Princeton Magazine, September 2021

Page 1

SEPTEMBER 2021

KATHRYN FOSTER MAPPING THE FUTURE OF TCNJ




2 months free, every year for 3 years!

IT’S D IF

Call 609.281.5495 today to learn more about this limited-time offer.

R FE

ENT HERE

NO.

10

Family is always welcome.

NOW OPEN!

Ovation at Riverwalk is unlike any 55+ apartment community you’ve ever seen. Beautifully appointed residences with the services and amenities you’d expect from a luxury resort. All to enjoy with whomever you call your family. To learn more, visit OvationAtRiverwalk.com or call 609.281.5495 today. Every day, amazing.

1 RIVERWALK • PLAINSBORO, NEW JERSEY 08536

OvationAtRiverwalk.com



Redefining

Design Redefining Design

Redefining

Design

Redefining

INSPIRING CUSTO

DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF PROJECT MANAG WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES

FROM CONCEPT T

INSPIRING CUSTOM DESIGNS

PROJECT MANAGEMENT FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION

DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES INSPIRING CUSTOM DESIGNS PROJECT MANAGEMENT FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION

DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS 48 West Broad Street • Hopewell, NJ 08525 • p: 609.466.1445 • tobiasdesignllc.com WOODS, FINISHES AND ST

Design Redefining

INSPIRING CUSTOM DESIGN

SELECTIONS OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT 48 West Broad Street • Hopewell, NJ 08525 • p: DISTINCTIVE 609.466.1445 • tobiasdesignllc. WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES 48 West Broad Street • Hopewell, NJ 08525 • p: 609.466.1445 • tobiasdesignllc.com

Design

Redefining

Design

FROM CONCEPT TO COMP

INSPIRING CUSTOM DESIGNS

PROJECT MANAGEMENT FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION

DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES INSPIRING CUSTOM DESIGNS PROJECT MANAGEMENT FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION

48 West Broad Street • Hopewell, NJ 08525 • p: 609.466.1445 • tobiasdesignllc.com

48 West Broad Street • Hopewell, NJ 08525 • p: 609.466.1445 • tobiasdesignllc.com 48 West Broad Street • Hopewell, NJ 08525 • p: 609.466.1445 • tobiasdesignllc.com


Stop by our new David Yurman Shop at Hamilton Jewelers in Princeton


SEPTEMBER 2021 TOUR LOCAL ARTISTS’ STUDIOS

IN & AROUND HOPEWELL BOROUGH

26

25

Sept. th Sept. th 10:00AM - 5:00PM 11:00AM - 4:00PM www.HopewellTourDesArts.com

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Lynn Adams Smith OPERATIONS DIRECTOR Melissa Bilyeu

TOUR LOCAL ARTISTS’ STUDIOS

IN & AROUND HOPEWELL BOROUGH

26

25

PUBLISHER J. Robert Hillier, Lh.D., FAIA

Sept. th Sept. th 10:00AM - 5:00PM 11:00AM - 4:00PM

ART DIRECTOR Jeffrey Edward Tryon

www.HopewellTourDesArts.com

Custom Designs and One of a Kind Engagement Rings Ethically Sourced and Responsibly Made Fine Jewelry

Robin Hepburn - Goldsmith 21 Route 31 North, Pennington NJ 08534 609-737-7235 www.orion-jewelry-studio-LLC.com email: Roborion7@gmail.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Matthew DiFalco PHOTOGRAPHERS Charles R. Plohn Jeffrey Edward Tryon

Ethically Sourced and Responsibly Made Fine Handcrafted Jewelry Bespoke Custom Creations Local Artisan Gifts

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Laurie Pellichero Wendy Greenberg Justin Feil Donald Gilpin Anne Levin Stuart Mitchner Taylor Smith

21 Route 31 North, Pennington, NJ 08534 orionjewelrystudio.com | 609-737-7235

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Charles R. Plohn

Artist, Designer, and Goldsmith Robin Koeppel Hepburn

ACCOUNT MANAGERS Jennifer Covill Joann Cella

TRI-ZONE LASER LIFT Eugenie Brunner, MD, FACS

ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES 609.924.5400 Media Kit available on www.princetonmagazine.com

Debuts her new, exclusive, non-surgical procedure

SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION 609.924.5400 ext. 30 subscriptions@witherspoonmediagroup.com PRINCETON MAGAZINE Witherspoon Media Group 4438 Route 27 North Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 P: 609.924.5400 | F: 609.924.8818 princetonmagazine.com BEFORE

AFTER

BEFORE

AFTER

BEFORE

AFTER

A proprietary and personalized procedure that utilizes SmartLipo or FaceTite, along with dermal f illers and non-invasive lasers for a total non-surgical lift.

Eugenie Brunner, MD, FACS Double Board Certif ied Facial Plastic Surgeon A Surgeon’s Hands, An Artist’s Eye, A Woman’s Touch

256 Bunn Drive, Suite 4 Princeton, NJ 08540 | 609.921.9497 | BrunnerMD.com

Princeton Magazine is published 6 times a year with a circulation of 35,000. All rights reserved. Nothing herein may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher. To purchase PDF files or reprints, please call 609.924.5400 or e-mail melissa.bilyeu@witherspoonmediagroup.com. ©2021 Witherspoon Media Group

6

|

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021


How far will you go if someone you love has cancer – especially gynecologic cancer? You’ll do whatever it takes, right? You’ll seek out a surgeon who not only performs traditional operations, but who also specializes in minimally invasive procedures that use the da Vinci® robotic surgery system. And you’ll also look for something more. You’ll look for care. Because when someone you love has cancer, you want it all. Unparalleled skill and unmatched compassion. And so do we.

CapitalHealth.org


|

48

CONTENTS

24

38 SEPTEMBER 2021

58

14

32

68

The Battle at the Observatory at Princeton by Robert Hummel.

ART AND ATHLETICS

KATHRYN FOSTER

BY JUSTIN FEIL

BY WENDY GREENBERG

James Fiorentino’s passion for both leads to an amazing career

Mapping the future of TCNJ 14

48

LENNI-LENAPE A STORYTELLER AND HIS CONSCIENCE

BY TAYLOR SMITH

The original residents of New Jersey

BY DONALD GILPIN

Economics professors Anne Case and Angus Deaton — beyond “Deaths of Despair”

24

BOOK SCENE

58

BY STUART MITCHNER

Poetry in the air

BY ANNE LEVIN

CALL OF THE WILD

A made-up Martian invasion that continues to fascinate

BY TAYLOR SMITH

Raising awareness and appreciation of wolfdogs at Howling Woods Farm 38

ON THE COVER: Dr. Kathryn A. Foster, president of The College of New Jersey. (Photography by Peter Murphy for The College of New Jersey)

8

|

“THE WAR OF THE WORLDS”

32

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021

76

68

A WELL-DESIGNED LIFE BY LYNN ADAMS SMITH 76, 78

(CREDITS) JAMES FIORENTINO BY CHARLES R. PLOHN; KATHRYN FOSTER BY JEFFREY E. TRYON; NI-CÓ-MAN, THE ANSWER, SECOND CHIEF BY GEORGE CATLIN, FROM THE SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM; COURTESY OF HOWLING WOODS FARM; ART BY ROBERT HUMMEL; ART BY RUDYARD KIPLING, WIKIMEDIA COMMONS; ANNE CASE AND ANGUS DEATON PHOTO COURTESY OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY; FLAG HALYARD CHAIR; ETERNITYMODERN.COM.


DINE

STAY

NEW HOPE'S ALL-NEW LUXURY LIFESTYLE HOTEL 215-682-2022 | riverhousenewhope.com | A REFINED HOSPITALITY PROPERTY

CELEBRATE


| FROM THE PUBLISHER In its early days, Princeton Magazine was published out of Bergen County and featured dinner parties and dances around town and paid-for stories about local merchants. Ten years ago, when Editor-in-Chief Lynn Adams Smith and I bought the magazine, we were determined to write and publish it in Princeton and explore, with our readers, the rich inventory of intelligence, talent, energy, and dedication that make “Our Town” of Princeton and its region so very special. I mention this background because this issue is a beautiful example of our longstanding goals being met. Since this is what we like to call the “Back to School Issue,” let us begin with the cover, which is graced by Kathryn A. Foster, president of The College of New Jersey. “Kate” began her tenure just a couple years before COVID-19 hit and has become an advocate for using the lessons learned from the pandemic to develop the possibilities for change that they offer. Wendy Greenberg tells you all about this whirlwind leader and what she has already accomplished in her short time at TCNJ despite COVID-19. I first met Kate when she gave a lunchtime talk to the Princeton Chamber of Commerce. She was amazing, as an educator, talking to a group of businesspeople about the differences between theirs and her “business” as a nonprofit. The difference is that her “customers” apply to buy her services and they may, in fact, be rejected. However, in some cases, she even pays her customers to come in, through scholarships. She must also build “customer loyalty” so that her customers are happy to pay back for years even though they are no longer getting any services. Her talk got rave reviews. Along the same educational lines, at Princeton University, which was the original College of New Jersey, we meet Anne Case and Angus Deaton, both world-class economists who have published a very important book with rave reviews from world leaders, though it does have a gloomy title, Deaths of Despair and The Future of Capitalism. Donald Gilpin does his usual good work at presenting this fascinating couple — who seem buried in the “science” of economics — as wonderful, open, charming, and so happy to be living in Princeton. We go from gloomy to downright scary with Anne Levin’s wonderful recount of “The War of the Worlds” on Halloween Eve in 1938. This was an invasion of the Earth from outer space that happened in neighboring Grovers Mill and was broadcast by Orson Welles on the radio as “an interruption of regular programming.” It sounded so authentic and, without the visuals that television would provide today, was perceived by many as so real that panic broke out across the country. Welles claimed to be totally surprised at the reaction, and that specific program was banned by the FCC from ever being broadcast again. A personal story — as a “Townie” and a class officer at the University, I was responsible for an evening lecture series on campus and many of the topics were controversial, such as having sex researcher Alfred Kinsey of The Kinsey Report. I decided that, for Halloween, it would be fun to replay “The War of the Worlds” in McCosh Hall. Though this was less than 20 years since the original broadcast, I was able to get permission from the FCC to broadcast it, but only once! About 150 students showed up to listen. From outer space, into the woods we go with two articles by Taylor Smith. When it comes to Native Americans, we often think of the tribes in the West, especially since they are usually portrayed in battles in movies called “Westerns.” That said, have you ever heard of the Lenni-Lenape tribes that inhabited New Jersey and its surrounding states? Taylor Smith tells us they were peaceful and business-oriented, with much of their trading taking place on an island called “Mannahatta” — yes, before the skyscrapers! They also had dealings with William Penn and were in Princeton well before the 17th century where they established trails that today are occupied by such highways as Route 206 and Route 27, which is Nassau Street. You will enjoy learning how today’s descendants are maintaining the proud Lenni-Lenape history from which we can learn much. In Call of the Wild, Taylor takes us to Howling Woods Farm, a very special place for wolves and wolfdogs which, according to its founder, Mike Hodanish, are not those frightening creatures from childhood tales. A tour of

10

|

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY E. TRYON

Dear Princeton Magazine Readers,

the farm will convince you of that, and you may come away so convinced that you will want to bring one of these beautiful animals home with you. In line with the beauty of the animals, please take note of the art in the spectacular photos by Matthew DiFalco and others. There is also a lot of art to be seen in Charles Plohn’s photography and Justin Feil’s story about James Fiorentino, an amazing artist in Flemington who captures athletes and athletics in many formats, from portraits to baseball cards. What is truly surprising is that he practices his art using watercolors which, in my experience, are the most challenging of all mediums because of the difficulty of correction or adjustment. You will find it more than inspiring to read about a person who so enjoys and is so passionate about his work. My letter would not be complete without a compliment to Stuart Mitchner for his Book Scene pages of “Poetry in the Air.” These poetry books for the young can provide wonderful bedtime readings for your children or grandchildren. Also take a look at Lynn Adams Smith’s Well-Designed Life pages, which she so enjoys putting together. I am always enthralled by the elegance of these pages and amazed by the variety of products that Lynn brings to the page and how they all complement each other. Now, I hope you can see why I believe this is such an exciting issue of your magazine. Lynn and I hope you enjoy “drilling down” on each of these stories. Also, please keep in mind that the advertisers who also occupy these pages make this magazine possible. We hope you will patronize them — shop local! Many thanks and respectfully yours,

J. Robert Hillier, Lh.D., FAIA Publisher


STAY

DINE

STONE HARBOR’S ONLY LUXURY BOUTIQUE HOTEL AND SPA 609.368.0100 | reedsatshelterhaven.com | A REFINED HOSPITALITY PROPERTY

SPA


FURNITURE STORE + INTERIOR DESIGN Visit our Store | Meet our Designers | Let’s start Designing!

126 Village Blvd • Princeton, NJ 08540 • 609-987-2600


VISIT OUR STORE

SEE OUR WORK

luxehomecompany.com

luxehomecompany.com


KATHRYN FOSTER

MAPPING THE FUTURE OF TCNJ By Wendy Greenberg | Portraits by Jeffrey E. Tryon

88 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021


TCNJ’s School of Education was founded in 1855 as the first teacher education program in New Jersey and the ninth in the nation. (Photo by Nick Romanenko/Courtesy of The College of New Jersey)

DR.

Kathryn A. Foster, who launched her own academic career as an undergraduate geography major, has found her place — as president of The College of New Jersey (TCNJ). She feels it was a good spot to land. “Taking this position was the best decision I’ve ever made,” she said. Foster’s presidency seems to suit the school too. Nestled in a suburban setting in Ewing Township not far from well-known neighbors Princeton University and Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, it could be easy to overlook TCNJ. Yet the school formerly known as Trenton State College has amassed accolades. Among them, TCNJ is ranked the No. 1 public institution among regional universities in the North by U.S. News & World Report (fifth overall). Its 2006 awarding of a Phi Beta Kappa chapter by the prestigious national academic honor society cemented its status as a selective college. TCNJ maintains the seventh highest four-year graduation rate among all public colleges and universities, and it is ranked by Money magazine as one of the top 15 public colleges “most likely to pay off financially.” Under Foster, fiscal 2021 was one of TCNJ’s strongest fundraising years. When visitors walk onto the campus with its landscaped walkways, green quadrants, and mix of stately Georgian red brick buildings (adjacent to a new commercial center with restaurants and a Barnes and Noble bookstore), “their jaws

drop,” said Foster, who has updated buildings and infrastructure. A dynamic woman in her early 60s, Foster, who goes by the name Kate, became president in 2018. Having weathered the pandemic with remote classes, she is ready for the fall semester, with (at press time) full residency, in-person classes, and a vaccination requirement, like many other colleges. The enrollment for fall is “strong,” said Foster, during an interview on a bench outside the four-year-old Brower Student Center, with a bronze lion, the school mascot, sitting proudly nearby. But the lessons of the pandemic are not lost on her. “We have gone through massive disruption because of the pandemic,” she said. “How do you take advantage of the insight gained from COVID? What choice or investment could we make today that will improve tomorrow? We don’t want to lose those lessons.” “We learned a lot,” she added. “The faculty and staff did a tremendous job, and I know they will continue excellence in a virtual world.” The college allowed remote flexibility to faculty and staff. Foster lauds the online interactions TCNJ has had with alumni, donors, families, and even companies that recruit students for employment — some interactions that the college may not have otherwise had. “The technology opens up spaces of opportunity. We can be mindful of which of those tools and methods work for us.” The more immediate challenge, she said, is the need for sensitivity to students, faculty, and staff

who came through COVID-19 and experienced family issues, and mental fatigue. “We are more mindful than ever to be a supportive community.” Susanne Svizeny, chair of the TCNJ Board of Trustees, said that Foster’s “principled approach to the college’s response to the global pandemic has kept the health and safety of the campus community in the forefront of every decision.” As a guest on Princeton University’s “We Roar” podcast in May 2020, Foster asked how the early college experience, skill-building, and early knowledge acquisition happen at home, and she predicted a more hybrid learning format. The planning for that year of quality hybrid and online learning was “so profound and so different from any other kind of planning that I’ve done,” she said. Having a regional planning background “is profoundly important to what I do,” said Foster. “I am inclined to think the way planners think: What choice or investment could we make today that will improve tomorrow? I think with the same ethos.” Foster was a geography major at Johns Hopkins University, got her master’s degree (MCP in city planning) at the University of California at Berkeley, and her Ph.D. in public and international affairs from Princeton University. When she was at Princeton, TCNJ had recently shed its Trenton State College moniker. But she had some years to go before she would meet the college she now calls home, and she knew little of the school growing up in Verona, New Jersey, where she still has family. SEPTEMBER 2021 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 15


Kathryn Foster in the atrium of the Social Sciences Building.

ROAD TO A PRESIDENCY

A distinguished academic career lay ahead. Foster spent years at the State University of New York at Buffalo as a faculty member in urban and regional planning and was director of the University of Buffalo Regional Institute, a research center of the School of Architecture and

16 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021

Planning. There, she had one foot in the policy world, engaging in strategy, governing, building a team, and for six years, “delivered good work,” she said. But in her early 50s she began to think, “What do I want to do?” She had built a skill set, and wanted to be a leader. “There was nothing on my resume to suggest

that I would be a college president, but I thought maybe I could be a college president,” said Foster. “A number of people said maybe I needed two more steps to do that, but someone said, ‘Go for it.’ The stars aligned.” The next stop was president of the University of Maine, Farmington, where she served for six years. She took the reins at TCNJ on July 1, 2018, replacing R. Barbara Gitenstein, who had served as president since January 1999. Again, Foster put her planning skills to work. When she first came to TCNJ, she said her thinking was, “’How can we leverage a new president?’ ‘How do we not rest on our laurels?’ But I was also learning from the community.” As she got to know the TCNJ community, the goals were refined. Today, a priority is “diversity, equity, inclusion — or inclusive excellence.” Foster said most people “are not always aware of how diverse we are — racially, ethnically, and economically. The entering class is the most diverse in the history of the college.” That class includes 29 percent firstgeneration students; 21 percent who are “Pelleligible” (below a certain family income level and therefore eligible for federal Pell grants); 55 percent Caucasian; 17 percent Latinx; 13 percent Asian/Asian American, and 10 percent African American. (Five percent are other ethnicities.) “This is a more diverse place than most people know,” said Foster. She created a Division of Inclusive Excellence and helped develop an Intercultural Center, among other initiatives related to diversity. An appreciation for diversity was gained some years ago when, following her master’s degree and before starting at Princeton for her doctorate, Foster joined the Peace Corps and was posted to the former Swaziland, now Eswatini. The Black African nation ranked older white males in importance, she said, and for that time, she was a minority. “The experience was profoundly important,” she said, “to know what it feels like to be dismissed, and to have assumptions made based on my age, race, and gender.” These days Foster travels mostly to U.S. state capitals, a beloved pastime. This summer she went to Juneau, Alaska, where she added to her collection of photos of herself in front of almost every state capitol building. She just needs Honolulu, Hawaii, and Pierre, S.D. (She has been to South Dakota, but does not have the photo.) The state capitol building photo quest stems from a fundamental interest in people and place, and “how one shapes the other,” she said. A Pennington resident, she has traveled the region, much of it by bike. Although she considers herself a “citizen of the region,” she emphasized that “there has not been a capital that hasn’t been interesting, and I’m thrilled that we are near Trenton.” Her office at TCNJ has a painting of the Trenton State House, given to her as a gift by the college trustees.


