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Princeton magazine september 2016

the education issue

NJSO Music Director Xian Zhang university presidents look ahead the first college football smackdown Camden’s Waterfront Revival DoughMain Education Foundation Alexander hamilton’s new jersey

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SEPTEMBER 2016 PUBLISHER J. Robert Hillier, FAIA EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Lynn Adams Smith CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jorge Naranjo ART DIRECTOR Jeffrey Edward Tryon GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Matthew DiFalco Erica Cardenas PHOTOGRAPHER Benjamin Ealovega CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Stuart Mitchner Nancy Plum Anne Levin Ellen Gilbert Donald Gilpin Wendy Plump Sarah Emily Gilbert Taylor Smith ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Robin Broomer ACCOUNT MANAGERS Jennifer Covill Kendra Broomer Monica Sankey Erin Toto OPERATIONS MANAGER Melissa Bilyeu PRINCETON MAGAZINE Witherspoon Media Group 4438 Route 27 North Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 P: 609.924.5400 F: 609.924.8818 princetonmagazine.com

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CONTENTS

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The Camden Waterfront masterplan development will replace area that currently exists as paved surface parking lots.

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SEPTEMBER 2016

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50 ..... FEATURES .....

..... HERE & THERE .....

Q&A WITH NEW JERSEY SYMPHONY MUSIC DIRECTOR XIAN ZHANG

UNIVERSITY PRESIDENTS

BY NANCY PLUM

“I had to learn to speak loudly in a foreign tongue”

BY ELLEN GILBERT

A seminar in interviews 60

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CAMDEN: REVIVAL ON AND OFF THE WATERFRONT

BY WENDY PLUMP

BY ANNE LEVIN

Where the American football experience began

More than one billion in tax credits promised to Camden projects

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HEADING FOR ANOTHER FINANCIAL CRISIS?

MARK YOUR CALENDAR

BY DONALD GILPIN

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Not if DoughMain Education Foundation has anything to say about it

BOOK SCENE

42

BY STUART MITCHNER

ALEXANDER HAMILTON’S NEW JERSEY

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Proust goes graphic

BY TAYLOR SMITH

From Elizabethtown to Weehawken

FASHION & DESIGN

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Back-to-school products

LOCAL YOUTH DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

A well-designed life

30 BY SARAH EMILY GILBERT

Girls On The Run and The First Tee foster a lifetime of good 50 ON THE COVER: New Jersey Symphony Orchestra Music Director Xian Zhang, 2015, photography by Benjamin Ealovega.

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AERIAL RENDERING: VOLLEY STUDIO FOR ROBERT A. M. STERN ARCHITECTS.

FIRST SMACKDOWN

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2016

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| FROM THE PUBLISHER

I call you “community” because our readership is not just in Princeton, but is, in fact, through subscriptions, across the country and, across the world. The loyalty of those who have lived here and yet want to stay connected through Princeton Magazine is truly amazing. Besides being dedicated to the time of year when the kids are heading back to school, this issue also ushers in a new segment of the year, the end of a summer of vacations and political party conventions. The core of our “Back to School” issue concerns what leading University Presidents are thinking about and advocating for their institutions. While our Presidential “perspectives” represent the top of the educational scene, we also have a story about the DoughMain Education Foundation, a non-profit program dedicated to teaching youngsters all about finances, financial management, and financial literacy. How to balance a checkbook, what a mortgage is, what an interest rate means, how to deal with credit card companies are all topics in the “curriculum.” DoughMain is all about making your kids smarter than we were at their age. We also have articles about raising the sights of Trenton’s youth. In “Girls on the Run,” we cover a program turning young women into runners, and in “First Tee of Greater Trenton” we show how youths have found the green of a golf course a safer and healthier alternative to the urban landscape. These are all wonderful programs that you might consider supporting. Of course, with our “Back to School” issue we have to add some history about the classic rivalry between Rutgers University and our own Princeton University played out in the very first college football game. Just consider, for a moment, how a major American culture has grown out of rough and ready contest between two New Jersey institutions. In light of the Broadway sensation Hamilton, you may want to know more about Alexander Hamilton’s life in New Jersey, particularly how he served George Washington in the battles of Princeton and Trenton. Over the last decade Weehawken, the scene of Hamilton’s fatal duel with Aaron Burr, has been undergoing a transformation in the shadow of New York City. In fact, a similar transformation is beginning for Camden, in the shadow of Philadelphia. A couple of decades ago, my architectural firm designed the Thomas Kean Aquarium [Adventure Aquarium], which was to be the stimulus for the “renaissance” of Camden. Aquaria in Monterey, California and in the Inner Harbor of Baltimore had led to major new developments in those cities, but this never quite gained traction in Camden. However, through various tax incentives, plus the amazingly positive growth of Philadelphia, Camden has a new energy! This has been reinforced by the development of the Cooper University Hospital in association with MD Anderson Cancer Center at Cooper, Rutgers University’s growth of their Camden campus, plus Rowan University, which has given the entire region a new energy.

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Photography by Andrew Wilkinson

Dear Princeton Magazine community,

Finally, our cover story is about Xian Zhang, the newly appointed director of the New Jersey Symphony, an important feature of our state’s culture. As you go through this issue, you will note the names of Camden, New Brunswick, Trenton, Weehawken, Newark, all towns that have a connection to Princeton through our magazine. The reach of Princeton Magazine is beyond our town’s municipal lines. A few years ago, in a talk to the Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce, I described Princeton as “The Best Little City in the World.” After all, it had all of the cultural, corporate, and institutional aspects of a city along with many of the complications of an urban environment. In the marketing realm, Princeton begins at Exit 13 on the N.J. Turnpike and ends at Exit 3. That alone indicates the the reach of this special town. Your Editor-in-Chief, Lynn Adams Smith, and I hope you enjoy this “Back to School” Issue. Respectfully yours,

J. Robert Hillier, FAIA Publisher

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Q&A with New Jersey Symphony Orchestra Music Director Xian Zhang “I always believe once you get the people to come and listen to the music, the music will do its magic and will work its own way to reach people’s hearts.”

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Xian Zhang with the NJSO - May 2015 - 03 (credit Fred Stucker)

by Nancy Plum

PRINCETON MAGAZINE September 2016

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Xian Zhang with the NJSO 2016 - credit Fred Stucker

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eptember 2016 marks the beginning of a new era in the history of the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra as internationally renowned Chinese-American conductor Xian Zhang takes the helm of the NJSO as the ensemble’s 14th Music Director. In the coming season, Zhang will conduct seven NJSO subscription classical concerts, including three performances in Princeton. Zhang’s music education includes training at Beijing’s Central Conservatory and doctoral studies at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music. She made her professional debut conducting Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro at Beijing’s Central Opera House at the age of twenty, and since then has conducted orchestras and opera companies throughout the world, including a performance of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 with The Philadelphia Orchestra in which this writer performed. Zhang was appointed the New York Philharmonic’s Assistant Conductor in 2002, subsequently becoming their Associate Conductor and the first holder of the Arturo Toscanini Chair. In describing her relationship with the NJSO, Zhang said “There was an instant connection the first time I conducted the NJSO. Ever since then, every

time we collaborated, these musicians impressed me with their commitment, intelligence and musicianship. I am proud to become the leader of an orchestra that shares my belief in the power of music to transform lives, both in and outside of the concert hall. The NJSO’s mission of performing music that touches hearts and engaging with communities and students throughout the state of New Jersey is one I fully embrace. I am looking forward to getting to know our musicians, patrons, artistic partners and the students in our education programs.” Zhang will be moving with her family to New Jersey from Milan, Italy. Nancy: Where exactly are you from in China, and what was it like growing up there? Xian: I was born in a small city near Korea called Dandong. I studied piano with my parents beginning at age three [on a piano built by her father] in a quiet family atmosphere, and followed a strict schedule of eight hours of daily practice time on the piano outside of school hours.

Nancy: What was your music education and training when you were young? Xian: I was taught privately by my parents, and later by professors at the Shenyang Conservatory of Music. I remember conducting my class once, singing something when I was seven—it’s a funny memory. Nancy: Have you had any musical role models? Xian: All of my teachers have been role models in one way or another. Nancy: Have you encountered any obstacles or challenges as a woman conductor? Xian: There have been a few obstacles, but in general, I have had positive experiences. Nancy: When you came to the United States for your doctoral studies, what was the most significant adjustment you had to make? Xian: I had to learn to speak loudly in a foreign tongue, and tell musicians what to do in a convincing way. SEPTEMBER 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Xian Zhang with the NJSO - May 2015 - 01 (credit Fred Stucker)

Nancy: Who is your favorite composer and why? Xian: My favorite composer is Johann Sebastian Bach, because his music is pure, natural and joyous—the best qualities of human nature. Nancy: What other musical positions do you hold? Xian: Besides my role with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, I have been Music Director of La Verdi Orchestra Sinfonica Milano (Milan Symphony “Verdi”) in Italy since 2009, Principal Guest Conductor of the BBC National Orchestra of Wales in the United Kingdom beginning in 2016 and Artistic Director of The Netherlands Jungen Orkest (The Dutch Youth Orchestra) in the Netherlands since 2011—an appointment which will end soon. Nancy: What are some of your goals for the NJSO? Xian: I take great pride in becoming Music Director of the historic New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, which has been associated with a succession of respectable maestros. In particular, I have enjoyed the flexibility and sensibility in the

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musicians’ playing and eagerness of wanting to sound good as a group, not for personal heroism. I wish to raise the performance level even higher and give audiences throughout the state musical experiences of high impact and excitement. I also wish to promote the NJSO’s role in community engagement and educational activities. Nancy: What do you think the NJSO brings to the state of New Jersey? Xian: We are the musical messengers of the state. We bring joy, hope, entertainment and emotional experiences to be shared with our audiences throughout this very diverse state. It makes this orchestra different and special in the United States, where most orchestras play only in their home halls and rarely do run-out concerts to other communities. Nancy: With this appointment, you will be moving your family to New Jersey. What is your favorite thing so far about the Garden State? Xian: The nature: the green landscapes, the seaside … We have been living in Italy for six years. Every summer we spend time in our home in the United States; my family loves it and never

has enough of it, so they are all very excited about the move. Nancy: If you had recommendations for music education in schools, what would you suggest? Xian: I would recommend group activities— playing instruments and singing together—making classical music “cool” and interesting to kids. With the NJSO, I’d love to give special attention to music education and involve even more children in our programs. Music education is one of the most important aspects of a professional orchestra. It is important to reach out to schools and to nurture the next generation. Nancy: How much traveling do you do each year and what is your favorite place to visit? Xian: I am on the road at least half of the year. My favorite place on the planet is actually my home, where I never get to stay much. Nancy: Do you have any hobbies or interests that audience members would be surprised to learn about you? Xian: I like to read historical fiction.

