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PRINCETON MAGAZINE

OCTOBER 2016

OCTOBER 2016

PRINCETON’S HISTORY OF MOVING HOUSES, CHURCHES, AND LANDMARKS

HEALTHY LIVING

WOMEN AND THE WHITE HOUSE

RUTGERS DR. DINA FONSECA TACKLES MOSQUITO-BORN DISEASES

AT HOME WITH DESIGN

BALLET BODIES

DELICIOUS AUTUMN COLORS

RIO 2016 OLYMPICS WRAP-UP

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OCTOBER 2016 PUBLISHER J. Robert Hillier, FAIA EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Lynn Adams Smith CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jorge Naranjo ART DIRECTOR Jeffrey Edward Tryon

We are pleased to announce the opening of the Eastridge Design Home store and showroom. Join us for “SCULPTURES AND SMALL OBJECTS” Curated by Heather Christensen Smith October 6 – 22, 2o16 342 Nassau Street Princeton NJ 08540 Tuesday through Saturday, 11am – 5pm (609) 921-2827 | eastridgedesign.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Matthew DiFalco Erica Cardenas PHOTOGRAPHER Andrew Wilkinson Tom Grimes Ed Hewitt CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Stuart Mitchner Ilene Dube Anne Levin Ellen Gilbert Bill Alden Sarah Emily Gilbert Taylor Smith ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Robin Broomer ACCOUNT MANAGERS Jennifer Covill Kendra Broomer Charles R. Plohn Monica Sankey Erin Toto OPERATIONS MANAGER Melissa Bilyeu

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CONTENTS

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28

26

36 58

76

78 12

OCTOBER 2016

..... FEATURES .....

..... HEALTHY LIVING .....

..... HERE & THERE .....

MUSICAL BUILDINGS

IT’S A JUNGLE OUT THERE...

FASHION & DESIGN

BY ILENE DUBE

BY ILENE DUBE

Princeton has a rich history of moving houses, churches and other architectural landmarks

Rutgers entomologist Dina Fonseca tackles the public health crisis of mosquito-born diseases

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AUTUMN COLORS

BALLET BODIES: BETTER FED THAN YOU THINK

BY STUART MITCHNER

BY ELLEN GILBERT

White is the silent hero 20

BY ANNE LEVIN

Dancers’ favorite foods may surprise you

A well-designed life 26

Wine-tasting attire BOOK SCENE

Crazy for ceramics: a marriage mission 46

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AT HOME WITH DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREW WILKINSON

Perhaps nothing is more representative of an interior designer than their home

MARK YOUR CALENDAR DENTISTRY WITH A GENTLE TOUCH

Sedation is a many-splendored thing

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RIO GRAND... OLYMPICS WRAP-UP

CONCIERGE MEDICINE BY SARAH EMILY GILBERT

Princeton medal winners reflect on the games

There’s a new trend in healthcare, and it’s gaining momentum in our area

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WOMEN AND THE WHITE HOUSE

DINING OUT GLUTEN-FREE

BY ELLEN GILBERT

BY TAYLOR SMITH

It’s important to remember, that other women were stirring things up quite a long time ago

Where to go in the Princeton area

BY BILL ALDEN

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BY TAYLOR SMITH

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ON THE COVER: A vintage photograph of 19th-century brick edifice at 4 Mercer Street, was originally located at 1 Nassau Street, where it was built in 1878. Photo courtesy of Town Topics.

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| FROM THE editor

Welcome to the October 2016 issue of Princeton Magazine. Many of you will recognize the building on our cover as the former longtime home of the Town Topics Newspaper. It’s also notable for being one of the nearly 200 buildings that have been moved in and around the Princeton area. Priest Drugstore occupied the Town Topics building when it was relocated in 1914, from 1 Nassau Street to the present location at 4 Mercer Street, to make room for the War Memorial monument. Horses and ropes were used to pull the building along soaped-up wooden railroad ties. Surprisingly, they did not remove the contents of the drugstore for the move and all the apothecary jars survived the journey. View photos and learn more about these unique structures in Ilene Dube’s article “Musical Buildings.” The sepia toned cover image with the orange Princeton Magazine logo are well suited for October, which brings to mind our story on fall color trends as seen in fashion, illustrations, and interiors. Discover the magical pen at the Cooper Hewitt Museum that will enable you to record your favorite patterns in their exhibit, “Scraps: Fashion, Textiles and Creative Reuse.” In addition, read about Pantone’s colors and the popularity of Benjamin Moore paint colors with interior designers and other professionals. If you are searching for home inspiration, you will enjoy our Q&A with local design professionals and photos taken in their own homes and studios. Additionally, our “Well-Designed Life” pages have an architectural theme including a few products designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Every October, we publish healthy living editorial that is related to current events, and this issue contains a number of informative articles. “Ballet Bodies: Better Fed Than You Think” highlights the trend for ballet dancers to make nutrition, health, and strength a central part of training. Today, many ballerinas have athletic bodies, a welcome change from days when they were expected to be uniformly thin. For example, Misty Copeland was told at the age of 13 that she had the wrong body type to be a ballerina, and today, she has international celebrity status as a principal dancer with the American Ballet Theatre. That’s good news for dancers and better news for women in general. Anne Levin wrote this article and being a former dancer herself, she has a lot to say about the subject. A healthy lifestyle includes enjoying outdoor activities, but in keeping some parts of the world, the Zika virus is of great concern and keeps people inside. Dina M. Fonseca, a professor of medical and veterinary entomology, runs a mosquito research and control lab at Rutgers University. She spoke to us about the Asian tiger mosquito that transmits Zika and the importance of mosquito control. The Zika virus did not stop a large number of athletes with Princeton connections from participating in the Rio 2016 Olympic games. Interviewed by Bill Alden, these dedicated athletes spoke of strenuous strength training, endurance, mental preparation, their performances in Rio, and plans for the future. Many of the athletes won medals and they all deserve celebratory kudos. Next month, voters will decide whether we will elect the first female president of the United States. You might be surprised to learn that this is not the first time a woman has run for the Oval Office—that 10

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Photography by Andrew Wilkinson

Dear readers,

would be Victoria Woodhull, who did so in 1872. Since then, there have been a number of other women to run for president, but none quite as colorful as Woodhull. Along with her sister, she was also the first woman to operate a brokerage firm on Wall Street and to publish a weekly newspaper. Ellen Gilbert’s article will provide readers with even more interesting facts about these ambitious and unusual women. Bob Hillier and I hope you enjoy this issue of Princeton Magazine and invite you to visit our website at princetonmagazine.com where we post additional content on a daily basis, above and beyond what you read in our print publications. Respectfully yours,

Lynn Adams Smith Editor-In-Chief @princeton_mag

PRINCETON MAGAZINE october 2016

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Musical Buildings Princeton has a rich history of moving houses, churches and other architectural landmarks BY ILENE DUBE

Architect Max Hayden moves his home (above) in Hopewell’s Mount Rose hamlet to a quieter site on Cherry Valley Road. (PHOTO BY TOM GRIMES) MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2016 30 | PRINCETON

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Ionic Colonnade in Princeton Battlefield Park.

T

he year was 1868. A few heads must have turned when the house with colossal columns, reminiscent of a Greek temple, arrived by barge in Princeton Basin. From there it traveled up Alexander before settling into an orchard on Mercer Street. The owner, the Rev. George Sheldon, had inherited his family’s Northampton, Mass., home, and when a builder gave the thumbs up to moving it more than 200 miles, the 1830s wooden structure was disassembled, freighted through Connecticut to New York City, then shipped up the Raritan and barged along the D&R Canal. These days, moving a building is rare—there are power lines, plumbing and other obstacles to contend with—but in the 130 years following the move of the Sheldon House, nearly 200 buildings were moved in Princeton. Everything from elegant Victorians and stately Colonial Revival homes to modest workers’ cottages, outbuildings, clubhouses and boarding houses were pulled by horses along soaped-up wooden railroad ties, and later by trucks pulling the structures along steel beams. Churches, pharmacies, a rectory, a theater and even a school were relocated. Some were moved twice, two were moved three times and three came to Princeton from other states. Historic and architectural value made a building worthy of moving. It was often cheaper to move a

house than to build anew. A lot of this game of musical chairs with buildings happened because Princeton University and Princeton Theological Seminary were expanding their campuses. The university would give houses away under the condition that the new owner move them. And as land on Nassau Street became more valuable, older houses were moved to make way for more stylish ones—a sort of precursor to the tear-down concept. The home of one of Princeton’s most famous residents, Albert Einstein, at 112 Mercer Street, was moved to its existing location from Alexander in the 1870s. Einstein lived in the Greek Revival-style house with a Victorian porch from 1936 to 1955. Another famous landmark, the Ionic Colonnade in Princeton Battlefield Park, was once part of the facade of a Philadelphia mansion, designed in 1836 by architect Thomas U. Walter, who later worked on the U.S. Capitol. When the house was torn down around 1900, the Colonnade was moved and incorporated into Mercer Manor, on the site of the 18th century William Clarke House, around which the Battle of Princeton was fought. When Mercer Manor burned in 1957, the Colonnade was moved to its present location. The 19th-century brick edifice at 4 Mercer Street, known as the “old Town Topics building,” was originally located at 1 Nassau Street, where it

was built in 1878. In 1914, to make room for the War Memorial monument, the entire structure was moved back 60 feet. The building was home to Priest’s Drugstore at the time, and the story goes that the move went so smoothly, a single drop of water didn’t spill from a glass. Town Topics occupied the building from 1950 until 2007, when Princeton University, the building’s owner, made plans to move its Office of Community and Regional Affairs to the first floor, and faculty housing on the second and third floors. What are the impacts on moving buildings a century later? The basement needed to have additional beams and supports installed, according to Director of Community and Regional Affairs Kristin Appelget. On the Princeton University campus, Corwin Hall, erected in 1951 and originally known as Wilson Hall, had to be moved 100 feet, to a site between Wallace and Robertson Hall, to make way for the then-new Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. The building weighed seven million pounds, and the New York firm of Spencer, White and Prentiss spent two months preparing for the move, which used hydraulic jacks to push the building along 12-foot steel tracks. The move itself took only 12 hours, and then another three months to secure it in its new foundation. To view archival footage of the move, visit http://bit.ly/2di4VLl. OCTOBER 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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The home of Albert Einstein, at 112 Mercer Street.

Rockingham, headquarters for George Washington during the Princeton session of the Continental Congress in 1783 and later a boardinghouse for quarry workers, was moved three times, most recently in 2001. It sits on a 27-acre property on Kingston-Rocky Hill Road, adjacent to the Delaware and Raritan Canal, and is open to the public year-round.

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Among other buildings in Princeton that have been uprooted from their original sites: The Bush House was originally built for President James McCosh on Prospect Avenue in 1888. In 1910, it became the Quadrangle Club. E. R. Branch and Lloyd Grover purchased the house in 1916 and moved it to the intersection of Nassau Street and Markham Road. In 1980, Architect J. Robert Hillier moved the house 26 feet to make room for the townhouses at Markham Square. The house was designed by an architect from the renowned firm of McKim, Meade, and White.

72 Library Place, built in 1836 by Charles Steadman and considered one of his best by Constance M. Greiff, author, Princeton Architecture (Princeton University Press, 1967). Leased by Woodrow Wilson in 1890, it was originally sited between Mercer and Stockton streets and moved circa 1880.

Beatty House, at 19 Vandeventer Avenue, originally stood on Nassau Street opposite Bainbridge House and was moved in 1875 to make way for the expansion of the university campus.

The 19th-century brick edifice at 4 Mercer Street was originally located at 1 Nassau Street in 1878, and was then home to Priest’s Drugstore. Still known to many as the “old Town Topics building,” it was restored by its owner, Princeton University, in 2013. Currently it is utilized as office space and faculty housing for the University.

