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FALL 2019

Princeton-Born Pianists Christina and Michelle Naughton are Rising Stars


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CONTENTS

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68

FALL 2019

48

26 SISTER ACT

Q&A WITH DR. RACHEL WERNER

BY ANNE LEVIN

BY DONALD GILPIN

Princeton-born pianists Christina and Michelle Naughton are rising stars

The executive director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics

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THE FIGHT FOR HEALTH EQUITY

PALMER SQUARE

BY WENDY GREENBERG

Dr. Richard Besser, head of Princeton’s Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is making a difference

BY TAYLOR SMITH

A look back 58

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TRENTON FARMERS MARKET ENTERS A NEW CHAPTER

“STATES OF HEALTH: VISUALIZING ILLNESS AND HEALING”

BY ILENE DUBE

A new manager carefully balances what made the market a draw for 71 years with new reasons to shop under the iconic sign

BY LAURIE PELLICHERO

Princeton University Art Museum exhibit explores wellness and illness, care and suffering, across time and cultures 38

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BOOK SCENE BY STUART MITCHNER

A “familiar sensibility”: Cookbooks for fall 78

FASHION & DESIGN

A Well-Designed Life 86, 88

ON THE COVER: Princeton-born pianists Christina and Michelle Naughton. Photo by Lisa Marie Mazzucco.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: YORÙBÁ ARTIST, TWIN COMMEMORATIVE FIGURES, COURTESY OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM, PHOTO BRUCE M. WHITE; CHRISTINA AND MICHELLE NAUGHTON, PHOTO BY LISA MARIE MAZZUCCO; PHOTO COURTESY OF PALMER SQUARE MANAGEMENT; DR. RACHEL WERNER PHOTO BY HOAG LEVINS; FARMERS MARKET PHOTO BY CHARLES R. PLOHN; DR. RICHARD BESSER PHOTO COURTESY OF ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION; INDUSTRY WEST CANE FLOOR LAMP, INDUSTRYWEST.COM.

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| FROM THE EDITOR Fall is my favorite time of year in Princeton, and our autumnal cover featuring twin pianists Christina and Michelle Naughton celebrates the season and acknowledges the town’s cultural vibrancy. The sisters were born in Princeton and studied at The Juilliard School in Manhattan and the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, where they were each awarded the Festorazzi Prize and became Steinway Artists. Their professional careers were launched with a recital at The Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., and the pair now regularly tours internationally. The Naughtons recently performed at Richardson Auditorium to commemorate Rossen Milanov’s 10th anniversary as music director of the Princeton Symphony Orchestra. Congratulations Director Milanov, and thank you for your musical innovation. This article has special meaning to author Anne Levin, whose parents were both pianists and played piano four hands, which is a type of duet involving two players on the same piano. The Naughton sisters occasionally play four hands, but performed on separate pianos for the Princeton concert. Every fall we publish health editorial, and every year the health care crisis becomes significantly more complex. Effective health care policies require brilliant minds, and physician-economist Rachel Werner is up to the task. At the University of Pennsylvania’s Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, Werner conducts research in an effort to improve the nation’s health system on both a state and federal level. Her data-driven and policy-focused reporting takes on important health issues such as the opioid epidemic. Donald Gilpin conducts the Q&A. On the subject of health, Laurie Pellichero highlights a compelling new exhibit at the Princeton University Art Museum, “States of Health,” which visually explores illness and healing across time and cultures. Curator Laura Giles notes that it also includes work that comments on the inequities of health care. Health care inequity is also the focus of an important initiative at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Princeton Magazine is honored to have interviewed Dr. Richard Besser, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and former acting director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention under President Barack Obama. Writer Wendy Greenberg summarizes Besser’s diverse career path that led him to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and describes the foundation’s health equity initiatives. Many of our readers will recognize Besser from his time at ABC News as chief health and medical editor, but you might be surprised to learn that he grew up in Princeton and graduated from Princeton High School in 1977. Besser was trained as a pediatrician and has a lifelong interest in volunteerism and public health stemming from being the son of a doctor and social worker. His wife Jeanne is a food writer, and they have two sons who they encourage to eat healthy, unprocessed foods. The Trenton Farmers Market is an excellent place to shop for fresh, seasonal vegetables, and our own foodie, Ilene Dube, has an article on the market’s new manager, Chris Cirkus, and the many updates she has made. You’ll see in Charles R. Plohn’s colorful photographs that the market has retained its timeless charm and is a fun place to visit any time of year. Did you know that Cedarville Farms was one of the founding farmers, Terhune Orchards has been a steady presence for over 20 years, and Terra Momo Bread Company is a new addition, baking pizza and focaccia on site? If you’re cooking this Thanksgiving, take notice of Cirkus’s recipe for roasted autumn vegetables and read Stuart Mitchner’s recommendations on Cookbooks for Fall. I am especially intrigued by The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook, written by food historian Annie Gray. This cookbook brings Downton Abbey to life with historically-based “upstairs” and “downstairs” menus featuring recipes popular in Great Britain between 1912 and 1926. History enthusiasts will enjoy Taylor Smith’s article Palmer Square: A Look Back. The amazing c. 1925 photograph of Baker’s Alley shows how the

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Photography by Charles R. Plohn

Dear Readers,

area looked before the square was built. The view in the photo points southward towards Nassau Street with a glimpse of Upper Pyne, which was razed in 1963 but looks very similar to Lower Pyne, the current day Hamilton Jewelers building. The majority of Princeton’s African American community lived on Baker’s Alley, and they were moved to Birch Avenue to make room for the development of Palmer Square. The plan was the dream of Edgar Palmer, a Princeton graduate of the Class of 1903, and heir to the New Jersey Zinc fortune. To write this article, Taylor researched documents from the Historical Society of Princeton and Princeton University’s Mudd Manuscript Library, and spoke with the management of Palmer Square as well as Shirley Satterfield — a sixth-generation resident of the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood and an instrumental figure in the neighborhood’s designation as a historic district. Bob Hillier and I hope you enjoy the fall issue of Princeton Magazine, and wish you all a happy and heartwarming Thanksgiving.

Respectfully yours,

Lynn Adams Smith Editor-In-Chief


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ars St ng isi R e ar n to gh au N lle he ic M d Princeton-Born Pianists Christina an by Anne Levin

Photo by Lisa Marie Mazzucco FALL 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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(Photo by Lisa Marie Mazzucco)

lassical music claims a long tradition of sibling performers. There are the Shahams (violinist Gil and pianist Ori), the Labeques (pianists Katia and Marielle), and the Capucons (violinist Renand and cellist Gautier) — just to name a few. Currently prominent on that roster are Christina and Michelle Naughton, 31-year-old virtuoso pianists who spent their first year of life in Princeton, and returned last month to perform as soloists with the Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO). The glamorous Naughtons, whose father taught computer science at Princeton University, are not just sisters — they are twins. Good luck telling them apart. As toddlers, the girls moved from Princeton to Madison, Wisconsin, when their father, Jeffrey Naughton, joined the faculty of the University of Wisconsin. Their earliest music study was with their mother, an amateur pianist. There was no grand plan, at first, for professional careers. “Our parents are not musicians, but they are very much music lovers,” said Michelle, speaking by phone from the Manhattan apartment she shares with her sister a few weeks before their PSO performances. “Practicing the piano was something we looked forward to. We didn’t know it was supposed to be a chore.” The sisters played separately, not thinking they would go on to appear in recitals and concerts with major symphony orchestras. “The together thing started toward the end of high school,” said Michelle. “We did a performance together, and it just clicked. We knew this was something we wanted to continue.” Both studied at The Juilliard School of Music in Manhattan, and later graduated from the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. The sisters’ joint career was launched in 2009 with a recital at Washington’s Kennedy Center. Next was a concert with the Philadelphia Orchestra, at The Mann Music Center. It was conducted by Rossen Milanov, who is currently celebrating his 10th anniversary as music director of the Princeton Symphony Orchestra. In a review of that

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FALL 2019

performance in The Philadelphia Inquirer, critic David Patrick Stearns wrote of the sisters, then 20 years old: “The duo piano medium is hard to do well. Two similar-sounding instruments aren’t easy to find in some quarters, and those who play them are often solo virtuosi on holiday, which means they pound away, reminding you all too often that the piano is essentially a percussion instrument. So hearing Mozart’s Concerto for Two Pianos and Orchestra with such a strong sense of the music’s specific needs being addressed — the case at Tuesday’s concert conducted by Rossen Milanov – is indeed a luxury. Of the two, Michelle (the one in red) had the deeper insights into what lay behind Mozart’s decorous piano writing. But Christina (the one in blue) must be credited with the kind of phrasing and sensitivity that so beautifully showcased her sister, and compatibility of sound that clearly showed one piano doing what the other was not.” Milanov has fond recollections of this early collaboration. A week before he conducted the PSO in the same Mozart piece with the Naughtons as soloists, he said, “We actually have a sort of long performance history. I have been following their career with great excitement since that time. They are such refined players. And I think it’s wonderful that the natural genetic relationship they share seems to raise the level of musicianship.” In the decade between that first concert and the present, the Naughtons have performed with major orchestras all over the United States. Internationally, they have appeared with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra, the St. Petersburg Philharmonic, the Royal Flemish Philharmonic, the Hong Kong Philharmonic, and numerous others. Their repertoire favors not only Bach and Mozart, “but a lot of modern music as well,” Michelle said. “Our most recent recording on Warner Classics is called American Postcard, and it has music by several 20th-century American composers.” The album includes compositions and commissions by John Adams,


Rossen Milanov posed with Michelle, left, and Christina following their appearance with the PSO. (Photo courtesy of Princeton Symphony Orchestra)

Milanov, shown on the podium, is celebrating his tenth year as music director of the PSO. (Photo courtesy of Princeton Symphony Orchestra)

Aaron Copland, Conlon Nancarrow, and Paul Schoenfield. The sisters have also premiered works at various festivals and series devoted to 20th-century American music, including a work by composer Paul Lansky, a professor emeritus at Princeton University. The Naughtons move comfortably between performing on two pianos and performing together on one instrument. The latter, known as piano four hands, is its own genre, with a distinct set of requirements. Two people used to having the 88 piano keys — and the pedals — to themselves must not only share, but feel comfortable with, the intimacy that comes with occupying one bench and one keyboard. “Each genre has its own advantages and disadvantages,” said Michelle. “Two pianos is wonderful for orchestral transcriptions. And with four hand, you almost feel conversational. We do a lot of that.” All of this togetherness that comes with being a sister act has its challenges. “It’s not like we’re always together. And we don’t always agree on everything,” said Michelle. “But we know each other so well, and that ultimately means we

have a certain spontaneity when we perform.” Milanov is especially appreciative of the sisters’ ability to perform as one unit while retaining their individuality. “In classical music, what is generally important is the point of view,” he said. “We are all different people, and we come with our own emotional history and understanding of the world around us. Just like in the visual arts, you couldn’t find two people who could paint the same object in the same way. But this is what I appreciate in performers — people who collaborate, with their own point of view. Certainly with Michelle and Christina, you can see their individual reflections to music. And it’s very exciting to watch.” The PSO chose the concerts featuring the Naughtons last month to announce a fundraising campaign to support the orchestra over the next 10 years. Starting with the sisters’ appearance, the season has been programmed to celebrate Milanov’s first decade as music director. The sisters were happy to be part of the occasion. “We have performed with Rossen Milanov before, but not with this orchestra,” said Michelle. “We were born in Princeton, so we are very much looking forward to playing there — with him.”

