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Volume LXXV, Number 3

Town Topics

Take- ut Directory Pages 17-28 Online Concert Series Features Buskaid Soweto String Ensemble . . . . . . . 5 Glaude, Nader Highlight PPL Virtual Events . . . . 11 NJSO Presents Second of Virtual Performances . . . . . . . 14 Princeton Triangle Club Show Goes Digital . . . . 15

Celebrating the Visual Poetry of Walker Evans on Inauguration Day . . . . . 13 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 30 Classified Ads . . . . . . 38 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 36 Performing Arts . . . . . 15 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 39 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

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COVID Vaccine Push Hampered by Delays In Delivery from Feds With last week’s expansion of eligibility to millions of additional New Jersey residents, including smokers, anyone from 16 to 64 with a qualifying medical condition, and all people over 65, there are now millions of people waiting to be vaccinated. The vaccine supply, however, continues to be severely limited. New Jersey has the capacity to administer 470,000 vaccine doses per week, health officials report, but the states depend on delivery from the federal government, and New Jersey received only about 100,000 doses per week last month and anticipates the same number —50,000 doses per week from Pfizer, 50,000 from Moderna — in the coming month. The New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) COVID-19 website states: “Due to supply limitations, vaccination appointment availability is extremely limited at this time.” A number of vaccination sites have reported overwhelming demand and a shortage of doses, and some overbooked sites are currently unable to schedule appointments. The NJDOH states that “there will be more vaccine with each coming week and month. We urge everyone to be patient, understanding everyone’s desire to get vaccinated as soon as possible.” The Princeton Health Department has reported an unusually high volume of calls and emails about the availability of the vaccine, coinciding with the federal government’s acknowledgement that there is a shortage of doses. “This unfortunate news comes at a time when our state has ramped up efforts to get shots into people’s arms by creating over 300 clinics, mobilizing a substantial vaccination force of volunteers and paid personnel to staff them, only to have those efforts impeded by this unexpected turn of events,” Princeton Press and Media Communications Director Fred Williams wrote in an email. NJDOH has notified Mercer County that the County will receive 800 doses per week starting next week. Prior to this temporary shortage, the Mercer County Public Health Officers’ Association mobilized a series of clinics that vaccinated many eligible people. New Jersey residents have been asked by the state to preregister for the vaccine Continued on Page 10

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Wednesday, January 20, 2021

Undergraduates Begin Return to University Campus The first phase of undergraduates returning to the Princeton University campus is underway. As of Tuesday morning, about 1,140 on-campus residents, sent home last March due to the pandemic, had arrived, completed their first COVID-19 test, and entered the University’s arrival quarantine process. Of the more than 1,300 tests given to arriving students as of Tuesday morning, six have been positive — a positivity rate of about 0.4 percent, according to Deputy University Spokesperson Michael Hotchkiss. Nearly 3,000 of the more than 5,400 undergraduates enrolled at the University have chosen to move back to campus. In doing so, they had to sign a strict “social contract” outlining expectations for behavior, and participate in a COVID-19 testing program. Students will have their own sleeping spaces. “Requirements of the social contract include wearing a face covering, maintaining a minimum of 6 feet of physical distance from others indoors and outdoors, and completing a daily symptom check,” Hotchkiss said in an email. “Students re-

main in strict quarantine — leaving their rooms only to use the restroom — until they receive the results of their first test. If negative, they continue the arrival quarantine protocol that concludes after at least seven days and two additional negative tests. Students who test positive are moved to separate spaces for isolation.” The return of the students was a key topic at a Zoom meeting of the Princeton Merchants Association last Thursday. The University’s Director of Community and Regional Affairs Kristin Appelget, and Executive Director of Environmental Health and Safety Robin Izzo, reported to the merchants on what was required

of the undergraduates. Merchants can expect to see students around town by February 1, which is when classes begin. “They can go into town, but they can’t leave Mercer County or Plainsboro without permission,” said Appelget. While classes will be held almost exclusively online, all of the undergraduates were invited to move back to campus. “Even though a lot of instruction is virtual, there is still a lot of benefit for students to see each other,” Izzo said. “I’m a parent of a college student. Looking at the experience he’s had, I’ve seen there is so much value to feeling like part Continued on Page 8

Princeton Parents Launch Black Students’ Advocacy Organization in Public Schools

A group of local parents has initiated the Princeton Parents for Black Children (PPBC), a nonprofit organization to support and advocate for Black students in Princeton Public Schools (PPS). Citing “unique challenges faced by Black students in Princeton Public Schools,” a January 14 press release from the organization stated, “The PPBC

is the outgrowth of decades of advocacy by families and allies seeking to improve educational opportunities and conditions for Black children.” Co-president Rhinold Ponder pointed out that PPBC is well underway in pursuing a full slate of goals as it works with the district and its Black students. Student Continued on Page 10

THE CALM BEFORE THEIR RETURN: The Princeton University campus was quiet prior to the return of undergraduates . The students who have chosen to come back began moving in, with specific time slots, last weekend . The process continues in the coming weekend . (Photo by Weronkia A. Plohn)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021 • 2

16 Stoney Hill Rd, New Hope, PA 18938

16 Stoney Hill Rd, New Hope, PA 18938

STONEY HILL OVERLOOK Welcome to 16 Stoney Hill a rare opportunity to own a 12 Acre estate in downtown New Hope. This well-appointed home has been completely updated including the kitchen and all bathrooms. The kitchen is completely upgraded with a chef’s heart in mind. Featuring white cabinets with a grey island, beverage bar with a wine refrigerator, marble countertops and new appliances throughout. The kitchen also has a large eat in area with French doors to your covered pavilion with blue stone patio and large outdoor fireplace. The Bluestone patio wraps around the front of the house providing expansive vistas of the property.The master bathroom is heavenly with its neutral tones and marble inlay in the shower and stunning soaking tub. Next to the master bath you have an expansive Walk In closet with custom built ins. Additionally, in the master suite you have a lounge area that is a great escape with a large deck overlooking the front of the house. There is an expansive 3.5 car garage. An additional guest house with a 2 car garage. This home is seconds from downtown New Hope. A short walk from the end of the driveway you can be in New Hope in just a few minutes. This property also has 2 approved building lots that just have to be recorded. $2,295,000

STONEY HILL OVERLOOK

Welcome to 16 Stoney Hill a rare opportunity to own a 12 Acre estate in downtown New Hope. This well-appointed home has been completely updated including the kitchen and all bathrooms. The kitchen is completely upgraded with a chef’s heart in mind. Featuring white cabinets with a grey island, beverage bar with a wine refrigerator, marble countertops and new appliances throughout. The kitchen also has a large eat in area with French doors to your covered pavilion with blue stone patio and large Welcome 16 Stoney Hill a rare opportunity to own a 12 Acre estate in downtown outdoor fireplace. The Bluestone patio wraps around the front of the house to providing New Hope. This well-appointed home has been completely updated including the expansive vistas of the property.The master bathroom is heavenly with its neutral tones kitchen and all bathrooms. The kitchen is completely upgraded with a chef’s heart in and marble inlay in the shower and stunning soaking tub. Next to the master bath you Nick@addisonwolfe.com mind. Featuring white cabinets with a grey island, beverage bar with a wine refrigerator, have an expansive Walk In closet with custom built ins. Additionally, marble in the master suite 646.745.5460 countertops and new appliances throughout.Cell: The kitchen also has a large eat you have a lounge area that is a great escape with a large deck overlooking the front of in area with French doors to your covered pavilion with blue stone patio and large the house. There is an expansive 3.5 car garage. An additional guest house with aPA 2 car outdoor fireplace. The Bluestone patio wraps around the• front of the house providing 550 Union Square, New Hope, 18938 • AddisonWolfe.com 215.862.5500 garage. This home is seconds from downtown New Hope. A short expansive walk fromvistas the of end the property.The master bathroom is heavenly with its neutral tones of the driveway you can be in New Hope in just a few minutes. This property also has Welcome to 16 Stoney Hill a rare opportunity to own a 12 Acre estate in downtown and marble inlay in the shower and stunning soaking tub. Next to the master bath you approved building lotshome that has justbeen havecompletely to be recorded. expansive Walk In closet with custom built ins. Additionally, in the master suite $2,295,000 New 2 Hope. This well-appointed updated including the have an

STONEY HILL OVERLOOK Nick Esser

STONEY HILL OVERLOOK

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marble countertops and new appliances throughout. The kitchen also has a large eat in area with French doors to your covered pavilion with blue stone patio and large outdoor fireplace. The Bluestone patio wraps around the front of the house providing expansive vistas of the property.The master bathroom is heavenly with its neutral tones and marble inlay in the shower and stunning soaking tub. Next to the master bath you have an expansive Walk In closet with custom built ins. Additionally, in the master suite you have a lounge area that is a great escape with a large deck overlooking the front of the house. There is an expansive 3.5 car garage. An additional guest house with a 2 car Nick@addisonwolfe.com garage. This home is seconds from downtown New Hope. A short walk from the end Nick@addisonwolfe.com Cell: 646.745.5460 of the driveway you can be in New Hope in just a few minutes. This property also has Cell: 646.745.5460 2 approved building lots that just have to be recorded. $2,295,000

Nick Esser

Nick Esser

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“The Residences at Rabbit Run” are an enclave of a limited number of prestigious individual homes that reflect architectural distinction and sophistication. This highly customized home, set within a gated community, comprises the taste level and desired amenities of today’s Buyers. As you enter the foyer, you are greeted with an open concept floor plan. The dining area is contiguous with the living room and distinctive fireplace. The expansive window walls with plantation shutters flood the space with natural light. The oversized chef’s kitchen features top-of-the-line appliances with marble countertops...the island becomes a show stopper with its beautiful “waterfall” edge.There is a natural flow throughout the first level that is ideal for entertaining and allows you to enjoy the custom wainscoting and millwork. The Nick@addisonwolfe.com second level provides guest bedrooms, baths and a luxurious master en suite that brings you to a level not usually found in this price range. Cell: 646.745.5460 The lower level is completely finished and boasts an extra bedroom area for overnight guests and a full bath. There is room for a home office or home theater, Naturally, all floors are serviced by a private elevator. “The Residences at Rabbit Run” are located 5 minutes from New Hope,550 PA and 30 minutes to Princeton. Once have experienced the amenities,•luxury and care-free living of these quality homes, Union Square, New Hope, PAyou18938 • AddisonWolfe.com 215.862.5500 you will quickly realize that all other gated communities in the area, pale in comparison. $1,725,000

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021 • 4

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HELPING HANDS: For the fourth annual Hopewell Gives Back: MLK Day of Service on Monday, January 18, more than 100 volunteers registered online to give back to the community. Hopewell Presbyterian Church hosted the event, which was organized by Hopewell Valley Central High School graduates Sarah Cleveland, Sam Fowler, and Gavin Fowler. I Support the Girls, The Rescue Mission of Trenton, Seeds to Sew, and the Sourland Conservancy were beneficiaries of the volunteer projects. our municipal BCCs, and housing mandate, deliverWilliamson Won’t Run For Second Council Term of course you, the people ing a Climate Action Plan,

P r i n ce ton C ou n ci l m a n Dwaine Williamson has announced he will not seek a second term. “It has been a pleasure serving our extraordinary to w n o n C o u n c i l s i n c e January 2019,” he said in a statement last Fr iday. “Our collective resiliency in responding to the very unusual operating environment of the pandemic in 2020 only increases my gratitude to have such learned, compassionate, and committed persons to serve amongst. For 2021, I look forward to working with Mayor Freda, Council President Fraga, my fellow Council colleagues,

of Princeton, to defeat this pandemic and make our wonderful town even better.” Williamson said he enjoyed serving with former Mayor Liz Lempert, former Council President Jenny Crumiller, and former Councilman Tim Quinn. Councilwoman Eve Niedergang is seeking a second term, and Leighton Newlin also has announced he will run for a seat on the governing body. “During my time as Councilman, we have accomplished many things including successfully completing the litigation aspect of our third-round affordable

m a i nt a i n i n g P r i n ce ton’s AAA credit rating and so many more things as were reiterated during last week’s reorganization meeting,” Williamson said. “Nothing evidences our collective humanity better than the fact that we viewed all our policy decisions through a lens of equity and with the consideration of how our policies affect the most vulnerable of our residents. As my final year on Council unfolds, I expect it to draw the people of Princeton closer to my heart. Thank you for being such wonderful colleagues, neighbors, friends, and constituents.”

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Register for COVID-19 Vaccine: For the latest information on receiving the vaccine, visit covid19.nj.gov/pages/vaccine or princetonnj.gov/282/CoronavirusCOVID-19-Information. Free COVID Tests: Saliva tests are available for free in Mercer County for anyone who is experiencing symptoms, has been in close contact with someone who has tested positive, is an essential worker, was recently in a large crowd, or recently traveled to a state with a high COVID infection rate. Visit mercercares.org. For an updated list of locations where tests are being administered, visit https://trentonhealthteam.org/covidtests/. Winter Running Program: On Tuesdays-Fridays through January 29, the Princeton Recreation Department offers this program for those in grades six-eight and nine-12, 3:15-4:30 p.m. The middle school group practices at PUMS fields; the high school group at Princeton High School track. $75 for Princeton residents; $125 for Cranbury residents and non-residents who attend school in Princeton. Financial assistance is available. Princetonrecreation.com. Nature Photo Contest: Friends of Princeton Open Space is sponsoring a “Give Thanks to Nature” photo contest. Photos must be taken in the Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve between November 27 and January 31. Prizes are provided by REI. Visit fopos.org for details.


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PSO Online Concert Series Features Buskaid Soweto String Ensemble

Eighteen months ago, the Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) took a group of trustees to South Africa. A highlight of the trip was time spent with the Buskaid Soweto String Ensemble,

known throughout the country as a world-class orchestra of young musicians from challenging circumstances. Thanks largely to that visit, the PSO is presenting a five-concert, on-demand series that begins Friday, January 29. Buskaid – A Musical Miracle was curated by the organization’s founder and music director,

in South Africa, helping the organization overcome f i na n c ia l d if f i c u lt i e s. A year later, she rented her London flat out and “took the plunge,” she said. The project reopened in a single room attached to a priest’s house near the original location. All children were invited to join, but some were threatened by other area factions. Despite several attempts to deter her, Nalden stayed on. “I thought it would be easy to attract local teachers to join me and then leave them in charge,” she said. “But I hadn’t bargained for the Rosemary Nalden, who put (very understandable) fear Continued on Next Page the archival material to- which many white South gether during the lockdown caused by COVID-19. PSO JOIN US AT ONE OF YOUR FAVORITE GRETALIA E xecutive Director Marc Uys, a South African violinHOSPITALITY GROUP FAMILY OF RESTAURANTS ist himself, was a Buskaid fan long before the fateful trip with the trustees. “For me, this is a wonderful thing,” he said last week.   “W hat is really str ik ing  about Buskaid is the energy    and incredible style they    have, around a wide variety  of genres. They are espe cially amazing with Baroque music. They open concerts  with that. It’s a very particuPrinceton: 154 Nassau Street (609) 924-1353 lar school of string playing   West Windsor: 64 Princeton-Hightstown Road (609) 799-0688 which comes from Rosemary  Ewing: 938 Bear Tavern Road (609) 493-4495 herself. She worked in that   Robbinsville: 19 Main Street (609)  772-4755 world for decades before she started this group.”  Kingston: 4581 Route 27 (609) 921-2778  It was back in 1991 that  Nalden, a British violist, heard on the BBC about a string project in Soweto experiencing financial dif  ficulties. The same story   Princeton: 354 Nassau Street (609) 683-9700 appeared in a newspaper a  year later. “It was by pure   chance that I heard and read  both reports, which immedi  ately sparked a fascination  in me to discover that clas sical stringed instruments Crosswicks: 2 Crosswicks Chesterfield Road (609) 291-5525 were being taught in SowePennington: 7 Tree Farm Road (609) 303-0625 to,” she said in an email. “I   wanted to help, so together   with around 120 friends, I organized a simultaneous ‘busk’ in 17 British rail stations, mainly in London, which took place in March 1992. We collected around Princeton: 3524 Route 1 North (609) 642-4770 6,000 pounds, which was Lambertville: 13 Klines Court (609) 773-0072 quite a lot of money in those days!” Nalden made up the name A CI C I N I “Buskaid.” To “busk” is to P R O C APCR O CCI N Crosswicks • Pennington Crosswicks • Pennington go into a public space and perform, usually as a musiOrder online with cian, to raise money, for a cause or for yourself. By 1996, Na lden was getforky.com spending considerable time

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and he wanted to touch the real thing.” Performances by Buskaid always incorporate movement. “Our teaching approach has, at its heart, movement – of a very specific kind. It is there to release tension and encourage freedom so that the instrument almost becomes an integral part of the body,” said Nalden. “When I first started teaching in Soweto, I was amazed at the ease at which this aspect of my teaching was accepted and accomplished. There was a very obvious transition to dance – both as a part of a group lesson, for example – and as a part of their performances of their own township music, Kwela.” (Kwela is defined as a South African style of music based on jazzy undertones and derived from the marabi sound). Buskaid performs music from the early Baroque to the 21st century. They also play classic pop, Afro-pop, and some jazz, on instruments donated from all over the world. “All in all, we own well over 300 instruments,” said Nalden. “Our big problem now is storage of those instruments not in use, as that modest Music School we built in 1999 for 35 students and two teachers now houses around 120 students and 14 teachers!” The January 29-31 opener presented by the PSO includes the third movement of Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 13 in C Major performed with guest artist Melvyn Tan, Max Bruch’s Romanze for Solo Viola and Orchestra featuring Buskaid-trained ar tist Tiisetso Mashishi,

5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021

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MUSICAL MIRACLE: The Princeton Symphony Orchestra presents the Buskaid Soweto String Ensemble in the first of five specially curated concerts January 29-31. The young musicians have been trained at the project’s renowned school in South Africa. (Photo by Graham De Lacy)

Afr icans feel when they v isit S oweto, somet hing which still holds true, albeit to a lesser extent. Finding teachers to join me was a huge challenge, and as a result, I stayed for another year. Large numbers of local children began to flock to our little project and I turned away dozens, if not hundreds. In 1998 I realized that we desperately needed a bigger space.” The motivation for Buskaid is similar to the famed El Sistema program started in Venezuela. But Buskaid has been in operation longer than El Sistema. The program has grown. There are currently 120 children enrolled in its music school. In 23 years, the performing ensemble has undertaken 26 international tours. The organization also runs an in-house teacher-training scheme, and currently employs 12 ensemble members as assistant and trainee teachers. The idea is not just to train string players. While some of the graduates do go on to musical careers, the focus is to provide a safe haven to those who need it, at the same time building self-esteem. “Quite simply we do not choose them – they choose us,” said Nalden of the students in the program. “We have never actively tried to recruit children to come to Buskaid. For the most part, children come because they have a friend, relative, classmate, who is already attending, and they also want to learn an instrument. Sometimes they’ve seen or heard a violin and they are fascinated. One boy came because he had seen a picture of a violin in a schoolbook


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021 • 6

PSO Online Concerts Continued from Preceding Page

and Princeton-based composer Julian Grant’s Sancho’s Dance-Mix, a suite after dances by Ignatius Sancho. The program also includes popular vocals and Kwela. Each concert in the series is available on-demand over a three-day weekend for a $5 per access link. Visit princetonsymphony.org. “You see this old school tradition, a musical aesthetic that comes through,” said Uys. “When they play Mozart, for instance, the phrasing is amazing. It is never static. You always have this sense of energy and enthusiasm. And then when they play Kwela music, Rosemary tends to stand to the side of the stage, and they take it away with dance and physical movement while they play. So it feels like they have this perfect marriage of their tradition and the very deep, old tradition of string playing. But it is incredibly relevant and belongs with the youth of today.” —Anne Levin

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“I hope that we get vaccinated soon and will get our lives back. The past year has been really hard, especially for the kids who can’t see their friends.” —Pattra Pappas, Princeton Junction

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Princeton Public Library has received the five-star rating from Library Journal, a publication for library professionals. The organization created the rating system to recognize public librar ies t hroughout t he United States. This is the fifth consecutive year that Pr inceton Public Library received five stars, the highest possible rating. “We like to think of the librar y as a star in t he Princeton community,” said Executive Director Jennifer Podolsky. “And this recognition affirms that the library is also a standout nationwide. We are honored that the welcoming atmosphere, exceptional collection, thought-provoking programs, and other services we provide to the community have led to this acknowledgment.” Ratings for 2020 were based on 2018 data from the Institute of Museum and Library Services Public Library Survey, which for the first time included e-retrievals, a measurement of database usage. More than 5,600 libraries were rated with 262 receiving three, four or five stars. Princeton Public Library is in the $5-$9.9 million expenditure category in which 173 libraries were rated. In that category, 10 libraries nationw ide received five stars with Princeton Public Library receiving the fifth highest score. The library is one of only three in New Jersey to receive stars and the only one to receive five stars. The full America’s Star Libraries 2020 list may be viewed at libraryjournal. com. The library is currently open for express services daily from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. In addition, the library is open from 4-7 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Items may be placed on hold through the library’s online catalog for pick-up inside the library building or contactless pick-up by appointment. More information is available at princetonlibrary.org.

