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Volume LXXIV, Number 3

Former St. Michael’s Orphanage Resident To Tell Her Story of Healing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Princeton University Sues Architecture Firms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Princeton Women’s Hoops Defeats Penn in Ivy League Opener . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Coach Monzo Bringing Emphasis on Basics to PHS Wrestling . . . . . . . 25

Profiles in Education: Choral Director Patty Thel . . . . . . . . . . 10 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .18, 19 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 17 Classified Ads . . . . . . 31 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 30 Performing Arts . . . . . 13 Police Blotter . . . . . . . 11 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 31 Religion . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

www.towntopics.com

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Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Protestors Seek “Diplomacy, Not War” with Iran

Council Gives Nod To Formal Resolution Supporting Migrant Families

More than 200 protestors gathered for a “No War with Iran” rally at Hinds Plaza next to the Princeton Public Library on Saturday afternoon, January 11. Under sunny skies with spring-like temperatures, 10 different speakers from political, academic, religious, and military communities addressed the crowd, many of whom carried signs or posters expressing anti-war sentiments. Sponsored by the Princeton-based Coalition for Peace Action (CFPA), along with the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice (BRC), Muslims for Peace, and Indivisible Cranbury, the rally was a response to the January 3 drone killing of Major General Qasem Soleimani ordered by President Trump. Protestors carried signs bearing such messages as “Diplomacy Not War,” “Trump Lies and People Die,” “Remove Trump,” Prevent WW III,” “No Imperial Presidency,” and more. “Say No to War,” sang singer/songwriter Sharleen Leahey. “What are we gonna tell our children? When are we gonna end all this madness?” as the audience joined in on the chorus.

A resolution related to the welfare of migrant families was the focus of a meeting of Princeton Council on Monday, January 13. The governing body voted unanimously to approve the measure, “calling upon the White House and Congress and the state of New Jersey to reunify migrant families, release them from detention, and afford them due process in immigration proceedings.” Several members of the public spoke in favor of the measure, as did Councilwoman Leticia Fraga, who thanked resident Afsheen Shamsi for crafting the resolution. “It truly reflects our values and who we are when it comes to protecting our neighbors,” Fraga said. One local resident who has accompanied migrants without legal representation to hearings — including an 8-yearold girl — said that while passage of the resolution is a positive step, a legal representation program is sorely needed. Shamsi commented that Princeton was among the first three towns to pass the resolution. She is delivering a “tool kit” to expand it on a national basis. Others who spoke in favor of the resolution included Maria Juega, former executive director of the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund; Tom Parker, chair of the town’s Civil Rights Commission; residents John Heilner and Linda Oppenheim; and immigration lawyer Sally Steinberg. Also passed by Council was a resolution authorizing a lease agreement with Mercer County to reinstate a nutrition program for the elderly, moved from Princeton Senior Resource Center to the Chestnut Street Firehouse, which has been renovated for the purpose. The new location can accommodate up to 80 people, while the former site served up to 20 people. There is no income requirement to participate. Those concerned about parking limitations on Chestnut Street can park at PSRC and take the FreeB bus to the site. Four ordinances held over from 2019 were introduced at the meeting. One creates permanent, paid firefighter positions in the Princeton Fire Department, which was previously staffed only by volunteers. Another is for a lease with the Friends of Herrontown Woods for care and maintenance of the Veblen property. Council

“What needs to happen now is serious engagement and diplomacy,” CFPA Executive Director the Rev. Robert Moore told the crowd. “We know that diplomacy works. It’s time to have diplomacy, not war with Iran.” Though by Saturday a de-escalation in tensions between the two countries had taken place, Moore warned, “It’s not a permanent de-escalation. The factors that could lead to war are still there.” He went on to criticize the use of drones as weapons of assassination and claimed that the kinds of strikes that killed Soleimani are undermining the peace process in the Middle East.

Richard Moody, former fighter pilot for both the United States and the United Kingdom, provided further background on the “extremely distressing,” increasingly dangerous uses of armed drones. “Did Trump order this attack to distract the public from his impeachment?” Moody asked the gathering. Moody went on to quote first Winston Churchill: “Jaw, jaw, jaw before war, war, war” and “War is the failure of diplomacy,” then Pete Seeger: “When will we ever learn?” from “Where Have All the Flowers Gone?” Continued on Page 8

Planning Board Gets Update On East Campus Projects

Princeton’s Planning Board heard a concept presentation on January 9 about the projects that are part of Princeton University’s East Campus development. A new parking garage, soccer stadium, soccer practice field, and a geo-exchange utility facility known as “T.I.G.E.R.” are the key elements of the plan. The concept review was for an area of

the University covered in its 2026 Campus Plan, which was unveiled in June 2017. The area is at the eastern end of the campus, bordered by Western Way, Princeton University Stadium, Faculty Road, and Broadmead. It affects the athletic fields and parking lots, FitzRandolph Observatory, and academic support Continued on Page 11

“DIPLOMACY, NOT WAR”: More than 200 protestors gathered at Hinds Plaza on Saturday afternoon for a “No War with Iran” rally . The event featured 10 speakers from political, academic, religious, and military communities, along with a musician . Participants share what brought them to the rally in this week’s Town Talk on page 6 . (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

Continued on Page 9

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Wassailing the Apple Trees

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WASSAILING THE APPLE TREES FARM FESTIVAL: Each winter, Terhune Orchards follows an Anglo-Saxon tradition of Wassailing the Trees. This year’s free event is Sunday, January 26 from 1-4 p.m. at the farm at 330 Cold Soil Road. This festive tradition, which includes singing and dancing, is said to drive away spirits and ensure an excellent harvest. Roasting marshmallows around the bonfire, drinking hot apple cider, and enjoying apple cider donuts and live music are also part of the festivities. For more information, visit www.terhuneorchards.com.

Sounds of Bulgaria At Library Program

On Saturday, January 25 at 2 p.m., the Lawrence Headquar ters Branch of the Mercer County Library System will host a meeting with ethnographer and cultural documentarian Martin Koenig. Between 1966 and 1979 Koenig made half a dozen trips to Bulgaria and filmed, recorded, and photographed the lively, yet endangered aspects of Bulgaria’s traditional village culture due to modernization, globalization, and emigration. In 1968, he co-founded and was a director of the Balkan Ar ts Center in New York City (later the Ethnic Folk Arts Center, currently the Center for Traditional Music and Dance). It is Koenig’s and his colleague, Ethel Raim’s, original recording of the song “Izlel Je Delyo Haidutin” performed by the Bulgarian folksinger Valya Balkanska, that was included on a gold disc launched into space in 1977 as part of a NASA project to bring a greeting from Planet Earth to any alien life forms out there in the far reaches of the universe. The meeting with him will tell the story of this recording and will feature a film on traditional Bulgarian folk dancing from the period 1966 – 1979, followed by a Q & A session. Copies of Koenig’s book S o u n d Po r t r a i t s f r o m Bulgaria: A Journey to a Vanished World (2019 ),

published by Smithsonian Folkways Recording, will be available for sale and signing through the Friends of the Lawrence Library. The 144page book with photographs and extensive bilingual notes also includes 109 minutes of music in two CDs. This program is co-sponsored by the Friends of the Lawrence Library and the Bulgarian Cultural Center of Pennsylvania, New Jersey

and Delaware — an organization based in Mercer County with the mission to preserve, present, and perpetuate the cultural heritage of the Bulgarian people and to educate audiences of all ages and ethnic backgrounds about Bulgarian culture. Registration is suggested. Call (609) 883-8294, email lawprogs @mcl.org or visit www.mcl.org.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Town-Wide Brush Collection: Princeton’s Department of Public Works is collecting Christmas trees and brush through January 31. Remove all decorations and lights from the tree, and do not put it out in a bag. Have everything out by 7 a.m. Free Flu Shots: Princeton’s Health Department will offer shots out of their office and select community events through February, to Princeton residents. Visit www.princetonnj.gov/health for details. Womanspace Needs Volunteers: Applications are being accepted through February 1 for the Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Victim Response Teams. For details, email dvrt@womanspace.org or call (609) 394-0136. Ice Skating: The three authorized locations for free ice skating are Smoyer Park pond, Community Park North pond, and Lake Carnegie between the Washington Road and Harrison Street bridges. A white flag means it is safe to skate; a red flag means it is not safe. Flags are located at all locations. For ongoing updates about ice conditions, follow Princeton Recreation on Twitter at @princetonrec or Facebook. Palmer Square is also hosting oudoor skating on Hulfish Street behind the Nassau Inn for a $10 fee, including skate rental. CONTACT of Mercer County Needs Volunteers: The crisis and suicide prevention hotline will sponsor training Tuesdays February 11-April 21, in Pennington. Call (609) 737-2000 for details.


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A POIGNANT STORY: The open space of St. Michaels Farm Preserve was once the site of an orphanage where Josephine Allen lived as a small child. Now a volunteer with D&R Greenway, which preserved the land, Allen will speak on January 22 about how she finds solace spending time at the site. (Photo by Carl Geisler)

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sense of nostalgia. Stopping at a gas station in town, she asked the attendant if there was an orphanage nearby named St. Michael’s — the place she had lived as a small child.

focus on the positive aspects of her life. Chief among them are her years at St. Michaels. “Because of the friends at the orphanage, and the nuns, it felt like my home,” she said. “It was my first connection with nature. I would walk around the farm, and the smell of the hay and the cows was amazing to me. I loved it. This sense of wonder started to heal me, even though my There had been, the at- family wasn’t there.” It was on a hike through tendant told her, but it was no longer s tand ing. He the acreage a few years ago pointed her in the direction www.princetonmagazinestore.com Continued on Next Page of the former St. Michael’s Orphanage and Industrial School, which had been operated by the Catholic Diocese of Trenton from 1896 to 1973. Allen was a resident from age 5 to 8. She followed the directions and found the place where, despite the obvious trauma of being separated from her family, she had many good memories. Since that day she rediscovered St. Michaels, Allen has repeatedly returned to the site to recall its setting on an expanse of farm fields and forests, and the peace that it brought her. “For years after that, I would go back, park my car, and walk through the woods,” said Allen, who is a real estate agent with Weichert in East Brunswick. “It would heal me, just being there — for years.” Today Allen is a volunteer with D&R Greenway, the organization that preserved the more than 400acre property in 2010. She will tell her story at an event on Wednesday, January 22 from 7 to 8 p.m. at D&R Greenway’s headquarters at 1 Preser vation Place. Also scheduled to speak are D&R Greenway CEO Linda Enjoy life’s little moments—without knee pain. Mead, and Story Clark, the founder and CEO of TravelNo one ever said, “I wish I’d waited longer to feel this good.” So rebuild your life now. Storys, which has developed At Princeton Medical Center, we can help you through physical therapy, surgery, a free mobile app about the recovery, pain management and beyond. Our team has the expertise and experience site and its history. in the latest minimally invasive procedures, including robotic surgery and outpatient joint replacement surgery. “I understand why St. Michaels is so important to her,” Mead said of Allen afTo find an orthopaedic surgeon call 1-888-742-7496, or visit PrincetonHCS.org ter hearing her story. “This was the last place she saw Penn Medicine Princeton Health complies with applicable Federal civil rights laws and does her father, after he dropped not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex. her off there. But also it was ATENCIÓN: Si habla español, servicios gratuitos de asistencia del lenguaje están disponibles a place where she found para usted. Llame al 1-609-853-7490. 1-609-853-7490 healing through the land.” 1475-18E0120 Allen spent years in foster care, but chooses to

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Story of Healing Continued from Preceding Page

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that Allen discovered D&R Greenway’s role in preserving the land. After the orphanage was sold, the building where the children lived and went to school was torn down and most of the land was leased to a local farmer. Before the diocese divested themselves of the property through development, they offered one last chance for preservation if D&R Greenway could raise the funds to purchase the property. Over $11 million was raised, and in 2010 D&R Greenway succeeded in purchasing the land through a public/private partnership. It is now preserved as open space forever. The largest amount of the purchase price came from the state Farmland Preservation Program. Six miles of farm roads provide walking trails throughout the preserve. “I saw a sign for D&R Greenway, and I called them,” said Allen, recalling the day she made the connection. “They told me about Willing Hands, which is the volunteer group that helps with managing and taking care of the preserve. So I joined. I helped them plant baby trees, which made me cry because I am so happy to give back. I can’t with money, but I can with time. So they just kind of threw me in, and I love it.” Mead said, “We were so fortunate that Jo reached out to us and we were able to engage her in this, and have her be willing to share her story. Having people like Jo who had trauma and have found healing through being on the land — that is the story of land preservation. This could have been a thousand houses, but instead, we’re farming and preserving it. It’s a part of the community and a treasure, and for people like Jo, it’s really personal.” Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for the January 22 event. Admission is free. Visit drgreenway. org for more information. “This might not work for all the people who lived at St. Michaels, but for me it has been transformed into a place of peace and joy,” Allen said. “I hope it will help others through the pain and take those tears away.” —Anne Levin

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Question of the Week:

“What brings you here today?”

(Asked Saturday at the “No War with Iran” rally at Hinds Plaza) (Photos by Charles R. Plohn)

“I am here to stand for diplomacy and not war. I think it is more important that we focus on what is happening inside our country rather than all of these other issues that we do not need. We need to focus on jobs, hunger, poverty, security, education, and the other internal issues that we face.” —Mustafa Abdi, Monroe Township

“I am here because the lies that we are hearing from the government and from the dishonest media are the similar types of lies that we heard that led us to go to Iraq. People are dying, we want there to be peace, and we want our voices to be heard.” — Ali Mirza, Long Island, N.Y.

“I think it’s important that the United States changes its policies in the Middle East. We are on a collision course for war with Iran, and President Trump, with his escalation, has made it even worse. I am here to join other people who are saying that’s not what the American people want. We want to dial down and have a diplomatic solution to the crisis.” —Marilyn Jerry, Princeton

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“My greatest worry at the moment is that we are sliding towards a war that nobody can stop. I am afraid that if this escalates, we don’t have the global leadership to stop war. It is unfortunate, but I believe that with small groups like this, supporting peace, we can do it.” —Silvaram Chelluri, West Windsor

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Shootings at synagogues in the U.S., attacks on Jewish people in France, and a fierce debate within the British Labour party. AntiSemitism is back, but why? And what is different from the experiences of the 1930s?

FEBRUARY 5 5:30 p.m. Wolfensohn Hall

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Julie Gottlieb

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Deborah Lipstadt

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7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020

Anti-Semitism—Past and Present


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020 • 8

Anti-War Protest continued from page one

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Zia Mian, physicist and codirector of Princeton University’s Program on Science and Global Security, also focused on the need for the U.S. to engage in real diplomacy as opposed to “you do what we say.” “The world has gotten the message that there’s no point in negotiating with the U.S. because they will not keep their end of the bargain,” Mian said. He also said that the U.S. has to learn to treat other nations as equals; people have to learn to pay attention and realize that they cannot isolate themselves from their decisions; and that “change will not come by asking, but by making it.” New Jersey Assemblyman A ndrew Zw icker emphasized the need to continue to speak out for the sake of democracy. “We gather to raise our voices in protest, to make sure our opinions are heard because we are patriots,” he said. “Here we go again,” said Zwicker who has spoken at many local rallies over the past few years. “How many times have we had to gather in the last three years to protest policies locking children in cages, to fight against climate change, or to impeach one of the most corrupt and incompetent presidents in history?” Zwicker went on to urge everyone to look ahead to the fall election. “Our weapon tomorrow is our vote,” he said. “November of this year is the single most important election of our lives. Make sure that every single person comes out and votes in

the name of democracy, because that is what this election is about.” Former Nassau County ( Long Island) Democratic Party Vice Chairman Ali Mirza called for truth to prevail over the lies that come from media and government officials. “We are being lied to again like we were lied to in 2003 when we went to war against Iraq,” he said. “They know when they keep repeating the same lies, people start to believe them. Our job is to keep on telling the truth again and again. Let our voices be heard.” Mirza echoed earlier calls for diplomacy, not war. “I don’t want Iranians to die,” he said. “I don’t want Iraqis to die, or Americans to die. I want diplomacy to prevail.” BRC Chief Activist Robt Seda-Schreiber commented on the possibility of war, the threat of a draft, and the risks to young people. “Our children are no longer safe,” he said. “They are indeed direct targets of this administration, Now we have a president who sees violence not as a last resort, not even as a potential option, but as an absolute necessity, as a way to bolster his image, improve his poll numbers, protect his real estate investments, foster relationships

with tyrants, despots, and enemies of the state.” The Rev. Lukata Mjumbe of the Witherspoon Street Presby terian Church demanded that all faith leaders stand up for peace. “You cannot pray or teach about peace on Friday and not stand up and fight for peace on Sat urday,” he said. “If you do not speak up in defense of peace you are not doing honor to your title or your community or your god.” He continued, “We need to be lifting up our voices, making noise. We have to have real peace and real justice.” Other speakers at the rally included Irene Etkin Goldman of the CFPA and the Jewish advocacy group J Street; Montgomery Township Mayor Sadaf Jaffer; and former UN official Sadim Lone. “We were very pleased with the rally turnout, as well as the great quality of each of the talks and the music,” Moore said. “We hope it will lead to increased involvement in our Diplomacy, Not War with Iran Campaign, so we can really turn toward sustained, effective diplomacy as the proven way to prevent war with Iran.” —Donald Gilpin

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President David Cohen thanked those who worked on the project, including staff, volunteers, and botanist Steve Hiltner, who is president of the Friends of Herrontown Woods. The other two ordinances introduced were related to salaries and compensation of municipal personnel, and the addition of alternate members to the Human Services Commission. All four ordinances will receive public hearings at the January 27 meeting of Council. —Anne Levin

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P.U. Sues Andlinger Center Architects For $10.7M Over Changes and Delays Princeton University has filed suit for $10.7M against Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects (T W BTA) and sub-consultants Jacobs Architects/Engineers, Inc. and Jacobs Consultancy, Inc. due to “extensive changes and delays those companies caused in the construction of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment,” according to Deputy University Spokesperson Michael Hotchkiss. Describing the action as “unusual but necessar y,” Hotchkiss pointed out that “as detailed in the complaint, TWBTA and Jacobs failed to meet their obligations in the construction of the Center, and the University is asserting claims for

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breach of contract and negligence, among others.” New York-based TWBTA and Jacobs, headquartered in Dallas, Texas, have not responded to requests for comment on the suit and the University’s claims against them. The complaint was filed on December 10 by the Board of Trustees of Princeton University, and, according to The Daily Princetonian student newspaper, Judge Brian Martinotti and Magistrate Judge Lois Goodman will preside over the case at the New Jersey District Court in Trenton. The Andlinger Center, on Olden Street adjacent to the School of Engineering and Applied Science, is a 129,000-square-foot facility for research and teaching in the areas of sustainable energy-technology development, energy efficiency, and environmental protection and remediation. It was founded in July 2008 through a $100M gift from international business leader and 1952 Princeton University graduate Gerhard R. Andlinger. The Andlinger Center began operations in the fall of 2010, and the formal opening of the complex of research, teaching, and garden spaces took place in May 2016. According to the complaint, the University contracted TWBTA to perform design services for the Andlinger Center project in February 2009. Construction began in 2012 and was “substantially completed” in January 2016, approximately 10 months behind schedule. The complaint claims that TWBTA and Jacobs were responsible for at least five months of that delay. Tod Williams, who with his wife founded Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects in 1986, received his undergraduate degree from Princeton University in 1965 and a master of fine arts from the University in 1967. TWBTA was also the architect for Feinberg Hall s t udent housing on t he Princeton University campus. According to Dezeen, an online architecture magazine, TWBTA has also been involved in controversies over a number of other projects, including the overhaul of Dartmouth College’s Hood Museum of Art, which opened last year, and the Obama Presidential Library, planned for construction in Chicago’s Jackson Park. —Donald Gilpin

analyzed to choose the winners in each category. The 2019 Lawrence Township Award Program focuses on quality, not quantity. Winners were determined based on the information gathered both internally by the program and data provided by third parties. The Lawrence Township Award Program was es tablished to recognize the best of local businesses in the community. The organization works exclusively with local business owners, trade groups, professional associations and other business advertising and marketing groups. The program’s mission is to recognize the small business community’s contributions to the U.S. economy.

Senior Center Receives Bunbury Grant Award

The Princeton Senior Resource Center (PSRC) has been selected to receive a three-year, $165,000, capacity-building grant from The Princeton Area Community Foundation (PACF) Bunbury Fund. Due to resource constraints, this grant will help PSRC address critical organizational needs: strengthening governance, leadership, and staff expertise, and supporting initiatives and planning, to effectively advance their mission toward sustainable organizational maturity. Since its founding in 1991, the Community Foundation has grown into an organization with more than $180 million in assets and made grants of more than $149 million, including $21 million in 2018. “It is rare to find an organization such as the Princeton Area Community Foundation Bunbury Fund that is so deeply committed to building the capacity of a nonprofit organization,” said PSRC Executive Director Drew A. Dyson.

tools including work gloves, loppers, saws, and pruners. But those taking part can bring their own tools if they prefer. Snacks and refreshments will include coffee, hot cider, and breakfast snacks. Volunteers should bring a reusable water bottle and/ or thermos. All ages are welcome, and children under 16 must be accompanied by a parent. Register through eventbrite. com. This event will be held rain or shine. In the event of severe weather, a nature project is planned for inside the Mountain Lakes House. Meet at 9 a.m. at the Princeton Open Space Mountain Lakes House, 57 Plans Day of Service Mountain Avenue. For quesIn honor of Dr. Martin tions, email info@fopos.org. Luther King Jr., on Monday, January 20, Friends Princeton Adult School of Princeton Open Space Opens Spring Registration (FOPOS) is hosting a Day Registration is now open of Service in Nature. Vol- for the spring session of unteers will work on a for- the Princeton Adult School est restoration project at (PAS), which will offer more the Billy Johnson Mountain than 200 classes in a range Lakes Nature Preserve. of topics. Par t icipants w ill work Registration remains open under the guidance of the until the classes are filled. organization’s natural re- The English as a Second source manager to identify Language program hosts and remove target invasive a one-day registration on species to improve habitat Tuesday, January 21, from quality for native insects, 7-8 p.m. at Princeton High birds, and other wildlife. School. They will also build deer Courses embrace the arts, exclusion cages to protect politics, humanities, history, native tree saplings from health and wellness, food deer browse and rut. The and drink, business and trees protected today will technology, home and garbecome the future canopy den, and world languages. of this important forest site. Examples include ArgenParticipants should wear tine Tango, The Sixties: The long sleeves, long pants, British Invasion, Truth and and good work boots and to Consequences — A Converlayer up depending on the sation about DNA Testing,” temperature. FOPOS will and Africa. provide all of the necessary “This grant is truly a difference-maker for PSRC and will set us on a path to organizational strength for years to come so that we can continue making a difference in the lives of the older adults we serve. We look forward to this season of growth and we are truly grateful for this unique opportunity.” The Bunbury Fund grant w ill be used to advance PSRC’s growth and development in the areas of strategic planning, board and staff training, marketing and communications, fundraising/donor development, and technology development.

