by a lot of Princeton University students wanting to get involved at the local level. I think there is a frustrating amount of gridlock at the national level, and often at the state level. It’s not like the big issues go away, but when working at the local level you can really see the impact of your work. And because we’re part of some national networks that have been set up, even on issues that feel so much larger than Princeton, by working in conjunction with other communities you feel like you’re part of a larger effort.” Between now and next January, there is a lot to do. “As a former reporter, I feel like part of my personality is that I’m deadline-driven,” Lempert said. “Knowing I have a year

left is energizing. I want to make sure we are able to cross out a lot of the big items we’ve been talking about and need to get done.” In her address to Council, Lempert outlined the municipality’s achievements during the past year. She also referenced setbacks; specifically the illegal dumping scheme that was uncovered at the River Road site. The scandal has led to a remediation plan and “internal supervision and reporting procedures to ensure that nothing like this ever happens again,” she said. Despite that situation, Lempert is focused on the positive. “I feel so lucky that my kids have had the privilege of growing up in Princeton,” she said. “I’m not somebody born and raised here, and I’ve had the opportunity to live in a bunch of other places. There is something really special about Princeton, and it is unique.” —Anne Levin

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BOE Reorganizes continued from page one

community in a comprehensive facilities master planning project. The goal in the coming months is to develop, with community input, multiple possible scenarios for consideration by the BOE. The first of several public forums with M&M, where the public can be informed and provide input, will take place on Saturday, January 25 at Princeton High School at 9 a.m. “As we begin a new year and a new decade as a Board and as a school district, I would ask us to continue to remember that our work is ultimately about building relationships,” said PPS Superintendent Steve Cochrane. “It is through building relationships with students that we help them achieve higher levels of joy, purpose, and learning. It is through building relationships with our staff and the community that we can harness our collective wisdom to solve the large and small challenges that face our growing schools.” Emphasizing the Board’s mission going forward, Behrend added, “We are a Board of ten experienced and dedicated members, united in our passion for public education and our desire to continue to provide the students of Princeton with an education that equips them with knowledge, skills, perspectives, and a love of learning.” —Donald Gilpin

ONLINE www.towntopics.com

Police Blotter On January 3, at 4:15 p.m., a 15-year-old female was charged with shoplifting a mobile phone accessory valued at $15 from a business on Nassau Street. On January 3, at 3:53 p.m., a complainant reported that, on December 31 between 12:35 and 12:43 a.m., two unknown males stole two signs valued at $500 from their building on the 200 block of Nassau Street. Both suspects are described as white males between 20 to 25-years old, one was wearing a black jacket, white shirt, and tan pants and the other was wearing a black vest, red shirt, and dark pants. On January 1, at 1:32 a.m., a 32-year-old male from Lawrenceville was charged with DWI, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop for speeding and failing to keep right on Quaker Road. On December 30, at 5:56 p.m., a complainant reported that an unknown male stole an iPhone 7 valued at $295 from their store on Witherspoon Street on December 29. The suspect was described as a black male between 25 and 30 years old, wearing a gray sweatshirt and black pants. On December 26, at 2:58 p.m., a resident of Loomis Court reported that a check they mailed was stolen, altered, and deposited into a different account than intended. The check was made out for $626.92 and altered to $4,500.80. On December 24, at 4:59 p.m., a 32-year-old female from Trenton was charged with DWI and obstructing the administration of law, subsequent to a report of an erratic driver on

Quaker Road. Police located the suspect’s vehicle disabled in a lot. On December 23, at 9:09 p.m., police responded to a noise complaint on South Harrison Street. They located a 17-yearold male, who was charged with possession of suspected THC oil and an electronic cigarette, and juvenile delinquency. On December 21, at 2:41 a.m., a 21-year-old male from Sewell was charged with possession of

under 50 grams of suspected marijuana, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop for speeding on Mercer Road. On December 20, at 1:48 a.m., a 25-year-old male from Hopewell was charged with DWI, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop for speeding and failure to maintain a lane on State Road. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

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continued from page one

Service at Nassau Presbyterian Church. “When Donald Trump was first elected, my biggest fear was that his impulsive, ignorant, and reckless approach to world affairs would get the U.S. into another war,” Moore wrote Monday in a letter urging CFPA members and others to call and email their congresspersons. “That moment may have arrived. War with Iran would be far, far worse than the disastrous one with Iraq.” Describing last week’s killing of Iranian Major General Qasem Soleimani as “a profoundly reckless move that could have deadly consequences” and calling for Congress “to halt this latest escalation and bring this administration back into line,” Moore continued, “Millions across the region are praying and hoping that this reckless assassination does not open Pandora’s box, but praying isn’t enough. We must put pressure on our leaders to stop war with Iran.” In a telephone conversation Friday, Moore emphasized the value of diplomacy, Trump’s failure to engage in diplomacy, and the dire consequences of war as the alternative to diplomacy. In its focus in recent years on U.S. relations with Iran and North Korea, the CFPA has mounted a vigorous campaign for “Diplomacy, Not War.” “Trump torpedoes diplomacy,” said Moore. “There’s no real engagement, no real diplomacy going on. That’s when the danger of war emerges.” Referring to the Iran nuclear agreement, negotiated by the Obama administration over a three-year period then vacated by the U.S. last year, Moore went on, “There’s no diplomatic track that Trump has been willing to get onto. He wants them to capitulate. That’s his version of diplomacy, but that’s not the way diplomacy works. That’s not the way the real world works. It’s very distressing. We need the diplomatic off-ramp, and that’s not there now. There’s only Congress, and Congress needs to push very hard.” Peace Voter 2020 Another top priority for CFPA in the coming months is its Peace Voter Campaign, which it initiated in 1995, the first of its kind in the country. It has been a pioneer ever since in what has become a national model for effectively influencing elections for peace and gun violence prevention, according to Moore. CFPA has targeted about 50 close races in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin since 1995, publishing peace voter guides in print and on their website based on candidate questionnaires and public positions taken. They have also published the peace voter guides as signature ads in newspapers in the targeted districts shortly before election day. Another CFPA innovation, started in 1999, is 90-minute candidate briefings. CFPA representatives and experts on issues of nuclear weapons and gun violence have met with more than 100 candidates from both parties over the past 20 years. “Candidate briefings give us a chance to start a strong relationship with candidates, many of whom have had no prior experience with the issues we

work on,” wrote Moore. “Obviously this is a crucial election,” he continued, looking ahead to November. “We’re at a place where we have a reckless president, who has already been impeached, and is in danger of getting us into wars. Democracy itself is on the line at this point, and that’s scary.” CFPA leaders are planning a retreat in February to set their ongoing strategy for the 2020 Peace Action Voter Campaign, but Moore suggested that target contests this year might include Tom Malinowski (DNJ-7) and Andy Kim’s (D-NJ3) races for re-election to the House of Representatives, as well as the race in the second congressional district where incumbent Jeff Van Drew (RNJ-2) recently switched from the Democratic party. Moore added that CFPA will most likely also do some campaign work in Pennsylvania, an important swing state in the 2020 presidential campaign. “We’re continuing interfaith in 2020,” Moore said. “We’re not a partisan political organization. We value the base we continue to have in the faith community. This is a way of relating to the elections that puts peace on the ballot. Peace and gun violence prevention are on the ballot. It’s really important to express our values in that way.” The Rev. Dr. Deborah Banks, pastor of the Mount Pisgah AME Church of Princeton, will be the speaker for the Princeton Clergy Association’s Annual Multifaith Service to Commemorate the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on January 20 at 7 p.m. Diverse faith leaders from a wide range of traditions will lead the multifaith worship service. —Donald Gilpin

Institute Awarded $1 Million For Astrophysical Studies

Schmidt Futures has awarded $1 million to the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) to leverage advances in high-performance computing to understand challenging astrophysical problems. The project, led by James M. Stone, Professor in the School of Natural Sciences, seeks to deepen our understanding of various cosmic phenomena, including neutron star mergers, star and planet formation, and the dynamics of the interstellar medium in galaxies such as our own Milky Way. “Computat ional as t ro physics continues to revolutionize the way scientists glimpse and interpret our universe, and Jim Stone is driving some of the most cutting- edge research in this field” said Robbert Dijkgraaf, director and Leon Levy professor. “The Institute is proud to recognize this important investment by Schmidt Futures in a project that promises to bring humanity closer than ever to stars in their finest detail.” Stone’s work harnesses advances in numerical algorithms and high-performance computers to model and interpret the dynamics of astronomical systems. There is a wealth of data available that guides the work: from gravitational wave astronomy to newly discovered exoplanetar y systems, unlocking valuable new insights into the fundamental nature of the cosmos. “Most of the exoplanetary systems discovered to date

are very different from our ow n solar system, challenging our current theory of planet formation,” said Stone. “Understanding how giant planets grow inside the gas and dust disks surrounding young stars requires numerical models that evolve a dust y, weak ly ionized plasma including self-gravity and radiation transfer. I have been working on various aspects of this problem for the past 10 years, and at the IAS I hope to greatly accelerate progress.” This IAS project is also poised to expand on a currently limited understanding of the properties and internal structure of neutron stars through an analysis of simultaneously detected g rav itat ional waves and electromagnetic radiation associated w ith gammaray bursts produced by the merger of two neutron stars. Stone’s work to understand the underlying physics of these events relies on the improved accuracy and more realistic physics enabled by special-purpose numerical methods. The development, implementation, and testing of these methods represents a core goal of this project. The three-year grant from Schmidt Futures began October 4 for the purpose of championing the world’s preeminent computational astrophysicists to develop tools and study the structure and evolution of various astrophysical systems. This funding will support the hiring of a software engineer and a long-term postdoctoral fellow, both with proven expertise in the field. Eric Schmidt, cofounder of Schmidt Futures, serves on the IAS board of trustees.

Local Environmentalists Hoping For State Ban on Plastic Bags

Some New Jersey residents Eight states — California, plaud them. But we haven’t fighting for the elimination of Connecticut, Delaware, Ha- heard any news about the single-use plastic bags got a waii, Maine, New York, Ore- Princeton store,” said Jones. New Year’s Day gift last week gon, and Vermont — prohibit “We know that West Windsor when it was announced that single-use bags to be used. has been pushing it.” 10 towns and one county Supporters of legislation The legislation being conhad banned the bags, plastic banning the bags and related sidered for New Jersey would straws, and expanded poly- products say it will go a long be welcome by environmentalstyrene (Styrofoam) from way toward removing toxic ists, including the Princeton further use. But Princeton plastics that clog waterways. Environmental Commission, was not among them. Opponents have included which has made the issue a Local ordinances have out- manufacturers of plastics, priority for 2020. “The Aslawed the products in Asbury business and industry groups, sociation of Environmental Park, Bayonne, Camden and some supermarkets. Commissions has said that County, Garfield, Glen Rock, The fifth and newest loca- this is one of the strictest manLamberton, Paramus, Ridge- tion of McCaffrey’s Food Mar- dates out there,” said Jones wood, Saddle Brook, Somers ket, scheduled to open in New of the proposed law. “So it’s Point, and South Orange. But Hope, Pa. on Thursday, Janu- pretty tough. It actually bans shoppers in Princeton can still ary 9, has announced a policy plastic bags, single-use plasuse them — at least for now. of no single-use plastic bags tic straws, and polystyrenes, Molly Jones, executive di- or plastic straws. The com- and puts a 10-cent charge on rector of Sustainable Prince- pany declined to comment paper bags. So there are positon, said that while Princeton on whether a similar policy tive cogs in place. We all very hasn’t passed an ordinance, is in the works for stores in much want to see this progeliminating single-use plastic Princeton and West Windsor. ress to be made, but we have bags, straws, and polystyrene “We find it super encourag- been hoping it happens at the is still very much the focus ing that McCaffrey’s is doing state level.” —Anne Levin of local efforts. Jones and this in New Hope, and we apcolleagues are hoping that a bill geared toward that issue, Need Help? Call me! pending in the New Jersey Senate, will pass soon. And the town doesn’t want to interfere with that process. Sales Associate “We’ve been getting feed609-933-7886 back that there is great hope jbudwig@glorianilson.com that it’s going to pass during the lame duck session,” Jones said. “So the feeling is, let’s not put a ton of effort when it could soon be passed at the state level. That’s why less energy has been devoted to this lately, because of this hope that it’s going to pass.” Senate Bill 2776 and Assembly Bill 4330 prohibit use of plastic carryout bags, expanded polystyrene (StyroLawn & Landscape Services foam), and single-use plastic straws. “A person who vio• Innovative Design lates any provision of the bill • Expert Installation Audubon Society Announces would be subject to a penalty of up to $5,000 for each of• Professional Care Field Trips and Programs fense, and each day during Wa s h i n g t o n C r o s s i n g 908-284-4944 • jgreenscapes@gmail.com which the violation continues Audubon Society will hold License #13VH06981800 would constitute a separate field trips and special prooffense,” the bills read. grams this winter. On Januar y 12, a free trip to Abbott Marshlands will begin at 9 a.m., led by Merritt, Mary Leck, and Andrew Bobe at Roebling Park, www.terhuneorchards.com The Mount Family a Mercer County Park adja609-924-2310 330 COLD SOIL ROAD cent to the Abbott MarshPRINCETON, NJ 08540 lands. Participants will follow the trails and see how the marsh and its wildlife adjust to the cold weather. The next trip is January 26, titled “Birds of Shark River.” Merritt and Bobe will lead the trip along the July 6th, 13th, 20th, 27th August 3rd bay, ocean, and fresh water Monday to Friday • 9 am to 3:30 pm pond habitats of the Shark River area. Call Merritt at (609) 9218964 in the evening two days prior to the trip for directions or in case of inclement weather. On January 21 at 8 p.m., a program titled “Birds of South Africa” will be presented by Sharyn Magee, president of the Audubon Society, at Stainton Hall of the Pennington School. Magee will introduce the birds of South Africa with photographs taken by her husband, Charles Magee. She will elaborate on distriCertified by the State of New Jersey Youth Camp Standards bution, habit requirements and conservation, with an • Hands on behind the scences emphasis on endemic spe• Explore the farm, fields & woods cies. • Share life on the farm The Pennington School is • Grow, harvest, cook & eat vegetables & fruits at 112 W. Delaware Avenue in Penning ton. Ref resh • Have fun! ments are served at 7:30 p.m. and the talk will begin For registration and additional information at 8 p.m. The public is invited. Additional information terhuneorchards.com/summer-camp can be found at www.washingtoncrossingaudubon.org.

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9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020 • 10

Concert Reading of Musical Comedy Brings Stars to McCarter Theatre

When the musical comedy The Big Time is staged at McCar ter T heatre on Friday, January 31, there will be no sets, costumes, or choreography. But the lineup of performers seated on stools at this concert reading of the play, accompanied by the Princeton Symphony Orchestra ( PSO ), represents some of Broadway’s busiest and best-loved actors. The second installment of the orchestra’s PRINCETON POPS series, The Big Time is a collaboration of the PSO and McCarter Theatre Center. The show, written by Douglas Carter Beane, takes place during the Cold War. Russian spies take over an ocean liner holding all of NATO, and some lounge singers on board save the day by turning the communists on

Santino Fontana to singing, dancing, and comedy. The cast includes Tony Award-winners Santino Fontana and Debbie

Gravitte, along with Laura Osnes, Jackie Hoffman, Michael McCormick, Bradley Dean, and Raymond Bokhour — names familiar to those who frequent Broadway musicals. “If I had one of these people, I would be grateful,” said Douglas J. Cohen, composer and lyricist for the show. “To have all of these amazing people, so varied and with so many things in their arsenals, is incredible. They are Broadway luminaries, and they are phenom ena l. T he s e are people who can make you laugh and break your heart.” The other Doug associated with The Big Time is Douglas Carter Beane, the author and director whose credits include The Nance, As Bees in Honey Drown, Shows for Days, Cinderella, Xanadu, and Sister Act. He first did the show two decades ago. “This is actually the very first musical theater piece I ever wrote, many years ago,” said Beane. “It was different then. It was about terrorism. Just magically, every time we would go to do a production, there would be another terrorist attack, which would sell tickets.” The show was originally set in Atlantic City, and the two lounge singers were from South Philadelphia. “This was the late nineties, when Atlantic City was full of these kinds of shows,” Beane said. “But it’s different now.” Beane took a break from

the play to work on several other musicals. When he decided he wanted to direct as well as write, he remembered how much he had enjoyed working on the show. He asked two friends, director Jerry Zaks and actress Tracey Ullman, what they thought. They urged him to change the time period and the setting. “So I started watching the news,” Beane said. “I saw Russia was in the news a lot. I approached Doug Cohen, and said, ‘What if we set it in the early 1960s and made them communists and NATO?’ it took a week and a half to do the rewrite.” The Big Time, revised, was staged by actors at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, Beane’s alma mater, and it did well. Michael Rosenberg, McCarter’s managing director, was familiar with the show and suggested it as a collaboration with the PSO. Cohen, whose resume includes multiple awards and such off-Broadway productions as The Evolution of Mann, No Way to Treat a

Lady, The Gig, and Children’s Letters to God, is happy to be a part of the show once more. “I always had a fondness for it. It has such an optimistic spirit,” he said. “And it has a sound that is really fun to listen to — from the era of Big Bands, swing, and the Rat Pack. August Eriksmoen, who has been lauded on Broadway, has done an exceptional orchestration of the score. And the Princeton Pops is just amazing.” The story of art triumphing over evil is especially meaningful to Cohen. “I do believe in that,” he said. “This is not a play that is blatantly political, but you can read things into it. It has relevance today, even though it’s set in 1963. There will always be artists and people who believe in creativity and putting something positive into the world.” The Big Time is Friday, Januar y 31 at 8 p.m. at McCarter’s Matthews Theatre, 91 University Place. Tickets start at $25. Visit mccarter.org or princetonsymphony.org, or call (609) 258-2787. —Anne Levin

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Carrier Clinic will host an Open Interview Day on Wednesday, Januar y 15, from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in its campus gym at 252 County Road 601 in Belle Mead. A wide variety of positions in patient care roles and support services are available. All are welcome. This hiring event is for part-time and full-time positions. Among those sought are residential counselors ( yout h residential treatment), who will use a nurtured-heart approach to provide supervision, behavior management, and counseling of the basic needs for the youth to build relationships and assist with developing adolescents through support of behavior modules. Responsibilities include leading resident group meetings, coordinating recreation activities, and participating in other group functions. Also needed are mental health technicians (inpatient adolescent unit). These positions function under the supervision of the unit directors or nursing supervisors. MHTs provides support services for the professional nursing staff and are responsible for the routine functions of patient care under the direction of the professional nurse. They perform other related duties as assigned or requested. Nursing supervisors, staff nurses, and licensed practical nurses are also needed. Positions are available within the inpatient and residential populations. Applicants may apply online at www.carrierclinic.org

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The Delaware & Raritan Canal Watch will hold a cleanup effort along the Delaware & Raritan Canal towpath in South Bound Brook on Saturday, January 11. Canal Watch board member Bob Barth will conduct the cleanup effort. Volunteers should meet 10 a.m. at Lock 11 parking lot, Canal Road, South Bound Brook, across from the South Bound Brook Post Office (11 Madison Street) . Bring work gloves. For further information and weather-related updates, call Barth at (201) 401-3121 or email bbarth321@ aol. com.

