Town Topics Newspaper, January 31, 2024

Page 1

Volume LXXVIII, Number 5

Entrepreneur’s Foundation Memorializes Creativity of Wife, Daughter . . . . . . 5 Orchestra of Ukraine Concert at McCarter Feb . 11 . . . . . . . . . . 9 HomeFront Week of Hope Offers Array of Opportunities to Learn, Volunteer . . . . . . . . . 11 Reading Fenimore Cooper Over Schubert’s Shoulder . . . . . . . . 14 Freshman Guard Chea Stars Off the Bench as PU Women’s Hoops Tops Cornell . . . . . . . 21 Afrifah Making Big Impact for PHS Wrestling, Winning Heavyweight Title at MCT as Tigers Take 3rd . . . . . . . . . . 25

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Fire Department Honors Its Local Heroes in Council Meeting Ceremony

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University to Contribute $50M+ to Municipality Princeton University will be contributing more than $50 million over the next five years to the town of Princeton, community organizations, and lower- and middle-income residents, according to a University announcement made on Tuesday, January 30. The funds will be supporting mutual town-University interests including sustainability and resiliency, socio-economic diversity and equity, safety and emergency services, college access, mass transit, and municipal infrastructure. “These financial contributions to the municipality, local nonprofit organizations, and residents reflect the University’s long-standing commitment to support the vibrancy of the Princeton community that we call home,” said Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber, as quoted in a University press release. “We are pleased to advance these shared priorities in collaboration with local government and nonprofit organizations to provide meaningful services and resources across our community.” Princeton Council President Mia Sacks, who was a member of the team representing the municipality in discussions with University representatives, commended the University’s contributions to the town and echoed Eisgruber’s emphasis on shared priorities and meaningful collaboration.

“We came to the table as partners with an interest in finding collaborative solutions to issues of mutual concern in the town that we share,” she said. “Today’s announcement reflects a welcome increase in recent years of cooperation between the municipality and the University at all levels. These open lines of communication will continue — and the foundation laid during this process will help us to maximize the impact of our work together.”

What the University describes as a “new framework” for contributions to the municipality includes $39.5 million — $28.2 million in unrestricted cash and $11.3 million for specific municipal projects and programs. The University plan also includes $10 million over five years to a nonprofit organization providing property tax relief for lower- and middle-income Princeton homeowners, with eligible households to be based on income limits set by the

More than 40 members of the Princeton Fire Department (PFD) received awards for a total of thousands of years of service to the community In a ceremony at last week’s Princeton Council meeting. “Celebrating their unwavering commitment and outstanding contributions to community safety,” according to a PFD press release, the ceremony marked a return to tradition after a hiatus and postContinued on Page 10 ponement of award presentations since 2019 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. “To the valiant members of our fire department, your courage and selflessIt has been nearly a century since the a birthday party for Frederick Douglass, ness have been the bedrock of our comfirst observance of Black History Month in plays, film screenings, even a special munity’s security,” said Assistant Chief America. Each of those years, the month- African and Afro-Caribbean board game Hank S. Pannell in introducing the event. long celebration in February has had a night are among the tributes taking place “Whether battling flames, rescuing lives, theme. this month. or providing crucial support, you have This year’s focus is on the contributions Events most closely related to the exemplified the true spirit of service. Toof Black painters, dancers, musicians, theme include “RESPECT: A Tribute to night we express our deepest gratitude and other cultural figures. A four-minute Aretha Franklin,” at State Theatre New for your sacrifices, for every sleepless video on the website of the National Mu- Jersey in New Brunswick on Sunday, night, and for every moment you’ve spent seum of African American History and February 18 at 3 p.m. featuring the New ensuring the safety of our community.” Culture (nmaahc.si.edu) serves as a fitting Jersey Symphony Orchestra and CaHe also thanked the families of mem(under introduction to the breadth and4.5’) scope of pathia Jenkins (visit stnj.org for tickets); bers, referring to them as “the silent hethese artists, who are being celebrated at and A Lovesong for Miss Lydia, a play by roes, enabling our firefighter to serve with the museum in Washington, D.C. the late Don Evans, at Kelsey Theatre on dedication.” He added, ”Behind every the campus of Mercer County Community Closer to home, the list of events firefighter is a network of loved ones who College in West Windsor, February 9-11. marking “African Americans in the Arts” share in the sacrifices and challenges. Call (609) 570-3333 for tickets. includes a wide range of subjects — Your encouragement, understanding, Continued on Page 8 artistic and otherwise. Lectures, concerts, and resilience do not go unnoticed.” Princeton Mayor Mark Freda, who was honored for 45 years of service to the PFD, pointed out that the tradition of these awards goes back to the PFD’s Annual Inspection, which was held every year in June with a parade down Nassau Street followed by a ceremony in front of Monument Hall. “All the fire trucks would line up,” said past chief and current Princeton Engine Company No. 1 President William D. Shields, who emceed the awards ceremony. “The mayor and Council would inspect the operation, and there would be a celebration at night.” Over the years the parade gave way to a dinner ceremony, then the arrival of the pandemic brought a halt to public gatherings. This year’s ceremony made up for several years of past awards that were Parkyears. Blvd. 1378 Route 206 not415 given outNassau during the pandemic “ThePrinceton, model of presenting these awards at NJ 08540 Skillman, NJ 08558 a meeting of mayor and Council may be SUNDAY AT THE LIBRARY: Princeton (behind Public LibraryWells was especially on Sunday afternoon as patrons took Sam’s Club) FargobusyBank) what we(near do going forward,” Freda wrote Can Eat Sushi All You Can Eat Sushi refuge from the heavy rain thatAll fell You in the area. People share what they like to do on rainy days in this week’s in an email.

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Kyleigh Tangen Helps PHS Girls’ Swim Team Win County Meet . . . . 24 Art . . . . . . . . . . . .18, 19 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 20 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . 29 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Performing Arts . . . . . 15 Real Estate. . . . . . . . . 32 Senior Living . . . . .16, 17 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024 • 2

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Winter 2024 Town Topics


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANuARY 31, 2024 • 4

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We Accept Reservations • Outdoor Dining Available RECOGNIZED FOR THEIR IMPACT: Sustainable Princeton Executive Director Christine Symington, third from left, accepts a $50,000 award from members of Citizens Bank.

Champion in Action Award available to make our build- journeys, and partnering For Sustainable Princeton ings and homes reduce their with community organiza-

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Sustainable Princeton, a nonprofit organization that inspires its community to develop and implement solutions that positively impact the environment, has been named a Citizens’ 2024 Champion in Action for their efforts promoting energy efficiency and renewable energy. Sustainable Princeton will receive $50,000 in unrestricted funding and promotional and volunteer support from Citizens to propel their work to build a more sustainable future for Princeton. “Our team is thrilled and hu mble d to receive t he 2024 Champions in Action award,” said Christine Symington, executive director of Sustainable Princeton. “This award allows us to expand our efforts to make the Princeton community a climate action leader. It will support our team’s capacity to provide Princeton businesses and residents of all income levels access to energy efficiency incentives, rooftop solar, and community solar. Sustained effort is needed to ensure that our businesses and residents use the programs and incentives

energy consumption and access renewable energy.” Sustainable Princeton’s vision is for Princeton to be a model town that examines every action through the lens of sustainability, ensuring a healthy environment, a strong economy, and the well-being of all community members now and in the future. Their three focus areas are: reducing greenhouse gas emissions by increasing energy efficiency in their built environment and the use of renewable energy, protecting their local ecosystem, and strengthening their resilience to climate change. They also provide sustainability consulting services to their municipality and public school district. As a Champion in Action, Sustainable Princeton will benefit from a $50,000 contribution in unrestricted funds from Citizens, volunteer support from Citizens colleagues, and public relations and promotional support. “Citizens is committed to driving positive climate impact by reducing our operational emissions, supporting our clients’ sustainability

tions to accelerate change,” said Domenick Cama, NYC Metro president at Citizens. “As one of our 2024 Champions in Action grantees, we are honored to support Sustainable Princeton’s work to strengthen New Jersey’s resilience to the impacts of the changing climate and ensure a sustainable future for all community members.” Citizens’ Champions in Action program celebrates and supports local nonprofits with operating budgets under $5 million who are creating lasting change in the communities they serve. Twice a year, a nonprofit in one of seven Citizens markets is selected to receive funding, promotional and volunteer support to advance programming and services focused on a relevant topic that changes biannually. S i n c e t h e p r o g r a m’s launch 21 years ago, Citizens has awarde d more than $10 million in unrestr icted grants and pro m ot i o n a l a n d vol u nte e r support to more than 375 Champion in Action nonprofit winners across the bank’s footprint.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Skating on the Square: Through February 25, on the outdoor synthetic skating rink. Thursdays and Fridays, 4-7 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, 12-3 p.m. and 4-7 p.m. Palmersquare.com. Leighton Listens: Councilman Leighton Newlin holds one-on-one conversations about issues impacting Princeton from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The next date is January 31 at Starbucks, Princeton Shopping Center. All are welcome. Volunteer with FOPOS: Friends of Princeton Open Space is holding two familyfriendly, half-day sessions on Saturday, February 10 to help remove invasive plants and identify native species. Registration is required. Visit fopos.org/getinvolved. Free Tax Assistance: The Mercer County AARP Tax-Aide program begins offering free federal and state tax preparation on February 2 at Princeton Public Library, the Suzanne Patterson Building, and Nassau Presbyterian Church. Call (888) 227-7669 for specifics. Scholarship Opportunity: College-bound Jewish female students who live in the Princeton/Mercer/Bucks community can apply for funding from the Dr. Esther Wollin Memorial Scholarship Fund. Visit JFCSonline.org.


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princetonmagazine.com Entrepreneur’s Arts Education Foundation Memorializes Creativity of Wife, Daughter

A program that uses art to teach critical thinking skills to kindergarten and first grade students honors the creative energies of a

family’s mother and sister, who were both artists. The Olivia & Leslie Foundation has launched an integrated math and arts program that embraces youths’ natural tendency to create, and adds problem-solving skills. While it arose from overwhelming loss, it inspired in its founders, Chris Kuenne and his sons, the desire to build confidence in budding artists.

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The program, now in two schools, has as its goal inte g r a t i n g m a t h e m a t i c a l concepts such as spatial relationships, geometry, and symmetry into a carefully designed arts program that enables young children to build creative confidence, said Kuenne. The science, technolog y, engineering, ar ts, and mathematics ( STE A M ) -based program also seeks to counter educational disparities. Honoring his daughter’s creative legacy t hrough an art-based program was percolating for some time, but the idea was further shaped when Chris’ wife Leslie Kuenne died almost five years ago. “Twenty-six and a half years ago, I lost my daughter Olivia,” said Kuenne, a Princeton entrepreneur and author, and a Princeton University lecturer at the Keller Center. Kuenne founded the global marketing firm Rosetta, which was the largest privately held digital marketing company before it was sold to Publicis Groupe for a record amount. Kuenne is now chairman & CEO of Rosemark. At the funeral reception for Olivia, he said in an interview, “hundreds of pieces of her art were displayed. After the reception, all the moms and dads went home and dug through basements and closets to retrieve and celebrate their own kids’ artwork.” He added that Olivia’s art showed a “prolific creative energy, and people said she created a lifetime of art in her short 5 1/2 years.”

The foundation website notes, “We would often find her hunched over a piece of paper drawing yet another rainbow or trying to figure out how to draw the roof of our house, in perspective. Her creative energ y was nothing short of miraculous.” The foundation said on its website that Leslie’s “artistic intention was to transmit not only what she saw, but the way she observed it, while leaving room for the viewers’ imaginations.” Leslie was a genetic counselor, a gifted painter, sketch artist, and award-winning

“It has b een ama z ing working with Dr. Harris, who led the team that built our curriculum,” said Kuenne. “Dr. Harris arranged for a panel of experts to review the curriculum and worked collaboratively with school administrators, helping them to envision what this art program can do for their students.” The program was piloted at Johnson Park last spring. “This innovative program works across disciplines and engages students in social and emotional learning,” said Angela Siso Stentz, Johnson Park principal, in a press release. “The initiative provides a way for our students to express themselves and their unique qualities. Research clearly tells us that students learn best by ‘doing.’ Teachers, students, and parents are all excited to have this program at our school.” Kuenne said he hopes to also build confidence in the young artists. To that end, the resulting art from Johnson Park students will be seen at the Arts Council of Princeton from April 19 to 21 in the Taplin Gallery. “One of the key elements of building creative confidence is celebrating the art,” said Kuenne, who noted that a similar event is being planned at a museum in Vermont where the program is also debuting. The curriculum will continually evolve, based on analysis and research of its impact on students, Kuenne said. The foundation has partnered with Maker Prep, an organization devoted to supporting computer science Continued on Next Page

Town Topics Calling All Gen Z Photographers Town Topics Newspaper Invites You To Showcase Your Favorite Places To Hang Out! Show us where to find the best matcha latte, pizza, tacos, or ramen bowls. Is your free time spent at the track, in the library, at a dog park, art studio, science lab, or browsing in retail stores? Let Your Creativity Shine! The most original photos will be published in the print and digital editions of Town Topics Newspaper on February 14 and posted on Instagram and Facebook. Email your photos to editor@towntopics.com No selfies please! Images must be in the form of a jpeg or pdf. Include the location of the photo with a brief description and your first name.

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gardener and nature photographer. She served as president of the McCarter Theatre Center’s Board of Trustees, a board member of the Arts Council of Princeton, and on the Vestry of Trinity Church. From loss came inspiration. After Olivia’s death, the fund in her name at the Princeton Area Community Foundation built an art room at the Princeton Junior School in Lawrenceville. As Kuenne put it, “the school’s beautiful art studio is a tangible tribute to Olivia’s artistic spirit.” There were what he called “ad hoc contributions” to various organizations, including the Olivia Rainbow G aller y in t he Johnson Education Center at D&R Greenway Trust. When Leslie died of ovarian cancer in August 2019, Kuenne said he became more focused “about reflecting their artistic gifts.” Advisors were gathered, and Kuenne credits arts educator Ronah Harris with developing 16 lessons which eventually became part of the arts curriculum at Johnson Park School in Princeton and the Hinesberg Community School in Vermont, near where the Kuennes have a summer home. Harris, who live and works in Princeton, is the founder of Play Pattern LLC, a digital platform for children to learn arts and technology. She earned two Daytime Emmys for her work on children’s television shows and for many years has been commissioned to create private works. She became an art and design teacher in 2018, and took on full-time studio practice.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024 • 6

Arts Education Continued from Preceding Page

and arts education. The materials are provided as part of the program. The advisors are “carefully crafting a white paper,” said Kuenne, “in which we hope to demonstrate a positive developmental impact on the young children we serve. “I am a business builder. First, you prove that you have something that works,” he said, “and then you seek to scale it.” He hopes the program will grow. “Olivia and Leslie taught all those around them the creative power of art to inspire, teach, and invoke our deepest humanity,” Kuenne said. “Our goal is to foster creativity among young students. Our longer-term goal is to catalyze changes in the way we all think about art and its role in developing creative problem-solving in our next generation.” For more information, visit oliviaandlesliefoundation.org. —Wendy Greenberg

Peddler’s Village Presents Chocolate-Themed Event

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“Besides the library, what do you like to do on a rainy day?” (Asked Sunday at Princeton Public Library) (Photos by Weronika A. Plohn)

“When we are not at the library, we like to spend some quality time with our family. We are lucky because our grandparents live very close to us, so whenever it rains we like to go to their house. The whole family loves it, especially the kids that get some extra play time with their grandma and grandpa.” —Momoko Kos, Plainsboro

Pe d d le r’s Vi l lag e, t h e countryside shopping, dining, lodging, and family entertainment destination just outside of New Hope, Pa., will present a new chocolate-filled event, Village of Chocolate, February 14-18. The five-day festival will feature special culinary events, including chocolate-themed dinners and a brunch, plus Chocolate-Covered Workshops and a Village Chocolate Trail. In addition to Valentine’s Day dining w ith special menus on February 14, two restaurants at Peddler’s Vi l lag e w i l l b e h o s t i n g special chocolate-themed When it rains our family likes to play some board games. dinners during the Village My oldest likes Monopoly and Pokémon Battle Academy. of Chocolate event: Earl’s My 3-year-old son likes to play with his cars. We do a lot New American is presentof puzzles as a family, and my wife loves to cook yummy ing a four-course Chocolate dinners for us.” & Whiskey Dinner on Thurs—Jonathan Yau, West Windsor day, February 15 at 6:30 p.m., and the Cock ‘n Bull will be presenting a fourcourse Chocolate & Beer Dinner on Friday, February 16 at 6:30 p.m. On Sunday, February 18, between 9:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m., the Cock ‘n Bull will be presenting Brunch in the Chocolate Factory a family-oriented school event featuringNet dishes and facility taxes would decrease next year, even with new desserts, live music, crafts, bonds, due to retiring debt from past facilities investments a chocolate fountain, and a magic show. Reservations $800 for and tickets are required Existing investment all dining events. New investment On Saturday, February $600 17, guests who register for the “On a rainy day, I like to go to the movie theater and see what is good. Sometimes I just stay at home and bake something Chocolate-Covered Worksweet like a cake. When it isn’t raining too hard, I like to take shops will learn how$400 to tema walk in the Herrontown Woods.” per, melt, dip, and decorate —Pallavi Nuka, Princeton chocolate treats. The event $200 will be led by Kim Pietrak of Skip’s Candy Corner, a shop in Peddler’s Village. Guests $0 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 of all ages can register on2022 the Peddler’s Village website. From February 14-18, Annual tax cost of guests can travel the Village Chocolate Trail to colnew bonds lect stickers that will entitle 2023 $171.62 them to a Golden Ticket, 2024 $262.30 each of which will reveal “Based on average assessed a prize. Prizes will include home value of $838,822 and 2025 $64.42 Peddler’s Village gift cards, assumes a 20-year bond at 2% 2026 $63.92 interest, with ‘front-loaded’ carousel rides at Giggleberprincipal payments. ry Fair, dining coupons, and 2027 $63.75 overnight stays. 2028 $64.00 Visit Peddlersvillage.com for more information.

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Chloe: “I like to play dress up with my sister. We have two princess dresses that we share: one is Belle and the other is FOR old FACTUAL INFORMATION Rapunzel. I also like to build with my Magna-Tiles and do Child must be three, four or five years some coloring. Violet and I love spending time with our on or before October 1, 2024. WWW.PRINCETONK12.ORG/DISTRICT/REFERENDUM-2022 ONLINE grandma too!” —Violet and Chloe Berneei, Cherry Hill

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FRI • FEB 2 • 8:00PM

CelloGayageum:

Lunar New Year Celebration East meets West through the universal language of music.

BOOK & LYRICS BY

TOM EYEN

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THU • FEB 8 • 7:30PM

Ayodele Casel: Chasing Magic

Featuring Special Guest 7-time GRAMMY winner Arturo O’Farrill. “Tap dancer and choreographer of extraordinary depth.” -The New York Times

FRI • FEB 9 • 8:00PM

American Patchwork Quartet

Featuring Falu, Clay Ross, Clarence Penn and Yasushi Nakamura On a mission to reclaim the immigrant soul of American Roots Music.

SUN • FEB 11 • 1:00PM

National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine Featuring an Arts & ideas post-concert talk. Ukraine’s most talented musicians showcase the country’s rich musical history.