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2016

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THE FOOTBALL GAME THAT STARTED IT ALL BY WENDY PLUMP IMAGES COURTESY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS AND UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES, RUTGERS UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES.

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This depiction of the Rutgers-Princeton game of 1869 was painted by William Boyd, Rutgers College Class of 1932. Since photographs of the game were not taken, Boyd's painting has become the standard representation of the ďŹ rst intercollegiate football game and appears in many accounts of the history of American football.

T

he game was held on a November afternoon, so the ground must have been wicked hard. They played without shoulder pads or shin guards. They played without helmets. There were no officials and no referees. The rules of play were adopted that very morning based on the home team’s wishes, and presumably on its strengths. There were uprights at each end of the field but there were no crossbars. There was a fence that onlookers used as bleachers, but two team members collided with it in a late play and it came crashing down along with everyone sitting on it. And with 25 players on each team the field was crowded; packed, in fact, with grit and muscle and an unholy amount of testosterone. A later Arnold Friberg painting of the game portrays a scrum of swarthy, burly, bloodied men who look more like pirates than college students

SEPTEMBER 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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(right) Composite of the individuals from Rutgers who participated in the 1869 contest with Princeton. “The appearance of the Princeton men was very different from that of our own players,” reported The Targum in November 1869. "They were almost without exception tall and muscular, while the majority of our twenty-five are small and light, but possess the merit of being up to much more than they look." (below) William J. Leggett, ‘72, elected by his teammates as captain of the 1869 Rutgers team. Leggett and his counterpart from Princeton, William S. Gummere ‘70, met prior to the starting time of the game to discuss and agree upon the rules of the game. Both men went on to distinguished careers, Leggett as a Reformed clergyman, and Gummere as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New Jersey.

Welcome to the first collegiate football game in America. It was played between Princeton and Rutgers on a frosty afternoon in 1869 on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick. By all accounts, it was no place for buttercups. There is much that is debatable about the game. Some claim it was not proper American football at all. Some claim it looked more like soccer than football, and others that it looked more like rugby than soccer. Some argue the first gridiron rules game was actually played between Tufts and Harvard several years later. There was a Rutgers graduate who repeatedly boasted that he had been a member of that team, but was not. No one alive can name Princeton’s 25th player, and no one at the time identified the nation’s first ignominious Wrong Way Corrigan, who enabled a goal for the opposing team. But you cannot deny that there was a game. And you cannot deny that it was a primitive forerunner of football. And you cannot deny that, in the words of sportswriter Allison Danzig describing that colonial rivalry many years later in The New York Times: “It was responsible for the turning loose of hordes of tigers, lions, wildcats, bulldogs, rams, leopards, owls, hawks, bobcats, panthers, bears, eagles, terriers, cougars, bisons, bulls, buffaloes, muskateers, generals, gentlemen, presidents, commodores, raiders, and about every other species except the man from Mars.” So who, in the end, wants to be a stickler for

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details? It is more satisfying to simply imagine the excitement as the teams gathered in the autumnal weather, hunkering down on the field off College Avenue, the captains chosen, the clothing shucked, the ball handed onto the field of play, and someone whose name is forever lost to history sounding the opening charge. “It’s technically not the first football game. Football as a game goes all the way back to the Greeks,” says Steve Greene, a 1979 Rutgers graduate who is researching the history of the Rutgers football program for a long-term project. “But if you go to this year’s Super Bowl and reverse the flow of dominoes all the way back, you’re gonna end up right there on November 6, 1869. There are other dominoes scattered earlier in time, but none that initiated the American football experience. Of the traditional top four major American sports, only football developed directly out of intercollegiate play.” A SPARSE FIRST SEASON

Three games were scheduled for the 1869 season, all of them between Princeton and Rutgers; or more precisely, between the College of New Jersey, not yet named Princeton, and Rutgers College, previously Queens College and not yet named Rutgers University. Princeton and Rutgers were both among the first colleges in the nation. There was a fierce rivalry between them even before the November 6 game. But there

PRINCETON MAGAZINE September 2016

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was also a bond born of the shared experience of being the first college students in New Jersey. On the side of commonality, the two schools nearly merged in 1793, with a consolidated Board of Trustees proposed. The idea was that Rutgers would serve as a preparatory school and Princeton as a college. The proposal was defeated by just one vote. When Rutgers was founded in 1766, its curriculum was based in part on Princeton’s classical template. Just 20 miles separates the two campuses, and that distance was easily bridged in the late 19th century by train travel. In addition, several of Rutgers’ first tutors were Princeton graduates. On the side of rivalry, however, there was the fact that the town of Princeton had successfully outbid New Brunswick in 1753 for the final location of the College of New Jersey. There was the award of the state’s Land Grant status to Rutgers in 1864, which Princeton had coveted for itself. There was a baseball game in 1866 in which Rutgers was thoroughly annihilated by Princeton. And there was the matter of the

cannon wars, in which a disputed Revolutionary War cannon was repeatedly stolen and re-stolen by Princeton or Rutgers students vying for permanent possession. (The cannon today rests on Princeton’s campus, sunk into several feet of concrete.) While the November 6, 1869 game attracted about 100 fans, it was insufficiently noteworthy to draw any of the great newspapers of the day. The sole remaining accounts of the game spring from three sources. Among them The Targum, the Rutgers newspaper that began publishing in January of 1869, carries the fullest report. A local New Brunswick newspaper, The Daily Fredonian, had an article in its November 9 issue. The remaining accounts, according to Greene, came from members of that original team harkening back to it decades later. Most histories written about the first football game base their own stories on these early reports. According to Princeton University’s 250th Anniversary book, the game originated with a proposal from one William S. Gummere, a

member of Princeton’s Class of 1870. Serving as team captain, Gummere offered to bring his men up to Rutgers for a football match, after which Rutgers would make its own visit to Princeton for a second game the following weekend. A third game would follow shortly thereafter. Together, these three contests would comprise the season of 1869. A COIN TOSS AND THEN BEDLAM

Rutgers University archivist Tom Frusciano, who researched the game for his 2008 book Rutgers University Football Vault, describes a casual, comradely air among players on the morning of November 6. The Princeton team arrived in New Brunswick by train accompanied by scores of Princeton students. They sauntered around New Brunswick, surveyed the college, and were treated to a fine lunch—with billiards—by the Rutgers team. The players, says Frusciano, took to the field by 3 P.M. Gummere was Princeton’s captain. Rutgers’ captain was William J. Leggett.

On Saturday, November 6, 1869, twenty-five young men from the College of New Jersey and their supporters boarded a train in Princeton and traveled one-hour to New Brunswick for a friendly match of "foot-ball" against twenty-five students from Rutgers College. Playing a game that resembled "mass soccer," Rutgers won the first intercollegiate contest, 6 goals to 4.

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(LEFT) Princeton University Football Game, 1888.

Stadium,

(BELOW) View of Princeton University’s Palmer Stadium during a game. Photographs provided by the Collection of the Historical Society of Princeton.

“It probably was fierce,” says Frusciano. “From what we have, it sounded like a fairly rough game.” It had been agreed that the rules would be based on those of the London Football Association. Each score counted as a “game.” Once the score reached 10 games, the contest was over. The ball could not be carried or thrown, but had to be kicked or batted forward until it went through the uprights. Among the 50 men assembled on the field were future clergymen, a state senator, a future chief justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court, several veterans of the Civil War—both Confederate and Union soldiers—and a finalist in the first U.S. Open Tennis Tournament. Most were said to have been excellent athletes. The Princeton team members were larger; the Rutgers team members more agile. Rutgers, Frusciano says, won the coin toss. Princeton got the ball and kicked it off to the side where the Rutgers’ players swarmed around it. Using the game’s earliest “flying wedge,” they moved the ball up the field and scored the first goal within five minutes. The second play was dominated by Princeton’s J.E. “Big Mike” Michael, who through sheer weight and size broke apart Rutgers’ wedge and paved the way for his own teammates. Princeton scored the second goal. The Targum captured the mayhem in its November 1869 article: “To describe the varying fortunes of the match, game by game, would be a waste of labor for every game was like the one before. There was the same headlong running, wild shouting, and frantic kicking. In every game the cool goaltenders saved the Rutgers goal half

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a dozen times; in every game the heavy charger of the Princeton side overthrew everything he came in contact with.” The contest proceeded with each team making almost alternate goals. The seventh goal, won by Princeton, included the notorious wrongway play by an unidentified Rutgers student. The score was tied after the eighth goal. Rutgers scored the ninth goal and the tenth, and the game was over, with Rutgers winning six to four. THE REST IS HISTORY

One week later, Princeton hosted the season at its own campus. They blanked Rutgers 8-0 deploying, in particular, their kicking skills to

rule the day. The third game was never played, apparently because, as Frusciano explains, faculty members from each college complained that the sport was interfering with academics. With the season ending in a default 1-1 tie, the National Collegiate Athletic Association posthumously awarded the championship for 1869 to both Rutgers and Princeton. Rutgers football did not defeat Princeton again until 1938. During the September 27, 1969 centennial re-match, Rutgers won 29-0. It should be noted that the 150th anniversary of that first game arrives in 2019—just three years away. Seems like a good time for another rematch.

