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Patrick Kennedy SUMMER 2018

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THE SPIRIT OF GOTHIC ARCHITECTURE: SPIRES, FLYING BUTTRESSES, AND GARGOYLES

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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OCTOBER 2016

SENATOR CORY BOOKER ADVANCING THE COMMON GOOD A Real “Boardwalk Empire”

EVOLVING NEIGHBORHOOD HOMES ADAPT TO CONTEMPORARY LIFESTYLES

Princeton University Tackles the 21st Century’s Biggest Problems McCarter Theatre’s OnStage Seniors Program “Tails” of Princeton

sePtember 2016

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SPRING 2017 • REUNIONS ISSUE

the education issue

NJSO MuSic DirectOr Xian Zhang university presidents look ahead the first college football smackdown camden’s waterfront revival doughmain education foundation alexander hamilton’s new jersey

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY REUNIONS WEEKEND PRINCETON’S ROLE IN WORLD WAR I GARDENING WITH AMERICA’S FOUNDING FATHERS LANDSCAPE DESIGN THE MAKER MOVEMENT

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BALLET BODIES RIO 2016 OLYMPICS WRAP-UP

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MARCH 2013

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APRIL 2015

MICHAEL GRAVES DRAWN TO DESIGN

O C T O B E R 20 1 2

OCTOBER

H O L I DAY

ALAN TURING AND THE DIGITAL UNIVERSE EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGISTS ROSEMARY AND PETER GRANT PRINCETON’S FLORAL ARTISTS STEP INTO SPRING CENTER OF THEOLOGICAL INQUIRY OUTDOOR LIVING A WELL-DESIGNED LIFE

2012

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Cecilia Rouse Returns to Princeton Brian’s Restaurant in Lambertville Photographer Jon Naar Princeton University’s Housing Plan Sowing Seeds at Freshkills Park Spring Home & Landscape Design Q&A With Coach Courtney Banghart

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34 KIRSTEN THOFT, ARCHITECT

CONTENTS

82

60

26 SPRING 2019

BOTANICAL CAMPUS

DIGITAL PRIVACY

BY ILENE DUBE

BY WILLIAM UHL

Exotic and native plants, shrubs, and trees get their start in Princeton University’s greenhouses and nursery

Threats and protections in today’s world 76

16

MORE THAN A WALK IN THE WOODS

AN ECOLOGICAL INVENTORY

BY WENDY GREENBERG

BY TAYLOR SMITH

Arboretum visits can help homeowners visualize their own landscape

The impact of invasive species 26

82

COEDUCATION AT PRINCETON FASHION & DESIGN

BY DONALD GILPIN

Recollections after 50 years 34

90

AMAZING SPACES BY ANNE LEVIN PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY E. TRYON

Architects in their own homes 46

IF WALLS COULD TALK BY TAYLOR SMITH

The immigration experience at historic Ellis Island 60

ON THE COVER: Witherspoon Media Group is celebrating 10 years of publishing Princeton Magazine.

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A Well-Designed Life 90, 92

DESTINATION: ASBURY PARK BY TAYLOR SMITH 94

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: WILLOWWOOD ARBORETUM; KIRSTEN THOFT, PHOTO BY JEFFREY E. TRYON; ARCHIVE PHOTO COURTESY OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY MUDD MANUSCRIPT LIBRARY; MAGNOLIA ESPALIER PHOTO BY ERICA M. CARDENAS; INSECTS COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; GLOBAL VIEWS FAUX BOIS WHITE FLOOR LAMP; ELLIS ISLAND ARCHIVE PHOTO COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS.

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| FROM THE PUBLISHER

PLACEHOLDER

Welcome to the Spring Issue of your magazine — an issue about “new beginnings,” which is appropriate for spring. But first, let me give you the cover story, since we are celebrating our own new beginning with the 10th Anniversary of our start in publishing this magazine; thus the array of some of the most interesting covers to grace our magazine. For many years, Princeton Magazine had been published by a company in Bergen County, with its only real connection to Princeton being a wonderful woman with a cell phone who sold advertising. The content was mainly about local businesses and big parties with pictures of who was there. One day, I got a call from a good friend and Lawrenceville classmate who asked, “Bob, how would you like to own Princeton Magazine?” My response was an immediate and unqualified, “Yes!” My wife, Barbara, and I were already investors in Town Topics with partner Lynn Adams Smith, and the magazine seemed like a perfect addition. We all agreed to move the magazine to the town that bore its name and completely redesign its content, its graphics, its format, and, eventually, even its size. And what a wonderful 10 years it’s been! Now to this issue… With the coming of spring, thoughts and concerns always turn to gardening and landscaping. Wendy Greenberg takes you on a stroll through some of the remarkable arboreta in our area, where you can gather inspiration for what to do at home. For more greenery, Ilene Dube introduces you to how the many exotic plantings come about on the Princeton University campus, one of the most beautifully landscaped campuses in the world. You will learn about the greenhouses and nursery the University operates, along with the caring people who work there. Donald Gilpin shares with us the 50th anniversary of a Princeton University new beginning with its going “coed” in 1969, with the first class to include women graduating in 1973. I was a very young architect in 1968 when Jack Moran, head of facilities at the University, teamed me with developer Herbert Kendall of Kendall Park to convert the former Princeton Inn and its employee housing wing into a dormitory for the incoming women. The entire project had to be completed in a short eight MARCH 2009 months. When the women moved in, the smell of fresh paint was still in the air, but it was the start of what has Kicking been and continues to be a great era for the University. Up A Taylor Smith takes us back a couple more Rackett generations to another new beginning with her piece to original lyrics by Poet Paul Muldoon on Ellis Island, the main entry point for immigrants coming from Europe under the inspiring gaze of the Statue of Liberty. Her story, “If Walls Could Talk,” is accompanied by some wonderful photographs of the restored buildings on Ellis Island. It is a wonderful place to visit and to revisit the fact that our entire country was born and developed by immigrants. Now, if you want to visit some more modern walls, follow Anne Levin as she tours some “Amazing Spaces” as created by architects for their own homes. In spite of what you may think, as an architect I can tell you that designing for yourself is a lot harder than Designer Cooking with BoBBy trigg Emily mann on DirEcting doing it for a client — especially when your spouse the haunting of the PrinCeton BarraCks going grEEn with tErracyclE is also an architect. We hope you enjoy what Anne has learned about how architects live with their own designs. Our first cover. Have you been to Asbury Park recently? That little seaside city is experiencing a “second beginning” with new development, ongoing restoration, and positive planning that is bringing it back to its greater days of the 1930s and 40s. Let Taylor Smith give you some pointers on what’s new. It won’t be long before you will want to hit a beach, and Asbury Park is only a short hour away. On a less positive note, Taylor also reports on the ecological impact of invasive species of bugs and plants. Art Director Jeffrey Tryon has provided some PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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MARCH 2009

27

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY E. TRYON

Dear Princeton Magazine readers,

beautiful images of the bugs and foliage, but what they can do to our environment is not that pretty. Finally, a last new beginning — start protecting your accounts, and, most importantly, your identity by following the advice of William Uhl in his article on “Digital Privacy.” Be careful about every email you get, and don’t open it if you are unsure about where it came from. Also, make sure that your bank calls you personally to confirm any wire transfers out of your account. The comptroller in our firm got an urgent email, supposedly from me, telling her to immediately wire a high five-figure sum to a realtor, followed up by another email from me, telling her to email the recipient that the money had been sent. The first email even copied our account person at our bank. Fortunately, Bank of America has a policy of personally calling the account holder before every wire, and our hacker was thus thwarted. I hope you find the article helpful in protecting your accounts. Your Editor-in-Chief, Lynn Adams Smith, joins me in hoping you enjoy this issue and enjoy the spring that is now upon us. Respectfully yours,

J. Robert Hillier, Lh.D., FAIA Publisher


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Botanical Campus

Exotic and native plants, shrubs, and trees get their start in Princeton University’s greenhouses and nursery By Ilene Dube Photography by Jeffrey E. Tryon

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It’s

Landscape designed by Beatrix Farrand at the Graduate College.

a bitterly cold day on the Princeton University campus, and species of trees, in a way that is inspired by nature but would never occur without the wind is whipping plastic flaps around the greenhouses. human intervention. Landscape architect Devin Livi uses his special key to let us Gardens fulfill a basic need. A recent spate of scientific studies points to inside, where the air is warm and moist. I feel like I’ve left winter the benefits of being outside in nature, in sunshine, in breathing air redolent of for the tropics. Flats of potted vinca and ivy are a reminder that we’re on an Ivy pine and wildflowers. Gardens are not just an indulgence in beauty, but students League campus. immersed in nature may be better learners. “When we’re done with the tour,” I find myself telling Livi, “I’m not leaving.” When Princeton formed in the mid 1700s, all that could be seen surrounding “It’s a great job,” he admits. Nassau Hall and the President's House He takes me to another greenhouse, was a barren landscape. The campus where he lifts a plastic screen. It’s like gradually evolved to the lush, parkpeering through a portal to spring. like setting it is today, including the There is coleus, orchids, lantana, “secret gardens” tucked into lessereuphorbia, even Einstein’s begonia. traveled areas of the campus — more “Everything is hand-watered,” Livi on that later. says as fans spin above, spreading the Princeton’s first consulting most air. landscape architect, Beatrix Farrand At the time of my visit this past (1872-1959), a niece of Edith winter, Livi, who is the associate Wharton, was a founder of the director, grounds, was more focused American Society of Landscape on snow removal and salting than Architects, along with Frederick in the orders he’d placed for bulbs Law Olmsted and others. She came and spring plants — his crew of 45 to Princeton to work for the Moses handles everything from maintaining Taylor Pyne estate at Drumthwacket. lawns to planting and pruning. “None Having served as apprentice at of this would be possible without Boston’s Arnold Arboretum, her first our dedicated crew,” he says. “One design for the campus was Wyman Climbing vines like Chinese wisteria, Wisteria sinensis, and trumpet vine, Campsis radicans, at the Graduate College. generation passes along knowledge to Garden at the Graduate College. Her the next.” curvilinear border plants extended to the main campus, as she sought to create In a few months, the campus will come to life. Beech, ash (those that haven’t a connection. She was known to follow students around campus to determine succumbed to emerald ash borers), European chestnut, dawn redwoods, American where paths should be sited. elm, and London plane will leaf out, and the land will give birth to fragrant Farrand favored native plants and trees, choosing varieties that bloom in flowers. What is now mud will become a verdant expanse. Like an arboretum, spring or fall when the University is in session. Influenced by English landscape the campus is a carefully planned garden that mixes exotic imports with native gardener Gertrude Jekyll, a proponent of the wild, Farrand’s designs were known

SPRING 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Einstein’s begonias, top, and nursery.

Greenhouse crewleader David Wagenblast, left, and landscape architect Devin Livi in one of the greenhouses.

for simplicity and ease of maintenance, and much of what she created still flourishes at Princeton today. In February, it was announced that a courtyard in the heart of the campus will be named for her. Farrand went on to design gardens for Yale University; Abby Aldrich Rockefeller in Seale Harbor, Maine; J. Pierpoint Morgan; and the White House. “We still refer to her drawings and design ideas,” says Livi, such as vines and espaliers. Some of what Farrand implemented no longer works due to disease or wetter sites resulting from climate change. “We won’t change her concept, but may change the plant material.” There are trends in gardening that affect the availability of plant materials. For example, when Farrand planted southern magnolias in the 1920s they were rare, but today can be sourced at nurseries from North Carolina to Connecticut. Or, if honey locusts are specified but can’t be located, smaller trees can be established in the nursery. Crape myrtle would not have been found on campus in the 1920s, but is now ubiquitous. “We have microclimates on campus, areas that are more protected so that a more southern-type of plant material can do well,” says Livi. SECRETS OF SUCCESS

It’s important to pick the right plant for the right location, where Mother Nature can provide, Livi points out. “We don’t use a lot of irrigation. You won’t be successful if you plant plants that require a lot of attention.” Foot traffic, events, and vehicles must be taken into consideration when planting Princeton’s campus. Many consider the grounds surrounding Prospect House, with its formally composed arrangement of trees, bushes, plants, and flowers, to be the most spectacular. While the garden has been shaped and changed over the years, many of its trees predate the house, notably the tulip trees and the American beech. The flower garden at the rear of Prospect, in the shape of a shield, was originally laid out by Ellen Axson Wilson, an artist and the first wife of Woodrow Wilson who was president of the University from 1902 to 1910. Today, Prospect Gardens has more perennials than annuals, a measure toward sustainability, according to Livi. Much of what is grown on the campus’s more than 600 acres gets its start in the greenhouses. “We source as much as we can locally,” says Livi.

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2019

Back in November, he and his crew made cuttings of ivy and vinca to start in the greenhouses. In the nearby nursery, trees are established, while being observed for pests and disease. “The trees might have originated in Florida or Maryland, and we want to establish them in this environment so it’s not a shock, or if it’s a new variety we can observe it.” The nursery is protected with a 10-foot deer fence. As long as the ground is workable, trees can be moved. A cut leaf maple salvaged from Bainbridge House, where construction is underway to make space for the Art Museum expansion, was moved to the nursery in mid-winter. Along with other trees in the nursery, including seedlings of the Mercer Oak, it will endure wind and other harsh conditions. “If it grows here, we know it will do fine on campus,” says Livi. On this particular day, a beautiful red witch hazel had come into bloom — just a teaser for spring. Princeton is one of the few non-agricultural schools to have its own greenhouses, thanks to the vision of Farrand. She contended the University could save money, gain new plant varieties, and acclimate plants to the New Jersey environment by growing them in house. The facility started in 1935 with one greenhouse that has since been relocated to the West Windsor end of campus. Livi takes me to see the compost — it’s where life ends and begins. When old trees on campus must be felled — “the worst part of the job is having to take down hundred-plus-year-old trees,” says Livi — carpenters at Willard Brothers are invited to look at the wood. If it isn’t of value to them, the wood will be ground and turned to mulch. Alongside the steaming piles of brown earth are the mounds, or windrows, of compost made from decayed leaves, to be used as a soil amendment. “We don’t buy any mulch,” says Livi, who studied landscape architecture at the University of West Virginia. “Using the right soil and plant material is what leads to success.” SUSTAINABILITY ON CAMPUS

A biodigester, which takes food scraps and mixes them with wood shavings, then heats the concoction, is now in an experimental phase. Livi’s crew makes compost tea in a large brewing vessel; when sprayed on plants and lawn, it can control for fungus and bacteria. Soil biology tests have shown that compost tea can reinvigorate


MAP COURTESY OF INTERDISCIPLINARY DOCTORAL PROGRAM IN THE HUMANITIES AT PRINCETON (IHUM); DESIGNED BY BINOCULAR, NEW YORK

Two Cedars of Lebanon Cedrus libani at the Graduate College. 1. American sycamore or buttonwood Platanus occidentalis 2. American elm Ulmus americana 3. American beech Fagus grandifolia 4. European hornbeam Carpinus betulus 5. Japanese pagoda tree Sophora japonica 6. Dawn redwood Metasequoia glyptostroboides 7. Tulip poplar Liriodendron tulipifera 8. Ginkgo tree or maidenhair Ginkgo biloba 9. American holly Ilex opaca 10. Sugar maple Acer saccharum 11. White ash Fraxinus americana 12. Golden rain tree Koelreuteria paniculata 13. Horse chestnut Aesculus hippocastanum 14. Southern magnolia Magnolia grandiflora 15. River birch Betula nigra 16. Rhododendron Rhododendron catawbiense 17. English ivy Hedera helix 18. Firethorn Pyracantha coccinea 19. Eastern redbud Cercis canadensis 20. Chinese wisteria Wisteria sinensis

damaged plant material. And as part of the sustainability plan, pollinators and beneficial insects are released on campus, to avoid reliance on chemicals. Deer, the modern-day plague of gardens, usually congregate on the south side of campus, “so we won’t plant hydrangeas or hostas there,” says Livi. Sadly, he reports, the deer made their way to Prospect Gardens last year, necessitating heavy spraying with hot pepper and garlic. When the University constructs a new building, the landscape architecture is part of the building design, but Livi’s department is consulted to review the plan and see how it will work. For example, Maya Lin’s earth-based installation, The Princeton Line, came with its own landscape plan, but Livi was given the chance to review the design drawings and offer input. Once it is established, it becomes his purview. The Washington Road Elm Allee is another favorite feature of the campus. There are actually two rows of American elms that line the allee; those closer to the road are owned and maintained by the county, but the University maintains the inner row. When the trees succumb to Dutch elm disease, they are replaced with a disease-resistant variety developed by William Flemer at Princeton Nurseries.

