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M AY 2 01 9 T H E R E U N I O N S I SS U E

A Ten-Year Renovation Transforms Firestone Library


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PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019


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CONTENTS

46

72

60 MAY/REUNIONS 2019 “BEAUTIFUL AND INSPIRING”

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT OUTPACES IVIES

BY DONALD H. SANBORN III

A ten-year renovation transforms Princeton’s Firestone Library 16

BURPEE SEEDS BY ILENE DUBE

Sowing seeds to remain close to its roots 30

BY DONALD GILPIN

40

Princo seeks to “Invest Well” and “Do Good” 50

POLICING IN PRINCETON BY ANNE LEVIN

Kinder, gentler, and community-oriented 60

BANDING TOGETHER

BOOK SCENE

BY WILLIAM UHL

BY STUART MITCHNER

100 years of the Princeton University Band

The spooky music of numbers

40

66

Q&A WITH NORMAN “NORM” CARTER

TOWERING LIGHTHOUSES HARBOR THE HISTORY OF MARITIME NEW JERSEY

BY LAURIE PELLICHERO

Princeton University Class of 1938 46

BY WENDY GREENBERG

And they make great day trips! 72

FASHION & DESIGN

A Well-Designed Life 80, 82

ON THE COVER: Princeton University’s Firestone Library. Photography by Charles R. Plohn.

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019

NORMAN CARTER, CLASS OF 1938. (UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY LIBRARY) ; OLD GUARD BY CHARLES R. PLOHN; FIRESTONE LIBRARY SCRIBNER SOLARIUM. SHELLEY SZWAST, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY; BURPEE ANNUAL, WIKIMEDIA COMMONS; BARNEGAT PHOTO BY SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; CHIEF SUTTER BY CHARLES R. PLOHN; TIGER BAND LOGO, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY.

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| FROM THE PUBLISHER Welcome to the Reunions Issue of your magazine. From May 30 through June 2, Princeton will get its annual “rash” of orange and black as Princeton University alumni and their families, a total of some 30,000, come back to “the best old place of all” as we call Nassau Hall. This is a festive time of reconnection, recollection, recognition, and recommitment to the institution and the people who shaped the lives of the alumni. There is nothing like this Reunion Weekend and its amazing P-rade at any other institution in the country. For openers, you will enjoy our Q&A with Norman “Norm” Carter, Princeton Class of 1938, who is coming back to walk with the Old Guard, the most senior alumni in the P-rade. Norm happens to be 102 years old, and is still as sharp as a tack! Laurie Pellichero had a great time interviewing him, and you should enjoy reading about this amazing “young” man. Don Gilpin’s article on Princo, Princeton University’s own financial investment firm, is a good reunion follow-up as he explores how the University’s endowment outpaces its rivals. The University’s fundraising “machine” is without equal in the institutional world, but what is more important is how that donated money is invested with the attitude at Princo being about “Doing Good” as they “Invest Well.” And where does the money go? Next, you want to join Donald H. Sanborn III in our cover story on a tour of the ten-year transformation of Firestone Library from one of the best libraries built in the 1950s to a world class, state-of-the-art, technologically-advanced media and information center for the 21st century. There are not enough pages in this magazine to adequately describe what has been accomplished in Firestone, from user friendliness, to technological finesse, to the comfortable modern look of its interior design. On the lighter and more musical side of the “goings on” on campus, please enjoy “Banding Together,” William Uhl’s story about the Princeton University Marching Band. The band is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year and deserves our cheers and applause. There is a lot in this issue about the University, so that the returning alumni feel welcome back to their alma mater. However, I think it is also useful for all of us, who literally live with the University, to know about it and better understand it. I often hear comments about the University and how it might do more for the town of Princeton. There is certainly some truth in those comments in certain areas, but look at the alternatives: where would the town be without the University? We would not be the high-profile, attractive place to live that we are today. There would be no McCarter Theatre, no great art museum, no great visiting dignitaries and lecturers, and, like it or not, no million-and-half visitors to support our local businesses every year. Unlike the typical corporation that dominates a town with its tax payments and then, due to stockholder demands or wooing from another city or state, closes its headquarters and moves away — look at Bell Labs in Holmdel, Merck in Whitehouse Station, or BASF in Mount Olive, all gone from those towns today — I doubt Princeton University will ever be leaving us. I have heard the complaints: Princeton University wouldn’t be what it is today without our town of Princeton. Turn the question around: Where would our town be without Princeton University? Besides a great University, what our town also has is a great and responsive police force and, as Anne Levin will explain to you in her article, that police force is in the process of getting even better under the leadership of Chief Nick Sutter. His goal is to create a kinder, gentler, and more community-oriented team of men and women to serve our needs. To address this spring with its huge amount of rainfall and look to summer and, hopefully, an excellent growing season, Ilene Dube turns us towards Burpee Seeds, one of the world’s largest producer of seeds. This is one of those, “I never even thought about how they made that stuff!” articles that will fascinate you. And, the fact they have been doing it for over a century is even more amazing. I was personally captivated by

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY E. TRYON

Dear Princeton Magazine readers,

the artwork on their seed packs and suggest they do what The New Yorker has done, publish a book of their collection. So, get out your hoe and rake, buy those sacks of planting soil, and go at it with your Burpee Seeds. Let us know how your crop comes out. With summer upon us, many will be heading out to New Jersey’s beautiful and famous beaches. Wendy Greenberg has beat you to it in her tour of the history of New Jersey’s great lighthouses. Barnegat Light is the one closest to Princeton, probably the most familiar to you, and certainly a beautiful lighthouse. But up and down the coast is a collection of some of the most interesting lighthouses imaginable. They are definitely worth a weekend tour! For summer reading, spend some time with Stuart Mitchner’s “Book Scene” and his review of the spooky music of numbers. That description alone will get you to his page. In closing, Editor-in-Chief Lynn Smith and I want to thank you all for your amazingly positive reaction to our 10th Anniversary Issue. We both received comments, notes, and emails raving about the cover, the graphics, and the stories. Our hope is that you find this and future issues as engaging and worthy of your attention. Thank you! Respectfully yours,

J. Robert Hillier, Lh.D., FAIA Publisher


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PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019


“BEAUTIFUL AND INSPIRING”

A TEN-YEAR RENOVATION TRANSFORMS PRINCETON’S FIRESTONE LIBRARY By Donald H. Sanborn III

“We

Exterior of Firestone Library. (Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications, Princeton University)

are in the position of a little child entering a huge academic unit” that embraces an “inclusive understanding…that investigates library whose walls are covered to the ceiling the myriad ways digital methods and technologies are opening new avenues for with books in many different languages,” Albert research into the human experience, past and present.” Einstein is quoted as saying. “The child notes a INCEPTION definite plan in the arrangement of the books, a mysterious order, which it does not comprehend but only dimly The Library History page of the website notes that the books suspects.” used by the original students of the College of New Jersey, as A 1941 photo of Einstein in his study is on display in the new Princeton University was known until 1896, came from the Ellen and Leonard Milberg Gallery of Princeton University’s personal collections of the school’s presidents, Aaron Burr Sr. Firestone Library, which is across from the University and Jonathan Dickinson. In 1750 Governor Belcher donated Chapel. The University has completed its ten-year renovation 474 books, making the library the sixth largest in the colonies. of Firestone, which was “focused on creating a building It originally was housed in a room on the second floor of Nassau that is well-suited to support modern library services and Hall, along with the Continental Congress. The Revolutionary contemporary approaches to scholarship, while also providing War did not destroy the library, but a fire in Nassau Hall did, in inspiring, flexible study and work spaces,” the University states 1802. Through the help of benefactors, the library’s collections in a press release. were rebuilt. The Milberg Gallery is one of two rooms that are open to However, the collection was deemed inadequate by the general public. The other is the Cotsen Children’s Library, President James McCosh, who came to Princeton in 1868. He which, during the renovation “underwent system upgrades complained to the trustees that the library was “insufficiently while maintaining its popular and imaginative décor,” says the supplied with books, and open only once a week — for one University. hour.” President McCosh saw that the library was open every “The speed and scale of change facing academic libraries day except Sunday, and acquired a building for the express in recent years has been unprecedented,” University Librarian purpose of housing the Chancellor Green Library, which opened Anne Jarvis notes in Town Topics, a sister publication of Bust of Harvey S. Firestone. next to Nassau Hall in 1875. Chancellor Green was filled to Princeton Magazine. “We are moving beyond the concept of a (Photo by Charles R. Plohn) capacity by 1897, so Pyne Library was added. Between them, library as a finite place with traditional collections — to that of the two libraries had acquired over a million volumes by the late 1940s, and again a library as a partner in research, teaching, and learning. Having state-of-the-art a new building was needed. facilities is essential to providing expert guidance, discoverability, and access to The Harvey S. Firestone Memorial Library opened in 1948, making it the first the world’s rapidly evolving knowledge resources.” large American university library built after World War II. It is named for Harvey Firestone also is home to Rare Books and Special Collections; the Scheide S. Firestone (1868-1938), the founder of the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company, Library, whose holdings include a Gutenberg Bible, medieval manuscripts, and one of the first global manufacturers of automobile tires. music manuscripts of Bach and Beethoven; and the Center for Digital Humanities By 1971 the library’s capacity again was exceeded, so two lower floors were — which, according to its website, “is an interdisciplinary research center and

Firestone Tower. (Photo by Shelley Szwast, Princeton University Library, Princeton University) MAY 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Interior of Firestone Library, before renovation. (Wikipedia)

Firestone Library Reading Room. (Photo by Shelley Szwast, Princeton University Library)

added; further expansion took place in 1988. A release about the just-completed renovation asserts that Firestone “is one of the largest open-stack libraries in existence.”

studying in small groups, tucked away in favorite hideaway spots, or sprawled on comfortable couches,” says Valenza. “Multiple floors above and below offer many more unexpected and unique spaces for research, studying, and group work — all of which have been thoughtfully designed to accommodate the needs of today’s scholars.” The new facilities include “technologically equipped classrooms with e-learning capabilities, which offer places for faculty to teach using collections, and allow library specialists to hold workshops on topics from information literacy to research data management,” Valenza says. There also is a “digital imaging studio that enables expanded digitization of book and other library materials, making it possible for people around the world to access library materials online for free,” and “a conservation lab that supports the stewardship of collections, carefully maintaining and preserving materials for today’s scholars and future generations.” “One of the greatest challenges during the renovation was undergoing construction while patrons continued to use the library,” says Jeffrey Rowlands, director of library finance and administration. “As PUL’s main library of nine campus locations, keeping Firestone open during the renovation was important, to provide continuous research facilities to our patrons. It required extensive detailed planning, and the ability to be flexible.” Rowlands says, “one of the most rewarding parts of the renovation was Princeton’s commitment to making Firestone more energy efficient.” Valenza adds, “Throughout the building, new systems include lighting sensors for dimming lights; thermally-insulated windows with UV control glazing; chilled