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7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024

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UPCOMING FEBRUARY EVENTS


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANuARY 31, 2024 • 8

Black History Month continued from page one

Christ Congregation, 50 Walnut Lane, will host its pastor, the Rev. Dr. Kirk J oh n s on, for a s p e c i a l book signing and discussion on “Race, Medicine, and Economics” at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, February 4. Johnson is also assistant professor of justice studies and medical humanities at Montclair State University. His books are The AntiRacism Resource Guide Volume One: Supporting Black Businesses and Economics, and Medical Stigmata: Race, Medicine, and the Pursuit of Theological Liberation. “ We a r e t h r i l l e d a n d blessed to have such an outstanding academic expert on racial justice and superb spiritual leader to help educate us about these critical issues at the intersection of race, medicine, and economics,” said the church’s co-moderator, the Rev. Robert Moore. “We invite anyone interested to attend this free event.” Call (609) 921-6253 for more information. Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, offers an eclectic list of events to celebrate Black History Month, in the Community R o o m u n l e s s i n d i c ate d otherwise. Through February 15, the exhibit “Three Eras of African American Inventor Experience” is on loan from the Black Inventors Hall of Fame in Newark. Mounted in the main lobby, the show focuses on the 400-year history of African American inventions from smallpox remedies to cell phone technology, and more. On Sunday, February 11 at 2 p.m., James Howard of the Newark organization presents “Black Inventors G ot G ame,” specif ically talking about the Black inventors’ contributions to the toy and game industry. Aut hor a nd P r i nce ton University professor Ruha B enjam in d is cus s es her new book Imagination: A Manifesto, and its connection to her previous book, Viral Justice, with writer/ scholar/activist Lorgia Garcia Pena on Monday, February 5 at 7 p.m. The talk will also be livestreamed on YouTube. The Douglass Day Transcribe-a-thon on Wednesday, February 14 from 12-3 p.m. invites par ticipants to transcribe handwritten general cor respondence of abolitionist Frederick Douglass from the Library of Congress, to help create a searchable database. This event is in the library’s

Technology Center. The film Lady Sings the Blues, about jazz singer Billie Holiday, is screened on Friday, February 16 at 4 p.m., in advance about author Paul Alexander’s discussion of his book, Bitter Crop: The Heartache and Triumph of Billie Holiday’s Last Year, on Tuesday, February 20 at 7 p.m. A panel discussion follows the screening of the PBS documentar y Revolution ’67 on Wednesday, February 21 at 6:30 p.m. The film is an account of the Black urban rebellions of the 1960s, focusing on the six-day Newark disturbances which began as spontaneous revolts against poverty and police brutality, and ended as milestones in this country’s struggles over race. A “Journey Through African American Music” on Saturday, February 24 at 2 p.m. is an interactive event for all ages. Finally, a bulletin board and book display on Black inventors is on view on the library’s third floor. Visit princetonlibrary. org for details. Diagonally across Witherspoon Street, the Arts Council of Princeton hosts a celebration and community discussion of Black History Month on Thursday, February 22 from 5 to 8 p.m. A collaboration with Joint Effort Princeton Safe Streets, “Black Angels Ancestors and Heritage: Reflections on the People and Growing Up in the Witherspoon-Jackson Neighborhood” will center on the contributions made by Princeton’s Black community, “and the memories, reflections, stories, tales, legends, truths about having been a resident of the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood,” reads a flyer about the event. Longtime communit y members Tommy and Joanne Parker will be honored, and an art exhibit related to the celebration will be on view. Visit artscouncilofprinceton.org for details. Princeton Public Library isn’t the only local site to celebrate the birthday of Frederick Douglass. On his Valentine’s Day birthday, February 14, the Stoutsburg Sourland African American Museum (SSAAM) in Skillman honors Douglass’ life and legacy with a party — complete with cake — as well as a live transcribe-athon of his papers from the Library of Congress. The event, at the True Farmstead, 183 Hollow Road, is one of others being held around the country. Space is limited, and advance registration is encouraged at ssaamuseum.org/upcoming events.

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Earlier in the month, the SSAAM presents a live theatrical performance, Meet Phillis Wheatley, at the Mt. Zion AME Church on the site, on Friday, February 9 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, February 10 at 11 a.m. An audience Q & A w ill take place following each performance. W heatley was kidnapped from West Africa and sold into slavery in Boston when she was 7 years old. In 1773, while still enslaved, she became the first published African American poet in U.S. history. While not as well known today as Harriet Tubman or Sojourner Truth, Wheatley was one of the most famous poets of her era, and was praised by such figures as Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. Daisy Century of American Historical Theatre portrays the young poet. West Windsor Arts at 952 Alexander Road partners with Art Against Racism and the African American Parent Support Group of West Windsor-Plainsboro to present traditional and contemporary African and Afro-Caribbean board game collection on Thursday, February 22 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Included are Bid Whist, Spades, and Dominoes. The exhibit “Manifesting Beloved Community,” inspired by Martin Luther King Jr., is on display. Admission is free. Register at westwindsorarts.org. Two virtual events related to Black History Month are sponsored by Mercer County Library System. On Tuesday, February 13 at 7 p.m., “T hree World-Renow ned Contemporary Black Artists” is presented by Jeanne Johnson, a docent at both the Princeton University Art Museum and Morven Museum and Garden. Photographer Samuel Fosso, mixed media artist Nick Cave, and por trait painter Kehinda Wiley are the subjects. “Finding Benjamin James and the History of the Mount Ely Hancock House” is the subject of a talk on Wednesday, February 21 at 7 p.m. Pat Donahue, current owner of the Mount Ely Hancock House in East Windsor, will discuss the history of the house and the genealogy of James, an enslaved man who once lived and worked at the house. She will place the life of James into the larger context of slavery in New Jersey. Visit mcl.org to register for these programs. Events in Trenton marking Black History Month include a celebration through storytelling on Sunday, February 4 from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie, in Cadwalader Park. S tor y tel ler Ja m i l L ong, Musszett the Poetess, dancer Victoria Smalls, and author Diane Ciccone will perform. Visit Ellarslie.org for information. The Capital Cit y Area Black Caucus celebrates with a Trenton “visioning discussion” and community salute to Mercer County Executive Dan Benson on Saturday, February 24 from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m., at Mt. Zion AME Church, 42 Pennington Avenue. The list of those being honored includes U.S. Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman, Assemblywoman Verlina Reynolds Jackson, State Sen. Shirley Turner, Mercer County Commissioner Sam Frisby, and several others. —Anne Levin

SEEKING INTERNS: Friends of Princeton Open Space needs help in keeping the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve in shape.

FOPOS Needs Volunteers graduate of the University ( Bank of America/Merrill of Illinois at Springfield and Lynch) as treasurer; Greg For Current Season

Friends of Princeton Open Space (FOPOS) is looking for three land steward interns for the 2024 season. The interns will work under the direction of the organization’s director of natural resources and stewardship to assist in the daily activities of managing an open space preserve. Most of the interns’ time will be spent outdoors working within riparian and forest restoration project sites at the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. Stewardship interns will play a critical role in organizing and leading the frequent volunteer sessions held by FOPOS, which are typically held on weekends. The application deadline is March 1. Visit fopos.org to apply or get more information.

Trenton’s Heritage Tourism Is Topic of Upcoming Talk

On Wednesday, February 7 at 12:15 p.m., a talk on how heritage tourism can play a greater role in Trenton’s economy will be given at Leonardo’s restaurant by Ashley Abruzzo, heritage tourism program manager for Crossroads of the American Revolution National Heritage Area. The Battle of Trenton; the first reading of the Declaration of Independence; the State House; the Roebling Company; Trenton pottery; Cadwalader Park; historic neighborhoods, cemeteries, and architecture — the City of Trenton is filled with sites worth visiting and learning about, but how many are actually coming? Abruzzo’s talk will explore whether Trenton is fully utilizing its history as an asset to fuel its future development. The event is sponsored by the Kiwanis Club of Trenton. Abruzzo’s focus will be how heritage tourism can play a greater role in Trenton’s economy, attracting visitors who will support small businesses, create jobs, and help strengthen neighborhoods and schools. She will discuss the potential for greater heritage tourism in Trenton and in New Jersey as a whole, in time for the 250th commemoration of the American Revolution. Abruzzo joined Crossroads in 2022, having previously worked for the Journey Through Hallowed Ground National Heritage Area, serving as a liaison between historic sites, DMOs, and local businesses for the 180-mile corridor between Charlottesville, Va., and Gettysburg, Pa. She is a

Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania. Founded in 1918, the Kiwanis Club’s programs have supported children’s services, community events and since 1955, the Times-Kiwanis Camp Fund, which has raised over $2 million for summer camp experiences for Trenton children. In addition to the ongoing Camp Fund, current Kiwanis initiatives include Vision Trenton, a collaborative community effort to stimulate economic redevelopment by promoting Trenton’s extensive historic assets. Leonardo’s II is located at 2021 Brunswick Pike, Lawrence Township. Lunch will be available off the menu for $20. RSVP by February 6 to Mike McCormick at (609) 208-9991 or mccormicknj@ aol.com.

Blair ( Nottingham Insurance) as secretary; and Bill Rue, Jr (Rue Insurance) as immediate past chair. The Chamber’s day-to-day operations continue to be led by Hal English, president and CEO. “New leadership always brings a new energy to an organization, and the Chamber is no different,” said English. “The Chamber has a long tradition of best-inclass programming and coalition-building that benefits our entire regional business community. In 2024, we are going to build on that tradition to launch a new era of growth, relevance, and economic opportunity.” Cimino will be officially installed as chair of the board on Thursday, January 18 at Changing of the Guard. The event will be held at The New Board Members Stone Terrace by John Henry’s from 5-7 p.m. Tickets At Regional Chamber T he P r i nceton Mercer can be purchased at princRegional Chamber of Com- etonmercer.org. merce has announced the election of 10 new members YWCA Princeton to Honor to their board of directors. Four Outstanding Women YWCA Princeton has anLeading this new group will be an executive committee nounced its 2024 Tribute chaired by Jeannine Cimino. to Women Gala at the MarThe new members reflect riott at Forrestal on Friday the diversity of the Cham- March 1. Four women will ber’s membership and the be honored for their work regional business commu- spearheading change across nity. The board is represen- Mercer County and inspiring tative of industries includ- positive change in future ing health care, banking generations and uplifting and finance, government, the community. The honorees are Elizapharma, tourism, higher e d u c at i o n , pr ofe s s i o n a l beth Koehler, managing diservices, IT, and nonprofit rector at BlackRock; Isabelle social services. The orga- Lambotte, president and conizations Chamber board founder of Share My Meals; members represent range Kim McNear, executive difrom Fortune 500 compa- rector of Anchor House; and nies to small, family-owned Lisa Skeete Tatum, founder and CEO of Landit. businesses. “I am looking for ward New board members include Benjamin Branche, to our community coming partner, Szaferman Lakind; together at our 40th AnniJames G. Demetriades, CEO, versary Tribute to Women Penn Medicine Princeton Gala and celebrating these Health; Bryan Evans, senior four honorees,” said YWCA vice president, Greater Tren- Princeton CEO Rose Wong. ton; David Fried, CEO, Pay- “Their remarkable contriDay Payroll; Mary Heagley, butions and leadership are vice president for advance- an inspiration to us all and ment, Thomas Edison State I hope by sharing their stoUniversity; Dolores Kelley, ries we are all encouraged shareholder, Stark & Stark; to forge ahead, uplift one David Reiner, assistant vice another, and create a fupresident for state affairs, ture where every woman›s Princeton University; Dan- potential is recognized and iel Smith, senior associate, celebrated.” 1868 Public Affairs; Sandra Tickets are now on sale, Toussaint, president/CEO, sponsorship opportunities United Way of Greater Mer- are available, and submiscer County; and Bill Wells, sions for the digital ad reel vice president, TD Bank. are being accepted. For more The new chair of the board information, visit ywcaprincis Cimino, who is chief re- eton.org/tribute2024. tail officer of William Penn Bank. Joining her on the executive committee are PatONLINE rick L. Ryan (First Bank) as chair-elect; Zack Warringer www.towntopics.com


The February 11 appearance by the National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine was booked for McCarter Theatre Center nearly a year ago. But when war broke out in the Middle East last October, adding to the already existing conflict in Ukraine, it became increasingly unlikely that the orchestra would be able to embark on its tour of U.S. locations — most on or affiliated with college campuses. A representative of the orchestra called McCarter just before the winter holidays. All of the orchestra’s funding for travel and cargo had dwindled, and they were told by the Ukrainian business community that they weren’t going to get the same subsidy. Navigating in and out of a war zone added to the problem.

“They said the situation in Gaza was making everything harder for them, which was completely understandable,” said Paula Abreu, McCarter’s director of presented programming. “The tour was in jeopardy.” Efforts led by Debbie Bisno, McCarter’s director of university and artistic partnerships, have not only kept the orchestra on the schedule, but have added a relevant post-concert discussion about the realities of being an artist during wartime. Following the 1 p.m. performance in the Matthews Theater, the orchestra’s director Alexander Hornostai and Princeton University visiting scholar Iuliia Skubytska will speak. “ I k n e w w e c o u l d n’t no t h av e t h e m ,” B i s n o

s a id. “T hey were ab out $140,000 in the hole, and were calling each venue to ask for help. In order to meet this gap, each venue on the tour had to commit to 10 percent over what they had originally committed to. That is no small feat for McCarter, since we’re a nonprofit ourselves. So I told them I would get back to them.” It occurred to Bisno that this was an opportunity for collaboration on a conversation about ar tists who are at risk, living through a war. She approached the University’s School of Public and International Affairs, its Humanities Council, and the Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Deter mination, where it was recommended that she connect with Lydia

“Lydia called some Ukrainian friends, and within a week we had mobilized the effor t,” Bisno said. “We called them [the orchestra representative ] back and said we were in.” The post-concert conversation, which no other venues on the orchestra’s tour had requested, inspired aid from Zaininger, the Liechtenstein Institute, The Olsen Foundation, George and Ellen Casey, and Steve and Linda Gecha. “None of these people were subscribers or contributors to McCarter in the past,” Bisno said. “Lydia was the anchor. She created a domino effect. She opened the door to new friends. She knew people in the community who were Ukraine-connected. This is

bridge to that. When you ask for something that resonates and feels authentically important, people come to the table.” The National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine performs Sunday, February 11 at 1 p.m. McCarter Theatre

nytsky as soloist in SaintSaens Piano Concerto No. 2, Dvorak Symphony No. 8, and Berezovsky’s First Ukrainian Symphony in C major. Visit mccarter.org for tickets. —Anne Levin

Princeton’s First Tradition

Worship Service Sundays at 11am

Princeton Preaching Sunday, February 4 is University Rev. Dr. Theresa S. Thames, Associate Dean of Religious Life and the Chaopel, Chapel Princeton University.

Open to all. Music performed by the Princeton

University Chapel Choir with Nicole Aldrich, Director of Chapel Music and Chapel Choir, and with Eric Plutz, University Organist.

THE SHOW MUST GO ON: Thanks to a collaborative, behind-the-scenes effort by McCarter Theatre Center and Princeton University, the National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine has overcome a funding shortage that would have prevented their appearance on February 11.

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University continued from page one

New Jersey ANCHOR Program; $500,000 over five years to the 101:Fund to support scholarships for low-income students who graduate from Princeton High School; and $300,000 over three years to Housing Initiatives of Princeton to provide rental assistance for families and individuals facing housing insecurity. Funding for the municipal projects and programs will include $7.5 million for sewer infrastructure repair and improvement; $1.5 million for the municipal shuttle service; $1 million over five years to support career fire department personnel in the Princeton Fire Department; $1 million to support the town’s purchase of a new fire department tower truck and high-water rescue vehicle; $250,000 to contribute to the town’s purchase of a new cold-storage facility for the Department of Public Works; and $100,000 for the Department of Human Services to help provide emergency housing for homeless individuals and families. “The University has for many years made discretionary unrestricted voluntary contributions to the municipality to

support its budget,” said University Vice President and Secretary Hilary Parker. “We took a new approach in developing this framework, engaging in a series of collaborative conversations to identify shared priorities for University support.” She continued, “We think the outcome is a positive one for the municipality, the University, and the residents of Princeton, and we are grateful to our municipal partners for the thoughtful and rigorous discussion we have had over many months.” The municipal team, which, in addition to Sacks, included Councilmembers Michelle Pirone Lambros and Eve Niedergang, and Municipal Administrator Bernard Hvozdovic, commented in a statement: “We welcome this significant increase in financial support from Princeton University that will benefit all residents of Princeton. For more than a year we have engaged in a series of productive conversations with University representatives. These planned contributions reflect our mutual commitment to addressing the urgent challenges of affordability, sustainability, and equity within the community we share.”

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Parker also noted, “This outcome is a testament to the strong and collaborative relationship the University has with our local leaders. As we advance the University’s teaching and research mission, we have a strong interest in strengthening our regional ecosystem to enhance the quality of life and economic well-being of our host community, the surrounding region, and the state of New Jersey.” Along with Parker, Kristin Appelget, University assistant vice president for community and regional affairs, represented the University in leading discussions with Princeton municipal officials. The University press release goes on to point out that Princeton University is the largest taxpayer in Princeton and the second largest in Mercer County. The University paid a total of $7.7 million to the municipality of Princeton in property and sewer taxes in 2023. Also, the University announced last March that it planned to contribute more than $14.6 million over five years to the Princeton Public Schools, as well as $1.34 million to Mercer County in 2023, with a gradually increasing payment in subsequent years. —Donald Gilpin

Fire Department continued from page one

Robert “Higgy” Higgins, who joined Princeton Engine Company No. 1 in 1948, was the senior honoree with 75 years of service; Edward Moyer, John Clausen, and Jack Petrone were honored for 60 years of service; and George Johnson for 55 — all five the recipients of a proclamation from the mayor, Council, and Municipality of Princeton honoring their years of volunteer service. William Hunter, Anthony Kr ystaponis, William D. Shields, Alfred Kahn, and Henry F. Shields were recognized for 50 years of service; Eric Karch and Jeffrey Golomb, in addition to Freda, for 45; Robert Toole and Alex Versfeld for 40 years; Thomas Stange, David Steward, Michael Miller, Neil Hunter, Anthony Santoro, Daniel Tomalin, and David Goldfarb for 35 years; William Urian for 30; George Luck III and Rick Miller for 25; Alexander Ridings and Lietta Kahn for 20; Michael Golomb, James Simon, Sal Baldino,

Matthew Freedman, T.R. Johnson, and Henry Pannell for 15; Gregory Griffis, W. Patrick Shields, and Ronald Dilapo for 10; and A. Douglas Davis, Mark Sitek, Gianluca Baldino, Yvette Felder, Keith Wadsworth, and Luke Walthour for five years of service. “I don’t think you can find a better group of people,” said William Shields, reflecting on his more than 50 years of service. “The Princeton Fire Department is interwoven in the tapestry of the town. Our membership has included the police chief, the mayor, postal workers and officials, lawyers, members of the business community, University students, and many more — all types. All are treated on one level. All are there for the same purpose.” Pannell added, “We have people from every walk of life, and you form relationships with people you may not have met otherwise. For me, serving on the Princeton Fire Department has not only allowed me to actively contribute to the safety of my community,

it also gives a chance to become a part of a bigger family.” He continued, “Since its inception in 1788, the Princeton Fire Department has been steadfast in its mission to protect the community from fires and emergencies. The awards ceremony serves as a testament to the enduring dedication of its members, who have selflessly served the community.” Shields and Pannell both urged locals to come out and support the PFD. “As we celebrate our history and achievements, the Princeton Fire Department remains committed to its mission and is actively seeking new volunteer members to join our ranks,” said Pannell. “We encourage community members to consider becoming a part of our tradition of service and community protection. As the department looks to the future, it remains committed to upholding the tradition of safeguarding the community.” —Donald Gilpin

