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Princeton magazine

march 2015

march 2015

Rafael Novoa interior Design W. Michael Blumenthal | Digital Atelier | The Einstein Papers Kelly Ingram | Princeton in Asia Program | Brandon Waddles A Well-Designed Life

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contents

12 march 2015

48

44

58

34

74 ..... HERE & THERE .....

..... FEATURES .....

BOOK SCENE

Michael Blumenthal

by Stuart Mitchner

BY LINDA ARNTZENIUS

Design begins at home

Former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, author, and Princeton resident

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12

ART SCENE by Linda Arntzenius

kelly ingram

Shake off the doldrums of winter at the Michener

Making her mark on walls, ceilings, even church steeples

40

34

MARK YOUR CALENDAR

The Einstein Papers

56

SHOPPING

A well-designed life 24

Special occasions 70

BY anne levin

BY ellen gilbert

Digitizing everything from love letters to quantum theory 44

Princeton in Asia program BY anne levin

Building bridges between the U.S. and Asia since 1898 48

the hand of the artist BY ilene dube

When sculptors want to make something large, and they want it fast, they go to the Digital Atelier 58 ..... LAST WORD .....

Brandon Waddles

Interim director of Westminster Choir College’s Jubilee Singers 74

ON THE COVER: Residence of Rafael Novoa and Robert Lieberman, Solebury, Pa. Photography by ©Jeffrey Apoian.

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| FROM THE PUBLISHER

By the time you open this magazine, I hope that the bitter cold of February has passed and we are feeling a bit of the “lamb” of March in anticipation of spring. This issue is an interesting blend of art, cultures, history, and all of it being brought to us by new and exciting technology. At Princeton Magazine, one of our goals is to introduce you to interesting and often amazing individuals who are influential in the nation or the world, yet happen to live in Princeton. The person featured in this issue is Michael Blumenthal, who was part of the Kennedy, Johnson, and Carter administrations, where he achieved the position of Secretary of the Treasury before moving on to become the CEO of Bendix and then Unisys. He was Founding Director of the Jewish Museum Berlin, giving back to the country he had left in fleeing from the Nazis with his family. Blumenthal’s rise from poverty as a German refugee to a national leader is one colorful piece of the fabric that makes up this intriguing town of Princeton. Albert Einstein, another German refugee and probably Princeton’s most famous citizen, is also covered in this issue in a story about the digitizing of all of his papers, thus making them accessible to the entire world. In addition to digitizing history, this issue also deals with the digitizing of art as delivered by the Digital Atelier, which began as a research and development component of the Johnson Atelier and it is now enabling artists to accurately enlarge their three dimensional works of art to super scales. I’m sure that the brief exposure to this amazing technology and the resultant art will entice you to spend an afternoon at the expanded Grounds for Sculpture, which is reportedly more fabulous than ever. Another artist doing work on a grand scale, but with her hand on the actual brush instead of a computer, is Kelly Ingram, a master faux painter transforming “plain Jane” spaces into very special environments. I for one enjoyed learning about her work from this story. Princeton University’s motto references, “service to the nation and to the world.” We are fortunate that our staff writer Anne Levin discovered how the University has been delivering on that motto since 1898. The “Princeton in Asia” program, whose mission is to build cultural bridges between the U.S. and Asia, is the oldest organization of its kind in the world. It offers fellowships and internships with Asian host organizations in the fields of health, international development, environmental advocacy, journalism, engineering, technology, law and business. You should certainly be inspired in reading about the experiences of students who have been part of this far-reaching program. With spring arriving after this harsh winter, it’s time to think about fixing up your home. Several of our advertisers can help you with that. Additionally, you may find some architectural inspiration for you next renovation endeavor from Stuart Mitchner’s books section where he reviews several books on architecture.

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Photography by Andrew Wilkinson

Dear Princeton Magazine Readers,

One look at our calendar pages will tell you this is going to be a very busy spring, typical of Princeton. Editor-in-Chief Lynn Smith and I, along with our dedicated staff, join you in anticipating a beautiful spring and hope you enjoy reading this issue of Princeton Magazine. All best wishes. Respectfully yours,

J. Robert Hillier, FAIA Publisher

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MICHAEL BLUMENTHAL’S SEARCH FOR ANSWERS TAKES HIM FULL CIRCLE

BACK TO BERLIN

BY LINDA ARNTZENIUS

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE MARCH 2015

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Following a diverse and unusual career, W. Michael Blumenthal helped found the Jewish Museum Berlin (ABOVE). He served as its first director from 1997 to 2014 and continues to serve the museum in an advisory capacity.

W.

Michael Blumenthal has made his home in Princeton since 1951 when he was a graduate student at the University. He has a fondness for the place, which he finds has retained its essential character even after six decades. “It hasn’t changed significantly in the last 30 years and even though there are new buildings, it isn’t overwhelmed by the franchises that have made this country so ugly,” he says. Besides, he has good friends here and it’s convenient to New York, Philadelphia and even Washington, D.C. Proximity to the nation’s capital has been important to Blumenthal who is used to being at the center of things—political, social and cultural. At 89, the self-described “observer of history” can look back on an eventful life. Born in Germany in 1926, Blumenthal witnessed the rise of Nazism that forced his Jewish family to flee their native land. They found refuge during the World War II years in Shanghai. After finding his way to the United States, he served in the Kennedy, Johnson, and Carter administrations and was successful in business as CEO of Bendix and Unisys. The former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury’s experiences and observations, drawn from privileged positions close to the center of government and trade for almost nine decades, can be found in his highly readable books, The Invisible Wall: Germans and Jews, a Personal Exploration

and From Exile to Washington: A Memoir of Leadership in the Twentieth Century. Blumenthal was prompted to write his first memoir, after his father died at the age of 101 in 1990. Ewald Blumenthal left his son a most valuable gift: the Blumenthal family tree. “After I retired, I worked as an investment banker and had some time on my hands,” he recalls. “I looked at the family tree and recognized some names, notably Giacomo Myerbeer, and Rahel Varnhagen von Ense, about whom there was quite a large literature, including a biography by Hannah Arendt. Each of these ancestors lived at a different period in German history and I found their stories to be a paradigm for the relationship between Jews and non-Jews over several hundred years.” He set out to examine the varied and complicated relationships between Germans and Jews over a three-hundred-year period from medieval ghetto to Holocaust in an exploration of the perennial questions: How could the Holocaust happen? Why did it happen in Germany? What were the warning signs? And can it be prevented from happening again? These are questions that have been brought to the fore by this year’s 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz and by attacks on synagogues in France and Belgium in the early part of this year. For Blumenthal, examining in them through the lens of personal family history would ultimately, and to some extent unexpectedly, bring him full

circle back to Germany in the 1990s where he would help found and serve as the first Director of the Jewish Museum in Berlin.

THE INVISIBLE WALL

Part memoir and part historical analysis, The Invisible Wall: Germans and Jews, a Personal Exploration, involves the reader in the lives of six of the author’s ancestors. Henry Kissinger described it as “a fascinating and thought-provoking work... significant not only in terms of Jewish history but of the evolution of European social history.” To quote Kissinger again: “[Blumenthal] explores the enduring questions of European Jewry: What is a Jew; How have they survived as an entity apart; Why, even if prosperous, were they second-class citizens; How did the Holocaust come to happen in the very country where Jews had most completely and successfully integrated into mainstream society.” “The history of Germany’s Jews can only be understood in the larger context of German history,” says Blumenthal. “From the beginning, the GermanJewish relationship was a marriage of convenience. Germany needed its Jews for economic reasons, and the Jews needed Germany as a safe haven with scope for their unique talents.” Blumenthal reveals the history that shows, for example, why Jews came to be so prevalent in retailing. “The law of unintended consequences that excluded Jews from so many other professions pushed them into it and they became experts,” he MARCH 2015 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Family photos from Blumenthal’s memoir In achtzig Jahren um die Welt published in Germany in 2010.

says, adding that this happened elsewhere in Europe, not just Germany. In The Invisible Wall we learn of Jost Liebmann (1640-1702), the peddler who became a court jeweler and one of Berlin’s richest men, and of Rahel Levin (1771-1833) who, as Rahel Varnhagen von Ense, created a literary salon for intellectuals such as the poet Karl Wilhelm Schlegel, philosopher and diplomat Wilhelm von Humboldt and his naturalist brother Alexander, among other luminaries. Von Ense is celebrated in Arendt’s Rahel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewess. The famous child prodigy and composer Giacomo Meyerbeer (1791-1864) is also featured, as is businessman and banker Louis Blumenthal (1818-1901), literary critic Arthur Eloesser (1870-1938), and Ewald Blumenthal (1889-1990), the author’s father. Blumenthal describes his father as “a conventional, middle-class German Jew. His self-image was that of a German. He had served in the Kaiser’s elite guards and fought for his country in the trenches of France. The Emperor had personally rewarded him with an Iron Cross.” “My parents were proudly German and deeply hurt that the Nazis had stamped them as alien and inferior,” he writes in From Exile to Washington.