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Heading for Another Financial Crisis? Not if DoughMain Education Foundation Has Anything to Say About It

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM.

BY DONALD GILPIN

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“Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it,” wrote philosopher

TEACHING FINANCIAL LITERACY

Ken Damato, chairman of the board of DoughMain Education Foundation (DMEF) and Rob Church, DMEF executive director, are not surprised by the abysmal state of financial literacy in this country, and they have a plan to help students learn the financial skills they need to survive and flourish in the 21st century—and to ensure that the great recession of 2008 is not repeated. “The goal of DMEF,” says Mr. Church, “is to build financial literacy in students and prepare them for a lifetime of financial responsibility. By developing effective financial literacy skills in students, we empower them to take control of their lives.” Mr. Damato, in his DoughMain office in Research Park across from Princeton Airport, blames “financial irresponsibility on the part of both consumers and the industry” for the 2008 crisis. The U.S. government—first President Bush, then President Obama—realized we had to do something, he says, and it had to start early in people’s lives. So they started to encourage the States through the Department of Education to take action to help teach children about money. Mr. Damato goes on to explain, however, that in spite of government and school efforts, “financial literacy is still getting a failing grade in this country. It’s hard to teach about money. Most adults don’t feel comfortable about their own money situations. Most people would give themselves a ‘C’ or below for their own knowledge of money. These are the same people—in debt, trying to pay their mortgages —who walk into the classroom and try to explain finances to students.”

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM.

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF DOUGHMAIN.

and essayist George Santayana. Have we learned anything from the financial crisis that devastated so many families and crippled our economy in 2008? Have our financial institutions and government organizations heeded the important lessons that arose from the financial irresponsibility that brought on that crisis? Have we learned our lessons about managing credit and debt, about saving and investing, about borrowing and budgeting that will help to keep us financially secure in future uncertain economic times? And, most importantly perhaps, do young people, graduating from high school, embarking on their lives of earning, spending, borrowing and saving, know what they need to know to provide the financial foundations necessary for stable, happy lives? The answers to the above questions are apparently a resounding “No,” and the consequences of this lack of knowledge could be disastrous for individuals, their families, communities, and our country. A recent National Capability Study by the FINRA foundation, which surveyed 27,564 Americans from June to October, 2015, revealed that 63 percent of respondents could answer no more than three out of five basic questions about money, and only 37 percent could answer four out of five. “Individuals need at least a fundamental level of financial knowledge,” the FINRA report stated. “This knowledge, paired with financial decision-making skills, can best ensure an individual’s financial capability.” But on the five basic survey questions, covering aspects of

economics encountered in everyday life—compound interest, inflation, risk and diversification, interest rates and mortgage payments—that fundamental level of knowledge was lacking. Despite all the concern and determination to avoid future catastrophe, the percentage of Americans answering more than three out of five questions correctly actually declined from 42 percent to 37 percent between 2009 and 2015. This financial knowledge deficit helps to explain disturbing reports on Americans’ financial state, which include: *18 percent reporting that they spend more than their income; *21 percent reporting medical bills overdue; *9 percent having an “underwater” mortgage, with the balance on the mortgage higher than the value of the home; *50 percent having no rainy day fund of money set aside to cover expenses for three months in case of emergencies; *more than half rating their current financial situation as fair or poor. And all of the above make it impossible for many Americans to make ends meet, to save money and to plan for the future. “Many people don’t understand budgeting, investing or how simple financial products like loans work,” according to Tom Sagissor, president of RBC Wealth Management-US, in an article last spring in The Street. “That puts them at a disadvantage not only during their working years, but as they begin to contemplate retirement.”

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sort of financial literacy standards, and 17 states, including New Jersey, now require 60 hours of financial instruction. “Teachers’ resources are being challenged,” Mr. Damato says. “They aren’t really equipped for what they need to do. The schools are trying to figure it out, but the materials aren’t very good. So you come back to the fact that 80 percent of Americans give themselves a financial literacy rating of C or below.”

THE DOUGHMAIN MISSION

DoughMain is addressing the challenges head-on, Mr. Church explains. Saying that “nothing has changed” despite much discussion in government and education arenas over the past eight years, he claims, “Our approach is a drastic change in the way financial education has been approached. We believe that the best learning takes place within the classroom and it’s led by skilled educators who are knowledgeable, understand teaching, understand their students, then have the opportunity to engage their students in the classroom—not a workshop, not somebody from the outside coming in for just two hours. Over the past three years DMEF has been piloting a financial literacy curriculum with a game model that makes the learning fun. It has been used by middle and high school students in the Montgomery School District, resulting in dramatic improvement in financial literacy scores, according to Mr. Church. In the summer of 2015 DMEF recruited a team of educators to develop and refine their Youth Financial Literacy Program called FitKit, a model,

comprehensive, standards-based curriculum, with original videos, micro-economy gaming, teach-the-teacher tools and student assessments to gauge the learning. Chris Giddes, a member of the FitKit curriculum teacher team, states, “I am very excited about the work that is being done by the DoughMain Education Foundation on this project.” A teacher of AP US History and personal financial literacy at Metuchen High School, Mr. Giddes is in his second summer at DoughMain. “Our teacher team,” he points out, “consists of very knowledgeable individuals, who have a lot of experience with the content of this course as well as the needs and interests of high school students. As we collaborate, really good ideas continue to evolve into great ideas.” Mr. Giddes, 34, emphasizes the importance of this endeavor. “The skills and content that students learn about in personal financial literacy courses are imperative for their futures, as well as the futures of our country and the world. Too many people were not as prepared as they could have been leading up to and during the great recession. I know that my generation would have benefited from having these types of courses in high school, as many of us entered our adult lives underprepared for the financial responsibilities of adulthood.”

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF DOUGHMAIN.

There are other reasons for the large gaps in financial knowledge in the 21st century. “The way you learn is through doing,” Mr. Damato points out. “When you were younger you walked into the bank with mom and dad. You pulled the bank book out of its plastic sleeve, pulled the card out and wrote in your $15 deposit. You had a sense of pride and accomplishment. And mom and dad deposited their check, and you watched how they spent money.” “That’s all gone,” Mr. Damato says. “Over the past 20-25 years money is becoming less visible. It’s more and more difficult to engage with children about money because we’re paying bills online. We all love that we can take a picture of a check and it deposits automatically. You’re not balancing your checkbook in front of them. You’re not walking into that bank branch. The bank is not encouraging mom and dad to open accounts for their children. All that’s disappearing. You walk up to a money machine. You put in a piece of plastic. It’s like magic. Money spits out at you. You pull out a piece of plastic for all your purchases. And that’s what this generation is seeing. “With this situation, transactions become frictionless. Life seems easier because there’s no friction in our day. But the reality is that lack of friction is the enemy to education.” Another factor driving DoughMain’s quest is that schools, in New Jersey and elsewhere, are struggling to meet newly adopted financial literacy standards. Over the past five years 35 states have adopted some

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IN THE CLASSROOM

Mr. Giddes goes on to describe the efforts of the DoughMain educator team to make this curriculum ”relatable and exciting” for the students. “Only reading about and hearing lectures on the content is not enough. The financial literacy course content needs to be presented to students in an engaging way, providing them with opportunities to complete activities that are hands-on and have real life connections.” Franklin Township middle school teacher Juan Swift, also in his second summer as DoughMain consultant and curriculum writer, explains how the FitKit curriculum allows students to apply their knowledge and information in real-life scenarios like paying taxes, receiving a pay check with deductions, budgeting, investing for the future, paying for college, getting a loan, using a credit card, and career planning. “It’s fun for the students and comprehensive in meeting the state standards,” Mr. Swift says. “College debt is serious, and students need to be able to figure out how to handle that. They need to know what grants and loans and scholarships are available. I didn’t know that when I went to college (Rutgers ’06) and I wish I had. I now have a large debt. “ Mr. Swift, 32, looks forward to teaching the FitKit curriculum at Franklin Middle School this fall. “I am excited to play the game with the students

and interact in a fun setting to help them make important financial decisions. DoughMain provides a valuable, outstanding view of what financial literacy is and how to help.” DMEF offers over 1000 pages of teach-theteacher tools, with background information, teaching cues, pre and post assessments, and everything teachers need to know to teach the curriculum effectively, meet the needs of their classrooms, and address the state standards, according to Mr. Church. “We look at the students first and see what their needs are, how they learn and what skills they want and need to develop. The curriculum is focused on individual learning styles.” Noting constant ongoing improvements in the DoughMain curriculum and its adaptability to different schools and different students, Mr. Damato states, “Our curriculum, free of charge to the schools, will always need to be modified and enhanced, but we’re ready to take this into a dozen communities in the fall. “ Teachers who have been involved as consultants and curriculum writers will be implementing that curriculum in their schools. “We’re starting with word of mouth,” Mr. Church explains. “We never have any intention of charging the schools. Right now our energy is directed to making the curriculum materials better, connecting with the schools, and raising money to be sustainable. We need people in

the community to listen to us and support us.” About 40 schools so far have expressed interest in the DoughMain curriculum, according to Mr. Church, and he and Mr. Damato are hoping “to expand to 30-40 schools, then eventually distributing our materials into thousands of schools around the country.” Initially, Mr. Damato says, 90 percent of the funding must come from individuals, but in the future most of the money to support the DoughMain financial literacy endeavor will come from banks and financial services companies. Annamaria Lusardi, academic director of the Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center at George Washington University, commented recently in a blog on the state of financial literacy education, “It is critically important to have financial literacy in school. This is how we learn any other topic — history, math, science. We start early and as simple as possible and build upon it.” She said that disappointing data from recent surveys is “a call for action. We know now that most students are not financially literate; they lack this basic but fundamental skill to live in the 21st century.” She went on to call for parents and the business community to demand financial education programs in the schools with well trained teachers to lead them. Ken Damato, Rob Church and their DoughMain team are answering that call to action.