Photo by Lisa Marie Mazzucco FALL 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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The Fight for Health Equity

Dr. Richard Besser, head of Princeton’s Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is making a difference BY WENDY GREENBERG

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PHOTO COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Dr.

perspective and approach to public health, and it all came together in leading the Richard Besser, a pediatrician and head of the Robert RWJF. Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), has volunteered RWJF, headquartered in Princeton near Forrestal Village, is the nation’s largest in a clinic in every place he has lived. philanthropy dedicated solely to health. Since 1972 it has supported research and Seeing children once a week at the Henry J. Austin programs targeting pressing health issues. Its approach is to help build a society in Center in Trenton brings health inequity into focus. which everyone has “a fair and just opportunity for health and well-being,” says There, in Trenton, the life expectancy for children is Besser. The RWJF calls it a “culture of health.” 73 years. In Princeton, the life expectancy for the same-age child is 87 years. It requires “shifting how people may think about the drivers of health — how the The clinic grants a window, he said, “into the lives of children, many of whom choices we make depend so fundamentally on the choices that we have,” continues have profound barriers to health, children growing up Besser. “It requires helping people recognize who has in very different circumstances than the children in my opportunity and who does not. It takes working to remove hometown of Princeton.” the barriers to health caused by poverty, racism, sexism, At a New York City health center, Besser met a and so many other social factors.” grandmother who knows her grandchildren needs daily physical exercise, but was concerned about the safety AN INTEREST IN PUBLIC HEALTH of playing outdoors. He met a youngster whose asthma attacks were triggered by environmental contaminants Besser came to the RWJF in April 2017, new to philanthropy in the family’s apartment. At the Trenton clinic, he met a but not new to public health. “I’ve been incredibly fortunate mother of a son with significant developmental disabilities in my career to be able to pursue issues that I am passionate who has been waiting two years for services that would about,” he says. He grew up in a family committed to help him. helping others, primarily through health care, says Besser, This kind of work has helped Besser rethink health in the son of an obstetrician/gynecologist and a social worker, terms of opportunities to lead healthy lives: the choices and the grandson of a neighborhood family doctor in people make are dependent on the choices they have. Philadelphia and the nurse who worked in his office. “In too many communities, health choices just aren’t “While I was attracted to improving health from a available,” he says via email. “These encounters fuel very young age, I knew my approach would be different. my passion for the work that we do (at RWJF). It is I was excited about the power of public health to create through these conversations that I come face-to-face with the incredible structural inequities in America and the This map shows the distribution of New Jersey’s health conditions that improved the health of entire populations,” outcomes, based on an equal weighting of length and he says. importance of addressing these head on.” quality of life. The map is divided into four quartiles Besser, who received a bachelor’s degree in economics Princeton-raised Besser trained as a pediatrician, with less color intensity indicating better performance in the respective summary rankings. (Map courtesy of from Williams College and medical degree from the served as the acting head for the Centers for Disease the University of Wisconsin’s Population Health Institute Control and Prevention, and has been a medical editor County Health Rankings and Roadmaps; and the Robert University of Pennsylvania, completed a residency and chief residency in pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University for ABC News. Each move provided him with a different Wood Johnson Foundation) FALL 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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PHOTO COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Hospital in Baltimore. “What I love about pediatrics is the opportunity you have to His next stop was ABC News as health and medical editor. “At first I thought affect the entire life course of a child,” he says. “However, from the beginning of my this was an odd fit for me, but the more I thought about it, I saw this as a chance to career I knew that public health was where I belonged.” practice public health in front of a camera — a chance to give millions of people After his residency, he worked doing research for the Johns Hopkins School of information to make more informed health decisions, a chance to explain health Hygiene and Public Health in Bangladesh, and worked at the Centers for Disease information that might be daunting or incomprehensible,” he says. “Through my Control and Prevention to learn how to be a disease detective in the Epidemic time at ABC News, I saw the power of the media to shape public perception of Intelligence Service. His first job after this fellowship was health events and I honed my communication skills.” running the pediatric residency program at the University of California, San Diego, and at the same time he conducted HEALTH EQUITY INITIATIVES research on the cross-border transmission of tuberculosis in children. In San Diego, he had the opportunity to provide Leading the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Besser medical commentary for one of the local television news finds he uses all of the skills he has acquired during his programs, and learned the value of “clear information career up to this point. presented honestly.” In this year’s annual message, which includes a video, After five years in San Diego, and missing working the RWJF shows how housing is a key part of the health in public health on a national level, he returned to the equation, and linked to health equity. The stability and CDC. There, over 11 years, he worked on issues including quality of housing and neighborhoods play a major role antibiotic overuse, Legionnaires’ disease, meningitis, in health, especially when a large part of a paycheck goes bioterrorism, and emergency preparedness and response. toward rent or mortgage, and other needs are set aside as Besser’s gift for communications again proved a result. useful as he led the initial response to the 2009 H1N1 flu A major RWJF statewide initiative is The Policy pandemic. “As part of our response we put a big focus on Roadmap to Help all New Jerseyans Live their Healthiest communications to the public,” he says. “We recognized Lives. The report was driven by growing gaps in health that during a public health crisis, people were concerned from county to county, and even within neighborhoods, about their health and needed information they could trust. particularly affecting the poor, and people of color. This map shows the distribution of New Jersey’s health We knew that trust required a level of communication often factors based on weighted scores for health behaviors, According to Besser, “barriers to being healthy are difficult in large bureaucracies. Each day we held press clinical care, social and economic factors, and the physical often the result of unjust policies and practices that have conferences and told the public what we knew, what we environment. Detailed information on the underlying persisted for generations. Policy actions have sometimes measures is available at countyhealthrankings.org. The didn’t know, and what people could do to protect their map is divided into four quartiles with less color intensity created unfair gaps in health. We can also leverage policy health. We shared what we were doing to answer critical indicating better performance in the respective summary to dismantle those barriers.” (Map courtesy of the University of Wisconsin’s questions and we were gratified that polling showed a very rankings. The report, produced in partnership with the Center for Population Health Institute County Health Rankings and State Health Policy and the John J. Heldrich Center for high trust in governmental public health.” Roadmaps; and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation)

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#CloseHealthGaps

Short Distances to Large Gaps in Health

SHORT DISTANCES TO LARGE GAPS IN HEALTH: Trenton, Hamilton, Lawrence, and Princeton

83 YRS

95

75 YRS

1

PRINCETON JUNCTION TRAIN STATION

ZIP 08648

87 YRS ZIP 08550

COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY

ZIP 08618

GROUNDS FOR SCULPTURE

80 YRS ZIP 08619

NJ STATE HOUSE

73 YRS ZIP 08611

295

3 miles 195

Life expectancy at birth (years) Shorter

Longer

© 2015 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Across America, babies born just a few miles apart have dramatic differences in life expectancy. Developed by the RWJF Commission to Build a Healthier America, this city map displays life expectancy values alongside common geographic landmarks and highway exits, to show how opportunities to lead a long and healthy life can vary dramatically by neighborhood, and in communities across the United States. (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation)

2019 County Health Rankings for the 21 Ranked Counties in New Jersey. (Chart courtesy of the University of Wisconsin’s Population Health Institute County Health Rankings and Roadmaps; and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation)

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LOCATION, LOCATION FOR HEALTHY LIVING

Not everyone has healthy choices, he emphasizes. “Health is about more than what takes place at the doctor’s office. Access to good quality health care is important, but the most important aspects of health take place where you live, learn, work, and play. “Yes, personal responsibility plays a key role in health, but the choices we make depend on the choices we have available to us. Not everyone has healthy ones. There are people who live in communities where there is no access to healthy, affordable foods and people who have to choose between housing and prescription medicine. This is real. Too many people start behind and stay behind because of where they live, how much money they make, or discrimination they face.” The Besser family, which includes two sons, does its part to live healthy. “We are incredibly fortunate to have the opportunity to make healthy choices,” Besser

BUILDING A CULTURE OF HEALTH The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation produced a report, A Culture of Health: A Policy Roadmap to Help All New Jerseyans Live Their Healthiest Lives, earlier this year with analysts at the Center for State Health Policy and the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, both at Rutgers University. The report, informed by research and conversations with nearly 300 residents, as well as nonprofit and business leaders, identifies 13 priorities for building a Culture of Health in New Jersey in the areas of healthy children and families; healthy communities; and high quality equitable health and social service systems. The RWJF website has more information on each policy option. HEALTHY CHILDREN AND FAMILIES 1. Improve maternal and infant health outcomes by enhancing care, support, and prevention.