Jessie: “More unity and overall peace in the country.” Bailey: “ I hope that we can get back to school, see our friends in person, and have social interaction with people.” —Jessie and Bailey Matra, Montgomery

Phoebe: “I hope he can unite a very polarized nation that was created during the last presidency.” Joshua: “I hope he is able to distribute the vaccine effectively over the next year.” —Phoebe Elias, West Windsor with Joshua Saova, Plainsboro

Annie: “Good health care, some sort of environmental policy, recognition of racial inequity in government, and bipartisanship.” Matthew: “Restoration of truth and sanity is all I care about.” Liz: “I hope that he won’t get a lot of resistance, and the vaccination will move along and we will get it soon.” —Annie, Matthew, and Liz Morgan, Princeton

Asha: “I hope that he can prioritize the nation’s health and well-being over the economy so we can get out of the cycle that we are in with the coronavirus.” Sam: “I hope that he maintains his strong environmental policy that he talked about during his campaign.” Shravani: “I hope that he is able to uphold the plans that he has in terms of the vaccine distribution and social equity.” —Asha Hauser, Princeton with Sam Forest, Princeton Junction, and Shravani Bagawde, Plainsboro


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Undergrads Return continued from page one

of a community in a way you just can’t do virtually, even with all of the virtual events.” Before making the decision to invite undergraduates back, the University looked at other universities that had allowed students to return to campus. “There was a lot of work we did, benchmarking with other schools that had let students back,” said Izzo. “We worked with faculty who have epidem iolog y backgrounds, to be able to do modeling on what was feasible. We even redid those models considering the variants that are now out there.” Not all u ndergraduate st udents were for t unate enough to be able to go home when the University went vir tual. “For some of our students, Princeton University is the safe place they have to call home,” said

Appelget. “We did have some students – less than 200 – who lived on our campus as undergraduates [during the closure], living in the way the students now coming back will live. They might be homeless. Or they might not have good internet access, or their own bedroom at home. So the thought of coming back to Princeton, to be in a dorm room, in the same time zone where classes are being held, where there is a reliable food source – there were some students who were ready to sign up for any social contract.” The contract is serious. “If you as business owners have any concerns about students who have arrived back, please reach out,” Appelget said. “Phone, email – we will get back to you. If there is something that isn’t appropriate, please let us know. I say that because I mean it.” —Anne Levin

Share My Meals Names Two New Trustees

The Princeton-based nonprofit Share My Meals Inc. has announced t wo new members to its board of trustees, Karen Lemon and Diana Pecina. S hare My Me a ls is t h e only organization in the Princeton region dedicated to allev iating hunger by reducing food waste. “We are delighted to welcome Karen and Diana to our board,” said Share My Meals President Isabelle Lambotte. “Both bring to our team added skills and talent to accelerate t he growth of our organization in order to help feed more families.” Throughout her career, Lemon held leadership positions in HR /training, customer service, operations, and sales. She retired from AT&T in 2020 to pursue diversity, equity, and inclusion. Until 2020 she served on the board for the Tri-State Diversity Council and was a member of Catalyst’s board of advisors. She is currently on the board for Junior Achievement of New Jersey. Before joining t he b oard of S hare My Meals, Lemon volunteered for the organization, delivering meals to families in Princeton. “I am ver y aware of the need to address food insecurity and I have been impressed with Share My Meals’ outreach and impact during the pandemic,” said L emon. “I look for ward to expanding the existing work of delivering meals to families in need in our community. This will involve growing our volunteers and

continuing to identify our neighbors who are in need. In addition to addressing food insecurity, reducing food waste is also part of the SMM mission. As businesses and universities return, I look for ward to working with them to help us support this mission.” Pecina was volunteering for Share My Meals long before being elected to the board. She brings more t ha n 30 ye ar s of marketing, nonprofit experience, and business development experience to the organization. An Illinois native, she holds a B.A. in communications from the University of Illinois and an M.B.A. from Columbia University. She began her c are er w it h Joh n s on & Johnson, and made t he transition to the nonprofit world in the late 1990s when she was drawn to the work of Habitat for Humanity. In 2005 she joined t he s t a f f of R a r i t a n Va l l e y Habitat as the affiliate’s first development director, working in partnership with corporations, faith-based communities, and private donors to expand community outreach and double annual revenues. During her tenure, she assisted 20 hardwork ing fam ilies to build and purchase their own safe, affordable homes. More recently, Pecina has turned her attention to the world of education, working on business development, partnerships, and strategic planning for Mosaica E d u c at ion a n d B e dt i m e Math Foundation. “T he Share My Meals program speaks to both my head and heart,” said

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Pecina. “It is wrong that more than 40 percent of food in our country goes to waste while, at the same t i m e, ma ny fa m i lie s go hungry. We can do better, and the Share My Meals Waste Watcher program is a great place to start.” T he Was te Watcher Program is a sustainable meals recover y process, approved by the local health depar tment, that distributes surplus meals from the cafeterias of local corporations, schools, universities, and restaurants to food-insecure members of the community. During the pandemic, Share My Meals

adapted its operations to launch the Share My Meals COV I D -19 P rog ram. By purchasing meals from local restaurants at the cost of goods, Share My Meals has been able to help the food insecure community while allowing these restaurants to stay active and to pay part of their staff members. Thanks to the suppor t of three, and recently four partner restaurants, volu nteers, and donors, the organization was able to deliver 39,000 healthy meals directly to the homes of the 100 families enrolled in the program in 2020. For more information, visit sharemymeals.org.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021 • 10

Vaccine Delays continued from page one

on the state’s website at covidvaccine.nj.gov. Eligible applicants will be notified when it’s time to schedule an appointment, and they will be referred to a list of vaccination sites to make the appointment. State officials have encouraged eligible residents to directly contact COVID-19 sites, which are listed on the state’s website, to schedule appointments. Vaccination sites are not able to accommodate walkups. Williams noted that the Princeton Health Department would announce a ny lo c a l opp or t u n it ie s to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, t hrough emails to those on their waitlist, by press release, to local news outlets, and on their web s ite at pr i n c e ton nj. gov, and on social media p ag e s. Pe ople w h o are preregistered through the state web portal will also be notified of locations to schedule an appointment as appointments become available, he added. Mercer Count y w ill be suppor ting t wo regional vaccination sites : one opening in late January or early February at Mercer County Community College managed by County Health Officers Association and one at CURE Insurance Arena in Trenton in partnership with Capital Health System beginning January 21. To receive a vaccination at the CURE Arena site prere g is t r at ion is re q u ire d through the New Jersey Vaccine Scheduling System at covidvaccine.nj.gov. Penn Medicine Princeton Healt h in Plainsboro is accept i ng app oi nt m ent s beginning January 20 with web for m s av a i labl e at princetonhcs.org to request an appointment. Additional Mercer County sites include the Princeton Health Department on Monument Drive, Hamilton Township Division of Health, Henry J. Austin Health Centers on Ewing Street and on Nor t h War ren St reet in Trenton, InFocus Urgent Care in Ewing, ShopRite of Hamilton, and ShopRite Pharmacy in Pennington. Area vaccination megasites include the New J e r s e y C o nv e n t i o n a n d Exposition Center in Edison and the Moorestown Mall i n B u r l i n g t o n C o u n t y. There are also mega-sites i n op e r at i o n at Row a n College of South Jersey in Gloucester County and at Rockaway Townsquare in Morris County. Additional mega-sites are planned in East Rutherford and Atlantic City to open at a later date. Information from the Princeton Health Depar tment, repor ted in last week’s page 1 article, that all staff and residents at Princeton’s long-term health care facilities who wanted a vaccine had received their

initial doses, was erroneous. T h e f i r s t C O V I D -19 vaccination clinic at Brandywine Living Serenade at Princeton (formerly Acorn Glen, recently purchased and renamed by Brandywine Senior Living LLC) will take place on January 26, with first doses available for all residents and employees. A second clinic for second d o s e s i s s c h e d u l e d for February 16, and March 9 is the date for a third clinic for any new residents or employees. As of January 19, Serenade at Princeton reported no active cases of COVID-19 among residents or staff. In a January 15 update, P r i n c e to n C a r e C e n te r reported 16 COVID-19 cases among residents, with one of the residents having been hospitalized on Januar y 14 and the other infected i nd iv idua ls cu r re nt ly i n quarantine in accord with Centers for Disease Control guidelines. Princeton Care Center held its f irst COV I D -19 vaccine clinic on January 5, with first doses for all consenting residents and staff. The next clinic will be on January 26 with the second dose of the vaccine administered to all who received the first dose and the first dose available to those who did not previously receive it. The third vaccine clinic date will be February 16. In its Januar y 19 case data update, the Princeton Health Department reported 35 new cases in Princeton in the past seven days and 63 cases in the past 14 days, both totals slightly below the highest seven- and 14-day totals that were recorded in December. There were 45 active positive cases in Princeton on January 19. —Donald Gilpin

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Black Students continued from page one

achievement, fundraising, community building, and political action are the focus of several PPBC working committees, he said. “We have already been aggressive in establishing collaborative relationships and per manent lines of communication w ith the district office to address issues which impact all of our children, including racial literacy, the unconscionable fact that 50 percent of Black children in the district have IEPs [independent education programs], and diversity in hiring and promotions,” he wrote in a January 19 email. In addition to Ponder, executive committee officers, who were elected at a recent or g a n i z at i o n a l m e e t i n g, include Veronica Foreman as co-president; Lanniece Hall, secretary; Teri Boyd, treasurer; Raphael Aryeetey as Princeton Community Village representative; and Valerie Henry as Griggs Farm representative. “We are proud that we have leaders representing communities in Princeton Com mu nit y Village, t he Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood, and Griggs Farm, in addition to the community at large,” Ponder said. “We have a large, diverse m e mb e r s h ip w it h m a ny concerns and needs which we plan to address strategically.” Foreman added, “We believe that everyone benefits when all of our children are provided the opportunity for academic s u cce s s a nd a h e a lt hy, encouraging environment. The families of Black children in this district, and their allies, are prepared to persistently and collectively advocate for justice and equity for our children.” Among many programs and events planned for the future in collaboration with local partners, the PPBC this month worked with the Arts Council of Princeton on Martin Luther King Jr. Day events and will continue to offer informative sessions on the transition to high school for member parents of eighth graders. “This is a critical juncture for the school district,” Ponder said. “The hiring of a new superintendent and a principal for the high school gives the district an opportunity to make great strides in matching its rhetoric regarding diversity and equity with its priorities, practice, and measurable results.” The district’s 2018 Equity Audit Report noted “raciallypredictable disparities in achievement data, a perception of disparities in discipline and academic expectations, a difference between various identities’ sense of welcoming and belonging, challenges in addressing incidents of oppression and bias, and a strong sense of academic pressure and competition.” During the past two years the district has increased efforts to address equity issues and to implement recommendations presented in the 2018 report. Membership in the PPBC is open to all PPS parents and g uardians of Black children. There are no fees to join. Adults interested in supporting the PPBC’s mission are encouraged to participate. Inquiries about membership and programming may be made by email at princetonpbc@gmail.com. —Donald Gilpin

FIRES UNDER CONTROL: The Mercer County Park Commission will conduct prescribed burns at Mercer Meadows between January and late spring.

Prescribed Burns Planned area within the Pole Farm through professional and will undergo a growing-sea- personal endeavors. For Mercer Meadows

The Mercer County Park Commission will perform prescribed burns at Mercer Meadows this winter and spring with the New Jersey Forest Fire Service (NJFFS). The NJFFS worked in collaboration with the Park Commission’s Stewardship Department on an initial prescribed burn in 2020. The next phase of the plan is set to begin soon. In 2018, Gov. Phil Murphy signed the Prescribed Burn Act, which expanded the ability of the NJFFS to implement prescribed fire for habitat management as well as other forestry and ecological needs. This legislation also made the services of the NJFFS more accessible to local governments. Properly conducted prescribed burns encourage native seed germination, reduce invasive plant pressure, and cycle nutrients into the soil. Increasing habitat quality and diversity along with promoting forest regeneration, managing invasive species, and grassland establishment are all benefits from conducting prescribed burns. The Park Commission anticipates the burns to have additional benefits such as reducing hazardous fuel loads to prevent unplanned, potentially damaging wildfires. Prescribed burns have also been successful in reducing tick and insect pest populations. Following the prescribed burn at the Pole Farm in 2020, stewardship staf f conducted a photo study of the areas that were burned. Photos were taken from fixed points throughout the park after the burn and during the growing season. The progression of photographs taken demonstrated the suppression of woody invasive species, and thriving herbaceous plants in the burned fields. Results from the annual breeding bird survey displayed an increase in overall abundance of birds in the field monitored during the breeding season postburn compared to previous years. Additional scientific monitoring is planned to evaluate the success of the prescribed burn. The prescribed burns at the Pole Farm are expected to take place between January and late spring as determined by the Section Forest Fire Warden. There will be two areas receiving a dormant- season burn, to happen prior to April 15. These burns will occur over a oneto two-day period. Another

son burn later this spring, prior to June 15. The Section Warden will determine when the conditions fall within a safe range and will notify the Park Commission and appropriate township and emergency response officials with 48 hours’ notice before the burn will begin. For the safety of the public, the park will be closed during and immediately after the burns. The closure will be posted at all entrances, crossings and trailheads, as well as on the Park Commission website and social media pages. “This initiative would not be possible w it hout t he NJFFS and their team of skilled professionals,” said Park Commission Executive Director Aaron T. Watson. “Prescribed burning is a new way for the Park Commission to manage for invasive species and promote a habitat with more native plants, improving the ecological functions of Mercer Meadows. We are thrilled to continue this initiative in 2021.” The fire will be lit, monitored, and managed by the Forest Fire Service officials who have undergone rigorous training and are experienced in conducting safe and effective prescribed burns. All appropriate safety measures and precautions will be taken by those performing the burn. While the burn is in progress there will be law enforcement and fire personnel, equipment, and vehicles present at the Pole Farm and surrounding areas. Specific conditions must be met in order to burn, including temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed and direction. For the days following the burn, there may be smoldering dead trees and logs within the burn areas. This activity is normal and need not be reported to the fire department or Park Commission as a fire hazard. Park Commission staff will be on site to monitor postburn activity. For more information, visit mercercountyparks.org.

T h e 2 021 Tr i b u te to Women Honorees are: Lisa Asare, assistant commissioner of Family Health Services, New Jersey Department of Health; Dr. Joy Barnes- Johnson, science and racial literacy educator, Princeton Public Schools; Joanne Canady-Brown, owner, The Gingered Peach; Nathalie Edmond, owner and director, Mindful and Multicultural Counseling; A ssembly woman Verlina Reynolds-Jackson; Dr. Den a l e r i e J oh n s on - Fa n i e l, director of Outreach and Community Relations, New Jersey Div ision on Civ il Rights, CEO of 3D Management Consulting, and adjunct professor, Middlesex County College and Mercer Count y Communit y College; Caroline L. Mitchell, food co-op manager, UrbanPromise Ministries, Inc.; Elizabeth Baran Wagner, senior vice president, director of institutional wealth management, Bryn Mawr Trust; community advocate Pam Wakefield; and Diana Zita, CEO of Hamilton Area YMCA. For t h e s e c o n d y e a r, YWCA Princeton will recognize women aged 21-34 impacting their community through the Young Woman category. The 2021 recipients are Blair Miller, founder, Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood Kindness Project; Franklin Township Councilwoman at Large Crystal Pruitt, deputy director, Office of Clean Energy Equity at New Jersey Board of Public Utilities; and Dr. Eman Tadros, Governors State University. “In every industry, at every level, women have risen to the occasion to support our communities throughout the COVID-19 pandemic,” said YWCA CEO Tay Walker. “It is our honor and privilege to celebrate women who create opportunity, promote equity, and provide support to those who need it most.” To l e a r n m o r e a b o u t the 2021 Tribute to Women Honorees, visit y wca princeton.org/tribute.

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Princeton University Professor and frequent MSNBC commentator Eddie S. Glaude Jr. on January 25 and legendary consumer advocate Ralph Nader on January 30 will be leading the conversations in two upcoming Friends of the Princeton Public Library (PPL) virtual events. As part of the PPL’s series of small events, both sessions will provide widerang ing com mentar y on current events, as well as a focus on recent books by the two authors, who have spoken and written widely on the Trump administration and the recent assault on the Capitol and its aftermath. Begin Again: James Baldwin’s America and Its Urgent Message for Our Own is the title of Glaude’s June 2020 book and also the title for the January 25, 7 p.m. Zoom event, where Glaude will be joined in conversation w ith his colleague, Princeton University African American Studies Professor Imani Perry. James Baldwin, as quoted in Glaude’s Introduction to Begin Again and on his Twitter page, wrote, “Not everything is lost. Responsibility can’t be lost, it can only be abdicated. If one refuses abdication, one begins again.” Glaude, who is chair of the Department of African American Studies at Princeton, author of numerous books and articles, and a frequent guest on television talk and news shows, has been featured regularly on MSNBC’s Morning Joe, commenting on police violence and Black Lives Matter protests, and in recent days responding to President Trump’s actions and the January 6 assault on the Capitol. S p e a k i ng on Mor ning Joe on Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Monday, January 18, Glaude pointed out “Dr. King’s sacrifice for us to actually make good on the promises of radical

reconstruction.” He continued, “What’s interesting about the recent moment is that we saw people sacking the Capitol in defense of a world that Dr. King sacrificed himself to destroy. Those people are clinging to a world that Dr. King gave his life to dismantle.” Glaude went on to tell Joe Scarborough and the Morning Joe audience, “It is up to us — you and me and others — to begin the hard work of imagining America apart from this insidious view that some people have to be valued more than others because of the color of their skin.” Glaude’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day Twitter post reflected his customary balance of optimism and pessimism. “We celebrate the life of Dr. King on this day,” he wrote. “We often invoke his ‘Mountaintop’ speech and his words about the promised land. But sometimes we forget that before he uttered those words Dr. King said, ‘We’ve got some difficult days ahead.’” All participants in the January 25 session will receive free copies of Glaude’s Begin Again. The Januar y 30 forum with Nader will also feature three other social justice advocates sharing their vision of a more just, egalitarian, and unified America. Richard Cordray, former director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau under President Obama ; Princeton author, lawyer, and consumer advocate Carl Mayer; and Andy Shallal, artist, activist, and founder of Busboys and Poets, a cafe and cultural events venue, will join the conversation with Nader. The 90-minute discussion will also feature a brunch, as Shallal prepares select dishes from Nader’s recent publication, The Nader Family Cookbook, which shares the cuisine of his Lebanese

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upbringing as well as stories about how his parents taught him social justice in the kitchen. Nader, a 1955 Princeton Universit y graduate, has been a consumer advocate over the past six decades, publishing more than 20 books and numerous articles, continuing up to the present with daily tweets, a regular syndicated column for the past 50 years, and a podcast and radio program. His best-selling 1965 book Unsafe at Any Speed: The Designed-In Dangers of the American Automobile led to increased safety standards for automobiles and thousands of lives saved over the years. Listed by Life, Time and The Atlantic as one of the 100 most influential Americans, he has run for president of the United States in four different elections. Nader, who does not use a computer, will be participating in the January 30 event by audio only. “I use technology,” he said in a phone interview last Saturday. “It’s called the Underwood typewriter and the telephone. I decided a long time ago I wanted to get a day’s work done, and the email, the iPhone — a huge amount of clutter, trivial stuff, nasty stuff, a waste of time, and it breaks your concentration.” All participants on September 30 will receive copies of Cordray’s new book Watchdog: How Protecting Consumers Can Save Our Families, Our Economy, and Our Democracy and Mayer’s Shakedown: The Fleecing of the Garden State. Copies of Nader’s new cookbook can be ordered through Labyrinth Books at (609) 497-1600. Digital tickets, $65 each for the fundraising events, with all proceeds going to benefit the library’s collection of books and materials, are available at princetonlibrary.org/support-us. —Donald Gilpin

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Tour to f ur t her expand has helped maintain new Satterfield Honored for Dedication to Social Justice awareness of Princeton’s programs launched directly Shirley Satterfield, Princeton historian and president of the Witherspoon-Jackson (W-J) Historical and Cultural Society, was awarded the 2021 Martin Luther King Jr. Legacy Award by the New Jersey Education Association (NJEA) at their Human Rights Celebration conducted by Zoom on January 16. Sat ter f ield was recog nized by the NJEA for “a lifetime of dedication to social justice,” according to Kim Scott-Hayden, chair of the NJEA Human and Civil R ight s C om m it te e, who presented the award. ScottHayden highlighted a number of Satterfield’s accomplishments over the years as a teacher, school counselor, researcher, historian, and tour guide. As a teacher and counselor at Princeton High School, Satterfield founded the historic high school female leadership group P.U.L.S.E., which stands for Pride, Unity, Leadership, Sisterhood, and Esteem. Scott-Hayden cited Satte r f i e l d ’s l e a d e r s h i p i n achieving the WitherspoonJackson neighborhood ’s designation as Princeton’s 20th Historic District and her work with the W-J Historical and Cultural Society in “researching, preserving, understanding, and celebrating the history of African Americans in Princeton.” Satterfield established the Albert E. Hinds Memorial Walking Tour, Hayden-Scott noted, and took the lead in placing 26 plaques on the neighborhood’s Heritage

African American history. Satterfield “embodies the spirit of this award,” ScottHayden said.

JFCS Honors Volunteers At Virtual Fundraiser

Jew ish Family & Children’s Service of Greater Mercer County (JFCS) has pivoted their annual fundraiser to a virtual format. The event, “Cheers to the Volunteers,” will be held Thursday, March 25, at 8 p.m. and will be an interactive, virtual wine or coffee tasting for guests. “Our annual event is an oppor tunit y to bring to gether communit y members, donors, and partners to celebrate the agency and recognize the efforts of partners who are honored for their exceptional support in the past year,” said JFCA Executive Director Michelle Napell. “In such challenging times, JFCS has been fortunate to be supported by many partners, but we knew this year our volunteers were the true stars.” The event will be honoring 70 individuals who volunteered throughout the pandemic, specifically in support of JFCS relief efforts in the most challenging times. “Almost as quickly as the world changed, and JFCS pivoted programs, there were volunteers new and old reaching out to help,” said Eden Aaronson, coordinator of volunteers and community programs. S i n c e M a r ch 2020, a steady corps of volunteers

in response to the needs J FCS recognized among their clients and the community, including making Friendly Weekly Phone Calls to isolated seniors, and grocery shopping for elderly clients unable or uncomfortable navigating the stores. When visits to the JFCS on-site pantry doubled and Mobile Food Pantry distributions ramped up, volunteers were there to pack bag after bag of groceries for distribution. And, twice a week, every week, Kosher Meals on Wheels volunteers show up to deliver hot meals to homebound seniors. “While we look forward to the day we can welcome hundreds of guests into a ballroom, we are looking forward to creating a celebrator y and communit y spirit through our virtual program,” said Jennifer Agran, JFCS board first vice president and event chair. The virtual event will allow guests to select their beverage of choice – red wine, white wine, sparkling wine, Kosher wine or gourmet coffee – and beverages will be shipped directly to their homes. On March 25, guests are invited to join a live Zoom event during which they will be moved into breakout rooms based on their beverage selection and led in an interactive, guided tasting with a wine sommelier or coffee expert. For information including sponsorships and registration, visit JFCSonline.org/ giving#events.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021 • 12

Mailbox Sourland Conservancy Thanks Hopewell Gives Back Volunteers For MLK Day Service

To the Editor: On behalf of the Board and members of the Sourland Conservancy, I would like to thank the many community volunteers, partner nonprofits, and teen leaders of Hopewell Gives Back (HGB) for observing the Martin Luther King Day of Service by volunteering on January 16-18. This year, the HGB teen leaders planned a virtual event to invite families and individuals of all ages to pick up a project “kit” to complete at home. Each project will benefit one of four local nonprofits: I Support the Girls (feminine hygiene packs), Seeds to Sew International (decorating paper bags/boxes), The Rescue Mission of Trenton (making no-sew fleece blankets or face masks), and the Sourland Conservancy (assembling native seed packets). I would also like to thank the Hopewell Presbyterian Church for once again opening its doors to allow safe pick-up of project kits on Saturday morning and drop off of completed projects on Monday morning. I am honored to be a part of this special event that welcomes volunteers of all ages and encourages us all to work together to support each other which is especially important during this challenging time. LAURIE CLEVELAND Executive Director, Sourland Conservancy

Encouraging Council to Think About Consequences of Tulane Street Change

To the Editor: I am writing to voice my objection to aspects of the newly passed ordinance permanently changing a portion of Witherspoon Street to a one-way street. I realize that this is a challenging issue with many parties having different hopes and needs. We are all struggling to cope with the effects of the COVID crisis, but adaptations that work for some may be a hindrance to others. While I appreciate that there was an impetus to move quickly on this plan because, according to then Mayor Lempert, “Delaying it would mean we’d lose the grant funding for this project,” I do not think the implications of this ordinance have been well-considered. Many of the merchants that will be strongly affected, myself included, have been overwhelmed trying to weather the busy Christmas season during this pandemic and were not able to focus on this complicated topic. I will leave aside the larger issue of whether Witherspoon should be one-way, although for the record I am against it, and focus on the part of this plan that directly affects my store. According to the Town Topics article on December 23 [“Council Vote Finalizes One-Way Traffic on Witherspoon,” page 1], South Tulane Street will be changed from one-way going north to south to one-way south to north. We survive by buying collections of used CDs and LPs, and we need our customers to be able to drop them off in front of our store. They are heavy and difficult to carry any distance. With this proposed scenario, our customers will not be able to reach us in a direct way from Nassau Street. These typically out-of-town patrons, who do not

know the ins-and-outs of our side streets, will be forced to take a circuitous route through a series of three one-way streets in the densest part of town to get to us. The perils of Princeton traffic have always been a complaint from our would-be customers, and this would increase those hassles dramatically. Further, I am not sure if anyone has envisioned what the traffic flow on South Tulane will likely be under this plan. I would assume that this will funnel hundreds of cars a day up to Nassau Street from Spring Street, perhaps thousands on the weekends. The thought of all these cars crossing the extremely busy pedestrian crosswalk on Nassau Street without a traffic light is terrifying to me. We have mostly eliminated the crossing hazard at Washington and Nassau. Do we want to create another just one block away? I encourage the town Council to put the brakes on this project and take some time to really think through the consequences of these proposed changes. JON LAMBERT Owner, Princeton Record Exchange South Tulane Street

Thanks to All Who Have Helped PCH Residents During the Pandemic

To the Editor: During the past 10 months of the pandemic, residents who live in homes built and managed by Princeton Community Housing (PCH) have been the recipients of generosity by many organizations and food markets in Princeton. The challenge of making food available to those in need has been met by our community partners and we are very grateful for their initiatives. Arm In Arm has provided 70 bags of food for 70 households, twice a month, at Elm Court (EC) and Harriet Bryan House (HBH), PCH’s senior developments on Elm Road. Princeton Community Village (PCV) residents have also received food deliveries. The YMCA has delivered 60 boxes of fresh produce every week, and over 100 households at our senior residences took turns receiving these food boxes. The YMCA also delivered weekly fresh produce boxes to 45 households at PCV and 30 households at Griggs Farm. The Jewish Family and Children’s Service mobile food truck delivered a reusable grocery bag to 90 residents at EC and HBH. The bag included fresh produce, chicken and non-perishables. The first delivery was on December 30 and hopefully will continue quarterly in 2021. The mobile pantry also delivered food to 20 residents at PCV on the same day. Senior Care Services of Greater Princeton has provided volunteer grocery shopping to 15 residents. The Neighborhood Buddy Initiative has also provided volunteer grocery shopping to 10 residents. The Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Safe-4-Seniors Program arranged for groceries to be delivered to residents in partnership with the Greater Mercer Transportation Management Association (GMTMA) and Ride Provide. Six residents participated. McCaffrey’s donated 70 $10 gift cards for PCV and Griggs Farm residents for use during the holidays. Arm In Arm provided $20 gift cards for ShopRite to 70 households who participate in the mobile food pantry at EC and HBH. Stonehill Church provided Thanksgiving gift baskets directly to six residents’ doorsteps. Princeton Community Housing residents have also received non-food generosity from the Stony Brook Garden Club, which brought flowers, wreaths, and other decorations for the holidays. The Arts Council of Princeton provided 50+ cloth masks to our senior residents early in the pandemic, when masks were difficult to find. The Princeton Christian Church donated 300 disposable masks during the summer to PCV and Griggs Farm. What all of this adds up to is a very caring community! In addition to thanking our community partners, we also send our gratitude to all the staff and trustees at PCH for their thoughtfulness, caring, and generosity in helping our residents get through this challenging time. SARA JUST PCH Trustee, Riverside Drive