P R I S M S!

P r i nPrinceton c e t o n IPrinceton n tInternational e r n a International t i o n a l SSchool cSchool h o o l of o Mathematics f Mathematics M a t h e mand a t Science i cand s a nScience d Science of A N e w S T EA M S Tf E oM c ufsoec d io r dainnd gD aaynHdi g hD Sa cyh oH u s, e dI,nItnet errn n aatti o n anl aBl o aBr doian g o li g h S c h o o l

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Congratulations to the Class of 2016, our first graduating class, with college admissions to:

| 45 MIT, CalTech, Duke, Cornell, Brown, UCBerkeley, UCLA, University of Michigan, Notre Dame, University of Illinois, Harvey Mudd, and 70+ more. SEPTEMBER 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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“W

hat’s your favorite subject in school?” This is one of the standard questions asked of school-aged children, and the answer is often recess or gym. The popular response can make parents cringe, but studies have shown that gym and recess are crucial to healthy child development. Sports-based youth organizations The First Tee and Girls on the Run understand the need for kids to break out of the structured school routine. Through the power of golf and running, extracurricular programs teach adolescents to master sports skills along with life and leadership skills in a fun, supportive, and challenging environment. With active chapters in the greater Mercer County area, The First Tee and Girls on the Run are gearing up local youths for a lifetime of health. Girls on the Run

“We believe that every girl Can embrace who she is, Can define who she wants to be, Can rise to any challenge, Can change the world. Can.” – girlsontherun.org In 1996, Former Ironman Triathlete Molly Barker founded Girls on the Run in Charlotte, North Carolina to create a space where adolescent females could avoid what she calls the “Girl Box.” According to Barker, young girls often go to this proverbial box when they start listening to social and cultural stereotypes more than themselves. The Girls

on the Run organization tries to break down these barriers through conversation-based curriculum and running activities that teach girls to be confident women who are mentally and physically strong. Over the course of three months, girls who are eight to 13 years old participate in a 20-lesson curriculum designed to help them better understand themselves, their relationships, and their role in society. The non-profit organization is divided into two programs: Girls on the Run for girls in third to fifth grade and Heart and Sole for girls in middle school. Each is designed to address challenges particular to that age group, and both programs culminate with a celebratory 5K that embodies the participants’ ability to meet any goal. Come 2016, more than one million girls have participated in the transformational learning program that’s facilitated by over 100,000 volunteers. In 2015 alone nearly 200,000 girls joined one of the Girls on the Run councils, which can be found in 227 cities across North America. That led to more than 350 end-of-season 5Ks, making the Girls on the Run 5K series the largest in the country. The North Jersey East chapter of Girls on the Run has a total of 70 sites, with 13 of them in Mercer County, and four in Princeton. In accordance with the international Girls on the Run format, twice a week during the spring and fall, the fields at Community Park North, Littlebrook Elementary, Stuart Country Day School, and Princeton Day School are full of young girls running in pursuit of their goals. Actually, the girls might be running, walking, or simply moving towards their goals because, as Anne Klein, Program Director of Girls

on the Run New Jersey East makes clear, Girls on the Run isn’t just a running program, but a selfesteem building program. While the power of running and movement is used to reinforce character development, each session focuses on a certain theme or topic. In following with the national curriculum, the coaches will facilitate a discussion with the girls on a subject such as emotions, and then conduct a related activity like a relay race or a game of tag. The final piece is the “workout,” which is more about processing the day’s discussions while interacting with teammates. Leah, a Littlebrook Girls on the Run participant, clearly expresses the important connections the programs make between running and youth development skills. “I learned how to have a happy pace, and how to pace myself,” she explains. “I made new friends and I like to run more than I did before.” Each team is composed of girls and coaches of all shapes, sizes, interests and abilities. Some are runners, and some are not, but they’re all trying to be themselves, something that the Girls on the Run community values. “There’s really only three things that we ask of anyone when they’re participating in Girls on the Run,” explains Klein. “It’s to have fun, be yourself, and try your best. If your best is a run/ walk combination, we’re good with that. If your best is walking the whole 5K, we’re okay with that. It’s about setting a goal and getting to the finish line. We really want the authenticity of our girls and coaches to come through.” Since introducing the program to Mercer County in 2009, Klein has helped Girls on the Run grow September 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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from 20 girls to 270 as of the spring 2016 season. Commenting on the program’s rapid growth, she says: “A lot of times people will see Girls on the Run if they happen to be in the park where we’re practicing or a part of the 5K that we join. They see that there’s so much enthusiasm and energy—just sweet smiling kids that are having a great time, so it’s super catchy!” A developing confidence among the program’s participants also proves to be super catchy. Klein recalls several memorable moments when quiet girls started to be team leaders. “We preach valuing others’ thoughts and opinions and feeling comfortable in that space. It gives girls the opportunity to be themselves. You see girls open up and become more of a sharer in the group. There’s the physical aspect as well. The kids are training for a 5K every time they come to practice, and when they cross the finish line of these races, it’s amazing. I was clicking through the pictures of the 5K we had in Florham Park and they just make me smile. It’s wonderful to see the kids feel so accomplished and good about themselves as they cross that finish line.” The First Tee

“Our Mission: To impact the lives of young people by providing educational programs that build character, instill life-enhancing values and promote healthy choices through the game of golf.” — thefirsttee.org

Program Director and Coach at The First Tee of Greater Trenton Robert McGill sees golf as a metaphor for life. According to the former marine, current minister, and dad to three golfers, “It is a sport that you can line up side by side with life. Every day you get up and face the same household; go to the same school, and take the same courses, but that day is never the same. Even though you’re going to the same places and doing the same things, everything changes, and there are new challenges. This is the same on the golf course. When you play a course three days in a row, it’s in the same place, but it could be raining, hot, or windy. You might not get the same results as the day before, but you’re up for the challenge each time you go out.” Like McGill, the nonprofit organization The First Tee (TFT) believes golf not only teaches adolescents to tee off, but to succeed both on and off the green. Founded in 1997 by the LPGA, Masters Tournament, PGA of America, the PGA Tour and the USGA, The First Tee is a national initiative to bring the game of golf and its basic tenets to adolescents of all backgrounds. Come 2016, there are approximately 171 United States chapters and three international chapters in 1, 090 program locations including The First Tee of Greater Trenton (TFTGT). Serving youths throughout Mercer County, the local chapter holds weekly classes year-round at Princeton Country Club, Mountain View Golf Club in Ewing, and Stonybrook Golf Club in Hopewell. In keeping with its mission to teach character development through golf, TFT is based on nine core values connected to the sport: honesty,

integrity, sportsmanship, respect, confidence, responsibility, perseverance, courtesy, and judgment. Called the Life Skills Experience™, the national curriculum is delivered to TFT participants through more than 20,000 volunteers and 2,900 coaches. Participants are placed in one of five levels of the Life Skills Experience depending on their age and understanding of the value and golf skill taught at each stage. The program’s youngest participants are placed in the “PLAYer” level where they are introduced to The First Tee Code of Conduct and the game of golf. Those who are ready to take an active role in the community and create their own education, career, and golf goals can advance to the highest tier, “Ace.” A certification can be obtained at each level to demonstrate the participants’ understanding of what was taught, which allows them entry into the next level. Mastering golf is no easy task, but it’s simpler to explain a technical skill like putting than an abstract concept like conflict-resolution. Knowing this, the TFT coaches often use the golf course to explain such complexities. For example, bunkers can represent obstacles youths face and how to maneuver around them. Depending on the session’s written curriculum, golfers might learn how to “blast out of the bunker” on any and all courses in life. Open to five to 18 year-olds, the TFTGT’s concrete examples prove particularly helpful to their younger players like nine-year-old Ezra Broomer. “One of the lessons I’ve learned from TFT is integrity,” explains Ezra. “It’s like when you wouldn’t pick up the golf ball and move it

