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SEPTEMBER 2019

Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart Inside Educational Testing Service Princeton’s Petey Greene Program Send Hunger Packing Princeton W-J District Heritage Tour Area Train Stations Reimagined


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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


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CONTENTS

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66 74

90

84

SEPTEMBER 2019

14 PRINCETON’S PETEY GREENE PROGRAM

ALL ABOARD

BY ILENE DUBE

BY ANNE LEVIN

Education plays a key role in reducing prison recidivism

Area train stations reimagined 66

14

THE AYRES WAY SEND HUNGER PACKING PRINCETON

BY BILL ALDEN

BY TAYLOR SMITH

PU wrestling coach Chris Ayres builds a winning program

Area nonprofit believes children should hunger for knowledge — not breakfast

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FALL HAPPENINGS — WINERIES A LOOK INSIDE PRINCETON’S EDUCATIONAL TESTING SERVICE

BY LAURIE PELLICHERO

Fall is a great time to visit the many area wineries

BY WENDY GREENBERG

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With a 70-year history, it’s at the forefront of today’s educational challenges

DESTINATION: NANTUCKET BY TAYLOR SMITH 84

40

BOOK SCENE

FASHION & DESIGN

BY STUART MITCHNER

A Well-Designed Life

Reimagining immigration

88, 90

50

PRESERVING HISTORY BY DONALD GILPIN

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The Witherspoon-Jackson District Heritage Tour 56

ON THE COVER: On Tuesday, June 11, 2019, 30 young men graduated from Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart during the school’s 17th Commencement Exercises. Princeton Academy is an independent school for boys in kindergarten through grade 8. Photo by Mark Wyville Photography.

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

PENNINGTON RAILROAD STATION PHOTO BY CHARLES R. PLOHN; WRESTLING PHOTO BY FRANK WOJCIECHOWSKI; FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF PRINCETON (BRIGHT HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH) COURTESY OF SHIRLEY SATTERFIELD; INDUSTRY WEST HEM SOFA, INDUSTRYWEST.COM; TEST TAKING, SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; V, HOPEWELL VALLEY VINEYARDS; NANTUCKET SIGN, SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; PETEY GREENE FOUNDATION, MIKE PETERS MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY.

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| FROM THE PUBLISHER Welcome to the September issue of your magazine! This is traditionally known as the Education issue, as it marks the beginning of the academic year in Princeton, which is literally the leading academic center in the state with the University, the Princeton Theological Seminary, Westminster Choir College, and the Institute for Advanced Study. We also have a host of outstanding private schools coupled with one of the finest public school systems in the nation. Within the pages of this issue you will find several Q&A interviews between Laurie Pellichero and the heads, teachers, and alumni of some of those private schools. In New Jersey many private schools are challenged for enrollment, but that doesn’t seem to be the case in Princeton, with some parents driving as much as 30 miles every day to get their children to a school in the region. Another education-oriented giant in our midst is the Lawrence Township-based Educational Testing Service, created in 1947 By Dr. Henry Chauncey and located from 1948 to 1964 right on Nassau Street. ETS, as it is known, is respected in the field of standardized testing, develops and administers the SAT and other programs for the College Board, and develops other tests and professional exams. An outstanding research organization, ETS measures teacher quality, studies how income impacts on testing, and has been critical to the development of computer-based testing. The organization has even researched the positive effects of Sesame Street! Wendy Greenberg’s story explores what ETS does, and its outlook for the future. Have you heard of The Petey Greene Program? Please join Ilene Dube as she reports on this effort, begun at Princeton University in 2008, to train and deploy university students to work with incarcerated students. The program now operates on 29 campuses across the Northeast. Filmmaker Damien Chazelle contributes to the story as a member of its board of trustees. Another individual contributing to the development of youngsters is Princeton University’s wrestling coach Chris Ayres. Besides his regular job of training Princeton’s wrestling team, Chris is very involved with youth wrestling in the region. Our sports writer Bill Alden reports that Chris has a master’s degree in elementary education and was a varsity wrestler at Blair Academy and then Lehigh University. With its belief that a child should hunger for knowledge and not breakfast, Send Hunger Packing Princeton is dedicated to supplementing the food needs of many children in the Princeton Public Schools system. Taylor Smith writes about an amazing organization that deals with the fact that almost 14 percent of our public school students are on a federally-supported meal program which provides meals at school, but not on the weekends. Getting decent nutrition to these students and their families is the mission of Send Hunger Packing Princeton. Looking at food from a different perspective, what do The Dinky Bar & Kitchen, the coming Roots Ocean Prime (formerly Cargot Brasserie), and Lambertville Station all have in common? Yes, they are all former railroad station buildings, now converted to restaurants. There was a time in this country, before the automobile age, when railroad stations were important and handsome pieces of architecture as the welcoming point to a town. Anne Levin takes you on a tour of former

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY E. TRYON

Dear Princeton Magazine readers,

train stations in our area to explore their “second lives,” ranging from restaurants to private homes to art galleries. You can follow that tour up with a look at area wineries and some interesting fall events, brought to you by Laurie Pellichero. And for your final getaway of this season, come with Taylor Smith to the island of Nantucket, where the beaches are beautiful, the restaurants are amazing, and the summer crowds have departed! You can visit the Whaling Museum, the Jethro Coffin House, Brant Point Light, and even borrow a book from the Atheneum, the island’s library, which is on the National Register of Historic Places. There is another historic place you will want to visit over the coming year, right here in Princeton — the Witherspoon-Jackson community, Princeton’s 20 th Historic District. Donald Gilpin describes the selfdirected Heritage Tour, created under the leadership of Shirley Satterfield, president of the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and Cultural Society. Lynn Adams Smith and I hope you enjoy this upcoming autumn, along with this issue of your Princeton Magazine. Respectfully yours,

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE PETEY GREENE PROGRAM

Erich Kussman at St. Bartholomew Lutheran Church.

Erich Kussman and Petey Greene co-founder Jim Farrin at the Princeton Theological Seminary’s 2019 Graduation.

A cross dangles from Erich Kussman’s neck, just below the white band of his La Land, First Man) and Roger Durling, executive director of the Santa Barbara pastor’s collar. From the pulpit at St. Bartholomew Lutheran Church in Trenton, International Film Festival. the 38-year-old speaks passionately about social justice, advocating for prison HE SENDS COLLEGE STUDENTS TO PRISON reform and ways for the formerly incarcerated to re-enter society. He reminds us that the 13th Amendment abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime. Kussman wants to rewrite the amendment to abolish all Petey Greene co-founder (along with Charles Puttkammer) Jim Farrin is known as “the man who sends college students to prison.” He first forms of slavery. examined the juvenile justice system in his senior thesis at Kussman talks from his heart — as recently as 2013 he Princeton in 1958. A political science major, Farrin went was inmate 380556c in the New Jersey state prison system, on to earn an MBA from Stanford and pursued a successful serving 12 years for armed robbery. career as a corporate executive. When he retired, at 72, It was thanks to the Petey Greene Program that Kussman, Farrin’s thoughts returned to incarceration. He was thinking who grew up with no father and a drug-addicted mother who about how two-thirds of those released from prison return. also served time, was able to turn his life around. Farrin held a passionate belief that education was the key in The Petey Greene Program, founded at Princeton enabling these individuals to go on to a more rewarding life. University in 2008, recruits, selects, and trains volunteer According to a 2013 study by the Rand Corporation, students to serve as tutors, helping prisoners along the path inmates who participate in an educational program are up to toward earning a high school diploma or equivalency. They 43 percent less likely to reoffend and return to prison. And meet one-on-one for an hour and a half. Students gain insight they’re also more likely to find a job after their release. into the humanity of inmates, and learn that these prisoners Damien Chazelle is connected to this story through his have aspirations and, if given another chance, can make mother, Celia Chazelle, who has been teaching incarcerated something better of their lives. students for 10 years, and who served as one of the original The program is named for Ralph Waldo “Petey” Greene Petey Greene coordinators at The College of New Jersey Jr., a TV and radio talk show host and community activist (TCNJ). who served time in prison and went on to become a media “My mom has been passionate about prison reform for personality in Washington, D.C. It has spread to 29 colleges years, but I’ve never heard her as excited about a program and universities across the Northeast, including Harvard, as she has been about Petey Greene,” says Damien Chazelle, Brown, Columbia, and the University of Pennsylvania. In Ralph Waldo “Petey” Greene Jr. (Wikipedia) from Paris where he was working over the summer. “The 2018, the Petey Greene Program had nearly 1,000 volunteers from 30 college campuses and surrounding communities, working in 46 facilities, amount the program has grown in such a short span of time is truly inspiring, and there’s nothing like it in its aim to unite universities and prisons, students and and provided 13,195 hours of tutoring. The program’s first fundraising event will be held at Nassau Presbyterian inmates, with a concrete, shared goal.” “We live in a harshly punitive society, one in which it often seems that Church on Thursday, September 26, with a conversation between Princeton native and Academy Award-winning director Damien Chazelle (Whiplash, La forgiveness only extends to the wealthiest members,” Chazelle continues. SEPTEMBER 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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MIKE PETERS MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

“Anything that can be done to place the emphasis on rehabilitation and London is known as the birthplace of modern imprisonment, according to humanization within prison, instead of on antiquated and childish ideas of the website of the Crime Museum in Washington, D.C. The original purpose of punishment, is a step in the right direction.” confining a person within a prison was not to punish them, but to keep perpetrators Celia Chazelle, a professor of early medieval history and a fellow of the detained until the actual punishment could be carried out. People who were found Medieval Academy of America, grew up in a politically aware household in the guilty of crimes would be stripped of their personal freedoms. Inmates were U.S. — her father was English, her mother Canadian, and she married French often forced to do hard labor while they were incarcerated and to live in harsh computer science professor Bernard Chazelle. She earned her doctorate at Yale conditions. There was no attempt made at rehabilitation. Corporal punishment University and became aware that a disproportionate number of black males are and public humiliation, as well as lack of food and water, led to anarchy, and locked up, often for non-violent inadequate facilities led to the crimes such as drug offenses, and spread of disease. that sentences are often too long The Quakers established and don’t prepare an inmate with the first true penitentiary in a path to reintegrate into society. Philadelphia. The word comes She decided to do something from penitent, and was designed about it. to inspire feelings of remorse and More than a decade ago she guilt. Inmates lived in solitary began volunteering at the Albert confinement to separate them C. Wagner Correctional Facility from corrupting influences. in Bordentown, a medium to Inmates at Eastern State maximum security facility for ages Penitentiary were given a half 18 to 35. She taught philosophy, hour in the morning and again in literature, ethics, and social justice the evening in a private exercise to inmates. Chazelle’s initial cell with fresh air and sunlight. Damien Chazelle, left, and his mother, Celia Chazelle. (Press photos) involvement was tied to a research A greenhouse allowed inmates to project, comparing the contemporary U.S. criminal justice system with medieval grow fruits and vegetables, and they engaged in activities such as weaving and penal systems. mural painting. But soon overcrowding resulted in these rehabilitative spaces She contributed an essay on how tougher drug legislation has led to an upsurge being converted to cell space. in the prison population to a book, Why the Middle Ages Matter: Medieval Light NO JUSTICE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE on Modern Injustice (Routledge, 2011). She found the judicial system treated prisoners too harshly and didn’t offer education or vocational training. The book When Chazelle began teaching at Albert C. Wagner, “the Department of explores what medieval practices can teach us about integrating prisoners into the Corrections still had a lockdown mentality and didn’t want people from the wider community. outside interacting with prisoners,” she recounts. She went to Labyrinth Books “Medieval settlements had no prisons, so they had to find other ways to foster to read more about education in prisons and met someone from the Petey social order,” Chazelle says.

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


Greene Program, then getting underway. She signed on to become a tutor. Driving along the rural road to get there, Chazelle looked to the right and saw white people on the sidewalks and in the Little League field; to the left, behind barbed wire fences, she saw a sea of African American young men. “I was struck,” says Chazelle. “You can’t tell me that 90 percent of crime in this area is committed by black men.” The prisoners at Wagner are “100 percent poor,” she says, “with public defenders. If they were from wealthy families they would have received lesser penalties.” Shortly after she began tutoring she realized there was an interest in more educational programming and began teaching college-level courses. She wrote to the Sunshine Lady Foundation, started by Warren Buffet’s sister Doris, and got funding to bring six college courses to the Wagner facility, partnering with TCNJ and Mercer County Community College. Soon some of Chazelle’s colleagues joined her in teaching, offering credit courses. She got additional funding from the Bonner and Ford foundations, and now inmates at Wagner can earn an associate’s degree from Raritan Valley Community College. Petey Greene tutors help inmates earn their GED, a prerequisite for the college level coursework. “At every level to which inmates progress, recidivism plummets,” says Celia Chazelle. “And for those who earn their associates degree behind bars, only a small percentage are reincarcerated. When inmates are in classes, instead of in cells, the prison is a much calmer place.” In Chazelle’s experience, many inmates are motivated by educational opportunities: it gets them out of the cell and offers a chance to interact with others. Some may have learning disabilities or mental health issues, or come from disrupted backgrounds. “I have to adjust my teaching style but sometimes I see a level of energy and excitement, a drive and passion, among the prison population that we don’t see at colleges where students come from families in which a college education is the norm,” she says. “We have lively discussions and it’s a joy to be there. My eyes have opened to a culture I knew nothing about. In reading a book like Lord of the Flies, these students come up with a new angle,

for example, making comparisons to inner city gang life.” Is she ever frightened to walk into the prison? “Never. The security is very good. We’re behind large glass windows facing a hall patrolled by officers, and if there was ever a problem it would be easy to get assistance. The program is a privilege for students with a good record, and if there were the slightest infraction they would lose this right. We have lively, frank, and open discussions, and if they think a book is boring they are not afraid to say so.” When she first told Damien she was volunteering — he was in college at the time — “he was scared. ‘You’re doing what?’ But as time went on he became interested and started talking to his friends about it.” Seeing how Princeton students grew from their Petey Greene experiences, Celia Chazelle made it available to TCNJ students as well. Volunteers are not told what their students have been incarcerated for. “It’s better not to know,” says Chazelle, “because that could affect how you interact with them. Petey Greene rules are that the inmates are to be treated as human beings.” Volunteers go through training that takes them through different scenarios, how to interact, how to shake hands, what names to use, even what to wear. Erich Kussman became enamored of the program when he learned that Princeton University students were voluntarily going into prisons to help people like him learn. Today, when Kussman speaks from his pulpit, it sounds like the thing he was born to do. “The Department of Corrections doesn’t do any correcting,” he says. “I had a good network of people who saw something in me.” Among that network was a chaplain, Emmanuel Bourjolly. “He was an older Haitian man who called me his son,” says Kussman. “I was teaching myself Greek, and he laughed at my pronunciation but said that, one day, I’d go to Princeton Theological Seminary.” And indeed Kussman did, earning a master’s degree there after earning a bachelor’s degree from Pillar College in Newark (in three years, at the top of his class). “True reform allows people to be educated,” says Kussman, who had dropped out of high school at age 14. “Petey Greene showed me a world outside of the box and gave me the tools to see on the other side of the wall.”