Arts Council Board of Trustees Thanks Community For Generous Response to Appeal

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To the Editor: On behalf of the Board of Trustees of the Arts Council of Princeton, I am writing to thank everyone in our community who made a gift of support during our winter appeal. The response was overwhelmingly generous. Over the past nine months, the Arts Council of Princeton’s response to the pandemic has been to offer free programs and creative ways to address the social isolation and the diminished sense of togetherness that characterized so much of 2020. Your support was an affirmative signal of support for the Arts Council’s hard work and continued commitment to keeping our community vibrant and connected. We will emerge from this pandemic stronger and more resilient as a community, and your support ensures that the Arts Council will be offering art-filled opportunities to come together and celebrate the creativity in each of us. On behalf of the entire Board, I offer a heartfelt thanks to all. BOARD OF TRUSTEES, ARTS COUNCIL OF PRINCETON SARAH COLLUM-HATFIELD, President Rock Road East, Hopewell

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Princeton Resident Thanks “Angel” For Help in Time of Social Distancing

To the Editor: The kindness of strangers. I want to publicly thank a very kind woman who stopped to help me and a friend on Hamilton Avenue on Wednesday, January 13. In this frightening time of social distancing she attempted to help a total stranger. I don’t know her name, but I think her middle name is Angel. Thank you so much. KATHRYN KING Linden Lane

Friends of Princeton Public Library Thank Supporters of Beyond Words 2020 Fundraiser

To the Editor: A heartfelt thank you from the Friends of the Princeton Public Library for the support of our amazing community for our Beyond Words 2020 fundraiser. On January 9th, we concluded our three-part speakers’ series with Kate Andersen Brower, the author of Team of Five: The Presidents Club in the Age of Trump, in conversation with Princeton University Professor Kevin Kruse. Considering recent events and the upcoming inauguration in Washington, D.C., our timing was impeccable. Kate Brower’s insights into the presidency, past presidencies, and life in the White House could not have been more timely and relevant. Coupled with the highly engaged participation from our patrons that we have grown to expect (and love), the event was proof again of the central role the Princeton Public Library plays in cultivating the curiosity of our community. We look forward to the day when we can gather once again in person for a Friends Evening or, hopefully, Beyond Words 2021. Until then, thank you for the unwavering commitment of our sponsors and supporters. Our ability to help the Library expand its collections, enhance its programming, and support its staff is all the more important during these challenging times. Thank you for being a Friend. DINA SHAW AND MEL GRZYMALA Beyond Words 2020 Co-Chairs ANDREA BRADLEY President, Friends of Princeton Public Library

Suggesting Ways to Pass on Stimulus Checks to Those Who Need Them Now

To the Editor: When those $600 stimulus checks arrive, let’s all consider their purpose, and whether we can just pass ours on to someone who needs it now. You may already have donated to one or more of the great relief organizations in town, yet find yourself looking for someone specific to give to, someone you would not embarrass by asking. Could it be the couple who have for years faithfully shoveled snow from your sidewalk, or helped you with gardening? Neither job is available now. Or a single parent, unemployed because a business you normally patronize has cut its hours? Maybe the home health aide, grocery checkout person, or crosswalk guard who’s missing because he or she has caught the virus — there must be a way to find that person. Once found, how to frame your gift? A tip? Pay for personal days off? Sick or vacation pay? Once you find the person, giving gets easier. Talk to that person. Think of what you can give, and do your best. Every gift counts. MARY CLURMAN Harris Road

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An Inauguration Day Celebration of the Visual Poetry of Walker Evans It’s transcendent, you feel it. It’s there, the vanished transcendence and insistence of chance, action and fortuity. It’s there and you can’t unfeel it. — Walker Evans (1903-1975) alker Evans is talking about the impact of the moment he encountered “a visual object” he knew he had to photograph. If you read those words after wading through the tide of raw imagery unleashed by the January 6 storming of the Capitol, you know what it means to feel a force so insistent that “you can’t unfeel it.” In the opening chapter of Walker Evans: Starting from Scratch (Princeton Univ. Press $39.95), Svetlana Alpers refers to poet William Carlos Williams’s review of Evans’s groundbreaking 1938 book, American Photography (“the pictures talk to us and they say plenty”). Focusing on the poet and photographer’s shared “passionate belief in American art as they made it,” Alpers quotes from a poem by Williams: “It is difficult / to get the news from poems / yet men die miserably every day / for lack / of what is found there.” The idea that poetry and photography have the power to enhance or sustain or even save a life resonates on January 20, 2021, whether in relation to the Capitol riots or the inauguration of the 46th president, who found therapy for a childhood disability by reciting the poetry of William Butler Yeats. The “news from poems” in this tumultuous month ranges from the “terrible beauty is born” of Yeats to President Biden’s campaign mantra by way of Seamus Haney: “Make hope and history rhyme.” Starting from Scratch Making is also the term Alpers stresses in revealing how “the weak role of tradition in photography” enabled Evans to present his work as something newly made and newly American; for the photographer it wasn’t “so much a matter of making it new as of starting from scratch,” thus the book’s subtitle, which has its own inaugural resonance. For Alpers, American Photographs, “the canny title of Evans’s book (made about America, made by an American, and made in an American style) says it all.” Corrugated Tin Façade, Moundville, Alabama, the first photograph in Walker Evans, plate 1 of 143, looks so dull, so profoundly ordinary, you wonder why it’s given such prominence. Perhaps by placing the image up front Alpers is simply prompting a closer look or urging you to ask yourself why Evans chose to make a picture of so underwhelming an object in the first place. Where’s the poetry? What is it that caught his eye? And what about that pile of dirt in the foreground? In fact, this is the “transcendent” visual object, the inspirational subject, that so excited Evans, this the “insistent” force, the nexus of “chance, action and fortuity” that “you can’t unfeel.”

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Reminding us at this point that Evans was “a disappointed author as a youth” with “ambitions so high he felt unable to write,” Alpers quotes the photographer’s less elegant explanation of his motive: “When I came upon it I was principally taken in by the cross-light on the silvery corrugated tin. This was just so beautiful I set my camera up, knocked over by that surface, moved by the barren look of the false front, and how the pile of dirt added to it .... I knew in a flash that I wanted that, and found out a lot more afterward, editing it. You are trying for something, and if it’s wrong you know later on. But first you get it on the film, you garner it in.” Heading North Even with Alpers’s insightful comments about the attraction that tin, “the humble A mer ican mater ial,” had for Evans, and her suggestion that “the beauty here, as elsewhere, is a sign of loss — a tin false front to the building with its castaway pile of dirt,” I don’t want to be in Moundsville, Alabama, not when I can escape to 19th-century Paris in the next chapter (“Evans’s France: Real and Virtual” ) with t h e p h o to g r a p h e r’s inspirational literar y heroes Flauber t and Baudelaire, or in New York City circa 19281930 with the woman on Fulton Street, fierce with attitude (Plate 4), or on West 11th in Chelsea watching workmen loading the massive neon word DAMAGED on to (or off of) a truck (Plate 28). I’ve always felt the pull of Evans’s New York, and the closest I’ve ever actually felt to the photographer was imagining myself riding side by side with him on the Broadway Local, destination 137th Street (Plates 116-118). Finding the Poetry Walker Evans first came my way in the company of James Agee, whose posthumous novel, A Death in the Family (1957), was one of the great “transcendent, you-feel-it-and-can’t-unfeel-it” reading experiences of my life. As much as I admire Evans, I’m in awe of Agee, especially when comparing his prose with Evans’s photographs of the people and interiors (Plates 101-112) that he and Agee lived among during their month in 1936 with Alabama sharecroppers. The experience is documented, dreamed over, loved and lost and found again in Agee’s daring, peerless, supremely presumptuous 471-page work of genius, Let Us Now Praise Famous Men (1941, 1960). As if to counter Agee’s Ahab-like quest to

vanquish the Moby-Dick of clichés, that “a picture is worth a thousand words,” Alpers juxtaposes an Evans interior (Plate 103, Table, Fireplace and Pictures...) with one of Agee’s more prosaic descriptions (“so many words” among “many, many more”), her point being to show Agee “giving up in favor of Evans” when it came to describing tableware fixed to one of the walls. “Evans’s photographs tell more because he loved less,” Alpers says, and it’s true, except for the upside that when Agee feels more, loves more, imagines more, which is often, he travels worlds beyond “telling.” It’s likely that Evans may have photographed the mirror Agee reimagines in the paragraph below, may even have felt “its vanished transcendence” and the “insistence of chance, action and fortuity” that can’t be unfelt. What Agee finds in it is the poetry “that men die miserably for lack of” — “T he m ir ror is so far corrupted that it is rashed with gray, iridescent in parts, and in all its reflections a deeply sad thin zincto-platinum, giving to its framings an almost incalculably ancient, sweet, frail, and piteous beaut y, such as may be seen in tintypes of family groups among studio furnishings or heard in nearly exhausted jazz records made by very young, insane, devout men who were soon to destroy t hems elve s, in New Orleans, in the early nineteen twenties.” A Passionate Photographer If Walker Evans did a Rip Van Winkle and returned to the 21st-century American scene, he’d undoubtedly be struck by the phenomenon of the camera phone and the selfie, the strange new reality in which everyone is a photographer, with people snapping up images as fast as thought, holding the magic wand up and down and all around like the more touristy elements of the mob that invaded the Capitol two weeks ago. No worries about “trying for something, and if it’s wrong you know later on. But first ... you garner it in.” No, you garner and garner and Instagram it and stream it in a frenzy. Evans knew about frenzy. “With the camera, it’s all or nothing .... I became a passionate photographer. Couldn’t think of anything else. I just caught it. Like a disease.” Alpers quotes from a 1930 journal in which Lincoln Kirstein says of Evans and photography, “the whole possibility of the medium excited him so much that he sometimes thought he was completely crazy.” In the chapter on the “Subway Portraits,” the 1938 -1941 series wherein Evans

snapped unknowing riders with a camera concealed in his coat, Alpers describes “a tense relationship between submission and aggression.” Evans saw the riders as “unconscious captive sitters,” of himself as “a penitent spy and apologetic voyeur ... strapped to a Leica.” During a 1971 Q and A at the University of Michigan, he explained that “it was just something that attracted me more and more and more ... until I really sort of went crazy with the subject. I had to make myself stop — or I’d be doing it until this day.” “Damaged” While potential subjects like the corrugated tin façade that Evans found transcendentally compelling would be passed over by the multitudinous shoot-fromthe-hip amateurs of today, certain visual subjects are universally irresistible. The most obvious example among the photographs assembled by Alpers is the previously mentioned Plate 28 with the caption “Workers Loading Neon “Damaged” Sign into Truck, West Eleventh Street, New York City, 1928-30.” Despite the unexciting caption, this is the sort of quirky spectacle that would have any so-called “man on the street” gaping and then grabbing his phone. The word DAMAGED is immense, all of a piece, I’m guessing at least 20 feet long and 3 feet high, two men hefting the one end, the big D, while the man on the truck steadies the big D on the far end. There it is. A ready-made message to underscore any era or occasion, like the damage recently inflicted on democracy by the losing candidate’s false claims of vote fraud. January 20, 1961 Sixty years ago on a cold, windy, winter day, the newly elected 41-year-old American president John Kennedy’s inaugural address was preceded by the 86-year-old American poet Robert Frost’s reading of “The Gift Outright,” a poem best remembered for its opening line, “The land was ours before we were the land’s.” Kennedy chose Frost because he felt “he had something important to say to those of us who are occupied with the business of government” and “would remind us that we are dealing with life, the hopes, and fears of millions of people.” The line of Frost’s that haunts every inaugural, however, comes from “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”: “But I have promises to keep, and miles to go before I sleep.” his year’s inaugural poet is 22-yearold A manda Gorman, who was named the U.S.’s first youth poet laureate in 2017. The poem she’s written for the occasion, “The Hill We Climb,” draws from the events during the storming of the Capitol, as she told ABC News: “That day gave me a second wave of energy. The poem isn’t blind. It isn’t turning your back to the evidence of discord and division.” —Stuart Mitchner

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We Are In This Together So Please Do Your Part Protect Yourself • Protect Your Family • Protect Your Friends Protect Your Neighbors • Protect Your Community E n j o y P r i n c e t o n’s P u b l i c S p a c e s , o u r B e a u t i f u l P a r k s , O u r P l a z a s and Sidewalks, And All Public Spaces Responsibly

*Message Brought to You by a Group of Caring Princeton Families

13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021

BOOK REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021 • 14

MUSIC REVIEW

New Jersey Symphony Orchestra Presents Second of Virtual Concert Performances

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ew Jersey Symphony Orchestra launched the second of its series of virtual performances this season last Thursday night. Led by NJSO Music Director Xian Zhang (who was also showcased as piano soloist), the concert also featured NJSO concertmaster Eric Wyrick and music of William Grant Still, Giacomo Puccini, Samuel ColeridgeTaylor, and Antonin Dvorák. Recorded in Prudential Hall of the New Jersey Performing Arts Center last October and presented as a “concert film,” in collaboration with DreamPlay Films, the online performance combined the lush music of these four composers with scenes of New Jersey Symphony’s home base in Newark. Considered the “Dean of African American composers,” William Grant Still composed nearly 200 works during the first two-thirds of the 20th century. Still had a multi-faceted career as classical composer, while also arranging for popular band leaders and film scores. Mother and Child was initially the second movement of Still’s 1943 Suite for Violin and Piano, inspired by a lithograph of the same name by abstract figurative and modern artist Sargent Claude Johnson. Still arranged this movement in several orchestrations, including for strings alone, which was the version heard Thursday night. Beginning with rich melodic passages from the violins, Mother and Child was based on a four-note musical motive expressed in a var iet y of dif ferent ways. The violin melody often floated above the rest of the strings, and the celli and double basses effectively played more percussively as the tension built. The onemovement work evoked a lullaby, but purposefully never resolved its harmony at the end, reflecting an ongoing lifelong journey between mother and child. 19th-century Italian composer Giacomo Puccini is renowned for his lush and melodic operas, but, in his early thirties, composed a single-movement elegy for string quartet in response to the death of a friend. Named after Italy’s flower of mourning and heroism, I Cristantemi (The Chrysanthemums) was composed in one night and was presented by the string sections of NJSO on Thursday night. The players brought out well the bit of operatic drama in the music, while the visuals included street scenes of Newark and close-ups of the players’ instruments as they played. The violins articulated phrases particularly well, and Zhang effectively drew out cadences at the ends of musical sections. The spiritual “Deep River” was first published in an 1870s collection of songs of the Fisk Jubilee Singers, founded in the 1870s at Tennessee’s Fisk University and still per for ming today. English composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, who

made a career of integrating traditional African music into the classical tradition, discovered this spiritual upon hearing the Fisk Jubilee Singers in England, and later published it as one of 24 Negro Melodies Transcribed for the Piano. Whereas choral arrangements of this tune stay centered on the original melody, ColeridgeTaylor’s version created a fantasy based on the first four measures of the song. For Thursday night’s performance, Xian Zhang took a step off the podium to demonstrate her piano accompaniment s k i l l s w it h N e w J e r s e y S y mp h ony concertmaster Eric Wyrick playing solo violin. Coleridge-Taylor’s arrangement shared the tune between violin and piano, moving into different octaves t hroughout t he piece w it h var y ing harmonic shifts. Wyrick’s bow seemed never to leave the strings of the violin in his presentation of the melody, and when the tune passed to the piano, Zhang provided a fluid interpretation while Wyrick played an elegant obbligato. This piece was the only work on the program with no accompanying visual scenes, with the virtual audience able to focus solely on the performers and the music. Czech composer Antonin Dvorák also sought to incorporate folksongs and traditions of his homeland into classical works. He composed the five-movement Serenade for Strings in less than two weeks while in his thirties, and the piece helped cement his reputation as a significant composer of the late 19 th century. With the Serenade in the same key as Coleridge-Taylor’s Deep River, the transition between the two works onscreen was effortless. Dvorák’s work became lush very quickly in NJSO’s performance, with accompanying first movement visuals principally of trains and their passengers coming and going in Newark. Melodic material in the violins was well answered by the violas in the first movement, with the viola section providing a lean yet rich melody. he second movement waltz had a bit of a folk feel, and the Symphony played the third movement “Scherzo” crisply. Transitions among musical passages were smooth, especially a swirling transition to the closing coda. New Jersey Symphony Orchestra closed the concert with a celebratory “Finale” to the Serenade, evoking a festive day in a Bohemian village. Zhang brought out well the decisiveness of the rhythm, with running passages and accents in the violins providing a whirling dervish-like effect. The visual effects followed the tempi of the movement, with images of people moving in slow motion matching the closing measures of the piece. —Nancy Plum

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New Jersey Symphony Orchestra will present its next online concerts February 1-6, with the ensemble’s 2021 Lunar New Year Celebration. This series will feature virtual festival performances and traditional craft demonstrations released daily and will culminate in a Lunar New Year Celebration concert premiere on February 6 at 7:30 p.m. This concert is a collaboration with the Peking University Alumni Chorus and Starry Arts Group Children’s Chorus. Information about the NJSO Lunar New Year Celebration can be found on the ensemble’s website at njsymphony.org.

Princeton Charter School is a free, K-8 public school. We encourage you to learn more about us in order to see whether Charter is the right option for your family. Open house sessions will be posted on the school website. Now accepting applications! Ranked #1 Public Elementary School in NJ 2020 & 2021 by Niche.com

Saturday, January 30, 2020, 10:00 AM Virtual Open House Wednesday, March 12, 12:00 Noon Lottery registration deadline 100 Bunn Drive Tuesday, March 16 – 4:00 PM Admissions lottery 100 Bunn Drive PCS is a small school community where students are well-known and teachers are accessible. We value diversity as a critical part of our school culture. We welcome all applicants from Princeton. Students are admitted to Charter based on a random lottery. Students who qualify for a weighted lottery based on family income will have their names entered into the lottery twice. Print registration forms or register online at: http://www.pcs.k12.nj.us


An International, Digital Cast for 2021 Princeton Triangle Club Show

To the Princeton University students who take part in the Princeton Triangle Club ( PTC ) Show at McCarter Theatre each year, canceling the 2021 production because of COVID-19 was unthinkable. The P TC is the oldest tour ing collegiate musical comedy troupe in the nation. Famous alumni of the show, which is written and performed by students and directed by professionals, include author F. Scott Fitzgerald and actors James Stewart, Brooke Shields, and Ellie Kemper. The annual musical comedy with a famous kick-line is a revered tradition, dating back 130 years. Members weren’t about to let the pandemic, which shut down the campus last March, break that tradition. Thanks to an effort that reached across three continents, a virtual version of the show will go on. But those involved in the creation of All Underdogs Go To Heaven say it is more than just a video. The production, which is available starting tonight, January 20 at 8 p.m., is being billed as “a movie musical.” “It’s definitely musical comedy all the way,” said junior Kate Semmens, PTC vice president and a cast member. “Our director Ashley Marinelli, who was choreographer for last year’s

show, came up with a concept that honors the movie idea instead of leaning into what we usually do.” Fourteen students wrote the script about an underdog sports team and their unusual efforts to reverse their 20-year losing streak. “As they coach the motliest crüe Partham [the name of the school] has ever seen, they’ll face r ival teams, magical sports equipment, overeager youngsters, and exp e n s ive a n i m ate d s e quences, while learning the true meaning of Ball (The sport is called Ball for efficiency’s sake.),” reads a press release. “Will the Pollawogs beat the Marthap Marauders in the Jersey Rec League Championship?” Once COVID-19 closed the campus to most undergraduates and activities last March, Marinelli began trying revamp plans for the production. “She was really thinking outside the box,” said Semmens. “It was a process of learning from the University about when it might open, and keeping up with contingency plans. Those kept falling through. But she kept being creative. The trustees said we could do a Zoom reading of the show, but she wanted to do something completely different.” M a r i n e l l i p l ay e d w i t h green screens. She was inspired by other digital

projects that were able to make it look like characters were touching each other. “Her background is directing and dance, not tech,” said Semmens. “We brought on a lot of people to support her. Students helped her with the technical aspect.” By September, PTC realized that they were dealing with an international cast. The show features a Princeton undergraduate cast of 27, an orchestra of 22 students, and 50 business, tech, and writing team members. Actors filmed their parts across three countries and 10 states. “We have people who were as far away as Barbados and England,” said Semmens. “We weren’t looking for that, but that’s how it ended up. So, if you include the pit orchestra and the tech people, we’re all over the world.” A l l Un d erd o g s G o To Heaven builds on the concept of an underdog sports movie. “It has a Moneyballesque plot,” said Semmens. “There are a lot of sports jokes. We’re kind of playing on those themes. This year’s show is more plotdriven than others, which have been revue-style. This is character-based and funcentered.” Semmens, who is from Brooklyn, was intent on joining Triangle when she arrived at Princeton two years ago. “It was the first

It was tricky, but we went through it.” Visit triangleshow.com for the link to stream the show for free until February 1,

after which it will be added to the Triangle on Demand library and will be available to rent or buy. —Anne Levin

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Performing Arts

club I auditioned for,” she said. “I have a theater background, and so do a lot of other members. But we have a healthy mix of people with different backgrounds. It has become my family at Princeton. I have made wonderful friends. I get to be with creative people who love to laugh.” P u t t i n g to g e t h e r t h i s year’s show was challenging. “It was difficult, mainly because things kept changing,” said Semmens. “But once we started, there was a lot of trial and error. We’d never done rehearsals on Zoom before. We had to teach members how to film and operate the phone as a camera. It was a learning curve for everyone. There was a lot of mailing of costumes and props all over.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANuARY 20, 2021 • 16

WW Arts Council presents “Harmony” Exhibition

Art

Communities often look to artists to provide the bridge b et ween what has hap pened in the past and what is needed going forward. When the Exhibition Committee of the West Windsor Arts Council sat down last September, this was exactly their intention in creating the “Harmony” exhibition. At that meeting, the conversation revolved around how to bring people together, “There are too many things up in the air right now. What makes us feel grounded and connected and how can art accomplish this?” When the Exhibition Committee created the theme of “Harmony,” they invited artists to explore the idea of balance disrupted and harmony restored as it relates to personal experience, beliefs, or obser vations. WWAC hopes the works in this show will help viewers to focus on the ideal of harmony in its many forms, recognizing that this is not an easy goal to attain, but one well worth the effort. The jurors Maureen Bennett, Eleni Litt, and SiriOm Singh selected 34 works of art and music for the show, each piece exploring the theme through a variety of media. The exhibition “HARMONY”: “High Fever” by Erika Hibbert, above, and “Flying Kites Series” by Carole Jury, is viewable online through below, are featured in the West Windsor Arts Council’s new online exhibition. It can also be February 26 at westwindsorarts.org and by appointviewed by appointment at the West Windsor Arts Center through February 26. ment at the Arts Center. Exhibiting artists include Zakia Ahmed, Jodi Oster, Clara Beym, Nikita Choksi, Vinny Conte, Connie Cruser, Emily Buchalski, Alice Eltvedt, Jayme Fahrer, Janet Felton, Michelle Floyd, Erika Hibbert, Jeanette Gaston Hooban, Carole Jury, Margaret Kalvar Bushnell, Lori Langsner, Dave Magyar, Lucretia Ellen McGuffSilverman, Renata Piccione, William Plank, Karen Schoenitz, Margaret Simpson, Tanzanight, and Barbara Weinfield. For more information, visit westwindsorarts.org, email info@westwindsorarts.org, or call (609) 716-1931.