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somewhere else. We get to practice golf and play the game when we learn lessons. You normally just sit in a chair and write, so you can easily get distracted. But in golf, you get to move, walk, and be in motion. You just have golf clubs, a tee, and a ball, so it’s easier to concentrate and it’s fun. TFT is an awesome golf program!” While the skills taught through the curriculum are beneficial in various areas of life, research has shown that they translate particularly well in the classroom. According to TFT’s website, 73 percent of its participants reported high confidence in their ability to achieve academically. This comes as no surprise as TFT conducts its classes much like those in a school. In addition to end-of-session certification testing, TFT assigns weekly homework for students to complete in their yardage books that relate back to the lessons learned. Seeing the strong influence its program has on education and learning, TFTGT has created additional channels to extend its reach to more adolescents. TFTGT has worked closely with area schools such as Daylight Twilight Alternative High School in Trenton and Nottingham High School in Hamilton. A testament to the program’s enduring effects on its students, a female TFTGT graduate from the Lawrenceville Prep School spearheaded an effort to start a First Tee mentor program at her school. Approximately fifteen students from the Trenton area are matched with a mentor from the Prep School to guide them through TFT curriculum. A similar program has recently been launched out of the Pennsbury Racquet Club. With its offices located in the Trenton YMCA, The First Tee of Greater Trenton and the YMCA make a concerted effort to reach the adolescents from their home base. Coach McGill has seen youths of all backgrounds transformed by the program. In a matter of weeks, shy newbies often become loquacious golfers. A Trenton native, McGill proudly admits that The First Tee program has lead to so many success stories from his town, that he can’t remember them all. What McGill can remember is the importance of pulling youths “out of the box.” “In my community, [TFT] is hard to sell because you don’t see golf courses here. You see cement; you see bricks; you see buildings. Once you get a child outside of the city limits, and they go onto a golf course, it becomes different. There’s something different for them and about them. When they come in and play golf, they see they don’t have to stay in the box. So many kids in our community only see the inside of the box. We get the opportunity to pull them out so they can see the outside of it. That’s the touchdown part, the championship part for me. It is to bring these kids to the program and let them see something different.” Fall Program Registration:

Registration for Girls on Run is ongoing until two weeks into the start of the fall season on September 12, 2016 or until all spots are filled. For more information on the program visit www.girlsontherunnj.org. Online registration for The First Tee of Greater Trenton is now open. For more information or to sign up, visit www.thefirstteegreatertrenton.org or call (800) 322-4352.

September 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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UNIVERSITY PRESIDENTS LOOK AHEAD BY ELLEN GILBERT “THERE IS ALWAYS A CRISIS.” —ANDREW DELBANCO IN COLLEGE: WHAT IT WAS, IS, AND SHOULD BE

John Harvard statue at Harvard University

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the National Endowment for the Humanities. Photography by Chris Flynn, NEH

Harvard University President Drew Gilpin Faust

T

Aerial of Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Courtesy of Shutterstock.com.

Enduring Symbols

As she began her speech to the Harvard undergraduate class of 2016 last spring, Faust even went beyond the vicissitudes of everyday life on campus to wonder about the apparent world horrors reflected in recent headline news. “It’s as if we are being visited by the Four Horsemen,” she mused,

citing terrorist attacks, racial strife, famine, and the Zika virus. How are university leaders addressing “these [academic] matters” (much less evidence of the Apocalypse)? Faust encouraged her audience at Harvard to contemplate two “enduring symbols” on the campus of “this magnificent institution” visible to them at that very moment: Widener Library and The Memorial Church. “We have been here before,” she said recalling earlier eras threatened by the clouds of war, financial crises, epidemics, and more. Anchored by their buildings and traditions, she suggested, the Harvard “model,” a long-lived “vehicle for veritas,” will prevail. Clark’s leep

Less than 50 miles west of Cambridge in the edgier city of Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University President David P. Angel has other ideas. The words “initiative,” “new,” “positive,” and “mentor” figured prominently in a recent interview with him. He’s clearly excited about what’s going on at this smaller liberal institution with a distinguished history; like Johns Hopkins it was founded in the late 19th-century on the model of German research university and is known as the only American university visited by Sigmund Freud during his 1909 trip to this country. Clark’s Liberal Education and Effective Practice program (LEEP) figures prominently in Angel’s

conversations. LEEP was set in motion at Clark several years ago, and its apparent success as a different kind of approach to education has only accelerated Angel’s determination to implement it. “Momentum is great at Clark right now,” he says. An important premise of LEEP is that experience in the classroom is directly connected to experience in the world. Angel points to a recently revamped art history class for undergraduates as a good example. Looking at slides is out. Instead, an art history professor and curator from the Worcester Art Museum challenge students to participate in every aspect of designing and curating a professional exhibit at the Museum. The final project in a pilot initiative proved the point when the student-driven exhibition won a rave review in the New York Times, soon followed by a $620,000 grant from the Andrew Mellon Foundation to incorporate similar teaching/ experiential practices into the rest of Clark’s curriculum. Figuring prominently in the mix, says Angel, are social justice and student projects abroad and at

photo courtesy of clark university

he cover story on a recent issue of Consumer Reports went straight to the point: “I kind of ruined my life by going to college,” it quoted a heavily indebted recent graduate. Her current balance due is $152,000, and she’s definitely not alone: according to recent reports some 42 million people owe $1.3 trillion in student debt. Skyrocketing tuition fees are just one of the many challenges currently faced by American colleges, and Harvard University President Drew Gilpin Faust readily acknowledges them. “There are undoubtedly many important issues confronting higher education, including tackling sexual assault on college campuses, expanding financial aid to lower income families, and arresting the decline of enrollment in the humanities,” she said in a recent email. “University leaders are working together with faculty, students, alumni and each other to address these matters.” “Teaching is a messy process,” observes Harvard University English Professor Louis Menand, author of The Marketplace of Ideas. “There are more than 4,000 institutions of higher learning in the United States, more than 18 million students, and more than 1 million faculty members,” he reports, citing the Digest of Education Statistics. “We can’t reasonably expect that all of those students will be well educated, or that every piece of scholarship or research worthwhile.” Yet, he says, “we want to believe that the system, as large, as multitasking, and as heterogeneous as it is, is working for us.”

Clark University President David P. Angel September 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Photo courtesy of Amy Gutmann

home where Clark has achieved noteworthy success in engaging with the neighborhood surrounding the campus. Tapping into the connections and know-how of Clark alums, and acknowledging different learning styles are important, too. “We are utterly convinced that this is the way to approach education,” Angel says. Educator Ken Robinson, whose TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design invitation-only) talk on creativity and education ranks among TED’s most watched events, agrees. “What David Angel is doing at Clark is a particularly refined version of what every head of a school should be aiming to do: honing and reshaping the school as necessary to fit the evolving needs of students and society,” Robinson writes in his book, Creative Schools. “The Most Exciting University in the World”

University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann Photo courtesy of shutterstock.com.

“I came to New York University (NYU) because I think it is the most exciting university in the world,” says Andrew Hamilton, who recently became president of the Greenwich Village-based campus. “What I’ve learned from serving as the head of a European university [Oxford] for several years and as a provost of an American university [Yale] before that is that while every university is unique, the issues facing all universities—and all university presidents—are more alike than different,” he observes. Hamilton’s approach is more inferential than Angel’s. “Campuses today can sometimes feel like a crucible, having to confront national issues in a very intense and concentrated way,” he says. “But I believe that it is part of the academic and social values that we instill in our students, which they in turn, take with them to the world beyond.” Although he did not cite specific initiatives in his emailed comments on NYU’s achievements and challenges, Hamilton also spoke of the place of the university in the world at large. “More than ever, 21st-century colleges must prepare students for a global future with global challenges,” he says, noting that NYU is “the U.S. university with the largest number of international students and the university that sends the greatest number of students to study abroad.”   

The University of Pennsylvania campus in Philadelphia.

OU Images/John Cairns

Penn’s Compact 2020 and “Real Talk” at Bard

New York University President Andrew Hamilton

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University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann points to “Penn Compact 2020” as a new initiative that “builds on the past decade of progress. . . It is a far-reaching vision that outlines next steps to increase access to Penn’s exceptional intellectual resources; integrate knowledge across academic disciplines with emphasis on innovative understanding and discovery; and engage locally, nationally, and globally to bring the benefits of Penn’s research, teaching, and service to individuals and communities at home and around the world.” There will be an opportunity to learn about “the power and promise of Penn Compact 2020” when Gutmann and Penn students lead a series of live conversations beginning Thursday evening, September 14. Those concerned with the future of higher education may also be interested in a conference being sponsored by the Hannah Arendt Center and Center for Civic Engagement at Bard College on October 20 and 21. “Real Talk: Difficult Questions About Race, Sex, and Religion” promises to address some heavy-duty, hot-button issues. “Is Title IX a positive way forward in addressing sexual discrimination?” its promotional material asks. “Can we balance the right to practice one’s religion with the desire for inclusiveness? Are micro-aggressions the kinds of speech that should

be disciplined? Does civility require limits on our right and obligation to speak our minds?” and, “should colleges and university campuses be safe spaces?” The coordinators say that they are asking, “above all,” how college “can be a safe and inclusive space for asking hard and uncomfortable questions essential to our democracy?” Hamilton has high hopes for new initiatives at NYU. “Whether it is designing an admissions policy that treats those who have run afoul of the criminal justice system fairly, or piloting a program to allow undocumented students from New York state to get scholarship aid on an equal footing, or creating an affordability task force that identifies new approaches to addressing the cost of college, we are building a community that teaches our students—both inside the classroom and out—to be prepared for a set of challenges that are global in nature and can transcend borders,” he says. And while Harvard perceives itself to be anchored by august buildings and traditions, it too is looking to the future. “Universities play an indispensable role in society. . . harnessing technologies to expand access to knowledge, discovering new medical treatments and scientific approaches, and equipping future generations to be citizens in a world where their leadership will be greatly needed,” notes Faust. “University presidents have a responsibility of leadership,” says Angel. ‘There are tremendous challenges and you need insight, a sense of mission

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2016

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Photo courtesy of shutterstock.com.