SEPTEMBER 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Spotlight Q&A with Fourth-Grade Teachers Meghan Dilmore, Dee Harris, and Drew Schoudel of Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart Interview by Laurie Pellichero

What is the history and mission of Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart? Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart has a unique history in Princeton as it is the only all-boy, K-8 school in town. The school recently celebrated its 20th anniversary and its mission is to develop young men with active and creative minds, a sense of understanding and compassion for others, and the courage to act on their beliefs. At Princeton Academy, we believe that He Can Be creative when he is given the time and space to explore, compassionate when he discovers the good within himself, and courageous when his full potential is realized. Through transformational experiences, dynamic academic endeavors, and devotion to character development guided by the Sacred Heart Goals and Criteria, we bring out the best in boys. I understand that you were faculty facilitators for a boat-building project with fourth-grade students. Tell us about that experience. In the fall of 2018, we announced to our students that they would be embarking on an exciting yearlong project to build a boat. As you can imagine, they were thrilled and, of course, had a ton of questions. This cross-curricular, project-based learning opportunity included the application of math, science, social studies, art and making, language arts, and living our Sacred Heart goals. In addition, the boatbuilding project gave boys the opportunity to develop important competencies that they need to successfully navigate academic and social settings. Our students learned and practiced important leadership and character-building skills. In one of our first endeavors after receiving the Eastport Pram kit, we repurposed the wood we had been using for sawhorses which necessitated separating 2x4s and removing many nails. It was a practical lesson in torque which made for a great follow-up discussion on the conceptual physics of forces and levers. Our students also spent time doing research and participating in science labs, where they observed the factors that create and affect wind patterns. They took full advantage of our MakerSpace to enhance their learning and practically complete tasks related to the building of the boat. They sanded, nailed, constructed, primed, and painted every inch of their vessel together, as a team. They learned to cooperate and collaborate — each student submitted their own design ideas for the hand-painted sail, the hull, and the name which they then voted on to determine the final design. How did the students relate this experience to character development and the Sacred Heart goals that you mentioned? The boys affectionately named their boat “Soar,” and each boy signed the mast, which proudly boasts a white sail depicting Princeton Academy’s school crest. Their labor of love was an homage to Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne, who traveled to North America from France to found Sacred Heart education in the U.S. and Canada 200 years ago. This intentional connection was not lost on the students as they prepared a wonderful presentation for parents to hear about how their boat-building experience related to Philippine’s journey. They emphasized perseverance, faith, wise freedom, and community as the lessons they learned. A testament to the boys and their dedication was that they built something with

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

their hands over the course of eight months and thoughtfully planned out different aspects of their creation according to the ideals and values inherent to the development of their character. Each detail of the project was aligned with the school’s mission which emphasizes creativity, compassion, and courage. On Tuesday, June 3, we set out on an epic adventure to launch the boat they built by hand on Mercer Lake in West Windsor. The boat sailed and the boys were elated! Each student had the opportunity to sail in Soar, and plenty of parents and grandparents were present to celebrate the accomplishment of an entire school year’s worth of hard work. After the successful launch of Soar, we asked our students to write down their reflections on the project. Here are a few examples and a poem written by our students: “Soar has led me to all of these life lessons and inspired me to do more things like this project. While building Soar, I have learned a lot about building. I had fun building her even though there were some ups and downs.” “This experience was unbelievable and unforgettable. I would have never been able to do this at my other school, but this is what I think of when someone says ‘teamwork.’ If it wasn’t for everyone else, we wouldn’t have done this.” Soar rides clean Soar uses her big sail To move nicely on the water She uses her pink rudder to turn And her daggerboard to keep her straight And her boom up high with the names of all her builders Engraved in it. Her blue and green colors Represent her school and, of course, Her name Soar engraved on the side of her. What other programs at Princeton Academy build on learning through character development? Princeton Academy is entering the second phase of Epic Vision: Soaring with Heart, the school’s five-year strategic plan. Various programs and initiatives have been introduced as a result of the work behind the plan. A great example is the school’s infusion of mindfulness and yoga as a part of an overall focus on boys’ wellness. This emphasis on the healthy development of boys allows for opportunities in leadership and character development to emerge. In other words, it’s a balance of academic excellence with honoring the time and space for social and emotional nourishment. Embedded in this approach to boys’ education is the philosophy that success is not the only reason for students to work hard at Princeton Academy — experiences and process matter. As a school community, we are committed to the individual growth and development of each boy — knowing that they are still in formation. Each boy’s journey and path are unique and we celebrate his discovery and exploration just as much as his successes.


“To be honest, you don’t know what your son is missing from school until you experience Princeton Academy. It is such a gift to be surrounded by families that share similar values of respect, kindness, integrity and a desire to have nothing but the best for our sons. You cannot appreciate the opportunities they are given until you have a chance to experience them firsthand.” - PASH Parent

Creative. Compassionate. Courageous. We bring out the best in boys. Princeton Academy embraces diversity, equity and inclusion, and our doors are always open to have a conversation that will help to fulfill your dream of providing the best education for your son. Learn more about our Individualized Affordable Tuition model. www.princetonacademy.org/AffordingPrincetonAcademy | (609) 759-3053


Spotlight Q&A with Cari Nelson, Science Department Chair, and Dan Perez, Science, Engineering, and Robotics Teacher, Solebury School

Describe the campus and mission of Solebury School. Cari: I love the way our campus reinforces Solebury’s mission to create an environment of educational excellence that prepares students for success in college and beyond. Our campus is very similar to a college campus. The departments are housed in separate buildings and students move around our 140-acre campus as they need to. It is nice to experience the outdoors several times a day and sit outside on a nice day when students or faculty do not have class. Solebury values challenging students academically and building creative and independent thinkers. You see that within the vast number of electives that we offer our students. What is the role of the Science Department at the school? Cari: The role of the Science Department is to give students an understanding of how science is around us every day and to look at things through that lens. We teach students to think about the answers that are given, and see if they make sense with what they already know. Engineering is all about problem solving. We run a “Physics First” curriculum, so students start looking at science that is very tangible with conceptual physics, doing hands-on experiments and collecting data. At the end of the year, the students end physics talking about the atom, setting them up to talk about chemistry. As a sophomore, students take chemistry and do more datadriven experiments and write up lab reports. As a junior, they take biology. All biology books starts with chemistry and the building blocks of macromolecules. Our students have already taken chemistry, so they understand bonds when we look at DNA or proteins. As a junior or senior they have their choice of electives that interest them. In the past few years we have added engineering to the Science Department and have given a path of STEM (Science, Engineering, Math, and Science) to a whole new group of kids that may have been scared off by the complexity of science. Engineering classes give them a way to look at problems and figure out how to solve them. I understand that you are opening a new IDEA Lab this fall. Tell us about that. Dan: The IDEA (Invention, Design, Engineering and the Arts) Lab is a new space in the center of Solebury’s campus that is specially designed to be used as both a classroom and collaborative design space for student projects. The lab will serve as a permanent home for Solebury’s engineering and robotics teams.

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

Cari: We are very excited to open a dedicated space to engineering. We will have classes offered in engineering, digital design, computer science, CAD, VR, and robotics. Some classes offer the option of being in local competitions, and others are trimester courses where they can learn how to code, design objects using the 3D printer, laser cut designs, or design their own video games. Keeping kids active in creating their own designs is the goal of the IDEA Lab. What projects do you plan to focus on this year? Dan: This will be an exciting year of introducing our new equipment. In the past, engineering classes would fabricate student designs externally. Our IDEA Lab can now have the students fully involved in the fabrication process using tools ranging from 3D printers, soldering irons, and Dremel tools to our new laser cutter and computer-controlled (CNC) milling machine. Students in our Spartanbuilders engineering club will use our club time to design personal projects as well as signs and decorations for the new space. Additionally, a new elective class called Virtual Reality will take advantage of our new computers and HTC VR systems. How does the STEM curriculum complement other aspects of the students’ education at Solebury School? Dan: There are a variety of STEM electives at Solebury School across multiple departments including the Science and Arts departments. Together with the Solebury Science Department “Physics First” curriculum, students have the opportunity to apply hands-on learning methods to reinforce basic concepts of the sciences. Cari: When students take classes in the IDEA Lab, they can use those same skills within their other classes. Once you know how to use the VR software you can design a tour of an art museum or a walking tour within a city in France. Students have a lot more options open to them for presentations within their other classes after learning the skills in the IDEA Lab. Our goal in the Science Department is to break down the walls of departmental silos and show students that as adults we do not function in 80-minute blocks of different disciplines. Science intertwines with history very well — we offer a cotaught Moral Conflicts class. Just because you like humanities, it doesn’t mean you can’t come into the IDEA Lab and make something using the CNC machine.

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF SOLEBURY SCHOOL

Interview by Laurie Pellichero


With an open, accepting environment With an open, accepting environment andand a curriculum designed toenvironment challenge designed to challengeand a Witha curriculum an open, accepting With an open, accepting curriculum designed to challenge and an inspire, Solebury is filled withwith an inspire, Solebury isenvironment filled inspire, Solebur y is filled with electives and andelectives a curriculum designed tocourses. challenge electives andand AP AP Honors courses. JustJust Honors AP and Honors courses. Just be yourself and anyourself inspire, Solebury isdeeply filled with into be andand divedive be yourself deeply what dive deeply into what you into love.what Our classes are electives and AP Honors courses. Just small. Your aspirations should have youyou love. OurOur classes areare small. Your love. classes small. Yourno limits. be yourself and dive deeply into what aspirations should have no no limits. aspirations should have limits. youSolebury love. Our classes are small. Yourshould be. is what school aspirations is should have no limits. Solebury what school should be.be. Solebury is what school should Solebury is what school should be.

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Send Hunger Packing Princeton Area Nonprofit Believes Children Should Hunger for Knowledge — not Breakfast By Taylor Smith

PHOTO COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Photos courtesy of SHUPPrinceton


R

oss Wishnick, chairperson of the Princeton Human Services Commission, remembers a meeting that was held in 2012 to address the problem of hungry kids in the Princeton School System. Of the Princeton school population, an estimated 14 percent of students receive free or supplemental lunches. Of particular concern to Wishnick and his fellow community members was the fact that these same children who receive supplemental meals during the school week often find themselves food insecure on the weekends and during summer vacations. Studies have proven that improper nutrition negatively affects a child’s ability to concentrate, learn, and ultimately retain information. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), more than 12 million children in the United States live in “food-insecure homes.” The USDA’s annual report on Household Food Security in the United States indicates, “In 2017, the typical foodsecure household spent 23 percent more on food than the typical food-insecure household of the same size and household composition. About 58 percent of food-insecure households participated in one or more of the three largest federal food and nutrition assistance programs: Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps); Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC); and the National School Lunch Program.” That 2012 meeting provided the impetus for Wishnick to establish the nonprofit organization Send Hunger Packing Princeton (SHUPPrinceton), and its Weekend Food Program involving the distribution of food pantry items to children in grades K-5 to take home over the weekend. This program also includes children at Princeton Nursery School.

SHUPPrinceton board members and volunteers.

Its vision statement, “We believe a child should hunger for knowledge and not breakfast,” was coined by SHUPPrinceton board member and volunteer Bob Rabner. Both Wishnick, SHUPPrinceton chairman and board member of The Bank of Princeton, and Rabner, owner of Rabner Graphics, are quick to point out that those who simply raise their hand indicating need are assisted. SHUPP is sensitive to any stigma attached to children feeling different from other children, and have no requirements to participate. The SHUPPrinceton team says they received a lot of initial direction, support, and inspiration from Mercer Street Friends and the Princeton Public School system. Mercer Street Friends was founded by Quakers in 1958, and today serves more than 20,000 families throughout Mercer County who “face the challenges and impacts of poverty.” “They were the model,” says Wishnick. “We didn’t need to look elsewhere.” SHUPPrinceton’s first fundraiser took place at Princeton Garden Theatre on June 9, 2013. It featured a screening of the documentary film A Place at the Table and a panel discussion moderated by Elizabeth Hirschhorn Donahue of Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School. Other speakers included writer and director Lori Silverbush; Doug Massey, Office of Population Research, Princeton University; Judy Wilson, superintendent of schools; and school psychologist Edwina Hawes. The Bonner Foundation, Princeton University, Princeton Theological Seminary, Jenny and Jon Crumiller, and the Albin Family Foundation were just some of the early supporters. “We pretty much exist because in 2013 Princeton University and the

SEPTEMBER 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Salsa & Salsa fundraiser.

Fill the Bowls fundraiser.

SHUPPrinceton Friend Raiser.

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


Bonner Foundation believed in our business plan and provided the first phone calls or requests from Princeton residents when there is a food need funding that gave us early credibility when asking for subsequent donations,” or a crisis. Recently, the 2018 fire at the Griggs Farm apartments left 35 say Wishnick and Rabner. residents homeless, and SHUPPrinceton responded immediately. Thanks SHUPPrinceton’s current efforts include the support and volunteer to SHUPPrinceton’s work with Arm in Arm Food Pantry, Trenton Crisis efforts of Princeton University students, such as Ministry, Nassau Presbyterian Church, and others, Princeton TruckFest, which was initiated by Princeton many otherwise precarious food shortage situations University’s Pace Center for Civic Engagement. The have been temporarily stabilized. annual event, last held in April, brings more than 15 As a nonprofit, SHUPPrinceton depends upon food trucks and live entertainment to Prospect Avenue. the skills, persistence, ingenuity, and participation of All proceeds go to SHUPP and Meals on Wheels. volunteers like Wendy Regina-Vasquez, a mother of SHUPPrinceton has also worked with the Princeton five whose children all attended the Princeton Public Recreation Department, Princeton Family YMCA, Schools. With over 20 years of marketing and sales and other local organizations to ensure that all school management experience, she brings a well-utilized children attending the various summer camp programs skill set in addressing the needs of Princeton Public run by these organizations have access to free food School children. services. Closely allied organizations include The Cornelia “We aren’t the source of the food, but we are the & Bertram F. Bonner Foundation, Princeton Public connection to the food,” emphasizes Wishnick. Thanks Schools, Nassau Presbyterian Church, Princeton to SHUPPrinceton’s funding, campers at the Princeton Public Library, United Way, Princeton Human Services Recreation Department are provided access to lunches Department, Princeton Children’s Fund, Mercer Street with no questions asked. Friends, Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton “Terhune Orchards and Cherry Grove Organic Area Community Foundation, Princeton University, Farm have been wonderful at offering fresh fruit and and the Princeton Recreation Department. produce to the children and their families during the In particular, for the past five years, Princeton summer months,” says Wishnick. “As is the case with Public Library has welcomed SHUPPrinceton to Hinds Ross Wishnick many food pantry services, the food we distribute has Plaza for its annual fundraising event, the most recent a shelf life and storage is always an issue. During the summer months of which, Fall Fest, took place on Sunday, September 15. SHUPP volunteers frequent the Princeton Farmers Market on Thursdays Donations to SHUPPrinceton are welcome, and all proceeds go towards to redistribute the very desirable produce not available during the school feeding Princeton’s food insecure children. For more information, visit year.” https://shupprinceton.org, email info@SHUPPrinceton.org or call (609) As a connector, SHUPPrinceton points out that they frequently receive 285-3233.

There is hunger in our schools in Princeton. We can all do something about it.

Since 2012, we have provided 140,000 meals to over 1,000 children.

A child should hunger for knowledge, not breakast.™ Please visit SHUPPrinceton.org to learn more, to make a donation, to get involved.

A tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization.

SEPTEMBER 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 29


Describe the mission and culture of The Hun School of Princeton. The Hun School of Princeton’s mission is to empower each student to thrive in a diverse and ever-changing world, by nurturing resilient character, providing individual mentorship, and inspiring vigorous and joyful learning. Said another way, we’re helping students develop academic and personal skills in a carefully cultivated environment to ensure that, whatever their chosen path, they can meet tomorrow’s challenges confidently capable. We have a fundamental belief that children learn best when they are in an environment that is caring and joyful — an environment that encourages them to feel safe taking risks and making mistakes so that they can achieve goals they would otherwise not even reach for. What grades does the school serve, and what is it most known for? The Hun School serves grades 6–12, and post graduates. It is most known for its unique combination of high-powered academics and its joyful atmosphere. Our kids are high-achieving, but they also smile and look out for one another. There is a culture here that people often notice first and remember most. It is a culture built on relationships, a culture that has been deliberately and proudly handed down from one generation to the next. It began with our founder, John Gale Hun, who believed that if you get to know a student really well as a person, you can teach that student anything. Many of our practices are still designed for this exact purpose. For example, we set aside time every single day for “Extra Help,” a period before and after school where students and teachers gather to work together on class-related matters, current events, or to simply discuss what is going on in their lives. It is elective, but people are often surprised to learn that most kids take advantage of it. Getting to know kids this way allows our faculty to tailor their curriculum to meet the needs of every student, challenging each of them at the optimal level. And because our students know that we care about them beyond their academic achievement, they give us their very best. Describe the new NextTerm program at The Hun School. NextTerm is a spring mini-semester, where kids in grades 9–11 take one class for three weeks. Each class is project-based and deals with an issue or topic from multiple angles, with coursework taking place in locations where that topic is most relevant. Like all good project-based learning, NextTerm courses are highly challenging, give students agency over their own work, involve collaboration and presentation, and offer exposure to real-life experts, ideas, and evaluation.

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

Interview by Laurie Pellichero

We gave our faculty several years to research and develop their classes, and we ended up with 27 carefully vetted offerings last spring. The topics and locations were wide-ranging. For example, we had kids go to Ghana to study the implications of colonialism and slavery. Another group traveled to the Arizona-Mexico border to study immigration from people on both sides of the debate. Others remained local, studying topics like regional ecology or food insecurity in New Jersey. Another group studied sustainability in the National Parks and then created an ebook guide for teens. I am incredibly proud of what our students accomplished, but more importantly, so are they. Programs like NextTerm are popping up at the college level because they simulate real-world professions and develop complex skills, but they also spark higher levels of student engagement, ownership, and understanding. They are unusual at the high school level because they are difficult logistically and require a lot from faculty and students. But we think it is well worth it. Kids are just like adults, they want their work to matter and they learn best by doing. You reach a whole new level of investment and understanding when the project is real. Already in the first year, 91 percent of students said they learned more because they were able to experience the subject matter firsthand. Are special programs also available for seniors? Seniors are able to apply as teaching assistants for NextTerm courses, which some elect to do. Otherwise, seniors participate in the Senior Capstone Experience during that time. Senior Capstone requires seniors to find or create an independent study project or internship. They research the field or topic well in advance, select a mentor and advisor, and ultimately spend three weeks furthering their knowledge in the chosen area. The Capstone Experience culminates with a final project and presentation to a small panel. In addition to the Capstone Experience, seniors have an abundance of leadership opportunities, from proctorships and house leadership to club and team leadership positions in athletics, arts, and competitive academic groups. We also have an extensive student government, consisting of student leadership opportunities in a student senate, executive branch, honor council, and discipline committees. And while college counseling begins as early as the ninth and tenth grade at Hun, the one-to-one guidance culminates in the senior year. Like our faculty, Hun’s college counselors spend quality time with their advisees so they can understand where they will thrive best. They work diligently together to discover and ultimately achieve the best college selection for each student.

