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FEBRUARY 2020

Springdale Golf Club Celebrates 125 Years


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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


CONTENTS

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34

22

FEBRUARY 2020

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66

12 62 T.S. ELIOT’S LETTERS TO EMILY HALE

INTERIOR DESIGNERS AT HOME BY ANNE LEVIN

They live in their living rooms

BY DONALD GILPIN

Over 1,000 romantic letters unsealed at Princeton University after 60 years

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12

FASHION & DESIGN

WEDDING WONDERS

58, 60

A Well-Designed Life

BY LAURIE PELLICHERO PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY E. TRYON

“IF THESE STONES COULD TALK”

Area florists create bouquets and boutonnieres celebrating love and springtime 22

SPRINGDALE GOLF CLUB — ON PAR FOR 125 YEARS BY ILENE DUBE

Under Troon management, the historic club is teeing off to a greener future

BY WENDY GREENBERG

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A book, a museum, and newly-discovered African American history in the Sourland region 62

BOOK SCENE BY STUART MITCHNER

The Book Scene Oscars: An arts and sciences ceremony

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ON THE COVER: A vintage Springdale Golf Club postcard featuring Cleveland Tower. (Courtesy of Springdale Golf Club)

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: PHOTO COURTESY OF SPRINGDALE GOLF CLUB; A.J. MARGULIS PHOTO BY JEFFREY E. TRYON; CAPTIVATING TECHNOLOGY (DUKE UNIVERSITY PRESS); BOUTONNIERE; MONDAY MORNING FLOWER AND BALLOON CO., PHOTO BY JEFFREY E. TRYON; STOUTSBURG SOURLAND AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM PHOTO BY CATHERINE HOGAN; EMILY HALE AND T.S. ELIOT IN DORSET, VERMONT, DURING THE SUMMER OF 1946. (PHOTO COURTESY OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY LIBRARY); BOUQUET, MONDAY MORNING FLOWER AND BALLOON CO., PHOTO BY JEFFREY E. TRYON; PATINA VIE PARIS REIGN GOBLET, SHOPPATINAVIE.COM.

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| FROM THE EDITOR Welcome to the February issue of Princeton Magazine. Our retro cover of Springdale Golf Club was taken from a vintage postcard and features a view of Cleveland Tower in the distance. Springdale is celebrating its 125th anniversary, but you don’t have to be a golf enthusiast to enjoy Ilene Dube’s article. History buffs will be interested in learning that George Washington’s encampment before the Battle of Princeton was located near the current fifth tee. The original 240-acre parcel of land was once Stockton Farm, and the first clubhouse was originally a tenant-farmer house. Today, many people consider the golf course to be a wildlife sanctuary with fox, deer, hawks, and migrating birds contributing to the natural beauty of the landscape. One of the most scenic views in Princeton is from the Cleveland Tower overlooking the course. The tower is set at the highest point between Alexander Street and the Institute for Advanced Study neighborhood, and has been a popular sledding spot for multiple generations of Princeton residents. The Cleveland Tower is a memorial to President Grover Cleveland, who, after his retirement from public office, lived in Princeton at 15 Hodge Road and served as a University trustee. The tower is home to a massive carillon organ containing 67 bells, with the largest one weighing 12,880 pounds. The summer carillon concert series is a delightful little-known secret where the audience brings blankets, lawn chairs, and picnics on the lawns around the tower. To learn more about the carillon and to watch a fascinating video of how it’s played, visit www.gradschool.princeton.edu/about/carillon. February marks the start of wedding planning season, and we invited local florists to design wedding bouquets and matching boutonnieres. The photos taken by Jeffrey E. Tryon are paired with romantic poems selected by Laurie Pellichero, and the result will have you dreaming about spring romance. One of the participating florists is Vaseful Flowers, part of the Community Options Enterprise that provides employment for people with disabilities. Their shop is located at the site of our former office on Witherspoon Street. Our publisher, Bob Hillier, has purchased flowers at Vaseful and gives the shop and the arrangements positive reviews. Some of our readers may not be aware that Bob inherited his love of flowers from his mother, Florence, who was an award-winning flower arranger and the founder of The Flower Basket on Nassau Street in 1948. She was also the owner of two other Princeton flower shops that she purchased in later years. Further on the subject of love, over a thousand of T.S. Eliot’s romantic letters to Emily Hale have been unsealed, after sitting in the basement of Firestone Library for 60 years. Eliot and Hale’s romance began in Cambridge, Massachusetts, when they both performed in Jane Austen’s play Emma while he was a graduate student at Harvard and she was a teacher at Simmons College. You have to read Donald Gilpin’s article to discover if this love story had a happy ending. If you have grown weary from the gray skies of February, consider brightening up your home with some redecorating. We had such a great response to our series of portraits of architects in their homes that we decided to repeat the concept with local interior designers. Anne Levin’s profiles of talented designers reveals their perspectives on creating beautiful, functional spaces using natural light, color, art, and personal touches. February is Black History Month and we are proud to share with you “If These Stones Could Talk,” an informative and heartfelt story about African American history in the Sourland Mountain region. Wendy Greenberg interviewed local residents Elaine Buck and Beverly Mills