OCTOBER 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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In more recent times, architect Max Hayden moved his home in Hopewell’s Mount Rose hamlet to a quieter site on Cherry Valley Road. Some have jokingly referred to the busy intersection of Carter and Cherry Valley roads as “Mount Max,” because the architect also bought the former Mount Rose General Store in 2002 and converted it to his offices (the property is now for sale). Hayden has worked on such restoration projects as the Grover Cleveland house, the Drumthwacket Coach House and the Morven farmhouse, as well as new construction. He is an old hand at moving buildings, having moved two tiny cottages, formerly located at the Brookside Motel on Routes 518 and 31. With no plumbing, the 12-foot-by-12-foot cottages were moved on a flatbed truck in 2004, then craned onto the property behind the old general store. Hayden’s home, in which he lives with his wife, Jennifer, and two children, was built in 1850 by Reuben Savidge, original owner of the general store. Hayden bought the property in 1984 when he was single. In the mid 1990s, when he wanted to put on an addition, he observed a neighbor move his house to gain further distance from the road. It gave another neighbor the idea to swap the corner lot, which Hayden needed for his addition, in exchange for the move. This was a relatively easy move, Hayden recollects, because no power lines were in the way. When his son, Max, and daughter, Caroline, came along in 2004 and 2006, the family sought a safer yard in which they could play. They looked at

other houses, but Hayden had an emotional attachment to this one. It reminded him of his grandparents’ home, an old farmhouse with a front portico and a widow’s walk. As a child, he experienced a double loss, first when half the property was taken by eminent domain to build an exit ramp for Interstate 78. Later, he watched the house itself smolder in a fire. “My heart sank, and I’ve always sought to re-create that house,” he says. “I’ve known since I was five that I wanted to be an architect.” Hayden’s parents owned the historic King George Inn, once a stagecoach stop, in Warren Township, and when Max was a teenager his parents moved a caboose into their backyard to serve as a cabana. To move his house, Hayden and his family, as well as half their belongings, decamped to temporary quarters in October 2006. Their home was pulled by a tractor, leap frogging onto steel plates so as not to sink in the ground that never froze that year—until it was time to dig for the foundation. And then it rained into March and April. The other half of their possessions, including everything in the attic and a corner cupboard, moved along with the house. The house moved well, one of the biggest problems being all the mud dragged onto the pumpkin pine floors. But by July 30 the family moved in, with only a few cracks and the kitchen floor an eighth of an inch lower. “We have a full basement now,” Hayden adds, for the utilities and laundry room, “and the neighbor is 500 feet away.” (The neighbor at the prior site was seven feet away.) “The road is 400 feet away.

We kept the orientation so the same south sunlight comes in as it used to, but having a different view took getting used to.” In 2007, a family room was put on. After adding all the costs to moving his house, Hayden says it was still less than it would have cost to build anew. “It took a year, plus three months for the addition, which is the right amount of time for a custom home.” And the emotional toll? “It was harder for Jennifer, with two small kids. She is very glad to be off the road and loves the house and the property. We had lemons and made lemonade but boy the price of sugar has gone up! But it’s good for every architect to go through this and appreciate what we put our clients through.” When the project was complete, Hayden rented a bus to shuttle visitors who wanted a view. Beyond moving a building to a different position on a property, the era for moved buildings may have come to an end. In 2013, when the university began to make way for its new Arts and Transit District, it offered seven properties along Alexander Street, some dating to 1860, free for the taking—provided the new owners would actually take the houses somewhere else. After receiving 1,000 inquiries, there were no takers. The houses were demolished. The Sheldon House at 10 Mercer Street remains a reminder of Princeton’s rich history of moved buildings.

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by Ellen Gilbert “Delicious autumn! My very soul is wedded to it, and if I were a bird I would fly about the earth seeking the successive autumns.” — George Eliot Reader advisory: This article will not provide the last word in what to wear, cook, or how to decorate your house this fall. It. turns out that there are many, many opinions about what is au courant for every aspect of our lives (all year round, actually). This may be a disappointment for those needing guidance, but free spirits may consider this conclusion a boon.

image courtesy of shutterstock.com

Delicious Autumn

Blues and Spicy Mustard “Fall colors” are traditionally associated with the reds, oranges, and yellows of changing leaves, pumpkins, and crisp apples. But maybe not. “The desire for tranquility, strength, and optimism have inspired a Fall 2016 color palette that is led by the Blue family,” declares Pantone’s’ Color Institute, which is “devoted to the study [of] how color influences human thought processes, emotions and physical reactions.” A research and information center that “shares its expertise with professionals in a variety of industries including fashion, commercial/industrial, contract and interior design, graphic arts, advertising, film and education,” the Pantone institute “has considerable name recognition, and is used as a resource by the world’s most influential media.” Along with “anchoring earth tones,” Pantone suggests you try “exuberant pops of vibrant colors also appear throughout the collections. Transcending gender, these unexpectedly vivacious colors in our Fall 2016 palette act as playful but structured departures from your more typical fall shades.” Leatrice Eiseman, the Institute’s Executive Director, points out that for this fall, “Spicy Mustard Yellows suggest a touch of the exotic.”

The Power of White New York-based interior designer Jill Jurgensen’s focus is on creating homes that look good in any season. In her private practice and her job as a consultant to Janovic/Benjamin Moore, she’s more enthusiastic about “gentle whites” in every season.

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“White doesn’t go in and out of style,” the video suggests. “It can be elevated to a design tool. Once you start to see the nuances of the color, the look is very elegant, very refined, and very deliberate,“ the video continues.

images courtesy of cooper hewitt museum

Indeed, Benjamin Moore has declared white the color of the year, but not just any white; there are over 250 whites in the current catalogue. “White has always been a hugely important color in architecture,” says a Moore video tribute to white. “It is able to exhibit the shadows; the darks, the lights; to help us appreciate the forum of the shape itself.

“White is transcendent, timeless, its versatility unrivaled,” says Benjamin Moore Creative Director Ellen O’Neill. “From weathered wainscoting to crisp canvas shades, porcelain tile to picket fences, white is everywhere in every form.” Jurgensen agrees with the philosophy that one should “never underestimate the power of pristine. White can be art gallery modern, country house classic or spring flower romantic.” The video ends with a touch of poetry, hailing white as “the silent hero.”

“Shades of the Dead” FashionTrendsetter.com’s take on this autumn’s color preferences has a decidedly intentional edge. “Our main inspiration has driven from one of the symbols of Halloween; the jack-o’-lanterns –representing the souls of the dead.” This “online fashion and color forecasting, trend reporting and news e-zine” is keen on “warm hues of pumpkin orange,” as well as reds and yellows accompanied by “the color codes of other inspirational items such as candy apples, caramel corn, novelty candy – shaped like skulls and bats.” The chills continue: “the dark side of the night has the signature hues on our palettes with purples, browns and deep sunset hues.”

What to Wear

Apple Days

The “Fashion Snoops” at ConnectFashion.com identify six key palettes for the coming months. “Terrain, saturated earth colors make the most influential mark, notably due to the comeback of brown tones. Frontier neutrals are notably darker than before,” they say, while Impulse offers a vibrant palette of brights” and mystery offers jewel tones, with burgundy and cyan at the forefront.” It is good to be reassured that “nostalgia mid-tones are decidedly more vibrant.”

Those longing for more traditional autumnal hues and experiences will be reassured by the continued existence of places like Princeton’s venerable Terhune Orchards. While seasonal fruit is available all year-round, fall is a bonanza for Terhune and other local farm stands where bright orange pumpkins, many-colored gourds, and an amazing variety of apples are in abundance. Keep in mind that September is the best month for Gala, JonaMac, Jonathan, McIntosh, Liberty, and Red and Golden Delicious varieties. Stayman Winesap, Braeburn, Cameo, Sun Crisp, Granny Smith, and Pink Lady apples are in their prime in October.

In case you were wondering about the Fashion Snoops’ use of the word “terrain,” there’s an effort at clarification: “as the name implies, terrain yields a complete palette of saturated earth tones,” with brown making a “major comeback,” along with and warmer tones like cognac and coppertone. Keep in mind that “both camel and toffee are key to the Terrain palette, positioned as influential outerwear colors,” and that “marigold yellow and red rust add a spice component.” Oh, and one last thing: “greens are also leveraged, from an olive base to light pea.” If all this is too confusing, it’s reassuring to know that Stylecaster.com has declared “the biggest trend” observed during Fashion Week in New York City recently “appeared to be not really paying attention to the season at all. Blame it on the exceptionally warm weather most of the U.S. faced this winter, but nearly every designer presented fall collections that felt springlike in nature—slinky slip dresses, billowy offthe-shoulder tops, florals, and strapless tops.”

Interactive For a hands-on experience with colors in any season, the Immersion Room at the Cooper Hewitt Museum in Manhattan offers what it touts as “a unique experience.” Using a “Pen,” viewers can “select wallpapers from the Museum’s permanent collection and see them projected on the walls from floor to ceiling,” making for “a vibrant, impactful, immersive experience.” Visitors “can even play designer by creating your own designs, or just stand back and watch as the wallpapers unfold across the room.” More than “just entertainment,” the Immersion Room provides “the first opportunity to discover Cooper Hewitt’s wallcoverings as they were intended to be viewed,” we’re told. Wallpaper OCTOBER 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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images courtesy of cooper hewitt museum; shutterstock.com

based online site that enables viewers to find representative colors of many objects in their collections. Old artifacts collide with new technology as museum curators explain how the colors included on this website were by “robotic eye machines” that scoured each image in “small chunks” to create color averages. These were then “harvested and ‘snapped.’” A click on the color “Indian red,” for example, yields Dyer’s RecordBook (USA), from the Museum’s Textiles Collection made of cardboard, paper and wood by the Old Pacific Print Works in 1870; there are 207 images of this object.

highlights include a damask-style sidewall design called “City Park” (2007) that contains “strikingly” modern imagery, including a fire hydrant, parking meter, pigeons and rats; a 1928 sidewall design called “Sahara” that depicts mounds of desert sand interspersed with camel caravans; a fuzzy flocked op art sidewall called “Razzamatazz,” as well as sidewall design entitled “Hunt Trophy and Floral Arabesque” (ca. 1785), acquired by founding Cooper Hewitt collectors Sarah and Eleanor Hewitt. If a trip into Manhattan isn’t on your schedule, the Cooper Hewitt also has an interactive, color-

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people used to carve turnips, beets and potatoes.” It was Irish settlers in the United States who found out “that pumpkins worked even better.” In a starred review, Kirkus described Bruce Goldstone’s Awesome Autumn as “one of the most comprehensive books about autumn available for kids.” Goldstone, we are told, enjoys two autumns a year: the first in May, in Buenos Aires and the second in October, in New York City. Not exactly Eliot’s “successive autumns,” but still a pretty good deal.

The folks at Benjamin Moore will be glad to learn that the Cooper Hewitt has 1,149 objects that overlap with the color “white.” These include a Panton Stacking Side Chair, designed in 1960 and manufactured by the Herman Miller Furniture Company and Vitra AG.in 1972 using injection molded thermoplastic.