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF THE HUN SCHOOL

Spotlight Q&A with Jonathan Brougham, Headmaster of The Hun School of Princeton


A BA L A N C E D E QUAT I O N

THE HUN SCHOOL OF PRINCETON is a joyful, striving community of learners and teachers who want to experience something profound every day: that sweet spot between challenging academics that push our brains and the personal endeavors that soar our hearts. This is what we call “a balanced equation”—a thoughtful way of teaching that brings out the best in our students and best prepares them for life.

JOIN US FOR A MIDDLE AND UPPER SCHOOL O P E N H O U S E O N S U N D AY, O C T O B E R 6 AT 1 2 : 3 0 & 1 : 0 0

To learn more, visit hunschool.org or call (609) 921-7600


When did you attend The Lewis School, and what were the best benefits of your Lewis education? Tara: I attended Lewis for fourth through sixth grade, and then attended Summer Study until I went to The Hun School for high school. I would have to say that the greatest benefit of my Lewis education was the realization that I wasn’t alone. That there were other people (students and teachers) who saw the world the same way that I did, and that these teachers understood how to teach me so that I could reach my full potential. As a Lewis student, I realized there were other kids like me who were smart and hard-working, yet needed different techniques for learning. The Lewis School utilizes unique and proven learning methods that can transform the entire educational process and experience. I finally found an environment where my areas of weakness could be addressed without overshadowing my gifts and strengths. Prior to Lewis, I felt that I was only defined by “what I couldn’t do.” Lewis is also where I learned how to self-advocate, and this skill helped me throughout high school and college. It has also helped me as a mother of two learning different children who also attended Lewis. Fred: I attended The Lewis School in the early 1980s for four years beginning in third grade. The year before, while attending a private school in Princeton, I got almost nothing right on spelling tests. I basically failed second grade, but it wasn’t for a lack of effort. The experience damaged my confidence, a situation made worse by the fact that the class was structured so everyone knew how everyone else did. With my self-esteem greatly diminished, I became “the slow, shy kid” who didn’t believe I was smart. To their great credit, my parents recognized my challenges and discovered The Lewis School. My experience there transformed the trajectory of my life. The Lewis School taught me the skills I needed to succeed. Their amazing support reinstilled the confidence that had been crushed out Tara Vinson McCullough and family of me. Together, Lewis and my parents provided the encouragement that let me know I could be successful. They taught me that I had great strengths, and if I focused on my strengths I could adapt for my weaknesses. It didn’t matter that I was a slow reader; I developed great strategies for listening and taking notes. I learned how to work hard and get good grades, and I continue to apply these strategies to this day. What are you doing now? Tara: After high school, I went on to Monmouth University and received my undergraduate degree in special education, but I kept asking myself, “How can I help children who don’t learn like everyone else? Children like me?” My search for answers took me to pursue a master’s degree as a reading specialist. But the question was still unanswered: “What about the students like me?” It was then that I returned to The Lewis

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

School to teach, and it was here that I found what I had been searching for. I am now surrounded by teachers who think the way that I do. Once again I’m not alone, but this time I’m the one helping a child to not be defined by their weaknesses, but rather their gifts. Over the past 19 years that I have been teaching at Lewis, I have had the rare opportunity to see “all sides of the desk” — as a student, as a teacher, and as a parent. Fred: After attending the University of Rochester, where I studied electrical engineering, I turned down numerous job offers from companies like IBM to start my own company. Auragen, a web development company, became one of the fastest-growing companies in the nation, according to Inc. magazine. After selling Auragen, I joined ITX in 2009 and currently serve as its president. In this role, I lead 230+ employees who deliver custom software product development to large and midsized organizations. The environment we have nurtured is based on much of what I learned at Lewis; to show and leverage each person’s strengths and provide the appropriate tools and training that help us overcome weaknesses. You also sent your children to The Lewis School. Did you base your decision on your own experiences at the school? Tara: I have two children and they both attended Lewis. Their academic success is directly related to the education they received here. They understand how they learn, how to study, how to organize, how to set themselves up for success, and how to ask for help when they need it. Most importantly, they have learned that what makes them “different” also makes them unique, creative, and future world leaders. Fred: In 2019, my wife and I had our 12-yearold son tested at Lewis. We conducted numerous tests and explored options in Rochester, N.Y., where we live, but none matched the depth of insight that Lewis offered. We decided to have my son attend Fred Beer Lewis’ Summer Program to help him manage his dyslexia. Seeing what Lewis does through my son’s experience reminds me of the amazing work they do to help kids with dyslexia thrive. What should prospective students and families know about The Lewis School? Tara: “Lewis changes lives” is an understatement. I speak not only from my own academic experiences, but that of my own children. I always say that walking through the door at The Lewis School is the first step to an amazing journey and I’m so grateful that, over 35 years ago, my parents took that step, because what an incredible journey it has been. Fred: I don’t know where I’d be today without The Lewis School. Being there taught me to work hard and to value and respect learning differences. I discovered that seeing and learning things differently gave me a unique perspective that is vital not only in my career but also in my life.

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF THE LEWIS SCHOOL

Spotlight Q&A with Tara Vinson McCullough and Fred Beer, Interview by Laurie Pellichero alumni of The Lewis School of Princeton


Member of the Junior Achievement Advisory Board, Rochester, New York, 1999-2018

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ofat theITX JuniorCorporation, Achievement Advisory a strategic Board, Rochester, New York, 1999-2018 technology firm; President of Multiply IT, ITX

 Corporation’s Partner at ITX Corporation, a product development

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builds simple, useful technology” – the Rochester  Acknowledged for “executive leadership, Business Journal 

innovation and for expertise in corporate cultures Acknowledged “executive leadership, development, design and business innovation andcombining expertise inITcorporate cultures growth strategies” development, combining IT design and business

growth strategies” Creative Problem Solving Institute – Certified and “groundbreaking leader”  Facilitator Creative Problem Solving Institutebusiness – Certified Fred Beer University of Rochester, Class of 1995 who is a and strategic consultant business to top leader” companies Facilitator “groundbreaking University of Rochester, Class of 1995 Westminster School Alumnus, Class of 1991 here who and is a abroad strategic consultant to top companies Westminster SchoolAlumnus, Alumnus, 1984 Class of 1991 here and abroad Lewis School  Co-founder and Board Chairman of Potential Lewis School Alumnus, 1984  Point, Co-founder Board Chairmantoofdevelop Potential LLC and where he continues award Point, LLC where hetocontinues to developgrow awardhighwinning software help companies winning software to places, help companies grow high“Lewis School was amazingly supportive in performance work 2005-2018 “Lewis School was amazingly supportive in

Fred Beer

performance work places, 2005-2018 building back that confidence that got  Completed the MIT Entrepreneurial Master’s building back that confidence that got  Completed the MIT Entrepreneurial Master’s crushed from me. Lewis and my parents Program as one of sixty executives worldwide crushed from me. Lewis and my parents Program as one of sixty executives worldwide provided the support for me to know that I who wereinvited invitedtotoparticipate participate provided the support for me to know that I who were couldcould be successful. Lewis taught be successful. Lewis taughtme, me,with with  CEO and Co Co - founder of of Aurag Aurag CEO and -founder en en my parents’ support, that Communications Inc./Catalyst Direct named my parents’ support, thatI had I hadgreat great Communications Inc./Catalyst Direct named one one strengths, andand if Iif focused ononmymystrengths, INC Magazine’s Magazine’s 500500fastest fastestgrowing growing strengths, I focused strengths, of of INC companies, 1995-2006 I could adapt for for mymy weaknesses. companies, 1995-2006 I could adapt weaknesses.ItItdidn’t didn’t matter thatthat I was a really matter I was a reallyslow slowreader reader––II don’t know today without TheThe Lewis School. knowwhere whereI’dI’dbe be today without Lewis School. developed skills listeningininclass class “I don’t developed greatgreat skills forforlistening hard andand to value and respect Being there theretaught taughtmemeto towork work hard to value and respect taking notes. I learnedhow howtotowork work and and taking notes. I learned learning differences. thatthat seeing and and learning learning differences.I discovered I discovered seeing learning hard and get good grades. These skills have hard and get good grades. These skills have things things differently gave me a unique perspective that is vital differently gave me a unique perspective that is vital stayed with me to today.“ not butbut alsoalso in my stayed with me to today.“ notonly onlyininmymycareer career in life.” my life.” Fred Beer Fred Beer

53 Bayard Ln, Princeton, NJ 08540 | (609) 924 �8120 | www.lewisschool.org

53 Bayard Ln, Princeton, NJ 08540 | (609) 924 �8120 | www.lewisschool.org


What is the history of the Princeton Montessori School, and where is it located? Princeton Montessori School was founded in 1968 and began as an early childhood center in rented space in the Princeton area. Since then, it has steadily expanded its programs, developed its facilities, and now permanently resides at the corner of Cherry Valley Road and Great Road. The School is dedicated to the highest quality education of children according to the values and principles of the Montessori philosophy. Our community of approximately 200 families from the greater Princeton area partner with over 60 passionate Montessori educators, and together are dedicated to developing passion and nurturing the potential in each child. We promote intrinsic motivation, independence, social responsibility, and a love of learning so that, as global citizens, our students can lead fulfilling lives and work to better the world. Five cornerstone multi-age programs are offered: Infant (through 18 months), Toddler (through 3 years), Primary (through kindergarten), Elementary (through fifth grade), and Middle School (through eighth grade). Enriching before- and afterschool offerings and stimulating summer programs are also offered. The school is also home to Princeton Center for Teacher Education, a world-renowned Montessori teacher training center. What is the Montessori Method of education? Montessori education provides the foundation for a purposeful, responsible, and fulfilling life. We nurture the potential and ignite a passion for learning within each child. The Montessori Method of education is a model based on the fact that learning is a natural human drive to be supported rather than strictly directed. It honors the fundamental characteristics of childhood at each developmental stage by designing environments and learning materials that optimize the growth and development for that aged child. The teacher meticulously prepares to serve as a learning guide rather

34 | PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

Interview by Laurie Pellichero

than an instructor. The environment is such that freedom of movement, choice, hands-on learning, and collaboration are inherently part of the classroom. How are Montessori teachers and administrators trained? Teachers formally train over several years and serve an internship year, guided by a master teacher. Master teachers work in teams to support a dynamic, wholesome, supportive classroom that serves a multi-age group sharing a developmental stage of childhood. Administrators receive an overview of the philosophy and typically are trained according to independent school best practices. What are the benefits of a Montessori education for a child’s early years? There is no better investment than quality education and development in a child’s foundational years. Montessori education doesn’t just teach knowledge, it develops the lifelong learning tools needed to go out in any setting and be a problem-solver, learner, collaborator, and respectful community member. A Montessori education stresses conflict resolution, inclusion, and a deep respect for the Earth and our responsibility to preserve it. What steps should prospective families and students take to learn more about Princeton Montessori School? Families interested in a Princeton Montessori School education for their child should make an appointment to come see the school. Experiencing what is possible when children have this kind of learning environment and this caliber of adults supporting them is truly a game changer for how to think about quality education. You can learn more at princetonmontessori.org. Come see what sets us apart!

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF PRINCETON MONTESSORI SCHOOL

Spotlight Q&A with Michelle Morrison, Head of School, Princeton Montessori School


KIND HAPPY CURIOUS ENGAGED

Montessori makes a difference.

Our Infant, Toddler, and Primary programs are exceptional, safe, developmentallyresponsive, and led by credentialed child experts. A high-quality Montessori experience ensures children move into their elementary years as explorers, thinkers, doers, and kind community members who are curious and courteous. The confidence and joy in learning they gain prepares them to get the most out of their formal education years.

See what sets us apart! www.princetonmontessori.org 609-924-4594 Tuition Assistance is Available

Princeton

Montessori School Nurturing Potential. Igniting Passion.


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Dance with a Difference Dance Movement Therapy for Adults Using dance, creative movement, and play in a supportive environment toward developing wellness & self-growth. On-going, Individual sessions. Fall group session: 10 weeks, Thursdays, 10:30-noon, beginning September 26th, 2019.

For more information, visit nassaunursery.org or call 917.698.2118

416 Route 518, Blawenburg, NJ 609-844-0151 movementwithjoy@gmail.com www.movementwithjoy.com

Cooperative Nursery School for 2.5-5 year olds Just steps from Princeton University

We are currently accepting

Providing the highest quality of individualized special education services to children, families and professionals since 1974.

Rock Brook School is a private, non-profit school for Communication Impaired and Multiply Disabled children, from age 3 through age 21. Rock Brook School is approved by the New Jersey State Department of Education and received accreditation from The Middle States Commission on Elementary Schools (MSCES).

(908) 431-9500 • www.rock-brook.org 109 Orchard Road, Skillman NJ 08558


PRINCETON BALLET SCHOOL CRANBURY | PRINCETON | NEW BRUNSWICK

From beginner to pre-professional ballet and classes for boys, Princeton Ballet School has gained a national reputation for excellent dance training since its founding in 1954. Through our open enrollment program, we offer the same high quality training in contemporary dance, hip-hop, tap, flamenco, CardioBallet, Bharatanatyam, and so much more. Children, adults, beginners, and advanced students. . .

Start enjoying the benefits of dance today!

Photo Credit: Eduardo Patino

Outstanding Faculty · Live Music · Flexible Schedules

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Each year, over 250 students receive diplomas and join the ranks of over 17,000 Notre Dame High School alumni. Here, SAT scores are well above the national average and 98% of our Each over 250 students receive diplomas and join the ranks of over 17,000 Notre Dame year, graduating seniors place in the nation’s finest colleges and universities, carrying graduating of our High School alumni. Here,inSAT scores arewith wellthem. above thewhere national average andlead 98%you. millions of dollars scholarships See Notre Dame will

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SEPTEMBER 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE |

37


Paying Attention to Attention By Drs. Rosemarie Scolaro Moser, Sarah Friedman & Christina Zebrowski

ADHD

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder, or pattern of brain functioning characterized by inattention, distractibility, and, in some cases, hyperactivity. Individuals identified with ADHD typically fall into one of three categories: Inattentive, Hyperactive/ Impulsive, or Combined. Inattentive ADHD is characterized by a failure to give close attention to details, to engage in active listening, or to see a task through to completion. Individuals often have trouble organizing tasks and activities, are forgetful, and are easily distracted. Hyperactive/ Impulsive ADHD is characterized by fidgetiness, chattiness, restlessness, difficulty remaining seated, and risk-taking. Combined ADHD is characterized by symptoms of inattention as well as hyperactivity and impulsivity. It is estimated that ADHD occurs in approximately 5 to 8 percent of the population. It is more frequently diagnosed in males than females, perhaps because males display more of the hyperactive symptoms that are easily identified. ADHD is not a modern disorder. Many believe that historical figures such as Pablo Picasso, Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein, and John F. Kennedy may have coped with ADHD, which has also been associated with creativity, spontaneity, innovation, and energetic qualities. Celebrities and contemporary figures such as Terry Bradshaw, James Carville, Justin Timberlake, Henry Winkler, Jim Carrey, Michael Phelps, and Adam Levine have also been identified with ADHD. ATTENTION BASICS

Attention, the first step in capturing new information, is critical to learning and memory.

38 | PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

With a lack of attention, new information cannot be stored in memory, and cannot be retrieved as needed. In this case, the problem is not with memory (or storage) per se, but poor initial attention (or encoding). There are also different types of attention depending on which body sense is registering the new information: visual (sight), auditory (hearing/listening), tactile (touch), olfactory (smell), and gustatory (taste). Attention concerns are usually associated with problems in visual and auditory attention.