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020

Photography by Charles R. Plohn

Dear Readers,

about their extensive research conducted over a decade, and how they uncovered new found history about slavery in central New Jersey. Since writing their book, their ongoing efforts have involved collaboration with the Stoutsburg Cemetery Association and the Sourland Conservancy. This has led to the opening of the Stoutsburg Sourland African American Museum in a one-room church built in 1899. To learn more about the history, culture, experiences, and contributions of African Americans in our region, visit www.ssaamuseum.org. Bob Hillier and I hope you enjoy this issue of Princeton Magazine and look forward to the promise of spring in Princeton, and all that it has to offer. Respectfully yours, , Lynn Adams Smith Editor-In-Chief


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T.S. ELIOT’S LETTERS TO EMILY HALE Over 1,000 Romantic Letters Unsealed at Princeton University After 60 Years

PHOTO COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

BY DONALD GILPIN


An envelope addressed to Emily Hale at 41 Brimmer Street in Boston, Massachusetts, and handwritten by T.S. Eliot. (Photo by Ashley Gamarello, courtesy of Princeton University Library)

he unsealing after more than 60 years of a collection of 1,131 letters written by Nobel laureate T.S. Eliot to Emily Hale, his secret platonic love, caused “the special collections equivalent of a stampede at a rock concert” on the morning of January 2 in the basement of Princeton University’s Firestone Library, according to Daniel Linke, interim head of the Library’s special collections, as told to the Associated Press. Released at the same time as a 1960 “disclaimer” statement from Eliot, which had been held in Harvard University’s Houghton Library, those letters, one of the most noteworthy sealed archives in the world, will provide rich fodder for English professors and biographers for many years to come. Eliot aficionados have long debated the true nature of Eliot’s relationship with Hale and her influence on his poetry. Psychotherapists will also be drawn to this intricately detailed, complex, unflattering depiction of a man who perhaps most closely resembles the persona of his first published poem, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” (1915). “Prufrock” is a very odd love song, an interior monologue full of doubt and indecision, anguish, regret, weariness, and longing, but no more odd and frustrating than Eliot’s relationship with Hale as depicted in his letters written from 1930 to 1957. If you thought his poetry was difficult to understand, the complexity and confusion of his love life as revealed in these letters and his 1960 statement disclaiming his relationship with Hale will not surprise you. Like his character Prufrock, the Eliot who emerges from the letters to Hale and the subsequent statement, apparently intending to set the record straight, is full of contradictions and uncertainty. He burned Hale’s numerous letters to him when he found out that she had turned over his letters to Princeton University, to remain sealed until 50 years after they were both dead. He died in 1965. She died in 1969. UNWILLING AUTOBIOGRAPHER

The American-born British poet, one of the most highly acclaimed writers of the 20th century, was also one of the most private and reserved of authors. He

Emily Hale and T.S. Eliot in Dorset, Vermont, during the summer of 1946. (Photo courtesy of Princeton University Library)

wrote in his famous essay “The Tradition and the Individual Talent” (1919): “Poetry is not the expression of personality, but an escape from personality.” Eliot may have escaped from his personality in his poetry, but his letters to Hale constitute a vivid, in-depth picture of that personality. In his statement, written, deposited in the Eliot Collection at Harvard University in 1960, and released also on January 2 when the letters to Hale in the Princeton Library were released, Eliot rejects the idea of ever writing an autobiography. The thousands of pages of letters to Emily Hale, however, create a sort of epistolary biography that sheds significant new light on his poetry as well as his life. The destruction of Hale’s letters to Eliot creates gaps in the story, but Hale’s voice is far from silent. Through Eliot’s constant direct references to her previous letters and actions, the reader of those letters easily infers Hale’s dominant influence, and her voice resonates powerfully through Eliot’s prose. She must have realized when she delivered those letters to Princeton in 1957 that she was ensuring her own immortality as well as Eliot’s. Eliot writes, somewhat cryptically, in his 1960 statement, “It seemed to me that her disposing of the letters in that way at that time threw some light upon the kind of interest which she took, or had come to take, in these letters.” Possibly he thinks she was is looking to embarrass him, seeking revenge for not marrying her. Perhaps he is worried that Valerie Fletcher, the woman he married three years before, would somehow learn about those letters. He notes in his statement about Hale that he was “disagreeably surprised when she informed me that she was handing the letters over to Princeton University during our lifetime.” Eliot’s statement of about 2,000 words contributes significantly to this “autobiography” of the letters at the same time that it presents a counternarrative that seems to contradict the love story told by the letters. Is this Eliot trying to suppress the intensely romantic content of the letters that he wished he had not written? Or is Eliot not wanting to appear vulnerable or guilty, embarrassed by his words and actions, trying to take control of the relationship with Emily Hale and depict it as he wished it had been? Is he trying to protect the feelings of his new wife? Is this a mid-20th century version of “mansplaining”? “It is painful for me to have to write the following lines,” Eliot says as FEBRUARY 2020 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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The collection of T.S. Eliot letters to Emily Hale made up 14 boxes of material. (Photo by Shelley Szwast, courtesy of Princeton University Library)