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P rofiles i n e ducation Choral Director Patty Thel: “It’s About the Human Spirit” Patty Thel’s roots in choral music go back to her childhood in the Southern Baptist church. The Westminster Conservatory Children’s Choir program director and founder a n d Tr e n to n C h i l d r e n’s Chorus director grew up in Fayetteville, North Carolina, where her parents took her to church three times a week, and at home the whole family improvised at the piano and organ. “Mostly hymns — that’s where their heart was,” she said. Thel has come a long way from the Fayetteville Baptist Church, but through many years of teaching music, she has remained devoted to choral work and literature, along with an experience that goes far beyond the words and the music. “The thing for me with choral music over the years is about being truthful and devoted to the work as much as possible and also conveying to the students the message brought to them through the literature,” she said. “In teaching you’re trying to teach music, but also teaching young people how to be well rounded human beings and how to be sensitive to other people. “T he interesting t hing about choral music is the effect that making music with other people can have, listening to other people, making a sound that transcends other people. There’s something transformative about it that I still don’t understand.” Neither of Thel’s parents was a professional musician, but her grandparents, who lived next door, had a grand piano and an organ in the house, and “my family could stand in a quartet and sing hymns,” she said. “Nobody thought that was unusual.” Thel remembers taking out a hymnal once as a little girl and learning where the notes were on the staff, then learning to read hymns before taking any lessons. She went on to take piano les-

sons and joined the church choir. “I loved playing the piano,” she said. As a high school student, Thel wasn’t sure she wanted to stay in music. Her parents had “some kind of a church school” in mind for college, and she knew she didn’t want to do that. They finally agreed on the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG), which, according to Thel, happened to have the best music department in the state. “Poetry Set on Fire With Music” Thel was drawn to both choral work and literature. “I loved poetry,” she said. “And in choral work, the idea of poetry being set on fire with music was fantastic.” She described legendary UNCG choral music professor Richard Cox, who retired in 2002 after more than 40 years at UNCG, as a role model and inspiration to her. “The experience I had in choral work at UNCG made me want to do this. It wasn’t just the fact that he was a wonderful musician and the choral music was so fantastic, but at some point I realized that I learned from him that in teaching choral music, you’re conveying something about the human spirit.” Thel went on to talk, with c h a r a c te r i s t i c h u m i l i t y, about her perspective on teaching. “Young people can be very affected by choral music, and sometimes I’m overwhelmed by what they give back to me. They seem to think it’s coming from me, but it’s not. I feel like the chemist who brought music to wonderful people, and then it happened. Often I feel I had very little to do with it. I just introduced two great elements.” In her first year af ter graduat ing f rom UNCG, Thel taught music to every child in Red Springs, N.C., from grades K to 8, along with the high school choir.

There was a widely diverse range of students, many so poor they’d never seen the inside of a movie theater, including large populations of migrant children, Lumbee Indians, African Americans, and also white students from wealthy families. In following the example of Professor Cox, Thel taught those children the music of Persichetti, Bach, Handel, and Palestrina. “I learned that first year you could set your standards wherever you wanted. It was a matter of loving the music enough and convincing the students that it was worth doing.” Thel taught her students the chor us parts to Donizetti’s “Elixir of Love,” so that when the National Opera Company came through town they staged her students in their performances. “I was convinced about using great materials from the get-go,” Thel said. “From having kids from such diverse backgrounds from the first year that I taught, I understood that it didn’t matter where the child came from or what their background was, I could get there from here. If I wanted to set a high standard I could do that with any child.” The following years were rich in career, travel, and life experiences for Thel. She moved on to East Carolina University, where she earned her master’s degree, taught as a graduate assistant, and worked on weekends as a choir conductor at a local church. She then moved to Atlanta, where she taught music at a pilot school, sang in the Atlanta Symphony Chorus under the direction of Robert Shaw, and met her future husband, who had just gotten out of law school and was clerking for a federal judge. They married and moved to Washington, D.C., where he worked for the Securities and Exchange Com-

“PUTTING PEOPLE TOGETHER:” Patty Thel leads the combined choral groups from Trenton Children’s Chorus and Princeton Day School Middle School at a Martin Luther King Jr. Day Event at Princeton University. (Photo courtesy of Patty Thel) mission and she worked in the Fairfax County Schools; then moved back to Atlanta where she worked as assistant conductor at the Pe a c h t r e e P r e s b y te r i a n Church, happily transitioning from Baptist to Presbyterian; then on to Oxford, Mississippi where her husband taught in the University of Mississippi law school and she worked for the theater department, eventually directing musicals. To New Jersey When her husband found his next job at Fordham University Law School in New York City, Thel decided she wanted to move to Princeton to be near Westminster Conservatory, where she wanted to work. They have lived in Princeton Junction since 1988. Her first Conser vator y job was helping to pilot Music Together, the young children’s music program which started through Westminster, but she wanted to have a choir, and in 1990 Thel started the Westminster Conservatory Children’s Choir (WCC ). A K-8 program, it quickly grew to an average of more than 100 children enrolled each year. Thel has three children: one son, who became a professional oboe player

and is now a coder for Ticketmaster; her second son, who is enrolled in a theater program at UNCG; and her daughter, who is getting a master’s degree in social work. Thel states that her middle son Tommy, who has a developmental disability, affected her teaching more than anything. She taught music in Tommy’s schools as he was growing up. “I learned to respect the sensitivity and abilities of children who had disabilities. It gave me a completely new perspective on teaching.” Thel has served as an adjunct instructor in the music education department at Westminster Choir College and has taught as middle school choral and general music instructor at Princeton Day School. In 2009 Thel joined the Trenton Children’s Chorus (TCC). “The mission of that organization is empowering the social, academic, and spiritual lives of children through artistry and music,” she said. “If you do it right, every choir should do that. In choral music you should touch on everything. You should be able to speak about culture, history, language, spirituality, and life.”

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Among the many highlights of the Thel’s career so far have been nine visits to the White House with the WCC and the TCC over the past 25 years. She remembers spending a whole day in the White House in the 1990s, meeting and performing for the Clintons; three or four visits during the Bush administration ; and a performance for the Obamas, where the president pretended to conduct before speaking to every child individually. Her recently-formed high school choir named Vox Amicus recently joined with the TCC students on Thel’s most recent trip to the White House on December 20, 2019, performing two 45-minute sessions in the East Room of the W hite House. Thel talked about where the future might lead her. She mentioned her interest in working with children with disabilities and noted, “My biggest goal in life is putting people together. If there’s some way I can make that happen, I will. In particular for those students whose heads are buried in their cell phones and iPads, if they can stand together and sing, it’s a good day.” —Donald Gilpin


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buildings. New athletic fields and a structured parking garage are proposed. Prior to the presentation, the University held two open house meetings with residents who live near the area. Several of those neighbors attended the Planning Board meeting to offer their comments and concerns, with the flow of traffic and the height of storage tanks chief among them. University Architect Ronald McCoy said that sustainability is a guiding principle of the plan. He also stressed that nothing is set in stone. “This is a primary step forward,” he said. “It is a planning framework, but it is not a master plan.” Princeton’s Planning Director Michael LaPlace told members of the Planning Board that the municipal staff had some concerns about what would happen to the observatory, the size and location of the storage tanks, and traffic circulation. According to McCoy, a new soccer stadium would be installed at the site of the existing FitzRandolph Observatory, which was built in 1934 to replace the Halsted Observatory. “This is the third observatory the University has had, built using stone from the previous one,” he said. “It hasn’t been used since the mid-’90s. We are exploring using stonework from it. We are very attentive to the history and we want to use it.” Some of the University’s existing athletic facilities would remain where they are, including Jadwin Gym, Caldwell Fieldhouse, and the DiNunzio pool. Along with the soccer stadium, the soccer practice fields would move. So will the surface parking lot. A five-level parking structure would be built, and would accommodate the number of cars that currently use the lot, and more. The garage would be solar-ready, McCoy said. One resident of the neighborhood near the development said there are concerns that Faculty Road and Hartley Avenue will experience increased traffic during certain hours. Those who live on Murray Place also said there are worries about an increase in traffic due to the parking changes. A resident asked if the retention basin behind the two water tanks could be moved north, and the 80foot towers could be shorter and wider. McCoy said the basin can’t be moved because a child care facility is planned for that site. “My sense is that it would be challenging, but we’ll look at that,” he said. Others suggested that the towers be moved to a lowerlying area on the site, which would lower their height. “It’s a good plan, but I believe they’ve lost their way, in particular, on the tanks,” one resident said. “Those tanks are huge.” He asked the University to consider coming up with a way to mitigate the height of the towers by either lowering them, moving them, or encasing them in some way. Responding to the University’s claim that it would be too costly to drill down and place part of the tanks into the ground, a resident

of Broadmead noted that Jadwin Gym goes down six stories. “There is plenty of room on the other side of the gym where these tanks might be located,” he said. “So I’d definitely urge the University to look at other opportunities.” While no firm date was mentioned on when t he Universit y will return to the Planning Board with a formal application, representatives said the parking component and results of a traffic study will likely be considered first, hopefully sometime this year. —Anne Levin

Gold Seal of Approval For St. Peter’s Hospital

Saint Peter’s University Hospital in New Brunswick, a member of Saint Peter’s Healt hcare System, has earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval for Perinatal Care by demonstrating continuous compliance with its performance standards in maternal-fetal medicine. The Gold Seal is a symbol of quality that reflects the organization’s commitment to providing safe and qualit y patient care for mothers and infants leading up to, during, and after birth. Saint Peter’s underwent a rigorous, unannounced onsite review in July 2019. During the visit, a team of Joint Commission reviewers evaluated compliance with perinatal care standards spanning several areas including care for high-risk births and birth complications. “The Perinatal Care Acc r e d i t at i o n i s e v i d e n c e that we’ve been measured against the highest quality national standards for perinatal health and have successfully achieved those standards,” said Carlos W. Benito, MD, maternal-fetal me d icine sp ecialis t and chair of the Depar tment of Obstetrics/Gynecology (OB/GYN) at Saint Peter’s. “Applying for certification was something we actively chose to do. While rigorous in its process and level of scrutiny, we felt the resulting third-party endorsement offered significant value to our patients, reinforcing our ongoing commitment to deliver top-rated maternity care from a healthcare system that continually strives for excellence.” Distinctions at St. Peter’s include the Regional Perinatal Center, for complicated pregnancy and infants born premature with serious medical issues; St. Peter’s Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit; St. Peter’s being the only New Jersey hospital in the Council of Women’s and Infants’ Specialty Hospitals; the new Mary V. O’Shea Bir th Center; and being ranked in the top 50 in Neonatology by U.S. News and World Report 2019-2020 Best Children’s Hospitals.

MCCC Service Day To Honor Dr. King

Mercer County Community College (MCCC) will be honoring the life and legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. through action and deeds, and invites the community to participate during a Day of Service at the college’s James Kerney Campus (JKC) in Trenton. MLK Day activities begin at 9 a.m. Monday, January 20 at JKC, 102 North Broad Street in Trenton, with registration and breakfast. Opening remarks will be delivered by the Rev. Dr. Alyn Waller of the Enon Tabernacle Baptist Church in Philadelphia, who will focus on the theme “20/20 Vision: Destination vs. Reality.” Last year, more than 150 community members signed up for the event. Volunteers will choose from four service activities, including preparing bag lunches for the Rescue Mission of Trenton, a children’s book fair in conjunction with First Book, a Trenton community cleanup project, and Sewing for Service, a project held in conjunction with MCCC’s Fashion Design program. For more information or to volunteer, visit www.mccc. edu/mlk_dos.

Police Blotter On January 12, at 4:28 p.m., a complainant re ported that, on January 9 between 7:40 a.m. and 4 p.m., someone stole their son’s bike, valued at $100, from the bike rack outside of John Witherspoon Middle School. On January 10, at 2:23 p.m., a 21-year-old male from Monmouth Junction was charged with possession of under 50 grams of suspected marijuana and drug paraphernalia, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop on Witherspoon Street for an improper turn. On January 10, at 11:46 p.m., a 19-year-old male from Hamilton was charged with possession of under 50 grams of suspected marijuana, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop on Nassau Street for tinted windows. He also had an active warrant out of Trenton in the amount of $250. On January 11, at 3:05 p.m., a victim reported that, between January 9 and 10, he sent $18,500 in Bitcoin and Target gift card numbers to someone purporting to be from the Social Securit y Administration. The victim realized it was a scam after advising his wife and trying to call back the numbers that contacted him. On January 10, at 1:47 a.m., a 29 - ye ar - old fe male from Flemington was charged with DWI, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop on Mercer Road for

failure to keep right. On January 9, at 8: 06 p.m., a 30-year-old male from the Bronx was charged with possession of under 50 grams of suspected marijuana, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop on Mercer Road for failure to keep right. On January 8, at 11:24 p.m., a 35-year-old male from Bayonne was charged with possession of less than 50 grams of suspected marijuana and drug paraphernalia, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop for speeding on Quaker Road. On Januar y 5, at 1:51 a.m., a 26-year-old female f rom L aw rencev ille was charged with DWI, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop for speeding and failure to maintain a lane on Lawrenceville Road. On January 6, at 7:55 p.m., a resident of Dogwood Lane reported that, between 6:20 p.m. on January 5 and 6 p.m. on January 6, someone punctured one of their vehicle’s tires multiple times while it was parked in their driveway. The damage was estimated at $180. On Januar y 7, at 5:41 p.m., a victim reported that, sometime between January 4 and 6, someone stole their locked black and green GMC 6061 bike from a rack near the Princeton Public Library. The value of the bike and lock is $240. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

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Wine Tasting accompanied with light tapas Thursday, January 30th | 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.

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11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020

East Campus Projects


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020 • 12

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Letters do not necessarily reflect the views of Town Topics Email letters to: editor@towntopics.com or mail to: Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528

Resident Expresses Concerns About Parking Task Force Approach

To the Editor: Do you live on a residential street in Princeton that has 2-hour or 3-hour parking or resident permit parking that is within a 15-minute walk of businesses on Nassau Street? If so, be aware — employees of Princeton businesses may soon be allowed to park all day on your street. And if you live near Princeton High School, high school students may soon be allowed to park all day on your street. The Permit Parking Task Force is planning to present a report to Princeton Council that will propose allowing employees to park on these streets. I have been attending Task Force meetings. I have been impressed with the Task Force members’ hard work and good intentions. Unfortunately, in my view, the Task Force is going in the wrong direction. A professional consulting firm that Princeton hired concluded in 2017 that there is ample parking for employees

without using residential streets. There are alternative places where employees could park — for example, underutilized meter parking and private parking lots. But the Task Force has not investigated these alternative places. I think that the Task Force should be investigating ways to increase the amount of parking available — ways to increase the pie. Instead, it is discussing ways to add employees and then divide up the existing pie. What can you do if you have concerns about the Permit Parking Task Force’s approach? 1. You can email the Task Force. Send emails to the chair of the Task Force, Letitia Fraga, at lfraga@princetonnj.gov. Ask her to forward your email to all Task Force members. 2. You can express your concerns to Princeton Council by attending the meeting when the Task Force will present its ideas. This is tentatively planned for the evening of Monday, January 27. Save the date. I think it is unfortunate that hard-working, well-intentioned people are pursuing such misguided plans. I hope that hearing from the public will persuade the Task Force to change direction and investigate alternatives that do not use residential streets for employee or high school student parking. PHYLLIS TEITELBAUM Hawthorne Avenue

Letters to the Editor Policy Tow n Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. When necessary, letters with negative content regarding a particular person or group may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

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“WHISKEY & WINE”: That’s the title of a new album by the Americana band Edna’s Kin, appearing at the 1867 Sanctuary in Ewing on February 14 at 8 p.m.

Edna’s Kin to Perform Favorites, New Music

The Americana band Edna’s Kin will appear at the 1867 Sanctuary in Ewing on February 14 at 8 p.m., performing old favorites and many new songs from their recently released CD of all original music, Whiskey & Wine. A diverse blend of folk, country, bluegrass, and blues music, Whiskey & Wine is the band’s first studio effort since their 2009 debut Same Old Lines, and is available for digital download on Amazon, iTunes, Spotify, and CD Baby. The album has also received airplay worldwide. Edna’s Kin is a family band featuring brothers Dan and Andrew Koontz and their father, Warren Koontz. Dan is the song writer of the group, and can be heard singing and playing guitar, piano, banjo, and accordion. Andrew is mostly on fiddle, but can sometimes be heard on bass, while Warren is mostly on bass, but can sometimes be heard singing and playing guitar. While the family members are present on every track, on Whiskey & Wine they’ve been joined by a number of guest musicians to create a much fuller instrumentation than can be found on their earlier recordings.

“In writing these songs, I was looking for a sound that went beyond the traditional fiddle, guitar, and bass arrangements that we’ve done in the past,” said Dan Koontz. “I wanted to bring in piano, pedal steel, even accordion, but still retain the core Edna’s Kin sound.” Edna’s Kin has also retained its sense of humor. The band created videos such as “Iron Man : The Bluegrass Version” and “The Country Bride of Frankenstein.” In the new album, the track “If You Got a Knife” offers an amusing take on the folk classic “Long Black Veil,” while “All This Lovin” tells the tale of a dedicated drinker who is getting more love than he can handle. But the band shows its serious side as well, ranging from the title track “Whiskey & Wine” to “Make It Right,” a song that evokes the heartbreak of caring for a loved one with depression. The 1867 Sanctuary is at 101 Scotch Road in Ewing. For information, call (609) 392-6409.

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STRONG WOMEN: The heroines of “Carmen” and “Frida” are the focus of “An Evening of Love and Romance,” which also includes performances by flamenco dancer Lisa Botalico, at Roxey Ballet’s Canal Studio Theater, 243 North Union Street in Lambertville, February 7-16. Tickets are $39-$45. Visit roxeyballet.org for details.

Pennington Pianist to Perform Benefit Concert

On February 1 at 7:30 p.m., Turkish American pianist and Pennington resident Meral Guneyman will present “Across the Universe,” a benefit concert and musical tribute to composers across genres spanning the centuries. The concert will feature piano compositions and transcriptions of music from Asia to the Americas, including Bach, Beethoven, T he B eatles, and Dav id Bowie. The concert will celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Swat Relief Initiative (SRI) (www.swatreliefinitiative. org), a Pennington-based all-volunteer charitable nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of women and children by fostering education and literacy, especially among girls and women; women’s economic empowerment and vocational training; preventive healthcare; and community development within the remote, mountainous Swat Valley of northern Pakistan. Co-hosted by the Culture Connections and Global Connections student organizations of Hopewell Valley Central High School (HVCHS), the concert will be performed at the school’s Per for m ing A r t s C enter ( PAC ). All net proceeds from this concert will bolster ongoing SRI efforts in northern Pakistan. G u ney man, an award winning Juilliard-trained Steinway artist, has performed on concert stages around the world throughout her life. She composes, transcribes, arranges, and improvises. Guneyman has released numerous albums, with recordings available on every platform, including two CDs with American jazz legend Dick Hyman. Last fall, she released her second album of personally arranged holiday favorites, Christmas Memories: Timeless Christmas Standards Reimagined. Guneyman serves as a cultural advisor to the World Council of Peoples for the United Nations. In her capacity as performer and educator, she has worked to raise funds for multiple charity organizations, including Save the Children Fund, Muscular Dystrophy Association, United Nations Association of New York, United Nations Association of the USA, and others. SRI president and Pennington resident Zebunisa ( Zebu ) Jilani co -founded SRI in the 2010 timeframe

Princeton Boychoir Auditions Scheduled for Winter Term

Princeton Boychoir (PBC) is currently conducting auditions for the Winter 2020 term. Any boy in grades 3-12 who likes to sing is welcomed. The Winter 2020 term will offer many concert and

performance opportunities, including the Carnegie Hall debut of Princeton Boychoir in June 2020. In addition to these performance opportunities, PBC offers a first-class music education to the choristers who participate in all three of their ensembles. Choristers who have trained with PBC, and its sister program Princeton Girlchoir, are regularly accepted into prestigious university music programs across the country. A strong desire to learn, a musical ear, and an eagerness to share music with others are key to a successful audition. Despite the many musical opportunities PBC offers during the year, the auditions remain low-key and enjoyable and no

music needs to be prepared in advance. Boys will be asked to sing “Row, Row, Row Your Boat,” along with some exercises that demonstrate their vocal range, and to complete a few musical challenges to help our music directors understand their current level of musical ability. Auditions for new choristers are scheduled throughout January at the organization’s facility in Princeton Junction. To schedule, contact the Westrick Music Academy office (home of Princeton Boychoir and Princeton Girlchoir) at (609) 688-1888, auditions@PrincetonBoychoir.org, or visit www. PrincetonBoychoir.org. Continued on Next Page

13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020

Performing Arts

with her late husband Arshad Jilani, both Pakistan natives by birth, now naturalized U. S. citizens, to help rebuild society within this ruggedly mountainous area after several consecutive social and natural calamities hit the region in the late 2000s. Jilani carries on a proud heritage and tradition within the region as the granddaughter of the Swat Valley’s last royal ruler, or Wali, a reform-minded leader who oversaw the construction of hundreds of schools, colleges, hospitals, clinics, and modern roads, among other advancements, in the region. Many such schools, built especially for girls, were destroyed by the Taliban, starting in 2008. To date, SR I operates within 16 villages, with a total population of some 30,000 people, in the Swat Valley. SRI has constructed 10 schools — six of them specifically for girls — within the Swat Valley. SRI aims to enroll 20,000 children in school by the end of 2020. SRI launched its education program in August 2015 and, to date, has enrolled 7,000 children in school. Tickets to the concert are $10-$20. Hopewell Valley Central High School is at 259 Pennington-Titusville Road, Contact Shanza Arooj at (845) 427-1834 or shanza.arooj@gmail.com for more information.