RENOVATION

“We are fortunate that the library was conceived as an open and flexible laboratory for the humanities,” University Architect Ronald J. McCoy, Jr. says in a Princeton Magazine story published early in the renovation process. “In this regard we have been focused on the transformation of the building’s infrastructure, creating state-of the-art systems for energy, life-safety, and the security of the collection.” The University notes, “while the classic collegiate Gothic exterior of Firestone remains, the library’s recent renovation vastly changed the 430,000-square-foot interior.” The goal of the renovation was to “transform Firestone Library into an innovative 21st-century library,” states Barbara Valenza, the library’s communications director. “The renovation of Firestone aimed to redefine, rethink, and revitalize this hub of campus life. The project focused on creating a building that is well-suited to support modern library services and contemporary approaches to scholarship, while also providing inspiring flexible study and work spaces. The renovation also incorporated a number of sustainable features, greatly improving the energy-efficiency of the building.” “Stepping inside Firestone Library today, visitors and patrons are now greeted with natural light cascading into open spaces where glass walls reflect students

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019


Firestone Library Trustee Reading Room. (Photo by Shelley Szwast, Princeton University Library, Princeton University)

A page from the Gutenberg Bible. (Photo by Roel Muñoz, Princeton University Library)

Milberg Gallery, cases. (Photo by Shelley Szwast, Princeton University Library, Princeton University)

beam technology for energy-efficient heating and cooling; a green roof; LED light fixtures, and more.” Valenza says that these features ensure that the library’s “energy use has been significantly reduced.” THE ELLEN AND LEONARD MILBERG GALLERY

The Ellen and Leonard Milberg Gallery is presenting its inaugural exhibition, “Welcome Additions: Selected Acquisitions 2012-18.” According to its website, the gallery will highlight the library’s “world-renowned collections while also drawing upon complementary collections from campus partners such as the Princeton University Art Museum.” Jarvis says, “With the opening of the… gallery in Firestone Library, we are able to share materials from our collections with a wider audience.” “Welcome Additions” is described as a retrospective of recent additions to PUL’s special collections within the Cotsen Children’s Library, East Asian Library, Graphic Arts, Manuscripts, Marquand Library of Art and Archaeology, Numismatics, Public Policy Papers, Rare Books, Scheide Library, University Archives, and Western Americana. Eric White, the curator of rare books, remarks that the exhibit “plays on the notion that our recent acquisitions may reflect either long-awaited opportunities to enhance existing collections, or unexpected ways of moving beyond traditional collecting interests.” In addition to the photo of Einstein, visitors to the gallery also can see a Qur’an from China that dates to the 1600s; a score to J.S. Bach’s 1736 Zweyter

Thell der Clavier Ubung; an early 20th-century toy theatre from Spain; covers of American Jewess magazine, dating to the 1890s; a draft of Bill Bradley’s Rhodes Scholarship essay, along with his professor’s advisory letter, from 1964-65; and a 1987 draft of Beloved by Toni Morrison. Also included among the exhibits is a photo of the First One Hundred Days campus protest of 2017, led by the Princeton Advocates for Justice. The gallery is named to recognize the contributions of 1953 Princeton Alumnus Leonard L. Milberg and his wife, Ellen. A dedication and ribboncutting ceremony took place Februrary 28. The gallery’s opening was attended by the Milbergs; their granddaughter Samantha Shapiro, a member of the Princeton class of 2021; Jarvis; and Fintan O’Toole, the Leonard L. Milberg ’53 visiting lecturer in Irish Letters. Future exhibits will include “In principio: The Origins and Early Spread of European Printing,” which will feature the Gutenberg Bible, among 50 or 60 other items; “Piranesi on the Pgae,” a 300th anniversary celebration of graphic artist Giovanni Battista Piranesi, which will include items on loan from the Vatican Library; and a tribute to 1950 alumnus Lloyd E. Cotsen. COTSEN CHILDREN’S LIBRARY

Donations from Lloyd E. Cotsen have made possible a research collection of illustrated children’s books, manuscripts, original artwork, and educational toys from the 15th century to the present. Cotsen’s website notes that the library’s curatorial division hosts academic programs on aspects of the history of children’s books, and publishes their proceedings. What visitors see upon entering Cotsen is Bookscape, a reading space created by James Bradberry, an architect whose specialty is institutional design. The space was built from Bradberry’s sketches by Judson Beaumont and his staff at Straight Line Designs, a custom furniture company based in Vancouver. MAY 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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William Elfers ’41 Reading Room. (Photo by Shelley Szwast, Princeton University Library, Princeton University)

As patrons enter Bookscape they see a giant book with “Cotsen Children’s Library” on its spine, along with a rabbit and other topiary animals. Part of the floor has been painted to resemble a pond in which fish are swimming. Young readers (or those who are young at heart) can sit in a cozy mini-house area that has two dens, one of which has a “Hearth of Darkness” fireplace. Beyond the house is a two-story reading nook that resembles a bonsai tree. Those who have finished reading can gaze at a wishing well, or create their own show at a puppet theater. The library also has a variety of programs. Young visitors under age 2 can build their vocabularies with Bookscape Babies; slightly older patrons, ages 3-5, can listen to a picture book and create a project to take home at Tiger Tales. If readers ages 6-8 join To Be Continued, the library will read a chapter book to them over several weeks. Cotsen Critix is a literary society for readers ages 9-12. “A BEAUTIFUL AND INSPIRING HOME”

Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber says, “Firestone Library is undoubtedly one of the world’s great research libraries, but for me, and for many others on this campus, it is also a defining part of the Princeton experience. I have been personally involved with the renovation project since its planning stages, when I traveled with [former] University Librarian Karin Trainer and various faculty members to visit other recently renovated university libraries. On those trips I learned that libraries express the scholarly character of individual campuses. This is very true of Firestone.” “Firestone has always been a powerful laboratory for the humanities and social sciences; it is now also a beautiful and inspiring home for scholars and the books they love,” Eisgruber adds. “I hope that alumni will take the opportunity to visit Firestone when they return to campus; they will find spaces that bring back memories of their time on campus, and evoke new appreciation for the wonders of learning.”

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019

Cotsen Children’s Library Bookscape entryway. (Photo by David Kelly Crow)


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BOXWOOD STUDIO

Boxwood Studio was the home of famed American Impressionist painter, Fern Coppedge, from 1929-1949. Located in the highly desirable and prestigious area of New Hope Borough. The spectacular sprawling 6600+ sq. ft. home offers 6 bedrooms and 5 full baths. The property provides one of the longest river fronts in town. The unusually large outdoor entertainment space comprised of a deck and blue stone patios can accommodate the largest of parties or family gatherings.The stone walls cascade down to the river offering private access and lounging. Boxwood Studio is arguably one of the most sophisticated and aesthetically stunning properties to be offered for sale in generations. $4,300,000

550 Union Square, New Hope, PA • Addison Wolfe Real Estate • www.AddisonWolfe.com 550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • 215.862.5500

Art Mazzei

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This circa 1920’s cottage has been expanded over the generations, and, yet, still maintains the charm and aesthetics of the proverbial fishing cottage. The home provides four bedrooms and two and a half baths and an updated eatin kitchen. The large, vaulted Great Room is filled with natural light from the walls of glass. An adjacent Solarium is ideal for an office or breakfast room. The library contains a fireplace and built-in book cases. The grounds meander along the river for, seemingly, endless views and the steps down to the water’s edge. LongShadow is a property whose soul calls to you and invites you to find your way home. $1,875,000

ARMITAGE HOUSE

Armitage House has sat proudly on its six acres since 1750. The main floor offers a separate kitchen with dining and an aesthetically pleasing fireplace.This lovely beamed room with floor reflecting a rich patina is anchored by a fireplace offering museum quality Mercer Tiles. French doors lead to an adjacent sunroom/office. The second level provides a comfortable master bedroom with a sitting room/office addition. There are a total of 3 bedrooms and 2.5 baths. One of the most stunning features on this property is the half moon in-ground pool. The property contains a stone garden house, stone storage building, garage and stone Spring House. Recent upgrades include a new septic system and upgraded electrical service. $1,749,000

550 Union Square, New Hope, PA • Addison Wolfe Real Estate • www.AddisonWolfe.com 550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • 215.862.5500 22 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019


166 FAIRWAY DRIVE BROOKSTONE, 2 + ACRE W/ POOL, 5 BEDROOMS, 4.2 BATHS, 2 FIREPLACES AND FINISHED BASEMENT

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HYPERION HALL

Hyperion Hall is a sophisticated sprawling county estate in Bucks County sited on one the most breathtaking parcels of land in the Solebury area. Impressive gates open to a long driveway that delivers you to this cut stone four bedroom home with inlaw/aupair suite with separate entrance. This retreat style home provides all of the entertainment one needs... an in-ground pool, pool house, koi pond and a professional tennis court with nighttime lighting. $2,695,000

550 Union Square, New Hope, PA • Addison Wolfe Real Estate • www.AddisonWolfe.com 550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • 215.862.5500

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Burpee Seeds

By Ilene Dube

Sowing Seeds to Remain Close to its Roots 30 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019


SMITHSONIAN POSTAL MUSEUM

W.Atlee Burpee

If

Fordhook Farm, Doylestown, Pa. (Smithsonian Postal Museum)

you’re a gardener, have ever planted a single seed, or even breeding — an interest that soon expanded to include the breeding of knew of someone who planted a single seed or read a book livestock, dogs, and plants, and he was fascinated by the nascent science about such a person, you’ve undoubtedly heard of the Burpee of genetics. Seed Company. As a teen, Atlee engaged in correspondence with English animal What you may not have known was that founder W. Atlee breeders. He published papers on his experiments in England, and the Burpee started the company in nearby Philadelphia. In fact his Fordhook breeders came to visit his Philadelphia home, mistaking Dr. Burpee as the Farm, on 60 acres in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, is listed on the National one with whom they’d been corresponding — not his 16-year-old son. Register of Historic Places. Burpee dropped out of the It operated as an inn for a University of Pennsylvania number of years, and was the Medical School to start his subject of an Architectural own animal breeding business, Digest feature in 2001, but is but after receiving letters from now a site where vegetables, farmers who had emigrated annuals, and perennials are from Europe complaining grown, tested, and evaluated. about the poor quality of seed This year there are three days here, he decided to go into the it is open: on June 21 for the business of seeds. Shipping International Master Gardener seed was easier and less costly Conference; and on August than shipping animals, and by 10 and October 5 for public the 1880s, the W. Atlee Burpee viewing. (For further details, Company was supplying visit www.gardenconservancy. the Northeast as well as the org.) booming Plains states with The Burpees were a wellseed as well as livestock — established Philadelphia family making it the world’s fastest descended from French Canadian growing mail-order seed Huguenots. The original family company. Then as now, Burpee name, Beaupe, evolved with guaranteed satisfaction for one an Americanized spelling and year from date of purchase or Fordhook Farm, Doylestown, Pa. (Smithsonian Postal Museum) pronunciation over the course of a replacement of the seeds. several generations. Seeds were collected during Burpee’s tours of Europe. He found the Born in 1858, W. Atlee Burpee was expected to become a physician best vegetable breeders in Germany, Holland, and Scandinavia, and the best like his father and grandfather, but beginning in his early youth he was flower breeders in England. He kept a notebook based on his observations, determined to pursue a different path. His boyhood hobby was poultry and that notebook eventually became the Burpee Seed Catalog. Its MAY 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 31