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says. “We are all very active, love to eat healthy food, and are socially connected. My wife, Jeanne, is a food writer and an amazing chef who knows the importance of eating unprocessed food. Physical activity and exercise are things we truly enjoy. We don’t smoke or overly consume alcohol. We get our annual flu shots. We don’t take these opportunities for granted for we realize that not everyone is so fortunate.” PRINCETON’S INFLUENCE

Besser says he loved growing up in Princeton. “Throughout my education, I had teachers who cared about me and got me excited about learning. I remember in fifth grade, our teacher wanted us to understand what a million looked like, so she had us work to collect one million bottle caps. It got me interested in math. “My high school world history teacher got me excited about learning about people, cultures, and countries around the globe. He helped me understand the ways in which we are all interconnected and helped begin a lifelong journey to improve health for people here and around the world. “It’s amazing the power teachers can have. They can inspire a student to see things in a new way. They can also limit that which a young person views as possible. I’ve been fortunate to have teachers who have opened my eyes in incredible ways. We must work together to make sure every child in America has that opportunity.” His philosophy is that everyone benefits from policies that remove barriers to revitalizing neighborhoods, improve schools, health care institutions, and housing. “America cannot be healthy if we are leaving behind entire communities. Communities with highways running through them, toxic dumps next to playgrounds, neighborhoods with more liquor stores than grocery stores, lack of safe and affordable housing, or poor-quality schools.” “Regardless of our differences, every person hopes and dreams for a better life for themselves and their kids,” he says. “And we all benefit when our neighbors have what they need, when communities give everyone a fair shot at being as healthy as they can be. That means access to good jobs with fair pay, good schools, affordable housing, safe neighborhoods, and quality medical care. This approach, an approach towards greater health equity, is crucial to a productive workforce, and a vibrant nation. “We can’t solve this on an individual level, it will take all of us working together.” As head of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Besser is helping to lead that effort.

2. Ensure maximum uptake of the recently expanded paid family leave benefit, particularly among lowincome workers. 3. Increase access to high-quality early education for all of New Jersey’s 3- and 4-year-olds, with a continued focus on children living in poverty. 4. Boost the incomes of families supported by lowand moderate-wage workers to promote financial stability and economic opportunity. HEALTHY COMMUNITIES 5. Ensure New Jerseyans have equitable access to safe, affordable, and stable housing in the communities where they choose to live. 6. Prevent childhood lead poisoning by maximizing state and federal funding, and ensuring properties are lead-safe through inspection, remediation, and enforcement. 7. Expand equitable access to healthy food in communities and schools.

8. Ensure all roads, sidewalks, and public transit systems are safe and accessible to all potential users. 9. Reduce tobacco use disparities through price increases and cessation programs. HIGH-QUALITY, EQUITABLE HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICE SYSTEMS 10. Shift the health care system’s focus toward delivering whole-person care working with other systems to promote overall health and well-being. 11. Ensure access to comprehensive, integrated mental health and addiction services. 12. Improve access to health and social services throughout the state by leveraging technology. 13. Foster collaboration within and across state agencies to improve health equity.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Workforce Development at Rutgers University, documents policy options to close inequitable gaps and broaden opportunities, such as improving maternal and infant health outcomes by enhancing care, supports, and prevention. The recommendations span education, housing, nutrition, income, and health care, with a focus on health equity, including paid family leave benefits, the minimum wage increase, and access to early education. How does New Jersey compare to other states on the issue of health equity? New Jersey, says Besser, “has a lot to be proud of — higher life expectancy rates compared to the national average, higher high school graduation rates, relatively higher incomes.” However, in every part of the state there are “wide, persistent — and in some cases, growing — gaps in health.” Take downtown Trenton, he says. There, the life expectancy in ZIP codes 08611 and 08618 is 73 and 75 years, respectively. The life expectancy in the more suburban 08619 and 08648 ZIP codes of Hamilton and Lawrence Townships jumps to 80 and 83 years, respectively. The average life expectancy in the affluent 08550 ZIP code — just outside of Princeton and only 13 miles from downtown Trenton — is 87 years. All of these ZIP codes sit within Mercer County, but across the county, life expectancy varies by as much as 14 years, he pointed out. Moreover, each year, Bergen, Morris, Monmouth, and Somerset counties see three infant deaths per thousand compared to eight deaths per thousand in Atlantic, Camden, and Cumberland counties. And, he noted, black infants in the state are more than twice as likely as white infants to die before their first birthdays, and black mothers are more than three times as likely as white mothers to die from pregnancy-related complications.


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Elegance, seclusion, and accessibility are hallmarks of this beautifully built 8-yr old home on prestigious private lane within walking distance of town and gown. The stone and stucco exterior is enhanced by balconies with wrought iron railings and covered stone terraces. 10 ft, 12 ft, and 20 ft ceilings with banks of windows fill the home with light while welcoming in the lush wooded views. Large formal rooms, extraordinary kitchen family room, and 5 bedroom suites. $2,600,000

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Drawing inspiration from centuries-old manor homes of Europe, this all brick Institute area residence, designed by architect Robert Bennett, distinctly suits a modern lifestyle with its masterful, light-infused floor plan. Broad floor-to-ceiling windows capturing views of the bluestone terrace and lovely, fenced yard are a defining feature of most spaces, but the architectural piece de resistance is the dramatic floating staircase. $1,750,000

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FALL 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE |

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Princeton Restorative & Implant Dentistry practice owner Stephen I. Hudis, DDS, FACP was inducted as President of the American College of Prosthodontists on November 1, 2019 in Miami, Florida. Dr. Hudis will continue to lead the American College of Prosthodontists with their mission to empower member success; promote education, research, and clinical practice of prosthodontics; and drive continuous improvement in the restoration of teeth and orofacial structures to enhance oral health outcomes. Dr. Hudis supports the vision that "Everyone can enjoy the confidence, fullness of life, and overall wellbeing that comes from a healthy mouth and an attractive smile." Dr. Hudis is excited to bring his knowledge and experience to the specialty of prosthodontics in his new capacity and continue to provide comprehensive restorative and implant dentistry along with Dr. Gregory S. Hughes in his Princeton location.

Princeton Restorative & Implant Dentistry Princeton Restorative & Implant Dentistry andand Stephen I. Hudis expands welcomes Dr.Dr. Stephen I. Hudis expands andand welcomes

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Harrison Street/Princeton/NJ/08540 187187 N. N. Harrison Street/Princeton/NJ/08540 drhughes@drhudis.com drhughes@drhudis.com 609-924-7910 609-924-7910 New Jersey Specialty # 6786 New Jersey Specialty # 6786


A home-like birthing experience.

The Mary V. O’Shea Birth Center The only birth center in New Jersey on a hospital campus. Women experiencing a low-risk pregnancy who are looking for more natural options for their birthing experience can be cared for by our certified nurse-midwives. The new Mary V. O’Shea Birth Center at Saint Peter’s University Hospital provides an alternative, home-like birthing option for women. With a separate street entrance and dedicated space, our birthing suites resemble bedrooms and feature a queen-size bed, large spa-size tub, and shower, all in a relaxing décor. From pregnancy through birth, our midwives will support you in the way you want to experience the birth of your child. You may choose to move around freely, use birthing tools, immerse yourself in water for comfort, and get the support you need to birth without medication.

To learn more or to make an appointment with a midwife, call 732.339.7879 or visit saintpetershcs.com/midwifery

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“STATES OF HEALTH: VISUALIZING ILLNESS AND HEALING”

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM EXHIBIT EXPLORES WELLNESS AND ILLNESS, CARE AND SUFFERING, ACROSS TIME AND CULTURES BY LAURIE PELLICHERO IMAGES COURTESY OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM


Leonora Carrington, British, active Mexico and United States, 1917–2011, Crookhey Hall, 1987. Color lithograph. Gift of David L. Meginnity, Class of 1958. © Leonora Carrington / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

P

andemics and infectious disease. Mental illness. The hopes and dangers of childbirth. The complexities of care. These concepts and many others are explored through more than 80 art objects from around the world — from antiquity to modern times —including paintings, drawings, prints, sculptures, photographs, and multimedia, in “States of Health: Visualizing Illness and Healing,” on view at the Princeton University Art Museum November 2 through February 2, 2020. “With the medical humanities a growing field, ‘States of Health’ afforded us an extraordinary opportunity to pose important questions about how we visualize both wellness and disease,” says James Steward, Nancy A. Dasher-David J. Haemisegger, Class of 1976, director. “By positioning objects that have likely never been in dialogue with each other before, the exhibition draws on multi-disciplinary perspectives to consider health and healing today, how artists have interpreted these states over time, and how they both differ and share

Master of the Greenville Tondo, Italian, active 1500–1510, formerly attributed to Perugino (Pietro di Cristoforo Vannucci), Italian, 1450–1523, Saint Sebastian, ca. 1500–1510. Oil on wood panel transferred to canvas on pressed-wood panel. Gift of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation to the New Jersey State Museum; transferred to the Princeton University Art Museum. Photo Bruce M. White.

certain characteristics across many cultures.” “States of Health” is displayed in four thematic groupings: “Confronting Contagion,” “States of Mind,” “Worlds of Care,” and “Birthing Narratives,” with cross-cultural juxtapositions throughout the exhibition considering both broad issues and specific historical events from a visual perspective. It is organized by Veronica White, curator of academic programs, and Laura Giles, Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970, curator of prints and drawings. White says the idea for “States of Health” grew out of her work with medical humanities classes at the University. “For several years I’ve been working with classes exploring visual narratives of illness, different cultural interpretations of disease, and the different roles that art can play in the face of illness, healing, and caregiving. Those classes focused on works of art responding to the bubonic plague and AIDS,” she notes. White then curated a mini-exhibition of four paintings and drawings in the gallery, all of which documented or evoked the bubonic plague in Italy during the 16 th and 17 th centuries.

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Eric Avery, American, born 1948. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2000. Linoleum block print over lithograph. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, Graphic Arts Collection, Princeton University Library. © Eric Avery.