ELECTRO-COUNTRY: Owen Lake and the Tragic Loves bring their unique sound to the Lee room at Princeton University’s Lewis Center Friday, January 31 at 8 p.m. The free show, geared to all ages, draws from the traditions of 1960s country, 1980s dream pop, and modern electronic music, mixed with an experimental aesthetic all their own. Visit owenlake.com for more information. (Photo by Angelica Vielma)

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YEAR OF THE RAT: The “Purple Swans” are just one part of Plainsboro Public Library’s annual celebration of Chinese New Year on Saturday, February 8 starting at 12 p.m. Under paper lanterns FROM PAGE TO STAGE: The cast of “Midwives,” premiering January 21 at the George Street decorated by local children and spring banners heralding good fortune, there will be a reception Playhouse in New Brunswick. David Saint directs the play, adapted by Chris Bohjalian from his for artist Peter Chung, demonstrations of Chinese art, dancers, and music. Admission is free but registration is required at plainsborolibrary.org. best-selling novel of the same name.

Bohjalian’s “Midwives” at Bohjalian is a New York len, Grace Experience, Ryan appearance) Jim Flint, Joe 32), Morrisville, Pa., near took part in the inauguration George Street Playhouse Times bestselling author George, Monique Robinson, Stockette, Chris Capitolo, the Calhoun Street Bridge. of President Barack Obama,

George Street Playhouse in New Brunswick will present a stage adaptation of author Chris Bohjalian’s Midwives January 21-February 16 at the Arthur Laurents Theater in the New Brunswick Performing Arts Center. The world premiere play was adapted by the author from his novel of the same name. The novel, which has sold more than 2 million copies, was also an early selection of Oprah’s Book Club. A severe snowstorm breaks out during a routine at-home birth. With no way to contact the outside world, midwife Sibyl Danforth makes an impossible decision to save the life of a baby. But when the sun rises and the blizzard TOPICS clears, questions arise about what really occurred that icy Vermont night.

of 21 books, including The Flight Attendant, now being adapted into an HBO Max limited series, The Sandcastle Girls, and Secrets of Eden. His work has been translated into 35 languages and three films. This production will star award-winning playwright and actress Ellen McLaughlin, who originated the part of the Angel in Tony Kushner’s Angels in America and appeared in every production from its earliest workshops to Broadway, in the role of Sibyl Danforth. She is joined by John Bolger, who previously appeared opposite her in George Street Playhouse’s production of Outside Mullingar. Bolger most recently appeared in last season’s The Trial of Donna Caine. The cast also features Molly Carden, Michael Cul-

Armand Schultz, and Lee Sellars. Visit www.georgestreetplayhouse.org or call (732) 246-7717.

Vanessa Nolan, Maryalice Rubins-Topoleski, Hans Peters, Ken Ammerman, Matt Duchnowski, Ed Patton, and Joe Ryan.

Agatha Christie Mystery Staged by ActorsNET

When a diplomat’s wife discovers a dead body in their drawing room shortly before her husband arrives home with a VIP, she tries to dispose of the corpse so the visit will be uneventful. The result is confusion and comedy. Spider’s Web is being produced by ActorsNET and performed on the Heritage Center Theatre stage in Morrisville, Pa., January 31-February 6. Co-directed and designed Charlotte Kirkby by C. Jameson Bradley and Shows are Friday and SatAndrena Wishnie, the production stars Charlotte Kirk- urday at 8 p.m. and Sunday by and co-stars (in order of at 2 p.m. The Heritage Center Theatre is at 635 North Delmor r Avenue ( Route

Tickets are $10-$22. To reserve, visit www.brownpapertickets.com or call (215) 295-3694.

Clarinetist to Teach At Master Class Series

Anthony McGill, principal clarinet of the New York Philharmonic, will give a masterclass to Princeton University student clarinetists on Sunday, February 16 at 5 p.m. The class, which is free and open to the public, will be followed by a one hour concert with pianist Donna Weng Friedman ’80. Both events are at Taplin Auditorium, Fine Hall, on the campus. McGill is the first AfricanAmerican principal player in the New York Philharmonic. He also maintains a chamber music career, and is an advocate for helping music education reach underserved communities. He

premiering a piece written specifically for the occasion by John Williams alongside violinist Itzhak Perlman, cellist Yo-Yo Ma, and pianist Gabriela Montero. In addition to the New York Philharmonic, McGill has performed with the Metropolitan Opera, Baltimore Symphony, San Diego Symphony, and Kansas City Symphony. As a chamber musician, he has collaborated with numerous groups including Daedalus, Guarneri, Pacifica, Takacs, and Tokyo quartets. He is a graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music and is on the faculty of that institution as well as the Juilliard School and Bard College’s Conservatory of Music.

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ATTENTION SINGERS: VOICES Chorale needs additional vocalists — tenors and basses, especially — for its upcoming spring performance at Trinity Episcopal Church of “A Prayer for Peace.” Singers will perform Handel’s “Anthem on the Peace,” along with other works, in this program. Those in all voice parts are welcome to audition. Visit jengoings8@gmail.com for more information.

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Art

Leslie Kuenne Tribute Exhibit at D&R Greenway

D&R Greenway’s Olivia Rainbow Gallery now features an exhibition of nature paintings and photographs by the late Leslie Vought Kuenne, on “SEED TO SEED”: This 1970-72 painting by Franz Jozef Ponstingl is featured in “Ponstingl: Dreams view through February 6. of Past Futures,” on view January 25 through June 20 at the Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, Pa. Born in Allentown, Pa., Ponstingl painted fantastical visions of surreal landscapes, future civilizations, and abstract networks.

The art space is maintained in perpetuity, honoring Leslie and Chris Kuenne’s late daughter, Olivia Michelle. The exhibit, “Light, Stillness & Beauty,” — named by co-curator Lisa Granozio — evokes the variety of this display of unexpected nature subjects. D&R Greenway Land Trust notes that it is deeply appreciative to Leslie’s husband, Christopher, and their sons, Peter, William, and Matthew; as well as Leslie’s sister, Victoria; for the privilege of remembering Leslie through this sample of her work. Leslie Kuenne was a generous public servant and diverse artist. Her husband, Christopher B. Kuenne, author and founder of Rosetta and Rosemark Capital, is a Princeton University lecturer in entrepreneurship. Until shortly before her death, Leslie served as the president of McCarter Theatre Center’s Board of Trustees. Kuenne’s lively, even quirky works include a hefty savoy cabbage that contends with the intimacy of a softly burgeoning tulip. Her saucy

rooster painting challenges a nearby portrait of a nearly exploding tulip. Her approaches to tulips in particular could be said to be that of a deepsea diver Kuenne’s close-up of local ice contends in both hue and line with her intense oil of a Vermont sunset. Coming from an artistic family — her father Peter Vought’s “passion to create came in the form of paintings, sculptures, gardens, and even story-telling” — Kuenne carried her father’s versatility to unexplored levels. Contrast could be said to have been Kuenne’s specialty: entwining leaves softening harshly weathered wood. rittle paint curls contrast with severe straightness in a venerable fence. Friend and co-artist Lisa Granozio is responsible for the inspired juxtapositions of her works throughout this tribute exhibition. D&R Greenway is located at One Preservation Place, off Rosedale Road. For more information, call (609) 9244646 or visit www.drgreenway.org.

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020

from the contest homepage, w w w.NJ Teen Media. org to serve as inspiration for the teens. The website also provides the official rules, frequently asked questions, entry forms, a look at the winners and honorable ment ions f rom prev ious contests, and other contest information. Entries can be submitted via the students’ art or English/language arts teachers, if their school is registered. Teachers and administrators can register their school by visiting www.NJTeenMedia. org or by contacting Matthew Cossel at (973) 799-0200 or info@winningstrat.com. Teens whose schools are not registered can submit entries directly. For complete submission guidelines, visit www.NJTeenMedia.org.

Continued on Next Page

delphia. There, they were art, including the written “Ponstingl: Dreams of Past Futures” at Michener discovered by Bert Baum, word, a valuable life lesson

Beginning January 25, the Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, Pa., will present “Ponstingl: Dreams of Past Futures,” its first solo ex hibit ion feat ur ing t he work of Franz Jozef Ponstingl (1927-2004). An artist with no formal training who achieved very little recognition during his lifetime, Ponstingl painted fantastical visions of surr e a l la n d s c ap e s, f u t u r e civilizations, and abstract networks. His body of work represented in this exhibition spans two decades from the 1960s until the late 1970s. Inspired by dreams, his work in the 1960s recalls the work of Salvador Dalí (19 0 4 -1989 ) a n d ot h e r Surrealist painters. In the 1970s, Ponstingl began exploring otherworldly landscapes inhabited by biomorphic, alien-looking forms. He also experimented with abstract patterning, creating a series of works that resemble circuit boards and interconnected networks. A recurring theme in his paintings are visions of abandoned, future civilizations, appearing as if discovered by intact, but uninhabited, by archaeologists. Born in Allentown, Pa., Ponstingl grew up on a 60acre farm in Coopersburg. He served in the Air Force during World War II and the Korean War. Themes of war and the military pervade several of his works. Following his service, Ponstingl worked intermittently as an interior designer for the Bolling Officers’ Club and the Monocle restaurant and bar in Washington, D.C., where he painted large-scale murals. He frequently returned to the Coopersburg farm to paint, until the death of his father in 1967 forced him to sell the property and donate many of his paintings to the Salvation Army in Phila-

a gallery owner and son of painter and educator Walter Baum (1884-1956). Ber t Baum held a solo exhibition of Ponstingl’s work in 1971 at his gallery in Sellersville, Pa., introducing the artist’s work to a wider audience. In the late 1970s, Ponstingl moved to his sister’s property in Kunkletown, Pa., where he built a studio. He struggled to find success as an artist, however, and relocated to California in 1982, where he lived until his death in 2004. “Ponstingl : Dreams of Past Futures” will include paintings and drawings from private collections, many of which have never been on public view. Featuring representative works from various stages of his artistic development, the exhibition, which runs through June 20, will showcase the artist’s refined technical skill and extraordinary imagination. The Michener Art Museum is located at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa. It is open Tuesday through Friday 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday noon to 5 p.m. For more information, call (215) 340-9800 or visit www.michenerartmuseum.org.

Call for Art: NJ Teen Media Contest

New Jersey Human Services has announced teens that across the state can now submit entries for the 25th Annual New Jersey Teen Media Contest, which highlights Human Services’ mission to support families. The contest, run by Human Services’ Division of Family Development, is open to all New Jersey middle and high school-aged students. This year, the contest will accept entries in the hand-painted, hand-drawn, and written word categories. This year’s challenge to teens is to illustrate through

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or moment that you will never forget. Teens are invited to show when parents and other loved ones provided valuable life lessons and teaching moments. “We always look forward to seeing the amazing talents and abilities of New Jersey’s high school and middle school students,” “LIGHT, STILLNESS & BEAUTY”: An exhibition of art by the late Leslie Vought Kuenne is on view in said Human Services Com- the Olivia Rainbow Gallery at D&R Greenway Land Trust through February 6. Kuenne’s wide-ranging (Photo by Lisa Granozio) missioner Carole Johnson. work features unexpected nature subjects. “We are excited to continue this great tradition as part of our ongoing commitment to support New Jersey children and build a foundation for opening celebration stronger families.” “The contest focuses on celebrating family and the importance of parents and loved ones and their deep involvement in a child’s life,” said Human Services Assistant Commissioner Natasha Johnson, who oversees the Division of Family Development. “The Teen Media Contest has been part of our enduring effort to foster that understanding. Year after year, the entire Human Services team is struck by the creativity, vision, and talent that students bring to the contest. Once again, we eagerly anticipate the creative works of this year’s entrants, and how they creatively conceptualize the essence of family.” All entries must be postmarked no later than March 11. Staff from the Division of Family Development and its Office of Child Support Services will judge the contest. Winners will be selected in first, second, and third places in both the middle and high school groups, for each of the two entry categories, with each receiving a prize packOpen house with curator-led and artist-led tours age at an awards ceremony in May. Exhibition on view January 18 to June 7 Winning entries will be included in the 2021 Office Art@Bainbridge is a gallery project of the Princeton University Art Museum of Child Support Calendar and be placed on display in the New Jersey State House in Trenton shortly after the always free and open to the public awards event. A number of honorable mention entries artmuseum.princeton.edu will be selected for possible inclusion in the State House exhibit and possibly the cal158 Nassau Street Hugh Hayden, America (detail), 2018. © Hugh Hayden, Courtesy Lisson Gallery endar. The 2020 calendar can be viewed or downloaded

Hugh Hayden Creation Myths

Saturday, January 18, 1–4 pm I Art@Bainbridge

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020 • 16

CELEBRATING DR. KING: The Arts Council of Princeton invites the community to a celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy through hands-on art, music, and history activities on Monday, January 20 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts, 102 Witherspoon Street.

“DREAM”: This painting by James Kearns is featured in “W. Carl Burger and James Kearns,” on view at the Center for Contemporary Art in Bedminster January 17 through February 29. An opening reception, free and open to the public, is Friday, January 17 from 6 to 8 p.m. shape the second half of the from 1946 to 1951. KeWinter Exhibitions at Contemporary Art Center 20th century,” say curator arns’s first one-man exhibiThe Center for Contemporary Art in Bedminster has announced the opening of two new exhibitions, on view January 17 through February 29. An opening reception, free and open to the public, is Friday, January 17 from 6 to 8 p.m. “REPRESENTING : Artwork of the County College of Morris Fine Art Faculty,” features the work of Clayton Allen, Marco Cutrone, Todd Doney, Patrick Gallagher, Andrea Kelly, Deborah Kelly, Barbara Neibart, John Reinking, Robert Ricciotti, Marisol Ross, Eileen Sackman, Keith Smith, and Leah Tomaino. The work of these 13 faculty members “spans a variety of media and styles, it is linked by exceptional craft and creative competence” says curator Keith Smith, from the Visual Arts Program at the County College of Morris. The other exhibit highlghts the works of “W. Carl Burger and James Kearns,” who have been making art for seven decades. “Each artist, within his own studio practice, has touched on a number of ideas that helped

Wes Sherman. “Burger’s paintings and drawings explore ideas of abstraction, or more accurately, they deconstruct, examining the external elements that make up an environment. Kearns’ art, in contrast, explores the psyche, mostly through humor, and how it is revealed in the human figure.” W. Carl Burger studied at New York Universit y, receiving a BS and MA in f ine ar ts educat ion. He took postgraduate courses at Columbia University, the Arts Students League in New York City, and Rutgers University. In 1993, he retired as professor emeritus of art from Kean University in Union. Burger has exhibited throughout the U.S., including the National Academy of Design in New York, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, the Newark Museum, Montclair Museum, New Jersey State Museum, and the Morris Museum. James Kearns studied at the Art Institute of Chicago, DePaul University, and at the University of Chicago

tion took place in New York in 1956. In 1960, Kearns became a professor at the School of Visual Arts, New York. His sculptures, paintings, lithographs, and etchings have been included in exhibitions at the National Institute of Arts and Letters, the Pennsylvania Academy of fine Arts and at the Whitney Museum in New York. He can be found in museum collections that include the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Smithsonian Museum in Washington D.C. The Center for Contemporary Art is located at 2020 Burnt Mills Road in Bedminster. For more information, call (908) 234-2345 or visit www.ccabedminster.org.

ACP Hosts Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Event

The Arts Council of Princeton invites the community to celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on Monday, January 20, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts. The event will feature hands-on art and history activities, music, and

12 ANGRY MEN Jan. 17 - 26 $20 adult, $18 senior/student

discussions as they relate to Dr. King’s life, teachings, and civic engagement. Activities include a free community breakfast from 9 to 10 a.m., with speakers C ong re s s woma n B on n ie Watson Coleman and Ruha Benjamin, author and associate professor of African American studies at Princeton University. F r o m 10 -11: 3 0 a .m ., Hands On! will feature art and history activities with the Historical Society of Princeton and the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice, a canned food drive with the Princeton Family YMCA, and children’s storytime (10:30 a.m.) with jaZams. At 11:30 a.m. to noon, a gospel performance will feature the First Baptist Church Unity Choir. This event is held in collaboration with Princeton University, the Paul Robeson House, jaZams, Princeton Family YMCA, the Historical Society of Princeton, the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice, and Labyrinth Books. The Paul Robeson Center for the Arts is located at 102 Witherspoon Street. For more information, visit www. artscouncilofprinceton.org or call (609) 924-8777.

ACP Bingo for the Arts Night

On Friday, January 17, 7:30 –9:30 p.m., the Arts Council of Princeton will host Bingo for the Arts. Admission is $5, which entitles the player to one bingo card to be used in all games played, along with the chance to win gift cards from Princeton establishments, light refreshments, and the opportunity to have some fun with others from your community. Players may purchase additional cards (up to a max of 5 additional cards) for $1 per additional card purchased. All proceeds from the event benefit the Arts Council of Princeton’s scholarship program, which provides access to our high-quality arts education regardless of ability to pay. The Arts Council of Princeton is located at 102 Witherspoon Street. For more infor mat ion, v isit w w w. artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Rustin Center Hosts Lilienthal Art Unveiling

609-570-3333 www.kelseytheatre.org

The Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice, 21 Wiggins Street, will present the unveiling of Ryan Stark Lilienthal's artistic exploration of the Mueller Report, on Sunday, January 19 from 4 to 6 p.m.

“It's an oppor tunity to meet the artist and learn of his pursuit of truth in exposing the dangers to democracy when communication is weaponized through misinformation and obstruction,” says Robt Seda-Schreiber, chief activist of the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice. “We are honored to show Ryan's inspirational series in our dedicated drive to present to the public thoughtprovoking and significant artworks which allow for open and honest conversation, and collaborative exploration of difficult issues.” “As our country careens from one constitutional crisis to another, I turn more and more to my training as an attorney to find the right visual vocabulary to artistically respond to our times,” says Lilienthal. “Documents give shape to both the form and substance of my recent artwork, particularly The Mueller Report and its underlying investigation, the core of which, as Robert Mueller succinctly stated, deserves the attention of every American.” This event is a fundraiser to help the Center continue to present important and challenging art both in-house and to the greater community. Lilienthal studied drawing, painting, and sculpture at the Boston Museum School in Massachusetts while attending Tufts University, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in religion. During that period, he apprenticed with Siri Berg, one of America's foremost Abstract artists, whose paintings are part of the permanent collection at the Guggenheim and other museums. For more infor mation, visit rustincenter.org.

Area Exhibits Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Silver Anniversary” through April 5. www.lambertvillearts.com. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Inside Out … When Worlds Collide” through February 22. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Considine Gallery, Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart, 1200 Stuart Road, has “Stories of Diversity” through February 27. www.stuartschool.org/arts/art-galleries. D & R G re e nwa y L a n d Trust, 1 Preservation Place, has “Portraits of Preservation”

through February 28. www.drgreenway.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, has “Trenton Eclectic” through March 15 and “If These Quilts Could Talk” January 19 through April 19. An opening reception is January 19, 2 to 4 p.m. www.ellarslie.org. Gourgaud Gallery, 23 North Main Street, Cranbury, has “Open Call” through February 28. www.cranburyartscouncil. com. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Interference Fringe | Tallur L.N.” through January, “Rebirth: Kang Muxiang” through May, and other exhibits. www. groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and Innovators Gallery,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. $4 admission Wednesday-Sunday, 12-4 p.m. Thursday extended hours till 7 p.m. and free admission 4-7 p.m. www. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Harry Leith-Ross: Scenes from Country Life” through February 9. www.michenerartmuseum.org. Mendel Music Library, Princeton University, has “Les Six: Collective Traces,” celebrating six composers whose modern sound changed the course of French musical history, January 16 through May 29. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Dreaming of Utopia: Roosevelt, New Jersey” through May 10. www.morven.org. New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, has “Preserving the Pinelands: Albert Horner’s Portraits of a National Treasure” through June 28 and “Fine Feathered Friends” through September 13. www. statemuseum.nj.gov. Princeton University Art Museum has “States of Health: Visualizing Illness and Healing” through February 2 and “The Eternal Feast: Banqueting in Chinese Art from the 10th to the 14th Century” through February 16. www.artmuseum.princeton. edu. Small World Café, 14 Witherspoon Street, has original work by artist Toral Patel through February 4. Paintings by Mark Allen Natale are on view at the 254 Nassau Street location through February 4. www. smallworldcoffee.com/art. West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, has “Doom and Bloom” through February 28. www.westwindsorarts.org.