Hunterdon Art Museum To Open Three Exhibits

Hunterdon Art Museum will open three new exhibitions on Sunday, January 24: “Glass in the Expanded Field,” “Architectonic: Bruce Dehnert Sculptural Ceramics,” and “Laura Moriarty: Resurfacing.” The museum will make its new exhibitions available virtually in mid-Febr uar y as par t of its ongoing effort to bring contemporary art to underser ved communities and those affected by COVID-19. A free virtual opening for the new exhibitions will take place on Saturday, January 23 from 7 to 8 p.m. and can

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on armatures of clay units. Dehnert has lived, worked, exhibited, curated, and taught in several parts of the world. He is also a master kiln builder, responsible for the rebuilding of the noborigama kiln at Peters Valley School of Craft where he heads the Ceramics Program. “Laura Moriarty: Resurfacing,” curated by the Hunterdon Art Museum’s Exhibitions Committee, highlights works whose forms, colors, textures, and patterns result from processes similar to those that shape and reshape the earth: heating and cooling, erosion, subduction, friction, enfolding, weathering, and slippage. Sculptures and two-dimensional works are included in the exhibition. The encaustic monotypes featured in this show are an ongoing project of Moriarty’s studio work in which she uses a heated metal plate to erode and shape sculptural paintings, and carefully offset the trails and spillways left behind onto paper as another way of capturing time. The Hunterdon Art Museum is located at 7 Lower Center Street in Clinton. For more information, visit hunterdonartmuseum.org or call (908) 735-8415. Continued on Page 29

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be attended by registering at hunderdonmuseum.org. “Glass in the Expanded Field,” curated by Caitlin Vitalo, highlights the complexity and versatility of glass art and the glassmaking community through the work of 17 artists. In the first half of the 20th century, American glassmaking was limited primarily to factories where workers produced multiples of the same object. Then in the 1960s, the American studio glass movement was born. Focusing on one of a kind objects that highlighted the unique qualities of glass, the early years of the movement set the tone for creative exploration of the material and its artistic capabilities. The modern studio glass movement now consis ts of a diverse grouping of people and perspectives that is the antithesis of the traditional factory production system. Embracing a medium that is defined by opposing terms — hot and cold; liquid and solid; strong and fragile; transparent and opaque — and showcasing work by artists of different backgrounds, “Glass in the Expanded Field” celebrates the complementary nature of opposites. “A r c h i te c to n i c : B r u c e D eh ner t S cu lpt u ra l C e ramics,” curated by Ingrid Renard and Hildreth York, focuses on Dehnert’s use of geometries as primary elements where semi-abstracted sculptures are supported

Wendy Kopp

White House photographer Amanda Lucidon documents Michelle Obama, PU Class of ’85

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“EX UNO PLURES 2”: This work by Laura Moriarty is part of “Laura Moriarty: Resurfacing,” one of three new exhibitions opening at the Hunterdon Art Museum in Clinton on January 24. A virtual opening is Saturday, January 23 from 7 to 8 p.m.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021 • 18

Menu Winter 2021 CREATE YOUR OWN SERVED ON TACOS, FLATBREADS, OVER GREENS OR OVER AIRFRIED POTATOES Rainbow Smashed Avocado, Red Cabbage, Tomato, Roasted Corn and Chickpeas, Lemon Caper Aioli Chipotle Smashed Avocado, Red Cabbage, Black Beans, Pico de Gallo, Cilantro and Lime, Chipotle Sauce Curry Tacos Smashed Avocado, Roasted Corn, Red Onion, Curry Roasted Chickpeas, Greens, Tahini Tofu Our Golden Turmeric Tofu, Black Beans, Greens and Tomato, Sriracha Aioli TACOS Served on soft corn tortillas $5.95 OVER GREENS $6.95 FLATBREAD $7.95 AIR FRIED POTATOES $7.95 ______________

SPUDS STREET SPUDS Airfried Potatoes topped with Smashed Avocado, Cayenne Lime Roasted Chickpeas, Lemon Caper Aioli, Green Onion Snack Size $5.95 Meal Size $7.95 CHILI SPUDS Airfried Potatoes topped with our Three Bean Chili, Lemon Caper Aioli, Green Onion Snack Size $5.95 Meal Size $7.95 ________________ NACHOS Rainbow Nachos Smashed Avocado, Red Cabbage, Tomato, Roasted Corn and Chickpeas, Lemon Caper Aioli Snack Size $5.95 Meal Size $7.95

Chipotle Nachos Smashed Avocado, Red Cabbage, Black Beans, Pico de Gallo, Cilantro and Lime, Chipotle Sauce Snack Size $5.95 Meal Size $7.95 ____________________ DESSERT

THE CALIFORNIA AVOCADO TOAST Smashed Avocado, Fresh Tomato, Lemon Caper Aioli on a toasted Flatbread, topped with Greens and EVOO drizzle $7.95 ___________________

CHOCOLATE PIZZA Avocado Mousse over a Cinnamon Sugar toasted Flatbread, topped with Fresh Fruit $5.95 ___________________

609-955-1120 to order The Trenton Farmers Market 960 Spruce Street Lawrence Township, NJ Friday 11-3 | Saturday 10-3 | Sunday Brunch: 10-2 Grubhub and now Uber Eats

Ladyandtheshallot.com

AL FRESCO: Shown are some of the new outdoor dining features on Witherspoon Street. Many of these will continue through the winter and beyond, says Princeton Councilwoman Michelle Pirone Lambros. “We have continued to provide the bin blocks to block off car spaces on several streets, have waived all fees for permitting and tent utilization, and plan to continue any support needed to expand and continue outdoor dining.” (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

With Imagination, Improvisation. and Adaptation, Restaurants are Meeting COVID-19 Challenges What a difference a year makes. January 2020. January 2021. Last January, COVID-19 was unknown to most of us, and certainly no one anticipated the enormous impact it would have. In fact, everyone has felt the shock of this virus. It has been a year like no other in recent history. Only the time of the 1918 flu pandemic is comparable. No handshaking, hugging, or touching. Instead, masks, hand sanitizers, temperaturetaking, testing, and social distancing are the new norms. Offices, stores, and businesses have been temporarily or even permanently closed, and “virtual” has become the new reality. Of all the businesses affected, arguably those hardest hit have been restaurants. Sadly, some are permanently gone, while others have managed to stay open, emphasizing takeout and curbside pick-up, and shifting to outdoor dining in the warmer weather, and 25 percent capacity indoors. Serving Customers With imagination and adjustments, they have adapted to the challenges, and continue to serve customers. Despite shortages of products and ingredients, reduced staff, and increased expenses, they are doing their best to stay open. And even while facing this crisis, many of them are helping those in need in the community by generously offering meals and outdoor pantries where food supplies can be picked up at no charge. For example, The Blue Bears Special Meals restaurant in the Princeton Shopping Center has participated in the Mr. Rogers’ Neighbors Kindness Project by delivering meals to families in need. “Our contribution is soups,” says chef/owner Eric Wimmer, adding that it is very important to stay open. “We wanted to give our entire staff the possibility to work safely. We want to be there to serve our clientele, who tell us how important it is for them to see us open and be able to find here a little comfort, warmth, and good food.” The Blue Bears is set apart in many ways, including its international flavor, and, especially, by its underlying

concept of encouraging and enabling young adults facing intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) to find opportunities for learning and meaningful work. “We had to reduce our staff to a bare minimum during the height of the pandemic,” reports Wimmer. “But since September and October, they have gradually come back, and we now employ four of the eight IDD staff we had originally.” Safety Precautions All the state-required safety precautions are in place, with all staff wearing masks and gloves, tables six feet apart, and 25 percent indoor capacity. In addition, he notes, ”As an extra precaution, we have installed filters inside that are able to trap particles greater than five microns.” Takeout and curbside pickup are available, and many customers order online. Catering is also another service. The good food, including its delicious pastries, at The Blue Bears continues to be a hallmark, but there has been an impact, emphasizes Wimmer. “The effect on the menus is mainly in the supply chain disruptions, deliveries, out-of-stock items, etc. We have been able so far to adjust correctly, as we change our menu every day, which gives us greater flexibility. We are all just continuing to adjust to this new environment.” Adjusting is key, agrees John Procaccini, owner with his partners of several restaurants, which are part of the Gretalia Hospitality Group. Among them are Trattoria Procaccini, Pj’s Pancake House, and More Than Q Barbecue as well as Osteria Procaccini in Pennington and Crosswicks, among others. “I think the local restaurants are hanging tough with the support of our local customers,” he points out. “We are grateful for them for adapting to all our COVID changes and the new way to dine out. Barbecue is still going strong, but there has definitely been a sharp drop since all the holiday warnings came out around Thanksgiving. Takeout is more than 80 percent of our weekly sales. “Outdoor dining was a blessing during the warmer months,” he continues. “This helped tremendously, and we currently have all of our patios open for those who wish

to brave the cold temps. However, we rarely get people who want to sit outside at this time. “So, we are at 25 percent capacity inside, and that’s not nearly enough to even try and tread water. Of course, all of our staff is checked daily for fever, and are asked a series of health questions. Gloves and masks are worn by all, and we do an intense sanitation of high traffic touch points hourly.” Meal Packages In addition, Procaccini continues, “We have implemented unique meal packages and online ordering and delivery platforms to help our customers get the food they love safely and efficiently.” Another challenge for the restaurants has been increased costs to implement so many changes, he adds. “Expenses have increased dramatically because of all of the PPE (personal protective equipment) requirements from the state mandates. The cost of takeout containers and bags, signage, tents, outdoor furniture, and heaters have added to this.” Staff has not been reduced, he points out, because generous unemployment benefits are a factor. “We are actually having a difficult time filling positions because of this.” Menu items have actually increased, he reports, with the addition of family-style offerings for easy set-up at home. “We also offer catering for small events of 25 people or less. My hope is for an increased indoor dining capacity and continued customer support in any fashion that makes them feel safe and comfortable.” Spring Reopening The Momo brothers — Carlo, Raoul, and Anthony — are in charge of a number of popular Princeton and area restaurants, including Mediterra, Eno Terra, Terra Momo Bread Company, and Teresa Caffe, as well as the Bread Company outlet in the Trenton Farmers Market. Teresa Caffe is currently closed, and the hope is for a spring reopening. The situation has been daunting, to say the least, explains Raoul Momo. “It has been incredibly painful, from the very start, when the Continued on Next Page


Continued from Previous Page

governor shut down all restaurants on March 16. And it is still difficult through today, with winter upon us. “The town has been very helpful in allowing expanded outdoor dining, and we hope they will allow us one more year of it, as the summer and fall of 2020 were lifesavers. People enjoyed going to restaurants, just not indoors. The other lifesaver was the PPE. Without that, all our places would have closed indefinitely.” Although they follow all the safety precautions, including weekly spray sanitizing of the facilities, testing employees, etc., indoor dining has been seriously affected, he says. “The guests really only want to dine outside, but the heating really does not work when temperatures drop below 50. When you dine, you are seated, relaxed, and eating, so you will get cold. We say, ‘Bring your own blanket!’” Costs have increased, he adds, with tent rentals, meat prices, and other items, and unfortunately staff had to be substantially reduced. After initial problems with limited meat costs and availability, that situation has now eased, he says. He is very pleased about their new Box to Table program, which began last April. “This has been a very successful pivot for us. The food is prepared at Mediterra, and customers pick up their Box at the Bread Company curbside. The dinner is fully prepared, and generally feeds four. The menu changes weekly, and it usually sells out each time. We can only make so many. This is not processed food. It is offered Thursday, Friday, and Saturday.” “We also have DIY pizza and paella kits,” continues Momo. “It’s a whole new business for us, and we’re sorry we did not diversify into it earlier. It was the pandemic that made it happen, but this type of business could easily grow. Customers have been asking if we can continue it post-COVID, and we hope to do so. “It’s our mantra to ‘Stay safe, stay healthy, and stay in business!’ All our businesses remain open, and our plan is to try and keep it that way. But we know it won’t be easy. We will need, most importantly, the support of our loyal patrons. They have been absolutely fabulous; buying gift cards, getting takeout, donating to help the staff, buying our takeout Box to Table specials, buying wine, etc. It is amazing!” Witherspoon Street “Everyone appreciates the way pedestrian traffic has opened up on Witherspoon Street. People have really enjoyed coming together and eating outside,” says Adam Angelakis. As co-owner, with his brother Nick, of Olives Gourmet & Bakery at 22 Witherspoon Street, he adds that “We are thankful and grateful for the way the town has allowed us to adapt to these changing times.” Indeed, the Witherspoon Street-scape is filled with intriguing scenes and scenarios as people enjoy the many outdoor dining opportunities that have been available. The street’s new traffic pattern has made it possible for more outdoor tables and

attractive settings to line the thoroughfare. “I want to give credit to for mer Mayor L emper t, the Princeton Council, and the Engineering Depar tment” says Angelakis. “They worked hard to make outside dining possible, and they have worked closely with the business community. I also want to compliment the Arts Council, and artistic director Maria Evans and her team. They have done a wonderful job of painting and beautifying the street.” He also points out that, in many ways, the challenge of the virus has actually brought out the best in people. “There has been a lot of sharing, with Witherspoon Street businesses working together as neighbors and supporting each other.” Healthy Eating “I also appreciate our customers who have stayed with us, and I enjoy spending time with them,” says Angelakis. “They have been so loyal. Our specialty is healthy prepared food, and everything is made from scratch. Healthy eating is definitely popular today, with healthier dishes in demand. We have healthy breakfasts, lunches, dinners, and specials every day, including box lunches to go.” Olives offers several dining options, he points out. “People can come in and select what they want; they can eat outside (if it’s not too cold); they can pick up their order curbside or inside, or we can deliver to their home or office. For delivery, they just need to download the apps, Doordash or Snackpass. “We are witnessing a real community effort and togetherness,” he says. “Somehow, the virus has created this sense of community and cooperation, and customers are really appreciating it. There is a lot more patience and kindness. Of course, we are looking forward to the virus being gone and getting back to normal or the ‘new’ normal, but in the meantime, we are all doing the best we can, and taking one day at a time.” One day at a time. That is good advice. And in these times we are living in, the municipality is facing challenges on many levels, all the while trying to maintain a viable downtown, with thriving stores, businesses and restaurants. In addition to Princeton’s unique history and its home to a prestigious university, it has always been known as an attractive setting for shopping, and increasingly, for dining. As new Mayor Mark Freda points out, a variety of options are being considered to create a positive outlook on many fronts. “The town staff, last year’s and this year’s elected officials have put a lot of effort into helping our businesses. That will remain an important focus going forward.” Landscape Elements In addition, Freda notes that the outdoor dining front was popular, and is expected to continue, along with the changes to the Witherspoon Street traffic pattern. He adds that “The one-way traffic pattern removes a traffic lane allowing that space to be used for something else. So the preliminary thoughts envision that newly available space for more landscape elements in some areas, and wider pedestrian elements in

other areas. All are possibilities for business uses, such as outdoor dining, etc. The town will continue to work with business owners and building owners on a consistent basis, with all of us working together to see what makes the most sense.” He also points out that changing traffic on Witherspoon Street can cause some traffic to go elsewhere. “The town has retained a traffic engineering firm to look at the streets around Witherspoon, as well as the intersections around the area. So there are projections on the traffic impact, suggestions for traffic-related and intersection improvements, and other actions to help create a coordinated traffic pattern for the area.” Princeton Councilwoman Michelle Pirone Lambros also emphasizes that the one-way traffic on Witherspoon will allow for more space for outdoor dining as well as redesigning the space for more green areas and more pedestrian and bike-friendly opportunities. “We are in the process of doing the redesign, and we hope to have more flexible space where parking can be metered by kiosk instead of individual meters; also, repaving to eliminate curbs, and create a pedestrianfriendly space. New lighting and landscaping will also be included. The first phase of the redesign will be from Nassau to Green Street, with the portion of Spring to Nassau being one-way northbound, as it is now. “We are also working to improve the timing of the traffic light on Vandeventer, and will make the Chambers to Nassau Street intersection a right-turn-only lane. No changes are anticipated on Palmer Square.” Resiliency Fund Helping the businesses remains an important priority, she emphasizes. “We worked with Princeton University and the Greater Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber Foundation to create the Princeton Small Business Resiliency Fund that gave out over $450,000 to many of our local restaurants as $5,000 grants. “We also worked to create activations over the holidays to help create an outdoor setting for patrons. Many restaurants continued to have outdoor dining, with space heaters and tenting, and continue to do so. “Another effort is to encourage a ‘Shop Local, Eat Local’ program, working together with the Princeton Merchants Association. Takeout is the best way to help our restaurants through these next months, when dining out options may be limited due to inclement weather.” Looking ahead, she says the municipality is open to suggestions on further ways to help the restaurants, while stressing that local support is crucial. “I would like to encourage our residents to think local first. We have a wonderful array of cuisine at various price points — something for everyone! If every resident could make the effort of ordering out once a week (or more, even better!), we can help our restaurants get through these very difficult months.” —Jean Stratton

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021

Takeout Directory


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021 • 20

Antimo’s Italian Kitchen Appetizers

BBQ SpecialtieS at trenton FarmerS market Thursday–Saturday, 9am–4pm In the Trenton Farmers Market 960 Spruce Street Lawrence Township, NJ

609-325-7357 about Hambone opera’s newask Year'S eve partY Special! BBQ inand Bandor Spicy Sauce. 50 Smoked Wings Original

Italian Antipasto – 17 soppressata, prosciutto, mozzarella, roasted peppers, provolone, olives Bufala Caprese – 13 Calamari Fritti – 12 Shrimp Scampi – 15 Eggplant Rollatini –14 Meatballs (3pcs) tomato, ricotta –13 Mussels-12 Clams –13 / mixed 14 marinara or bianco Sausage & Broccoli Rabe – 12 Chicken Fingers & Fries – 9.5 Onion Rings or Jalapeno Poppers –5 Mozzarella Sticks – 8 Pizza Strips – 5 Garlic Knots (4) – 3.5

Salads

$59.99

Receive of Free Side w/Platter Purchases.

*Pre-Order for New Year’s Eve up until Thursday, December 28, 2017.

Sides

Must Pick Up All Orders by Saturday, December 22 by 4pm. Slaw, Beans, Cornbread

$1.49

Sandwiches and Platters, or Pulled Chicken, Pulled Pork, Brisket, Smoked Baby Back Ribs, By the pound Smoke House Beans, Slaw by the lb. Pulled Chicken lb. All Meats Sold by the$12lb. Pulled Pork Brisket Baby Back Ribs Smoke House Beans Slaw

$14 lb. $16 lb. $13.99 lb. $5.99 lb. $4.99 lb.

16 lb. $185 16 lb. $199 16 lb. $219 Full $85 Full $65 Full $40 $6/Dozen

½ $99 ½ $109 ½ $119 ½ $45 ½ $35 ½ 20

Having a party? ask about our whole Hog Special

Paninis (more online)

Sides

Angus Burgers

house salad & homemade bread Rosemary Chicken veggie – 21 Salmon – 22 add shrimp 8 roasted garlic, oil, mixed veggie Shrimp & Scallops – 29 lemon, butter, mixed veggie

HM Crumbled Sausage / Sauce – 6 Meatballs or Sausage Links (2pcs) –6 Veggie – 6 Broccoli Rabe – 9 French Fries – 3.95 w cheese 5 Fried Pickles – 5

Soup Du Jour

seasonal, served with bread pint 5 / quart 9

Guests Mixed Greens Saladenjoy – 4 / 9 personalized service from Corner an– 14experienced Kiddie waitstaff. Italian Chicken Salad Pasta with Sauce – 7 olives, red onions, fresh mozzarella, roasted 52 East BroadSpaghetti Streetor Penne – 9 peppers, balsamic NJ with 08525 meatball and sauce add chicken 5 / calamari 6Hopewell, / shrimp 8 / Cheese Ravioli (3) – 13 609.466.3333 salmon 8 Tortellini Alfredo – 13 Antimositaliankitchen.com Chicken Fingers with Fries – 9 Homemade Pasta Kids Pizza with 1 Topping – 9.5 house salad & homemade bread Agnolotti – 24 Antimo’s Favorites Three Cheese Ravioli – 19 Fig Crostini – 14 vodka or tomato sauce Sunday Sauce with HM pasta – 26 Spinach Ravioli – 22 Creamy Garlic Toscana Salmon HM alfredo or tomato sauce pasta – 26 Porcini & Sausage Ravioli – 24 Pan Seared Scallops Pancetta HM sun dried tomato, portobello mushroom, pasta – 27 cream sauce Shrimp Scampi HM pasta – 24 Black Squid Ink Ravioli – 26 Marechiara Mixed Seafood HM pasta black pasta, clams, scallops, crab, in an –32 arrabbiata sauce Lobster Ravioli – 26 pink cream sauce Family Packages for 4 Tortellini – 22 served with Bread and Cannoli alfredo, tomato or vodka sauce Package #1–70 Tortellini Tre-P – 24 Penne Vodka, Chicken Parmigiano, Caesar prosciutto, peas, pecorino, cream Salad Package #2 – 100 Classico 3 cheese Ravioli tomato sauce, Sausage & house salad & homemade bread Broccoli Rabe, Bella Napoli with sausage – 18 Mixed Green Salad sun dried tomatoes, spinach, white wine Package #3 – 160 Daniella with chicken – 21 Shrimp Scampi HM pasta, Ribeye Steak mixed mushrooms, caramelized onions, Arugula Salad marsala, cream Francese w chicken – 21 / or shrimp 24 Soda egg, lemon, butter, white wine 2 Liter Soda 3.75 Marsala w chicken – 21 / or veal 24 coke / diet coke / sprite chicken, mushrooms, marsala Parmigiana w chicken – 21/ or eggplant Catering & Parties 17 / or shrimp 24 / or veal 24 View full catering menu on web site: antimozzarella, tomato sauce mositaliankitchen.com/catering Picatta with chicken–21 / or veal 24 We use Bell & Evans air chilled chicken, and capers, artichokes, lemon, white wine milk fed top round veal. Scarpariello w chicken – 25 / or veal 28 sausage, roasted red peppers, mushrooms, in Consuming raw or undercooked meats, poultry, seafood, shellfish, or eggs a marinara sauce may increase your risk of foodborne illness. Alfredo – 18 Arrabbiata – 16 marinara, garlic, red chili pepper Cold Subs Bolognese angus beef – 19 ½ subs and whole subs available Broccoli Rabe – 17 served with lettuce, tomato, onions Eggplant Rollatini 18 Italian – 9 / 15 Garlic & Oil –14 ham, salami, cappicola, provolone, oil, Lasagna – 18 vinegar Primavera veggies in blush sauce – 18 Napoletana – 10 / 16 Puttanesca –18 prosciutto, roasted red peppers, fresh olives, capers, chili pepper, plum tomato, mozzarella basil olive oil, balsamic Tomato or Marinara –14 Ham & Cheese – 8 / 14 Vodka – 16 Turkey & Cheese – 8 / 14 Gnocchi with Vodka- 20 Panino Rustico – 12 / 17 Cavatelli with Broccoli- 19 add chicken 5 / sausage 6 / meatballs 6 Hot Subs / pancetta or prosciutto 5 / shrimp 8 / ½ subs and whole subs available salmon 8 Meatball or Sausage – 9 / 16 Meatball; Sausage; Chicken or all entrees are served with pasta Eggplant Parmigiana – 9.5 / 16 gluten free pasta add 5 Cheesesteak – 9/ 16 homemade pasta add 5 Chicken Cheesesteak – 9 / 16 Buffalo Chicken Cheesesteak – 9/16 Neapolitan Seafood Chicken Primavera – 9 / 16 house salad & homemade bread roasted red peppers, provolone, basil Bianco garlic, basil, tomato, white wine Chicken Cutlet – 9 / 16 Fra Diavolo spicy marinara Hot Grinder – 9 / 16 Marinara plum tomatoes, garlic, basil hot ham, salami, provolone mussels 18 / clams 19 / lettuce, tomato, hot peppers calamari 18 / shrimp 24 / scallops 28 / mixed seafood 29 Homemade Wraps Shrimp Scampi with homemade pasta 24 Grilled Chicken, Spinach & Roasted Peppers – 9 all seafood is served with pasta Chicken Caesar – 9 with homemade pasta add 5 Chicken Finger – 9 with gluten free pasta add 5

Having a partY? aSk aBout our wHole Hog Special catering/pick-up and cHeF JeFF'S HamBone opera Band Pulled Chicken Pulled Pork Brisket Smoke House Beans Slaw Cornbread Fresh Baked Rolls

From The Grill

served with homemade bread Caprese Salad – 12 Homemade Sauce Antipasto – 10 / 13 – pint 5 / quart 9 Antimo’s casual,Sauce family friendly mixed greens, tomatoes, redoffers onions, olives, alfredo, vodka, marinara, tomato dining with Southern Italian family favorites, ham, salami, provolone Bolognese – pint 7 / quart 11 Arugula Salad – 12 pasta, thin crust pizza, and more. homemade Greek Salad – 12 Italian Kitchen, located in Hopewell Antimo’s Dessert Caesar Salad – 5/ 9 NJ, is aptly self-labeled Borough, Large Cannolias – 3 both a Apple Salad 13 Trattoria and Pizzeria. Antimo’s 40 Ice cream Truffle – 5seat Strawberry Salad - small 8 Tiramisu – 4 friendly. room causal and family Grilleddining Veggie or Chef Saladis– 13

Comes with a Pound of Blue Cheese and Celery. platters Also ComesSandwiches with a Freeand Pound of Slaw & Beans. Pulled Chicken Sandwich $7 $10 Pulled Pork Sandwich $8 $11 Brisket Sandwich $9 the$12 *Come to the Restaurant & Mention ad, Baby Back Ribs $13.99 lb.