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The year 1938, as recalled in From Exile to Washington: “Two men came for my father in the early morning, sometime before 6AM. They were detectives from the local police station and reasonably polite but otherwise uncommunicative as they waited for him to get dressed and took him away. The commotion had woken me, and I can still hear my mother’s insistent questions as she asked what it was all about, the note of panic and helpless frustration in her voice, and my father’s frightened last look back at us as he was being led away. He barely survived the dreadful Buchenwald camp and returned six weeks later, his head shaved, sixty pounds lighter and in a pitiful state. He never spoke about Buchenwald again, but it left him with a deep psychological trauma from which he never fully recovered.” This event, coming on the heels of Kristallnacht, was a shrill wake-up call. It shook the author’s parents from any idea they had of waiting out the bad times. His mother faced the “herculean task of surmounting the innumerable obstacles in the way of our escape.”

The family left Germany in 1939, shortly before the outbreak of World War II. Asked why they had not gone earlier, Blumenthal explains some of the thinking that had kept them there against all the warning signs: “My parents were middle class shopkeepers, not poor, but of modest means. They had never been outside of Germany except for one visit to Italy, their honeymoon, which they spoke of fondly for the rest of their lives. When the pressure mounted to leave Germany, where were they to go? They spoke only German. They were not allowed to take any money with them. This was a time when in many countries, for various reasons, there was little enthusiasm for admitting immigrants. It was a tough time to get a job. Where were two middle-aged people to go? It was a time of anti-Semitism.” Blumenthal was 13 when he embarked, with his parents Rose-Valerie and Ewald and older sister Stefanie, from Naples on the SS Haruna Maru, a Japanese ship bound for the “open city” of Shanghai. To this day, the month-long journey is fresh in his recollection. “From Naples via Port Said, Suez, Aden, Bombay, Colombo, Singapore, and Hong Kong; each one of those ports of call was part of the British Empire and none would admit Jewish refugees. I remember Bombay was as hot as hell; our ship was part freighter, part passenger ship.” Shanghai and, for a time, the Honkou ghetto

PRINCETON MAGAZINE MARCH 2015

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would be Blumenthal’s home for eight years. “Shanghai had a terrible reputation and quite rightly,” he says, “a dreaded place of crime, poverty, and disease at the other end of the world, the last resort for those who had found no other place to go.” He vividly describes the city as a place of contrasts. And the sometimes bizarre community that “so diverse a group of poor and bedraggled European Jews, cast adrift in China under tough conditions in the midst of war, nevertheless succeeded in establishing.” “Community life was astonishingly active and rich, tinged with heightened awareness of Jewishness,” he writes of the 18,000 Germans, Austrians, Polish, Hungarian and Czech who were crowded into a narrow area. “Some rediscovered the synagogues, and there was substantial interest in Zionism and Palestine. Yet most remained strongly wedded to the culture of the past. The Austrians put on Lehar operettas, lending libraries did a brisk business in the German classics, and in the little cafés comedians told jokes with Berlinese and Viennese themes.” The period took a toll on his parents and their marriage but for their teenage son, [at least] observed in hindsight, “The tough refugee war years were precious lessons for the future...In Shanghai I learned what it means to be hungry, poor, and forgotten for no fault of one’s own, and what people will do when their backs are up against the wall. I saw that life can be unfair, that titles, possessions, and all the trappings of position and status are transitory, that they are not as important as one’s

own inner resources in the face of hard times, personal setbacks and defeats.” He credits the Shanghai years for his interest in social science and economics and for leading him directly to the “Democratic Party of Franklin Roosevelt, Harry Truman, John F. Kennedy, and Barack Obama.” When the war ended in 1945, Blumenthal thought that he might find a future in Canada. “I read in a newspaper that the Canadian Consul General had announced that Canada needed immigrants. I was 19 and I went along. I was attending a British school and I spoke good English. I was told that I was ‘just the sort of fellow we’re looking for’ and then I was asked, ‘Under what passport do you intend to travel?’ I told them I was a refugee.” When the long-awaited letter from the government of Canada arrived, it did not have good news. The sting of rejection is clearly something that Blumenthal finds easy to recall, but it is tempered by the satisfaction he felt years later, in 1960, when as U.S. Ambassador in charge of trade negotiations in Geneva, he was described by the Canadian Minister of Trade and Commerce as being a tough negotiator. “If they’d let me into the country in 1945, I might have been working on their side.” Instead, he came to the United States two years later under President Harry S. Truman’s special “Refugee Admission Order” which opened the doors to Holocaust survivors. He arrived, with his sister, in San Francisco on board the SS Marine Adder in 1947 at the age of 21. After that, it seems, there was no stopping him.

AFFAIRS OF STATE

With a bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Berkeley, he entered Princeton University where he gained a Ph.D. and went on to teach economics for three years in the late 1950s. Then he joined and ultimately became vice president and director of Crown Cork International. In the 1960s, he entered politics and public service, serving from 1961 to 1963, as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Economic Affairs. He was with the State Department until 1967, as advisor on trade to Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. Of his direct dealings with the former, Blumenthal concluded, “Kennedy had political courage, a scarce commodity in politics.” Following a ten-year career as president and then chairman of the board of Bendix, he was appointed as Secretary of the Treasury by President Jimmy Carter, serving from 1977 to 1979. He found Carter “unlike any other politician I had ever met.” His was a “problematic presidency,” and Carter accepted Blumenthal’s resignation in 1979. “Simply put, he fired me,” Blumenthal records in a chapter in From Exile to Washington which offers a riveting insider’s view of the highs and lows of the period. “By then, sadder but wiser, I was more than ready to go.” Returning to the business sector, he joined Burroughs Corporation in 1980 as vice chairman, and then became chairman of the board a year later. After the company merged with the Unisys Corporation in 1986, he became chairman and chief executive officer of Unisys, where he remained until his

Blumenthal (Third from left) shown here with President Carter and Secretary Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. (Energy, left), Undersecretary Anthony M. Solomon (Treasury) and U.S. ambassador to the economic summit Henry Owen during their flight from Washington, D.C. to Anchorage, Saturday, June 23, 1979.

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Blumenthal was elected as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention to back President Barack Obama in 2008. In May 2014, he received the EstrongoNachama Prize for Tolerance and Civil Courage. In 1999, he received the Grand Cross of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany and the Leo Baeck Medal. Blumenthal’s books: The Invisible Wall, From Exile to Washington, and In achtzig Jahren um die Welt (Around the World in Eighty Years).

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Daniel Libeskind’s Jewish Museum Berlin interior detail; Jewish Museum Berlin interior detail, Shalechet (Fallen Leaves) in a section of the Void. The Jewish Museum Berlin is a short distance from the Holocaust Memorial (ABOVE), designed by architect Peter Eisenman and engineer Buro Happold.

retirement in 1990. “Much of history is the result of accident,” Blumenthal contends. “So much depends upon who has his hands on the levers of power. Take recent history as an example, in the year 2000, the presidential election was up in the air and ultimately decided by a freak of fate, ‘chads.’ The Supreme Court had to make a much-debated decision. They gave the election to George W. Bush. They could have given it to Al Gore, in which case we wouldn’t have invaded Iraq. In the 20th century there were assassination attempts on Hitler, which, if successful, would have altered the course of history.”

FROM EXILE TO WASHINGTON

In From Exile to Washington, Blumenthal reflects on leadership by examining each decade from the thirties through the nineties. For each period he focuses on one signal event in which he either took part or observed from close quarters. His insights range from Washington in the 1960s; business and the Carter cabinet in the 1970s; technological change and globalization in the 1980s; to the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and his return to Germany in the nineties. “Traveling the world as a business executive and government official, I was in a privileged place to observe the unfolding of these events. Occasionally I would play a small role in them myself,” he says with typical diffidence. Blumenthal’s observations encompass reforms in China under Deng Xiaoping, with whom he had direct negotiations in 1979 that helped bring the country into the modern world after years of isolation. “Deng is the father of modern China,

without whom it wouldn’t have come as far as it has.” He witnessed, at first hand, the fall of the Shah, the beginnings of religious fundamentalism in the Muslin world, and the decline of Communism. Along the way, he has words of praise for fellow Princeton resident and distinguished Under Secretary of State George Ball, whom he describes as “the single most influential and most admired individual in my life. I learned a lot from him.” Of Helmut Schmitt, one of Kennedy’s advisors in the Cuban Missile Crisis, Blumenthal argues he should have been made Secretary of State—“he was a far-sighted man and intellectually powerful.” Blumenthal’s writings are peppered with fascinating anecdotes and details including his involvement with the Princeton Housing Associates formed to help combat the bigotry that had confined the town’s black population to “a de facto black ghetto.” The last chapter of From Exile to Washington focuses on the founding and building of The Jewish Museum Berlin

BACK TO BERLIN

The importance of this museum to the sociopolitical life in present day Germany cannot be underestimated, says Blumenthal. “In addition to being a museum, it is an educational and cultural center, one of the most visited in Germany.” Blumenthal’s conception of the museum was underscored by the belief that it is impossible to understand the history of Berlin without understanding the enormous contributions made by its Jewish citizens. Rather than being a Holocaust memorial, he points out, the museum integrates the meaning of the Holocaust into the German

consciousness and memory. He believes that it is crucial for Germany’s future that the erasure of Jewish life from its history be acknowledged. “The museum demonstrates that Germans cannot understand their own history without knowing about the influence of the Jewish community on their culture.” The museum, which opened in 2001, is regarded as architect Daniel Libeskind’s masterpiece. Its structure speaks to its subject in a dramatic way that marries the past with the future. Visitors enter via the Baroque Kollegienhaus and then descend by stairs underground to arrive at three destinations: the Holocaust Tower, the Garden of Exile and Emigration, and, by means of a second stairway, to the exhibition spaces. The building’s zigzag plan features a “void” that embodies absence while also allowing visitors to “cross-over” numerous bridges connecting one side of the museum to the other. Blumenthal felt it was crucial to show Germans that Jews lived as Germans in Germany for thousands of years. It is with some satisfaction that he speaks of the increase in the number of Jews living in Berlin today. “Since the wall came down, it has grown from 40,000 to 250,000.” Blumenthal served as director of the Jewish Museum Berlin from 1997 until 2014. His writings probe and shed light on the deep contradictions and nuanced ambiguities of the German/German Jewish experience. In 1999, for his humanitarian work promoting tolerance and social justice, he received the Leo Baeck Medal and the Grand Cross of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany.