Wednesday, January 15 7 p.m.: Storyteller Maria LoBiondo tells Scheherazade and the Tales of the Thousand and One Nights, at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Free. princetonlibrary.org. Thursday, January 16 9:30-11 a.m.: YWCA Princeton Area Newcomers and Friends meet at Bramwell House, behind the main building on Robeson Place. www.ywcaprinceton.org/ newcomers. 10 a.m.: Meeting of the 55-Plus Club at The Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street. Princeton University professor Kim Lane Scheppele speaks, “In the Ruins of Constitutional Government.” Free, $4 donation suggested. 10 a.m.-9 p.m.: Princeton University Art Museum store, on campus, is holding its annual sale with crafts, jewelry, accessories, toys, books, cards, and more, at 50-70 percent off. museumstore@princeton.edu. 7:30 p.m.: “The Theory of Relativity,” new musical song cycle by Neil Bartram and Brian Hill, at Princeton High School Black Box Theatre, Walnut Lane. $5. princetonk12.org. Friday, January 17 9:45 a.m.: The Piano Teachers Forum meets at Jacobs Music, 2540 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. pianoteachersforum.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Princeton University Art Museum store, on campus, is holding its annual sale with crafts, jewelry, accessories, toys, books, cards, and more, at 50-70 percent off. museumstore@princeton.edu. 6:30 p.m.: One Table Cafe at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street. The Rev. William D. Carter performs with his eight-piece ensemble. Dinner provided by Eno Terra. Open to all. Reservations are needed. (609) 216-7770. 7:30 p.m.: “The Theory of Relativity,” new musical song cycle by Neil Bartram and Brian Hill at Princeton High School Black Box Theatre, Walnut Lane. $5. princetonk12.org. 8 p.m.: New Jersey Symphony Orchestra performs The Ring Without Words, Lorin Maazel’s arrangement of music from Wagner’s fouropera Ring cycle, at Richardson Auditorium. njsymphony.org. Saturday, January 18 10 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market is at MarketFair, Route 1. westwindsorfarmersmarket.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Princeton University Art Museum store, on campus, is holding its annual sale with crafts, jewelry, accessories, toys, books, cards, and more, at 50-70 percent off. museumstore@princeton.edu. 11 a.m.: Represent New Jersey meets at Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 50 Cherry Hill Road, to begin the next phase of anti-corruption efforts. A screening of the short film Unbreaking America: Divided We Fall is planned. RSVP to https://volunteer.represent.us/nj_meeting_011820. 7:30 p.m.: Central

Nursery Lands. Bring saws, clippers, loppers, and rakes, and wear sturdy shoes and warm clothing. 145 Mapleton Road, Kingston. https:// fpnl.org/. 7-8:30 p.m.: Princeton Clergy Association’s Annual Multifaith Service to Commemorate the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street. The Rev. Dr. Deborah Banks, pastor of the Mount Pisgah AME Church of Princeton, is the speaker. Tuesday, January 21 6:30 p.m.: SCORE Seminar, “Small Business Trends,” at Princeton Public Library 65 Witherspoon Street. princetonlibrary.org. Wednesday, January 22 6:30 p.m.: Morven Museum, 55 Stockton Street, presents David Herrstrom lecturing on “The Prophetic Quest: Stained Glass Art of Jacob Landau.” $10 (free for Friends of Morven). morven.org. Thursday, January 23 6:45 p.m.: Mercer’s Best Toastmasters meets at Lawrence Community Center, 295 Eggerts Crossing Road, Lawrenceville. All are welcome. Friday, January 24 7:30 p.m.: “Live Arts” at The Warehouse, the Martin Center for Dance, 11 Princess Road, Suite G, Lawrenceville. Live jazz, photo and art exhibit, jewelry. Free. www.MartinBartonARTS.com. Saturday, January 25 12-6 p.m.: Artisan Market at Unionville Vineyards, 9 Rocktown Road, Ringoes. Crafts, gourmet food, live music, wine, and more. unionvillevineyards.com. 3 p.m.: At Morven, 55 Stockton Street, the New Brunswick Chamber Orchestra presents “Extended Techniques,” part of a three-part series. $25 for the series (free for Friends of Morven). morven.org. 6:30 p.m.: “Mad for Plaid” Robert Burns Party and Silent Auction, at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street. Food, drink, and more. $30; includes one drink and hors d’oeuvres. Benefits Trinity Choir’s 2021 UK tour. www. trinityprinceton.org/events/ mad-for-plaid-2020. Sunday, January 26 12-5 p.m.: Artisan Market at Unionville Vineyards, 9 Rocktown Road, Ringoes. Crafts, gourmet food, live music, wine, and more. unionvillevineyards.com. 4-6 p.m.: Reception for

the exhibit “Jewish Lawyers in Germany Under the Third Reich,” at The Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street. Open to all. The exhibit runs through January 30. info@ thejewishcenter.org. 4 p.m.: Central Jersey Dance Society presents the Pure Ballroom Dance, at Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. Argentine tango lesson till 5 p.m., then open dancing till 8 p.m. to ballroom music with DJ Mark Liebeskind. No partner needed. $10-$15. www.centraljerseydance.org. Monday, January 27 5-9:15 p.m.: Princeton Community Works conference at Frist Campus Center, Princeton University. Dr. Randall Pinkett of BCT Partners will speak and workshops will be held on addressing the challenges of the nonprofit world. $40 includes two workshops and boxed dinner. princetoncommunityworks.org. 7 p.m.: Engaged Retirement presents a tax update for the 2019 filing season, at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Free. princetonlibrary.org. Wednesday, January 29 2 p.m.: John Baxter on “Richard Stockton: Revolutionary Unsung Hero,” at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. Museum tour available at 11 a.m.; tea at 1 p.m. $10 for talk only (free for Friends of Morven); $32 for tea/tour/ talk ($18 Friends of Morven). morven.org. Thursday, January 30 6:45-7:45 p.m.: Mercer’s Best Toastmasters holds a Better Speaker Series meeting at Lawrence Community Center, 295 Eggerts

Crossing Road. mercersbest. toastmastersclubs.org. Friday, January 31 6 p.m.: Screening of Toni Morrison: The Pieces That I Am, at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Free. princetonlibrary.org. Saturday, February 1 8:30 a.m-12 p.m..: Round Valley Reservoir — free birding trip with Washington Crossing Audubon society. washingtoncrossingaudubon.org. 10-11:30 a.m.: Groundhog Day Celebration at The Watershed Institute, 31 Titus Mill Road, Pennington. $5. thewatershed.org. 3 p.m.: Screening of Beethoven Lives Upstairs, at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Free. princetonlibrary.org. 7:30 p.m.: Pianist Meral Guneyman performs at Hopewell Valley Central High School, Pennington, in a concert to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Swat Relief Initiative, which promotes education and literacy, especially for women, in northern Pakistan. Works by Bach, Beethoven, The Beatles, and David Bowie are on the program. $10$20. swatreliefinitiative.org. Sunday, February 2 1:30 p.m.: “Fistful of Popcorn” Oscars Road Show at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Film reviewers from Princeton Community TV offer takes on the upcoming Oscars. Free. princetonlibrary.org. Monday, February 3 Recycling 7 p.m.: Continuing Conversations on Race at Princeton Public Library 65 Witherspoon Street. “The Green

Book: An American Journey Through White Racism.” Free. princetonlibrary.org. Wednesday, February 5 5:30 p.m.: Panel discussion at the Institute for Advanced Study on the rise of anti-Semitism. ias.edu. Thursday, February 6 6:30 p.m.: Screening of Thou Shalt Not Grow Old, at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Free. princetonlibrary.org. 6:45-7:45 p.m.: Mercer’s Best Toastmasters holds a Better Speaker Series meeting at Lawrence Community Center, 295 Eggerts Crossing Road. mercersbest.toastmastersclubs.org. Friday February 7 6:30 p.m.: Screening of the documentary True Justice, followed by a panel discussion, at Princeton High School Performing Arts Center, Walnut Lane. Saturday, February 8 11 a.m.: Victorian Pressed Flower Valentine Workshop at Morven, 55 Stockton Street. $20-$30. morven.org. 12 p.m.: Chinese New Year celebration at Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van Doren Street, Plainsboro. Art, music, dance, and more. plainsborolibrary.org. 1:30 p.m.: Chinese New Year celebration at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Traditional dance, painting, calligraphy, music, origami, martial arts, and more. Free. princetonlibrary.org. 2 p.m.: Naturalist and photographer Jim Amon reads from his new book Seeing the Sourlands: Photos and Essays at the Lambertville Public Library, 6 Lilly Street, Lambertville. sourland.org.

EDWARD T. CONE CONCERT SERIES How long is a piece of music?

FLUX QUARTET

Three Pieces for String Quartet

Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971)

FLUX QUARTET with VICKI RAY Piano and String Quartet Morton Feldman (1926–1987)

Friday, January 31 at 8:00 p.m. Saturday, February 1 at 8:00 p.m. Wolfensohn Hall Institute for Advanced Study

Fri. 1/17/20 to Thurs. 1/23/20

The Song of Names Fri-Thurs: 1:15, 6:55 (PG-13)

Just Mercy

Fri-Sat: 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 (PG-13) Sun-Thurs: 1:00, 4:00, 7:00

1917

Fri-Sat: 1:35, 4:15, 6:55, 9:35 (R) Sun-Thurs: 1:35, 4:15, 6:55

Little Women

Fri-Sat: 1:00, 3:55, 6:50, 9:45 (PG) Sun-Thurs: 1:00, 3:55, 6:50

Uncut Gems

Continuing Little Women (PG) 1917 (R)

Fri-Sat: 4:00, 9:25 (R) Sun-Thurs: 4:00

Dark Waters

Fri-Sat: 4:00, 9:40 (PG-13) Sun-Thurs: 4:00

There are pieces of music that get their power from how short or how long they are. Composers have to do things differently to make us notice that the foreground of a piece is the time it takes to play it. The FLUX Quartet plays Stravinsky’s early Three Pieces—a complete and revolutionary work in three movements that only lasts 4 minutes—and is joined by pianist Vicki Ray in Morton Feldman’s lush, delicate, 80-minute Piano and String Quartet.

A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood Fri-Thurs: 1:30, 6:55 (PG)

Parasite

Fri-Sat: 1:00, 3:55, 6:50, 9:45 (R) Sun-Thurs: 1:00, 3:55, 6:50

Showtimes change daily Visit for showtimes. PrincetonGardenTheatre.org

To reserve your tickets, please visit: www.ias.edu/events

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020

Calendar

Jersey Dance Society presents the No-Name Dance at Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. No partner needed. Country Two-Step lesson till 8:30 p.m., then open dancing till 11:30 p.m. to California Mix dance music with DJ Alan Saperstein. $10-$15. www. centraljersey.org. 7:30 p.m.: “The Theory of Relativity,” new musical song cycle by Neil Bartram and Brian Hill, at Princeton High School Black Box Theatre, Walnut Lane. $5. princetonk12.org. Sunday, January 19 12-5 p.m.: Princeton University Art Museum store, on campus, is holding its annual sale with crafts, jewelry, accessories, toys, books, cards, and more, at 50-70 percent off. museumstore@ princeton.edu. 1 p.m.: Jigsaw Puzzle Tournament at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. Free. princetonlibrary.org. 1 p.m.: Lambertville Historical Society annual meeting at Pittore Justice Center, 25 South Union Street, Lambertville. Author/historial Linda J. Barth will discuss the people, bridges, locks, and aqueducts of the D&R Canal. Free. www.lambertvillehistoricalsociety.org. 3 and 7 p.m.: Youth Orchestra of Central Jersey performs at Kendall Hall, The College of New Jersey, Ewing. At 3 p.m., the Wind Symphony, String Preparatory Orchestra, and Pro Arte Orchestra will play. At 7 p.m., the Saxophone Choir and Symphonic Orchestra featuring Angela Zator-Nelson, assistant principal timpanist of the Philadelphia Orchestra, perform Jennifer Higdon’s Percussion Concerto. $20-$25. tcnjcenterforthearts.tcnj.edu. 8 p.m.: Princeton Folk Music Society presents Anne Hills at Christ Congregation Church, 50 Walnut Lane. $10-$25. www.princetonfolk.org. Monday, January 20 Recycling 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.: The Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, celebrates the life of Martin Luther King Jr. with talks by Congresswoman Bonnie Watson Coleman and Princeton professor Ruha Benjamin, art and history activities, and more. Free. artscouncilofprinceton.org. 12-3 p.m.: MLK Day of Service Work Session in the Mapleton Preserve, hosted by Friends of Princeton


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020 • 18

PRESENTING

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PRICE IMPROVEMENT

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Open House Saturday 1/18 1-4pm

22 Hart Avenue, Hopewell Boro Marketed by: Helen H. Sherman $510,000

4 Lori Drive, Somerville Boro Marketed by: Kelley McCaffrey $441,000

Open House Sunday 1/19 1-4pm 16 Nostrand Road, Plainsboro Twp Marketed by: Roberta Parker $645,000

54 Petty Road, Cranbury Twp Marketed by: Ania Fisher $1,090,000

From Princeton, We Reach the World.

12 Sortor Road, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Donna M. Murray | $1,198,000

28 Todd Ridge Road, Hopewell Twp Marketed by: Christina “Elvina” Grant | $759,000

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

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symbol are registeredsubsidiary service marks HomeServices ofof America, Inc. ®Inc., EqualaHousing Opportunity. Information notand verified or guaranteed. If yourAffiliates, home is currently listed with Hathaway a Broker, thisHomeServices is not intended asand a solicitation. © BHH Affiliates, LLC.HomeServices An independently operated ofofHomeServices America, Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, a franchisee of BHH LLC. Berkshire the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation. © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.


PRICE ADJUSTMENT! • Open House Sunday 1/19 1-4 pm 364 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton

364 Cherry Hill Road New construction custom built home Set beautifully on this 1.52 wooded acre property, this new construction contemporary style home features 4/5 bedrooms and 5 full baths and a finished full basement with daylight windows and ceiling height of 9.5 feet. Location, location, location...a very short distance right into town. If you~re a jogger then the open Jogging Trail (almost 1/2 mile around) will be the finishing touch to this very special incredible home. This custom home abuts 300 acres of Witherspoon Woods. The long driveway to the beautiful oversized 2 car garage with mud room and beautiful entrance provides privacy as it sits sideways in the trees. This home offers a fabulous wide open floor plan. Enter into a 2 story foyer and enjoy the view of the Red Oak Flooring throughout. Formal living room & dining room are traditional design w/gorgeous windows & 9 foot ceilings. Custom designed kitchen boasts, Harbor Breeze Full Height Cabinets w/Glass Doors & Stainless Steel Farm sink, Quartz Countertops with bar area and Stainless Miele High End Kitchen Appliances and almost room sized walk in pantry. Light and bright on each level. Recessed lights throughout. Master bedroom is with fireplace, walk in closet & enormous master bath w/sauna and master sitting room that opens to a balcony w/fabulous views. 5000 sq ft. Finished basement. Offered at: $1,645,000

PRICE ADJUSTMENT! • Open House Saturday 1/18 1-4 pm 422 Wendover Drive, Princeton

Warm and Welcoming with a comfortable elegance that embraces you and your guests...This home is ideal for entertaining....inside with the beautiful rooms and outside on the very spacious deck. Tucked away on a private treed property this wonderful home with side entry 3 car garage...provides a beautiful front door entrance opening to the very large formal living room with fireplace, and the formal dining room and the straight ahead entrance to the warm and cozy all so spacious family room with fireplace. Views of the open yard from all the large windows provides gorgeous sun and bright light. The second level offers 5 bedrooms and 3 full baths. Hiking/bike trails a few steps away leading to Ettl Farms neighborhooding development and beyond. Offered at: $1,100,000

Roberta Parker

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ 08540 | 609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

Sales Associate 609-915-0206 Mobile roberta.parker@foxroach.com robertasellsprinceton.com

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020

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21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020

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CONNECTION BETWEEN TWO PRESERVES: A 38-acre property known as the Maziarz aquisition creates a partial connection between the Sourlands and Cedar Ridge Preserve.

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D & R G re e nw ay L a n d Trust recently concluded the purchase of a 38-acre land preserve on Van Dyke Road in Hopewell. The Maziarz property is situated between two of the land trust’s popular preserves, Cedar Ridge and the vast Sourlands Ecosystem Preserve. With its protection secured, D &R Greenway is now only one property away from linking these two preserves and adding to more than seven miles of connected trails through the Sourlands. T h e n e w l y pr e s e r ve d land will help protect wildlife movement bet ween these lands that provide wooded Sourland habitat for fox and bear and for neo-tropical migrant songbirds that breed in the area in summer. Bird species identified on the property include the red-shouldered hawk, downy and red-bellied woodpeckers, blackcapped chickadees, Carolina wren, tufted titmouse, white-throated sparrow, and white-breasted nuthatch. This land also protects the headwaters of the Stony Brook. The purchase raises to 20,903 the total acreage and to 309 the total number of properties permanently preser ved by D & R Greenway since its founding 30 years ago. Partners in the project include Mercer County and the New Jersey Green Acres program. “Creating connections between preserves is a high priority for D&R Greenway. The Maziarz acquisition helps create another wildlife corridor between the region’s biggest preserve, the Sourlands, with one of our earliest preserves, Cedar Ridge, which is used for hiking and birdwatching,” said D&R Greenway CEO Linda Mead. “This land further contributes to the Stony Brook greenway, which is the first greenway project we took on beginning in 1990 with the first property we acquired.”

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020 • 22

S ports

Tiger Women’s Hoops Tops Penn in Ivy Opener As Meyers Showing Signs of Regaining Form

A

bby Meyers isn’t back where she wants to be yet, but just being back at Princeton University and contributing again to the women’s basketball team is significant. “It’s going to be a process,” said Meyers. “I’m not going to be the best I can be tomorrow or the week after. It’s a gradual process.” The process took a big step forward last Saturday when the sophomore guard scored 14 points off the bench — 10 in the fourth quarter — to help the Tigers open Ivy League play with a 75-55 win at Penn. In a season-high 18 minutes, she shot 6-for-10, had four rebounds, two assists, two steals, and no turnovers. “I haven’t reached my best yet,” said Meyers, a 6’0 native of Potomac, Md. “I haven’t reached a good consistent feel when I play. That could be reading the defense, knowing what to do. I’m still getting there. In the Penn game, I had a role, and hopefully it’s going to grow as the coaches trust me more, the players trust me more.” Meyers missed all of last season because of an academic violation, then her return to the court was delayed further after she reinjured a meniscus in her knee that had been partially torn a year ago while working out

in her year away. “It’s been quite the long journey for me,” said Meyers. During her time away from Princeton, Meyers worked in Chicago, trained on her own, sharpened her game, and did some traveling. She kept up with the Tigers, who won the Ivy League tournament, but only to a certain degree. “They had a busy and successful season and you get caught up in that,” said Meyers. “There’s also a certain level of distance that I wanted to keep. I didn’t watch every single game. I didn’t look at all their stats. It’s tough knowing you could be with them, on the team, going to their games, playing in games, going to the NCAA tournament, but you’re not. They updated me on school and social life.” Meyers stayed focused on returning to help the team and finish her degree. It was during a workout when she first partially tore her meniscus. “I kind of overdo things,” said Meyers, who averaged 9.4 points and 3.0 rebounds a game as a freshman in 2017-18. “I go in hyperdrive when I’m not overlooked or taken care of.” She had surgery to repair the meniscus but was travel-

ing after the New Year and couldn’t fully rehabilitate her knee. She hiked around South America through the spring, and in September she returned to Princeton only to tear the same meniscus worse. “I missed start of practices and half the preseason,” said Meyers. “It was hard to get back in shape. It was my time to get back in shape. I hadn’t played in a year. I had to re-find the pace and the muscle memory. It’s coming back slowly. The year off, I kept thinking how this year would go for me and I’d be healthy and ready. It’s another bump in the road. The Penn game, it felt great to be out there.” On top of the physical setback, Meyers had to adjust to new teammates and a new staff as Carla Berube took the helm of the program after Courtney Banghart headed south to coach the University of North Carolina. She was behind in doing both because of the injury. “The only thing you can control is how much work you put in,” said Meyers. “It’s continuing to get reps in practice, continuing to play against amazing players in practice and regaining the confidence I had. I’ve been out a year, and it’s a whole new coaching staff. I have to get their trust. The more I practice, the more they can