Children’s books For basic, color-full Fall facts, there’s nothing like children’s books with simple names like Colors of Fall, in which authors like Laura Purdie Salas report that a jack-o’lantern isn’t just an orange pumpkin with a face carved into it, but that “in ancient Ireland,

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images courtesy of shutterstock.com; erica cardenas

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At Home With Design Perhaps nothing is more representative of interior designers than their homes and studios. In addition to being a personal haven, it acts as a blank canvas for creativity. For our interior designer photo series, Princeton Magazine got the opportunity to peek inside the homes of some of the areas most respected interior designers. Here, they share their design aesthetic, personal mottos, career highlights, and more. Photos by Andrew Wilkinson

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AJ Margulis, Owner/Senior Interior Designer AJ Margulis Interiors 136 King George Road, Pennington, NJ 609.577.0666 | ajmargulisinteriors.com

“‘Never say never,’ it applies to all aspects of life, especially in design. One always has to be ready to switch gears and consider a new perspective.” —AJ Margulis

AJ Margulis Interiors is a full service design firm headed by its eponymous owner, AJ Margulis, who recently received two Design Excellence Awards from the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID). Margulis and her team provide space planning, furniture and lighting selection, accessorizing, and more. Describe your design aesthetic in three words: Inviting, classic, and current. What is your favorite room in a home? I don't have a favorite room when I am designing. For me, all rooms are fun to tackle and each can be beautiful and rewarding in their own way. Complete this sentence: Every room needs— at least one beautiful piece of art to be complete. What inspires your designs? My work is inspired by everything: my life, my kids, my travels, what I read, what I watch. I get ideas from all sorts of things. One of my favorite sources of inspiration is nature; I often keep rocks and leaves and use them as color guides on projects.

extremely happy client gave me the confidence to take on a 17,000 square foot house, renovate an historical inn, and tackle many other design challenges that were thrown my way. With a Master’s Degree in interior design under the architecture school at Arizona State University, Margulis understands that architecture and design cannot live separately. This is an integral part of her design process, which she explains below: Meeting with my client and understanding their design aesthetic and wish list is my priority and comes first. Once that is established, the second step is to lay out the space correctly. The best rooms wrap you in an embrace. This can only be created by having the right mix of architecture and design. The way the spaces flow together is as important as the right mix of textures, colors, furnishings and lighting. The accessories add the finishing touch.

What has been your career highlight thus far? I think the first job I ever did that was really soup-tonuts is still my highlight. A large home where I began working with the architect on the floor plan and then moved on to choosing all the finishes, trim, furnishings, and lighting. Kitchen, bathrooms... the whole enchilada. Seeing that job through and completing it with an

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“Rooms you love to live in, that’s what I create!” —Deborah Leamann

Deborah Leamann, Principal/ Interior Designer Deborah Leamann Interior Design, LLC 250 Main Street, Pennington, NJ 609.737.3330 | deborahleamanninterior.com Deborah Leamann Interior Design is a full service design firm. Projects range from full home conception to single room conception and one time in home consultations are available. Describe your design aesthetic in three words: Beautiful, harmonious, and pleasing. What is your favorite room in a home? The kitchen. Finish this sentence: Every room needs—Art. What inspires your designs? My clients inspire my work. Their desires and aspirations keep me moving forward. What has been your career highlight thus far? My career highlight was being able to renovate and design a 6,500 square foot, 1920-era Maisonette in Manhattan on the East River. It was more than one year in the planning and then nine months of renovation. I was able to put together our team of an ‘Architectural Digest Top 100’ architect and builder DeBono Construction. The most fabulous part was my client. It was an unforgettable design journey. We were always on the same page at all times creating beauty along the way. With over thirty years of design experience working with discerning clients from across the country, Leamann has developed a deep understanding of an entire space. “My favorite design element is starting a project with great architectural bones, then layering all the wonderful interior ingredients to make it home,” she says. Indeed, her thoughtful designs offer contemporary comfort that maintains the familiarity of a home. This is due inpart to her respect for classic design and the tried-and-true rules that go along with it. There is one old design rule I learned at the onset of my career: either match the window treatments to the floor covering or to the wall,” Leamann explains. “It’s a rule that gets broken frequently, but sometimes with a tricky space, it is very sage advice.

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Robert Jennings, Owner/ Interior Designer & Decorator Robert Jennings Design, LLC New Hope, PA | 908.442.9437 robertjenningsdesign.com http://bit.ly/2cm8pbp Robert Jennings Design is an interior design firm specializing in complete home transformations. Projects range from new build homes and entire house renovations to single room furniture plans. Describe your design aesthetic in three words: Functional, timeless, captivating. What is your favorite room in a home? The kitchen. It really is the heart of the home. Finish this sentence: Every room needs—To be welllived-in and enjoyed.

“Form follows function. A space must be functional to suit the homeowner’s way of living.” – Robert Jennings

What inspires your design? The client, architecture, and natural surroundings. What has been your career highlight thus far? I would have to say my project called Helm in Mantoloking, NJ. Under my sole direction, I renovated a completely dated house into a warm welcoming getaway where the true potential of the home was realized. I finished the whole house renovation in a record four months to have it ready for a wedding shower. The home was complete for six weeks before Hurricane Sandy hit and flooded the house with five inches of water. I had to do it again! I did everything in the home: the design, furniture, finish selections,

landscaping and pool, down to the silverware and dishes. I even had the refrigerator stocked and directed the caterers to set up the party. The client was blown away when they arrived; I was ready for the emergency room. As is evident in his retelling of the tumultuous design project, Helm, Jennings is relentlessly committed to any endeavor. Rated a pro-level designer on the community interior design website, Houzz, he has received praise for both his thoughtful nature and his thoughtful designs. After having their 35-year-old Colonial transformed by Jennings, one client wrote on Houzz: “Robert has incredible vision, wonderful communication skills and is a true design professional…But [his] skills do not stop there…he is incredibly kind and honest.” In addition to his design-savvy, Jennings has a knack for working with realtors, contractors, and any other intermediary. This, paired with his worldly sensibilities and penchant for renovating outdated homes, makes his designs memorable. I have had the incredible opportunity to live and travel extensively through Europe, Japan, and India, which has greatly influenced my inspiration in design. I love the experience of creating a customized and personal home through my unique relationships with my clients and contractors.

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Elizabeth Guest, Principal/Owner Elizabeth Guest Interiors, LLC 908.236.0503 | elizabethguestinteriors.com Elizabeth Guest Interiors is a high-end interior design firm that provides a customized, individualized approach to each project ranging from hourly consultations to complete project management and implementation.

“My personal motto is ‘Beautiful living…with fine design.’ My firm’s goal is to make beauty and style a part of everyday living: to give my clients environments that are useful and functional, and infuse them with a luxe-attitude and comfort.” — Elizabeth Guest

Describe your design aesthetic in three words: Classic, eclectic, and global-chic. What is your favorite room in a home? The main living area—call it a great room, family room, living room—the space that is most often used by everyone in a family, including pets. Complete this sentence: Every room needs—That unique piece that conveys the owner’s individuality and point of view. What inspires your designs? I am inspired by so many different visual references—art, nature, gardens, travel to different countries and locations. The act of seeing and absorbing everything around me can be like falling down a rabbit hole—there is an endless stream of things to really LOOK at and absorb that trigger my imagination and will cue me to make a mental ‘file.’ What has been your career highlight thus far? I was one of the designer’s selected to create a room in the prestigious ‘Mansion in May’ 2014 designer show house that took place at the Blairsden Mansion in Gladstone, NJ. We had over 33,000 visitors in one month and raised over $2,000,000 for the Goryeb Children’s Hospital, Morristown Medical Center. Guest seeks to create a layered room with depth of design when undertaking a project. Her rooms achieve balance and symmetry while mixing fabrics, textures, and finishes. The resultant space artfully juxtaposes old and new for modern livability. Her late motherin-law and style icon, C.Z. Guest, largely influences Elizabeth’s hybrid design aesthetic. “She had impeccable taste with homes,” says Elizabeth. “They were the ultimate blend of glamour, chic, and comfort. I absorbed so much of that over the years spent with her, and that same aesthetic has infused my work today.” C.Z.’s influence continues in the overall brand of Elizabeth’s design firm, which she explains below: ���Elizabeth Guest Interiors delivers classic luxury and comfort with a modern, global vision. Every project is custom tailored and designed to reflect each unique client’s specific story and wishes. I love seeing a client’s enjoyment and use of a finished space that they may not have visualized for themselves. As the saying goes, ‘Give them what they don’t know they wanted!’”

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“First impressions are lasting.” — Judy King Judy King, Owner Judy King Interiors LLC 44 Spring Street Princeton, NJ 08542 609.279.0440 www.judykinginteriors.com

Judy King Interiors offers distinctive custom designs driven by a passion for pattern and an inspired eye for color. With every detail and nuance tailored to express each client’s personal style, King’s work is original, creative, and executed according to the highest standards. Describe your design aesthetic in three words: Harmonious, original, personal. What is your favorite room in a home? The kitchen—the heart of every home.

been getting into the Kip’s Bay Designer Show House in New York City. In addition, I am fortunate enough to have really great clients from all over the country that respect my creativity.

Complete this sentence: Every room needs— Personality.

Founded by Judy King in 1990, Judy King Interiors design studio and antique shop are located in the center of Princeton. Establishments that have recognized King’s work include the Kip’s Bay Boys and Girls Show House, Junior League of Princeton Show Houses, Cap and Gown Club of Princeton University, Planned Parenthood, the New York Academy of Art, Trenton Children’s Choir, and Trinity Counsel of Princeton.

What inspires your designs? I get inspired by nature, organic elements, fashion, travel, and art. Two of my favorite artists are Damien Hirst and Jackson Pollock. What has been your career highlight thus far? My greatest career highlight thus far has

Whether she is shopping at a flea market in Paris or visiting The Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, Judy King has a passion for staying ahead of the trends. Her love of fashion, color, and juxtaposition are reflected in all of her designs.

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| BOOK SCENE

Crazy for Ceramics: A Marriage Mission by Stuart Mitchner

E

dmund De Waal’s The Pot Book is the most recent in a long marriage’s succession of birthday, Christmas, and anniversary gifts inspired by my wife’s fondness for all things Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Arts and Crafts, with ceramics at the top of the list. Another book I’ve got my eye on is related to the recent Princeton University Art Museum exhibit Women, Art, and Social Change: The Newcomb Pottery Enterprise, which my wife enthused about after a visit a few months back. It makes some kind of serendipitous sense that our arrival in Princeton some 41 years ago coincided with the University Museum’s landmark exhibit devoted to the American Arts and Crafts Movement. In fact, the first piece we furnished our Princeton apartment with was a Mission desk we found at a flea market. David Rago’s shop was a good source, particularly when it was still located in downtown Lambertville and Rago’s wife, Suzanne Perrault, was there to help me make the right choice, which, given the state of our finances, was usually something relatively affordable, like a tile or a book. Since quality pottery can run from the hundreds to the many thousands uness you’re very very lucky, a book chock full of brilliant images like the Antique Trader Pottery & Porcelain Ceramics Price Guide, with an introduction by Rago, is a good default option. Of course the appeal of antique shops and flea markets is the possibility of finding something rare. One such find on the occasion of our first Christmas turned up in an Ann Arbor shop; it had some literary charisma, being an antique plate in the Charles Dickens series made by Adams (“Est 1657”), featuring an elaborately jumbled Dickensian illustration from The Old Curiosity Shop. After decades of exploring, only a few pieces from the Dickens series ever surfaced again, none of them during visits to the Tomato Factory in Hopewell or the Lambertville Golden Nugget flea market. For a time I had to make do with humbler items like Fiestaware, one anniversary quest for Fiesta butter dishes in hard to find colors taking me all the way to a shop in Mullica Hill.