MARCH 2015 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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| BOOK SCENE

Le Corbusier

Design Begins at Home by Stuart Mitchner

Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye

M

ost of us grow up with an innate sensitivity to architecture and design. This primal design sense no doubt comes to life as soon as your parents hang a pretty mobile above your crib. As you grow up, you’re likely to develop an attachment to familiar objects, as I did, for one example, to the curtains that can be seen in photos of the duplex my parents were renting when I was born. The curtains moved with us from home to home and when we transitioned to a bigger house after I entered seventh grade, I asked that the surviving remnants be hung in my room, even though they were starting to show their age. The colors were warm and cozy, gold and a faded red, with filigree and medallions and knights on horseback; it was the design equivalent of comfort food. It was also a reminder of a happy, secure childhood. LOUIS KAHN

I thought of the curtains when I saw Louis Kahn’s watercolor of a child’s room in George A. Marcus and William Whitaker’s Houses of Louis Kahn (Yale $70). Though the image had no obvious aesthetic relationship to the cozy, colorful disorder I inhabited between the ages of 12 and 19, the ambience felt right. It was less easy to connect with the amusing photograph of Lenore and Bobby Weiss lounging in their Kahn-designed house in suburban Philadelphia, Bobby with his head in Lenore’s lap, amid a dizzying array of imagery and artifacts that would make an amusing New Yorker cover or cartoon. You can see Kahn’s style in the elements of the interior design, but the overall effect is bizarre, beginning with the huge black and white Cubist fantasy of the wall overlooking the happy couple. In the adjacent text, Kahn’s daughter Sue Ann describes his response to her question “Daddy, why don’t you ever design us a house?” His reason was the feeling that his life at home never lived up to his romantic ideal of what a home was. “You don’t build a home,” she remembers him saying. “You build a house,” As the editors point out, home was an elusive concept for someone who had “three children with three different women.” INFINITELY BROWSABLE

Steven Heller and Rick Landers’s Infographic Designers’ Sketchbooks (Princeton Architectural Press $60), with 700 color illustrations, is among the most browsable books of the season; inside, some of the world’s leading graphic designers and illustrators in what the publisher calls the “golden age of data visualization” open their sketchbooks, revealing various idea-generating methods, “from doodles and drawings to threedimensional and digital mock-ups.” One of the most interesting projects is Stefanie Posavec’s Writing Without Words, a series of literary infographics primarily focusing on Jack Kerouac’s On the Road. The effect is that of a passionately devoted

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reader attacking the text with an array of different colored pencils, “fire engine red for the narrator, soft blue for jazz, taupe for drugs.” The diagrammatic result has to be seen to be believed. For younger readers, the same publisher offers Who Built That? Modern Houses ($16.95) by Didier Cornille, a designer, illustrator, and professor at the École des Beaux-Arts in Le Mans. The book offers children a tour through ten of the most important houses by the greatest architects of the 20th and 21st centuries. Beginning with a brief biographical sketch of each architect, Cornille depicts the various stages of construction, paying special attention to key design innovations and signature details. The houses range from Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye (1931) and Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater (1939) to Shigeru Ban’s Cardboard House (1995) and Rem Koolhaas’s Bordeaux House (1998). Another new book in the same series is Who Built That? Skyscrapers, also by Didier Cornille. Subjects include Gustave Eiffel’s Eiffel Tower (1889) in Paris, Mies van der Rohe’s Seagram Building (1958) in New York City, and Adrian Smith’s Burj Khalifa (2010) in Dubai. Its name notwithstanding, Princeton Architectural Press is actually located in New York, just down the street from the building at 206 E. 7th where Allen Ginsberg lived. The Press has been around for 32 years and has published

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everything from theory anthologies to visual portraits of remote Canadian fishing villages.Their first publication, Letarouilly’s Edifices de Rome Moderne (1981), is still in print.

Steven Heller and Rick Landers’s Infographic Designers’ Sketchbooks

PRINCETON AT THE CENTER

Princeton University’s reputation as an epicenter of architectural studies is evident in Retracing the Expanded Field (MIT $34.95), which had its genesis in a two-day symposium in April 2007 at the School of Architecture, in collaboration with the Department of Art and Archaeology. Edited by Princeton’s Spyros Papapetros and Artforum’s Julian Rose, the book revolves around critic and editor Rosalind Krauss’s seminal 1979 essay, “Sculpture in the Expanded Field,” and begins with a roundtable discussion in which Krauss responds to questions about her work and its repercussions from colleagues and members of the audience. For anyone who might feel challenged by the streams of theory and terminology in full flow here, the back and forth of a panel discussion provides a more accessible format than a formal essay. The book is generously illustrated with maps, diagrams, graphics, and photographs of sculptures, designs, and projects by Brancusi, Serra, Christo, Smithson, and Carl Andre. For baseball fans like myself, one of the highlights of Retracing the Expanded Field is the sequence illustrating the famous “camera eye” and flawless coordination of Ted Williams in the high-speed stroboscopic photos Gjon Mili took of the young slugger, bare-chested and in shorts, showing off his swing, the essence of his art, in September of 1941, the year he batted over .400, the last player to do so. Another early indicator of my responsiveness to design was the “expanded field” of the baseball diamond and the classic St. Louis Cardinal logo of two redbirds perched on the metaphorical branch of a slanted bat. The visual poetry in that image pleases me to this day, and so does the living architecture of Cardinal Hall-of-Famer Stan Musial waiting in the batter’s box, staring over his shoulder at the pitcher. Williams might have had the superior eye but Musial’s batting stance was the most exotic in the sport, sinuous and stylish, and dangerous. More than one sports reporter, including the great Red Barber, pictured Musial at the plate, “coiled like a cobra, ready to strike.” ARCHITECTS PAST AND PRESENT

Jean Paul Carlhian and Margot M. Ellis’s Americans in Paris: Foundations of America’s Architectural Gilded Age (Rizzoli $85) documents the work and history of American architecture students at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, the namesake and founding location of the Beaux-Arts architectural movement. Known for demanding classwork and setting the highest standards, the École attracted students from around the world, including the United States, where students returned to design buildings that would influence the history of architecture in America, including the Boston Public Library of 1888–95 (Charles McKim of McKim, Mead & White) and the New York Public Library of 1897–1911 (John Carrère of Carrère and Hastings).

Portraits of the New Architecture 2 (Assouline $75) introduces thirty-two architects and firms, among them David Adjaye, Asymptote, Annabelle Selldorf, Tatiana Bilbao, and Dominique Perrault. Besides Richard Schulman’s portraits and select photographs of the architects’ projects, as well as sketches and designs, the book features an introduction by former New Yorker art critic Paul Goldberger. LIVING IN DESIGN

Although the curtains that gave a coziness to the rooms I grew up in are long gone, the “comfort food” notion is still in effect. I’m still happy to be surrounded by a lot of pleasant clutter, most of it in the form of books. And while the macrame crochet Rue de France “cat curtains” on the windows, picked by my wife when this was my son’s room, are the lacy opposite of those dusky childhood fabrics, it so happens that a real cat spends a lot of real time peering through them, and there’s nothing like the presence of a purring cat to make “a house a home.”

MARCH 2015 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Fancifu Finishes: Kelly Ingram makes her mark on walls, ceilings, even church steeples

By Anne Levin | Photographs courtesy of Kelly Ingram

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(left) A still life painted by Kelly Ingram. (below) This fanciful floor was designed and painted by Ingram for a client's home in Bucks County, Pa.