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Remembering Rabbi Feldman For Community Partnerships

To the Editor: As the executive director of Trinity Counseling Service, I feel a profound professional as well as personal loss as a result of Rabbi Adam Feldman’s death. As I joined hundreds of family, friends, colleagues, and parishioners at Rabbi Feldman’s funeral last Sunday, the theme of devoted friend, passionate colleague, and connector continued to emerge. People used phrases like “master of relationships,” and talked about the power of Adam’s ability to listen and join with people from all faith traditions and backgrounds. They talked about his investment in community partnerships as well as his commitment to constructive, civil discourse as a means of both connecting and healing. His commitment to modeling collaboration, partnership, respect, and support for others were hallmarks of Adam’s way of being in the world. He exuded gentle strength that was powerful. He could also be feisty, which was part of his charm. As a member of the TCS Board of Trustees, Rabbi Feldman was a strong supporter of mental health awareness and talked openly about his experience with how many are struggling with anxiety and depression today. He understood that mental health is not a luxury, but a necessity. He advocated for the importance of people to have access to mental health support when needed. He and I talked frequently about ways to expand services to support the greater Princeton community including ways to support other faith leaders, school personnel, law enforcement, etc. in order for community leaders to be better prepared to offer support to those we serve. Adam was an invaluable colleague — a calm, steady presence who gave honest feedback and always had your back. A signature and sincere question for those of us who met with him regularly was, “now…what can I do for you?” Adam made an indelible impact on our community, and now it’s our job to ensure that his legacy lives on. WHITNEY B. ROSS, PHD Executive Director Trinity Counseling Service

Noting Mark Freda’s Leadership During Consolidation Process

To the Editor: I am delighted that Mark Freda has decided to run for mayor of Princeton. I had the privilege of serving with Mark in 2012 when I was one of the Borough Council’s representatives to the Consolidation Transition Task Force. Mark chaired the task force and we served on multiple subcommittees together. I quickly became a fan of Mark, both personally and professionally. We were handed a road map that needed to be transformed into tangible product that would allow a consolidated government to be operational on January 1, 2013. Mark’s experience in government and his deep roots in the community were invaluable as the process unfolded. More than that, however, his leadership skills were outstanding. Although consolidation had passed overwhelmingly in both the Borough and the Township, it remained a delicate and controversial issue, and implementing the reality of consolidation meant working around the landmines of rules, regulations, various departments, and personnel. Here is what I appreciated about Mark’s leadership: he didn’t shy away from the tough conversations, taking chances, being truly transparent, or managing differences of opinion. For example, on the personnel subcommittee, we felt there might be an opportunity to move to Paid Time Off [PTO], a concept used by many governments and corporations. The employees, who were understandably anxious about additional change, protested strongly, and the idea was dropped. We tried; it didn’t work; and we moved on. No finger pointing, no recriminations. On the infrastructure and operations subcommittee, I felt that the Recreation Department needed a dedicated crew of employees to ensure optimal operation of the pool and high-quality park maintenance. There was an emphasis on cross-training during consolidation, so not everyone agreed with me, including Mark. Nonetheless, we had the discussion at the subcommittee level, at the taskforce level and in the consolidated government. While Mark didn’t agree initially, he never undermined my efforts, never made it political or personal. Today Rec has a small, dedicated crew, and Mark and I agree that it has paid off. Mark’s professional life has been about leadership and accountability. He understands chain of command and the importance of everyone doing his/her job to exacting standards. He has vision, and he knows how to move organizations and projects forward. There are many challenges facing our town, and all towns, and I feel strongly that Mark will be the outstanding leader we need as we move to Princeton 2.0. JO BUTLER Hibben Road

TOWN TOPICS is printed entirely on recycled paper.

To The Editor: Rider University’s attempt to impress the public that moving Westminster Choir College (WCC) students to Lawrenceville in the fall of 2020 is a done deal continues a misinformation campaign to get the public to believe that nothing more can be done to keep WCC in Princeton. This is not a lost cause, and it is not a done deal. On the contrary, there are currently three different lawsuits challenging Rider’s legal rights to grab WCC for monetary purposes. These suits will take a few years to resolve, cost a lot of money, especially to Rider which is losing money on it every year, and, by the time the issue is resolved, WCC may be an empty shell, unless the Princeton public will unite to support keeping it in Princeton. If the public wants to keep WCC in Princeton it needs to write letters to the editors of the local papers. The public should communicate their wishes to the mayor and to each member of the town’s Council as well as to the president and members of the Princeton Public School Board of Education. Rider’s latest step is not what they originally wanted to do, i.e. sell WCC, the college, and it’s property.

Letters to the Editor Policy Tow n Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. When necessary, letters with negative content regarding a particular person or group may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

That did not happen, and Rider is stuck and is trying to get its money any way it can, even if it will cause the demise of one of the best choir colleges in the world. Any elected Princeton official encouraging Rider to continue this destructive path by showing interest in buying the Westminster property is, in effect, aiding and abetting in the destruction of this jewel of Princeton. If the public will rise to the occasion, Rider may finally realize that there are no buyers to the property and will be willing to negotiate a settlement that will leave an independent WCC in Princeton. RALPH PERRY Random Road

Books nat ional polit ical cor re spondent for NBC News and MSNBC, will be discussing “2020 : What We Can Expect” in the Library’s Community Room tonight, Wednesday, January 8, at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Kornacki is the author of The Red and the Blue: The 1990s and the Birth of Political Tribalism. His work has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Roll Call, Steve Kornacki and the New York Times among other outlets. He is MSNBC’s Steve Kornacki Speaking at Library Tonight a native of Groton, MassaAs the Iowa caucuses ap- chusetts, and lives in New proach, Steve Kor nacki, York City.

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Princeton Public Schools Presents

Family Learning Workshop Series FOR FAMILIES OF INCOMING KINDERGARTENERS District education specialists will present the following six sessions for families of incoming PPS kindergarteners. Each session will emphasize the critical early learning skills and the home-school connection that foster a smooth transition to kindergarten. Attendance at all six workshops is recommended. Tuesday January 14

Interactive Read Aloud

Tuesday February 11

Phonological Awareness & Phonics

Tuesday March 10

Mathematical Number Sense

Tuesday April 14

Science Fun

Tuesday May 12

Learning Readiness: Motor Development, Behavior & Social Skills, Home Routines

Tuesday June 9

Princeton Public Library, School Routines & Procedures, Technology Resources Time: 6:00p.m. -7:30p.m. Community Park School 372 Witherspoon Street Princeton, NJ 08540 To sign up, please register at: http://pschool.princetonk12.org/public/preschool.html

SPACE LIMITED TO 25 FAMILIES PER WORKSHOP For further inquiries, please contact: Laurie Oneto in the Office of Curriculum and Instruction at (609) 806-4203 or Liliana Clotilde-Morenilla 609-955-6067

11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

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Letters do not necessarily reflect the views of Town Topics Email letters to: editor@towntopics.com or mail to: Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528

Move of Choir College by Rider University “Not a Done Deal”


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020 • 12

Town Topics

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membership that incorporates Personal Training, Small Group Training, and a basic membership. We feel this is the best option for achieving your goals safely and effectively. The 1:1 attention during your personal training sessions allows for a structured program customized for you based on your goals and abilities. Pair that with unlimited access to our SGT classes and you have a training week that cannot be matched elsewhere. The ability to use the gym on your own is the icing on the cake and another way that separates us from smaller studios and gyms, where you are bound only by the class schedule. Regardless of your goal, we have a program for you. Whether you are just looking to get started, or you are trying to amplify you current training, NexT Princeton is your destination. Our team of fitness professionals are dedicated to helping you achieve your goals, and we can’t wait for you to try us out. 390 Wall Street, Princeton; (609) 252-1117.

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13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

Performing Arts

LEARN BALINESE DANCE: Princeton Ballet School is now offering lessons in Balinese dance at its studio in Princeton Shopping Center, 301 North Harrison Street. Classes are held January 8-29, in four sessions.

Balinese Dance and Culture enrollment-classes/ or call At Princeton Ballet School (609) 921-7758. Princeton Ballet School, Westminster Conservatory the official school of American Repertory Ballet, is of- Resumes Noontime Recitals

TRIPLE THREAT: Violinist Isabelle Faust, cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras, and pianist Alexander Melnikov play Beethoven piano trios in the first program of Princeton University Concerts at Richardson Auditorium.

Beethoven’s 250th Birthday surrounded by candlelight, There are two free related Is Focus of Concert Events at the Princeton University events to this concert, as

Princeton University Concerts resumes its 2019-2020 season programming on Thursday, February 6, 8 p.m. at Richardson Auditorium, with musicians Isabelle Faust, violin; Jean-Guihen Queyras, cello; and Alexander Melnikov, piano, in a program of Ludwig van Beethoven’s piano trios, in celebration of the composer’s 250th birthday. The three musicians have each appeared on Princeton University Concerts’ stage separately, quickly becoming fan favorites. Melnikov made a debut in 2016 playing Shostakovich’s complete Preludes & Fugues, returning again last season alongside pianist AnTOPICS dreas Staier. Faust performed a J.S. Bach’s complete violin sonatas and partitas in 2016,

Chapel. And Queyras made his Princeton debut as part of the Arcanto Quartet in the fall of 2015. Tickets to the concert are $25-$55 General/$10 Student, available at princetonuniversityconcerts.org, by phone at (609) 258-9220, and in person at the University Ticketing Box Offices. Any remaining tickets can be purchased at the door prior to the concert. A t 7 p.m ., P r i n c e to n professors Scott Burnham ( Depar tment of Music, Emeritus) and Elaine Pagels (Department of Religion) offer a pre-concert Warm Up free to all ticketholders, discussing Beethoven and his impact from a range of perspectives.

part of Princeton University Concerts’ “Beyond the Music” programming. On Saturday, February 1 at 3 p.m. in the Princeton Public Library, families are invited for a screening of the children’s movie Beethoven Lives Upstairs, which was awarded the 1993 Emmy for Outstanding Children’s Program. Cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras will participate in a Live Music Meditation on Thursday, February 6 at 12:30 p.m. at Richardson Auditorium. This is an opportunity for the community to participate in a free meditation guided by Associate Dean Matthew Weiner (Office of Religious Life) during Queyras’ playing. No experience is necessary. Doors open at noon.

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fering Balinese dance classes through its Dances of the World program. The class will be taught from 12:15 to 1:15 p.m. on Wednesdays in four sessions, January 8-29, at the school’s Princeton Studio located at 301 North Harrison Street. The Balinese dance program will provide an introduction to both Balinese culture and dance. Students will study Tari Desar Laki (male form) and Tari Desar Wanita (female form) along with Tari Pendet — a graceful welcoming dance, and Tari Bari — a fierce warrior dance. They will learn the basic postures and expressions of both dances choreographed to gamelan music specific to each dance. Balinese dance instructor Sharron Bolen studied and performed Balinese dance at the Cudamani Institute (associated with UCLA Pacific Rim Studies) in Ubud Bali. She has taught Balinese dance at both Rider University and Princeton Ballet School as part of their world dance programs. Balinese classes are intended for students ages 13 and over. Students can drop in for one or more classes or attend all four. All levels are welcome. For more information or to register, visit www.arballet. org/class-division/open-

Westminster Conservatory at Nassau recitals will resume at 12:15 p.m. on Thursday, January 16 with a program of music from France for piano duet. The performers, Ikumi Hiraiwa and Megan Hofreiter, are members of the teaching faculty of Westminster Conservatory. The free recital will take place in the Niles Chapel of Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street. The program will include duets for piano four-hands that are related to childhood: Gabriel Fauré’s Dolly, op. 56; Maurice Ravel’s Ma mère l’oye (Mother Goose); Camille Saint-Saëns’ Le carnival des animaux; and Georges Bizet’s Jeux d’infants, op. 22. Ikumi Hiraiwa, a native of Japan, earned a bachelor of arts from UCLA and a master of music from Westminster Choir College of Rider University. She also holds an associate diploma in piano performance from the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto, Canada. She has performed as a solo and collaborative pianist at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia, Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall and the Esterházy Palace in Eisenstadt, Austria, among other venues. She is a part-time lecturer at Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University, teaching aural skills to undergraduate music majors. Delaware native Megan

Hofreiter performs often as a soloist and collaborative pianist, and she is a frequent accompanist in student recitals and competitions. At Westminster Conservatory, she teaches piano, coordinates the concerto competition, and co-directs the summer piano camp. She holds degrees in piano performance and pedagogy from Westminster Choir College of Rider University and from Columbus State University. She studied piano with Phyllis Alpert Lehrer, Betty Anne Diaz, and Linda Dyson. Her piano pedagogy teachers include Ingrid Clarfield, Phyllis Alpert Lehrer, James Goldsworthy, Jean Stackhouse, and Steve Clark.

Auditions Being Held For Annual PlayFest

The Lawrence Headquarters Branch Library is hosting PlayFest, its annual one-act play festival, on Saturday, April 25, and the festival’s directors are seeking actors to fill a variety of roles in the staged readings from the selected works of local playwrights. The audition consists of a cold reading from selected scripts. It will be held at the library, located at 2751 Brunswick Pike, on Wednesday, February 26 from 6-8 p.m.; Saturday, February 29 from 1-4 p.m.; and Monday, March 2 from 6-8 p.m. To schedule an audition, call branch manager James Damron at (609) 883-8291 or email jdamron@mcl.org.

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“TRY IT OUT DAY”: From 12 to 5 p.m. on Sunday, January 12, children and parents can take a 20-minute “test drive” of music lessons at Westminster Conservatory, on the campus of Westminster Choir College on Walnut Lane. Register for a trial lesson in cello, voice, piano, flute, trombone, trumpet, or euphonium at www.rider.edu/arts. Fast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020 • 14

Pike. As time passed, family members spread out and settled in other towns along the Pike, and to this day it continues to serve as the main road to get to family, friends, and other destinations.” For more information, visit smallworldcoffee.com/artshows and marknatale.com.

Art

“Stories of Diversity” at Stuart’s Considine Gallery

“WHITE HORSE FARM”: Recent paintings by Mark Allen Natale are on view through February 4 at Small World Coffee, 254 Nassau Street. In this exhibit, Natale pays homage to nostalgia, with oil paintings of landscapes and objects representing times passed. connection to feel-good memSeveral paintings on display Mark Allen Natale Exhibit at Small World ories are represented in me- are from his “White Horse

An exhibition of recent paintings by Mark Allen Natale is now on view at Small World Coffee, 254 Nassau Street. The show features detailed oil paintings of landscapes and objects that represent times passed. An opening reception is January 11, and the exhibition runs through February 4. In this exhibition, Natale pays homage to nostalgia. Old buildings, roadside signage, and objects that have a direct

ticulous detail. The subjects of Natale’s paintings are in stark contrast with today’s fast paced, impermanent, technology-driven world, where the flick of a thumb swipes away images just as quickly as they appeared. Instead, Natale’s compositions show things that stood the test of time and were built by hand using traditional tools and skills. His images are powerful; yet embody a quiet solitude.