ABOUT THOSE SECRET GARDENS

Beatrix Farrand's very first garden still blooms on the grounds of the Graduate College, next to Procter Hall, just off the main campus. Wyman Garden includes a 100-year-old sundial, a European hornbeam arbor, and several fountains within beds of lamb's ear, Japanese spirea, hydrangea, and wild geranium. Bamboo, hellebores, and lavender hostas are among the attractions in the Class of 1946 Garden next to Maclean House. The adjacent Class of 1936 garden features painted ferns, native geraniums, and many other varieties. A tiny rose garden abuts the wide expanse of lawn behind Palmer House on the northeast corner of Route 206 and Nassau Street. And it’s no wonder that Princeton has made it to various lists of prettiest campuses — visitors come to tour the grounds, which also include a spectacular collection of sculpture maintained by the Princeton University Art Museum. “We recognize the historic beauty of the campus and work hard to be good stewards,” says Livi. “We’re continuing Beatrix Farrand’s legacy.”

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AN ECOLOGICAL INVENTORY THE IMPACT OF INVASIVE SPECIES BY TAYLOR SMITH

Extensive damage caused by emerald ash borer larvae.


English ivy, Hedera helix

IMAGES COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys

Jetbead, Rhodotypos scandens

INVASIVE Webster’s New World Dictionary defines “invasive” as “the onset or appearance of something harmful or troublesome, as a disease.” A massive influx of invasive flora and fauna has negatively impacted huge swaths of our native ecosystem, disrupting plant, animal, and human function. In contrast, native plants help to sustain native wildlife like butterflies, birds, mammals, reptiles, beneficial insects, and other fauna. The vision of Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space (FoHVOS) is to protect New Jersey’s natural lands with their native plants. Its focus is on eliminating threats posed by newly emerging invasive species before they become widespread pests. Created to do just that, the FoHVOS New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team is currently working on a project to protect rare species throughout the municipality of Princeton. Since 2017, the Strike Team has focused a great deal of its efforts on Herrontown Woods and Mountain Lakes. Both areas are battling invasive plant species including Amur corktree, Boston ivy, Callery pear, English ivy, Japanese aralia, Japanese maple, jetbead, Kousa dogwood, oriental photinia, Siebold’s viburnum, Toringo crabapple, and wintercreeper. According to the group’s website, “Japanese maple has been of primary concern due to the high population in the Princeton area. Since 2017, we were able to eradicate more than 110 populations.” The Strike Team goes on to note, “As in the Hopewell Valley, Japanese aralia has several limited, but notable, populations. Our goal is complete eradication of this highly threatening species in both Princeton and throughout Hopewell Valley.” Project partners are Friends of Herrontown Woods, Friends of Princeton Open Space, and the Municipality of Princeton. Japanese maple, Acer palmatum

Another active site for the Strike Team is protecting the Highlands forests of the Morris County Park Commission. Project locations of Tourne County Park and Lewis Morris County Park are seeing great threats to forest health due to the proliferation of oriental photina, Japanese aralia, Siebold’s viburnum, and linden viburnum. These species are threatening due to their height. Growing up to 20 feet tall, they are most prolific in shaded habitats where they spread through fruit and underground runners. Since early 2019, the NJ Strike Team has targeted the newly-discovered Photinia fraseri population in Morristown National Historic Park. The Morristown branch team said it will also be targeting populations of jetbead, winged burning bush, border privet, and oriental photinia. While non-natives have been here for a long time, the first invasive plants most likely came over with the first settlers in bags of seeds. Not all plants turn out to be invasive, but the one’s that do take hold often share a number of traits, such as producing vast quantities of seeds naturally, as well as offspring that easily take root and have a tendency to crowd out natural diversity. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Invasive Species Information Center recently shared a study on the discovery of a new invasive pest in New Jersey’s Warren County — spotted lanternflies. Also known as the Asian plant hopper, the lanternfly could be potentially devastating to New Jersey crops and hardwood trees. A complementary Rutgers University study on the discovery of lanternflies in Warren County states, “The insect was accidentally introduced into Pennsylvania in September 2014. At first, it was found only in Berks County, however, today it has been collected from Lehigh, Northampton, Bucks, Montgomery, and Chester County. Since its discovery in Pennsylvania, a state quarantine encompassing 13 Pennsylvania counties for SLF was issued, meaning that live SLF and any material or object that can spread the insect cannot be moved from the quarantine area.” It was suggested last year that people and businesses traveling into and out of SPRING 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Oriental photinia, Photinia fraseri

Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Callery pear, Pyrus calleryana

Japanese Angelica tree, Aralia elata

Kousa dogwood, Cornus kousa Winged burning bush, Euonymus alatus


IMAGES COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Asian long-horned beetles, Anoplophora glabripennis

Japanese honeysuckle, Lonicera japonica

Mercer, Hunterdon, and Warren counties should inspect their vehicles for For example, in the Florida Everglades, federal officials have spent “hitchhiking SLF.” millions of dollars addressing threats posed by pythons. According to fws. Approximately 1 inch in length, the colorful adults have a black head, gov, “the Burmese python has established breeding populations in South gray-black spotted forewings, and reddish-black spotted hindwings. Their Florida, including the Everglades…. Burmese pythons on North Key Largo egg masses are laid on smooth surfaces and appear like a patch of mud, and have killed and eaten highly endangered Key Largo wood rats, and other the juveniles will hatch from the eggs around mid-May. pythons preyed on endangered wood storks.” If the pythons spread to other In terms of destruction, “feeding occurs on the trunk and limbs of plants, states, the federal government will be forced to spend more money on not on the fruit or leaf tissues.” control and containment purposes. Another blight on New Jersey’s environmental health is the So, what can you do to prevent the spread of invasive species? emerald ash borer. Much has been reported on this insect, The Nature Conservancy offers six easy guidelines: which was discovered in May 2014 in Somerset County. 1. Verify that the plants you are buying for your yard According to the State of New Jersey Department of and garden are not invasive. Agriculture (NJDA) website, “Through March 5, 2. When boating, clean your boat thoroughly 2019, emerald ash borer has been found in New Jersey before transporting it to a different body of water. in Bergen, Burlington, Camden, Essex, Hudson, 3. Clean your boots before you hike in a new Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Morris, area. Passaic, Somerset, Sussex, and Warren counties.” 4. Don’t “pack a pest” when traveling. Fruits This non-native insect infests and kills all species and vegetables, plants, insects, and animals can carry of ash trees in North America. The emerald ash borer pests or become invasive themselves. has killed tens of millions of ash trees in Michigan, 5. Don’t release aquarium fish and plants, live bait, Spotted lanternfly, alone. Of the many forests in New Jersey, 24 percent of or other exotic animals into the wild. Lycorma delicatula them have ash trees, according to the NJDA. The lifespan 6. Volunteer at your local park, refuge or other wildlife of an infested tree is just 3-4 years. Protection treatments are soil area to help remove invasive species and/or help to educate others treatment or trunk injection, and bark spray. about the threat. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the only agency of the U.S. No matter where you live, chances are you’ll be able to find an invasive government whose primary responsibility is the conservation of the nation’s species volunteer opportunity nearby. Some state governments organize fish, wildlife, and plants. Because of its responsibilities, the Service online training programs where you can become a “Weed Warrior” and be is dedicated to “the impacts that invasive species are having across the certified to conduct removals on state property. Nation…. Invasive species degrade, change, or displace native habitats and Lastly, remember that if you see an unfamiliar plant or animal in your compete with [our] native wildlife and are thus harmful to our fish, wildlife, community, you should report it to a local environmental, state, or academic and plant resources.” group specializing in invasive species management.

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LISA TOBIAS | OWNER & DESIGNER AT TOBIAS DESIGN, LLC BRINGING YOUR DESIGNER KITCHEN DREAMS TO LIFE Lisa Tobias loved design so much that she gave up a career as an actuarial consultant in New York to start designing kitchens — a huge risk for someone who made a living minimizing risk. And if that wasn’t remarkable enough, she brought with her a specialized skill set that is a welcome rarity in this business. An analytical whiz, a creative dynamo, and a natural people-person, Lisa makes the design process not only manageable, but, dare we say, a joy. Lisa Tobias, who lives in Princeton, started her professional career in New York working in the arena of employee benefit consulting as an actuarial assistant. Understanding she had an untapped creative side, she shifted into communications of employee benefits. After 20 years of working as a professional she once again transformed her career, while continuing to merge her love of math and the arts, into kitchen and bath design. Lisa is the owner and head designer for Tobias Design, LLC based in Hopewell. She’s been in business for over 13 years — first operating out of a home office in Princeton before building a showroom in Hopewell in 2005. Lisa Tobias prides herself on working with her clients to design a unique kitchen, bathroom, or other home space that reflects their personalities and needs. “We, at Tobias Design, are like actors absorbing themselves into a role.

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We put ourselves into the mindset of each client and reflect through the design incorporating their unique style and needs.” No two projects are ever alike. Recently Lisa also embarked on a new venture as part-owner of a company called Lifetime Home. Their mission is to assist with the modification of homes for people living with disabilities or who desire to age in a place, so they may live independently for as long as possible. Lisa enjoys the rich history and beautiful scenery in Princeton, and giving back to the community has always been especially important. She sits on the board of the Greenwood House Home for the Aged, and the United Jewish Federation of Princeton Mercer Bucks, from which she was awarded the 2017 Woman of Valor, and is involved with HomeFront’s Women’s Initiative. In addition, Lisa’s business, Tobias Design, has been recognized by the Best of Houzz, an online design platform for homeowners, for seven years in a row from its inception. Lisa is a member of the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), National Association of Professional Women (NAPW), Princeton Chamber of Commerce, and CLIPPs (Certified Living in Place Professional). Lisa Tobias resides in Princeton with her husband and has three grown children. In her downtime she enjoys golf, tennis, cycling, photography, piano, and reading. In her own words, “the consummate jack of all trades, and master of none.” If you’re looking to redesign that aging kitchen or bath, stop by and see Lisa and her associates at the Tobias Design showroom located at 48 West Broad Street, Hopewell, New Jersey, or email Lisa at info@tobiasdesignllc.com. SPRING 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Photos courtesy of University Archives, Princeton University Library


The graduating class of 1973.

s lunchtime approached, my two roommates and I, all of us sophomores, peered out the window of our second story Laughlin Hall dormitory room, watching the pathway below leading towards Blair Arch and the Commons dining halls beyond. It was September 1969. Nixon was in the White House, the Vietnam War continued, The Rolling Stones’ “Honky Tonk Women” was No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100, and Princeton University had just admitted regularlyenrolled undergraduate women for the first time. A young woman came into sight, walking up the path. Sandy Stuart, the bravest of the three of us, quickly headed out the door. We watched as he hustled to catch up to the “coed,” as the 149 regular undergraduate women were called, hoping to introduce himself and maybe even sit next to her at lunch. His odds were not good. With a ratio of 19 undergraduate men to each woman in Princeton’s first year of coeducation, most male students would find that male-female encounters were rare, and most female students would suggest that encounters with Princeton males were likely to be awkward, unnatural, or worse. After 223 years as an institution devoted exclusively to the education of men, Princeton University decided and implemented its first year of educating women with uncharacteristic alacrity. The times were changing in all sorts of ways, politically and socially; Yale was admitting women for the first time in the fall of 1969; the most highly qualified applicants from

the top public and private secondary schools in the country were overwhelmingly showing a preference for coeducational colleges and universities; and the mood on campus, among students and professors, was strongly, perhaps even urgently, in favor of opening the doors of Princeton to women — for practical, academic, social, cultural, and political reasons. Among the members of the board of trustees and the loyal and generous alumni, opinions were more divided, and, in some cases, opposition to admitting women to Princeton was much more overt. Enraged alumni wrote in to Princeton Alumni Weekly, to the administration, and to the development office, some threatening to never give their beloved alma mater another dollar. But the forward-looking majority prevailed, and the tradition-bound University made the decision in January 1969 to admit women as regular undergraduates, then in April decided that in September the first freshman women, along with a small contingent of transfers and women in the Critical Languages Program, would launch Princeton University into a new era of educating both genders. Citing expert opinions that a coeducational environment would strengthen academics and better prepare students for the late 20th-century world, the board stated, “A Princeton which persisted in denying admission to women applicants probably could not long maintain a strong position of leadership in the nation.” The Patterson Report, an extensive

Assistant Dean Allen Kassof, top left, talks with two Critical Languages students, ca. 1966-1967. Historical Photographs Collection. Female Princeton University student, top right, during the first year of coeducation, photo taken from 1970 Bric-a-Brac. 1970 Class Day Committee, bottom, photo from Nassau Herald, 1970.

study which weighed heavily in the trustees’ deliberations, had recommended an optimal ratio of 3:1, a far cry from the first year’s 19:1 men to women, but the University was not going to wait any longer. Pyne Hall was designated as the women’s dormitory and was refurbished with new lounges, a kitchen, additional bathrooms, curtains on the windows, and locks on the doors. “LIKE PIONEERS”

On Saturday, September 6, 1969, the women arrived, 101 freshmen and 48 transfer students. Stuart, formerly a photographer and journalist, now a businessman, remembers that day. He was the chief photographer at the time for an undergraduate publication called The Princeton Notice — in charge of covering the first day of coeducation. “I remember the girls arrived at Pyne Hall with their parents, and there were so many guys standing around, just looking, thinking, ‘Who are these ladies who have come into our world?’” Stuart, with an outgoing personality and his job as photographer, was able to overcome the challenges of getting to know the vastly outnumbered coeds. From his point of view, coeducation, at least outside the classroom — perhaps much less so in the classroom — was a success from the start. “They were impressive women to me,” Stuart said, “because they knew they were a minority and yet they carried themselves like pioneers.