The STEM Forum (foreground) is one of TCNJ’s newest buildings, opened in 2017. Green Hall is the oldest, completed in 1931. (Photo by Rakieer Jennings/TCNJ)

The Brower Student Center is at the heart of the campus community offering services, activities, events, and dining for students and guests. (Photo by Bill Cardoni/Courtesy of The College of New Jersey) SEPTEMBER 2021 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 17


An aerial view of Trenton Hall, which houses the admissions office and the Department of Nursing. (Photo by Rakieer Jennings/TCNJ)

navigation and maps. But for those who are sure of their futures, TCNJ offers seven-year medical school and optometry degrees in partnership with TCNJ has, from the beginning, been connected Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. to Trenton, located on Clinton Avenue until the Despite all the good news at TCNJ, there are mid-1930s. Founded in 1855 as New Jersey State challenges ahead for higher education. Even before Normal School, and changing its name in 1908 to the pandemic, a big issue was demographics. The New Jersey State Normal School at Trenton (the largest market for colleges — traditional first teacher training school in the state), students coming from high schools — is a the school was New Jersey State Teachers shrinking demographic, due to the birth rate College and State Normal School at Trenton in the early 2000s. That makes the higher before dropping the “Normal School” and ed landscape very competitive, and leads emerging as New Jersey State Teachers to strained resources. “We’re constantly College at Trenton in 1937. Its 1958 Trenton running to stay ahead,” said Foster, who State College name gave way to The College pointed out that tuition doesn’t cover all the of New Jersey in 1996 (which was the name expenses. of Princeton University until 1896). “While public opinion asks, ‘what is Today, some 160 initiatives connect the return on investment?’ we hear a lot TCNJ to the surrounding area, and TCNJ of skepticism about whether college is is working to better organize its “Greater worth it. There is pressure on colleges and Trenton commitment,” Foster said. Students universities to realize the expectations of the partner with Trenton Central High School, public as we continue to be an institution Capital City Youth Violence Coalition, that matters, to further the economy, and Connect Trenton, and more. The Center for civic life.” Community Engagement partners with youth Roscoe, the college's mascot, joins TCNJ students at an on-campus event. (Photo by In a competitive marketplace, students activities in Trenton, local environment and Lauren H. Adams/TCNJ) an added year could yield a master’s degree. But should have choices, she said. TCNJ is “an food security programs, ARC Mercer, Trenton excellent choice” for getting “the private college Foster has an affinity for the undeclared college Area Soup Kitchen, and other organizations. experience, wherein a student explores various experience at a public price point.” As a planner TCNJ is completing a walking path around the and geographer, Foster is happy to be actively subjects and discovers a new passion and/or skill. perimeter of the campus. Neighbors also enjoy engaged in mapping its future. She herself was “undeclared” as an undergraduate, sporting events (Division III), the Center for the and finally settled on geography because she loved Arts, and The Sarnoff Collection. TRENTON TIES

18 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021

The college is also looking toward expanding its graduate programs. Currently TCNJ enrolls approximately 7,400 students, including 6,790 undergraduates and 610 graduate students. In the next few years those students could find more interdisciplinary degrees, combining two fields of study, and more “plus one” programs in which


Why TCNJ? Don’t just take our word for it.

#1 public college U.S. News & World Report (Regional Universities North), 2021

4th highest

4-year graduation rate among highly residential public universities —The Chronicle of Higher Education’s 2021–22 Almanac

top 3%

of all master’s-level colleges and universities —Washington Monthly, 2020

Best Value Colleges —The Princeton Review, 2021

Learn more at academics.tcnj.edu. 2000 Pennington Road, Ewing, NJ 08628-0718


AMERICAN REPERTORY BALLET EMERGENCE NEW BRUNSWICK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER OCTOBER 23-24, 2021

Westminster College of the Arts MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR SUMMER

ARBALLET.ORG

Pre-college programs for students who love the arts

AMERICAN REPERTORY BALLET

ETHAN STIEFEL TICKETS: NBPAC.ORG

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

JULIE DIANA HENCH EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

PHOTO: EDUARDO PATINO. NYC

20 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021

RIDER.EDU/ PRECOLLEGE


We honor who he is and feel f el fe blessed to be a part of his journey.

Delivering on our promise to bring out the best in each boy. Offering full in-person and full remote learning in fall 2021! Fall Open House Dates: SEPT. 26 | OCT. 17 | NOV. 11 Register: princetonacademy.org/visit K-8, All-boys | www.princetonacademy.org


STRONG in spirit

OPEN HOUSE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21 7:00 - 9:00 PM

Laurel School

| BRAND GUIDE

LAWRENCEVILLE, NJ TEXT LOGO

I NDNJ.ORG

ICON

FULL COLOR

Recognizing Brilliance:

343C 7723C EMPOWERING STUDENTS WITH LANGUAGE-BASED # 0d5440 # 3d9c80 10 86 64 61 156 128 LEARNING DIFFERENCES TO DISCOVER THEIR UNIQUE PATH.

SINGLE COLOR (NEGATIVE)

SINGLE COLOR (POSITIVE)

FONT FAMILY LOGO:

IvyJournal SemiBold TAG LINE:

IvyJournal Italic HEADLINES:

IvyJournal SemiBold SUB HEADLINES:

IvyJournal Regular BODY CONTENT:

The Laurel School of Princeton is an independent, co-educational day school for students in grades 1-12. OurIvyStyle evidence-based Sans Regular approach helps students discover their unique educational and social/emotional path by acknowledging the strengths, talents, and brilliance of people who learn differently. This empowers our students and helps them enjoy school and thrive developmentally.

ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS YEAR-ROUND Learn more at laurelschoolprinceton.org 22 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021

The Laurel School of Princeton SOCIAL MEDIA TILE / FAVICON 800 North Road, Hopewell, NJ 08534 laurelschoolprinceton.org 609-256-3552



Ni-có-man, The Answer, Second Chief by George Catlin. From the Smithsonian American Art Museum.


SUMMER 2021 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 89


he “grandfathers” or “ancient ones” as the Lenni-Lenape people are known, were the historic inhabitants of large swaths of the Northeastern United States. Originally occupying parts of New York, New Jersey, Delaware, and Pennsylvania, the Lenape suffered forced migrations and removal to reservations at the hands of European settlers. In fact, prior to the 1600s, the Lenape lived all over the Northeastern woodlands and the Eastern Shore of Maryland, as noted on nanticokelenapemuseum.org. The Lenape trace their lineage to the Nanticoke or “Tidewater People” who resisted British colonial intrusion to the best of their abilities. The name “Nanticoke” references the Nanticoke River on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. At the time of European contact in the early 1600s, the Lenape were estimated to number over 20,000 people. A powerful and influential tribe, early Dutch settlers sought to establish amicable relations with the Lenape through trade of tools, sugar, firearms, animal pelts, and fabric. Unfortunately, like most early contact between Native Americans and European immigrants, tribespeople were deceived and diminished by unfair trade agreements and the introduction of contagious diseases. Dutch traders were established on the banks of the Delaware River by 1623. Swedish and Finnish colonists followed, significantly predating the arrival of German and English travelers in response to the establishment of William Penn’s colony. Familiar with the forests of Northern Europe, the Nordic immigrants cleared woodland in the new territory and introduced the use of the log cabin. What little is known of these early encounters between the Swedes and the Lenape is that both groups were independent, rugged individualists who practiced similar agricultural methods, rotating productive fields of crops along the banks of the Delaware River, according to paheritage.wpengine.com. In contrast, the Dutch were eager to establish business in the New World. They engaged in the trade of land, guns, and beads for beaver pelts. One of the most notorious transactions between the Dutch and the Lenape was the “purchase” of New York City in 1626. Long before high rise buildings and endless concrete sidewalks, New York City was truly an idyllic island, scattered with hills and marshland and teeming with plant and wildlife. Oak and hickory forests dotted the landscape while black bears, wildcats, beavers, tree frogs, oysters, mink, brook trout, and bog turtles roamed free. In a 2020 New York Times article, ecologist Eric W. Sanderson of the Wildlife Conservation Society, based at the Bronx Zoo, noted that wolves were known to live on Manhattan until the 1720s and whales were an important part of the local ecosystem. “Mannahatta” (as it was referred to in the Lenape language) was a trading hub for the Lenape bands of tribes who regularly gathered on

the island for the exchange of goods. Mannahatta inaccurate depiction of Lenape dress (the Native was also the site of Lenape games and musical American figure is outfitted in Plains Indian performances. The native dwellers certainly garments). made use of the plethora of natural resources at According to thelenapecenter.com, the their disposal. For example, soaring tulip trees purchase of the island of Manhattan by the Dutch were favored for making canoes and the rich was quickly reinforced through the construction soil and pond water was ideal for cultivating of a wall around New Amsterdam. This act vegetables and oyster estuaries. represented the first time that the Lenape were In his poem “Mannahatta,” fabled New York forced out of their lands at the hands of European resident Walt Whitman writes: immigrants. The wall was constructed in 1660 “I was asking for something specific and around what is today known as Wall Street. The perfect for my city, passage between Lower Manhattan and Upper Whereupon lo! upsprang the aboriginal name. Manhattan was a major trade route and cultural Now I see what there is in a name, a word, hub for the Lenape people. liquid, sane, unruly, musical, self-sufficient, THE LENAPE WAY OF LIFE I see that the word of my city is that word from of old, The Lenape people typically lived in longhouses Because I see that word nested in nests of within a village setting. The longhouses could water-bays, superb, home several hundred people, but in the summer, Rich, hemm’d thick all around with sailships the tribes adopted more nomadic practices with and steamships, an island sixteen miles long, the aim of hunting and gathering flora and fauna. solid-founded….” More transient summer establishments were While Whitman paid literary homage to the original inhabitants of Manhattan, the actual transaction that took place between the Dutch and Lenape in 1626 was less equitable. Many modern-day historians suspect that the Lenape intended the sale to be for the purposes of sharing the island rather than excluding themselves from it. Two monuments in Manhattan currently stand in acknowledgement of the Lenape. One is in Inwood Hill. The plaque reads, “According to legend, on this site of the principal Manhattan Indian village, Peter Minuit in 1626 purchased Manhattan island for trinkets and beads then worth about 60 guilders.” The other monument, in Battery Park, was gifted by the Dutch government to the state of New York in 1926. It depicts a Dutch man and Native American standing together. Scholars have criticized the monument for its Jennie Bobb, and her daughter, Nellie Longhat, both Delaware (Lenape), Oklahoma, 1915. (Photo courtesy of the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, Washington)

26 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021


the “Three Sisters”: corn, squash, and beans. The Lenape eventually made use of a “slash and burn” technique; this form of farming involved shifting active plots of land. For example, when a plot of land became infertile, the Lenape would clear cut any remaining vegetation and burn it away. The resulting ash provided a nutrient-rich layer to help fertilize future crops. WILLIAM PENN AND THE LENNI-LENAPE

Black Beaver. Delawares. Alexander Gardner Portraits of Tribal Delegations to the Federal Government, 1872.

constructed of birch bark wigwams. Wigwam is the word for “house” in the Abenaki tribe. Usually 8 to 10 feet tall, wigwams were not portable, but were comfortable and easy to build. In terms of social structure, the Lenape followed a matrilineal system in which children traced their lineage through their mother’s side. Women played a significant role in the upbringing and education of their children and were also typically in charge of land and territory rights. Women planted, harvested the crops, and cooked the meals. Women were also creative and talented artisans, known for their ability to sew clothing and create pottery and baskets. Interestingly, a matrilocal system was practiced when a couple was first married. Specifically, a husband would typically live with his new wife and her parents. Family “clans” were thus identified through matrilineal heritage. Hereditary leadership passed through female lines and the women elders could remove people of power of whom they disapproved. Tending to the cultivation and harvesting of crops was a significant component of daily Lenape life. The Europeans were particularly impressed by the Lenape mastery of farming

William Penn arrived in his new colony of Pennsylvania in 1682. His land holdings represented a grant from Charles II of England. Penn also arranged the purchase of a significant portion of lands from the Lenape. In an ode to his Quaker ways, Penn sought to establish an attitude of respect between the settlers and Lenape people. In his 1683 “Letter to the Free Society of Traders,” written to attract future settlers still back in England, Penn said of the Lenni-Lenape, “Their Houses are Mats, or Barks of Trees set on Poles, in the fashion of an English Barn, but out of the power of the Winds, for they are hardly higher than a Man; they lie on Reeds or Grass. In Travel they lodge in the Woods about a Great Fire, with the Mantle of Duffills they wear by day, wrapt about them, and a few Boughs stuck round them. Their Diet is Maze, or Indian Corn, divers ways prepared: sometimes roasted in the Ashes, sometimes beaten and Boyled with Water, which they call Homine; they also make Cakes, not unpleasant to eat: They have likewise several sorts of Beans and Pease that are good Nourishment; and the Woods and Rivers are their Larder.”

The Treaty of Penn with the Indians by Benjamin West, located at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia.

SEPTEMBER 2021 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 27


In 1683, Chief Tammany was present to sign the deed of land rights to William Penn for the purchase of four parcels of land owned by the Lenape. Tammany was considered by his people to be a great Lenape leader. Tammany and Penn reportedly maintained good relations, feasting together, visiting one another’s homes, and trading goods. The Wampum belt gifted to Penn by Tammany is today kept at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Penn traded guns, tobacco, clothing, pipes, and many more items for the land that would become part of Pennsylvania. This event was memorialized in an oil painting by Benjamin West titled The Treaty of Penn with the Indians. The painting depicts William Penn’s meeting with members of the Lenape tribe at Shackamaxon on the Delaware River. The subsequent Treaty of Shackamaxon in 1683 with Tammany included an agreement that the European settlers and Lenape would live in a state of perpetual peace. Alluding to Penn’s Quaker ideologies, the painting depicts three key factions of the state of Pennsylvania’s early identity — Native Americans, Quakers, and merchants. The painting was commissioned by Thomas Penn, son of William Penn. According to the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (pafa. org), West was the first American-born artist to earn acclaim outside of his homeland. West was born in modern-day Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, and went on to study fine arts in London.

catering to road-weary travelers. The formal name “Princeton” was first decreed in 1724. The King’s Highway Historic District was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2000. Interestingly, in 1756, The College of New Jersey relocated from Newark to Princeton and erected Nassau Hall on land owned by the Lenape people. In 1758, the New Jersey assembly established a new home for the Lenni-Lenape people in Burlington County. This settlement would become known as the first “Indian Reservation.” The new community was overseen by the Reverend John Brainerd, a devout missionary who

THE LENNI-LENAPE IN EARLY PRINCETON

The first recorded history of Princeton, New Jersey, began in the 17th century when European travelers crossed New Jersey between the Delaware and Raritan rivers. These pathways were actually long-established routes of the Lenni-Lenape people. One of the most famous routes is the King’s Highway Historic Route, which covers portions of modern-day U.S. Route 206 and Route 27 towards Kingston. King’s Highway served as a main thoroughfare for people traveling from Lawrenceville to Kingston in Franklin Township/South Brunswick. At a certain point, some European settlers began establishing public houses along the route,

Above is a woman’s blouse with handmade silver brooches. Delaware, Oklahoma 1810-1880. Below on the left is an Abbott Zoned incised bowl, made between AD 200-900. On top is a piece of jasper flaked into a turtle found in Monmouth County. (Photos courtesy of the New Jersey State Museum)

28 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021


named the community “Brotherton.” Brainerd introduced the use of grist mills and sawmills, and the area eventually took on the name of Indian Mills. Far from an equitable deal, the state of Lenni-Lenape health and society quickly declined on the reservation. In 1801, the New Jersey Assembly decided to sell the reservation to the remaining Lenape residents, who at that time numbered fewer than 85. A few of the Lenape stayed in South Jersey while others joined the Cherokees and Osages west of the Mississippi and Oklahoma. Modern-day Lenni-Lenape are scattered across the United States, including Oklahoma, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. There are two federally recognized Lenape or “Delaware” tribes in the United States, and both are in modern-day Oklahoma. According to Delawaretribe.org, the Lenape were gradually pushed over time from their ancestral home along the Delaware to Ohio, Indiana, Missouri, and eventually Oklahoma. Following the Civil War, the U.S. government forced the Lenape out of Kansas to make room for new railroad lines. The government then purchased a reservation in Oklahoma from the Cherokee, where the Lenape were told they could reside. In 1982, the New Jersey Legislature formally recognized the Lenape and two other tribes as “American Indian Tribes” originating in the state. Unfortunately, this political recognition was “dropped” during the Chris Christie administration in 2011. In consequence, Lenape tribe members lost access to federal grants and scholarships. The restoration of tribal recognition by the state of New Jersey was not reinstated until November 2018. As noted on nlltribe.com, tribal members hope that the new legal acknowledgement will help to foster an attitude of mutual respect between the state and existing Lenape tribe members. The Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape Tribal Nation is headquartered in Bridgeton, Cumberland County in Southern New Jersey. According to inclusive.princeton.edu, in 2018 the Princeton Histories Working Group recommended that Princeton recognize the historical links between the University and the Lenni-Lenape people. Notably, in September 2019, Princeton Council passed a resolution to observe Indigenous Peoples’ Day on the second Monday of October. The holiday serves as a reminder of the heritage of New Jersey’s original residents and is a timely counterpoint to the celebration of Columbus Day. While Christopher Columbus is attributed with the discovery of the New World, he is also strongly associated with violence against Native Americans, slavery, disease, and destruction. For those remaining Lenape who do continue to reside in New Jersey, it is imperative that the state continues to uphold their native rights, health, business, and cultural heritage. Tellingly, it is when history is forgotten that it tends to repeat itself. Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape’s 40th annual Pow-Wow in Woodstown, New Jersey, on June 7, 2019.