The campus of New York City's Columbia University

Alumni Sensibilities

Besides questions about affordability, college administrators also face financial challenges in maintaining alumni support as campus environments evolve. “Alumni from a range of generations say they are baffled by today’s college culture,” reported New York Times writer Anemona Hartocollis in an August 4 article. Citing Amherst College, she described alumni who perceive students as being “too wrapped up in racial and identity politics,” taking “too many frivolous courses,” and repudiating “the heroes and traditions of the past by judging them by today’s standards, rather than in the context

of their times.” Schools like Princeton and Brown, where students have challenged the continued use of buildings named for people whose politics are now deemed morally offensive, know this very well. (Presidents Christopher Eisgruber of Princeton; Christina Paxson of Brown; Lee Bollinger of Columbia, Amy Gutmann of Penn, and Peter Salovey of Yale were unavailable for comment.) Passion helps, of course. “We are a community like no other, united in love for our The Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, which great University and proud to announced on April 4, 2016 that it was keeping its controversial name. do together what we cannot do alone,” Gutmann has been quoted as saying. “This is for his leadership potential several years before he our Penn.” actually became president, Angel appreciates the “When the time comes for me to pass the baton focused mentorship he received. Understanding on to my successor, I suspect that I will share the “the deep sense in our community that we want words that John Sexton [Hamilton’s predecessor] to steward and continue our values,” he says, shared with me,” says Hamilton, “That despite has enabled him to make a “rigorous and honest its size, its complexity and all the messiness and assessment” of Clark’s needs. challenges that can come with it, in order to lead Menand would appear to applaud this “ongoing NYU, you must love NYU.” inquiry into the limits of inquiry. It is not just Angel is both passionate and, not surprisingly, asking questions about knowledge,” he writes, “it is perhaps, pragmatic about being president of Clark creating knowledge by asking the questions.” University. As a faculty member who was identified Photo courtesy of shutterstock.com.

and the responsibility to make a difference in the lives of your students.” This includes, he says, “a profound commitment to diversity; the ability to conduct ‘difficult conversations,’ making decisions about ‘reasonable’ financial investments, and a “guiding sense of values.” Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger expressed some of these values in a recent New York Times op-ed piece (“Affirmative Action Isn’t Just a Legal Issue. It’s Also a Historical One”): “The Supreme Court’s decision this week in Fisher v. University of Texas is a profound relief, and a cause for celebration among those of us in higher education who have long insisted that affirmative action is vital to our schools’ missions and to society as a whole.”

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in Campbell Soup Company’s 77-acre mixed use community known as Knights Crossing. The facility is scheduled to open next year. The plan includes several parks and bike trails along with 1.5 million square feet of office space. “We are very pleased to be moving to the City of Camden for the next stage in our development,” president and CEO Thomas J. Doll said in an official statement. “We want The Camden Waterfront masterplan development will replace area that currently exists to be part of it, as a catalyst and a contributor. as paved surface parking lots. We know that our presence in Camden will only encourage other businesses to come and to invest in private investment in the city,” says Timothy J. Lizura, the area…We look forward to the coming day when we the president and chief operating officer of the EDA. call Camden home.” “Companies qualify in various industries, and we have Philadelphia developer AthenianRazak has everything from small manufacturers to a major recycler. two Camden projects. The Ruby Match Factory is It’s really broad-based to include all of the commercial a conversion of a historic warehouse into 74,000 enterprises, other than retail, that you can imagine.” square feet of collaborative loft office space tailored to The focal points for investment are one of Camden’s technology-driven companies. The developer is also two ports and two commercial districts that bookend its building a new 125,000-square-foot facility housing a downtown. Some $175 million was invested in recent training center and corporate offices for the Philadelphia decades around a ballpark, an aquarium, educational and 76ers. medical institutions. The old RCA Victor building, with What makes all of this possible is the Grow New its famous stained glass tower window depicting the dog Jersey act, which provides sizable tax incentives through “Nipper” cocking his head as he hears “His Master’s the EDA to businesses relocating to the state’s poorest Voice,” was successfully converted to apartments 12 cities. Business that are creating or retaining jobs in New years ago. Jersey can be eligible for tax credits ranging from $500 But these projects lacked cohesion. What makes to $5,000 per job, per year, with bonus credits ranging planners think the latest proposal will succeed? from $250 to $3,000 per job, per year. “It’s a confluence of several things,” says Lizura. More than $1 billion in tax credits have been “One is local leadership, which Camden lacked. Several promised to projects in Camden. mayors had gone to jail. That changed with Mayor “Camden was one of the most distressed [Dana] Redd, who has been awesome.” municipalities in the state. We wanted to get more Lizura also cites improvements in public safety.

Volley Studio for Robert A. M. Stern Architects.

C

amden was still lively by the time my mother gave up her job in the early 1950’s. But the good times were not to last. By 1970, the city had begun its slow decline. The relocation to the suburbs of some industries and closing of others resulted in decades of crime, urban blight, and corruption. It all culminated in Camden earning the distinction, in 2012, of having the highest crime rate in the United States. There have been attempts to heal this broken city, with mixed results. But the latest plan, approved last March at a meeting of New Jersey’s Economic Development Authority, is the most promising yet. It is backed by some $2 billion in development projects and generous tax incentives. Turning Camden into a place where people want to live, work, visit, and spend money is a plan focused on revitalization projects not only for the waterfront, which has expansive views of the Philadelphia skyline, but also other parts of town. Subaru of America, American Water, Holtec International, Lockheed Martin, and the Philadelphia 76ers NBA basketball team are among the big-name companies that have signed on. Projected for the riverfront are some 1.44 million square feet of commercial office space, along with residences, parks, and retail, and prominent flag hotel. The masterplan designer of the 20-acre tract, which is being developed by Liberty Property Trust, is Robert A.M. Stern Architects, whose masterplan includes two high-rise buildings overlooking the river, open spaces, and walkable streets. Construction is planned to begin late this year. Subaru of America is moving from cramped headquarters in nearby Cherry Hill to the Camden site,

Synoesis for Robert A. M. Stern Architects.

Located along the Delaware River in Downtown Camden, The Camden Waterfront will be an active community anchored by large and small corporations.

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Rendering courtesy of Subaru of America, Inc. Robert A. M. Stern Architects.

Night rendering of Subaru Camden Headquarters.

Three years ago, Camden eliminated its police force and replaced it with one that is now run by Camden County. Officers are more visible on the streets and crime figures are reported to be declining. “There has been 50 years of disinvestment in the city,” Lizura says. “You really have to do something very significant in order to turn that philosophy around.” There are those who feel all of this investment and redevelopment won’t heal Camden’s most pressing problems of poverty and joblessness. Lizura maintains that each of the companies coming into the city promise they will provide jobs for local residents, even after construction is complete. “All of the companies we speak to have expressed a strong desire to work with the local workforce board, the colleges and high schools to do job training programs and local hiring as best as they can,” he says. In order to qualify for the tax incentives, companies must make an investment, hire, relocate, and keep employees at the site for 15 years. “Holtec broke ground a year ago, but they’ve already started a training program for local construction workers,” Lizura continues. “The impact is already happening.” Whether this massive reinvestment in Camden acts as a catalyst for the city’s rebirth remains to be seen. According to Lizura, the Economic Opportunity Act will make the current effort succeed. But it is built on years of revitalization attempts that came before. “It took 50 years for Camden to get into the shape it was, and it’s not going to take five years to turn it around,” he says. “It is a process to be able to bring property back. You’re standing on the shoulders of giants who came before you in order to have success today.”

The masterplan for the Camden Waterfront has been envisioned to create a pedestrian friendly neighborhood, foster vibrant mixed-use activity throughout the day, while strengthening connections to the local community and City.

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Alexander Hamilton’s New Jersey

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“Hamilton” has become something of a phenomenon. The play won 11 Tony Awards, including best musical, as well as a Pulitzer Prize for drama and a Grammy Award for best musical theater album. Additional awards include the Kennedy Prize for Drama and a “genius grant” from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. The musical’s creator Lin-Manuel Miranda has freestyled for President Obama and a national tour is set for 2017. What New Jersey residents might not know is that Alexander Hamilton has many connections to the state. Ron Chernow’s 2004 biography, Alexander Hamilton, details Hamilton’s journey from the West Indies to New Jersey, and New York. When Hamilton first arrived in America, he resided in Elizabethtown (currently Elizabeth, New Jersey) and studied at Elizabethtown Academy in hopes of pursuing a degree at Princeton University in Princeton, which was then known as the College of New Jersey. Hamilton met with the Head of School, John Witherspoon, in September of 1772. Unfortunately, his acceptance was later revoked due to his desire to pursue an accelerated degree in less than four year’s time. In contrast, James Madison and Aaron Burr had both completed accelerated degree programs. Having been snubbed by his first choice, Hamilton entered King’s College in 1774 (now Columbia University). He embraced New York, finding Manhattan to be a city of immigrants. He himself was, as John Adams put it, “the bastard brat of a Scotch peddler.” Orphaned at 12, he sought to establish roots in North America and quickly acclimated to life in early New York.

The victory at the Battle of Trenton on December 26, 1776, distinguished Hamilton in a Continental Army that gained a new found hope in fending off the British.