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Women arrive on campus, 1969. Woman walking into Princeton University Admissions Office, 1969. (Princeton University Library)

They really did. They would go to class and the professor would come in and say, ‘Gentlemen… and lady,’ because there would be about one woman in each lecture class. There was pressure on them, but they were high performing, very capable people. The first year must have been tough on those women.” He described his perspective on the contrast between his freshmen year 1968-69, when “every Friday these American Tourister suitcases would come to campus, then leave on Sunday,” and the following year when he developed a range of friendships, more than one still going strong after 50 years. “It was really great to become friends with these women and not feel that you’re in dating mode. You could have a casual friendship, just drop by and there wasn’t this heavy atmosphere that something was going to happen. You could just talk.” He added, “I appreciated that. It helped me to get a better perspective. For me it was interesting to see the institution bend and flex in those early years — or at least try to.” Noting how one of his lifetime friendships started, Stuart described how he would photograph the campus and its newest students. “I kept noticing that a particular beautiful woman kept showing up in my photographs. It turned out it was Lisa Halaby, the future Queen Noor. I felt like I was her personal photographer, and I didn’t even know her at first, but we became great friends.” In addition to his memories of some professors experiencing awkwardness in dealing with women in their classes for the first time, Stuart also recalled the remarkable accomplishments of the women’s athletic teams, overcoming difficulties with inferior facilities and equipment and a traditional male sports culture that was not always ready to embrace coeducation. “To me,” Stuart concluded, “Princeton was totally transformed. It was even transformed in

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2019

that first year by those brave women.” For others, the transformation was not so apparent, nor so felicitous. Stuart himself, whose father had also gone to Princeton, remembers the reactions of some of his father’s friends. “They were never going to give a cent to Princeton again, they said. I don’t know whether they held onto that or not.” And the reactions of two of Stuart’s classmates, looking back 50 years, were perhaps more typical. “Coeducation had absolutely no impact on my Princeton existence,” said David Barkhausen, a Chicago-area businessman, lawyer, and 1972 Princeton graduate. “I have no recollection of any woman in any of my classes.” Dan Schwartz, retired international businessman and former Nevada state treasurer, also Princeton Class of 1972, reflected similarly. He described the failure of plans he and his roommates devised to engage with the new female students. “During room draw, my roommates and I chose a room in 1901 Hall overlooking Pyne where the coeds were housed,” he said. “That’s about as close as we came to seeing them on campus. Things got a little better by senior year, but my guess is a couple of decades passed before Princeton became truly coed.” “WE BECAME A KIND OF ‘THIRD SEX’”

Liz Cohen, 1973 Princeton graduate, now a history professor at Harvard University and former dean of the Radcliffe Institute, saw Princeton adapting rapidly to coeducation after the first year. “Over the four years I was a Princeton undergraduate, from the fall of 1969 to the spring of 1973, I experienced tremendous improvement in the environment for women students, and surely for men as well,” she wrote in an email. “At first there were so few of us that we couldn’t possibly transform the dominant social scene,” she continued. “Hence we became a kind of ‘third sex’ — apart from our male peers but

Town Topics reports on coeducation approval, January 16, 1969.

also distinct from the female dates who visited for the weekend from the women’s colleges. And in classes, our small numbers made us mouthpieces of our gender rather than individuals with unique opinions.” She described some of the transformations that took place in the context of national and international political upheavals that were taking place as the first year of coeducation at Princeton drew to a close. “For me personally, the politics on campus in the spring of 1970 made a huge difference,” Cohen recalled. “Not only did they engage me with serious activism, but they drew me into a true community of peers — men and women — who shared common commitments and experiences. These friends still define my Princeton world, as we hold our own biennial reunions and I have been married to one from this group for over 40 years.” And as for the next generation, Cohen continued, “In contrast to my experience in that first class of women, my daughter (Class of 2009) had a fully coeducational social and academic experience — and she too married one of her classmates.” Alice Fahs, who joined the class of 1973 for her junior and senior years, described Princeton, even in its third year of coeducation, as “an alien and strange place to be,” but noted that the original 101 faced more prejudice than women transfers. “It was really odd,” she recalled, “but I didn’t have horrendous experiences either socially or in the classroom.” Now history professor emeritus at UC Irvine, Fahs, who won the Princeton English Department prize for best senior thesis in 1973, described positive experiences in the classroom and supportive professors. She fondly remembered her advisor A. Walton Litz as “inspiring — absolutely wonderful to work with.” She added, “I really appreciated being taken seriously by those professors.”


“BEST THING … SINCE 1746”

The first year of coeducation at Princeton was, for most, no honeymoon, despite a humanizing effect on the overall campus environment and some glowing reports from academic quarters. The biggest problem was the lopsided ratio of men to women, which added to the institution’s difficulties in adapting rapidly and effectively. By most accounts the second year, with more than 400 undergraduate women in six different

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE CLASS OF ’73

Susan Merrill Squier, who graduated with the class of 1972, also transferring to Princeton for her junior and senior years, described a more problematic academic experience, as Princeton’s professors, still almost entirely male, continued to navigate the challenges of coeducation. She remembers a Chaucer professor mocking the Wife of Bath and “creating what we would call now a ‘chilly climate’ for women, to put it mildly,” and another “rather chilly place for a woman” in a poetry seminar where the presiding professor/ poet made fun of her “pinky writing.” Squier, who is now professor emerita of women’s, gender, and sexuality studies and English at Penn State, won three different University poetry prizes in her senior year. In an essay titled “Trials of the Coed 100,” published in the Princeton Alumni Weekly in 1973, Jane Leifer, at the end of her four years as a Princeton undergraduate, wrote, “It was not easy to be a woman at Princeton during the past four years; it is not easy now to tell you what it’s like to be a female and also to be from Princeton.” She went on to reflect on her feelings and experiences during Princeton’s first four years of coeducation. “During my freshman year,” she wrote, “coeds were to the Princeton campus as ladies’ rest rooms were to classroom buildings — scarce and hard to find.” She described the stately freshman dining hall. “The eyes of the portraits hung high on the wall bored into me with looks of disapproval. They had seen rituals I had only heard about — food fights and ‘spooning’ people’s dates. They remembered when ties and jackets had been mandatory dress for dinner and probably when beanies had been worn.” The male tradition, the awkwardness of many male classmates and professors, and the dearth of other females all contributed to the oppressiveness and loneliness often experienced by Leifer and other women during the first years. Princeton’s first women undergraduates did receive a lot of attention, but that attention was often unwanted and discomfiting. “We wanted to be just people, but we were in a system which could see us only as coeds and freaks,” Leifer said. “We each wanted to be able to be ourselves, not the representatives of what our preceptors called on us to explain: ‘the woman’s point of view.’ We had no initial opportunity to become a natural part of the Princeton tradition; we had no idea of how to make our own. We had been admitted to the campus without being admitted to its soul.”

Jane Leifer, left, and Lisa Dorota Tebbe, right, hoisting the Class of ’73 Coeducation P-rade banner. In the foreground is Elaine Chan.

dormitories spread throughout the campus, significantly improved the social and educational environment. “Princeton did not become a truly coeducational campus until our sophomore year, when the female ghetto in Pyne Hall was disbanded,” Leifer wrote. “The entryways there and all over campus became coed, with male coeds segregated from female coeds by floor or by bathroom facilities. We finally began to feel as if part of the campus in some way belonged to us, and we belonged within it.”

Gale Gilleaudeau Stafford, left, and Macie Hall Rensselaer lining up for Reunions P-rade.

After my freshman year, 1968-69, in Princeton’s 223rd and final year as an all-male institution, and my sophomore year, 1969-70, still in a predominantly male environment, I took a gap year and missed the second year of coeducation. My motives for taking a gap year in 197071 had nothing to do with coeducation, but the transformation of Princeton from spring 1970 to fall 1971 seemed remarkable. The pace of adaptation to coeducation had accelerated dramatically. Huge progress towards normalization was evident, with 327 freshman women, 751 women regularly enrolled in all four classes, and a 4.2:1 male-female ratio, down from 19:1 two years earlier. Increasing in influence as well as numbers, women began to make their mark and excel in every

facet of University life. With admissions for women significantly more selective than for men, it was not surprising that there were women leading student government, campus publications, and other student organizations; winning major academic awards and scholarships; fielding first-rate championship sports teams; even joining all except three of the staid Prospect Street eating clubs. (Cottage Club would not admit women until 1986, and Ivy and Tiger Inn five years later, after a 12-year legal battle waged by 1980 graduate Sally Frank.) The Princeton I returned to in 1971 for my junior and senior years was a different place from the Princeton of my freshman and sophomore years. The dynamic impact of women in the classroom as colleagues, dramatically raising the level of discussion and engagement for all, and the humanizing effect of women in all facets of campus life truly had transformed the University. And despite dire predictions from some quarters, the admissions and development offices were both reporting record results. Princeton had, and may still have, a way to go to achieve full gender equity, but those first years of coeducation were ones of remarkable progress. Nancy Weiss Malkiel, in “Keep the Damned Women Out”: The Struggle for Coeducation, her 2016 landmark study of the history of coeducation at top American and British universities, quotes professors looking back on the first decade of coeducation from a 1980 report by Princeton President William G. Bowen. “This University is, in my view, infinitely richer, more varied, more intellectually interesting, more warmly human than it ever was before 1969,” said Edward D. Sullivan, professor of romance languages and literatures and former dean. Even more succinctly, Charles Gillespie, history professor and director of the Program in History and Science, added, “I have no doubt that [coeducation] is the best thing that has happened to Princeton since 1746.” SPRING 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Princeton’s Best - Classic to Contemporary

193 Ridgeview Road — Known as Windwhistle Farm ... On Princeton’s coveted ridge, the timeless setting of this stunningly renovated and expanded antique Colonial feels perfectly above the fray. A two-story foyer joins the charming original home with two fireplaces, beamed ceilings, and built-ins to the 2008 addition which accommodates a large formal living room with fossilized granite fireplace and French doors to a raised terrace, a master suite above, and a walk-out day-lit game room below. Offering fabulous views on 5 scenic acres bordering preserved land. $1,550,000

68 Library Place — Designed by Richard Morris Hunt in the 1880’s, this grand all-brick home with its lofty ceilings and chestnut woodwork, is ideally located a block from downtown in the Princeton’s Western Section. Special features include gracious formal rooms, nine fireplaces, huge windows, and three floors of flexible living space including a generous guest suite. The heart of the home is a fabulous kitchen renovation with a gazebo breakfast room addition with 360 degree views. Beautifully maintained inside and out on a large manicured lot. $2,795,000

30 Vandeventer Avenue — Grab a coffee. Catch a movie. Attend a lecture on campus. All of this and so much more are at the doorstep of this beautifully updated Queen Anne in a heart of the town location. The home offers a lovely blend of modern amenities such as central air, new bathrooms, and sparkling white and granite kitchen, and period details like wood floors, built-in bookshelves, and bay windows. A large deck steps down to a secluded landscaped backyard. Newly added, a driveway now offers this Victorian home off-street parking! $1,250,000

16 Greenview Avenue — On a quiet street a block from the Public Library, the University, and many shops and restaurants, this stunning four story home designed by J. Robert Hillier offers contemporary living at its best. In addition to two bedrooms and two and one half baths, remarkable features of this home include walls of windows, 19 ft. living room ceiling, sleek bamboo floors, maple and granite kitchen, rooftop deck with panoramic views, finished day-lit basement, three-story elevator, secluded yard, and adjoining two-car parking, $965,000

“Real estate has been the perfect profession for me, a lifelong Princetonian with a love of architecture and people. As a broker associate for over 30 years, I have guided sellers and buyers in Princeton and the surrounding communities through the ups and downs of the real estate market. Educating and supporting my clients - past, present, and future - are my primary goals. Real estate is my passion and every day brings new relationships and opportunities.” — Barbara

Barbara Blackwell Broker Associate 4 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

(609) 921-1050 Office (609) 915-5000 Cell bblackwell@callawayhenderson.com For more information about properties, the market in general, or your home in particular, please give me a call. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.


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Perched upon a hill with scenic views, this 10+ acre lot is ready for your dream home as the prep work has been completed - a long circular drive with a 12” sub-base and mature landscaping, a drilled well (with recent well and water test results) and a septic design with all required perk tests submitted to the Township. In addition, there is natural gas available in the street. The seller has maintained the Farmland Assessment status for lower $469,000 taxes!! All you need to do is bring your building plans!

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Just nine minutes from Palmer Square, this exceptional 4-bedroom, 3-bath passive-solar contemporary serves up a serene oasis, tucked in the woods backing into a 135-acre reserve. Designed by renowned architect Cyril Beveridge, this efficient home blends seamlessly with surrounding nature and has been featured on environmental house tours. Lovingly maintained, this elegant property offers established gardens, walking paths, specimen trees, and custom-designed fences and gates by master woodworker David Robinson. Superior craftsmanship by builder James Potts is felt throughout, including the hand-cut cedar shake roof, authentic Japanese shoji doors. The blue stone patio with retaining wall overlooks one of the two meandering streams. This gracious, thoughtful, integrated home is turnkey ready for a young family or couple who would like to age in place all the while connecting $825,000 with the natural world. Helen H. Sherman Broker Associate/Realtor 609-683-8507 direct 609-915-1216 mobile helen.sherman@foxroach.com www.HelenSherman.com

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2019

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ 08540 | 609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com


28 STONE CLIFF ROAD ETTL FARM EXPANDED CARMEL, 7 BEDROOMS, 6.5 BATHS, WALK-OUT FINISHED BASEMENT, MULTIPLE GUEST/ OFFICE USES

16 ANDREWS LANE 4/5 BEDROOMS, 4 FULL BATHS, FIREPLACE, FINISHED BASEMENT, FIRST FLOOR MASTER SUITE, VAULTED CEILINGS, LOTS OF SUNLIGHT

28 WARREN COURT WASHINGTON OAKS COLONIAL, 4 BEDROOMS, 2.1 BATHS, FIREPLACE, DOUBLE STAIRCASE, 9 -FOOT CEILINGS, WITH 2 -STORY ROOMS

H H H

8 FOULET DRIVE ARCHITECTURAL ELEMENTS MAKE FOR A UNIQUE FLOOR PLAN, 4 BEDROOMS, 3.5 BATHS, 2 FIREPLACES, PRIVATE STUDY

148 HERRONTOWN ROAD NEW CONSTRUCTION IN LITTLEBROOK, 6 BEDROOMS, 5.2 BATHS, FINISHED BASEMENT, 4,700 SQ. FT. BACKS TO A PRIVATE PARK

166 FAIRWAY DRIVE BROOKSTONE, 2 + ACRE W/ POOL, 5 BEDROOMS, 4.2 BATHS, 2 FIREPLACES AND FINISHED BASEMENT

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Art Mazzei

Art@addisonwolfe.com Cell: 610.428.4885

Nicole Curran Nicole@addisonwolfe.com Cell: 215.801.1935

RIVERSTONE LODGE

$4,300,000

Riverstone Lodge is an iconic stone Riverfront home located in a highly desirable and prestigious area of New Hope Borough. The spectacular sprawling 6600+ sq. ft home offers 6 bedrooms and 5 full baths. The property provides one of the longest river fronts in town. The unusually large outdoor entertainment space comprised of a deck and blue stone patios can accommodate the largest of parties or family gatherings. The stone walls cascade down to the river offering private access and lounging. Riverstone Lodge is arguably one of the most sophisticated and aesthetically stunning properties to be offered for sale in generations.

Art Mazzei

Art@addisonwolfe.com Office: 215.862.5500 | Cell: 610.428.4885

COLTS FOOT FARM

$2,895,000

Simply, Exceptional. The farm is a 5.6 acre parcel sited so it is surrounded by Natural Lands Trust property assuring the utmost of privacy. Every aspect of this property has been renovated and/or reconstructed with the finest of materials. As you pull into the gated auto court, you immediately see a beautifully fully equipped stone carriage house and attached garages. The Cottage has its own patio and looks out at the award winning gardens.The large two-story bank barn is waiting for the creativity and imagination of the new steward. The irrigated vegetable gardens are adjacent to the large patio in front of the barn itself that can allow for al fresco dining, fundraisers, or large scale entertainment. The proper stone manor home, with a radiant heated blue stone patio, is the perfect fusion of classic Bucks County and minimalist sensibility. The interior of the home consists of large rooms with high end appliances and cabinetry, mill work and tile work.The nucleus of this home is the authentic 1949 Nakashima Room that the world renowned craftsman constructed for his good friend.The landscaping consists of mature specimen trees and shrubs, English hedges, a forest of White Pines, meandering stone steps for reflection, various flower beds, a grape vine arbor, a large pergola, and a multitude of annuals too numerous to mention. Looking out at the pergola is a stone garden house and symmetrical wings of glass walls that can host the ideal luncheons for friends or relatives.This is a property that provides all of the aesthetic pleasures one needs.... primarily, because it is a property with a soul.