TAKE OUT MENU ORDER ONLINE FOR PICKUP 52 East Broad Street Hopewell, NJ 08525 609.466.3333 antimositaliankitchen.com facebook.com/antimositaliankitchen antimositaliankitchen@gmail.com Family owned and operated since Grilled Chicken – 9 eggplant, fresh mozzarella Italiano – 10 prosciutto, fresh mozzarella, roasted red peppers, balsamic HM Sausage Broccoli Rabe – 12

served with lettuce, tomato, onion, mayo and french fries or salad Hamburger – 11 Cheeseburger – 12 Mushroom & Swiss – 12 Bacon Cheeseburger – 13

Jumbo Wings

Buffalo ,BBQ, Garlic Parm or Sweet Red chili - all served with dressing 6 Wings – 8 12 Wings – 16 18 Wings – 24 24 Wings – 30 36 Wings – 42 48 Wings – 54

Calzone & Stromboli

served with tomato sauce Plain Calzone – 10 small / 18 large mozzarella, ricotta Plain Stromboli – 11 small / 21 large sausage, pepperoni, mozzarella Extra Toppings – 1.5 / 2.5 Extra Premium – 2.5 / 3.5 Extra Sauce – 1.5

Pizza

Plain Thin Crust –11 small/ 15.5 large White Thin Crust –12 small /18 large White Clam –24 Vegan Veggie –21

Toppings

Veggie – 1.5 small / 2.5 large slices of fresh tomato, green peppers, roasted red peppers, banana peppers, jalapeno peppers, mushrooms, onions, fresh, garlic, spinach, broccoli, artichokes, black olives, green olives, kalamata olives, ricotta, pineapple, extra cheese Meat – 2.5 small / 3.5 large crumbled sausage, pepperoni, bacon, sliced ham Premium – 4 small / 7 large grilled chicken, breaded chicken, prosciutto, meatball, broccoli rabe, fried eggplant, arugula

Extra Sauce – 1.5 Thin Crust Special – 18 / 24 sausage, pepperoni, peppers, onions, mushrooms Arugula & Prosciutto – 18 / 29 European – 15 / 26 pepperoni, spinach, mushrooms, fresh mozzarella Mediterrana – 17 / 28 artichokes, prosciutto, kalamata olives, basil, fresh mozzarella Sicilian – 20 Sicilian Special – 26

Specialty Pizza

for small pizza, add gluten free 5 Margherita – 13 small / 18.5 large Trenton Tomato –12 small / 17 large Trenton Tomato with Sausage – 14.5 small / 20.5 large Buffalo or BBQ Chicken – 18 / 23 Cheesesteak – 18 small / 23 peppers, onions, american cheese, mozzarella Penne Vodka – 18 small / 22 White or Red Veggie – 18 small / 23 Chicken Bacon Ranch – 18 small /23

Brooklyn Pizza Brooklyn Plain – 20 Brooklyn Tomato – 19 Brooklyn with Sausage – 24 plum tomato sauce Brooklyn Margherita – 22.5 fresh mozzarella, fresh basil Brooklyn Eggplant – 25 fresh mozzarella, eggplant, spinach, plum tomato sauce Brooklyn Caprese – 24 fresh tomatoes, sun dried tomatoes, olives fresh mozzarella, basil, olive oil, balsamic Brooklyn Grandma – 25 plum tomatoes, fresh bufala mozzarella, fresh basil, olive oil

Prices subject to change at any time


www.elementsprinceton.com

A La Carte To Go Menu (pick up available between 4:30pm – 6:30pm) We will happily accommodate allergies/dietary restrictions with advanced notice

Wellfleet Oyster $4pc trout roe, scallion, citrus Salad of Local Lettuces $14 seeds. herbs, vegetables Lobster Bisque $16 (quart) yuzu, perilla seed, ginger Madai Sashimi $20 yuzu, perilla seed, ginger Scallop $18 cardoon, parmesan, nori Seared Foie Gras $20 jujube, persimmon, chervil Bobolink Cheese and Mushroom Tart $18 puff pastry, lemon, herbs Linguine $16 local mushrooms, pecorino, herbs Roasted Pumpkin $18 spaetzle, apple, root vegetables Black Bass $25(3oz) $42(6oz) sunchoke, crab, fermented chili & garlic Wagyu Ribeye $36(3oz) $59(6oz) cauliflower, mushroom, spelt Our Bread Whole Wheat Sourdough Boulle $12 ½ Seeded Spelt Loaf $14 Our Cultured Butter $4 menu items subject to change.

Weekly Take Out Menu | @ elements Taking orders for pick up Thursday through Sunday evenings

4:30pm – 6:30pm Phone 609-924-0078 Take Out orders can please placed online or you can call or email us Email info@elementsprinceton.com www.elementsprinceton.com

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021

(609) 924-0078

TO GO MENU | @ MISTRAL Taking orders for pick up: Monday-Thursday: 5:15pm-8:45pm Friday: 4:15pm-9:45pm Saturday: 11:30am-2:15pm & 4:15pm-9:45pm Sunday: 11:30am-2:15pm & 4:15pm-8:45pm SMALL PLATES Beausoleil Oysters (ea) 3. persimmon, yuzukosho, mignonette foam Foie Gras PB & J (4pc) 12. peanut shortbread & concord grape Butternut Squash Hummus 9. chickpea pita & pumpkin seed dukkah extra pita 3. Cordon Bleu Beignets (4pc.) 11. smoked ham & swiss cheese Tempura Mushroom 12. old bay & tartare sauce Crispy Brussels Sprouts 12. fermented black bean, peanut, chili, scallion Mistral Wings 13. szechuan spice, chili, garlic PLATES TO SHARE Market Salad 12. seasonal vegetables, pecorino, crispy quinoa, red wine vinaigrette Spinach Waldorf Salad 15. apple, celery, walnut, bleu cheese Roasted Cauliflower 15. harissa, almond, tahini, arugula Beef Tartare Toast 15. pepperonata, mushroom, provolone Burrata 16. eggplant, baghara curry, peanut, mint Steamed Mussels 16. leek, crème fraîche, parsley, lemon extra toast 3. Tuna Ceviche 17. beet, avocado, blood orange, chili Crab Cake 17. watercress, citrus, fennel, remoulade LARGE PLATES Dry Aged Brisket Burger 17. bacon jam, garlic aioli add aged cheddar +2 add fries +2 Spicy Shrimp Ramen 21. bok choy, poached egg, ginger, lobster chili butter House Made Pappardelle Pasta 24. mushroom bolognese, swiss chard, sheep’s milk ricotta Poussin Tikka Masala 26. kale, basmati rice, cashew, fenugreek

Skate Picatta 26. beurre blanc, spinach, fennel, pine nut Seared Diver Scallops 30. green bean, mushroom, sunchoke, sherry cream, old bay Wagyu Bavette Steak 32. potato rösti, broccoli, mustard, au poivre sauce Pork Schnitzel 26. crème fraîche veloute, fried egg, b&b pickles, dill DESSERT Butterscotch Pot de Creme 11. bourbon sabayon, banana, miso blondie, walnut Black Forest Cake 11. chocolate, roasted cherry, cream cheese chantilly, almond KIDS MENU Kids Pasta 12. house made pasta with butter & parmesan Kids Burger 12. served with fries ___________________ COCKTAILS TO GO (8oz bottle – $21 16oz bottle – $39) Tee Time vodka, elderflower, chamomile, honey, lemon, sweet vermouth Cincinnati rye whiskey, malabar, ciociaro, demerara, clove Uh Huh Honey vodka, pineapple, lime, honey ginger beer, mint Thaw of Quarantine bourbon, lemon, maple, jalapeño, luxardo maraschino, bitters The Kick & The Hat gin, rhubarb, birch, dry vermouth, orange bitters The Souless gin, ginger beer, ginger liqueur, lime Acapulco mezcal, spiced rum, pineapple, grapefruit, agave Rockatansky calvados, old tom gin, pear liqueur, oj, grenadine The Derby bourbon, lime, cointreau, sweet vermouth Mamie Taylor scotch, lime, ginger, soda

609-688-8808 66 WITHERSPOON STREET, PRINCETON WWW.MISTRALPRINCETON.COM


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021 • 22


Restaurant & Enoteca

4484 NJ-27, Kingston, NJ 08528 (609) 497-1777

Online Ordering | Eno Terra - Farm to Table Restaurant & Enoteca in Kingston, NJ www.enoterra.com WINE Kurtatsch Pinot Bianco ‘Weifsgurgunde’ 2019 Even though most Pinot Biancos have subdued aromas, This has a lovely nose offering beeswax, white stone fruit... $20.00

FAMILY STYLE Family- Style To Go Experience our seasonal offerings, family-style. $39 per person, minimum of 4. Please allow 1 hour of prep time $156 PRIMI Burrata Arugula, roasted beets, citrus vinaigrette, toasted pistacchio, crostini $16.00 Tre Colore Salad Radicchio, endive & arugula, orange segment, toasted almond, citrus vinaigrette, 24 month aged parmigiana reggiano. $16.00 Brussels Sprouts Apple, honey glaze $10.00

SALUMI & FORMAGGI Salumi Board Locally produced artisanal charcuterie Prosciutto di Parma, Sweet Coppa, Capicola,Picante, Cacciatorino,Finocchiona,Salame Biellese $36.00 SECONDI Pastaless Lasagna eggplant, seasonal greens, ricotta, mozzerrella, marinara $24.00 Black Angus Beef 8oz Burger Onion marmellata, fontina, peppadew garlic aioli, baby greens $18.00

Menu subject to change

Al Fresco Dining On Princeton’s Historic Palmer Square

Online Ordering - Mediterra www.mediterrarestaurant.com

Kurtatsch Pinot Nero ‘Blauburgunder 2019 Pinot Noir comes under two names in the Alto Adige, Blauburgunder and Pino Nero an expression… $22.00

WINE & SANGRIA Mediterra 2-Pack Includes: Scarbolo Pino Grigio and Poggio Al Tesoro

Calamari Fritti Spicy tomato sauce, lemon $16.00

Side Shrimp 5 grilled shrimp, extra virgin oil, onion, herbs $7.00

PEI Mussels en Brodetto Garlic white wine & tomato broth, crostini $18.00

Amatriciano Candela rigate pasta, prosciutto di parma, sweet coppa,capicola picante, carmelized onion, garlic, red wine tomato sauce $24.00

Jersey Green Salad local baby greens, tomato,radish,grilled onion, sherry vinaigrette Vegan, Vegetarian $14.00 Pasta Braised Pork Ragu cresto de gallo pasta, braised Bershire pork shoulder, cippollini, pork jus, parmigiana reggiano $26.00 Cacio e Pepe Fettuccini, grana padano, pecorino ramano, cracked pepper, butter sauce $18.00

12oz NY Strip Roasted baby carrots, rock potato, red wine Demi-glace $36.00 Roasted Salmon Roasted beets, Swiss chard, parsnip puree $30.00 Grilled Chicken Sandwich Fontina, tomato confit, baby spinach Vegetarian $18.00 Amish Half Chicken whipped potato, Brussel sprouts, chicken jus $32.00

Side Chicken 5oz chicken breast, extra virgin olive oil, herbs $6.00 SALUMI & FORMAGGI Formaggi Platter Selection of Artisanal Italian Cheeses Pecorino Brillo, Gorgonzola Dolce, Nabbabo,Roccolo Valtaleggio 24 month aged Parmigiana Reggiano $26.00

‘Mediterra’ Toscana $29

START Artisan Bread Olive oil & focaccia spice $4.00 Grass Fed Meatball San Marzano, herb & whipped ricotta $12.00 Artisan Cheeseboard Seasonal jam, spiced almond & grape $17.00 Papas Bravas Fried potato, manchego aioli & salsa brava Vegetarian $8.00

Tuscan Chicken Soup kale, cannellini bean & charred charred onion $10.00

Biscotti Classic almond, chocolate $11.00

“Pollo e Orzo” Salad field green, grilled chicken, olive, sun-dried tomato vinaigrette & ricotta salata $19.00

Flourless Chocolate Torte Vanilla cream, strawberry $11.00 Tiramisu Expresso, mascarpone cream, cocoa $11.00

Sangria to Go! Traditional Spanish Punch. Red wine, spirits, and fruit. 64 oz. 4 pack with 4, 16 oz. individual tall boys. $40.00

Caesar Salad Little gem lettuce, toasted focaccia bread crumb & parmigiano $8.00

MAIN

Baci Gelato Trio Chef ’s selection of gelato and sorbet $11.00

4 Pack 16 oz. Classic Sangria

Falafel Radish, cucumber, pickled onion & sumac yogurt $14.00 Shrimp Cocktail Tomatillo, horseradish, roasted onion & cilantro citronette

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Seasonal Fruit Crostata Apple/cherry, vanilla ice $11.00

We are open for outdoor & indoor dining! Book your reservation now.

House-made Tagliatelle Braised lamb, cippolini $26 Lump Crab Cake Broccoli rabe, red quinoa, celery root puree & lemon $32.00 Beef Bourguignon Short rib stew, brussels sprout, turnip, cipollini onion & whipped potato $29.00

16 oz. Classic Sangria Sangria to Go! Traditional Spanish Punch. Red wine, spirits, and fruit. $13.00

Beef Brisket Empanada roasted onion, pepper, pumpkin, chili & salsa brava Antipasto Plate jamon serrano, fresh mozzarella, guindilla pepper, tomato jam, roasted pepper & balsamic $16 Chickpea & Carrot Tehina Hummus pistachio, pickled radish & pita $14.00

House -made Cresto di Gallo “mushroom Bolognese”, cremini & shitake ragu, san Marzano, herb, parmigiano $23.00 Pastaless Lasagna Roasted eggplant, Portobello, garlic spinach, pompodoro & fresh mozzerrella $25.00 Nordic Blu Salmon Haricot vert, baby potato, toasted coconut, garlic radish & winter citrus vinaigrette $29 The Med Burger -grassfed beef, roasted tomato, Berkshire bacon, Havarti, salsa verde & fries $18.00

Salmon Tartare avocado puree, pickled maitake, radish, cucumber. Sesame vinaigrette & crisp shallot $15.00 NJ Green Salad roasted badger flame beet, car acara orange, pink grapefruit, herb & Dijon $9.00

Local Half Chicken Polenta, roasted red onion & shishito pepper, DESSERT Orange Olive oil Cake Whipped sweet ricotta $10.00 Biscotti chocolate walnut & vanilla almond $7.00 Buterscotch Budino Custard, almond crunch, sea salt $10.00

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021

29 Hulfish Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (609) 252-9680


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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021 • 24

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25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021

the breakfast nook Showcasing local breakfast and brunch options

Princeton ■ Kingston ■ West Windsor ■ Princeton ■ Kingston ■ Ewing ■ Robbinsville West Windsor ■ getforky.com ■ Robbinsville Ewing

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021 • 26

609.466.0001 / 21 East Broad St. Hopewell, NJ 08525 21 E Broad St, Hopewell, NJ 08525 T​uesday-Saturday 3 to 8 pm Tuesday-Saturday 3 to 8pm Carry out /East Outdoor dining /NJCatering 609.466.0001 // 21 Broad NJ 08525 609.466.0001 21 East Broad St. St. Hopewell, Hopewell, 08525 T​T​uuesday-Saturday esday-Saturday 33 to to​ 8 8 pm pm f​acebook/Instagram:tomatelloshopewell / ​tomatillos-hopewell.com Carry out/Outdoor Dining/Catering Carry dining / Catering Carry out out // Outdoor Outdoor dining / Catering 609.466.0001 / 21 East Broad St. Hopewell, NJ 08525 f​f​aacebook/Instagram:tomatelloshopewell cebook/Instagram:tomatelloshopewell​ ​ // ​t​tomatillos-hopewell.com omatillos-hopewell.com

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​SOPAS​ ​ ​​ ​A ​APERITIVOS​ PERITIVOS​

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Empanadas Empanadas$$2.50 2.50

Chicken ChickenTortilla TortillaSoup Soup

Chips Chips$2.00 $2.00

Arepas ArepasPues Pues$$7.50 7.50 m. $ 6.95 lg.$ 8.95

​APERITIVOS​ ​

​POSTRES​

​POSTRES​

ickenArepas Tortilla Soup sm. Chips $2.00 Chips Arepas$$3.00 3.00 sm.$$6.95 6.95lg.$ lg.$8.95 8.95 Chips&&Salsa Salsa$4.00 $4.00

T​uesday-Saturday 3 to 8 pm (609) Carry out /466-0001 Outdoor dining / Catering ​BEBIDAS

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​POSTRES​ ​BEBIDAS f​acebook/Instagram:tomatelloshopewell ​ / ​tomatillos-hopewell.c Flan Flan$$4.00 4.00 Banana BananaQuesadilla Quesadilla$$6.95 6.95

Flan $ 4.00

​SOPAS​ ​

​EXTRAS​

Jarritos/Colombian Jarritos/Colombiansodas sodas$$2.25 2.25 Canned CannedSoda Soda$$1.50 1.50

​POSTRES​

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Chips &&Guac Churro Blondies hocolate Chips$4.00 Guac$5.00 $5.00 ChurroChocolate Chocolate Blondies$$4.00 4.00 hocolateCaliente Caliente$$4.00 4.00 Chips & Salsa Banana Quesadilla $ 6.95​CC​ Flan Canne Chicken Tortilla Soup Chips $2.00 $ 4.00

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$ 6.95 lg.$ Churro 8.95 Chips & Salsa $4.00 Banana Quesadilla $ 6.95C Chocolate Blondies $ 4.00 ​ hocol 09.466.0001 / 21 East Broad St. Hopewell,$5.00 NJsm. 08525 C ​ OMIDA RAPIDA $ ​ 9.95 C ​ OMIDA RAPIDA $ ​ 9.95  Arepas Pues Chips & Guac $5.00 Churro Chocolate Blondies $ 4.00 T​uesday-Saturday 3 to $8 7.50 pm CHOOSE BASE ​B​Burrito Tacos Bowl $10.95 $$11.95 CHOOSE YOUR BASE dining urrito Tacos(3) (3) Quesadilla Quesadilla BowlPopsicle $10.95 Taco Taco Salad 11.95 ​Coconut $Salad 2.50(summer) Café/​T CarryYOUR out / Outdoor / Catering ​Coconut Popsicle $ 2.50(summer) 609.466.0001 / 21 East Broad St. Hopewell, NJ 08525 C ​C Steak Carnitas Chorizo Vegetables ​ HOOSE HOOSE YOUR YOUR PROTEIN​ PROTEIN​​ /​ ​ ​tChicken Chicken Steak Carnitas Chorizo Vegetables book/Instagram:tomatelloshopewell omatillos-hopewell.com T​ uesday-Saturday to 8 pm / 21 East St. Hopewell, NJ3Beans 08525 C ​C ​ ​ White Cauliflower Rice $1.00 Pinto Beans Black Lettuce Cheese ​ HOOSE HOOSE YOUR YOUR TOPPINGS TOPPINGS 609.466.0001 WhiteRice Rice Cauliflower RiceBroad Pinto Beans​COMIDA Black Beans Lettuce Picadillo Cheese 609.466.0001 /$1.00 21 East Broad St. Hopewell, NJPicadillo 08525 RAPIDA ​$ 9.95  Carry out / Outdoor dining / Catering T​ u esday-Saturday 3 to 8 pm 609.466.0001 / 21 East Broad St. Hopewell, NJ 308525 Corn Guacamole $$3.00 Corn Guacamole 3.00 T​u​Besday-Saturday to 8 pm ​ XTRAS​ E ​POSTRES​  Tacos (3) CHOOSE YOUR BASE ​ BEBIDAS urrito Quesadilla Bowl $10.95 Taco Sa Carry out / Outdoor dining / Catering f​ a cebook/Instagram:tomatelloshopewell ​ / ​tomatillos-hopewell.com T​ u esday-Saturday 3 to 8 pm C ​C HOOSE YOUR SAUCE​ ​ T omatillo Picante Chimichurri Sour Cream Roasted ​ HOOSE YOUR SAUCE​ ​Tomatillo Picante Chimichurri Cream Roasted jalape​ññ​o​o Carry outSour / Outdoor dining / jalape​ Catering a4.00 cebook/Instagram:tomatelloshopewell ​ / ​tomatillos-hopewell.com out / Outdoor dining /Bowl Catering oup Chips $2.00 FlanC sodas $Carnitas 2.25 Taco Chorizo Burrito Tacos (3)Carry Quesadilla $10.95 Salad $ 11.95 ​ $f​HOOSE YOUR PROTEIN​ ​ Jarritos/Colombian Chicken Steak Vegetab f​ a cebook/Instagram:tomatelloshopewell ​ / t ​ omatillos-hopewell.com f​ a cebook/Instagram:tomatelloshopewell ​ / t ​ omatillos-hopewell.com 95 Chips & Salsa $4.00 1.50 ​APERITIVOS​ ​ Banana ​ Quesadilla S OPAS​YOUR ​ $ 6.95 TOPPINGS ​ XTRAS​ Canned E EBIDAS C ​ HOOSE ​ White Soda Rice​P$OSTRES​ Cauliflower Rice $1.00 Pinto Beans ​BBlack Beans ​APERITIVOS​ Chicken ​ ​SOPAS​ ​ Steak​EXTRAS​ Carnitas​POSTRES​ ​BEBIDAS   Chorizo Vegetables Chips & Guac Blondies $ 4.00 ​ hocolate C 4.00 Corn Caliente Guacamole $ 3.00 ​BEBIDAS   609.466.0001 / 21$5.00 East Broad St. Chocolate Hopewell, NJ 08525 ​A PERITIVOS​ ​ Churro ​S​ OPAS​ ​Soup ​E XTRAS​ ​PFlan OSTRES​ ​BEBIDAS Empanadas $​ 2.50 Chicken Tortilla​E Chips $2.00​POSTRES​ $$ 4.00 Jarritos/Colom ​APERITIVOS​ ​S OPAS​ XTRAS​ Arepas Chips$ 3.00 & Guac