“That display received a strong response from both the campus community and the wider public, so we saw the potential to expand the concept into a full, multi-thematic, and multimedia exhibition with global context compelling broader conversations concerning universal and topical health-related issues,” says Giles. “When the opportunity arose for a special exhibition, we realized that we could gather works that would not have been seen together in the past,” continues Giles. “Traditionally,

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museums present Egyptian works in one gallery, Renaissance objects in another, and contemporary art in yet another. But through this thematic approach we’ve been able to place works in conversation with one another to connect common threads across cultures and time. It was wonderful how quickly the Museum’s curators came together and worked with us to seize this opportunity to create unique trans-cultural juxtapositions.” White notes that the exhibition explores the

multiple roles that art can play in the face of illness, healing, and birth. Some of these roles include grappling with knowledge, attempting to visualize the effects of a diseases before the disease is understood; trying to make a disease concrete, in the form of an object; art as activism, exploring unequal access to diagnosis and care; and art as a form of catharsis and healing for artists themselves. “Modern and contemporary examples include Leonora Carrington, who created works that have been discussed in light of her own experience in an asylum; Mario Moore, who created a series of works while recovering from brain surgery; and Jo Spence, who talks about the therapeutic role of photography in the face of her own cancer,” says White. White also points out works of art that are seen as having healing functions in and of themselves. “For example, praying to Saint Sebastian was believed to have the potential to heal someone stricken with the bubonic plague. The small prayer book devoted to Saint Margaret would have been held by a woman while giving birth, as it was believed to provide protection,” she says. According to the curators, the Museum collaborated with a wide range of disciplines, programs, and faculty voices at the University — including experts in molecular biology, anthropology, literature, psychology, and creative writing — to provide various points of view about the objects on display. “Overall, this exhibition is the product of an academic institution and reflects ways of thinking from multiple disciplines,” says White. “That was the genesis of the project and has proved to be the most interesting aspect, approaching the objects from so many different viewpoints.” As to how the exhibition plays into health care issues today, Giles notes, “one thread is that it includes work that comments on the inequities of health care. Examples include a LaToya Ruby Frazier photograph of a hospital in Braddock, Pa., that was the only resource for the African American community — before it was demolished. “Other examples include David Wojnarowicz’s photomontages, which address the U.S. government’s problematic response in the face of AIDS during the 1980s and 1990s, and Gordon Parks’ photographs that investigate a family’s health problems in the favelas of Brazil.” Highlights of “States of Health” also include “the painting of St. Sebastian, particularly the way it is presented in this exhibition in a completely different context,” says Giles. “We are taking the painting out of the Italian Renaissance gallery, out of the framework of devotional art, and are instead presenting it in juxtaposition with secular objects — Maya and American works, etc. — in a broader global context, both spiritual and secular. “The Typhoid Fever work by Ruth S. Cuthand is another absolute highlight. It’s a contemporary work by an indigenous artist from Canada, and one of five new acquisitions being


Gordon Parks, American, 1912–2006, Isabel Beside Sick Father, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1961. Gelatin silver print. Museum purchase, Hugh Leander Adams, Mary Trumbull Adams, and Hugh Trumbull Adams Princeton Art Fund. © The Gordon Parks Foundation.

Late Formative, Xochipala, Old woman with a young child, 400 B.C.– A.D. 200. Ceramic with traces of white slip. Princeton University Art Museum, anonymous gift. Photo Bruce M. White.

Yorùbá artist, Twin commemorative figures (ere ibeji) with tunic, late 19th– early 20th century. Wood, tukula, metal, glass beads, cotton, abrus seeds, and leather. Museum purchase, Fowler McCormick, Class of 1921, Fund. Photo Bruce M. White.

Italian, Desco da Parto: The Garden of Youth, ca. 1430. Tempera on wood panel. Princeton University Art Museum, bequest of Frank Jewett Mather Jr. Photo Bruce M. White.

Marcus Leatherdale, American, born Canada, born 1952, AIDS, 1988. Gelatin silver print. Princeton University Art Museum, gift of James Kraft, Class of 1957. © Marcus Leatherdale.

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Ruth S. Cuthand, Canadian, born 1954, Reserving: Typhoid Fever, 2018. Glass beads, thread, backing. Princeton University Art Museum purchase. © Ruth S. Cuthand.

shown for the first time in ‘States of Health.’ She’s using beautiful images that tie-in with our flat screen of medical imagery. Her work looks like typhoid under a microscope, addressing a very dark period in North American history when indigenous populations were severely decimated by disease. Her depiction of typhoid is beaded and glittering — she uses visual beauty to evoking something horrific.” The curators both say that correlations across time and place are at the heart of the exhibition. “We show works about the bubonic plague alongside works about AIDS. In both cases, we see artists grappling with the disease before the disease is understood,” says Giles. “In our narrative section about childbirth, we have an ancient Etruscan terra cotta votive uterus juxtaposed with an 18th century French illustrated manual on midwifery. And in ‘Worlds of Care,’ we present figures looked to for healing across cultures, including a MesoAmerican figure, an Egyptian statuette, a Tlingit shaman, and a Chinese scroll painting of Guan Yin.” White points out that “States of Health” examines illness and tribulations, but it also focuses on hope. “Indeed, we end the exhibition with works examining childbirth and rituals associated with the start of life.” “This is not a show of anatomical drawings or medical illustrations,” says Giles. “It goes

far beyond that, showing how art has arguably anticipated the sciences in visualizing disease and healing.” “There are so many cultures represented,” continues White. “And while specific cultures may interpret or represent these issues

differently, there’s a kind of basic humanity in the exhibition that will speak to people about their own experiences, such as having been ill or having served as caregivers. Considering these themes provides an opportunity to reflect on that, and to feel a communal sense that goes beyond the self and extends to other cultures. “This is why we have a reflection area in the gallery, with notebooks for people who wish to note their own experiences.” Programs accompanying “States of Health: Visualizing Illness and Healing” include a curator’s lecture and student dance performance inspired by the themes in the exhibition on November 7 at 5:30 pm ; an all-day symposium followed by a reception on November 15; a concert by the Princeton Chamber Music Society on November 21 at 5:30 pm exploring the intersection of music and medicine; and a Day With(out) Art community event on December 1 at 2 pm marking the 30 th anniversary of World AIDS Day. The Princeton University Art Museum is located at the heart of the Princeton campus. Admission is free. Museum hours are Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 10 am to 5 pm ; Thursday 10 am to 9 pm ; and Sunday 12 to 5 pm . For more information, visit www.artmuseum. princeton.edu.

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A unique birthing experience awaits expecting families when Saint Peter’s University Hospital opens the doors to the new Mary V. O’Shea Birth Center in October. The state-of-the-art facility is New Jersey’s first Birth Center found on the grounds of a hospital and is the new home of Saint Peter’s midwifery practice – where expectant mothers and their families will go for office visits, birthing classes and the birth of their baby. According to The American Association of Birth Centers (AABC), a birth center is defined as a “home-like setting where care providers, usually midwives, provide family-centered care to healthy pregnant women.” To be a true birth center, AABC stipulates that one connected to a hospital must meet certain standards for independence and also be separate from the Labor and Delivery unit. At 4,100 square feet, the Mary V. O’Shea Birth Center includes two birthing suites with the look and feel of a residential bedroom, exam rooms, a lounge area, dining area and fullsize kitchen. Each birthing suite has a queen bed, spa-size tub and shower, plus space and furnishings to accommodate family and other support individuals. 44 |

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A distinctive factor from other birth centers in the region, the Mary V. O’Shea Birth Center is in close proximity to the leadingedge services, expertise and technology of Saint Peter’s University Hospital’s Labor and Delivery Unit and renowned Regional Perinatal Center with its Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit should medical intervention be needed. “It truly is the best of both worlds,” said Joanne Cunha, MS, CNM, certified nursemidwife and clinical director of Saint Peter’s Midwifery Services. The growth of the birth center concept coincides with an evolution in obstetrics care, regarding pregnancy and childbirth as a healthy, normal part of life – not something to be treated as a medical condition. Each birth is attended by a midwife, a registered nurse and a patient care technician who is trained as a doula to provide support during the birthing experience. The team is exclusive to the Birth Center and all Saint Peter’s midwives are certified by the American Midwifery Certification Board. “We respect each woman’s right to decide the circumstances of her birth experience,”

Cunha said. “Central to the experience is the mother’s birth plan, developed at the beginning of the pregnancy.” The birth plan allows expectant mothers to document their personal preferences and wishes for how labor should progress – everything from designating family members and support individuals in attendance to labor expectations and directions regarding medical intervention, should the need arise. This philosophy of care is part of a holistic approach. “It’s low-tech and high-touch, incorporating the family. We spend time. We educate. It’s an inclusive, personalized, one-onone approach,” Cunha explained. The Birth Center was named to honor the memory of Mary V. O’Shea, benefactor and longtime New Brunswick area resident. For more information call (732) 339-7880 or visit www.saintpetershcs.com/birthcenter, where you may also download the birth plan.


Spend the Holidays at Our House Annual Festival of Trees Tour

November 12–December 30 Enjoy one of the most unique Bucks County holiday traditions. View stunning Christmas trees decorated by area designers and community groups during special tours of the historic Pearl S. Buck House.

Holiday Craft Show

November 29–December 8 Browse this annual holiday craft show for jury-selected crafts, gifts, clothing, jewelry, and more in the historic Cultural Center on the Pearl S. Buck estate. Luncheon Café also available. Lovingly produced by the Pearl S. Buck Volunteer Association Current Exhibits:

Pearl S. Buck’s Legacy Lives on in Bucheon

Through November 30 This exhibit celebrates Bucheon’s rich cultural history and the deep realationship between Pearl Buck and the Korean people.

Building on the Dream: From Africa to Bucks County Pearl S. Buck International

520 Dublin Road, Perkasie, PA 215-249-0100 | pearlsbuck.org

Through December 30 This exhibit pays tribute to the lives, culture, accomplishments and contributions of African Americans in Bucks County from their origins in Africa through the 21st century.

A CENTURY OF PROGRESS

State-of-the-art surgery, close to home. For the past 100 years, Princeton Medical Center has been committed to providing outstanding care to our community. Which is why we offer access to minimally invasive and robotic surgical procedures across many clinical specialties. These techniques can help you recover quickly and with minimal scarring and pain. It’s one more way that we provide the care you need, close to home. Discover more at PrincetonHCS.org/100years.