E

very time I go to my friend Kelly Ingram’s house in Trenton’s Cadwalader Heights, something is different. At a “Downton Abbey” party last year, the living room and dining room had switched places. On another visit, a wall had been primed and was awaiting repainting. Visiting the powder room at a recent dinner party held by Ingram and her husband Ray, I noticed that the floor had been turned into an artful mosaic of pennies, lined end to end. A native New Englander with a warm smile and sky-blue eyes, Ingram is endlessly creative—and not just at home. Her work as a gilder, glazer, painter of wall finishes, and works on canvas is on view in buildings as near as Princeton and as far away as Texas, where the family of a bank executive flew her on their private plane so she could gild portions of the aircraft’s interior. Most recently, she worked on a plaster job at the sun-filled Brooklyn Heights apartment owned by the creator of the Sesame Street character, Miss Piggy. Several Doylestown, Pa. and Princeton Junior League showhouses, the interior of McCarter Theatre’s larger auditorium, a church spire on Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue, and a house in Maine bear the signature of Kelly Ingram Finishes. But it wasn’t until Ingram was midway through another career selling software that she discovered her true calling. “I got into my creative side in my early thirties,” Ingram says. “I was working for a company called Mathematica and living in New York. A friend there introduced me to the Isabel O’Neil Studio for decorative finishes, which teaches an old world, apprentice way of painting furniture. I loved it right away.” Ingram learned how to mix paint and apply the layers, and became familiar with many classic finishes—from tortoise shell and lapis lazuli to glazing and gilding. She started thinking about an artistic career, and took an intensive, two-

week course in wall finishes at San Francisco’s Joanne Day Studio. “It was one week of just mixing color, and the other of applying finishes to one of the famous ‘painted ladies’ houses in the city. It was just phenomenal,” she recalls. “And that helped me know how to do this as a business, because I learned, on site, how to handle all the problems that could come up, and how to fix them. It was invaluable training.” After moving to Trenton with her husband, Ingram began taking her work around to local designers. Soon she was assigned a space to paint in a designer showhouse in Doylestown, Pa. It was an important step. “I met interior designers from Princeton and Hopewell and Pennington, including Deborah Leamann,” Ingram says. “She was working then at Nassau Interiors. When she went out on her own, she called me. We ended up working together for years.” The McCarter job was part of a 1990‘s renovation of the theater. Ingram, her husband, and some hardworking helpers painted the walls, ceiling, and lobby of the Matthews Theater. “That was real teamwork,” she says. “We had seven weeks to get it done, and we managed to pull it off.” Ingram is always learning. She became familiar with the Venetian plaster technique nearly two decades ago and has used it frequently. Recently, she discovered an affinity for still life painting. “I’m enjoying the collaborative process with designers and clients to create abstract paintings for their homes, offices and the like. I think that in one way, I’m preparing myself for the day far in the future when I am no longer going to be climbing up on ladders. But at the same time, it has taken me down a path that I love. It’s really in my blood now. I’m in the process of organizing my days so I can be in the studio more often.” march 2015 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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(top) Ingram hard at work on an abstract canvas at an assisted living residence in Paramus. (bottom-left) A cross gilded by Ingram atop Packanack Community Church in Packanack Lake. (bottom-right) This abstract lacquer and gilded painting is in a client's home in Trenton's Hiltonia section.

The abstracts are filled with color and texture, always key in the work that Ingram does. “When I’m in a class, I truly  feel the the freedom to create like I did in elementary school,” she says. “It’s always a learning process. I didn’t do the usual art school route, so I’m doing it my own way.” Ingram is looking forward to September 12, when her Cadwalader Heights neighborhood holds its annual house tour. The circa 1920’s home she shares with her husband, their German shepherd Fiona, and three felines is always a star attraction. It is probably a safe bet that between now and then, its rooms will go through numerous transformations as this creative artist tests out her latest ideas. I’ll be watching.

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| ART SCENE Philip Leslie Hale, Crimson Rambler, ca. 1908, Oil on canvas, 25 1/4 x 30 3/16 in. Courtesy of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.

SHAKE OFF THE DOLDRUMS OF WINTER AT THE MICHENER

I

by Linda Arntzenius

f ever there was an art show to shake off the doldrums of winter with thoughts of the gentler seasons to come, it’s The Artist in the Garden at the James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown.

Curator Kirsten M. Jensen has mined the museum’s permanent collection for gems by regional artists such as Daniel Garber, Edward Redfield, John Folinsbee, Violet Oakley, Rockwell Kent, Max Weber, Arthur Bowen Davies, Jennifer Bartlett, Elizabeth Osborne, Elsie Driggs, and Peter Paone. A companion exhibition to the glorious The Artist’s Garden: American Impressionism and the Garden Movement (1887-1920) at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA), the Michener show picks up where the PAFA exhibition leaves off. At PAFA, the focus is on the growing popularity of gardening as a middle-class leisure pursuit at the turn of the 20th century. At the Michener, it’s a celebration of the garden as a personal habitat, a place for rejuvenation and refuge from the 1920s through to the end of the century. Both the Michener and the PAFA shows are organized around themes. At PAFA you’ll find work by Hugh Henry Breckinridge, Cecilia Beaux, William Merritt Chase, Charles C. Curran, Maria Oakey Dewing, Frederick Carl Frieseke, Daniel Garber, Philip Leslie Hale, Childe Hassam, Violet Oakley, Jane Peterson, Jessie Willcox Smith, John H. Twachtman, Robert W. Vonnoh, and J. Alden Weir arranged into sections: American Artists/European Gardens; the Lady in the Garden; Leisure and Labor in the American Garden; the Urban Garden; the Artist’s Garden; and Garden in Winter/Garden at Rest. At the Michener, the paintings are loosely divided into three thematic sections, The Back Yard, The Mythic Garden, and Intimate Spaces/ Private Worlds.

(TOP) Charles C. Curran, A Spray of Goldenrod, 1916, Oil on canvas, 14 x 14 1/4 in., Private Collection. (BELOW) Childe Hassam, The Goldfish Window, 1916, Oil on canvas, 34 3/8 × 50 5/8 in., Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, NH.

Both exhibitions capture changes in attitudes to the natural environment prompted by industrial and urban development. Both can be viewed as celebrations of light. “This exhibition was created primarily from our permanent collection, and presents an opportunity for the Michener to highlight paintings not usually displayed in our collection galleries,” notes Ms. Jensen. “I thoroughly enjoyed selecting these paintings . . . and I welcome visitors . . . to experience our painted gardens, both the real and the imaginary.” In the early part of the last century, artists were drawn to the picturesque towns along the Delaware River, to New Hope and Lambertville in particular. While most focused on the pastoral landscape, many were passionate gardeners. The depictions of their own backyard retreats demonstrate a post-industrial revolution rediscovery of nature’s restorative power. It’s an aesthetic that finds expression in the work of contemporary painters for whom their own back yard is not just a symbol of environmentalism but also a place for contemplation, a place to dream. Also at the Michener but moving back in time to the late 19th century, is Rodin: The Human Experience—Selections from the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Collections, which also has a companion exhibition that goes along with it, The Rodin Legacy. There is no doubt that Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) is one of the greatest sculptors of the late nineteenth century. Could there be a better evocation of theatrical swagger than Rodin’s portrait of Honoré de Balzac wearing

(ABOVE) Daniel Garber (1880 – 1958), Mother and Son, 1933, oil on canvas, 80 1/8 x 70 1/4 in., Courtesy of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.

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(left) Auguste Rodin, Balzac in Dominican Robe, modeled 1893; Musée Rodin cast 9 in an edition of unknown size in 1981, bronze; Georges Rudier Foundry. (right) Charles Rudy (1904 - 1986), Shorn Medusa, 1959, Bronze, 26 x 22 x 15 in. James A. Michener Art Museum.

the Dominican robe he used when working in his study? The sculptor’s many studies of Victor Hugo are nothing short of magnificent and a portrait of the famous French writer is here too, as are bronzes of musician Gustav Mahler and the artist Claude Lorraine. There is also a portrait of Rodin’s favorite dancer, the Japanese actress Hanako. Rodin made more portraits of Hanako than of any other individual. He was fascinated by her, describing her anatomy as “exceedingly beautiful in its unique strength.... beauty, character and expression. The human body is, above all, the mirror of the soul, from which the greatest beauty comes.... What we adore in the human body is definitely more than its form, however beautiful; it is the flame that illuminates the body from within.” His portrayal of God, incidentally, also happens to be a self-portrait. The Michener’s Rodin: The Human Experience spans the artist’s long career with major achievements such as the powerful Burghers of Calais, as well as works derived from his masterpiece, The Gates of Hell. Others, such as The Night, demonstrate his experimentation with assemblage. Also featured are sculptures, such as Monumental Torso of the Walking Man, which shows his admiration for Michelangelo, and Dance Movement D, which speaks to his interest in creating an illusion of movement. Because of his facility with bronze, able to convey the feeling of living flesh, as well as his interest in expressing extreme psychological states, Rodin is regarded as a bridge between traditional

and modern sculpture. He influenced generations of younger artists in Europe and in the United States. The Michener’s companion exhibition, The Rodin Legacy, also curated by Ms. Jensen, shows the depth and breadth of that influence wth pieces by Gaston Lachaise, Warren Wheelock, Charles Rudy, Harry Rosin, George R. Anthonisen, and Charles Wells, among others. As the Michener puts it, “Whether they embraced or rejected Rodin’s realism and respect for tradition, modern sculptors were, and continue to be, indebted to his innovative sculptural techniques as well as his focus on formal qualities and spatial relationships rather than narrative elements.” This small exhibition yields a measure of Rodin’s influence— his interest in naturalism, the partial figure and the use of direct carving—as it shows up in the work of leading American sculptors (as well as the British Henry Moore) to this day.