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THE CHARM OF BIZARRE

At a Bath antique market on our last full day in the U.K. when we had very little spending money, my wife found the piece that remains the crown jewel of her collection. When she saw the bright, boldly designed bowl with the magic words “Hand-Painted Bizarre by Clarice Cliff” on the back, it was all over. The price was £110. “Impossible,” I said. “We can do it,” she said, having tucked away some extra cash unbekownst to me. I tried to talk her out of it, but my words fell, as they say, on deaf ears. I realize now that it was a moment of truth in our relationship, an existential coming to terms with the fact that beauty is forever and money is cosmically irrelevant. So began an education. If you’re shopping three times a year for someone whose taste you’ve come to trust, it’s a class in aesthetics taught by your better half. And nothing she’s ever fixed her sights on has charmed and disarmed me as much as the work bearing the name of “this determined yet mysterious woman,” in the words of Leonard Griffin’s introduction to The Rich Designs of Clarice Cliff (Rich Designs Ltd). Says Griffin, “Even if she had not covered them with so much jazzy color, just the shapes of her teapots, vases, and fancies are themselves a celebration of imagination let loose.” According to another Griffin book, Taking Tea with Clarice Cliff (Pavilion), she was influenced by two folios of vividly colored pochoir prints by French artist Edouard Benedictus whose “brave use of color was something she took to heart.” You can see online that she more than took it to heart, she reimagined it into English countryside settings both familiar and surreal, whimsical and cozy, where storybook cottages sit on storybook hills with oranges and blacks and blues as bold and bright as colors seemed in childhood and placed with a child’s disregard for reality’s logic. Judging from the auction prices online, the bowl my wife found in Bath for $140 U.S. in 1987 would sell for thousands now (the most paid for a single

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piece by Cliff appears to have been £39,500, in 2004). A July 9, 1999 article in the New York Times with a silly head (“Jolly Pots in Hot Colors Are Back”) suggests that Mick Jagger “helped put Cliff back on the radar screen” when he bought a gaily colored Age of Jazz centerpiece she designed. ENJOYING TALAVARA

All that remains of our Fiestaware is a $20 replica of the butter dish I ventured to Mullica Hill for (the original priced at ten times the amount). Speaking of replicas, Wedgwood brought out a line of Clarice Cliffs in 2004 that my wife’s parents gave her for a significant birthday. Although a tea set like the one in Griffin’s book was included in that Metropolitan Museum of Art present, we rarely if ever use it. What we do use at every meal is Talavera from Uriarte, most of it bought at Eyes Gallery and Indigo in Philadelphia. Our dinner plates and coffee mugs and serving pieces are there to be used and admired and are never taken for granted. The plates are heavy and dense, combining decorative elegance and peasant solidity with an earthy downhome el restaurante glamour. According to Talavera Poblana (American Society Art Gallery), the term originally referred to the city of Talavera de la Reina in Spain, with one theory saying that the name came to Mexico when Dominican friars in Puebla de los Angeles asked their brothers in Spain to teach them the process of making glazed ceramics. Another theory says that the Puebla ceramic tradition was named after the Spanish ceramist Roque de Talavera, who settled in Mexico in the 17th century. As users of Uriarte, we prefer to think the term comes from Dimas Uriarte, who founded a ceramic workship in Puebla under the name of Talavera de Puebla.

IZNIK

At the moment we have more of the blue and white, intricately embellished Iznik pottery than we do Clarice Cliff. While Cliff evokes the family attachment to England and Talavera the same for Mexico, Iznik suggests Turkey, Iran, and Morocco. According to Iznik: The Pottery of Ottoman Turkey (Thames and Hudson) by Norban Atasoy and Julian Raby, “whitebodied ware decorated in blue on a white background” was developed in Iznik “a small town of only 400 households” as the 15th century “drew to a close.” My only gifts related to Iznik were the Atasoy & Raby book and The Art of the Islamic Tile (Flammarion) by Gerard Degeorge and Yves Porter. Another indispensable Clarice Cliff book is Clarice Cliff: The Bizarre Affair (Abrams), which the ubiquitous Griffin co-authored with Louis K. and Susan Pear Meisel THE FIRST GIFT

Now that I think of it, you could say our marriage began with ceramics in the form of a wedding present of two place settings of Wedgwood in the Florentine pattern (turquoise and white, festooned with dragons) that my wife had dreamed of owning since she was in her teens, and now after 50 years of marriage we’ve accumulated enough china to serve a party of eight should that unlikely event ever come about. My fondness for our china has literary roots, since Josiah Wedgwood’s son Thomas arranged for Samuel Taylor Coleridge to have an annuity of £150 in 1798 so that he could “devote himself to philosophy and poetry.”

OCTOBER 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Fall is for Planting! by Lisa Miccolis, owner of Bountiful Gardens

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It’s a Jungle Out There... Blood-thirsty insects nipping at our flesh are spreading Zika, West Nile and other viruses. Rutgers entomologist Dina Fonseca tackles the public health crisis.

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By Ilene Dube

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Dina M. Fonseca, a professor of entomology at Rutgers University, warns that if temperatures continue to be higher than normal, it could be a banner year locally for Asian tiger mosquitoes. Fonseca worked with genetic markers of the insect at her lab in 2014, part of her study of the species’ rapid expansion in the United States. (Photo by Kristina Carle)

We’ve read all the studies: it’s healthier to be outdoors, where walking among the trees alleviates depression, lowers blood pressure and staves off Alzheimer’s disease. Children who play outside do better in school. OK, but how to protect ourselves from ticks and mosquitoes that spread deadly diseases? Among the most ferocious is the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus). Native to both tropical and temperate climates, this insect with a penchant for international travel arrived in New Jersey in 1995. It can survive in urban, densely populated areas, and eggs of the species hitchhike on used tires that fill with rainwater, stimulating their eggs to hatch. Classified as an invasive species, the Asian tiger mosquito—thus named for its striped body and aggressive behavior—can transmit pathogens such as Zika, dengue and Chikungunya viruses. And unlike mosquitoes of yore, which limited their human feasting to dawn and dusk—those otherwise splendid hours for pulling weeds—the Asian tiger feasts all day. The stealth predators with a fondness for legs and ankles bite before even making their presence known. Who better to chat with about these critters than Dina Fonseca, a professor of medical and veterinary entomology at Rutgers University. The Fonseca Labs, a mosquito research and control lab, is part of the Rutgers Center for Vector Biology, located in an unassuming building behind the New Brunswick Community Farmers Market on Jones Avenue. Surrounded by greenhouses and sunflowers growing 10 feet tall, a visitor is greeted by illustrations of mosquitoes on the glass entry doors. Dr. Fonseca ended her summer with a visit to Montpellier, France, where she gave a talk on urban mosquitoes at the 2016 EcoSummit. The conference

coincided with World Mosquito Day, August 20, commemorating Sir Ronald Ross, the British doctor who, in 1897, discovered that female mosquitoes transmit malaria between humans. DETERMINED TO REPRODUCE

Female mosquitoes pierce mammal flesh with a hypodermic needle-like proboscis to draw in blood, which provides them with enough protein to develop eggs—and send more mosquitoes into the world! To the rescue: John Smith, an attorney with a passion for insects who went on to become the second professor of entomology at Rutgers, giving Rutgers the distinction of being the place where mosquito control was invented. “If not for John Smith, we could not take vacations on the Jersey Shore,” Dr. Fonseca points out. His book Mosquitoes of New Jersey (1904) details practical control on a large scale. Smith led the effort to amend the New Jersey Health Act, leading to a bill signed by then Governor Woodrow Wilson authorizing the formation of mosquito control commissions in New Jersey. “As a lawyer, Smith had the ability to talk to politicians and persuade them to fund the solution,” continues Dr. Fonseca. Each county is required to have a mosquito control program and allocate funding. “That’s how important mosquito control is to New Jersey and why I have the position I hold.” The model has been copied in Florida and California, three states with strong mosquito control programs, she adds. In some quarters, biting insects are considered defenders of the wilderness. Because of the system of narrow trenches Smith developed to eliminate areas where larva develop, he is sometimes blamed for the erosion of salt marshes, now known to be beneficial. “But it was developers, who realized they could dry october 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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CDC’s Response to Zika

ESTIMATED range of Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti in the United States, 2016* Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are more likely to spread viruses

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* Maps have been updated from a variety of sources. These maps represent CDC’s best estimate ofrange the potential range of Aedes aegypti and Aedesin albopictus in the ESTIMATED of Aedes albopictus the United States, 2016* United States. Maps are not meant to represent risk for spread of disease.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention * Map has been updated from a variety of sources. The map represents CDC’s best estimate of the potential range of Aedes albopictus in the United States. The map is not meant to represent risk for spread of disease.

out the marsh and build houses on it, who are really responsible,” says Fonseca. “We have to be smart about it—the marsh is a habitat for fish. Scientists and engineers need to talk to each other and create incentives for restoring habitat.” And that’s exactly what happened at the EcoSummit in Montpellier.

CS264451-F April 1, 2016

FROM AN INTEREST IN CONSERVATION

Interestingly, despite her vast knowledge of insects, and her ability to rattle off Latin names and research results, Fonseca didn’t start out as an entomologist but as an ecologist. She grew up in Coimbra, Portugal, an ancient city with a 13th-century university. “I always liked insects and experiments. We had frogs, chickens, fish and snakes—my parents were understanding.” At the University of Coimbra, where Fonseca was the first member of her family to go to college, she studied biology and geology and proposed a course on biospeleology, or cave biology, to study organisms that live in caves. “In my 52 years, of the two moments that terrified me most, the first was spelunking in a cave so narrow I couldn’t fit my helmet on my head,” she recounts. “I had to push it ahead of me inch by inch. Of course you had to get out the same way. I suddenly had this urgent need to stand up.” Fonseca had to exercise mind over matter to calm herself and get over it. And the second terrifying moment? “It was in 2001 when I came home from the hospital with my one-day-old baby and my husband said, ‘OK, I have to go to work now.’ I looked at my kid and said, ‘We can do this.’” Fonseca and her husband have two sons, 12 and 15. The youngest shares her interest in insects. Insects are good indicators of water quality. Before she left Portugal, Fonseca, enamored of her country’s beautiful rivers, worked to establish metrics. After she taught high school health and biology, the University of Coimbra offered her an opportunity to get her doctorate and become a tenured professor. During the program she spent a summer at Central Michigan

60 |

University Biological Station, taking classes on the Beaver Island archipelago, and fell in love with American education. Without any guarantees, she switched programs to get her master’s degree at Central Michigan, then to the University of Pennsylvania for a doctorate in ecology and evolutionary biology. The year was 1989, she was 25, and she met her future husband who was getting a doctorate in immunology. The problem with being married to another researcher, Fonseca says, is that you don’t always get to work in the same state. There was a time when his work was in Philadelphia and hers was in Washington, D.C. The family lived in Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania, in an old stone farmhouse whose stone walls were a great place to capture the marmorated stink bugs she needed for research. Fonseca’s husband had been a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, but two years ago he became a senior researcher for the National Institutes of Health and the family moved to Bethesda, Maryland. Fonseca spends Wednesdays through Fridays in New Jersey. This leads to occasional confusion. During the day I visited, she received a phone call from the piano teacher, wondering who would be bringing the boys to their lesson. IN THE RIGHT PLACE AT THE RIGHT TIME

In 1996, after completing her Ph.D., during which she studied how stream insects interact with the fast-flowing water they live in, Fonseca applied for a fellowship at the Smithsonian Institution. “I wanted to learn molecular biology and, surprisingly, when I applied for a postdoc at the National Zoo my soon-to-be advisor proposed I develop genetic tools to examine populations of mosquitoes that transmit bird malaria to endangered Hawaiian endemic birds.” As it turns out the vectors of bird malaria in Hawaii are also the vectors of West Nile Virus the pandemonium around which started in 1999. “I had the tools and it launched my career. I got into medical entomology through conservation.”

PRINCETON MAGAZINE october 2016

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She then spent two years as a research associate at Walter Reed Army Hospital studying human malaria in Kenya, and in 2001 the Smithsonian hired her as a geneticist. In 2004 she became an assistant curator at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, and in 2007 she came to Rutgers, becoming tenured in 2010 and a full professor in 2014. Fonseca’s primary field of research is documenting and understanding how mosquitoes adapt to the human environment, how they change our quality of life, and strategies to empower homeowners and communities to develop and support enlightened mosquito control. Among questions she’s explored when looking at the costs of not controlling mosquitoes have been whether fear of mosquitoes leads to childhood obesity because children are less likely to go outside. (Children are more likely to play outside when the mosquito population has been controlled.) For every $1 spent on research, she says, $8 is saved on money not spent, for example, on citronella torches and repellant bracelets, none of which work. An important step, she says, is to improve elementary school education on insects and arachnids. Teachers often have a dislike for insects. “Kids who say they like insects, especially girls, are looked at in a funny way,” says Fonseca. So, I ask, scratching mosquito bites on my arms, incurred a day earlier while snipping basil from the garden, is it safe to go outside? IT’S AN ODDS KIND OF THING

Chikungunya is debilitating but doesn’t kill, she points out. Victims recover and go on with their lives. Mosquitoes can spread EEE—Eastern Equine Encephalitis—that has a 30 percent chance of killing you, but getting the disease is rare. Since 1958 there have been 50 cases in New Jersey.