Nancy’s House is honored to have been given a Project Stream grant by the Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance and the Pa. Partners for the Arts program. We will use it to run a 1-day arts-based retreat at Independence LIVE, 1919 Market St. Philadelphia, Friday, Jan 17. (Snow Date: Friday, Jan. 24) Nancy’s House is honored to have received a Quality of Life Grant from the Dana & Christopher Reeve Foundation to run two 3-day retreats, one for men and one for women, at the nationally-acclaimed and historic Wedgwood Inn in New Hope, PA. The women’s retreat will be held March 11-13, 2020, and the men’s retreat will be March 25-27, 2020.

To register or for other information, contact Elissa at elissa@nancys-house.org FALL 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE |

45


| PROFILES IN HEALTHCARE Q&A with Princeton Spine & Joint Center

Tell us about the history of Princeton Spine & Joint Center. Princeton Spine & Joint Center (PSJC) was started in 2008 by Drs. Ana Bracilovic and Grant Cooper, who met at Princeton High School and are married. Drs. Bracilovic and Cooper trained in New York together at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, The University Hospital of Columbia and Cornell in physical medicine and rehabilitation. After fellowship, they returned to Princeton to start PSJC, where they focus on helping patients with spine, joint, and nerve pain return to their daily lives without pain and without surgery or dangerous medications. Over the last 11 years, PSJC has grown to include seven other non-surgical physician specialists who share the vision and commitment to provide exceptional and individualized patient care and enable patients to have the highest quality of life and greatest personal performance possible. Where are you located? We have two offices: 601 Ewing Street, Building A-2, and 256 Bunn Drive, Suite B, both in Princeton. What kinds of conditions do you treat? We treat patients of all types who are in pain. We see patients with neck pain, back pain, shoulder pain, hip pain, knee pain, wrist, hand, ankle, and foot pain. We also treat different types of nerve pain including conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome and neuropathy. We also see all sorts of sports injuries from tendonitis to concussions.

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FALL 2019

What types of procedures do you perform? The most important starting point in any treatment plan is an accurate and complete diagnosis. This starts with a history and physical examination, but we also use the most up-to-date diagnostic technology to not just pinpoint the diagnosis, but to put it into the context of the person as a whole. For example, if a golfer has hip pain and you fix the hip pain but don’t address the rotation of the swing that might be causing that hip pain, then the pain will return and the treatment was incomplete. So it’s important to address the whole person, including the biomechanical components that are likely contributing to the formation of the pain. We have two offices and they are each equipped with two fluoroscopy suites as well as two portable ultrasound machines and two electrodiagnostic rooms. We are proud of course that our equipment is state of the art, but even more important is that our doctors are at the forefront of research in our field and are dedicated to treating each person as an individual and not just an MRI finding. When necessary we perform a variety of image guided injections for diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes, including epidurals, facet joint injections, sacroiliac joint injections, rhizotomies, ultrasound guided injections, nerve blocks, and regenerative medicine therapies. How would you describe your practice’s philosophy? Princeton Spine and Joint Center’s foundational commitment is to treat one patient at a time and ensure the absolute best possible outcomes.

We have always believed that if we combine the most advanced medical treatments with compassionate individualized care, then our outcomes will reflect that commitment to excellence with patient satisfaction. How should patients prepare for their first treatment? Patients should try to bring a list of their current medications and any previous imaging they may have had, as well as dress comfortably and bring an open mind. What sets Princeton Spine and Joint Center apart? It’s said so often that it becomes a cliché, but we really do treat each patient as if they were a family member. Our doctors are fellowship trained and board certified. They have collectively written over 17 medical texts including two upcoming books on regenerative medicine and sports medicine. Our doctors have appeared everywhere from ABC’s Good Morning America Health show, ESPN, Sirius XM Doctor Radio, and NPR to local Rider University’s The Bronc radio station. Our doctors have trained at the best institutions in the world and we bring that wealth of experience and dedication to Princeton, where we choose to live and raise our families. How can patients contact you? You can visit us online at www.PrincetonSJC.com or call us at 609.454.0760.


As a trainee at American Repertory Ballet/Princeton Ballet School, dancing is my passion and my art. As a dancer, I am constantly striving to optimize my physical technique and artistic expression, which places extreme demands on my body every day. There is nothing more important to me than pursuing optimal health and maintaining my musculoskeletal strength and flexibility. To that purpose, I am happy and grateful to put my trust in the doctors at Princeton Spine and Joint Center. All dancers eventually get injuries but Dr. Bracilovic and her colleagues have kept me strong and dancing. I am able to perform on stage and follow my dreams. I am comforted in the knowledge that if I need help with achieving my goals, the doctors at Princeton Spine and Joint Center are here for me.

”— Amy Allen

601 Ewing Street, Building A-2, Princeton 256 Bunn Drive, Suite B, Princeton (609) 454-0760 • www.princetonsjc.com


QA &

WITH

Dr. Rachel Werner BY DONALD GILPIN | PHOTOS BY HOAG LEVINS

E xe c u t i ve D i re c to r o f t h e U n i ve r s i t y o f Pe n n sy l va n i a ’s Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics (LDI) 48 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE FALL 2019


“...improving the value of care in the United States is one of the biggest challenges our health care system faces. We also face challenges in providing care in a way that is equitable and that addresses other drivers of health, including social factors.”

R

achel Werner, M.D., Ph.D., took over last May as the first female and the first physician-economist executive director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics (LDI). She is a professor of both medicine at Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine, and health care management at the Wharton School; a member of the National Academy of Medicine; and a practicing physician at Philadelphia’s Corporal Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center. Werner came to Penn in 1994 after graduating from Macalester College in Minnesota. She earned her M.D. in 1998 and her Ph.D. in health economics in 2004. She joined the Penn faculty in 2005 as an assistant professor of medicine and an LDI senior fellow. A longtime member of LDI’s executive committee, Werner has played an important role in expanding LDI data services and was director of the LDI health economics data analyst pool that provides LDI fellows with statistical analysts. Werner has received numerous awards, including the National Science Foundation’s Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers for demonstrating “exceptional potential for leadership at the frontiers of scientific knowledge.” She was also awarded a 2018 Excellence in Teaching award in Penn’s Master of Science in

Health Policy Research program, which she co-directed. Her research in recent years has focused on the effects of health care payment and organization on post-acute care, the continuing care services many patients require after they are discharged from a hospital into rehab facilities, nursing facilities, or home health programs. “Rachel is one of the smartest health services researchers I have ever met,” said Judith Long, M.D., chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine, Perelman School

professor, and LDI senior fellow in an interview in a recent issue of the LDI’s eMagazine Health Economist. “As a woman, she is a role model for all of us.” LDI, established in 1967, two years after Congress enacted Medicare, now sits at the center of an array of health services research initiatives within various Penn departments and centers. Penn’s hub for data-driven and policyfocused research to improve the nation’s health system, LDI connects and supports researchers across schools and disciplines to accelerate interdisciplinary research and initiatives. I asked Werner a few questions about health care, her work at LDI, her new position as the first woman leader in the Institute’s 51-year history, and her priorities for her career and the future of LDI. DG: U.S. health care was described by the late Princeton University economist Uwe Reinhardt as “a system that’s both cruel and inefficient,” costing more and delivering less here than in almost all other developed countries in the world. Do you agree? What should we do about that?

The Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics (LDI) is based in the Colonial Penn Center on Locust Walk, at the heart of Penn’s campus. (Wikipedia)

RW: I do agree — improving the value of care in the United States is one of the biggest challenges our health care system faces. We also face challenges in providing care in a way that is equitable and that addresses other drivers of health, including social factors. FALL 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 49


LDI will be focusing its efforts on improving health care delivery in a few key areas. We have selected areas that are strongly connected to LDI’s core mission, have faculty actively engaged in research, and are timely issues in health policy. LDI’s current four priority areas are the care of vulnerable populations, coverage and access to health care, health care for aging populations, and the opioid epidemic. DG: What has been on the top of the agenda for you and LDI since you took charge in May? RW: LDI’s mission is to catalyze and support innovative research to shape and improve health and health care delivery, and to translate and disseminate research to increase its visibility and impact both at Penn and nationally. My main priority is to support that mission. Within that mission, we will be working to further engage Penn faculty in LDI’s mission, to facilitate collaborations across disciplines and across campus, to expand the ways in which we can support their research and dissemination, and to extend the impact of research in shaping health care policy and delivery. DG: How has your background and training as a physician-economist helped you in pursuing these priorities and your work at LDI?

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FALL 2019

RW: As a physician-economist, I am at the crossroads between two large disciplines that make up LDI and contribute to the field of health economics more generally, making my background a good fit for LDI. It presents an opportunity to further existing collaborations between Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School. Fostering these crossschool collaborations has been a vital part of LDI’s success. Having gone back and forth between these disciplines many times myself gives me unique insights into both the challenges and benefits of such collaborations, including the importance of using rigorous economic methods to answer questions that matter the most to patients. DG: Has being the first woman leader of LDI given you any advantages? Disadvantages? Perspectives that might be different from past leadership? RW: I am honored to be chosen as the first woman leader of LDI and, after more than 50 years, to break down that barrier. It has been important to many people across Penn to see a woman appointed to this leadership position. Having visible female role models is vital to younger faculty and trainees who aspire to be in leadership positions. I hope my appointment will make it easier for others to succeed. At the same time, it is both surprising and

frustrating that it took over 50 years to have a woman appointed as the executive director of LDI. I have benefited so much from the women ahead of me who have broken down barriers and made it possible for me to be in this position. But it reminds me that we still have a long way to go to get to a time when it will no longer be surprising or novel to have women in leadership positions. But mostly, I hope I am remembered for being an effective executive director rather than simply being remembered as the first woman executive director. DG: What is the best part of the job for you? RW: I believe strongly in the importance of LDI’s mission at Penn and more broadly. LDI has been integral to my career, from when I was a Ph.D. student in health economics at Wharton to this day. An LDI pilot grant supported my dissertation; LDI-affiliated faculty mentored me; and LDI seminars introduced me to leaders in the field. Since I joined the faculty at Penn in 2005, LDI has provided the soup-to-nuts research support I needed to be successful; from the data infrastructure to support my research to the translation and dissemination of the results to promote their impact. It is wonderful to lead an institute that I have such a deep and important connection to, and, more importantly, to work to ensure that others have the same benefits from LDI that I have had.