Burpee’s Brandywine Tomato. (Smithsonian Postal Museum)

beautiful watercolor illustrations were created by immigrants from the climbing plants. The new bean was aptly named the Fordhook. Germantown neighborhood. Another almost accidental discovery was Golden Bantam corn. At Almost immediately, Burpee began introducing the turn of the century, yellow corn was grown strictly his own varieties, from Surehead cabbage and Long for livestock and poultry feed. Only white corn was Orange cabbage to the Stringless Green Pod Bean. Soon considered fit for human consumption. But a farmer he discovered that the heirloom seeds from Europe named William Chambers in Greenfield, Massachusetts, did better in northern climates, and not so well in the grew a delicious unnamed yellow mutant sweet corn southern U.S., where the European varieties were weak that became locally famous. When Chambers died, a and susceptible to disease. Thus began a program of friend of his found a handful of yellow kernels among selective breeding and hybridization. his possessions and sold them to Burpee. The result, That’s where Fordhook Farm came into play. In Golden Bantam, the first yellow sweet corn, was offered 1888, Burpee bought the Doylestown property and in 1902. Burpee claimed it had a buttery corn flavor, began transforming it into a plant development facility. without adding expensive butter. Golden Bantam corn Here he could adapt the best European vegetables and became a favorite “on the cob.” flowers to American growing conditions. In the early years, farmers rather than home gardeners The Burpees were friends of fellow Doylestown made up the majority of Burpee customers; the catalog resident Pearl S. Buck and named flowers for her. was called Burpee’s Farm Annual and a lot more space By the 1890s Burpee became the largest seed was allotted to corn and cabbage, melons and beans, and company in the world. Burpee traveled more than potatoes and squashes than to flower seeds and bulbs. 30,000 miles each year in search of seeds that would David Burpee had always been close to his celebrated produce superior vegetables and flowers. Sometimes father and shared his enthusiasms, intrigued by the he didn’t have to travel far from home to find exactly mysteries of plant genetics since childhood. He knew C.A.R.E crates being loaded onto a ship. what he was looking for. Such was the case with the first that someday he would assume the helm at W. Atlee (Smithsonian Postal Museum) bush lima bean, which he found growing in the garden Burpee & Co., but hoped that day would be in the distant of Asa Palmer in Chester, Pennsylvania. Until then, lima beans had been future. He was just beginning his scientific training in horticulture at

32 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019


Burpee’s Farm Annual covers. (Wikimedia Commons) MAY 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 33


Burpee’s Farm Annual covers. (Wikimedia Commons)

34 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019


Cornell University when his father’s health failed, and David had to return And yet heirloom tomatoes, while producing more vine and less fruit, home to help manage the family business. as well as tomatoes that bruise easily, are often touted for superior taste. W. Atlee Burpee died in 1915, by which time his company was sending Keeping up with demand, Burpee offers not only heirloom tomatoes but out a million catalogs a year, and 22-year-old David became head of the potatoes, cabbages, okra, and more. firm. Soon after, World War I led to a shortage of seeds. Many know about Perhaps you associate Burpee with the “burpless cucumber” — cukes the Victory Gardens of the World War II era, but David Burpee pioneered that are sweeter and have a thinner skin than other varieties of cucumber, “War Gardens” during the first World War with the belief that the best way and are reputed to be easy to digest (an unproven claim). These are indeed to help our country’s war effort was by showing people how to grow a good sold through Burpee, but the cultivar is commonly available through most portion of their food right in their own backyards. To promote this, he set nurseries. up War Gardens in a number of cities, including New York’s Union Square. Throughout David Burpee’s career, he put great effort into the Soon, thousands began growing their own. development of flowers and vegetables of many kinds, but new and David Burpee emphasized the potential of hybrids. In his words, improved marigolds were his greatest love, and by 1960 he had helped “Crossing two strains of the same or different species to create something make marigolds America’s most popular flower. entirely new brought another Remembered by horticulturists dimension to horticulture. The as an innovator, David Burpee’s Big Boy Tomato, the Early Hybrid philanthropic activities included aid Crenshaw Melon, and the Red to developing countries. He promoted and Gold Marigold are just a few improved international relations, and of the outstanding hybrids we’ve through his efforts the first Chinese/ developed. Hybrids are … strongerAmerican Horticultural Conference growing and more disease-resistant took place in Philadelphia shortly than either of the parents.” A hybrid after World War II. His final can grow with less fertilizer and less philanthropic act was to bequeath ideal soil than the parent strains, a significant portion of his estate to and require less care throughout the Bucknell to endow a genetics and growing season. research chair in his name. Of course, these days we know Today, the organization positions that too much manipulation of our itself as an environmentally-friendly crops may not be a good thing. company, taking a stance against Ancient wild plants provided genetically modified crops, urging phytonutrients that are largely gardeners to save the bees and, during absent from our modern cultivated the Obama administration, made a fruits and veggies. The preference $2.5 million gift to fund the White for sweeter, starchier foods led to House Kitchen Garden. The company, less nutritious staples common bought by George Ball in 1991 (in today, such as sweet corn. Bitter March he named James Mattikow, and brighter colored plants that formerly the Ferrara Candy Company’s were packed with nutrition have chief commercial officer and Kraft’s been largely replaced with sweeter, vice president of signature brands, the more muted varieties. new CEO), has even bred a “meatier” During World War II, Burpee eggplant that is marketed for veggie vigorously promoted Victory Gardens, burgers. and although genuine patriotism was Ball, a Bard College graduate his primary motivation, the Victory and past president of the American Garden movement was instrumental Horticultural Society, is also a gardening in turning non-farming Americans writer whose works include such pieces into vegetable gardeners, with Burpee as a plea to First Lady Melania Trump to as their foremost seed supplier. keep the White House Kitchen Garden. As the movement gained At the 60-acre Fordhook Farm, momentum, Burpee breeders turned hundreds of new vegetables, annuals, their attention to ideal vegetables and perennials are still grown, tested, David Burpee in a field of marigolds. (Smithsonian Postal Museum) for home gardeners. Thus was born and evaluated. The original Burpee the Burpee Hybrid Cucumber and the Fordhook Hybrid Tomato. In 1942, Seed House and 16 core acres are listed on the National Register of Historic celtuce — a cross between celery and lettuce — appeared in the catalog. Places. In addition to the test plots, there are display gardens of perennials, Burpee’s Big Boy Tomato, another hybrid, was introduced in 1949 shrubs, and trees, blended into the landscape with sculpture by Steve Tobin. and became a runaway success. The Big Boy is still popular today, due Tobin, a friend of Ball’s, creates sculpture that resembles enormous to its taste, texture, aroma, and large size, as well as ease in growing. The root structures. “The root system is the most important part of the plant,” hybridization made it less of a vine so that only a single stake per plant Ball has said. And by remaining close to Burpee’s roots, the organization is needed, while increasing each plant’s yield two or three times. The Big has succeeded in keeping its position as a leader in the home gardening Boy needs less or no fertilizer and is significantly more tolerant of foliage industry. diseases.

MAY 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 35


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BANDING TOGETHER

100 Years of the Princeton University Band By William Uhl

The Princeton University Band poses on the steps of Blair Arch in October, 2010. (Photo by R.W. Enoch Jr., Wikipedia)

IN

1967, Princeton University’s football team faced Harvard. During the halftime performance, the Princeton University Band marched onto the field, clad in their traditional blackand-orange plaid blazers and boater hats. This time, they had a national audience: ABC was televising the show, one of the band’s first televised performances. Forming the letters “ABC,” the Tiger Band began to play. And as they performed “Who’s Sorry Now?” their formation shifted from “ABC” to “NBC.” “As a result, national networks refused to broadcast the band for many years after,” laughed Jim Bedell ’68. During his four years in the band, Bedell played the snare drum, and years later became one of the original trustees of the Friends of Tiger Band alumni organization. Shortly after the ABC incident, the band’s halftime performances came under scrutiny. “About a year later, some of the shows got risqué enough that they actually instituted a censor,” said Robert Wright ’97. Now working in aerospace engineering, Wright joined the band first as the halftime show announcer, and later as a saxophonist and trombonist. “To this day, 50 years later, the band has to take the halftime show to someone in [the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Students] to go through and approve everything that’s in there.” The Tiger Band’s prankster legacy continues as it celebrates its centennial anniversary this year. It started as a group of undergraduate students in 1919 bringing musical school spirit to football games. By 1952, the band was playing at all manner of PU sports games, wearing their iconic blazers, and infusing their performances with wildcard comedy. Now, the band is rich with traditions, including a

40 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019

banquet called the “bandquet,” a White Castle burger-eating contest, and a playful prank on its censors known as “the show that never was.” “At least once a year, they come up with a fake show that’s specifically intended to horrify [the censor] as much as possible,” said Wright. “They take a couple tacts. Sometimes they hit them right out of the gate with just the most offensive things you could think of, and sometimes they try to slowly descend, so they draw them in and think it’s real at first. What was particularly fun is, if we had an overly shy president, we’d have that person do the talking on it as well, who often was not the person who’d written it.” A tradition for irreverent humor has been an important part of the band’s identity, but so has offering welcoming inclusivity. “If you’re interested in joining the band and you don’t know how to play an instrument, that’s fine,” said Gabe Eggers ’13, secretary of Friends of Tiger Band. “You can come in and you’ll get stuck on trash percussion for a bit, like for a game or two, just to ease you in and get you used to all of the different things that are going on.” The trash percussion section (also known as the “garbussion” section) is a mix of common percussion instruments and objects just as oddball as the band’s humor. “Most famously, a school crossing sign that someone stole deep in the past,” said Eggers. “They repainted the kids on the sign to be in plaid jackets, and covered over the ‘School Xing’ and put ‘Band Xing’ on it.” Beyond including students without musical experience, band members are also happy to help teach fellow bandmates how to play more traditional instruments.