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Diaper wrapping for families in need, delivering meals and supplies to area motels, an art event in Hopewell, a bus tour to learn about HomeFront’s more than 35 different programs, lunch with HomeFront CEO Sarah Steward —during its Week of Hope, from February 12 to 17, HomeFront is offering an array of volunteer and educational opportunities for everybody to get involved and make a difference in the community. “I always look for ward to the Week of Hope as its brings us together with community members committed to making a difference through service,” wrote H o m e Fr o n t C EO S a r a h Steward in an email. “It’s a time to connect, learn, and address the challenges of poverty and homelessness in a meaningful way. Join us by signing up for opportunities throughout the week. And learn more about how you can make a real, tangible impact in the lives of our neighbors in need.” Founded in 1991, the Lawrence-based nonprofit organization provides shelter on any given night to more than 500 individuals, two-thirds of them children. Last year 18,500 hungry local people were fed by HomeFront through the distribution of free bags of groceries, and 68 long-term unemployed were successfully placed in jobs or received their high school diplomas. S eek ing to help fam ilies end homelessness and break the cycle of poverty

by “harnessing the caring, resources, and expertise of the community,” according to HomeFront’s mission statement, “We lessen the immediate pain of homelessness and help families become self-sufficient. We work to give our clients the skills and opportunities to ensure adequate incomes, and we work to increase the availability of adequate, affordable housing. We help homeless families advocate for themselves individually and collectively.”` Every day of the week of February 12 there are several chances to join Week of Hope activities. On Monday af ternoon, from 5 :30 - 6 :30 p.m., a “How You Can Help” volunteer orientation will take place at HomeFront headquarters, 1880 Princeton Avenue in Lawrence Township, providing information about HomeFront, its programs, and opportunities to get involved. Earlier in the day on Monday, February 12, volunteers will be working at HomeFront’s Freestore at 1000 Division Street in Trenton, assisting with incoming donations and organizing the store ; assisting w ith the Our Choice Food Pantry at the Lawrence headquarters, where members serve more than 200 families in a fourhour period each day; and working at home to “Bake Some Love” in the form of nut-free treats for children experiencing homelessness and currently living in motels. On Tuesday at 5:30 p.m.,

HomeFront’s Treasure Trove at 31 West Broad Street in Hopewell will host a “Share the Love” art event, with guests and volunteers invited to “ join us to paint and sip while learning more about our work.” Also needing volunteers on Tuesday, February 13, will be the Choice Food Pantr y, as well as the Double Helpings team, which will be delivering hot meals and necessary supplies to people experiencing homelessness and living in area motels. On Wednesday, February 14, HomeFront is seeking volunteers to bake cupcakes at home or bring Valentine’s goodie bags for children and families staying at the HomeFront emergency shelter. At 11 a.m. interested participants will gather at 1880 Princeton Avenue for the HomeFront Bus Tour, where they will learn about HomeFront’s work and the scope of all the HomeFront programs, as they accompany CEO Steward on a private bus tour. Thursday’s offerings include volunteer work at the Freestore, in the Choice Food Pantr y, and in the delivery of meals and supplies to homeless people in need at area motels, as well as an 11 a.m. tour of the HomeFront main office, food pantry, and diaper resource center. Rounding out the Week of Hope at the Lawrenceville headquarters will be “Lunch & Learn with Sarah” on Friday at 12 p.m., when visitors are invited to dine with the

11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANuARY 31, 2024

HomeFront Week of Hope Offers Array Of Opportunities to Learn, Volunteer

THE SPIRIT OF SERVICE: Volunteers at the HomeFront Choice Food Pantry prepare food to be delivered to hungry families. HomeFront’s Week of Hope, February 12-17, invites visitors to join in a variety of volunteer opportunities and educational forums and to learn how to make a difference where help is needed in the community. (Photo courtesy of HomeFront) CEO and learn more about HomeFront’s programs and services and the issues clients face every day; and, on Saturday, February 17 from 1-3 p.m., diaper wrapping for HomeFront families. HomeFront Community Engagement Manager Gina Davio recommends the rich “smorgasbord of familyfriendly events during the Week of Hope, designed to illustrate that volunteers themselves can make a difference in the lives of individuals and families that they serve. It’s a chance to give back.” The HomeFront website points out that now, more

than ever, “it’s important that HomeFront continues to mobilize and prov ide the holistic w raparound ser vices for parents and children that can signify a

new, better beginning.” Visit homefrontnj.com for more information and registration for Week of Hope events. —Donald Gilpin

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Mailbox The views of the letters do not necessarily reflect the views of Town Topics.

Sharing Thoughts on Princeton Council’s Approval of New Consolidated Committee

To the Editor: Regarding “Council Approves Consolidation of Board, Commissions” [January 24, page 1], the word “oligarchy” comes to mind: “Rule of the few; a form of power structure in which power rests with a small number of people. These people might be distinguished by nobility, wealth, family ties, education or corporate, religious, or military control.” Hmmm. But hey, perhaps some of the current members of Council would like to step down to create more efficiency and enhance the group’s overall effectiveness. ELLEN GILBERT Stuart Road East

Those Most Vulnerable Will Suffer From Consolidation of Board, Commissions

To the Editor: On Monday, January 22, after over two hours of public comment, virtually all of which objected to the proposal to consolidate the Human Services Commission, the Affordable Housing Board, and the Civil Rights Commission, Princeton Council voted for consolidation. There were plenty of apologies from Council members about the manner in which this proposal came about, that is, with zero consultation with current commission and board members and none with the public. I was taught that apologies without change in behavior are meaningless. Not only did Council ignore pleas to pause the process so that consultation could take place, but they gave a demonstration of slipshod decision making in their adoption of two amendments to the proposal before comment began, a questionable process. Council’s major complaint about the board and commissions was that they were not effective in managing human needs and civil rights in the municipality. It is doubtful whether Council’s new committee with nine instead of the former 29 commissioners will better deal with these problems. To use Justice Ginsberg’s allusion to taking down an umbrella in a rainstorm, Council may well learn that the shrunken body it has created offers far less protection than is needed or that was provided by the three advisory groups they voted out of existence. Unfortunately, it will be the most vulnerable people in Princeton who will suffer from their action. LINDA OPPENHEIM South Harrison Street

Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.


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65 Witherspoon Street. The event is presented by the library, Labyrinth Books, and Not In Our Town Princeton. It is cosponsored by Princeton University’s African American Studies Department and Humanities Council. Imagination: A Manifesto (W.W. .Norton & Co., $22), to be released February 6, is Benjamin’s proclamation that we have the power to use our imaginations to challenge systems of oppression and to create a world in which everyone can thrive, despite obstacles. The book, according to publisher’s notes, says the most effective way to disrupt destructive systems of class, race, and gender-based oppression is to do so collectively. Educators, artists, activists, and others who are challenging the status quo to illustrate that imagination is a resource and a tool are highlighted in the book. “Benjamin invites readers to consider a different world, one that the imagination of others tells us is the best of all possible worlds,” stated Kirkus Reviews. “A provocative manifesto indeed, and one that deserves a wide audience.” Benjamin is an internationally recognized writer, speaker, and professor of African American Studies at Princeton University, where she is the founding director of the Ida B. Wells Just Data Lab. She is the award-winning author of Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code, and Viral Justice, and editor of Captivating Technology, among many other publications. Garcia Peña is a writer, activist and scholar who specializes in Latinx Studies with a focus on Black Latinidades. Her work is concerned with the ways in which antiblackness and xenophobia intersect the Global North producing categories of exclusion that lead to violence and erasure. She is the author of Community as Rebellion. This program will be held in person at the library and will also be available to view as livestream on the library’s YouTube channel. More information is at princetonlibrary.org.

13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024

are required. Reserve tickets through University Ticketing at tickets.princeton.edu. Vara is the author of the bestselling story collection This is Salvaged, which was named a notable book of 2023 by Publisher’s Weekly, The New Yorker, and others. Her novel The Immortal King Rao was shortlisted for the National Book Critics Circle’s John Leonard Prize, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, and several other prizes in addition to being a finalist for the Pulitzer. Her third book, an essay collection entitled Searches, will be published in 2025. Vara’s fiction has received an O. Henry Award, as well as honors from the Rona Jaffe Foundation, the Canada Council for the Arts, MacDowell, and Yaddo. Her creative nonfiction has been anthologized in The Best American Essays series. As a journalist, Vara writes for Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, and The New York Times Magazine. She teaches at Colorado State University as a 2023-24 Visiting Assistant Professor of Creative Writing. Each of the 10 senior readers is working on a novel, a screenplay, translations, or a collection of poems or short stories as part of their creative independent work for a certificate. On March 19, the 2023-24 Princeton High Alumna Bao, series will conclude with a reading by Jake Skeets, author Author Thakrar, at Library Event of the award-winning poetry Young adult author and not spinning stories about collection Eyes Bottle Dark Princeton High School alum- spider silk and shadows, with a Mouthful of Flowers, na Karen Bao will speak in magic and marauders, and along with eight seniors. the Princeton Public Library courageous girls illuminated Community Room on Tues- by dancing rainbow flames, Award-winning Author Benjamin day, February 6 at 7 p.m. T h a k r a r r e a d s, t r ave l s, Discusses “Imagination: A Manifesto” Award-winning author Ruha She will be in conversation bakes, and plays the harp. Benjamin is joined in conwith local author Shveta Thakrar about Bao’s newest Writing Students to Join versation by scholar Lorgia García Peña to discuss Benjabook, Pangu’s Shadow. The Vara in Reading Series authors will discuss the writJournalist, novelist, and es- min’s new work, Imagination: ing process and how real-life sayist Vauhini Vara, author A Manifesto, in which she experiences can inspire fan- of The Immortal King Rao, calls on us to take imagination tastical worlds. The library which was a finalist for the seriously as a site of struggle is at 65 Witherspoon Street. 2022 Pulitzer Prize, will read and a place of possibility for A murder mystery, Pangu’s from her work at 5:30 p.m. reshaping the future. Also up Shadow (Lerner Publishing on February 13 in the God- for discussion is a connection Group) centers around two frey Kerr Studio at the Lewis to her previous book, Viral apprentices at a prestigious Arts complex on the Princeton Justice. The conversation happens biology lab who become sus- University campus. on Monday, February 5 at 7 pects in the death of their p.m. in the Princeton Public br illiant but demand ing Library Community Room, boss. To clear their names, the two put aside their mutual suspicion and team up to search for the real killer. Bao is also the author of Dove Arising, Dove Exiled, and Dove Alight and contributed to the anthology (Ab) solutely Normal. A recent doctoral graduate of Harvard University, she studies mosquito brains. She also cooks, tends to her Vauhini Vara plants, and plays the violin. Additionally, Lara Katz, Thakrar is a believer in magic. Her work has ap- Amanda Kural, Ethan Luk, p e are d i n a nu mb er of Hailey Mead, Zoe H. Monmagazines and anthologies, tague, Tobias Nguyen, Anurag including Enchanted Liv- Pratap, Olivia Ragan, Claire ing, Uncanny Magazine, A Schultz, and Mollika Singh, Thousand Beginnings and seniors in Princeton’s ProEndings, and Toil & Trou- gram in Creative Writing, will ble. Her debut young adult read from their recent work. fantasy novel, Star Daugh- This event is part of the 2023ter ( Harper Teen), was a 2024 C.K. Williams Reading finalist for the 2021 Andre Series, named after the late Norton Nebula Award, and Pulitzer Prize and National her second and third nov- Book Award-winning poet els, The Dream Runners C.K. Williams, who served and the forthcoming Divin- on Princeton’s faculty for ing the Leaves, take place 20 years. The series showin the same universe. Her cases senior students of the 201-861-7770 adult fantasy novella, Into Program in Creative Writing the Moon Garden, is avail- alongside established writers. The event is free and open able as an original audiobook from Audible. When to the public; however, tickets

Author Paul Halpern Discusses “The Allure of the Multiverse” Author Paul Halpern’s book has been called a “rich and rewarding history of one of the most astounding ideas in physics and astronomy” by Black Hole author Marcia Bartusiak, and suggests that the universe we know isn’t the only one. In The Allure of the Multiverse: Extra Dimensions, Other Worlds, and Parallel Universes (Basic Books, $30), physicist Halpern tells the epic story of how science became enamored with the multiverse, and the controversies that ensued. He will speak at the Princeton Public Library on Thursday, February 8 at 7 p.m., in a program co-presented by Labyrinth Books. According to the publisher, the questions that brought scientists to this point are big and deep: Is reality such that anything can happen, must

happen? How does quantum mechanics “choose” the outcomes of its apparently random processes? And why is the universe habitable? Each question leads to the multiverse. Drawing on centuries of thought from the likes of Nietzsche, Einstein, and the creators of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Halpern reveals the multiplicity of multiverses that scientists have imagined to make sense of our reality. Halpern is a professor of physics at Saint Joseph’s University and the author of 18 science books, including Flashes of Creation, The Quantum Labyrinth, Einstein’s Dice and Schrodinger’s Cat, and Synchronicity. He is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society. For more information, visit princetonlibrary.org.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANuARY 31, 2024 • 14

book review

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Reading Fenimore Cooper Over Schubert’s Shoulder

oday, January 31, is Franz Schubert’s birthday. Born in 1797, he died on November 19, 1828, age 31. Toward the end of that year he was composing his last three piano sonatas and vicariously exploring the backwoods America of James Fenimore Cooper. I’ve been intrigued by this deathbed connection ever since I read Schubert’s last letter, in which he tells a friend, “I am ill. I have eaten nothing for eleven days and drunk nothing, and I totter feebly and shakily from my chair to bed and back again.... Be so kind, then, to assist me in this desperate situation by means of literature. Of Cooper’s I have read The Last of the Mohicans, The Spy, The Pilot, and The Pioneers. If by chance you have anything else of his, I implore you to deposit it with Frau von Bogner at the coffee house....” For the past week I’ve been reading The Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757 (1826) and listening to Schubert’s penultimate piano sonata, No. 20 in Amajor completed on September 26, 1828. The sonata’s haunting second movement, the Andantino employed so powerfully in Robert Bresson’s 1966 film, Au Hasard Balthazar, has been following me around ever since last Wednesday’s mist-making Schubertian snowfall. Opening the Door The relationship between snow and Schubert began for me in M. B. Goffstein’s A Little Schubert (Harper and Row 1972), which I shared with my 3-year-old son in the winter of 1980. The book opens with the image of “a cold and snowy town called Vienna” and a short, fat, bespectacled, heavily bundled up young man walking through the falling snow like a Peanuts character on his way to give piano lessons to Schroeder. This long-in-coming musical revelation was abetted by a small plastic record called “Noble Waltzes” tucked into a pocket in the back of the book. So infectious were the 12 dances that I traded a Grateful Dead album to the Record Exchange for the three-LP set of Schubert’s piano waltzes that led me to his string quartets, piano sonatas, trios, symphonies, and, finally, songs and song cycles. Four decades later, the same little book is open on my desk; even the plastic disc has survived, as has the seductive charm of Goffstein’s imagery and her celebration of the power of creation: Schubert sitting at a table in a bare little room without a fire writing music “as fast as it came into his head,” his mouth open as he writes, as if he were singing as he hears “music no one had ever heard before.” It’s so cold in

the room that he has to clap his hands and stamp his feet, dancing to keep warm. As the book ends, he’s skip-dancing off the closing pages, both arms raised as if he were hoisting himself into heaven. Reading Over His Shoulder Also on my desk is an early-20th-century pocket edition of The Last of the Mohicans, from a set of Cooper’s Leatherstocking Tales, which I’ve been reading, in effect, over Schubert’s shoulder. My sense of the composer’s presence is based on the small wooden bust perched on the w indowsill to my r ight and a mind’s-eye version of Goffstein’s Schuber t smiling as he rereads in English one of his favorite passages from the novel he devoured in German in late September. Why is he smiling? Maybe because he’s dreaming of the set of songs he could write about the itinerant singing-master David Gamut, who introduces himself to Hawkeye, aka Leatherstocking, as “an unworthy instructor in the art of psalmody.” Schubert would have appreciated the situation: the party Hawkeye is guiding, which includes the Munro sisters (dark-haired Cora and fair-haired Alice) has taken refuge in a cavern, hiding from the Maqua t r ib e. A lt hough Hawkeye has doubts about the stranger’s profession (“Tis a strange calling! to go through life, like a catbird, mocking all the ups and downs that may happen to come out of other men’s throats”), he tells the singing-master to “let us hear what you can do in that way.” Pleased, Gamut adjusts “his iron-rimmed spectacles” (a touch that would already have the bespectacled composer smiling) before handing his little volume of hymns to Alice, who shares it with Cora as the “sacred song” proceeds. Having composed hundreds of songs, including a number based on the prose and poetry of Sir Walter Scott, Schubert would have been accustomed to Cooper’s somewhat flowery description of the music’s effect on Hawkeye and the Mohicans Uncas and Chingachgook:

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“The air was solemn and slow. At times it rose to the fullest compass of the rich voices of the females, who hung over their little book in holy excitement, and again it sank so low, that the rushing of the waters ran through their melody, like a hollow accompaniment. The natural taste and true ear of David governed and modified the sounds to suit the confined cavern, every crevice and cranny of which was filled with the thrilling notes of their flexible voices. The Indians riveted their eyes on the rocks, and listened with an attention that seemed to turn them into stone. But the scout, who had placed his chin in his hand, with an expression of cold indifference, gradually suffered his rigid features to relax, until, as verse succeeded verse, he felt his iron nature subdued, while his recollection was carried back to boyhood, when his ears had been accustomed to listen to similar sounds of praise, in the settlements of the colony. His roving eyes began to moisten, and before the hymn was ended, scalding tears rolled out of fountains that had long seemed dry, and followed each other down those cheeks, that had oftener felt the storms of heaven than any testimonials of weakness.” A search online suggests that this may be the only time in the multi-volume saga when the stoic Leatherstocking is reduced to tears. In any case, Cooper makes sure the shock of the next sentence gives readers no time to absorb this glimpse of weakness: “The singers were dwelling on one of those low, dying chords, which the ear devours with such greedy rapture, as if conscious that it is about to lose them, when a cry, that seemed neither human nor earthly, rose in the outward air, penetrating not only the recesses of the cavern, but to the inmost hearts of all who heard it.” Transcribing the Cry When asked about the unearthly sound, the best Hawkeye can do is to admit that though he had ranged the woods “for more

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than thirty years” believing that there was no cry that Indian or beast could make that his ears had not heard, this proved that he “was only a vain and conceited mortal!” My guess is that on rereading the passage, Goffstein’s Schubert, who “heard music that no one had ever heard before,” would be pondering a musical equivalent for a sound “neither human nor earthly.” As long as I’m taking liberties with time, space, language, and translation, I’ll suggest that Schubert’s response to the sudden unearthly “cry” might be one among numerous instances when the shock value of the narrative impacted the penultimate piano sonata he was composing in September 1828. Consider the language that the Andantino has provoked among critics quoted on sites like core.uk: for example, the way “the music continues to build with increasing savagery via extreme registers and the use of trills to sustain tension,” the continued use of the word “savage,” and references to the “dark, arpeggiated chords” that close the movement, “the rising sense of hysteria,” the “contrasting disruption,” and the way in which the lyricism of the opening section provides, in pianist Alfred Brendel’s words, “a dramatic foil to the savage intensity of the middle section.” Schubert and Balthazar his may be the most presumptuous “liberty” I have yet taken, but assuming that Schubert has been gently introduced to certain 20th and 21st century innovations prior to a personal screening of Au Hasard Balthazar, I’m supposing that he would approve director Robert Bresson’s use of the opening and closing measures of the Andantino from Sonata No. 20 as accompaniment to the life and death of a sublimely sympathetic donkey named Balthazar. Having just seen the film, frequently listed as one of the greatest of all time, I think Schubert would find himself at an emotional ground zero, in tears, devastated, immobilized. It’s said that Bresson regretted using Schubert on the soundtrack. In fact, the film is unimaginable without the music, which suggests a place for the stalwart Balthazar among the composer’s company of tragic wayfarers. —Stuart Mitchner ——— Note: I found Schubert’s last letter and other helpful information in Otto Erich Deutsch’s Schubert Reader (W.W. Norton 1947) and in his edition of Schubert’s Letters and Other Writings (Vienna House 1974).