Addison Wolfe Real Estate • www.AddisonWolfe.com 550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • 215.862.5500


THE

ARCHITECTURE

OF

COMMUNITY

THE WILLOW SCHOOL AND THE WATERSHED INSTITUTE PHOTOS BY ROBERT FAULKNER PHOTOGRAPHY; ALL SAINTS’ CHURCH PHOTO BY KATHLEEN FAREWELL

THE CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ADVOCACY, SCIENCE AND EDUCATION AT THE WATERSHED INSTITUTE

THE HEALTH WELLNESS AND NUTRITION BUILDING, THE WILLOW SCHOOL

CHANCEL ADDITION, ALL SAINTS’ CHURCH

ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING, AND INTERIOR SERVICES 759 STATE ROAD, PRINCETON, NJ 08540 | 609.681.2484 | www.farewell-architects.com


AMAZING SPACES ARCHITECTS IN THEIR OWN HOMES By Anne Levin | Photography by Jeffrey E. Tryon

W

hen architects design a home, the challenge is to navigate a delicate balance between their artistic vision and the client’s demands. But when the residence they are designing is their own, a sense of freedom comes into play. The Princeton area boasts an unusually high concentration of architects. We visited the homes of eight of them — six houses, including two married couples — and found a marked individuality in styles, approaches, and visions. One thing they all have in common: They love where they live. J. ROBERT AND BARBARA HILLIER

A 22-acre piece of land between the Delaware River and the Delaware Canal in Bucks County, Pa., is the site of Autretemps, the home of the Hilliers, partners in the Princeton firm Studio Hillier. (The couple are shareholders in Witherspoon Media Group, which publishes Princeton Magazine). “The house is totally modern, but with its construction with materials and forms that are indigenous to Bucks County, it has a casual and relaxed warmth that is often lost in modern architecture,” said Bob Hillier. “A silo, built of glass block instead of silo tiles, houses a circular stair and, at night, serves as a beacon for travelers along the river road. Local fieldstone, big timbers, and cedar siding all work with the great amounts of glass to build the warmth while providing fantastic views of the river and the surrounding terrain.” Studio Hillier has designed numerous hospitals, corporate headquarters, libraries, schools, and multi-family residential projects, and is currently working on an eco-engineered luxury waterfront resort in the Bahamas. The couple love their great room, which has 14-foot ceilings and incorporates the open kitchen, dining area, outside deck, and elevated working study and design studio. “This is our favorite part of the house, though the master bedroom suite with its dressing areas and spectacular bathroom overlooking the river is a very close second,” Hillier said.

photo courtesy of studio hillier.

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KIRSTEN THOFT

The house on Linden Lane that Kirsten Thoft designed for her family was the first in Princeton to be recognized, in 2014, with Platinum LEED Certification by the United States Green Building Council. With its expansive front porch, the house fits in with the style of others on the street. Yet it has its own, distinctive touches. The house is situated on a hill. “The lot is only 50 feet wide, but there’s an eightfoot drop from right to left,” said Thoft, who has designed renovations for homes and businesses including both Small World Coffee locations in Princeton and Wildflour Bakery/Cafe in Lawrenceville. She is currently working on a house on Valley Road. “You don’t see a lot of houses on a slope. I started by imagining it as a working building rather than a home. I also liken it to a spine with ribs, which are the beams.” Her favorite spot in the house depends on the season. “When it’s warm, I like the front porch, or the fire pit out back,” she said. “But when it’s cold, I love sitting with a glass of wine in my comfy, leather chair in front of the fireplace.” Most people assume that Thoft renovated the house, but it was built from scratch. “I wanted the front to read like it had always been on the street,” Thoft said. “People always seem to think it was a renovation, so I guess it’s worked.”

photo courtesy of kirsten thoft.

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2019


PHOTO COURTESY OF TODD MASON, HALKIN MASON PHOTOGRAPHY

MARINA RUBINA

When she built a 2,000-square-foot house on Quarry Street in Princeton’s WitherspoonJackson neighborhood, Rubina was looking for space, light, “and location, location, location,” she said. The house feels bigger than it is because of the strong relationship between the inside and the outside. Rubina, whose output ranges from large-scale educational and commercial buildings to single-family houses, lives there with her husband and two young sons. Her office is in a room with windows overlooking the front. “Strong connection to the street was important to me in designing the house,” she said. “Both the kitchen and home office have large windows facing the street. It is so much fun to talk to and wave to neighbors and friends going by.” The airy, pre-fabricated house is L-shaped, creating outdoor rooms that extend the living space. “I greatly enjoy the openness and light, but feel that we have enough privacy given that we are on a small lot in the center of town,” Rubina said. That proximity to town has allowed the architect and her husband to walk and bike to town and her children to take themselves to the library or swim class. The family has one car, housed under a carport off the street. Building her own home gave Rubina a chance to test out techniques she would have been hesitant to try for the first time on a project for a client. “This house was my first experiment with pre-fabrication, and it allowed us to afford a home that we would not have been able to afford otherwise,” she said. “Even though some ideas worked better than others, I am very happy to come home to my living laboratory every evening.”

SPRING 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

63 | 49


CATHERINE KNIGHT

With their three daughters grown, Catherine Knight and her husband decided they didn’t need to stay in their large suburban home on two acres. They found an 1895 gabled Colonial on Nassau Street, in Princeton’s Jugtown Historic District, and Knight set about turning it into exactly what they wanted. “We moved here a year ago last October,” she said, sitting in her light-filled living room overlooking a surprisingly spacious backyard and park. “I like that this house is long and narrow, with really nice light on both sides.” Knight is known for the homes she has built and renovated locally, and as far as Nantucket and New Hampshire. She also designed the Jammin’ Crepes restaurant and LiLLiPiES Bakery in Princeton, among other projects. Since it is in a historic district, the renovation of her own house, which included the addition of a two-and-a-half-story addition on the back and complete renovation of the front, needed extra approval. Once obtained, the project took a year to complete. Living in town as opposed to a suburban development suits everyone in the family. “My daughters love it,” Knight said. “We can take the grandkids and throw them in the strollers and walk to town. It’s a different feel, and everybody is happy.”

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2019


MAX HAYDEN

When he was 24, Max Hayden bought a 19th-century house on a busy corner in Hopewell Township. He expanded the house 12 years later. And in 2007, by then married with two young children, Hayden moved the home to a nine-acre open field just down the road. Once it was settled in its new location, Hayden designed a new addition. The connected buildings look like a stately mansion from the road, but inside, the house is cozy and comfortable. The newest section blends seamlessly into the old. The family spends a lot of time in the new section, which has floors reclaimed from an attic of an old house in Hillsborough. Every door in the room was repurposed from other projects. “The only furniture that is not antique in that room is the upholstered furniture,” Hayden said. “The same cannot be said of the living room, where every piece is antique except one custom-made bench I pilfered from a historic design, and had made.” Hayden, who is currently restoring a house on Green Street in Princeton and other properties in the Hopewell area, likes to hang out in the family room. “It’s really where we live,” he said. “It has the nicest light and views. It’s designed to fit in with the rest of the house. It’s actually a slightly deeper, taller version of the living room.” SPRING 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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DAVID HENDERSON AND JOHN HATCH

When David Henderson and John Hatch bought their three-story Victorian in Trenton’s Mill Hill district three decades ago, it was a wreck in some sections, but intact in others. The back wall was collapsing and there was severe water damage. But the original decorative details in the front part of the house were in remarkable shape. The home had been empty for 25 years. “Although the systems were from the 19th century, all of the bones of the house were good,” said Henderson, sitting with Hatch in the front parlor. “So we restored this part to

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what was previously here. I like this room in particular, because it has a kind of serenity, and a richness.” The couple, who have two children, have renovated numerous houses in Mill Hill. With partner Michael Goldstein, they are currently involved in Phase II of Roebling Lofts, a mixed-use development located in former industrial buildings nearby. Phase I, which is 138 apartments, is almost completely leased. Their home is a frequent gathering place for family, friends, and neighbors. Having lived there for so long, Henderson and Hatch are currently renovating sections that need updating.

They recently added a bay window to the rear of the second floor, and are extending their first floor dining room. “When you work on your own house, you have the freedom to try out what you want,” said Hatch, who is a partner with the Trenton firm Clarke Caton Hintz. “We’ve been here a long time, we know what works and what needs to change.” Henderson sums it up: “If you had asked us, when we were in our 20s, what our dream house would have been, we probably wouldn’t have said something like this. But this is my dream house. I love it and I couldn’t imagine living anywhere else.”


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Morgan Stanley is proud to congratulate

Wade Martin

Named to Forbes’ 2019 list of America’s Best-in-State Wealth Advisors Being named to Forbes Magazine’s list of America’s Best-in-State Wealth Advisors, is a testament to your experience, professionalism and dedication to your clients.

(L to R): John Rizzo; Allison DeLay, Director of Business Strategy; Brett Scharf, Portfolio Management Associate; Brianna Clater, Client Service Associate; Arthur Martin; Maria Gaspari, Business Development Associate; Wade Martin

Thank you for the work you do each day and for carrying forward the culture of excellence at our firm.

The Martin-Rizzo Group at Morgan Stanley Wade Martin Executive Director Senior Portfolio Management Director Financial Advisor John C. Rizzo, CFP® Senior Vice President Portfolio Management Director Financial Advisor Arthur Martin Senior Vice President Portfolio Management Director Financial Advisor 1200 Lenox Drive, Suite 300 Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 877-522-2387 https://fa.morganstanley.com/ themartinrizzogroup

Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and federally registered CFP (with flame design) in the U.S. Source: Forbes.com (Feb. 2019). America’s Best-In-State Wealth Advisors ranking was developed by SHOOK Research and is based on in-person and telephone due diligence meetings and a ranking algorithm that includes: client retention, industry experience, review of compliance records, firm nominations; and quantitative criteria, including: assets under management and revenue generated for their firms. Investment performance is not a criterion because client objectives and risk tolerances vary, and advisors rarely have audited performance reports. Rankings are based on the opinions of SHOOK Research, LLC and are not indicative of future performance or representative of any one client’s experience. Neither Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC nor its Financial Advisors or Private Wealth Advisors pay a fee to Forbes or SHOOK Research in exchange for the ranking. For more information: www.SHOOKresearch.com. © 2019 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC. CRC 2452736 03/19 CS 9524397 03/19

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JOB INFORMATION

SPECIFICATIONS

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Dedicated Dedicatedtoto creating creatingaa world worldclass class dining diningexperience experience ininthe thePrinceton Princeton community community since since2008. 2008. MENUS MENUS Weeknight Weeknight A la A la Carte Carte Critically Critically Acclaimed Acclaimed Tasting Tasting Menus Menus Attention Attention toto Detail Detail Private Private Dining Dining Carefully Carefully Curated Curated Wine Wine List List SPECIALS SPECIALS Wed Wed Night Night Bar Bar Menu Menu Guest Guest Chef Chef Dinners Dinners Holiday Holiday Menus Menus HOURS HOURS TUE-THUR TUE-THUR 5-9pm 5-9pm FRI-SAT FRI-SAT 5-10pm 5-10pm CONTACT CONTACT elements elements 6666 Witherspoon Witherspoon St.St. Princeton Princeton NJNJ 08542 08542 www.elementsprinceton.com www.elementsprinceton.com (609) (609) 924-0078 924-0078


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IF WALLS COULD TALK The Immigration Experience at Historic Ellis Island by Taylor Smith Photos courtesy of The National Park Service and Wikimedia Commons


M

ore than 12 million immigrants passed through the U.S. immigration portal at New York’s Ellis Island between 1892 and 1954. These determined individuals — many of whom were escaping extreme poverty, famine, and persecution — often spent all of their savings on a single ticket, causing many families to become separated. Teenage children were left to cross the ocean alone, not knowing what was in store for them when they arrived in America, or whether they would every see their parents again. This uncertainty did not dissipate after the ships sailed past the Statue of Liberty, a literal beacon of light, hope, and freedom to the arriving passengers. The inspection process at Ellis Island was another big hurdle to cross, and the health and confidence of the arriving immigrants — who often did not speak English and had eaten little and seldom bathed during their long journey — was not strong. All arriving passengers were processed in the Registry Room where they were organized in pens similar to cattle or livestock. Public Health Service doctors poked and prodded as they asked the new arrivals to cough, stand up straight, and answer a few questions to assess their psychological state. Special attention was paid to individuals who appeared weak and off balance, struggling to carry their own luggage up the broad staircase to the Registry Room. Of primary concern were cholera, scalp and nail fungus, tuberculosis, epilepsy, trachoma, insanity, and other mental impairments. Trachoma, a contagious eye infection that can lead to blindness and death, was itself somewhat akin to a death sentence, sending afflicted patients back to their home country. During their examination, Ellis Island

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Main Building, Ellis Island.

physicians used a hooked metal tool to literally flip a new arrival’s eyelid inside out. Excessive redness on the under-eyelid was taken as suspected trachoma. Cases of misdiagnosis were not uncommon. Registration involved documenting the arriving passengers’ names, age, and country of origin in encyclopedia-sized journals. The handwritten notes offer a chance for modern-day visitors to search for their own distant relatives who arrived in the United States via New York Harbor. All of the data has been digitized into the Ellis Island Foundation, Inc.’s Passenger Search, a database of over 65 million passengers. All that is needed is a first name (or initial) and last name. The database, found at www.libertyellisfoundation.org/passenger, even takes into account alternative spellings and close matches, as many new immigrants were given new names based on their ship boarding passes. In fact, contrary to popular belief, your great-great-grandmother’s last name was not altered at Ellis Island, but most likely was changed when she bought her ship ticket at whichever European port she departed from. In general, the registration officials at Ellis Island spoke many of the same native languages as the new arrivals. However, most cases suggest that the attendants at the shipping ports, where most immigrants traveled to from their family homes, hurriedly wrote out tickets in whatever name they heard. This was then the official documentation (akin to a driver’s license for those who had no other forms of ID), that followed the passengers into the New World. Consonants and vowels were dropped from last names, which thus became more “Americanized.” Similar to a modern Visa, registration required that all immigrants had


An Albanian woman wearing her native costume, photographed at Ellis Island, N.Y. Circa 1905.