Pike” series. These paintings show roadside landmarks that can be found along Route 30 (aka White Horse Pike), a historic highway that slices through South Jersey and for many years served as the main artery connecting Atlantic City to Philadelphia. “This road has a lot of history for me and my family,” says Natale. “In the 1930s, my great-grandparents owned and operated a service station/cafe on the White Horse

yoga Finals Edition Thursday, January 9, 6:30 pm Art Museum Take a break and enjoy the healing benefits of yoga with Debbi Gitterman of YogaStream. You are encouraged to bring your own mat. Refreshments in the galleries will follow.

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Late Thursdays are made possible by the generous support of Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970.

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Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart has announced that its winter gallery exhibition in Stuart’s Considine Gallery will feature art by Felicia V. Bland, Habiyb Ali, Ronah Harris, and Tamara Torres. The show, “Stories of Diversity,” shares views of life through artistic perspectives in the United States. It will be on view January 10 through February 27. An opening reception is Friday, January 10 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., and a gallery talk is January 14 at 1 p.m. “Our exhibits would like to bring new voices of reality in celebration of our collective experience,” said Gallery Director Andres Duque. “We will commemorate Black History Month and the Herstory performance at Stuart.” “Herstory: A Celebration of Black Women in History” will be presented on February 2 at 2 p.m. The gallery, at 1200 Stuart Road, is open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, when school is in session. For more information, visit www.stuartschool.org/arts/ art-galleries.

“Art + Design” Exhibit at Hunterdon Art Museum

“Art + Design” explores the drawings of Gloria OrtizHernández, the ceramics of Lorraine Kisly, and the furniture designs that emerge from their collaborative vision. The exhibition’s opening reception is on Sunday, January 12 from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Hunterdon Art Museum in Clinton, and will feature gallery talks with the artists and light refreshments. All are welcome to attend. The exhibition runs through April 19. Ortiz-Hernández works with a variety of materials including pencil, colored pencil, and charcoal. Her drawings on paper in the exhibition and her steel sculptures all have clear references in the design work. One reviewer noted that Ortiz-Hernández’s drawings — the source and inspiration for much of the work in this exhibition — are complex, multi-layered creations: “One looks at these drawings ... but also into them, into their many layers, and into their history,” noted Gregory Volk, a contributing editor at Art in America. “Ultimately, while Ortiz-Hernández’s near-fanatical drawings are all about surfaces, they also have a great deal of depth, both literally and psychologically. . . . How Ortiz-Hernández achieves this look is through exquisite and fastidious control, but the effect on the viewer is liberating and open-ended.” Kisly works in high-fire stoneware, using both the wheel and hand-building techniques, and her work explores themes of openness, receptivity, containment, and compression. The two artists began collaborating on furniture design when a specific need arose in a studio/living space in Bogota, Colombia. Creating the first piece ignited both artists’ creativity, and other works soon followed.

“URBAN 10”: Art by Felicia V. Bland, along with works by Habiyb Ali, Ronah Harris, and Tamara Torres, will be featured in “Stories of Diversity,” on view at the Considine Gallery at Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart January 10 through February 27. An opening reception is Friday, January 10, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Their furniture, while uncompromisingly functional, reflects the same aesthetic concerns that inform their art. Mass, weight, proportion, balance, form, clarity of line, restraint — all these elements engage the deep response of the viewer, and can be seen reflected in the drawings, sculpture, and ceramic works. “Their work, based firmly on geometry, does not strain for originality by addition or distortion, but achieves a startling inevitability by taking away the extraneous and revealing the essential,” one observer noted. The two furniture pieces in the HAM exhibition are console tables, Coromoro and Guatavita. In Coromoro, bands of steel shift perspective as the viewer passes by. The 1-inch elevator bolts are finished in the same patina as the steel and are countersunk into the cherry, relating and revealing the relationship above and below. With Guatavita, the feeling began with compression, a bite. A right angle of steel corresponds to a right angle below, the wood compressed

between them. The steel plate is flush with the ash top. Ortiz-Hernández’s work as an artist and sculptor can be found in many private collections internationally as well as in the permanent collections of a number of institutions including The Museum of Modern Art and The Morgan Library, both in New York City; and The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass. Kisly has maintained studios in rural Pennsylvania; Bogota, Colombia; and in Clinton over the 30 years since her apprenticeship with renowned ceramic artist Toshiko Takaezu. Ortiz-Hernández and Kisly maintained a showroom on Main Street in Clinton, New Jersey, for several years, featuring drawings, ceramics, and their joint design work. The Hunterdon Museum is located at 7 Lower Center Street, Clinton. Hours are Tuesday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $7 for adults; $5 for seniors and students; children under 12 are free. For more information, call (908) 735-8415 or visit www. hunterdonartmuseum.org.

“CROSSING #3”: This piece by Gloria Ortiz-Hernàndez is featured in “Art + Design,” her joint exhibit with Lorraine Kisly, on view at the Hunterdon Art Museum January 12 through April 19. An opening reception with the artists is January 12 from 2 to 4 p.m.


Ellarslie, Trenton’s City through May 10. www.mor“Trailscapes” Photo Exhibit M u s e u m i n C ad w a lad e r ven.org. At Mercer County Library T h e b e au t y a n d t r a n qu ilit y of t he L aw rence Hopewell Trail ( LHT ) as captured by Ewing Township photographer Susan Jacobsen is now on display at the Mercer County Library Branch Headquarters throughout January. An artist reception will be held on Sunday, January 12 from 2 to 4 p.m. at the library, located at 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. “The photographs capture the LHT in different seasons and at different times of day. I love the play of light on the trail,” said Jacobsen. “I want others to see the trail in its many moods and to enjoy it as much as I do.” Jacobsen’s photographs have been on display at a number of local galleries. Her exhibition, “Trailscapes: The Beauty of the Lawrence Hopewell Trail,” is the first public show of photographs of the LHT. “We were delighted when a friend of Susan’s suggested that we collaborate with the photographer to mount a show of her works,” said LHT Co-President Eleanor Horne. “We jumped at the chance. We consider this the first of many exhibitions of photographs, paintings, and drawings by artists who enjoy the multipurpose trail that connects Lawrence and Hopewell Townships.” “We hope that Susan’s many fans, photographers, and LHT enthusiasts will attend the artist reception on January 12. The reception is open to the public, but we ask that our guests RSVP at www.lhtrail.org,” said LHT Co-President Becky Taylor. “It will be a wonderful way to spend a Sunday afternoon.” For exhibition hours, visit www.mcl.org/lawrence.

Area Exhibits A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Silver Anniversar y” through April 5. www.lambertvillearts.com. Arts Council of Princet o n , 102 W i t h e r s p o o n St reet, has “Inside Out … When Worlds Collide” through February 22. www. artscouncilofprinceton.org. D & R Greenway Land Trust, 1 Preservation Place, has “Portraits of Preservation” through February 28. www.drgreenway.org.

Park, Park s ide Avenu e, Trenton, has “Trenton Eclectic” through March 15 and “If These Quilts Could Talk” January 19 through April 19. An opening reception is January 19, 2 to 4 p.m. www.ellarslie.org. Gourgaud Gallery, 23 North Main Street, Cranb u r y, h a s “O p e n C a l l ” through February 28. www. cranburyartscouncil.com. G roun d s For S c ul p ture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Interference Fringe | Tallur L.N.” through Januar y, “Rebir th : Kang Mu x ia ng” t hrough May, and other exhibits. www. groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and Innovators Gallery,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. $4 admission WednesdaySunday, 12-4 p.m. Thursday extended hours till 7 p.m. and free admission 4-7 p.m. www. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Harry Leith-Ross: Scenes from Country Life” through February 9. www.michenerartmuseum.org. Lakefront Gallery, RWJ University Hospital Hamilton, 1 Hamilton Health Place, has “Mostly Modern,” an exhibit of contemporary quilts made by members of the Central Jersey Modern Quilt Guild, through January 9. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Dreaming of Utopia: Roos evelt, New Jers ey”

New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, has “Preserving the Pinelands: Albert Horner’s Portraits of a National Treasure” through June 28 and “Fine Feathered Friends” t h rou g h S epte mb e r 13. www.statemuseum.nj.gov. Pr inceton Universit y Art Museum has “States of Health: Visualizing Illness and Healing” through February 2 and “The Eternal Feast: Banqueting in Chinese Art from the 10th to the 14th Century” through February 16. www.artmuseum.princeton.edu. Small World Café, 14 Witherspoon Street, has original work by artist Toral Patel through February 4. www.toralpatelart.com. West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, has “Doom and Bloom” through February 28. www. westwindsorarts.org.

Calendar Wednesday, January 8 6 p.m.: Richard Buckley of Rutgers lectures on “Updates on Spotted Lanternfly and Other Newcomers to the New Jersey Landscapes” following pizza at 6 p.m. At Mercer County Community College, Room SC 104. RSVP to kipatthesierraclub@gmail. com. Free; small donation welcome. 7-8:30 p.m.: At Hopewell Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, the Hopewell Public Library presents a

Thursday, January 16 9 : 3 0 -11 a.m . : Y WC A Princeton Area Newcomers and Friends meet at Bramwell House, behind the main building on Robeson Place. www.ywcaprinceton.org/ newcomers. Friday, January 17 9: 45 a.m.: The Piano Teachers Forum meets at Jacobs Music, 2540 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. pianoteachersforum.org. 8 p.m.: New Jersey Symphony Orchestra performs The Ring Without Words, Lorin Maazel’s arrangement of music from Wagner’s four-opera Ring cycle, at Richardson Auditorium. njsymphony.org. Saturday, January 18 10 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market is at MarketFair, Route 1. westwindsorfarmersmarket.org. 11 a.m.: Represent New Jersey meets at Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 50 Cherry Hill Road to begin the next phase of anti-corruption efforts. A screening of the short film Unbreaking America: Divided We Fall is planned. RSVP to https://volunteer.represent.us/nj_meeting_011820. 7:30 p.m.: Central Jersey Dance Society presents the No-Name Dance at Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. No partner needed. Country 2-Step lesson till 8:30 p.m., then open dancing till 11:30 to California Mix dance music with DJ Alan Saperstein. No partner needed. $10-$15. www.centraljersey.org. Sunday, January 19 1 p.m.: Lambertville Historical Society Annual Meeting at Pittore Justice Center, 25 South Union Street, Lambertville. Author/historian Linda J. Barth will discuss the people, bridges, locks, and aqueducts of the D&R Canal. Free. www.lambertvillehistoricalsociety.org. 3 and 7 p.m.: Youth Orchestra of Central Jersey performs at Kendall Hall, The College of New Jersey, Ewing. At 3 p.m., the Wind Symphony, String Preparatory Orchestra, and Pro Arte Orchestra will play. At 7 p.m., the Saxophone Choir and Symphonic Orchestra featuring Angela Zator-Nelson, assistant principal timpanist of the Philadelphia Orchestra, perform Jennifer Higdon’s Percussion

Concerto. $20-$25. tcnjcenterforthearts.tcnj.edu. 8 p.m.: Princeton Folk Music Society presents Anne Hills at Christ Congregation Church, 50 Walnut Lane. $10-$25. www.princetonfolk.org. Monday, January 20 Recycling 12-3 p.m.: MLK Day of Service Work Session in the Mapleton Preserve, hosted by Friends of Princeton Nursery Lands. Bring saws, clippers, loppers, rakes, and wear sturdy shoes and warm clothing. 145 Mapleton Road, Kingston. https://fpnl.org/. Wednesday, January 22 6:30 p.m.: Morven Museum, 55 Stockton Street, presents David Herrstrom lecturing on “The Prophetic Quest: Stained Glass Art of Jacob Landau.” $10 (free for Friends of Morven). morven. org. Thursday, January 23 6:45 p.m.: Mercer’s Best Toastmasters meets at Lawrence Community Center, 295 Eggerts Crossing Road, Lawrenceville. All are welcome. Saturday, January 25 3 p.m.: At Morven, 55 Stockton Street, the New Brunswick Chamber Orchestra presents “Extended Techniques,” part of a three-part series. $25 for the series (free for Friends of Morven). morven.org. Sunday, January 26 4-6 p.m.: Reception for the exhibit “Jewish Lawyers in Germany Under the Third Reich,” at The Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street. Open to all. The exhibit runs through January 30. info@thejewishcenter.org. 4 p.m.: Central Jersey Dance Society presents the Pure Ballroom Dance, at Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. Argentine tango lesson till 5 p.m., then open dancing till 8 p.m. to ballroom music with DJ Mark Liebeskind. No partner needed. $10-$15. www.centraljerseydance.org. Monday, January 27 5-9:15 p.m.: Princeton Community Works conference at Frist Campus Center, Princeton University. Dr. Randall Pinkett of BCT Par tners w ill speak and workshops will be held on addressing the challenges of the nonprofit world. $40 includes two workshops and boxed dinner. princetoncommunityworks.org.

Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Dance presents

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Please Starting Friday 1917 (R)

phone

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the theatre

Special Program In Search of Beethoven (NR) Sun, Jan 12 at 12:30PM

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Showtimes change daily Visit for showtimes. PrincetonGardenTheatre.org

Thank you.

Urban Bush Women’s

Legacy + Lineage + Liberation Join the acclaimed Urban Bush Women as they rehearse a collection of classic works, all choreographed by UBW Founder and Visioning Partner Jawole Willa Jo Zollar, transcend genres and amplify the voices of Women(+) of color and give multiple dimensions of life that are timely and relevant and continue to resonate especially in this era of #MeToo and Black Lives Matter.

January 15, 2020 4:30 pm HEARST DANCE THEATER Lewis Arts complex Free and Open to the Public

arts.princeton.edu

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

“ROSEDALE LAKE AT MERCER MEADOWS”: This photograph by Susan Jacobsen is featured in “Trailscapes: The Beauty of the Lawrence Hopewell Trail,” on view at the Mercer County Library Branch Headquarters in Lawrenceville through the end of January. An artist reception is Sunday, January 12, 2 to 4 p.m.

non-partisan introduction to climate change. Free. www. redlibrary.org. 7:30 p.m.: Benefit show at the Studio Theatre, next to Kelsey Theatre at Mercer County Community College, West Windsor, to support the show Desires of a Criminal, a Devised Theatrical Collage going to a national conference sponsored by the Kennedy Center. $20-$40. kelseytheatre.org. Thursday January 9 10 a.m.: The 55-Plus Club meets at The Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street. “Soldiers and Police: What are the Rules of Engagement?” will be the topic of a presentation by Michael Walzer, professor emeritus of social science at the Institute for Advanced Study. Free; $4 donation suggested. 6:45 p.m.: Mercer’s Best Toastmasters meets at Lawrence Community Center, 295 Eggerts Crossing Road, Lawrenceville. All are welcome. Friday, January 10 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: The Hunterdon County Rug Artisans Guild meets in the administration building, Hunterdon County Complex, 314 Route 12. www.hcrag.com. Saturday, January 11 9:30 a.m.: Princeton Plasma Physics Lab’s Science on Saturday lecture series begins with Princeton University professor Sabine Kastner, whose topic is “Visual Perception and the Art of the Brain.” Free. 100 Stellarator Road. Registration required. pppl.gov. 10 -11:30 a.m.: Lit tle HAWKS Gymtime at Princeton Academy’s McPherson Athletic and Convocation Center, 1128 Great Road. For kids 4-9. Free. www.princetonacademy.org/gymtime. Sunday, January 12 2 p.m.: Washington Crossing Postcard Collector Club meets at Union Fire Company, 1396 River Road, Titusville. www.wc4postcards.org. Tuesday, January 14 6:30-8:30 p.m.: Women in Development Annual Open House, YWCA, 59 Paul Robeson Place. Free. 10 a.m.: D&R Canal State Park towpath cleanup. Meet at Lock 11, Canal Road, South Bound Brook, across from the post office. For information, call Bob Barth at (201) 401-3121 or email bbarth321@aol.com.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020 • 16

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020 • 20

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Princeton Men’s Hoops Defeats Penn in Ivy Opener As Schwieger Explodes in 1st Start Against Quakers