SEPTEMBER 2021 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 29


Westminster Conservatory of Music A MUSICAL UTOPIA FOR STUDENTS OF ALL AGES Private lessons and remote instruction for all skill levels RIDER.EDU/CONSERVATORY

Are you concerned about your child’s communication skills?

Princeton Speech-Language & Learning Center (PSLLC) is New Jersey’s leading practice for a variety of language, social, academic, and psychological services for children of all ages.

Tele service therapy sp by all o rovided f our therapis ts!

• • • • •

Services include, but are not limited to the following:

Articulation Auditory Processing Therapy Autism CogMed® Evaluations - Speech-Language, Neuropsychological, & Psychoeducational • Executive Function Therapy • Receptive and Expressive Language

• • • • • • •

Parent Training & Support Preschool Therapy Psychological Services Social Communication Groups Reading Services Writing tutoring Fast ForWord®

For a free phone consultation and/or more information about PSLLC please visit our website, psllcnj.com or call 609-924-7080. 615 Executive Drive Princeton, NJ 08540 609-924-7080 info@psllcnj.com

30 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021


UPCOMING OPEN HOUSE

SUNDAY, OCT. 17, 2021 • 1–3 PM

A STUART GIRL IS UNSTOPPABLE BECAUSE... She is provided with the highly personalized resources and rigorous academic experience to make courageous decisions in life. She is educated to be academically strong, fearless and articulate, ready to change the world for the better.

STUARTSCHOOL.ORG/OPENHOUSE


| BOOK SCENE

Poetry in the Air BY STUART MITCHNER

ISSUES OF THE DAY

In this pandemic-haunted year, a number of new poetry books for children reflect issues ranging from slavery to social justice to environmental awareness. One of the most appealing expressions of a time of loss, loneliness, and togetherness is Patrick Guest’s Windows (Starry Forest 2020), illustrated by Jonathan Bentley. Guest wrote the rhymed story at a time when he was forced to isolate from his family as a medical worker. The book begins: “Out the window, I can see a new world looking back at me. The streets are still, there are no crowds ... but looking up, I see the clouds.” A physiotherapist by day and a children’s book author by night, Guest lives in Melbourne, Australia. An award-winning illustrator of over 30 children’s books and the author and illustrator of four of his own, Bentley grew up in West Yorkshire, England.

I

still have the bound volume containing the first 20 issues of Classic Comics my parents gave me on my 7th birthday. Along with vivid graphic renditions of the likes of Moby-Dick and Gulliver’s Travels, I found poetry, everything from “Ojibwa War Songs” to Emily Dickinson’s “Railway Train,” pictured in the style of “The Little Engine That Could.” I also found Walt Whitman’s “I Hear America Singing,” where “each sings what belongs to him or her and to none else,” and Matthew Arnold’s “Dover Beach,” which told me the world “which seems to lie before us like a land of dreams” has “neither joy, nor love, nor light, nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain.” I doubt if Arnold’s message got through to me at 7 (what’s “certitude”?), but when I was moved by the poem years later in college, the feeling that I’d been there before deepened the experience. Poetry seemed to be a primal element, as much a part of life as the air we breathe. I felt it again at the same age during the singing of Christmas carols, breathing in the beauty of “Above thy deep and dreamless sleep the silent stars go by” in “Little Town of Bethlehem.” Ten years later, when I discovered Keats’s “Ode on a Grecian Urn,” there was a chill of recognition as I read “And little town thy streets for evermore / Will silent be.” I’d been there before, long ago, in another little town.

32 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021

THE WIND OF SLAVERY

Notable among recent releases is BOX: Henry Brown Mails Himself to Freedom (Candlewick Press 2020), a 2021 Newbery Honor Book by poet Carole Boston Weatherford, with illustrations by Michele Wood. Included are historical records and an introductory excerpt from Henry’s own writing as well as a timeline, notes from the author and illustrator, and a bibliography. The stanzas are six lines each, as here: WIND An autumn breeze blows maple leaves While I sit on my mother’s lap. Slavery is a cruel wind, she says, Sweeping children away from parents, Scattering families far and wide. She shivers and holds me close. A starred review from Kirkus says “Brown’s story never gets old, and this illustrated biography is rich in context and detail that make it heavier on history and better for slightly older readers than, for instance, Ellen Levine and Kadir Nelson’s Henry’s Freedom Box (2007). Heartbreaking and legendary.” A New York Times best-selling author and poet, Weatherford was named the 2019 Washington Post Children’s Book Guild Nonfiction Award winner. Wood is an illustrator, painter, filmmaker, and designer whose numerous honors include a Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award.


FEELING BLUE

Marjorie Maddox’s I’m Feeling Blue, Too! (Resource Publications 2020) is a series of untitled poems on the color blue, accompanied by Philip Huber’s detailed, multi-textured illustrations. A blueberry becomes a “miniature morsel of midnight that pops” and a dragonfly “hums to the blue firs,” “strums with cicadas,” and “hovers by still lakes.” The book would be “a lovely addition to a library, according to School Library Journal, which lists it as a 2021 NCTE (National Council of Teachers of English) Notable Poetry Book. A professor of English and creative writing at Lock Haven University in Pennsylvania, Maddox has published a dozen poetry collections, a story collection, and four children’s books. Huber is a Fulbright scholar and professor of art, also at Lock Haven. SCIENCE, NATURE, POETRY

Poet Leslie Bulion and illustrator Robert Meganck perform another cross-curricular celebration of science and poetry in Amphibian Acrobats (Peachtree 2020), which includes feats by frogs, toads, and salamanders. In a starred review, Kirkus finds it “a completely satisfying package” in which Meganck’s “wry cartoons amplify the humor. The backmatter, strong as the main text, serves young readers well .… Child readers and educators will find themselves enthralled by short, punchy poems and the science behind them.” Nature is the subject of New Green Day by Antoinette Portis, with illustrations by the author (Neal Porter Books 2020). On each two-page spread, children can solve riddles about the animals, plants, and the weather encountered during a day outdoors. A New York Times review comments, “This poetic conversation with nature over the course of a new green day is friendly and familiar and fresh and surprising, and Portis’s evocative illustrations made with sumi ink, vine charcoal and leaf prints are as elegant and perfectly composed as a snail.” New Green Day is a NCTE Notable Book in Poetry, a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year, and a Junior Library Guild Selection. Portis is the author of many books for children, including Not a Box, a New York Times Best Illustrated Book.

and photographer Theodore Taylor III, with a foreword by New York Times bestselling author, and Newbery Award Honoree, Jason Reynolds. Vogue says, “This collection of poems by women of color covers topics relating to social justice, activism, discrimination and empathy, focusing on the need to speak out and inspiring middlegraders.” WALT’S WORLD

Given my first Classic Comic reading of Walt Whitman, it was nice to see the continuum of poetry reaching from the 19th century to August 2021 in The World Below the Brine (Creative Editions), with illustrations by James Christopher Carroll. The poem was first published in 1860 in the group “Sea-Shore Memories,” later included in “Sea Drift” in the 1881 edition of Leaves of Grass. Using a single stanza format, Whitman pictures life within the ocean: “Different colors, pale gray and green, purple, white, and gold, the play of light through the water.” Carroll’s other picture books include A Song, also published by Creative Editions. CLASSICS

Any time I want to revisit the days when poetry and songs and stories came together in tales like Cinderella, Little Red Riding Hood, and Jack and the Beanstalk, I pick up The All About Story Book (Cupples & Leon 1927) with illustrations by John B. Gruelle. Some other classics of the genre that come to mind are Robert Louis Stevenson’s A Child’s Garden of Verses with the Jessie Wilcox Smith illustrations and Rudyard Kipling’s Just So Stories, strikingly illustrated by the author himself.

ON BEING WOKE

Woke: A Young Poet’s Call to Justice (Roaring Brook Press 2020) is a collection of poems edited by Mahogany L. Browne, a Cave Canem, Poets House, and Serenbe Focus Fellow alum whose books include Swag and #Dear Twitter: Love Letters Hashed Out Online in 140 Characters or Less. The book’s purpose is to inspire kids to stay woke and become a new generation of activists. Contributing poets are Elizabeth Acevedo, the New York Times bestselling author of With the Fire on High and National Book Award-winning novel The Poet X and Olivia Gatwood, who has received national recognition for her poetry and writing workshops. Woke is illustrated by artist, designer, Illustration by Rudyard Kipling, from Just So Stories. SEPTEMBER 2021 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 33


A BA L A N C E D E QUAT I O N

THE HUN SCHOOL OF PRINCETON is a joyful, striving community of learners and teachers who want to experience something profound every day: that sweet spot between challenging academics that push our brains and the personal endeavors that soar our hearts. This is what we call “a balanced equation”—a thoughtful way of teaching that brings out the best in our students and best prepares them for life.

JOIN US FOR IN PERSON AND VIRTUAL ADMISSION EVENTS:

Admission Kick-off | Sept. 29 Student to Student | Oct. 6 The STEM Equation | Oct. 14 A Conversation about Harkness | Oct. 27 Parent to Parent | Nov. 3 Magic in the Middle School | Nov. 7 Living Your Best Student Life | Nov. 10 Cultural Competency & DEIB | Dec. 1

To register or learn more, visit hunschool.org or call (609) 921-7600


We i c h e r t R e a l t o r s

Color Key

ecifications

singReal Services Estate

Color Key We i c h e r t R e a l •t o r sInsurance Mortgage

Closing Services

Specifications

Weichert Black Print: C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

We i c h e r t R e a l t o r s

Real Estate

Mortgage

We i c h e r t R e a l tCoo rl osr K e y

Weichert Yellow Print: C-0,M-0,Y-92,K-0 Digital: Hex

Insurance

Closing Services

Realtors

Specifications

Specifications

Weichert Black Print: C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

We i c h e r t R e a l t o r s

Weichert Yellow Print: C-0,M-0,Y-92,K-0 Digital: Hex

altors

Realtors

Estate

Insurance

Mortgage

Closing Services

Insurance

Closing Services

We i c h e r t R e a l t o r s

Specifications

Real Estate

Realtors

Mortgage

Realtors

Mortgage

Insurance

Insurance

Real Estate

Closing Services

243CherryHillRoad.info We i c h e r t$4,700 R e aper l t omonth rs

We i c h e r t R e a l t o r s

Closing Services Specifications

Specifications

Specifications

Real Estate Color Key

Weichert Black Print: C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

FOR MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO

LLEC TION RealPRINCE TON COLLEC TION • Insurance • Closing Estate Services• Mortgage • Insurance • Closing Services PRINCETON PRINCETON

Insurance

34MayburyHillRoad.info $1,450,000

Mortgage

Mortgage

• Insurance • Closing Services Closing Real Estate Services• Mortgage FOR MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO •

Real Estate Closing Services

Realtors Realtors •

40NorthHarrisonStreet.info $885,000

We i c h e r t R e a l t o r s

Insurance

Realtors Realtors Re Realtors

ClosingReal Services Estate

117LeabrookLane.info $1,100,000

nce

Weichert Yellow Print: C-0,M-0,Y-92,K-0 Digital: Hex

PRINCE TON COLLEC TION

Realtors

Mortgage

Mortgage

Weichert Ye Print: C-0,M-0,Y-9 Digital: Hex

Rea

S pSepcei c f i icf iact ai ot inosn s

Realtors •

We Wei ci chheer tr

Weichert Black Print: C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

pp e ce icf ii fci ac tai to We i cih e aelat lot rosr s S S We ce hretr tRR Real

Weichert Black Print: C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

Real Estate

Rea

Color Key

Color Key

Specifications

Specifications

Weichert Black Print: C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

Weichert Yellow Print: C-0,M-0,Y-92,K-0 Digital: Hex

Specifica

Insurance

Color Key

Closing Services

• Real Estate Real Estate Weichert Black Print: C-94,M-77,Y-53,K-94 Digital: Hex#

Weichert Yellow Print: C-0,M-0,Y-92,K-0 Digital: Hex

$1,649,000

$1,649,000

•W

P C D H

Re

the heartPrinceton, of downtown few blocks from Princeton University, stunning the home thatand combines the charm and appeal of In the heart of In downtown a few Princeton, blocks froma Princeton University, sits a stunning homesits thata combines charm appeal of a century home with a spacious modern open floor plan.Thoft Architect Kirsten remodeledthis and fullyinrenovated a century old home with aold spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten remodeled andThoft fully renovated home 2007 with this home in 2007 with spectacular detail toand both traditional and modern amenities. Thenorenovations nomaintain expensethe to character carefully of maintain the character of the home, spectacular detail to both traditional modern amenities. The renovations spare expense to spare carefully the home, updated for today’s staircase and mouldings, pocket doors, floors, and extensive built-ins updated for today’s lifestyle. Customlifestyle. staircaseCustom and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, andhardwood extensive built-ins throughout make it boththroughout make it both MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO an 83MountLucasRoad.info intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true. anFOR intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true. $999,000 9FairwayDrive.info $1,165,000 15JeffersonRoad.info $1,125,000 102SnowdenLane.info $875,000

New Listing in Princeton - $1,150,000 additional photos and floorplan N COLLEC TIONThe For PRINCE TON COLLEC TIONvisit 14CaldwellDrive.info spacious entrance hall opens into the family room with original tin ceiling, and pocket doors. The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets,

Re

PRINCETON $1,649,000 The spacious entrance hall opens into the family room with original tin ceiling, and pocket doors. The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets,

appliances, and enormous island theisland light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful The great&room Instainless-steel the heart of downtown Princeton,pantry a few blocks from Princeton University, sits a stunning homeoverlooks that combines thelight-filled charm and appeal of room with stainless-steel appliances, pantry andoverlooks enormous the great built-inbar. bookcases beautiful bar. The great room aopens century to old a home with adining spacious modern open floor plan. a Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 with formal that overlooks wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch to function an indoor/ opens to room aand formal room that overlooks a wraparound porch. custom doors allowarea for dining and as porch area to function as an indoor/ spectacular detail to both traditional moderndining amenities. The renovations spare no expense to carefully maintain theThe character of the home, outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom with built-in cubbies and tons of storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, doors, hardwood floors, and built-ins throughout outdoor entertainment space.pocket A separate mudroom withextensive built-in cubbies andmake tonsit both of storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. an intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true.

Realtors

Retreat upstairs to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a Retreat the master with endoors. suiteThe walk-in steamwith shower. Just down hallwayheated are two additional The spacious entrance hall opensupstairs into the family room with originalbedroom tin ceiling, and pocket gourmet kitchen custom cabinets, fireplace and the other a wallto ofisland floor-to-ceiling woodgreat built-in bedrooms share hall bath with the a BainUltra Jacuzzi tub. bedrooms one with a stainless-steel appliances, pantrywith and enormous overlooks the light-filled room closets. with built-inThese bookcases & beautiful bar. The a great room

fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub.

opens to a formal dining room that overlooks a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indoor/ outdoor entertainment A separate with built-in tonstwo of storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. built-in The crown jewelspace. of this homemudroom is the third floorcubbies whichand has additional spacious bedrooms, featuring

Closing Services

• Mortgage Real Estate Insurance Closing The crown jewel of •this home is• the thirdServices floor which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat

and closets. two bedrooms full bath and a bonus sitting area. are two additional bedrooms one with a Retreat upstairs toThe the master bedroom withshare en suitea walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway The twowood bedrooms share a bedrooms full bathshare anda hall a bonus area. fireplace and the otherand with aclosets. wall of floor-to-ceiling built-in closets. These bath with sitting a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub.

Realtors

Realtors

bookcases, window seat • Mortgage • Insurance Real Estatedesks,

The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has The crown jewel of this home is the third floor which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat fenced in backyard with Ipe the wood deck offers terrific outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has it all. With ample off-street leave at home and stroll space aroundfor town. and closets. The two The bedrooms shareparking a full bath you and acan bonus sitting area.cars

NEW LISTING in Princeton - $799,000 43EttlCircle.info $1,350,000 / $7,000 per month For photos and floorplan visit 229MountLucasRoad.info CherryHillRoad.info 40NorthHarrisonStreet.info $4,700 per month $885,000 34MayburyHillRoad.info 243CherryHillRoad.info $1,450,000$4,700 per month 34MayburyHillRoad.info $1,450,000 218GallupRoad.info 343JeffersonRoad.info $1,548,000 it all. With $1,329,000 ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at$1,347,500 home and stroll around154ChristopherDrive.info town.

The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has it all. With ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town.