The PUB's uniforms haven't changed much over the years, but members are fond of augmenting them with funny sunglasses and pins. (Photo by GeekPhotog, Wikipedia)

Princeton University Band members with the “56” bongos at a Princeton University vs. Lehigh University football game in 2009. (Photo by Beverly Schaefer)

The Double-Double Rotating P in 1984. (Photo by R.W. Enoch Jr., Wikipedia)

The band often celebrates victory with a post-game concert in the Woodrow Wilson School Fountain and a rendition of “Rock Lobster.” (Photo by R.W. Enoch Jr., Wikipedia)

“If you want to learn how to play an instrument, then someone will take you under their wing, or one of the sections will take you under their wing and teach you how,” said Eggers. “I know several people over the course of my undergrad that learned actual percussion, trumpets, saxophone, etc.” Eggers also noted, “The band has a pretty close relationship with the Class of ’56. They fundraise for us and we play all their tailgates at every football game and go to their thing at Reunions. It’s been a really tight relationship over the years. At some point before I came to campus, Tom Meeker — I don’t know if he’s technically the president of the class, but he’s definitely the face of the class — had crafted these bongos. You know those plastic pumpkins that kids will go around on Halloween with? He took two of those, screwed them together into bongos, put a chain around them so you can wear them, and then painted ‘56’ on the backsides of them. That is sort of a legacy instrument. It was passed down to me by the prior player, and then I passed it down when it was time for me to graduate.” Band alumni are a key part of the band’s community, especially at Princeton’s Reunions Weekend. Ben Elias had several roles in the band, including officer, drillmaster, and president. “When I was an undergrad, I was class of ’05, there were regularly people from the class of ’90-something coming on the road trips with us,” said Elias. “At Reunions, large groups of bandies would all hang out

together — people from the class of ’70-something all the way up to modern day. You see them every year and get to know them pretty well.” According to some of the alumni, the band has an ability to bring people together across generations, whether they graduated three or 30 years apart. “It’s more than 20 years ago now, and it’s still where so many of my closest friends come from,” said Wright. “It’s part of why I go back to Reunions every single year. I’m about to buy my tickets for this year. This’ll be my 22nd and I haven’t missed one yet, which is saying a lot coming from the West Coast. Now I have all these close friends that I was never in school with at the same time, and we know each other because we were both in the band at different times.” After 100 years, some traditions have come and gone, but the Princeton University Band has remained and become something greater. “I would, in a very real sense, attribute to the band why I completed my four years at Princeton,” said Eggers. “More than extracurricular, it really becomes a family.” As Reunions begin again this year, you can expect to see the band marching (or scrambling) with alumni in tow, clashing cymbals and rapping snare drums to the same songs from their college days.

MAY 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 41


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Q&A with Norman “Norm” Carter, Princeton University Class of 1938

Norm Carter at the 2018 Reunions Weekend, being driven by Hamza Chaudhry ’19. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Bill Coors and Norm Carter at the 2008 P-rade. (Photo by Beverly Schaefer)

A

favorite highlight of Reunions Weekend each year is the P-rade, a parade of Princeton University alumni dressed in their class uniforms, from conservative to outrageous. It is led by a grand marshal and other dignitaries, followed closely by the Old Guard, those in classes beyond their 65th reunion. This year, the same as just about every year since he was a boy, Norm Carter is eagerly anticipating the P-rade and all the Reunions Weekend activities, including a Saturday reception and Old Guard Luncheon with President Christopher L. Eisgruber. At 102 ½, he is one of the oldest members of the Old Guard, and says he feels so fortunate to return each year. I asked Mr. Carter a few questions about his long history with the University.

was the fifth, but he passed away last September at 102. I was also a member of the Cap and Gown Club. We loved going to the Tap Room at the Nassau Inn. Everything was so great during my time at Princeton. How have you seen Princeton change over the years? There are lots of new buildings. I get lost on campus because it is so different! What do you like best about Reunions Weekend? I absolutely like seeing old friends that I don’t get to see during the year. It is such a happy time with a great atmosphere. I attend with my son, Tom Carter, who graduated in the Class of 1966. He now lives in Virginia. My other son, Norman Jr., also attended Princeton. We are very proud of our Princeton tradition.

Tell me a little about yourself. How did you come to attend Princeton University? I come from a long line of family who attended Princeton University. My father graduated in 1901, and I attended the reunions with him when I was a boy. We lived in Plainfield, and I came in the rumble seat. I’ve always loved coming to Princeton. My older brother Howard Carter Jr. was in the Class of 1933. I went to prep school at Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire, and then graduated in the Princeton University Class of 1938 with a degree in politics. After graduation, I married and worked as a lumber broker, which became my career. I traveled all over the U.S. What are some favorite memories of your time as a student?

Where do you live now? What do you enjoy doing?

Norman Carter, Class of 1938. (University Archives, Princeton University Library)

When I was at Phillips Exeter, I roomed with Bill Coors of the Coors Brewing Company. I convinced Bill, whose family members had traditionally attended Cornell, to attend Princeton with me. I don’t think his family ever forgave me! We were roommates for four years in 1901 Hall in a suite of rooms with a huge fireplace. We also became lifelong friends. There are four people remaining in the Class of 1938, and two of the four were roommates, myself and John Hardy. Bill

46 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019

By Laurie Pellichero

I am twice widowed. I spend a lot of time in Vero Beach, Fla., but come back every year to stay with my dear friend Angela Sinatra in Point Pleasant before Reunions. I like to read the New York Times every day, play Scrabble, and read history books, especially Word War II. I am a WW II veteran — I was a lieutenant senior class in the Navy and served on a supply ship in the North Atlantic. What advice would you give to today’s students?

Just go with the flow and get the most out of the experience. Princeton is such a wonderful place. I was so fortunate to go there and am so fortunate to go back each year. This year’s Reunions Weekend is May 30 through June 2.


photography by kateandguy.com

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Wo r

GUESt PrEAchEr froM thE 50th rEUNioN clASS of 1969

Rev. Dr. Christopher Thomforde ‘69 Sh i PS

10 AM SUNDAY JUNE 2, 2019

Er Vic

Princeton University chapel 48 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019

E


I wish to go to the San Diego Zoo Madison, 3 cancer

Wishes Can’t Wait. Help children with critical illnesses experience the life-changing power of a wish.

NJ.WISH.ORG/DONATE


“Invest Well. Princeton University Endowment Outpaces Ivies As Princo Seeks to “Invest Well” and “Do Good” By Donald Gilpin

Do Good.”


$16K

“There’s always a bunch of luck for the returns in one given year. The returns in any one given year reflect literally decades of decisions.”

$14K $12K $10K

— Princo President Andrew Golden

$8K $6K Endowment

$4K $2K

(princo.princeton.edu)

65/35 Benchmark 1978 1982 Fiscal Year

1986

1990

1994

1998

2002

2006

2010

2014

$0

2018

Endowment vs. 65/35 Benchmark; 1977-2018 (Growth of $100 Invested)

“Invest Well. Do Good,” reads the headline on the website of the from the perspective of the past 10 years, neither Princeton nor any other Princeton University Investment Company (Princo), which manages most Ivy League University beat the 10-year performance, 8.1 percent increase, of the University’s $25.9 billion endowment, the largest endowment per of a simulated plain vanilla portfolio made up of 60 percent stocks and 40 student in the country and one of the five largest overall. percent bonds. Recent results for the endowment — a 14.2 percent investment gain for Princo President Andrew Golden declined to be interviewed for this the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2018 — and its support of an increasing article, but in a November Princeton Alumni Weekly (PAW) report he share — 55 percent for 2018-19 — of the University’s annual budget emphasized Princo’s long-term perspective and downplayed the importance indicate that Princo has indeed been investing well and doing good. of annual, or even 10-year performance results. “There’s always a bunch of The endowment, which supports a financial aid program that helps luck for the returns in one given year,” he told PAW. “The returns in any to provide access to a Princeton education to students from all economic one given year reflect literally decades of decisions.” He noted, as quoted backgrounds and makes it possible for them to attend in Wikipedia, “When you have a mission to preserve regardless of ability to pay and without the need purchasing power into perpetuity, in some sense a Percent investment gain for the fiscal to take out loans, increased by about $2.1 billion year is a pretty short period of time.” year that ended June 30, 2018 from June 2017 to June 2018, taking into account Golden has been managing Princeton’s endowment investment returns, gifts, and spending. since 1995. Before that he worked at Duke Management 14.2 Princeton “The earnings from our endowment cover more Company and before that, from 1988 to 1993, as 13.5 MIT than half of the University’s operating budget, as well portfolio manager at Yale’s Investment Office. At Yale, 13.2 Brown as help fund our high priority strategic initiatives,” he served under the legendary David Swensen, creator of said Provost Deborah Prentice. “Without a strong the Yale Model, which Princeton and most schools with 12.9 UPenn endowment, we would not be able to support our large endowments now follow. The Yale Model strategy, 12.3 Yale students in the way that we do.” as outlined in Swensen’s landmark work Pioneering 12.2 Dartmouth Princo’s investment results for the last fiscal year Portfolio Management: An Unconventional Approach surpassed returns from other Ivy League schools, to Institutional Investments (2000), entails investing in 11.3 Stanford which ranged from 9.2 percent at Columbia to 13.2 alternative asset classes, such as hedge funds, real estate, 10.6 Cornell percent at Brown. Median returns for university and private equity. 10.0 Harvard endowments tracked by the Cambridge Associates In seeking long-term returns above 10 percent research firm registered a gain of 8.3 percent over per year, Princo relies on “an aggressive, equity9.2 Columbia the same one-year period. based approach,” according to its recent document Harvard’s endowment returned 10 percent for the on investment strategy. Princo works with about 80 2018 fiscal year, with Cornell checking in at 10.6 percent, Dartmouth at different investment managers across the globe, and further leverages its 12.2 percent, University of Pennsylvania at 12.9 percent, and Yale at 12.3 advantageous long-range horizon, relatively low spending requirements, the percent, according to an October 2018 report in Institutional Investor. MIT endowment’s size, Princeton’s large network of alumni, and the reputations reported a 13.5 percent return and Stanford registered an 11.3 percent gain. of the University and Princo. Princeton University’s Office of Communication reported that over the Princo’s investment strategy report notes that non-traditional asset past 10 years the average annual return of the endowment has been 8 percent, allocation is “a critically important element” of its approach. Although 95 “which places Princeton among the top percentile of 458 institutions listed percent of the portfolio is assigned to equities, only 9 percent is earmarked by Wilshire Trust Universe Comparison Service.” for U.S. equities, with 6 percent dedicated to developed international equity, A November 2018 Institutional Investor article, however, reported that, 10 percent to emerging international equity, 26 percent to independent return