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Performing Arts

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024

Brown Bag and Ballet series where guests are invited to bring their lunch and get a peek into the rehearsal world of professional artists as they craft choreography for upcoming productions. Dancers will provide the audience with an up-close viewing of the creative process, and engage in conversations about choreography, training, and artistry, also offering the opportunity to stretch and move alongside the dancers. Tickets are available at roxeyballet.org/ brownbagandballet.

Mostly Motets Performs At Dorothea’s House

Vassilev is 16 years old, tale of the fabled temptress Bulgaria’s National Orchestra but has already earned an of Seville. Roxey Ballet will At State Theatre New Jersey State Theatre New Jersey presents the Sofia Philharmonic Orchestra led by Principal Conductor Derek Gleeson on Saturday, February 17 at 7 p.m. The allBeethoven program includes the Coriolanus Overture, Piano Concerto No. 5, and Beethoven Symphony No. 7 with pianist Ivaylo Vassilev. In 1945 the Sofia Philharmonic Orchestra became the national orchestra of Bulgaria and represents the overall contemporary musical culture of the country. The repertoire ranges from classical to contemporary, including premiere performances of numerous works by Bulgarian composers. I n 2020 G le e s on w as named principal conductor of the orchestra. As a guest conductor, he has led the London Symphony Orchestra, the BBC Orchestras, the Bour nemouth Sy mphony Orchestra, and the Chamber Orchestra of Europe. He was music director of the Rückert Orchestra of Dublin (1990 through 1993), and since 1997, he has been permanent music director of The Dublin Philharmonic Orchestra.

impressive collection of more than 30 prizes from international competitions from around the world. As a soloist, he has performed with many Bulgarian and Russian orchestras, including the four major Bulgarian ones — Sofia Philharmonic, Bulgarian National Radio Orchestra, Classic FM orchestra, and Varna Philharmonic, as well as with Russian Philharmonic Orchestra. His first album with Mozart and Shostakovich piano concertos was recorded and released in 2019 in St. Petersburg, as a special prize for winning the Golden Nutcracker Award. State Theatre New Jersey is located at 15 Livingston Avenue in New Brunswick. Tickets are $25-$55. Visit stnj.org.

Roxey Ballet Presents Mark Roxey’s “Carmen”

Roxey Ballet Company will present Carmen beginning February 24 at Mill Ballet School in New Hope, Pa. The production, choreo graphed by Mark Roxey, is returning for the first time since 2020. The one-act work tells the

also host two events that offer the community the opportunity to witness the rehearsals as the company prepares for the opening. The production, which runs through March 3, features a guest appearance by Princeton-based flamenco dancer Lisa Botalico in the role of the Fortune Teller. Carmen will be performed on February 24 at 7 p.m.; February 25 at 1 and 4 p.m.; March 1 at 7 p.m.; March 2 at 4 and 7 p.m.; and March 3 at 1 and 4 p.m. Mill Ballet is at 46 North Sugan Road. In-person and virtual tickets are available at roxeyballet.org/carmen. With an additional $15 donation to Roxey Ballet, patrons will receive a glass of wine as a thank-you gift for contributing to the nonprofit. On February 16 at 7 p.m., a Beer and Ballet series opens with a behind-thescenes look at Carmen rehearsals, paired with a selection of beers presented by Triumph Brewery. Guests are invited to Tickets are available at roxeyballet.org/ beerandballet. On February 15 at 2 p.m., Roxey Ballet will host a

New Jersey Symphony Honors Aretha Franklin

State Theatre New Jersey presents “RESPECT: A Tribute to Aretha Franklin,” featuring Capathia Jenkins and Ryan Shaw, on Sunday, February 18 at 3 p.m. A tribute to the Queen of Soul, this program features such hits as “Respect,” “Think,” “A Natural Woman,” “Chain of Fools,” “Amazing Grace,” and several others. Brooklyn-born and raised Jenkins premiered her new show, She’s Got Soul, with the Houston Symphony in October 2022. Jenkins’ Broadway credits include Newsies, The Civil War, The Look of Love, Caroline Or Change and Martin Short-Fame Becomes Me.

PRI N CETO N U N IVERSIT Y

JAZZ VOCAL COLLECTIVE

Sisters in Song PRESENTS

DR. TRINEICE ROBINSON-MARTIN DIRECTOR

“RESPECT”: Capathia Jenkins stars as Aretha Franklin in a tribute concert on February 18 at State Theatre New Jersey. Jenkins has appeared with numerous orchestras around the world including the Cleveland Orchestra, Houston Symphony, Pittsburgh Symphony (with Marvin Hamlisch), National Symphony, Cincinnati Pops (with John Morris Russell), Philly Pops, and San Francisco Symphony. Shaw is a three-time Grammy nominated artist for his solo projects, Columbia Records’ This is Ryan Shaw, In Between, and Dynotone’s Real Love. He has shared

the stage with such artists as Van Halen, Bonnie Raitt, John Legend, B.B. King, and Jill Scott. His music has been featured on FOX’s So You Think You Can Dance and ABC’s Dancing with The Stars, Grey’s Anatomy, and Lincoln Heights, and the films My Blueberry Nights and Bride Wars and the Sex and the City soundtrack. Tickets are $29-$59. The State Theatre is at 15 Livingston Avenue in New Brunswick. Visit Stnj.org for tickets.

The Wolfgan g

ALL BEETHOVEN: The Sofia Philharmonic Orchestra brings works of the master composer to State Theatre New Jersey in New Brunswick on February 17. (Photo by Vasilka Balevska)

Dorot hea’s House w ill host Mostly Motets for a concer t feat ur ing music from the 16th to 21st centuries, including works from the pioneer in the development of opera, Claudio Monteverdi, and contemporary composer Fabio Fresi, on Sunday, February 4. The group of about a dozen singers, founded in 1996, performs sacred and secular pieces in a repertoire ranging from the medieval to postmodern eras. The event, from 5-7 p.m., is free. Dorothea’s House is located at 120 John Street. Par ticipants are encouraged to bring refreshments to share at a post-program reception. Doors open at 4:45 p.m.

Concordia Chamber Players Tammy McCann

TRINITY CHURCH, SOLEBURY

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Celebrating the music of Dinah Washington, Sarah Vaughan, Billie Holiday, Mahalia Jackson, and more.

Thursdays at 12:30pm

Saturday | Feb 10 | 8pm

Princeton University Chapel

A weekly opportunity for the Princeton Community to enjoy performances by local, national, and international organists. Performing February 1 is Michael Ryan, St. James Roman Catholic Church, Basking Ridge, NJ Open to all.

FEBRUARY 4TH @ 3PM

Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall $15 General | $5 Student Faculty & Staff: 2 free tickets

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Elegy — Igor Stravinsky 3 Madrigals, H.313 — Bohuslav Martinů Divertimento in E-flat Major — Wolfgang A. Mozart

FREE OPEN REHEARSAL @ RAGO GALLERY SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3RD @ 3:30 PM 333 N Main St, Lambertville NJ

TICKETS $35 • AVAILABLE ONLINE AT CONCORDIAPLAYERS.ORG OR AT THE DOOR jazzatprinceton.com | music.princeton.edu

18 YEARS AND UNDER ADMITTED FREE OF CHARGE


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024 • 16

Town Topics

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AND YOU WILL, TOO. “I am proud and honored to serve as Greenwood House Hospice Medical Director and to work alongside some of the best nurses, social workers, chaplains and volunteers in the business. Our team provides intimate and comprehensive care for our terminally ill patients. We support not just those in their final months but also their families and loved ones.”

– DAVID R. BARILE, MD

Medical Director, Greenwood House Hospice

Hospice is about living the fullest life possible according to a patient’s capabilities within a life-limiting condition. In hospice, your choices guide the care we provide. Hospice care affirms quality of life. Our goal is to prevent and relieve pain, discomfort, anxiety and fear. We provide emotional and spiritual support to patients and their loved ones. Hospice care is provided wherever a patient feels most comfortable or where they call home. We help families and caregivers prepare for endof-life challenges and find creative ways to share in life review and legacy projects so that our patient’s wisdom and memories can be treasured for future generations.

Our Hospice Team consists of: • Hospice Medical Director, a board-certified hospice physician • Registered Nurses (RNs) monitoring pain, managing symptoms and guiding patient’s plan of care • Hospice Certified Home Health Aides (CHHAs) providing personal patient care and companionship • Social Workers supporting patients and families and connecting them with community resources

• Spiritual Counselors providing emotional support and personal counseling • Bereavement Services offering guidance and education concerning anticipatory grief to families throughout care and bereavement • Hospice Volunteers assisting with a variety of patient and family personalized support activities

Greenwood House Hospice is a nonprofit, mission-based organization rooted in cherished Jewish traditions and an industry leader in providing high-quality senior health care in the state of New Jersey. Seniors of all faiths are welcome.

Call us today: (609) 883-6026 Or email us at info@greenwoodhouse.org

greenwoodhouse.org @GreenwoodHouseNJ

Greenwood House is a beneficiary agency of the Jewish Federation of Princeton, Mercer, Bucks. *Greenwood House Hospice was established in memory of Renee Denmark Punia.

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024

At Greenwood House Hospice, our families and caregivers LOVE HOW MUCH WE CARE!


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANuARY 31, 2024 • 18

Art

Branch on Tuesday, April 23 at 6:30 p.m. Entries will be anonymously judged by local artists and representatives of the Mercer County Library System on creativity, originality, and artistic merit. Patrons will have a chance to vote for the People’s Choice awards in person at each of the nine branches and virtually on the MCLS website. Register online for the TrashedArt Reception at mcl.org. This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Library Ewing Branch, Friends of the Hickory Corner Library, Friends of the Hopewell Library, Friends of the Lawrence Library, and Friends of the West Windsor Library. The Friends help support programs at t he librar y branches, includ ing t he Summer Reading Program. For more information, visit mcl.org.

ACP Gets $25K Grant to Support Totem Pole Project

The Arts Council of PrincTRASH TO TREASURE: Previous winners of the Mercer County Library System’s TrashedArt Con- eton (ACP) has been aptest are displayed at one of its branches. Submissions for this year’s contest, which celebrates proved by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Earth Day, will be accepted February 28 through March 6. for a Grants for Arts Projects teens (ages 14 and up) who plastic, and cloth. The con- award of $25,000. This grant Call for Art: 2024 live, work, or go to school in test is limited to one entry will support a project titled TrashedArt Contest The Mercer County Li- Mercer County are eligible per ar tist. See mcl.org / “Monumental Sculptures: Unbrary System has announced to participate. Contest entry events/trashedart/ for de- derstanding the Totem Poles the dates for its 15th Annual forms and information are tails. The Mercer County of the Northwest Coast,” a TrashedArt Contest. The available online at mcl.org/ Library System will not be program honoring and celheld responsible for any ebrating the artwork of the contest celebrates Earth Day events/trashedart. damage, theft, or loss to art Tlingit peoples of the NorthEntries must be original by encouraging patrons to west Coast. turn ordinary trash into ex- ar t work, no larger than entries. The Grand Prize winners In total, the NEA will award traordinary art. The library 2.5’ by 2.5’ by 2.5’ and no will accept artwork starting heavier than 10 pounds. in first, second, and third 958 Grants for Arts Projects Wednesday, February 28, Any art medium is accept- place for adults, first place awards totaling over $27.1 through Wednesday, March able, as long as a minimum in a special student cat- million announced as part of 6. Accepted artwork will be of 75 percent recycled con- egory, and People’s Choice its first round of fiscal year on display at Mercer Coun- tent is used. Some examples award winners will be an- 2024 grants. ty Library System branches of recycled content include nounced at the TrashedArt Known as Nor thwest throughout the months of m e t a l s , p a p e r, r u b b e r, Contest Reception at the Coast Formline Design, the March and April. Adults and glass (but no sharp shards), L aw r e n c e H e ad q u a r te r s totem poles of these Indigenous Tlingit peoples captivate and intrigue visitors Princeton Charter School is a free, K-8 public school. the world over. Having very little exposure to the depth We encourage you to learn more about us in order to see and complexity of these arwhether Charter is the right option for your family. tistic and cultural treasures on the East Coast, the ACP will commission renowned Tlingit artist Nathan Jackson, National Heritage Fellow and United States Artist Fellow, to carve a 9-foot totem pole that will be installed on permanent display at the ACP. Ketchikan, Alaska, native

2023 National Blue Ribbon School; one of nine schools in NJ to win this award.

SPECIAL PROJECT: The Arts Council of Princeton recently received a $25,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to support a totem pole project with Tlingit artist Nathan Jackson. Jackson is one of the world’s most accomplished totem pole carvers and has created more than 50 totem poles on view across the world. Jackson will begin this commission at the Edwin DeWill Carving Center in Saxman Native Village, Alaska, and, after shipment of the pole to New Jersey, will complete the carving at the ACP. During his stay in Princeton, Jackson will be featured in a series of events that include public carving demonstrations, panel discussions, student workshops, and a traditional dance performance. Jackson will have an allocated carving space at the ACP’s Paul Robeson Center for the Arts, open to the public throughout the week, and will offer designated carving demonstrations that involve opportunities for visitors to ask questions and engage in discussion. “The NEA is delighted to announce this grant to the

Arts Council of Princeton, which is helping contribute to the strength and well-being of the arts sector and local community,” said National Endowment for the Arts Chair Maria Rosario Jackson. “We are pleased to be able to support this community and help create an environment where all people have the opportunity to live artful lives.” “We are beyond thrilled and humbled to have the NEA’s support for this very special project,” said ACP Executive Director Adam Welch, “We are honored to bring Mr. Jackson to Princeton to demonstrate the resplendence and power of Northwest Coast native art and culture. There is no one else like him, an artist of the highest caliber. Nathan Jackson is a true national treasure.” For more information on other projects included in the NEA’s grant announcement, visit arts.gov/news.

Virtual OpenHouse: House:Saturday, Sunday, November February 11, Virtual Open 18, 2024 2023 atat11:00 Link on onwebsite website 11:00AM AM –– Zoom Link In-person OpenHouse: House:Saturday, Sunday, November February 11, In-person Open 18, 2024 2023 1:00PM PM –– Gym, Gym, 100 atat1:00 100 Bunn BunnDrive Drive We welcome all applicants from Princeton. Students are admitted to Charter based on a random lottery. Students who qualify for a weighted lottery based on family income will have their names entered into the lottery twice. “MEMBERS EXHIBITION”: Members of The Gourgaud Gallery, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, will present their work during the month of February. Artists on exhibit include Linda Gilbert, Monica Sebold Kennedy, Kathleen Morolda, Louse Palagyi, Donna Rittner, and Debby Rosen. An artists’ reception is on Sunday, February 4 from 1 to 3 p.m. For more information, visit cranburyartscouncil.org.


Works by Thomas Kelly in occurrences in which people his insight into the creative struggle to establish and process and how ar t re“Embrace the Everyday”

“Embrace the Everyday,” on view in the art gallery at Ficus Bon Vivant through May 6, features Thomas Kelly’s expressionist style paintings and invites viewers to relate to moments observed or relationships they experience in their own everyday occurrences. The community is invited to an opening event with the artist on Sunday, February 4 from 3:30- 5 p.m. Kelly’s work has been featured at the Artful Deposit Gallery, Bordentown; Beauregard Fine Art in Rumson; Bethlehem House Gallery in Bethlehem, Pa.; and the Walter Wickiser Gallery in New York City. Since 1994, his work has been shared in over 40 solo and group exhibitions around the world. Kelly has also been selected to share his passion in art and writing as a lecturer since 2000. “My paintings are of common scenes, everyday

sponds to the dynamic conditions of the 21st century as part of the Distinguished Lecture Series at Mercer County Community College (MCCC) on Friday, February 7, followed by the opening reception of his exhibit “Currents” at the Gallery at Mercer. Witmer’s talk, “Painting Do - er: A Reductive Ab stract Artist in Response to Conditions of Our World,” begins at 11:45 a.m. in the Communications Building, Room CM108 on MCCC’s We s t Wi n d s or C a mpu s, 1200 Old Trenton Road. Witmer will share insights into his creative philosophy and how art responds to the dynamic conditions of the 21st century. Rooted in “painted prese n c e ,” W i t m e r’s r e c e n t works activate the compoArtist Douglas Witmer to sition with sensuous color Deliver Lecture at MCCC and improv ised actions, Acclaimed abstract artist operating within a formalist Douglas Witmer will offer abstraction framework. The

maintain relationships,” said Kelly. “It is these universal emotions and sit uations which most interest me. The paintings are acrylic on canvas, which lends to the way I work. The idea begins from a tiny sketch. T hat sketch w ill have the emotional feeling or gesture that first intrigued me. I encourage viewers to participate in the narrative by placing themselves inside my scenes and characters. W hen asked by v iewers if their interpretation is the true one, I say, ‘The paintings must stand on their own.’ I don’t tell them that their stories often rival my own.” For more information, visit ficusbv.com/ficusartshow, t homaskelly.net, or call (609) 917-3656.

Area Exhibits A r t @ B a i n b r i d g e , 158 Nassau Street, has “Reciting Women: Alia Bensliman and K hailiah Sabree” through March 31. An open house is on February 3 from 1 to 4 p.m. artmuseum.princeton.edu. A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Gallery-Wide Group Show” through March 31. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Art on Hulfish, 11 Hulfish Street, has “Chtistina Fernandez: Multiple Exposures” February 10 through Apri 28. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Arts Council of Prince to n , 102 Wit herspoon St reet, has “Wait ing to Detonate” through February 3 in the Taplin Gallery. artscouncilofprinceton.org.

“LIGHT AND SHADOW”: This painting by Bill Jersey is featured in “Local Beauty,” his joint exhibition with Debbie Pisacreta, on view through February 29 in the Bell’s Tavern Dining Room, 183 North Union Street, Lambertville. Jersey and Pisacreta are member artists at Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville.

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19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024

“EMBRACE THE EVERYDAY”: Works by award-winning acrylic painter Thomas Kelly are on view at Ficus Bon Vivant, 235 Nassau Street, through May 6. An opening event is on Sunday, February 4 from 3:30 to 5 p.m.

talk will provide a unique opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of his artistic focus, creative process, and extensive exhibition history. The public is also invited to the opening reception of Witmer’s exhibit “Currents” from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on February 7 at The Gallery at Mercer, also on the MCCC campus. Witmer’s work explores the materiality of the painted object through refined processes within the framework of reductive abstract painting. The subject of his work is presence, creating a visual place that invites a personal experience of seeing and feeling. This is evident in his largest work exhibited at MCCC, Forty, For You. Forty, For You combines Witmer’s painting and music composition. Initiated in 2019, it responds to Instagram’s format with 40 square paintings and unique ambient music compositions. Released daily from February 26, 2020, during the pandemic, the series explores varied color compositions. The series, titled Day 1, Day 2, etc., showcases diverse variations with rich color and structured compositional strategies. The music may be accessed via QR codes, optimized with headphones or earbuds. The exhibit runs through March 29. Witmer is based in Philadelphia and is internationally known within the field of reductive geometric abstraction. He holds a B.A. from Goshen College and an M.F.A. from The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Ar ts and continues shaping abstract painting’s discourse through curated exhibitions and a philo sophical approach to art making. Witmer’s extensive exhibition history includes solo shows at prestigious institutions globally and his work is featured in prominent collections. Gallery hours are Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Wednesdays from 12 to 7 p.m. For updates, directions, and other information, visit mccc.edu/gallery.