If you want your home featured, contact me: If you wantReal your Estate home featured, contact me: • Mortgage • Insurance

Closing Services

Real Estate

“Awesome Experience”

If you want your home featured, contact me:

Beatrice Bloom Beatrice Bloom

Mortgage

609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

| BeatriceBloom.com Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

Office | 609-921-1900 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com ITPHOTOS FOR 15LINDENLANE.INFO MORE PHOTOS Princeton ANDPrinceton FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO Office | 609-921-1900 ENE.INFO AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO

Princeton | 609-921-1900 FOR MOREOffice PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO

PRINCETON

Insurance

Closing Servic

117LeabrookLane.info PRINCE TON COLLEC TION$1,100,0 34MayburyHillRoad.info $1,450,000

Salesmonth Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker $1,100,000 243CherryHillRoad.info 40NorthHarrisonStreet.info $4,700 per $885,000 34MayburyHillRoad.info 243CherryHillRoad.info $1,450,000 PRINCE TON COLLEC TION $4,700 per month Beatrice Bloom Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

AN, VISITFOR 15LINDENLANE.INFO MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO OR NDENLANE.INFO MORE PHOTOS$1,649,000 AND FLOOR PLAN,$1,649,000 VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO $1,649,000

117LeabrookLane.info 117LeabrookLane.info$1,100,000 $1,100,0

$1,649,000 $1,649,000

FOR MO

stunning home athat fewand combines blocks from the charm University, appeal of a combines stunning home thatand combines the that charm andtheappeal Inof the Princeton heart of downtown Princeton, a sits few blocks from Princeton University, sits aappeal stunning home combines charm andof appeal of PRINCETON aown combines few Princeton, blocks the from charm Princeton appeal University, sits a and stunning home that the charm of FOR PRINCETON FORMORE MOR TON $1,649,000 $1,649,000 a century old home with a spacious modern openremodeled floor plan. Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this homewith in 2007 with with remodeled a spacious and modern fullyinArchitect renovated open floor this plan. home Architect in 2007 Kirsten with Thoft and fully renovated this home in 2007 $1,649,000 modern yft renovated open this floor home plan. 2007 $1,649,000 with Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 with spectacular detail to both traditional and modern amenities. The renovations spare no expense to carefully maintain the character of the home, In the heart of dow In the heart ofPRINCETON downtown Princeto both o expense traditional to carefully and modern maintain amenities. the character The renovations of home, spare no expense to character carefully maintain the character ofand theappeal home, updated for today’s lifestyle. staircase and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout make rsity, tPrinceton, of downtown sits stunning Princeton, home athat few combines blocks from the Princeton charm and University, appeal of sits a combines stunning home that combines the charm ofit both nd maintain modern the character The of renovations the home, spare no expense to carefully maintain the of the home, home thata aamenities. combines few blocks the from charm Princeton and appeal University, of sitsthe a Custom stunning home that the charm and appeal of PRINCETON 117LeabrookLane.info $1,100,000 40NorthHarrisonStreet.info $885,000 243CherryHillRoad.info $4,700 pe aPRINCETON century old home PRINCETON a century old home with a spaciou 117LeabrookLane.info $1,100,000 40NorthHarrisonStreet.info $885,000 243CherryHillRoad.info $4,700 per month 34MayburyHillRoad.info $1,450,000 an intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true. ood estyle. floors, Custom and staircase built-ins and mouldings, throughout pocket make doors, itremodeled both hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout make it both old Kirsten home Thoft with remodeled a extensive spacious and modern fully renovated open floor this plan. home Architect in 2007 Kirsten with remodeled and fully this home in 2007 with taircase ive built-ins and throughout mouldings, make pocket it both doors, hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout make it2007 bothwith led spacious and fully modern renovated open this floor home plan. inArchitect 2007 with Kirsten Thoft andThoft fully renovated this home inrenovated In the heart ofdetail down spectacular t In the heart of dow spectacular detail to both traditiona In the heart of downtown Princeton, In the heart of downtown Princeton AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO rce ns detail spare to no both expense traditional to character carefully and modern maintain amenities. the character The renovations of into thethehome, spare expense to carefully maintain thegourmet character the home, The spacious entrance hallno opens family roomno with original tin ceiling, and pocket doors. The kitchenof with custom cabinets, ainer’s dream come true. and an entertainer’s dream come true. raditional to carefully and maintain modern the amenities. The of renovations the home, spare expense to carefully maintain the character of the home, aupdated home 15JeffersonRoad.info 9FairwayDrive.info $1,125,000 $1,165,000 102SnowdenLane.info 15JeffersonRoad.info $875,000 $1,125,000 102SnowdenLane.info $875,000 a centuryfor old home with aold spacious for today’s “Knowledge, savvy, and patience! Not even COVID-19 could diminish acentury century old homew updated today’s lifestyle. Custom

stainless-steel appliances, pantrymake and enormous island overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great rooma century old home with a spacious ors, re.and today’s hardwood lifestyle. floors, Custom extensive staircase built-ins and mouldings, throughout pocket doors, itand both hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout make it both Custom extensive staircase built-ins andand throughout mouldings, make pocket it both doors, hardwood floors, extensive built-ins throughout make it both spectacular detail to b

spectacular detail tointimate traditional as FOR MORE PHOTO opensFOR to a formal dining room that overlooks a wraparound porch. 15LINDENLANE.INFO The custom doors allow for diningFOR and porch areaPHOTOS to function AND as an FLOOR indoor/ spectacular detail to MORE PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.IN an intimate family space and an ent an family detail toboth both traditional MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 83MountLucasRoad.info $999,0 $1,649,000 FOR MORE ANDcomplete FLOOR PLAN, VISIT spectacular 15LINDENLANE.INFO kitchen room with with custom original cabinets, tin ceiling, and pocket doors. The gourmet kitchen with cabinets, PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO nd anfamily entertainer’s dream come true. family space and an entertainer’s dream come true. pocket eEurmet hall opens doors. into The the gourmet family room kitchen with with original custom tinher cabinets, ceiling, and pocket doors. The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, FOR MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom with built-in cubbies andcustom tons of storage along withPHOTOS a powder room the first floor. updated for li energy, tenacity, flexibility, and professionalism. ” updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom othe $999,000 15JeffersonRoad.info 9FairwayDrive.info $1,125,000 $1,165,000 102SnowdenLane.info 15JeffersonRoad.info $875,000 $1,125,000 102SnowdenLane.info $875,000 updated fortoday’s today’s updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom cases normous & beautiful island bar. the great light-filled room great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great&room om Princeton University, sitsThe a stunning home that combines thelight-filled charm and appeal of room with FOR MORE PHOTOS oom ces, pantry with built-in andoverlooks enormous bookcases island & beautiful overlooks bar. the The great room great built-in bookcases beautiful bar. The great room an intimate family space and an entert an intimate family spa PRINCETON PRINCETON The spacious entrance hall opens FOR MORE PHOTO an intimate family space and an ente an intimate family sp 83MountLucasRoad.info $999,000 The spacious entra PRINCETON PRINCETON $1,649in Retreat upstairs to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are $1,649,000 two additional bedrooms one with a 83MountLucasRoad.info $999,0 $1,649,000 $1,649,000 oor plan. Kirsten Thoft remodeled and cabinets, fully renovated this home in 2007 with ors. opens The into gourmet the family kitchen room with with custom original tin ceiling, and pocket doors. gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, PRINCETON $1,649,000 us iling, entrance and pocket hall opens doors. into The the gourmet family room kitchen with with original custom tin cabinets, ceiling, and pocket doors. The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, erlooks porch area aArchitect wraparound to function porch. as an The indoor/ custom doors allow for dining and The porch area to function as an indoor/ stainless-steel pantry an s ng allow room for that dining overlooks and porch a wraparound area to function porch. as The an indoor/ doors allow for dining and porch area function as an indoor/ fireplace and the other with acustom wall ofthe floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share ato hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. In the heart of sits downtown Princeton, a few bloc In the combines heartPrinceton, of downtown Princeton, a Princeton few blocks from Princeton University, aappliances, stunning home that combin stainless-steel appl In the heart of downtown a few blocks from University, sits a stunning home that combines the charm and appe enities. The renovations spare no expense to carefully maintain the character of home, In the heart of downtown Princeton, a few blocks from Princeton University, sits a stunning home that the charm and appeal of built-in pantry and bookcases enormous &built-in beautiful island overlooks bar. The the great light-filled room great room with built-in bookcases &abeautiful bar. The great room In the heart ofthe downtown Princeton, aisland few blocks fromcombines Princeton University, sits aappeal stunning thatwith combines the the charm and appeal of and a few appeal blocks of room from Princeton University, sits a and stunning that the charm and of home The entrance hall opens into eel lled appliances, great pantry with built-in and enormous bookcases &ahome beautiful bar. the The light-filled great room great room built-in &complete beautiful bar. The great room te wder mudroom room complete with cubbies first floor. tons ofoverlooks storage along with aThoft powder room complete first floor. The spacious entranc abookcases century home with a spacious modern open floor plan.Thoft Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renov PRINCETON aPRINCETON century old and home with adining spacious modern op Thespacious spacious entrance hall opens in century old home with aold spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten remodeled fully renovated this home inthat 2007 opens to a formal room The spacious entran a century old home with spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 with ouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout make it both orage space. along A separate with a powder mudroom room with complete built-in cubbies the first and floor. tons of storage along with a powder room the first floor. a century old home with a spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 with modern in 2007 open with floor plan.area Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this in 2007 with opens tocharacter aaand formal The crown jewel of this home isrecommending the home third which hasporch two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat om dining that and overlooks porch aArchitect wraparound to function porch. as an The indoor/ custom doors for floor dining and area to function astraditional an indoor/ spectacular detail toand both traditional and modern amenities. The renovations spare no expense to carefully mainta stainless-steel appliances, pantry and spectacular detail to both traditional modern “Very helpful inallow a myriad of contractors tomodern facilitate the repair In the hearttoof downtown Princeton, few blocks spectacular detail to both amenities. The renovations spare no expense carefully maintain the of the d he

stainless-steel applian appliances, pantry and spectacular detail toaand both traditional and modern amenities. The renovations nomaintain expense to character carefully maintain the character of the home,as an indoor/ formal doors dining allow room that dining and wraparound area totwo function porch. as The ancustom indoor/ doors allow forarea. dining and porch area to function Instainless-steel the heartentertainment of downtown Princeton, a few block ome true. spectacular detail tooverlooks both traditional modern amenities. The renovations spare expense to spare carefully the of the home, space. Aapplia sep stainless-steel and rstom of the modern home, amenities. Thefor renovations spare noporch expense to carefully maintain the character ofno the home, and closets. The bedrooms share ahardwood full bath and aand bonus sitting updated for and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, and extensive buil updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircaseCustom and mouldings, doors, hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout make it updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase an aoutdoor century old with adining spacious modern open outdoor opens to ahome formal room that ov ce. ng with A separate a powder mudroom room complete with built-in the cubbies first floor. and tons ofthe storage along with adoors, powder room complete the first floor. updated for today’s Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout make it staircase both pocket a century old with a spacious modern ope updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors, extensive built-ins throughout make ittoday’s both two m with additional en suite bedrooms walk-in steam one with shower. alifestyle. Just down hallway are two additional bedrooms one with alifestyle. opens to ahome formal dining room that tstaircase make it both and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout make itfloors, both opens toto aentertainme formal din tertainment d tons of storage space. along A separate with adoors. powder mudroom room with complete built-in cubbies the first and floor. tons of storage along with aFOR powder complete the first floor. MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO an 83MountLucasRoad.info intimate family space and anroom entertainer’s dream come true. an intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true. an spectacular detail to both traditional and modern am opens a formal doa intimate family space and an entertainer’s dre $999,000 9FairwayDrive.info $1,165,000 15JeffersonRoad.info $1,125 FOR MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO an intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true. spectacular detail to both traditional and modern an intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true. e own master the hallway bedroom are with two en additional suite walk-in bedrooms steam one shower. with Just a down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a m with original tin ceiling, and pocket The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, outdoor entertainment space. A separa 83MountLucasRoad.info $999,000 9FairwayDrive.info $1,165,000 15JeffersonRoad.info $1,125,000 102SnowdenLane.info $875,000 tainer’s dream come true. The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has outdoor entertainment space. A sepa updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and m hor-to-ceiling with a BainUltra wood heated built-in Jacuzzi closets. tub. These bedrooms share agreat hallroom bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. outdoor entertainmen Retreat upstairs tokitchen the master bedr updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and outdoor entertainme overlooks the two light-filled great room withabuilt-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The PRINCETON $1,649,000 spacious entrance hall opens into the family room original tin tub. ceiling, pocket doors. The gourmet with cab hallway ster bedroom are additional en suite bedrooms walk-in steam one with shower. a Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with acustom The spacious entrance hall opens intowith the family room with and original tin ceiling, and pocket doors. Thecustom gourmet k anan intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream itinto all. With ample off-street parking you can leave cars at home and stroll around town. Retreat upstairs to The spacious entrance hall opens into the family ooms with ashare wall of awith hall floor-to-ceiling bath with BainUltra wood built-in heated closets. These tub. bedrooms share aThe hall bath with apantry BainUltra heated Jacuzzi PRINCETON $1,649,000 The spacious entrance hall opens the family room with original tin ceiling, and pocket doors. The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, Theceiling, spacious entrance hall opens into theJacuzzi family room with original tinthe ceiling, and pocket doors. The gourmet kitchen with cabinets, intimate family space and an entertainer’s drea wer. stairs Just to the down master the hallway bedroom are with two en additional suite walk-in bedrooms steam one shower. with Just a down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a fireplace and the other with a wall of otom the cabinets, family room with original tin and pocket doors. The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, around porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indoor/ stainless-steel appliances, and enormous island overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great In the heart of downtown Princeton, a few blocks from Princeton University, sits a stunning home that combines the charm and appeal of stainless-steel appliances, pantry and room enormous island overlooks stainless-steel the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & Retreat upstairs toto the master bedroo stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous island theisland light-filled great a room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great appliances, pantry and enormous is In the heart of downtown Princeton, a few blocks from Princeton University, sits a stunning homeoverlooks that combines thelight-filled charm and appeal of room ea built-in agreat wall hall ofisland bath floor-to-ceiling with aold BainUltra wood heated built-in Jacuzzi closets. tub. These bedrooms share hall bath with aaopens BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. stainless-steel appliances, pantry andoverlooks enormous the great with built-in bookcases &room beautiful bar. The great Retreat upstairs the master bedro century old home with adining spacious modern floor plan. Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 with fireplace and the to ato formal room that overlooks aArchitect wraparound porch. The custom doors allow dining andRetreat porch area tointo function as anot ina enormous he room overlooks the great room with built-in bookcases &remodeled beautiful The great room upstairs to th The spacious entrance hall opens family th cubbies and oflight-filled storage along with afloor powder room complete the first floor. awith century home with adining spacious modern open Kirsten Thoft andbar. fully renovated thisbedrooms home in 2007 with lt-in rd floor bookcases, which has desks, two window seat spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat opens toan aand formal dining room that overlooks a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch opens to a formal that overlooks aArchitect wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and share porch area function as indoor/ Retreat upstairs to The spacious entrance hall opens into the family opens tofor aof formal dining room that overlooks aroo wrt nd These the bedrooms other atons share wall of aadditional hall floor-to-ceiling with aplan. BainUltra wood built-in heated Jacuzzi These tub. hall bath with aopen BainUltra heated tub. spectacular detail to both traditional modern amenities. Theas renovations spare noJacuzzi expense to carefully maintain the character the home, opens to room abath formal dining room that overlooks a closets. wraparound porch. custom doors allow fora dining and porch area to function an indoor/ fireplace and the other with athe wall ofislan flo spectacular detail to both traditional and modern amenities. The renovations spare no expense carefully maintain theThe character of the home, outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom with cubbies and tons of cubbies storage along with a powder room complete the first flo fireplace and the other with a wall of verlooks as home an indoor/ a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch area toto and function asstorage an indoor/ stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors,built-in hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout make it both outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom with built-in cubbies tons of along with a powder room complete the first floor. outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom with built-in and tons of storage along with a powder ro drooms, s is featuring the third built-in floor which bookcases, has two desks, additional window spacious seat bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous isla outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom fireplace and the The to crown jewel of this home isaothe the updated forbonus today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, and built-ins throughout make outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom withextensive built-in cubbies tonsit both of storage along with a and powder room dream complete the first floor. ae walk-in full bath and abookcases, sitting area. fireplace and the oth an intimate family space an entertainer’s come true. opens a formal dining room that overlooks wrap ate first mudroom with built-in cubbies and of storage along with a powder room complete the first e steam Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a floor.and me eaturing isfloor. the built-in third floor which has desks, two additional window spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat anshower. intimate family space and antons entertainer’s dream come true.seat opens to a formal dining room that overlooks a of wrw The crown jewel Retreat upstairs to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one and closets. The two bedrooms sha bedrooms share aentrance full and aroom bonus sitting area. outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom w Retreat upstairs tobath the master bedroom with enhas suite walk-in steam shower. Just downhome the bedrooms, hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a room The crown jewel of this home ismudroom the th Retreat to the master with en suiteThe walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two add The contact spacious entrance hall opensupstairs into the family with originalbedroom tin ceiling, and pocket doors. gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, Ifdoors. you want your featured, me: pacious jewel of bedrooms, this home is featuring the third built-in floor which bookcases, two desks, additional window spacious seat featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat ood built-in closets. These bedrooms share asitting hall bath with atinBainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. outdoor entertainment space. A separate Retreat upstairs to the master bedroom with en The crown jewel of this home is the ooms share a full bath and a bonus area. Retreat upstairs to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a The spacious hall opens into the family with original ceiling, and pocket The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzz stainless-steel appliances, pantryJacuzzi and enormous island overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great bedrooms room The ms om one withwith en suite a stainless-steel walk-in Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a agreat fireplacesteam and theshower. other with a wall ofisland floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share hallroom bath with a BainUltra heated tub. crown jewel of th and closets. The tw fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These share a hall bath with at appliances, pantry and enormous overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The and closets. The two bedrooms share The jewel of fireplace and other with acrown wall of floor-to-ceilin deck mily and offers friends. terrific This space home for truly outdoor has memories to be created with family and friends. home truly has fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. opens share to aThis formal dining room that overlooks a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch area toand function as anthe indoor/ closets. The two bedrooms shar s. The two bedrooms share a full bath and a bonus sitting area. Retreat upstairs to the master bedroom with en sui opens to a formal dining room that overlooks a wraparound porch. Thebath custom doorsaallow for dining heated and porch Jacuzzi area to function oor-to-ceiling d Jacuzzi tub. wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share a hall with BainUltra tub.as an indoor/ outdoor Retreatthe upstairs to and the master bedroom with en s two additional bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat entertainment space. A separate with built-in tonstwo of storage along with a powder room complete first floor.in Beatrice Bloom The crown jewel of this homemudroom is the third floorcubbies whichand has additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window The two The fenced backyard Ipe wo outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom with built-in and tonsoutdoor of storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. Thespacious crown jewel ofoffers this home is the third floorcubbies which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat fireplace and the other with aclosets. wall ofwith floor-to-ceiling w and The two shhas d to with be Ipe created wood with deck and terrific friends. space This for home truly memories has tospacious be created with family and friends. This truly has can leave the cars atfamily home and stroll around town. fireplace and the other aclosets. wall of floor-to-ceiling The crown jewel of this home isand thehome floor which has two additional spacious featuring built-in boo Ipe with wood family deck and offers friends. terrific This space home outdoor has memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has and closets. two bedrooms full bath athird bonus sitting area. The crown jewel ofbedrooms, this with home iswith the third floor wh aated bonus sitting area. The crown jewel offor thistruly home isand thebuilt-in floor which has two window additional bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, window seat Retreat upstairs toThe the master bedroom withshare en suiteadesks, walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with abackyard andtwo closets. two bedrooms full bath athird bonus sitting area. Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker The fenced in Ipe wood hird window floor which seat has additional spacious featuring desks, seat Retreat upstairs toThe the master bedroom bedrooms, withshare en suitea walk-in steam shower. Just bookcases, down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a The fenced in back it all. With ample off-street parking y and closets. The two bedrooms share a full bath and a bonus sitting area. The fenced in backyard with Ipe woo fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. 343JeffersonRoad.info $1,347,500 th and closets. Theoftwo bedrooms share afloor full bath and closets. The two bedrooms share a full bath and a bonus sitting area. rin memories backyard to with be Ipe created wood with deck family offers and terrific friends. space This for home outdoor truly memories has to be created with family and friends. This home truly has parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town. The crown jewel this home is the third which treet town. parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town. fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. The crown jewel of this home is the third floor whi a full bath and a bonus sitting area. info@BeatriceBloom.com |home BeatriceBloom.com Theand fenced in backyard with Ipehas wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memoriesittoit be created with family and friends. This home trul The fenced in backya all. With ample off-street parking you 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,00 The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for609-577-2989 outdoor memories to be |created with family friends. This home ific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has(cell) The fenced in backy all. With ample off-street parking ya itto all. With of and closets. The two bedrooms share aample full bath and The crown jewel of this is the truly third floor which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat 1,329,000 $1,347,500 th and closets. The two bedrooms share a full bath The crownparking jewel of this home is343JeffersonRoad.info the can third floorleave which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories be created with family an ample oll around off-street town. you the cars at home and stroll around town. it all. With ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town. andbe closets. The twowith bedrooms share a fullfriends. bath and aThis bonus home sitting area. The fenced in backyard withWith Ipe wood deck off-s offers 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,000 The fenced in backyard with Ipewith wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor to created family and truly has it all. With ample off-street leave the at home and strollFor around town. full testimonials, visit BeatriceBloom-Ratings.info ittown. all. ample atoffers home and stroll around town. and closets. The two bedrooms shareparking a full bath and bonus sitting area.cars 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,000 dcars ome decktruly hasterrific space for outdoor memories toyou beacan created family and friends. This home truly has memories itwith all.Ipe With ample off 218GallupRoad.info $1,329,000 343JeffersonRoad.info 154ChristopherDrive.info $1,54 Princeton Office 609-921-1900 it all. With ample off-street 43EttlCircle.info parking you can$1,350,000 leave the cars at$1,347,500 home and stroll 218GallupRoad.info 343JeffersonRoad.info 154ChristopherDrive.info $1,548,000 / $7,000 per month fenced in around backyard woodyou deck offers te itThe all. With ample off-street parking can leave it all. With $1,329,000 ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at$1,347,500 home and stroll| around town.

and eventual sale of our Estate property in Princeton.”