MAY 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 51


(hedge funds), 27 percent to private equity (private companies), 18 percent to real estate and natural resources, and 5 percent to fixed income and cash. Though 95 percent equities indicates a high level of risk, Golden emphasized Princeton’s strong financial position and long timeline, and pointed out, “The multi-asset class approach also offers diversification benefits that help to control risk in most environments.” Golden mentioned private equity (a whopping 18.2 percent annualized return over the past five years) as last year’s best performing asset class and one of the main drivers of last year’s performance. Hedge funds earned about 7 percent and fixed income and cash investments saw little growth. In speaking about the Yale Model in an interview reported last December in the New York Times, Golden noted, “I wouldn’t recommend it for my mother.” Alternative assets, particularly hedge funds, have been criticized for their high fees, typically 2 percent plus 20 percent of gains, and for their illiquidity, keeping money locked up for long periods of time. Those concerns seem particularly relevant when plain, low-fee, index-fund-type investments can produce better results over a 10-year period. Emphasizing that “focusing on the calendar just leads to short-termism,” Golden, according to the New York Times, pointed out that though the Princeton endowment dipped toward the end of the tech boom in 199899, at least in relation to the overall market, it then fared relatively well through the ensuing bursting of the tech bubble and has far surpassed the performance of a standard 60/40, stock/bond mix in the period of the past 20 years. Golden suggested that only a full market cycle, market peak to market peak or trough to trough, most likely more than 10 years, can provide a meaningful comparison. Princo, with its headquarters on Chambers Street, across Nassau Street

from the main University campus, and its own 12-member Board of Directors, is officially part of the University, “a University office operating under the final authority of the University’s Board of Trustees,” and yet independent from the University. “Organizationally distinct from the University, but not a separate legal entity,” Princo employs an investment team of 22 and an operations team of 18. Golden reports to both the University president and to the chair of the Princo Board of Directors. Princo’s website emphasizes the greater flexibility and responsiveness of employing external management and notes that the Princo staff is fully empowered to hire and fire external managers and to shift assets among sectors, authority which “provides Princo a competitive advantage relative to most peer endowments.” Its detachment from the day-to-day workings of the University’s multiple concerns and constituents might also have helped to spare Princo from the kind of political turmoil that has raised the issue of socially- and environmentally-conscious investing and targeted investments in fossil fuels and the prison industry at Yale, Harvard, and other major universities in recent years. Princeton’s investment portfolio has not come under fire since the 1970s and 1980s, when students demonstrated against investments in the defense industry and in apartheid South Africa. Despite Princo’s banner year in 2018, the jury remains out, as the bull market seems to continue — high volatility and quasi-corrections notwithstanding. Will Princo’s 2019 investment results for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2019, again lead the Ivy League? Will they again struggle to keep pace with the plain vanilla index fund portfolio? Will the true test for the Yale Model and for Princo come when a stock market downturn turns into a prolonged bear market and completes the market cycle? Continuing to “invest well” and working to “do good” might become even more challenging for Princo in the coming months and years.

Helping you achieve your goals has always been ours Congratulations to Stephen A. Pollard for being named to the 2019 Barron’s “Top 1,200 Financial Advisors” list.

The Pollard Group Stephen A. Pollard, CFP® Managing Director Wealth Management Advisor 800.477.3417 stephen_pollard@ml.com Merrill Lynch 14 North Harrison Street 2nd Floor Princeton, NJ 08540

Source: Barron’s “Top 1,200 Financial Advisors” list, March 11, 2019. The ranking considered advisors with a minimum of seven years financial services experience and have been employed at their current firm for at least one year. This is a list of the top advisors in each state, with the number of ranking spots determined by each state’s population and wealth. Other quantitative and qualitative measures include assets under management, revenues generated by advisors for their firms, and the quality of the advisors’ practices, regulatory records, internal company documents, and 100-plus points of data provided by the advisors themselves. Barron’s is a trademark of Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All rights reserved. Rankings and recognition from Barron’s are no guarantee of future investment success and do not ensure that a current or prospective client will experience a higher level of performance results and such rankings should not be construed as an endorsement of the advisor. Merrill Lynch Wealth Management makes available products and services offered by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated, a registered broker-dealer and Member SIPC, and other subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation. Investment products:

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P r i n c e t o n S p i n e a n d J o i n t C e n t e r i s c e l e b r a t i n g i t s 11 t h y e a r i n P r i n c e t o n a n d we are grateful for the support and trust that has been placed in us. We are proud to introduce three new board cer tif ied, fellowship-trained spor ts medicine doc tors. Scott Curtis, DO Director, Sports Medicine Division

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At Princeton Spine and Joint, we specialize in the latest medical treatments to get people of all ages and abilities better and back to their best performing selves without pain and without surgery. Our new Regenerative Medicine Division offers the latest in restorative tissue treatments, including PRP. Our doctors are co-editing along with the chairperson of Mount Sinai’s PM&R department the new textbook, “Regenerative Medicine for Spine and Joint Pain.”

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SAINT PETER’S HEALTHCARE SYSTEM EXPANDS USE OF PATIENT ENGAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE PATIENT EXPERIENCE Dr. Attila Kett, Saint Peter’s University Hospital’s anesthesiology chairman, knows firsthand the challenges new mothers face post-Caesarean, and developed an interactive program to improve patient outcomes. He introduced the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery program (ERAS), a proven model for accelerating recovery established in Europe for colorectal, gynecology, urology, and orthopaedics, to help Saint Peter’s obstetrical patients enhance their pregnancy and delivery experience, reduce their length of stay and recovery time, and decrease or eliminate the need for opioid medications for pain management. Dr. Kett collaborated with Dr. Elizabeth Cherot, medical director of Brunswick Hills Obstetrics and Gynecology/Axia Women’s Health, and Pamela Harmon, MSN, RNC-NIC, Saint Peter’s nursing director, Women and Children’s Division. They identified goals of improving preoperative education, reducing pre-operative Dr. Attila Kett fasting, facilitating patient engagement, encouraging early mobility, reducing the perioperative stress response, improving satisfaction with post-operative analgesia, and discharging home earlier. They knew a multidisciplinary approach was the key to improved coordination between providers and to standardizing care with an emphasis on clinical outcomes and enhancing patient education and empowerment. Seeking a way to reach patients the way they like to receive information — virtually — Dr. Kett tapped into patient engagement technology for the clinical pathway he and the team would create. The app, accessible on a smartphone,

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019

tablet, or computer, includes reminders, tasks, tailored education, and daily milestone tracking to help patients follow ERAS. It facilitates remote pre- and post-surgery health checks such as pain control and wound recovery. Patients are guided through every step of the ERAS pathway, and providers can monitor patients using a real-time dashboard. Saint Peter’s, with one of the largest maternity services in the U.S., is one of the first healthcare systems in the country to provide an ERAS program for C-section patients, and has expanded the program to support its orthopaedic surgical patients. Amidst the opioid epidemic, Saint Peter’s is also paving the way towards alternative pain management protocol. Over 50 percent of patients do not receive any narcotic pain medications in the hospital or after discharge. Patients, and their newborns, do not have to suffer the effects of opioids or run the risk of exposing themselves to the possibility of Dr. Elizabeth Cherot addiction. Results are game-changing: reducing the length of hospital stay by 1.5 days; producing significant cost savings for the hospital; reducing the need for narcotics utilizing a ground-breaking pain protocol; catching deadly blood clots after surgery; treating infections earlier and avoiding unnecessary trips to the emergency department; lessening patient anxiety; and increasing patient satisfaction. Dr. Kett presented the program to leaders in anesthesiology at the March 2018 Annual Congress of Enhanced Recovery and Perioperative Medicine, and the program is unfolding nationally.


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T he Hun School Congratulates THE CLASS OF 2019! THE BREADTH OF YOUR COLLEGE MATRICULATION REFLECTS THE STRENGTH AND DIVERSITY OF YOUR TALENTS, INTERESTS, AND HARD WORK. WE ARE SO PROUD OF YOU.

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Make Us Proud!

The University of Alabama American University Amherst College Babson College Barnard College Bates College Bentley University Boston University Bournemouth University Brandeis University Brown University Bucknell University University of California, Los Angeles University of California, San Diego Carnegie Mellon University The Catholic University of America University of Chicago Christopher Newport University Clemson University Colgate University Colorado School of Mines Columbia University Cornell University Davidson College Denison University Dickinson College Drew University Drexel University East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania Elon University Emory University Fairfield University Fordham University

Franklin & Marshall College Furman University Georgetown University Georgia Institute of Technology The George Washington University Gettysburg College Hampton University Hobart and William Smith Colleges Howard University University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Imperial College London Jacksonville University Johns Hopkins University Kean University University of Kentucky Lehigh University Louisiana State University Loyola University Maryland Marquette University McDaniel College McGill University University of Miami Montana State University, Bozeman Nazareth College New York University The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Northeastern University University of Notre Dame Nova Southeastern University University of Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University Pepperdine University University of Pittsburgh

Princeton University Purdue University Quinnipiac University University of Rochester Sacred Heart University University of St. Andrews Saint Joseph’s University Salisbury University San Diego State University The University of Scranton Skidmore College Stevens Institute of Technology Stonehill College Tulane University Vanderbilt University The University of Vermont Villanova University Wake Forest University Washington and Lee University Wesleyan University West Virginia University Worcester Polytechnic Institute Yale University


Policing in Princeton Kinder, Gentler, and Community-Oriented

By Anne Levin | Photographs by Charles R. Plohn

L

ast February, Princeton Council approved a settlement of $3.925 million in a lawsuit with seven members of the Princeton Police Department. Filed in 2013, the suit accused police chief David Dudeck of harassment, discrimination, and creating a hostile work environment. The town did not admit any liability, and the plaintiffs agreed to not file another suit. The settlement marked the end of an unsavory chapter in the history of law enforcement in Princeton. But things have actually been on the upswing since 2015, when former police captain Nicholas Sutter was promoted to replace Dudeck, who was permitted to retire soon after the suits were filed. A different culture that began to emerge then appears to now be firmly in place. Transparency, diversity, an openness to change, and respect are the department’s core values. While nine officers have retired over the past few years, new recruits — several of whom are under 30 — come from a variety of non-traditional backgrounds. Of the 61 officers now on the force, six speak Spanish. One speaks Mandarin. Six are African American, including the first black woman officer in the department’s history. There is an officer dedicated to LGBTQ issues. “It’s not just ethnicity or gender,” says Sutter. “It’s also about backgrounds. We have former teachers, former members of the military. We even have some talented musicians. There is a vast level of experience here that we might not have seen before.” Sutter, who is 48 and has been with the department since 1995, has a background that is part traditional; part unusual. A native of Hillsborough who graduated from Kean University with bachelor’s degrees in economics and finance, he worked on Wall Street for a year before realizing he was meant for public service.