ART TALK AT MCCC: Abstract artist Douglas Witmer will deliver the Distinguished Lecture at Mercer County Community College’s West Windsor Campus at 11:45 a.m. on Friday, February 7, followed by an opening reception for his exhibit “Currents” at The Gallery at Mercer at 5:30 p.m. Considine Gallery, Stuart Country Day School, 12 Stuart Road, has “The Stuart 60th Anniversary Community Art Exhibit” through March 8. stuartschool.org. Fic us A r t G a l ler y, 235 Nassau St reet, has “Embrace the Ever yday” through May 6. An opening event is on Sunday, February 4 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. ficusbv.com. G a l l e r y 14 Fi n e A r t Photography, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “2024 Juried Exhibition” through February 4. Hours are Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. gallery14.org. G ourgaud G a l ler y, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbur y, has “Members E x h ib i t i o n” Fe b r u a r y 4 through February 29. cranburyartscouncil.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and Innovator’s Gallery,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. Museum hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 12 to 4 p.m., Thursday to 7 p.m. princetonhistory.org. Lambertville Free Public Library, 6 Lilly Street, Lambertville, has “Threads of Nature” through February

15. greencottagestudios.com. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Str iking Beaut y” through February 18, and the online exhibits “Slavery at Morven,” “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898,” and others. morven.org. Phillips’ Mill, 2619 River Road, New Hope, Pa., has “Youth Art Exhibition” on weekends through February 18. phillipsmill.org. P r e s e n t D a y C l ub, 72 Stockton Street, has “E mbrace d by Nat u re” through March 3. The exhibit is open on Fridays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. catherinejmartzloff.com. Princeton Public Librar y, 65 Witherspoon Street, has “A nt hropo morphic: Photos and Stories” through March 15. princetonlibrary.org. West Windsor Arts, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “Manifesting Beloved Community” through March 2. westwindsorarts.org. Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers, 71 G eorge Street, New Brunswick, has “George Segal: Themes and Variations” through July 31. zimmerli.rutgers.edu.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024 • 20

Mark Your Calendar Town Topics

Wednesday, January 31 sponsored by the Bildner Wang discuss Murphy’s book 11 a.m.-12 : 30 p.m.: Center for the Study of Jew- How We Age. Free. PrincLeighton Listens, at Star- ish Life at Rutgers Univer- etonlibrary.org. bucks, Princeton Shopping sity. Free. Register at bildFriday, February 2 Center. Princeton Council- nercenter.rutgers.edu. man Leighton Newlin holds 8 p.m.: CelloGayageum Thursday, February 1 one-on-one conversations Lunar New Year Celebration about everyday issues im11 a.m.-1 p.m. : Meet at McCarter Theatre (Berpacting Princeton. Open to Arm in Arm, at Princeton lind Theatre), 91 University all. Public Library, 65 Wither- Place. Austrian cellist Sol 5:30-7:30 p.m.: Hunt- spoon Street. Representa- Daniel Kim and Korean gayae r d o n H o m e o w n e r s h i p tives of the nonprofit share geum player Dayoung Yoon Expo, at Hunterdon Cen- information about their work perform. McCarter.org. tral Regional High School, on food and housing insecuSaturday, February 3 Flemington. Exhibitors, re- rity and about volunteering. altors, lenders, title compa- Princetonlibrary.org. 9:30-11 a.m.: Princeton nies, inspectors, and more. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.: Plasma Physics Lab’s Science Hunterdon-chamber.org. Princeton Mercer Regional on Saturday series, at 100 6-8 p.m.: Capital Har- Chamber’s monthly mem- Stellarator Road. “Natural mony Works presents an bership luncheon, at Princ- Products as Antivirals.” Arevening of live music show- eton Marriott at Forrestal, rive by 8:30 a.m. for coffee casing student progress ; 100 College Road East. and doughnuts. Pppl.gov/ players from the Trenton Bryan Hornung of XactIT events/science-Saturday. Music Makers Orchestra. At Solutions speaks on “The 10 a.m.: Mid-Day Toastthe home of Karen Palmer New Breed of Cybercrimi- masters meets at The Library, Richardson, 6 Buckingham nal.” Princetonmercer.org. 138 Hickory Corner Road, Avenue, Trenton. Donations 5 p.m.: Emerging voices East Windsor. Live and on accepted. RSVP to Niki.sgra- from Princeton University’s Zoom. Toastmastersclubs.org. ham@captalharmony.works. Interdisciplinary Doctoral 11: 30 a.m.-12 p.m. : 7 p.m.: “silver through Program in the Humanities Mandarin Chinese Storytime the grass like nothing,” new are joined by poet Ilya Ka- at Princeton Public Library, work-in-process at Hearst minsky and writer Joyce Car- 65 Witherspoon Street. For Dance Theater, Lewis Arts ol Oates in an event in the children and their caregivcomplex, Princeton Univer- Newsroom at Princeton Pub- ers. Princetonlibrary.org. sity. Princeton arts fellow lic Library, 65 Witherspoon 12-5 p.m.: Winery Weekyuniya edi kwon performs. Street. Princetonlibrary.org. end Music series at Terhune Free. Arts.princeton.edu. 6 p.m.: “How we Age: Orchards, 330 Cold Soil 7 p.m.: “Mystical Zion- The Science of Longevity” at Road. Indoor and outdoor ism’s Surprising Origins : Princeton Public Library, 65 seating with firepits. Live Witherspoon Street. Princ- music from 1- 4 p.m. by N, Rav NJ Kook’s Early Decades,” 08540 virtual talk by Yehudah Mir- eton University professors Brooke DiCaro. Also, reMurphy and Sam scheduled from January 28: N,sky ofNJ 08540 Brandeis University, Coleen

JANUARY-FEBRUARY

Wassailing the Apple Trees, with singing, dancing, playing primitive instruments, and toasting led by the Handsome Molly Dancers and Kingsessing Morris Dancers. Terhuneorchards.com. 1-4 p.m.: Open House at Ar t @ Bainbr idge, 158 Nassau Street. “Reciting Women : A lia B ensliman and Khalilah Sabree, to celebrate the opening of the exhibit “Reciting Women.” Artmuseum.princeton.edu. 7 p. m . : T h e G r e ate r Princeton Youth Orchestra’s Concert Orchestra and Symphonic Orchestra perform at Richardson Auditorium. Joseph Pucciatti and Jiannan Cheng conduct. Gpyo.org. 8 p.m.: Arthur Miller’s play All My Sons is at Kelsey T heat re, Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. $20$22. Boxoffice@mccc.edu.

works from composers Claudio Monteverdi and Fabio Fresi at Dorothea’s House, 120 John Street. Participants are encouraged to bring refreshments to share at a postperformance reception. 5 p.m.: Choral Evensong for the Feast of the Purification (Candlemas), All Saints’ Church, featuring works by Ayleward, Noble, Tallis, and McKie. Freewill offering and reception. Monday, February 5 7 p.m.: Ruha Benjamin and Lorgia Garcia Pena discuss Benjamin’s book Imagination: A Manifesto, at Princeton Public Library, 65 Wit herspoon St reet. Princetonlibrary.org. Tuesday, February 6 10 a.m. : Read and Explore: Animal Tracks, at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Read books and make bird feeders, visit farm animals. Terhuneorchards.com. 6:30 p.m.: “The History of the Hershey Chocolate Company,” virtual program from the Lawrence Headquarters Branch of Mercer Cou nt y L ibrar y System. Register at mcl.org. 7 p.m.: Author and Princeton High School alumnus Karen Bao discusses her novel Pangu’s Shadow, with local author Shveta Thakrar at Princeton Public Library, 65 Wit herspoon St reet. Princetonlibrary.org.

Sunday, February 4 11 a.m.-1 p.m.: Hunterdon Land Trust’s Winter Farmers’ Market is at Dvoor Farm, 111 Mine Street, Flemington. Hunterdonlandtrust.org. 12 - 5 p . m . : W i n e r y Weekend Music series at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Indoor and outdoor seating with firepits. Live music from 1-4 p.m. by Allan Wilcock, NJ 08540 son. Terhuneorchards.com. 12:15 p.m.: “University NJ 08540 Chapel: An Inside Look,” tour of Princeton University Chapel, offered by the His- Wednesday, February 7 torical Society of Princeton. 10:30 a.m.: Discussion: PRINCETON, NJ 08540 330 COLD SOIL ROAD Free, but registration re- Power of Words. Particiquired. Princetonhistory.org. pants listen to and discuss 1-2 p.m. Princeton Univer- short stories in this six-week sity Carillon concert, listen series facilitated by Ellen PRINCETON, NJ 08540 330 COLD SOIL ROAD on the Graduate School lawn. Gilbert, in the conference room of Princeton Public Gradschool.princeton.edu. 2 p.m.: Oppenheimer Librar y, 65 Witherspoon Walking Tour, including Street. Princetonlibrary.org. • 6:45-8 p.m.: “Cunard the Princeton University campus and inspired by Steamships and the Quest t he f ilm Oppenheimer, for Perfect Coal.” Lecture by sponsored by the Historical Dennis Waters at Hopewell Society of Princeton. $15. Presby terian Church, 80 West Broad Street. Free. Princetonhistory.org. 2 p.m.: Arthur Miller’s Redlibrary.org. 7 p.m.: “Presidential Preplay All My Sons is at Kelsey T heat re, Mercer Election Polls: Why it’s GetCounty Community Col- ting Harder to Get it Right.” lege, 1200 Old Trenton Program at the Lawrence Road, West Windsor. $20- Headquar ters Branch of $22. Boxoffice@mccc.edu. Mercer County Library Sys3 p.m.: Westminster Con- tem, 2751 Brunswick Pike. servatory Annual Showcase, Princeton University ProfesR ichards on Aud itor iu m. sor Edward Freeland leads. Students and ensembles Sponsored by the League of from the conservatory and Women Voters. Register at Rider University. $10-$15. Mcl.org. 7 p.m.: Climate Action Rider.edu/arts. 3 p . m . : C o n c o r d i a Plan Update: Sustainable Chamber Players play mu- Princeton gives an update sic by Stravinsky, Martinu, of Princeton’s 2019 Climate a nd Moz ar t, at Tr i n it y Action Plan. In person and Church, 6587 Upper York virtual. At Princeton Public Road, Solebury, Pa. $35. Librar y, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org. Concordiaplayers.org. 3-3:30 p.m.: Russian StoThursday, February 8 rytime at Princeton Public Li11 a.m.-3 p.m.: Winter brary, 65 Witherspoon Street. For children and their care- Farmers Market at Hinds Plagivers. Princetonlibrary.org. za. Locally grown produce, 4 p. m . : G at her ing in pasture-raised meats, fresh uneorchards.com solidarity with the October baked breads, homemade 7 hostages, and a call for treats, and handmade gifts. Winery Open Sat & Sun 12-5pm their release. Organized by Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 5-7 p.m.: February Busia grassroots group of Israelis (609) 924-2310 • Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat & Sun 9-5 • www.terhuneorchards.com huneorchards.com in Princeton. At Hinds Plaza. ness After Business, spon5 p.m.: Mostly Motets sored by Princeton Mercer huneorchards.com performs a concert including Regional Chamber, at Mrs.

Tr ees Tr ees Trees ees Tr Wassailing the Apple Trees RESCHEDULED: Wassailing the Apple Trees Saturday, February 3 1-4pm

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ments Cider Drinking • Refreshments unch” g with Molly Dancers e e r ments Dancing & Singing withMaking Molly Dancers Bonfire • Merry F g Cider Drinking • Refreshments unch” ay 12-5 Cider Drinking •“Spiced Refreshments Live Music with• Merry Punch” g Bonfire Making unch” e e Bonfire • Merry Making Fr unch” day 12-5 WineLive Tasting Roomwith ~ Open Friday-Sunday 12-5 Music “Spiced Punch” day 12-5 day 12-5 Wine Tasting Room ~ Open Friday-Sunday 12-5

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G Appliances, 2720 Business Route 1, L aw rence Township. Pre-game network ing and tailgat ing fair; food prepared with newest cooking technology. Princetonmercer.org. 7 p.m.: Paul Halpern discusses his book Allure of the Multiverse, at Princeton Public Librar y, 65 Witherspoon Street. Friday, February 9 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Hunterdon County Rug Artisans Guild holds a monthly meeting at the Administration building, Hunterdon County Complex, Route 12 outside Flemington. Guests are welcome. Hcrag.com. 7 p.m.: Dance event hosted by Shira Gregory. Participants gather in a dimly lit, socialization-free room to create a liberating environment where they can fully express themselves through dance. $5. Westwindsorarts.org. 7 p.m.: “Tribute Concert: The Beatles and Ed Sullivan 60 Years Later,” featuring the bands of the Einstein Alley Musicians Collaborative. At Princeton Public Librar y, 65 Witherspoon Street. Princetonlibrary.org. 8 p.m.: The Cher Show at State Theatre New Jersey, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. $40-$105. Stnj.org. 8 p.m.: A Lovesong for Miss Lydia by Don Evans is performed by Theater to Go at Kelsey Theatre, Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. (609) 570-3333. 8 p.m.: American Patchwork Quartet is at McCarter Theatre, 91 University Place. Bringing together jazz, folk, and world music, led by vocalist Falu Shah, guitarist Clay Ross, drummer Clarence Penn, and bassist Yashsushi Nakamura. McCarter.org. Saturday, February 10 9:30-11 a.m.: Princeton Plasma Physics Lab’s Science on Saturday series, at 100 Stellarator Road. “The Pathway to Achieve a Netzero Economy in the U.S. by 2050.” Arrive by 8:30 a.m. for coffee and doughnuts. Pppl. gov/events/science-Saturday. 10 a.m. : Read and Explore: Animal Tracks, at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Read books and make bird feeders, visit farm animals. Terhuneorchards.com. 2-5 p.m.: Winery Weekend Music series offers wine and chocolate at Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road. Indoor and outdoor seating with firepits. Live music from 1-4 p.m. by Sarah Teti. Terhuneorchards.com. 2 p.m.: A Lovesong for Miss Lydia by Don Evans is performed by Theater to Go at Kelsey Theatre, Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. (609) 570-3333.

Get the scoop from


21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024

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Running with Chen has team 47,” said Berube. “It tanding at 5’8, Ashley homestretch of her debut helped Chea make plays. was great, they were aweChea is usually one of campaign. some. We want them to the shortest players on “I know that my team- “Kaitlyn is her role model, the court when she is in ac- mates have my back and I that is who she is to her,” come in and make an imtion for the Princeton Uni- have theirs,” said Chea. “It said Berube, who got 12 pact; elevate what we are versity women’s basketball is just so easy to play with points and a career-high 10 doing and they certainly did that today. Fadima played team. them, it feels no different assists from Chen in the win well, Tabby had some great But freshman guard Chea than it did in high school.” over Cornell with Madison minutes. Taylor came in St. Rose tallying a gamehas made a big impact in her Due to being less than imand had some good minutes debut season for the Tigers, posing physically, Chea has high 15 points. “What we too. I am really happy about are hoping for this whole emerging as a key spark of worked on getting stronger that.” the bench, averaging 5.9 to deal with the bigger play- year is that Ashley picks up That bench strength could on the great things that Kaipoints and 1.3 rebounds in ers she is facing on the colprove critical as Princeton tlyn does out there.” 15.3 minutes per game. lege level. The Tigers did some very hosts Yale on February 2 Last Saturday as Princ“It is my strength and my and Brown on February 3. eton hosted Cornell, Chea defense; in most of the games good things at the defensive “It is so good to be here end as they stifled the Big produced one of her best that I play, I am one of the in our own beds and not on all-around games of the sea- smallest people on the court,” Red in the first half. “The defense was great the road; we have got a big son, tallying 11 points with said Chea. “I have to be a litfour assists and three steals tle stronger than I was in high to start; Cornell makes you weekend ahead with Yale as the Tigers cruised to an school. Obviously on defense, play for a full 30 seconds, and Brown coming to town,” 85-47 win over the Big Red there are people who are they run their offense well,” said Berube. “I am excited, before a crowd of 1,104 at stronger, faster, and quicker said Berube. “I thought we this is our first back-to-back. We haven’t had one yet — I Jadwin Gym. than I am. That is something were communicating well, am looking forward to that. and jumping to the ball well, Chea got off to a good that I still need to work on.” In those back-to-backs, when start, scoring five points in The influence of senior getting our hands on a lot you have a deep bench, you of passes and things. I love the first quarter as the Tigers star guard and fellow Caliare in a good place. We are built a 20-8 lead and never fornian Kaitlyn Chen has the way we started. We got really confident in so many, a little undisciplined with too looked back as they im- helped Chea get up to speed. many fouls. We put them on my problem is trying to find proved to 15-3 overall and “Playing with Kaitlyn is the line and they scored a lot minutes for all of them and 5-0 Ivy League, leaving them so easy,” said Chea. “She of points from the free throw who plays well together in atop the league standings. teaches me, she guides me, line. Overall, I thought when those rotations.” “My teammates were so she is like my big sister. She Chea, for her part, beconfident in me, I think that is a great leader, she is a our defense was on it, it relieves the Tigers are in a very ally fueled our offense well.” helped a lot,” said Chea, a great mentor.” The offense was clicking good place as they continue native of Montebello, Calif. Chea is looking to apply for Princeton as it shot 70 their homestand. “Being a young one on the those lessons. “I need to stay “I think our trajectory is team, just them showing me more poised and be more percent (21-of-30) from the upwards, ever since the beI can do it and everyone else confident in my choices on floor in the first half. “When a team is playing ginning of Ivy League play on the team can do it. It was the court and trusting myzone, you just need to move we have gone up and up evgreat.” self,” said Chea. it, have pass fakes and have ery game,” said Chea. “It is Other reserves also exPrinceton head coach cutters,” said Berube. “We great that we have this mocelled as the Tigers pulled Carla Berube trusts Chea to found the high post open a mentum. I love playing here, away from Cornell. excel whenever she is on the lot, whether it was on a drive we haven’t played here in “I think the starters knew court for the Tigers. or just slashing to the high exactly what the game plan “Ashley is a freshman but was,” said Chea. “People she can make a lot of great post. It is hard when you who come off the bench, plays,” said Berube. “She are in a 3-2 zone to defend they picked up where the is building from the Colum- the back line. We found just starters left off. We are just bia game (an 80-65 win on like little dump off passes all prepared with the way January 20), I thought she to Paige [Morton] or Chet that we practiced for this had some great minutes in [Nweke] inside, that really game. I think that showed that game. In this one, she opened things up.” T h e s q u a d ’s r e s e r v e s up on the court today.” shot the ball really well and In the second half, the found open teammates. She played very well as Tabitha bench took charge as the is great. She is definitely Amanze scored eight points reserves ended the day out- someone who we are confi- with Taylor Charles and scoring their Big Red bench dent in to get in there and Paige Morton chipping in six apiece, Fadima Tall adding counterparts 47-16 and run our offense.” matching the total points scored by Cornell on the day. “We played with so much poise and so much confidence with the people that Atl antis Acco unting | Personable | Professional | Proactive came off the bench,” said Chea. “It was almost 50 AA t ltalna tn i s tAicsc o i nu g n t| i nPg e r s o n| a b lPee| rPsro o fne a s sbi o P roofae c st s i vi eo n a l | P r o a c t i v e A ucncto l ne a |l P| r Atl antis Acco unting | Personable | Professional | Proactive a n t i spoints A c c o uoff n t ithe n g bench, | P e r swe onable | Professional | Proactive go in so deep. I think that is something that not that t ltalna tn i s tAicsc o i nu g n t| i nin Pg e r s o n| a b lPee| rPsro o fne a s sbi o P roofae c st s i vi eo n a l | P r o a c t i v e A A ucncto l ne a |l P| r t l a nmany t i s Ateams c c o uhave n t i n g the | Personable | Professional | Proactive NCAA.” “Don’t take it personally.” Chea is gaining confi“Don’t take be it personally.” You might surprised. The IRS wants you to take as many deductions as possible. dence as she heads into the When it comes to deductible business expenses, you cannot claim your personal expenses as being deductible. Sorry!