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ArepasArepas $ 3.00$ 7.50 sm. $ 6.95sm. lg.$$8.95 Salsa $4.00 Banana $ 6.95Chocolate Canned $ 1.50 $ 4.00 Pues Chips $5.00 Churro $ Soda 4.00Caliente ​Chocolate Cali $ 3.00$ 7.50 6.95 lg.$Chips 8.95&&EL Salsa $4.00Quesadilla Banana QuesadillaBlondies $ 6.95 Canned Soda Arepas Pues Chips Guac $5.00& Guac Churro ​Chocolate BURRITO 10.95   CAZUELA (Seafood RANCHERO 12.95 BREAKFAST BURRITO 10.95   CAZUELA (Seafood Stew) Stew) 19.95 19.95​ / ​tomatillos-hopewell.com EL RANCHERO 12.95Chocolate Blondies $ 4.00 BREAKFAST book/Instagram:tomatelloshopewell C ​ OMIDA RAPIDA $ ​ 9.95  g Arepas Pues $ 7.50 Chips & Guac $5.00 Churro Chocolate Blondies $ 4.00 C ​ hocolate Caliente $ 4.00 Arepas Pues $ 7.50 Chips & Guac $5.00 Popsicle Chocolate Blondies $RANCHEROS ​C10.95  hocolate CChurro ​ oconut Popsicle $HUEVOS 2.50(summer) Café/​ Té $ ​ Cali 2.50 ​Coconut $ 2.50(summer) Café/​ T4.00 é$ ​ 2.50 Agua $ 1.50 CHURRASCO 18.95 CHORIZO LOCO 6.50 HUEVOS RANCHEROS 10.95  CHURRASCO 18.95 CHORIZO LOCO 6.50 opewell.com ​Burrito Tacos (3) Quesadilla Bowl $10.95 Taco Salad $ 11.95 ​Coconut Popsicle $ 2.50(summer) Café/​Té $ ​ 2.50 Agua $ 1.50 ​EXTRAS​ ​POSTRES​ ​BEBIDAS​C oconut Popsicle $EL 2.50(summer) 11.95 Café/​Té $ ​ 2.50 BBQ 17.95 CAMARONES 16.95 DESAYUNO 11.95  ​CLOS OMIDA ​$RAPIDA 9.95  BBQ RIBS RIBS 17.95 Carnitas LOS CAMARONES 16.95 Chicken Steak Chorizo Vegetables ​CRAPIDA OMIDA ​$ 9.95  EL DESAYUNO

Corn ​Tomatillo

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​Psodas LATOS FUERTES RAPIDA ​$ 9.95  oup Chips $2.00 Flan $ 4.00 ​Burrito ​COMIDA Jarritos/Colombian $ 2.25 ​BEBIDAS  BASE CHOOSE YOUR Tacos (3) Quesadilla Bowl $10.95 Taco Salad $ 11.95 PAELLA FOR 2 38.95 * ​ Takes 45 mins to prepare F ​ AJITAS 16.95 S ​ autéed chicken or steak ​ T PAELLA FOR 2 38.95 ​*Takes 45 mins to prepare F ​ urrito AJITAS 16.95 ​S(3) autéed chicken or steak ​TOSTADA OSTADA BURGER 11.95  CHOOSE YOUR BASE ​ B Tacos Quesadilla Bowl $10.95 TacoBURGER Salad $ 11.95  11.95 S ​ White Rice CHOOSE Cauliflower Rice $1.00 Pinto Beans Black Beans Lettuce Picadillo Cheese C ​ OMIDA RAPIDA $ ​ 9.95  YOUR BASE ​ Burrito$ 6.95Tacos (3) Quesadilla Bowl $10.95 Taco Salad $ 11.95 .95 ChipsC & Salsa $4.00 Banana Quesadilla Canned Soda $ 1.50 Jarritos/Colombian sodas $ 2.25 ​ HOOSE YOUR PROTEIN​ ​ Chicken Steak Carnitas Chorizo Vegetables CAZUELA (Seafood 19.95 EL Chorizo RANCHERO Corn Guacamole $ 3.00 C ​ HOOSE PROTEIN​ Steak Carnitas Vegetables NACHOS 9.95* ​ choice of protein(*$1.00extra) CHOOSE BASE ​BP​ Stew) urrito Tacos (3) ​ Goddess Quesadilla Bowl $10.95 12.95 Taco Salad $ 11.95 NACHOS 9.95* ​ choice ofYOUR protein(*$1.00extra) ACHAMAMA 11.95 of harvest (vegetarian) C ​ HOOSE YOUR PROTEIN​ ​ Chicken ​ Chicken Steak Carnitas Chorizo Vegetables P ​ ACHAMAMA 11.95 ​ Goddess of harvest (vegetarian) ChipsC Guac $5.00 Churro Chocolate Blondies $ 4.00 Rice $1.00 ​Chocolate Caliente $ Black 4.00 Beans Lettuce Picadillo Cheese ​ & HOOSE YOUR TOPPINGS ​ White Rice Cauliflower Pinto Beans 95​Tomatillo Canned Soda $ 1.50 Picante Chimichurri Sour​ White Cream Roasted jalape​ ñ​o C ​ HOOSE YOUR TOPPINGS PROTEIN​ ​ ​ Chicken Carnitas Chorizo C ​ HOOSE YOUR TOPPINGS Rice Cauliflower $1.00 Pinto Beans Beans Lettuce Picadillo CHURRASCO 18.95 CHORIZO LOCO 6.50 White Rice Rice Cauliflower Rice $1.00 Black Pinto Beans BlackVegetables Beans Cheese Lettuce Picadillo Corn Guacamole $Steak 3.00 ies $ 4.00 C ​ hocolate Caliente​C$oconut 4.00 Popsicle $ 2.50(summer) Café/​ T é $ ​ 2.50 Agua $ 1.50 Corn Guacamole $ 3.00 Corn Guacamole Sour $ 3.00 C ​ HOOSE YOUR TOPPINGS Rice Chimichurri Cauliflower Rice $1.00 Pinto Beans C ​ HOOSE YOUR SAUCE​ ​T17.95 omatillo ​ White Picante Cream Roasted jalape​Black ñ​o Beans BBQ RIBS CAMARONES 16.95 Lettuce Picadillo ​ HOOSE C SAUCE​ Picante Chimichurri Sour Cream LOS Roasted jalape​ñ​o Roasted (summer) Café/​ TéYOUR $ ​ 2.50YOUR Agua $SAUCE​ 1.50 ​Tomatillo ​Tomatillo C ​ HOOSE Picante Chimichurri Sour Cream jalape​ñ​o Corn Guacamole $ 3.00 ​COMIDA RAPIDA ​$ 9.95  PAELLA FOR 2 38.95 ​*Takes 45Picante mins to prepare F ​ AJITAS 16.95 ​SRoasted autéed jalape​ chicken C ​ HOOSE YOUR SAUCE​ ​Tomatillo Chimichurri Sour Cream ñ​oor steak ​Burrito

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e of protein(*$1.00extra) P ​ 45ACHAMAMA ​ Goddess ofchicken harvest (vegetarian) PAELLA 2 38.95 mins to prepare F ​ 11.95 AJITAS 16.95 ​Sautéed or steak ​TOSTADA BU NACHOSFOR 9.95* ​ choice ​*ofTakes protein(*$1.00extra) Enchiladas 12.95 NACHOS 9.95* ​ choice of protein(*$1.00extra) EL RANCHERO 12.95 NACHOS 9.95* ​ choice of10.95   protein(*$1.00extra) BREAKFAST CHORIZO BURRITO LOCO 6.50

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with photographic processes and subject matter by artists in the Delaware Valley region. The exhibition is organized through the themes of for m, figure, landscape, community, and social and polit ical act ivism and highlights over 100 photographs by nearly 40 artists. “Through the Lens” draws primarily from the Michener’s own deep collection of local photography, including many works that have never before been on view, from late prints by the modernist Charles Sheeler — whose time in Doylestown cemented his dedication to the medium — to aerial

views of industrial sites by Newtown-based photographer Emmett Gowin. Other represented photographers include Tom Baril, Paula Chamlee, Edmund Eckstein, Susan Fenton, David Graham, Diane Levell, Martha Madigan, Ray Metzger, Tim Portlock, Jack Rosen, Thomas Shillea, and Michael A. Smith. Exhibition curators have also borrowed work by Donald E. Camp, Maria Dumlao, Ada Trillo, and William Earle Williams that explores issues of race, identity, and social and environmental justice in order to connect the Museum’s historic images with contemporary concerns.

“Tara Kaufman and I are excited to share a snap Continued from Page 16 shot from our rich pho Michener Museum Reopens tography collection with visitors,” said Igoe. “From February 5 with New Exhibit local landscape views to imThe Michener Ar t Muages of public protest, these seum in Doylestown, Pa., works capture the creativity w ill reopen to the pub and fresh perspective of the lic on February 5 with the region’s photographers over new exhibition “Through several decades.” the Lens: Modern Photography in the Delaware ValThe photographic commuley.” On view through Aunity in Bucks County and the g u s t 15 , t h i s m a j o r greater Philadelphia area exhibition is curated by the has a rich history, anchored Michener’s Curator of Amerby photography programs at ican Art Laura Turner Igoe Bucks County Community and Curatorial Assistant College, the Tyler School Tara Kaufman. of Art at Temple University, the University of the Arts, “Through the Lens” exand other local universities. plores nearly 70 years of Many nationally recognized artistic experimentations photographers have settled or passed through the area to study, teach, and document the region’s landscape features, unique architecture, and vibrant urban areas. While these photographers have embraced a wide variety of subject matter and techniques, they are united by a deep interest in photographic processes, both historic and new, as well as their capacity for expanding our perspective of the world around us. In addition to this show, the Michener will reopen with new artworks installed in its permanent collection galleries, highlighting new acquisitions and visitor favorites. The Michener Art Museum is located at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa. The Museum is open Thursday, 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Friday through Saturday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; and Sunday noon–5 “BEST COMPANY, LANGHORNE, PENNSYLVANIA”: This 1981 work by David Graham is featured p.m. For more information, in “Through the Lens:  Modern Photography  in the Delaware Valley,”  on view  February 5 visit MichenerArtMuseum. through August 15 at the Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, Pa. org or call (215) 340-9800.

Area Exhibits Check websites for information on safety protocols. A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “A Clear Light” through January 31. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Travels: Domestic and aBroad” through Januar y 30. Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. artscouncilofprinceton.org. D & R G ree nway L a nd Tr ust, One Preser vation Place, has the ongoing virtual galleries “Trail of Breadcrumbs: Nature in Fairytales” and “Portraits of Preservation: James Fiorentino Art.” The center is currently closed to the public. drgreenway.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, has “The Conversation Continues” and “On the Forefront: Trenton’s Junior 1, 1916,” both in the museum and online. Visit ellarslie.org for museum hours. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Rebirth: Kang Muxiang,” “Bruce Beasley: Sixty Year Retrospective, 1960-2020,” and other exhibits. Hours are Thursday through Monday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Timed tickets required. Indoor buildings are closed to the public. groundsforsculpture.org. H istor ical Soc iet y of Princeton, Updike Farm-

stead, 354 Quaker Road, has “A Virtual Tour of Hamilton’s Princeton” and the “History@ Home” series. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Syd Carpenter: Portraits of Our Places” through February 28, and “Fern Coppedge: New Discoveries” through April 18. The museum reopens to the public February 5. michenerartmuseum.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Dreaming of Utopia: Roosevelt, New Jersey” through January 24 and the online exhibit “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints Of New Jersey, 1761–1898.” Open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. morven.org. Old Barracks Museum, 101 Barrack Street, Trenton, has the ongoing virtual exhibits “When Women Vote — The Old Barracks and the Anti-Suffrage Movement” and “Necessary and Proper for the Public Good.” The museum is temporarily closed to the public. barracks.org. Princeton University Art Museum has the online exhibits “Looking at 17th -Century Dutch Painting,” “Life Magazine and the Power of Photography,” “The Eclectic Eye: A Tribute to Duane Wilder,” and more, along with many online events. The museum is currently closed to the public. artmuseum.princeton.edu. West W indsor A r ts Counc il, 952 A lexander Road, West Windsor, has ”Harmony Art Show” online and by appointment through February 26. westwindsorarts.com.

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29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021

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Our Nation, by Cokie Roberts. All welcome to read and discuss. Mcl.org. Wednesday, February 10 7 p.m.: Pissi Myles hosts Online Trivia Night with a Valentine’s Day theme, virtual event presented by State Theatre NJ. $5. To sign up, visit STNJ.org/trivia. Thursday, February 11 2-3 p.m.: Introduction to American Sign Language, online presentation from Mercer County Library System. Becky Selden-Kelly is the instructor. Msl.org. Saturday, February 13 9:30 a.m.: Science on Saturdays lecture series from Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Slobain Duffy, “Virus Host-Shifting: Insights from Laboratory Experimental Evolution.” Pppl.gov. Monday, February 15 Recycling 8 p.m.: Washington Crossing Audubon Society presents “Sex, Science and the Way We Bird Today,” free online presentation by Rick Wright. Visit Contact.wcas@ gmail.com for a link. Space is limited. Wednesday, February 17 5 p.m.: Princeton University Public Lectures and Partners present “Ayad Aktar, Faisal Devji, and Sadia Abbas: Money and War, an American Conversation.” Free via Zoom. Labyrinthbooks.com/events. 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meeting, via Zoom. Princetonlibrary.org. Thursday, February 18 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market Winter Market, Franklin Avenue lot.

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Sunday, January 31 4 p.m.: “Little Books and Big Ideas in the 17th Century.” Presented virtually by Princeton University Library. With Jennifer Larson, professor of classics at Kent State Universit y. Libcal. princeton.edu. Monday, February 1 Recycling Thursday, February 4 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market Winter Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket. com. 12 p.m.: Chocolate-making demonstration by Robinson’s Chocolates via Zoom. Presented by Princeton Senior Resource Center. Princetonsenior.org. 7-8:30 p.m.: Poetry Circle: Winter Poems. Online program presented by Mercer County Library System. Discussion of poems by Wallace Stevens, Tomas Transtromer, Robert Frost, Emily Bronte, Pablo Neruda, and several others. Mcl.org. Saturday, February 6 9:30-11:30 a.m.: Science on Saturdays lecture series from Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Adam Ruben, author, “Public Perception of Science: Lesson from a Dead Sheep.” Pppl. gov. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. : We s t Windsor Winter Farmers Market, at Meadow Road lot of MarketFair mall, U.S. Route 1. wwcfm.org. Monday, February 8 7- 8 : 3 0 p. m . : M e r c e r County Library System presents Monday Night Book Group: Founding Mothers: The Women Who Raised

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Wednesday, January 27 4-5:30 p.m.: Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber holds virtual Business After Business, a networking event. Princetonmercer.org. Thursday, January 28 1-3 p.m.: The Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber presents the Central Jersey 2021 Real Estate Forecast with keynote speakers. Princetonmercer.org. 7-8 p.m.: “The Influenza Pandemic of 1918: The Story and Lasting Impact.” College of New Jersey Professor Rita King leads this virtual discussion. Sponsored by Mercer County Library System. Registration required. Mcl.org. Friday, January 29 On demand through January 31: Virtual concert by the Buskaid Soweto String E nsemble, presented by Princeton Symphony Orchestra. “Brilliant Baroque to Cool Kwela,” including works by Mozart, Bruch, and Princeton-based composer Julian Grant. $ 5. Princetonsymphony.org or (609) 497-0020. Saturday, January 30 9:30-11:30 a.m.: Science on Saturdays series from Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory presents “From Studying the Sun to Searching for Dark Matter to Fighting COVID-19,” with Princeton University Professor Cristian Galbiati. Pppl.gov. 10 a.m.: “Ice Harvest,” at Howell Living Histor y Farm, 70 Woodens Lane, Hopewell. Learn about tools and technology that made ice harvesting a successful business at the turn of the century. Visitors, who must wear masks and be socially distanced, can try to use the ice saw on the pond. Howellfarm.org. 11 a.m.: Friends of Princeton Public Librar y host Ralph Nader and Richard Cordray in conversation with Carl Mayer via Zoom. Andy Shallal, founder of Busboys and Poets, w ill prepare dishes from Nader’s new cookbook. $65 including books from Cordray and Mayer. Princetonlibrary.org.

Cleaning

Wednesday, January 20 6 p.m.: Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees meeting via Zoom. Princetonlibrary.org. Thursday, January 21 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market Winter Market, Franklin Avenue lot. Princetonfarmersmarket.com. 12 :15 p.m. : We s t m in ster Conservatory at Nassau presents virtual “Music

6:30 p.m.: Virtual Open House, Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart. Meet head of school R ik Dugan, hear from students, and drop into classrooms with teachers. Register at https://bit.ly2KU4cTk. 7-8 p.m.: “Revolutionary Princeton, 1774-1783: The Biography of an American Town in the Heart of a Civil War,” virtual talk presented by Larry Kidder. Sponsored by Mercer County Library System. Registration required. Mcl.org. Friday, January 22 11:45 a.m.: Princeton Senior Resource Center presents virtual event, “A Look at Senior Housing.” Registration required at princetonsenior.org. 6 p. m . : F r e e v i r t u a l screening of Field Biologist, shot in Costa Rica by local filmmaker Jared Flesher, followed by Q&A. Eventbrite. com. Saturday, January 23 9:30-11:30 a.m.: Science on Saturdays lecture series from Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. “Chemistry and Art: Like Dissolves Like. How Solubility Influences Creating and Restoring Art, Forgery, and Telling a Good Story,” with Rutgers Professor Geeta Govindarajoo. Pppl.gov. 1 p.m.: “Immigration and Americanization – Eastern European Workers in Trenton’s Roebling Factories.” Talk based on material from the Trentoniana Collection of Trenton Public Library. Williamtrenthouse.org. Monday, January 25 12 p.m.: “What’s Cooking @ MCLS.” Staff from Mercer County Library System share recipes from books in the collection. Watch on YouTube channel. Mcl.org. Tuesday, January 26 10:30 a.m.: Princeton Senior Resource Center presents virtual TED Talk, followed by discussion. Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi, the founders of Black Lives Matter, are interviewed. Registration required. Princetonsenior.org.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021 • 30

Calendar

from Norway” with soprano Danielle Sinclair and pianist Michael Jacobsen. Music of Grieg and piano settings of traditional Norwegian folk songs and dance music. Nassauchurch.org/Westminster-conservatory-recitals/. 4-5 p.m.: Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber holds “Meet the CEO,” introduci ng new pre s ident /C EO Hal English. Virtual event. Princetonmercer.org. 6-7:30 p.m.: Women in Development Mercer County (WID) hosts annual open house and networking event, via Zoom. Visit widmercer. org for link.


31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, JaNuaRy 20, 2021

S ports

Back on the Ice After Pandemic Ended PU Hockey Career, Fogarty Produces Superb Start in Swedish Pro League

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hen the Princeton U n i v e r s i t y m e n ’s hockey team saw its season halted last March by the pandemic after it had swept Dartmouth in an ECAC Hockey opening round playoff series, Jordan Fogarty was planning to move on from the sport. “I was pretty well prepared to have that Dartmouth game be my final time lacing up the skates,” said forward Fogarty, who graduated from Princeton last June. “I was applying to work in finance because I worked an internship over last summer.” But after hitting the interview circuit, Fogarty decided that he wanted to get back on the ice and committed to play a post-graduate season at Long Island University while studying for an MBA. With the specter of COVID-19 hanging over the college season, Fogarty checked out options to play pro hockey abroad and eventually signed with Virserums SGF in Sweden’s Third Division. “I got a really interesting offer in the summer to work as an internship with a Princeton hockey alum (Steve Shireffs ’99) at a credit management fund (Granite State Capital Management),” said Fogarty, an economics major who made the ECAC AllAcademic Team three times. “He said if you play pro, you can work for us remotely while playing. I got an agent and I ended up signing over in Sweden and dropping out of my MBA program.” By November, Fogarty was on the ice for Virserums. “It was pretty cool, coming from a point from where I thought I was done playing hockey to playing a game professionally in another country,” said the 5’8, 180-pound Fogarty, who hails from Sarnia, Ontario, and tallied one goal and one assist in 46 appearances over his Princeton career. “I let it sink in because one thing I learned from Princeton is that you never know when it is over so that is something pretty good.” In his time at Princeton, Fogarty had a cool experience playing for his father, Ron Fogarty, the head coach of the Tiger men’s program. “I think it is an opportunity that very few people get to have at such a high level of athletics, being on the same team as somebody you love dearly and somebody who raised you,” said Fogarty. “It was really cool, I wouldn’t trade it for the world.” It did take some time for Fogarty to gain the trust of his teammates in his position as the coach’s son. “It was tough my first few years, it is the elephant in the room,” recalled Fogarty. “In my freshman year, the older guys were thinking, “How is this guy going to be?” I had to show that I wasn’t going to be a snitch and I was going to be one of the guys. The first year was interesting but then the guys kind of warmed up to

it and understood that I was a player. I called him Ron at the rink, I never referred to him as my dad.” In Fogarty’s senior campaign last winter, the Tigers got off to a tough start, going 1-8-3 on the way to posting a regular season record of 4-20-5. “We just had to wait until guys get used to new roles and started to pull together,” said Fogarty. “We showed that hey we don’t give up and towards the end of the season we were a pretty good team.” The Tigers ended the season on a high note, going up to Dartmouth and sweeping the Big Green in a best-ofthree ECACH opening round series, winning both games in overtime. “Everybody just bought in, guys who were playing all of the time were smart with their shifts,” said Fogarty. “Guys were really engaged and always watching and helping other guys out. Guys were blocking shots and there was just an energy around the team. Granted we didn’t win a lot of games last year but at that point we knew we could win. We were determined to win and destined to win at that point. It was pretty cool.” While coming through against Dartmouth was cool, having the rest of the postseason cut short by COVID-19 concerns and then being sent home days later was tough for Fogarty and his classmates. “I am still not over the fact that I didn’t get to go out like everybody else at Princeton to end their career,” said Fogarty. “I felt for the guys and everybody. The way our season has always ended is that you fight until your last breath. The seniors get their last swan song, the game is over with their last shift there. Then you are in the locker room and there are tears and hugs. Then you get to go back and you have three months of hanging with the guys and saying goodbye. It just got all ripped away from us in a matter of two days.” Over this time at Princeton, Fogarty developed deep bonds with the guys on the team. “The number one thing is the people I got to play with, it was a special group of guys,” asserted Fogarty. “It is different than most schools because we have no scholarships; guys check their egos at the door because we are all going to pretty much the hardest school in the world. All day, we are just grinding through class, through exams, and trying to maintain a crazy schedule. Then we are going to the rink and this is our time to be athletes. We are just such a close-knit group.” Going through that grind helped Fogarty grow on and off the ice. “It is a place that makes you mature really quickly, especially with sports and being older,” said Fogarty. “I didn’t realize how much

maturing I had to do until I was at Princeton and saw how the world works. It taught me a lot about relationship management, with people at the rink, older people, everybody you meet, and how important it is. It is understanding humility as well. In high school, I was a pretty good student. At Princeton, I was immediately introduced to a great deal of humbling and humility, seeing how much you need to learn and grow as a person.” Fogarty had to utilize that maturity when he arrived in Sweden this fall and dealt with new surroundings. “I got off the plane and I had two days to get used to the time zone and move into the hotel they had me in for the year,” said Fogarty. “It was a culture shock at first. The town I am in has 1,800 people. It is tiny but the thing with Sweden is that it is such a rural and sparsely populated spot, it is all connected by their love for hockey. It is crazy; the entire town will go to very single game in every single city.” It didn’t take long for Fogarty to find a comfort level off the ice. “I adjusted pretty well, the town is super nice,” added Fogarty. “We have guys in the supporter group, which is essentially the booster group for the team and they lend us their cars any time we asked. In the hotel, we have five guys and we have the entire basement to ourselves. It has X-boxes, TVs, a pool table, and a ping pong table; it was kind of like being in college again.”

JORDAN RULES: Jordan Fogarty heads up the ice during his career for the Princeton University men’s hockey team. After graduating from Princeton last June, Fogarty headed to Europe to play pro hockey, joining Virserums SGF in Sweden’s Third Division. Through his first 10 games with the club, forward Fogarty tallied 11 goals and eight assists. (Photo provided courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

Once he got on the ice, Fogarty had some catching up to do. “Sweden never really shut down the rinks, it was pretty impressive,” said Fogarty. “Our team has our own rink so we were on the ice like two hours a day to start preseason training. I was pretty rusty at the beginning so I would go in the mornings and just do some skill stuff to get my feet back underneath me.” In the first segment of the season, Fogerty displayed his skill, tallying 11 goals and eight assists in his first 10 games for Virserums. “I have got line mates who also played college in the states,” said Fogarty. “They are pretty good puck movers and then I just

kind of found a groove there. The coach really liked how I played and put me in a lot of good situations and I started scoring.” With the league going on a pause over the holidays due to COVID-19 concerns, Fogarty was looking forward to getting back on the ice for the team in January as it makes a push to get promoted to a higher league in the Swedish system. “At this point in the season, it is just all about winning games,” said Fogarty. “I promised the coach that I would do my best to make sure that we got promoted to the next level.” Drawing on his Princeton experience, Fogarty was getting the best of both worlds, doing work remotely for

Granite State while starring for Virserums. “We have a pretty good thing going there where I work a few hours a day,” said Fogarty. “I am on the phone for a few hours and then I practice at night. So I take some hours off for practice and then finish up my work and start again the next day.” Looking ahead, Fogarty is hoping to keep thriving on both fronts. “I would love to do that,” said Fogarty. “Playing hockey for a few years and to keep working for those guys are two things I found myself really enjoying. A personal goal of mine is to see what I can do with this.” —Bill Alden


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021 • 32

PU Sports Roundup PU Men’s Swimmer Porges Sets School Record

Competing in a TYR Pro Swim Series event, Princeton University men’s swimmer Dylan Porges broke the school record in the 800 meter freestyle and got one step closer to Olympic qualification last Thursday night at the Collegiate School Aquatics Center in Richmond, Va. Porges, a resident of New York City who was an AllIvy League performer last winter in his freshman season for the Tigers, won the event with a time of 8:07.03 seconds. He broke his own school record of 8:12.42 seconds from the 2020 U.S. Open and earned a FINA B cut, which gives a swimmer consideration for the 2021 Olympics. Porges is eligible to represent the Mexican national team. To g uarantee Oly mpic qualification in the 800 freestyle, a swimmer must touch the wall at 7:54.31 seconds and earn a FINA A cut.