Financial Planning Forum

Retirement Plans

Financial Planning Forum

Qualified Retirement Retirement Plans Plans and and Accounts Accounts Qualified

Qualified retirement retirement accounts accounts include include 401(k) 401(k) and and other other employer employer sponsored sponsored retirement retirement Qualified CHANGES TO IRA AND(IRA’s). RETIREMENT PLAN plans and and Individual Retirement Retirement Accounts (IRA’s). Typically, contributions contributions are RULES not subject subject plans Individual Accounts Typically, are not to income income tax tax when when made, made, the the account account grows grows tax tax deferred deferred (without (without tax), tax), and and distributions distributions to in retirement (after age age 59.5)Act are subject to ordinary ordinary income tax. Other qualified retirement The recently enacted Secure makes significant changes to the rules governing IRAretirement accounts in retirement (after 59.5) are subject to income tax. Other qualified accounts include Simplified Employee Pension Plans (SEP); Savings Incentive from Matching and employer sponsored retirement plans.Pension The new law limits “stretch” distributions inherited accounts include Simplified Employee Plans (SEP); Savings Incentive Matching Plans (SIMPLE); andpushes Defined Benefit Pension plans. date for retirement account distributions, Plans (SIMPLE); and Defined Benefit Pension plans. retirement accounts, back the required beginning eliminates the age restriction on IRA contributions, and expands tax credits available for small business Plan SEP SIMPLE 401(k) Defined Benefit Benefit Plan 401(k) Defined retirement plans. SEP In this column, we willSIMPLE focus on the changes to the IRA distribution rules. May Be Be Best Best for: for: Businesses looking looking Businesses seeking seeking Businesses seeking seeking Self-employed and and May Businesses Businesses Businesses Self-employed Inherited IRA’s – New Ten-Year Rule an easy to administer to make make large large plan flexibility, flexibility, salary salary small, closely closely held held to plan an easy to administer small, Previously, inherited IRA’s could befor in installmentsdeferrals over the beneficiary’s expected on lifetime, contributions on deferrals and matching contributions plan that that permits permits businesses looking fordistributed and matching plan businesses looking behalf of of the the owner owneraway contributions salary deferrals deferrals simple plan plan funds to continue thus allowing non-distributed to grow tax free. If the original beneficiary passed behalf contributions salary aa simple before distributing the entire account, the remaining funds could be distributed to a family member continuing theto taxSave deferral. Is It Better Better to Save in aa Qualified Qualified Retirement Retirement Account? Account? Is It in The conventional Secure Act now requiresis most instances anrationale inheritedis be distributed in full within ten The conventional wisdom isthat yes,inbut but the common rationale isIRA often based on on unrealistic unrealistic The wisdom yes, the common often based assumptions. For instance, instance, the ending ending after-tax value in in 401(k) oran IRA is prior usually years of the original account owner’s death. Beneficiaries that inherited IRA to 2020 are still eliassumptions. For the after-tax value aa 401(k) or IRA is usually compared to the the the after-tax value oftheir non-qualified account invested in bonds bonds or cash. proceeds gible to distribute account overof expected lifetime but upon their death any or remaining compared to after-tax value aa non-qualified account invested in cash. However, retirement accounts are often often invested in stocks stocks and long-term long-term stock appreciation appreciation must be distributed within ten years. Of course, inherited IRA funds may be distributed in full immediHowever, retirement accounts are invested in and stock is subject totime lower taxtorates rates thanifbonds bonds or at cash (capital gains versus ordinary income tax is subject lower tax than or cash (capital gains versus income ately or anyto prior ten years needed, which time the funds will beordinary subject to incometax tax. rates). Even so, when comparing qualified retirement account (e.g., 401(k) or IRA) IRA) to aa rates). Even comparing aa qualified retirement account (e.g., aa a401(k) or to The new rulesso, dowhen not apply to spousal IRA beneficiaries. For example, when husband is named non-qualified account account invested invested in in stocks, in in most most cases, cases, the the after-tax after-tax value value of of aa 401(k) 401(k) or or non-qualified beneficiary of his wife’s IRA account stocks, (or vice versa), the account may be transferred to the surviving IRA will will be be higher. higher. IRA spouse’s own IRA and the funds may be distributed under the normal distribution rules (required minimum distributions must begin after age 72 and continue over the spouse’s expected lifetime). If more Reference Guide for for 401(k) 401(k) Plans Plans Reference Guide advantageous, thebe spouse may transfer the funds to an inherited IRA account andRoth begin distributions 401(k) plans can can established to allow allow for pre-tax pre-tax contributions, after-tax contributions, 401(k) plans be established to for contributions, after-tax Roth contributions, before age 59.5 without penalty. safe harbor harbor matching matching contributions, contributions, and and additional additional discretionary discretionary profit profit sharing sharing contributions. contributions. safe Required Date – After Age 72 A financialBeginning advisor and and Third Party Administrator (TPA) can can work work with with the the employer employer to to A financial advisor Third Party Administrator (TPA) Previously, distributions from hadgoals to begin after age 70Well 1/2.designed Under theplans new law, develop plan that best best fitsIRA theaccounts employer’s goals and budget. Well designed plans candistridevelop aa plan that fits the employer’s and budget. can butions are not required from IRA accounts after agecontributions 72, unless oneas age 70 ½ and in 2019 in help owners and key personnel personnel maximizeuntil retirement contributions asturned well as as attract and help owners and key maximize retirement well attract retain talented employees. Employer contributions to the plan and any other costs are which case there are current required distributions. This allows for additional tax deferral and retain talented employees. Employer contributions to the plan and any other costs are a longer deductible business expenses. potential window for full or partial Roth conversions, which may become more important under the new deductible business expenses. ten-year distribution rule. 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see me play. I want to make a difference for this team. It’s continuing to get reps in practice, which will ultimately translate to games.” Playing double-digit minutes in the last nine games after a four-minute test of her knee against Iowa on November 20, Meyers is working her way into being a regular contributor for the Tigers. “She’s a great teammate and wants to play whatever role we need her to play,” said Princeton head coach Berube. “That’s her role right now. Every player’s role is ever-changing based on what they’re able to do every day in practice and in games. We’re looking forward to seeing how she progresses these three weeks we have off and moving forward. She’s a great weapon to have.” Princeton’s win over Penn helped it improve to 13-1 in a battle of one-loss teams. And unlike a year ago, the Tigers don’t have to go into their three-week exam break coming off a painful loss that put them behind Penn. “It’s great to go into the Palestra against a really strong team and win,” said Berube, whose team returns to action when it plays at Dartmouth on January 31. “Penn has had a great nonconference schedule with a lot of great wins. We knew it was going to be a battle. To get that first conference win was big. We had been off for a while. It was one game and now we’re going to be off for a bit, so it was great to play well in a tough environment and against a really talented, well coached team. To walk out of there with a victory was big.” Leading just 33-30 at halftime, Princeton put together an 18-4 run to start the third quarter and break the game open. It was a 12-point lead going into the fourth quarter when Meyers did most of her damage. She scored Princeton’s first five points of the quarter and by the time she exited the game, the Tigers were up 20 points. “Abby is a really talented player,” said Berube. “To have that sort of player to come off our bench with that kind of spark was huge. She played tough against their 2-3 zone, found openings, got into the paint and made some great feeds into our post players and then knocked down some big shots. She had a couple big 3s late third quarter or early fourth quarter that were a huge lift. She was good on both ends. She rebounded the ball well and got some great deflections. It was a great overall performance from her.” The Tigers owned the inside against Penn with its

BACK IN THE GAME: Princeton University women’s basketball player Abby Meyers drives to the basket during her freshman season in 2017-18. Meyers missed all of last season because of an academic violation and her return this season was delayed by a knee injury. Last Saturday, sophomore guard Meyers contributed 14 points off the bench as Princeton defeated Penn 75-55 in the Ivy League opener for both teams. The 25th-ranked Tigers, now 13-1 overall and 1-0 Ivy, are on exam break and return to action when they play at Dartmouth on January 31. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) front line of senior captains offense instead of settling or Bella Alarie and Taylor Baur 3-point jumpers, and going combining for 40 points and harder for rebounds. 24 rebounds. Alarie had 25 “It came together in that points and 11 rebounds and third quarter and kept rolling Baur had a career-high 15 in the fourth,” said Berube. points and equaled her ca“Penn put together some reer-high with 13 rebounds. nice runs but we were able “I thought both Bella to come back and go on our and Taylor had really great own run which I think comes games; defensively on the from an experienced team boards, on the offensive and they know how to settle boards, they were relentless themselves and make plays and they got after it,” said for each other.” Berube. Meyers was thrilled to be a “They played really hard big part of the win and feels defensively. They also got like she’s on an uphill trend. some big buckets for us. Her defense has gotten betTaylor was really tough in- ter and she’s been working side. She did a great job to read the game better and with [Penn’s Leah] Parker. connect on her shots and She was defending her a passes. lot. She’s sort of our garbage “As I start to play better, player, so she had points I’ll get more confident,” said off offensive boards or off Meyers, who is averaging dump off passes from our 6.3 points and 2.8 rebounds guards or from Bella. She a contest in 10 appearancwas tough inside and made es. “I’m able to give my all. a lot of those shots. Bella is Things will come more natuBella. She was able to score ral. I don’t want to overthink in a lot of different ways – in it.” transition, from the 3, putWhile Meyers is gaining backs, post moves, she has confidence daily, she is staysuch a great arsenal and a ing patient with herself and great skill set. They were her progress. Her knee still big. I thought our guards gets sore after long pracfound them well against the tices. She’s not physically Penn 2-3 zone and they were where she wants to be yet, able to finish inside.” but she is coming around Princeton did not make as her performance at Penn big changes at halftime to showed. ignite their run. The surge “She’s a baller; she really came down to playing a little gets after it,” said Berube. tougher on defense, focusing “She gets in the gym, gets on getting the ball inside on shots up, works on her defense. She wants to get better every day. She was Need Help? Call me! coming off an injury at the beginning of the season and missed most all of our preSales Associate season. When she came back in early December, that was 609-933-7886 the first time she was playing jbudwig@glorianilson.com this whole fall. It’s great that she’s now up to speed, and hopefully this Penn game is just a start to a great season for her.” —Justin Feil

JUDITH BUDWIG


Mitch Henderson knows from hard experience that the heated rivalry between t he Pr inceton Universit y men’s basketball team and Penn involves a unique ferocity. “I was a freshman at the Palestra and I got the taunting chant,” said Princeton head coach Henderson, a star guard for the Tigers in the late 1990s. “I like playing Penn, we like playing Penn. They bring out the best in us and that is what rivals should be. I think that is the best thing about sports.” L ast Fr iday evening as Princeton hosted Penn at Jadwin Gym just six days after beating the Quakers 7864 in the Ivy League opener for both teams, it was the visitors who brought it in the early going, jumping out to a 10-2 lead. “They started [Jarrod] Simmons, they made some adjustments to what they were doing which was problematic for us,” said Henderson. “They moved [A.J.] Brodeur away which keeps Richmond [Aririguzoh] away from the basket.” The Tigers, though, didn’t let Penn run away with the contest. “Ryan [Schwieger] made a three to make it 10-5 which is a lot better than 102; that allowed us to catch our breath,” said Henderson. “They punched us in the face bad and then it was 1010 and at first media timeout. We were holding on for the first few minutes of the game

but we wrested control back of the game.” While Princeton stretched its lead to 56-41 with 8:53 remaining in the second half, it nearly lost that control when the Quakers narrowed the gap to 61-58 before Jose Morales hit a twisting lay-up with 10 seconds left as the Tigers pulled out a 63-58 win in front of a Jadwin throng of 3,040. “There were a couple of huge plays where they had some steals to get it down to three,” said Henderson, whose team posted its fifth win in six games and moved to 6-8 overall and 2-0 Ivy League. “We turned the ball over but credit to them. I thought Jose’s and-one drive was the play that stood out obviously.” A relieved Henderson was happy to go into the school’s exam hiatus with a sweep of archrival Penn. “That is a really long two weeks, I am thrilled with being 2-0 against a really good team,” said Henderson, whose squad returns to action when it hosts Division III foe Rutgers-Camden on January 26 and then resumes Ivy play with home games against Dartmouth and Harvard on January 31 and February 1. “That was an incredible game, it had a little bit of everything from a fan’s perspective. They are very difficult to guard.” Junior guard Schwieger sensed t hat t he rematch would be difficult for the Tigers.

“It was tough, we knew it wasn’t going to be like the first game,” said Schwieger, who tallied 16 points and had four assists in the win, later getting named as the Ivy Player of the Week. “We knew it was going to be a closer one. They went ahead early and we just responded well.” When Penn responded with its late rally, Princeton maintained its cool in closing out the game. “We just didn’t get discouraged; I think we got discouraged early in the year when we would go down,” said Schwieger. “In the last game, they made a couple of runs and we fought back. In this game they were up and we didn’t get discouraged. We just kept going and eventually it went our way.” Utilizing a balanced attack with Jaelin Llewellyn scoring 14 points, Drew Friberg adding nine, Aririguzoh getting eight to go with 16 rebounds, and Ethan Wright and Tosan Evboumwan tallying six apiece, the Tigers kept the Penn defense on its heels. “We look to go inside to Rich but we were going inside and they were doubling him,” said Schwieger. “So we got it out; we were moving the ball and we made some shots.” With Princeton going on exam break, Schwieger believes the focus on academics won’t blunt the team’s momentum. “It is kind of weird in the middle of the season, having

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a two-week break with no games,” said Schwieger. “We have to take care of things up campus with finals and papers and still be getting in the gym and working on that stuff.” Henderson, for his part, is confident his players will take care of their business. “That is who we are, that is what goes on here,” said Henderson. “We are going to get together and watch the game and talk about the plan for the next few weeks. The guys have got to study. It is a huge week, we have engineers and premed guys. They have got a lot of work to do.” Looking ahead, Henderson believes the Tigers are going in the right direction. “We are guarding, we are taking a little bit better shots,” said Henderson. “Ryan is a very difficult matchup, Tosan is a very difficult matchup. We are very difficult to guard and if we can guard, we can be special. What I know about the 31st is that it is a whole new season for us. We have to get back into it at that point. We have a long time to think about it. We haven’t been very good here so far this season but we are getting there.” In Schwieger’s view, the Pr inceton players simply need to pick up where they left off in the battles against Penn to be good down the stretch. “I think it is the same stuff that got us these first two wins - prepare well in practice, come in everyday locked in, and try to get better everyday,” said Schwieger. —Bill Alden

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020

Holding Off Furious Comeback by Penn, PU Men’s Hoops Edges Quakers, Now 2-0 Ivy

FLYING HIGH: Princeton University men’s basketball player Jaelin Llewellyn flies to the hoop in a game earlier this season. Last Friday evening at Jadwin Gym, sophomore guard Llewellyn contributed 14 points and four rebounds to help Princeton defeat Penn 63-58 and complete a season sweep of the Quakers. The Tigers, now 6-8 overall and 2-0 Ivy League, are on exam break and will resume action when they host Division III foe Rutgers-Camden on January 26. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020 • 24

PU Sports Roundup PU Women’s Hockey Ties Harvard 3-3

Carly Bullock starred as the Princeton Universit y women’s hockey team skated to a 3-3 tie at Harvard last Saturday afternoon. Senior forward Bullock tallied a goal and two assists as the Tigers moved to 14-4-1 overall and 9-3-1 ECAC Hockey. She was later named the ECAC Hockey Player of the Week. Princeton is currently on exam break and will return to action when it plays at Quinnipiac on January 28.

Tiger Swimmers Defeat Villanova

Producing a dom inant performance, the Princeton University men’s and women’s swimming teams posted wins over Villanova last

Friday at DeNunzio Pool. The Tiger men prevailed 226-74 as they improved to 6-1 while the Princeton women won 232-68 in moving to 4-1. Overall, Tiger swimmers won 30 of the 32 events contested in the meets. The Princeton men’s squad is next in action on January 31 when it hosts Yale while the women return to competition by hosting Columbia on January 25.

at No. 9. The Tigers, who moved to 6-1 overall and 1-1 Ivy League, with the defeat, are on exam break and return to action with a match at Penn on January 29.

Princeton Men’s Squash Defeated by Harvard

The Tigers also got wins from sophomore Patrick Glory at 125 and junior Patrick Brucki at 197. Princeton, now 2-4, starts Ivy League competition with a match at Harvard on January 31.

PU Men’s Volleyball

Running into a buzzsaw, Sweeps Charleston Jerod Nelsen had a big the fourth-ranked Princeton University men’s squash team fell 9-0 at No. 1 Harvard last Sunday. The Tigers, now 6-1 overPU Women’s Squash all and 1-1 Ivy League, are on exam break and return to Edged by Harvard Coming up just short in action with a match at Penn a battle of top squads, the on January 29. third-ranked Princeton Uni- Princeton Wrestling versity women’s squash team Falls at N.C. State fell 5-4 at No. 1 Harvard last Grant Cuomo provided Sunday. a highlight as the No. 12 The tight contest came Princeton University wresdown to the final game of tling team fell 29-12 at No. the last match on court, and 6 N.C. State last Saturday. only three points decided Sophomore Cuomo picked the outcome. Princeton got up his first victory over an wins from Andrea Toth at Intermat-ranked opponent No. 5, Grace Doyle at No. as he edged No. 10 Thomas 7, Morgan Steelman at No. Bullard 7-6 at 165 pounds. 8, and India Stephenson

weekend as the Princeton Universit y men’s volleyball team started Eastern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association (EIVA) play by sweeping a two-game set at the University of Charleston. Sophomore Nelsen contributed 11 kills as Princeton posted a 3-0 win on Friday (25-21, 25-19, 25-22) and

then contributed seven kills a day later as Princeton completed the sweep with another 3-0 triumph (25-22, 25-19, 25-22). The Tigers, now 2-3 overall and 2-0 EIVA, are currently on exam break and return to action when they head west to play at UC-San Diego on January 28.

BUZZER BEATER: Princeton University men’s hockey player Corey Andonovski controls heads up ice in a game earlier this season. Last Saturday, sophomore forward Andonovski assisted on a Luke Keenan tally in the last second of overtime, which gave Princeton a 1-0 win at St. Lawrence. The Tigers, now 3-12-4 overall and 1-8-3 ECAC Hockey, are currently on a hiatus for exams and are next in action when they host Colgate on January 31. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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For Jess Monzo, coaching wrestling is a labor of love. “There is always something that drives you and you want to give back and you want to do exactly what your coaches did for you,” said Monzo, who wrestled for Clifton High and Montclair State before getting into high school coach ing with stints at Jefferson Township, David Brearley, Matawan, Freehold, and East Brunswick. “You want to do that and more for the next crop of kids. Wrestling is in my blood, it is going to be in my blood until I can’t do it any more.” This winter, Monzo, 39, has brought his passion for the sport to Princeton High

where he has taken the helm of the wrestling program, succeeding longtime coach Rashone Johnson, now an assistant principal at the school. “When I spoke with the kids, I instilled the message that we are going to start with a good foundation ; we are going to try to grow numbers and do things in progression,” said Monzo. “T here are some k ids in my program right now that are very good and may have aspirations after high school. Chloe [Ayres] has won a state title and other kids have done very well in the region tournament. Their aspirations are to make it to the states and place down there. I have

kids like that and kids who never wrestled before and came out this year. My big thing was that we are going to build the basics.” Monzo got his star t in wrestling as a freshmen at Clifton High when he was encouraged to take up the sport by legendary coach John Monaco, a two-time New Jersey state champion wrestler. “He came down and talked to the football team my freshman year and took one look at me and asked me why I was playing football,” recalled Monzo. “I weighed like 90 pounds; he told me I should be wrestling the lowest weight class which was 100 pounds at the time.”

TAKING HOLD: Princeton High wrestler Chloe Ayres, top, controls a foe in a match last year. Junior Ayres, who placed first at 105 pounds last winter in the first-ever NJSIAA girls’ championships, has emerged as a leader on the mat for the Tigers under new head coach Jess Monzo. PHS, which started 1-8 in dual match competition, has meets at Nottingham on January 15 and at Ewing on January 17 before hosting a quad meet on January 18. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Following Monaco’s advice, Monzo went out for wrestling and never looked back. “It was something where size didn’t matter any more after playing football against kids that were 150, 200 pounds and weighing 90 pounds,” said Monzo. “It was something I fell in love with and never stopped. I always looked to progress and to continue.” The deep bond with Monaco helped steer Monzo into coaching. “I had a great relationship with John and I still do to this day,” said Monzo, a three-time conference medalist at Montclair State who injured his neck in the league final as a senior and was unable to keep competing. “It is learning the life lessons and the morals and values that he taught us and knowing that my career ended a couple of weeks short.” As Monzo builds a relationship with his PHS wrestlers, his holistic approach is resonating. “They have embraced it, they are loving it,” said Monzo. “They are learning this culture that I want to set, the standard that I want to set. They have accepted it with open arms and it has been great.” In developing that culture, Monzo has faced a logistical challenge as the program doesn’t have its own wrestling room and is sharing the gym with the PHS varsity basketball teams to conduct practice. “We work with each other, everyone is held accountable and ever yone does what they need to do to be successful,” said Monzo, who

has relied on such veterans as junior Ayres, sophomore Aaron Munford, junior Chris Sockler, senior Dominick Riendeau-Krause, and junior James Romaine to set a positive tone. “It is a big give and take but these kids come in everyday with that understanding and the expectation that they need to get better. They come in and roll the mats out everyday, they roll the mats up and put them away. Some people would say it shouldn’t be like this but they just accept it and are understanding of it.” Defending state champion Ayres has helped her teammates get better. “Chloe is fabulous; in school, she is not a very vocal person but in the wrestling room, she is as vocal as anyone else,” said Monzo. “She will let you know when you are not pulling your weight. She is great to have because she doesn’t care who you are; if you are not pulling your weight, she is yelling at you.” Sophomore Munford has been pulling his weight, emerging as a star at 138 pounds. “Aaron has made some outstanding jumps; he was a JV wrestler last year and was sitting behind Alec Bobchin, a region champion and state place-winner.” said Monzo, noting that Munford did get some varsity experience last winter, posting an 11-0 record.