SMALL WONDER: Princeton University women’s basketball player Ashley Chea dribbles upcourt in a game earlier this season. Last Saturday, 5’8 freshman guard Chea tallied 11 points with four assists and three steals off the bench to help Princeton defeat Cornell 85-47. The Tigers, now 15-3 overall and 5-0 Ivy League, host Yale on February 2 and Brown on February 3. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) like a month. Now we have two more games coming up, and it is just so exciting.” —Bill Alden

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What can he plancreates to deduct travel-related d realareto estate investors. Why? Because the first jobs, support documentation should he be audited. Princeton | Princeton Village For Our Community Scenario: JoshForrestal owns an architectural He likes traveling. What can he plan to deduct for travel-related nario: architectural firm.his Hebusiness likes traveling. What can he plan deduct travel-related one-on-one consultation and planning to to make it yours.forfirm. depends onowns your profession and expertise, asNJBlvd., well. penses? Josh What can heando tocosts. “audit proof” deductions? usiness portion ofprovides 116 Village Suite 200 | Princeton, 08540 | Tel. 609.212.4119 The bottom line is job NJ creation and boosting the economy! d the second housing. Since both businesses and real Since 1985 expenses? What canIIIhe(South do toTower) “audit proof” his business Paramus NJsummary, | Mack Cali Center enses? What can he do to “audit proof” his business deductions? 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Getting Recognized for her Contributions On and Off the Ice PU Hockey’s Monihan Nominated For Humanitarian Award As one of the captains of the Princeton University women’s hockey team, Kate Monihan tries to uplift her teammates. “I am big into building strong relationships off the ice, I tend to lead by connect ing w it h ever yone,” said senior defender Monihan as she looked ahead to the 2023-24 season. “It is empathy-driven leadership by being ever yone’s No. 1 supporter and ensuring that they feel confident on and the off the ice and supported on and off the ice. I think that channels into the team culture. If we all feel like our buckets are filled, we will be able to give more to the team as a whole. At our games, I think I expend more energy cheering on our teammates than playing.” Off the ice, Monihan has displayed an empathy in the Princeton community that has resulted in her recently being selected as one of 18 nominees for the Hockey Humanitarian Award, given for outstanding play on the ice and for exceptional volunteerism in the community. The finalists for the prestigious award, which is its 29th season, will be revealed in February, with the ultimate recipient announced on April 12 during the NCAA Men’s Frozen Four weekend in St. Paul, Minn. M o n i h a n , a n at i ve of Moorestown and a former standout at the Lawrenceville School, has impressed Princeton head coach Cara Morey with her selfless approach in and out of the rink. “Kate is a great leader on the ice, in the classroom and in t he com mu nit y,” said Morey of Monihan, who has seven assists so far this season as the Tigers have started 12-7-5 overall and now has 28 points in her career on four goals and 24 assists.

“Kate is always looking out for the best interest of others and puts her teammates ahead of herself. Kate has been an impactful leader since her freshman year. Not only does she lead by example on the ice, but she is also always willing to go out of her way to help her teammates and her community. She is very well respected with her peers on and off the ice, not only for her hockey abilities, but her attitude and energy she brings every day.” Among her many activities on campus, Monihan is the vice president of Cannon Dial Elm, an eating club on campus, and was a peer and the vice president of external development of SHARE, Princeton’s on-campus resource for sexual harassment/assault advising, resources and education. In that role, Monihan was responsible for offering peer support to empower students with healthy relationship skills. She facilitated on-campus bystander intervention training and community outreach and trained SHARE peers on teaching those skills. She also helped restructure the training materials utilized by SHARE peers in interpersonal violence prevention training on campus. Through her efforts, Monihan earned the organization’s Peer to Peer Leadership Award in Creative Facilitation. Within the athletic community at Princeton, Monihan serves on the StudentAthlete Wellness Leaders Leadership Council and as the liaison from that group to SHARE. As part of that, Monihan arranged a lunch for student-athletes with a SHARE coordinator to learn more about what SHARE does, and Monihan sat on a Varsity Student-Athletes Advisory Council panel on engaging beyond athletics. In the summer of 2022, Monihan was one of Princ-

eton’s student-athletes who traveled to Vietnam as part of the Coach for College program, an initiative to promote higher education t hrough spor t s and en courage cultural exchange. While there, Monihan taught English in rural Vietnam, mentored life skills, and coached baseball to at-risk middle schoolers. Also during that summer, Monihan was a legislative intern in the area of health policy in the U.S. Senate, conducting health policy analysis and bill sponsorship recommendations on topics from maternal mental health to disability integration services. Monihan served in the role after earning a place among Princeton’s Leonard D. Schaeffer Fellows in Government Service. Dur ing the summer of 2 02 0, M o n i h a n s e r v e d as an intern with the Live Like Blaine Foundation, recruiting and facilitating inter v iews of more than 30 candidates for a yearlong internship program, overseeing the foundation’s social media accounts, and contributing to planning for the organization’s fundraising event by evaluating virtual event platforms. The organization seeks to teach leadership skills to female athletes and create community among them. In the fall of 2021, Monihan served as a fall athlete orientation leader, welcoming first-year student-athletes by facilitating community-building activities and supporting their transition to college life. Monihan, a student in the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, has also earned Princeton’s nomination for ECAC Hockey’s Mandi Schwartz Award, an honor that recognizes contributions on the ice, in the classroom and in the community. In addition, she is a three-time ECAC All-Academic Team selection.

HUMAN TOUCH: Princeton University women’s hockey player Kate Monihan skates around the crease in a game earlier this season. Senior defender and team co-captain Monihan was recently selected as one of 18 nominees for the Hockey Humanitarian Award, given for outstanding play on the ice and for exceptional volunteerism in the community. The finalists for prestigious award, which is in its 29th season, will be revealed in February, with the ultimate recipient announced on April 12 during the NCAA Men’s Frozen Four weekend in St. Paul, Minn. Group (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) Witherspoon Media

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Tiger Men’s Hoops Falls at Cornell

Xaivian Lee scored 17 points as t he Pr inceton University men’s basketball team fell 83-68 at Cornell last Saturday. The Tigers trailed 43-24 at halftime and drew within 66-55 with 7:16 left in regulation but could get no closer in a clash of rivals who both entered the day undefeated in Ivy League play. T he Tigers, now 15 -2 overall and 3-1 Ivy, play at Yale on February 2 and at Brown on February 3.

PU Women’ Hockey Ties Yale 1-1

Princeton Men’s Squash Defeats Dartmouth

Capping a weekend sweep, the No. 3 Princeton University men’s squash team defeated No. 10 Dartmouth 9-0 last Sunday. Posting eight 3-0 wins, the Tigers improved to 7-0 overall and 4-0 Ivy League. On Saturday, Princeton defeated No. 4 Harvard 6-3, ending an 11-match losing streak to the Crimson and earning its first win in the rivalry since January 13, 2013. In upcoming action, the Tigers play at Trinity on February 3 and at Yale on February 4.

Kather ine K hramstov scored the lone goal for the No. 12 Princeton University women’s hockey team as it skated to 1-1 tie at No. 15 Yale last Saturday. The Tigers, who moved to 12-7-5 overall and 5-75 ECAC Hockey with the Tiger Women’s Squash draw, play at No. 8 Quinni- Tops Dartmouth Bouncing back from a piac on February 3. tough 5 - 4 loss to No. 3 PU Men’s Volleyball Harvard on Saturday, the Falls to BYU four t h -ran ked Pr inceton Nyherowo Omene starred University women’s squash in a losing cause as the No. team defeated No. 9 Dart14 Pr inceton Universit y mouth 9-0 last Sunday. men’s volleyball team fell The Tigers, who improved 3-0 to No. 8 BYU last week. to 7-1 overall and 3-1 Ivy Junior Omene contrib - League, play at Trinity on uted 16 kills, four blocks, February 3 and at Yale on and two aces but it wasn’t February 4. enough as the Cougars prevailed 25-22, 25-18, 25-23 PU Women’s Squash in the January 23 contest. Coach Ramsay Honored Princeton University womA night earlier, BYU topped the Tigers 3-0 (25-23, 25- en’s squash head coach Gail 19, and 25-21) in the opener Ramsay, the program’s alltime leader in wins who has of the two-match set. Princeton, now 4-3, hosts guided the Tigers to five UC-Santa Barbara on Janu- national championships, ary 31 and Pepperdine on was recognized at the J.P. M or g a n To u r n a m e n t of February 2. Champions’ Women’s LeadTiger Women’s Water Polo ership Award and Luncheon Goes 2-1 at Rainbow Invitational on January 18 in New York. Starting its 2024 season The event, held at the Yale last weekend at the Rainbow Club in New York City, recInvitational in Honolulu, ognized Ramsay as part of Hawaii, the No. 9 Princeton

the organization’s women’s leadership program, which supports female athletes, leaders, and equality. One of Ramsay’s former players, Meredith Quick ’01, was a featured speaker at the event, and among the co-chairs of the event was men’s program alu m nus John Nimick ’81. Following the luncheon, members of the Princeton women’s squash team in attendance w e n t to w a tc h a l u m n a and assistant coach Olivia ( Fiechter) Weaver ‘18 advance to the round of 16 in the J.P. Morgan Tournament of Champions.

Julia Jongejeugd provided a highlight as the Princeton University women’s track team competed in the Dr. Sander Invitational Columbia Challenge last weekend at the Nike Track & Field Center at The Armory in New York City. Sophomore Jongejeugd placed first with pentathlon with a score of 3,805, the second-best mark in program history. Other individual victors at the meet included Siniru Iheoma in the shot put, Tessa Mudd in the pole vault, and Angela McAuslan-Kelly in the weight throw. Princeton takes part in the Sykes and Sabock meet hosted by Penn State at University Park, Pa.

Princeton Men’s Track Excels at Penn State Event

Tyler Konopka and Jack Gregorski starred as the Princeton University men’s track team competed in the Penn State National Open last weekend at University Park, Pa. Konopka placed first in the shot put with a best heave of 58-7.25 while Gregorski won the 5,000-meter run in a time of 14:16.86. Princeton competes in the Scarlet Knight Open on February 3 at the Nike Track & Field Center at The Armory in New York City.

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PU Women’s Track Shines at Sander Invite

HEE’S THE MAN: Princeton University wrestler Drew Heethuis controls a foe in recent action. Last Friday, freshman Heethuis posted a 1-0 win at 125 pounds to help Princeton defeat Columbia 26-7 in the Ivy League opener for both teams. Other individual victors for the Tigers in the dual included Sean Pierson at 113, Tyler Vazquez at 141, Eligh Rivera at 149, Blaine Bergey at 165, Nate Dugan at 184, Luke Stout at 197, and Aidan Connor at 285. Princeton, now 3-3 overall and 1-0 Ivy, has duals at Harvard on February 3 and at Brown on February 4. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024

PU Sports Roundup

University women’s water polo team went 1-2. The Tigers fell 10-6 to No. 4 Hawaii in its season opener last Friday. A day later, Princeton split two matches, losing 8-7 to No. 5 Fresno State and then topping Azusa Pacific 11-6. The Tigers return to action when they host Villanova on February 8 in this home opener.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024 • 24

she did the day before. PHS Boys’ Swimmers Win 3rd Straight County Title, in the 100 fly and third in Producing Dominant Performance from Start to Finish, than Jesse was a distance star at the 100 backstroke as well. PHS Girls’ Swim Team Takes 3rd County Crown in a Row the county meet, but at the Rising to the Occasion with Target on Their Backs He is another standout perFor the Princeton High girls’ swimming team, its performance in the 400-meter freestyle relay in the finals of the Mercer County Swimming Championships last Saturday exemplified the competitive fire that has led the squad to dominate the meet in recent years. The PHS quartet cruised to a win by nearly 10 seconds as they posted a winning time of 4:04.92 with Robbinsville taking second in 4:14.84. “Our 400 free relay dropped eight seconds from Friday (in the preliminaries) to Saturday,” said PHS head coach Carly (Misiewicz) Fackler. “It was that statement piece, distancing ourselves from the field.” That was the final statement of the day for PHS as it won its third straight county crown, piling up a winning score of 359 points, more than doubling second-place finisher WW/P-South who came in at 156. Coming into the finals on Saturday at WW/P-North, Fackler sensed that her girls’ squad was primed for a command performance. “The girls were just dominant, almost every girl that swam in prelims made it back to the finals,” said Fackler. “In the 200 free, there were three girls that made it back. In the IM, all three girls that swam got back. In the 50 free, all four girls made it. That set the tone, it was ours to lose essentially.” Senior star Kyleigh Tangen took first in the 50 and 100 free races to set the tone for the Tigers early in the meet. “Kyleigh had big goals set for herself,” said Fackler. “Winning the 50 and the 100 last year as a junior was an accomplishment in and of itself. She wanted to repeat as champion in both of these

events as well. She is a competitor; she gets out, she races and she accepts nothing but victory.” Tangen was pushed by her teammates as Sabine Ristad took second in the 50 free while Annie Flanagan placed second in the 100 free. “Having Sabine right next to her in the 50 free and Annie on the other side of her in the 100 free, they say different things like, ‘Oh we are racing against each other,’” said Fackler. “I tell them you can always use each other and have great races against each other, so utilize things like that to your advantage. It is great.” Another senior standout, Courtney Weber, produced some great races, taking first in both the 200 individual medley and 100 breaststroke. “We had another double winner there with Courtney. She was on our winning medley relay and was on the winning 200 free relay well,” said Fackler of Weber who has committed to attend Boston College and compete for its women’s swimming program. “She has been one of seniors that we look to and rely on in moments like that. She is an athlete who wants to win and will stop at nothing.” Fackler has a number of other good athletes to rely on as Ristad also placed second in the 100 backstroke while Jesse Wang placed second in the 200 free and third in the 400 free and Nia Zagar finished third in both the 200 IM and 100 breast. “Sabine was second in the back, she had two very close finishes,” said Fackler. “Megan Dera from Robbinsville is an outstanding athlete as well. Sabine was up there again and had a great competitor and great person to race with and swam even faster

same time I can put her in the 100 back and the 100 fly. Nia getting third in two events in the county is great. It sets the tone for not only the rest of this year but the future of the program too.” Earning a county title threepeat was a special moment for the program. “It is that excitement, that adrenaline rush,” said Fackler. “Of course you are on this natural high, it is three years in a row.” With PHS having won the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association ( NJSIA A) Group B state championship last year, the Tigers have their eye on a title repeat. “It shows them that we have a lot more to prove, we are not finished yet,” said Fackler, whose team is bringing an 11-0 record into the state tournament which starts on February 5. “Being able to repeat as a state champion would be amazing and would be nothing short of two awesome seasons back to back, but it is not going to come easy. Like I told them, nothing is guaranteed — you have to work for it. There is a difference between being cocky and being confident. I tell them it is just be confident in ourselves and our abilities and what we can do and what we can put together as a team.” With such seniors as Tangen, Weber, Wang, Lauren Girouard, and Nora Chen leading the way, Fackler is confident that Tigers will get the most out of their abilities. “The seniors are the core and the backbone of the entire team,” said Fackler. “It is great seeing how they performed at counties and how they stepped up in clutch situations throughout the regular season.” —Bill Alden

SPRINT FINISH: Princeton High girls’ swimmer Kyleigh Tangen heads to victory in a freestyle race earlier this season. Last Saturday, senior star Tangen placed first in both the 50-meter and 100 freestyle races at the Mercer County Swimming Championships. Tangen’s heroics helped PHS place first in the team standings as the Tigers won their third straight county title. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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former. Henry was second in the 100 breaststroke — they had a very good race, him and Gavin Bossio of Notre Dame. Henry went for it in the first 50 and Gavin just had just a little more in the end.” The Tigers ended the day on a high note by taking first in the 400 free relay, coming in at 3:40.15, nearly four seconds ahead of runner-up Pennington. “It is just one of those races that is the icing on the cake,” said Fackler. “You always love to win the last event.” Achieving the county title three-peat gives the Tigers, who have a 12-0 dual meet record, confidence as they look to win more races in the upcoming New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) state team tournament. “It sets the tone for the rest of the postseason, we went through the regular season undefeated which was awesome,” said Fackler, whose boys’ team fell to Chatham in the North 2 Group B sectional final last year. “I say to them all of the time the regular season record is what it is. Yes it is nice to be undefeated absolutely, but when you come to the county meet, it is whole different ball game. Everything is different. This was our first test. You are rested, you are swimming every top swimmer in the county. I think they are excited, they are ready.” —Bill Alden

MAKING A SPLASH: Princeton High boys’ swimmer David Xu displays his breaststroke form in a meet earlier this season. Last Saturday, junior star Xu placed first in both the 200-meter individual medley and 100 backstroke to help PHS finish first in the team standings at the Mercer County Swimming Championships. It marked the third straight county crown for the Tigers. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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was like, ‘Jaiden wants this.’ They both swam really well. They wanted it one-two and that is exactly what they did. David won the 100 back and Jaiden won the 400 free, which was also one of the best swims I have ever seen him have. The amount that Jaiden has improved is tremendous across the board. It is remarkable. In the 400, the three of them (Xu, Will Bashore of W W/P-North, and Caleb Collins of Pennington) were really neck and neck, stroke for stroke for the entire race. In that last 25, Jaiden put his head dow n and won by three 100ths of a second. It was a great race. Jaiden had said going into it, ‘I want to win something this year’ and I was like, ‘Go for it.’” Another junior star, David Brophy, produced a superb back-to- back effort, winning the 50 free and then coming right back in the 100 butterfly to take second. “Luck ily t here is t hat 15-minute break between the 50 free and the fly,” noted Fackler. “To win the 50 free and come second in the fly to Max Peterson (of Hightstown), who was also an awesome athlete, was huge. David had a great meet as well.” Others who came up big at the meet for the Tigers included Daniel Guo, Zach Guan, and Henry Xu. “Daniel had second in the 200 free and the 100 free,” said Fackler. “Zach was third

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Knowing that it had a target on its back as it went for a third straight title at the Mercer County Swimming Championships last Saturday at the WW/P-North pool, the Princeton High boys’ swim team made a statement in the first final of the meet. Competing in the 200-meter medley relay, PHS placed first in a time of 1:49.82 with W W/P-North taking second in 1:51.78. “Everyone is after us, I think going into finals there was about a half second that separated us,” said PHS head coach Carly ( Misiewicz) Fackler. “We knew going into it that it was going to be a close race. The guys were ready and very much up for the challenge. Jerry Liu with the freestyle leg in the event had probably the best 50 free I have ever seen him swim.” The Tigers were clearly up for the challenge of achieving a three-peat, taking first with 247 points, well ahead of runner-up WW/P-North who totaled 169. The Xu twins, juniors David and Jaiden, provided a highlight early in the meet as they finished one-two in the 200 individual medley. “David got going there with the 200 IM — he had a great race with Jaiden,” said Fackler of the race which saw David clock a winning time of 2:10.40 with Jaiden just behind in 2:10.72. “Watching the two of them I