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yan Schwieger had scored his only previous two career points against Penn for the Princeton University men’s basketball team, hitting a pair of free throws two years ago. One year after sitting on the bench through a pair of Princeton victories last winter over their archrival, the versatile junior guard exploded for a new career-high of 27 points to lead the Tigers to a 78-64 win over Penn last Saturday in the Ivy League opener for both teams at the Palestra in Philadelphia. “He likes to remind me he did not play one minute last year,” said Princeton head coach Mitch Henderson. “You can see that we’ve missed him.” Schwieger made 10-of-16 field goals, including a 3-pointer just before halftime to forge a 39-27 lead in a game in which the Tigers never trailed. He hit on 6-of-7 free throws as well and added three rebounds to a 40-35 rebounding edge for Princeton. The Tigers outscored Penn inside, 52-46, with senior Richmond Aririguzoh going for 15 points and 14 rebounds and freshman Tosan Evbuomwan chipping in eight points. Sophomore point guard Jaelin Llewellyn also made an impact in the paint, tallying 18 points and grabbing a career-high 14 rebounds and was later named the Ivy Player of the Week. “We’ve been trying to go inside all season between Rich-

mond and myself and Tosan and other guys,” said Schwieger, a 6’7, 205-pound native of Matthews, N.C. “I thought tonight it just showed up more so than other nights. That’s what we do – go inside and score.” The performance against Penn marked the fifth straight game in double figures scoring for Schwieger, whose scoring average has climbed to 13.3, third best on the team. Not coincidentally, the Tigers have won four of those five games to improve to 5-8 overall, 1-0 in Ivy play. “Every game we get better,” said Schwieger. “And in practice, we’re focused on that and if we keep going as hard as we do in practice, we should keep that going.” Schwieger came on strong to end last year, scoring in double figures in seven games after the Princeton exam break. In his final four games, he scored 23 against Cornell, 20 against Columbia and a then-career high 26 points against Dartmouth before finishing with 10 points against Harvard. He was poised to pick up where he left off before an injury cost him five games early this season. His return has helped the Tigers improve. Princeton returns to the court when it hosts Penn in a rematch on January 10 at Jadwin Gym in its last action before a two-week exam break. Looking ahead to round two against Penn, Henderson

knows that the win last Saturday doesn’t guarantee anything. “They hurt us on the boards,” said Henderson. “We’ll look closely at everything. Last year we played two terrific games. I enjoy this stuff very much when we get to do playoff-type coaching. I’m sure Penn will make some changes and so will we. It’s the second game of the league, so we want to keep working.” On Saturday, Princeton jumped out early on the Quakers. They went inside early and more effectively than Penn had seen in their game preparation. “Both of us play each other similarly and force you to take a lot of twos,” said Henderson. “We scored a lot of points in the paint, but so did they.” The Tigers showed a commitment to get the ball in the paint. Their size made a big difference in a game in which they only attempted 11 3-pointers compared to Penn’s 23. “We’re a really big team,” said Henderson. “We’re skilled at a lot of different positions. I’ve had multiple people come up to me and say it’s good to see you guys playing with three bigs. I say, ‘Who? What are you talking about?’ They’re talking about Tosan and Ryan, who are big guards and can do a lot of different things.” A 10-8 Princeton lead jumped to 20-10 on a layup by Aririguzoh only nine minutes into play. Penn came as close as 29-25 before Schwieger

keyed a 10-2 run with seven of his points to end the half and gave the Tigers the start that they needed to the Ivy campaign. “I think we just prepare for these games really well,” said Schwieger. “We come ready to play, maybe more than those other games for some reason, but I think it comes down to our preparation. Going backto-back, I think we can really lock in for two weeks and lock in on this game specifically.” The Tigers maintained a double-digit lead through the second half. Princeton hasn’t been accustomed to playing with that sort of lead this season, but weathered a late Penn run and never really was challenged. “That’s a really good win,” said Henderson. “They’ve been such a difficult team to prepare for. It’s a really interesting stat sheet. They hurt us on the boards. I thought our defense was terrific, and our inside play between these two (Aririguzoh and Schwieger) and Tosan and Jaelin, we got some nice layups. It’s a great way to start out the year. I’m really happy with the win. I think it’s a terrific road win.” Princeton, which came into the game ranked last among Ivy teams in scoring defense, put together one of its finest efforts of the year. The Tigers held Penn to 3-for-23 from 3-point range and 37 percent shooting overall. “It was good,” said Henderson of his team’s defense. “They missed some shots, but so did we. We were 2-for-11 and we have really good shoot-

CHOKED UP: Princeton University men’s basketball player Ryan Schwieger fights through a choke hold on the way to the basket in a game earlier this season. Last Saturday at the Palestra in Philadelphia, junior guard Schwieger poured in a careerhigh 27 points to help Princeton defeat Penn 78-64 in the Ivy League opener for both teams. The Tigers, now 5-8 overall and 1-0 Ivy, have a rematch with the Quakers on January 10 at Jadwin Gym. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) ers. It was a really interesting game. We maintained control.” A maturing Princeton squad would like to take control in the second meeting with its travel partner on Friday. “It’s a young team but we’ve played a lot of games,” said Henderson. “It’s time for us to grow. I thought Tosan gave us terrific minutes inside and got to the basket.” The inside play helped the

Tigers keep momentum on their side, a perfect recipe on the road in Ivy play. It showed their season-long development and earned them an important win to start the league season. “I just think our guys were locked in tonight and it went our way,” said Henderson. “We have to do it again in a week and it’s really hard to prepare for.” —Justin Feil


As the Princeton University women’s hockey team hosted Saint Anselm last Saturday afternoon, Maggie Connors turned the contest into her personal showcase. Princeton sophomore forward Connors assisted on a goal by classmate Sarah Fillier 2:03 into the game and then scored three straight goals for a natural hat trick as the Tigers jumped out to a 4-0 lead by the end of the first period. With t wo of her goals coming on assists by Fillier, Connors credited their partnership with sparking her outburst. “Playing with a player like Sarah Fillier makes it pretty easy, it is just being in the right spots at the right time,” said Connors, reflecting on her third career hat trick. “We talked before the game; we really want to get our chemistry going for the second half of the year after having a break.” The Tigers kept it going as they cruised to a 10-0 win, picking up their play from Friday night when they were sluggish early in returning from the holiday break before pulling away for a 5-0 win over Saint Anselm. “We came into this game knowing that we wanted to play a full 60 minutes because we have been a little bit inconsistent. at some points throughout the year,” said Connors, a 5’6 native of St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, who now has 23 points on the season with a team-high 13 goals and 10 assists. “We had a few different goals that we wanted to work on - keeping high energy and things like that. We really just focused on those few aspects and I think we really did well tonight. It was a little bit sloppy yesterday; I think yesterday’s game was getting back into it. Today we were finally back on track like we usually are.” The Princeton players did well across the board over t he weekend. Fresh man Emma Kee scored her first career goal and Daniella Calabrese had her first career assist on Friday with soph-

omore goalie Cassie Reale ear ning her first career shutout in the win. A day later, junior Amanda Harris notched her first goal of the season while sophomore Kayla Fillier scored her first career goal. “The highlight of that was just how much individuals on our team had success,” said Connors. “We really thought about everyone. We wanted everyone else to have success. That is huge and the wins came off of that. Emma getting her first goal yesterday and Cassie getting a shutout. Dani being super close to her first goal and Harris getting on the board. Kayla got that first goal which was long overdue. It was awesome.” In the view of Connors, the No. 7 Tigers, now 13-4, have the chance to produce an awesome season. “We are halfway through the year now so our team is really well bonded and I think with the consistency thing, we have gotten better almost every game with that,” said Connors. “Today we played a full 60 minutes; we did really well with that. We tried to just stick with detail. When we set goals before the game on things that we want to focus on and do, everything just comes really naturally.” Wit h a season of college hockey under her belt, things are coming more naturally for Connors this winter. “In freshman year, everything is just so new; the competition is new, the systems are new and you are getting used to things,” said Connors. “This year, you know what to expect. Last year it might have looked like we were doing really well on the ice as a freshman class and that we were doing really well as a team but the biggest adjustment was trying to deal with hockey and school. We understand now how to deal with all of the different aspects of Princeton.” Attending the 2019 Hockey Canada National Women’s D evelopment Team

Selection Camp in August has helped Connors be even more competitive. “Playing with Canada; it is a level slightly above this and things just move a little bit faster,” added Connors. “There is not much time and space with the puck. Playing with them gets me so much better no matter what. I love going to those camps. Sarah and Claire [Thompson] were there this summer, which was awesome.” P r i nce ton h e ad coach Cara Morey knows that she has two high level performers in Connors and Sarah Fillier. “Maggie can score and Sarah obviously can find her so they are lethal,” added Morey. “Maggie just snipes. When she has the opportunity, she is going to bury it.” Morey relished getting the opportunity to give all of her players a chance to shine in the two-game set with Saint Anselm. “It was an important weekend because we got every single player in with significant time,” said Morey “All three goalies, all of our forwards, and all of our defense got to play some meaningful minutes so it was a great weekend for that reason. It was really great for team culture because we have the usual players that get a lot of recognition. The bench was amazing, they were supporting everybody there.” That supportive attitude was exemplified by senior assistant captain Carly Bullock, who typically plays on a line with Connors and Fillier. “Everybody filled roles so we moved people around,” said Morey. “I put Bullock with two freshmen to really help them elevate their game and I thought she did a great job helping support them. Anne Kuehl has really stepped up in the last few weeks, she is getting consistent. Dani [ Calabrese ] has been getting more aggressive and gritty and it is causing a lot more turnover which is giving Annie more puck possession. That line did great this weekend. This

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

With Connors Producing Natural Hat Trick, PU Women’s Hockey Sweeps Saint Anselm

IN A RUSH: Princeton University women’s hockey player Maggie Connors races up the ice in recent action. Last Saturday, sophomore forward Connors tallied three goals and an assist to help No. 7 Princeton defeat Saint Anselm 10-0. The Tigers, now 13-4 overall, resume ECAC Hockey action this weekend by playing at Dartmouth on January 10 and at Harvard on January 11. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) weekend we were really trying to come together as a team with our culture.” With the Tigers heading to New England this weekend to play at Dartmouth on January 10 and at Harvard on January 11, Morey is hoping that team chemistry will pay dividends. “Next weekend is huge, it is two Ivy League games, the Ivy games are always big and we have some redemption with Harvard,” said Morey, whose club fell 6-2 to the Crimson on November 8. “People have that game circled. Dartmouth is getting

really good too and they are playing some strong hockey so it is going to be a battle. It is just really pushing the pace in practice, just knowing that we have a job to do and we have to work hard all week to get ready.” Connors, for her part, is ready to get to work from the opening face-off on Friday. “We just want to win each period; we really want to be consistent and the way to do that is to just focus on the first period of the first game and things will follow,” said Connors.

“We are going to work really hard this week to get prepared for these teams and hopefully it will go well. Our team knows how the last time against Harvard went; we are going to keep that in the back of our minds. It was a tough game for all of us. Sarah and Claire were gone with the Canada team; it was tough adjusting for that. You don’t take anything away from them, they played a great game. We definitely want to get back at them and get another shot.” —Bill Alden

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020 • 22

Junior Keenan Assuming More Responsibility, Helping Tiger Men’s Hockey Tie Harvard 3-3 Luke Keenan realized that he needed to step up this winter in his junior season for the Princeton University men’s hockey team. “I have been given more responsibility this year, a lot of other guys have too,” said forward Keenan. “We lost a lot of scoring from last year.” L ast Sat urday evening against visiting Harvard, Keenan handled that responsibility well, tallying an assist and a goal as Princeton overcame a 2-0 first period deficit in skating to a 3-3 tie with the Crimson. “We did come out a little flat tonight; I think we turned it around quickly,” said Keenan, reflecting on the tie which moved Princeton to 2-11-4 overall and 0-7-3 ECAC Hockey. “It was just to stick to the systems there; we were deviating from the systems. The main thing was to hit harder. We brought it to them, we started finishing checks and that led to shots.” Keenan assisted on the first goal for the Tigers, combining with Mark Paolini as Derek Topatigh blasted the puck in from the point for a power play tally. “It was a good pass by Paolini and Derek has a good shot and he really stepped into that one,” said Keenan. Late in the second period, Keenan cashed in on a power play chance for Princeton’s third goal, assisted by Adam Robbins and Paolini.

“I just got a back door; Adam Robbins, the freshman, made a really good backhand pass finding me there and it was a tap in,” said Keenan. For Keenan, whose last goal came in the second game of the season, the performance against the Crimson was a boost for his psyche as well as his teammates. “We haven’t been putting up many goals this year so as many as we can put in the back of the net, it is going to build everyone’s confidence,” said Keenan, a 6’1, 196-pound native of Courtice, Ontario, who now has seven points this season on four goals and three assists. With Pr inceton hav ing rallied to force overtime against Dartmouth on Friday night only to lose 4-3, the tie against Harvard marked progress. “It is a step for ward,” said Keenan. “We have had a hard time holding on to games in overtime and it was good that we held on to that one. Moving forward, hopefully we get the wins out of that.” Princeton head coach Ron Fogarty saw the result against Harvard as a positive. “It is baby steps and this was a small baby step in getting back on track on our style of play,” said Fogarty. “We were down 2-0, we had a couple of chances that just missed. This was a good tie, you want to get points.” Coming into the clash with the Crimson, Princeton was

focused on defensive play. “We had a good talk this morning about how we have been successful in the past in limiting the 5-on-5 goals to one or two,” said Fogarty. “We have been giving up two or three 5-on-5 goals and today it was one 5-on-5 goal against. That gives you a chance to win.” In order to tighten things up after falling behind 2-0, Fogarty made a key adjustment. “We switched our forecheck around after the first,” said Fogarty. “We executed the new forecheck very well. Even though they had a couple of power plays, there were no grade A chances because the play up ice was helping us defend. We were in a really good position.” Fogar t y liked t he way Keenan executed as the junior has adjusted to playing a bigger role for the Tigers. “There are a lot of players who have never played in the special team roles so now it is new for them and they are still adapting to it,” said Fogarty, noting that the graduation of senior stars Alex Riche, Max Veronneau, Ryan Kuffner, and Josh Teves left a major void on the Princeton attack. “The guys last year absorbed so many minutes in critical times. They played 23 minutes so you have guys who played 7 or 8 minutes for their career; now they are playing 15 or 16 in different situations so they are still new to that. Luke is new on the power play and he

KEEN INSIGHT: Princeton University men’s hockey player Luke Keenan, right, battles a foe in recent action. Last Saturday, junior forward Keenan contributed a goal and an assist as Princeton skated to a 3-3 tie with Harvard. The Tigers, now 2-11-4 overall and 0-7-3 ECAC Hockey, play at Clarkson on January 10 and at St. Lawrence on January 11. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) is starting to figure it out. I think Robbins’ pass was just terrific. He has great vision.” With Princeton playing at Clarkson on January 10 and at St. Lawrence on January 11 before it goes on exam break, Fogarty is hoping his young squad can take more steps forward. “We are in a relearning

process, we are playing in different situations where we have to adjust to new roles,” said Fogarty. “It is a big adjustment role right now; we are putting a lot of freshmen in those situations.” Keenan, for his part, is confident that the Tigers can come through if they stick to the process.

“We just take the positives out of what we did tonight and last night,” said Keenan. “We haven’t had a lot of three-goal games so far this year so it is good to see that the scoring is coming. We just have to stay patient and stick to our systems and it is going to work out.” —Bill Alden

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PU Men’s Volleyball Falls to No. 2 UCLA

George Huhmann came up big as the Princeton University men’s volleyball team dropped a 3-2 thriller to No. 2 UCLA last Monday at Dillon Gym. Senior star Huhmann had a team-high 16 kills but it

sity of Tennessee Diving Invitational over the weekend in their first competition of 2020, Princeton University divers produced some stellar performances. Princeton had a particularly strong showing on the men’s 1-meter board as senior Charlie Minns finished f if t h a n d j u n ior C olte n Young took eighth. Both men earned NCAA zone cuts in the event. On the 3-meter board, Young placed 14th with Minns coming in 15th.

On the women’s 1-meter board, junior Sophia Peifer finished 17th while senior Katrin Lewis placed 20th. As for the women’s 3-meter board, senior Mimi Lin paced 22nd while Lewis was 26th and Peifer came in 27th.

PU Water Polo Alum Johnson Named Player of the Year

For mer Princeton University women’s water polo superstar goalie, Ashleigh Johnson ‘17, was honored as the 2019 Swimming World’s Female Water Polo Player of the Year, the magazine said this week. Johnson helped the United States capture the 2019 FINA World title and the Pan American Gold Medal. The national squad is currently on a 68-game winning streak and has lost just one

time in the past two years. One of the greatest athletes in Princeton history, Johnson won the C. Otto von Kienbusch and Cutino Awards during her senior season in 2017. She was the first player in Princeton women’s water polo histor y to be named first team All-America and third ever to be picked as AllA merican in each of her four seasons. Johnson finished her Pr inceton career w ith a 100-17 record, along with a school-record 1,362 saves and a .693 save percentage. She was a 19-time Collegiate Water Polo Association (CWPA) Defensive Player of the Week award winner, a four-time first-team allconference player and the CWPA Player of the Year.