To help improve attention while studying: 1. Remove games, electronics, and nonhomework related materials from the desk. 2. Be sure the desk is fully organized with all necessary work materials, before sitting down to study. Use of external organization aids such as calendars, whiteboards, bins, and colored folders may help to support organization. 3. Use a white noise machine, electric fan, or soft classical music in the background to drown out distracting noises, voices, and conversations that may disrupt attention and focus. Noise canceling headphones may also be helpful. 4. Program a timer or alarm to sound every 5 to 10 minutes to minimize daydreaming, check on wandering focus, and provide designated break times to reset focus on the task.

behavior disorder, brain impairment, concussion, dementia, autism, seizures, auditory processing difficulties, emotional trauma, learning and memory disorders, chronic sleep deprivation, and even normal aging. As an example of the serious implications of misdiagnosis, a student who appears inattentive, due to an undiagnosed auditory processing disorder, may be incorrectly prescribed ADHD stimulant medications. In order to most accurately diagnose ADHD, a clinical interview and completion of selfreport checklists are not enough. It is important to conduct a comprehensive evaluation, which includes a broad range of neuropsychological tests that measure various aspects of attention, and assist in ruling out other potential causes. Based on the findings of testing, a tailored treatment plan can be developed to address the individual’s areas of functioning that are most affected by ADHD. Depending on the age and life stage of the individual, recommendations may include academic accommodations for school and for standardized testing, work accommodations, skill training, coaching, psychotherapy, behavior therapy, and mindfulness training. A medical-psychiatric consultation for possible pharmaceutical therapy may be considered and, in many cases, may be helpful. In addition, an ADHD academic or life coach can be instrumental in teaching compensatory strategies to manage distractibility, motivation, procrastination, and organizational difficulties.

Attention is highly influenced by the value of the stimulus. It is far easier to attend to information that is considered to be very important or very interesting. A student who is passionate about video games may be able to focus on them for hours at a time, yet be unable to focus on his or her teacher for five minutes in the classroom when the educational material seems monotonous, repetitious, or uninteresting. ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT ARE ESSENTIAL

ADHD can often be misdiagnosed. Proper diagnosis is imperative in order to effectively treat and manage the symptoms of ADHD. Symptoms of attention difficulties are found in a wide array of disorders and diseases other than ADHD, which may include but are not limited to: hearing loss, depression, anxiety, stress,

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Director Rosemarie Scolaro Moser, PhD, right; Sarah Friedman, PsyD, left; and Christina Zebrowski, PsyD provide neuropsychological testing, psychotherapy, and academic coaching services at the RSM Psychology Center in Princeton. For more information, visit www.rsmpsychology.com.

PHOTO COURTESY OF RSM PSYCHOLOGY CENTER; SKETCHES COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

B

ack to school time, that time of year when both youth and adults must bid a temporary farewell to vacation mode and attend to the business of school and work. For some, the transition is an easy one. For others, problems with rallying our attention make the transition difficult. We all experience occasions when our minds wander, or when we miss the details of conversations because we are preoccupied. At these times, our attention is interrupted by distractions. For some, this distractibility or loss of focus is frequent, persistent, and longstanding since childhood, disrupting normal daily activities. It can hamper our academic achievement and professional performance, place stress on relationships and jobs, and make the back to school transition agonizing both for students and parents.


A Look inside Princeton’s Educational Testing Service With a 70-year history, it’s at the forefront of today’s educational challenges By Wendy Greenberg

Educational Testing Service: a) Provides research and recommendations on significant issues in education b) Develops questions for standardized tests, administers the tests, and scores them c) Explores topical issues in education and strives to provide data-based solutions d) Gives back to the New Jersey education community in support and expertise e) All of the above* *CORRECT ANSWER


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1947, a small nonprofit organization with a mission of advancing equity in education began its work in a brick building at 20 Nassau Street in Princeton. After more than seven decades, Educational Testing Service (ETS), located since 1964 on a scenic campus off Rosedale Road just outside of Princeton in Lawrence Township, still adheres to its original mission to “advance quality and equity in education” and “measure knowledge and skills, promote learning and performance, and support education and professional development for all people worldwide.” But since the early years of ETS, the testing and assessment landscape has evolved. The topic of standardized testing has been in the news, both heralded and under scrutiny, with debates focusing on the importance to college and graduate school admissions, and whether the tests are indeed equitable to all. Even with its long history, ETS is facing forward, and has evolved as the needs of learners have changed. While it is considered the epicenter of research in and development of tests like the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) and TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) and development of test questions used on the College’s Board’s Scholastic Aptitude Tests (SATs), ETS is also immersed in conducting research to improve quality and equity in education. Among topics for ETS researchers are how to

IN

best ensure that testing is fair; identifying promising teaching practices; why intercultural competence is important; what language skills are needed for effective communication; what information do colleges and grad schools need to make sure their students are successful; and how achievement gaps are reduced. At the same time, ETS develops, administers, and scores more than 50 million tests annually in more than 180 countries at more than 9,000 locations worldwide, with some 150,000 new “items” or questions each year. A philanthropic arm supports education locally and across the country. Led by Lenora Green, the Center for Advocacy and Philanthropy (CAAP), established 2013, provides grants to community nonprofits that raise awareness of educational issues, especially among underserved groups. CAAP collaborates with the Research and Development division to go out into the community and provide workshops conducted by ETS research scientists and assessment specialists. “This is one way in which we can ensure the community has a greater understanding of the impactful work that we do at ETS,” said Green. A cadre of volunteers, said Green, supports education and social services in the local community. An individual employee giving campaign last fall raised close to $860,000, she noted. During the annual giving campaign, ETS employees may donate to the ETS Employees’ Community Action Fund scholarship program. Since the inception of this program, employees have

funded more than $1 million to nearly 250 students in New Jersey. This year 25 students were awarded scholarships ranging from $2,500 to $10,000. All 2019 awards totaled $100,000 and winners were from 12 New Jersey counties, seven from Mercer County. WRITING THE TEST QUESTIONS

In 1947, three organizations — the American Council on Education, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, and the College Entrance Examination Board — contributed testing programs, assets, and key employees to form ETS, believing that an independent, nonprofit organization devoted to educational research and assessment could best enable opportunity for all learners, regardless of income or social status. Through this arrangement, ETS designs and delivers its own assessments such as the GRE, TOEFL, and others. The College Board owns the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and Advanced Placement (AP) tests. The College Board is the largest client for ETS, where ETS staff experts design and write test questions, among other tasks undertaken at the request of the College Board. Writing the test questions posed to millions of students is a meticulous process. “We need to make sure the questions are relevant to the intended purpose of the assessment. We also need to make sure they are fair,” explained Ida Lawrence, vice president of research and development. She is seen in the 2010 ETS film

SEPTEMBER 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 41


% Men

% Women

% Total

29

30 25

23

21

20 15 10

14

13

14 9

7

6

5 0

21

7

7

6

5

4

4

14 9

14 12

4

10 4

6

5

6

6

12

6

3 Business

Education

Engineering

Humanities and Arts

Life Sciences

Physical Sciences

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Other Fields

Undecided

No Major Provided*

Percentage of GRE General Test Examinees, by Intended Graduate Major Field and Gender. Courtesy of ETS. Note: The chart analyses were based on a total of 541,750 test takers who took the GRE General Test between July 1, 2017, and June 30, 2018. The percentage in the figure above represent the percentage of test takers within a particular gender category (e.g., men, women) for each intended graduate major field. *Test takers in the “No Major Provided” category include those who indicated their intended graduate major as “Any Department Not Listed,” those who did not respond to the question and those who provided an invalid answer.

The Life of an Item, which describes the test writing process, and, in the film, she says that “it’s vitally important that these items are fair because, taken together, they are the basis for a decision that will be made about the person who takes the assessment.” The process begins with deciding what skills or knowledge the item is intended to measure, and whether the skills or knowledge are relevant for the test’s purpose. The process includes a sensitivity review to see if the question is fair and free from cultural bias. The rigorous process includes 10-15 sets of process points, as the item goes through multiple levels of review. The items are often pretested or tried out before they count toward a score. A “red flag analysis” determines if the item is performing differently for different genders and populations. In addition to development and scoring, the Research and Development division, which includes some 1,200 staff, also carries out research on learning and assessment.

Priorities also include raising global Englishlanguage proficiency; increasing the diversity and quality of admissions to higher education; promoting assessment and development of critical

NEW METHODS OF LEARNING AND OTHER ROLES

CHANGING PRIORITIES

To meet the changing needs of the educational community, ETS reframed its research agenda two years ago around nine educational challenges. Its priorities are to increase sustainable access to a diverse and high-quality teaching pool; to improve science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) pathways; to raise U.S. literacy levels; and to support U.S. English learners’ development of language proficiency.

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

Assessment (Springer 2017, editors Randy E. Bennett and Matthias von Davier). The book describes continuous programs of research involving, for example, topics such as computerized adaptive testing, measuring aptitudes and abilities, and procedures to help ensure test fairness. As it seeks solutions to today’s challenges, such as achievement gaps among racial and ethnic groups that could lead to inequities in global workplace opportunities, ETS is mindful that “employers want candidates who are technologically skilled, communicatively proficient, culturally aware and agile, and in possession of a range of other competencies” such as collaborative problem solving, said Lawrence.

competencies in a global context; increasing workplace preparedness and success; and supporting underserved learners and those who teach them. Much of ETS’s research is documented in a recent ETS-authored book, Advancing Human

Education and technology landscape changes have resulted in new methods of learning and measurement. “Many years ago, ETS changed the assessment industry by introducing computer adaptive testing,” said Scott Nelson, senior vice president, strategy marketing and growth and CMO. “Today, that groundbreaking spirit continues to drive us forward into new ways to deliver effective solutions.” In computer adaptive testing, the difficulty level of a test can change, based on how the test taker answers each question. “Today we are looking at assessment in an immersive environment,” said Nelson. “In an assessment where one can do a lab experiment in an immersive environment, we would


PHOTOS COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

be able to understand not only if the test taker got Evaluation and Research Center (PERC) conducts COLLEGE COACHING COURSES? the correct answer, but we could learn from how research based on public policy issues such as they got the answer. Being able to have this type closing achievement gaps for underrepresented Despite the broad ETS portfolio, parents look of information excites educators because they can populations. PERC’s clients include schools and to ETS for practical matters, like how students better understand how students learn.” colleges, foundations, professional associations, can improve test scores. ETS, according to its The line between assessment and learning website guidance, does not recommend is blurring. “What if measurement became coaching courses. “Although the courses part of learning in the classroom?” said vary according to objectives, duration, and Nelson. “This is a critical question for us that method, we believe that most of the claims will change assessment as we know it and we made by commercial coaching companies believe will be a welcome development for are overblown. However, we do recommend teachers.” that students prepare for any important test. Recently ETS has offered Massive The best way to do that is to familiarize Open Online Courses (MOOCs) to help yourself with the format of the test and to students prepare for tests, and is partnering review the content areas the test will cover, with “education accelerators,” such as and you can do this on your own. . . . Note, LearnLaunch, to identify start-ups in however, that last-minute cramming will education that provide “access to innovation never replace years of study and effort.” outside ETS, and allow us to share our Despite the focus of some on scores, capabilities with them,” added Nelson, as the focus of ETS has always been more a few examples of the new solutions ETS concerned with creating the best educational is building and exploring “to ensure we opportunities possible for the most people. ETS offers Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) to help students prepare for tests. continue to meet our mission using today’s A plaque still found at 20 Nassau Street technologies and innovations.” education organizations, state and federal research quotes Nancy S. Cole, fourth president, ETS, “What Also, test-taking for the disabled has opened an and education agencies, and private corporations. we teach, what we test, even what we aspire to is entire research program into accessibility and the The ETS Center for Research on Human Capital but a mere glimpse of the possibilities that lie within process for evaluating. and Education publishes books and studies on our students, our schools, and those great human Several ETS centers and programs have opportunity, and gaps between degrees and skills. questions that will outlast all our technologies.” more specific roles. The Institute of Student For example, one study looks at why someone with Achievement (ISA) has the mission of improving a college degree may not have the skills to succeed schools, providing coaching to teachers. The Policy in the workplace.

Congratulations to Jim McLaughlin and Congratulations to Jim McLaughlin the Princeton Wealth Advisors team for and the Princeton Wealth Advisors team #1ininSouthern SouthernNJ, NJ, Forbes forbeing being named named #1 Forbes Best-In-State Wealth Advisors. Best-In-State Wealth Advisors. .

902 Carnegie CenterCenter | Suite| Suite 320 320 | Princeton, 902 Carnegie | Princeton,NJ NJ08540 08540 609-750-3000 (Local) | 888-711-4362 (Toll-Free) 609-750-3000 (Local) | 888-711-4362 (Toll-Free) Raymond James & James Associates, Inc. Member New York Raymond & Associates, Inc. Member New YorkStock Stock Exchange/SIPC Exchange/SIPC

©2009 Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC 09-BR3DD-0013 EG 9/09 The Forbes ranking of Best-In-State Wealth Advisors, developed by SHOOK Research is based on an algorithm of qualitative criteria and quantitative data. Those advisors that are considered have a minimum of 7 years of experience, and the algorithm weighs factors like revenue trends, AUM, compliance records, industry experience and those that encompass best practices in their practices and approach to working with clients. Portfolio performance is not a criteria due to varying client objectives and lack of audited data. Out of 29,334 advisors nominated by their firms, 3,477 received the award. This ranking is not indicative of advisor’s future performance, is not an endorsement, and may not be representative of individual clients’ SEPTEMBER 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE 43 experience. Neither Raymond James nor any of its Financial Advisors or RIA firms pay a fee in exchange for this award/rating. Raymond James is not |

©2009 Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC 09-BR3DD-0013 EG 9/09 The Forbes ranking of Best-In-State Wealth Advisors, developed by SHOOK Research is based on an algorithm of qualitative criteria and quantitative data. Those advisors that are considered have a minimum of 7 years of experience, and the algorithm weighs factors like revenue trends, AUM, compliance records, industry experience and those that encompass best practices in their practices and approach to working with clients. Portfolio performance is not a criteria due to varying client objectives and lack of audited data. Out of 29,334 advisors nominated by their firms, 3,477 received the award. This ranking is not indicative of advisor’s future performance, is not an endorsement, and may not be representative of individual clients’ experience. Neither Raymond James nor any of its Financial Advisors or RIA firms pay a fee in exchange for this award/rating. Raymond James is not affiliated with Forbes or Shook Research, LLC.


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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


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BEETHOVEN’S BIRTHDAY BASH: Beethoven’s Piano Concertos 1 & 5 Mar 19–22

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Coming Home

Oil Paintings by Jim Rodgers September 4 – October 26, 2019

Snowbound in Phillips, 24” x 30″, oil on panel

Larger Cross Barn, 24” x 30″, oil on panel

Sultry Summer Evening 18” x 24”, oil on panel

Saturday Night, Bernards Inn, 16” x 20”, oil on panel

Kathleen Palmer, Director 5 Morristown Road, Bernardsville, NJ 07924 (908) 963-0365 • pskjpalmer@verizon.net Wed-Sat, 10-4pm & by appointment

Artist Receptions

www.studio7artgallery.com

September 6 and October 4, 6-9pm

Sundown Sonata, 40″ x 30″, oil on panel

10/15 Paul Starr (PU)

Entrenchment: Wealth, Power, and the Constitution of Democratic Societies

FALL 2019 ~ EVENT HIGHLIGHTS Sept.- Nov. ~ Events are at 6pm in Labyrinth’s downstairs event space, unless otherwise noted. More information and a complete calendar at: labyrinthbooks.com/events

10/22 Mary Norris

Greek to Me: Adventure of the Comma Queen

10/23 Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor (PU) & Imani Perry (PU) Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Esate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership

9/19

LLL* @ the Library: Ruha Benjamin (PU) & Eddie Glaude (PU)

9/25

LLL@ Labyrinth, 7PM : Joyce Carol Oates (PU)

10/1

Naomi Klein with Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor (PU) @ 7pm A Call to Action: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal

11/5

Jumpa Lahiri (PU) & Sandra Berman (PU)

11/12

10/2 10/8

Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code

11/4

My Life as a Rat: A Novel

The Penguin Book of Italian Short Stories

LLL @ Labyrinth: Darcey Steinke & Susan Wheeler (PU)

Flash Count Diary: Menopause and the Vindication of Natural Life

10/10 Elaine Pagels (PU), Ilana Pardes & Leora Batnitzky (PU) The Song of Songs: A Biography

10/11 Johannes von Moltke, Helmuth von Moltke & Dorothea von Moltke

Last Letters: The Prison Correspondence between Helmuth James and Freya von Moltke 1944-1945

Fintan O’Toole (PU)

The Politics of Pain: Postwar England and the Rise of Nationalism

LLL @ Library: Emmet Gowin (PU)

The Nevada Test Site: Photographs

LLL and The Paul Robeson House @ Labyrinth:

Eddie Glaude (PU) & Stephen Schapiro

The Fire Next Time: An Illustrated Memoir

11/13 Mimi Schwartz, Nan Bauer-Maglin & Penny Dugan

Widows’ Words: Women Write on the Experience of Grief, the First Year, the Long Haul, and Everything in Between

11/14 Daphne Kalotay (PU) & Suzy Hansen

Blue Hours & An American Abroad in a Post-American World

Events continue in December! Announcements and up-to-date info in our weekly events email at labyrinthbooks.com/subscribe *Library Live at Labyrinth (LLL) events are co-sponsored with the Princeton Public Library

SEPTEMBER 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE |

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| BOOK SCENE

Ellis Island Arrivals, Ellis Island mural detail, 1937. Photo courtesy of The Public Buildings Service, General Services Administration, Washington, DC.