“I would highly recommend Beatrice to anybody who wants to get the best results in the shortest amount of time”

u can leave the cars at home andwith stroll around town. The fenced in backyard Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has

want your home featured, contact me:

it all. With ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town.

antIf your homeyour featured, you want home contact featured, contact me: contact me: If you wantme: your home featured, If you want your home featured, contact me:

The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. home in truly has The This fenced backyard with Ipe wood deck offers it all. With ample off-street parking you can leave the it all. With ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town. it all. With ample off-street parking you can leave t

If you want your home featured, contact me: me featured, contact me:

ice BloomBloomBeatrice Bloom Bloom Beatrice m Beatrice Bloom rice Bloom Beatrice Bloom resentative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com Beatrice ceton Residential Specialist, MBA,Bloom ECO-Broker oker Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Beatrice Bloom Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com fo@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 If you want your home featured, contact me:

want your home featured, contact me:Beatrice

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker presentative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

If you want your home featured, contact me:

If you want your home featured, contact me: If you want your home featured, contact me:

Beatrice Bloom

Beatrice Bloom Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

Beatrice Bloom

Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

youw If Ifyou

you If IfIfyou youww

If you want your h

Bea Beatr

If Ifyou youwant wantyour yourhom h

Beat Beatrice Blo Beatrice BeatriceBloo Blo

| BeatriceBloom.com Sales R Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Sales Sales Representative SalesRep Re Sales Representative/Pri Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 Sales Representative/P 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 609-57 609-577-2989 (cell 609-577 609-577-2989 (cell) |i 609-57 609-577-2989 (cell)

om.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com A, ECO-Broker Sales Representative/Princeton Residential MBA, ECO-Broker -2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com |Specialist, BeatriceBloom.com ecialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Princeton | 609-921-1900 e | 609-921-1900 Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 FOR MOREOffice PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO eton Office | 609-921-1900 atriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com ton Office | 609-921-1900 .com | BeatriceBloom.com 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

Princeton | 609-921-1900 FOR MOREOffice PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISITPrinceton 15LINDENLAN Princeton Of Offic

Princeton Offi Princ Prince Princ

Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 In the heart of downtown Princeton, a few blocks from Princeton University, sits a stunning home that c VISIT FOR 15LINDENLANE.INFO MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISITVISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO R900 PLAN, VISIT FOR 15LINDENLANE.INFO MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, 15LINDENLANE.INFO PRINCETON

PRINCETON

$1,649,000


WE’RE NOT JUST BREAKFAST ANYMORE!

Robbinsville

Princeton

Ewing

Kingston

West Windsor

Lawrenceville location coming soon! Formerly Michael’s Diner.

PROCA P CRCOI NCI A C C I N I Crosswicks • Pennington

Crosswicks • Pennington

getforky.com


VOLVO CARS BRIDGEWATER & PRINCETON Recipient of DealerRater’s Consumer Satisfaction Award for 2021

END OF SUMMER SAVINGS New 2021 Volvo

Lease For

SXC90 T5 AWD MOMENTUM

565

$

MSRP $53,290

Per Mo. x 36 Mos.1

$4,965 down, $0 security deposit, 1st mos payment due at signing

New 2021 Volvo

XC40 RECHARGE PURE ELECTRIC

New 2021 Volvo

Lease For

S60 T5 MOMENTUM AWD

365

$

MSRP $42,295

Per Mo. x 36 Mos.2

$3,665 down, $0 security deposit, 1st mos payment due at signing

New 2021 Volvo

XC40 T5 AWD MOMENTUM

MSRP $55,085

Lease For

539

$

Per Mo. x 36 Mos.3

OR

0

.99% APR X 60 Mos.+

$4,039 down, $0 security deposit, 1st mos payment due at signing.

New 2021 Volvo

Lease For

V60 T5 AWD CROSS COUNTRY

409

$

Lease For

MSRP $46,095

Per Mo. x 36 Mos.5

$3,889 down, $0 security deposit, 1st mos payment due at signing.

385

$

MSRP $36,795

Per Mo. x 36 Mos.4

$3,885 down, $0 security deposit, 1st mos payment due at signing.

New 2021 Volvo

Lease For

XC60 T5 AWD MOMENTUM

449

$

MSRP $45,095

Per Mo. x 36 Mos.6

$4,199 down, $0 security deposit, 1st mos payment due at signing.

*All offers Plus tax, title, license and doc fee. Prices are subject to change. With approved credit through Volvo Car Financial Services (VCFS). No security deposit required. Lessee is responsible for excess wear and mileage over 7,500 miles/year at $0.25 / mile. (1) Lease based on 2021 Volvo XC90 T5 AWD Momentum, includes destination charge and application of $2,300 Lease Bonus. (2) Lease based on 2021 Volvo S60 T5 AWD Momentum, includes destination charge and application of $3,700 Lease Bonus. (3) Lease based on 2021 Volvo XC40 Recharge Pure Electric, includes destination charge and application of $7,500 Lease Bonus. 10k miles. +Based on $17.09 per mo. per $1,000 financed. (4) Lease based on 2021 Volvo XC40 T5 AWD Momentum, includes destination charge and application of $500 Lease Bonus. (5) Lease based on 2021 Volvo V60 T5 AWD Cross Country, includes destination charge and application of $2,250 in Lease Bonas. (6) Lease based on 2021 Volvo XC60 T5 AWD Momentum, includes destination charge and application of $1,140 Lease Bonas. See dealer for details. Must take delivery of a new vehicle between August 3rd, 2021 and August 31st, 2021.

VOLVO CARS BRIDGEWATER

VOLVO CARS PRINCETON

(908) 526-7700

(609) 882-0600

1028 US-22, Somerville, NJ 08876

www.volvocarsbridgewater.com

2931 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648

www.volvocarsprinceton.com



Call Wild of the

Raising Awareness and Appreciation of Wolfdogs at Howling Woods Farm by Taylor Smith


F

ounded by animal lover Mike Hodanish, Howling Woods Farm in Jackson aims to educate the public about the true nature of wolves. In contrast to what many read as children in Little Red Riding Hood and observed in numerous cartoons, wolves and wolfdogs are actually submissive creatures that are more comfortable living within a pack of other wolves than being surrounded by people, highways, and fast cars. The modern world has not been easy on the plight of wolves. In much of America, wolves have been shot to extinction under the notion that they were violent, devilish creatures that would drag a child into the woods or pick apart a farmer’s animal herd, one-by-one. Hodanish tries to educate visitors to Howling Woods that this storyline is simply not true. Hodanish’s own experience with wolves began back in the 1980s when he was living in Southern Arizona, adjacent to the Sonoran Desert Museum. One night, a young, lone dog (that looked very much like a wolf) started wandering into his carport. It looked hungry and Hodanish and his roommate at the time began leaving scraps out for the animal. Eventually, Hodanish decided to adopt the dog as a pet; however, within the span of a few months, the dog doubled in size and its submissive, cautious behavior became extremely exaggerated. This, says Hodanish, was his first clue that the animal was, genetically, part wolf. Hodanish named the canine Heidi, and the two became extremely attached. On long walks through the mountains of the Sonoran Desert, Heidi and Hodanish would wander the natural landscape, enjoying the peace, solitude, and companionship of one another. Eventually, Hodanish relocated to New Jersey and brought Heidi with him. Heidi unfortunately contracted Lyme disease and, after suffering from subsequent kidney failure, passed away. After that, Hodanish’s job didn’t allow him to have a dog due to the amount of traveling involved. But his head and heart didn’t forget Heidi. Eventually, Hodanish adopted two wolf pups while living in Bordentown (much to the chagrin of his neighbors). The intimidating appearance of the dogs, combined with their occasional howling, left a few people concerned, but others would approach the fence line and ask Hodanish all about the animals, their curiosity peaked. Hodanish then moved to Jackson and settled into a more rural area nestled within the Pine Barrens and bordered by protected land. There, he sought to establish what is today Howling Woods Farm, a wolf and wolfdog hybrid sanctuary that is open by appointment only to visitors. As a nonprofit, the sanctuary seeks to educate the public about wolves, while also attempting to adopt out wolfdogs to suitable homes. One-hour tours at the farm are extremely informative. Visitors typically walk through three or four pens and visit with the wolfdogs, Howling Wolf Farm’s large wolfdogs pose for a group of visitors in February 2017. (Photo by Matthew DiFalco)

40 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021


Samson is a mix of wolf and Alaskan malamute. He and three other wolfdogs from Howling Woods Farm appeared in the 2010 film The Sorcerer’s Apprentice from Walt Disney Pictures. (Photo courtesy of Howling Woods Farm)

interacting with them and getting to observe their personalities. Just like people, says Hodanish, the animals at Howling Woods have their own personal preferences and mode of interacting with the human visitors. While some of the dogs may affectionately rest their giant paws on your chest for a playful “hello,” others are slightly more wary and will observe from a distance. Hodanish and his small team of volunteers also visit schools, libraries, scouting events, and fairs, where they attempt to answer any questions that people may have about wolves. Most people are surprised to learn how fearful wolves can be, along with how well they take care of their offspring. Wolves and wolfdogs become extremely anxiety ridden and depressed if they are forced into isolation, and they thrive in a pack system. For this reason, anyone who applies to adopt a wolfdog from Howling Woods must meet a strict series of requirements including the companionship of other preexisting dogs and no children.

“Most of the people that adopt our animals are senior couples that have time on their hands or younger folks in their twenties who have more time to spend with the animals, taking them to parks,” says Hodanish. “They also need to have a large, fenced-in yard. These aren’t house pets.” Adoptable wolfdogs will want to live primarily outside, so the overall backyard and home setting is an extremely important part of the application. The animals are dangerous with children, says Hodanish, primarily because you can’t predict the behavior of the child around the animal and the animal, in turn, doesn’t know how to respond. Applicants also must bring their preexisting dog (or dogs) to the sanctuary to see how they get along with the potential adoptee. The companionship aspect of the adoption process is key, says Hodanish, because the wolfdogs do not do well as solitary animals. “Out of every 100 applications, we have one successful adoption,” he says. “They have to want the animal for the right reasons.” So, how do these wolfdog hybrids find their way to Howling Woods Farm? Many of the animals were purchased from breeders, and once they grow to their full size and start to exhibit more wolf-like behaviors (as opposed to a domesticated dog) they are turned into shelters, and the shelters then contact Howling Woods. “Typically, by 7-8 months old, the dogs become aware of their unnatural surroundings and will develop separation anxiety and become destructive in the home,” says Hodanish. “Sometimes, when they get to the animal shelters, they are euthanized, and sometimes they contact us. We probably get two to three requests to take in wolfdogs every week, but we only have a certain amount of space, and I don’t want to take on more animals than we can handle.” When asked if there is a law in New Jersey that regulates how a public animal shelter should handle the arrival of a wolfdog, Hodanish says, “There is no law as to how a shelter responds to

No two wolfdogs are alike. Usually, they are a combination of wolf with Siberian husky, Alaskan malamute, or German shepherd, but can be mixed with other breeds as well. (Photo courtesy of Howling Woods Farm)

SEPTEMBER 2021 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 41


Today’s wolfdogs, like Rubix, are not the result of wild wolves breeding with domestic dogs. They are the result of dozens or more generations of wolfdogs bred with other wolfdogs. (Photo courtesy of Howling Woods Farm)

summer, horse troughs are filled with fresh water, so the animals can cool themselves off with a quick bath. By far, the wolfdogs dramatically prefer New Jersey winters to summers. Hodanish notes that the dogs will stay out all day in the freezing winter temperatures, and it is quite evident that they are relaxed, comfortable, and enjoying themselves when the thermometer drops to glacial levels. All the animals at Howling Woods are spayed, neutered, microchipped, and vaccinated. The older animals require extensive vet care. Ninety percent of Howling Woods’ funding comes from tour donations. The tours require a donation of $20 per person, but personal donations can also be made online at howlingwoods.org. To schedule a tour, call 732.534.5745 or email luv2howl@optonline.net. Adoptable animals can be viewed at howlingwoods.org/foradoption. Tours are Tuesday through Friday at 11am , 12pm , and 1pm . Weekend tours are on Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 7pm . Howling Woods is closed to the public on Mondays. Visit the website to learn more about how to have a howling good time at the sanctuary this fall.

receiving a wolfdog. Decisions are internal to the shelter and township. Sometimes, someone will have a purebred Alaskan malamute or Siberian husky, but if they tell the shelter that the dog is part wolf, the shelter may feel obligated to euthanize it. Other times, the shelters actually become fond of the wolfdogs and will contact us to rehome them.” Hodanish and his team do Embark testing (embarkvet.com) to determine if there is any wolf DNA in the dogs. This just involves taking a cheek swab from the dogs. The DNA testing is largely done for the personal knowledge of the staff. All the ambassador dogs, as they are known at Howling Woods, have had DNA testing. These are the animals that are typically included in public education events. According to Hodanish, the ambassador dogs are 30-90 percent wolf and can be walked on a leash into a building with people. “Most of the dogs that are primarily wolf are actually quite timid and afraid,” says Hodanish. “They stay away from people as much as they can, and for good reason — they don’t want to get shot by a human or run-over by a car.” Wolfdogs can weigh anywhere from 60-120 lbs. and are built more like a deer than a dog — with long legs and a high, narrow, chest. “When they lose their winter coats in the summer, they look about 30 pounds lighter,” says Hodanish. The canines eat a diet of raw chicken leg quarters supplemented with kibble and other nutrients. All the animals prefer to live outside on the sanctuary’s seven-acre property. In the Howling Woods Farm provides learning experiences to the public about wolves and wolfdogs. (Photo by Matthew DiFalco)

42 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021


Serving Central NJ and Bucks County, PA

Serving Central NJ and Bucks County, PA

CUSTOM POOLS • HARDSCAPING OUTDOOR LIVING •HARDSCAPING LANDSCAPING CUSTOM POOLS • CUSTOM POOLS OUTDOOR LIVING •LIVING LANDSCAPING COMMERCIAL SNOW REMOVAL HARDSCAPING • OUTDOOR • LANDSCAPING COMMERCIAL SNOW REMOVAL Looking for a yard that complements Looking a yard that home? complements yourforbeautiful your beautiful home?

Call Cedar Creek Landscapes of Pennington, NJ Call Cedar Creek Landscapes of Pennington, NJ at 609-403-6270 today. at 609-403-6270 today. www.cedarcreeklandscapes.com www.cedarcreeklandscapes.com


Inspirational thoughts during this time 944 Stuart Road Princeton of Covid-19 Hanging in a Princeton house that is coming on the market this fall. (Designed by the owner's child years ago.) I hope you find some inspiration in this piece. Rear View Kitchen

Family Room

$1,795,000

Living Room

Dining Room

And a Pool!

H H H HH H

Call / Text 609.658.3771 Call / Text 609.658.3771 E: HeidiHartmannHomes@gmail.com E: HeidiHartmannHomes@gmail.com W: HeidiHartmannHomes.com W: HeidiHartmannHomes.com

Heidi A. Hartmann

Heidi A.Sales Hartmann Associate Sales Associate


944 Stuart Road Princeton

Rear View Kitchen

Family Room

$1,795,000

Living Room

Dining Room

And a Pool!

H H H

Call / Text 609.658.3771 E: HeidiHartmannHomes@gmail.com W: HeidiHartmannHomes.com

Heidi A. Hartmann Sales Associate


Weddings | Elopements | Retreats | Luxurious Accommodations

Rustic Elegance at A Faraway Place Close to Home 6 Woolverton Road, Stockton NJ

Wolverton.indd 1

609-397-0802

woolvertoninn.com

8/25/21 12:51 PM

Pure Golf

|

Timeless Retreat

|

Always Welcoming

EXCLUSIVELY LOOKAWAY The only Top 20 Pennsylvania golf course in Bucks County, Lookaway Golf Club is Bucks County’s “place to be”. For current Membership opportunities, including our unique Preview Membership Program, please call us at 215-794-5727 or email MembershipSales@LookawayGolf.com LGC.PM.9x5.406.2020_2.indd 46 | PRINCETON MAGAZINE1

SEPTEMBER 2021

To learn more visit LookawayGolf.com

8/23/20 10:25 AM


WE’RE WE’RE GROWING! GROWING! WE’RE AGE GRADE AGE 22 -GROWING! GRADE 66

AGE 2 -expanding GRADE 6 campus! Comevisit visit our expanding Come our campus! Come visit our expanding campus! Toschedule schedule appointment: To appointment: To schedulean an appointment: (609) 924-8126 or admissions@princetonjuniorschool.org (609) 924-8126 or admissions@princetonjuniorschool.org (609) 924-8126 or admissions@princetonjuniorschool.org

princetonjuniorschool.org

princetonjuniorschool.org

princetonjuniorschool.org princetonjuniorschool.org princetonjuniorschool.org

One of America’s 56 Greatest Old-School PizzeriasPR Junior QP.indd

princetonjuniorschool.org 1

8/27/21 9:27 AM

William P. Boxer, MD, FACP

Direct primary care......in your home or mine Pennington, NJ • 609-293-3904 • www.DrBoxerAtHome.com

(609) 921-8041

We now serve gluten-free pizza and pasta! 339 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ 08540

Monday 11:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Tuesday - Friday 11:30 a.m. - 10:30 p.m. Saturday 4 p.m. - 10:30 p.m. • Sunday 4 p.m. - 9 p.m.