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019

“Growing up, I spent a lot of time at my grandmother’s house, and I saw my uncle, who was a police officer in North Plainfield, all the time,” he recalls. “He would show up for lunch in his leather jacket, with the police radio and everything — I just loved it. But what impressed me most, even as a little kid, was the way he gave back to his town. He was protecting the people he grew up with and lived with.” Sutter had expressed an interest in law enforcement at a young age, but his parents encouraged him to be open to other options before making a decision. The year on Wall Street was the deciding factor. He enrolled in Somerset’s police academy in January 1995, and was hired by the Princeton Borough Police Department that summer. He started out as a patrol officer, was a sergeant by 2000, a patrol sergeant by 2004, and then lieutenant, captain, and ultimately, chief. Princeton Borough and Township had just consolidated when the lawsuits against Dudeck were filed six years ago. Between the legal issues and the merging of the two departments, the challenges facing the police were considerable. “It wasn’t only the Dudeck thing. We had just consolidated. We were literally building a new department,” says Sutter, who served as acting chief for two years before his official appointment to chief. “When there is a merger, you want to go in on a positive note, but we didn’t. The lawsuits made it more difficult. But I look at it this way: Opportunities can arise in times of crisis. It caused us to go through formal and informal assessments. We wanted to get to the root of issues that needed to change. If we had never had these problems, it would have just been business as usual. But it wasn’t.” The Borough had one culture; the Township had another. And the public had


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certain perceptions of each. “This gave us the chance to look at who we were and change it,” Sutter says. “I actually saw it happen before my eyes. And it never would have happened otherwise. We had no choice but to fix things and make things better. Yes, it was stressful. It was uncharted territory. But from crisis came opportunity.” Community policing has been a priority of the department since consolidation, and it continues today. With a sizable portion of Latino residents, many of whom are undocumented, Sutter wants everyone to feel included and protected. “Our officers have embraced this mission and they have taken community-oriented policing to new heights,” Sutter said in an April presentation to Princeton Council of the 2018 Police Report. “The innovation and creativity that our officers have shown in developing new and unique policing strategies that increase community partnerships and increase the quality of life for our citizens is the type of exemplary police work our community has come to expect.” Former Princeton Council member Heather Howard, who served as the governing body’s police commissioner for several years, believes the police department turned a corner with consolidation. “It was a time to bring these two departments together, and it could have been fraught with peril,” she said. ”But under Nick’s leadership, it worked.” The town’s law enforcement went through a rigorous accreditation process. “They have the standards and procedures and sophistication of a much larger department, which is a credit to the fact that Nick is a visionary,” says Howard. “He sees the role of the police not as warriors, but as guardians of the public. And that says it all. It’s about protecting the public. Sometimes that means acting like counselor — connecting with the community.” Charges of police brutality have tested law enforcement in cities and towns across the nation. “Our biggest challenge today as a department is writing our own narrative and succeeding against what the national narrative is on policing,” says Sutter. “We have to rise above it and prove to people that our mission is legitimate, and the officers are well intended. We have to meet their expectations and help them.

And we have to go against what you see on the nightly news.” On a national basis, those incidents have caused a drop in the number of people pursuing police careers — but not in Princeton. “We have had three recruitments since 2013, with over 800 initial applicants each time,” says Sutter. “It’s weird, because departments nationwide are having problems recruiting. But we are not. We put a positive face on policing and a great effort into recruiting and putting our story out there. We have a team that is young and diverse, and they attract the right people. We want morally strong communicators who will treat the public with respect. And we train them how to be cops. We still need to recruit the fastest and the strongest, but now we also concentrate on attitudes, communication, and diversity. It’s the moral being I’m looking for. And I think that’s a huge piece of our transformation.” Taking a cue from a strategic plan, the department has undergone various changes and restructuring. More officers are now on the streets instead of sergeants in the middle. Another new focus is the speed of information and a recognition of the importance of social media. During the “swatting” incidents, where numerous threats were repeatedly called in to Princeton’s public schools four years ago, students had the information on social media before the police were on the scene. While there is always room for additional improvement, the department has reached a level of which local officials are proud. “Nick has been a transformative leader for the department in a time of significant change starting with consolidation, then the departure of Chief Dudeck, and more recently, the large number of officers aging into retirement,” said Mayor Liz Lempert. “The chief has taken on each of these challenges and managed to strengthen the department in the process. Today the Princeton Police Department is more diverse, more community-oriented, more effective, and more beloved than at any time I can remember. Nick has created a model for how to proactively engage with community partners, build meaningful relationships of trust, and act as guardians of the Constitution for everyone in town.”

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prosthodonticsofprinceton.com field forward into the future,” reports Dr. Perlman, Co-Director of PSJC’s regenerative medicine division and Co-Editor of the forthcoming book, Regenerative Medicine for Spine and Joint Pain. “It’s really the best of both worlds. At PSJC I get to spend time involved in research and lecturing but at the end of the day, what I love most about my role is the PRINCETON SPINE & JOINT CENTER opportunity to use that knowledge and expertise to sit down with a Princeton Spine & Joint Center (PSJC) is patient one-on-one and map out a treatment plan celebrating its 11th year in practice in Princeton, together to get that person out of pain and back NJ. Founded by husband and wife team and to their active and pain-free life. Nothing feels Princeton natives Drs. Bracilovic and Cooper, better than knowing that I’ve helped someone live PSJC has focused on getting people out of a better, less painful life. And I get to do it every pain and back into their active lives without day in a beautiful town where I love to live.” surgery. Over the years, it has grown into a seven Dr. Curtis is the Director of the sports doctor group. Its doctors are board certified and medicine division at PSJC and notes, “I loved fellowship trained. Between them, they have living in North Jersey and working with the New authored and edited 18 medical texts in their York Jets and Seton Hall University Athletics but field. Their doctors are recognized as national and I equally love working with Princeton University international leaders in their field. athletes and the local high school and junior “We have chosen to live in Princeton and high school athletes.” Dr. Curtis emphasizes raise our families here. At the same time, we are taking his time with each patient to be sure to still passionate about research and moving our

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arrive at an accurate diagnosis and then giving the patient all the essential information so they can make a plan of action together based on the patient’s particular needs and goals. “One of the things I also emphasize,” Dr. Curtis notes, “is the importance of a maintenance treatment program to help prevent future injury once the acute injury is resolved. Sometimes this involves carefully evaluating the mechanics of the particular sport. Sometimes this involves uncovering muscle imbalances that may have contributed to the injury in the first place. Solving an acute problem is important, and that’s the first step. But making sure future injuries are prevented is also a really important part of comprehensive treatment. At the end of the day, we don’t take care of MRIs or just an injury. We have to take care of the whole person.” One of the developments that Dr. Bracilovic is enjoying is her new role as Director of the dance medicine division. PSJC is proud to be an official provider for Princeton Ballet School and Dr. Bracilovic has a particular passion for educating and helping dancers stay healthy and dancing well into the future.

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| BOOK SCENE

The SPOOKY Music of Numbers BY STUART MITCHNER

P

rinceton University Press celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2005, the same year that Peter Dougherty began his illustrious 12-year term as director and British singer songwriter Kate Bush recorded a love song about a man obsessed by “a complete infatuation with the calculation of Pi (π),” the mathematical truth that coincides with the March 14th birthday of Albert Einstein, Princeton’s most renowned citizen. Bush’s song about a man who loves loves loves his numbers lends a retrospective allure to my mathematically embattled school days, especially when she croons — sensually, caressingly, deliciously — a series of nothing but numbers that become things of beauty as she makes love to “three one four one five nine two six five three five nine” and on into infinity. And when she imagines a “great big circle” of numbers surrounding her pi-infatuated lover, she could be describing the cover of Millions, Billions, Zillions: Defending Yourself in a World of Too Many Numbers, by Princeton professor of computer science Brian W. Kernighan, whose small but numerically mighty book landed on my desk recently along with The Discrete Charm of the Machine: Why the World Became Digital by his computer science colleague at Princeton Ken Steiglitz. Both books are, of course, from Princeton University Press, as is Daniel Kennefick’s No Shadow of a Doubt, timed for the 100th anniversary of the 1919 eclipse “that confirmed Einstein’s Theory of Relativity.” Although Kennefick is a physics professor at the University of Arkansas, he qualifies as a local, his previous books, all about Einstein, having been published by Princeton. NUMBERS AND BASEBALL

For some time now these three books have been staring at me and I’ve been staring at them, wondering Why? Why send books of this caliber to a D student

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in math who barely squeaked by in junior high science? It all began to make some kind of subliminal sense when I read Louis Menand’s piece in The New Yorker about another new Princeton University Press book, Christopher Phillips’s Scouting and Scoring: How We Know What We Know About Baseball. It’s like a mundane variation on Einstein’s “spooky action at a distance” that even as I’m enmeshed in the why-me enigma of the other books, the one volume that Princeton had to be asked to send me for review is about one of the absolutes of my life. Not only is another baseball season underway, giving life another muchneeded dimension of meaning, this is the very sport that revealed the beauty of numbers to me at a time when I was struggling with simple math. Here were numbers even more alluring than comely Kate could make them, numbers you could feel the weight of, hold in your metaphorical hand, like, say, a batting average of .376, 39 home runs, 131 runs batted in, 135 runs scored, 230 hits, 46 doubles, and 18 triples, all produced in the summer of 1948 by a Polish American named Stan Musial who wore the number 6 on his back. But Toto, I’ve got a feeling we’re not in Missouri any more, for, as Menand points out, what used to be called scoring is now known as “data capture,” wherein a player’s score is computed in categories like WAR (wins above replacement), FIP (fielding independent pitching), WHIP (walks plus hits per inning pitched), wOBA (weighted on-base average), and OPS (on-base percentage plus slugging). To Menand, “quantifying a player’s production in this way allows him to be compared numerically with other available players and assigned a dollar value.” Where’s the poetry in terms like that? Where’s the edge? When Ted Williams and Stan Musial scored $100,000 contracts, it was big news, but it had nothing to do with data capture. It was value above and beyond computing, and it mattered very much to the hometown fans in Boston and St. Louis that both players spent their careers with one team. Menand sees Scouting and Scoring as “an effort to help us understand one of the oldest problems in modern societies, which is how to evaluate human


the history of scholarship” (Renaissance Quarterly). In Emergency Chronicles, Indira Gandi and Democracy’s Turning Point, Gyan Prakash “argues forcefully that this was no momentary distortion in India’s democratic record or a nightmare that came from nowhere” (India Today). Columbia professor of English and comparative literature Sharon Marcus’s The Drama of Celebrity is “a field-defining and compellingly readable book,” according to Joseph Roach, author of The Player’s Passion: Studies in the Science of Acting.

beings.” He also finds the book “appropriate to our more chastened post-recession moment, when social confidence in Big Tech is going through a rough patch.” It’s a reminder “that algorithms and machine intelligence are only extensions of the men and women who create them, and that there is no substitute for human judgments based on experience with actual people. Scorer types aren’t interested in history; Phillips tries to show us that knowing the past can help us grasp what’s at stake in the choices we make in the present.”

IF BLACK HOLES CAN SING

RATED FOR READABILITY

Reviewers of Millions, Billions, Zillions; The Discrete Charm of the Machine; and No Shadow of a Doubt give the authors high marks for readability. Kernighan’s tone “is more that of a mellow friend breaking down a concept that flummoxes you rather than an Ivy League professor expounding on the elegance of numbers” (NJ.com); Steiglitz describes in “witty and cogent language” the “nuts and bolts” of “something analog, such as waves traveling through the air that make sound” (Scientific American); and Kennefick “addresses with exquisite clarity foundational issues in physics, astronomy, technology, and the history and philosophy of science” (The Einstein Papers Project). FORGERY, INDIA, CELEBRITY

New releases from Princeton in other areas include works by two Princeton history professors. Anthony Grafton’s Forgers and Critics is “a learned, insightful, and most entertaining introduction” to “this fascinating and controversial aspect of

According to the online Kate Bush Encyclopedia, she actually sings the number pi to its 78th decimal place, then from its 101st to its 137th decimal place. Since my ears are still sometimes ringing with the dismal school-day dissonance of decimals, I don’t want to think about whether or not that makes sense, but I trust Kate’s genius for the erotic and the exact, and she is a genius, nothing less. In 2005 when Aerial, the double album containing “Pi,” came out, she told a BBC interviewer about “trying to sort of, put an emotional element into singing about...a seven...you know and you really care about that nine.” She also finds it fascinating that there are people who actually spend their lives trying to formulate pi; she loves the idea of something that will go on to infinity with people “trying to pin it down and put their mark on and make it theirs.” So it’s easy to imagine that when Kate Bush sees the first photograph of the black hole, she’ll cackle with delight, the way she does on Aerial’s symphonic second side, and go straight to the piano. And why not? According to the New York Times story that broke the news on April 11, “Black holes can sing.” That might sound like a challenge, but if anyone could meet it, Kate can. She has the range.