Princeton Baseball Promotes Jurczynski

Alex Jurczynski has earned a promotion to second assistant coach of the Princeton University baseball team, Tiger head coach

Scott Bradley said last week. Jurczynski finished his third season as an assistant coach with Princeton in 2020. Prior to coming to Princeton, Jurczynski was the head coach at Hudson Valle y C om m u n it y C ol le g e for three years. During his time there, he was awarded Mountain Valley Conference Coach of the Year in backto-back years (2015-16) as his team ranked in the top five in the nation in batting average, slugging percentage and on-base percentage all three years. Jurczynski was a catcher at Mohawk Valley Community College for two years before transferring to Oswego State where he was awarded all-conference accolades his junior year. Upon graduation, Jurczynski coached at Oswego for one season. “Alex has a passion for the game of baseball and coaching unlike anyone else,” said Bradley in reflecting on the promotion. “He came to us as a volunteer and had to be very creative in finding ways to provide for himself. Alex has made a major impact on our program and we are very excited that we are able to move him into the second assistant position. This will enable him to become involved in the recruiting process where we expect him to make immediate impact.”

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Jurczynski, for his part, is thrilled with the promotion. “I’m extremely grateful for the opportunity to continue my coaching career at Princeton,” said Jurczynski. “Our players make the job special. Being able to come to work every day to coach some of the brightest minds and to share a dugout with someone with Scott’s depth of knowledge has been and continues to be an incredible opportunity.”

Former PU Soccer Coach Bradley to Receive Award

For mer Princeton University men’s soccer player and head coach Bob Bradley ’80, the former U.S. Men’s National Team Coach and current Coach of the Los Angeles Football Club ( L A FC ) of Major League Soccer ( ML S ), has been named to receive the 27th Walt Chyzowych Lifetime Achievement Award. Bradley will officially receive the prestigious award on January 15 at the Walt Chyzowych Fund’s Annual Award Ceremony during the 2021 United Soccer Coaches Digital Convention. T h e Wa l t C h y z o w y c h Fund was founded after his passing in 1994 to honor his memor y and spread his legacy as U.S. National Team Coach and Director of Coaching during the formative years of development of soccer in America. The fund helps provide coaching education scholarships and grants to aspiring young coaches and developing soccer organizations through its fundraising efforts in partnership with Un ite d S o c c e r C o ach e s Foundation. B e i n g n a m e d a Wa l t Chyzowych Lifetime Achievement Award recipient was special for Bradley. “It is a great honor to receive this award from the Walt Chyzowych Fund,” said Bradley. “I believe in the mission of the Fund and United Soccer Coaches Foundation to provide resources to aspiring American Coaches, and

I thank Dr. Joe Machnik, Gene Chyzow ych Jr, and everyone involved with the Fund for continuing to grow soccer in this country.” Bradley has succeeded at every level of soccer in the United States, has achieved recognition for his accomplishments in several European countries and as coach of Egypt’s national team which fell just short qualifying for the 2014 World Cup. He most recently led LAFC to within one goal of winning The CONCACAF Champions League title after defeating three LIGA MX teams with come-from-behind victories. Born in Montclair, N.J., Bradley played for West Essex High School before coming to Princeton. After graduating from Princeton, he enrolled in the Sports Management Program at Ohio University, where in 1981 he was named as head coach at the age of 22. He later served as assistant coach for Bruce Arena at the University of Virginia before taking the head coaching job at Princeton in 1984, where he won two Ivy League Championships and reached the NCAA Final Four in 1993. In 1996, Bradley teamed up again with Bruce Arena as assistant coach for DC United in MLS’ first season, which began a long association with MLS. He then became the head coach of the Chicago Fire and led the club to the MLS Cup and US Open Cup Championships in 1998, the club’s first year during which Bradley was named MLS Coach of the Year. He also coached MLS’ NY Metro-Stars and Chivas USA. Bradley has won three MLS Coach of the Year Awards, most recently in 2019 with LAFC, and now ranks third for most wins in league history. In 2007, Bradley became the head coach of the U.S. Men’s National Team and guided the squad to a 12-15 record in his debut campaign, which included a win over Mexico in the 2007 Gold Cup Final. In 2009, Bradley led the

MAGIC MAN: Devin Cannady heads up the court during his junior season with the Princeton University men’s basketball team. Last week, Cannady signed with the Lakeland Magic, the NBA G-League developmental affiliate of the Orlando Magic. The NBA G League tips off in February at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex near Orlando. This will be Cannady’s second season in the G League, as he played for the Long Island Nets last season. Cannady averaged 14.4, points, 3.9 rebounds, and 2.6 assists per game for the club. Prior to signing with Lakeland, Cannady appeared in two preseason games for the Orlando Magic. During his college career, Cannady earned a pair of All-Ivy League honors and finished as Princeton’s fifth-leading all-time scorer with 1,515 points. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

U.S. team to a second-place finish in the FIFA Confederations Cup, beating Spain 2-0 in the semifinal before losing in the Final to Brazil, 3-2. A successful CONCACAF qualifying campaign led the U.S. to the 2010 World Cup where Bradley’s team won Group C before losing to Ghana in the knockout stage in extra time. In September 2011, Bradley was hired by Egypt to coach its national team in the qualifying phase of the 2014 World Cup. Eg y pt went undefeated in its first six games before losing to Ghana in the third-round playoffs. In January 2014, Bradley signed to manage Stabaek

Football Club in Norway, making him the first American to manage a club in top level European competition. He later coached at Le Havre AC (France) in Ligue 2 and missed promotion into Ligue 1 based on a goal scored tiebreaker. In 2016, Bradley was appointed Coach at Swansea Cit y, becoming the first American to coach in the Premiership. Returning to the U.S., Bradley was named Head Coach of LAFC for its inaugural MLS season, winning the Supporter’s Shield in 2019 and again being named MLS Coach of the Year.

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Last winter, the Princeton High girls’ hockey team relied on senior star Victoria Zammit to control the tempo at both ends of the ice. “Victoria was great because she could do everything herself to keep it in our other zone and give the defense a break,” said PHS head coach Christian Herzog of Zammit who tallied 45 points on 34 goals and 11 assists to help the Tigers go 4-14. “She could also play defense and could be helpful there as long as she had the green light to rush the puck when she had the opportunity.” With Zammit having graduated, Herzog is looking for sophomore Catie Samaan and junior Grace Rebak to step up this winter. “Catie and Grace are going to have to be iron women and log a ton of time and be situational specific forwards to be on the power play and things like that,” said Herzog, whose team opens its 2021 campaign by playing at Princeton Day School on January 21. “In the drills that we have been doing, I have Catie and Grace do mostly defense. They

are the two strongest players on the team, they take initiative. They are going to have to work a lot of give and go together. They have to make some opportunities happen, especially offensively. Samaan has a strong head for hockey and Rebak is calm on the ice.” Herzog is looking for some offensive production from junior Tessa Solvibile, junior Defne Arsoy, junior Kelsey Riley, junior Carly Ruzich, and senior Hailey Hawes. “Tessa has improved, her hands seem to have gotten better shot-wise,” said Herzog. “Defne is returning. Kelsey Riley will definitely be playing forward and Carly is back. Hailey is one of the brand new girls who have come out.” At goalie, junior Jadie Tome appears to be coming into her own. “Jadie made some progress last season, she has the right attitude,” said Herzog. “She is never complaining and is willing to work hard. She takes direction well. Her father works with her quite a bit.” With PHS unable to practice

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PHS Girls’ Hockey Primed for 2021 Campaign, Relishing the Opportunity to Get Back On the Ice at Hobey Baker Rink on the Princeton University campus as in past years, Herzog has been scrambling to get the team early morning practice slots at the Ice Land Rink in Hamilton. “To put it simply, my whole goal of this after setting everything up and going through the first round of this is to give the girls some opportunity to play ice hockey,” said Herzog. “We all agree it is not going to be an ideal season. We have to roll with the punches and be flexible and do the best that we can to give them an opportunity to play the sport.” While things may not be ideal, so far it appears that the PHS players are relishing the opportunity to be on the ice. “It is a break from the Zoom, it is working positively from a mental standpoint,” said Herzog. “The family won’t let you go out. You are practicing social distancing and you can’t carpool with this person. They are happy to be getting out of the house, taking a break from life.” —Bill Alden

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GAINING CONTROL: Princeton High girls’ hockey player Catie Samaan controls the puck in a game last winter. Sophomore standout Samaan figures to be a key performer for the Tigers this season. PHS opens its 2021 campaign by playing at Princeton Day School on January 21. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021 • 34

Despite Starting Late Due to COVID Concerns, PDS Girls’ Hockey Looking Forward to Big Season While the Princeton Day School girls’ hockey team didn’t hit the ice until early January due to delays stemming from COVID-19 concerns, John Ritchie believes that the late start may have made his players even more enthusiastic about the upcoming season. “They are really excited, building off some of the enthusiasm from last year,” said PDS head coach Ritchie, who guided the Panthers to a 10-11 record last winter in his debut campaign at the helm of the program. “We almost doubled the number of girls that are playing this year, which is awesome. Some are coming out for the first time. Some have played when they were younger and stopped to focus on other sports and they are coming back to it. For others, hockey is their primary sport. It is a really good mix. We had two scrimmages this week that went pretty well, so far, so good.” PDS boasts really good depth in its forward unit. “We definitely have two legit lines in terms of travel players and then we have a third line that is definitely going to be utilized in games,” said Ritchie. “It is not like they are learning how to play. They are girls that although it is not their primary sport, they have come a long way and they really give us some nice depth.” Ritchie believes the quintet of senior Hailey Wexler, junior Ally Antonacci, senior

Maisie Henderson, freshman Emily McCann, and freshman Logan Harrison will emerge as the primary offensive threats. “In terms of scoring, we are looking to Hailey again,” added Ritchie. “Ally will probably have a really strong year. Getting Maisie back from injur y has been huge. We have two freshman in Emily and Logan who I think they are going to have really good years. Those five are going to be the ones who score a lot, they are going to carry a heavy load. We have a couple of others who will factor in against some of the teams that maybe aren’t as experienced.” On defense, the group of sophomore Lauren Chase, senior Hannah Choe, junior Natalie Celso, and freshman Isabel Cook will carry the load along the blue line. “We have four good defensemen,” said R itchie. “Lauren is a big, defensive player, she has improved her shot. She has been working with her father (former Brown University star Tim Chase), obviously he has a great background. Hannah is another good one. They will be our top pair. Nat is rock solid and the freshman who will be playing there is Isabel.” Senior Jillian Wexler and sophomore Abigail Ashman form a rock solid goalie tandem for PDS. “It is such a good problem for me to have, trying to figure out how to utilize both of

them and play them in good games,” said Ritchie. “We scrimmaged Chatham last night and they spilt; it was a good game for both of them. We are very fortunate to have both. Jillian will get the games that we deem are good games for her as a senior. It stinks that she is less than 500 saves away from 2,000; in a normal year she would have gotten it. I think it is going to be tough this year and with us being a little bit stronger, she will face less shots. I have to find a balance. Abby will take over for the next two years so she has to get some of the better games too.” In Ritchie’s view, the Panthers have the potential to produce a strong season. “It is tough to put a record on in my head; if we originally had 10 games scheduled, I think this team should finish well over .500,” said Ritchie. “It should be one of the better years that PDS has had in a while. I am looking to really improve on that from last year.” No matter what the scoreboard ultimately says, Ritchie wants his players to savor their time on the ice this winter. “We are just going to have HAIL STORM: Princeton Day School girls’ hockey player Hailey Wexler heads to goal in a game to be flexible day-to-day and last season. Senior forward Wexler will be depended on to help trigger the PDS offense this week-to-week,” said Ritchie. winter. The Panthers open their 2021 campaign by hosting Princeton High on January 21. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) “Whatever happens, whatever games we get, we have to Available for be appreciative. We can’t take Lunch & Dinner any games for granted. Even these scrimmages we had this Mmm..Take-Out week were big for us.” Events • Parties • Catering 908.359.8388 41 Leigh Avenue, Princeton —Bill Alden

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Eugene Burroughs has undergone quite a basketball odyssey since the 1980s. Growing up in Philadelphia, Burroughs starred at Episcopal High ( Pa.) and then went south to play college ball at the University of Richmond. During his freshman season in 1991, point guard Burroughs sank the game-clinching free throws as the Spiders upset Syracuse 73-69 in the opening round of the NCAA tournament, becoming the first 15th-seeded team to defeat a No. 2 seed in tourney history. Upon graduating in 1994, Bur roughs worke d as a salesman for Coca-Cola before he was pulled back into the game to become an assistant coach for the American University men’s hoops program. From there, he had associate coaching stints at Marist, Hofstra, Navy, Penn State, and a second stop at Marist. The NBA came calling in 2014 as Burroughs became the shooting coach for his h o m e to w n P h i l a d e l p h i a 76ers. He later coached GLeague teams in Delaware and California from 201620. Now, the latest stop on Burroughs’ hoops journey is coming to Princeton Day School, where he has taken the helm of its boys’ basketball program, succeeding Doug Davis. For Burroughs, getting into high school coaching gives him the chance to put down some roots and apply his knowledge in a different environment. “The G-League is not a job where you make a career out of it; it is a very fluid, transient type of job,” said Burroughs, 48, who is also working at as an admission associate and athletics liaison in the school’s Admission Office. “I loved coaching in the league, but for me, I just needed something a little bit more. I got to the stage in my life where I needed something different. I didn’t see where my next move was and where my path was going. I was looking for something more stable so I ended up looking at different

opportunities.” Burroughs found a good fit at PDS and is looking for ward to working with players at an earlier stage of development. “I am excited to get on the court with them; I have never coached high school basketball,” said Burroughs. “It is definitely going to be a new experience for me and I am looking forward to just learning from the experience. I told my players when I met with them that I have a lot of experience. I have been at a lot of different levels but I don’t have the answers to everything.” Growing up playing on the blacktops of Philly parks, Burroughs learned some valuable lessons from that trial by fire. “I was playing against grown men since seventh grade so you learn how to compete and play at that level and earn your stripes,” said Burroughs. “When you play against older guys, the game is just different than when you are playing against kids your own age.” Coming through in Richmond’s historic NCAA win remains a memorable competitive moment for Burroughs. “I get fouled, I go to the free throw line; they call time out so now there is 21 seconds left in the game,” recalled Burroughs. “We are up one and I am sitting down. I get off the bench and one of my good friends still today, Curtis Blair, who is actually an NBA referee right now, looks at me and goes you better make these free throws. I am like oh my God. I end up going to the line, I was always a very good free throw shooter. I take my two dribbles and let it go. I make the first, I make the second and we are up three. We come back down and get the stop and the game is over.” After serving as a captain at Richmond, Burroughs went into the cor porate world upon g raduat ion, working as a salesman for Coca-Cola. But in the summer of 1996, one of his college coaches told Burroughs that American University

was looking for an assistant and he jumped at the chance to return to the game and got the job. It didn’t take long for Burroughs to realize that he had found his calling. “I enjoyed the game as a player, I was a player-coach type of person,” said Burroughs. “I would run the show. I love playing defense, that was part of who I was as a basketball player. When the opportunity came up to go to American to coach, I was like why not, let’s give it a try. That was my first time coaching, it was a great experience.” Moving on to Hofstra in 1997, Burroughs worked w it h t he le gendar y Jay Wright, who went on to Villanova and has led the Wildcats to a pair of NCAA titles. “He was always particular about how he wanted things done,” said Burroughs, reflecting on his time with Wright. “He would always say just get it done, I don’t want to hear any excuses, just find a way to get it done. It made you become creative. One of the things he said to me that I will never forget is that to advance in this profession you have to learn from the bottom to get to the top. You have to know what everyone’s role on your staff is. His thing was that you have to learn all aspects of the job to be successful.” Staying in the realm of mid-majors, Burroughs worke d as a n as s is t a nt coach at Marist from 200004 and served at the associate head coach at the Naval Academy from 2004 -11. He then headed into the big time, becoming an assistant at Penn State and getting a taste of the Big 10. “From a basketball perspective, it was a great opportunity to see the next level, the arenas, and the players,” said Burroughs. “You hear about these places and when you go and experience the environment in these places, it is unbelievable. It is amazing what the competition is like at that level and how challenging it is. The Big 10 is hard.” In 2014, Burroughs moved

up to the pro level, becoming the shooting coach for the Sixers. “Even t hough my role w a s a s h o ot i n g c o a c h , which is helping the players technique and shooting, I soaked in all of the basketball knowledge,” said Burroughs. “I didn’t hold myself to just shooting. I am in meetings for practice, I traveled with the team. I am getting the full experience. There was so much knowledge about basketball that I learned, it was unbelievable. I would say that from a coaching standpoint, it is something that shaped me more than any other experience that I ever had. Brett Brown (Sixers head coach at the time) was a great teacher of the game. I just learned the game, looking at it from another way and from a very good teacher. The game is so different from college with the terminology they use. They talk about spacing on the floor. It is just the little nuances of the game. It made me a better coach.” Using that knowledge, Burroughs headed to the GLeague where he served as head coach of the Delaware 87’ers from 2006-18 and as associate head coach of the Agua Caliente Clippers from 2018-20. “It taught me a lot because now you are in control,” said Burroughs. “Now you have to manage the practice and manage the personalities on the team. You have to deal with all of the nuances of running a program. It was a great experience to make some mistakes, learn from your mistakes.” As he takes the helm of t he PDS prog ram, Burroughs will be drawing on that experience. “I told them that I am going to coach you like I would coach the G-League players,” said Burroughs. “I wouldn’t say I am an uptempo guy and that we are going to press you all over the place and score 100 points. It is more about just looking at the game in a different way. For me, that is spacing on the floor, learning the fundamentals, and helping them with shooting.” In the process, Burroughs is looking to influence his players on and off the court. “It will be fun to coach the kids and hopefully have an impact on them as basketball players and as people,” said Burroughs. “I told the guys one of the things that is important to me is being respectful. I will be teaching them responsibility and being able to compete. You have to be able to compete because not only are you competing on the basketball floor, you have to compete in life.” —Bill Alden

TOWN TOPICS

VOICE OF EXPERIENCE: Eugene Burroughs directs his players during a summer pro league game. Boasting a resume that includes coaching at the Division I level, the NBA, and the G-League, Burroughs has taken the helm of the Princeton Day School boys’ basketball program. (Photo provided courtesy of Eugene Burroughs)

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Local Sports Princeton Athletic Club Holding Membership Sign-up

The Princeton Athletic Club (PAC), a nonprofit running club open to runners of all ages and abilities in the Princeton area, is holding registration for 2021 memberships. The PAC organizes several local running events each year and helps organize group runs. One can sign up as an individual member or get a household discount. For more information on membership options and fees, log onto princetonac.org/membership. Membership benefits include e-notifications of group runs, member discount off registration fees for clubsponsored events, PAC Tshirt for all new and renewing adult members, and automatic membership with Road Runners Club of America. PAC events in the past have included an April Trail Run at the Institute Woods, Trail Runs at Mountain Lakes, All-Comer Track Meets, Pub Runs, and the Winter Wonder

Run at the Institute Woods. The PAC is affiliated with USA Track and Field as USATF-NJ club #409. Individual USATF membership is optional and available from USATF directly. Membership in PAC is also non-exclusive; if one is a member of another club, he or she is free to join PAC as well to support club activities and get discounts for PAC events.

PHS Athletic Hall of Fame Moves Ceremony to 2021

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2021

Having Coached in College, the NBA, and the G-League, Burroughs Continuing Hoops Journey with PDS Program

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANuARY 20, 2021 • 36

Obituaries

William J. Toole William J. Toole, 90 ½ years young, passed away after a brief illness on Friday January 8, 2021 in Melbourne, Florida. Born in Trenton NJ, to S cot tish immigrants, he was raised in Princeton, living there most of his life until moving to Pennington in 2005, with winters in Florida. Mr. Toole was predeceased by h is parents, William M. Toole and Jane (Jean) W. Gray, his wife Anne E. Toole, and his grandson Alexander Platt. He is survived by three children, Linda A. Toole and husband David Gottschlich of Columbia, MD; Jane E. Platt and husband Greg of Cream Ridge, NJ; and Robert K. Toole and wife Patricia of Lawrenceville, NJ; eight grandchildren ; and three great-grandchildren with one more on the way. He is also survived by his brother, the Reverend Dr.

George G. Toole of White Hall, MD. He also leaves his “out-law” family in the Columbus, Ohio, area. His companion of the last nine years, Emma Denny, and many friends in Florida will also miss him. Mr. Toole graduated from Princeton High School and attended Rider College. He formerly worked for the Princeton University Store but spent most of his career with IBM Corporation. He was part owner of Tartan Taxi of Princeton. Bill was a 70-year member of Princeton Hook and Ladder Co. of the Princeton Fire Department, serving as President and Trustee. He was the longtime Secretary of the Princeton Firemen’s Relief Association and a Life Member of The NJ State Firemen’s Association. He was a Past Master of Princeton Lodge #38 F&AM, and Past District Deputy Grand Master and Past Chaplain of the Grand Lodge for New Jer s e y. Adv is or y B oard member of the International Order of Rainbow Girls #51, he was also a Trustee of the Masonic Home at Burlington, NJ. He was a member of the Scottish Rite, Crescent Temple, and the Princeton Shrine Club. He additionally served his community as a member of the Borough of Princeton Affordable Housing Board and as a Sergeant and Tank Commander for 13 years in the New Jersey National Guard. Bill enjoyed history and geography and was able to enrich those passions through his love of travel with his wife, Anne. They were members of the Wally Byam Caravan Club, trav-

eling the North American Continent in their Airstream travel trailer. Bill was proud of his Scottish heritage and they traveled to Scotland many times visiting family and other countries as well. After 59 years of marriage, Anne passed away. Bill met Emma in Florida, and they continued traveling this time mainly by cruise ship, including one eventful trip to Cuba. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions in Bill’s memory may be made to the Shriners Children’s Hospital. Interment will be at Trinity-All Saints’ Cemeter y, Princeton. A c e l e b r a t i o n of B i l l Toole’s life will be held at a later date this year. Arrangements are under the direction of MatherHodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

Jeffrey Lionel Gossman Jeffrey Lionel Gossman, the M. Taylor Pyne Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures, Emeritus, at Princeton University, died on Monday, January 11, 2021, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

Lionel was a meticulous scholar who happily crossed intellectual boundaries to follow untrodden paths and discover the orphans neglected by scholarly research to create connections between fields and disciplines. He understood that events great and small do not happen in isolation and the high and the low do not inhabit separate realms. His scholarship was driven by a passion to bring attention to those who have been neglected, misunderstood, or out of fashion. He was not a linear thinker who stuck to his chosen path. He was a scholar, a lover of arts, and a storyteller. He wrote on topics ranging from historiography to the stained-glass windows in the working-class sections of Glasgow. He published in the most prestigious academic presses, but loved to publish on Openbookpublishers.com, VictorianWeb.org, and other online platforms, which made his work accessible to everyone around the world. He was both an intellectual trailblazer and a skeptic of the latest intellectual fashions. He was a generous and contributing citizen to the institutions which he served – Johns Hopkins from 1968 to 1976 and Princeton University from 1976 until his retirement in l999 as well as the American Philosophical Society which he loved, and on whose many committees he served for years. He was a reader for Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic (now Learning Ally), and he was usually assigned the most unglamorous French grammar texts. Lionel was born on May 31, 1929, on the kitchen table of a rented flat in Hyndland in the West End of Glasgow. His father was born in London, his

mother in Glasgow, both children of immigrant workingclass parents. Lionel received all his basic education in the Scottish public school system. In 1943, at the age of 14, he earned what was to be his first of many academic honors, “The James Wilson Medal for Excellence in French.” In 1946 he entered the University of Glasgow where he majored in French and German. He graduated with first-class honors in 1951 — the year of the University’s 500th birthday. Between 1952 and 1954 he served first in the Royal Navy and then in the Army, where he was trained as a simultaneous translator between Russian and English and earned a First-Class interpreter’s certificate. In 1954 he entered St. Antony’s College, Oxford, where he received his D.Phil degree in 18th-century French literature in 1958. In September 1958 Lionel came to the United States. As he writes in his (unpublished) autobiography “In the Footsteps of Giants: My Itinerary from Glasgow to Princeton,” “… though I was suspicious of American power and appalled by the McCarthy witch hunts, I sensed the deep democratic instinct of the Americans and it appealed to me as a Scot. I felt instinctively that my Glasgow accent and my provincial lower-middle class Jewish background would not be held against me. I would be taken for who I was and allowed to become whatever I could make of myself.” A full list of Lionel’s publications and academic honors are included in the Princeton Universit y obituar y : https://www.princeton.edu/ news/2021/01/15/lionelgossman.