Portrait of three women and a baby. Just arrived to Ellis Island along with hundreds of other immigrants that day. Circa 1905.

potential work and a definite place to stay. Government officials at the time were greatly concerned that immigrants with no place to live and no relatives would live on New York City’s streets, become vagrants, and join various gangs and mafia rings. Organized crime was a constant battle for New York City’s police force (as it still is today). Unmarried and unattached young women were not allowed to leave Ellis Island. For the disoriented, fearful, and exhausted women, having an aunt, uncle, cousin, or other relative currently living in New York City where they knew they could stay was sufficient, but they had to be able to give the registration official the exact address of where they were staying and what type of work they planning to pursue. It was not entirely uncommon for pimps to show up at the registration process, having paid off Ellis Island officials, to recruit single women into prostitution. Impromptu (but binding) wedding ceremonies were sometimes conducted on the spot, so that women with no husband and unconvincing stories had somewhere to go. Little did these ladies suspect that they had married into a web of prostitution affiliates. Once they had passed the medical inspections and registration, the immigrants were free to enter the New World and adjust to the sights and sounds of the United States. Those less fortunate were sent back to their home country or died in containment facilities on the island. It is estimated that more than 120,000 immigrants were forced to sail back and 3,500 immigrants perished from disease on the island itself. Beyond prostitution and organized crime, other significant concerns for

American politicians and the general public during Ellis Island’s half-century of operation were criminality, anarchists, and communists. Suspected Bolsheviks were labeled as “immoral” and were not allowed to leave Ellis Island. Of the 20 percent of immigrants that were detained at the island, 10 percent were detained for moral or political reasons. Fear of radicals was (and is) nothing new in America. Dating back to 1692, the Puritan Minister Cotton Mather expressed his concern over “heretics and malignants” to the people of the Massachusetts Bay Colony: “To Ye Aged and Beloved, Mr. John Higginson, There be now at sea a ship called Welcome, which has on board one hundred or more of the heretics and malignants called Quakers, with W. Penn … at the head of them. The General Court has accordingly given secret orders to Master Malachi Huscott, of the brig Porpoise, to waylay the said Welcome slyly as near the Cape of Cod as may be, and make captive the said Penn and his ungodly crew, so that the Lord may be glorified and not mocked on the soil of this new country with the heathen worship of these people. Much spoil can be made by selling the whole lot to Barbados, where slaves fetch good prices in rum and sugar and we shall not only do the Lord great service by punishing the wicked, but we shall make great good for His Minister and people, Yours in the bowels of Christ, Cotton Mather.” Such expressions of nativism dramatically rang out through the general voices and consciousness of U.S. society during America’s period of isolationism during World War I. The anti-immigration viewpoint peaked SPRING 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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in the spring of 1917 when newspapers, radio, comics, advertisements, songbooks, films, theater, and other forms of marketing warned of the backwardness and inhumane quality of the foreigners, suggesting that America was on its way to becoming a melting pot of non-English speaking criminals, radicals, and racially subset hoards. American children consumed this type of racial profiling in sing-alongs, backyard games, and comic strips. Fear of immigration was not just a concern of the upper classes; the American farmer, laborer, and factory worker feared that the Irish, Italians, Polish, and Russian arrivals would strip them of their hard-earned jobs. The nativist years prompted President Warren G. Harding to sign into law the first Quota Act in 1921, which effectively ended America’s “opendoor policy.” Monthly quotas were established and limitations were placed on the nationalities of those being allowed into the country. It was intended that census data would reflect a reduction in the number of specific ethnic groups that were essentially deemed “a threat to American society.” Additional anti-immigration restrictions followed. The National Origins Act forced prospective immigrants to undergo an extensive investigation in their home country before ever boarding a ship to America. Most were never allowed to depart.

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With immigration slowing to a halt by the 1930s, Ellis Island was used primarily as a detention and deportation center. During World War II, some 7,000 detainees and political prisoners were housed on the island. Within the surreal setting, Nazi prisoners were given the right to celebrate Adolf Hitler’s birthday each year. After 62 years of operation, Ellis Island’s Immigration Services closed in 1954. For the next 10 years, the buildings stood vacant and filled with flood waters from each passing hurricane season. In 1965, Ellis Island became part of the Statue of Liberty Monument overseen by the National Park Service. Twenty-five years later, in 1990, the Main Building was fully renovated and restored into the Immigration Museum, which remains open to the public today. Now, through the efforts of the National Park Service and the nonprofit Save Ellis Island, more than 30 other buildings on the island have also been restored. For modern-day visitors, the walls of the processing buildings on Ellis Island seem to have their own voice and life, eager to tell the tales of the hopeful passengers who passed through their halls. To plan your own trip to both the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island’s Immigration Museum, visit www.libertyellisfoundation.org.


Princeton Spine and Joint Center is celebrating its 11th year in Princeton and we are grateful for the support and trust that has been placed in us. We are proud to introduce three new board certified, fellowship-trained sports medicine doctors. Scott Curtis, DO Director, Sports Medicine Division

Zachary Perlman, DO Co-Director, Regenerative Medicine Program

Jason Kirkbride, MD Co-Director, Regenerative Medicine Program

At Princeton Spine and Joint, we specialize in the latest medical treatments to get people of all ages and abilities better and back to their best performing selves without pain and without surgery. Our new Regenerative Medicine Division offers the latest in restorative tissue treatments, including PRP. Our doctors are co-editing along with the chairperson of Mount Sinai’s PM&R department the new textbook, “Regenerative Medicine for Spine and Joint Pain.”

Now offering same day appointments, because we understand that when you have an injury or significant pain, you need to be seen right away. Treating people from ages 8 to 108.

601 Ewing Street, Building A-2, Princeton • 256 Bunn Drive, Suite B, Princeton (609) 454-0760 • www.princetonsjc.com


DR. RUXANDRA BALESCU Dr. Balescu has been practicing dentistry for 17 years. A native of Romania, she is a graduate of Carol Davila School of Dental Medicine in Bucharest and University of Pennsylvania Dental School in Philadelphia. She says, “I passionately work to achieve FUNCTION,

BEAUTY, BIOCOMPATIBILITY, and HEALING through visionary treatment plans that support YOUR choice to live a cleaner, healthier, and more natural life.” Dr. Balescu has extensive continuing education in general dentistry, nutrition, and biological medicine, including training with Dr. Rau, from the Paracelsus Clinic in Switzerland. Her focus and passion are bridging the gap between conventional dentistry and holistic health. Her practice offers gentle, caring, compassionate treatment and educational seminars for professionals and the general public. Dr. Balescu and her team offer all general dentistry services, including preventive care and comprehensive exams; cosmetic, prosthetic, restorative, and periodontal work; as well as implants, orthodontics, and oral surgery. We welcome new patients into our practice and we are committed to making your care a pleasant, educational, and refreshingly different experience. We invite you to explore a wide range of needs from detoxing after an appointment, alleviating stress and anxiety, nasal and sinus troubles, headaches, muscle aches, or simply the need to stop for a moment,

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disconnect, and restore. We also offer healing protocols, supplements, and food recipes cabinet, these are products that we’ve tried or have an opinion based on good feedback from patients, friends, or peers. We offer a range of services that you can book with your regular dental visit or on a separate day. What sets Dr. Balescu apart is her ability to deeply listen, evaluate in detail, and create individualized treatment plans that have the rest of the patient’s life in mind. Dr. Balescu is proud and excited to be on the forefront of modern dentistry that aims for prevention and healing of disease and promotes vitality of the entire body.

Please contact us at info@rethinkdentalhealth.com

609.460.4574 201 S. Main St. Lambertville, NJ 08530

the joints range of motion. Light calisthenics and dynamic stretching are perfect for these goals. Cool downs are all about recovery, and are a good 4/10/19 time to perform static stretching. TAKE IT EASY

Spring is here. It’s time for baseball, track, lacrosse, tennis, and more outdoor activities. Before setting foot on the field, the track, or the diamond, make sure you are ready to play. Sports injuries generally come in two forms: acute and chronic. Acute injuries happen due to an event such as a fall or a collision with another player. Chronic injuries tend to be due to overuse; for example, a pitcher uses the same arm to throw so many times that their shoulder or elbow tendons become Dr. Jeffery Bechler inflamed and painful. Athletes can prepare themselves against common sports injuries such as an ankle sprain, knee injury, or shoulder tendinitis. “Injuries in the athlete can be minimized with proper preparation and patient education,” says Dr. Jeffery Bechler, a sports medicine orthopaedic surgeon at University Orthopaedic Associates (UOA) and the orthopaedist for Princeton University Athletes.

The risk of injury greatly increases when players and athletes are exhausted. Form breaks down and players get tired and careless. Regular breaks in practice will keep athletes safe. Dehydration is a contributor to musculoskeletal injuries and is a real danger as the temperature increases during late spring and into the summer months. “The time to hydrate is prior to the practice or the athletic competition,” Dr. Bechler says. Water and hydration should be available during practice and games to help prevent cramping and stay hydrated. However, it is more important to increase hydration prior to the event.

TAKE IT SLOW

If you or your athlete has experienced a sports injury, contact UOA at UOANJ. com or 855.UOA.DOCS and be sure to check out our sports performance and wellness program, which focuses on education and injury prevention.

If you’ve been cooped up inside all winter, you may not be ready to jump right into practice or play. It is critical not to go too hard, too soon. Initial training sessions should be aimed at conditioning athletes to prepare them for the rigors of skilled practice and live competition. Taking it slow is also essential on a day-to-day level. “Each athlete should perform a proper warmup and cool down routine before every practice or game,” says Dr. Bechler. Warm-ups should be focused on getting the heart pumping and improving

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PLAY IT SAFE

Finally, it is essential to use all athletic equipment properly and make sure it fits well. Shoes and cleats should fit comfortably as should any pads and helmets required by the sport. Proper safety equipment should be worn at all times in practice and in game competition.

2:06 PM


Princeton Community welcomes its only Board Certified Periodontist,

M. Ilhan Uzel, D.M.D., D.Sc With 26 years of experience, 11 years of teaching background at Boston University and at PENN, and more than 10,000 successful procedures performed, M. Ilhan Uzel, D.M.D., D.Sc is now serving the Princeton Community as its only Board Certified Periodontist.

Before

After


Do you want to avoid or get off of your medications? Let’s see if we can do it safely and appropriately. Call for an appointment today.

Aly Cohen, MD, FACR Integrative Medicine Rheumatology Internal Medicine 601 Ewing Street, Suite B-1

Princeton, NJ 08540

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MERCER CENTER FOR IMPLANTS AND PERIODONTICS AT PRINCETON Healthy mouth, healthy body is our aim at Mercer Center for Implants and Periodontics at Princeton. We are a full-service periodontics practice led by Princeton’s only board-certified periodontist, Dr. Ilhan Uzel. Dr. Uzel has more than 25 years of clinical experience — with 11 years of clinical and didactic teaching at Boston University and the University of Pennsylvania — and he has performed more than 10,000 successful procedures. Having earned a Doctor of Science in Bone Biology, Dr. Uzel takes a scientific, evidence-based approach while working with all dentists to ensure

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optimal oral health for each patient. The Mercer Center for Implants and Periodontics is committed to treating our patients with the latest techniques and cutting-edge equipment. Improving the health and well-being of our patients is at the core of everything we do. We offer a variety of periodontal services, including cosmetic and regenerative procedures, dental implants, and treatment of periodontal infections. Procedures also include bone grafting, sinus lift, scaling and root planing (deep cleaning), and gum surgery for gum disease, among others. Dr. Uzel believes in taking a conservative, yet effective, approach to treatment. Each patient is evaluated carefully and thoroughly. Surgery is recommended only when absolutely necessary. The mouth is filled with countless bacteria, some linked to tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease. Researchers have found that periodontitis, the advanced form of periodontal disease that can cause tooth loss, is linked to other health problems such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke, bacterial pneumonia, and most recently Alzheimer’s disease. Everyone can benefit from having a periodontal evaluation for optimal dental health. You

do not need a referral to visit a periodontist. Good oral and dental hygiene can help prevent bad breath, tooth decay, and gum disease — and can help you keep your teeth as you get older. It is essential that a dental hygienist pays careful attention to detail when working in a patient’s mouth. Dexterity is also incredibly important in such a small space, as the slightest nudge to a sensitive tooth can be extremely painful for a patient. Our Senior Hygienist, Tara Zarski, is not only highly qualified in her field, but also passionate, detail oriented, patient, and understanding. Our office offers convenient hours, opening at 7 a.m. on Mondays and by appointment on Saturdays, so our patients don’t have to disrupt their work schedules. The Mercer Center for Implants and Periodontics proudly serves Princeton and surrounding areas. Our office is located at 601 Ewing Street, Suite B-15. Call 609.212.2140 or visit www.mercerimplantperio.com.


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field forward into the future,” reports Dr. Perlman, Co-Director of PSJC’s regenerative medicine division and Co-Editor of the forthcoming book, Regenerative Medicine for Spine and Joint Pain. “It’s really the best of both worlds. At PSJC I get to spend time involved in research and lecturing but at the end of the day, what I love most about my role is the PRINCETON SPINE & JOINT CENTER opportunity to use that knowledge and expertise to sit down with a Princeton Spine & Joint Center (PSJC) is patient one-on-one and map out a treatment plan celebrating its 11th year in practice in Princeton, together to get that person out of pain and back NJ. Founded by husband and wife team and to their active and pain-free life. Nothing feels Princeton natives Drs. Bracilovic and Cooper, better than knowing that I’ve helped someone live PSJC has focused on getting people out of a better, less painful life. And I get to do it every pain and back into their active lives without day in a beautiful town where I love to live.” surgery. Over the years, it has grown into a seven Dr. Curtis is the Director of the sports doctor group. Its doctors are board certified and medicine division at PSJC and notes, “I loved fellowship trained. Between them, they have living in North Jersey and working with the New authored and edited 18 medical texts in their York Jets and Seton Hall University Athletics but field. Their doctors are recognized as national and I equally love working with Princeton University international leaders in their field. athletes and the local high school and junior “We have chosen to live in Princeton and high school athletes.” Dr. Curtis emphasizes raise our families here. At the same time, we are taking his time with each patient to be sure to still passionate about research and moving our

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arrive at an accurate diagnosis and then giving the patient all the essential information so they can make a plan of action together based on the patient’s particular needs and goals. “One of the things I also emphasize,” Dr. Curtis notes, “is the importance of a maintenance treatment program to help prevent future injury once the acute injury is resolved. Sometimes this involves carefully evaluating the mechanics of the particular sport. Sometimes this involves uncovering muscle imbalances that may have contributed to the injury in the first place. Solving an acute problem is important, and that’s the first step. But making sure future injuries are prevented is also a really important part of comprehensive treatment. At the end of the day, we don’t take care of MRIs or just an injury. We have to take care of the whole person.” One of the developments that Dr. Bracilovic is enjoying is her new role as Director of the dance medicine division. PSJC is proud to be an official provider for Princeton Ballet School and Dr. Bracilovic has a particular passion for educating and helping dancers stay healthy and dancing well into the future.

(609) 454-0760 • www.princetonsjc.com


Controlling the Mini-Adult and “Shoulds” in Our Lives By Drs. Rosemarie Scolaro Moser & Christina Zebrowski

PHOTO COURTESY OF RSM PSYCHOLOGY CENTER; SKETCHES COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

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rom the time we learn to walk and talk, we are socialized to learn what we should and should not do. “You should always share your toys”… “You should never touch the stove”… “You should never talk to strangers.” The first “shoulds” we learn are meant to protect us and guide us, because as children we are not yet ready to make independent decisions and we are still learning about the world. Those early shoulds become internalized, ingrained, automatic recordings in our brains. This repository of shoulds creates the mini-adult who accompanies us when parents are not there to provide oversight. Our mini-adult helps keep us safe as we navigate childhood. Eventually, as we transition into adulthood, we become much less reliant on our mini-adult and are ready to make our own independent decisions and judgments. There are times we may reasonably choose not to share our possessions with someone, times we want to cook and use the stove, and times we choose to smile and greet strangers. At these points in our lives, our old internalized mini-adult is not useful, so we override it, and learn to say goodbye to it. But it is sometimes very difficult to say goodbye to an old friend. Many of us often have problems appropriately overriding the important shoulds in our lives. “I should be nice” becomes “I shouldn’t say no when my neighbor asks for a ride to work, even if it will make me late.” “I should respect my elders” becomes “I should give my older sister a loan to go on a cruise with her friends, even though I know she will never pay it back and its hard making ends meet.” “I should be a successful hard worker” becomes “I shouldn’t miss a day from work even if I have the flu.” We collect a long laundry list of shoulds as we travel through life: “I should get into the best college,” ”I should have the perfect wedding,” “I should be happy in my job,” “I should make more money,” “I should have a bigger house,” “I should have kids who get ‘A’ grades in school,” and so on. Too many shoulds weigh us down if we are not careful. Many of these shoulds make us think we are not good enough or that our lives are not good enough. We learn to not accept ourselves as human beings who try to do our best, but will never be perfect and will never

make everyone happy. The unreasonable shoulds result in unhappiness, disappointment, guilt, anger, anxiety, and depression, and they are not logical. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or “CBT” can help us reign in the shoulds and say goodbye to the mini-adult we have outgrown. What is CBT? CBT is a form of psychotherapy that works by identifying dysfunctional thought patterns (or the unreasonable shoulds) that affect how one feels and behaves. Dysfunctional thought patterns prevent the individual from living life in a productive, successful way and contribute to emotional distress, depression, anxiety, guilt, worry, and everyday stress. As a result, individuals may feel stuck, trapped, or unable to achieve their goals.