Reimagining Immigration BY STUART MITCHNER

M

ural painters love walls. In place of a symbolic denial of freedom, a barrier between two countries, they see an immense panorama of possibility, a space free but necessarily and beautifully finite. When muralist Edward Laning (1906-1981) looked at the 100-foot-long wall of the Aliens Dining Hall at Ellis Island, he was pondering his assigned subject, “The Role of the Immigrant in the Industrial Development of America.” He was happy to have the work. It was 1934, he was broke and months behind in his rent for a top-floor loft with skylights on East 17th Street. As he recalls in “Memoirs of a WPA Painter” in American Heritage (October 1970), doing justice to his subject meant “learning how railroads were built and saw mills were operated and coal was mined and steel was manufactured.” SALVAGING THE MURAL

The Ellis Island mural was very nearly lost due to extensive water damage from a leaky roof, as well as serious neglect and vandalism during the years after the immigration center closed in 1954. Several of the eight original panels had gone missing, presumably due to theft. In 1970, the surviving sections were removed and restored under Laning’s supervision and relocated to the Theodore Roosevelt Federal Courthouse in downtown Brooklyn. A 2013 article posted on bklynr.com (“Breathing Free: A salvaged WPA-era masterpiece ... welcomes immigrants once again”) describes a citizenship ceremony presided over by Judge Marilyn Go. Speaking to 267 immigrants from 50 countries including China, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, India, Liberia, and South Korea, Go mentioned her own family’s journey from China when she was 6 years old. Then she pointed to the murals looming behind the citizens-to-be, “vast images created to welcome immigrants to the country” showing “dozens of figures engaged in the work of building railroads and fueling factories, debarking from ships, and beginning their lives in America.”

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

The judge’s intention was to have the newly arrived citizens imagine themselves “within the full history of immigration.” The article goes on, however, to point out “the gulf of decades, in which the status of the immigrant has gone from boon to burden.” “ISLAND OF TEARS”

In Tyler Anbinder’s City of Dreams: The 400-Year Epic History of Immigrant New York (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt $35), the Ellis Island chapter begins with the “shouts of joy” from immigrants first viewing of the Statue of Liberty on the way to the “terrifying gauntlet of physical and oral examinations” that awaited them at Ellis Island, which Italian immigrants often referred to as l’Isola dell Lagrime,” the “Island of Tears.” There’s a hint of recent border issues in the fact that from 1875 to 1917, Congress created “an increasingly long list of conditions that might bar a potential immigrant from entering the United States. Medical problems, political beliefs, even one’s occupation or employment status could cause inspectors to turn an immigrant away.” Anbinder, a journalist who had crossed in steerage with the immigrants, said that arrival at Ellis Island was “the nearest earthly likeness to the final Day of Judgment, when we have to prove our fitness to enter Heaven.” In a later chapter titled “Renaissance,” the view of Ellis Island as an ordeal gives way to something more in keeping with Judge Go’s upbeat depiction of the Laning murals as welcoming images of inclusion. After describing the postwar decline in immigration that led to the closing of Ellis Island, Anbinder quotes a New York Times editorial stating, “If all the stories of all the people who stopped briefly or for a longer time on Ellis Island could be written down, they would be the human story of perhaps the greatest migration in history.” Not only had Ellis Island’s millions of immigrants made countless contributions to American society, they had become “part of what is now the


Above; Edward Laning and assistants work on the Ellis Island mural, tasked as “The Role of the Immigrant in the Industrial Development of America.”

American temperament — a livelier and richer national personality than could ever have existed without them.” The jacket copy calls City of Dreams an “inspiring account” of both “famous and forgotten immigrants.” Among the famous and infamous who passed through the barriers are two future mayors of New York City (Abe Beame and Vincent R. Impellitteri), along with Dracula and Tarzan (Bela Lugosi and Johnny Weissmueller), Cary Grant and Bob Hope, composer Irving Berlin, film director Frank Capra, renowned pianists Vladimir Horowitz and Arthur Rubinstein, and Princeton’s most illustrious citizen Albert Einstein, along with mobsters Joseph Bonnano, Joe Adonis, and Lucky Luciano. SIX LITTLE WORDS

Larry Smith’s Six Words Fresh Off the Boat: Stories of Immigration, Identity, and Coming to America (Kingswell $15.99) includes hundreds of glimpses of the immigration experience, from everyday people, not to mention celebrities like Aziz Ansari, Julianne Moore, Mario Batali, Neil Gaiman, Amanda Palmer, Billy Collins, Junot Diaz, and Dr. Sanjay Gupta. Smith’s idea of seeking six-word life stories originated with the legend of Ernest Hemingway’s six-word story: “For sale, baby shoes, never worn.” Six Words is prefaced by a note stating that “due to the current political environment,” some names have been changed. Smith explains that the project was conceived before Trump’s election, with the result that “the unsettling political climate for immigrants that he has ushered in has made the discussions that follow from these stories more vital than ever.” IMMIGRATION IN POETRY AND PROSE

Poet Javier Zamora, the author of Unaccompanied (Copper Canyon Press $16), was 9 years old when he traveled alone 4,000 miles, across multiple borders, from El Salvador to the United States to be reunited with his parents. This poetry debut describes borderland politics, race, and immigration while remembering

the birth country that’s been left behind. Zamora graduated from the University of California at Berkeley. He earned an MFA at New York University and was a 2016-2018 Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford. Edwige Danticat’s family memoir, Brother, I’m Dying (Vintage Contemporaries $16), won the 2007 National Book Critics Circle Award. In it, according to Vogue, “Danticat pays moving tribute to the two men who raised her — her uncle, with whom she lived in Haiti until the age of 12, and her father, whom she then joined in America — documenting a disintegrating Port-au-Prince and dubious American immigration policies.” A recent novel about immigration is Rutgers graduate Imbolo Mbue’s Behold the Dreamers (Random House paperback $17), which won the 2017 PEN/ Faulkner Award for Fiction. The New York Times calls Mbue’s “dissection of the American Dream ... savage and compassionate in all the right places.” NPR says the novel depicts a country both blessed and doomed, on top of the world, but always at risk of losing its balance.” WEDDING OF THE RAILS

Edward Laning was 28 when he began work on the Ellis Island murals. Half a century later, at 71, he painted The Building of the Transcontinental Railroad for the Railroad Museum in Ogden, Utah, on a National Historic site marking the meeting place of the railway joining the nation’s east and west coasts. Originally conceived by the Roosevelt administration as the “Wedding of the Rails,” the vision of laboring immigrants was intended as a complement to the Ellis Island commission. The mural occupies two separate panels, one, the Union Pacific, showing coolie-hatted Chinese laborers at work, the other, Central Pacific, depicting a mostly Irish crew. The project was completed in 1979 and the murals were installed in January 1980. When he died in May of the following year, Laning was at work on a series of murals on American literature for the Periodicals Room of the New York Public Library, the site of the central achievement of his life, The History of the Printed Word, the four immense panels and a ceiling mural, Prometheus, illuminating the McGraw rotunda. SEPTEMBER 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Paul Robeson Place (Jackson Street)

Preserving History

The Witherspoon-Jackson District Heritage Tour BY DONALD GILPIN | PHOTOS COURTESY OF SHIRLEY SATTERFIELD The Original Witherspoon School for Colored Children


The Witherspoon School for Colored Children on Quarry Street was built in 1907 to accommodate the increased enrollment of students who were attending the original school at the corner of Witherspoon and Maclean streets.

It

Describing the First Baptist, established in 1885 as Bright Hope Baptist Church, as “the light on the hill,” Liverman added, “It seems like it protects the rest of the community.” The plaque unveiled by Liverman and Deacon Lamont Fletcher notes, “The church is a beacon of faith and stewardship, community involvement, social justice, and world peace.” Recognizing “this important day when we claim and reclaim, mark and document our history,” Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Pastor the Rev. Lukata A. Mjumbe said, “This is a moment that allows us to understand more about ourselves, our present situation, and where we go from here. If we do not know where we have been we can never truly understand where we need to go.” Before unveiling the Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church plaque, Mjumbe recounted some of the history of the church from its founding in 1836 as the First Presbyterian Church of Colour in Princeton after many African American members of the segregated Nassau Presbyterian Church were dismissed to form a church of their own. Mjumbe urged, “We need to know the complicated and the beautiful and the diverse history of this church. As we reveal this marker we remember to remember all of that — the UNDERSTANDING THE PAST good times and the struggles, the legacy, the striving, the difficulty, the failures, but most “The Citizen” was a newspaper that was dedicated to the “moral, intellectual, and importantly the people that God has blessed us “It’s always great when you can preserve and industrial improvement of the Negro race.” This is a 1904 edition of the newspaper. share your culture,” said former Princeton to be connected to, those in this neighborhood, Councilman Lance Liverman, a trustee of in this community. It’s you.” the First Baptist Church of Princeton. “And by having these plaques, my At the Morning Star Church of God in Christ, established in 1923 and children and your children and others will understand the significance of currently undergoing renovation, Pastor Elder Kevin E. Bynes Sr. echoed these churches.” a slogan that is displayed in the church sanctuary. As he and Mamie Lee

was nothing less than the transformation of a vision into reality on Saturday morning, August 10, as a large contingent of church members, town leaders, and other participants proceeded from Morning Star Church of God in Christ on Birch Avenue, up Witherspoon Street to Mt. Pisgah AME Methodist Church and Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church, then to the First Baptist Church of Princeton at John Street and Paul Robeson Place to witness the unveiling of the first four of 29 Heritage Tour historic plaques. “These black church plaques and the other plaques to follow are part of a reminder of the history of the Witherspoon-Jackson (W-J) community and the people, personalities, and families that once lived in this community,” said W-J Historical and Cultural Society President Shirley Satterfield, who led the tour and whose vision has inspired and driven the project to preserve the memory of Princeton’s 20th Historic District. At each church along the way there was a short presentation including a condensed history of the church, remarks by the minister or church official, and recognition of the donors of the plaque.

SEPTEMBER 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Shirley Satterfield (at podium), president of the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and Cultural Society, unveiled the first four Heritage Tour plaques and recognized the Society’s board of trustees (surrounding her) at a reception last March at Studio Hillier on Witherspoon Street. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

Oldham, whose family was among the original members of the congregation, unveiled the plaque, he told his listeners, “We must remember the past, maintain the present, and prepare for the future. We want to beautify the community, with humility.” The Mt. Pisgah African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church, at the corner of Witherspoon and Maclean streets, is the oldest African American church in Princeton, established in 1832 by the Rev. Samson Peters of the Trenton AME Church and led today by the Rev. Dr. Deborah Blanks, who spoke to the walking tour participants. The present church was constructed in 1860. 25 MORE SITES, A RICH 300-YEAR HISTORY

In addition to the four church plaques dedicated in August, the 25 additional Heritage Tour plaques will recognize historic sites that include stores, restaurants, a tavern, the Charcoal Inn (which was listed in the 1939 Negro Motorist Green Book), and other places of business. Also recognized will be Dorothea’s House (originally established to serve Italian immigrants, now an Italian American cultural institution), the Mary Moss Playground, Paul Robeson’s birthplace, Paul Robeson Place (the former Jackson Street), the former Witherspoon School for Colored Children, the Princeton Nursery School, and the “colored” YMCA-YWCA (where the Arts Council of Princeton is located today). Outside of the W-J District, which is bounded by Witherspoon and John streets, Paul Robeson Place, and Birch Avenue, plaque sites will include Albert E. Hinds Plaza adjacent to the Princeton Public Library, and, across the street, what used to be Mr. Griggs Imperial Restaurant. They will also be at stores on Spring Street and on upper Witherspoon Street at the former office (now occupied by Agricola) of The Citizen, “a newspaper dedicated to the moral, intellectual, and industrial improvement of the Negro race,” according to the plaque design. Community organizer John Bailey, who with Satterfield co-founded the W-J Historical and Cultural Society in 2016 when W-J was designated as the 20th Historic District, helped with the planning and fundraising for the Heritage Tour. The demographics of the W-J District have changed significantly over

the past decades, as it has become the most diverse neighborhood in Princeton, with the African American population declining and an influx of Latinx and many other residents of different ethnicities and backgrounds. Much of the history of the district, however, has, until recent decades, been a history of African Americans, and most of the plaques reflect that fact. The African American community has been an important part of Princeton since the early 18th century, when many of the residents were slaves who worked on large farms or in homes. As the Princeton community and the University grew, along with demand for domestic workers and laborers, many African American families moved to Princeton from Southern states. They eventually settled, or were relocated to, what is now the W-J District. “The community is still vibrant,” Bailey said, “but the ethnic groups that used to be here aren’t here en masse anymore as they were historically. There’s still a lot of activity, and the plaques represent that community. They represent Robeson. They represent Doris Burrel. They represent Chip Fisher. They represent any person who has come through that community. And they are still watching over us. There’s a lot of inspiration and history, spirituality, and reminiscing.” J. Robert Hillier, architect and Princeton Magazine shareholder, who has collaborated with Satterfield on the Heritage Tour project and whose Studio Hillier designed and arranged for the production of the plaques for no charge, pointed out, “This tour is in essence the one that Shirley Satterfield has given for years. By being a self-tour and with the plaques, Shirley’s dedication to the community and its history will be continued well into the future.” Hillier, treasurer of the W-J Historical and Cultural Society, continued, “What is truly awesome for me is the fact that, due to segregation, this African American community was established as its own self-contained, self-sufficient, and self-sustainable community within the town of Princeton. The residents of this community were its own business people, school teachers, and University employees. The community was so close that the teachers knew every student because they were the neighbors of their parents. Ultimately, this led to an amazing group of students coming out of this closed community and going on to succeed at important colleges and in many different professional fields.” Hillier is playing a leading role in helping to fulfill Satterfield’s vision SEPTEMBER 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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HERITAGE TOUR

HERITAGE TOUR

THE WITHERSPOON -JACKSON COMMUNIT Y

THE WITHERSPOON -JACKSON COMMUNIT Y

This self-guided tour of Princeton’s 20th Historic District

This self-guided tour of Princeton’s 20th Historic District

is brought to you by the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and

is brought to you by the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and

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community. This history was prepared by Ms. Shirley A.

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district as a proud, self-sufficient and self-sustaining

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original African-American residents occupied this segregated

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community. This history was prepared by Ms. Shirley A.

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district as a proud, self-sufficient and self-sustaining

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Cultural Society. Since the early 19th century, Princeton’s

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lived with his wife and nine children in a home he named “Avalon.” His daughter, Dorothea, welcomed the Italian immigrants to Princeton,

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many of whom were stonemasons. NASSAU ST

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Her dedicated work offered education, employment opportunities, and housing for Italian families who settled in the Witherspoon-Jackson Community.

ALBERT E. HINDS PLAZA

At age 23, Dorothea van Dyke McLane died while

The Albert E. Hinds Plaza, adjacent to the Princeton Public

Resource Center, Mr. Hinds gave loyal service to the overall

Library, is named in honor of Mr. Albert Edward Hinds, the

Princeton community. The designs on the open gates at the

grandson of a slave. Mr. Hinds was born and educated in

plaza represent the many aspects of his life and service.

giving birth to her first child. To commemorate her life and charitable work,

House Board of Trustees has given scholarships to deserving

The house was officially opened on October 7, 1914.

Princeton High School graduates

Princeton during the era of segregation. From shining shoes for Princeton University professors to serving on and leading

Mr. Hinds was an ordinary man who led an extraordinary life

community boards to teaching Bridge at the Princeton Senior

during his 104 years.

This noted house that welcomed many Italian families

and to Princeton University

now houses non-profit and charitable organizations that provide human services

first-year students studying the

to Princeton and neighboring communities.

Italian language.