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

PU Sports Roundup

Junior Leibson prevailed in both the 50 and 100-meter freestyle races. Junior Corey Lau took first in the 100 breaststroke for Princeton while senior Wade O’Brien won the 200 backstroke and freshman Nicholas Lim was the victor in the Tiger Men’s Swimming 100 butterfly. Loses to Navy The Tigers are next in acCharles Leibson starred tion when they host Villaas the Princeton University nova on January 10. men’s swimming team started 2020 action by falling Princeton Divers 171-129 to Navy last Satur- Excel at Tennessee Event Competing at the Univerday in Annapolis, Md. wasn’t enough as the Bruins prevailed 25-17, 26-25, 3335, 16-25, 15-10. Princeton, now 0-3, heads south for two matches at the University of Charleston on January 10-11 in Charleston, W.Va.

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GLORY DAY: Princeton University wrestler Patrick Glory grabs the foot of a foe in a match earlier this season. Last week, sophomore Glory won the title at 125 pounds at the 57th Annual Ken Kraft Midlands Invitational in Hoffman Estates, Ill. Glory, the Intermat No. 3-ranked wrestler, topped 10th-ranked Michael DeAugustino of Northwestern 4-0 in the final on December 30. Sophomore Quincy Monday took third at 157 as Princeton matched its fifth-place team finish from a year ago, collecting 84.5 points with Iowa coming in first at 196.5 to lead the 37-team field. In action last Saturday at the Franklin & Marshall Open in Lancaster, Pa., Princeton wrestlers Sean Pierson (125), Marshall Keller (141) and Kevin Parker (174) won their weight classes. In upcoming action, the 12th-ranked Tigers head south to face 17th-ranked North Carolina on January 10 and sixth-ranked North Carolina State on January 11. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Saturday, February 8, 2020


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020 • 24

With Hennessy Stepping Up in Varsity Debut, PHS Girls’ Basketball Showing Improvement Brynne Hennessy has leapt up the ranks for the Princeton High girls’ basketball program this winter. After having played for the junior varsit y squad last year as a sophomore, Hennessy was not only promoted to the varsity this season, she is serving as a tri-captain for the team. “I love playing on varsity; ever yday, I look for ward to going to practice,” said Hennessy. “I love all of the girls, it is so much fun being captain with Molly [Brown] and Ashley [ Tumpowski ] . We are really starting to get into the groove of working as a team; that is what we really need to do.” Last Friday evening a g a i n s t v i s i t i n g E w i n g, PHS found its groove early, jumping out to a 7-0 lead. “Coming back from two losses, we really wanted to win today,” said Hennessy. “Being up 7- 0 was awesome.” After falling behind 17-14 at halftime, PHS put itself in position to win, outscoring the Blue Devils 16-9 in the third quarter to take a 30-26 lead heading into the final eight minutes of the contest. “I thought we really played as a unit and a big part of it was communication,” said Hennessy, reflecting on the third quarter effort. “We were all communicating and looking for each other.” But Ewing responded by going on a 13-3 run to start the fourth quarter and seize

control of the game on the way to a 41-33 victory. “I think that the pressure got to us a little bit,” said Hennessy. “Our main thing is that we make so many turnovers. We panic, make a bad pass and that turns into an easy bucket for them. If we run through our plays, we can get it done and can get shots in.” Hennessy hit some shots in a losing cause, ending up with a team-high nine points on the night along with three rebounds and three steals. “I am trying to work on my 3-point game a lot,” said Hennessy. “Today, I was trying to draw some fouls by driving into the basket.” PHS head coach Dave Kos a l i ke d t he w ay h is team kept working hard. “We continued to fight and claw,” said Kosa. “ We j u s t d i d n’t h av e enough at the end but we did play well in spurts so that is going to help us for the future.” The best spurt for the Tigers came in the third quarter when they were moving the ball around, generating some easy shots. “It is just a matter of making the right play in the right spots,” said Kosa. “W hen we are play ing well, we share the ball. That is Princeton basketball. We just didn’t make the right decisions; we would get the ball right away and then just panic. When we made plays poised and confident, we scored 16 points.”

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In the latter stages of the contest, PHS lost its poise in the face of some fullcour t pressure employed by Ewing. “The difference today was turnovers, if we handle their press a little bit better, we get wide open looks,” said Kosa. “In the third quarter we did, in the fourth quarter, we didn’t.” Kosa credited Hennessy with converting on some looks at the basket, both on the perimeter and in the lane. “Brynne has really worked hard, I told her you are a shooter so continue to shoot the ball,” said Kosa. “She also took the ball to the basket a couple of times.” W hile Kosa was disap pointed with the loss, he saw the performance as a step in the right direction. “We are getting there,” asserted Kosa, whose team dropped to 0-4 with a 3320 loss at New Egypt last Saturday and will look to get on the winning track as it plays at Hopewell Valley on January 10, hosts East Brunswick on January 11, and then plays at W W/PNorth on January 14. “Now it is a matter of finishing.” Hennessy, for her part, believes things will get better and better for the Tigers. “I am really proud of how we played today; it kind of got away from us in the fourth quarter,” said Hennessy. “I am really looking forward to the rest of the season because we can definitely build on this and win some games.” —Bill Alden

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Sparked by Stellar Play from Defenseman Gorman, PDS Boys’ Hockey Makes Progress by Tying Hoosac Having gone 0-3 at the Barber Tournament in New England to end December and then falling 8-0 to the Albany Academy (N.Y.) on Saturday to open its Harry Rulon-Miller Invitational, the Princeton Day School boys’ hockey team went back to basics as it faced the Hoosac School (N.Y.) in a consolation contest. “Today we just focused on the simple things, just getting pucks deep and getting pucks on net,” said PDS junior defenseman Birch Gorman, reflecting on the Sunday matchup. After Hoosac jumped out to a 1-0 lead with 6:15 left in the first period, PDS got a puck in the back of the net less than four minutes later as senior David Sherman converted a feed from sophomore Michael Sullo for a power play goal. “The first goal took the wind out of our sails a little bit but then Sullo passed it to David and he had a top shelf snipe, it was so nice,” said Gorman. “That one really motivated us. Once we started scoring, the boys were all buzzing and it was such a good atmosphere.” In the second period, Gorman got into the act, coming up with a power play tally of his own as PDS went ahead 2-1. “We had a pretty long power play,” recalled Gorman, who was assisted on the goal by classmate Drew McConaughy. “I just got it and fired a one-time snapper in the left side of the net. It was a good goal.” The Panthers led 3-2 after two periods but Hoosac scored a goal with 2:00 left in regulation to pull out a 3-3 tie. While Gorman would have liked to see PDS hold on for a win, he was was pleased with the team’s performance overall. “This is definitely the best hockey we have played in a while,” said Gorman. “I think this coming week, playing Hill and Delbarton, they are two very tough teams so this is a good motivator. All of us are just ready to work here.” Notwithstanding yielding the late goal, PDS produced some good work at the defensive end. “We have six solid defensemen; all of us are doing well and the forwards are really starting to back check now which is good,” said Gorman. “Our goalie [Tim Miller] held us in there pretty well. He made some really good saves. I think we are finally just starting to jell as a team.” As one of the most experienced players on the team, Gorman is looking to play a bigger role in helping the Panthers jell. “In my first two years, I was more of a middle of a pack player,” said Gorman. “We graduated some of our older guys and I have been trying to work on my game. I, along with some of my other older teammates, are really leading the group. I have evolved into more of a leader.” PDS head coach Scott Bertoli was cautiously optimistic that his squad would come up with a good game in the wake of its four-game losing streak. “Hoosac is a good group that took Lawrenceville to

overtime last night,” said Bertoli. “I was a little concerned about our psyche and our mindset. Our confidence was probably a little shaken. We scored three goals in the previous four games and have been shut out three times.” The first period tally by Sherman helped break the ice for the Panthers. “It was encouraging to see us score early,” said Bertoli. “The power play has been our bread and butter for years here and we have struggled there. We made some adjustments and we put some guys in different spots. We tried to get Sullo the puck more because he is our most dynamic offensive guy.” Bertoli credited Gorman with providing some dynamic play along the blue line. “Birch is pressing when we are not scoring; he tries to do too much,” said Bertoli. “He extends himself, he gets tired. When he simplifies it, he is unbelievable. In the defensive zone, he has shut down a lot of kids on the attack. He is an older presence back there.” In Bertoli’s view, the Panthers did a lot of good things against Hoosac even though they didn’t have a win to show for their efforts. “I was proud of the guys; truthfully I don’t care about the result other than for them to feel good about themselves,” said Bertoli.

“Giving up that goal late hurts but I am more impressed with the way we played. At the end of the day, I just want us to play good hockey. I wanted us to improve from yesterday and everyday we look to make adjustments and improvements. I feel like we got better as a team and we took a huge step forward today.” With PDS playing at the Hill School (Pa.) on January 8 before hosting Delbarton on January 9, Bertoli is looking for his team to keep taking steps forward. “We haven’t beaten Hill in 12 games but we played them very tight most of the time, more often than not those games are going to OT,” said Bertoli. “From a statewide perspective, Delbarton, to me, is the gold standard of New Jersey hockey. That is a game I look forward to; I highlight it on my calendar every year. I respect the way they play and the success they have had. It is a great challenge for our guys. I am excited.” Gorman, for his part, is excited by the challenges presented by the formidable foes. “They are two really good teams; we just need to do the fundamental, basic stuff,” said Gorman. “It is literally something as simple as chipping the puck out of the offensive zone. We just have to play defense first and score when the chances come.” —Bill Alden

BIG MAN: Princeton Day School boys’ hockey player Birch Gorman brings the puck up the ice in a game last season. Last Sunday, junior defenseman Gorman scored a goal to help PDS skate to a 3-3 tie with the Hoosac School (N.Y.) in the consolation game of its Harry Rulon-Miller Invitational. The Panthers, now 3-5-1, play at the Hill School (Pa.) on January 8 before hosting Delbarton on January 9. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


Although the Hun School boys’ swimming team opened the season by losing 88-76 to the George School (Pa.) last month, the program is maintaining its upward trend. “It was a pretty close meet, they are continuing to improve,” said Hun head coach Joan Nuse reflecting on the December 10 competition. “We have kids in the first meet of the year who were swimming times that were better than their time in the previous year. We have some freshmen who came in and made an impact right off the bat. That is great and really sets things up for the season.” Nuse is looking for a great season from senior standout Josh Nguyen. “Josh came in the first meet and goes out and won both the 50 and the 100 free,” said Nuse. “He bettered his time from his best time ever right off the bat and he is not a club swimmer. That is just him putting in the effort in practice. He is one of our captains and he has been doing a great job of helping out everyone. He is definitely a sprinter but he can do backstroke.” The other captain, senior Andrew Petty, has helped set an upbeat tone around the team. “Andrew puts in the effort and he brings so much enthusiasm on the deck,” said

Nuse. “He is a kid who will be out there cheering for everybody. He is very loud, that is very helpful. He leads our cheers, he can out yell the entire team.” Hun has been getting good efforts from two other key veterans, sophomore Gabe Huang and junior George Bailey. “Gabe and George have both done really well for us,” said Nuse. “They are both setting high goals for themselves and putting in the effort to try to reach them. They are kids that we can count on.” A quartet of juniors, Pedro Blauth Poli, Jack Hartmann, Trent Pinchot, and Colm Lovett along with sophomore Jayden Nguyen are doing some good things for the Raiders. “Pedro has also been contributing to the team,” said Nuse. “Another kid who has been a pleasant surprise is Jack; this is his first year swimming for us. He should definitely keep getting better, he likes the fly so that is always a win. Jayden is a good swimmer for us. Trent just came out as a junior and has been a pleasant surprise. Colm dropped time from last year in the first meet. It is just nice to see all of these kids coming out and just continuing to improve.” Freshmen Luke Cura and

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Nick Danko have already proven that they can be very good swimmers for the program. “Luke and Nick are both very versatile for us so we are able to use them in a lot of events,” said Nuse. “Luke likes distance so that is wonderful; he is really solid too. I may use him in the individual medley sometimes just to change it up so kids don’t have to do the same things all of the time. Nick stepped up for us and did a nice job swimming fly in our first meet and he is not a flyer.” With the Mercer County championship meet on the horizon, Nuse believes her boy swimmers are poised to step up at that competition. “We have a shot of some kids making finals this year,” said Nuse, referring to the county meet which is slated for January 30-February 1. “Last year for the boys we only had a couple of relays make finals. It would be really exciting to have some individuals make it as well. I think any of those kids have a good shot at it.” With more and more kids having joined the group over the years, Nuse sees an exciting future for her boys’ program. “Even though we have some seniors who we have been counting on for four years, it is nice to have these young people coming in,” said Nuse, whose team resumes action by swimming at the Blair Academy on January 8. “They have great attitudes. To me, it is so amazing to see the growth. We used to not even fill up a bus and now we need two.” —Bill Alden

Coming Off Banner Campaign Last Winter, Hun Girls’ Swim Team Gets Off to Solid Start

Flying under the radar, the Hun School girls’ swimming squad pulled off a major surprise last winter as it won the program’s firstever team title at the Mercer County Championships. Reflecting on the 2019-20 campaign, Hun head coach Joan Nuse realizes it will be tough to match that success. “It was awesome last year; it is going to be a challenge to live up to that,” said Nuse, noting that a talented group of six swimmers scored all the points for Hun at the county meet. “We will do the best we can.” Starting the season by defeating the George School ( Pa.) 89-78 on December 10, Hun showed that it can still be formidable. “It was good to see that some of our new, young swimmers did well and are able to contribute,” said Nuse. “The girls were really enthusiastic.” Nuse is enthusiastic about what senior stars Abbie Danko and Marie-Eve Hebert can contribute this winter. “They are both very versatile, I think they will both have to step up for us in some of the tougher events,

whether that be the 500 or the individual medley or the fly,” said Nuse. “I am trying to make it so that nobody gets the burden on them every single time and try to change up the lineup. I am sure that when we have a need they are going to have to step up for us.” Senior Grace Dav is, a team captain along with Danko and fellow senior Grace Lin, and sophomore Hannah Davis are stepping up again for the Raiders. “They both did really well for us last year, it is good to have them both back,” said Nuse, noting that the Davis girls are unrelated. “This is Grace’s fourth year so she is another one who is a big part of the growth of the team over the years. Hannah is just continuing to improve and once again will have to be like the others and pick it up for us where we need her.” A pair of freshmen, Sophia Burton and Charlotte Petty, are already showing that will be a big part of the team this season and beyond. “Sophia and Charlot te have stepped up nicely for us,” said Nuse. “Having lost Izzy [Peel] and Becca [Della

Rocca], we have a need for some people to step in. They are going to be solid swimmers for us.” With Hun returning to action from the holiday break by facing the Blair Academy on January 8, Nuse will need her swimmers to get up to speed quickly. “It is going to be interesting because we have been off for a while,” said Nuse. “We have to get everybody right back in shape because we only have a handful swimming club who have been in the water. We haven’t been in the water since December 18, it is a little bit rough. We will have to go out and do the best we can and hope that Blair has not been in the water for a while.” No matter what happens at Blair, Hun looks to be on track for another stellar performance at the county meet which takes place from January 30-February 1. “Our numbers are continuing to grow and it is always a lot of fun to watch the kids who don’t have much experience really come along,” said Nuse. “They are doing a nice job with that. We are going to have some kids continue to improve and hopefully keep going for the future.” —Bill Alden

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

Featuring Mix of Solid Veterans, Promising Freshmen, Hun Boys’ Swimming Maintaining Upward Trend

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ABBIE ROAD: Hun School girls’ swimmer Abbie Danko shows her form in a meet last year. Senior star Danko is leading the way for Hun as it looks to build on the success it experienced last winter when it won the program’s first-ever team title at the Mercer County Championships. Hun, which defeated the George School (Pa.) 89-78 on December 10 in its first meet of the season, returns to action on January 8 with a meet at the Blair Academy. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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For t he Hun S chool boys’ hockey team, its trip to compete in the Purple Puck National Capital Hockey Tournament outside of Washington, D.C. has proven to be an annual highlight for the program. Having won the Purple Puck competition in 2018, Hun was primed to defend its title as it headed down to D.C. in late December. “That trip is always fun for us. People like it for dif ferent reasons,” said Hun head coach Ian McNally. “If you are ret ur ning, you like it because you lo ok for w ard to it. We have a lot of new guys this year so it was new again for them.” While Hun failed to make it two straight crowns as it lost 5-3 to Loyola Academy (Ill.) in the semis on December 30, McNally believes his team will benefit from the experience. “ We playe d we l l, t h e guys were in high spirits,” said McNally. “We milked as much as we could out of t h e 10 v a r s it y g u y s that we brought there. We had three JV guys filling in the holes and they did

the best they could. It was definitely enjoyable and wor th it. Ever ybody had a great time. We are glad we went.” In the semi, Hun played well in defeat as it pushed L oyola hard. “It w as a g reat game. T hey were fast and physical, similar to us,” said McNally who got two goals from junior Charles Lavoie in the loss with junior Elliott Lareau adding the third. “Up until two or three minutes left in the game, I thought we might pull it out. All of sudden when there is a minute lef t, I realized it is not going to happen.” Two newcomers to the Hun program, junior transfers and fellow Canadians Lavoie and Lareau, have been making things happen. “Both of them are gett i n g m o r e c o m fo r t a b l e every week that they are here, they are very skilled players,” said McNally. “We put them on a line together af ter t his rash of injuries we had. They were on different lines for the first month ; we had six pretty good players so

we had two lines. Out of necessity, we threw them all together and those two have clicked.” T he ma n ner i n wh ich L avoie and L areau have clicked as a one-two punch is reminding McNally of the partnership between NHL greats Patrick Kane and Jonathan Toews of the Chicago Blackhawks. “Charles is not huge, but he is a bigger guy and he can shoot; he is more of a nose-for-the-net finisher,” said McNally. “Elliott is the consummate student of the game. He absorbs where to be, how to use his stick, and what position to have. On top of that, he can score and he can pass. He is the all-around guy. He is the Jonathan Toews and Lavoie is like the Patrick Kane type.” McNally is hoping his players can use the Purple P uck exper ience as a springboard for a r un i n Mid - At la nt ic Ho ckey League (MAHL) competition. “ We haven’t qua l if ie d for this MAHL playoff yet in the the three years we have done it, that is still

STEADY EDDIE: Hun School boys’ hockey player Eddie Evaldi heads up ice in a recent game. Last week, senior star Evaldi helped Hun reach the semifinals of the Purple Puck National Capital Hockey Tournament outside of Washington, D.C. Hun, now 3-5-1, hosts Wyoming Seminary (Pa.) on January 8 and Seton Hall Prep on January 10 at the Ice Land Skating Center. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) available,” said McNally, whose team hosts Wyo ming Seminar y ( Pa.) on January 8 and non-league foe S eton Hall Prep on January 10 at the Ice Land Skating Center. “We play Wyoming Sem-

inary right away and that is basically a must win. We have played three games and we have gone w in, l o s s , ov e r t i m e t i e. We have got one of each but we have to string two wins together here.”