The crate pictured housed the collection for over 60 years and held a Post-it note that read, “Eliot/Hale, sealed until 2020.” (Photo by Shelley Szwast, Princeton University Library)

T. S. Eliot in 1923, by Lady Ottoline Morrell. (Wikipedia)

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020

The T.S. Eliot letters to Emily Hale, unboxed. (Photo by Shelley Szwast, courtesy of Princeton University Library)


he begins his statement. “I cannot conceive of writing my autobiography.” Echoing Prufrock’s “It is impossible to say just what I mean! But as if a magic lantern threw the words in patterns on a screen,” Eliot continues, “In my experience, there is much for which one cannot find words even in the confessional.” LOVE STORY

her was his love poem to her. “Footfalls echo in the memory/Down the passage which we did not take/Towards the door we never opened/Into the rose garden,” Eliot wrote in “Burnt Norton” (1935). Hale was certainly also the inspiration earlier for Eliot’s much discussed “hyacinth girl,” who appears in “The Wasteland” (1922). He wrote in the first section of the long poem: “You gave me hyacinths first a year ago;/They called me the hyacinth girl.”/—Yet when we came back, late, from the Hyacinth garden,/ Your arms full, and your hair wet, I could not/Speak, and my eyes failed, I was neither/Living nor dead, and I knew nothing,/Looking into the heart of light, the silence. Hale wrote that she had developed feelings for him by the 1930s, Dickey notes, but “they kept their relationship on as ‘honorable’ a basis ‘as we could.’” Eliot, in his 1960 statement, confirms, “I never at any time had any sexual relations with Emily Hale.” In 1927 Eliot became an English citizen and joined the Anglican Church. Despite their separation, he would not divorce Haigh-Wood.