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As a student at King’s College, Hamilton pursued studies in mathematics and became involved in politics. Committed to the revolutionary cause, he gave speeches in praise of the Boston Tea Party and wrote pamphlets and handouts in support of The Continental Congress. In 1775, when an angry mob stormed King’s College searching for the school’s loyalist president Myles Cooper, Hamilton diffused the situation by delivering a lengthy speech, giving Cooper time to flee on a British frigate. Following graduation, Hamilton joined the Revolutionary army as an artillery officer and his company was used in strategic areas throughout New York and New Jersey, including Trenton, Princeton, and Morristown. On December 25, 1776, Hamilton was with General George Washington and his troops as they rowed across the Delaware River. The conditions were icy and dangerous, but Washington felt that catching the Hessians off-guard was their best hope for victory. The Battle of Trenton occurred the following morning, when Captain Hamilton’s artillery companies were stationed at King Street and Queen Street in downtown Trenton. Hamilton was with Washington when he embarked on what was to become known as The Battle of Princeton, a victory for the Revolutionary Army. Legend has it that Hamilton fired a canon at the remaining British soldiers in Nassau Hall. Following the battles of Trenton and Princeton, Hamilton was invited to join Washington’s staff as an aide-de-camp. As Washington’s chief staff aide, Hamilton penned letters to Congress, drafted orders from Washington, and participated in intelligence and diplomatic duties amongst the Continental Army’s most high-ranking officers.

King’s College Hall, 1770.

IMAGE COURTESY OF HAMILTON | WWW.HAMILTONBROADWAY.COM

Duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr.

Broadway’s hit new musical, Hamilton, is playing at the Richard Rodgers Theatre.

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Original 1776-1777 Map of the Battles in New Jersey.

During the course of The Battle of Monmouth Courthouse in Freehold, Hamilton bravely rallied fleeing American soldiers, once again proving his worth to the Revolutionary War effort. Now a Lieutenant Colonel, Hamilton spent two winters in Morristown, New Jersey. During this time, he met and began to court Elizabeth Schuyler, the daughter of General Philip Schuyler, a wealthy New Yorker of Dutch descent. The couple married on December 14, 1780 at the Schuyler estate near Albany, New York. Hamilton resigned from Congress in July 1783 and began to practice law in New York. In 1784, he founded the Bank of New York, which stayed in business for over 220 years before merging. Severely damaged during the war, King’s College was restored as Columbia College, with Hamilton playing a key role in the restoration. In 1791, Hamilton formed the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures on the Passaic River in Paterson, New Jersey. The goal was to use the Great Falls to create a thriving industrial community. Although the project eventually closed, Paterson went on to become a center for textile and silk production. The famous duel between Aaron Burr and Hamilton took place at dawn on July 11, 1804 on a rocky ledge in Weehawken, New Jersey. Hamilton was mortally wounded by Burr and taken to the Greenwich Village home of his close friend William Bayard Jr., where he died. He was buried in Trinity Churchyard in Manhattan.

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| BOOK SCENE

Proust Goes Graphic by Stuart Mitchner

M

arcel Proust’s In Search of Lost Time: Swann’s Way: A Graphic Novel (Liveright/Norton $26.95) may be the most luxurious book of its kind. Picture a 224-page landmark amid a perfect storm of classic graphics that includes R. Crumb’s Kafka, Jacques Fernandez’s illustrated edition of Camus’s The Stranger, a graphic Odyssey, a graphic Macbeth, but nothing comparable to Stéphane Huet’s daring adaptation of a complex work that could have been pitched with the old slogan, “They said it couldn’t be done!” When critics and Proustians grumbled, Huet countered with statements of support from the Society of Friends of Marcel Proust and from the holder of Proust’s literary rights, the author’s greatgrandniece Nathalie Mauriac. He also has a respected translator in Arthur Goldhammer, whose more than 125 translations include numerous scholarly works, most notably Thomas Piketty’s best-seller, Capital in the Twenty-First Century.

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A DRAMATIC DEPARTURE

CLASSIC BEGINNINGS

Probably the most explicit preview of the graphic phenomenon came in 1978 with Will Eisner’s A Contract with God, which was presented as “a graphic novel.” In 1986 the first volume of Art Spiegelman’s Maus: A Survivor’s Tale appeared, an even more dramatic departure from the standard comicbook subject matter. While both volumes of Maus eventually attracted a wide, appreciative audience, booksellers found it a challenge to categorize and Spiegelman himself was slow to accept the term “graphic novel,” perhaps because he was an admirer of Lynd Ward, a pioneer of the novel of images, with six books released between 1929 and 1937. Thus Spiegelman was an obvious choice to edit the Library of America’s 2-volume set Lynd Ward:Six Novels in Woodcuts.

For this writer, however, it all began with a humble 10-cent comic printed on the same cheap funky newsprint-fragrant paper as Donald Duck, Little Lulu, and Superman. My father brought back the first issues of Classic Comics from New York along with other special treats from the magic city of automats and skyscrapers. He liked to produce each issue as if by magic, waving his wand, crying, “Abracadabra!” whereupon I’d look under a chair cushion or the living room rug and find a Classic Comic of Moby Dick or The Three Musketeers. No doubt this was “messing with the classics” and then some, but the publisher’s heart was in the right place even if the sales pitch was a bit crass (“the greatest stories ever written” by “the world’s immortal authors”). For an impressionable sixyear-old already very much at home with comics, it was both educational (with the inclusion of “interesting highlights” in the life of each author)

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and inspirational. Between Classic Comics and the game of Authors, I was on my way to becoming a future serious reader and a novelist. Looking back over the first issues, it’s interesting to see how the illustrators chose to present each work, the recurring design features, the large print capital letters for dialogue and narrative. The actual drawings seem crude next to the best graphic novel standards, though each illustrator seems to excel in the larger, more dramatic images, most strikingly in the cover art, for instance Lillian Chestney’s elaborate image for No. 8, The Arabian Nights. Even when I left Classic Comics behind for “real books,” I still enjoyed the Disneys and the Lulus, though they eventually gave way to lurid soon-to-be-banned stuff like EC Comics Vault of Horror and Crypt of Terror, which morphed into EC’s early Mad, with artists like Jack Davis and Will Elder making the transition into a style of comicbook art that presaged the rise of the counter culture and comics like Zap, a showcase for R. Crumb, whose work both incorporates and celebrates graphic influences dating all the way back to the early days of newspaper comicstrips. The Proustian Challenge

R. Crumb is one of the only graphic artists around I enjoy “reading” in book form. Clearly, he was born to illustrate the works of authors like Kafka, Dostoevsky, and Poe. His depiction of Kafka writing is amusingly similar to his images of Crumb drawing. Even though I grew

up reading comics, I found it hard to adjust to the graphic genre. So the idea of a tome like Huet’s In Search of Lost Time/Swann’s Way presented a daunting challenge, a mountain of imagery to climb. But climb it I did and it was worth the effort. If nothing else, it gave me an excuse to skimmingly reread Swann’s Way. It would be hard to imagine an experience more alien to a narrative of images and word balloons than the elaborations of Proust. The core pleasure of those long lush richly figured paragraphs is to sink into them as into a feather-bed of elegant prose. With Proust, you get it all: intimate exposure to the memory and imagination of a literary genius whose sense of color and visual detail is such that an artist/illustrator could find material on almost every page. The cliche “painting with words” was made for Proust. If you take a quick tour of Huet’s book, the impression is of bright open visuals at the beginning and end—a refreshing sense of sweeping colorful space—while the dominant middle section about Swann in love is relatively crowded and dark. One of the most beautiful pages accords with Proust’s description of two steeples in the setting sun. The drawings have a charming simplicity that nicely complements the prose and offers something pleasing beyond it. Where the graphic Proust suffers is primarily in the drawing of characters. The boy Marcel and the imagery that surrounds him reminded me of the style of the TinTin series (1929-1976), which suggests that Huet is evoking a tradition in graphic art most famously associated with the

Belgian cartoonist Herge. While the landscapes and settings have a charming clarity that speaks to the inner child, the faces of characters are invariably limited and inexpressive, particularly when the original image is as romantically compelling as that of Swann’s daughter Gilberte, whom Marcel loves at first sight, or Swann’s lover and eventual wife, Odette. Or Swann himself, for that matter. One problem is how the button eyes compare to the wonders Proust can divine in the human gaze or the movement of a glance or of a body. It would be a challenge for even the most gifted graphic artist to find an equivalent for something so subtle and suggestive. Graphic Non-Fiction

Some of the most readable graphic works I found were not novels, such as the biographical series by Ted Rall on, among others, Edward Snowden and Donald Trump; Robert Moses: the Master Builder of New York City by Pierre Christin and Oliver Baiez; and the cinematically imaged Indeh: A Story of the Apache Wars, a large, exhaustively researched volume with illustrations by Greg Ruth and text by Hun School graduate and man of many talents, Ethan Hawke.

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| CULTURAL EVENTS

SEPT. 1

M A R K YO U R

CALENDAR DAR M U S I C | B O O K S | T H E AT R E | L E C T U R E S | S P O R T S OCT. 21

SEPT. 18

SEPT. 24

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16

11AM – 4PM Princeton Outdoor Farmers Market in

4:30PM The Fund for Irish Studies at Princeton

Hinds Plaza adjacent to the Princeton Public Library (repeats weekly through Thanksgiving). www. princetonfarmersmarket.com

University welcomes actress Lisa Dwan as she speaks on “Performing Beckett” at the James M. Stewart ’32 Theater. arts.princeton.edu

7PM Screening of Top Gun (1986) at Princeton Garden Theatre. www.princetongardentheatre.org

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 11AM Tiger Tales at Cotsen Children’s Library on the campus of Princeton University. This free, interactive storytime is best suited for children ages 3-5 (repeats weekly). www.princeton.edu/cotsen

8PM World premiere of Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Nilo Cruz’s Bathing in the Moonlight at McCarter Theatre (through October 9). www. mccarter.org

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10 ALL DAY The Doylestown Art Festival features over 160 juried artists, 5 stages of live music, 2 food courts, live demonstrations, and more. The festival is located on the streets of historic Doylestown, Pa. (also on Sunday, September 11).