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Kw ab e n a A f r ifa h won “We composed ourselves all of that and even going to the heavyweight title in his and stayed in really good the weight room and getting first boys’ wrestling Mercer position and were able to some cardio done or some County Tournament on Sat- fight and gut out a 2-0 win,” lifting, all of that has been urday, but it wasn’t begin- said Monzo. “It’s tough when able to help me prepare for ner’s luck. you’re winning by two going where I’ve come from.” Afrifah only joined the into the third period and you Waiting to debut for the Princeton High team this have a kid that’s good and Tigers was the hardest part. year after transferring from can wrestle so he’s looking Afrifah had to watch from J.P. Stevens, where he was a to cause a scramble and get the sidelines for the first two-time Region 4 qualifier into a roll and weasel his 22 days of the season, and out of District 15. After sit- way to a reversal. We were could only help with his enting out because of the 22- able to limit the times where couragement. day senior transfer rule, Af- we were going to be scram“It was definitely difficult,” rifah has taken to the mats bling. We stayed really solid s aid A f r ifah. “Watch ing with a vengeance, and the and kept our composure and my team go out there and county crown was the latest stayed calm.” handle business, that was in a string of wins. While Rose and Mele are enough to keep me going “It feels great,” said Afri- familiar names for PHS and waiting patiently.” wrestling, Afrifah is new. fah. “It really feels great.” Once Afrifah got back on Afrifah was one of three He’s been a welcome addi- the mats, he was able to individual champions for the tion to the lineup although show his abilities to everyTigers along with Blase Mele he got off to a tough start. one in the county. He has and Cole Rose, who placed Afrifah actually lost his first become a big presence for third in the team standings match as a Tiger. the Tigers and a reliable “From that first match, winner. with 174.5 points. Hopewell Valley won the team title it was a cardio issue,” said “He’s 287 pou nds, so with host Robbinsville sec- Afrifah. “I wasn’t getting he’s right at the top of the enough cardio in, that’s limit,” said Monzo. “He’s a ond with 180 points. “Robbinsville beat us by why I was so exhausted by big boy and he likes to use 5.5 points,” said PHS head the second or third period, his weight, but he’s quick. coach Jess Monzo. “It was and the kid was able to pin He’s quick on his feet. He’s close. There were a couple me. Moving from that time deceiving for a big heavyweights where we might on, you have to up the con- weight. He’s got really good have underperformed our ditioning to better prepare footwork. He’s able to use seeds, and there were a me for my other competitors his weight the right way. couple weight classes where out there.” Sometimes at heavyweight, Afrifah made significant they get their weight going we outperformed our seeds. Overall, it was a good day strides since then. He has and they can’t stop themto be a Tiger. We had three not lost a match since his selves and it’s kind of like debut and he’s become a who falls first. But he’s been champs.” Afrifah came in seeded valuable contributor to his pretty good at being shifty. For a 285-pound kid, he’s second in his division but new school. “He’s progressing,” said pretty light on his feet.” felt confident in his abilities. He pinned all three of Monzo. “He’s gradually imThe Tigers are hoping that his opponents on the day, proving. He came in and had they can count on him for finishing with a pin in 2:24 a good skillset. We’ve been points in the state sectional of Notre Dame’s Andrew correcting little things. As team tournament. PHS is long as we keep correcting expecting to make the state Onzik. “Honestly I felt like my them and keep progressing tournament for the third chances were good,” said forward, we’re going to have straight year, and the Tigers Afrifah. “Prior to this tour- a really good shot come are hoping for a longer run. nament, I had wrestled a postseason time.” “We’ll find out where we Afrifah has been adjust- actually stand when the final decent amount of kids, so I knew what I was expecting ing to his new environment. standings come out where It started with him playing we’re going,” said Monzo. when I got there.” Junior star Mele won the offensive and defensive line “The last two years we’ve 138-pound division with a to help the PHS football been fortunate enough to 25-0 technical fall in the team to one of its better qualify and represent Princfinal against Allentown’s seasons in recent years as eton and Mercer County on Tanner Wilson. Mele won his the Tigers went 5-4. Afrifah the state stage. But we’ve first two matches by pin and is considering playing foot- been unfortunate with our overall reinforced his domi- ball in college. He jumped draw, going down to Brick nance in the county. It was from the gridiron right into Memorial for the last two his second straight MCT title another physical sport when years and wrestling Brick (Mele missed his freshman he joined the wrestling pro- and wrestling Long Branch. gram at his new school. We’ll see where we stack year’s MCT due to injury). up this year. It could be the “It hasn’t been bad so far,” “He’s running into the fact that a lot of people now said Afrifah. “I’ve met a lot of same, we have to go down know who he is, and it’s a people, a lot of nice parents. there looking to win a match. testament to how good he’s Being in this program, sur- We can’t be happy that we been and what he’s done, rounded by good people all qualified. We’ve been there they’re not really trying to around, it’s truly remarkable. two years in a row, now we wrestle him, they’re trying Not everyone gets to experi- have to start winning these to escape or weather the ence this type of love that I’m matches.” The county tournament storm or see how long they experiencing right now.” A f r ifah came into t he was another teachable mocan last on the mat with him,” said Monzo. “He’s season hoping to advance ment for PHS. Just a few figuring out ways he can further than he ever did at different outcomes could continue to score points. If J.P. Stevens. He advanced make a difference. The Tia guy wants to sit back, we to regions twice from dis- gers can take away how they were to placing his closedetails. have to keep the pressure Designer on tricts, but is looking for for or ask your and not give him a chance to first trip to the state tourna- second overall. look for that out. We have ment. As the calendar turns “It still showed us when to fire on all cylinders and to February, he is feeling we expect things to hapleave no doubt, and let them good about his progress. pen, sometimes they don’t,” know who you are, keep “I t hin k I’m def initely said Monzo. “We still need your foot on the gas. That’s ahead in comparison to my to make them happen. But what he’s been doing.” previous years,” said Afri- overall I’m very pleased with Rose won his third straight fah. “Just because of the the way we performed. As a program, it’s a good thing. MCT crown. In the second- experience.” closest final of the day, the Afrifah continues to work We took some bad losses this junior avenged a regular- on his conditioning and year to some of these Mercer season loss to Hightstown’s strength each day with the County schools, so to come C h r i s to p h e r C r o p a n e s e Tigers. He has adjusted to the back and outshine them at with a 2-0 shutout at 126 practice routine and coach- the county level when everypounds. Rose had hoped to ing. He’s been appreciative one is here to show the rest of the county where we really build a substantial lead to of the smooth transition. alleviate some third-period “It’s been great,” said Afri- are was good.” pressure, but only scored fah. “The conditioning that Afrifah made the most the two points with a sec- we go through, having me of his one and only Merond-per iod escape from wrestle with the coaches or cer County Tournament. It the bottom, something that other guys near my weight was his first big tournament didn’t happen for him in the class that are good at their win with the Tigers, and earlier loss to Cropanese. respective weight classes, he’s grateful for the strides

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024

Transfer Afrifah Making Big Impact for PHS Wrestling, Winning Heavyweight Title at MCT as Tigers Take 3rd

TOP OF THE PODIUM: Princeton High wrestler Kwabena Afrifah, second from right, enjoys the moment after he took first in the heavyweight division at the Mercer County Tournament last Saturday at Robbinsville High. In addition to senior Afrifah, junior Cole Rose placed first at 126 pounds and junior Blase Mele won at 138. The Tigers finished third in the MCT team standings behind champion Hopewell Valley and runner-up Robbinsville. he has taken in his final scholastic season at a new school. “It’s all helped me,” said Afrifah. “Every single guy in that program, they always urge each other to push beyond their limits all the time whether it’s out on the mat, or just in the training room. They always find a way to find a way to push each other beyond their limits.” —Justin Feil

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024 • 26

Harrison Comes Up Big on Her Senior Night, Starring as PDS Girls’ Hockey Tops Randolph As the Pr inceton Day School girls’ hockey team held its annual Senior Night celebration last Friday when it hosted Randolph High, Logan Harrison was deeply touched. “It is a great experience. I have been playing here for seven years — this last year I have seen all of the seniors of the past graduate, and now it is like my time,” said senior star forward and team cocaptain Harrison. “It is really moving honestly. It really was bittersweet, I was so glad to have my family here too.” The team’s Class of ’24, which includes 10 players, was honored with numbers posted on one side of the rink and posters with messages from their teammates at the other end. That group has developed a family feeling over the years. “We got our core group of seniors in our sophomore year and we created a friend

group out of that,” said Harrison, whose classmates on the squad include Julia Miranda, Emily McCann, Elena Sichel, Lily Ryan, Colleen Mayer, Isabel Cook, Ceci Scheil, Madison Trend, and Brigid Milligan. “All of these seniors are part of my closest friends. We hang out all of the time and I hope we can hang out after we graduate. It has been so nice playing with them and being able to see how they grow and their skills progress. A lot of people started playing in their freshman or sophomore year.” Once the game started, Harrison was determined to play well and get everyone in the flow. “It was, ‘I need to work hard, I need to have everyone else be a part of it,’” says Harrison. “It is a whole community, collaborative thing. You want to work as a team, you want to score, and you want to win on senior night.”

SENIOR MOMENT: Princeton Day School girls’ hockey player Logan Harrison controls the puck in a game earlier this season. Last Friday, senior captain and star forward Harrison scored a goal and had an assist to help PDS defeat Randolph 4-0 as the program held its annual Senior Night celebration. The Panthers, who lost 4-2 to Immaculate Heart last Monday to move to 8-4, host Morristown-Beard on January 31 before playing the Pingry School on February 1 at the Bridgewater Sports Arena. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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are just trying to enhance our skills and be more of a team. It is knowing where to be, instead of just skating up alone. It is being able to connect off the ice so that we can understand and learn about each other. When we become better friends, we play better on the ice. It translates.” As a two-time captain, Harrison has focused on setting a positive tone. “It is different being a senior captain than a junior captain,” said Harrison. “As a junior captain last year I still had a leadership role, but I was still a junior and not one of the top leaders. As a senior I have really got to explore and be able to express myself and how I want the team to work.” PDS first-year head coach Jamie Davis has enjoyed seeing the team’s seniors grow over the years. “We have a lot of seniors that started playing here at PDS,” said Davis, who served as an assistant coach for the program before taking the helm this winter. “It is cool for me, I have been coaching here for four or five years

now. I have coached them all the way through. It is nice to teach them how to skate and all of that. That is the case for most of them. Then you have the seniors who have been playing hockey their whole life and we are obviously going to miss them next year.” The win over Randolph proved to be a cool moment for the team collectively as Davis got to clear his bench. “It was fun for everyone, for the seniors and all of the players. said Davis. “Everyone got in and we had a lot of fun. It was a good time.” Davis has had fun watching Harrison develop into a star with her gritty play. “Logan is a great player. She is a twoway player; she does a lot of stuff you really don’t get credit for on the scoresheet,” and Davis. “Her points are probably not as high as they could be. She is doing all of the stuff that takes the opponent out ofth the play, breaking pucks out, working hard in the corners, doing what a center should be doing. She is still getting her points.” Goalie Milligan has been

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Harrison did some good work on the offensive end on the first period, assisting on a goal by classmate Emily McCann and then scoring on a rush as PDS built a 2-0 lead. On her goal, Harrison took matters into her hands. “I was going up, I didn’t know if I had anyone with me,” said Harrison. “I was just trying to get a shot on net because somebody could crash the net and get the rebound. I see the five hole open up — I just went in and I shot it there.” A third senior, Lily Ryan, added another goal along with sophomore Brynn Dandy as the Panthers won 4-0. Senior goalie Brigid Milligan earned the shutout. For Harrison, seeing her class lead the way in the win was special. “I am glad that everyone got to see how good our seniors are and how we play together,” said Harrison. The play of goalie Milligan was a particular highlight of the evening. “Brigid gets the shutout and she is going out, playing the puck,” said Harrison. “She is doing really great in net since she came here. She is great, I love her.” With the state playoffs around the corner, Harrison believes the Panthers are primed to do some great things down the stretch. “I think we are in a really good place as a team. It is not only on the ice, but off the ice too. We know each other,” said Harrison. “We

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doing very well between the pipes. “She was having fun out there, she was trying to play the puck and skate out of the crease a little bit,” said Davis of Milligan. “She has been here for two years now and has been stealing games for us. She is a big presence in net, she is good at positioning. We work on her focus; as long as she is staying focused and locked in, she plays great.” With PDS heading into postseason play in early February by competing in the Libera Ice Hockey Tournament and the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) state tourney, Davis is looking for his players to be more opportunistic around goal. “We are playing really strongly defensively, but we have to score a little bit more,” said Davis, whose team lost 4-2 to Immaculate Heart last Monday to move to 8-4 and hosts MorristownBeard on January 31 before playing the Pingry School on February 1 at the Bridgewater Sports Arena. “We are winning these close games and that is great. The playoffs are going to be tight games and you want to get those insurance goals. We just need to finish a little bit. We are doing the right stuff in the offensive zone, but we just have to put the puck in the net. That is the next step, that is where it leads.” Harrison and her classmates enjoyed a moving moment after the game as they gathered on the ice for photos and a group hug as they reflected on the impending finish of their time with the program. “We just started hugging each other and then at the end, we were talking and reminiscing on the four years,” said Harrison. “It is crazy that it is almost over. This is one of tthe best experiences I have had at PDS, learning and growing as a team since freshman year. It has been like a safe space for all of us. A lot of these girls, they just start hockey freshman year because they hear how much of a family that we are. We are not just a team, we are a friend group. We like to be around each other and that is something that is important for our team.” —Bill Alden

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Boys’ Basketball: Mac Kelly scored 23 points as Hun lost 70-56 to the Hill School (Pa.) last Saturday. The Raiders, who moved to 7-11 with the defeat, host the Mercersburg Academy (Pa.) on February 2 and the Perkiomen School (Pa.) on February 5. G irls’ B asketba l l : Sparked by Gabby D’Agostino, Hun topped the Hill School (Pa.) 64-43 last Saturday. Sophomore guard D’Agostino poured in 27 points as the Raiders improved to 9-8. Hun hosts Mercersburg Academy (Pa.) on February 2. Boys’ Hockey: Unable to get its offense going, Hun fell 2-0 to Holy Ghost Prep (Pa.) last Friday. The Raiders, who moved to 3-9 with the defeat, host LaSalle College High School (Pa.) on January 31.

Lawrenceville B oys’ B aske tba l l : Vaughan Foster and Caleb Frederick each scored 13 points as Lawrenceville lost to the Blair Academy 81-54 last Saturday. The Big Red, who moved to 2-10 with the defeat, host St. Benedict’s on January 31 and then play at the Pingry School on February 2. Girls’ Basketball: Anna O’Keefe scored 12 points in a losing cause as Lawrenceville fell 94-23 to the Blair Academy last Saturday. The Big Red, now 3-12, play at Springside Chestnut Hill (Pa.) on January 31, at the Pingry School on February 2, and the Perkiomen School (Pa.) on February 6.

Pennington Boys’ Basketball: Kae Kilic scored 19 points but it wasn’t enough Pennington dropped a 57-55 nail-biter to the Haverford School ( Pa.) last Saturday. The Red Hawks, who moved to 12-7 with the loss, host the Shipley School (Pa.) on February 5. Girls’ Basketball: Morgan Matthews led the way as Pen n i ng ton defe ate d Stuart Country Day 62-23 last Thursday. Matthews tallied 24 points to help the Red Hawks improve to 5-8. Pennington hosts Peddie on February 1 and South Brunswick on February 5. Boys’ Swimming: Caleb Collins starred as Pennington placed third in the Mercer County Championships last week at WW/P-North. Collins took third in both the 200-meter freestyle and the 500 free in the meet, which was won by Princeton High. Pennington is next in action when it competes in the Mid-Atlantic Prep League (MAPL) championship meet on February 3 at the Peddie School. G irl s’ Sw i m m i ng : Sparked by Riley Edge, Penning ton took eighth in the Mercer County Championships last week

PDS Boys’ Basketball: Gary Jennings scored 13 points in a losing cause as PDS fell 60-38 to Robbinsville last Friday. The Panthers, now 5-9, play at Hopewell Valley on January 31 and at Nottingham on February 2 before starting play in the Prep state tournament on February 4. Girls’ Basketball: Nandini Kolli and Briana Camp each tallied six points as PDS lost 41-30 to Rob binsville last Friday. The Panthers, who moved to 1-9 with the defeat, host Hopewell Valley on January 31 and Nottingham on February 2 before starting play in the Prep state tournament on February 4. Boys’ Hockey: Running into a buzz saw, PDS fell 10-1 to the Christian Brothers Academy last Monday. Filip Kacmarsky scored the lone goal for the Panthers as they dropped to 9-6. PDS faces St. Augustine Prep on February 1 at the Igloo Center in Mount Laurel and Seton Hall Prep on February 5 at the Codey Arena in West Orange.

PHS Boys’ Basketball : Jahan Owusu came up big to help PHS defeat Allentown 67-48 last Saturday. Senior star Owusu poured in 27 points for the Tigers, who improved to 7-7 with the win. PHS hosts STEMCivics on January 31, plays at Robbinsville on February 2, and hosts Pioneer Academy on February 3. Girls’ Basketball: Anna Winters star red as PHS topped L aw rence 54 -35 las t Fr iday. S ophomore standout Winters tallied a game-high 20 points as the Tigers improved to 11-4 and posted their eighth straight win. PHS hosts Robbinsville on February 2, plays at Spotswood on February 3, and then hosts WW/P-North on February 6. G irls’ Hockey : Cassie Speir scored all three goals for PHS as it fell 12-3 to Holton Arms last Friday. The Tigers, now 1-7, play at Westfield on January 31 and at Academy of New Church (Pa.) on February 1. Girls’ Wrestling: Lara Bahr provided a highlight as PHS competed in the firstever Mercer County Tournament for girls’ wrestling last Saturday. Bahr took second at 100 pounds as the Tigers tied WW/P-South for ninth place in the team standings of the event won by Trenton Central.

Get the scoop from

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024

Hun

a t W W / P- N o r t h . E d g e placed second in both the 200-meter individual medley and 400 freestyle at the competition which was won by Princeton High. Pennington returns to action when it competes in the Mid-Atlantic Prep League ( MAPL) championship meet on February 3 at the Peddie School.

Stuart Basketball: Taylor States scored nine points for Stuart as it lost 59-21 to Montgomery High last Monday. The Tartans, now 3-5, host Bridgewater-Raritan on February 3 before starting play in the Prep state tournament on February 4.

Local Sports Dillon Youth Hoops Recent Results

In action last weekend in the Boys’ 3rd/4th grade division of the Dillon Youth Basketball League, Milk & Cookies defeated Tortuga’s Mexican Village 24-19. Kaden Taffer scored 10 points for the victors with Zachary Johnson adding eight. Rohan Gregory tallied 17 points in the loss. Sportworld defeated Branning Collision Centers 23-16 as Nazir Rollins scored 14 points to lead the way. James Freedman scored six points for Branning. Princeton Air defeated Princeton Supply 16-11, led by six points each from Patrick Bullinger and Aviv Itzhaki. Brady Goldsmith had six points in defeat. In the Boys’ 5th/6th grade division, Majeski Foundation defeated Pizza Den 34-16. Nathan Stock scored 11 points for Majeski while Ali Redjal added eight points for Pizza Den. Ivy Rehab posted a 3114 win over Locomotion as Malcolm Harris led the way with 17 points while Nikhil Gregory added 12. Aidyn Shah scored eight points for Locomotion. Lependorf & Silverstein, P.C. defeated PBA #130 25-17. Theo Henderson scored 15 points for the victors while Hugh Kelly had 15 points for PBA #130. Jefferson Plumbing topped Mason Griffin & Pierson 35-26. Alex Spies scored 19 points for Jefferson Plumbing with Ilan Speigel tallying 14 points for Mason Griffin. In the Girls’ 3rd/5th grade division, the Sparks edged the Suns 18-17 as Elizabeth Howes scored eight points in the victory. Layla Bak tallied 10 points for the Sun.

TEEING OFF: Princeton High boys’ hockey player TT Zhao heads up the ice in recent action. Zhao tallied three goals and an assist as PHS defeated Lawrenceville B 9-6 last Friday. The Tigers, who moved to 4-7 with the win, play at Paul VI on February 1 at the Flyers Skate Zone, at Colonia on February 2 at the Woodbridge Community Center, and at Hamilton Ice Hockey Coop on February 5 at the Mercer County Skating Center. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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The Princeton 5K is returning on March 16 for its 15th year. The event annually brings together athletes — young and old, big and small, fast and not so fast — to run or walk while supporting the Princeton High cross country and track programs. The in-person race starts in front of the Princeton Middle School at 217 Walnut Lane at 8:30 a.m. In addition to the 5K, there is a 300-meter kids dash for children under 10. To register and get more information on the event, log onto runsignup.com/Race/NJ/ Princeton/PrincetonNJ5K. T-shirts are guaranteed for those who register by February 25. Registration is also available in person on race day. The Princeton 5K is the largest annual fundraiser for the Princeton High School Cross Country Track and Field Booster (PHSCCTF), a 501(c) (3). All donations directly support the PHS boys’ and girls’ cross country and track teams.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024 • 28

Obituaries

Suki Lewin Suki Lewin, longtime Princeton resident, passed away on January 17 from natural causes; close to her 92nd birthday. She had a unique and colorful origin: she was born in Manhat tan as a f irst generation American from Eastern European parents, but she was largely raised in the Panama Canal Zone, so she spoke English, Spanish, and Yiddish fluently. As a teenager she worked at a Jewish Culture secular socialist-leaning camp called Boiberik, located in Rhinebeck NY. This is where she met her future husband, Mort; all four of her children were campers/employees at Boiberik as well.