cities during the 1960s and 1970s, “when shifting demographics and political protests had as significant impact as highways and urban renewal.” The work of architects, photographers and filmmakers reveal “seismic transformations,” and a climate of upheaval. The City Lost and Found explores photographic and cinematic responses to the changing fabric of New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles through the work not only of major artists such as Ed Ruscha and Garry Winogrand but also through newly rediscovered projects that evoke the era. If you were not there the first time round, the experience of viewing these images might be the nearest thing to time travel. The City Lost and Found transports the viewer back to the streets, neighborhoods, and events in the country’s three largest cities during the sixties and seventies. The Artist’s Garden: American Impressionism and the Garden Movement (1887-1920) is at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 118 N. Broad Street, Philadelphia through May 24. For more information visit www.pafa.org. The Artist in the Garden will run through August 9 at the James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine St., Doylestown, Pa., where Rodin: The Human Experience—Selections from the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Collections and the companion exhibition, The Rodin Legacy, will be on view through June 14. For more information, hours and admission, call 215.340.9800 or 800.595.4849, or visit: www. MichenerArtMuseum.org. The City Lost and Found: Capturing New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, 1960–1980 will be on view in the Princeton University Art Museum through June 7. For information and hours, call 609.258.3788, or visit: http:// artmuseum.princeton.edu/exhibitions.

(below) Kenneth Josephson, American, born 1932. Chicago, 1969. Photo collage, 10.4 × 14.9 cm. The Art Institute of Chicago.

And now for something completely different

Princeton University Art Museum’s exhibition, The City Lost and Found: Capturing New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, 1960–1980, is a collaboration with the Art Institute of Chicago. It looks at the changes in these

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G N I Z I T I G I D IN

E T S N EI ew N t n a t r o n Imp tal i a g f i o D e o t G o Taking N : Einstein Papers GILBERT N BY ELLE Resource

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In June 26, 1935, Einstein encourages Hamelberg to publish an anti-Nazi article (LEFT). In this July 23, 1935 letter, he offers continued praise for GermanAmerican anti-Nazi publications (RIGHT).

T

he December 2014 announcement of the launch of the Digital Einstein Papers (einsteinpapers.press. princeton.edu) was greeted with huzzas from scientific circles as well as the popular media. “They have been called the Dead Sea Scrolls of physics,” began one article about the project by New York Times science writer Dennis Overbye. They will, he said, enable readers to “dance among Einstein’s love letters, his divorce file, his high school transcript, the notebook in which he worked out his general theory of relativity and letters to his lifelong best friend, Michele Besso, among many other possibilities.” John D. Norton, a University of Pittsburgh professor of history and philosophy of science who wrote his dissertation on the history of Einstein’s general theory of relativity, weighed in on the project from the academic world, declaring, “The best Einstein source is now available to everyone, everywhere through the web. This is a great moment for Einstein scholarship.” The official announcement, released on December 4, tidily summed things up: “The Digital Einstein Papers is an unprecedented scholarly collaboration that highlights what is possible when technology, important content, and a commitment to global scholarly communication are brought together.”

JOINT EFFORT

When Einstein died in 1955, he left behind a trove of letters, notebooks, diaries, papers, postcards, notebooks, and other archival material in attics and shoeboxes around the world. Princeton University Press and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, to whom Einstein bequeathed his copyright, almost immediately embarked on “the Einstein Project,” a quest to collect and assimilate all the documents. The first volume of The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, published by Princeton University Press, sponsored by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and supported by the California Institute of Technology, appeared in 1987, and thirteen volumes of the series, which is currently edited by Diana Kormos-Buchwald, a professor of physics and the history of science at the California Institute of Technology, have been printed so far. When completed, the series will contain more than 14,000 full text documents and will fill an expected thirty volumes. Along with Tizra, a digital publishing platform, these same institutions are also responsible for the online project, with additional support from the Harold W. McGraw, Jr. endowment, the California Institute of Technology, the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Arcadia Fund, U.K.

THE ELECTRONIC ENVIRONMENT

Paper vs. electronic? There is no end in sight to the arguments that can be made for digital, like wider accessibility and wonderfully flexible search capabilities, as opposed to print volumes, which have, for many, greater aesthetic appeal and whose readability is not contingent on the availability of specific equipment. The digital pages of Einstein’s Collected Papers “look” identical to the print versions, say its producers. “One of the reasons we chose Tizra is that we wanted to preserve the look and feel of the volumes,” said Kenneth Reed, digital editions manager at Princeton University Press. “You’ll see the pages as they appear in the print volumes, with added functionality such as linking between the documentary edition and translation, as well as linking to the Einstein Archives Online, and the ability to search across all the volumes in English and German.” Other practical considerations came into play; “when you actually look through the content, there are a lot of equations, a lot of physics, a lot of detailed work that’s gone into the printed page,” Reed notes. “To duplicate that—creating XML and HTML—would be very labor-intensive and costly and take years to develop.” “Einstein belongs to the world,” Reed adds. “I’m excited for the open access part of this—that this is a MARCH 2015 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Draft pages of Einstein's letter to President Roosevelt regarding the use of Uranium as a new source of energy, and experimentations in laboratories.

scholarly text that will be available for the world. It’s a way to preserve the texts.” Additional material will be available on the website approximately eighteen months after the print publication of new volumes of The Collected Papers. “Eventually,” say its creators, “the website will provide access to all of Einstein’s writings and correspondence, accompanied by scholarly annotation and apparatus.” Looking ahead, Kormos-Buchwald is pleased that the online papers “will introduce current and future generations to important ideas and moments in history. I very much hope that historians will access the papers, because Einstein is a major figure in German academic life, intellectual life and eventually political life. He’s become a public persona.” With a long history of publishing books by and about Einstein, Princeton University Press has a particular stake in the digital project. “We are delighted to make these texts openly available to a global audience of researchers, scientists, historians, and students keen to learn more about Albert Einstein,” says press director Peter Dougherty. “This project not only furthers the mission of the Press to publish works that contribute to discussions that have the power to change our world, but also illustrates our commitment to pursuing excellence in all forms of publishing—print and digital.” Reed describes the project as a “first foray” into online publishing for the Press. Other candidates for future digitization include the Press’s similar series of collected writings of Thomas Jefferson, Søren Aabye Kierkegaard, and Henry David Thoreau.

BRILLIANCE AND HUMANITY

While there is undoubtedly “a lot of physics” in the

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Digital Einstein Papers, there are many documents that testify to the casual, slippers-wearing persona that has always been part and parcel of the Einstein mystique. “This material has been carefully researched and annotated over the last twenty-five years and contains all of Einstein’s scientific and popular writings, drafts, lecture notes, and diaries, and his professional and personal correspondence up to his forty-fourth birthday,” says Buchwald. “Users will discover major scientific articles on the general theory of relativity, gravitation, and quantum theory alongside his love letters to his first wife, correspondence with his children, and his intense exchanges with other notable scientists, philosophers, mathematicians, and political personalities of the early twentieth century.” There are those who will want to read “On a Heuristic Point of View Concerning the Production and Transformation of Light,” the paper on the hypothesis of energy quanta for which Einstein received the Nobel Prize. Recent college graduates struggling with today’s tough employment scene, though, may be reassured to see that although he graduated from university in 1900, the notice of Einstein’s first job, an appointment as a technical clerk at the Swiss Patent Office, dates from June 1902. For inspiration there is “My Projects for the Future,” a high school French essay, in which the seventeen-year-old Einstein comments that “young people especially like to contemplate bold projects.” Speaking of “bold projects,” he undertook in the future, there is the telegram that reached Einstein, then travelling in the Far East, telling him that he had won the Nobel Prize. Any element of grand surprise, however, is tempered by reading a clause

regarding the prize’s disposition in a preliminary divorce agreement from Mileva in 1918, indicating that he had long been expecting the award. There are the Four Lectures on the Theory of Relativity held at Princeton University in May 1921 during his first trip to the United States, as well as letters to friends like Heinrich Zangger, a professor of forensic medicine at the University of Zurich, to whom Einstein complained about the vicissitudes of being famous, “worshipped today, scorned or even crucified tomorrow.” He tells scientist Max Planck that he is unable to attend a scientist’s convention in Berlin because he is “supposedly among the group of persons being targeted by nationalist assassins,” and mixes the personal and professional in a letter to his mother, Pauline, in which he shares the news that his prediction of gravitational light bending was confirmed by a British eclipse expedition in 1919. “It is exciting to think that thanks to the careful application of new technology, this work will now reach a much broader audience and stand as the authoritative digital source for Einstein’s written legacy,” observes Kormos-Buchwald. Indeed, one is struck by the fact that producing The Digital Einstein Papers (or any other online enterprise, for that matter) is possible at all is largely because of Einstein himself. As recounted by his biographer Jurgen Neff, Einstein’s publications during 1905 (his annus mirabilis) set in motion “a theoretical revolution with technological implications that have had a major impact on mankind today. It has given rise to the high-tech world of microelectronics, cellular phones, digital photography, computers, chips, the Internet, superconductivity, nanotechnology, and modern chemistry.”