DG: What is the most challenging part of the job for you? RW: Trying to balance this with my ongoing research, teaching, and clinical work! It is important to me to continue with these endeavors as they help inform and focus LDI’s mission. DG: As you look ahead to the next 10 years, what are some of your most ambitious goals? RW: To be determined. It is still early in my tenure… DG: Any surprises in the past six months since you became executive director? RW: I have been pleasantly surprised at people’s enthusiasm for and commitment to LDI. I have spoken to many Penn faculty over the last four months and am gratified to know that so many people think so highly of LDI and have felt its positive impact on their experience as a researcher at Penn, on the larger Penn community, and on the health policy landscape more broadly.

FALL 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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“As a physician, I find it fulfilling to treat all my patients as individuals. I give them my time and expertise. When I’m a patient, I expect the same level of attention and care that I give my patients. I’ve been to doctors in New York and the surrounding area. I’m truly happy to have found the doctors at Princeton Spine and Joint Center to help keep me out of pain and able to continue to treat patients and enjoy my life and family. I put my trust and my health in the hands of the doctors at Princeton Spine and Joint center and recommend them to my family and friends. If you have pain, I’d strongly recommend you give them a call.”

— Andrew Pedinoff, MD

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PHOTO COURTESY OF HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF PRINCETON.

Baker’s Alley in Princeton, looking south toward Nassau Street c. 1925. A historic African American neighborhood that was demolished to make way for Palmer Square.

Palmer Square A Look Back By Taylor Smith


Construction photos courtesy of Palmer Square Management.

T

he September 28, 1928 issue of Princeton Alumni Weekly (PAW) announced that “Plans for a gigantic program of reconstruction in the heart of Princeton, to cost several million dollars, have recently been made public by Edgar Palmer ’03, President of Princeton Municipal Improvement, Inc. This development will affect the section on Nassau Street from Upper Pyne Dormitory to the Second Presbyterian Church. The area to be reconstructed extends as far as Quarry Street, four blocks to the north of Nassau Street, and is bounded on the east and west, respectively, by Witherspoon Street and Quarry Street.” PAW goes on to describe: “In place of numerous old wooden houses and tenements which are not only unsightly but which also form a great fire hazard, there will be two large apartment houses of the ‘garden’ type.” The municipal square model was not everyone’s ideal. Significantly, the plan involved the removal of Baker’s Alley and the relocation of the majority of Princeton’s African American community to Birch Avenue. Longtime Princeton resident Shirley Satterfield is an expert on the history of African American life in Princeton. “My family is six generations in this neighborhood, and I love this neighborhood,” she says. Satterfield describes Palmer Square as Princeton’s first example of “urban renewal.” When asked to characterize the effect of Edgar Palmer’s plans on the African American

community, Satterfield states, “It wasn’t a hardship for us, it was a movement for us.” “A lot of our families were domestic workers and they didn’t talk about discontent to the children,” she adds. “In those days, a lot of people didn’t complain.”

Edgar Palmer

Palmer Square as we know it today was originally a dream of Edgar Palmer, heir to the New Jersey Zinc Company and a 1903 graduate

of Princeton University. Modeled on Thomas Stapleton’s construction of Rockefeller Center, Palmer Square would re-route all commercial traffic towards a central town square. The plan also called for a new municipal center; a hotel; playhouse; post office; and retail, office and residential spaces in a Colonial Revival Movement style, as suggested by Stapleton, the project’s architectural mastermind. While Edgar Palmer first conceived of the idea for Palmer Square in 1906, the project did not move forward until around 1929, at which time Palmer became president of Princeton Municipal Improvement, Inc. Construction on Palmer Square began in earnest in 1936, but it was not completed until well after Palmer’s death in 1943. In fact, Palmer was only alive to see less than half of his plans realized. Local newspapers had much to say about the Palmer Square project. The front page of the February 15, 1929 edition of The Princeton Herald was emblazoned with the headline, “TOWN IMPROVEMENT WILL COST MILLIONS.” A variety of sub-headlines noted, “Nassau St. Properties Between Upper Pyne and Second Church Involved in Development Affecting Huge Area in Heart of Princeton” and “Destruction of Nassau Inn May Be Regretted Later, Mayor Warns.” Palmer was well known to local residents by 1929. Chief among his early contributions to Princeton University was his donation of the funds for Palmer Stadium. The event FALL 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Palmer Square brochure. Images courtesy of Historical Society of Princeton.

was reported in the March 29, 1914 edition of The New York Times: “Edgar Palmer of Rye, N.Y., a Princeton graduate of the Class of 1903, has offered to build and present to Princeton University for the use of the Athletic Association, a stadium costing $300,000 and seating 41,000 persons. This announcement was made by President John Grier Hibben this afternoon after a meeting of the Committee on Grounds and Buildings of the University, at which the architect’s plans were approved.” In addition to Palmer Stadium, Edgar Palmer’s donations included funds for the University Cottage Club, an organization cofounded by J. Frederick Talcott, Princeton Class of 1888, successor to the influential New York textile company, James Talcott Inc. In the mid1930s, Palmer commissioned artist Norman Rockwell to paint the large mural still featured in the Yankee Doodle Tap Room in the Nassau Inn. The precedent for Palmer’s generosity was set by his father, Stephen Squires Palmer, himself a Princeton graduate and strong proponent of the sciences. Palmer Physical Laboratory was a gift from the senior Palmer, who served as a trustee of the University from 1908 to 1913. The Laboratory provided two acres of space for the Physics and Electrical Engineering departments and was considered to be the leading University research facility of its kind. According to Princeton University’s website, Palmer reasoned that the gift was of the “absolute necessity of extending Princeton’s

usefulness in the field of science and of placing her in a position where she can respond to the demands that will be made upon her.” Much later, Palmer Physical Laboratory served a key role in the Manhattan Project’s weapons research during WWII.

BREAKING GROUND

The first phase of construction on Palmer Square was completed in 1937 with the new Nassau Inn situated in the town square. Originally built in 1756, the Nassau Tavern had been located at 52 Nassau Street and played host to many students and famous guests, including Judge Thomas Leonard, Paul Revere, Robert Morris, and Thomas Paine. Buildings on Palmer Square West and around the corner leading onto Nassau Street were finished in 1941, just two years before Palmer’s death. Other historic events in Palmer Square history include the installation of the Bronze Tiger Memorial in 1944 (in memory of Edgar Palmer), the planting of the Norwegian Spruce in the late 1940s, the building of One Palmer Square in 1963-64 and the Chambers Street Garage in 1985, the Hulfish Street development in 1989-92, and the completion of The Residences at Palmer Square. Princeton University President John Grier Hibben

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The will of Edgar Palmer benefited the University further. Upon his death at his home on Bayard Lane, the trustees of the University received majority ownership of Princeton Municipal Improvement, Inc., which at the time was valued in the millions. As a result, the University acquired ownership of the company’s buildings on Palmer Square and Nassau Street, including numerous shops, apartments, offices, the playhouse, and more.


altors

Jamie Volkert, director of marketing at Palmer Square Management, says, “Thomas Stapleton’s architectural design is classic and timeless. Palmer Square West looks much as it did when the doors first opened in September 1937.” Volkert adds, “Seventyfive years later, in 2012, the Residences at Palmer Square opened their doors, and Palmer’s vision was complete. Palmer Square continues to prosper and remains a pulse of the community, celebrating its commitment to serving visitors and the community alike.”

Quarry Street in 1908 — in 2004, transforming the building into an apartment complex named after Howard B. Waxwood Jr., the school’s former principal during the period known as the Princeton Plan, the Princeton Public School’s

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The Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood, where many African American residents were relocated by the Palmer W eich eofficially r t R e a l t Weichert o r s Realtors Square project, was S p e c i f i c a t i o n s th Specifications designated as Princeton’s 20 Photo courtesy of Palmer Square Management. Historic District in 2016. The desire to preserve and educate the public on movement towards an integrated school system. the neighborhood’s historical significance is The building is currently listed on the National coupled with a modern-day need to provide town Register of Historic Places. residents with housing. J. Robert Hillier, PU Satterfield worked with Hillier and Class of 1959, GS ’61, and a Princeton Magazine community organizer John Bailey to launch shareholder, renovated the Witherspoon Street the Witherspoon-Jackson Heritage Tour, School for Colored Children — which moved to which focuses on 29 sites in Princeton that

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TRENTON FARMERS MARKET ENTERS A NEW CHAPTER A new manager carefully balances what made the market a draw for 71 years with new reasons to shop under the iconic sign BY

C

ILENE DUBE | PHOTOS BY CHARLES R. PLOHN

antaloupes the size of basketballs; sweet red peppers the size of, well, what I previously thought cantaloupes to be. Peaches with a blush of fuzz and tomatoes with names like Oxheart Riviera among the usual Brandywines and Sun Golds. These are among the recent finds at the Trenton Farmers Market, where the air is scented with basil, smoked sausage, and barbecue. The 71-year-old institution has been infused with new energy since Chris Cirkus, longtime manager of the West Windsor Farmers Market, took the helm in January. She is the fifth manager in the market’s history. Cirkus wants people to know that she’s still managing, and committed to, the West Windsor market. On a recent Saturday, after breaking down in West Windsor where she’d stood in the hot sun since 7 a.m. greeting customers, making sure everything went smoothly, and playfully interacting with the children accompanying their parents, Cirkus zipped over to Spruce Street in Lawrence Township (technically it’s located in Lawrence Township, even though it’s named the Trenton Farmers Market) and continued her duties. She had spent the previous evening hand-lettering, in colored chalk, the

sandwich board’s announcements of what’s seasonal and fresh, as well as special events (shoppers at the West Windsor market will recognize the homey touch). Cirkus’s octogenarian mother often accompanies her to the market, shopping for tomatoes or nectarines, then gets a lift home and dries her haul in an Excalibur dehydrator — one of the few belongings she brought when she moved in with Cirkus a year ago. “She likes to use recipes, she’s more methodical than I am,” Cirkus says of her French-born mother. Cirkus self-identifies as an inspirational cook, finding what’s in season and simply sautéing or roasting (see recipes). An earth mother of sorts, Cirkus has a history of getting people to eat their fruits and vegetables. Before she began managing farmers’ markets, she created a cooking program for kids at Beth Chaim Synagogue in West Windsor, and later taught kindergarteners how to make fresh pasta with herbs they picked from the garden. They learned to make pesto using a mezzaluna, a half-moon shaped tool for cutting veggies and herbs, instead of a food processor. Her own daughters — Samantha, 23, and Rebeka, 26 — enjoy cooking with fresh ingredients and are regulars at all the farmers’ markets they happen upon. In more recent years, Cirkus has worked as assistant coordinator with the New Jersey State Department of Agriculture’s Farm to School program, connecting area