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A

The first known engraving of the Sandy Hook Lighthouse, 1790. (NPS)

Sandy Hook Lighthouse in 1968 with Fort Hancock buildings. (Photograph courtesy U.S. Coast Guard)

gleaming white lighthouse, capped with red, towers over a Lighthouse lore — coordinates, beam distance, classes, and characteristics of strip of land at Sandy Hook, between Sandy Hook Bay and lights — is all there for those who want to find the facts. And, for those who just the Atlantic Ocean. The lighthouse has been standing there want breathtaking views of the coast, 11 towers await your sensible shoes. since it was built in 1764. Most have been lovingly and meticulously restored by area citizen groups “Think about that,” muses Carol Winkie, president of so visitors can enjoy the panoramas that reward them after climbing narrow and the New Jersey Lighthouse Society (NJLHS). “Sandy Hook often winding staircases. But the destinations have plenty to offer even for those Lighthouse, the oldest lighthouse in the United States, who don’t climb up the steps, not the least of which is oft-overlooked history. was built before the United States was a country.” Sandy THINK MARITIME Hook is the lone survivor of the Eastern Seaboard Colonial lighthouses. Sara Cureton, head of the New Jersey Historical Commission, who was a keeper The lighthouses of New Jersey that stand today are at Absecon Lighthouse for nine years, emphasizes the state’s maritime history beacons of maritime history. It is a quirky history, and a when asked about the shore. fascinating one. The “ABCs” (Absecon, Barnegat, and Cape May) were designed “I think New Jersey is justifiably by George G. Meade, a hero of the known for the Jersey Shore, but people Battle of Gettysburg. Finn’s Point Rear do think of beaches and boardwalks as Range Lighthouse was built in Buffalo, the predominant images,” she says. “The N.Y., shipped by railroad, and pulled on part of the story that gets overlooked is wagons by mules to Supawana Meadows that New Jersey is a maritime state and National Wildlife Refuge in 1877. The the New Jersey story includes a rich Tinicum Rear Range Lighthouse sits in a maritime history.” football practice field in Paulsboro. With the state’s seaboard located And, sadly, the original 1868 Tucker’s between New York and Philadelphia, Island Lighthouse, a white tower with red there was “tremendous maritime traffic trim, went into the sea in 1927, and soon after the entire island, formerly a resort, On October 12, 1927, the lighthouse keeper’s nephew Paul Rider photographed the Tucker's Island traveling our shoreline,” Cureton notes. Lighthouse toppling into the water. (Photos courtesy of Kraig Anderson, lighthousefriends.com) “Because of shipwrecks and the need to was wiped out. A replica stands today. safely navigate, lighthouses were built.” LIGHTHOUSE LORE Sandy Hook was built to address the dangers of coastal ocean travel, but lighthouse service was not standardized until the mid-19th century with the “Steadfast, serene, immovable…” is how the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow building of Absecon, Barnegat, and Cape May lighthouses, which happen to be described the lighthouse in 1849. And 170 years after he wrote “The Lighthouse,” the three tallest in the state. we can not only still see many of the imposing lighthouses that dot the New Many lighthouses are still equipped with a Fresnel lens — a multi-part lens Jersey shoreline, but we can climb those which are open to the public. (There are invented by physicist Augustin-Jean Fresnel of France — which consists of about 15 lost lighthouses, and other towers and lightships standing, but not open a beehive arrangement of glass prisms, allowing light to be seen over greater to the public.) distances. MAY 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Barnegat Lighthouse at sunset. Barnegat Lighthouse is a historic landmark located on the northern tip of Long Beach Island. (shutterstock.com)

title of person who took care of the lighthouse; and who or what organization maintains the light. Each lighthouse is unique and all have a “personal” history. For example, Gugliemo Marconi demonstrated the wireless telegraph from Navesink Twin Towers in 1899. Navesink was one of the first electrically-lit seacoast lighthouses in the country. THE ROMANCE OF LIGHTHOUSES Adds Cureton, “What is fun is comparing different lighthouses. They are all different on purpose. Every lighthouse has its own colors and flash patterns so Jean Muchanic, keeper of the Absecon ships can tell them apart. Lighthouse near Atlantic City, credits a “I think for folks starting out visiting, the fellow lighthouse fan in explaining the fun thing would be to pick two different ones romance of lighthouses. “Other continents, — get a sense of the range of geography, the more ancient than the United States, have style.” castles and structures that last through Consider, she says, the geography, time,” she says. “Lighthouses are akin whether they are on the ocean, or inlets. to these. They are recognized as having There was a need for mariners to differentiate tremendous value to our history.” during the day and night. They daymark Muchanic also explained why some was physical appearance — pattern colors, lighthouses have different ways of stripes. And at night, the pattern of light reporting height. Some measure height by itself, whether it was a flash, pattern, or fixed bricks and mortar. Others measure by focal light. plane, which is where the light shines out Some, like those at Hereford Inlet, East to sea. A lighthouse built on a cliff would Point, and Sea Girt, have small houses have a taller focal plane whereas Absecon’s integrated into the buildings. tower, for example, is right on the ground. Others, like Sandy Hook, are pyramidal It is the tallest in New Jersey and the with an octagonal base. Barnegat’s tall tower country’s third tallest masonry lighthouse Barnegat Lighthouse in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Illustration originally published in Hesse-Wartegg's is a conical shape. Nord Amerika, Swedish edition published in 1880. (Public domain illstration) in terms of bricks and mortar. Rear range means that ship captains must line up the light from the rear range with the lights of the front range lights BEST WAY TO VISIT in order to be able to turn the ship to keep it in the channel, such as at Finn’s Point and Tinicum. What is the best way to visit lighthouses? Winkie would like visitors to be able to observe aspects like type of lighthouse (tall tower, skeletal, or built within a house); when the light was first lit; the number of steps; the height; the colors;

The NJLHS, one of the largest regional lighthouse societies in the U.S., has assisted on many lighthouse preservations, and on cleaning Fresnel lenses so they can be used or displayed on lighthouse sites, or in museums. The lighthouse society has helped in making renovations possible, including a railing at Finn’s Point, and help in obtaining grants.

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Abescon Lighthouse. (Photo by Donna Connor)

Cape May Lighthouse. (shutterstock.com)

LIGHTHOUSE DAY AUGUST 7 To better get to know each lighthouse, Winkie recommends participating in a special day this summer. She pointed out that the Ninth Act of the First Congress of the U.S. on August 7, 1789 created the Lighthouse Service under Alexander Hamilton’s Treasury Department. In 1989, the 200th anniversary of the Lighthouse Act, National Lighthouse Day was inaugurated. NJLHS celebrates by encouraging all lighthouses to be open August 7 for a free climb or reduced rate, with some exceptions. Some lighthouses will observe National Lighthouse Day the first Sunday of August. Please check the NJLHS website to see when each lighthouse celebrates. Youthful climbers will get a junior keeper certificate. This precedes the annual fall Lighthouse Challenge, which attracts more than 1,500 hearty climbers, this year on October 19 and 20, 2019. The NJLHS has an extensive website at www.njlhs.org with a membership form, which Winkie encourages enthusiasts to complete. She says, “We want to attract a new generation of lighthouse fans.”

NEW JERSEY’S OPEN LIGHTHOUSES Absecon Lighthouse 31 South Rhode Island Avenue, Atlantic City 609.449.1360 www.abseconlighthouse.org Want an awesome view of Atlantic City? Absecon Lighthouse, New Jersey’s tallest lighthouse, is also the third tallest masonry lighthouse in the U.S. at 171 feet tall. Completed in 1857, it is the only lighthouse in the state with its original first-order Fresnel lens still in place at the top. Although Absecon was decommissioned in 1933, it is lit every evening, thanks to a restoration by the Inlet Public Private Association (IPPA). Other activities include a museum, keeper’s house replica, children’s programs, and theme parties. A bonus: keeper Jean Muchanic officiates at weddings on site. Climbing fee. Steps: 228. Hours: September to June – open Thursdays through Mondays, 11am to 4pm. July and August – open daily 10am to 5pm; Thursdays until 8pm. (Last tower climb is ½ hour before closing.)

Barnegat Lighthouse 208 Broadway, Barnegat Light 609.494.2016 www.state.nj.us/dep/parksandforests/parks/barnlig.html “Old Barney” offers majestic views of Long Beach Island. The site of the lighthouse on the northern part of the island was an important change of course point for coastal vessels, which depended on the lighthouse to avoid shoals. It was re-lit on January 1, 2009, 150 years to the day it was originally lit in 1859. The original lens is on display at the nearby Barnegat Light Historical Society and Museum. Without climbing, visitors can see views from the top through four cameras that transmit live images to screens in the Interpretive Center. Located in Island Beach State Park. Climbing fee. Steps: 217. Hours: Memorial Day to Labor Day, open daily 10am to 4:30pm. (Off season, weekends only, 9am to 3:30pm.) Cape May Lighthouse 215 Lighthouse Avenue (Rt. 626) Cape May Point 609.884.5404 www.capemaymac.org The third time was the charm…. In 1821, Congress appropriated money for the construction of a lighthouse at Cape May Point, and that lighthouse was completed in October, 1823. After some 25 years, beach erosion put the tower in water at high tide. A second lighthouse was built more inland, on a high bluff, with a light showing 14 feet higher than the first one. Yet this lighthouse was eventually razed and the present one was built in 1859, further inshore, equipped with a first-order Fresnel lens, lit by kerosene wick lamps. In 1938, a 250-watt electric bulb cast a beam for 19 miles. The light is now visible 24 miles to sea. The Fresnel lens is at the Cape May County Historical and Genealogical Museum in Cape May Court House. Nautical-themed story times are held from Memorial Day to Labor Day and Family Fun days are Wednesdays in July and August. Look for full moon lighthouse climbs. Located at Cape May Point State Park. Parking: free. Admission fee. Steps: 199, open grid. Hours: Call

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East Point Lighthouse. (shutterstock.com)

Sea Girt Lighthouse. (shutterstock.com)

Hereford Inlet Lighthouse. (shutterstock.com)

to confirm — through mid-June, daily 10am to 4pm; mid-June to mid-August, daily 9am to 5pm ; September, 10am to 5pm; reduced hours fall and winter. East Point Lighthouse 10 Lighthouse and East Point Roads, Heislerville 856.785.0349 www.eastpointlight.com Known for many years as the Maurice River Lighthouse, it is the second oldest lighthouse in New Jersey, built in 1849. The lighthouse was blackened out during WWII, and it was decommissioned in December, 1941. With no keepers, it quickly deteriorated and in February, 1971, the Maurice River Historical Society was founded with the goal of restoring the lighthouse. A fire that year damaged the lantern room, roof, and most of the interior, but over the years restoration work has been completed, including an accessible ramp to the first floor. To tour the lighthouse museum, check the schedule for times and dates. Admission fee, but free for 12 and under. Steps in tower: 17. Hours: July through September, every weekend from 1-4pm. Finn’s Point Rear Range Lighthouse Fort Mott and Lighthouse Roads, Pennsville 856.935.1487 www.friendsofsupawnarefuge.org This 115-foot tall iron tower with a skeleton support structure was built in 1877 near a turn in the Delaware River, and was automated in 1939. It was discontinued in 1951, due to a change in the shipping channel. The keeper’s house was demolished in 1977, but in 1981 local citizens formed a “Save the Lighthouse” committee to refurbish the tower. It is part of the Supawna Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. Admission: free. Steps: 130. Hours: Third Sunday beginning May 19 through Oct. 19-20, 1am to 4pm.