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In order to be in better position to pick up some wins, Hun will need some luck on the injury front. “We will get some bodies back here in the next week and hop ef u lly get back up to full strength,” said McNally, who has guided the Raiders to six straight Mercer Cou nt y Tour nament titles. “Wednesday is a mustwin because after that, we will only have two league games and we have eight or nine non-league games to finish. It would be nice to go on a run there, but you want to feel like you are playing for something, too.” —Bill Alden

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020 • 26

Enjoying Another Trip to Purple Puck Event, Hun Boys’ Hockey Primed for Stretch Run

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Boys’ Hockey: Pulling out a nailbiter, Lawrenceville edged Albany Academy (N.Y.) 5-4 in overtime last Sunday in the championship game of the Harry Rulon-Miller Invitational held at Princeton Day School. Peter Poulianas scored the game-winning goal in the title game as the Big Red improved to 7- 4. Goalie T.J. Semptimphelter also starred, making 24 saves in the victory. Lawrenceville plays at the Portledge School (N.Y.) on January 8 and at the Hill School (Pa.) on January 11.

PHS Boys’ Hockey : Rocco Salvato notched the winning goal as PHS edged Robbinsville 3-2 last Monday. Austin Micale and Stephen Avis assisted on Salvato’s decisive tally which came with 10:45 left in the third period. The Tigers, now 7-0-1, face Not-

last Monday. Senior star Champion-Adams tallied 23 points as the Panthers improved to 5-2. PDS hosts Friends Central ( Pa.) on January 10 before playing at Solebury School (Pa.) on January 11 and at Princeton High on January 13. Girls’ Basketball: Unable to get its offense going, PDS fell 59-4 to Lawrenceville last Monday. The Panthers, now 1-7, play at Lawrence High on January 9 and at the Pennington School on January 13.

Stuart

Basketball: Nia Melvin led the way as Stuart defeated Roselle Catholic 6726 in the final of Roselle Catholic’s Holiday Tournament on December 30. Junior guard Melvin tallied 14 points and had eight rebounds to help the Tartans improve to 6-6. In upcoming action, Stuart plays at Lawrenceville on January 10 and hosts Hopewell ValB o y s ’ B a s k e t b a l l : ley on January 11. Sparked by Jaylin Champion-Adams, PDS defeated L aw rencev ille 63 - 42

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In opening day action last Saturday in the 4th /5th grade boys’ division of the Dillon Yout h Basketball League, McCaffrey’s defeated Corner House 34-10 as Raymond McL aughlin

led the way with 16 points. G av in L ev ine tallied 15 points to help Lependorf & Silverstein defeat Princeton Restorative Dental 40-20. Henry Jamieson-Dove and Jacob Lilienthal starred as Cross Culture topped JM Group 40 -16. JamiesonDove poured in 23 points while Lilienthal chipped in 12. In the 6th/7th grade boys’ division, University Orthopedics edged Dick’s Sporting Goods 31-27. Jonathan Feldman tallied 14 points for the victors while William Ponder scored 10 in a losing cause. Princeton Pettoranello topped Princeton Dental Group 36-32 as Jordan Phanthavong and Asher DeLue tallied seven points apiece. Jeremy Wachtel To: ___________________________ scored 10 in the defeat. Jefferson Plumbing cruised to a From: _________________________ Date & Time: __________________ 30-10 win over Mason, Grifis a proof your ad, scheduled to run ___________________. finHere & Pierson 10 as of Carmine Carusone led the way with Please check it thoroughly and pay special attention to the following: eight points. (Your check mark will tell us it’s okay) In t he 8t h -10 t h grade boys’ division, Henry Doran � Phone numberto help� Fax number � Address � Expiration Date scored 10 points Syracuse top Seton Hall 31-22. Jihad-Jasiri Wilder tallied 15 points with Matt Baglio and Tarak Jayachandran each scoring 12 as St. John’s posted a 59-28 win GOOD GUY: Princeton High boys basketball player Ethan over North Carolina. Rut- Guy passes the ball in a game last year. Last Friday, junior gers defeated the Majeski forward Guy scored 23 points, including five 3-pointers, Foundation 43-30 with Mat- to help PHS edge Ewing 47-46. It marked the first win for thew Land tallying 20 points the Tigers against the Blue Devils since the 2009-10 seafor the victors. son. PHS, now 1-2, hosts Hopewell Valley on January 10, In the girls’ division, Kare plays at Ferris on January 11, and then hosts Princeton Day (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) Chung poured in 14 points School on January 13. as PBA #130 topped Bank of Princeton 33-8. Princeton Fast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In Eye Care defeated HomeHunan ~ Szechuan stead 26-14. Anna Winters Malaysian ~ Vietnamese scored six points in the win while Grace Li tallied nine in Daily Specials • Catering Available a losing cause. 27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

Lawrenceville

tingham on January 8 and Hopewell Valley on January 10 with both games to be played at Mercer County Park. PHS will then host Jackson Memorial on January 13 at Baker Rink. Girls’ Hockey: Running into a buzz-saw, PHS fell 8-0 to Morristown-Beard last Monday. The Tigers, now 1-5, play at Princeton Day School on January 8 before hosting Randolph on January 10 and Pingry on January 14 at Baker Rink. Wrestling: Chris Sockler and Aaron Munford starred in a losing cause as PHS fell 66-13 to Hopewell Valley and 63-16 to Jackson Liberty in action last Saturday. Sockler posted a pair of wins at 132 pounds and Munford followed suit with two victories at 138. PHS hosts Allentown on January 8 and Trenton on January 10 before taking part in a quad at Hightstown on January 11.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020 • 28

Obituaries

Daniel A. Harris Daniel A. Harris, age 77, Professor Emeritus of English and Jewish Studies at Rutgers University, and since 1985 a resident of Princeton, NJ, died on December 26, 2019. Following his retirement in 2002, after decades spent teaching poetry, Harris published three volumes of his own poems (Loose Parlance, 2008; Random Unisons, 2013; Accents, 2018). Harris took his degrees from Yale University and taught at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Colorado before coming to Rutgers in 1979. Devoted to the improvement of undergraduate education, he was honored with Rutgers’ Award for Excellence in Teaching in 1992. A recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim, Mellon, and Newberry Library Foundations, he focused his attentions on modern and Victorian British poetr y, with books on Yeats, Tennyson, and Hopkins.

The great-great-grandson of Rabbi David Einhorn, z”l, the founder of Radical Reform Judaism in the United States, Harris in his later years at Rutgers taught Jewish poetry written in English as the original language of composition. Writing about Emma Lazarus, Isaac Rosenberg, and Grace Aguilar, he also founded JEWISH VOICES: 200 YEARS OF POETRY IN ENGLISH, an educational program for synagogues and other Jewish cultural sites, through which he gave courses on Jewish poetry at over 300 locations in the tri-state area. Harris became an active environmentalist after retiring. With Jane Buttars (his wife), he founded Save Princeton Ridge, which succeeded in limiting development on the Princeton Ridge in Princeton and in contributing to the creation of the Princeton Ridge Preserve. For this effort he and his wife were honored with a Sustainable Princeton Award in 2012. He organized a robust citizens’ resistance to the megablock apartment development of the old Princeton Hospital site. He participated vigorously in a local and statewide campaign to ban the distribution of single-use plastic bags; for this effort he was honored with an award from the New Jersey Environmental Lobby in 2013. Harris was privileged to belong to the core group who, in 2015 and 2016, pushed to have the his torically segregated neighborhood of Princeton (the Witherspoon-Jackson area) designated as Princeton’s Twentieth Historic District; that district, with its distinctive architecture, cul-

ture, and history was so designated in April 2016. In 2018, he led a movement to establish for Princeton an Indigenous Peoples Day on the second of October annually to recognize and honor the native peoples who first occupied Princeton and the United States. The resolution instituting such a day was adopted unanimously by Princeton Council in 2019. Harris is survived by his beloved wife of 34 years, the musician Jane Buttars. A Celebration of Life service will be held on January 26 at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton, beginning at 3 p.m. Contributions in lieu of flowers may be made to any of the following: the America Civil Liberties Union (New York, NY), Amnesty International USA (New York, NY), the Southern Poverty Law Center (Montgomery, Alabama), the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (New York NY), or the American Indian College Fund (Denver, CO).

Jonathan Purcell Horner July 20, 1974 — December 15, 2019 Jonathan Purcell Horner, 45, of Princeton, New Jersey, died on December 15, 2019 at New York Presbyterian Hospital in Manhattan. In recent months he had been treated for cancer, which had been detected a few weeks before his 45th birthday. With him at the time of his death were his wife, Anna Horner, of Princeton; his mother, Constance Horner, and his father, Charles Horner, both of Delray Beach, Florida, and also of Lexington, Virginia;

and his brother, David Horner, of Richmond, Virginia. He is also survived by his son Thomas, 11, his daughter, Caroline, 7, two nieces, and two nephews. He was born in Washington, D.C., and lived, when young, in two neighborhoods — Foxhall Village and Cleveland Park. He attended the Francis Scott Key and John Eaton elementary schools. Subsequently, he attended Saint Albans School in Washington and Phillips E xeter Academy in New Hampshire. He graduated from Exeter in 1992, receiving prizes in Greek and Latin. He was also a member of the school’s rowing team. He graduated from Princeton University in 1996 with a Bachelor of Arts in Classics, cum laude. He also participated in the Princeton-inChina program and studied Chinese in Beijing. He was a member of the Princeton men’s crew, which won the NCAA National Championship in 1996. He went on to graduate study at Harvard, receiving a Master of Arts in East Asian Studies in 1998. He then joined Goldman Sachs, where he spent 18 years and was a Managing Director of the firm. At the time of his death he was Director of Research at PointState Capital in New York. Anna Morgan Kaufmann of Rye, New York, and he were married in 2004. They knew each other first at Princeton when she was an undergraduate and later at Harvard, when she was a student in the Graduate School of Design. They lived first in Manhattan and then moved to Princeton. Their son, Thomas Morgan Horner, was born in 2008 and their daughter,

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Caroline Purcell Horner, was born in 2012. Throughout his life, he maintained a lively interest in the classics, sports, and world affairs. He was active in the Princeton community and served on the Executive Committee of the Friends of the Institute for Advanced Study. A funeral service for family members was held in Princeton on December 21, 2019. A memorial service will be held at Trinity Church in Princeton at 11 a.m. on January 25, 2020. Donations in his memory may be made to The Jonathan Horner Memorial Fund of the Princeton Area Community Foundation.

Donald C. Thiel Donald C. Thiel was born on June 20, 1923 in the original Princeton Hospital. He passed away peacefully December 31, 2019 at the age of 96. Don grew up in Princeton, graduated from Princeton H ig h S cho ol, a n d later moved to Montgomery Twp. He was in Cadets at West Point for 22 months, where he earned his wings as a pilot at Stuart Field. As the

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Princeton University Chapel /ŵĂŐĞ͗WƵďůŝĐĚŽŵĂŝŶ 'ĞƌĂƌĚ^ĞŐŚĞƌƐ;ĂƚƚƌͿͲ^ĂŝŶƚƵŐƵƐƚŝŶĞ /ŵĂŐĞ͗WƵďůŝĐĚŽŵĂŝŶ tŝŬŝŵĞĚŝĂŽŵŵŽŶƐ 'ĞƌĂƌĚ^ĞŐŚĞƌƐ;ĂƚƚƌͿͲ^ĂŝŶƚƵŐƵƐƚŝŶĞ tŝŬŝŵĞĚŝĂŽŵŵŽŶƐ

war was winding down he was sent to various bases, training as a B-17 gunner. Don graduated from Trenton State Teachers College in 1950 and received his Masters at Rutgers in 1953. He taught Industrial Arts at Princeton Country Day School for one year and spent the next 35 years at Princeton Regional Schools: Valley Road, John Witherspoon, and Princeton High School. He spent evenings at The Lawrenceville School’s Periwig Club as Technical Director, instructing set construction for 30 years. He took great pride as a decorated volunteer fireman. Prior to 1955, he was a member of Princeton’s No. 3 Fire Co. and after moving Montgomery he joined the then small Montgomery Twp. Volunteer Fire Co. No. 2. He was a former Chief, a Trustee, and Fire Police Sergeant active until age 90. Don was proud to introduce his grandsons George (Current Chief), Bryon (Captain), and Barry Gurzo to the fire company and responsibilities associated with membership. He love d t he outdo or world, hik ing, camping, hunting, fishing, Boy Scouts, and boating at his cabin in Canada. Summer vacations for Don meant pulling the family and trailer across the U.S. and Canada, camping and sightseeing in many National and State parks, making friends along the way. He even managed to drive to Acapulco, Mexico, twice. He was predeceased by his wife of 53 years, Miriam Doyle Thiel, parents Cornelius and Matilda Thiel, and his brother Cornelius Thiel, Jr. He is survived by his children and their spouses Donald Jr. and Peggy and Bonnie and Michael Gurzo, and grandchildren Donald Thiel, III, Mar y Kathr yn and Christopher Anderson, Christopher Thiel, Patrick and Cathy Thiel, George Gurzo, Byron Gurzo, and Barry Gurzo. He also loved his little guys (great-grandchildren) Henry and James Anderson, and nieces Betty Lou Bu xton and Sandra Thiel. He was also grateful for the love and support of his extended family, dear friends, and a wonderful community. S er v ices were held at the Blawenburg Reformed Church and burial was private. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions in his memory can be made to: The Montgomery Twp. Volunteer Fire Company No. 2, 529 Route 518, Skillman, NJ 08558. Funeral arrangements by Mat her- Hodge Princeton, NJ.

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was predeceased by her brother E. David Cronon of Madison, WI, and survived by her sister Nancy Ball of Walla Walla, WA. Connie is sur v ived by her three sons and their families: David and Rujira of Chiang Mai, Thailand; John and Connie Cloonan of Lawrence Township, NJ; and Mark and Susan Galli of Belmont, MA; as well as her five grandchildren, Patrick, Elizabeth, Emilia, Laura, and Nat han ; and greatgrandchild William. A memorial service will be held at Pennswood Village on Saturday, January 25, 2020 at 10:30 a.m. in Penn Hall, with a reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Presbyterian Peace Fellowship, 17 Cricketown Road, Nyack, NY 10980, or to Newtown Friends School, 1450 Newtown-Langhorne Road, Newtown, PA 18940.