Age is another factor. EEE can kill people of all ages, and Zika virus is most problematic for women of childbearing age. Older people are more susceptible to West Nile Virus, but few of those infected get sick; millions have been infected in the U.S., but their immune systems take over and they may never notice an infection. “It’s unlikely to make you sick, and even less likely to kill you,” says Fonseca. “It’s a perception thing and panic driven,” she adds. “Six or seven years ago we were talking about dengue and Chikungunya in Florida and Texas. Now it’s all about Zika. If it weren’t for microcephaly we wouldn’t be talking about Zika.” Zika is already here in New Jersey, having arrived with travelers to the Caribbean or South America. “If you get bit by a mosquito, what’s the likelihood of local transmission? We don’t know the odds. We know the Asian tiger can transmit. It’s an odds kind of thing.” When a mosquito bites an infected person it can then transmit to another person and lead to an avalanche of cases. For example, Fonseca recounts, a traveler from India infected with Chikungunya arrived in Italy in 2007. He visited friends in northeastern Italy, spending time at an outdoor café, and two weeks later cases of Chikungunya started occurring in the region. Eventually there were more than 260 reported cases. “You’re only infectious for a short time, and it takes two weeks to develop symptoms, but the more mosquitoes are infected, the more they infect,” says Fonseca. The good news is, as temperatures fall, frost will kill the female mosquitoes and their eggs won’t hatch again until spring. “Winter is a good thing,” says Fonseca. “We need to make use of it.” I put on my hiking boots and head out into the crisp fall air. I’m scratching just from thinking about the conversation with Fonseca. It’s never too late to slather on the lemon eucalyptus oil. october 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Ballet Bodies: Better Fed Than You Think ...by Anne Levin

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(above) Misty Copeland in Le Corsaire. Her strong, muscular physique, once considered a hindrance, has turned into an asset. Photo by Gene Schiavone. (opposite) Fit and healthy: left to right, dancers Abigail Jorgenson, Jorina Kardhashi, Max Azaro, and Ben Jorgenson of Princeton Dance and Theater Studio. Photo by Horst Frankenberger. (below) Emily Wohl of Princeton Dance and Theater Studio. Photo by Rosalie O’Connor.

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n a video that is part of a series on the New York City Ballet, dancers are asked to name their favorite foods. “I want grease, and, like, salt,” says corps de ballet member Gretchen Smith, who munches on a chip. “I’ve gotta go with fried chicken, mac and cheese, and curry,” enthuses principal dancer Amar Ramasar. “Cookies, sugar, chocolate,” announces petite principal dancer Megan Fairchild. Retired dancer Jenifer Ringer, who documented her struggles with weight in her autobiography Dancing Through It: My Journey in the Ballet, confesses in the video to her passion for ice cream with peanut butter. While it isn’t likely that these sleek creatures indulge themselves in their fat-laden favorites on a regular basis, the video’s message is clear: Dancers love to eat. And these days, it seems, they are more encouraged to do so—within reason. In professional dance companies and ballet schools, the emphasis is on being healthy, fit, and strong, rather than waiflike. Yes, dancers have to be slim, and the women light enough to lift. But protruding bones and concave physiques are out. Cross-training is in. Dancers swim laps, run on treadmills, and do Pilates. Ballet companies have physical therapists on staff for on-the-spot treatment of the aches and pains that, left untreated, can lead to injury. Consider the case of Misty Copeland, the American Ballet Theatre dancer who was the first woman of color to be named a principal dancer. In the reams of publicity surrounding her rise to the top, race was not the only focus. Copeland’s naturally sinewy body, originally considered a detriment to her career, has turned into an asset. Her striking musculature is the focus of an ad campaign for Under Armor underwear. And she stars in a television commercial for the health benefits of Oikos yogurt. Back in the days when choreographer George Balanchine was revolutionizing ballet, many aspiring dancers were nearly starving themselves in an effort to attain his reed-thin ideal. Risa Kaplowitz, co-founder and director of Princeton Dance and Theater Studio and artistic director of Princeton Youth Ballet, recalls weekly weighins by her ballet teacher when she was a young student. “It was mortifying to have the scale go up in front of my friends,” she recalls.

“In order to avoid such an embarrassment, I became one of those young dancers who suffered from an eating disorder.” Thankfully, Kaplowitz continues, the pendulum has swung in the other direction. “The trend these days in ballet is to be fit and strong rather than waif thin,” she says. “Today’s ballet companies require much more stamina and high level skills than in the past, and a ballet dancer simply would not survive physically in a company unless she is eating enough. Of course, a ballerina must still be able to be lifted by her male partner and body lines are an important aspect of the art form, so excess weight is still not tolerated well. But the good news is that dancers are expected to be healthy.” Christine Taylor, director of the North Jersey School of the Arts and the New Jersey Civic Youth Ballet in Hackettstown, affirms that proper nutrition is a focus for today’s dancers. “But I don’t agree with the perception that a dancer’s body is an athletic body,” she says. “One of the things that is so amazing about a ballet dancer is the long, lean look. An athletic body moves in a different way. When muscles are over-developed, they don’t move in the same way.” Taylor isn’t afraid to let students know that taking off some weight will help their careers. “When we have a dancer who is overweight, we tell them to put away the cookies and start eating correctly,” she says. “If you’re a wrestler, what does the coach say? I think that in general, society today is more aware of healthy living. And we do have a nutritionist who comes in and gives lectures to our company and school. It is very important to know about proper nutrition.” Douglas Martin, artistic director of New Jersey’s American Repertory Ballet, has his own theory about why dancers’ bodies appear to have more meat on them than in years past. A former football player who was a member of The Joffrey Ballet in the 1980s, Martin credits the artistic vision of that company’s late artistic director Robert Joffrey. “I think this is evolving rather than randomly happening,” Martin says. “Mr. Joffrey put an emphasis on dancers’ physiques in a slightly different way from what the dance world, especially in New York, had seen. He wanted the very best dancers he could get his hands on. There were certainly Joffrey icons who didn’t have that ‘perfect’ body. And october 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Midleap: Jacopo Jannelli of American Repertory Ballet. Photo by Richard Termine. (opposite) Lithe and limber: Nanako Yamamoto of American Repertory Ballet, in a high arabesque. Photo by Leighton Chen.

this facilitated an understanding of what ballet could do, without those ‘perfect’ they’re going to take it to the next level. A lot of them eat really well, and bodies.” they make sure they’re getting good food. Most people don’t realize that Martin also believes that the AIDS crisis, which saw the death of several dancers can eat big meals. Many of them eat quite well, because they’re ballet choreographers, allowed some known more for contemporary dance— working really hard.” Twyla Tharp and Mark Morris among them—to get a foothold in classical In a recent issue of the magazine Coveteur, several dancers detailed what ballet. “Contemporary dance bodies tend to be different from the iconic ballet they eat in a day. New York City Ballet’s Megan Fairchild said she starts her bodies. So it was no longer about sleek, long lines,” he says. “The look began day with an English muffin with goat cheese, prosciutto, sautéed spinach and to change.” two poached eggs with a banana and coffee (with milk). Her fellow principal That said, American Repertory Ballet and its dancer Sara Mearns revealed late-night, postaffiliated Princeton Ballet School take nutrition performance meals of filet mignon or honey-butter seriously. “We try to help them think about how to roasted chicken, and pasta if she knows she has a lot take care of their bodies,” Martin says. “When I see of rehearsals and performances the following day. a girl getting too thin, I stop her. We do talk about it. Gretchen Smith eats an avocado every day, and Aesthetic value is important, but you have to do it by doesn’t deny herself during a grueling schedule of using your brain and having a good diet.” class, rehearsals, and performances. A sausage, egg American Ballet Theatre has had physical and cheese sandwich, a BLT, and Mexican food might therapist Julie Daugherty on staff for the past decade. be part of her daily intake. And all three women These days, she says, the company’s dancers are well include dark chocolate in their diet. educated about eating healthily and taking care of Ballet being ballet, the push to be thin remains. their bodies. That means augmenting the daily ballet Professional companies and schools just try to keep class. “They see that in order to jump higher and it within reason. “Some dancers just have issues,” turn better, they have to do more,” Daugherty says. Daugherty says. “Even if it is not full-blown anorexia, “They follow a sports model a little bit more than which we haven’t had in our company, there is still they did before. A part of that is cross training. We some disordered eating. We worry about it. We have American Repertory Ballet’s Mattia Pallozzi. Photo by Leighton Chen. have a gym here and they use it all the time. They’re a program in our school, and we screen them yearly in here doing Pilates type stuff, lifting weights, and doing cardio. Part of what to check that they’re growing and that the girls are getting their periods. It’s they see is that in order to reach higher and higher levels, they have to add to still out there. But there are plenty more healthy dancers.” what they did before.” Martin says American Repertory Ballet rarely encounters a dancer with At the New York City Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, and regional a full-blown eating disorder. “It is very unusual these days,” he says. “The companies, dancers of today are better educated on taking care of their information in general, while it still leaves a lot to be desired, is getting better bodies. “You hear them talking about juicing, going vegan, or vegetarian, and better. It’s not so much about being thin. It’s about learning to maintain but the main thing is they want to eat healthy,” Daugherty says. “It seems the weight you want as a dancer and doing it in a healthy manner.” like this movement is happening also in the general population. But dancers take it to a further extreme. These guys have amazing bodies already, and

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Dentistry With a Gentle Touch By Taylor Smith

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any people live in fear of going to the dentist and put off receiving necessary procedures simply due to high levels of anxiety. The good news is that many dentists in New Jersey cater to those with dental anxiety by providing sedation treatments. In order to qualify for treatment, a patient must be in good health with no evident heart problems. A diagnostic evaluation is necessary prior to the procedure. There are many forms of sedation including oral sedation, IV sedation, and/ or nitrous oxide gas. Dr. Haddad of Advanced Dental Arts in Somerset, NJ delivers oral sedation in the form of prescription medications like Valium, with the requirement that patients receive transportation to and from the office. The benefits of oral sedation are that the patients can achieve a relaxed state, enabling them to receive multiple procedures, from routine cleanings to cosmetic treatments, with no discomfort. It is important to note that with oral sedation, a patient remains conscious throughout the entire procedure. Dental anxiety is typically caused by a history of negative dental experiences and, in extreme cases, can develop into a phobia. Such patients will likely suffer from rapid heartbeat, sweating, loss of sleep, and feelings of panic. Dr. Kirk Huckel of Princeton Center for Dental Aesthetics is the only dentist in Princeton with an advanced New Jersey State License for oral conscious sedation. The most anxious patients may initially require a mild sedative for a simple routine cleaning, but according to Dr. Huckel, “eventually, over time, their anxiety will lessen.” He goes on to state, “In addition to phobic patients, many people with busy schedules use oral conscious sedation as a means of getting many procedures done at one time.” Thus, if you find yourself avoiding the dentist’s office, year after year, oral conscious sedation may be the solution.