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Tucker’s Island, replica. (Wikipedia)

Hereford Inlet Lighthouse 111 North Central Avenue, North Wildwood 609.600.1561 www.herefordinletlighthouse.com While the Wildwoods are known for beaches and boardwalks, Hereford Inlet Lighthouse is surrounded by English country gardens that showcase more than 200 plant varieties. The lighthouse, built in 1874 to stem frequent shipwrecks, is the only lighthouse on the East Coast built in Swiss Gothic style. As a result of a storm-damaged foundation in 1913, it was moved inland. In May 1938, there was a fire in the lighthouse that caused extensive damage. Used until 1964, it was discontinued and superseded by a nearby iron tower. But in 1986, the light was relit and is maintained by the Coast Guard as a navigational aide. The original Fresnel lens is on display. Look for full moon night climbs. Admission: free. Steps: 56. Hours: May 10 to October 20, daily 9am to 5pm; October 21 to December 8, Friday to Sunday 10am to 2pm. Sandy Hook Lighthouse 85 Mercer Road, Highlands Sandy Hook Visitor Center: 732.872.5970 www.nps.gov/gate With its whale oil lamps lit on June 11, 1764, Sandy Hook was the fifth lighthouse to be built in the U.S. and today it is the country’s oldest operating lighthouse. New York colony merchants raised the money by lottery for its construction because of loss of property due to shipwrecks on the shallow sandbars around the hook. The 103-foot octagonal stone tower survived an attack during the Revolutionary War. The Sandy Hook lighthouse was the first lighthouse in the country to be lit by electric incandescent lamps in 1889. Since spring 2000, it has been administered by the National Park Service. Surrounded by Fort Hancock and part of Gateway National Recreation Area, visitors can enjoy fishing, hiking, birding, and a holly forest. Kids must be at least 48 inches tall to climb the tower. Steps: 95, and a nine-rung ladder to the top. Lighthouse admission: free. Hours: Lighthouse tours through October 31, 1-4:30pm; until 3:30pm thereafter.


Twin Lights (Navesink). (shutterstock.com)

Sea Girt Lighthouse 9 Ocean Avenue, Sea Girt 732.974.0514 www.seagirtlighthouse.com

Tucker’s Island (Replica) 120 West Main Street (Route 9), Tuckerton 609.296.8868 www.tuckertonseaport.org

Sea Girt Lighthouse was lit in 1896 to bridge the gap between the Barnegat and Navesink lighthouses after numerous shipwrecks. The last live-in lighthouse built on the Atlantic Coast, it was in disrepair until it was restored by a citizens’ committee. Today the lighthouse is open for tours, including the keeper’s office and living quarters. It was used until 1955, when the shipping lanes changed to a more easterly direction. Visitors can see historical photos and artifacts from Morro’s Castle, the cruise ship that burned offshore in 1934, when the lighthouse served as a first aid station. Admission: free. Steps: 42. Hours: Sundays 2–4PM, April through November 18, except holiday weekends.

Tuckerton Seaport & Baymen’s Museum illustrates the coastal culture of Ocean County, N.J. The Seaport is a recreated maritime village and nature trail, including museum exhibits, a lighthouse, visitor center, and coffee shop. The lighthouse is a reproduction of an 1868, 42-step lighthouse that fell into the ocean in October 1927. Admission fee. Hours: Daily 10AM to 4PM. (Last museum admission 2:30PM.)

Tinicum Rear Range Lighthouse 70 2nd Street and Mantua Avenue, Paulsboro www.tinicumrearrangelighthouse.org This still-active 1880 lighthouse, which sits in the middle of an athletic field, is equipped with a fixed red light of 1,000watt lamps (500,000 candlepower), and is 112 feet above sea level. The Tinicum Rear Range Light Society maintains the structure, which is on the foundation of the old front range light. Admission: free. Steps: 112. Hours: The third Sunday of the month through October, noon to 4PM, and October 19-20 for the Lighthouse Challenge.

Twin Lights (Navesink) Lighthouse Road, Highlands 732.872.1814 www.twinlightslighthouse.com

The unique dual tower design of the Twin Lights (Navesink Lightstation) offers views of the Atlantic Ocean from the north tower. The first twin lights, in 1828, were two identical but unconnected towers. In 1841, the towers became the first lighthouse in the U.S. equipped with the Fresnel lens. Twin Lights was the first to be fueled by mineral oil (kerosene) in 1883, and the first electrically powered lighthouse in 1898, when a huge bivalve lens was installed in the south tower, illuminated by an electric arc lamp. At that time, the south tower became the most powerful lighthouse in the country, producing a light that could be seen 22 miles at sea, though there were reports of greater Tinicum Rear Range Lighthouse. (Wikipedia) distances. By 1862 however, the lighthouses were in such a state of disrepair that the current structure replaced them, until it was decommissioned by the Coast Guard in 1949. The bivalve lens is at the Boston Museum of Science. The Fresnel lens was returned. The on-site museum exhibits lighthouse and lifesaving station artifacts. Admission: free. Steps: 65. Hours: Tuesday through Sunday 10AM to noon, and 1– 4PM.

MAY 2019 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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SUMMER PREVIEW

The Red The Red MillMill The Red Mill Museum Village Museum Village Museum Village Vote for your favorites at the Jersey Shore!

Fun Family Events! Fun Family Events! FunFamily FamilyEvents! Events! Fun

Who has the best lobster bisque? What’s the best oceanfront hotel? What is the best beach for a day trip?

www.theredmill.org for full schedule VisitVisit www.theredmill.org for full schedule

56 Main Street, Clinton, Jersey for (908)735-4101 56 Main Street, Clinton, NewNew Jersey (908)735-4101 visit www.theredmill.org full schedule Visit www.theredmill.org for full schedule 56 Main Street, Clinton, 56 Main Street, Clinton, New JerseyNew Jersey (908)735-4101 (908) 735-4101

Princeton Magazine wants to hear from YOU! Voting is now open at www.princetonmagazine.com Results will be featured in our Summer 2019 edition, in homes early July

Lady and the shallot is turning

U-PICK Y

D TH E An

S

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Flatbreads, Tacos, Salads, Paninis, Teas and Catering

D

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www.snyders-farm.com for picking schedules A

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| www.snyders-farm.com PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019

for picking, Roadside Stand hours & events.

Our 17th Season Every Saturday, 9am - 1 pm June 1 -October 26 Village Shopper 1340 206 South, Skillman www.montgomeryfriends.org

Plant Based Comfort Foods

The Trenton Farmer’s Market www.snyders-farm.com 960 Spruce Street • Lawrence Township, New Jersey www.snyders-farm.com www.ladyandtheshallot.com for schedules forpicking picking schedules The Trenton Farmers Market

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MONTGOMERY FRIENDS FARMERS’ MARKET

TO

New Look!

Look! w e N e our e s e m Co TO

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THE RESIDENCES AT RABBIT RUN CREEK

EVEN THE BEST CAN GET BETTER. The fourth phase is now available for contract.

3,600–5,500 SF residences with full basements and elevators

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Misha Wallcoverings Cranes set of 2 wallpaper panels; $4,196; luisaviaroma.com

Nada Debs Summerland Paravan screen; price upon request; nadadebs.com

Osanna Visconti melted bronze candle; price upon request; osannavisconti.it

Osanna Visconti bamboo chandelier; price upon request; osannavisconti.it

Zyne raffia woven mules; $645; luisaviaroma.com

Serpu straw clutch; $259; farfetch.com

George Nakashima Conoid bench; price upon request; nakashimawoodworkers.com

Hamilton Jewelers Chanel boyfriend tweed H4881 watch; price upon request; hamiltonjewelers.com

Aviva Stanoff sea fan on ombre kohl pillow; $290; avivastanoff.com

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019

PRODUCT SELECTION BY LYNN ADAMS SMITH

A WELL-DESIGNED LIFE


Luxury Lives Here

One-of-a-kind townhomes and condominiums in the heart of downtown Princeton – distinctive residences featuring grand master bedrooms, contemporary kitchens, and spa-style baths. Own or rent to live in the center of it all.

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Pewter seashell salt dish with spoon; $56; abchome.com

Sotow Luigina Mountain Chair; $651; 1stdibs.com

Currey and Company Regatta pendant; price upon request; gasiorsfurniture.com

18th c. French Rocaille clamshell; $325; restorationhardware.com

Ray-Ban club round acetate and gold tone sunglasses; $190; net-a-porter.com

Lavorazioni Artistiche Vetro sea horse Murano wine glass; $560; artemest.com

Lane Ventures Hemingway chair; price upon request; boyles.com

Dolce & Gabbana platform sandals; $995; us.dolcegabbana.com

Marni Bindle bucket suede bag; $650; luisaviaroma.com

NB Milano Kryptos bookcase; price upon request; nbmilano.com

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE MAY 2019

PRODUCT SELECTION BY LYNN ADAMS SMITH

A WELL-DESIGNED LIFE


FURNITURE MATTRESSES FLOORING

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ndd 1

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RogersAppliances.com 8/25/17 1:44:00 PM


Design with Purpose Full-Service Interior Design Specializing in • Furniture retailer of over 200 brands • Custom Cabinetry • Lighting Retailer

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WE HAVE THE AREA’S LARGEST INVENTORY OF GRANITE. OUR EXPERIENCED STAFF AND CRAFTSMEN HAVE BEEN HELPING LOCAL RESIDENTS AND CONTRACTORS WITH CUSTOM GRANITE AND MARBLE COUNTERTOPS FOR OVER 30 YEARS.

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Princeton Magazine May 2019  

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Princeton Magazine May 2019  

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