Following is a small selection: Honors: The Howard T. Behrman Award, Princeton’s highest award for distinguished achievements in the humanities (1990); Officier des Palms Académiques (1991); elected to the American Philosophical Society (1996); and honorary degree of Doctor of Humanities, Princeton University (2005). Publications: “Men and Masks: A Study of Molière” (Johns Hopkins University 1963); “Medievalism and the Ideologies of the Enlightenment” (JHU, 1968); “Between History and Literature” (Harvard University Press, 1990); “Basel in the Age of Burkhardt,” awarded the George L. Mosse Prize for modern cultural history by American Philosophical Association (Chicago University Press 2000); “Brown Shirt Princess: A Study of the Nazi Conscience” (Openbook Publishers, 2009); “Thomas Annan of Glasgow: Pioneer of the Documentary Photograph” (Openbook Publishers, 2015); and “Scottish Publishers and English Literature : Some Smaller Publishers” (Victorian Web, December 2020). Lionel is survived by his wife Eva; his daughter Janice, sonin law Michael Coppola and his son Nicholas; his sister-in-law Gabriella Weiss, and brotherin-law Alexander Ben Ami; his nephew Dr. Daniel Weiss (Debbie) and family; niece Ruth Bergman (Rabbi Aaron) and family; nephew Oded Ben Ami (Judy) and family; Rivka (Nivi) and family; Yair Ben Ami (Maya) and family; as well as many cousins in Glasgow, London, and Zurich. Donations can be made to a charity of choice or to the American Friends of Glasgow University.

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photographer. After retiring, he loved traveling with his wife Lib, vacationing in Maine, and visiting family across the U.S. Bill was known and loved for his integrity and generosity, his gentlemanly charm, and dry humor. He is survived by his sister, Joan O. Lautenberger; his three children, Lynn D. Osborne, Wendy O. Pierce, and William H. Osborne IV; and six grandchildren.

Marjorie C. Horowitz

William H. Osborne III William H. Osborne III, 91, formerly of Princeton, N.J., passed away on November 30, 2020, of COVID-19. He was a resident of Pacifica Senior Living in Santa Fe, NM. Bill was born and raised in Newark and Maplewood, NJ. He attended Princeton University and served on the alumni committee for class of 1950. During the Korean War, he served as lieutenant in the U.S. Army. He worked many years as a Trust Officer at National Newark & Essex Bank, Midlantic Bank, and several other NJ banks. He served on the board of several charities, including the Job Haines Home for Unwed Mothers. Bill was a voracious reader, avid cyclist, and

Marjorie C. Horowitz, 96, longtime Princeton resident, most recently residing at the Stonebridge at Montgomery retirement community in Skillman, New Jersey, passed away on January 4, 2021. Mar j or ie, dau g hter of Dora and Barnett Chasen, and younger sister of Harr iet, was bor n on June 19, 1924 in Newark, New Jersey, and lived in nearby New Brunswick for most of her youth. After graduating from high school, she attended optical school and worked as an optician in New York City before returning to New Jersey to marry her childhood best friend’s handsome older brother, Milton Horowitz. The Chasen and Horowitz families were longtime friends and the engagement was welcomed and celebrated. Marjorie and Milton married in 1947. She moved to the Princeton area where Milton and his cousin had purchased Weber’s Training School and established a

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veterinary practice on Highway US 1. In those days, room and board were part of the kennelmen’s salary so she cooked three meals a day for her husband and six other hungry men. A tough job for a new bride. Speaking of cooking, Margie made the best pies ever. The fruit filling was terrific, but her crust received top billing. If fruit pies were not to your liking, not to worry, her mandelbrot (Jewish biscotti) was a big hit with her friends and family. Nobody had just one helping of her brisket as well. Marjorie raised her two children, Carol and David, on the property. She was active in the community and was a founding member of the Princeton Jewish Center. She and Milton traveled the world together, and when in mid-life she, also, took up his hobby of fishing, “they fished all over the world” too. In later years, Marjorie became interested in stained glass. She made many beautiful lamps, mirrors, boxes, and window pieces. She loved the Yiddish language; she spoke, wrote, and read it fluently. She also belonged to a Yiddish reading and conversation group in Princeton. She is lovingly remembered by her children, their spouses, her grandchildren, n i e c e s, n e p h e ws, m a ny friends, and her dearest friend of 90+ years and sister-in-law, Shirley Shapiro (née Horowitz). Due to current public health Covid precautions, there will not be a funeral service or gathering at this time. When conditions permit, a celebration of her life will be held.

Lawrence Walter Howley Lawrence Walter Howley, 84, passed away peacefully and returned to the Lord on Januar y 12, 2021 at Princeton Care Center from complications with COVID related illness. Mr. Howley was born on October 3, 1936 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, to Anna (Benedyk) and James S. Howley. As a young man of 17 he enlisted in the Air Force but received a medical discharge. Mr. Howley relocated to Princeton with his family in the late 1950s. Mr. Howley was self-educated as a freelance writer. He especially enjoyed writing for children and contributed to children’s magazines. He was most proud of a piece titled “The Long Ride” taken from his childhood memories of sledding. While residing in Princeton, “Larr y and Susan” frequently visited the Princeton Public Library, enjoyed “going to the shore” and walks around town. Larry was a loving caretaker of his wife of 60 years, Susan, who suffered from medical issues in recent years. He was the best “big brother”

and always had a quick wit. He will be dearly missed, as he was dearly loved. He was preceded in death by his parents, and t wo brothers, James Neill Howley and John Timothy Howley. He is survived by his wife, Susanna Robertson Howley, and four sisters: Blanche M. Ropars, Naperville, IL; Linda HowleySkuby, Bloomington, IL ; Colleen Howley Gosselin, Charleston, IL; and Maureen ( Randy) Pletcher, Springfield, IL. Susanna and Lawrence had no children but doted on their many nieces and nephews. The family would like to extend special thanks to the dear neighbors on Bank Street, especially Mrs. Hannah Rosenberg and Chip and Jean Crider for their support of Larry and Susan during their time of need. Also, our brave nephew, Robert Howley, who was able to supervise the closing of their apartment of 50 years. In time of need, the staff of Princeton Care Center, and Dr. Barile, MD, were kind and generous with their support. Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated on January 15, 2021 at St. Paul’s Church. Burial followed in St. Paul’s Church Cemetery. Arrangements are under the direction of MatherHodge Funeral Home, Princeton. Donations may be made to charity of your choice.

37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, JaNuaRy 20, 2021

Mandy Rabinovich Mandy Rabinovich passed away peacefully in the early morning of January 16, 2021. A longtime Princeton local who had lived all over the world, Menachem Mendel Rabinovich was born on January 30, 1927, in Bucharest, Romania. It was there, as a teenager, that he met Edith Hershkovich, his wife of 53 years whom he married in 1949, the same year the couple moved to Israel and started their family. Mandy always described Edith, known to all as Dita, as his soulmate. She passed away in 2002. Mandy’s love of life, adventure, and travel took him all over the world. He raised his family on three continents — in Israel, Brazil, and Germany — exposing his children and grandchildren to multiple cultures. It wasn’t uncommon to hear four languages spoken over a single family dinner. In their later years, Mandy and Dita settled in Princeton, where he would spend many hours drinking cappuccinos, in particular at Small World Coffee, and befriending baristas all over town. He was known for his warmth and his ability to make friends in a matter of minutes, extracting life stories and dispensing advice as only he could. “Health and luck,” he would say at the end of every conversation. “These are the most important things.” Ma n dy is s u r v ive d by his three children and one

d a u g h te r - i n - l aw : S h i f r a Rubin, Pnina Rabinovich, Alan Rabinovich, and Lina Rabinovich. He was also the beloved Saba of eight grandchildren – Itay, Noa, Deborah, Eli, Rafael, Shai, Dita, and Lucas – and four greatgrandchildren – Matan, Ori, Mia, and Nuri. His life affirming optimism, unusual sense of humor and electric smile will forever be remembered by those who knew him and loved him. Funeral services and burial were Monday at Princeton Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to UNICEF USA (unicefusa.org). To send condolences to the family visit OrlandsMemorialChapel.com.

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PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21

I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-15-22 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf DO YOU HAVE ITEMS YOU’D LIKE TO BUY OR SELL? Consider placing a classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf THE ANNUAL REPORT: Year ending 10/31/2020 of “The National Poetry Series” has now been prepared and is available for public inspection. For a copy please write to: The National Poetry Series, 57 Mountain Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08540. 01-20

HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Call Roeland- preferred phone, (516) 888-9687. Active original, (609) 933-9240.. tf

cy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-15-22 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 01-06-4t

Princeton References

TUTOR: Phi Beta Kappa, Summa Cum Laude–SAT/ACT Prep/Math/ English/French. Mature, motivated, responsible. 35 years’ experience, M.A. Excellent references available. lilyaz@verizon.net 01-06-5t

“When I go home, its an easy way to be grounded. You learn to realize what truly matters." —Tony Stewart

Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf DO YOU HAVE ITEMS YOU’D LIKE TO BUY OR SELL? Consider placing a classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf THE ANNUAL REPORT: Year ending 10/31/2020 of “The National Poetry Series” has now been prepared and is available for public inspection. For a copy please write to: The National Poetry Series, 57 Mountain Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08540. 01-20 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

Specialists

2nd & 3rd Generations

MFG., CO.

609-452-2630

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

WATER WATER EVERYWHERE! Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

Let's rid that water problem in your basement once and for all! Complete line of waterproofing services, drain systems, interior or exterior, foundation restoration and structural repairs. Restoring those old and decaying walls of your foundation.

Call A. Pennacchi and Sons, and put that water problem to rest!

Mercer County's oldest waterproofing co. est. 1947 Deal directly with Paul from start to finish.

609-394-7354

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

Over 70 years of stellar excellence! Thank you for the oppportunity.

apennacchi.com

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $65 • 4 weeks: $84 • 6 weeks: $120 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, JaNuaRy 20, 2021

Tranquility Awaits at This Custom Country Estate 5BR/3.2BA 6,588SF 4.94AC + 10.83AC Avail. Low Taxes Custom-Crafted Reproduction Updated Kitchen & Bathrooms 6 Fireplaces Incredible Views Cary Simons Nelson: 484.431.9019 Lambertville, NJ Kurfiss.com/NJHT106362 $1,985,000

The Residences at Rabbit Run Creek

Serenely Peaceful Brookmill Farm

3BR/3.2BA 5,400SF Custom New Construction Low Taxes Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590 New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU510742 $1,450,000

6BR/5.1BA 6,092SF 13.79AC Guest House Pool Michael Richardson: 609.647.4523 Lambertville, NJ Kurfiss.com/NJHT106318 $1,249,000

Secluded Sun-Filled Contemporary

Newly Priced: Bucolic Ho-Hum Farm

4BR/3.1BA 4,090SF 11AC Hardwood Flrs. Cook’s Kitchen Beth Danese: 215.208.6549 Plumstead Township, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU501290 $1,050,000

8.8AC Hilltop Setting Fenced Pasture 1840’s Homestead Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590 Pipersville, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU508886 $595,000

Experience Property Videos and 3D Walk-Through Tours at Kurfiss.com 215.794.3227 New Hope Rittenhouse Square Chestnut Hill Bryn Mawr © 2021 Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. SIR® is a registered trademark licensed to SIR Affiliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.


2016

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANuARY 20, 2021 • 40

Line Road

Publishing and Distribution

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co. Mirrors installed in your frame

Rider

Furniture

741 Alexander Rd, Princeton 924-2880 Brian•Wisner

Broker Associate | Luxury Collection C: 732.588.8000 O: 609.921.9202

Brian Wisner

Broker Associate | Luxury Collection

of Princeton

Brian E : Wisner bwisner19@gmail.com

“Where quality still matters.” : BrianSellsNJ.com BrokerWAssociate | Luxury Collection

C: 732.588.8000 O: 609.921.9202

Brian Wisner E : bwisner19@gmail.com

Broker Associate | Luxury Collection W : BrianSellsNJ.com 343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540

C: of732.588.8000 Princeton O: 609.921.9202

Lic: 1432491 E : bwisner19@gmail.com

W : BrianSellsNJ.com Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

2016

609-924-0147

riderfurniture.com

343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540

Lic: 1432491

E : bwisner19@gmail.com W : BrianSellsNJ.com

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

Twp.

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

343 Nassau St. NJ 08540 C:Princeton, 732.588.8000 O: 609.921.9202

343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540

Lic: 1432491

Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

$788,800

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

2016

Lic: 1432491

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

venue

You’re invited to a FREE workshop on Understanding the Residential Tax Appeal Process - How Property Assessment Values are Set - To Appeal or Not Appeal - The Appeal Process Presented by Jennifer R. Jacobus Esq. Monday, February 8th at 6:30pm Followed by Q&A session Streamed Live through Zoom Meeting RSVP at PrincetonTaxAppeal.com or 609-577-2989 to obtain link and program materials

ery Twp. $2,550/mo. Donna M. Murray

· Newsletters HANDYMAN–CARPENTER: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Call Roeland- preferred phone, (516) 888-9687. Active original, (609) 933-9240.. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 01-06-4t TUTOR: Phi Beta Kappa, Summa Cum Laude–SAT/ACT Prep/Math/ English/French. Mature, motivated, responsible. 35 years’ experience, M.A. Excellent references available. lilyaz@verizon.net 01-06-5t HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-15-22

Employment Opportunities · Brochures in the Princeton Area · Postcards

LIVE-IN HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED:

· Books

Non-smoker, driver’s license, doglover (2 dogs), references. Princeton, NJ, (609) 688-1017. 01-13-3t

SENIOR ARCHITECT: Supply Chain and Technology Strategy Provider (Princeton, NJ) seeks Senior Architect to Architect solutions for the Mareana platform using SAP ECC, SAP APO, SAP GTS, SAP MDG, SAP CRM systems, SAP ABAP, HP ALM, Rational. Define development strategy and system architecture. Support data conversion activities and design/develop interfaces to supply data to legacy systems and global data management systems. Mail resume to Mareana, Inc. at 190 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542. 01-20

· Catalogues

· Annual Reports

BUSINESS SYSTEMS ANALYST - LEAD (#6470):

Bach deg in Comp Info Systs, Comp Apps, Comp Sci, or rel + 6 yrs of exp. Use XML, Schemas, web svcs, Oracle & SQL queries to lead business and user needs requirements gathering & analysis for software dvlpmt projs. F/T. Educational Testing Service. Princeton, NJ. Send CV to: Ritu Sahai, ETS, 660 Rosedale Rd, MS-10J, Princeton, NJ 08541. No calls/recruiters. 01-20

For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ Witherspoon Media Group witherspoonmediagroup.com Witherspoon Media Group

a Princeton tradition!

Custom Design, Printing, Custom Design, Printing, Publishing Distribution Publishing and and Distribution · Newsletters · Newsletters · Brochures · Brochures · Postcards

· Postcards · Books

· Books

· Catalogues

· Catalogues · Annual Reports · Annual Reports For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com For additional info contact:

melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

Sales Associate, REALTOR® 23 Years Experience Servicing Princeton & Bordering Townships

You take pride in your home.

You worked hard to own and maintain your most valuable asset. You deserve to get the best price for your investment.

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

BE A PART OF THE A-TEAM!

Work with someone whose standards are as high as yours. • • • • • •

Extensive Knowledge of Princeton & Greater Princeton Area Aggressive Marketing Program Expert Negotiator Expert in Luxury Homes Approved Agent for Corporate Relocation 70+ Units Sold in 2020

Listed by Donna M. Murray

Let’s create a plan to get your property out ® in front of Sales Associate, REALTOR the competition in 2021. Give me a call today! Cell: 908-391-8396 All conversations are confidential and obligation-free.

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton NEW PRODUCTS ADDED WEEKLY!

donnamurray@comcast.net Zoom, FaceTime and in-person consultations available. NJdistancing REALTORS® Circle will of be followed. CDC guidelines2015 for social & mask-wearing Excellence Award® Winner -Platinum

253Nassau NassauStreet, St, Princeton, 253 Princeton,NJ NJ08540 08540 609-924-1600 609-924-1600 Cell: 908-391-8396 Donna.murray@foxroach.com A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC.

www.princetonmagazinestore.com


Move-In-Ready and Quick-Delivery Homes in Beautiful New Hope These exclusive residences span 3,600 square feet, offering abundant space and privacy. Our move-in-ready option features the most in-demand extras and upgrades to make your new home feel perfect as soon as you step through the door.

DISTINGUISHING FEATURES

TAKE A VIRTUAL TOUR

Open, Contemporary Floorplans Private Elevators Full Basement Two-Car Rear Garages Private Gated Community

Experience our model residence from the comfort of home. Visit rabbitruncreek.com/tour to view an immersive in-home video tour.

Maintenance-Free Lifestyle

Starting at $1,150,000 215.862.5800 | RabbitRunCreek.com Rte 202 (Lower York Road) & Rabbit Run Drive, New Hope, PA

In-person tours available: Wednesday–Friday | 10am–5pm Saturday–Sunday | 12pm–4pm

41 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, JaNuaRy 20, 2021

OPEN THE DOOR TO GRACIOUS LIVING


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANuARY 20, 2021 • 42

AT YOUR

SERVICE A Town Topics Directory

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner Home Repair Specialist

609-586-2130

BLACKMAN

LANDSCAPING FRESH IDEAS

Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Stone Walls and Terraces FREE CONSULTATION

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual

PRINCETON, NJ

609-683-4013

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CArS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

609-466-2693

A Tradition of Quality

Erick Perez

(609)737-2466

Serving the Princeton Area since 1963 Find us on Facebook and Instagram

HD Highest Quality Seamless Gutters. Serving the Princeton area for 25 years Experience and Quality Seamless Gutters Installed

3 Gutter Protection Devices that Work! Free estimates! All work guaranteed in writing!

Easy repeat gutter cleaning service offered without pushy sales or cleaning minimums!

609-921-2299

EStAtE LIQUIDAtION SErVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-15-22

A Gift Subscription!

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

Fully insured 15+ Years Experience Call for free estimate Best Prices

tOWN tOPICS CLASSIfIEDS GEtS tOP rESULtS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

WHAt’S A GrEAt GIft fOr A fOrMEr PrINCEtONIAN?

CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. Of PrINCEtON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21

HOUSE PAINTING & MORE

House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish (Benjamin Moore Green promise products)

Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

American Furniture Exchange

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

tf DO YOU HAVE ItEMS YOU’D LIKE tO BUY Or SELL? Consider placing a classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf tHE ANNUAL rEPOrt: Year ending 10/31/2020 of “The National Poetry Series” has now been prepared and is available for public inspection. For a copy please write to: The National Poetry Series, 57 Mountain Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08540. 01-20 HOME HEALtH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CArPENtrY/ HOME IMPrOVEMENt in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

HOME rEPAIr SPECIALISt: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-15-22 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. Of PrINCEtON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21 tOWN tOPICS CLASSIfIEDS GEtS tOP rESULtS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf EStAtE LIQUIDAtION SErVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-15-22 WHAt’S A GrEAt GIft fOr A fOrMEr PrINCEtONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CArS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf DO YOU HAVE ItEMS YOU’D LIKE tO BUY Or SELL? Consider placing a classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

HANDYMAN–CArPENtEr: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Call Roeland- preferred phone, (516) 888-9687. Active original, (609) 933-9240.. tf

tHE ANNUAL rEPOrt: Year ending 10/31/2020 of “The National Poetry Series” has now been prepared and is available for public inspection. For a copy please write to: The National Poetry Series, 57 Mountain Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08540. 01-20

PrOfESSIONAL BABYSIttEr Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

CArPENtrY/ HOME IMPrOVEMENt in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

rOSA’S CLEANING SErVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 01-06-4t tUtOr: Phi Beta Kappa, Summa Cum Laude–SAT/ACT Prep/Math/ English/French. Mature, motivated, responsible. 35 years’ experience, M.A. Excellent references available. lilyaz@verizon.net 01-06-5t

HOME HEALtH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

HANDYMAN–CArPENtEr: Painting, hang cabinets & paintings, kitchen & bath rehab. Tile work, masonry. Porch & deck, replace rot, from floors to doors to ceilings. Shelving & hook-ups. ELEGANT REMODELING. You name it, indoor, outdoor tasks. Repair holes left by plumbers & electricians for sheetrock repair. RE agents welcome. Sale of home ‘checklist’ specialist. Mercer, Hunterdon, Bucks counties. 1/2 day to 1 month assignments. CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED, Covid 19 compliant. Active business since 1998. Call Roeland- preferred phone, (516) 888-9687. Active original, (609) 933-9240.. tf


43 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, JaNuaRy 20, 2021

"Opening doors to life's most meaningful dreams..."

Rare opportunity for in-town living. 1940s colonial, fully renovated and exquisitely decorated by the current owner who is an interior designer. This gracious home sits back from the road and oozes old world charm, sophisticatedly updated to modern standards. On the first floor there is a large open plan sitting/family room with large windows and a wood burning fireplace. This flows through to the well-designed kitchen with granite topped island and stainless steel appliances including Sub-Zero fridge/freezer and Wolf range. The kitchen opens to a light-flooded breakfast room from which you can view the garden whilst reading the paper and sipping your morning coffee. Located just off the kitchen is a formal dining room with doors to the deck and the garden beyond. The laundry with slate floor, and mud room with decorative brick floor and louvered windows are both accessed from the double garage. Also on this level is a private office and powder room. Upstairs is the principal bedroom with walk-in closet and en suite bath. Three further bedrooms are light filled and airy. Wood floors throughout, new energy efficient windows, ready-to-finish loft offering the opportunity for a bonus room or 5th bedroom with or without en suite, an unfinished basement, two-car garage, storage shed and a large, private back yard with blue stone patio and deck. Minutes from downtown Princeton shops, restaurants, Princeton University and walkable to the Dinky Train station and some of Princeton's outstanding Public schools. Offered at $1,125,000 4

2/2

2581 sf .37 ac

253 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540

foxroach.com

609.924.1600


Open House Sunday 1/24 1-4pm 37 Berkley Avenue, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Blanche Paul $722,500

25 Fitch Way, Princeton Marketed by: Kathryn “Katy” Angelucci & Kenneth “Ken” Verbeyst $1,450,000

30 Gordon Way, Princeton Marketed by: Robin L. Wallack $699,000

6 Littlebrook Road N, Princeton Marketed by: Eva Petruzziello & Roberta Parker $2,499,000

NEWLY PRICED

17 N Main Street, Cranbury Twp Marketed by: Rocco D’Armiento $700,000

1714 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor Twp Marketed by: Terebey Relocation Team/John Terebey $349,888

From Princeton, We Reach the World.

22 Slayback Drive, West Windsor Twp Marketed by: Annabella “Ann”| Santos $785,000

47 Tree Swallow Drive, West Windsor Twp Marketed | by: Ivy Wen $619,000

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 foxroach.com TEMPORARILY LOCATED AT 33 WITHERSPOON STREET

© BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

From Princeton, We Reach the World. 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 Princeton Office Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com Princeton, NJ ||253 foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

Profile for Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper, January 20, 2021  

The January 20, 2021 issue of the Town Topics Newspaper

Town Topics Newspaper, January 20, 2021  

The January 20, 2021 issue of the Town Topics Newspaper