THIS PL AQUE DONATED BY THE TRUSTEES OF DOROTHEA’S HOUSE

THIS PL AQUE DONATED BY PRINCETON UNIVERSIT Y

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HERITAGE TOUR

HERITAGE TOUR

THE WITHERSPOON -JACKSON COMMUNIT Y

THE WITHERSPOON -JACKSON COMMUNIT Y

This self-guided tour of Princeton’s 20th Historic District

This self-guided tour of Princeton’s 20th Historic District

is brought to you by the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and

is brought to you by the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and

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THE ORIGINAL WITHERSPOON SCHOOL FOR COLORED CHILDREN

PAUL ROBESON HOUSE IN PRINCETON

In 1851 the State of New Jersey authorized the incorporation

In 1908 a new and larger school was built on Quarry Street.

of public schools in the Borough of Princeton. To

This first school building then became Douglass Hall, named

This house, 110 Witherspoon Street, is the birthplace of Paul

Street Presbyterian Church, which now owns this property.

accommodate the educational needs of the Colored

after Frederick Douglass the Abolitionist. It was a multiuse

Leroy Bustill Robeson: Scholar, Athlete, Lawyer, Activist,

The mission of the house is to serve as a beacon in the

children, this building was constructed in 1873. It was called

building for neighborhood religious and social events. In later

Singer and Actor. He was born here on April 9, 1898. This

African American Community, to serve as a Cultural Center

the “Witherspoon School for Colored Children”, educating

years this structure became an apartment building. Mr. J.

structure was originally a double house, 20-21 Witherspoon

in Princeton and to memorialize the life and achievements of

children from kindergarten to the eighth grade. Paul Leroy

Robert Hillier FAIA, Architect and Developer plans to restore

Street. His father was the Minister at the Witherspoon

Paul Robeson, “Princeton’s Native Son.”

Robeson attended the primary grades.

this building to its original architectural exterior.

THIS PL AQUE DONATED BY J. ROBERT AND BARBARA A. HILLIER IN HONOR OF SHIRLEY A. SAT TERFIELD

Plaque designs courtesy of Studio Hillier.

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community. This history was prepared by Ms. Shirley A.

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Satterfield, Princeton’s Historian of African-American life.

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district as a proud, self-sufficient and self-sustaining

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original African-American residents occupied this segregated

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community. This history was prepared by Ms. Shirley A.

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Cultural Society. Since the early 19th century, Princeton’s

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district as a proud, self-sufficient and self-sustaining

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Cultural Society. Since the early 19th century, Princeton’s original African-American residents occupied this segregated

Since 1963, the Dorothea’s

her father, Dr. van Dyke, and her husband, Guy Richard McLane, a New York stockbroker, established Dorothea’s House on September 6. 1913.

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

THIS PL AQUE DONATED BY DAVID AND K AREN MILLER TO HONOR OUR NEIGHBORHOOD - PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE,


have been one of the least challenging aspects of the project. Emphasizing the importance of supporting Satterfield’s vision and “uplifting the community,” Bailey described securing committed pledges for the four church plaques in less than two hours. “I could do that because the people knew who was calling, and I was asking them to do something that was about their history, their church, their families,” he said. “I was asking them to get involved and come up with the money to make sure the plaques were there. And not one person hesitated. Not one person paused. Everybody was enthusiastic.” Bailey added, “I’m honored to be a part of the initiation, a part of the dedication, but more importantly I’m honored to be a part of the community that sees the value of its history, its families, its churches, and its town.” Princeton Mayor Liz Lempert, who attended “A DREAM COME TRUE” last month’s commemoration of the plaques at the African American churches, reflected on Satterfield, whose family has lived in Princeton the event and its significance. “The Princeton for six generations, described the origins of her community owes an enormous debt of gratitude vision of the Heritage Tour. “This is a dream to Shirley Satterfield for sharing her deep come true,” she said. “It all started in 1990 when knowledge, to Bob Hillier for designing the I joined the Historical Society of Princeton and plaques, and to all the people who have come all they were talking about was white Princeton.” forward so far to help fund this project,” she Satterfield decided then that she needed to help said. “It was Shirley’s vision to memorialize her win recognition for the African American history famed historic walking tour of the WitherspoonWitherspoon School for Colored Children (Quarry Street School). of Princeton. Jackson neighborhood and capture the stories, “I said if you go from Wiggins to Birch Avenue, you’ll see how Princeton photos, and history in a series of plaques.” became Princeton,” she said, and in 1997 Satterfield started her Albert E. She continued, “It’s wonderful to see her vision start to become a reality Hinds Memorial Walking Tour, named after “an ordinary man who led an with the unveiling of the first four plaques. The Heritage Tour plaques will extraordinary life during his 104 years,” according to plaque No. 1 in the help residents and passersby gain a deeper understanding of the neighborhood plaza that bears his name. and the people who lived and worked here, and the vital role it played in the Raising money for the 29 plaques, most of which have now been fully shaping of Princeton and our country.” funded at $1,500 apiece, primarily by members of the community, seems to as Studio Hillier redevelops two buildings on the Heritage Tour, both the original Witherspoon School for Colored Children at 184 Witherspoon Street, which served the African American children of Princeton until 1908, and The Waxwood on Quarry Street, the subsequent location of the School for Colored Children, which, in 1948, when schools in Princeton Borough were integrated under the Princeton Plan, became the junior high school for all students in the Borough. Hillier named the Quarry Street building, redeveloped into an apartment building with permanent placards noting its historical significance, in honor of Howard B. Waxwood, the African American principal of the school. The original School for Colored Children site on Witherspoon Street will bear a plaque donated by Bob and Barbara Hillier in honor of Shirley Satterfield.

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ALL ABOARD AREA TRAIN STATIONS REIMAGINED BY ANNE LEVIN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHARLES R. PLOHN


T

hirteen years ago, Lee White and her 13-year-old daughter were taking a stroll near their house in Pennington when they noticed that the town’s former train station, a three-story, 1882 building with a curvy, mansard roof, was for sale. The sign on Railroad Place beckoned, and they peeked in. It was love at first sight. “We both just adored it,” says White, a fourthgrade teacher at Toll Gate Grammar School. “I didn’t think my husband would agree. But when we brought him over, a train happened to go by while he was looking. Since the walls are 18 inches thick, we didn’t hear it. That impressed him.” So did the former depot’s textbook-Victorian architecture and compelling history. The couple bought the building, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, and moved in with their two children. They were the second private owners to occupy the old station, which had been purchased by another person a few years after service was discontinued in the late 1960s. Now nearing retirement age and ready for a home with less upkeep, the Whites recently put the building on the market. According to The National Railway Historical Society, there are thousands of former train depots located in cities, towns, and villages across the globe. They are relics of rail travel’s heyday; the lucky ones rescued from deterioration and

George and Lee White have made their home at the former Pennington Railroad Station for 13 years, becoming train buffs along the way.

repurposed into other uses. Some are residential dwellings. But businesses, community centers, restaurants, and offices are more commonly housed within their walls. The Whites’ home is among local examples of old stations saved from the wrecking ball. The former Hopewell depot, designed by Daniel A. Clarkson, the same architect who did the Pennington station, is now used for public events, weddings, exhibits, and other community

gatherings. The popular Lambertville Station restaurant, opened in 1983 in the abandoned depot that had served the town for nearly a century, is still going strong. The Georgian Revival-style West Trenton station, also on the National Register, now serves as offices.

Princeton’s prominent example of train station rehabilitation is The Dinky Bar & Kitchen and its adjacent restaurant Roots Ocean Prime, which until recently was known as Cargot Brasserie. The buildings on University Place, across from McCarter Theatre Center, served as the Princeton train station, and luggage facility, which connected to Princeton Junction, less than three miles away. The station buildings, which date from 1918, were the subject of much controversy when Princeton University opted to build a new, contemporary-style terminal some 460 feet further away from town as part of the $330 million Arts and Transit project. A group called Save the Dinky rallied to keep the station where it was, but the University and NJTransit won out. The station is on New Jersey’s Register of Historic Places. When the Pennington Railroad Station building was nominated for National Historic status in 1974, the application described it as being made of sandstone with a mansard roof and center pavilion. “Its height and width cause the building to loom out of the background, making it a prominent landmark,” the application reads. “This forcefulness is tempered by the smooth, curved lines of the roof.” Until World War I, the station was surrounded by landscaped grounds and ornamental flower beds. “The grounds were maintained by a crew of gardeners who arrived each spring with fresh

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At the former Pennington Railroad Station, exterior features have been preserved and the interior has been turned into a comfortable home with many historical references.

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


At the former Dinky station, exterior features have been preserved, and the two buildings converted into a restaurant and bar/café. A new station was built as part of the Lewis Center for the Arts development.

plants,” it continues. “During the summer, the lawns were cut every week, and the hedges and shrubs were trimmed. In the fall, the old plants were removed and the beds were prepared for winter. Up to 1925, there was a large fountain in the center of the lawn and it was turned on every summer afternoon.” At its peak in the first decade of the 1900s, the station was busy with the arrival and departure of over 50 daily trains. “An early evening walk down to the station to sit on the benches beside the fountain and catch a glimpse of the luxurious dining cars on the 5:09 p.m. from St. Louis via Washington was considered one of the biggest events in the town,” the application says. “Theodore Roosevelt stopped here during his Bull Moose Campaign of 1922. According to reports of the time, almost the whole town came out to see him.” But the station began to decline after World War I, as the automobile increased in popularity. By 1967, passenger service to and from Pennington was discontinued. White enjoys showing visitors around the old Pennington station. There are visible vestiges of the old waiting room and ticket office. The rear of

the building, which faces the tracks, is especially evocative of the past. White is a Harry Potter fan, and the tracks conjure up the famous King’s Cross Station Platform 9 and 3/4. “I wasn’t a train freak when I moved here, but I kind of am now,” she says. “Freight trains still go by. When it’s snowing, and you’re inside, and a train just appears out of the darkness and the snow, there is nothing like it. It’s just magical. We’ll miss that.” The Lambertville building dates from the 1870s, when the town was a bustling industrial center in which the railroad played a key role. Documented as 19th century eclectic in style, the station was designed by Philadelphia architect Thomas Ustick Walter, whose impressive credits include the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C. The station served originally as headquarters for the Belvidere-Delaware Railroad, or the BelDel. “In the late 19th century, there were 10 trains a day in each direction,” says Fred Eisinger, a trustee with the Lambertville Historical Society. “By the time service ended in 1960, a one-car train ran between Philipsburg and Trenton. Service to Flemington had ended in 1931. A freight service

continued until 1975.” The station had been abandoned for two decades when Dan Whitaker and Skip, Tony, and Rose DiMarco bought it in 1980. Their restaurant, Lambertville Station, opened in 1983. “When we brought in a structural engineer, he said the roof was in such poor condition that the building would have imploded in another year,” says Whitaker, who continues to run Lambertville Station today. “The whole thing would have come down. So we got in there just in time.” Over the 20 years that the building was empty, “people had gotten in and had parties, that kind of thing,” Whitaker says. “It was in really bad shape. Everything that had any value had been taken out. But there is always a silver lining. The fact that it was empty allowed us the availability to do whatever we wanted.” The weathervane that had been stolen was recreated by a coppersmith. The building was broken into different levels to house a wine cellar, bar, Victorian lounge, dining room, and offices. “We had to gut the inside, but we saved as much of the wainscoting as we could,” says Whitaker. “A restoration company came in from Harrisburg and did the woodwork. We hired an antique dealer to

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Hopewell Station, top and right, has become a popular community center while Lambertville Station, bottom two photos, was transformed into a restaurant that has attracted locals and tourists for more than three decades.

furnish the whole place with antiques.” The restoration has worked. “We’ve been successful from the beginning,” says Whitaker. “Our goal is that everybody who comes here wants to come back, and they do. I have people from all over say they know about us.” A few miles away in Hopewell Borough, the former railroad station near the center of town is almost always busy. The Borough opened the threestory, 1876 building in 1996, following a three-year renovation done in partnership with the New Jersey Historic Trust. Designed in Second Empire style and once part of the Delaware and Bound Brook Railroad, the old station, which has offices on its upper levels, hosts meetings, birthday parties, weddings, and community gatherings on its first floor. “It really is limitless,” says Michele Hovan, Hopewell’s Borough administrator. “It is very heavily used; open 365 days a year — even on Christmas.” The station’s elegant mansard roof and decorative gingerbread woodwork are part of its appeal. “It’s the history, and the architecture, and the fact that it’s set on a little park-like complex,” says Hovan. “It is very much the crown jewel of the Borough. It’s replicated in our logo. It is certainly a community identifier — a valued, prized asset.” When passenger service ended in the late 1970s, the building was offered to the Borough “at a nominal cost,” Hovan explains. “But at the time, there were concerns about the maintenance. So it was sold to a private developer, who proposed tearing it down and building condos and other uses on the lot. The community rallied around and made sure that was not approved, and the Borough ended up buying it back from the developer.” The town has applied to the New Jersey Historic Trust for further restoration of the building. “It’s very important to the town,” says Hovan. “We want to keep it at its best.”

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


PHOTO COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

THE AYRES WAY PU Wrestling Coach Chris Ayres Builds a Winning Program BY BILL ALDEN | PORTRAIT BY FRANK WOJCIECHOWSKI Ayres will tell you that this reversal of fortune has been an arduous process. “It is a gradual thing; people think with organizational transformation there is one thing that does it, but it was just a lot of things,” says Ayres, 45. “We finally got enough coaches and we hired the right coaches. We were getting more recruits.”

EARLY INFLUENCES

PHOTO BY PRINCETON UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF ATHLETIC COMMUNICATIONS

S

ettling gingerly onto a couch in the living room of his Princeton home this July days after undergoing a hip replacement, Chris Ayres laughs through the pain, recounting the beginning of his wrestling career as a fourth-grader. “I lost my first 14 matches, but then I won my last four,” says Ayres with his face creasing into a grin before he chuckles at the memory. “I wasn’t good at it right away but I loved it.” That rough debut proved to be a harbinger of things to come as Ayres has gone on to fight and win a number of uphill battles in his wrestling career, fueled by his passion for the sport. After not medaling in the New Jersey state championships during his career at Newton High, Ayres spent a year competing as a postgraduate at the Blair Academy and then walked on the Lehigh University wrestling team. He ended up as one of the greatest wrestlers ever for the Mountain Hawks, setting a program record with 120 victories and twice earning the school’s Outstanding Athlete award. Ayres, though, failed in his bid to make the U.S. team for the world championships, and turned to coaching as an assistant at Lehigh. He spent five years learning the ropes and preparing himself to guide a college program. In 2006, he undertook a massive challenge, becoming the head coach of a moribund Princeton University wrestling program that was mired in the cellar of the Ivy League. The Tigers went 0-35 in Ayres’ first two seasons but, true to character, he kept plugging. Breaking through with a third-place finish in the Ivy League in the 2009-10 season, Princeton has emerged as a force. In the last three years, Princeton has placed second in the Ivies and has been third at the Eastern Intercollegiate Wrestling Association (EIWA) championships. Last winter, the Tigers took 15th at the NCAA championships and produced a program-record three All-Americans.

Looking back, Ayres views the 200910 campaign as a key turning point in the rebuilding effort. “I would say the one season it turned around was when we took third in the Ivies,” asserts Ayres. “We hadn’t won in the Ivies, and all of a sudden we won all of these Ivy matches. It was a big jump from never winning to winning a bunch in a row. That was a big year, that was one of my most fun years.”

Reflecting on his wrestling career, his interest in the sport took a big jump in his sophomore year of high school when he encountered an international wrestling legend in Philadelphia. “I was at the Palestra and this Russian guy Sergei Beloglazov did a clinic,” says Ayres of Beloglazov, a winner of two Olympic golds and a six-time world champion who later coached him at Lehigh. “He was doing all of this wild stuff I had never seen before in terms of technique. I was mesmerized — I didn’t know you could do those things. I was floored by this guy. All of a sudden, I saw this art that was wrestling and I wanted to figure it out. I followed this guy around. That is a moment when I really got into wrestling.” Inspired by the lessons he learned from Beloglazov, Ayres became a star at Newton High, not losing a match in regular season competition as a senior. But when he fell short of his goal of winning a state championship, failing to medal at the NJSIAA Championships, Ayres nearly left wrestling. “At that moment, I took my ball and went home and said ‘I am done with wrestling, that is it,’” says Ayres. “In reality I was being a little bit of a baby. Fortunately, my dad and my mom and a coach from elementary school pulled me aside and said, ‘you are going to keep going, you are going to wrestle.’” Doing a post-graduate year at the Blair Academy, Ayres enjoyed a transformative experience in the classroom and on the mat. “Coach [Jeff] Buxton said ‘if you are going to prove yourself, you are going to have to take honors courses at Blair.’ I hadn’t done homework in years,” says Ayres. “I took honors physics, I took this calc course — they loaded me up. I really focused, I knew what I wanted to do and I got all As. SEPTEMBER 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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I’ve got a cubicle, I’ve got to wear a suit every day,” says Ayres, the first member of his family to attend college. “I go to the cubicle and look at a spreadsheet all day. It was the best internship I ever had, because I realized that it was not what I was going to do. I love wrestling. I decided that I would go to grad school for education and still compete.”