Katherine earned a B.S. degree from Skidmore College in 1940. She was a homemaker and lovingly took care of her family. Katherine was also a member of the First Presbyterian Church of New Vernon. In her spare time, she was a volunteer with Family Service — Morris County, Women’s Association of Morristown Memorial Hospital, Junior League of Madison, The Garden Club of Madison, and Volunteer Ambulance Squads in Dover and Madison. Katherine is survived by her devoted children, Robert W. Schick, Jr., (“Bart”) and his wife, Nancy S. Schick, of Gloucester, MA, and Pamela Schick Kelsey and her husband, John F. Kelsey, III, of Skillman, NJ. She is also survived by her cherished grandchildren, Allison Schick Masson and her husband, Kenneth, Alexandria, VA, Courtney Schick Kellogg and her husband, Hunter, Beverly, MA, Robert Schilling Schick and his wife, Erika, Durham, NC, Katherine (Lisa) Kelsey Pisano and her husband, Bob, Lawrenceville, NJ, John (Jay) F. Kelsey IV and his wife, Anne, Rocky Hill, NJ, and Christine Simonet Meola and her husband, Kris, South Boston, MA; as well as her adored 13 great-grandchildren. Katherine was predeceased by her first husband, Robert W. Schick, Sr., and her second husband, William L. Lyall, Jr. A Memorial Service for Katherine will be held on Saturday, January 18, 2020, at 11 a.m. at the New Vernon Presbyterian Church, 2 Lee’s Hill Road, New Vernon, NJ 07976. Katherine was laid to rest in New Vernon Cemetery, New Vernon, NJ. In lieu of flowers, the family kindly requests donations in memory of Katherine may be made to: The Seeing Eye (www.seeingeye.org), Schick

Art Gallery at Skidmore College (www.skidmore.edu/ schick/), or Atlantic Hospice Care V NA (w w w.atlantichealth.org/conditions-treatments/home-care.html). Arrangements were under the care of Burroughs, Kohr & Dangler Funeral Home, Madison, NJ.

Andre Yokana

er they raised two children. From 1952 to 1966 Andre worked with the management consulting firm George S. Armstrong and Company in New York City. In 1966 he joined his brother’s firm, Sterling Extruder Corporation, as executive vice president, which became one of the largest and most innovative plastics companies in the industry. He became president in 1980. Sterling merged with Baker Perkins in 1986. After the merger, Andre and Lucien retained the Davis Electric division (later Merritt Davis) where he was vice president of finance until the company was sold in 2005. He enjoyed summers in Greensboro, Vermont, with his family and friends, and was actively engaged in the Princeton community and Princeton University’s Alumni Network, serving on reunion committees and fundraising for the University. A devoted husband, father, grandfather, uncle, brother, and friend, Andre was beloved by all who knew him and could always be seen with a glint in his eye and a thoughtful smile. Andre was predeceased by his wife in 2018. He is survived by his children, Davis Yokana and Lisa Yokana, of Portland, OR, and Bronxville, NY, respectively, and by his grandchildren, Alice Longobardo and Anne Longobardo Donado, of New York City. A service in celebration of his life will be given at Princeton Memorial Chapel on January 17 at 10 in the morning. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to Princeton University. Arrangements are under the direction of MatherHodge Funeral Home, Princeton, NJ.

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

serve in Japan. During their two five-year terms, they helped in the rebuilding and strengthening of the Japanese ecumenical church in the post-war period. Connie taught at Doshisha University (in Japanese), focusing on women students and those preparing for ministry. She also created after-school programs for urban youth. Follow ing t heir ret ur n from Japan in 1963, Connie and her family lived in New York City and became active in Riverside Church. After Constance C. Thurber moving to Montclair, NJ, she Constance C. Thurber, 98, served for eight years as the of Newtown, PA, died on director of Christian educaSunday, January 5, 2020 tion for Central Presbyterian Church. She then worked for surrounded by her family. 15 years as the administraConnie had a long and tive associate for the joint varied career in ecumenical Southern Asia office of two service to the church and national church denominawas a pioneer among wom- tions at the Interchurch Cenen church leaders. She spent ter in New York. her life working for peace, Connie was a wonderful justice, and reconciliation and loving wife, mother, across the world and in her grandmother, and greatown community. grandmother. She treasured Connie was born in Min- old friends and found great neapolis, MN, on February joy in new ones. She deeply 7, 1921. She was awarded appreciated her bond with a B.A. cum laude from Ma- the members of her book calester College in St. Paul, group, which has met conMN, and a M.Div. from Yale tinuously since 1954. Divinity School in New HaConnie and Newt moved ven. She also attended the into their retirement comYale Institute for Far Eastern Studies, Japanese Language munity at Pennswood VilSchool, as well as Union lage in 1995. Follow ing Theological Seminar y in Newt’s death in early 1998, she became especially grateNew York. ful for this caring commuConnie was among the nity of residents and staff, first women to graduate from which suppor ted her reYale Divinity School, where newed engagement with life. she met her husband, Lucius Connie served at various Newton Thurber. After get- times on seven Pennswood ting married, they worked committees, as well as with AN EPISCOPAL PARISH with Native Americans for the Friends of Stony Point, a year in Oklahoma during the Union Theological SemiTrinity Church SundayHoly Week WWII, providing community nary’s Women’s Committee, Holy Rite I &a.m. Easter Schedule service as an8:00 expression of Eucharist, and as a classroom voluntheir pacifist beliefs. 9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All AgesFriends teer at New town Wednesday, March 23 A lt hough10:00 women were School. a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Holy Eucharist, II, 12:00 pm not yet being ordained by RiteDaughter of the late Ed5:00 p.m. Evensong withPrayers Communion following Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Healing, 5:30 pm the Presbyterian Church, mundforand Florence Cronon Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm in 1947 both Connie and of Sandy Spring, MD, she Newt were commissionedTuesday to

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES A ndre Yokana, 94, of Princeton, NJ, and Greensboro, VT, passed away on We d n e s d ay, Ja nu ar y 1, 2020. Andre was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, in 1925. He spent his childhood and adolescence in Alexandria, Egypt, before moving to Princeton in 1946 with his brother Lucien. Andre graduated from Victoria College in Alexandria, Egypt. He entered Princeton University in February 1946 and graduated in October 1947 with a BSE with highest honors in mechanical engineering. He was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and belonged to Dial Lodge. Andre earned his MSE from the Princeton Graduate School in 1948 and took fur ther graduate studies at the Harvard School of Applied Science in 1949. In 1954, he married Frances Mary Brown, and togeth-

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES Katherine Schilling Schick Lyall

Katherine Schilling Schick Lyall, 100, of Morris Township passed away on December 19, 2019 at home with her loving family by her side. Born in Orange, NJ, Katherine resided in New Vernon before moving to Morris Township 16 years ago.

DIREC DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES Thursday March 24 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist

5:30

Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer p.m. Holy Eucharist

RECTORY OF RY OF GIOUS SERVICES ERVICES IRECTORY OF The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector AN EPISCOPAL PARISH

Friday, March 25

Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am Sunday The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of theEucharist, Cross, 1:00 pmRite – 2:00Ipm 8:00 a.m. Holy Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm 9:00 a.m.The Christian Education for All Ages Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

Trinity Church Holy Week & Easter Schedule

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic March 23 216Holy Nassau Street, 214 Nassau Street,Princeton Princeton 10:00Wednesday, a.m. Eucharist, RiteChurch II

Holy214 Eucharist, RiteStreet, II, 12:00Princeton Nassau Saturday, Marchpm 26 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor 5:00 Evensong with Communion following Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Holyp.m. Eucharist, Rite II Easter with Prayers for3:00 Healing, 5:30 pm Egg Hunt, pm Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm 7:00 Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30pmp.m. The Great Vigil of Easter, Vigil Mass: 5:30and p.m. Sunday:Saturday 7:00, Tuesday 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 5:00 p.m. Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. Thursday March 24 12:00 p.m. Eucharist, Holy Eucharist Rite I, 7:30 am Mass in Holy Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. HolyFestive Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am Holy Eucharist withEucharist, Foot Washing Festive Choral Rite II,and 11:00 am Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector p.m. Holy Eucharist

Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are always welcome to worship with us at:

Princeton’s First Tradition EcumEnical christian worship sunday at 11am ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

ChristianPH.d. Science Reading Room Rev. Alison l. Boden, Rev. dR. THeResA s. THAmes

dean of Religious Associate dean of Religious life 178 life Nassau Street, Princeton and of the Chapel and of the Chapel

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Join us! All are welcome! Visit religiouslife.princeton.edu

GIOUS SERVICES 5:30

The Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate The. Rev. PaulWhittemore, Jeanes III, Director Rector of Music Mr. Tom Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr.609-924-2277 Tom Whittemore, Director of Music 33 Mercer St. Princeton www.trinityprinceton.org

Friday, March 25

3 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm H Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm es eek The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm eI

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton wing

All Ages

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Rev. Jenny Street, Smith Walz, Lead Pastor 214 Nassau Princeton Saturday, March 26 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Worship and Children’s Program Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Saturday 5:30 The GreatVigil Vigil ofMass: Easter, 7:00 pmp.m. Sundays at 10 AM are Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30and p.m. Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 5:00 p.m. Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. Mass in Spanish: Sunday Wherever you are on your journey of faith, youat are 7:00 p.m. ng Prayer Holy Rite am Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church always Eucharist, welcome to worship withI, us 7:30 at: inWherever Spanish: at 9:00 7:00 p.m. you areSunday on your journey of faith, yer MassFestive 124 Witherspoon Street, NJ are Choral Eucharist, Rite II,Princeton, am you

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Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are always welcome to worship with us at:

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Christian Science Reading Room

178 Nassau Street, Princeton

609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4

Firstalways Church of Christ, Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church welcome to worship witham us at: Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 10:00 a.m. Worship Service 124 Witherspoon Street,Mother Princeton, NJ Scientist, Princeton of 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School First Church ofStudy Christ, Youth Bible The. Rev. and Paul Jeanes III, Rector Adult Bible Classes The Rev. Nancy J. Hagner,Princeton Associate Scientist, Mr. Tom (A Whittemore, Director of Music multi-ethnic congregation) 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

God Orthodox Church

10:00 a.m. Worship Service 904 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School 609-466-3058 V. Rev. Peter Baktis, Rector www.mogoca.org and Youth Bible Study 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, Adult Bible Classes Sunday, 10:00 am: Divine LiturgyNJ (A multi-ethnic congregation)

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. oror or ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! p.m. 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton Sunday, 9:15 am: Church School 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org 10:00 a.m. Worship Service p.m. Christian Science Reading Room d 5:00 p.m. 609-924-1666 •www.csprinceton.org Fax 609-924-0365 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 609-924-5801 – 178 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, 5:00 pm: Adult Education Classes d 5:00 p.m. 00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School witherspoonchurch.org witherspoonchurch.org 10 p.m. -4 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 00 Saturday, 6:00 pm: Vespers Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. am

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RELIGIOU

First Church of Christ, Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church Princeton University chaPel Scientist, Princeton

and Youth Bible Study Adult Bible Classes (A multi-ethnic congregation)

124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ

10:00 a.m. Worship Service Sundays 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School 8:00 a.m. – Holy Eucharist Rite I and Youth Bible Study 9:00Adult a.m. Bible – Christian Education for All Ages Classes 10:00AN a.m.EPISCOPAL – Holy Eucharist Rite II (A multi-ethnic congregation) PARISH

5:00 p.m. – Choral Evensong (Compline the 4th Sunday of the Trinity Holy on Week Sunday 609-924-1666 • FaxChurch 609-924-0365 8:00&a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I Easter Schedule month) witherspoonchurch.org

9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages Wednesday, March 23 10:00 a.m. Holy12:00 Eucharist, Rite II Tuesdays, p.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm

Holy Eucharist Rite I Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm

Tuesday Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m. Thursday March 24 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Holy Eucharist Rite II with Prayers for Healing Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and

Wednesday Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 5:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist with Healing Prayer Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Rev. Paul Rector, KeepingThe Watch, 8:00Jeanes pm –III, Mar. 25, 7:00 am

The Rev. Canon Dr. Kara Slade, The. Assoc. Rector, The Rev. Joanne Epply-Schmidt, Assoc. Rector, Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of MusicDirector of Music Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Friday, March 25 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ

Wherever alwa

Firs 10:00 a.m. Worship Service Sc 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School St. Paul’sandCatholic Church Youth BibleChurch Study 609 St. Paul’s Catholic 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton Sunday Church Adult Bible Classes 214 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, MarchPastor 26 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Princeton Quaker Meeting Wednesda Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00congregation) pm (A multi-ethnic Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Saturday Vigil 5:30pmp.m. The Great Vigil ofMass: Easter, 7:00 Step outSaturday of time into the shared silence a Vigil Mass: 5:30and p.m. Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 5:00 of p.m. Sunday, March 27 609-924-1666 • 11:30 Faxat 609-924-0365 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, and 5:00 Mass in Spanish: Sunday 7:00 p.m. p.m. Quaker meeting in 10:00, our historic Meeting House. Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 am 609-924-091 MassFestive in Holy Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. witherspoonchurch.org Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am Meetings for Worship at 9 and 11 The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Child Care The available at 11 Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org

470 Quaker Road, Princeton NJ 08540 www.princetonfriendsmeeting.org


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020 • 30

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circulation@towntopics.com $1,450/mo. includes • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday2 •BR.Payment: All heat ads& must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon tf hot water, dishwasher, yard, off-street BUYING: Antiques, paintings, RANCH • FOR RENT– Princeton Street: Private, quiet suite with 4 25 words or less: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: for ads than 60 words in length. TOWN TOPICS$15.00 CLASSIFIEDS Orientalgreater rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, Bright, beautiful, light-filled, 3 BR, offices with approx. 950 sq. ft. on parking, coin operated washer/dryer. WE BUY CARS Security lease credit check. (609) RESULTS! old toys, military, books, cameras, 2 full baths, fireplace, floor. $1,700 month rent; $50.00 • 3landscaped weeks:ground $40.00 • 4perweeks: • 6 weeks: $72.00GETS • 6TOP month and annual discount rates available. Belle Mead Garage Whether it’s selling furniture, finding silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars yard, 2-car garage. $3,550/mo. (908) utilities included. We can build to suit 466-0852. &$10.00/week musical instruments. I buy single 01-08-3t • Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inch your business. Email recruitingwr@ a• lostall pet,bold or havingface a garagetype: sale, 613-2285. (908) 359-8131 01-08

PENNINGTON ESTATE SALE: 11 E. Delaware Avenue. Saturday Jan. 11 & Sunday Jan. 12; 9:30-3:30. Entire contents. Empire, Victorian & Country furnishings. Early glassware, Limoges, Lenox, rugs, lighting, Majolica. Attic & basement contents. Much more! For photos visit evelyngordonestatesales.com 01-08 SPACIOUS FURNISHED ROOM: Combo BR/sitting room/study, (28’x17’). Room has fridge & microwave. Bright, w/windows on 3 sides, kitchen privileges, W/D access, wireless internet, parking, 1.4 miles from Nassau Hall @ Princeton University. $1,200/mo. utilities included. Short or long term. (609) 924-4210. 01-08 PRINCETON-Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time for studio apartment on Princeton estate. Big windows with views over magnificent gardens, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, full bath with tub & shower. Separate entrance, parking. Possible use as an office or art studio. (609) 924-5245. tf CREATIVE CLEANING SERVICES: All around cleaning services to fit your everyday needs. Very reliable, experienced & educated. Please call Matthew/Karen Geisenhoner at (609) 587-0231; Email creativecleaningservices@outlook. com 11-20-8t

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12-18-4t HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius, (609) 466-0732 tf HOME IMPROVEMENT: Princeton based general contractor. Small & large construction work, framing, drywall finished to paint, tile, kitchens, baths, decks & handyman items. References, licensed & insured. Immediate response, Steve (609) 613-0197. 01-08

A BIG DECK for a small price All phases of home improvement. Riverview Construction Princeton (609) 468-7594 01-08-3t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 01-01-5t 6 BEDROOM RUSTIC COUNTRY HOME: 10 minutes north of Princeton, in the small village of Blawenburg, Skillman, $2,890 discounted monthly rent: http://princetonrentals. homestead.com or (609) 333-6932. 01-01-6t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 01-08-8t TK PAINTING: Interior, exterior. Power-washing, wallpaper removal, plaster repair, Venetian plaster, deck staining. Renovation of kitchen cabinets. Front door & window refinishing. Excellent references. Free estimates. Call (609) 947-3917. 12-18/06-10

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STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 05-01-20 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-31-20 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-10-20

Ask for Chris tf LOOKING TO RENT YOUR HOME ? Place a classified ad with TOWN TOPICS! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf RANCH FOR RENT– Princeton Bright, beautiful, light-filled, 3 BR, 2 full baths, fireplace, landscaped yard, 2-car garage. $3,550/mo. (908) 613-2285. 01-08 PENNINGTON ESTATE SALE: 11 E. Delaware Avenue. Saturday Jan. 11 & Sunday Jan. 12; 9:30-3:30. Entire contents. Empire, Victorian & Country furnishings. Early glassware, Limoges, Lenox, rugs, lighting, Majolica. Attic & basement contents. Much more! For photos visit evelyngordonestatesales.com 01-08 SPACIOUS FURNISHED ROOM: Combo BR/sitting room/study, (28’x17’). Room has fridge & microwave. Bright, w/windows on 3 sides, kitchen privileges, W/D access, wireless internet, parking, 1.4 miles from Nassau Hall @ Princeton University. $1,200/mo. utilities included. Short or long term. (609) 924-4210. 01-08

Specialists

2nd & 3rd Generations

MFG., CO.