“He is a guy that has made tremendous improvements; he went to different camps across the country last year. He put a lot of work in, he is one of the first people in the room, he is one of the last people to leave. He is in the weight room whenever he can. He is really trying to etch his name into Princeton’s rich history. He knows he has three varsity years to get it done. He is putting the work in and it is showing.” With the Mercer County Tournament slated for February 1, Monzo believes his wrestlers can make some history at the competition. “Some of the guys have wrestled well against Mercer County teams, whether they win or lose, they wrestled full six minute matches and have done very well,” said Monzo, whose team is 1-8 in dual meet competition and has meets at Nottingham on January 15 and at Ewing on January 17 before hosting a quad meet on January 18. “You put five or six placewinners up there and your team can do well. We have some guys who can perform at a very high level. I am interested to see how seeding shakes out and how the wrestling goes. At the end of the day, we are wrestling the persons on the mat, we are not wrestling the name. We are wrestling a body, so we will see what happens.” —Bill Alden

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25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020

Taking the Helm of PHS Wrestling Program, Monzo Emphasizing Basics, Systematic Progress


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020 • 26

Lifted by Samuels’ Play at Point Guard, PDS Boys’ Basketball Defeats PHS 57-43 In his first two seasons with the Princeton Day School boys’ basketball team, Dameon Samuels took a backseat as David “Diggy” Coit ran the team’s offense. But with Coit having graduated, junior point guard Samuels is now triggering the PDS attack. “I learned a lot from Diggy, handling the ball and knowing when to get to the basket and knowing when to pass the ball,” said Samuels. “Now as a junior, it is my turn to run the offense. I have to keep up my scrappiness like I have always been.” Last Monday, Samuels deftly handled the ball all game

long and added 13 points to help PDS defeat Princeton High 57-43, a particularly sweet win since the Panthers lost twice last season to their crosstown rivals. “It is a pride thing; every time we play them it is a rivalry game,” said Samuels, reflecting on the matchup. “We just want to beat them every single time. We had to get this one.” The PDS defense changed the tone of the contest as the Panthers outscored PHS 12-7 in the second quarter to take a 27-21 halftime lead and seize momentum. “Our coach [Doug Davis] keeps telling us, punch them

ON POINT: Princeton Day School boys’ basketball player Dameon Samuels drives to the basket against Princeton High last Monday. Junior guard Samuels scored 13 points to help PDS pull away to a 57-43 win over PHS. The Panthers, now 7-4, hosts Hopewell Valley on January 16 before playing at Doane Academy on January 18. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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in the face and keep punching,” said Samuels. “We didn’t do that at first and we had to come back out and hit them in the face and keep going.” In the fourth quarter, PHS landed some punches as it narrowed the gap to 50-43 with 1:46 remaining but PDS thwarted the Tigers from there. “We practice situational stuff all the time; it was coming down to our guards settling things down,” said Samuels. “If we needed to push, we pushed. If we don’t need to, we just slow it down.” Draining five free throws in the waning minutes of the contest, Samuels helped settle the Panthers. “If we miss a free throw in practice, we run,” said Samuels. “It is common for us to just make free throws at the end of the game.” While Samuels has excelled defensively since the start of his PDS career, he has worked hard to improve his offensive game. “All I was doing in the summer time was working out with my AAU team, getting better and better,” said Samuels. “I can showcase it now.” PDS head coach Davis believes Samuels is getting better and better. “The way he runs the offense and the way he attacks has been great for us,” said Davis of Samuels. “He was able to knock down some free throws at the end to help us out a bit. Just watching film from from his sophomore year to this year, he is doing well.” Beating PHS was a great win for PDS. “That is a really good team; they just play, they run all of their sets the right way,” said Davis. “He [Pat Noone] coaches them up, you can tell. It just comes down to our guys sticking to what we do. If we stick to what we do and not deviate from the plan, we will be OK.” Davis liked the defensive effort he got from his guys as they limited PHS to 13 points combined in the second and third quarters. “When you light that fire in our guys, we are a pretty good defensive team,” said Davis. The one-two punch of senior Jaylin Champion-Adams and junior transfer Ethan Garita also helps makes the Panthers pretty good. “They have been doing that all year,” said Davis, who got 19 points from Champion-Adams with the 6’7 Garita contributing 13 as he employed some nice moves in the post. “Jaylin is just an athlete. He is able to slash and hit the occasional three. Ethan is taking advantage of his size.” With PDS hosting Hopewell Valley on January 16 before playing at Doane Academy on January 18, Davis will be looking for his players to utilize intensity and athleticism. “We just have to make sure that we are playing hard all of the time,” said Davis. “If we do those things and play smart, we will be good.” Samuels, for his part, sees good things ahead for the Panthers. “Last year we lost to teams we should not have lost to so now we are trying to pick it up,” said Samuels. “Coach keeps saying it is a culture change in a year for us. We are a better team. We are more together, more cohesive.” —Bill Alden

Junior Star Trainor Following Family Tradition As PHS Boys’ Hockey Produces 10-0-1 Start Colm Trainor is savoring his last chance to play with one of his brothers on the Princeton High boys’ hockey team. The junior forward is the fourth Trainor to play for the program, having been preceded by older siblings Anthony ’17, Robby ’19, and current senior Aidan. “I have always played with some sort of sibling, first Robby and now Aidan,” said Trainor. “Next year is going to be interesting, I am the last one.” Last Wednesday against Nottingham, the Trainor connection resulted in a second period goal as PHS prevailed 5-0. “Whenever Aidan is on the ice, we have the same playing style and we know where each other are going to be,” said Trainor. “That came off on the second goal. Aidan shot the puck, it went off the pad and I was there. He knew I was going to be there and that is why he shot off the pad.” With PHS having rallied to a 3-2 win over Robbinsville on January 7, it didn’t produce its sharpest effort in the victory over Nottingham. “You are supposed to come to the game in the right mindset,” said Trainor, who ended up with two goals and an assist against the Northstars. “I think we did that today. We should have pulled through a little more but we did well.” Trainor is assuming a greater responsibility this winter in helping PHS pull together. “I am an upperclassman now, I have to be more of a

leader on the team,” said Trainor. “Especially with Aidan being here, he gets on me sometimes. I think we are still trying to find ourselves. We are kind of playing down to some of the teams that we play but we are doing good things. We are working hard, everybody is getting in and everybody is working.” PHS head coach Joe Bensky acknowledged that his squad didn’t play its best against Nottingham. “We were looking to keep things going and continue our success at the start of the season,” said Bensky, who is in his first winter guiding the Tigers. “It was another big win on Monday against Robbinsville. We are trying to take one game at a time and Nottingham was today. We came out flat today but the bottom line is that we want to win and we were able to play a lot of our players today and we won 5-0.” Bensky sees Trainor as a key to success for PHS. “Colm is one of our main guys for sure; he is a very, very talented player,” said Bensky of Trainor who contributed two assists as PHS defeated Jackson Memorial 5-3 last Monday evening to improve to 10-0-1.“He is very, very skilled with the puck. He knows what to do with the puck and he gets the puck to the net a lot.” Having both Trainor brothers on the ice is a luxury for Bensky. “Everyone wants one Trainor, let alone two, so it is nice to have both of them,” said Bensky. “I am sure they have played

a lot growing up, they definitely can find each other on the ice. They look very good together.” Sophomore John O’Donnell and freshman Nico Vitaro are showing growth for the Tigers. “John has been playing very, very well for us; he is someone that just works extremely hard,” added Bensky, who got a goal from O’Donnell in the win over Nottingham with Vitaro chipping in an assist. “He is an awesome young man, he is always looking to get better. Nico had some really good scoring opportunities. He has been very impressive this year, he has been getting better each and every game.” While PHS is off to an impressive start, Bensky knows there is room for improvement. “It is funny to say with this record but we want to get better each and every day,” said Bensky, whose team faces Lakeland Regional on January 17 at the Ice Vault in Wayne and then plays Hunterdon Central on January 21 at the Flemington Ice Arena. “That is our main focus so we can really make this season extremely special.” Trainor, for his part, believes that PHS is poised for a special playoff run. “The states and counties are definitely something we have to get ready for,” said Trainor, who helped the Tigers advance to the MCT final and Public B state quarters last winter. “Playing these good teams is something that is going to get us ready and help us. We are hoping to go further than we have in the past. We have stayed in the same spot but this year I think we can do it.” —Bill Alden

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OH BROTHER: Princeton High boys’ hockey player Colm Trainor, right, goes after the puck last Monday as PHS defeated Jackson Memorial 5-3. Junior forward Trainor, the youngest of four Trainor brothers to play for the PHS program, had two assists in the win as the Tigers improved to 10-0-1. PHS faces Lakeland Regional on January 17 at the Ice Vault in Wayne and then plays Hunterdon Central on January 21 at the Flemington Ice Arena. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) Fast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In

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Trailing powerful Delbarton 1- 0 heading into the third period last Thursday, the Princeton Day School boys’ hockey team was due for some breaks to go its way. “We needed to find a way to score and get a lucky bounce,” said PDS head coach Scott Bertoli, whose team had gone 0-5-1 in its last six games coming into Thursday with each of those games having been against boarding schools “In seven straight games we have given up a goal on a shot where Timmy [Miller] is screened or it gets redirected. One of these days we have to score a goal like that for ourselves and put bodies in front of the net.” After squandering a power play opportunity early in the third, PDS rebounded to get a goal from freshman Oliver Hall on an assist by sophomore Michael Sullo to tie the game at 1-1 with 3:17 left in regulation. “We started to generate some offensive chances down low; they are a younger group this year and are just not as structured in terms of their team game as they have been in the past,” said Bertoli. “That line of Sullo, [Chris] Babecki, and Hall has done a lot of our 5-on-5 scoring.

They just cycled the puck and made a play from behind the net to the front of the net. Oliver banged it in so we went from pressing, pressing to sitting back.” Building on the momentum from that goal, PDS pulled out a dramatic 2-1 victory as Sullo notched the game winner with three seconds left in the third. “For the last shift of the game I just felt like if we had an opportunity to win the game it is probably going to come from Sullo so we put him out there with Drew [McConaughy] and Gibby [Gibson Linnehan],” said Bertoli. “It was kind of a mistake on their end with a 10 seconds left, their kid probably should have dumped the puck but he was thinking let’s try and make one play. David [Sherman] stepped up at the blue line and turned the puck over and flipped it to Sullo who was just flying down the offside wing. He went on a oneon-one and used the goalie as a screen and just ripped it high glove side.” The PDS goalie, sophomore Miller, came up big for the Panthers, making 24 saves. “Timmy played solid and made some good saves,” said Bertoli. “The shots were

pretty equal and he made the saves he needed to make. He was really good, that is what we need from him if we are going to have any success against good teams.” Hav ing success against Delbarton was a big lift for PDS. “Outside of league play as far as recruiting and our presence in New Jersey, it is probably the biggest game on our schedule,” said Bertoli. “I have the utmost respect for Delbarton and their program. They have won state championships in nine of my 12 years coaching at PDS. For me it is a huge game, regardless of whether they are a young team or not. They are a gold standard of high school hockey in New Jersey so it was a big win.” In Bertoli’s view, his youthful group is gaining maturity. “Our young kids are starting to make some strides, we are seeing some improvement,” said Bertoli, whose team fell 1-0 to the Portledge School (N.Y.) last Monday to move to 4-7-1 and hosts Don Bosco on January 15. “They are playing more minutes and playing more meaningful minutes. They are starting to contribute so that is exciting. We do have a young group and we can’t rely on the same six or eight kids all of the time. It is good.” —Bill Alden

Splitting Her Time Between the Stage, Ice, Haggerty Starring for PDS Girls’ Hockey Charlotte Haggerty has been giving new meaning this winter to the famous S ha ke sp e are line f rom Hamlet, which proclaims “the play’s the thing.” The Princeton Day School senior is excelling again on the stage in a school production and has made time to play for the Panther girls’ hockey team. “I am in the musical so when I have rehearsals that always has to take priority over practice,” said Haggerty. “It is really tough balancing that. Yesterday I had rehearsal and then right after that I ran up to make hockey practice.” In order to be sharp for t he PDS hockey team, Haggerty doesn’t waste a moment on or off the ice. “When I am here, I make the most of it,” said Haggerty. “I do a lot of off ice training, working on speed and stuff, just the details that nobody really sees.” Last Saturday morning against v isit ing Holton Arms ( Md.), Hagger ty made the most of her time on the ice, tallying a goal as PDS pulled out a 2-1 win. With the contest knotted at 1-1 entering the third period, Haggerty and her team mates made a big push for the win, culminating with a goal by Ally Antonacci with 23.2 seconds left in regulation. “The game was tied but we were really having possession of the puck most of the game,” said Haggerty. “We just wanted to come out really strong. It was like something needs to change, somebody needs to make a difference, who is it going to be. Towards the end of the period, we started having a sense of urgency. We were so tired but we had to keep pushing.” Haggerty got the scoring started with a goal midway through the first period. “It was a scrum in the net

and it was whose stick is going to be stronger, who is going to get up there and make the play and be better than the girl on the other team,” said Haggerty. “I was just in there battling hard and I hit it in.” Being on the ice with twin sister and star defenseman Caroline was a key factor underlying Haggerty’s decision to make time for hockey this winter. “It is a lot of fun, we work well together, it means a lot,” said Haggerty, who had a goal and an assist as PDS defeated Holton Arms 5-1 on Sunday to earn a weekend sweep. “I genuinely love this team, I love hockey and that is why I push myself. I just emphasize that every second you are on the ice you have to be working hard. I have to make the most out of that because I can’t be here all of the time.” PDS head coach John Ritchie cites the hardworking Haggerty with setting the tone for the squad when she is on the ice. “T hat s t uf f is cont a gious,” said Ritchie. “If you have one or two players that can really push not only the pace but the energy level on the bench, that makes a big difference.” Richie liked the way his players pushed things in the offensive zone against Holton Arms. “I thought today was our most complete offensive game,” said Ritchie, noting that the Panthers generated 50 shots. “I still think we have some work to do defensively; we had a couple of breakdowns that Abby [Ashman ] bailed us out on.” Seeing PDS pull out the win in the waning seconds of the contest was heartening for Ritchie. “It was the urgency factor, we talked that Rye Country Day (N.Y.) is prob-

ably the clear No. 1 in our division but as we position ourselves to get towards playoffs, we want to make sure that we get as high of a seed as possible,” said Ritchie. “We beat Princeton the other day (4-0 on January 8) which was a good win for us and had an opportunity to play some of the other girls too so this was a big weekend.” Ritchie credited freshman L auren Chase and sophomore Elizabeth Thomas with producing good efforts against Holton Arms. “I thought Lauren had a really good game, as a freshman she is getting more comfortable,” said Ritchie. “She is aggressive, she can move the puck, she can rush the puck. She has a good shot from the point. We had Lizzie on the first goal with her stick in the right spot and getting an assist there.” With PDS improving to 6-3 due to the sweep of Holton Arms, Ritchie believes his squad is heading in the right direction. “Those little plays where everybody can contribute, that makes a big difference mov ing for ward,” added Ritchie, whose team hosts Morristown Beard on January 16, plays at Upland Country Day (Pa.) on January 17 and at Pingry on January 21. “The more girls we can have contribute the better, instead of relying on one, two or three. As those younger girls get more comfortable and they start contributing, that leads to why we had a good offensive day.” Haggerty is primed to enjoy a very good finish to the final act of her hockey career. “We have some tough games coming up,” said Haggerty. “We are looking to build off this weekend and stay strong going into playoffs.” —Bill Alden

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020

With Young Players Showing Progress, PDS Boys’ Hockey Edges Delbarton 2-1

STANDING TALL: Princeton Day School boys’ hockey goalie Tim Miller guards the crease in a game earlier this season. Last Thursday, sophomore goalie Miller made 24 saves to help PDS edge Delbarton 2-1. PDS, which fell 1-0 to the Portledge School (N.Y.) last Monday to move 4-7-1, hosts Don Bosco on January 15. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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FINAL ACT: Princeton Day School girls’ hockey player Charlotte Haggerty, left, goes after the puck in a recent game. Senior Haggerty starred as PDS swept Holton Arms (Md.) last weekend, scoring a goal as the Panthers won 2-1 on Saturday and then adding a goal and an assist in a 5-1 victory on Sunday. PDS, now 6-3, hosts Morristown Beard on January 16, plays at Upland Country Day (Pa.) on January 17 and at Pingry on January 21. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020 • 28

Sparked by Martin’s Vocal Leadership, Stuart Hoops Gets on Winning Track Catherine Martin earned a battlefield promotion earlier this season for the Stuart Country Day School basketball team. “My coaches named me captain, I love supporting my team,” said junior guard/ forward Martin. “This year, I am a leader on the team, I want to help out my teammates as much as I can. It is nice to have the chance to step up.” Martin stepped up last week, scoring 16 points to help Stuart cruise to a 70-24 win over Pennington, snapping a losing streak in the rivalry. “We knew we were going to win, we knew we had to win,” said Martin, reflecting on the January 7 contest. “It has been so many years and it was time. We came in here, no remorse, no fear that we were going up against them.” Starting the game with a 22-0 run, the Tartans displayed a remorseless defensive approach. “We wanted to shut them out, that was the goal the whole game,” said Martin. “You aim for that mindset.” At the offensive end, the Tar tans achieved a nice

balance with Ariel Jenkins tallying 13 points, Lauren Klein adding 12 and Laila Fair contributing 10. “We were playing together today, we were moving the ball with pace,” said Martin. “We played inside and out; we wanted everyone to have the ball. We wanted to move it from side to side so something would open up for our post and get an inside shot.” While Martin isn’t usually the team’s top scorer, she got into a groove against Pennington. “My shot was very sharp,” said Martin. “You just have to keep shooting, that is what I have learned.” Winning the Roselle Catholic Holiday Tournament to wrap up December on the heels of going 1-4 at the Nike Tournament of Champions in Phoenix, Ariz., the Tartans were feeling sharp coming into 2020. “It helped us get a winning mindset,” said Martin of winning the competition in Roselle. “Arizona was kind of tough but it was great exposure to the best. We need to see the best in order to become the best. We are going to aim to become better because we

want to win MCTs this year; that is the goal.” Stuart head coach Justin Leith saw the performance against Pennington as a baby step forward. “It was good, it was decent, but it is not where we want to be,” said Leith. “I am not worried about wins or losses. With these top teams that we are playing, even though we have lost, we have shown we can play at an elite level.” In any event, it was good for Stuart to snap the losing streak against the rival Red Raiders. “We knew they weren’t what they have been but it is the first time since we have been here that we beat them,” said Leith. “We have been trying to put a blank face and a blank jersey on every team and work at our highest level so that when we play some of these stronger teams, we are ready for them.” Leith credited Martin with being a strong voice on the court for the Tartans. “Catherine was made a captain after a couple of games in the season because of what she does defensively and how much she talks,”

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said Leith. “She is the motor behind our team.” Getting the title at the Roselle tourney was a boost for Stuart. “It always feels good to w in, especially against Roselle Catholic (6726 in the final on December 30), we won the right way,” s aid L eit h, whos e team topped Hopewell Valley 6321 last Saturday to improve to 9-6 and faces Northfield Mount Hermon (Mass.) on January 18 in the Elite Prep Nationals Yes to Success and then plays at Princeton Day School on January 21. “It didn’t matter who we were play ing, we would still have been in the game against anybody. We played hard from start to finish and that second five came in and raised the level.” Martin, for her part, acknowledges that the Tartans need to raise the level of their game with postseason play looming. “Heading into the homestretch, we need to work on pace and moving the ball faster,” said Martin. “We want to improve our offense. Our defense is pretty good and we usually focus on defense. This year, coach wants to focus on offense To: ___________________________ because we want to work _________________________ Date & Time: __________________ onFrom: our weaknesses; that is the only way to get better.” Here is a proof of your ad, scheduled to run ___________________. —Bill Alden

Please check it thoroughly and pay special attention to the following: IN CHARGE: Stuart Country Day School basketball player Cath(Your check mark will tell erine us it’s okay) Martin dribbles the ball in recent action. Junior guard/

� Phone number Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

forward Martin has emerged as a leader for the Tartans, get-

�ting Faxnamed number Address Expiration Date as a team � captain earlier this � season. Last week Martin tallied 16 points to help Stuart defeat Pennington 7024. The Tartans, who topped Hopewell Valley 63-21 last Saturday to improve to 9-6, face Northfield Mount Hermon (Mass.) on January 18 in the Elite Prep Nationals Yes to Success and then play at Princeton Day School on January 21.

Taking care of Princeton’s trees 2nd & 3rd Generations

MFG., CO.

Local family owned business for over 40 years

609-452-2630

Mercer County Curbside Recycling Information All recyclables must be in official buckets and at the curb by 7:00 a.m. • NO ITEMS IN PLASTIC BAGS WILL BE COLLECTED

2020 MERCER COUNTY Curbside Recycling Schedule MONDAY Lawrence

Jan. 13, 27 Feb. 10, 24 March 9, 23 April 6, 20 May 4, 18 June 1,15,29

July 13,27 Aug.10,24 Sept.12,21 Oct.5,19 Nov. 2,16,30 Dec.14,28

WEDNESDAY

Entire City of Trenton Jan. 8, 22 Feb. 5, 19 March 4,18 April 1, 15, 29 May 13,27 June 10,24

July 8,22 Aug. 5,19 Sept. 2,16,30 Oct. 14,28 Nov 11,25 Dec. 9,23

FRIDAY

Hamilton Zone 3

Jan. 3, 17, 31 Feb. 14, 28 March 13, 27 April 10, 24 May 8,22 June 5,19

July 3,17,31

Aug.14,28 Sept. 11,25 Oct. 9,23 Nov. 6,20 Dec. 4,18

Princeton

Jan. 6, 20 Feb. 3, 17 Mar. 2, 16,30 April 13, 27 May 11,30 June 8,22

TUESDAY Ewing July 6,20 Aug. 3,16,31 Sept. 14,28 Oct. 12,26 Nov. 9,23 Dec. 7,21

Hamilton Zones 1 and 4

Jan. 4, 15, 29 Feb. 12, 26 March 11, 25 April 8, 22 May 6,20 June 3,17

July 1,15,29 Aug. 12,26 Sept. 9,23 Oct. 7,21 Nov. 4,18 Dec. 2,16,30

HOLIDAY COLLECTIONS

If collection day falls on a holiday (Christmas, New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day and Thanksgiving) collection will be the following SATURDAY.