TRUE CALLING While competing at a high level, taking fourth at the U.S. Senior Open Nationals and at the U.S. World Team Trials, Ayres gradually realized his true calling. “That is where the coaching bug really kicked in because I was helping coach while I was trying to compete,” says Ayres. “I had a successful post-college career, but you have to be No. 1 in the U.S. to be on the World Team. I was as high as fourth and that just doesn’t do it. When I lay in bed, I slowly stopped thinking so much about me and I found myself thinking about the guys on the Lehigh team, and that he could do this or someone else could do this. I had a really easy time hanging them up; it was time. Once I knew I was done with competition, I really started coaching.” After five years as an assistant at Lehigh, where he helped the program win five straight EIWA titles, Ayres was ready to take the next step and move into a head coaching position. It

PHOTO BY FRANK WOJCIECHOWSKI

PHOTO BY PRINCETON UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF ATHLETIC COMMUNICATIONS

All through my Newton career, I didn’t have any state placers or champs in my room, so I thought they worked so hard. If I can’t beat them, they must be doing so much work. So now I am living with these guys, and wrestling with them every day, and these guys don’t work very hard. I get in the room with these guys and I am beating them. That was when I knew I belonged. I always had this confidence that no one is going to outwork me, and that was true most of the time. In competing in high school, I had trouble. Now it was starting to come out on the mat and I was starting to show that same confidence in competition.” That confidence helped Ayres go from walk-on to a Lehigh legend. “Every year, I got a bit stronger,” says Ayres, who won the EIWA title at 150 pounds as a junior and placed sixth in the NCAA Championships at 157 as a senior, earning AllAmerica honors. “I was one of the best technically, but some guys overpowered me. The biggest thing is your mind — that is the thing you keep working on. Now I was at a high level, I had beaten All-Americans and I was an AllAmerican. What separates everyone at the end it is what is in your head.” Earning a degree in marketing, Ayres assumed that he would get into business after graduation, but a summer internship changed his thinking. “I was working at a corporation, BASF.

was his wife, Lori, who made him aware of the Princeton opportunity. “I had an interview with Hofstra lined up that I was going to go do and I heard her say, ‘hey honey the Princeton job is open,’” says Ayres. “They wrestled 20 matches the year before and they lost them all. I said ‘no way, are you kidding? I don’t know how to build it out.’ She said ‘just give it a shot, check it out,’ so I applied.” Speaking to a number of Princeton wrestling alums after throwing his hat in the ring, Ayres was impressed by the passion they displayed for the program and became serious about his pursuit of the Tiger position. Getting the Princeton job in 2006, Ayres quickly realized that he faced a number of obstacles in turning the Tigers around. “I didn’t know how bad it was, it was tough,” acknowledges Ayres, noting that three rising seniors quit the team before that school year began. “It was a great experience, I had to figure out how to motivate in the most trying of situations. Thank God for the kids on that team, it would have been so easy for any of them to just walk away. We couldn’t beat a D-III team that first year; Blair would have killed us, but that is what we had. What we did well is that we got them on board in relation to ‘hey, you are really important for the future of this program. We are going to build something great and you guys have to stick it out so we can do that.’ I learned a lot; that was the


PHOTO BY FRANK WOJCIECHOWSKI

PHOTO BY FRANK WOJCIECHOWSKI

PHOTO BY FRANK WOJCIECHOWSKI

toughest challenge of my life but it was really rewarding. It shaped who I am as a coach.” Even though Princeton was the doormat of Ivy League, Ayres shot for the moon in his recruiting pitch. “I am selling the school really hard and I am selling what we are going to be,” says Ayres, noting that he lost a number of recruiting battles to Ivy schools during his time at Lehigh. “I would say to the recruits from my first year on, ‘hey, we are going to win the Ivy League and we are going to be top 10 in the country in the NCAAs. We are going to have multiple All Americans and national champions and we are going to win the EIWA.’ “This is when we are 0-35, and most of them would sit there and say ‘this guy is out of his mind,’ but I would get a few guys who would buy in. That is what I was looking for. What is funny about saying that is that all of those things are happening. You have to have that ability to see further in order to get everyone there.” Princeton associate head coach Sean Gray, who is entering his ninth year with the program, notes that Ayres’ vision was multifaceted. “It was really taking our experience and starting to set the foundation for what we wanted to be, which is today,” says Gray. “That included everything from how to do we pull the alumni in to how do we build a recruiting system, and a system for everything.

One of our themes here is systems and using everybody’s expertise to put systems in place that will propel the program forward, but also that we can tweak year to year.” In creating those systems, Ayres set the tone for his staff. “It is ‘don’t take short cuts, do things the right way.’ That is first and foremost,” adds Gray, when assessing the personal qualities that distinguish Ayres. “He came up with this quote and we all use it for the program — it is ‘find a way to win’ and just having a relentless work ethic. There are times where he is there at 6 in the morning to 8:30 at night.” But along with that work ethic comes a personal touch as the down-to-earth Ayres has a knack for connecting with everybody. “For Chris, it is simple. He is going to love you when he needs to love you and be hard on you when he needs to be hard on you, and that is it,” says Gray. “I think those are good qualities of a coach, you have to have many hats. I think with him all the way down, what resonates through the staff and the program and anybody you will come in contact with is that those guys are a lot of fun, they are great to be around. He is able to blend all of those hats together and the staff and the guys love him for that.” Ayres loves the guys he has on his current squad. “It has been so rewarding, the kids we have now are special,” says Ayres, who guided the Tigers to a 21-19 dual win over Lehigh

last winter, the program’s first win over the Mountain Hawks since 1968. “That year we took third was a big turning point,” he says. “I really think that last year was our next turning point for what we really want to be. Nobody graduates who started last year. We have a good crew of freshmen coming in. This is the team we have been envisioning.” There were amazing moments last winter for Ayres in another arena as his daughter, Chloe, won the title at 105 pounds in the first-ever girls’ NJSIAA Championships as a Princeton High School sophomore. “It has been such a cool experience for me as a dad to have that with her,” says Ayres, who has taken an active role in local wrestling, coaching at the Princeton Wrestling Club (PWC) and working on beefing up the New Jersey freestyle program. “I never expected her involvement; it has been great. She just placed in Fargo, which is her first time placing in a national tournament. She is all into it; I am so proud as a dad. It is not her winning, it is what she puts into it. I would put her work ethic up to anyone, boy or girl. She works her tail off, and she is really committed.”

ROLE MODEL For Princeton star wrestler Matt Kolodzik, having a coach like Ayres has inspired him to work harder. SEPTEMBER 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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“I could tell you about the technique he has taught me and all the hours he has put into me and everything he has done to impact my personal growth, but I think that is kind of minuscule in comparison to the fact that Coach Ayres is such a good role model, not just for me, but for all of the guys he coaches,” says Kolodzik. “I have never seen anybody as happy as he is and who works as hard as he does. He is such a hard worker, but he also does it out of love. That is something you want to find in life.” Kolodzik notes that Ayres doesn’t hesitate to go the extra mile for his athletes. “Coach Ayres is the only coach that will be like ‘oh so you want to come in and get a workout in at 6 a.m. three days a week. All right, let’s do it, and if you can’t find a partner to do that with you, I will be your partner,’” says Kolodzik, the program’s first three-time All-American who has placed fifth and third at 149 in that last two NCAA Championships and will be taking a year away from school to train for a shot at the 2020 Olympics. “That is not an isolated thing, that is regular. What is really impressive is that I will come in because I am restless from the night before a match and roll into Jadwin Gym at 5 a.m. and he is there. He is there at night because of the PWC guys.”

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With his older brother, Daniel, having wrestled for Princeton from 2008-2012, Kolodzik has known Ayres for years and has developed a bond with him. “I know coaches that are businesslike all the time and authoritarian. The great thing about Coach Ayres is that he is all of that, and then he is the type of guy you sit down with and grab a coffee with and talk about anything but wrestling,” says Kolodzik. “He is very laid back too, which is crazy,” adds Kolodzik. He wants the best for every individual to a fault. He loves every kid on the team. Every college coach has to confront the question of what is best for the individual over what is best for the team and vice versa. Coach Ayres, to a tee, always cares about what is best for the kid.” Seeing Princeton develop into one of the top teams in the East has been heartening for Kolodzik and his teammates. “It has meant the world. It is hard to be retrospective when you are just in the grind of ‘I have got to get better,’” says Kolodzik. “When you do take those moments at the banquet every year to look back, it is like ‘wow we really have come a long way.’ The hindsight is always one of those things nice to have and revel in. It is a lot of admiration for Coach Ayres and everything he has put into the program.”

In the view of Ayres, the Tigers should be even better this winter. “There is no reason we can’t win the Ivy and the EIWA and finally place in the top 10 at the NCAAs; we need a national champion,” says Ayres. “We have this vision hanging on the wall in our wrestling room; we wrote it my second year. It is basically a story, called a vivid description. You write out what the future is going to look like — some parts of it were pretty funny. In one part, it says youngsters will be sitting in their rooms with posters of Princeton wrestlers on their walls and they will be staying up late at night trying to get the grades so they can one day wrestle like their heroes on the Princeton wrestling team. There is NCAA championship talk. Some of those things are happening. There were times I looked at it and I was thinking ‘are we ever going doing any of that stuff?’ I didn’t know, but we were going to keep working towards it.” Driven by Ayres’ unflagging work ethic, Princeton wrestling has come a long way from its days as a laughingstock.


Mark McLaughlin, MD

A NEUROSURGEON ON A MISSION Dr. Mark McLaughlin is a practicing neurosurgeon, author, inspirational speaker, coach, and philanthropist with a passion for teaching and sharing. His upcoming book “Cognitive Dominance: A Brain Surgeon's Quest to Out-Think Fear” will hit the stands in October, 2019.

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Hopewell Valley Vineyards

Laurita Winery

Terhune Orchards Vineyard and Winery

Fall Happenings — Wineries

Fall is a great time to visit the many area wineries. Mark your calendar for these upcoming events… By Laurie Pellichero

Hopewell Valley Vineyards 46 Yard Road, Pennington www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com Hopewell Valley Vineyards, led by proprietors Sergio and Violeta Neri, is dedicated to the creation of handcrafted wines by blending Old World traditions with New World flair. Their mission is to provide a relaxing, quaint, and beautiful environment where one can experience world class wines and enjoy the company of friends. Events at Hopewell Valley Vineyards include Jazzy Sundays every Sunday with live music from 2 to 5PM , complemented by a light fare menu. There is also music every Thursday evening from 6 to 9PM ., and Music & Merlot is presented every Friday and Saturday evening from 6-9 PM with a variety of live music along with artisan brick oven pizza. A Sangria Making class is offered on Sunday, September 22 from 11 AM to 1PM , and participants (must be 21 or older) get to take home a jar of the final product. Laurita Winery 85 Archertown Road, New Egypt www.lauritawinery.com Local, authentic, and sustainable is the philosophy at Laurita Winery, which gets its name from the first names of owners Randy Johnson’s and Randy Shea’s

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mothers, Laura and Rita. At Laurita, production focuses on making wine from grapes that are recognized and accepted worldwide, concentrating on the vinifera, the classic and noble varieties. The first vines were planted in 1998, Its first harvest and bottling was of Merlot and Chardonnay in 2003. The winery now features 40 cultivated acres of vineyards and 200 acres of woodlands, meadows, and pastures, and produces 14,000 to 16,000 cases of wine that are exclusive to the winery. Its main structure is built mostly from recycled and reclaimed materials, with the skeleton of the building formed through the merging of two 150-year-old barns that had been marked for demolition. Laurita Winery is a regional destination for a wide variety of events including A Touch of Italy and Food Trucks, Too! on Saturday, September 21 from 11AM to 9 PM and Sunday, September 22 from 11 AM to 7PM . OktoberFest is celebrated over two weekends, October 5-6 and October 19-20, starting at 11AM each day. Run the Vineyards — Laurita Winery 5K will be held on both October 12 and October 13, starting at 10AM each day. And Girls Night Out with special discounts is every Wednesday from 6 to 9PM . Old York Cellars 80 Old York Road, Ringoes www.oldyorkcellars.com Featuring scenic views of the Sourland Mountain range, Old York Cellars boasts 25 acres of preserved farmland and 13 acres of vineyards. Planted in 1979, the vines were the first to produce wine under the New Jersey Farm Act of 1981. Old York also features three

new and newly-renovated estate buildings that offer guests a broad range of winery experiences. Fall events include a Fall Harvest Festival on September 21 and 22 from noon to 5PM . Wine and Music Under the Stars is offered every Friday evening from 6 to 9 PM through October 18. Cheese, Chocolate, and Wine Pairings are featured on Saturdays and Sundays at 1 and 3 PM through October 27. Those who enjoy comedy can visit on Wine and Comedy Night on October 5 at 8PM featuring Taylor Mason. Old York Cellars opens at noon daily. Old York Cellars also offers live music every Friday and Saturday from 5 to 8PM at its Quaker Bridge Mall location in Lawrence Township. Terhune Orchards Vineyard and Winery 330 Cold Soil Road, Princeton www.terhuneorchards.com/winery Owned and operated by the Mount family, Terhune Orchards Vineyard and Winery features nine acres of grapes and 14 varieties of wine, including three fruit wines made from Terhune Orchards’ own apple cider. The historic 150-year-old barn on the farm is home to the tasting room, which is open Friday through Sunday from noon to 5PM . Bottles are also available seven days a week at the farm store. Terhune Orchards is one of the few operating farms in the Garden State to also have a winery and tasting room. People visiting the tasting room can also enjoy pick-your-own and the farmyard activities, as well as the farm store full of fresh fruits and vegetables, baked goods, and more. Terhune features a plethora of fall activities including Apple Days Harvest Festivals held each weekend until October 27, at which the Apple Wine is a seasonal favorite. Pie Sampling Weekend in the Wine Barn is November 9 and 10 from 10 AM to 5PM with


Working Dog Winery

Bishop Estate Vineyard and Winery

Unionville Vineyards

wine tastings available and all proceeds from the event to benefit HomeFront.

alfresco on the winery patio and will include a tour of harvest and the grape crush in progress.

Unionville Vineyards 9 Rocktown Road, RIngoes www.unionvillevineyards.com

Working Dog Winery 610 Windsor-Perrineville Road, Robbinsville www.workingdogwinerynj.com

Unionville Vineyards rests on 89 acres of preserved farmland in Hunterdon County. The winery is comprised of five estate vineyards spread over three counties, allowing for unique wines to be crafted from fruit grown in the varying terroir of Central and Northern New Jersey. Winemakers Zeke Johnsen and Conor Quilty craft acid-driven, fruit-forward, aromatic wines, focusing on Burgundy and Rhone varieties such as Chardonnay, Syrah, Pinot Noir, and Viognier. Its tasting room is open from 12 to 5 pm daily. On Sunday, September 22, 1-5 pm , Unionville will be one of the five wineries featured at The Winemakers Co-Op Fall Portfolio Tasting at Beneduce Vineyards in Hunterdon County. Attendees can meet the winemakers and proprietors of the co-op wineries, and taste more than 40 wines that are 100 percent New Jersey grown from the classic vinifera grapes of Europe and dry in style. Author Jason Wilson, the featured guest speaker, will discuss the importance of emerging wine regions and lesserknown grape varieties to the American wine industry. There will also be gourmet food offerings and live music by The John Beacher Trio. To learn more, visit www.thewinemakersco-op.com. Unionville will also host a Harvest Dinner on October 4 at 6:30 pm . Produced in partnership with Metropolitan Seafood & Gourmet of Lebanon, this four-course dinner with wine pairings will feature conversations with winemaker Conor Quilty and Metropolitan President Mark Drabich. Dinner will be

Located in eastern Mercer County, Working Dog Winery, formerly known as Silver Decoy, was established by a group of friends in 2001. Starting with three acres of Cabernet Franc and Chardonnay, it now features 17 acres of grapes under cultivation. The dog and family-friendly winery, which is also featured in the Winemakers Co-Op Fall Portfolio Tasting at Beneduce Vineyards in Hunterdon County on Sunday, September 22, offers tastings on Fridays from 2 to 6 pm and Saturday and Sunday from 11 am to 6pm . Live music is hosted every Saturday, year-round, from 1 to 5pm . Food trucks are often on-site as well.