William P. Boxer, MD, FACP William P.care......in Boxer, FACP Direct primary yourMD, home or mine

Pennington, NJ • 609-293-3904 • –www.DrBoxerAtHome.com Limited availability signhome up today! Direct primary care......in your or mine Pennington, NJ • 609-293-3904 • www.DrBoxerAtHome.com SEPTEMBER 2021 PRINCETON MAGAZINE |

47


88 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021


Art Art and and Athletics Athletics JAMES FIORENTINO’S PASSION FOR BOTH LEADS TO AN AMAZING CAREER

BY

JUSTIN FEIL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

CHARLES R. PLOHN

James Fiorentino intertwines art and athletics in strokes of watercolor genius. At an early age he was best known for his athletic prowess, but he already was showing promise as an artist. He rose quickly and prominently to national attention when he began combining his two passions as a teenager, and remains one of the most decorated sports watercolorists in the country.

SEPTEMBER 2021 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 49


T

he Flemington house that the 44-year-old Fiorentino shares with his wife, Jessica, a social worker in the Princeton Public Schools system, and their 12and 8-year-old boys, is a collage of more than 30 years of colors and collections. A small room just inside the front door is overflowing with collector items and autographed works, an ode to how Fiorentino’s passions for painting and sports first united. A table buried under side-by-side piles of Fiorentino’s recent paintings and giclees primed to be sent to buyers, galleries, and shows sits just outside his studio room. A small TV hangs in one corner of his studio, looking down on the surprisingly neat art table where he paints every day. One wall features a mix of art and books while Fiorentino’s paintings adorn the three other walls from floor to ceiling. Through the studio and down a set of stairs are more pieces brightening the basement level. Fiorentino’s other works adorn museums, galleries, companies, and private collector’s homes around the country and even internationally. His realistic watercolors and illustrations of sports figures and celebrities, as well as wildlife and landscapes, are highly sought. Art and athletics have been passions he first balanced as a boy, and then later combined when art became a profession. “I think the art came first, but not by much,” said Fiorentino. “My whole life I’ve been playing sports and painting. So from when I was a little kid, I’ve been drawing and painting and went to private lessons.” His first painting lessons came from Carol Gadek

50 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021

Skapinetz when he was just 8. She agreed to teach him because of a sports connection. “He was the youngest private student I ever took,” said Skapinetz. “I knew his family through Little League in Middlesex.” Fiorentino grew up a fan of Yankee great Don Mattingly, and admired shortstops like Derek Jeter, Barry Larkin, and Alex Rodriguez. He went on to star in their mold as a power hitting, smooth fielding firstteam All-State shortstop for Middlesex High School, which will induct him into their Hall of Fame next year. He also started for four years at shortstop at Drew University, where he majored in fine art — though already he had been painting professionally for years. “When he arrived at Drew, he was probably the only student who was paying his own way,” said Drew Professor Michael Peglau. “He was paying for his whole package with painting.” Fiorentino’s interest in trading cards and memorabilia spawned his early sports work. He painted Joe DiMaggio at 14 and brought the piece to a show to try to get an autograph from the Hall of Famer. It worked, and soon clients were coming to him. His art was winning contests and a year later, when he was 15, he became the youngest artist displayed in the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum for his rendering of Reggie Jackson. It added to the thrill of a return trip to the Hall of Fame with his American Legion baseball team. “We would travel to Cooperstown every summer,” he said. “Hitting a homer at Doubleday Field was exciting because I was the kid who had the painting in the Hall of Fame and then I hit a home run there.” Fiorentino was commissioned at 17 by Ted

Williams to paint the 20 greatest hitters of all time and asked to be official artist to Cal Ripken Jr.’s 2131 project, and he then began to see a professional future in artwork. “I don’t think a lot of guys and girls knew that they were going to do something specific at such an early age,” said Fiorentino. “All through school I was working, but I was also learning all different sorts of art. I had already established clients at that point when I was 15, 16, 17 years old and working with all these players throughout Drew.” Hall of Fame athletes were calling Fiorentino’s dorm room to commission his evocative watercolors. He worked with Topps on a collection for the first time in 1999 when he was still in college. That came five years after he was the youngest to ever win Beckett Magazine’s annual sports art competition. Fiorentino was passed out of Drawing 1 at Drew, a nod to his ability as an illustrator that is a key to being an accomplished watercolorist. In 1998, he became the youngest artist inducted into the New York Society of Illustrators. Peglau taught Fiorentino in Drawing 2, two painting classes, and an independent study and served as his adviser. Peglau, a former player himself, would often talk baseball as much as art with Fiorentino. “He was very, very hard working,” said Peglau. “He really listened. He was extremely easy to work with. A lot of athletes that get far enough along, they have to put in an endless amount of work.” Peglau believes Fiorentino’s athletic background and experience resonate in his artwork, citing his painting of a glistening with sweat Whitey Ford that


SEPTEMBER 2021 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 51


bared the hard nature of being a pitcher. Skapinetz says Fiorentino was blessed with an incredible eye. It helped give him a strong starting point as he honed his art skills. “There’s no doubt it’s God given,” said Fiorentino. “I just wanted to color and draw all the time.” He focused on watercolor in part because of the influence of Skapinetz and Sonja Weir, the private teacher he went to later during his early teens. Skapinetz lost touch when she moved out of state, but recently found Fiorentino’s work. “When I started seeing what he was doing, it blew me away,” she said. “But it didn’t surprise me. He’s taken it to another level.” Watercolor is unforgiving — the hardest of all painting media. Make a mistake and it can’t be painted over. Watercolorists need to work quickly, a part of the process that Fiorentino enjoys along with the challenges of making his portraits and sports paintings as realistic and accurate as possible. “Watercolor sets me apart,” said Fiorentino. “I’m still learning and challenging myself. I love being able to show that to people and they say, ‘Wow, I can’t believe that’s watercolor, how are you doing that?’” Fiorentino begins by sketching out the piece. He paints in his studio often with the TV or music on in the background, mixed with the chaotic sounds of family life, something that he is used to from painting in his family living room while growing up. He can finish a painting in a couple of days or a couple of

52 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021

weeks, depending on its size. There is a distinctive style to his work, fashioned once he grasped the painting process in those early private lessons. He experiments with new ways to put his watercolors on the thick smooth paper that he uses, often using household materials for certain techniques that he has developed.

“That’s all self-taught,” said Fiorentino. “That’s just 20-something years of doing it, and every day you’re sort of figuring out things. That’s why everybody has their own style.” Sports subjects seemed a natural pursuit, though Fiorentino is also lauded for his wildlife and landscape

work that is inspired by his support of conservationist efforts. He is a trustee of the Raptor Trust of New Jersey and of D&R Greenway Land Trust and does work with Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey, which recently relocated to Princeton. “In the private lessons I was doing wildlife and landscapes and things like that, which I did love, but I loved painting baseball players and football players,” said Fiorentino. “I remember a juror saying, you should stick with the landscapes and don’t paint sports. I tell people, ‘I stayed true to the way I felt.’ I still am today. I’m influenced by certain things. I love painting everyday life, I love doing landscapes and nature, but I still love painting sports so that’s always been a thing for me.” Fiorentino always had a strong interest in the history of sports, particularly baseball, and he gravitated toward painting former rather than current players. He built a friendship with the late Yogi Berra after meeting him as a teenager and talked baseball with Williams. Fiorentino often talks baseball with his clients, many of whom have become friends, and he finds his own athletic experience a helpful backdrop. “I think that has an influence on how you set up a painting, certain shots, and how you want to depict an athlete,” said Fiorentino. “The passion for knowing how great a player is and knowing how good they have to be, that gets you excited.” Art opened the door for Fiorentino to meet legendary athletes like Muhammed Ali and


Mickey Mantle, political figures such as President Joe Biden, and historic figures like Buzz Aldrin and Desmond Tutu. He has painted trading cards for Topps, Upper Deck, and Kellogg’s; had work featured on the covers of Sports Market Report and Beckett magazines; and done an impressive collection of horse racing-related art for charity in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. His painting of Roberto Clemente is kept in the Hall of Fame’s permanent collection. The late Congressman John Lewis hung Fiorentino’s painting of him in his Washington, D.C. office. This spring, he contributed locally to Mercer County College’s inaugural Hall of Fame induction ceremony. The breadth of his work is exhaustive. “This is literally all I’ve done,” said Fiorentino. “To make a living for 20-some years and a successful living being an artist and illustrator and being known for sports has been a dream.” What continues to interest and drive Fiorentino now are chances to paint new and emerging athletes and history-changing subjects, to continue to see his own work evolve, and to develop new projects. Card collecting and memorabilia made a sharp uptick during the COVID-19 pandemic, and his collection “There Is Only One: The Most Iconic Trading Cards of All Time” will debut at the Philly Show from September 24-26 at Valley Forge Casino outside Philadelphia before it travels the country on display. The paintings are large 22x30-inch replicas of trading cards, which he has never done at this scale. It follows last spring’s release of his paintings at the other end of the scale,

“The Topps 2021 Transcendent Collection Hall of Fame Edition,” which consisted of 50 boxes, priced at $23,000 each, that included one trading-card sized painting apiece from Fiorentino along with 46 other cards autographed by Hall of Fame baseball players. Unlike the 1999 Topps collection in which his 11x14 paintings were shrunk down, he painted the 2021 collection on their original card size. “The hard part was drawing them,” said Fiorentino. “You’re drawing so small, there’s not a lot of room for error. When you draw or paint larger, there’s a lot more room to be off a little and still look good. The challenge with those bigger trading cards I’m doing is all the detail and the writing.” Fiorentino regularly makes appearances for charity work and shows his art around the country. His “Baseball in Black and White: The Watercolors” is on display November 17-December 31 at Studio 7 Fine Art Gallery in Bernardsville. Fiorentino’s experience makes him an elder statesman among sports artists, but he isn’t slowing down in his fourth decade of painting. Coming out of the pandemic, he has found himself as busy as ever with more than a year of work lined up. He ambitiously is building his own brand, Fiorentino Elite, in which he will paint the most legendary athletes of all time on a larger

scale and higher end than he ever has done to kick off the next step of a career built on his passion for art and athletics. “Maybe I’ll be doing other forms of pieces,” said Fiorentino. “There are a lot more everyday portraits of people I’d like to do, expanding on the sports art, which I never would have thought I’d say, but pushing myself to the front. Even though people may consider me at the front, I still want to push to be the best sports artist ever, which is a nice goal to have.”


EXHIBITIONS 2021 MICHENER ART MUSEUM IT’S PERSONAL : THE ART OF ROBERT BECK 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pennsylvania JULY 30, 2021 through JANUARY 2, 2022

MORPETH CONTEMPORARY ROBERT BECK : RECENT WORK 43 West Broad Street in Hopewell, New Jersey OCTOBER 9 through 31, 2021 Visit RobertBeck.net for new work and information about upcoming exhibitions. Robert Beck, Moby Dick (detail), 2012, oil on panel, 24 x 40 inches

Anton’s At the swAn

Locally Inspired Cuisine, Impeccable Service in a Sophisticated Romantic Setting

43 South Main St LaMbertviLLe, nJ 08530 (609) 397-1960 54 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021 Antons QP.indd 1

8/26/21 4:34 PM


355 355Route Route 601, 601, Belle Belle Mead, Mead,NJ NJ 08502 08502

Phone: 908-281-6600 Phone: 908-281-6600 Fax: 908-281-9672 Fax: 908-281-9672

Hardscape Patios • Terraces Driveways Landscape Outdoor Living Spaces • Landscape Lighting Maintenance

www.sunsetcreationsinc.com

www.sunsetcreationsinc.com www.sunsetcreationsinc.com

NJNLA • CNLP • ICPI • TECHO PRO • BBB ACCREDITED

NJNLA •• CNLP PRO • BBB ACCREDITED NJNLA CNLP••ICPI ICPI• •TECHO TECHO PRO • BBB ACCREDITED


Family Owned and Operated

FLESCH’S ROOF Family Owned and Oper & Sheet Metal FLESCH’S ROOFING Family Owned andCo., Operated FLESCH’S the Princeton over 25 & SheetServing Metal Co., community Inc forRO

FLESCH’S ROOC & Sheet Metal

Serving the Princeton community for 25 years INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTO

& Sheet Metal Cof

the Princeton INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIALServing • HISTORICAL WORKcommunity

Serving the Princeton community for ove INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL •

We specializ

INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HIS

Slate ✧ Copper ✧

We speci

Shingles ✧ Metal

Slate ✧ Copp

Shingles ✧ M

We alW WeG Gutte

A Tradition of Quality since 1963

_cOZWbg Q`OTba[O\aVW^ aW\QS '&

`]dWRW\U _cOZWbg Q`OTba[O\aVW^ aW\QS '& >`]dWRW\U _cOZWbg Q`OTba[O\aVW^ aW\QS '& >`]dWRW\U _cOZWbg Q`OTba[O\aVW^ aW\QS '&

>`]dWRW\U _cOZWbg Q`OTba[O\aVW^ aW\QS '& >`]dWRW\U _cOZWbg Q`OTba[O\aVW^ aW\QS '& 3\VO\QW\U bVS ZWTS W\ g]c` V][S >`]dWRW\U _cOZWbg Q`OTba[O\aVW^ aW\QS '& 3\VO\QW\U bVS ZWTS W\ g]c` V][S 3\VO\QW\U bVS ZWTS W\ g]c` V][S 3\VO\QW\U bVS ZWTS W\ g]c` V][S >`]dWRW\U _cOZWbg Q`OTba[O\aVW^ aW\QS '& 3\VO\QW\U bVS ZWTS W\ g]c` V][S 1cab][ 0cWZRW\U @S\]dObW]\a 1OPW\Sb`g 1cab][ 0cWZRW\U @S\]dObW]\a 1OPW\Sb`g 3\VO\QW\U bVS ZWTS W\ g]c` V][S

R

Gut

FullyF

O\QW\U bVS ZWTS W\ g]c` V][S

REGENT

1cab][ 0cWZRW\U @S\]dObW]\a 1OPW\Sb`g 1cab][ 0cWZRW\U @S\]dObW]\a 1OPW\Sb`g 3\VO\QW\U bVS ZWTS W\ g]c` V][S >`]dWRW\U _cOZWbg Q`OTba[O\aVW^ aW\QS '&

3\VO\QW\U bVS ZWTS W\ g]c` V][S 1cab][ 0cWZRW\U @S\]dObW]\a 1OPW\Sb`g 1cab][ 0cWZRW\U @S\]dObW]\a 1OPW\Sb`g

0cWZRW\U @S\]dObW]\a 1OPW\Sb`g Flooring • Kitchen • Bath 1cab][ 0cWZRW\U @S\]dObW]\a 1OPW\Sb`g 1cab][ 0cWZRW\U @S\]dObW]\a 1OPW\Sb`g >`]dWRW\U _cOZWbg Q`OTba[O\aVW^ aW\QS '&

Woodworking & Building Co.

#7 Route 31 North | Pennington, NJ 08534

(609)737-2466

3\VO\QW\U bVS ZWTS W\ g]c` V][S $ ' #' % &# Since 1980 $ ' #' % &# `Og\]`e]]Re]`YW\U Q][

`Og\]`e]]Re]`YW\U Q][

$ ' #' % &#

1cab][ 0cWZRW\U @S\]dObW]\a 1OPW\Sb`g `Og\]`e]]Re]`YW\U Q][

Serving the Princeton Area since 1963 Find us on Facebook and Instagram

$ ' #' % &# `Og\]`e]]Re]`YW\U Q][

Raynor 6th.indd 1

Woodworking & Building Co. $ ' #' % &#

8/26/21 12:07 PM

$ ' #' % &# `Og\]`e]]Re]`YW\U Q][ Since 1980 $ ' #' % &# `Og\]`e]]Re]`YW\U Q][ `Og\]`e]]Re]`YW\U Q][

$ ' #' % &#

`Og\]`e]]Re]`YW\U Q][PRINCETON • NJ

$ ' #' % &# `Og\]`e]]Re]`YW\U Q][

$ ' #' % &# `Og\]`e]]Re]`YW\U Q][

Nursery & Landscape Service, Inc.

133 Carter Road, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (609) 921Ͳ9248 / www.kalesnursery.com

56 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021

FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY S

Ful We specialize609-394in Slate ✧ Copper

We also do Gutter work and Roof Maintenance

FREE ESTIMATES Rubber ✧ Shingles • QUALI

Metal and Cedar Roofing

609-3

Fully Insured FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK

609-394-2427

LIC#13VH02047300


How will your new kitchen look on you? Try on a Wolf induction range for size. With designer kitchen vignettes featuring the latest innovations from Sub-Zero, Wolf, and Cove, The Living Kitchen offers you a hands-on experience to help you envision new appliances in your home.

2720 U.S. 1 Business • Lawrence Township, NJ • 609-882-1444 • www.mrsgs.com


A Storyteller and

His Conscience (PHOTO CREDIT: REBECCA WILCOX, PURDUE UNIVERSITY )

88 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021


Economics Professors Anne Case and Angus Deaton — Beyond “Deaths of Despair” By Donald Gilpin

SEPTEMBER 2021 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 89


Y

ou might think that Anne Case and her husband Angus Deaton, both economics professors emeritus at Princeton University, would be the epitome of ivory tower academics detached from the vicissitudes of the everyday world. The title of the book they recently co-wrote, Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism, might lead you to believe that that ivory tower would be a dark and gloomy place to inhabit. On both counts you would be wrong. Deaton and Case — or “Sir Angus and Lady Angus” since 2016 when Deaton, a 2015 Nobel laureate, was knighted at Buckingham Palace by Prince William, or “Dada and Lady Anna” as they are known by their grandchildren — joined me for a Zoom interview in July from their home on Pretty Brook Road in Princeton. Economics may have been labeled as “the dismal science,” but Case and Deaton are a warm, engaging, and entertaining couple — committed to making an impact on one of the most troubling problems plaguing our country, as they wield significant weight in the corridors of power. Deaths of Despair, which depicts the decline of the American dream amidst a surge in deaths of working-class men, has been cited as one of the most influential books written in the past decade.