Jan. 14, 28 July 14,28 Feb. 11, 25 Aug. 11,25 March 10, 24 Sept. 8,22 April 7, 21 Oct. 6,20 May 5,19 Nov. 3,17 June 2,16,30 Dec. 1,15,29

THURSDAY

Hamilton Zone 2 Jan. 2, 16, 30 Feb. 13, 27 March 12, 26 April 9,23 May 7,21 June 4,18

July 2,16,30 Aug. 13,27 Sept. 10,24 Oct. 8,22 Nov. 5,19 Dec. 3,17,31

Hopewell Township Hopewell Boro and Pennington

Jan. 7, 21 Feb. 4, 18 March 3, 17, 31 April 14, 28 May 12,26 June 9,23

July 7,21 Aug. 4,18 Sept. 1,15,29 Oct. 13,27 Nov. 10,24 Dec. 8,22

West Windsor

July 9, 23 Jan. 9, 23 Aug. 6,20 Feb. 6, 20 Sept. 3,17 March 5, 19 April 2, 16, 30 Oct. 1,15,29 May 14,28 Nov. 12,28 June 11,25 Dec. 10,24

SPECIAL RECYCLING EVENTS Household Hazardous Waste Collection and Electronics Recycling Events Dempster Fire School (350 Lawrence Station Road) March 28, June 6 and September 19 / 8am - 2pm

OPEN TO ALL MERCER COUNTY RESIDENTS!

Document Shredding Events Lot 4/651 South Broad Street (across from Mercer County Administration Bldg.), April 25 and October 17 / 9am - 12pm

NEW! Get the FREE ‘Recycle Coach’ APP!

NEVER MISS ANOTHER COLLECTION DAY!

Scan the code for instant access to all your recycling needs! MUNICIPAL RECYCLING AND PUBLIC WORKS: Ewing / 882-3382 Hamilton / 890-3560 Hopewell Boro / 466-0168 Hopewell Twp / 537-0250 Lawrence Twp / 587-1894

Pennington Boro / 737-9440 Princeton / 688-2566 Trenton / 989-3151 West Windsor / 799-8370

East Windsor, Hightstown, Robbinsville: Call your Recycling / Public Works Office for your recycling schedule

Scan here or download from your favorite App Store

Mercer County Participates in MERCER COUNTY

RECYCLES

SINGLE STREAM RECYCLING; ALL Recyclables EITHER Bucket! No more separation anxiety!

Mercer County Improvement Authority / 609-278-8086 / www.mcianj.org

(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co.

Custom Fitted Storm Doors

741 Alexander Rd, Princeton • 924-2880 Fast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In

Hunan ~ Szechuan Malaysian ~ Vietnamese Daily Specials • Catering Available 157 Witherspoon St. • Princeton • Parking in Rear • 609-921-6950

American Furniture Exchange

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Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

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Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area


Pennington

Lawrenceville

B oys’ Basketba l l : Daniel Vessey star red in a losing cause as Hun fell 60-49 to the Mercersburg Ac ad e m y ( Pa. ) las t S aturday. Sophomore guard Vess ey tallied 19 points as the Raiders dropped to 4 -9. Hu n plays Te a ne ck High on January 18. B o y s’ H o c ke y : E d d ie Evaldi picked up five as sists but it wasn’t enough as Hun fell 7- 6 to Seton Hall Prep last Friday. The Raiders, who dropped to 4-6-1 with the defeat, play at the Hill School ( Pa.) on Januar y 15 before hosting Morristown-Beard on January 16.

B oys’ Basketball : Ru n n ing into a bu z z s aw, Pen n ing ton fell 67-37 at the Blair Academy last M o n d a y. T h e R e d R a i d e r s , n o w 5 - 9, p l a y a t L aw rencev ille on Januar y 16. B oys’ Hockey : Suf fering its third loss in its last fo u r g a m e s, Pe n n i n g to n fell 6 - 0 to t he Haver ford School ( Pa.) last Mond a y. T h e R e d R a i d e r s , n o w 2 - 5, h o s t A c a d e m y of N e w C h u r c h ( Pa . ) o n J a n u a r y 15 a t I c e L a n d Skating Center before play ing at Hop ewell Val ley on Januar y 18.

Girls’ Basketball: Posting a Mid-Atlantic Prep L eag ue ( M A PL) v ictor y, L aw rencev ille defeated Mercersburg Academy (Pa.) 50-28 last Sunday. The Big Red, who improved to 9-7 with the win, play at Peddie on January 18. Boys’ Hockey: Unable to get its offense going, Lawrenceville fell 4-1 at the Hill School (Pa.) last Saturday. The Big Red, now 8-5, host Wyoming Seminar y ( Pa.) on January 15 before heading to New England over the weekend to play at the Hotchkiss School (Conn.) on January 17 and at Northfield Mount Hermon (Mass.) on January 18.

PDS

Local Sports

Cross Culture topped Corner House 24-8 with Jacob Lilienthal netting six points in the win. In the 6th/7th grade boys’ division, Dick’s Sporting Goods topped Princeton Dental Group 44-39 as Travis Petrone led the way with 20 points. Mason, Griffin and Pierson defeated University Orthopedic 32-13 with Gabriel Sigrist scoring 16 points for the victors. Princeton Pettoranello Foundation edged Jefferson Plumbing 28 -25, led by Asher DeLue, who tallied 13 points. In the 8th-10th grade boys’

division, Rutgers topped Seton Hall 61-38 as Remmick Granozio starred for the victors. Majeski Foundation defeated North Carolina 4136 with Frank McLaughlin scoring seven points to lead the way. St. John’s topped Syracuse 41-23 as Tarak Jayachandren tallied eight points in the win. In the girls’ division, Princeton Eye Care topped Bank of Princeton 30-9. Stella Olivi tallied 10 points to lead the way for the victors. Princeton PBA#130 edged Homestead 10-8 as Kate Chung scored six points in the win.

Sing with us! JOIN THE FUN! NEW SESSIONS START SOON.

Dillon Youth Basketball Girls’ Basketball: Kirst- Recent Results

en Ruf scored five points at PDS fell 46-9 at Pennington last Monday. The Panthers, now 1-10, host Pingry on January 16, play at Doane Academy on January 18, and then host Stuart on January 21.

PHS

IN THE FAST LANE: Hun School girls’ basketball player Lainey Nolan heads to the basket in recent action. Last Saturday, Nolan contributed 11 points and six rebounds to help Hun defeat the Mercersburg Academy (Pa.) 72-35. The Raiders, who improved to 6-4 with the win, host King’s Christian on January 17 and Hopewell Valley on January 18. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Boys’ Basketball: Gefen Bar-Cohen had a big game in a losing cause as PHS fell 57-43 to Princeton Day School last Monday. Senior star Bar-Cohen tallied 22 points as the Tigers moved to 3-5. PHS hosts Steinert on January 17 and North Brunswick on January 18 before playing at Allentown on January 21. Girls’ Basketball: Nora Devine and Molly Brown each scored six points in a losing cause as PHS fell 4020 to East Brunswick last Saturday. The Tigers, who dropped to 1-6 with the loss, play at Steinert on January 17 before hosting Allentown on January 21. Girls’ Hockey: Victoria Zammit had a huge game as PHS defeated Randolph 10-5 last Friday. Senior star Zammit tallied eight goals and an assist to help the Tigers improve to 2-6. PHS plays at Immaculate Heart on January 16 before host-

In action last Saturday in the 4th/5th grade boys’ division of the Dillon Youth Basketball League, Lependorf & Silverstein defeated the JM Group 26-10. Gavin Levine scored 12 points to lead the way for the victors. Princeton Restorative Dental edged McCaffrey’s 27-20 as Phineas Choe tallied a game-high 13 points.

Princeton Boychoir welcomes boys, grades 3-11, who love to sing and have a strong desire to learn, to share music with others. RSVP: info@WestrickMusic.org Or call us at 609-688-1888

ONLINE www.towntopics.com

231 Clarksville Road, Princeton Junction

We now serve gluten-free pizza and pasta!

What is YOUR New Year’s Resolution? Complete your estate planning:

What is YOUR New Year’s Resolution? Complete

• • your • •

Living Will Power Attorney estateof planning: HIPAA Authorization Last Will & Testament

• Living Will of Attorney Call Mary Ann Pidgeon• atPower (609) 520-1010 or email her at mpidgeon@pidgeonlaw.com to discuss your estate planning • HIPAA Authorization needs. • Last Will & Testament 600Alexander Alexander Road, 600 Road,Princeton, Princeton,NJ NJ08540 08650

Call Mary Ann Pidgeon at (609) 520-1010 or email her at mpidgeon@pidgeonlaw.com to discuss your estate planning

Open Daily 339 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ 08540

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020

Hun

ing East Side on January 17 at Hobey Baker Rink. Boys’ Swimming: Owen Tennant and Jeshurun Reyen each won two events as PHS defeated Trenton High 132-38 last Thursday. Tennant prevailed in the 100 and 200 freest yle while Reyen took first in both the 100 butterfly and 500 free. PHS, which improved to 8-1 with the win, has meets at Notre Dame on January 17 and at Lawrence High on January 21. Girls’ Swimming: Cameron Davis was a double w inner as PHS defeated Trenton High 130-36 last Thursday. Davis was the victor in both the 50 freestyle and 100 breaststroke as the Tigers improved to 7-2. PHS has meets at Notre Dame on January 17 and at Lawrence High on January 21.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020 • 30

The daughter of the late Max Kaufman and Edna Goldstein Kaufman, she is survived by her daughter, Aurora Bearse, and her husband, Ian Crosby, and their two daughters, Sarah and Lilah. Myrna was sadly predeceased by her other daughter, Miriam Bearse, but Miriam’s wife, Karen Fieland, and their daughter, Ariella, survive her. A memorial service in Princeton is planned for spring 2020. Please contact her daughter via email to express condolences or for information about the memorial service, to myrnamemorial1@ gmail.com. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Friendship Circle of WA, www. friendshipcirclewa.org or SAVE of Princeton, NJ, www. savehomelessanimals.org/ donate.

Obituaries

Hon. Mark E. Litowitz Myrna Kaufman Bearse Myrna Kaufman Bearse, started reporting for Town age 81, a former editor and Topics in the mid 1980s. reporter for Town Topics, died She occupied a front winon January 6, 2020, after a dow office in the old Town short illness. Topics building looking over Myrna was born in Brook- Nassau Street. She was a lyn, NY. She graduated from fixture at Borough Council, T homas Jef ferson High planning, and other governSchool at age 16. After a brief ment meetings. And if somemarriage, she moved to the thing interesting happened in West Village in New York City. Princeton between the 1980s There, she worked as a jour- and early 2000s, chances are nalist for various magazines. good that she wrote about it. She recalled interviewing She served briefly as the paJoan Rivers, the comedian, per’s editor when ownership for a parenting magazine. transitioned away from the She remarried and moved Stuart family, and also beto Princeton with her young came an investor in the paper family to a house on Leigh Av- through Witherspoon Media enue. She continued to work Group. She lived in the same as a freelance journalist while house on Leigh Avenue until she left Princeton in the early AN EPISCOPAL PARISH raising her two daughters, 2010s to be closer to grandboth of whom graduated from children the Seattle area. Trinity Church HolyinWeek Sunday Princeton High School. She

January 10, 1929 — January 9, 2020

intelligence Corps. Upon his return to the States, he embarked on a distinguished legal career that began at the law firm of Montis and Litowitz. In 1964, he became an Assistant U.S. Attorney in the Trenton office of the U.S. Department of Justice. In 1967, he was appointed Judge of Worker’s Compensation, eventually becoming the Chief Judge of Compensation for the State of New Jersey, a position he held for over two decades. During his tenure, Judge Litowitz presided over and decided thousands of cases involving New Jersey workers and employers while earning the admiration and respect of litigants, their attorneys, and court personnel. In 1990, then-Governor Florio appointed Judge Litowitz Director of New Jersey’s Department of Worker’s Compensation. In that capacity, Judge Litowitz oversaw the State’s Worker’s Compensation system, one of the largest and most complex in the nation. Following retirement from public service in the mid-nineties, Judge Litowitz returned to private practice, becoming of-counsel to the Princeton law firm Hill, Wallack. Judge Litowitz received numerous honors and awards, including The Jack O’Brien Service Award recognizing his contributions and achievements during his distinguished career. Throughout his adult life, Judge Litowitz was active in the community, serving on the Board of Directors of the Jewish Federation of Princeton Mercer Bucks and Greenwood House, the Jewish Home for the Aged. In 1998, he and Selma received The State of Israel Independence Issue Award,

recognizing their years of service and philanthropy. Judge Litowitz is survived by children Robert (Mariah) of Washington, D.C., Debra Frank of Yardley, Pa., and Carol Golden (Andrew) of Princeton, N.J.; grandchildren Dana, Drew, Reid, and Selma Litowitz, David and Matthew Frank, and Jackson and Elliott Golden; a sister, Natalie Fulton; and niece Susan Talbot (Richard). A daughter-in-law, Karen Dubin, predeceased him. Funeral services were held Sunday, January 12, at Orland’s Ewing Memorial Chapel with burial in Fountain Lawn Memorial Park, Ewing, N.J. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that contributions in Judge Litowitz’s memory be made to Greenwood House, 53 Walter Street, Ewing, NJ 08628. w w w.greenwoodhouse.org.

Rosemary Catherine Forrey Rosemary Catherine Forrey of Skillman, NJ, and Avalon, NJ, formerly of Princeton, passed away peacefully on January 11, 2020. Rosemary was a cherished and loving wife, mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. She was predeceased by her loving husband, Robert Carl Forrey, her brother Walter Chatham Jr., and her parents Walter Chatham Sr. and Jane Buckley Chatham. She is survived by her four devoted children, Carole (Chris), Lynne (Eric), John (Debbie), David (Erin); and 11 grandchildren and one greatgrandchild. She is also survived by her brother and sister-in-law, John and Barbara Chatham, and many nieces and nephews. Rosemary traveled the world with her husband, Bob, and family visiting many places

including England, Ireland, Scotland, France, Italy, Spain, China, Turkey, Greece, Mexico, Canada, and Hawaii. Rosemary and Bob also enjoyed several sailboat adventures throughout the Caribbean islands. She shared her love of life and music with her grandchildren who affectionately called her “Gigi.” Many happy years were spent at her shore home in Avalon, NJ, where four generations of the family gathered together each summer including special July 4th celebrations. She always lit up the room with her warm smile, beautiful singing voice, and witty sense of humor. A strong advocate for education and inspiration for her children and grandchildren, she studied at Academy of Notre Dame de Namur, Fitzgerald Mercy Hospital, Immaculata University, and The College of New Jersey. Throughout a career in nursing and volunteer activities, she was always helping others. Rosemary was very involved in her community and active with the Springdale Golf Club, Dogwood Garden Club, Medical Center at Princeton, Princeton Hospital Fete, Nassau Club, Present Day Club, Yacht Club of Stone Harbor, and as a docent at Morven Museum & Garden in Princeton. Her family will miss her dearly, and fondly remember her stories, laughter, and loving presence. Family and friends are invited to a Funeral Mass on Monday, January 20, 2020 at 10 a.m. at St. Charles Borromeo Church, 47 Skillman Road, Skillman, NJ 08558. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in honor of Rosemary to the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Philadelphia, PA.

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES The Honorable Mark E. Litowitz died on January 9, 2020 after a brief illness, one day before his 91st birthday. The cause of death was esophageal cancer. A lifelong resident of the Trenton area, Judge Litowitz was the first child of Carl Litowitz and Anne (Edelman) Litowitz, both of Trenton. He attended Trenton Central High School and Pennington Prep before attending Rutgers University, where he received his undergraduate and law degrees. At Trenton High, he met Selma Urken. They married in 1951 and he remained devoted to her until her death in 2005. Judge Litowitz was a veteran of the Korean War, where he served in the Army Counter-

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES DIRE DIRECTORY OF 8:00&a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I Easter Schedule 9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages March 23 10:00Wednesday, a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm 5:00 Evensong withPrayers Communion following Holyp.m. Eucharist, Rite II with for Healing, 5:30 pm Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm

RELIGIO RELIGIOUS SERVICES

Tuesday Thursday March 24 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist

5:30

Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer p.m. Holy Eucharist

RECTORY OF RY OF GIOUS SERVICES ERVICES IRECTORY OF The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector AN EPISCOPAL PARISH

Friday, March 25

Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am Sunday The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of theEucharist, Cross, 1:00 pmRite – 2:00Ipm 8:00 a.m. Holy Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm 9:00 a.m.The Christian Education for All Ages Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

Trinity Church Holy Week & Easter Schedule

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic March 23 216Holy Nassau Street, 214 Nassau Street,Princeton Princeton 10:00Wednesday, a.m. Eucharist, RiteChurch II

Holy214 Eucharist, RiteStreet, II, 12:00Princeton Nassau Saturday, Marchpm 26 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor 5:00 Evensong with Communion following Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Holyp.m. Eucharist, Rite II Easter with Prayers for3:00 Healing, 5:30 pm Egg Hunt, pm Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm 7:00 Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30pmp.m. The Great Vigil of Easter, Vigil Mass: 5:30and p.m. Sunday:Saturday 7:00, Tuesday 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 5:00 p.m. Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass inp.m. Spanish: Sunday Thursday March 24 at 7:00 p.m. p.m. 12:00 Holy Eucharist Holy Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 am Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. HolyFestive Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am Holy Eucharist withEucharist, Foot Washing Festive Choral Rite II,and 11:00 am Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector p.m. Holy Eucharist

Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are always welcome to worship with us at:

First Church of Christ, Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church Princeton University Scientist, Princeton chaPel

Princeton’s First Tradition EcumEnical christian worship sunday at 11am ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

ChristianPH.d. Science Reading Room Rev. Alison l. Boden, Rev. dR. THeResA s. THAmes

dean of Religious Associate dean of Religious life 178 life Nassau Street, Princeton and of the Chapel and of the Chapel

609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4

Join us! All are welcome! Visit religiouslife.princeton.edu

GIOUS SERVICES 5:30

The Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate The. Rev. PaulWhittemore, Jeanes III, Director Rector of Music Mr. Tom Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr.609-924-2277 Tom Whittemore, Director of Music 33 Mercer St. Princeton www.trinityprinceton.org

Friday, March 25

3 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm H Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm es eek The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm eI

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton wing

All Ages

pm te II

Rev. Jenny Street, Smith Walz, Lead Pastor 214 Nassau Princeton Saturday, March 26 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Worship and Children’s Program Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Saturday 5:30 The GreatVigil Vigil ofMass: Easter, 7:00 pmp.m. Sundays at 10 AM are Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30and p.m. Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 5:00 p.m. Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. Mass in Spanish: Sunday Wherever you are on your journey of faith, youat are 7:00 p.m. ng Prayer Holy Rite am Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church always Eucharist, welcome to worship withI, us 7:30 at: inWherever Spanish: at 9:00 7:00 p.m. you areSunday on your journey of faith, yer MassFestive 124 Witherspoon Street, NJ are Choral Eucharist, Rite II,Princeton, am you

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Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are always welcome to worship with us at:

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Christian Science Reading Room

178 Nassau Street, Princeton

609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4

Firstalways Church of Christ, Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church welcome to worship witham us at: Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 10:00 a.m. Worship Service 124 Witherspoon Street,Mother Princeton, NJ Scientist, Princeton of 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School First Church of Christ, Youth Bible Study The. Rev. and Paul Jeanes III, Rector Adult Bible Associate Classes The Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Scientist, Princeton Mr. Tom (A Whittemore, Director of Music multi-ethnic congregation) 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

God Orthodox Church

10:00 a.m. Worship Service 904 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School 609-466-3058 V. Rev. Peter Baktis, Rector www.mogoca.org and Youth Bible Study 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, Adult Bible Classes Sunday, 10:00 am: Divine LiturgyNJ (A multi-ethnic congregation)

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. oror or ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! p.m. 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton Sunday, 9:15 am: Church School 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org 10:00 a.m. Worship Service p.m. Christian Science Reading Room d 5:00 p.m. 609-924-1666 •www.csprinceton.org Fax 609-924-0365 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 609-924-5801 – 178 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, 5:00 pm: Adult Education Classes d 5:00 00 p.m. p.m. 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School witherspoonchurch.org witherspoonchurch.org 10 p.m. -4 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 00 Saturday, 6:00 pm: Vespers Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. am

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nceton.org

Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Christian Science Reading Room

and Youth Bible Study Adult Bible Classes (A multi-ethnic congregation)

124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ

10:00 a.m. ServicePARISH ANWorship EPISCOPAL 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School Trinity Church Sunday and Youth Bible StudyHoly Week 8:00& a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I Easter Schedule Adult Bible Classes 9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages (A multi-ethnic congregation)

March 23 10:00Wednesday, a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm witherspoonchurch.org Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm

Tuesday Thursday March 24 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist

5:30

Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer p.m. Holy Eucharist

Wh

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church Friday, March 25 The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of the a.m. Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00Service pm 10:00 Worship Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton and Youth Bible Study

Nassau Street, Princeton Princeton214 Quaker Meeting Saturday, March 26 Adult Bible Classes Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor

Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor (Atime multi-ethnic congregation) Step out of into shared silence Saturday Vigil 5:30 The Great Vigil the ofMass: Easter, 7:00 pmp.m. of a Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m. Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. Quaker meeting in10:00, ourMass: historic Meeting House. 609-924-1666 • Fax Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass in Spanish: Sunday at609-924-0365 7:00 p.m. p.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 am MassFestive in for Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 witherspoonchurch.org Meetings Worship at 9 and 11 p.m. Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am Child Festive Care Choral available at 11

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector 470 Quaker Road, NJ 08540 ThePrinceton Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music www.princetonfriendsmeeting.org 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org

F

Sunday

We

609-9


“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS VISA

MasterCard

The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. IT’S A GREAT TIME TO CLEAN & ORGANIZE YOUR HOME! If you offer these services, consider placing your ad with Town Topics! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

ROCKY HILL APT RENTAL: 2 BR. $1,450/mo. includes heat & hot water, dishwasher, yard, off-street parking, coin operated washer/dryer. Security lease credit check. (609) 466-0852.