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PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF PRINCETON IN ASIA

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Sofia Orlando, left, and Rachel Alter, right, were 2014 PiA fellows in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

f a college student is lucky, he or she might be able to spend a semester in a foreign country. Those who have the opportunity to bunk in with a family are even luckier, getting a close-up look at how those in different cultures live, work, and play. A program based out of a small suite of offices on Princeton’s Nassau Street takes the concept even further. Princeton in Asia, which has been sending young people to Asian countries since 1898, awards fellowships to some 150 people a year, sending them to such far-flung locations as East Timor, Kazakhstan and Myanmar. Settling in for a year or more, they teach, study, and work in fields including education, media, public health, environmental conservation, and international development. This is immersion taken to a new level. “I formed really strong relationships,” says Alex Jones, who taught seventh grade English for two years in China’s rural Yunan Province after graduating from Hamilton College. He also taught music, introducing his young charges to punk, reggae, and classic rock and alternating singing a Chinese and English song every week. “It was easily the hardest thing I’ve ever done,

and I think about it every day,” he says. “It was unlike anything I had ever experienced—much more difficult and much more rewarding.” After returning from China, Jones joined the staff of Princeton in Asia and now works alongside other PiA alumni. “I heard about the program from a friend who had gone on it,” he says. “I fell in love with the culture and the spirit of the organization.” While fellows come from 70 universities, the largest contingent comes from Princeton University, where the program was begun by a group of undergraduates who raised $500 to support the YMCA in Tientsin (now Tianjin), China. In 1898, Robert “Pop” Gailey ’96 went to China and started the program, enlisting the help of his classmates. Eight years later, he and Dwight Edwards ’94 established the first YMCA in Peking. Over the next 30 years, students worked on famine relief programs, organized the country’s first athletic associations, opened the Peking School of Commerce and Finance, and established the Princeton School of Public Affairs at Yenching University in 1923. Later called the PrincetonYenching Foundation, the program had to temporarily cease operations in China in 1949. It

was then that the organization branched out to include other countries in Asia. The China connection was kept alive through the awarding of scholarships to several students from Hong Kong to attend Princeton University. The name “Princeton in Asia” was coined in 1955. While the program has grown and embraced technological advancements that keep fellows only a text or phone call away from each other, the aims of the organization have remained the same. “The mission has not changed,” says Maggie Dillon, PiA executive director. “We’re here to exchange the best ideals of east and west and to be a meaningful contribution to the community. Humility is a big part of it. It is so important in Asia, and so valuable for people to learn.” Dillon, who graduated from Princeton in 2006 as a German major, looked into PiA because she wanted to do something different. “I wanted to be pushed out of my comfort zone,” she recalls. “I was interested in teaching in Singapore, but the executive director at the time said, ‘Try Laos.’ I had played rugby at Princeton so I went to the National Rugby Foundation in Laos, and stayed three years. It totally changed my life.” MARCH 2015 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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2013 fellow Kyle Kessler, left, in Can Tho, Vietnam. Monica Gonzalez, right, was a Summer of Service participant in 2013. (BOTTOM) PiA executive director Maggie Dillon, right, and Lao Khang, in traditional dress with a rugby ball in Laos, 2012. Photo by Hannah McDonald-Moniz.

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During the building of a playground in Cambodia, left, children check the biceps of a participant. Transit terminal in Bangkok, Thailand, right. A Summer of Service group in 2013, bottom, in Jishou, China, included Alex Jones, 4th from left in the second row.

Dillon became proficient at speaking Lao, and learned how a national foundation works. At Lao Rugby, she served on the executive committee and traveled all over Asia to Kazakhstan, India, China, Malaysia, Cambodia, and within Laos. “I used the rugby program to promote healthy living, life skills, and academic development within the ethnic minority community,” she said. “It was amazing.” She came back to Princeton a year and a half ago to take the executive director’s job. While she loves her work, she misses the life she led in Laos. “There is a really amazing sense of community there,” she says. “It doesn’t feel the same here.” PiA staff travel around the United States interviewing potential candidates for fellowships each year. Victoria Chernova, who comes from Oregon, is among those who were chosen for the program in 2010. A current staff member at PiA , she is a graduate of the University of Southern California. She taught sixth grade language arts in Singapore for a year and a half, and then stayed on

for another year teaching current events and writing. “I had traveled to Hong Kong in college, which made me realize I hadn’t seen much of the world at all,” she says. “I knew I wanted to get back out there and see more. This program, on top of the amazing opportunity it affords for getting to Asia, has a unique vibe, right off the bat. People are funny and clever. It’s just a breath of fresh air.” An outgrowth of PiA is the 10-year-old Summer of Service program, which was an idea suggested by a Princeton University undergraduate to address the need for better language skills in China. The six-to-seven-week English language immersion camp places students in a remote part of Hunan Province, at a university in Jishou City. “It has transformed the reputation of that institution,” says Dillon. “It is now seen as a center for English language learning in China. We’re very proud of that.” Other summer internships are in public health. Among the 15 Princeton University students who

took part in the summer of 2013 is Kate Kaneko, now a junior. Kaneko worked in Bangkok, Thailand for the global health organization Population Services International. She wrote a policy report for the company about heroin overdoses in the community, focusing on how to make the drug Naloxone more readily available. “I was there two months,” she said. “It was great. Being in the moment, you don’t realize until you look back just how great it was. I knew no one. I lived alone. It was the first time I learned how to be lonely.” Having experienced one aspect of PiA, Kaneko says she will probably apply for the full program once she graduates. That doesn’t surprise Dillon. “People have a transformation when they do this program,” she says. “The purpose is not just to go over to study, but to live and work. You’re building relationships. You get a greater understanding of interdependency. And that’s an important lesson. We’re so interdependent, in whatever community we’re in.” MARCH 2015 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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| CULTURAL EVENTS

APRIL 25

MARCH 10

MARCH 16

APRIL 11

M A R K YO U R

APRIL 4

CALENDAR DAR M U S I C | B O O K S | T H E AT R E | L E C T U R E S | S P O R T S TUESDAY, MARCH 10

SATURDAY, MARCH 14

SATURDAY, MARCH 28

7-9PM Christina Henriquez, author of The Book of

3PM Toast to St. Patrick’s Day at the Bucks County

10:30-11:30AM Wander through the fields and forests

Unknown Americans, will deliver a public reading at Princeton Public Library. http://princetonlibrary.org

Playhouse in New Hope for a performance of “Songs of Ireland” by the Galway Girls (also at 8 p.m.). Stop by the Riverview Café after the show for some Irish drinks www.bcptheater.org

of the Watershed Reserve in Pennington in search of naturally-dyed Easter eggs! Children should bring their own basket for egg collection. http://watershed.org

7PM Opening night for the Sherlock Holmes comedy thriller, Baskerville, at McCarter Theatre (March 29). www.mccarter.org

7PM Rustic Italian Winter Market Dinner at Brick Farm Market in Hopewell. www.brickfarmmarket.com

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11 6:30PM An Evening with Bill Holloran of Holloran Vineyard Wines at Agricola in downtown Princeton. A special full-course dinner will be served to accompany the wine. http://agricolaeatery.com

THURSDAY, MARCH 12 6PM Naomi Murakawa discusses her latest book The First Civil Right with Eddie Glaude, Professor of Religion and African American Studies at Princeton University. This free event will be held at Labyrinth Books of Princeton. www.labyrinthbooks.com

8PM The New Jersey Symphony Orchestra performs Mahler’s first symphony, Titan, at the State Theatre of NJ in New Brunswick. www.statetheatrenj.org

SUNDAY, MARCH 15 NOON Philadelphia’s 245th St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Thousands of marchers in their green bedecked finery are accompanied by bands, floats, and flags. This event is one of the grandest parades in Philadelphia. www. philadelphiastpatsparade.com 3PM Join Morven Museum at the Arts Council of Princeton

Way to the Moon at Princeton Garden Theatre. This film follows the life of Princeton mathematician and artist Ed Belbruno. http://thegardentheatre.com

for a musical exploration of the 18th and 19th centuries and how it related to schoolgirl education. The program coincides with Morven’s current exhibit, Hail Specimen of Female Art, New Jersey Schoolgirl Needlework, 17261860. http://artscouncilofprinceton.org

FRIDAY, MARCH 13

MONDAY, MARCH 16

7:30PM Screening of the documentary, Painting the

11AM-NOON Tiger Tales at Cotsen Children’s Library at Princeton University. The interactive storytime begins with a picture book and ends with a creative hands-on project to bring home (repeats every Friday). www.princeton.edu/cotsen

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1 6:30-8:30PM Learn new cooking techniques at this fun cooking class at Williams-Sonoma at MarketFair Mall in Princeton (also on April 15). www.marketfairmall.com

SATURDAY, APRIL 4 9AM The Navy-Princeton Rowing Cup at Lake Carnegie in Princeton.