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Dr. Huckel of Princeton Center for Dental Aesthetics specializes in the treatment of dental anxiety. (Photo Credit: Princeton Center for Dental Aesthetics)

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Concierge Medicine

There’s a new trend in healthcare, and it’s gaining momentum in our area. By Sarah Emily Gilbert

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or the past two years, Dr. Lynne B. Kossow and Dr. Barbara A. Brown of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine have offered their patients far more than the traditional primary care practice. Most doctors see 25-30 patients a day for an average of 15 minutes, but Drs. Kossow and Brown see six patients a day for up to an hour. In addition to providing treatment for acute illnesses, the doctors act as their clients’ healthcare coaches through Lifestyle Medicine, a scientific approach to patient wellness by effecting changes in areas such as diet, physical activity, and stress management. With the current shortage of primary care physicians and the abundance of high volume practices, this type of individualized attention is rare. However, by switching to a concierge format, doctors like Kossow and Brown are able to practice medicine that consists of this broadspectrum care. Concierge medicine, also known as retainer-based medicine, is an umbrella term for private medical care wherein patients pay an out-of-pocket fee in exchange for enhanced care. Born in the 1990s, concierge medicine was once thought of as a service for the wealthy that charged patients a lofty fee for luxury medicine. In recent years, it has evolved to accommodate patients across all income brackets, leading to expanding interest among patients and their primary care doctors. According to a survey released by the American Academy of Private Physicians at the AAPP 2015 Fall Summit, more than 45 percent of 862 independent physicians would consider a concierge or similar membership model in the next three years. This may be due in part to our aging population needing increased and varied medical services, leading to an imbalanced patient/doctor ratio. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act has increased the number of insured patients, putting a further strain on primary care doctors. As a result, physicians are often unable to dedicate enough time to each patient. In the hopes of increasing both job and patient satisfaction in a financially sustainable way, primary physicians like Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are looking toward concierge medicine. “Where conventional medicine is failing is in the prevention and reversal of chronic diseases that are becoming an epidemic in the United States today,” explain the doctors. “The current insurance model is built upon a problem-based economic reimbursement that encourages doctors to address medical problems very quickly. This leads to most doctors rushing to see 25-30 patients per day in order to make ends meet…This is not how we have ever practiced. We always want to have the time to address the root cause of diseases that are preventable today.” “For the past two years, we have been offering our Lifestyle Medicine Concierge Program as an optional program for our patients,” they continue. “Lifestyle Medicine is a 21st century approach to healthcare that consolidates the very best characteristics of traditional medicine with the profound impact of lifestyle behaviors on health. As our program grew, it became readily apparent to us that integrating Lifestyle Medicine into our internal medicine practice was the best way for us to continue to provide exceptional care… We feel that the concierge model is the only way to effectively [do that].” Concierge medical practices come in various forms, including those that reject insurance plans all together, but this is not the case for Princeton Lifestyle Medicine.  Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown accept insurance for all covered medical services. In addition, their patients pay an annual fee of $1,200 for the Lifestyle Medicine Concierge program, which gives them access to an elevated level of care. Trained at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine at Harvard Medical School, the doctors are at the vanguard of their field, having lectured about their practice development model at The Institute of Lifestyle Medicine Conference

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Dr. Barbara A. Brown (left) and Dr. Lynne B. Kossow of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine.

in 2015. They are also members of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and the American College of Physicians. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown’s practice is unique in that it offers patients comprehensive conventional medical care combined with lifestyle counseling. Patients interested in a natural approach to disease prevention are provided in-depth, individualized coaching based on their needs. The doctors can assist with everything from quitting smoking to creating a manageable diet and exercise plan. According to the doctors, this is an evidence-based practice that has been shown to prevent, reverse, or slow down heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, diabetes, dementia, and some cancers. The concierge model offers Princeton Lifestyle Medicine patients additional benefits including access to the doctors’ emails, cell phone numbers, and private phone line, extended patient office visits, a one-hour consultation, and same or next day appointments. As a result, patients see Drs. Kossow and Brown not only as accomplished medical doctors, but health advocates, mentors, and even friends. “Our practice structure allows us to spend more time educating our patients about what may be going on with them medically,” the doctors explain. “We are better able to work with them as partners in their care and advocate for them with their specialists or if they are in the hospital. We provide tremendous support and guidance to them and their caretakers or family. We are happy to have this enhanced communication with our patients. It allows us to make social visits when they are hospitalized at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro so that we can stay in close touch while they are receiving care.” Concierge practices like Princeton Lifestyle Medicine focus the healthcare system on its most vital component: the patient-doctor relationship.  The model emphasizes quality care instead of quick care, benefitting both parties.  This is helping revive medical students’ interest in internal medicine, which is predicted to increase the number of primary care doctors and revitalize our healthcare system. As leaders in both concierge and Lifestyle medicine, it comes as no surprise that Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are at the forefront of this effort, bringing Princeton into the future of healthcare. The Princeton Lifestyle Medicine Concierge Program is $1,200 per year. The fee can be paid monthly, quarterly, biannually, or annually, and credit cards are accepted as payment. All medical services are billed through the patient’s insurance company as usual. Princeton Lifestyle Medicine is located at 731 Alexander Road, Suite 200 in Princeton, New Jersey.  For more information call 609.655.3800 or visit www. princetonlifestylemedicine.com.

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Dining Out Gluten-Free By Taylor Smith Even though an estimated 1 percent of the population suffers from celiac disease, dining out while staying gluten-free has become increasingly popular at restaurants throughout New Jersey. For example, iPhone apps like Find Me Gluten-Free allow users to view local business ratings and reviews, along with gluten-free menus and allergen lists. In addition, many popular chain restaurants have special gluten-free menus available upon request. Of course, there’s always the risk of cross-contamination in restaurant kitchens that are not exclusively glutenfree, but for those who do not have celiac disease, it is possible to follow a mostly gluten-free diet at any of the restaurants listed below. Agricola Eatery, Princeton http://agricolaeatery.com Gluten free brunch, lunch, and dinner options including the kale salad and autumn squash soup.

Jules Thin Crust Pizza, Princeton http://julesthincrust.com Jules pizzeria serves organic thin-crust and glutenfree pies and salads.

Arlee’s Raw Blends, Princeton www.arleesrawblends.com Local Olympic athletes frequent Arlee’s Raw Blends, which specializes in raw vegan foods and cold-pressed fruit and vegetable drinks.

Mediterra Restaurant & Taverna, Princeton www.mediterrarestaurant.com Mediterranean food from over two dozen cultures right in the heart of downtown Princeton. Gluten free options include daily fish specials and more.

Café Vienna, Princeton www.cafeviennaprinceton.com Gluten free omelettes and salads.

Mistral, Princeton www.mistralprinceton.com At Mistral, international flavors are melded with creativity and taste.

Conte’s Pizza, Princeton 609.921.8041 This Princeton staple now serves gluten-free pizza and pasta. Despaña Restaurant and Tapas Café, Princeton http://despanaprinceton.com Modern tapas and Spanish dishes, plus a food market and rooftop terrace. Infini-T Café & Spice Souk, Princeton www.infini-tcafe.com Infini-T offers vegan, vegetarian, gluten-free and fair-trade food and drinks. Jammin’ Crepes, Princeton www.jammincrepes.com Savory and sweet gluten-free crepes are always available upon request.

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Olives, Princeton www.olivesprinceton.com Kali Oreksi - enjoy your meal. It’s what Greeks say when they sit down to eat. And it is what Olives has been wishing their customers since they first opened in 1995. Princeton Soup & Sandwich Company, Princeton www.princetonsoupandsandwich.com Serving dairy free, gluten free, and vegetarian soup options. Sandwiches are available on a gluten free bagel or wrap. The Taco Truck, Princeton www.thetacotruck.com Gluten-free tacos, chips, salsas, and more.

the bent spoon, Princeton www.thebentspoon.net Inventive gelato and ice cream flavors using locally-sourced ingredients. Try the sweet basil and ricotta! Tico’s Eatery & Juice Bar, Princeton www.ticosprinceton.com Fresh squeezed and cold-pressed fruit and vegetable juices. The gluten free acai bowls are a particular favorite! Triumph Brewing, Princeton www.triumphbrewing.com Gluten-free menu available upon request. Great options include the gluten free Triumph burger and fish tacos. Wildflower Bakery & Café, Lawrenceville www.wildflourbakery-cafe.com Wildflower is a 100 percent gluten-free bakery and café located in Lawrenceville, just south of Princeton. Crepes, salads, and amazing bakery items. Winberie’s Restaurant & Bar, Princeton http://princeton.winberies.com An American-style restaurant, Winberie’s offers gluten-free brunch, lunch, and dinner options. Whole Earth Center, Princeton www.wholeearthcenter.com Princeton’s homegrown natural foods grocery including gluten-free daily specials.

PRINCETON MAGAZINE october 2016

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“I prepared mentally and physically for that day and that race and when you do that correctly, you are able to have your best race.” — Gevvie Stone, Princeton University alum

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RIO GRAND.... Olympics Wrap-Up by Bill Alden | photography by Ed Hewitt

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Katelin Snyder relished bike rides from her apartment in Kingston to the boathouse at Lake Carnegie in Princeton to get in some exercise and clear her head before assuming the duties of coxswain for the U.S. women’s eight and guiding it through grueling practice sessions as the rowers prepared for the 2016 Summer Olympics. Up in Boston, Gevvie Stone, a 2007 Princeton University alum, honed her sculling skills over the last several years, navigating through the tough conditions and the boat traffic on the Charles River as she pursued her dream of an Olympic medal while earning an M.D. from the Tufts University Medical School. Ashleigh Johnson, a star Princeton women’s water polo goalie, took a leave of absence from school last summer, moving to Southern California for 6-day-a-week training in and out of the pool with the U.S. women’s national team. While their paths to the Rio Summer Games were divergent, the three athletes ended up with a medal haul as Snyder piloted the women’s 8 to its third straight gold medal while Stone earned silver in the single sculls, the first U.S. athlete to medal in that event since 1988, and star goalie Johnson anchored the water polo squad on an undefeated run through the Olympic tournament to its second straight gold. Their success highlighted an extraordinary performance in Rio by athletes with Princeton connections. Former Tiger women’s soccer star Diana Matheson ’08 helped the Canadian women’s team to a second straight bronze. Princeton field hockey stars, Katie Reinprech ’13, Julia Reinprecht ’14, and Kat Sharkey ’13 helped the U.S. squad turn heads as it won four straight games before losing to eventual gold medalist Great Britain in its last game of pool play and then suffering a 2-1 loss in the quarterfinals to Germany, which went on to take bronze. Princeton fencing standout Kat Holmes ’17 made it to the Round of 32 in the women’s individual epee and then helped the U.S. place fifth in the team competition. Princeton track legend Donn Cabral ’12 took ninth in the men’s steeplechase while Tiger track coaches Priscilla Frederick and Robby Andrews competed in the women’s high jump and the men’s 1,500, respectively, with Frederick taking 28th in her event and Andrews advancing to semis in the 1,500. october 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Gevvie Stone showing her intensity and form in the singles sculls.

Adding to Princeton’s storied rowing tradition in Olympic competition, Glenn Ochal ’08, helped the U.S. men’s eight take fourth while Lauren Wilkinson ’11 competed for the Canadian women’s eight that took fourth. Two other former Princeton rowers, Taylor Nase ’13 and Robin Prendes’11, saw their U.S. men’s lightweight four take 10th overall while Kate Bertko ’06 and Devery Karz placed 10th in the women’s lightweight double sculls. ROAD TO RIO

Snyder and her boatmates tried to lighten the weight of expectations coming into the Games as the U.S. women’s eight had won 10 straight world or Olympic title, including gold at the 2008 and 2012 Summer Games. “It was going really well all summer; one of the things that we were really working on was eliminating all expectations and focusing on ourselves and the girl in front of you,” says Snyder, 29, a 5’4, 110-pound former University of Washington standout who patiently worked her way up the ranks in the U.S. program, moving to the Princeton area in 2013 to begin training with the national women’s program at the Shea Rowing Center on Lake Carnegie. “It was really important to put that out of our minds and focus on being the fastest we can be and let the chips fall where they may.” Stone, who placed seventh in the single sculls at the 2012 London Summer Games, came to Rio focused on getting on the podium. “I was still prepared to have my best race,” says Stone, 31, a lithe 6’0, 156 pounds. “I had come off a world cup where I had been second so I knew that I was in medal contention.” While the water polo squad entered its competition as the favorite, Johnson and her teammates were concentrating more on reaching their full potential than their medal prospects. “I think we were ready,” said Johnson, a chiseled 6’1 native of Miami, Fla. “Our whole mindset leading up to Rio was working on being consistent, putting our hearts into the game, and to be the team we have been wanting to be the whole time.”