COGNITIVE REFRAMING:

In CBT, the therapist helps the individual see or view distressing life events and beliefs in a fresh, new light and with a new, more rational and positive perspective. It is called reframing, just as the right frame can transform the whole look of a picture.

What kinds of techniques are used in CBT? Some specific techniques the therapist may use include, but are not limited to: • • • • • • • • • •

Challenging irrational beliefs Relaxation education and training Self-monitoring Cognitive rehearsal Thought stopping Communication skills training Assertiveness skills training Social skills training Bibliotherapy Homework assignments

How does one start CBT? A CBT trained therapist will first meet with you to gather information about your history and background in order to understand you better and to help you identify your personal goals. A targeted treatment plan with clearly defined objectives helps to launch the treatment. To start, therapy is usually scheduled on a weekly basis. The duration of the treatment depends on each person and her or his needs. Ultimately, in CBT, your therapist is a partner on an educational journey to help improve coping skills and emotional well-being, while equipping you with the strategies needed to meet future challenges.

How does CBT work? CBT focuses on identifying inaccurate thinking styles and helping the individual challenge and reframe those dysfunctional thoughts. By learning to think differently and more logically, individuals can overcome their fears and find ways to cope with stress and the overwhelming demands of their daily lives. In CBT, the therapist encourages the individual to be an active participant in the treatment process by practicing new skills, learning stress reduction exercises, completing written homework to document daily events that provoke the shoulds, and trying out new behaviors in the “real world.” CBT teaches you to think out of the box, to challenge misconceptions, to acquire tools for personal change, and to feel confident moving forward. SPONSORED CONTENT

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Concierge Medicine

There’s a new trend in healthcare, and it’s gaining momentum in our area. By Sarah Emily Gilbert

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or the past few years, Dr. Lynne B. Kossow and Dr. Barbara A. Brown of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine have offered their patients far more than the traditional primary care practice. Most doctors see 25-30 patients a day for an average of 15 minutes, but Drs. Kossow and Brown see six to eight patients a day for up to an hour. In addition to providing treatment for acute illnesses, the doctors act as their clients’ healthcare coaches through Lifestyle Medicine, a scientific approach to patient wellness by effecting changes in areas such as diet, physical activity, and stress management. With the current shortage of primary care physicians and the abundance of high volume practices, this type of individualized attention is rare. However, by switching to a concierge format, doctors like Kossow and Brown are able to practice medicine that consists of this broad-spectrum care. Concierge medicine, also known as retainer-based medicine, is an umbrella term for private medical care wherein patients pay an out-of-pocket fee in exchange for enhanced care. Born in the 1990s, concierge medicine was once thought of as a service for the wealthy that charged patients a lofty fee for luxury medicine. In recent years, it has evolved to accommodate patients across all income brackets, leading to expanding interest among patients and their primary care doctors. According to a survey released by the American Academy of Private Physicians at the AAPP 2015 Fall Summit, more than 45 percent of 862 independent physicians would consider a concierge or similar membership model in the next three years. This may be due in part to our aging population needing increased and varied medical services, leading to an imbalanced patient/doctor ratio. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act has increased the number of insured patients, putting a further strain on primary care doctors. As a result, physicians are often unable to dedicate enough time to each patient. In the hopes of increasing both job and patient satisfaction in a financially sustainable way, primary physicians like Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are looking toward concierge medicine. “Where conventional medicine is failing is in the prevention and reversal of chronic diseases that are becoming an epidemic in the United States today,” explain the doctors. “The current insurance model is built upon a problem-based economic reimbursement that encourages doctors to address medical problems very quickly. This leads to most doctors rushing to see 25-30 patients per day in order to make ends meet…This is not how we have ever practiced. We always want to have the time to address the root cause of diseases that are preventable today.” Lifestyle Medicine is a 21st century approach to healthcare that consolidates the very best characteristics of traditional medicine with the profound impact of lifestyle behaviors on health. As our program grew, it became readily apparent to us that integrating Lifestyle Medicine into our internal medicine practice was the best way for us to continue to provide exceptional care. We feel that the concierge model is the only way to effectively do that.

Dr. Barbara A. Brown (left) and Dr. Lynne B. Kossow of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine.

Concierge medical practices come in various forms, including those that reject insurance plans all together, but this is not the case for Princeton Lifestyle Medicine. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown accept insurance for all covered medical services. In addition, their patients pay an annual fee of $1,200 for the Lifestyle Medicine Concierge program, which gives them access to an elevated level of care. Trained at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine at Harvard Medical School, the doctors are at the vanguard of their field, having lectured about their practice development model at The Institute of Lifestyle Medicine Conference in 2015. They are also members of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and the American College of Physicians. They are among the first physicians to become board certified in Lifestyle Medicine, as well as maintaining their board certifications in internal medicine. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown’s practice is unique in that it offers patients comprehensive conventional medical care combined with lifestyle counseling. Patients interested in a natural approach to disease prevention are provided in-depth, individualized coaching based on their needs. The doctors can assist with everything from quitting smoking to creating a manageable diet and exercise plan. According to the doctors, this is an evidence-based practice that has been shown to prevent, reverse, or slow down heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, diabetes, dementia, and some cancers. The concierge model offers Princeton Lifestyle Medicine patients additional benefits including access to the doctors’ emails, cell phone numbers, and private phone line, extended patient office visits, a onehour consultation, and same or next day appointments. As a result, patients see Drs. Kossow and Brown not only as accomplished medical doctors, but health advocates, mentors, and even friends. “Our practice structure allows us to spend more time educating our patients about what may be going on with them medically,” the doctors explain. “We are better able to work with them as partners in their care and advocate for them with their specialists or if they are in the hospital. We provide tremendous support and guidance to them and their caretakers or family. We are happy to have this enhanced communication with our patients. It allows us to make social visits when they are hospitalized at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center so that we can stay in close touch while they are receiving care.” Concierge practices like Princeton Lifestyle Medicine focus the healthcare system on its most vital component: the patient-doctor relationship. The model emphasizes quality care instead of quick care, benefitting both parties. Dr. Brown and Kossow are now board certified as specialists in the practice of Lifestyle Medicine and are the only physicians in the Princeton area who are board certified in both Internal Medicine and Lifestyle Medicine. As leaders in both concierge and Lifestyle medicine, it comes as no surprise that Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are at the forefront of this effort, bringing Princeton into the future of healthcare.

The Princeton Lifestyle Medicine Concierge Program is $1,200 per year. The fee can be paid monthly, quarterly, biannually, or annually, and credit cards are accepted as payment. All medical services are billed through the patient’s insurance company as usual. Princeton Lifestyle Medicine is located at 731 Alexander Road, Suite 200 in Princeton, New Jersey. For more information call 609.655.3800 or visit www.princetonlifestylemedicine.com.


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Digital Privacy

Threats and Protections in Today’s World By William Uhl

D

igital communication has made the world a more interconnected place. Instant global communication has allowed for more international collaboration. But as digital communication becomes more centralized, government and corporate surveillance bleeds further into everyday life. Now, as world leaders make bolder legislation and multi-billion-dollar companies produce more invasive products, rights and convenience are clashing — and there is more than personal privacy on the line.

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For Fun and Profit

mandatory two-week delay after confirming account deletion assumes that second-guessing users will change their minds. And users rarely, if ever, know how their data is being used. “There’s no guarantee or policies that the data they are selling is safe or the clients are notified,” said Phan. “There’s no formal metric to measure the risk there, so they’re just selling data.” Outside of the United States, however, there are more legislative protections for users. In 2016, the European Union introduced the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The acronym may seem familiar to anyone who remembers the flood of “updated privacy policy” emails around May 2018, when the GDPR started to be enforced. It introduced data privacy-focused rights, such as the

More troubling is how Facebook and other dataharvesting companies enable others to manipulate people’s opinions. In February 2019, The Guardian reported on anti-vaccination groups targeting nearly 900,000 people that Facebook marked as “interested in ‘vaccine controversies.’” In an open letter to Facebook, California Congressman Adam Schiff wrote, “the algorithms which power these services are not designed to distinguish quality information from misinformation or misleading information, and the consequences of that are particularly troubling for public health issues…. Repetition of information, even if false, can often be mistaken for accuracy, and exposure to anti-vaccine content via social media may negatively shape user attitudes towards vaccination.”

Social media has introduced another party to surveillance: technology corporations. Facebook is the obvious example; the company is infamous for the amount of information it collects about its users from their smartphones. Facebook has documented calls and texts made outside their apps, constantly recorded the phone’s geographic location, and deceived users into uploading the phone’s contact list. However, every popular social media giant is guilty of tracking more personal data than users realize, including Twitter and Tumblr. It’s their business model. Social media sites make most of their profits from advertising, and being able to target advertisements to specific users is good business. As a result, Facebook tracks not just the location, age, gender, language, and education level of its users, but also categorizes users according to details as specific as “Users who are ‘heavy’ buyers of beer, wine, or spirits” and “Users whose household makes more purchases than is average.” The more data advertisers collect, the better they can target users. In some cases, users don’t even have to be logged in for websites to track their information. Using a technique called browser fingerprinting, advertisers can piece together a logged-out user’s identity based on their computer. To quote the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF)’s example, “yours is likely the only browser on Central European time with cookies enabled that has exactly your set of system fonts, screen resolution, plugins, and graphics card.” By using browser fingerprinting and similar techniques, advertisers can piece together user identities from separate accounts. And when data harvesting A London protest in March 2018, following the Cambridge Analytica and Facebook data scandal. companies start piecing together user information, the whole is greater than It can also be a politically useful tool, as “right to access,” which entitles users to learn if, the sum of its parts. “If I collect information from evidenced by The New York Times’ “How Trump how, and why their data is being used, and the “right different resources — different websites, different Consultants Exploited the Facebook Data of to be forgotten,” which entitles users to erase their social media platforms —and put them together, Millions.” It was one of several articles exposing personal data and stop its use. Though imperfect, we can infer almost everything about a particular Cambridge Analytica, the voter-profiling company the GDPR was in many ways a win for consumer user. Right now, there’s no policy or something to that served several conservative campaigns between rights. For everyone else, their aggregated personal prevent that kind of privacy risk,” said Dr. Hai Phan, 2014 and 2018. As noted in the article, “The firm information remains invisible, intangible, and an assistant professor at the New Jersey Institute harvested private information from the Facebook invaluable. of Technology. His research, in part, focuses on profiles of more than 50 million users without data privacy on social media and medical social their permission, according to former Cambridge networks. “It’s not like one plus one equals two; one employees, associates, and documents, making it plus one equals everything.” The danger with personal data is not just how it is one of the largest data leaks in the social network’s Because of this, users have less control over their acquired, but also how it is used. Again, Facebook history. The breach allowed the company to exploit own information than ever. The adage “the internet is an example, with countless headlines regarding the private social media activity of a huge swath is forever” still rings true – anyone posting personal its unethical practices intermittently appearing in the of the American electorate, developing techniques information online can generally assume it will stick past decade. While Facebook is conducting research that underpinned its work on President Trump’s around indefinitely. The steps required to delete a to exploit teenage insecurity, it is also covertly campaign in 2016.” Cambridge acquired the data Facebook account are a perfect example of how giving personal data to companies like Mastercard, through a third party who, according to Facebook, reluctant companies are to forfeit user data. Prompts Apple, and Huawei — a firm flagged by the U.S. claimed it was for academic purposes. attempt to redirect users who want to deactivate their government as a Chinese spy. accounts (leaving their data with Facebook), and a

Nothing to Hide?

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Big Brother, Streamlined Much in the same way that corporate data aggregation has been misused, U.S. government surveillance projects have been appropriated for political gain and silencing dissent, even decades before the internet. “Even here in the U.S., where we have a constitutional right to speech, assembly, [and] the press, our government has repeatedly actively worked — and I’ll use the FBI’s word here — to ‘neutralize’ domestic social movements,” said Shahid Buttar, director of grassroots advocacy at the EFF. Buttar is a constitutional lawyer focused on community

organizing, policy reform, and resisting mass surveillance. “What people think of as ‘privacy’ actually stands in for something far more fundamental. So in the context of surveillance, it’s not privacy that’s at risk, it’s democracy. Surveillance and restrictions on speech silence discourse, and through silencing discourse, they undermine democracy. There is a public harm beyond the individual interest in not being observed. To construe privacy as merely an individual interest in not being observed is a very thin conception of privacy that overlooks a historical litany of examples.” Ubiquitous and widespread telecommunications have opened the door

First Steps To Privacy Reclaiming your privacy takes more than choosing the right apps, but it’s a start.

1. Uninstall Facebook-related apps Between the egregious amount of data it tracks and Facebook’s rampant misuse of that data, taking all Facebook-related apps off of your smartphone is the best first step towards reclaiming your privacy. If you still need to use Facebook, visit it on a computer with a secure browser.

2. Use Firefox instead of Microsoft Edge/Safari/Google Chrome Mozilla Firefox is the best web browser for retaining basic privacy features without sacrificing the convenience of a modern browser. Out of the major browsers, it is the only one that consistently prioritizes privacy. Download it for free on any app store, or at mozilla.org/en-US/firefox.

3. Install uBlock Origin uBlock Origin is an extension for most modern web browsers (including Firefox and Google Chrome) that blocks unwanted content — including scripts in webpages meant to track users. Download the Firefox version here: https://mzl.la/1LCnIua. (Not to be confused with uBlock, an unrelated project.)

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for more state surveillance. The New York Times revealed the National Security Agency (NSA)’s warrantless domestic wiretapping program in 2005, and in 2013, Edward Snowden leaked documents exposing the NSA program PRISM, which monitors all kinds of internet communications between American citizens. Most of Congress either didn’t understand or didn’t know about the program, which continues to this day. One of the most notorious known examples of misused government surveillance is COINTELPRO, an FBI operation meant to disrupt organizations deemed subversive. In 1976, the U.S. Senate wrote, “The Bureau conducted a sophisticated vigilante operation aimed squarely at preventing the exercise of First Amendment rights of speech and association,” according to Book 3 of the Church Committee Investigation, which examined abuses by the CIA, FBI, IRS, and NSA. Its targets included women’s rights advocates, Vietnam protestors, and the civil rights movement, and its tactics involved stalking, wiretapping, and more. “If you had any opinion in the United States for the 50 years between the second World War and the exposure of this program in the late ’70s, you were basically a criminal, despite our First Amendment rights. Many Americans have forgotten that era.” The final report of the Church Committee Investigation concluded, “Too many people have been spied upon by too many Government agencies and too much information has been illegally collected…. Governmental officials — including those whose principal duty is to enforce the law — have violated or ignored the law over long periods of time and have advocated and defended their right to break the law. The Constitutional system of checks and balances has not adequately controlled intelligence activities.” Though COINTELPRO officially ended, internal FBI documents from 2017 showed the FBI conducting surveillance on members of the Black Lives Matter movement similarly, including tracking travel and staking out residences.