MONDAY, APRIL 6 7:30PM David Sedaris’ annual Princeton visit has become a McCarter tradition. His bestsellers include Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim, Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk, and his latest, Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls. www.mccarter.org

FRIDAY, APRIL 10

Visitor Center during the Second Annual Bucks County GardenFest. Browse springtime displays at area nature centers, parks, and gardens (through April 17). www. visitbuckscounty.com

7PM New York Yankees vs. the Boston Red Sox at Yankee

11AM-1PM Garden Pickling Workshop at Blue Moon Acres in Pennington. Learn to jar and pickle a variety of vegetables. Each participant will go home with their own recipes and a jar of pickles. http://bluemoonacres.com

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NOON Princeton University mens baseball vs. Yale University at Princeton’s Clarke Field (also at 3:30PM). www.goprincetontigers.com

11AM-5PM Spring will bloom at the Bucks County

SATURDAY, MARCH 21

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SUNDAY, MARCH 29

Stadium (also on April 11 and 12). www.yankees.com

8PM Bob Dylan Tribute Concert at Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton Township. Artist Michael Graves counts Dylan as one of his primary artistic inspirations. His exhibit, Michael Graves: Past as Prologue, just finished a six-month run at the Museum. www. groundsforsculpture.org

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APRIL 23

APRIL 23

APRIL 26

APRIL 18

SATURDAY, APRIL 11 10AM-5PM Dinosaurs of the Deep Invade Adventure Aquarium at Adventure Aquarium on the Camden Waterfront. Large-scale skeletons, ancient fossils, and more than 20 life-size replicas will be on display to teach guests about fascinating prehistoric marine reptiles (through July 5). www.adventureaquarium.com

10AM-4PM Plan It Expo and Bridal Show at Quakerbridge Mall in Lawrenceville. www.simon.com/ mall/quaker-bridge-mall

8PM Comedian, writer, and actor Jerry Seinfeld performs at the Borgata Hotel, Casino & Spa in Atlantic City. www.atlanticcitynj.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 12 4:30PM Princeton Symphony Orchestra’s principal

10AM-8PM Spring Fling at Peddlers Village in Bucks County. Shop the local stores and enjoy special menu options at the village restaurants (also on April 19). www.peddlersvillage.com

11AM-5PM Bring the whole family to the Beach Plum

1-5PM 34th Annual Shad Festival in Lambertville, NJ. Art vendors, live music, and food (also April 26). www. shadfest.com

MONDAY, APRIL 20

Brunswick. This family and alumni oriented event is a celebration of Rutgers University’s research, education, and athletic programs. http://rutgersday.rutgers.edu

6PM Steven Pinker, cognitive scientist, linguist, and author, delivers a free public lecture at Princeton University’s McCosh Hall. http://lectures.princeton.edu

TUESDAY, APRIL 21

FRIDAY, APRIL 17

Princeton University Art Museum’s The City Lost and Found Film Series, the result of a partnership with the Princeton-Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism, and the Humanities. http://artmuseum.princeton.edu

University at Princeton’s Class of 1952 Stadium. www. goprincetontigers.com

8PM The Lewis Center for the Arts presents Theatre Intime’s La Cage Aux Folles at Princeton University’s Hamilton Murray Theater (through April 25). http:// arts.princeton.edu

SATURDAY, APRIL 18 11AM-7PM Spring Food Truck Fiesta. More food trucks, more fun, beer & wine, music, children’s activities, fire pits and more!! Mercer County Park Festival Grounds. Rain or shine! www.foodtruckfiesta-nj.com

10AM Arbor Day Celebration at Terhune Orchards in Princeton. Children will have the opportunity to listen to a “tree” story and receive a free blue spruce seedling to take home and plant.

Farm Spring Festival in Cape May. The 62-acre Beach Plum Farm produces more than 100 varieties of fruits, vegetables, herbs, and flowers. All-inclusive packages are available at Congress Hall, the Virginia Hotel, and Sandpiper Beach Club (also on Saturday, April 25 and Saturday, May 2). www.caperesorts.com

cellist Alistair MacRae performs with soprano Allison Pohl. www.princetonsymphony.org

6PM Princeton University mens lacrosse vs. Harvard

FRIDAY, APRIL 24

6PM Screening of Driving Los Angeles, part of the

SATURDAY, APRIL 25

10AM-4PM Rutgers Day at Rutgers University in New

SUNDAY, APRIL 26 1-6PM Communiversity, an annual celebration of the arts and local businesses in downtown Princeton. Live entertainment, food vendors, giveaways, and more. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org/communiversity

experimental Princeton Sound Kitchen at Princeton University’s Taplin Auditorium. http://arts.princeton.edu

NOON-4PM 40th Annual Bucks County Designer House & Gardens Tour at Villa d’Braccia in Chalfont, Pa. This 7,800 square foot villa is set on four acres. The home will serve as a backdrop for top area designers and landscapers (through May 30). www. buckscountydesignerhouse.org

THURSDAY, APRIL 23

THURSDAY, APRIL 30

8PM “This is How We Fly” musical concert by the

8PM Dan Rather, CBS Evening News anchor from 1981 to 2005, will discuss his life and the state of journalism today at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center in Newark. www.njpac.org

9AM-6PM Penn Relays at Franklin Field in Philadelphia. More athletes compete in the Penn Relays than the Olympics (through April 25). www.thepennrelays.com

6:30-9PM A Conversation with Julian Zelizer, author of The Fierce Urgency of Now: Lyndon Johnson, Congress, and the Battle for the Great Society at Princeton Public Library. Includes wine and a light dinner. http:// princetonlibrary.org

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Karma, Do Ho Suh, Photo by Alan Teo.

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THE HAND OF THE ARTIST WHEN SCULPTORS WANT TO MAKE SOMETHING LARGE, AND THEY WANT IT FAST, THEY GO TO THE DIGITAL ATELIER BY ILENE DUBE

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Photography by Jason Wyche, courtesy of Creative Time, 2014.

A Subtlety, Kara Walker’s sphinx, with exaggerated African features, was accompanied by 15 “sugar babies” – molasses boys bearing baskets of bounty.

L

ast year, visitors lined up at the former Domino Sugar Factory in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, to view A Subtlety, Kara Walker’s homage to the African American slave trade that built the sugar industry. Her giant white sphinx coated in 40 tons of sugar towered over its visitors at 75 feet tall. This was the first sculpture for the artist, a 1997 MacArthur Fellow previously known for two-dimensional silhouettes. The sphinx, with exaggerated African features, was accompanied by 15 “sugar babies” – molasses boys bearing baskets of bounty. Under all that sugar were 330 enormous cubes of Styrofoam that had shipped on 18 wheelers from the Hamilton, N.J.-based Digital Atelier. The Digital Atelier is a state-of-the-art mold making facility. In space leased from the Johnson Atelier, the for-profit company uses laser scanning, CNC (computer numeric control) milling and coating technologies for artists, architects, museums and the entertainment industry. Walker’s slave children were molded in rubber, then cast in sugar that slowly melted – video records of the installation show a brown molasses dripping into puddles on the floor. When A Subtlety closed, 240 of those Styrofoam blocks were shipped back to Hamilton to be recycled. And should Walker ever want to recreate A Subtlety, the master file can be used. In addition to Walker, Digital Atelier clients include Do Ho Suh, Kiki Smith, Carole Feuerman, Gordon Gund and Jeff Koons. For Walker’s project, the Atelier began by scanning her 12-inch model to make an eight-foot model. Laser scanners shoot the object and collect data to make a three-dimensional file. “Once we

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have the file we can manipulate it the way the artist asks,” says President/CEO Jon Lash. Although there are many hands on the project, the artist exerts final control. “It’s the latest greatest revolution,” says the salt-and-pepper-haired Lash, with all modesty. The final work can be milled in materials from acrylic, nylon and wood to metal and plastic. Sculptor Matthew Day Jackson supplies the Atelier with the repurposed materials from which his work is to be milled. Using video cameras and computers, Jackson can watch the milling from his Brooklyn studio and direct the process. “We don’t see people that often,” says Lash, sitting in a room with computers. “They come for the finishing. Most projects come in as small models or maquettes and we talk over the phone.” The Atelier is currently bidding on a project for John Portman, the architect known for creating the Atlanta skyline. Lash zooms in on a detail to show how it’s made up of small triangles, what he calls a point cloud, or points in space. The software fills it in, he says, to create a polygonal model. He is assisted by John Rannou, an engineer, and Brad Warner, a programmer. “We hire people from art and engineering schools,” says Lash. “Princeton University and the University of Pennsylvania have combined art, architecture and engineering programs.” Out on the milling floor, monitors surround the project to send data from the lab to the foundry. Lash’s son, Sawyer, is working in his father’s company while on break from the School of Visual Arts at Tucson, Arizona. With an interest in animation and three-dimensional manipulations, he is learning programs so, as his father says with a grin, he’ll have something to fall back on.