Her husband was still an undergrad in the mid 1950s when she f irst came to Princeton. During her earlier days in town, Suki raised her two older children and formed lifelong friendships at the Princeton University’s Butler Tract on South Harrison Street. She was fond of recounting a conversation she overheard of 3-yearolds seated on the porch. “Who is the boss of everything?” one asked. One little boy answered, “My mom and dad.” “No,” another offered, “God is the boss of everything.” Still a third differed, “No, the university is the boss of everything.” As a young mother, Suki’s family lived on Jefferson Road near Wiggins Street b efor e m ov i n g to D e e r Path. Suki worked for many years with the Princeton real estate broker Adlerman & Click. She became enamored with that business, and changed family residences regularly, always in the Princeton area. She joked that she never had to do serious housecleaning – whenever the house got too dirty, the family would just move. In the 1960s Suki took charge of annual art shows at the Princeton Jewish Center through B’nai Brith. In this capacity she befriended local legendary artists including Rex Gorleigh, Gregorio Prestopino, and Stefan Martin. This experience led to a friendship and business partnership with Princeton’s Sue Abrams. They started a gallery on Kingston’s Main Street dubbed Susuki. They embarked on a global buying trip which included Haiti and nourished her love for primitive art. Her signature

pitch to browsing customers at the gallery was “You have very good taste!” To her children at least, it seemed like everyone in town knew Suki. Regularly in the 1970s they would shop on Nassau Street and ask establishments such as the Army Nav y store, or Zinder’s, to “put it on Suki’s tab,” and all the storekeepers were happy to comply. In the ’80s and ’90s, she had several office assistant jobs, culminating in her favorite at the Institute for Advanced Study. After retiring, she enjoyed v isiting F lor ida, play ing bridge, and daily long walks. In her later years she suffered from cognitive decline. Despite this burden, Suki remained open and warm, and was beloved by those who cared for her. Although her brain was impaired, one friend suggested, her heart remained fully functional. She maintained her positive outlook until the end, smiling even when it was difficult to speak. She was predeceased by her husband Mort in 2013, and is survived by her children Cherie Maharam (Stanley), Brandon Lewin, Julie Barudin Cole (Butch), and Gene Lewin (Suzanne Aptman), as well as daughterin-law Miki Mendelsohn and son-in-law Guy Barudin. She also leaves eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Suki taught her children to be kind; she imparted her love of nature and animals, and instilled a primary value from an early age to be generous and help others. She had a talent for writing and was a voracious reader.

Mostly she was a true character – with unique style (often thrift–store bought and artfully put together), a buoyant sense of humor, and a true passion for life.

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Jewish Community Dorothy Anne Metzger Walker Our dear mother, Dorothy Anne Metzger Walker, passed away on Januar y 26, 2024 at the age of 82. Dorothy was born in Philadelphia in 1941. She studied chemistry at Barnard College and received her PhD in organic chemistry from Carnegie Mellon University. She loved animals and was a lifelong learner. She is survived by a son and daughter-in-law Nicholas and Aino Walker; two daughters and a son-in-law Barbara Walker, Karen and Daryle Masters ; and two grandchildren Michael and Clara Masters. Funeral arrangements are under the direction of the MJ Murphy Funeral Home, Monmouth Junction, NJ.

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of Princeton because we are a part of it.

Member of KAVOD: Independent Jewish Funeral Chapels Serving All Levels of Observance

609-883-1400 OrlandsMemorialChapel.com 1534 Pennington Road, Ewing, NJ JOEL E. ORLAND

MAX J. ORLAND

Senior Director, NJ Lic. No. 3091

Funeral Director, NJ Lic. No. 5064

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES Princeton’s First Tradition

SundayS

8:00 AM: Holy Communion Rite I 10:30 AM: Holy Communion Rite II 5:00 PM: Choral Evensong or Choral Compline The Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector The Rev. Canon Dr. Kara Slade, Assoc. Rector Wesley Rowell, Lay Pastoral Associate 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 • www.trinityprinceton.org

ONLINE

www.towntopics.com

Worship Service in the University Chapel Sundays at 11am Rev. Alison Boden, Ph.D. Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel

Rev. Dr. Theresa Thames Associate Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel

Wherever you are in your journey of faith, come worship with us First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ You are welcome to join us for our in-person services, Sunday Church Service and Sunday School at 10:30 am, Wednesday Testimony meetings at 7:30 pm. Audio streaming available, details at csprinceton.org. Visit the Christian Science Reading Room Monday through Saturday, 10 am - 4 pm 178 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ For free local delivery cal (609) 924-0919 www.csprinceton.org • (609) 924-5801

Mother of God Joy of All Who Sorrow Orthodox Church 904 Cherry Hill Rd • Princeton, N 08525 (609) 466-3058 Saturday Vespers 5pm • Sunday Divine Liturgy 930am • www.mogoca.org

To advertise your services in our Directory of Religious Services, contact Jennifer Covill jennifer.covill@witherspoonmediagroup.com

(609) 924-2200 ext. 31


CLASSIFIEDS

To place a classified ad, please call:

Deadline: Noon, Tuesday

tel: (609) 924-2200 x10 • fax: (609) 924-8818 • e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com NOT IN PRINCETON ANYMORE? Stay connected by receiving a mailed subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com

fOx CLEANINg (609) 547-9570 eqfoxcarpetcleaning@gmail.com Licensed and insured Residential and commercial Carpet cleaning and upholestry

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf

Pressure and soft washing • Area rugs

LOLIO’s wINDOw wAsHINg & POwER wAsHINg: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf

ADMINIsTRATOR!

JOEs LANDsCAPINg INC. Of PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience • Fully Insured • Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only): (609) 356-9201 Office: (609) 216-7936 Princeton References • Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 tf HOME REPAIR sPECIALIsT: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 tf ExPERIENCED AND PROfEssIONAL CAREgIvER Available Part-Time With Excellent References in the Greater Princeton Area (609) 216-5000

Strip and wax floors • Sanitizing Water damage • Grout cleaning 01-17-25 MEET YOUR NEw

As your new administrator, I will take the devil out of the details of your busy day. I will give you more time to devote to your business by taking care of all front office functions from streamlining processes to managing your correspondence. You will find that I am highly communicative, cooperative and personable. Thank you for stopping by – I look forward to working with you, your staff, and your clients. With over 10 years of admin experience, I am looking for full-time position in Princeton, where I will soon be relocating. So, let’s set up an informational interview to see if we’re a good match. My name is Emily and I can be reached at AtWorkForYou@yahoo.com. 02-07

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Videos of past jobs available. Call Roeland, (609) 933-9240. tf I BUY ALL kINDs of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 10-11-24

(609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

Knotty pine bookcases a specialty! skILLMAN fURNITURE CO. 609-924-1881 Elevated gardens • Slat tables Writing desks • Small furniture repair skillmanfurniture.com skillmanfurnitureco@gmail.com

EsTATE LIQUIDATION sERvICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 06-28-24

wE BUY CARs THE MAID PROfEssIONALs: Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Residential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404.

Witherspoon Media Group tf

sTORAgE UNIT fOR RENT 10 minutes north of Princeton in Skillman/Montgomery. 10x21, $210 discounted monthly rent. Available now. https://princetonstorage.homestead. com or call/text (609) 333-6932. 01-31

05-29

CARPENTRY–PROfEssIONAL Custom Design, Printing, All phases of home improvement. Publishing andServing Distribution the Princeton area for over

30 yrs. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak: (609) 466-0732

· Newsletters · Brochures

· Postcards ADVERTISING SALES Witherspoon Media Group is looking for · Books an Advertising Account Manager, based Catalogues out of our ·Kingston, NJ office, to generate sales for Town Topics Newspaper · Annual Reports and Princeton Magazine The ideal candidate will:

• Establish new sales leads manage For additional infoand contact: existing sales accounts for both publications

melissa.bilyeu@

witherspoonmediagroup.com • Develop industry-based knowledge and understanding, including circulation, audience, readership, and more.

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best! Call (609) 356-2951 or (609) 751-1396. tf LOLIO’s wINDOw wAsHINg & POwER wAsHINg: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860.

Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area HOUsEkEEPER NEEDED for family in Princeton area who is willing to help with cleaning, laundry and cooking for couple with adult children and grandchildren visiting occasionally and summer months - June, July, August in Cape Cod area with private quarters also part of the job. Drivers license required. Please contact: snlorenzo@earthlink.net. 1-31

tf

Cracking the Code:

with BeatriceThe Bloom January Paradox

TOwN TOPICs CLAssIfIEDs gET TOP REsULTs!

We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas.

is printed entirely on recycled paper.

Stay connected by receiving a mailed subscription!

BUYINg: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 06-28-24

Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go!

TOWN TOPICS

NOT IN PRINCETON ANYMORE?

With the New Year, we embrace fresh starts and resolutions, but as January unfolds, a peculiar time warp ensues, stretching its days seemingly beyond the rest of the year combined. This elongated January is a shared sentiment, with jokes and memes circulating about its neverͲending nature. Perhaps it's the postͲholiday blues or the dark days contributing to this temporal distortion. Paradoxically, there's a comforting aspect to its perceived length. January acts as a buffer, a gentle transition into the rapid pace of the months ahead. Its prolonged duration allows for easing into the year, adapting to resolutions, and setting the tone for upcoming challenges. It's a time for reflection, planning, and recalibration before the hustle takes over. In a strange twist, we welcome the elongated January for the opportunity it provides to make meaningful progress towards our goals. As we trudge through the month, inching closer to its end, we gain momentum. The paradox emerges: January's slowness becomes the catalyst for the swift passage of the months that follow. Before we know it, spring will arrive, and we'll wonder where the time went. So, let's appreciate January's deliberate pace—a gift of time, a chance to prepare for the sprint that is the rest of the year. Embrace the paradox, for in its rhythm lies the secret to a wellͲpaced and fulfilling journey through the months ahead.

wHAT’s A gREAT gIfT fOR A fORMER PRINCETONIAN? A gift subscription! Call (609) 924-2200, ext 10 circulation@towntopics.com tf

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECOͲBroker Princeton Office 609Ͳ921Ͳ1900 | 609Ͳ577Ͳ2989(cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

“Home is where, when you

cross its threshold, you finally feel at peace." —Dennis Lehane

• Collaborate with the advertising director and sales team to develop growth opportunities for both publications

Track record of developing successful sales strategies and knowledge of print and digital media is a plus. Fantastic benefits and a great work environment.

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

Please submit cover letter and resume to: charles.plohn@witherspoonmediagroup.com

4428C Route 27, Kingston, NJ 08528 609.924.5400

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANuARY 31, 2024

Town Topics


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANuARY 31, 2024 • 30

AT YOUR

SERVICE A Town Topics Directory

HOUSE

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual

HD PAINTING

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Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

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Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner

609-466-2693

CHERRY STREET KITCHEN Serving food businesses, chefs, bakers, small-batch producers, caterers, food trucks, and more... Cherry Street Kitchen is a licensed commercial kitchen, commissary, and production kitchen with multiple kitchen spaces for short and medium-term rental to professional chefs, bakers, and food professionals. 1040 Pennsylvania Ave. Trenton, New Jersey (Between Cherry and Mulberry Streets)

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

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PRINCETON, NJ

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AN RIC

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Professional, Courteous Professional, Courteous Professional, Courteous Professional, Courteous Antiques • Jewelry • Watches • Guitars Professional, Courteous Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, Drywall Repair Professional, Courteous and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed Professional, Courteous Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, andand Drywall Repair and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed Cameras Books • Coins • Artwork and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, Guaranteed andGuaranteed Drywall Repair and 100% Satisfaction and 100% Satisfaction Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, andGuaranteed Drywall Repair and 100% Satisfaction terior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair Interior Painting, Exterior and Drywall Repair Interior Painting, ExteriorPainting, Painting, and Drywall Repair

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• Reasonable Rates • Licensed, Bonded & Insured Professional, Courteous Courteous Professional, • Free Estimates and 100%Satisfaction Satisfaction Guaranteed and 100% Guaranteed • Popcorn Ceiling Repair Professional, Courteous Professional, Courteous Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, Painting, and Repair Interior Painting, Exterior andDrywall Drywall Repair •100% Cabinet Painting and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed and Satisfaction Guaranteed • Painting, Power Washing Decks/Home Interior Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair • Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper • Deck Sealing/Staining •Quality Craftsmanship •Quality Craftsmanship •Reasonable Rates (609) 799-9211 •Reasonable •Licensed, Bonded Rates & Insured •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •FreeCraftsmanship Estimates www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Quality •FreeCraftsmanship Estimates •Quality •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Reasonable Rates LicenseInstallation # 13VH047 •Popcorn Ceiling & Repair •Cabinet Resurfacing •Reasonable Rates •Quality Craftsmanship •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •Cabinet Resurfacing •Quality Craftsmanship •Power Washing Decks/Home •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •Reasonable Rates •Free Estimates • Quality Craftsmanship •Decks/Home Cabinet Resurfacing •Power Washing •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper •Reasonable Rates •Free Estimates • Reasonable Rates • Power Washing •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Licensed, Bonded & of Insured • Quality Craftsmanship • Cabinet Resurfacing •Deck Sealing/Staining •Wall Resurfacing/Removal Wallpaper ••Popcorn Licensed, Bonded &Bonded •Quality Craftsmanship • Reasonable Rates • Decks/Home Power Washing Ceiling Installation & Repair •Licensed, & Insured •Cabinet Resurfacing •Quality Craftsmanship •Free Estimates •Deck Sealing/Staining InsuredBonded • Rates Wall Resurfacing/ •Reasonable • Licensed, & Craftsmanship Decks/Home •Quality (609) 799-9211 •Power Washing Decks/Home •Cabinet Resurfacing •FreeBonded Estimates • Free Estimates of & Wallpaper •Popcorn Ceiling Installation Repair •Reasonable Rates Insured • Removal Wall Resurfacing/ •Licensed, & Insured •Reasonable Rates www.fivestarpaintinginc.com (609) 799-9211 • Popcorn Ceiling • Deck Sealing/Staining •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper •Power Washing Decks/Home • Free Estimates Removal of Wallpaper •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Cabinet Resurfacing •Free Estimates •Licensed, Bonded & Insured Installation & Repair •Licensed, Bonded &Sealing/Staining Insured www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Deck Sealing/Staining License # 13VH047 • Popcorn Ceiling • Deck •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Power Washing Decks/Home •Quality Craftsmanship •Cabinet Resurfacing •Free Estimates Installation & Repair •Free Estimates •Deck Sealing/Staining

Over 30 Years Experience

Diamonds • Furniture • Unique Items Daniel Downs, Owner

Erick Perez

Fully insured 15+ Years Experience Call for free estimate Best Prices

You Can’t Find Your Town Topics Newspaper? •Quality Craftsmanship •Quality Craftsmanship Come visit our office atRates 4438 Routh 27 North •Reasonable Rates •Quality Craftsmanship •Reasonable •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •Cabinet Resurfacing License # 13VH047 inCeiling Kingston, where you can purchase a copy •Reasonable (609) 799-9211 •Popcorn Installation & Repair •Reasonable Rates •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper •Power Washing Decks/Home •Quality Craftsmanship (609) 799-9211 •Licensed, &Rates Insured •Power Washing Decks/Home Bonded •Free Estimates •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Cabinet Resurfacing •Licensed, Bonded &ofInsured •Quality Craftsmanship www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Deck Sealing/Staining (609) 799-9211 •Reasonable Rates www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper •Wall Resurfacing/Removal Wallpaper for 75 cents (3Repair quarters required) (609) 799-9211 •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •Free Estimates •Power Washing Decks/Home •Cabinet Resurfacing •Free Estimates •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & •Deck Sealing/Staining •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •Quality Craftsmanship www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Deck Sealing/Staining www.fivestarpaintinginc.com # 13VH047 •Wall Resurfacing/Removal ofLicense Wallpaper •Reasonable Rates •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair from our coin-operated newspaper boxes, (609) 799-9211 •Free Estimates •Power Washing Decks/Home •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Cabinet Resurfacing •Free Estimates •Deck Sealing/Staining (609) 799-9211 •Cabinet Resurfacing License # 13VH047 •Reasonable Rates www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Popcorn Ceiling Installation &a Repair •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper (609) 799-9211 •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •Power Washing Decks/Home www.fivestarpaintinginc.com 24 hours day/7 days a week. •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Cabinet Resurfacing •Power Washing Decks/Home (609) 799-9211 •Cabinet Resurfacing •Deck Sealing/Staining www.fivestarpaintinginc.com License # 13VH047 •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper •Licensed, Bonded & Insured www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Power Washing Decks/Home •Free Estimates •Cabinet Resurfacing •Power Washing Decks/Home •Deck Sealing/Staining •Deck Sealing/Staining # 13VH047 •Wall Resurfacing/Removal ofLicense Wallpaper License # 13VH047 •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper (609) 799-9211 •Power Washing Decks/Home •Free Estimates •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Deck Sealing/Staining (609) 799-9211 www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Deck Sealing/Staining •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper (609) 799-9211 www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Cabinet Resurfacing •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair (609) 799-9211 License # 13VH047 www.fivestarpaintinginc.com License # 13VH047 •Deck Sealing/Staining •Power Washing Decks/Home www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Cabinet Resurfacing (609) 799-9211 License # 13VH047 License # 13VH047 •Wallwww.fivestarpaintinginc.com Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper •Power Washing Decks/Home (609) 799-9211 •Deck Sealing/Staining •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper www.fivestarpaintinginc.com License # 13VH047

B

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TR

Seasoned Premium Hardwoods Split & Delivered $240 A cord / $450 2 cords Offer good while supplies last

Stacking available for an additional charge

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60

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CALL 609-924-2200 TO PLACE YOUR AD HERE


31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2024


LOCAL OWNERSHIP • GLOBAL CONNECTIONS • REMARKABLE AGENTS

2023 Unrivaled Results #1

Our average sold listing price is

100%

We proudly claim:

MARKET SHARE

higher than our next closest competitor in Mercer County *

in Princeton, Pennington, Hopewell Township, Montgomery Township, and Mercer County**

We have:

We participated in

12

of the top 25 agents in Princeton, 11/20 in Hopewell Township, 4/7 in Pennington, and 5/6 in Montgomery Township

social media followers from around the world (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter(X), TikTok, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and YouTube) We brought buyers from

9

28

states & territories

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referrals placed and received

(20/21) of the sales contracts >$2,500,000 that involved a broker.**** (No other company had more than 3.)

in Canada, Costa Rica, Panama, and Greece; N.Y.C, Florida, Massachusetts, the Jersey Shore & more

397,281

★★★★★ Average rating of 244 client reviews received post-closing was 5/5 stars

views of our high-definition listing videos in 2023

We proudly supported

We represented sellers of homes sold for as low as

50+/-

countries and

of the top 30 agents in Mercer County

233

95%

12,087

12

local nonprofit organizations, making $75,000+/in charitable contributions

$92,500 and as high as

$5,975,000

callawayhenderson.com LAMBERTVILLE | 609.397.1974 49 Bridge Street, Lambertville, NJ 08530

PRINCETON | 609.921.1050 4 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

*Out of the Top 10 brokerage firms in Mercer County based on units sold. **Based on dollar volume and/or unit sales. ***Based on dollar volume. ****Mercer County, Montgomery Township, East and West Amwell Townships. Source: Bright MLS, GSMLS, and TrendGraphix data for 1/1/23 - 12/31/23 and firm knowledge, as of January 2024. Each office is independently owned and operated.


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