Moving Forward From corporate profiling to government silencing, privacy has become a dire issue. “The only places we have ever witnessed the kind of ubiquitous monitoring that the U.S. government and the NSA and the entire intelligence community, including the DIA, the FBI, etc., subject Americans to is … A: in dystopian science-fiction novels, Orwell and Huxley in particular, and B: in contemporary China,” said Buttar. “The Stasi had nothing on us. East Germans were far less monitored behind the Iron Curtain than Americans are today. And if you take from that that the implication is not privacy but freedom and liberty, and freedom of speech, conscience — that is exactly the reason that we are concerned about it at EFF.” Public awareness has gradually caught up with the power of government and corporate surveillance. However, privacy violations have become increasingly unavoidable for the average


insufficient to protect your privacy on or from systems that don’t belong to you. When we communicate with others or move around the city, our privacy depends on the practices of society. We can avoid some of the systems that surveil our communications and movements, but not all of them. Clearly, the better solution is to make all these systems stop surveilling people other than legitimate suspects.” Buttar agrees, emphasizing the power of group action, “Small numbers of people acting together in concert, even doing something as simple as signing a letter together, can meet a very difference response than isolated individuals acting alone. Organizing locally, thinking globally, but acting locally by meeting one’s neighbors, discovering common causes, discussing those issues, and particularly formulating a plan, however infinitesimal, to raise their voices.” Change is happening already: the Data Care Act, a GDPR-style privacy bill, was introduced in December 2018 by 15 U.S. senators. While it does not go as far as the GDPR in many areas, if it passes, it may act as a foundation for future legislation. Buttar emphasizes the importance of local involvement. “That’s the basis for legitimacy in the constitution: popular sovereignty. It’s an organized populace — it’s just a matter of neighbors knowing each other.”

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Mandating interoperability would be a major step forward for consumer rights and data privacy. Five years ago, that may have been a political long shot in America, but the GDPR has set a powerful precedent. Its requirement for data portability already allows users to export their data in common formats. “I think a lot of people feel increasingly conscripted by the network effect — that is to say, the pull of these tools,” said Buttar. “If you want to participate in public life, increasingly, you have to be on this platform or that platform. That pull, I think, is ultimately forcing users to adopt tools that they might defect from if they had alternatives. Or, if they could, for instance, take their content from corporate social media platforms and port it to an opensource federated alternative — if that option were available, we might see a dramatic change in the internet marketplace effectively overnight. It’s not like these tools don’t exist, they just don’t have the network effect created by half a billion users or what have you.” Moreover, due to how reliant government surveillance is on corporate surveillance as seen with programs like PRISM, fixing one may help mitigate the other. While there are individual steps one can take to protect their own privacy, there is only so much an individual can do to avoid surveillance. Richard Stallman, president of the Free Software Foundation, wrote, “Self-protection is essential, but even the most rigorous self-protection is

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user. “It started with ignorance, particularly in ways these tools could be used against us and what people give up in the aggregate by seemingly-innocuous disclosures that empower these companies to essentially gain control over many civilizations’ discourses,” said Buttar. “I think more than the ignorance at the moment, what constrains concerted response is powerlessness…. I generally think [the internet] gives the illusion of power and influence, but in this context, the emergence of the corporate internet — the one centered on the Googles and Facebooks of the world — has certainly narrowed the choices that are easily available to users. Even if the full range of the internet remains available, increasingly, users’ experience of it is filtered through these corporate platforms.” The corporate centralization of the internet is increasingly unavoidable in everyday life, but there are solutions. One of the leading ideas for empowering users is interoperability — “basically requiring companies to allow consumers to walk away and not say ‘by abandoning this platform, I’m going to lose the accumulated data I’ve posted over the last several years – all my connections with friends and whatnot,’” explained Buttar. “Interoperability means you can take your posts and take them somewhere else, and that control over user data is one of the central provisions that we hope to see emerge in any potential data privacy regulation.”

S a c re d H

Congratulations to the Class of 2019 for earning admission to the following secondary schools: Blair Academy | Choate Rosemary Hall | Deerfield Academy | George School | Germantown Friends School | The Hill School The Hotchkiss School | The Hun School | Immaculata High School | The Lawrenceville School Montverde Academy | Notre Dame High School | Peddie School | The Pennington School | Phillips Academy Andover Phillips Exeter Academy | Pomfret School | Princeton Day School | Rutgers Preparatory School | Solebury School

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MORE THAN A WALK IN THE WOODS

Arboretum visits can help homeowners visualize their own landscape BY WENDY GREENBERG The ambler, the hiker, or those seeking inspiration from nature are probably not far from one of the many lush arboreta and gardens in the tri-state area. A visit can also offer homeowners a preview of what a young tree will look like in 50 years, among other landscaping ideas.

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Big chairs, and Magnolia kobus ‘Larry,’ at Rutgers Gardens in New Brunswick.

et’s face it,” says Bruce Crawford, director of Rutgers Gardens at New Brunswick, “the palette we (homeowners) pick from is limited, and somewhat self-perpetuating, as we often see one style of a backyard and acquire the same plants and trees. But a public garden or arboretum can show what blooms in the off season, and create a broader palette for the home.” Rutgers, he notes, has many native dogwoods, but also has interspecific hybrids between our native dogwood and the Chinese dogwood, like the recent hybrid, Scarlet Fire, with “good deep, red flowers.” The Garden State, after all, was home to New Brunswick’s Alfred Joyce Kilmer, who wrote the oft-quoted poem, “Trees.” Any collection of trees might be called an arboretum, but a respected database, the Morton Register, run by the Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Ills., lists arboreta and gardens worldwide that focus substantially on woody plants. ArbNet (The Interactive Community of Arboreta at www.arbnet.org), has criteria for achieving varying tiers of arboretum distinction (Levels I through IV) and designates accordingly. The Morton Register lists 30 arboreta in New Jersey. Within this list, four are accredited at Level I: Barton in Medford, Colts Neck, Florham in Madison, and Marquand Park in Princeton. Two are designated at the next level of certification, Level II: Sister Mary Grace Burns in Lakewood, and Robert A. Winters at Meadow Lake in East Windsor. There are none at Level III, and the nearest Level IV arboreta are Longwood Gardens and Morris Arboretum in Pennsylvania. The accreditation program looks at criteria such as planning, governance, number of species, staff or volunteer support, education and public programming, and tree science research and conservation. Grounds For Sculpture in Hamilton is in the process of applying for Level I accreditation, says Janis Napoli, horticulturist. The designation will help achieve peer recognition and guide consideration of the longevity of the collection, sustainability, and education, such as signage. Additionally, joining the arboretum community will offer early notice of concerns such as tree disease in the area, Napoli says.

TOURS AND VISITS In some cases, an arboretum can be explored in combination with a college visit, since many colleges maintain accredited arboreta. On the East Coast, these include Frank. A. Waugh Arboretum at U Mass Amherst (Level IV); Botanic Garden of Smith College (Level III); Connecticut College Arboretum (Level II); Haverford College Arboretum; Florham Arboretum at Fairleigh Dickinson University (Level I); Bard College Landscape and Arboretum Program (Level II); Rowan University Arboretum; and Sister Mary Grace Burns Arboretum at Georgia Court University (Level II); among other campuses. The Level III Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College is about an hour’s drive from the Princeton area. Becky Robert, who coordinates public relations and volunteer programs at Scott, says it encompasses “every tree” on the campus. Scott’s mission is “to showcase great garden plants for the average gardener.” Gardens are designed on a residential scale. Also, visitors can get an idea of what gardens look like in all seasons through a QR code that offers a look at the seasonal changes. According to Deanna Curtis, senior curator of woody plants and landscape project manager at New York Botanical Garden (NYBG), the majority of the trees that can grow outside at NYBG would also be suitable for New Jersey’s climate. Some highly ornamental smaller tree collections to look for at NYBG this spring include dogwoods and magnolias. Cultivated varieties (or cultivars) of flowering dogwood (Cornus florida) and kousa dogwood (Cornus kousa), or their hybrids, are planted throughout the garden. “A few of my favorite cultivars are Appalachian Spring, an excellent selection of flowering dogwood; Mandarin Jewel, a kousa dogwood with unique orange-yellow fruit; and Venus, a dogwood hybrid with plentiful large-bracted blooms,” she says. Generally, arboreta horticulturalists and education staff are eager to answer questions – and many are shown cell phone photos of trees and plants with accompanying queries. Most sites have educational events, self-guided tours, or cell phone tours.

Opposite; Willowwood Arboretum, Tubbs House front, Willowwood trail. SPRING 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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For a learning experience or an inspirational walk, discover these and more arboreta, and see what those who know them well have to say:

OFFICIAL GARDEN OF RUTGERS UNIVERSITY Rutgers Gardens 112 Ryders Lane New Brunswick rutgersgardens.rutgers.edu Rutgers Gardens relies heavily on support from facility rentals, special events, memberships, and donations. The oldest collection in the garden dates to 1927. The gardens adjoin Frank D. Helyar Woods, a climax forest with marked trails. Fundraising is ongoing for expanding the site store, Cook’s Market, where the first living green roof at Rutgers New Brunswick will come to life this spring. Rutgers Gardens will spotlight its trees during National Public Gardens Week May 13-19, sponsored by American Public Garden Association and feature many unusual plants for sale during the Mother’s Day Plant Sale May 10-12. Rutgers Gardens is open 365 days a year, and admission is free. What I like about Rutgers Gardens “The sense of unwinding and feeling human again, each garden has that. But at Rutgers, there is a sense of innocence; the garden slowly opens up in front of you.” – Bruce Crawford, director

THE ART LOVERS’ ARBORETUM Grounds For Sculpture 80 Sculptors Way Hamilton Township groundsforsculpture.org Located on the site of the former state fairgrounds, Grounds For Sculpture melds art and nature with more than 270 sculptures by contemporary artists, each work purposefully positioned on a landscaped parkland with thousands of exotic trees and flowers. The sculpture, many monumental, join the work of founder Seward Johnson. Throughout the year, Grounds For Sculpture offers hands-on art and horticulture classes. General admission is by timed ticket only. Fees range from $18 to $10, and are less expensive online. Hours are 10am to 6pm Tuesday through Sunday through April 30. Check website for summer hours. What I like about Grounds For Sculpture “A lot of the grounds are planted with such an artistic eye, whether they’re inspired by the sculpture they’re framing, or recreating the scenery from a painting, through plant choice and pruning. The landscape is a work of art unto itself, and it changes with the seasons, much like the exhibitions in our galleries.” – Janis Napoli, horticulturist

BIRD SANCTUARY Cora Hartshorn Arboretum and Bird Sanctuary 324 Forest Drive South Short Hills hartshornarboretum.org The Cora Hartshorn Arboretum is a historic woodlands garden and educational institution that fosters ad promotes environmental awareness, education, and stewardship. The nonprofit organization relies on special events, memberships, summer camps, field trips, scout programs, birthday parties, and classes. “If you come in the winter, it is fun to track animals through the snow; in spring, the Wildflower Dell is bursting with delicate spring ephemeral wildflowers; in summer, the pollinator garden out front is buzzing with bees and butterflies; in the fall, the trails glow with golden leaves,” says educator Wendy Mulvey. The Stone House education center is open weekdays 9am to 4:30pm and closes at 4pm weekends and holidays. Trails and grounds are open during daylight hours year-round. No dogs are allowed, per a Millburn Township statute. Admission is free, donations are welcome. What I like about Hartshorn Arboretum “Our beautiful historic Stone House was designed and built by the Hartshorn family with the intention of connecting people to nature, well before conservation was a popular buzzword. Our 16-plus acres of forest are maintained both as a recreation area, where families can hike and explore, and as an outdoor laboratory, where citizen scientists can learn to collect and interpret data on diverse projects such as Project Feederwatch, FrogWatch, Project Budburst, and a variety of other biodiversity projects. We train volunteers to help restore the woodlands to a pristine, precolonial state, leading teams to remove invasive species and restore native plants.” – Wendy Mulvey, environmental educator

CENTRAL PARK CO-DESIGNER Reeves-Reed Arboretum 165 Hobart Avenue Summit reeves-reedarboretum.org Listed on the National and State Registers of Historic Places, Reeves-Reed’s estate and gardens represent design trends by prominent landscape architects of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Calvert Vaux submitted the original landscape design for The Clearing, now Reeves-Reed Arboretum, shortly after the founding Wisner family purchased the property in 1889. Vaux was partner of Frederick Law Olmsted, and together they designed Central Park in New York City. Reeves-Reed “engages and educates” through horticulture and environmental education. The Arboretum Grounds are open from 9am to 4pm from November through March and from 7am to 7pm April through October. The Visitors Center is open seven days a week from 10am to 4pm. Did you know? “We were voted the Best Garden in New Jersey by readers of NJ Family and recently received the Good Neighbor Award from the Suburban Chamber of Commerce. This is a real testament to the Reeves-Reed staff.” – Frank Juliano, director

MORRIS COUNTY BOUNTY

Frelinghuysen Arboretum, Haggerty entrance garden.

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Frelinghuysen Arboretum 353 E. Hanover Avenue Morris Township www.morrisparks.net The 127 acres of woodlands, meadows, gardens, and distinctive collections of trees and shrubs offer serenity, exploration, and education, surrounded by a stately Colonial revival mansion. George Frelinghuysen and his wife Sarah, heir to Ballantine Brewing, spent summers there and had fresh vegetables and fruits shipped by train to their New York City winter home. Their daughter Matilda left the house and grounds to the Morris County Parks Commission for use by the public.


Aerial of Grounds For Sculpture. Photo by David W Steele.

Carlos Dorrien, The Nine Muses, 1990-97, photo by David W Steele.

Grounds hours: 8am to dusk daily. Admission is free. See website for hours for Haggerty Education Center.

numerous trails that wind through the fields and along Bamboo Brook. A wide variety of birds, butterflies, and animal life inhabit the area.

What I like about Frelinghuysen Arboretum “The English country estate setting with formal Rose Garden and may other gardens for public education and enjoyment. The Frelinghuysen family horsedrawn carriage collection is also available for viewing in the historic Carriage House.” – Charley Zafonte, assistant deputy director, Morris County Park Commission

Did you know? “Bamboo Brook was home to Martha Brookes Hutcheson, one of the first women landscape architects in the U.S. It is a national and state registered historic site, and a stop on the N.J. Woman’s Heritage Trail.” – Charley Zafonte

Willowwood Arboretum Morris County Park Commission 300 Longview Road Chester Township www.morrisparks.net Willowwood is the longest, continually operating arboretum in the state. The 136 acres of rolling farmland is home to about 3,500 types of native and exotic plants. Of interest is the historic residence and Pan’s Garden, where plants are woven together to form a living tapestry based on the design of a Persian prayer rug. Willowwood Arboretum is free and open to the public daily, 365 days a year, from 8am to dusk.

Duke Farms 1112 Duke Parkway West Hillsborough www.dukefarms.org/en/Visit Duke Farms emphasizes stewardship and conservation. The 2,000 acres of farmland and nine man-made lakes were designated for public use by socialite landowner and conservationist Doris Duke. From mid-March to early November, the Orientation Center and Duke Farms are open six days a week Thursday through Tuesday from 8:30am to 6pm. After November, the hours shorten to 8:30am to 4:30pm. Admission is free. Duke Farms is closed to visitors Wednesdays, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day.