IN PENNSYLVANIA: Bucks County Wine Trail www.buckscountywinetrail.com Right over the river in Bucks County, Pa., Bucks County Wine Trail wineries include Bishop Estate Vineyard and Winery in Perkasie, Buckingham Valley Vineyards in Buckingham, Crossing Vineyards and Winery in Washington Crossing, Rosebank Winery in Newtown, Rushland Ridge Vineyards in Jamison, Sand Castle Winery in Erwinna, and Wycombe Vineyards in Furlong. The Bucks County Wine Trail incorporated as a nonprofit organization in 2004. Its official mission is “promotion and education of Bucks County wines and wineries,” but, as family businesses all making wine in Bucks County, the wineries also work together to plan

Crossing Vineyards and Winery (Photo by Jorge Fernandez)

events for their followers and newcomers alike. Fall events include the annual Bucks County Wine Trail Harvest Celebration, held at all seven wineries on October 12 and 13. In addition to sampling a variety of award-winning Bucks County wines, guests can sample freshly pressed grape juices that have not yet fermented into wine. Celebration hours and events vary for each winery, check the winery for specific times. The Passport to Bucks Self-Guided Tour starts November 1 and runs through March 31, 2020. Visitors who purchase a Passport to Bucks card for $30 will receive a complimentary wine tasting and have their card punched as each winery is visited and wine is sampled. Once all seven wineries have been visited and the card has all its punches, it can be exchanged for a drawing card at the last winery visited and entered into a drawing for a grand prize. And on November 9 and 10, wine lovers can taste the newest, fruitiest varieties of at Bucks County Wine Trail’s annual Nouveau Weekend. Nouveau wines are bottled young with little aging, offering light and sweet tastes. As is tradition in the Beaujolais region of France, four of the Bucks County wineries will offer their own version of these wines fresh from harvest. Buckingham Valley Vineyards, Crossing Vineyards and Winery, Rushland Ridge Vineyards, and Winery and Sand Castle Winery are offering Nouveau wine tastings during the event. Bishop Estate Vineyard and Winery will feature a new wine release during Nouveau weekend. Cheers! Event dates and times subject to change. See websites for full details.

SEPTEMBER 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Destination:

NANTUCKET Located approximately 30 miles off the coast of Cape Cod, Nantucket is a compact island popular with generations of vacationers. The island was first sighted by Captain Bartholomew Gosnold of Falmouth, England, on his way to Virginia in 1602. In October 1641, William, Earl of Sterling, deeded the island to Thomas Mayhew of Watertown, Massachusetts Bay. Shares of the island were eventually sold to nine other purchasers. These 10 original owners were eager to attract tradesmen to the island, and the total number of stakeholders gradually expanded to 27 shares among 31 owners. Names like Coffin, Folger, Gardner, Macy, Starbuck, Hussey, and Swain still have a large presence on the island today. When the Englishmen arrived, the island was already home to an estimated 1,600 Wampanoag Indians. The influence of European disease, alcohol, debt, and servitude took a toll on the native population, and it is chronicled that the last Wampanoag (Abram Quary) on the island died in 1885. The settlers innately understood the value of

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

the cold waters at their doorstep, and sought the guidance of established New England whaling captains to learn how to hunt whales from a boat. At the time, whale oil was used to light lamps.

Eventually, a new species of whale was discovered in Nantucket’s waters — the sperm whale. Although smaller and more difficult to catch than the right whale, sperm whales housed

by Taylor Smith

huge quantities of oil (spermaceti) in their heads. The oil was also considered to be a much higher grade and drew larger profits. Nantucket whalers developed a reputation of being fearless and sought to pursue sperm whales from Bermuda to the Arctic Circle. By the 1830s, the price of whale oil had begun to drop as kerosene rose in consumption. It is said that the last whaling ship left Nantucket’s shores in 1869, never to return (Nantucket Historical Research Library: www. nha.org/research/research-library). Improved mass transportation and the advent of the railroad signaled the arrival of the tourism industry. In an effort to draw wealthy vacationers, locals began to build rental cottages and luxury hotels, taking out advertisements in New York City and Boston newspapers. Ferry service was established between Cape Cod and Nantucket in 1920. City-weary folks were attracted by the promise of fresh sea air, mild temperatures, untouched beaches, and quietude. In fact, the name “Nantucket” is recognized as an adaptation of an Algonquian word meaning “faraway island.”


PHOTOS COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

The National Park Service designated Nantucket as a National Historic Landmark District in 1966, thereby influencing and regulating all subsequent construction and development. As such, modern-day visitors are quick to feel a sense of traveling back in time, the natural dunes, beach grass, and shinglestyle homes easily recalling the island’s historic aesthetic as a New England seaport. Nantucket has featured prominently in literary and popular culture. Perhaps most notably, Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick (1851) has Ishmael departing for his voyage from Nantucket. The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (1838) is the only complete novel written by Edgar Allan Poe. Described by the New York Post as “the queen of the summer beach read,” American writer Elin Hilderbrand is a full-time Nantucket resident and sets the majority of her novels there. Speaking of books, one of the island’s most treasured community centers is the Nantucket Atheneum (www.nantucketatheneum.org), which is open year-round. From lectures to classes,

performances, and workshops, the Atheneum offers programs for all ages. Residents and visitors can browse over 1.6 million books, CDs,

DVDs, and downloadables. The adult “Book of the Day” highlights trending recommendations.

The library also maintains a vast collection of works by local authors. Standing tall on India Street, the white pillared structure has gone through significant renovation since 1847. Graced with artworks and artifacts, the Atheneum is a unique emblem of Nantucket’s proud historical heritage and vibrant modern day culture. Families joke that “to summer” on Nantucket is a verb and, chances are, there will be no shortage of high-profile sightings. Famous second-homeowners on the island include former Secretary of State John F. Kerry, Vice President Joe Biden, actor/director Ben Stiller, and actress Drew Barrymore, to name a few. Getting to the storied island takes some preplanning. For those who prefer a long, relaxing boat ride and want to bring their vehicle onisland, the Steamship Authority (SSA) is a 2 hour and 15-minute ride that requires advance reservations. Offering “the lowest fares to the island,” the SSA’s route travels first to Martha’s Vineyard and then onward to Nantucket (www. steamshipauthority.com). SEPTEMBER 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Seastreak ferries (www.seastreak.com/ daytrips-and-getaways/nantucket) offer service from New Jersey/New York City and New Bedford, Mass., to Nantucket, and Hy-Line Cruises runs high-speed ferries from Hyannis to Nantucket (www.hylinecruises.com/schedulesrates/nantucket-ferries). Nantucket Airlines offers frequent daily, year-round flights between Hyannis and Nantucket (www.nantucketairlines.com). Cape Air/Nantucket Air provides year-round service from Boston, Hyannis, and New Bedford to Nantucket (www.capeair.com). Seasonal service is offered from New York’s JFK Airport to Nantucket. United Airlines departs from Newark, N.J. (EWR) to Nantucket. Tradewind Aviation flies seasonally from White Plains, N.Y. (HPN) and Teterboro, N.J. (TEB) to Nantucket (www. flytradewind.com). Other commercial airlines servicing the island include American, Delta Airlines and JetBlue. Charter company options range from Blade (www.blade.flyblade.com) to Fly the Whale (www.flythewhale.com). Lastly, before you pack the car, drive to the airport, and/or set sail for Nantucket, take a moment to review Princeton Magazine’s suggested list of highly recommended hotel accommodations, dining, beaches, lighthouses, and assorted activities. You won’t be disappointed.

HOTELS

CRU Oyster Bar 1 Straight Wharf; www.crunantucket.com

21 Broad 21 Broad Street; www.21broadhotel.com

Galley Beach 54 Jefferson Avenue; www.galleybeach.net

76 Main 76 Main Street; www.76main.com

Millie’s 382 Madaket Road www.milliesnantucket.com

Brass Lantern Inn 11 North Water Street www.brasslanternnantucket.com Greydon House 17 Broad Street; www.greydonhouse.com The Wauwinet 120 Wauwinet Road; www.wauwinet.com

ACTIVITIES Brant Point Light Easton Street; www.nps.gov/nr/travel/maritime/ brn.htm

White Elephant Village 19 North Water Street www.whiteelephantnantucket.com

Jethro Coffin House 16 Sunset Hill; www.nha.org/research/ nantucket-history/histories-of-historic-sites/ oldest-house-history

DINING OUT

Madaket Beach, South Shore www.nantucket.net/beaches/south.php

Black-Eyed Susan’s 10 India Street www.black-eyedsusans.com

Nantucket Bike Tours 31 Washington Street www.nantucketbybike.com

Chanticleer Restaurant & Gardens 9 New Street www.chanticleernantucket.com

Nantucket Whaling Museum 13 Broad Street; www.nha.org/visit/ museums-and-tours/whaling-museum

Cisco Brewers 5 Bartlett Farm Road; www.ciscobrewers.com

Sankaty Head Light Baxter Road; www.sconsettrust.org/ stewardship/sankaty-head

Club Car Restaurant 1 Main Street; www.theclubcar.com Company of the Cauldron 5 India Street www.companyofthecauldron.com

Siasconset Beach Siasconset; www.nantucket.net/ beaches/east.php

IT IS TIME TO BOOK YOUR NEXT NANTUCKET RENTAL Cottages to Compounds

LEE REAL ESTATE 10 South Beach Street • Nantucket, MA 02554 508.325.5800 • office@leerealestate.com • leerealestate.com 86 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


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STONE POND LODGE

SHEEPHOLE FARM

Stone Pond Lodge is a magnificent 6,800 sq. ft. stone manor home. The house is sited down a long drive, over a bridge and past an inviting pond. The house with 4 bedrooms, 4 full baths and 2 powder rooms, sits among 45.6 acres of rich farmland, perfect for agrarian pursuits or an equine facility. The property allows for the building of 1 additional home. The Great Room offers cathedral ceilings with “rustic” beams, 2-story fireplace, wet bar and walls of glass doors. There is also a caretaker’s apt.

Sheep Hole Farm is one of the last remaining family compounds that offers magnificent and varied architecture, extreme privacy, recreational facilities; all sited on 82 vista strewn elevated acres. The main structure, once the original barn, went through a strenuous renovation creating a multi-level dwelling offering large and exciting open spaces and private family gathering places. A huge stone fireplace is the nucleus of the Great Room and open kitchen.There are multiple bedrooms, baths, a guest suite, theater room, and a motorized seat $2,895,000 that elevates you into the cupola above to view even more spectacular views. . There is a beautiful original stone manor home with hardwood floor, fireplace, three bedrooms, two full and one half baths. $4,500,000

For property information contact Art Mazzei directly at 610.428.4885 550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • AddisonWolfe.com • 215.862.5500


Ironies Sargasso armoire; price upon request; southhillhome.com

Currey and Company Ishaan accent table; price upon request; gasiorsfurniture.com

Jeffrey Campbell Lindsay statement heel sandal; $149; shop.nordstrom.com

Fine Art Lamps Perspectives 6 light chandelier; $5,565; foundrylighting.com

Vista Alegre Summit whiskey decanter; $225; bergdorfgoodman.com

Vintage Hermes Raji horn bracelet; $550; onlyauthentics.com

Industry West Hem sofa; $3,500; industrywest.com

Versace Medusa Lumier d’Or whiskey glass, set of 2; $250; versace.com

Cambridge Satchel Doctors Bag; $525; us.cambridgesatchel.com

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

PRODUCT SELECTION BY LYNN ADAMS SMITH

A WELL-DESIGNED LIFE


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2,900,000

$2,900,000

Upper Makefield Upper Makefield $1,299,900 $1,299,900

Upper Upper Makefield Makefield

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2,399,900

$2,399,900

Solebury Solebury $3,995,000 $3,995,000

Upper Makefield Upper Makefield

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College Savings or Retirement Planning? How to Save for Your Child’s Future Without Disrupting Yours Spotlight Q&A with Brooke M. McGeehan, Princeton branch director at RBC Wealth Management Interview by Laurie Pellichero

You mention saving for college. How can parents help their children fund education without jeopardizing their retirement savings? As the cost of college education in the United States continues to rise, many parents want to help their children get through school without accumulating a mountain of debt. This is not surprising when you consider the average annual cost for tuition, fees, and room and board at a four-year private college is now nearly $50,000 per year. However, it is important to ensure that parents are not disrupting their own futures by prioritizing their children’s education over their own retirement goals. Even families of means should consider what paying for their child’s college education could do to their overall retirement plan. At RBC Wealth Management, we create customized wealth plans that help clients balance saving for retirement while prioritizing other important financial goals like saving for college, paying down debt, or perhaps purchasing their dream vacation home. I know that 529 college savings plans are a common strategy. What are some of the reasons a family might choose to establish a 529 plan for their child? Utilizing a 529 plan to fund a child’s college education offers features that no other education savings vehicle can match. Contributions to 529 plans accumulate tax-deferred and earnings are tax-free if the funds are used to pay the beneficiary’s qualified education expenses. For higher education, this includes tuition, fees, books, supplies, equipment, computers, and sometimes room and board. And it’s not just for college. You can also use a 529 plan to save for graduate school and K-12 education (limited to using $10K per year for K-12). 529 plans also offer flexibility. If your first child decides not to attend college or perhaps they obtain a scholarship, then you can use the funds for someone else in your family.

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It is important to note that the tax benefits of 529 plans are most valuable when you have a longer time to invest and allow your contributions to grow. You should set up a 529 plan for your child as early as possible to take full advantage of the potential growth opportunities. Funding a 529 plan just a few years before your child goes off to college will have fewer benefits than if you put a plan in place for your child soon after they are born. What about grandparents? How can they help contribute to funding their grandchildren’s education? A powerful strategy for grandparents who are looking to contribute to their grandchild’s education through a 529 plan, as well as to reduce their taxable estate, is a five-year upfront gift. This strategy, known as “super-funding,” offers income and estate tax benefits. Under current tax laws, the grandparent can gift up to $15,000 per recipient per year gift tax-free. A married couple that elects to “split” gifts can gift up to $30,000 per recipient per year gift tax-free. With “super-funding,” the grandparent can make an upfront gift to the grandchild’s 529 plan, up to $75,000 for an individual or $150,000 for a joint gift to be spread over five years. This strategy, which isn’t just for grandparents, offers an opportunity to put significant money in a 529 plan gift tax-free to help children and grandchildren with college expenses while reducing the grandparents’/ parents’ estate and potential estate tax liabilities. But please make sure to coordinate with your CPA, as a special election must be made on your federal return. You are fairly new to the Princeton area. What made you decide to leave New York and join RBC’s Princeton office? I’ve been with RBC Wealth Management for 14 years, most of that time in our New York City office. I love New York City and never thought I would leave, until I was offered the branch manager position in Princeton. I’m not one to turn down opportunities, and, as a New Jersey resident, the thought of a better commute was appealing. However, what really inspired me to take this opportunity was the people I would be joining in Princeton and the sense of community. Many of my colleagues in Princeton have been with RBC Wealth Management for 25+ years. They take great pride in their profession and demonstrate an unprecedented commitment to their clients. It is a tremendous honor to be part of the Princeton office. I look forward to working with my colleagues and growing our presence in Princeton by adding experienced financial advisors that are looking for a culture and resources that are second to none. Brooke M. McGeehan

Brooke M. McGeehan can be contacted at 609.936.6456 or email brooke. mcgeehan@rbc.com.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF RBC WEALTH MANAGEMENT

In an age where investors have a plethora of choices when it comes to managing their assets, how does RBC Wealth Management differentiate itself? RBC Wealth Management is unique in that it has all the resources and offerings of a global financial institution, but with a small-firm feel. We don’t offer the typical Wall Street experience that the financial industry was built on decades ago, which makes it a great fit not only for clients who want to feel like they are valued and understood, but also for advisors who are passionate about the business and want to help their clients reach their goals. We like to say we are more Main Street than Wall Street. Another differentiator is the emphasis we place on the human element of advice. Many companies in the financial services industry and beyond are replacing people with technology. While technology is essential, and can provide important insights into data and trends, it can’t empathize with a client or understand how they feel. It can’t really appreciate or understand the emotions that go into so many financial decisions. But financial advisors who know their clients can. That’s why our firm is investing in technology that doesn’t take the advisor out of the equation, rather we better enable our advisors to serve their clients. Whether clients are saving for a home, planning for retirement, implementing a strategic estate plan, or saving for college, the role of a financial advisor is critical to help clients stay on target and obtain their goals.


Your most precious asset is time Whether for your career or your family, you want to be around for the moments that matter. At RBC Wealth Management, we’ll help you simplify and secure your financial future, so you have time to focus on what’s most important to you. Because we believe that the greatest returns are realized when you grow more than wealth. Call today for a complimentary consultation. Brooke M. McGeehan, CFP®, AWM Senior Vice President – Branch Director Senior Portfolio Manager – Portfolio Focus (609) 936-6456 | brooke.mcgeehan@rbc.com www.brookemcgeehan.com

Investment and insurance products offered through RBC Wealth Management are not insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency, are not deposits or other obligations of, or guaranteed by, a bank or any bank affiliate, and are subject to investment risks, including possible loss of the principal amount invested. © 2019 RBC Wealth Management, a division of RBC Capital Markets, LLC, Member NYSE/FINRA/SIPC.


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Princeton Magazine, September 2019  

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Princeton Magazine, September 2019  

Witherspoon Media Group