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farmers and the school lunch program. reliving what was here,” she says. Farmers’ markets underwent a resurgence in popularity beginning 15 years Cirkus’s husband, Mikel, an artist and graphic designer with Firmenich, was ago, with markets opening in Princeton, West Windsor, Montgomery, Hopewell, recruited to redo the logo (as a volunteer), which he based on the iconic metal sign and in Trenton neighborhoods, but the Trenton Farmers Market’s roots go back to over the building. the early 1900s, when farmers came by horse and wagon to sell their produce near The market’s Facebook page has 6,000 “very vocal” followers, says Cirkus, the Trenton Makes bridge. who share her posts across the country. “People love this market.” In 1939, in anticipation of the building of Route 29, the Trenton Market Although Cirkus hasn’t yet figured out how to count customers, as she does Growers Cooperative Association formed and purchased by employing a person who sits at the entrance to the West the property on Spruce Street. The original market buildings Windsor market, she has heard that people are once again were moved and the Trenton Farmers Market opened in vying for parking spaces, as they did in days of yore. “The 1948. What began with three parallel buildings became the history of this market is what sets it apart,” she says. current cross shape by cutting the center building in half As we are talking, Cirkus stoops to pick up trash from and affixing it to the eastern building in 1968. Outdoor the floor, as she does throughout the day at both jobs. She stalls gave way to an indoor facility with overhead doors to is standing with a cane — she had foot surgery a few years give the market its open, outdoor look. ago, she tells a concerned customer who inquires about the The classic market structure is cooled by overhead fans, cane, but the reason she is carrying it is because she has and on a muggy day in late summer the air was comfortable. rescued it for a customer who left it behind. In its heyday, the cooperative had 100 farmers. Over Conversations with Cirkus are frequently interrupted the years, the market branched into the sale of fresh meats, by the many customers who have come to know her by baked goods, poultry, plants, flowers, jewelry, apparel, name, and she is deft at speaking to several people at once, and flea market items. Catering to the surrounding Polish making each feel listened to. They have questions about American community, stalls selling pierogis and kielbasa items they are searching for, vendors they no longer see, or proliferated. Some vendors rent stalls on a weekly basis, so may inquire about the price to rent a stall. the offerings are constantly changing, from handbags and One customer stops to chat, and then mentions that shea butter to patchouli oil and gift baskets. she suffered a recent head injury and is feeling confused. As supermarket superstores proliferated, the Trenton “Are you OK to drive home?” Cirkus asks. “Can I get you Farmers Market faced stiff competition. When Cirkus took a cider?” One gets the feeling that Cirkus will take care of the helm, she set about performing a deep clean — painting, Bushels of produce have always been in abundance at the market. the world. power washing and restriping the floors, adding an ATM, updating the restrooms, The two markets she runs are quite different — the West Windsor market is a and taking out ads in local newspapers (Cirkus is hands-on — the market also has a nonprofit, and the Trenton market is run by a farmers’ cooperative. She reports to secretary, who has been in the job for 24 years and is a great source of institutional a board of six farmers. knowledge, a custodian, and an 88-year-old volunteer). During the cleaning, she Cirkus describes herself as a people person who is “good at community, unearthed historic photos that she has framed and incorporated into a slideshow logistics, events, rules, and organization. Now I’m dealing with a building, as on the TV monitors at both ends of the market. “People love the nostalgia, they are well.”

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When she first came on board, a few of the farmers and vendors closed shop — not because of the new management, but because they had been in business a long time and were ready to move on. Cirkus has had to fend off accusations that she “fired” the vendors or that she’s raised the rent (she has not). It is a careful balance to keep the loyal customers happy and bring in new faces. She is presently negotiating with a few new farmers (Abe’s Acres of Hightstown will start in the new year, as will Zell’s of Hillsborough), and has brought in several new businesses, such as Terra Momo Bread Company, Trenton-based Tea for All (Cirkus’ mother loves the “Buddha’s Meditation” blend), Kafe Ojala, and Lady and the Shallot. Raoul Momo, who has known Cirkus through the food world for years, saw her Facebook post about another baker who was retiring from the market and phoned her immediately. The bread Terra Momo sells at the market is baked at its Princeton store, but the pizza and focaccia is baked on site. Cirkus found Tea for All at an event at Artworks — they will be opening a shop in the market with tastings and classes in how tea is grown, processed, and blended — and Kafe Ojala will be selling beans and brewed coffee from the former Trenton Coffee Roaster equipment. Lady and the Shallot is a vegan eatery that was started by a hairdresser and a teacher who turned to catering; they offer gluten-free, nut-free, and low sodium products. And it’s not the only vegan eatery in the market. Savory Leaf offers vegan fare made from jackfruit, a chick-pea tuna salad, and the Impossible Burger. Meat eaters, don’t despair — there are kielbasa vendors and butchers, and Crab Shack sells fresh seafood (the “Shack in the Back,” with live crabs, whole fish cleaned to order, and “blow-out sales” on Sundays). King Foods and Grill sells chicken salads and sandwiches. Hambone Opera has been cited as best barbecue in Trenton and offers live music Fridays from noon to 1 p.m. Pie’d Piper went into business selling pies but now offers kielbasa, pierogis, and donuts. “People come from far and wide for Polish delicacies, including stuffed cabbage,” says Cirkus. Amish meats and poultry, baked goods, rotisserie chicken,

RECIPES: From Chris Cirkus “Roasting vegetables and making applesauce are two of the simplest “nonrecipes” you’ll ever make,” says Cirkus. ROASTED AUTUMN VEGETABLES The tricks to delicious roasted vegetables are cutting them into uniform sizes for even cooking, placing like vegetables together when roasting, and then adding vegetables with shorter cooking times to the other vegetables mid-cooking process, all while not crowding the roasting pan(s), using enough oil, salt, pepper, and high heat. You’ll end up with caramelized and toasty vegetables. A 2-inch cut vegetable is the ideal size for roasting, so try to keep them about this size. The smaller the cut, the quicker the cooking time, so if your pieces are huge, they’ll take a long time to cook. Serve with a multitude of options: fresh salad greens, sautéed spinach or kale, brown rice, farro, whole wheat pasta, roasted chicken, fish, meats, beans, tofu. I like to use a little grain or pasta in the bottom of a bowl, and then top with three to four different roasted vegetables greens, a protein, and either a dollop of fresh pesto, a drizzle of tahini, or simply some fresh herbs or spices to match the flavor profile. For example, if using black beans and a little avocado, I’ll add some cumin, chili powder and lime; if I’ve got chicken or pork, I might use a little thyme, sage, or a drizzle of maple syrup. I like to roast a bunch of vegetables at some point during the week or late on Sunday to use

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an Amish grocery store, even essential oils and CBD — it’s all here. Cedarville Farms is one of the founding farmers, and Terhune Orchards has had a stand at the market for more than 20 years. In fact, Terhune is one of two farms to have a year-round presence at the market. Among the things the Trenton Farmers Market offers in abundance is diversity, representing the many cultures of the surrounding community. La Trucha Catracha, a Spanish grocer offering tropical fruits and vegetables, is set to open as of this writing. Under Honduran ownership, it will offer prepared foods for eat in and takeout, tapping into the Latin community, says Cirkus. “There’s a price point for everyone at the market,” she adds; the market accepts WIC and EBT. “We attract people from every walk of life.” Surveys conducted over the years have shown the average customer to be between 51 and 70 years of age, live within a 10-minute drive of the market, and has been coming “forever.” A 75-year-old man, a customer since childhood, stopped to ask Cirkus where he might find turnips. “I read in Reader’s Digest that the greens are healthy and good for arthritis,” he said. He and Cirkus engage in a conversation about how the reports on what is good for you change from week to week: coffee and eggs, for example, are now good for you. Cirkus quotes food writer Michael Pollan: “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants.” Cirkus has covered the tables filling the center hall with cheerful green-and-white gingham oil cloths. “Some may come for kielbasa and two apples, or to socialize. People are looking for a sense of place. Now they can enjoy coffee and tea, and meet with neighbors and friends.” The Trenton Farmers Market, 960 Spruce Street, Lawrence, is open Thursday through Saturday, 9AM to 6PM and Sunday, 10AM to 4PM in November and December. Additional holiday hours are posted at thetrentonfarmersmarket. com. January through April hours are Thursday through Saturday, 9AM to 6PM; May through October hours are Wednesday through Saturday 9AM to 6PM and Sunday 10AM to 4PM.

up what is in the house, so as the farmers’ market week begins again, I’ve got most of the meal prep done, and can replenish my vegetable selection and shop while I’m working! The roasted vegetables keep for about five days giving me plenty of time to eat well all week while not tiring of the same thing. Cooking times: Roots (potatoes, sweet potatoes, beets, carrots, parsnips, turnips, rutabaga, onions), 30-40 minutes; squash (butternut, honeynut, acorn, delicate), 20-45 minutes; Cruciferous (cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts), 15-25 minutes. Preheat oven to 425°F, cut like vegetables and toss with oil (avocado, coconut, olive, vegetable) until you can see a light coating on the vegetables, and generously season with salt and freshly ground pepper. Place cut vegetables on a rimmed baking sheet or roasting pan, being careful not to crowd them — too close and they’ll just steam. If need be, split the vegetables between two pans. Roast anywhere from 15-45 minutes depending upon the vegetable, giving them a good stir or toss about halfway through. You want them to develop a nice, rich brown color on the sides and edges, while remaining tender and not burnt or mushy. Add a sprinkling of fresh herbs, a little pesto, or a drizzle of tahini to create grain bowls. The end of the week’s roasted vegetables typically become a frittata or quiche.