What I like about Willowwood Arboretum “The informal, natural country ambiance with delightful gardens and plantings in personal and intimate settings. Willowwood is home to many New Jersey State Champion trees, including one of the largest dawn redwood trees in the U.S.” – Charley Zafonte

The Thielke Arboretum of Glen Rock 640 Doremus Avenue Glen Rock www.thielkearboretum.org A wetland forest with trails, a garden, and a spring-fed pond and brook, the 11 acres support many species of trees and plants native to Northern New Jersey, and includes many trees recommended by Rutgers University appropriate for New Jersey residential landscapes. It is also a natural habitat for birds, butterflies, amphibians, and water fowl. It features an antique gazebo and a comprehensive education program. Grounds open daily, dawn to dusk. See website for hours for the Vielbig/Scerbo Environmental Education Center.

Bamboo Brook 170 Longview Road Chester Township www.morrisparks.net Bamboo Brook features 670 acres of fields, woodlands, and a formal garden. Portions of the designed landscape have been restored to a “circa 1945” appearance with careful attention to the plants used. In addition to its formal areas, there are

WORTH A VISIT

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Bamboo Brook, pond.

GREAT DAY TRIPS New York Botanical Garden 2900 Southern Boulevard Bronx, N.Y. www.nybg.org Established in 1891, The New York Botanical Garden (NYBG) is said to be the largest in any U.S. city. Within the 250-acre garden are 50 specialty gardens and collections comprising more than 100 plants and 30,000 trees, many more than 200 years old. This spring visitors can see many new exciting later-flowering magnolia hybrids becoming more readily available at nursery retailers. These vigorous-growing cultivars bloom after the threat of frost, which endangers so many early-spring blooming classic magnolia varieties. Look for newer cultivars like the yellow-blooming Sun Spire, the coral-colored Daybreak, and dark redpurple Genie. Also look for a new large native canopy tree, the blackgum (Nyssa sylvatica) cultivar Wildfire, featured in the NYBG Native Plant Garden. The NYBG is open all year, Tuesday to Sunday, and select holiday Mondays. Typical hours are 10am to 6pm. See website for special circumstances and ticket prices. What I like about New York Botanical Garden “The beauty and diversity found within the natural landscape (Bronx River, forest, unique site geology) and the designed landscape (engaging temperate to tropical collections, plus naturalistic to formal display gardens) all at a single Botanical Garden, set within one of the largest cities in the world.” – Deanna Curtis, senior curator

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Rob Cardillo, Waltz In The Woods, 2015. Morris Arboretum.

Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania 100 East Northwestern Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. (Chestnut Hill) www.morrisarboretum.org Morris Arboretum is a 92-acre public garden that offers winding paths, colorful gardens, champion trees, and beautiful fountains. Its award-winning Out on a Limb takes visitors 50 feet up into the treetops on a canopy walk that requires no climbing. An outdoor Garden Railway exhibit features a quarter-mile track with model trains, open all summer and around Christmas. Regular hours are 10am to 4pm. Open daily except for New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, and Christmas Day. See website for expanded summer hours. What I like about Morris Arboretum “Morris Arboretum is great for visitors of all ages. It’s perfect for families to spend time with one another, to explore, learn, and have fun. It’s a safe place for kids to run around. It’s a great date place with secret gardens to discover. There is always something happening in the changing landscape with events and classes all year long. Research has shown that getting outside in nature is healthy for the mind, body, and spirt.” – Susan J. Crane, director of marketing Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College Swarthmore, Pa. www.scottarboretum.org Among the 4,000 plant varieties are an impressive display of bulbs, a tree peony collection, and much more. The gardens represent the diversity of the Delaware Valley and the mature plants and trees can help homeowners make decisions, says Director Becky Robert. A number of plants introductions are now in the nursey trade, such as Hamamelis mollis Early Bright and magnolia denudate Swarthmore Sentinel,

hosta Swarthmore Surprise, and magnolia virginiana var. Australis Henry Hicks. Hours: Dawn to dusk daily, free admission.

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P R I N C E TO N ’ S LO C A L A R B O R E TA Herrontown Woods Arboretum Snowden Lane and Herrontown Road Princeton www.mercercounty.org

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Willowwood Arboretum, arbor with bench.

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Destination:

ASBURY PARK During decades of economic decline, Asbury Park was mostly known as the place where musical icon Bruce Springsteen got his start at The Stone Pony nightclub in the mid1970s. However, since 2000, Asbury has seen a dramatic revitalization and influx of new residents from urban centers like New York City. In fact, modern-day Asbury has been affectionately dubbed “Brooklyn on the Beach” for its large population of artists, musicians, foodies, and creatives. Real estate projects, like the new Asbury Ocean Club, and new restaurants dominate the historic boardwalk, and day trippers flock to the seaside town year-round. Over 39 bars, several blocks of art galleries, antique shops, restaurants (from traditional Italian to vegan), and an art house cinema lure visitors from the nearby NJ Transit depot. The tradition of live musical acts is still alive and well at venues like The Stone Pony, Wonder Bar, and the vintage bowling alley-music hall Asbury Lanes. Food trucks serving ceviche, empanadas, and Johnny’s Pork Roll gather north of the Convention Center at North Eats. The seasonal Market at Fifth Avenue features independent artisans and designers selling everything from woven leather jewelry to locally-made sunglasses. For those who are fans of design, be sure to browse the beach cottage decor at House of

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2019

Modern Living, Shelter Home, and Salt Design Co. Shoppers can search through racks of vintage clothing at Backward Glances at The Shoppes at the Arcade before heading over to the surfer bar Asbury Park Yacht Club. Visitors and locals also enjoy the atmosphere at Asbury Festhalle & Biergarten, which features craft brews and long wooden communal tables. Families and those looking for a mellower scene might want to wander down the boardwalk to neighboring Ocean Grove, which was founded as a Methodist summer retreat. Its 6,000-seat wooden auditorium, circa 1894, hosts free concerts with a 11,010-pipe organ on most Saturday afternoons. Ocean Grove features a plethora of Victorian mansions as well. As the sun sets and your appetite grows, why not explore Asbury’s unique dining scene? Mogo serves Korean-fusion tacos at a sit-down spot downtown. The Bonney Read is known for freshly shucked oysters and other regional seafood favorites. Talula’s offers wood-fired pizzas topped with local meats and produce. Porta is one of the best upscale pizzerias in town with pies like the Spring Betty, featuring goat cheese and spinach béchamel. For ocean views, try Langosta Lounge, a Caribbean fusion restaurant with nightly live music on the boardwalk. After dinner, try your hand at the vintage pinball

by Taylor Smith

machines at the boardwalk’s Silverball Museum. For the over 21 crowd, experience why Asbury is a center for LGBTQ nightlife at the Jersey Shore at the poolside Paradise Nightclub at The Empress Hotel. In terms of hotels, Asbury has a surprisingly large number of options. The Asbury brings trendiness and sophistication to a whole new level with two different rooftop bars, permanent art installations, easy access to the beach, a rec room with pinball and ping-pong machines, and more. Another great option is Tides, where the combination of a luxury spa and lively pool scene creates the perfect balance between relaxation and excitement. For all things weird and wonderful, check out the drag queens in all their glory at the annual Asbury Park Promenade of Mermaids. In addition, local favorite Paranormal Books and Curiosities sells obscure occult books and objects. While you’re there, get your tarot cards read, tour the paranormal museum, and participate in a séance. Finally, don’t leave town without playing a round of mini golf at Asbury Eighteen Mini-Golf. The course is located right next door to Asbury Splash Park and features 18 holes of quirky, beachfront miniature golf. For a daily calendar of events on the Asbury Park Boardwalk, visit www.apboardwalk.com.


IMAGES COURTESY OF ASBURY OCEAN CLUB

Experience Beachfront Luxury at

ASBURY OCEAN CLUB

Located along the Jersey Shore just an hour by car from Princeton, Asbury Ocean Club is the highly-anticipated centerpiece of a 35-acre oceanfront redevelopment from renowned developer iStar, as part of the company’s 10-year, multibillion-dollar plan for a 1.25-mile stretch along the Asbury Park waterfront. With closings commencing this summer, the 17-story tower will offer 130 luxury condominium suites perched above a 54-room boutique hotel, with more than 20,000 square feet of retail space that will offer a new year-round restaurant and carefully curated shops. The resort features an unrivaled amenity package and concierge services that are on par with the top residential buildings in Manhattan and Miami. From the prime beachfront location, world-class amenity package, and concierge service to the uber-luxe interior finishes, every detail has been meticulously crafted. There is simply nothing of this caliber of luxury available anywhere on the Jersey Shore. The residential experience at Asbury Ocean Club starts in the dramatic, doubleheight lobby. The two- and three-bedroom residences have been particularly popular, as many of the future homeowners at Asbury Ocean Club will be making this their primary residence. Those who plan to use the property as a vacation home are drawn to the extra space for family and friends. All of the residences include east-facing terraces that wrap either north or south, and provide views of an endless coastline and promote seamless indoor/outdoor living. With a wealth of space for enjoying the spectacular vistas and taking in the soothing sounds of the ocean, the terraces are a coveted amenity for the residences. Asbury Park is the perfect escape from the hustle and bustle of the nearby cities and offers new culinary, shopping, and entertainment venues to enjoy throughout the year. iStar tapped a world-class team of global talent to bring the building to life, including renowned interior designer Anda Andrei, president of Anda Andrei Design, who worked with Bonetti Kozerski and Handel Architects to create the interiors of the residences. Each home comes equipped with a Miele appliance suite including washer and dryer.

The residences are outfitted with white lacquer cabinetry by Spazzi of Spain, wide-plank bleached white oak flooring, and Marvel Calacatta bathroom walls, all with abundant hurricane-impact-resistant floor-to-ceiling windows that show off the spectacular ocean views and let in an abundance of light into the homes. There are multi-zone heating and air-conditioning systems in every home for comfortable, year-round living. The amenities at Asbury Ocean Club make beachfront living completely effortless and cater to a healthy, active lifestyle. The indoor-outdoor spaces on the fourth floor include an expansive terrace with a 65’ x 30’ pool overlooking the ocean, a full-service pool bar and grill, a garden pavilion with reflecting pool, and an outdoor lounge with fireplace. The ocean-view fitness center has been programmed by New York-based fitness consultant The Wright Fit and boasts a yoga room with sun-warmed meditation terrace, a spa that offers residents on-call massages, and relaxation rooms. The children’s facilities are stocked with games and activities for the little ones, and there is an entertainment lounge, 16-seat cinema screening room, library, and game room with custom billiards to ensure residents and their guests will stay entertained. There is also an event room with chef’s kitchen, perfect for hosting private celebrations. To ensure ease of living, a concierge will be on call 24/7 to assist with residents’ day-to-day needs including grocery shopping, stocking refrigerators, making dinner reservations, and securing concert tickets. Pets and their owners will enjoy the dog wash for sandy paws, and private storage rooms for paddleboards and surfboards will provide a much-needed convenience. By 2020, residents will get to enjoy a members-only beach club featuring a pool, cabanas, bar and grill, restrooms, and changing facilities. The residences at Asbury Ocean Club will sit on top of a 54-room boutique hotel operated by David Bowd of Salt Hotels (Chateau Marmont in Hollywood, Mercer in New York, and the Chiltern Firehouse in London). Bowd is also a partner and operator of The Asbury. With just a small collection of rooms, Asbury Ocean Club’s hotel will be able to provide bespoke services and curated offerings that create a luxurious experience for its guests. Corcoran Sunshine is the exclusive sales and marketing team for Asbury Ocean Club. Pricing for one-bedroom residences start at $897,000. For inquiries, call 732.705.1100 or visit www.asburyoceanclub.com.

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EXPERT ADVICE

WHAT TO EXPECT FROM A

CERTIFIED KITCHEN & BATH DESIGNER

KITCHEN DESIGNER

Wanda Peirce has been designing kitchens and baths for over 40 years. In addition to her expertise with kitchens and bathrooms, Wanda routinely designs projects ranging from laundry rooms, craft rooms, custom closets, entertainment centers, to offices, bars, and even garage storage areas. Having previously worked as a product representative for major brands, Wanda understands the importance of a successful partnership between the manufacturer and distributor, as well as the designer and customer. Wanda draws on her unique vision and years of diverse experience to create beautiful and functional spaces. Email: wpeirce@taguelumber.com

Considering a kitchen or bath remodel? If so, you’ve probably been watching HGTV programming which makes the renovation process look a little too easy. The reality is, remodeling your home can be a daunting task which, if not monitored closely, can easily run off schedule and over budget. When it comes to updating the most heavily used spaces in your home like a kitchen or bathroom, it really does pay to consult a professional designer. Why hire a certified designer? With a project this important, you want to make sure you’re making the right choices. It’s easy to get caught up in the “fun” aspects of a kitchen or bath renovation like color selection and design choices, only to lose sight of functionality and budget. Professional designers stay on top of trends and technology and understand how to

CERTIFIED KITCHEN & BATH DESIGNER

Ana Zmuda brings 18 years of experience in Kitchen and Bath Design to Tague. After earning her degree in Interior Design from Berkeley College, where she studied the creative and technical aspects of the design industry, Ana chose to specialize in Kitchens and Baths. Ana works with customers on every aspect of their project—from initial design concepts to the final reveal. Ana’s ability to connect with clients and match designs to their personal style, along with her vast product knowledge and years of hands-on design expertise keeps her projects on track and on budget. Email: azmuda@taguelumber.com\

seamlessly blend form with function. A certified designer knows how to pull all these pieces together to maximize your space and they can offer valuable insights on how to keep your project on budget — without sacrificing your design aesthetic. How to work with a designer? If you want to maximize the time with your designer, come prepared. Remember — a picture is worth a thousand words. Take lots of photos of your current kitchen or bathroom; jot down the room measurements as well. If you are working with an architect, bring the plans they’ve drawn. It is also helpful to collect inspiration from magazines and the Internet. Coming prepared will help the designer get a better sense of your current style as well as your expectations for the finished project. What makes working with the Tague Design Showroom so easy? The professional design staff at the Tague Design Showroom draw on decades of experience. Renovating projects are stressful enough so Tague is happy to offer their customers a free design consultation. At that meeting your Tague designer will review the photos and research materials you’ve gathered, then take you on a tour of their 3,500 sq. ft. showroom for more inspiration. Once

the designer learns how your new space needs to fit your lifestyle, the final piece to the puzzle is to establish a spending plan and then the design process can begin. The professionals at the Tague Showroom believe a successful collaboration between designer and client is based on communication, honesty, teamwork, and a lot of patience. There is never any pressure at the Tague Showroom. Once you feel comfortable, Tague’s designers will work with you to make sure you fully understand each step of the process from initial concept, to elevation drawings, through the selection process, to the final installation. As a partner on your project, your Tague designer becomes an integral part of the whole renovation from start to finish—their goal is to make your dream kitchen or bath a reality while making the renovation process as easy and stress free as possible.

Tague Design Showroom | 6100 Easton Road, Plumsteadville, PA | 215.348.9408 | TagueLumber.com

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6100 Easton Road Doylestown/Plumsteadville 215.348.9408 | TagueLumber.com Voted Best of the Intelligencer 2018

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1-3 BEDROOM HOMES FROM $897,000 PENTHOUSE INFORMATION AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST OCCUPANCY SUMMER 2019 732 743 7457 ASBURYOCEANCLUB.COM

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Profile for Witherspoon Media Group

Princeton Magazine Spring 2019  

Witherspoon Media Group

Princeton Magazine Spring 2019  

Witherspoon Media Group