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

01-08-3t

OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Private, quiet suite with 4 offices with approx. 950 sq. ft. on ground floor. $1,700 per month rent; utilities included. We can build to suit your business. Email recruitingwr@ gmail.com 01-15-4t

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read.

WE BUY CARS

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-15-21

Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

Irene Lee, Classified Manager tf IT’S A GREAT TIME

TO CLEAN & ORGANIZE • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash,ESTATE creditLIQUIDATION card, or check. A BIG DECK YOUR HOME! (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; ROSA’S for a small •price SERVICE: • 25 words each add’lCLEANING word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words length. If you offerin these services, consider SERVICE LLC: HOME HEALTH AIDE/or less: $15.00 classifieds@towntopics.com placing your ad with Town Topics! COMPANION AVAILABLE: All phases of home improvement. I will clean out attics, basements, For houses, apartments, offices, daytf • 3 weeks: Riverview $40.00 • 4 weeks: $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual discount rates garages & houses. Single items available. NJ certified with 20 years experiCall (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; care, banks, schools & much more. Construction Princeton to entire estates. No job too big or ence. Please call Cindy, (609) 227classifieds@towntopics.com GREEN–PLANET PAINTING: Has good English, own transporta• Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inch • all bold face type: $10.00/week (609) 468-7594 small. In business over 35 years, 9873. 01-08-3t

01-01-3t HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE: Newly renovated, waiting area, kitchenette, ground floor, ample parking. Internet & phone line included. Available for immediate sublease. Looking for tenant to compliment mental health practice in Princeton. Call Stephen (201) 232-2766.

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

01-15-3t

HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, masonry, etc. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www. elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf PRINCETON-Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time for studio apartment on Princeton estate. Big windows with views over magnificent gardens, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, full bath with tub & shower. Separate entrance, parking. Possible use as an office or art studio. (609) 924-5245. tf

SEMI-RETIRED GENTLEMAN SEEKING a caretaker, gardener, pet-sitting position. In lieu of salary would welcome lodgings in guest house or other private quarters. Experience includes more than 30 years in special event planning, fluency in several languages & previous work in Princeton. After 40 years in fast-paced New York, seeking a more relaxed atmosphere in Princeton. References upon request. Email MacePR@rcn. com 01-15-3t 6 BEDROOM RUSTIC COUNTRY HOME: 10 minutes north of Princeton, in the small village of Blawenburg, Skillman, $2,890 discounted monthly rent: http://princetonrentals. homestead.com or (609) 333-6932. 01-01-6t HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 947-2958. 01-15-4t

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co.

tion. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 01-01-7t

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 01-08-8t CREATIVE CLEANING SERVICES: All around cleaning services to fit your everyday needs. Very reliable, experienced & educated. Weekly, biweekly & monthly. Please call Matthew/Karen Geisenhoner at (609) 587-0231; Email creativecleaningservices@outlook. com 01-15-8t TK PAINTING: Interior, exterior. Power-washing, wallpaper removal, plaster repair, Venetian plaster, deck staining. Renovation of kitchen cabinets. Front door & window refinishing. Excellent references. Free estimates. Call (609) 947-3917. 12-18/06-10 BUYERS • APPRAISERS • AUCTIONEERS Restoration upholstery & fabric shop. On-site silver repairs & polishing. Lamp & fixture rewiring & installation. Palace Interiors Empire Antiques & Auctions monthly. Call Gene (609) 209-0362. 10-02-20

Commercial, Residential & Custom Paint, Interior & Exterior, Drywall Repairs, Light Carpentry, Deck Staining, Green Paint options, Paper Removal, Power Washing, 15 Years of Experience. FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES. CALL: (609) 356-4378; perez@green-planetpainting.com 04-03-20 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-04-20 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-22-20 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS:

Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-14-20

serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-15-21 AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 05-01-20

MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-31-20 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-10-20 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon

tf HOME HEALTH AIDE/ COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified with 20 years experience. Please call Cindy, (609) 2279873. 01-01-3t HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, masonry, etc. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www. elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf

“He is happiest, be he

king or peasant, who finds peace in his home." —Goethe

Established in 1947

WATER WATER EVERYWHERE! Let's rid that water problem in your basement once and for all! Complete line of waterproofing services, drain systems, interior or exterior, foundation restoration and structural repairs. Restoring those old and decaying walls of your foundation.

Call A. Pennacchi and Sons, and put that water problem to rest!

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

Mercer County's oldest waterproofing co. est. 1947 Deal directly with Paul from start to finish.

609-394-7354

Over 70 years of stellar excellence! Thank you for the oppportunity.

apennacchi.com

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020

to place an order:

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $24.80 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $63.70 • 4 weeks: $81 • 6 weeks: $121 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


ROCKY HILL APT RENTAL: 2 BR. $1,450/mo. includes heat & hot water, dishwasher, yard, off-street parking, coin operated washer/dryer. Security lease credit check. (609) 466-0852. 01-08-3t A BIG DECK for a small price All phases of home improvement. Riverview Construction Princeton (609) 468-7594 01-08-3t

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE: Newly renovated, waiting area, kitchenette, ground floor, ample parking. Internet & phone line included. Available for immediate sublease. Looking for tenant to compliment mental health practice in Princeton. Call Stephen (201) 232-2766. 01-15-3t

6 BEDROOM RUSTIC COUNTRY HOME: 10 minutes north of Princeton, in the small village of Blawenburg, Skillman, $2,890 discounted monthly rent: http://princetonrentals. homestead.com or (609) 333-6932. 01-01-6t

SEMI-RETIRED GENTLEMAN SEEKING a caretaker, gardener, pet-sitting position. In lieu of salary would welcome lodgings in guest house or other private quarters. Experience includes more than 30 years in special event planning, fluency in several languages & previous work in Princeton. After 40 years in fast-paced New York, seeking a more relaxed atmosphere in Princeton. References upon request. Email MacePR@rcn. com 01-15-3t

HOUSE CLEANING: Good experience and references. English speaking. Please call Iwona at (609) 947-2958. 01-15-4t OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Private, quiet suite with 4 offices with approx. 950 sq. ft. on ground floor. $1,700 per month rent; utilities included. We can build to suit your business. Email recruitingwr@ gmail.com 01-15-4t

WHAT’S THE ONE THING HOME BUYERS CARE MORE ABOUT THAN LOCATION? PRICE! Overpricing your home to earn a bigger profit may seem like a good idea at first. But chances are, if you don’t get the pricing right, your home will sit on the market many more days than it should, which plants the idea in prospective buyers’ minds there is something wrong with your home. And this means your home very well may end up selling for even less than asking, in addition to the lengthy amount of time spent finding a buyer, which can be stressful and costly. Don’t ignore the comps. Most of us are very emotionally attached to our homes, which leads us to believe it’s worth more than it really is. If your next door neighbor’s home in a similar condition to yours was sold in the past six months and has a comparable square footage and number of beds/baths, this is what you will need to focus on when determining an asking price. Because not only will prospective buyers and their agents already have that information, and more importantly, the appraiser assessing your home’s value once it’s under contract certainly will, too! Take note: just because the internet claims your home is worth a certain amount, it is unlikely that is what your home will ultimately sell for, as that estimate doesn’t take into account the condition of your home, which is a huge determining factor. Finally, choose wisely if you decide to invest in renovations prior to listing your home. While kitchens and baths tend to have the best ROI, they are still not necessarily a dollar-for-dollar investment.

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188.

SPACE AVAILABLE Spring 2020

01-01-7t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 01-08-8t CREATIVE CLEANING SERVICES: All around cleaning services to fit your everyday needs. Very reliable, experienced & educated. Weekly, biweekly & monthly. Please call Matthew/Karen Geisenhoner at (609) 587-0231; Email creativecleaningservices@outlook. com 01-15-8t

THE VILLAGE OF LAWRENCEVILLE

TK PAINTING: Interior, exterior. Power-washing, wallpaper removal, plaster repair, Venetian plaster, deck staining. Renovation of kitchen cabinets. Front door & window refinishing. Excellent references. Free estimates. Call (609) 947-3917.

OFFICE SPACE

2,755

SQ. FT.

FULLY ACCESSIBLE

12-18/06-10 BUYERS • APPRAISERS • AUCTIONEERS Restoration upholstery & fabric shop. On-site silver repairs & polishing. Lamp & fixture rewiring & installation. Palace Interiors Empire Antiques & Auctions monthly. Call Gene (609) 209-0362.

Please call 609-895-2683 2633 Main Street Lawrenceville, NJ

10-02-20 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS!

Witherspoon Media Group

Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10;

Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

classifieds@towntopics.com tf

SUITES AVAILABLE:

MEDICAL OFFICE

· Newsletters · Brochures · Postcards · Books · Catalogues · Annual Reports

SPACE • FOR • LEASE 8’ 6”

14’ 2”

11’ 3”

CONFERENCE ROOM

T.R.

CL.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020 • 32

PRINCETON-Seeking tenant who will be in residence only part-time for studio apartment on Princeton estate. Big windows with views over magnificent gardens, built-in bookcases & cabinetry, full bath with tub & shower. Separate entrance, parking. Possible use as an office or art studio. (609) 924-5245. tf

6’ 7”

OFFICE

GENERAL OFFICE AREA 21’ 8” 15’7”

10’

OFFICE

OFFICE

10’ 3”

7’ 5” 17’

6’ 1”

Rt. 206 & Applegate Road | Princeton | NJ

For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

Prestigious Princeton mailing address

10’ 6”

11’ 1”

6’ 4”

Montgomery Commons

10’6”

Building 1, Suite 111: 1,006 sf (+/-)

Medical/Office Suites Available: From 830 to 1,006 sf (+/-)

Built to suit tenant spaces with private bathroom, kitchenette & separate utilities Premier Series suites with upgraded flooring, counter tops, cabinets & lighting available 219 Parking spaces available on-site with handicap accessibility VERIZON FIOS AVAILABLE & high-speed internet access

(908) 874-8686 | LarkenAssociates.com Immediate Occupancy | Brokers Protected | Raider Realty is a Licensed Real Estate Broker No warranty or representation, express or implied, is made to the accuracy of the information herein and same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of rental or other conditions, withdrawal without notice and to any special listing conditions, imposed by our principals and clients.

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400


33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 1/19, 1:00 - 3:00PM 4BR/3.1BA 109.90AC Circa 1790 with Recent Additions 4 Fireplaces Bank Barn No Restrictions/Easements Chris Preston: 215.262.9609 Michael Richardson: 609.647.4523 137 Tumble Idell Rd., Frenchtown, NJ

Kurfiss.com/NJHT105280

$2,050,000

OPEN HOUSE: Saturday, 1/18, 1:00 - 3:00PM

NEWLY PRICED: The Residences at Rabbit Run Creek

5BR/5BA 3,811SF 12.16AC Smart/Private/Luxurious Hellen Cannon: 215.779.6151

3BR/3.1BA 3,700SF Customized New Construction Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590

7043 Phillips Mill Rd., Solebury Township, PA Kurfiss.com/1000463284

New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU364666

$2,575,000

$1,450,000

Motivated Seller, 9 Acres in Warren County

Charm, Character, and Comfort

5 Units on Musconetcong Riv. Melissa Sullivan: 917.741.4555 Nancy Bousum: 215.378.0410

3BR/2.1BA 2,501SF 0.37AC Completely rebuilt in 2001 Ally Steffens: 609.558.2555

Phillipsburg, NJ

Pennington Borough, NJ

Kurfiss.com/NJWR100244

$825,000

Kurfiss.com/NJME287918

$670,000

Upgrades and Updates Throughout

NEWLY PRICED: The Waterworks

4BR/2.1BA 2,488SF 2.03AC Gourmet Kitchen Beth Danese: 215.208.6549

2BR/2.1BA 1,660SF Open Floor Plan Canal Views Chris Preston: 215.262.9609

Pennington, NJ

New Hope Borough, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU485862

Kurfiss.com/NJME289142

Kurfiss.com

|

$619,900

$569,000

Artfully Uniting Extraordinary Homes With Extraordinary Lives

215.794.3227 New Hope Rittenhouse Square Chestnut Hill Bryn Mawr © MMXIX I Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. SIR® is a registered trademark licensed to SIR Affiliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020 • 34

GREEN–PLANET PAINTING: Commercial, Residential & Custom Paint, Interior & Exterior, Drywall Repairs, Light Carpentry, Deck Staining, Green Paint options, Paper Removal, Power Washing, 15 Years of Experience. FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES. CALL: (609) 356-4378; perez@green-planetpainting.com 04-03-20

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-15-21

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-04-20

AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 05-01-20

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-22-20 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-14-20 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-15-21

MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-31-20 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-10-20 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE, LLC

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

CURRENT RENTALS

tf IT’S A GREAT TIME TO CLEAN & ORGANIZE YOUR HOME! If you offer these services, consider placing your ad with Town Topics! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf HOME HEALTH AIDE/ COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified with 20 years experience. Please call Cindy, (609) 2279873. 01-01-3t HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, masonry, etc. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www. elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf

*********************************

OFFICE RENTALS: Attention: Dissertation Writers $1,600/mo. Heat, Central Air & Parking included. We have an Office Suite that would be perfect for you and your dissertation. In Princeton, within walking distance to campus, the Suite is approximately 653 sq. ft. & is divided into a reception area, 2 private offices & private WC. Available now.

RESIDENTIAL LISTINGS: Princeton – $125/mo. each Parking Spaces: 3 parking spaces-2 blocks from Nassau Street. Available now. Princeton House– $1,950/mo. Plus utilities. 2 BR house, 1 bath, LR, Kitchen. Nice yard. Available now. Princeton Condo– $2,400/mo. +utilities. 3 BR, 2½ baths, LR, DR, Kitchen, Laundry. Available now.

We have customers waiting for houses!

STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE. We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com See our display ads for our available houses for sale.

32 CHAMBERS STREET PRINCETON, NJ 08542 (609) 924-1416 MARTHA F. STOCKTON, BROKER-OWNER

Specialists

609-452-2630

QUALITY ASSURANCE MANAGER

JOB CODE 1101 (CitiusTech, Princeton, NJ) Wrks in the healthcare domain majorly focusing on EHR & Payer-Provider model. Defines the IT QA process improvemt effort to establish a strong QA workforce w/in the R & D dept. Anlyz rqmt specs to create test plans. Resp for gather’g rqmts, dvlpg QA test plan/ strategy & creating wireframes. Assist dvlprs in replicat’g issues & follow up & monitor QA teams. Uses tools such as Qual Center, Pl/SQL Dvlpr, Postman, Jira & Version One. Bach’s deg in Comp Sci./Eng.or rel or frgn equiv +5yrs of progress wrk exp. Loc’n: Princeton, NJ & various unanticipated loc’ns w/in the U.S., reloc maybe rqd. Please refer to job code & email resume to: us_jobs@ citiustech.com 01-15

TECHNICAL SPECIALIST

JOB CODE 1102 (CitiusTech, Princeton, NJ)wrks in the healthcare domain. Rqmt gather’g of functionalities to be implemented. Dsgns data integrat’n architecture for billing & clinical wrk flows & preps dsgn specificat’n docs as per client needs. Deploymt of new integrat’n solut’ns, provides post release suppt. Uses tools such as Mirth Connect, Javascript, SQL, SSIS & Healthcare Standards - HL7 & CCDA. Bach’s deg in Comp Sci./Eng. or frgn equiv +5yrs of progress wrk exp. Loc’n: Princeton, NJ & various unanticipatd loc’ns w/in the U.S., reloc maybe rqd. Please refer to job code & email res to: us_jobs@citiustech.com 01-15

TECHNICAL LEAD

JOB CODE 1104 (CitiusTech, Princeton, NJ)wrks in the healthcare domain. Resp for analytical & data needs of the client that incl dvlpmt, automat’n & mainten of claims & authorizat’n data. Leads the migrat’n of d/b platform. Dsgn & dvlpmt of WebAPI’s & data via Apache Storm to Elasticsearch, Redis & Couchbase. Uses tools such as Apache Storm, Apache Kafka, Elastic search, Microsoft Azure, ASP. Net, WCF, WebSrvcs & TFS. Bach’s deg in Comp Sci./Eng/Info Technol or frgn equiv + 5yrs of progress wrk exp. Loc’n: Princeton, NJand various unanticipatd loc’ns w/in the U.S., reloc maybe rqd. Please refer to job code & email res to: us_jobs@ citiustech.com 01-15

MFG., CO.

• Innovative Design • Expert Installation • Professional Care 908-284-4944 • jgreenscapes@gmail.com License #13VH06981800

TECHNICAL LEAD

JOB CODE 1107 (CitiusTech, Princeton, NJ) wrks in the healthcare domain. Resp for high lvl tech dsgn docs. Create & dsgn use cases for implementat’n. ID datatypes & data formats suppt’d & dsgn interoperability. Dsgn & implemnt real time data process’g. Uses tools such as JavaScript, Oracle SQL Dvlpr, Mirth Connect Rhapsody, TCL, Ensemble & Cloverleaf IDE. Bach’s deg in Comp Sci./ IT/Eng. or frgn equiv +2yrs of exp. Loc’n:Princeton, NJ & various unanticipatd loc’ns w/in the U.S., reloc maybe rqd. Please refer to job code & email res to: us_jobs@citiustech. com 01-15

ACCOUNT MANAGER

Lawn & Landscape Services

2nd & 3rd Generations

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

JOB CODE 1103 (CitiusTech, Princeton, NJ) wrks in the healthcare domain & resp for bus dvlpmt. Sell IT srvcs & solut’ns on an onshore/offshore model to said clients. Coord w/leadership, tech teams, & bus analysts to assure client satisfact’n & proper complet’n of projts. Facilitates projt definit’n, rqmt gather’g, dsgn & architecture for delivery teams us’g ASP.Net, MS SQL Srvr, VB.Net.Help the delivery stakeholders understand the bus rqmts, scope of the projts, dsgn & architecture rqmts. Bach’s deg in Comp Sci./ Eng. or frgn equiv +5yrs of progress wrk exp which incl 2yrs of exp in the rqmts listed above. Loc’n: Princeton, NJ & various unanticipatd loc’ns w/ in the U.S., reloc maybe rqd. Please refer to job code & email res to: us_jobs@citiustech.com 01-15

WET PAPER IN THE DRIVEWAY? Sorry. It Happens, even with a plastic bag. We can’t control the weather, but we can offer you a free, fresh and dry replacement paper if you stop by our office at 4438 Route 27 N. in Kingston.

PART-TIME GRAPHIC DESIGNER NEEDED Witherspoon Media Group is looking for a part-time graphic designer to work in our Kingston, New Jersey office on the production of the Town Topics Newspaper, luxury magazines, and digital marketing. The ideal candidate must: • Have 3-5 years experience or more in print design or ad agency work. • Be proficient in Adobe Creative Suite 6 or higher (Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator). • Be deadline-oriented. Must also be able to: • Typeset and file newspaper articles. • Design and set page layouts for weekly newspaper. • Multitask and work in a fast-paced environment. • Design client advertisements for newspaper, magazines, and online. • Assist with social media, email marketing, and website updates.

Gorgeous 2 bed 2.5 bath home for sale in Hillsborough Recently renovated Hillsborough N.J. townhome with fully finished basement, brand new AC/Furnace and hot water heater. Gas unit and large master bedroom with en suite. Attached garage for convenient parking! Open and contemporary floor plan, hardwood floors throughout, remodeled bathrooms, and kitchen with stainless steel appliances. $290,000

FSBO: Contact Vincent at 908.616.0821 for more information

We are looking for a self-motivated, excellent communicator who is able to organize, prioritize, and produce results independently and with the team. Knowledge of HTML is a plus. Compensation is negotiable based on experience. Please submit cover letter and resume to: jeff.tryon@witherspoonmediagroup.com


OPEN HOUSE THIS SUNDAY, JAN. 19 | 1:00—3:00

48 BOGART COURT IN PRINCETON IS OFFERED AT $1,995,000 Nestled on nearly five acres, this exquisite home has undergone extensive renovations throughout. Stop by this Sunday and take a tour.

Alison Covello, Sales Associate | MOBILE 609.240.8332 | acovello@glorianilson.com | MoveWithAlison.com

OPEN HOUSE THIS SUNDAY, JAN. 19 | 1:00—4:00

6 MORRIS DRIVE IN PRINCETON (HOPEWELL TWP) IS OFFERED AT $879,000 Fully updated and move-in ready, this four bedroom Toll Brothers home features over 3600 square feet and is situated on 1.27 acres. Stop by on Sunday for a tour!

Teresa Cunningham, Sales Associate | MOBILE 609.802.3564 | BusyTC@gmail.com | BusyTC.com

33 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 | 609.921.2600 | glorianilson.com Licensed Real Estate Broker

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020

THE BRAND THAT DEFINES LUXURY REAL ESTATE. WORLDWIDE.


A DREAM HOME FOR ENTERTAINING 1,800 SF FULLY CUSTOMIZABLE LOWER LEVEL

A One-of-a-Kind Limited Time Offer. Special pricing plus a $100,000 allowance toward upgrades remain on just two residences in the coveted Fourth Phase at Rabbit Run Creek.

OUR COMMUNITY FEATURES: Refined Architecture and Finishes

Full Lower Levels and Elevators

Open, Contemporary Floorplans

Private, Gated Community

Two-Car Rear Garages

Extraordinary Low-Maintenance Lifestyle

Starting at $1.4 million. 215.862.5800 | RabbitRunCreek.com Rte 202 (Lower York Road) & Rabbit Run Drive, New Hope, PA

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Town Topics Newspaper, January 15  

Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper, January 15  

Witherspoon Media Group