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COMING THROUGH

The women’s eight, for its part, lived up to its billing as one of the most dominant teams in the history of its sport. The U.S. cruised to victory in its opening heat, winning by more than eight seconds over runner-up Netherlands. In the final, the boat pulled away to a win of 2.49 seconds over silver medalist Great Britain. In the wake of the gold medal race, Snyder gained worldwide attention for exhorting her teammates by bellowing “this is the U.S. women’s eight” when the boat stood in third halfway through the final. “We had such a good rhythm and we lengthened out, it was so strong, it was so easy to move the boat, the call came from my excitement,” recalls Snyder. “From my perspective, I was so excited. We are in this good rhythm and I think all of us knew that if we stay in this rhythm, we are going to inch out into the front. That was so motivating and so empowering. We are the US women’s 8 and this is our rhythm. We are doing it right now even though we are not in the lead, it is still where we want to be and what we want to do.” With the boat in a rhythm that resulted in gold, Snyder lost her composure for a moment at the finish. “It was all about executing the first shift up and we did that in the last 300 meters and once we executed that I just remember thinking, we are going to win, we are going to win,” says Snyder. “It was really exciting. I just kept saying Olympic gold, Olympic gold, you can do it, it was awesome, we did it. The finish line was a little bit hairy because I didn’t actually tell them to paddle, I just started celebrating. If you watch the video and you look for it at the end of the race, there are two or three strokes after the line where they are sprinting and I am splashing the water.” Stone got into the rhythm of her life in her gold medal final, surging past China’s Jingli Duan and Emma Twigg of New Zealand and making a run at gold medalist Kim Brennan of Australia, ending up at 7:22.92 over the 2,000-meter course with Brennan coming in 7:21.54. “It was to go out hard, be with the pack as much as possible at the start and to keep pushing hard through the middle,” says Stone, reflecting on her race plan.

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U.S. women’s eight coxswain Katelin Snyder guides the boat (in bottom photo) in action at the Rio Summer Games and raises her hands in exultation (top photo, left) after the U.S. took gold. october 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Star goalie Ashleigh Johnson makes a save for the U.S. women’s water polo team (lower left) in its run to the gold medal at the 2016 Summer Olympics and displays the spoils of victory individually and with her teammates. (Photos courtesy of USA Water Polo)

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Katelin Snyder, far right, enjoying the moment with the U.S. women’s eight after the boat took gold at the Rio Summer Games.

“At 1,000 meters, I thought this is fun, this feels good. Usually at 1000 is when you are shaky and you find another gear. It wasn’t that I didn’t feel any pain. I think I managed to be in the zone.” Getting into that zone was the product of years of training. “I prepared mentally and physically for that day and that race and when you do that correctly, you are able to have your best race,” says Stone. “I was having fun even though I am working hard. I had no idea how exhausted I was until I pulled into the awards dock and tried to stand up and ended up on all fours. They had to support me.” For Johnson, the gold medal game against Italy turned into one of the more fun and rewarding days of her life as the U.S pulled away to a 12-5 triumph. “We were just really excited for the opportunity to play in the game that we have been looking forward to these past four years,” says Johnson. “It was kind of surreal that we were in that situation but we were ready for it. That is what we have been training for, that is where we wanted to be. We just wanted to play the way we have been playing. We knew that we could get so much better, that is what we were aiming for. I was trying not to think about the clock the whole time once I got out of the game. I was like this is really happening, we are going to win an Olympic gold medal; it was really amazing. Just seeing my family in the stands and seeing all of my teammates so happy and crying, it was really overwhelming.” Bonding on a deep level as much as talent proved to be the secret of the team’s success. “I think that we are really a genuine team and we worked hard to build what felt like a family and not just a team who came together to play a game,” asserts Johnson. “We knew each other really well, we knew so much about each other. I think in the water we just play the game differently. We are really fast, we play really smart, we make those extra passes. We played unselfishly, it is a really fun way to play.” MEDAL REFLECTIONS

In the process of earning gold, Snyder learned a lot about herself and her capabilities.

“There are so many times on the national team where we tried and failed; it is just validation of all those failures,” says Snyder, noting that she didn’t make the women’s eight for the 2012 Summer Olympics. “At the time when I was cut, it seemed so unfair and there were so many other people to blame besides myself. Making the team and winning, I was really able to reflect and learn and realize that all of those failures were not anybody else, it was me learning. Now I am a better athlete and a better teammate. It all worked out.” For Stone, things could not have worked out any better, particularly considering that she had initially decided that the 2012 London Summer Games would be her rowing swan song. “It was incredible, it is proof that dreams can come true,” says Stone. “There was definitely a big mix of emotions up there on the medal stand; it is overwhelming, it is amazing. One of the best things about winning a medal is sharing that joy with everyone else who supported me along the way.” After originally balking at joining the national program due to the intense commitment that entailed, Johnson now realizes that it was one of the best moves she has ever made. “When I look back at my time, there is no way that I would have doubted embarking on this journey if I had known what would come,” says Johnson. “Not just what the ending would be but how many lifelong friends I would make, how many good experiences I would have, and how much stronger I would be at the end of this.” While Stone will be applying to hospital residencies as she pursues her goal of being an orthopedic surgeon and Johnson is heading back to Princeton for her senior season undecided whether she will continue her international career, Snyder is already primed for another Olympic journey with the 2020 Tokyo Summer Games on the horizon. “I thought once you reach the Olympics, what else is there to do after that,” says Snyder. “But I realize now so many things I did right and so many things that I did wrong. I just want to go back and do it again. I learned so much from my teammates who have already been to the Games and were there for their second or third Olympics.” october 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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BY ELLEN GILBERT

Not So Unimaginable

WOMEN

AND THE WHITE HOUSE

“Although we weren’t able to shatter that highest, hardest glass ceiling this time, thanks to you, it’s got about 18 million cracks in it” —HILLARY CLINTON TOLD SUPPORTERS WHEN SHE DROPPED OUT OF THE RACE FOR THE 2008 DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATION. IT’S IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER, THOUGH, THAT OTHER WOMEN WERE STIRRING THINGS UP QUITE A LONG TIME AGO.

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“I...claim the right to speak for the unenfranchised women of the country, and believing as I do that the prejudices which still exist in the popular mind against women in public life will soon disappear” — VICTORIA WOODHULL, ANNOUNCING HER CANDIDACY FOR PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES IN 1870

VICTORIA WOODHULL

The distinction of being the first woman Presidential aspirant belongs to the feisty Victoria Woodhull, who ran for the office in 1872 when another woman named Victoria was most assuredly already ruling Britannia. Since this was almost 50 years before the ratification of the 19th Amendment giving women the right to vote in the United States, Woodhull was unable to vote for herself that year. At least two other facts were decidedly not in her favor, notes Politico.com’s Carol Felsenthal. On inauguration day that year she would have been just 34 years old, and Article 2, Section 1 of the Constitution requires that the president be 35 on the day “he” takes office. The second consideration is that she happened to be

incarcerated on Election Day (and for a month or so after) in New York City’s Ludlow Street Jail on obscenity charges for writing an article about an adulterous love affair between Henry Ward Beecher, a powerful minister, and a parishioner just days before the election. Still, it was a first and also of no small note is the fact that Woodhull’s running mate was Frederick Douglass, the first African-American ever nominated for vice-president. “On paper,” notes Felsenthal, “it was an impressive pick, but not really: Douglass never appeared at the party’s nominating convention, never agreed to run with Woodhull, never participated in the campaign and actually gave stump speeches for [incumbent President] Grant.”

Some of the issues Woodhull championed would be familiar to contemporary voters: she supported labor unions, workers’ rights (including an eight-hour workday), “equal pay for equal work, help for working mothers, an end to spousal abuse, better public education, legal aid to the poor, opposition to capital punishment, tax reform, sex education in schools, and social welfare programs aimed at ending poverty.” Certain aspects of Woodhull’s long and colorful career are complicated. She worked not only as a women’s rights advocate, but as a stockbroker, newspaper editor, and, it was rumored, prostitute. “She was controversial and polarizing,” observes Time writer Erin Blakemore. She took a stand against abortion, but supported eugenics. OCTOBER 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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“VOTE FOR GRACIE”

For sheer comic relief during this particularly contentious campaign season nothing beats the story of comedienne Gracie Allen’s 1940 run for president. A Surprise Party candidate, her platform (“redwood trimmed with ‘nutty’ pine”) declared that “Congress Must Go” since “the Senate is the only show in the world where the cash customers have to sit in the balcony.” She called for “Ending Secrecy in Foreign Affairs,” because “if Charles Boyer is going around with Greta Garbo, the people are entitled to know about it.” Gracie’s immortal campaign song (sung by Gracie herself, and featuring her husband and comedy partner George Burns adding some suggestions) can be seen on YouTube.

“REMEMBER THE LADIES”

Although not a presidential aspirant, Abigail Adams had no problem expressing her concern for women’s rights. In a letter she wrote on March 31, 1776 she reminded her husband, John, then serving as the Massachusetts representative to the Continental Congress in Philadelphia. While she longed “to hear that you have declared an independence,” she made sure to point out that “in the new code of laws which

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I suppose it will be necessary for you to make, I desire you would remember the ladies and be more generous and favorable to them than your ancestors. Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the husbands. Remember, all men would be tyrants if they could. If particular care and attention is not paid to the ladies, we are determined to foment a rebellion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice or representation.” Benjamin Franklin’s youngest sister, Jane, has also emerged as a wonderfully compelling female presence in early American history thanks to Jill Lepore’s Book of Ages, published in 2013. “Jenny and Benny” were both passionate readers, writers (she, despite a very limited education), and observers of the political scene. Unlike her brother, though, Jane had twelve children to care for. In reviewing Lepore’s book, NPR’s Maureen Corrigan observed, “to call it simply a biography would be like calling Ben’s experiments with electricity mere kite flying...The end product is thrilling—an example of how a gifted scholar and writer can lift the obscure out of silence.” Benjamin Franklin’s books include, of course, The Autobiography, Poor Richard’s Almanack, and The Way to Wealth. Jane’s output was far less prodigious, though, as Lepore tells us, “she did once write a

book. She stitched four sheets of foolscap between two covers to make sixteen pages...She called it her Book of Ages.” It was meant to record of the births and deaths of her children but Lepore ingeniously finds a great deal more than that “litany of grief” in it; it is, she writes, “a history of books and papers, a history of reading and writing, a history from reformation to revolution, a history of history.”

MORE WOMEN

Journalist Cokie Roberts, another NPR regular who also happens to be the sister of the late Princeton mayor, Barbara Sigmund, has also profiled important women in American history. Her books include Capital Dames: The Civil War and the Women of Washington, 1848-1868; Ladies of Liberty, and Founding Mothers: The Women Who Raised our Nation. Exuberantly illustrated young adult and children’s books that will eventually need updating include Catherine Thimmesh’s Madam President: The Extraordinary, True (and Evolving) Story of Women in Politics; Ilene Cooper’s A Woman in the House (And Senate), and Kathleen Krull’s Lives of Extraordinary Women, whimsically subtitled “Rulers, Rebels (and What the Neighbors Thought”).