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 8:30AM 2016 Thompson Bucks County Classic in Doylestown, Pa. www.buckscountyclassic.com 9AM RunBucks Alternative Half Marathon at Washington Crossing State Park. www.runbucks.com

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 10AM – 5PM Celebrate harvest season at the 41st Annual

SEPT. 11

10AM – 6PM New Hope Arts and Crafts Festival at New Hope-Solebury High School. This annual event attracts nearly 15,000 visitors (also on Sunday, September 25). www.newhopeartsandcrafts.com NOON Princeton University women’s field hockey vs. Dartmouth at Bedford Field. www. goprincetontigers.com

Apple Day at Terhune Orchards in Lawrenceville. Includes farm-fun activities, live music, and seasonal treats (also on Sunday, September 18). www. terhuneorchards.com

6 – 8PM Join the Arts Council of Princeton at the

NOON Yoga in the Garden at Morven Museum & Garden. www.morven.org

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 NOON – 6PM 25th Annual JazzFeast in downtown Princeton. This open-air festival features performances by some of the area’s best jazz musicians along with food from local restaurants. www.palmersquare.com

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 7:30PM Outdoor screening of the film Star Men at Princeton University’s Fine Hall Plaza (next to the Lewis Library). Star Men explores the exceptional lives and friendships of four noted astronomers. www.starmen.space

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 7:30AM 17th Carnegie Center 5K and Fun Run for The Parkinson Alliance. Proceeds will support Parkinson’s disease research. www.parkinsonalliance.org

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM.

OCT. 14

Princeton Shopping Center for Bollywood Nights, an evening of Indian culture, dancing, drums, and food. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org

7:05PM New York Yankees vs. Boston Red Sox at Yankee Stadium. newyork.yankees.mlb.com

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1 10AM – 4PM Colorful Batik Workshop at Morven Museum and Garden. Explore self-expression through dying. Registration is through the Arts Council of Princeton. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org

10AM – 5PM Hopewell Tour Des Arts. Tour over 35 local artist studios in and around Hopewell, including painters, sculptors, potters, photographers, wood turners, and jewelers (also on Sunday, October 2). www.HopewellArts.com

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5 6PM Susan Sugarman discusses her new book, What Freud Really Meant: A Chronological Reconstruction of His Theory of the Mind at Labyrinth Books of Princeton.

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NOV. 19 OCT. 22

SEPT. 17

OCT. 27

PHOTOGRAPHY BY EMILY REEVES.

DOYLESTOWN ART FESTIVAL

Kulu, India, The demon Dhumraksha in a chariot leads his army to attack Hanuman, ca. 1705. San Diego Museum of Art, Edwin Binney 3rd Collection. Princeton University Art Museum.

SEPT. 10

OCT. 22

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8

MONDAY, OCTOBER 17

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27

7PM Rutgers University football vs. Michigan at

7:30PM Anne Carrere returns to McCarter Theatre to

High Points Solutions Stadium in Piscataway. www. scarletknights.com

5PM Dress up in your best costume and join the Arts Council of Princeton for the Annual Hometown Halloween Parade (route begins on Palmer Square Green and end at Hinds Plaza). www.palmersquare.com

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14

pay homage to Edith Piaf and to bring France’s greatest singer to life. Join “the sparrow” on a journey through the streets of Montmartre during the halcyon Paris cabaret days of the 1940s and 50s. www.mccarter.org

1PM Princeton Public Library welcomes New

11:30AM – 2:30PM 11th Annual Animal Alliance Pet

York Times bestselling author Jennifer Weiner on tour for Hungry Heart at the D&R Greenway Johnson Education Center in Princeton. www. princetonlibrary.org

8PM Rock and country artist Jason Isbell performs live at Count Basie Theatre in Red Bank. www. countbasietheatre.org

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15 6 – 7:30PM Princeton Tour Company’s Ghost Hunt and Cemetery Tour. During the tour, each guest will use authentic paranormal investigation equipment. This is a chance to experience the spooky side of Princeton University’s campus and the surrounding neighborhood! www.princetontourcompany.com 6:30PM Oktoberfest at Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association in Pennington. Enjoy seasonal beers and cocktails at the Watershed Center for Environmental Advocacy. www.thewatershed.org

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16 2 – 4PM Scarecrows in the Village! Make your own scarecrow at Weeden Park in downtown Lawrenceville. Guests should bring their own clothing, shoes, and accessories to decorate the scarecrows (hay and other supplies will be provided). www.lawrencevillemainstreet.com

Masquerade. The parade begins at Mary Sheridan Park in downtown Lambertville. Prizes for best costume and goodie bags for participating dogs! www. animalalliancenj.org

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21 7:30PM The Rocky Horror Show is alive and well at Bucks County Playhouse in New Hope, Pa. (through Sunday, October 30). www.bcptheater.org

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22 1PM Experience one of the fiercest rivalries in the Ivy League! Princeton University football vs. Harvard at Princeton Stadium. www.goprincetontigers.com 5PM Pumpkin Carving Contest at Inn of the Hawke in Lambertville. Fun for the whole family! The Inn of the Hawke will provide pumpkins. www.innofthehawke.com

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25 7PM Seven-time Grammy winner and ACM Female Vocalist of the Year nominee Carrie Underwood brings The Storyteller Tour to Madison Square Garden. www. thegarden.com

8PM Experience a night of magic at the State Theatre on NJ in New Brunswick with legendary comedic magicians Penn and Teller. www.statetheatrenj.org

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29 10AM – 6PM Book you reservations for the best Halloween party this side of Transylvania – The Count’s Halloween Party at Sesame Place in Langhorne, Pa. Come dressed in your favorite costume and enjoy an evening of entertainment with The Count, Elmo, Zoe, and Cookie Monster (also on Sunday, October 30). www. sesameplace.com

MONDAY, OCTOBER 31 11 PM-1AM Halloween Party at Triumph of New Hope featuring Pumpkin Ale, drink specials, music by Tigerman, and a costume contest. www.visitnewhope.com

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6 7AM 2016 HiTOPS Princeton Half Marathon. www. princetonhalfmarathon.com

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19 10AM – 5PM Opening of “Epic Tales from India: Paintings from The San Diego Museum of Art” at Princeton University Art Museum (through February 5, 2017). www.artmuseum.princeton.edu

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IN PRINCETON

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LIVE SERENE

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NOW LEASING: Luxury Rentals and Furnished Suites

SCHEDULE YOUR TOUR TODAY!

609.924.0333 SLEEK AND STYLISH ONE AND TWO-BEDROOM APARTMENTS MODERN FLOOR PLANS AND STATE-OF-THE-ART FINISHES

Free amenities include: 20 acres of preserved woods, walking & biking trails, fitness center, business center, recreational room, bike storage, outdoor grilling plus assigned single level parking in a heated garage. Relax by the plaza fountain, or take a stroll through the lush landscape and meet your neighbors at our tenant functions.

609.924.0333 | COPPERWOODPRINCETON.COM

Copperwood Apartments | 300 Bunn Drive | Princeton, NJ 08540 A project by J. Robert Hillier, FAIA

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Currey & Co. Raven table lamp; price upon request; gasiorsfurniture.com

Chanel tweed and lambskin short boots; $1,700; chanel.com

Givenchy pearly chain cross bracelet; $795 bergdorfgoodman.com

Cynthia Rowley designed fleur de glee writing desk by Hooker furniture; $1,469 gdchome.com

Amy Somerville designed Casino chair; price varies with fabric amysomerville.com Alexander McQueen mini padlock leather shoulder bag; $1,073 luisaviaroma.com Ari Norman feather letter opener; $395 barneys.com

Waals world clock; $165 barneys.com Jonathan Adler designed Dora Maar bowl; $295 jonathanadler.com

PRODUCT SELECTION BY LYNN ADAMS SMITH

A WELL-DESIGNED LIFE

Circle II Laser Etched Card Case, Verner Paton; $66.50; www. princetonmagazinestore.com

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MAKE THE MOST OUT OF

YOUR SPACE

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Currey & Company destination chandelier; price upon request gasiorsfurniture.com Painted regency bedside table; price upon request modernhistoryhome.com

French Heritage Passy wing gold eastern king bed; $5,665 Mottahedeh Imperial blue teacup; $69 michaelcfina.com Prada flat velvet bow mules, blue: $650 bergdorfgoodman.com

Dian Austin couture home pieced Gatsby throw with ruched velvet sides; $875 neimanmarcus.com

Dove Gray button chair; $597 abchome.com

Marble top side table; $439 horchow.com

John Robshaw Steed pillow; $228 anthropologie.com

Jaime Hayon silhouette rug; $236 per square foot; therugcompany.com

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PRODUCT SELECTION BY LYNN ADAMS SMITH

A WELL-DESIGNED LIFE

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2016

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coming soon

a luxury baby & child boutique from rittenhouse home

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Dmitri Wright, Black Couple in Bed Looking at TV, 1971. Acrylic on canvas, 54 1/2 x 54 3/4 in. Gift of the Prudential Insurance Company, 1971 71.167 © Dmitri Wright 1971

Experience a tale told by heroes. Modern Heroics brings together rarely exhibited works by leading historical and contemporary African-American expressionists. Legendary names like Norman Lewis, Purvis Young, and Romare Bearden will take each visitor on an epic journey. Don’t miss this courageous collection 75 years in the making. There’s More at the Museum.

NOW UNTIL JANUARY 8, 2017

49 Washington Street, Newark, New Jersey • newarkmuseum.org

Sponsored by:

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The Robert Lehman Foundation

Official Airline

Newark Museum Volunteer Organization

8/18/16 11:02:38 AM

Princeton Magazine, September 2016  

Witherspoon Media Group

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