“Economics is the language of power,” said Case. “We would be delighted if people in positions to make decisions read our book and took it on board. It’s clear that some of them have. Janet Yellen, secretary of the treasury, is a fan of this work. Cecilia Rouse, who was the dean of the [Princeton University] School of Public and International Affairs and is now the chair of the Council of Economic Advisors, is also a fan of the work. So, we’re really hoping that we’ll be able to make some progress through the writing.” As they state in the preface to Deaths of Despair, “We hope this book … will help put us back on track to make the progress in this century that we have generally made in the past. The future of capitalism should be a future of hope and not of despair.” “OUT OF DRAGONS’ EGGS”

The couple described the very different routes each had taken into the world of academics, the field of economics, their focus on poverty, and on their journeys to Princeton. Deaton provided the short version: “Economists come out of dragons’ eggs.” Case filled in the details. “Neither of our parents were educators,” she explained, “but they did believe in education. When I went to college, I studied economics and thought I wanted to go out and do good, so I came to Princeton and studied at what

“We went to the Oval Office. President Obama came to the door and opened it. I put out my hand. He shook my hand, and I said, ‘I’d like to introduce Anne,’ and he said, ‘Professor Case needs no introduction. I’m a great fan of her work. You guys come in here and we’re going to talk about that paper you’ve just written.’”

—Angus Deaton

“I think most academics would tell you that no one in power listens to them,” Deaton said. “We can’t say that. People in power listen to us, and we know that the people who are running the country know the work.” He recalled the couple’s visit with President Obama in the White House following the announcement of Deaton’s 2015 Nobel Prize for economics. He continued, “If they’re not doing something about it, it’s because there’s really nothing they’re able to do. One of the stories in our book is about just how difficult it is to reform things, with a system that’s helping keep rich people rich, often at the expense of poor people.”

60 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021

was then the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.” Deciding that getting a Ph.D. in economics would be “a step along the way of going out to do good,” Case proceeded to earn her doctorate from Princeton in 1988, and realized, “I really loved the research. I loved teaching. I loved the idea that I could be in the classroom and also do field work. I was entirely smitten with life as an academic.” Case worked as an assistant professor at Harvard University for three years before returning to Princeton’s School of Public and International Affairs, where she has served on

the faculty for the past 30 years, becoming the Alexander Stewart 1886 Professor of Economics and Public Affairs in 2007. An award-winning scholar, Case has written extensively on health economics and currently serves on the Committee on National Statistics. She described her interests that led up to their landmark 2015 paper and Deaths of Despair five years later. “As long as I’ve been an economist, I’ve been interested in how poor people cope, how they keep body and soul together,” she said. She did research work in South Africa for about 12 years before deciding to tackle problems closer to home. “I realized it was time to tie off that work in Africa and begin to look at what was going on in the U.S. And that’s about when Angus and I started this project.” Deaton, who grew up in Scotland and has both British and American citizenship, described a different journey to Princeton and to the pinnacle of the world of academics. “Neither of my parents graduated from high school,” he said. “My dad started out life as a coal miner and wanted me to have a much better education than he had. My mother was not so convinced. She was a carpenter’s daughter and thought working with your hands was a really good idea. But she liked to tell stories, and I think that was something important I learned from her and inherited from her.” Starting out as a mathematician, Deaton attended the University of Cambridge in England. He had always read a lot, and the transition into economics came naturally. “To me one of the great things about economics is that it combines mathematics with history,” he said. He described contrasts between himself and Case in their approaches to the field of economics, contrasts that have contributed to their success in collaboration as researchers and writers. “I’m not sure I was dedicated to doing good,” Deaton continued in reflecting on his early interest in economics, “not as dedicated as Anne was. She’s the conscience of the two of us. I like to play with data and see patterns, which is what this book was almost entirely about — just seeing those patterns.” Deaton described economics as the “imperial science,” which confers a certain power to its practitioners. “We can trespass in a way that’s harder for sociologists or demographers or political scientists,” he said. “Our training trains us about how to handle data, and that’s a big advantage in doing this sort of work.” Stressing the importance of drawing from many different fields in working to address problems, Case added that Deaths of Despair would not have been as rich and extensive as it is if they had not read sociology, psychology, and history. “We’re believers in the interplay,” she said. “We don’t believe that economics should take over all of social science. We need to coordinate with others.”


Sir Angus is knighted by Prince William at Buckingham Palace in 2016 as part of the Queen’s Birthday Honours list. “It’s a wonderful tribute to scholarship, and much more fun than having to find a horse, a suit of armor, and a lance, so to ride into battle for the Queen,” said Deaton. (Photo courtesy of Anne Case and Angus Deaton)

Deaton pointed out that he has “always been interested in what makes people tick, why some people are poorer than other people.” He continued, “I began my life studying savings and spending patterns and differences between people, and it’s not a big step from there into studying poverty.” He emphasized that poverty is about much more than just money. “It’s about your health,” he said. “It’s about your education. It’s about deprivation in multiple forms, so I think both of us moved towards health-related things over the years.” Deaton was happily and successfully ensconced at the University of Bristol (England), “a lovely place which I really liked,” as a professor of econometrics, when Margaret Thatcher became prime minister in 1979. Thatcher, he claims, precipitated his emigration to the United States. “It was Mrs. Thatcher who did it,” he said. “Mrs. Thatcher was taking a lot of the budget away from British universities, and it became very unpleasant at Bristol and very difficult to work there. I visited Princeton between 1979 and 1980, and I had friends here in the economics department, and when I made it clear that I would consider moving to the U.S., this was one place it was suggested I come. I’ve never regretted it.” Deaton joined the Princeton University faculty in 1983 and is currently the Dwight D. Eisenhower Professor of International Affairs

and Professor of Economics and International Affairs at SPIA and the Department of Economics. Since 2017 he has held a joint appointment with the University of Southern California, where he is the Presidential Professor of Economics. He was previously widowed, with two children born in 1970 and 1971. Deaton and Case were married in 1997. “ALPHA DOGS”

A marriage is one thing, but a working partnership between two strong-minded writers and economists is another. Despite their extraordinary successes over the years as coauthors, it has not always been easy. “When we first got married, we tried to work together,” Deaton recalled. “I remember we were writing a paper together and we were on New Jersey Transit coming back from New York. By the end we were barely speaking to each other. We were so angry.” Case has not forgotten the incident. “We literally fought over every word,” she said. “So that wasn’t going to work if we were going to write a book together. We’re both sort of alpha dogs, so we had to figure out how this was going to work.” She continued, “We worked on an outline, then a chapter outline. Then Angus would take the first stab at the writing, and I was the numbers person, and then we would kind of flip around and each do what the other one had been

doing and clean it up or reword it or whatever, understanding that it was something that could break, that it wasn’t just a given that this was going to work well.” Their dedication to the work and the collaboration prevailed. Case went on, “I think we almost felt like — it’s a little strong to say this, but I think we almost felt as if we were on a mission. We really wanted this to work. We really thought it was important to get the word out, so we were willing to check our egos at the door and just plow into the work, more so than we might have otherwise.” “Also, we’ve found it works,” Deaton added. He went on to point out a particular strategy that helps the collaboration: “We’ve often gone to nice places when we have a deadline to write something.” The introduction to Deaths of Despair describes how the book “was born in a cabin in Montana,” where they spend August each year, in the town of Varney Ridge on the Madison River overlooking the mountains of the Madison Range. They were especially looking forward to the trip this year, and after the intense pace of their work over the past year they were hoping to find time for rest and recreation. “So, we booked two fishing trips a week instead of one,” Deaton said. LIFE-CHANGING HONORS

Case and Deaton talked about how the events of SEPTEMBER 2021 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 61


“This is our home, and I love the fact that when I walk down the street I often see people I know, and I stop and chat, catch up a bit. You feel like you’re part of a community here and that’s enormously important, that kind of connection.” —Anne Case 2015 changed their lives. In early October of that year Deaton was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his work in helping to achieve economic reform and reduce poverty by first illuminating individuals’ consumption choices. “His work has helped transform the fields of microeconomics, macroeconomics, and development economics,” read the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences citation. Case and Deaton’s landmark paper, “Rising Morbidity and Mortality in Midlife Among White Non-Hispanic Americans in the 21st Century,” came out less than a month later. “We’d just recovered from the tsunami that came with the Nobel Prize,” said Deaton, “but the tsunami associated with the paper was much, much more overwhelming.” Case and Deaton’s carefully documented discovery that the American dream was in decline;

that mortality rates were rising significantly among middle-aged, white, non-Hispanic men, particularly the less-educated; and that hundreds of thousands in the U.S. were dying “deaths of despair” from suicide, drugs and alcohol abuse sent shock waves throughout the country. In following up on their discovery over the next five years, they expanded their research leading up to the publication of Deaths of Despair in 2020. “There is something going on in America that is different, and that is particularly toxic for the working class,” they wrote in the book’s introduction. “Much of this book is concerned with trying to find out just what that something might be.” In 2015, in the days between the announcement of the Nobel Prize and the award ceremony in Stockholm, Case and Deaton were invited to the White House. “We went to the Oval Office,” he said. “President Obama came

Deaton and Case were recipients of the 2017 Franklin Founder Award, one of the numerous accolades they have received for their work in economics. (Photo courtesy of Anne Case and Angus Deaton)

62 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021

to the door and opened it. I put out my hand. He shook my hand, and I said, ‘I’d like to introduce Anne,’ and he said, ‘Professor Case needs no introduction. I’m a great fan of her work. You guys come in here and we’re going to talk about that paper you’ve just written.’” Case added, “He gave us very good advice. We had been grappling with the fact in our first paper that these deaths from suicide, drugs, and alcohol were happening to white people who don’t face overt discrimination. It was this group where all of the dysfunctions were taking place.” She continued, “He said, ‘You need to make sure you look at what happened in the Black community in the 1960s and ’70s, because that’s the point at which a lot of the dysfunctions you see now happening in the white working class were happening in the Black working class.’ And that was incredibly helpful as we made our way through thinking about how to put this group into the broader picture of what has happened in the U.S.” PRINCETON LOCALS

Case and Deaton’s emeritus status does not seem to have any correlation to retirement, as they continue to be an active, visible presence at the University and around town. Case will be teaching graduate courses this fall on Poverty, Inequality, and Health in the World and Economic Analysis of Development. “The local community has always been interested in hearing about our work,” said Deaton. “Non-University people in Princeton like to know what’s going on at Princeton University.” Case and Deaton have spoken a number of times at the Princeton Public Library, and participated in several events at the Nassau Club, the Center of Theological Inquiry, and with the Old Guard of Princeton. They have also bought burial plots in the Princeton Cemetery, “next to Grover Cleveland,” Deaton reported. “This is our home,” said Case, “and I love the fact that when I walk down the street I often see people I know, and I stop and chat, catch up a bit. You feel like you’re part of a community here and that’s enormously important, that kind of connection.” Princeton also seems to fulfill two of Case and Deaton’s shared lifelong passions: for music and fish. “At Princeton we love the fact that there are concerts at the University and lectures, open to the public, where everyone is welcome,” said Case. “The town has a real sense of self, and we’re happy to be a part of that.” Deaton expressed his love of fish and fishing. “We eat a lot of fish in Scotland,” he said, and he noted his disappointment when he lived in England to find that “the fish was terrible, and I hated it.” When he first came to Princeton there was no fish shop, but he and Case are now very happy to have Nassau Street Seafood in town. He added, “We know them well and they know us well, and we’re in there often.”


An avid fly fisherman, Deaton is not entirely happy with the Stony Brook. “It has trout in it, but it’s not what you’d call a fly-fishing stream,” he said. “I have fished in the Stony Brook, but only in desperation.”

enormous hype by the people who have benefited from the system, and that’s going to be really hard.” There are potential solutions, Deaton pointed

LOOKING AHEAD: “A DANGEROUS POSITION”

Unsurprisingly, life for Case and Deaton in the 18 months since Deaths of Despair came out has been extremely busy. There were many questions early in the pandemic, with callers asking what COVID-19 would mean for deaths of despair. But there was no data available and little Case and Deaton could say definitively. A long, complicated international book tour, which was originally scheduled to start at Labyrinth Books on Nassau Street, was conducted almost entirely through Zoom readings and discussions online. “I believe the book continues to have legs,” Case said, “because we haven’t solved the problems that were there that we think are structurally undergirding this mid-life mortality. Because we haven’t dealt with those, the problems aren’t just going to solve themselves.” Deaton went on, “I really think we’re in a dangerous position. In the long run the American economy has been working well for well-educated elites. But it’s not working well for everyone else, and that is not a sustainable situation. We’ll see

out, but not the willingness to implement those solutions. “We have the remedies,” he said. You would have thought, just to take an example, that we’d give the IRS more funding to collect what is

due, right? Well, there’s a huge uproar about that from the right, saying ‘How dare you try to make us pay the taxes that we owe?’ Well, if you can’t do that, you know, it’s going to be really hard.” Insisting that he remains optimistic, “at least in the evening when we’ve had a glass of wine or two with a meal,” Deaton went on to note that there is evidence of progress. “I think our work has actually helped, because before our work a lot of people would say, ‘You know these people are actually not doing so bad. You’re just not measuring it right. The price index hasn’t been going up as much as you think. Poor people have actually done really well over the past 50 years. All this pessimistic stuff is from Marxists, Communists, or something. But when you tell people that they’re dying — you might lie about your paycheck, but you don’t lie about being dead. And so I think that had a big impact, especially among conservatives who thought that everything was OK.” Case and Deaton will be pursuing their ongoing research and their mission to combat these deaths of despair and to reshape the future of capitalism. “This fall will be very busy,” said Case. “A lot more quantitative research papers will come out of the book, and we’re trying to write them at a level that the average person can just pick up and read. There’s a lot of work to be done.” Deaton added, “We love Princeton. We’re very grateful to both the University and the community for giving us such a great place to live and work.”

PHS ClaSS of 1968 SCHolarSHiP fund SUPPORT A FIRST-GENERATION SENIOR!

Please send your tax-deductible donation to:

Trisha Volk Princeton Area Community Foundation PO Box 825454 Philadelphia, PA 19182-5454

The Princeton High School Class of 1968 annually awards a scholarship to a first-generation PHS graduating senior to continue their education. The senior is selected by the PHS administration and the scholarship is administered by the Princeton Area Community Foundation. We have raised $70,000 from our Classmates. Currently about 4% is distributed annually. We are pleased to announce that three awards have already been granted. Won’t you join with the Class of ’68 and support a qualifying senior? Learn to Live and Live to Learn.

Checks payable to:

Princeton Area Community Foundation Please note on the check — PHS Class of 1968 Scholarship Fund

ClassOf1968-HP.indd 1

Donate online – visit www.pacf.org • In the upper, right-hand corner of the screen, click ‘Donate Now’ • Click ‘support a specific fund’

• Enter amount of gift • Click on ‘specify a fund’ (just below ‘make this a monthly gift’)

• Enter PHS Class • Enter credit card and billing information • Click Donate Now

| 63

SEPTEMBER 2021 PRINCETON MAGAZINE 8/27/21 11:16 AM


1st month discount 3rd month 10%30% discount

2nd month 20 % discount

Waived community fee for St. Mary & Grace Gardens 3rd-month 10% discount a $2,500 value.

**excluding Morris Hall Meadows** Waived Waived community community fee fee for for St. St. Mary Mary & & Grace Grace Gardens Gardens -- aa $2,500 $2,500 value. value.

Serving The Community – Together Campus Shared with St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center

Campus Shared with St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center **excluding **excluding Morris Morris Hall Hall Meadows** Meadows**

St. Mary’s Assisted Living

9704326-02

9704326-02 9704326-02

St. Mary’s Assisted Care LivingAssisted Living Garden Memory •Grace St. Garden Joseph’s Skilled Nursing Center Grace Memory Care Assisted Living Joseph’s Skilled Nursing • MorrisSt. Hall Meadows Skilled Nursing St. Joseph’s Skilled Nursing • St. Mary’sHall Assisted Living,Skilled Nursing Morris Meadows Morris Hall Meadows Skilled Nursing • Grace Garden Memory Care • New Palliative Care Unit at St. Mary’s

9704326-02

Morris Hall Senior Care Communities includes:

Located in •• For more please visit us Located in Lawrenceville, Lawrenceville, NJ Formore more information, information, please visitvisit us at at us at Located in Lawrenceville, NJNJ • For information, please www.morrishall.org or us at mhadmissions@morrishall.org www.morrishall.org or contact contact mhadmissions@morrishall.org or or 609-895-1937 609-895-1937 www.morrishall.org or contact us us at atmhadmissions@morrishall.org or 609-895-1937

Morris Hall Senior Care Communities • St. Joseph’s Skilled Nursing & Long Term Care • St. Mary’s Assisted Living • Grace Garden Assisted Living Memory Care • Morris Hall Meadows at Lawrenceville Skilled Nursing

Specialized Services • Short Term Rehabilitation • Respite Care • Palliative Care • Hospice Care

St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center Salutes our Nursing Staff! Thank you for your dedication, hard work and compassion every day and especially during the COVIC-19 pandemic.

2381 Lawrenceville Road | Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 609-896-9500 | www.slrc.org

68 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SUMMER 2014


Specialized treatments for ear, nose and throat conditions with one focus...you.

Exceptional care and safety for exceptional times. The otolaryngologists at Saint Peter’s University Hospital offer medical and surgical treatments for illnesses and conditions involving the ear, nose and throat with specific expertise treating head and neck cancers, such as skull-based tumors, in adults and children. Our physicians treat hearing loss, dizziness and chronic ear diseases, obstructive sleep disorders, thyroid and parathyroid diseases, chronic sinus diseases and nasal polyps. Our ENTs specialize in cosmetic and reconstructive facial deformities, including functional rhinoplasty, facial re-animation and the removal of facial tumors and cysts. Robotic procedures using the da Vinci® robot offer a less invasive means of surgical tumor extraction which allows for faster recovery times for patients.

For more information, call the Department of Surgery at 732.745.8571 or visit saintpetershcs.com/ent

Safely treating you better...for life. Sponsored by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen da Vinci is a registered trademark of Intuitive Surgical or their respective owners.


the

only choice

At Greenwood House Hospice, our families and caregivers

LOVE HOW MUCH WE CARE! AND YOU WILL, TOO. “I am proud and honored to serve as Greenwood House Hospice Medical Director and to work alongside some of the best nurses, social workers, chaplains and volunteers in the business. Our team provides intimate and comprehensive care for our terminally ill patients. We support not just those in their final months but also their families and loved ones.”