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from 1969 to 1983. During that time she became the first African American candidate for a major party’s nomination for President of the United States, and the first woman to run for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination, paving the way for both the African American man (President Obama) and female nominee (Secretary Clinton) who followed. In her book Unbought and Unbossed, Chisholm described some of the challenges she faced and her determination to effect change. “She knew she couldn’t win,” observes Ilene Cooper, “but she felt strongly that the political landscape in America needed change and color.” “When I die,” Chisholm said in a 2004 documentary, “I want to be remembered as a woman who lived in the twentieth century and who dared to be a catalyst for change.” “You got it, Shirley,” enthuses Cooper. In 2015 Chisholm was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

OTHER BIDS

Like Shirley Chisholm, Linda Jenness (b. 1941) knew she couldn’t win when she threw in her bid as the Socialist Workers Party candidate in 1972. Too young to actually be nominated in some states, Jenness shared the nomination with another female candidate, Evelyn Reed, who ran in states where Jenness did not qualify. “Though Jenness repeatedly challenged Democratic nominee George McGovern to a debate, he refused,” writes Erin Blakemore. Jenness was reported to have said, “the Socialists do not fool themselves that they have a chance of winning any major victories this year.” She did, however, receive over 83,000 votes. Jill Stein’s presidential aspirations are probably more familiar to voters today. The American physician, activist, politician, was the Green Party’s nominee for President of the United States in 2012, and is running again in 2016. Blakemore notes that “in a raucous election year, Jill Stein’s 2012 presidential run felt more like an afterthought than a milestone. But in fact, Stein’s presidential candidacy was the most successful ever conducted by a woman.” Stein appears to mean business again: in response to a recent Washington Post editorial that described her campaign as a “fairy tale,” Stein called the Clinton and Trump campaigns “nightmares.”

JUST THE START

A CATALYST FOR CHANGE

“One of my heroines is Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm,” President Obama has written, adding that “she once said, ‘The emotional, sexual, and psychological stereotyping of females begins when the doctor says, ‘It’s a girl.’ We know that these stereotypes affect how girls see themselves starting at a very young age, making them feel that if they

don’t look or act a certain way, they are somehow less worthy.” Shirley Chisholm (1924-2005) was a politician, educator, and author, who, in 1968, became the first African American woman elected to the U.S. Congress. Chisholm went on to represent New York’s 12th Congressional District for seven terms

History notes that Victoria Woodhull is also remembered for her campaign to raise the hemlines of women’s skirts, making it easier for them to negotiate the muddy streets of the day. “She likely couldn’t imagine a candidate for president campaigning in pastel pants suits,” quips Felsenthal. Hillary Clinton’s run is, of course, history-making, while for many it is still part of a beginning. “If Hillary wins in November 2016, it will be, of course, a huge step for women,” writes Emily’s List founder Ellen R. Malcolm in her book, When Women Win. “But we must remember that if we achieve this once-unimaginable goal...it is still just one step on a much bigger journey.”

OCTOBER 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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| CULTURAL EVENTS

OCT. 25 photo by t. charles erickson.

photo courtesy the arts council of princeton

OCT. 21

OCT. 15

nov. 12

M a r k Yo u r

OCT. 22

Calendar m u s i c | b o o k s | t h e at r e | l e c t u r e s | s p o r t s

OCT. 20

Friday, October 14 4:30pm Princeton University’s Fund for Irish Studies: Len Graham and Brian Ó hAirt on The Road Taken: Songs, Music and Dance from the Irish Tradition. Graham and Ó hAirt share the traditional art of sean-nós singing in English and Irish Gaelic, as well as dance music on concertina, accordion, whistle, puirt-á- beul (mouth-music) and sean-nós dancing. http://arts.princeton.edu

6pm The dead live again in The Penguin History of the Undead: Fifteen Hundred Years of Supernatural Encounters at Labyrinth Books of Princeton. Historians Scott Bruce and Anthony Grafton will discuss the presence and popularity of ghost stories throughout history. www.labyrinthbooks.com

8pm Soulful singer-songwriter Jason Isbell performs with Josh Ritter at Count Basie Theatre in Red Bank. www.countbasietheatre.org

Saturday, October 15 10am – 5pm Fall Family Fun Weekends at Terhune Orchards in Lawrenceville. Pick-your-own pumpkins, corn stalk maze, tractor rides, homemade treats, and much more (through October 30). www. terhurnorchards.com

6pm Princeton Tour Company’s Ghost Hunt and Cemetery Visit. Experience Princeton Cemetery and the surrounding neighborhood using real ghost hunting equipment! www.princetontourcompany.com

6:30pm Lift a stein to the Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association’s annual WatershedFest. This year’s theme is Oktoberfest and includes an authentic German Biergarten. http://bit.ly/2doxOXV

Sunday, October 16 10am – 4pm Autumn Encampment and Marketplace at Washington Crossing State Park in Bucks County, Pa. Shop colonial crafts and watch the soldiers assemble to drill 18th C. military tactics. www. washingtoncrossingpark.org

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12:30pm Guild for Early Music Festival at Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton Township. The event will be announced by hosts of WWFM – The Classical Network. In addition, sculpture tours will be offered on this year’s theme recognizing 12 years of the event – “The Zodiac and the Night Sky.” www.groundsforsculpture.org 2 – 4pm Opening reception for Stuart Country Day School’s Faculty Art Exhibition at Stuart’s Considine Gallery (on view through November 22). www. stuartschool.org

Monday, October 17 1pm Still Life and Interiors Painting Workshop at Morven Museum & Garden in Princeton. Students will have access to the windowed garden room overlooking the Morven estate so that they can paint en plein air without weather concerns (meets weekly through November 7). www.morven.org 7:30pm Anne Carrere returns to McCarter Theatre with her homage to France’s “sparrow,” Edith Piaf. Watch as Carrere journeys through the streets of Montmartre with classics like La Vie en Rose and Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien. www.mccarter.org

Thursday, October 20 9am The 30th Anniversary Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival at New Jersey Performing Arts Center (NJPAC) in Newark (through October 23). www.njpac.org 4:30pm Princeton Public Lectures presents playwright Robert Schenkkan author of All the Way, which explores LBJ’s first year in office and the campaign to pass the Civil Rights Act. In 2016, HBO presented a filmed version of the play starring Bryan Cranston. http://lectures. princeton.edu

Friday, October 21 7:30pm The Rocky Horror Show is alive at Bucks County Playhouse in New Hope, Pa. Dress up as your favorite crazy creature and be prepared to participate! The show runs at select times through October 30. http://bcptheater.org

Saturday, October 22 1pm Princeton University football vs. Harvard at Powers Field at Princeton Stadium. www.goprincetontigers.com 1:30pm Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed ROCK-tober Hike. Join Jeff Hoagland on a moderate hike to celebrate the rugged rocks of the Sourland Mountains. http:// thewatershed.org

Sunday, October 23 9am – 8pm Data & Art Hackathon at West Winsdor Arts Center in Princeton Junction. This STEAM-inspired event brings together artists, engineers, designers, and computer programmers to create visual data for the arts community. http://westwindsorarts.org

photos courtesy of shutterstock.com

Poet Gary Snyder reading at the 2014 Festival.

2pm Raconteur Radio presents a staged radio play at Princeton Public Library based on the 1886 novella The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. The 90-minute production features period costumes, theatrical lighting, sound effects, Golden Age radio equipment, and vintage commericals. www.princetonlibrary.org

Tuesday, October 25 7pm Seven-time Grammy winner Carrie Underwood performs at Madison Square Garden as part of her Storyteller Tour. www.thegarden.com

Friday, October 28 5pm Annual Hometown Halloween Parade. Dress up in your best costume and join the Arts Council of Princeton for a parade that starts at Palmer Square Green and travels through downtown Princeton to the YMCA. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org

Saturday, October 29 7am 2016 Trenton Double Cross Half Marathon, 10K, 5K, and Kids Run. www.trentonhalf.com 10am – 6pm The Count’s Halloween Spooktacular at Sesame Place in Langhorne, Pa. Come in costume and enjoy three special Halloween shows, neighborhood street party, parade, music, and spooky rides! https:// sesameplace.com

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OCT. 17

OCT. 17

NOV. 12

photos courtesy of shutterstock.com

xian zhang with the njso 2016, photo by fred stucker

OCT. 28

OCT. 29

NOV. 25

3PM Rum & Onions 37th Annual Halloween Contra Dance presented by the Princeton Country Dancers at Pond Road Middle School in Robbinsville, NJ. Potluck supper begins at 6 p.m. www. princetoncountrydancers.org

8PM Xian Zhang debuts as Music Director of the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra (NJSO) at the State Theatre of NJ in New Brunswick. www.statetheatrenj.org

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30 3PM Neuropsychiatrist and author Daniel J. Siegel discusses his latest book, Mind: A Journey to the Heart of Being Human. The event is part of the annual Gould Lecture Series at Princeton Public Library.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 31 7:30PM Screening of Halloween (1978) at Princeton Garden Theatre with a special introduction presented by Rutgers University professor of psychiatry Anthony Tobia. http://princetongardentheatre.org

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2 7PM Poetry Reading & Conversation with Billy Collins and Princeton Theological Seminary President M. Craig Barnes at the Seminary Library. http://ptsem.edu

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12 9AM – 5PM Not sure which pie to serve at your Thanksgiving meal? Taste test over 20 varieties of home-baked pies at Terhune Orchards Pie Sampling Weekend. The friendly store staff will be on-hand to take Thanksgiving orders (also on Sunday, November 13). www.terhuneorchards.com

10AM Learn more about Woodrow Wilson’s controversial life in Princeton on this walking tour presented by the Historical Society of Princeton. The tour will use local buildings and houses as focal points in a narrative on Wilson’s life before he became 28th President of the United States. www.princetonhistory.org

6PM Dining by Design 2016 is the Arts Council of Princeton’s signature fall gala fundraiser in support of the ACP’s community education programs for at-risk populations. The evening will features a sumptuous 3-course sinner at Rat’s Restaurant at Grounds for Sculpture. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org

8PM Westminster Choir College’s Symphonic Choir performs Maurice Ravel’s ballet Daphnis et Chloé with The Philadelphia Orchestra at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia. www.kimmelcenter.org

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16

10AM – 5PM Epic Tales from India: Paintings from the San Diego Museum of Art opens at Princeton University Art Museum (through February 5, 2017). http://artmuseum.princeton.edu

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25 9:30AM – 5PM A Brandywine Christmas opens at the Brandywine River Museum of Art in Chadds Ford, Pa. View the towering trees in the museum’s three-story atrium, light displays, model trains, and more (through January 8). www.brandywine.org 10AM – 5PM 22nd Annual Holiday Covered Bridge Artisans Studio Tour in Southern Hunterdon County, NJ. A multi-artist exhibition will also be held at the Sergeantsville Cultural Arts Center (through November 27). http://coveredbridgeartisans.com

4:45PM Kick-off the holiday season with the Annual Christmas Tree Lighting Spectacular at Palmer Square in downtown Princeton. www.palmersquare.com

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26 NOON – 3PM Strolling holiday entertainment in Princeton’s Palmer Square every weekend through Sunday, December 17. www.palmersquare.com

5:30PM Princeton University professor Sergio Verdu

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27

delivers a public lecture on Claude E. Shannon, author of A Mathematical Theory of Communication, at the Institute for Advanced Study. www.ias.edu

10AM – 4PM View the 2016 Festival of Trees exhibit at Morven Museum & Garden (through January 8). www. morven.org

vs. Penn at Princeton’s Bedford Field. www. goprincetontigers.com

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6

Greenhouse, journalist and Yale Law School lecturer. http://lectures.princeton.edu

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5 10AM – 4PM The Historical Society of Princeton’s November House Tour. www.princetonhistory.org

NOON Princeton University women’s field hockey

7AM 2016 HiTOPS Princeton Half Marathon. https://

6PM Princeton Public Lectures welcomes Linda

princetonhalfmarathon.com

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19

1PM NY Giants vs. Philadelphia Eagles at MetLife

ALL DAY Crafters’ Marketplace Weekend, a live juried

Stadium in East Rutherford, NJ. www.giants.com

7:30PM A Child’s Christmas in Wales opens at The Shakespeare Theatre of NJ in Madison. Based on Dylan Thomas’ classic story about his childhood holidays in Wales in the early 1900s, the production is directed by Joseph Discher (through January 1). www. shakespearenj.org

show of more than 85 artisans and their handcrafted goods at John Witherspoon Middle School in Princeton. Proceeds from the event support the YWCA Princeton’s Pearl Bates Scholarship Fund (also on November 20). www.ywcaprinceton.org OCTOBER 2016 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Princeton Magazine, October 2016