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A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

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Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $24.80 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $63.70 • 4 weeks: $81 • 6 weeks: $121 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


PRINCETON |

Tucked into a spacious acre of lushly landscaped grounds, a grand estate with distinctly Mediterranean influence lies behind a stately gate and circular paver driveway with a large granite water fountain. Designed to accommodate an indoor/outdoor lifestyle, the numerous patios, verandas and balconies create additional rooms for bringing both everyday living and grand scale entertaining out of doors. With five en suite bedrooms, six full baths and two powder rooms, two kitchens, six fireplaces, a solarium, indoor pool and a large sauna among the many amenities found across the three levels of living space, 76 Pettit Place is a bold residence unlike any other in its Princeton Ridge neighborhood. Detailed custom moldings and ceiling medallions are sophisticated touches that draw the eye in nearly every room. The two-story great room is the centerpiece of the home, with other rooms radiating from it on both the main and second levels, creating the feel of an indoor courtyard where wide, arched doorways lead to other rooms on the main floor and skylights and transoms let in abundant natural light. A two-sided fireplace bridges the office and great room. The solarium enjoys seasonal vistas from three sides, skylights, a private door to a balcony and outside, and a surprising pop of whimsy - a structural glass floor through which the heated indoor pool on the lower level can be viewed. The family room opens to the breakfast room and kitchen with large center island, built-in desk, glass-front cherry wood cabinetry, granite counters and stainless-steel appliances. French doors lead from the kitchen to the spacious balcony that accommodates banquet-sized dining and evokes thoughts of soirees under the stars with the majestic tree line formed by the preserved open space bordering the backyard serving as the most picturesque of backdrops. The second level houses the expansive master suite, three additional en suite bedrooms, a loft, and a second story ~pajama lounge~ with a wet bar that provides a cozier gathering space than the open floor plan of the main level. Two bedrooms share access to a balcony, while the master suite has its own balcony. The lower level of the home is home to the fifth en suite bedroom, a second kitchen, a family room with fireplace, a sauna, a full bath, a changing room and an indoor saltwater heated pool with sliding doors and private patio to bring the outdoors in during the warmer months. The lower level steps out onto the covered patio, with stairs to the mezzanine and the main level balcony, providing three levels of outdoor living space, plus a gazebo, pergola, swing and a gorgeous yard accentuated by sod lawn, exotic trees, flowering planting on arbors, and a 30-zone sprinkler system.

Randy Snyder Sales Associate Mobile: 609.658.3193

33 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 | 609.921.2600 | glorianilson.com Licensed Real Estate Broker

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

THE BRAND THAT DEFINES LUXURY REAL ESTATE. WORLDWIDE.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020 • 32

AT YOUR SERVICE A Town Topics Directory

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PRINCETON-Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time for studio apartment on Princeton estate. Big windows with views over magnificent gardens, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, full bath with tub & shower. Separate entrance, parking. Possible use as an office or art studio. (609) 924-5245. tf CREATIVE CLEANING SERVICES: All around cleaning services to fit your everyday needs. Very reliable, experienced & educated. Please call Matthew/Karen Geisenhoner at (609) 587-0231; Email creativecleaningservices@outlook. com 11-20-8t CHARMING PRINCETON APT: Fully furnished, 2 bedrooms, picture windows overlooking yard. W/D, cable, wireless high-speed internet, parking. Utilities included. No smoking or pets. $2,500/mo. Short or long term. Call (609) 924-4210. 01-08 OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Private, quiet suite with 4 offices with approx. 950 sq. ft. on ground floor. $1,700 per month rent; utilities included. We can build to suit your business. Email recruitingwr@ gmail.com 12-18-4t HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

609-466-2693

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC.

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius, (609) 466-0732 tf HOME IMPROVEMENT: Princeton based general contractor. Small & large construction work, framing, drywall finished to paint, tile, kitchens, baths, decks & handyman items. References, licensed & insured. Immediate response, Steve (609) 613-0197. 01-08 HOME HEALTH AIDE/ COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified with 20 years experience. Please call Cindy, (609) 2279873. 01-01-3t ROCKY HILL APT RENTAL: 2 BR. $1,450/mo. includes heat & hot water, dishwasher, yard, off-street parking, coin operated washer/dryer. Security lease credit check. (609) 466-0852. 01-08-3t

Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner

CALL 609-924-2200 TO PLACE YOUR AD HERE

Home Repair Specialist

609-586-2130

American Furniture Exchange

30 Years of Experience!

Call for a Free Estimate

Call for a Free Estimate • Basement Waterproofing Call• Basement for a Free Estimate Waterproofing • •Concrete Leveling Basement Waterproofing • Concrete Leveling Crawl Space Repair ••Concrete Leveling • Crawl Space Repair • Mold Control • Crawl Space Repair • •Egress Windows • Mold Control Mold Control 609-306-0613 • Egress Windows • Egress Windows

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

HD

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PAINTING 609-297-8200 & MORE

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All phases of home improvement. Riverview Construction Princeton (609) 468-7594 01-08-3t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 01-01-5t 6 BEDROOM RUSTIC COUNTRY HOME: 10 minutes north of Princeton, in the small village of Blawenburg, Skillman, $2,890 discounted monthly rent: http://princetonrentals. homestead.com or (609) 333-6932. 01-01-6t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 01-08-8t TK PAINTING: Interior, exterior. Power-washing, wallpaper removal, plaster repair, Venetian plaster, deck staining. Renovation of kitchen cabinets. Front door & window refinishing. Excellent references. Free estimates. Call (609) 947-3917. 12-18/06-10 BUYERS • APPRAISERS • AUCTIONEERS

AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 05-01-20 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-31-20

“To Adam Paradise was home. To the good among his descendants home is paradise" —Hare

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-10-20

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR®

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

A Gift Subscription!

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

tf

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

Restoration upholstery & fabric shop. On-site silver repairs & polishing. Lamp & fixture rewiring & installation. Palace Interiors Empire Antiques & Auctions monthly. Call Gene (609) 209-0362. 10-02-20 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go!

123 123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, 2.5 updated 4Franklin bedrooms, 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated 4 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated Park $1,598,000 throughout. throughout. throughout. throughout. Elegant custom built estate on 8+ premier acres just minutes to Princeton Univ, private, tranquil, resort like setting. Two master

We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read.

suites total 5 BR, 4.5 BA, chef’s kitchen w/Viking appliances, 3 car gar.

$870,000 $870,000 609-921-2700

(609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

04-03-20 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469.

$870,000 $870,000

609-555-0000 609-555-0000 MLS#1923602

PROPERTY SHOWCASE

tf GREEN–PLANET PAINTING: Commercial, Residential & Custom Paint, Interior & Exterior, Drywall Repairs, Light Carpentry, Deck Staining, Green Paint options, Paper Removal, Power Washing, 15 Years of Experience. FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES. CALL: (609) 356-4378; perez@green-planetpainting.com

609-555-0000 609-555-0000

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. Pennington (Commercial Lease) $3,500 throughout.

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. Ewing (New Construction) $649,900 throughout.

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. Yardley $514,900 throughout.

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. Pennington $700,000 throughout.

ranging from approximately 195 to609-555-0000 339 sq feet per room, a $870,000 $870,000 609-555-0000 small kitchen area, with a waiting room and one bathroom.

Stoneham Rd in Ewing. Starting at $399,900. Open every $870,000 609-555-0000 $870,000 609-555-0000 Sat/Sun 12-4pm and by appt. 19 lots and 2 Quick Delivery

larger 4 bedroom, 3 full bath farmhouse that dates back $870,000 609-555-0000 $870,000 to 1830. Calling all hobbyists who 609-555-0000 are looking for a 4-6 car

and 2 half bath home offers a quiet setting to create your $870,000 609-555-0000 own personal oasis. $870,000 609-555-0000

This commercial lease property consists of six office spaces

609-737-1500

MLS#NJME286190

Stonegate at Braeburn! 4 BR, 2.5 Bath custom homes on homes left!

609-737-1500

MLS#NJME287772

Tucked away on 2.56 acres in Lower Makefield Twp sits this detached garage to hold your classic cars and a very large barn to hold equipment.

609-737-1500

Set back from the road on its large lot, this 4 bedroom, 2 full

609-737-1500

MLS#NJME286384

MLS#PABU484540

09-04-20 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, Titusville $450,000 4 bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. Set back off the road with seasonal views of the river, sits this beautiful throughout. 4 BR 2.5 bath home on 1.12 acres in Hopewell Township, NJ. New roof,

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, $799,900 4Hopewell bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. Located in Hopewell Township, this glorious 40+ ACRE throughout. FARM borders the Sourland’s Kulak and Lawrence Preserves.

2nd floor finished bonus room with balcony (art studio, billiard room or summer guest room.)

valley vistas plus a kaleidoscope of color year round will not disappoint.

New septic (2015), New well pump, private fence-in brick patio, hot

$870,000 609-555-0000 tub, balcony deck, indoor coal grill, detached 2+ car garage includes a $870,000 609-555-0000 609-737-1500

•Green Company

MLS#NJME281698

The private lot comprised of 1/4 mile driveway, home and

$870,000 609-555-0000 barns, tillable open and wooded land, sunny mountain and $870,000 609-555-0000 609-737-1500

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, 1/5 1–3 PM

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, colonial, updated Brunswick2.5 baths, colonial, updated $635,000 4South bedrooms, throughout. Fabulous 4 bed 3 full bath in Prestigious Princeton Manor, throughout. a Toll Brothers Community. Active Adult living at its Finest.

32 Hardwick Dr. $870,000 609-921-2700 $870,000

609-555-0000 MLS#NJMX122514 609-555-0000

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, 1/5 1–3 PM

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, $825,000 4Lambertville bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. Exquisite Center Hall Brick Col. located in The Hills of throughout. Hunterdon, special features incl. 3 levels of gracious living space, state of the art saltwater pool and entertaining area

$870,000 609-555-0000 designed for luxury. 4 beds, 3.5 baths. 16 Williamson Ln $870,000 609-555-0000 609-921-2700

MLS#NJHT105466

MLS# NJME276306

HIC #13VH07549500 05-22-20 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-14-20 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613.

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, 1/12 1–3 PM

123 MAIN STREET, PENNINGTON NEW LISTING! Brunswick 123 MAIN South STREET, PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, This N facing END UNIT townhomecolonial, has an openupdated floor plan 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, colonial, updated with three level living! Contemporary living with spacious throughout. throughout. rooms, vaulted ceilings and skylight. Abundance of storage,

123 MAIN Robbinsville $373,872 123 MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, 2.5 colonial, updated to own a 3baths, level, 2100 sq. ft townhome in 4Opportunity bedrooms, 2.5 baths, colonial, updated Washington Town Center.. 3 BR 4 BA, Open concept includes throughout. throughout. a custom kit w/island, mosaic tiles, granite counters, and

$870,000 609-921-2700 $870,000

$870,000 609-921-2700 $870,000

loft area makes a wonderful office. 27 Allison Ct.

609-555-0000 MLS#2009038 609-555-0000

upgraded maple cabinets.

609-555-0000 MLS# NJME288144 609-555-0000

123 MAIN STREET, PENNINGTON Bernards Twp STREET, PENNINGTON $649,900 123 MAIN 4 bedrooms, 2.5 colonial, upgraded BR Colonial just 1 mi updated to NYC rail 4Beautifully bedrooms, 2.54 baths, baths, colonial, updated service! throughout. throughout. 908-782-0100 ID#3593859 $870,000 $870,000

609-555-0000 609-555-0000

123 MAIN Lawrence Twp STREET, $525,000 123 MAIN STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, 2.5 colonial, 4 BR Colonial w/finished basementupdated situated on 4Spectacular bedrooms, 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, updated 2.38 acres. throughout. throughout. 908-782-0100 MLS#3566702 $870,000 $870,000

609-555-0000 609-555-0000

NMLS 113856

01-09-20 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20

TOLL FREE: (800) 288-SOLD WWW.WEIDEL.COM WWW.WEIDEL.COM PROPERTY PROPERTY

MORTGAGE MORTGAGE

INSURANCE INSURANCE

TITLE TITLE

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

A BIG DECK for a small price


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020 • 34

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE, LLC CURRENT RENTALS

908.359.8388

*********************************

Route 206 • Belle Mead

OFFICE RENTALS: Attention: Dissertation Writers

Quality, Inexpensive

$1,600/mo. Heat, Central Air & Parking included. We have an Office Suite that would be perfect for you and your dissertation. In Princeton, within walking distance to campus, the Suite is approximately 653 sq. ft. & is divided into a reception area, 2 private offices & private WC. Available now.

Skillman H HFurniture New & Used Furniture

MODIFIED BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION HOURS

Extended Hours Saturday Tues-Fri 9:30-5 • Sat 9:30-4 212 Alexander St., Princeton 609-924-1881

Best wishes for 2020!

RESIDENTIAL LISTINGS: Princeton – $125/mo. each Parking Spaces: 3 parking spaces-2 blocks from Nassau Street. Available now. Princeton Apt.– $1,700/mo. + electric & gas. Heat & hot water included. 1 BR, 1 bath (new in 2019)LR & Kitchen. Available now. Princeton House– $1,950/mo. Plus utilities. 2 BR house, 1 bath, LR, Kitchen. Nice yard. Available now. Princeton Condo– $2,400/mo. +utilities. 3 BR, 2½ baths, LR, DR, Kitchen, Laundry. Available now.

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area COOK POSITION: Wildflour Bakery/Cafe now hiring cook. Duties include short order cooking, prep work, cleaning, organizing, menu planning. Salary is approx 28,000 a year with possibility for advancement. Weekends included in 40 hour work week. Hours are 7:30 am-3:30 pm. Restaurant experience an asset. Please send resume to https://www.wildflourbakery-cafe. com/contact/ 12-25-3t

well loved and well read since 1946

SPACE AVAILABLE Spring 2020

We have customers waiting for houses!

STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE. We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com See our display ads for our available houses for sale.

32 CHAMBERS STREET PRINCETON, NJ 08542 (609) 924-1416 MARTHA F. STOCKTON, BROKER-OWNER LOOKING TO RENT YOUR HOME ? Place a classified ad with TOWN TOPICS! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf RANCH FOR RENT– Princeton Bright, beautiful, light-filled, 3 BR, 2 full baths, fireplace, landscaped yard, 2-car garage. $3,550/mo. (908) 613-2285. 01-08

The Top Spot for Real Estate Advertising Town Topics is the most comprehensive and preferred weekly Real Estate resource in the greater Central New Jersey and Bucks County areas. Every Wednesday, Town Topics reaches every home in Princeton and all high traffic business areas in town, as well as the communities of Lawrenceville, Pennington, Hopewell, Skilllman, Rocky Hill, and Montgomery. We ARE the area’s only community newspaper and most trusted resource since 1946! Call to reserve your space today! (609) 924-2200, ext 27

Gorgeous 2 bed 2.5 bath home for sale in Hillsborough Recently renovated Hillsborough N.J. townhome with fully finished basement, brand new AC/Furnace and hot water heater. Gas unit and large master bedroom with en suite. Attached garage for convenient parking! Open and contemporary floor plan, hardwood floors throughout, remodeled bathrooms, and kitchen with stainless steel appliances. $290,000

FSBO: Contact Vincent at 908.616.0821 for more information

THE VILLAGE OF LAWRENCEVILLE OFFICE SPACE

2,755

SQ. FT.

FULLY ACCESSIBLE

Please call 609-895-2683 2633 Main Street Lawrenceville, NJ

“The Town Topics provides excellent service and gives our marketing the exposure throughout the Princeton area.”

- Gerri Grassi, Vice President/Broker Manager, Berkshire Hathaway, Fox & Roach, REALTORS®, Princeton Office

The Top Spot for Real Estate Advertising Town Topics is the most comprehensive and preferred weekly Real Estate resource in the greater Central New Jersey and Bucks County areas. Every Wednesday, Town Topics reaches every home in Princeton and all high traffic business areas in town, as well as the communities of Lawrenceville, Pennington, Hopewell, Skilllman, Rocky Hill, and Montgomery. We ARE the area’s only community newspaper and most trusted resource since 1946! Call to reserve your space today! (609) 924-2200, ext 27


1,800 SF FULLY CUSTOMIZABLE LOWER LEVEL

A One-of-a-Kind Limited Time Offer. Special pricing plus a $100,000 allowance toward upgrades remain on just two residences in the coveted Fourth Phase at Rabbit Run Creek.

OUR COMMUNITY FEATURES: Refined Architecture and Finishes

Full Lower Levels and Elevators

Open, Contemporary Floorplans

Private, Gated Community

Two-Car Rear Garages

Extraordinary Low-Maintenance Lifestyle

Starting at $1.4 million. 215.862.5800 | RabbitRunCreek.com Rte 202 (Lower York Road) & Rabbit Run Drive, New Hope, PA

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

A DREAM HOME FOR ENTERTAINING


ARE YOU THINKING OF SELLING? A second opinion is always wise…

Call me for mine!

I have 36 years of Listing and Selling Experience and I’m Relocation Certified! Heidi A. Hartmann Sales Associate 

Cell: 609-658-3771

Profile for Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper, January 8  

Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper, January 8  

Witherspoon Media Group