– DAVID R. BARILE, MD

Medical Director, Greenwood House Hospice

Hospice is about living the fullest life possible according to a patient’s capabilities within a life-limiting condition. In hospice, your choices guide the care we provide. Hospice care affirms quality of life. Our goal is to prevent and relieve pain, discomfort, anxiety and fear. We provide emotional and spiritual support to patients and their loved ones. Hospice care is provided wherever a patient feels most comfortable or where they call home. We help families and caregivers prepare for endof-life challenges and find creative ways to share in life review and legacy projects so that our patient’s wisdom and memories can be treasured for future generations.

Our Hospice Team consists of: • Hospice Medical Director, a board-certified hospice physician • Registered Nurses (RNs) monitoring pain, managing symptoms and guiding patient’s plan of care • Hospice Certified Home Health Aides (CHHAs) providing personal patient care and companionship • Social Workers supporting patients and families and connecting them with community resources

• Spiritual Counselors providing emotional support and personal counseling • Bereavement Services offering guidance and education concerning anticipatory grief to families throughout care and bereavement • Hospice Volunteers assisting with a variety of patient and family personalized support activities

Greenwood House Hospice is a nonprofit, mission-based organization rooted in cherished Jewish traditions and an industry leader in providing high-quality senior health care in the state of New Jersey. Seniors of all faiths are welcome.

Call us today: (609) 883-6026 Or email us at info@greenwoodhouse.org

greenwoodhouse.org @GreenwoodHouseNJ

Greenwood House is a beneficiary agency of the Jewish Federation of Princeton, Mercer, Bucks. *Greenwood House Hospice was established in memory of Renee Denmark Punia.


Wheels

in te gr at iv e

V I NO A W TE A L VA ap E IL pr M AB oa E D ch I LE es C to I N C E

ov id -1 9

What we treat: Gout

Lyme Disease

MEALS Osteoarthritis

Back pain/Sciatica Fibromyalgia/Pain Osteoporosis

Rheumatoid Arthritis Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Aly Cohen, MD

Diabetes/Cholesterol

Le ar n

Rheumatology Integrative Medicine Environmental Health

Multiple Sclerosis Alzheimers Parkinsons

Integrating a holistic approach into conventional medical care

Wheels Wheels Wheels Wheels Wheels

Board certified – Rheumatology & Integrative Medicine Jones/Lovell Fellow, Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine Faculty, Academy of Integrative Health and Medicine (AIHM) Winner – 2015 NJ Healthcare Heroes Award for Education Voted “Top Docs NJ” 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, & 2021 www.TheSmartHuman.com Founder, The Smart Human LLC.

MEALS MEALS MEALS MEALS MEALS

Migraines Acid Reflux Cancer Support Inflammation Overweight Fatigue

How we do it: Nutrition Supplements Sleep hygiene Stress Management Exercise

www.AlyCohenMD.com

Detoxification

601 Ewing Street, Suite B-1 | Princeton, NJ 08540 | Office 609-436-7007 | Fax 609-436-7008

Medical Management

Wheels Wheels Wheels

MEALS MEALS

JFCS W4M_HP.indd 1

67

SEPTEMBER 2021 PRINCETON MAGAZINE | 8/26/21 3:31 PM


The Battle at Grovers Mill, by Princeton Art Impressions artist Robert Hummel, is on display at the Grovers Mill Coffee House. www.ArtistRobertHummel.com | www.BattleAtGroversMill.com

88 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021


“The War of the Worlds” A Made-Up Martian Invasion That Continues to Fascinate By Anne Levin

SEPTEMBER 2021 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 89


D

Mercury Theatre radio rehearsal, 1938. (Wikimedia Commons)

ecades before the term “fake news” became familiar, there was “The War of the Worlds.” The infamous 1938 radio broadcast, inspired by the H.G. Wells novel of the same name, announced to fans of the CBS Radio drama series Mercury Theatre on the Air that Martians had crash-landed in a farmer’s field in Grovers Mill, New Jersey, and were invading the earth. It was the golden age of radio, and Sunday night was prime time. October 30, 1938 also happened to be mischief night. Led by 23-year-old Orson Welles, the theater company decided to take things a bit further than usual and give listeners a jolt. Just how much of a jolt they intended remains in question. An announcer who claimed to be at the crash site just a few miles from Princeton breathlessly described a slimy Martian slithering its way out of a metallic cylinder. “Good heavens, something’s wriggling out of the shadow like a gray snake,” he began. “Now here’s another and another one and another one! They look like tentacles to me. I can see the thing’s body now. It’s large, large as a bear. It glistens like wet leather…. I can hardly force myself to keep looking at it, it’s so awful! The eyes are black and gleam like a serpent. The mouth is kind of V-shaped with saliva dripping from its rimless lips that seem to quiver and pulsate.” It was all a spectacular hoax, of course. But to some listeners across the country, the sophisticated sound effects and supposedly terrified announcers reporting Martians firing “heat-ray“ weapons created chaos. Newspaper reports at the time said people claimed they saw things that didn’t exist, and crowded the roadways in an effort to escape the invasion. Local legend has it that in Grovers Mill, an inebriated farmer shot at the wooden water tower because he thought it was an alien (never proven, but people who grew up in the West Windsor town have recalled seeing bullet holes in the tower). The legend lives on. In leafy Van Nest Park just down the road from the actual Grovers Mill buildings, a series of four plaques along the pond tell

70 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021

the story of the broadcast. A large, sculpted monument that pays tribute is prominently positioned. Over the years, West Windsor has commemorated the notorious event at key anniversaries. A section of the township’s website is devoted to the broadcast, its history, and the havoc it caused. On Saturday, October 30, a family-oriented celebration of the event will be held at the MarketFair mall on Route 1, in collaboration with the West Windsor Arts Council. “Every year, especially come October, we get inquiries,” said Gay Huber, West Windsor’s municipal clerk. “That’s why we put all that information on the website. There used to be several individuals who actually lived through it, and I was able to give their names to people. But they’re no longer with us.” While newspapers reported widespread panic due to the broadcast (“Radio Listeners in Panic, Taking War Drama as Fact” read the front page of the New York Times), most local residents may have taken it in stride. “If you think about it, there was no Twitter, no Instagram or social media,” Huber said. “So, a lot of people didn’t know about it. My family’s farm was only a couple miles away, and I’m not sure they even knew about it. It wasn’t something my grandparents talked about.” But October 30, 1938 certainly put Grovers Mill on the map. “It’s still something that we consider one of the more popular aspects of West Windsor history. However, there used to be a lot more interest,” wrote Paul Ligeti, head archivist of the Historical Society of West Windsor, in an email. “For the first half century, WotW [“War of the Worlds”] was actually a point that many in town did not want to highlight, because of the image that many thought it would give the town (of local yokels running for their lives from a hoax – whether this was actually true or not). However, in the late 1980s, there was a push to reframe WotW as a point of pride, and in 1988 there was a series of celebrations for its 50th anniversary.” In a strip mall a few miles from the “crash site,” the Grovers Mill Coffee House celebrates the broadcast with newspaper clippings, photographs, and artifacts. Prominently on display is a mural by Princeton artist Robert Hummel, showing the water tower said to be the target of the gun-toting,


Orson Welles in the studio in 1938. (Wikimedia Commons)

Orson Welles, center, meeting with reporters in an effort to explain that no one connected with the “War of the Worlds” radio broadcast had any idea the show would cause panic. (Wikimedia Commons) SEPTEMBER 2021 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 71


Plaque commemorating the radio broadcast in Van Nest Park, West Windsor, and the Grovers Mill Barn. (Wikimedia Commons)

drunken farmer. The mural is one in a series of artworks Hummel has created that’s the story she told,” Hummel said. that were inspired by the broadcast. At the West Windsor Arts Council’s building on Alexander Road, Hummel painted the coffee house mural after listening to the recorded a 12-foot sculpture by Eric Schultz, called Scout Ship, greets visitors. 1938 broadcast for the first time. “It was what I had thought listeners that It was commissioned to help launch a sculpture program and mark the night may have been imagining while tuning in if not realizing it was only 80th anniversary of the broadcast. In recent years, the nonprofit has a radio play,” he said. created programming around the annual mischief night His second painting, created for the 75th anniversary anniversary of the event. of the broadcast, is the artist’s version of the action that “‘War of the Worlds’ is important because it was the might have taken place later in the night, with more first time there was this realization that art was used to Martians and destruction. For the 80th anniversary three surprise people, and maybe fool them,” said Aylin Green, years ago, his painting was focused on the Princeton executive director of the arts center. “Orson Welles University Observatory, which plays a part in the radio didn’t like to look at it that way, but that’s kind of what play. Hummel is having the painting framed in oak happened. It was able to happen because of the tenor of wood trim that was salvaged from an office inside the the times, and what was going on in the world. There observatory. “When they tore it down last year, the head were general fears about invasions. I love that this was engineer let me in to see it before it was demolished,” he a work of art – a theatrical production. That gets a little said. “He gave me some of the oak wood that was around bit lost in the story. But it’s an example of art having a the doors.” real impact.” Scene two, as well, is framed in salvaged wood with a In interviews just after the craziness caused by the historical pedigree – interior pine planks from within the broadcast, Welles claimed that he had no idea it would red barn in place at the time of the broadcast. They were affect people the way it did. But as time went on, he given to Hummel by the barn’s current owner when he admitted that his intentions weren’t so innocent. was transforming it into living accommodations. “I still meet people all over the place, everywhere in The farmer firing at the water tower is just one the world who’ve had experiences, bitter or otherwise, as example of the folklore surrounding the broadcast. a result of our little experiment in broadcasting,” he said “Another [legend] talks of someone being so scared that in a filmed interview that is available on YouTube. “I they took off in their car so quickly they forgot to open the suppose we had it coming to us. We were fed up with the garage door and crashed right through it! Unfortunately, Scoutship by artist Eric Schultz, in front of the way in which everything that came over this new magic it’s hard to tell currently whether these stories are 100 West Windsor Arts Center. (Courtesy of WWAC) box, the radio, was being swallowed. Anything that came percent accurate or not – they could be, or they couldn’t be,” wrote Ligeti. through that new machine was believed. So, in a way, our broadcast was an Hummel’s mother had a lifelong friend from Shamokin, Pennsylvania, assault on the credibility of that machine. We wanted people to understand – coal mining country – who claimed that a frightened relative hid in a coal that they shouldn’t take any opinion pre-digested, and shouldn’t swallow mine to escape the Martians. “I find that hard to believe, personally, but anything that came through the tap. Whether it was radio or not.”

72 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021


It’s time for fall fun Free scarecrow display through October 30

65 shops • Seven restaurants Elegant country inn Indoor family fun center

rist # 1 to u i n th e n o i t c a attr e l ph i a Philad region usin lphia B Philade al, 2020 Jou r n

ess

Bucks County, PA (5 miles from New Hope)

PeddlersVillage.com


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT: Black Bear recently commissioned Highland Design Farm to design and fabricate a bespoke metal and wood Mid Century Modern staircase and railing, for a client’s unique home in Princeton. It’s the first impression when you enter and sets the stage for the home.

PENNINGTON, NJ 6 0 9 • 7 3 0 • 07 0 0

www.blackbearbuilders.com

Black Bear is a sponsor of this year’s 14th annual Hopewell Tour Des Arts.

TOUR LOCAL ARTISTS’ STUDIOS IN & AROUND HOPEWELL BOROUGH SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 25TH 10:00AM - 5:00PM SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 26TH 11:00AM - 4:00PM

www.hopewelltourdesarts.com


Max and his talented team can create an extraordinary event that your guests will never forget. [215] 766-3439 MaxHansenCaterer.com


Currey & Company Rousham chandelier; price upon request; luxehomecompany.com Chanel vintage Interlocking CC metallic leather loafers; $675; therealreal.com Armenta Sueno wide channel set white sapphire baguette ring; $1,290; davidsonandlicht.com

Arteriors Serafina table; $845; luluandgeorgia.com Restoration Hardware Opale hand knotted wool rug; $6,985; rh.com Celine Daoust 14k gold white diamond baguette earrings; price upon request; celinedaoust.com Flag Halyard chair; $1,799; eternitymodern.com

Hermes Chaine d’ancre platine mug; $169; scopelliti1887.com

76 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021

Chan Luu walnut lunar rock dip dyed cashmere and silk scarf; $205; chanluu.com Tessitura Bevilacqua Caterina beige bauletto bag; $1,190; artemest.com Four Hands Cuzco bleached Yukas cabinet; $3,875; claytongrayhome.com

PRODUCT SELECTION BY LYNN ADAMS SMITH

A WELL-DESIGNED LIFE


YOU’RE READY, WE’RE READY. Move-in ready homes available featuring $300,000 in upgrades.

Welcome to Bucks County’s most exclusive gated community. Featuring open floor plans with elegant finishes, these exclusive homes span 3,600 square feet, offering all the privacy, space, and luxury you could want. COMMUNITY FEATURES • Full Basement • Two-Car Rear Garages • Maintenance-Free Lifestyle • Open, Contemporary Floorplans • Private Gated Community • Private Elevators

Final Phase of Construction!

In-person tours available by appointment Starting at $1,575,000 215.862.5800 | RabbitRunCreek.com Rte 202 (Lower York Road) & Rabbit Run Drive, New Hope, PA


A WELL-DESIGNED LIFE Currey & Company Sepentina chandelier; price upon request; luxehomecompany.com A.R. Arredamenti white cabinet; $18,360; artemest.com Platner dining chair; $897; kardiel.com Lucque Paris tote in weathered blue wool; $695; lucque.com Verellen Barcelona dining table; $4,640; amethysthome.com Jill Sander leather ankle boots; $667; luisaviaroma.com Theresienthal Newport cocktail glass; $215; kneenandco.com Blanca Monros Gomez Lily ring; $2,565; twistonline.com Pomellato Nudo 18k gold and blue topaz earrings; $3,800; hamiltonjewelers.com

PRODUCT SELECTION BY LYNN ADAMS SMITH

Alexander McQueen Glasswings rug; $370 per square foot; therugcompany.com

78 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2021


100% electric for $479/mo Polestar — Princeton

Test drive today polestarprinceton.com 100% electric for $479/mo 609-450-3200

Test drive today polestarprinceton.com 609-450-3200

39 month lease with $4,000 down payment. Offer valid for vehicles leased through Polestar Financial Services (PFS). Available to qualified customers that meet PFS credit standards at authorized Polestar Spaces. Not everyone will qualify. Must take delivery by September 1, 2021. See your participating Polestar Space for details. Automobile financing and account servicing provided by Volvo Car Financial Services US LLC d/b/a Polestar Financial Services. Polestar Financial Services is a registered trademark of Polestar Holding AB.


THE GEORGE ELY HOUSE

The lineage of the George Ely house begins in 1795 when George Ely purchased the home from Oliver Paxson...Two important events in the history of New Hope. This home has been restored and renovated by various owners and the current stewards have brought it back to its original zoning of a single home residence. The current owners have maintained the property to a pristine state and have kept the home in stellar condition. The George Ely house is approximately 3200 square feet (quite spacious for an in-town home) with 4 bedrooms and 2.5 baths. There are two large public rooms… One with a slate floor and decorative fireplace. This room is the equivalent of today’s “Great Room.” The other room, adjacent to the “Great Room,” offers pine flooring and is ideal for a large family dining room. The open kitchen looks out on what can be a formal living room or T.V. room. The second and third levels contain 4 bedrooms and 2 full baths. The George Ely House is the Currier and Ives home located in a quaint River Hamlet. Walk to restaurants, the theater, galleries, gift shops and the River, all within 5 minutes. Yet, only 40 minutes to Princeton; 55 minutes to Philadelphia; and 90 minutes $1,049,000 to New York City. This property has extremely low taxes and is part of the prestigious New Hope-Solebury School District.

THE MCNEAL HOUSE

The McNeal House is a highly desirable vintage home located in the heart of New Hope Borough. This early period house has gone through an extensive and meticulous preservation by the current stewards. The three bedroom , en suite home has all new tile and fixtures. The spectacular eat-in kitchen with multi-hued slate floors and stone arches and offers a state-of-the-art kitchen. The lower level, with walls of glass, looks out on the three-tiered patios and dining location that are perfect for al fresco dining or to enjoy the pleasure of the hot tub. The infrastructure of the nearby concrete arches adds an ambiance of Parisian living while the patio spaces capture the rear vistas of a long lawn and views of the Aquetong Creek. The McNeal House is perfect for those full-time or weekend residents who want to walk down their street…enjoy a cocktail, have dinner and see a play…and then have a casual walk back home. 35 minutes to Princeton/55 minutes to Philadelphia/90 minutes to N.Y.C. $895,000

Art Mazzei

Art@AddisonWolfe.com Cell: 610.428.4885

550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • AddisonWolfe.com • 215.862.5500



A Window on Windrows

Illuminating a facet of life at Princeton Windrows

StayingFit will serve you well

At Princeton Windrows, fitness is not a destination, it’s a way of life. Our residents embrace a healthy lifestyle and can choose to participate in a range of dynamic activities that are tailored to meet their preferences, passions, and abilities. A healthy, independent lifestyle improves cognitive and physical functioning, and at Windrows, both the mental and physical needs of our residents are our focus. Ready, set, go! You can enjoy numerous invigorating exercise classes and fitness opportunities, both indoors and outdoors, that serve to not only keep you in great shape, but promote a sense of well-being. Nature lovers will appreciate our beautiful, wooded paths for an inspiring walk. If you prefer higher speeds, take your bike out for a spin, or go for a jog around our 35-acre campus to get your blood pumping.You can also enjoy the beauty of the nearby Delaware-Raritan Canal for a stimulating stroll. Enjoy pickleball and tennis on our outdoor courts. For some friendly competition, head out for a game of croquet on the lawn. If you prefer something a bit more calming, try a yoga, tai chi, or strength class. Water lovers? Jump in the pool for some swimming, water aerobics, or water Zumba. Our state-of-the-art fitness center boasts a variety of workout equipment and free weights, as well as an indoor pool, jacuzzi, and dressing rooms. If the gym doesn’t inspire you, join your neighbors in a friendly game of ping-pong anytime the mood strikes. For an additional boost, you can also book an appointment with our massage therapist or onsite personal trainer.

Looking for an active environment? There’s something for everyone at Princeton Windrows. Get in on the action and experience why we are truly… A resident-owned and managed 55-plus independent living condominium community Princeton Windrows Realty, LLC | 2000 Windrow Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 609.520.3700 | www.princetonwindrows.com | All homes located in Plainsboro Township. Photo Credits: Princeton Windrows Photography Club