FROM ART TO ARCHITECTURE

Architectural restoration projects have included crumbling facades. Stone walls for Longwood Gardens are being milled in foam so the committee can preview it and make decisions before its final execution in stone. For Paramount, the Digital Atelier fabricated a David-like statue of Sacha Baron Cohen and backdrops for Men in Black. Other projects included work on Shrek and Miss Piggy for Henson Studios and fabricating cars for Disney. Also underway is a re-creation of the Porsche James Dean drove to his death in 1955. The fire melted all but the steel frame of the original, which is being restored in cherry with an aluminum body. “Conservators come to us with projects,” says Lash, giving an example of a masthead for the Naval Academy. “Most museums are now scanning important pieces, so if they are damaged they can be restored digitally.” Conservators for an underground mural in Nicaragua that was compromised by changes in humidity worked with the Digital Atelier to scan and reproduce it, preserving the original colors. After it travels, the reproduction will be installed outside the cave in Nicaragua. “You know that David outside the Uffizi is not the real David,” says Lash. “The real David was attacked by chemicals in the air.” Lash gave a talk on digital sculpture at Florence’s museum. “Over the next 50 to 100 years they’re going to remake all the sculpture in the Milan Cathedral. The European Union is giving the money to train digital carvers. It preserves the apprentice program and starts a new business,” he says.

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Photography by Jason Wyche, courtesy of Creative Time, 2014. Images courtesy of Digital Atelier (TOP) A Subtlety, Kara Walker’s homage to the African American slave trade that built the sugar industry. (ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT) Walker’s process sketches; Carved Styrofoam blocks provide foundation for sugar; Refining the sculpture, coated in over 40 tons of sugar.

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Images courtesy of Digital Atelier

(below) Confrontational Vulnerability, inspired by Manet’s “Olympia,” J. Seward Johnson; (right) Digital isometric of Olympia; Sculpting process.

THE EYE OF THE ARTIST

Lash himself started as a sculptor and apprentice in the Johnson Atelier, where he met his wife, Dona Warner. She headed the metal finish department and became director. In his own work, Lash began as a figurative artist who eventually turned to abstraction. As an apprentice he worked with Georgia O’Keeffe on casting and enlarging her aluminum sculpture in the 1980s. He was promoted to staff, then worked in every department before becoming supervisor and director of special projects. “I saw the sculpture world changing and went to Seward Johnson and told him about sculpting through digital means. Much of what was formerly done by hand and took months, if not years, is now possible to accomplish in weeks with fewer steps and less labor. He asked, what would I need to do that? He met with the board and they said ‘no way.’ He came back to me and said if I wrote a business plan, including how I’d pay him back, he’d front $100,000 for a start up.” This was in 1998, and no one else was doing this, says Lash – which meant learning by trial and error. “By 2002, the Digital Atelier had taken off, and we went to the board and said we have a problem – we’re making money.” Making money can be problematic for a not-for-profit. “The IRS said it would allow the Sculpture Foundation to have a for-profit subsidiary for four years” but then it would have to be liquidated. Johnson was supportive of the idea all along, says Lash. In 2011, the Digital Atelier was sold to Lash, who leases space from the Johnson Atelier. Although he can’t talk much about it, Lash says

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he is working on a project with Koons that is of an experimental nature. Koons wants to make his piece out of an expensive stone. “To check the tool paths, he is doing it on a dense urethane first so the stone will not be ruined. We’re working closely with his studio.”

Big Gorilla, Jeff Koons.

Koons’s Popeye and Big Gorilla were fabricated at the Digital Atelier. “He likes to see the object first at full scale. He has his own computer modeling staff that can make changes before it goes into the final material.”

A FAMILY AFFAIR

The former Stone Division of the Johnson Atelier, which became the Digital Stone Project, was bought by Koons, who moved it to Morrisville, Pennsylvania, where it operates solely for his own use. Lash’s wife now works as a manager for Koons. Jon and Dona keep a studio at home, but have little time for their own work. “This keeps me going 12 hours a day,” says Lash, who stays awake at night answering e-mails from Korea, Belgium and China in the wee hours. But it sates his artistic passions. A customer calls to find out how much lead time is needed for a project. Lash asks his assistant to say three weeks. “People are looking for new materials, and they’re looking for a recommendation on what materials to use. I tell them if it won’t work in wood, or what changes they’d need to make to make it work in wood. “They always control the project,” continues Lash. “You learn to use someone else’s hands. Jeff [Koons] says he doesn’t touch his own work but he’s a total control fanatic. He doesn’t take ‘no’ – someone in the world can do it the way he wants.” Kiki Smith is more hands on. “She comes to do sanding and detail work,” reports Lash. “Tom Otterness likes to do everything. He does all the surface finishing. We make the armature, then the artist can put a fingerprint on it. “The argument,” continues Lash, “is that sculpture will lose its heart if it is made by machine. But sculpture has always been made by machine.”

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Images courtesy of Digital Atelier

Image courtesy of Scoboco

(clockwise from top-left) Tomb, Matthew Day Jackson; Fluke, Gordon Gund with his work in the University Medical Center of Princeton’s meditation garden. Photo courtesy of Princeton Healthcare Systems; Carole Feurman working on Cocoon; Milling the head of Don Myhre’s Walt Disney; Kiki Smith, modeling.

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| the last word

Brandon Waddles

W

hen Brandon Waddles speaks, his deep baritone is an immediate giveaway to what he does for a living. The Detroit native is the interim director of Westminster Choir College’s Jubilee Singers, who specialize in stirring African-American spirituals, hymn arrangements, and gospel songs as well as other forms of vocal music. The 38-member choir will celebrate its 20th anniversary with a special reunion concert on Sunday, April 19 at Princeton Meadow Church and Event Center in West Windsor. Among the expected alumni are Anwar Robinson, who was a finalist on American Idol; Laquita Mitchell, a winner of the Metropolitan Opera Competition and recent performer in the San Francisco Opera’s production of Porgy and Bess; televised on PBS; and the ensemble’s celebrated

former conductor J. Donald Dumpson. In its two decades, the “Jubs,” are they are sometimes known, have appeared with the Fisk University Jubilee Singers, after which they were modeled, as well as groups such as Sweet Honey in the Rock, on such stages as Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center. Waddles has headed the ensemble for the past two years. What is your background? I graduated from Westminster two years ago. While I was a student I was a member of the choir and also served as accompanist. My father is a pianist and choir director who does everything I do, only ten times better. I grew up with several denominations but attended Baptist church with my grandmother. I also went to Holiness/Pentecostal services. All of that helped to put together what I do now. My grandmother took us to the ballet and the opera, too, and that adds to the mix. I also write and arrange music. What is it about spirituals, gospel, and related music that draws people in? What touches people is the heart and soul behind the music. This is the definitive American music. The spiritual was America’s first true form. There’s a struggle in it that not only speaks to blacks, but to anyone who has experienced life. Some people are wary of singing it because they think it’s the music of slaves. But these songs speak to a variety of expression. Just like Beethoven and Brahms, they speak to the human condition. It’s something very different from the western tradition. Great conductors like John Finley Williamson and Joseph Flummerfelt were building a huge legacy at Westminster of choral classics. So for something like Jubilee to come out of that was amazing. It was really a battle, in some ways, to get that music out. This particular music was not always thought of as legitimate. It was thought to be debilitating to the voice.

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Images courtesy of the Director of External Affairs, Westminster Choir College of Rider University.

Interview by Anne Levin

PRINCETON MAGAZINE march 2015

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Are most members of the choir African-American? No. The majority is not, actually. We have Caucasians, Asians, Latinos, and blacks. These are students who are passionate about choral music. I’m spoiled at Westminster, because of the tremendous passion and clarity the students bring to what they perform. To see and hear that in action is truly amazing. They bring their own intricacies to the music. One student in the choir told me that for her, it’s her greatest release. It’s a breath of fresh air. What do you see as the purpose of Jubilee Singers? One big goal is to revitalize the spiritual and make it accessible to the world at large. The other is to bring a greater aspect of diversity to Westminster. The school has evolved in such a fresh way in recent years, and

this is part of that. We also want to make choral artistry a more family-oriented and passionate thing. I’m a great fan of choral music, but it seems a little rigid. Westminster serves the family atmosphere of making music, and the Jubs enhance that. Kids love it. How will the reunion concert celebrate the choir? The first half will be the current choir, and the second half will bring in the alumni. Mr. Dumpson will be there to conduct and the alums will do their hallmark pieces. The full band from the First Baptist Church of Lincoln Gardens in Somerset, where I’m on the music ministry staff, will be part of it, too. We want people to have a great time. As I told the audience at our last concert, these seats don’t have glue on’em!

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The only Range sophisticated enough to be a Miele. Allow the Miele Range to guide you to extraordinary culinary adventures. Only through Miele’s intuitive functionality and impeccable design, can the sanctuary of your kitchen become a world of exploration night after night.

Miele Center at Princeton 800.843.7231Way, Princeton, NJ 08540 9 Independence mieleusa.com 8mieleusa.com &800.843.7231

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Princeton Magazine, March 2015