APPLESAUCE When I taught preschool and kindergarten cooking classes, making applesauce was an all-time favorite of kids and their parents. While there are great jarred sauces out there, making homemade applesauce is quick and oh so delicious. A great side dish, dessert, or snack. 6-8 apples, a mix of seasonal tart and sweet (Granny Smith, Macintosh, Golden Delicious, etc.) 1/4-1/2 cup of water Cinnamon (optional; you can use a cinnamon stick when cooking if you prefer) Peel and cut apples into about 1- to 2-inch pieces. Place them in a saucepan and add water. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat and simmer until the apples are soft, about 30 minutes. Stir, occasionally adding a little water along the way if the apples are getting too dry. Use an immersion blender or carefully transfer to a blender or VitaMix and buzz to your desired consistency. Add cinnamon if you’d like. I like to portion the applesauce into freezable silicone or zipper bags, lay flat, and freeze. It keeps beautifully for about six months in the freezer, so that side dish for Thanksgiving is already covered! In the fridge, it keeps no longer than two weeks. The apple peels can be roasted for an amazing snack: simply toss the apple peels with a drizzle of melted butter, a sprinkling of cinnamon, and a little sugar (if you like sweet). Place on a parchment lined baking sheet and bake at 400°F for about 10 minutes, watching carefully so they don’t burn. Remove from the oven and allow to cool; toss with a little more cinnamon or cinnamon/sugar mixture if you’d like. Let cool and store in an airtight container.


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A “Familiar Sensibility”: Cookbooks for Fall BY STUART MITCHNER

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his Book Scene began with lunch at cookbook legends Melissa Hamilton and Christopher Hirsheimer’s newly opened Canal House Station restaurant in Milford, N.J. At the time, all I knew about the Canal House series was what I heard from my wife on the drive up. According to an August 12 article in Food and Wine, the “meticulous restoration” of the Milford station took about two years, with the result evoking “the warmth of a dear friend’s home.... Even the entrance, past the small garden and through a back door, contributes to the familiar sensibility the brand new restaurant has already managed to create.” I understood “familiar sensibility” as a way of describing the quality that has made the Canal House books so popular, an idea that accords with the Cambridge English Dictionary definition of sensibility as “an understanding of or ability to decide about what is good or valuable, especially in connection with social activities.”

me, is not a “foodie” and admits to “no discernible culinary talent.” In fairness to Jamie Lee, the resemblance is strictly superficial; she cooks every day for “lots of people” and I’m a back-up cook, occasional sous chef, grater of cheese, composer of salads, and cleaner-upper. AUTUMNAL RADIANCE

Another example of Hirsheimer and Hamilton’s subtle understanding of the “good and valuable” is the photograph of a Dutch Oven on the cover of Canal House Cooking Fall and Holiday (Canal House paperback $34.90). I should admit that I’ve never been responsive to gastronomical photography, even when it’s as artfully done as it is in the Canal House series. Take the cover shot on the newly published Cook Something: Recipes to Rely On (Voracious $35). The clarity of the image is striking, the presentation state of the art, but no visual POETRY UP FRONT artist this side of Paul Cézanne could make a cluster of scallions aesthetically appealing or appetizing to my eyes. If, as Cavafy says, I found the “familiar sensibility” in evidence as soon as the road to Ithaca is “long, full of adventure, full of knowledge,” the I opened my wife’s prized copy of Canal House Cooks Every Day green onion route is not for me. (Andrews McMeel $45) to a photograph and a poem that would The image of the Dutch Oven on the cover of Canal House seem to have more to do with what is “good and valuable” than with Cooking Fall and Holiday has a yellow-orange hue that absolutely cooking. The first image you see after turning the title and dedication radiates autumn. Better yet, this sturdy piece of cookware clearly pages is a blurry vision of blue sky and cloud mass photographed has a history. Memorable meals have simmered inside it, and it is through the window of a plane en route to Istanbul; taking up the what it is without benefit of photographic tarting up. Compared to facing page is C.P. Cavafy’s poem “Ithaca,” which begins, “When the minimalist clarity of conventional, air-brushed, soft-core food Cook Something: Recipes to Rely On you set out on your journey to Ithaca,/pray that the road is long,/full porn, it has the depth of a Rembrandt. Its blemishes, flecks of red, of adventure, full of knowledge” and ends “Wise as you have become, with so much specks of black, are in full view, marking its passage through generations of use, a experience,/you must already have understood what these Ithacas mean.” kitchen poet’s equivalent of Cavafy’s journey to Ithaca. With its lid ajar and the track As someone whose heart has never soared at the sight of a cookbook, of some long-ago overflow baked for all time into the enamel, it’s worthy of a Cézanne I was more impressed by the association of cooking with a “beautiful voyage” than still-life or at least a place of honor in his kitchen. More than the patina of age, an aura with any of the celebrity testimonials on the endpapers, except perhaps the tribute to both painterly and human, its primary beauty is that autumnal radiance. “this kitchen bible” from actress Jamie Lee Curtis, a Canal House devotee who, like

78 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE FALL 2019


The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook

COOKING À LA DOWNTON ABBEY

Speaking of “what is good or valuable, especially in connection with social activities,” if you’re a fan of a certain wildly popular Masterpiece Theatre series, you’ll want to check out food historian Annie Gray’s Official Downton Abbey Cookbook (Weldon Owen $35), which contains over 100 recipes showcasing, says the publisher, “the cookery and customs of the Crawley household — from upstairs dinner party centerpieces to downstairs puddings and pies. The emphasis is on original recipes of the period, replicated as seen or alluded to on screen,” or typical of the period covered (1912-1926), all the recipes reflecting “the influences found on the Downton Abbey tables.” There’s a foreword by executive producer and co-creator of Downton Abbey Gareth Neame, along with a host of color photographs, including stills from the PBS series as well as the recently-released feature film. Besides providing notes on the etiquette and customs of the times, the book includes quotes from the characters, and descriptions of the scenes in which the foods appear. A sample of the upstairs menu includes Oysters au Gratin, Quail and Watercress, and Charlotte Russe. Downstairs in the kitchen, the heart of the series, it’s Toad-in-the-Hole, Beef Stew with Dumplings, and Jam and Custard Tarts. “JOY” RETURNS IN TIME FOR THANKSGIVING

One of the most notable new fall arrivals, with a title that should evoke fond memories in cooks of all sensibilities, is the 2019 Joy of Cooking, revised and updated for the first time since 2006, with a release date just ahead of Thanksgiving. The first commercial edition of Irma S. Rombauer’s Joy of Cooking was published by the Bobbs-Merrill Company in 1936. Subsequent editions were revised and updated by Irma Rombauer and Marion Rombauer Becker throughout the 20th

century, selling hundreds of thousands of copies by the end of World War II. Marion Rombauer Becker took over with the publication of the popular 1963 edition. Her son Ethan Becker helped her revise the 1975 edition, and then oversaw the releases of the 1997 and 75th Anniversary (2006) editions rewritten by Irma’s great-grandson John Becker and his wife, Megan Scott. Besides being the first revision since the 2006 edition, this is the first Joy of Cooking available as an eBook. A WEDDING PRESENT

In my years lurching cluelessly around the kitchen, the book I turned to in times of stress was the 1966 edition of Joy of Cooking, a wedding present, which means we’ve had it more than 50 years. The big book has held up beautifully, the only sign of age the slightly torn rear dust jacket, probably from the times I pulled it off the shelf in a panic looking for how to make something embarrassingly basic like cinnamon toast or scrambled eggs. Just now, opening it at random, I landed on the pumpkin page, where it’s suggested that “each of the children carve his own pumpkin and then stack them into a totem pole.” Sounds like a recipe for disaster. I wonder if this idea made it into later editions. THE HEART OF THINGS

Like the kitchen in Downton Abbey, the one in the new Canal House Station restaurant is at the heart of things — as you walk through it on your way to the dining rooms, you might find yourself saying hello to Hamilton and Hirsheimer, who were there the day we had lunch.

FALL 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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83


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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FALL 2019


Visit

From Princeton We Reach The World Berkshire Hathaway is the world’s most trusted brand. Fox & Roach has deep roots and a dominant position in the regional real estate market. Together, we serve buyers and sellers the world over. • Reaching more than 8 million unique affluent international customers monthly • 70+ countries • Translations in 100’s of languages

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85


Arteriors Smyth chandelier; $3,055; arteriorshome.com

Kifu Paris galaxy table; price upon request; kifuparis.com

Industry West cane floor lamp; $600; industrywest.com

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Rove Concepts Luca sofa in vintage velvet; $1,775; roveconcepts.com

Gianvito Rossi slit vamp suede pumps; $845; barneys.com

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FALL 2019

PRODUCT SELECTION BY LYNN ADAMS SMITH

A WELL-DESIGNED LIFE


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Lucque Paris tote bag; $725; lucque.com

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Charmed & Chained crystal drop earrings; $2,650; barneys.com

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FALL 2019


WE HAVE THE AREA’S LARGEST INVENTORY OF GRANITE. OUR EXPERIENCED STAFF AND CRAFTSMEN HAVE BEEN HELPING LOCAL RESIDENTS AND CONTRACTORS WITH CUSTOM GRANITE AND MARBLE COUNTERTOPS FOR OVER 30 YEARS.

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Granite Countertops • Marble Countertops • Quartz Countertops • Natural Stones Over 350 colors and 8,000 slabs in stock. Only produce on state-of-the-art CNC machinery All inventory imported directly from overseas Stone Tech 930 New York Avenue Trenton, NJ 08638

Hours Monday - Friday 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

(609) 984-8818 • stonetechmarble.com Authorized dealer of:


Profile for Witherspoon Media Group

Princeton Magazine, Fall 2019  

Witherspoon Media Group

Princeton Magazine, Fall 2019  

Witherspoon Media Group