The story of Eliot and Hale began in 1912. He was a 24-year-old graduate student in philosophy at Harvard. She was a 21-year-old speech and drama teacher at Simmons College. They met at a social gathering in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where they performed in a dramatization of Jane Austen’s Emma. Soon afterwards, he confessed his love to her, according to University of Missouri English Professor Frances Dickey, who was in the line of readers at the Princeton University Library Special Collections on January 2 before the doors opened at 9 a.m. Reporting in a blog for the T.S. Eliot Society, as she read through the first ELIOT’S “MANSPLAINING” of the 14 boxes, Dickey began with Emily Hale’s narratives of her relationship with Eliot that accompanied the 1,131 letters. In response to Eliot’s declaration Hale’s narrative goes on to describe two shocks to their relationship. When of love, Hale “found herself surprised by his confession and did not feel the same Haigh-Wood died in 1947, Eliot decided not to marry Hale, “a decision she about him,” Dickey reported. accepted but could not understand and found very painful,” Dickey writes. Hale Eliot moved to England, where he stayed reportedly suffered a nervous breakdown, during World War I. In 1915, he met and three and spent time recuperating in Massachusetts months later married Vivienne Haigh-Wood. General Hospital. They did continue to keep Their marriage rapidly soured, but Eliot did in touch, and he saw her when he came to the not see Hale again for 15 years. Haigh-Wood United States, but in 1957 Hale delivered the and Eliot eventually separated, and she died in letters to Princeton University, probably aware 1947 after spending the last seven years of her of Eliot’s relationship with Valerie Fletcher life in a mental institution. but unaware that Fletcher would become his In his 1960 statement, Eliot finds himself second wife later that year. Hale never saw unable to explain why he so suddenly married him again after that marriage. Haigh-Wood, but claims, most pointedly, that Eliot’s 1960 statement goes further in its “it saved me from marrying Emily Hale” (also attempts to explain — or re-explain — or that it brought him to the state of mind out of rationalize what happened. The explanation which he wrote “The Waste Land” (1922), is a fascinating picture of a man in mental perhaps his most famous poem). “Emily Hale anguish as he struggles to justify the most would have killed the poet in me; Vivienne important decisions of his life. In reading his statement without the context of the nearly was the death of me, but she kept the “autobiography” of letters written over a 25poet alive,” he writes. “In retrospect the year period, it is possible to sympathize with nightmare agony of my seventeen years with the “divided,” tormented Eliot — up to a point. Vivienne seems to me preferable to the dull That point comes where his prose becomes misery of the mediocre teacher of philosophy An envelope in a bundle tied with ribbon addressed to Emily Hale at her address in angry, controlling, and egotistical. which would have been the alternative.” Massachusetts. (Photo by Shelley Szwast, courtesy of Princeton University Library) “Upon the death of Vivienne in the winter On Hale’s visit to her aunt and uncle in of 1947, I suddenly realized that I was not in love with Emily Hale,” he writes. England in 1922, she and Eliot renewed their acquaintance. Eliot’s love for her “Gradually I came to see that I had been in love only with a memory, with the remained unabated, and their correspondence began in earnest in 1930, with the memory of the experience of having been in love with her in my youth. From first letter in the collection dated October 3, 1930. She became his confidante 1947 on, I realized more and more how little Emily Hale and I had in common. I and his muse. When Eliot came to the United States to teach at Harvard for a had already observed that she was not a lover of poetry, certainly that she was not year in 1932-33, Haigh-Wood did not accompany him. He visited Hale at Scripps much interested in my poetry; I had already been worried by what seemed to me College in California, where she was teaching. evidence of insensitiveness and bad taste.” He goes on to note how their religious The letter writing continued, at least weekly. Eliot’s letters that I saw views also differed. from 1931, in box 2 of the 14 boxes, almost all between one and two typed He continues, claiming to have deceived himself in regard to Hale as long pages, single-spaced, surely reveal a man deeply in love with a woman who as his first wife was alive, “I came to see that my love for Emily was the love of is unattainable. In a letter dated August 14, 1931, he refers to “one more stage a ghost for a ghost, and that the letters I had been writing to her were the letters in mutual understanding, and that is the most exciting adventure of my life: to of a hallucinated man, a man vainly trying to pretend to himself that he was explore and to get to know you as I never have and never shall know anyone the same man that he had been in 1914.” He concludes with the comment that else.” marrying Emily Hale would have been an even greater mistake than it was to And on August 18 he writes, “And there are times when I desire you so much marry Vivienne Haigh-Wood. that neither religion, nor work, nor distraction, and certainly not dissipation, At the end of her first day of reading through the first of the 14 boxes of could relieve it. It is like a pain that no sedative will deaden, or an operation letters, Dickey titles her January 2 late evening blog entry “Box 1: A Confession without an aesthetic — nothing to do but sit still and wait. At other times I feel of Love.” Urging readers to see for themselves, she writes, “There may be many glorified and transfigured through you.” further revelations in the letters to come, but it is hard to imagine any clearer Eliot and Hale saw each other each summer from 1934 on, during Hale’s acknowledgement of Hale’s importance to him as a man and a poet. These letters visits to England, usually meeting at the house of Hale’s relatives in Chipping tell a very different story from the belittling counter-narrative Eliot wrote in 1960, Camden, Hale writes. On one occasion, they walked to the abandoned estate and in my view, a better one. You might have to see it to believe it.” Burnt Norton, a visit that inspired Eliot’s famous poem, which Hale says he told FEBRUARY 2020 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020

With wedding season approaching, Princeton Magazine invited area florists Dahlia Florals, Monday Morning, Princeton Floral Design, Vaseful Flowers, Viburnum Designs, and Wildflowers of Princeton Junction to create bouquets and boutonnieres celebrating love and springtime. Their amazing floral designs are displayed here, alongside timeless romantic poems.


A W h i t e Ro s e The red rose whispers of passion, And the white rose breathes of love; O, the red rose is a falcon, And the white rose is a dove.

Wildflowers of Princeton Junction 315 Cranbury Road, Princeton Junction 609.275.6060; wildflowerspj.com Wildflowers of Princeton Junction is a full-service florist offering the finest quality and freshest flowers at very competitive prices. Their unique designs incorporate unusual color combinations, lots of texture, and a good sense of balance with attention to the principles of floral design. They will work with you to integrate your own ideas and distinct style to create an atmosphere of elegance that captures the essence of your special day.

But I send you a cream-white rosebud With a flush on its petal tips; For the love that is purest and sweetest Has a kiss of desire on the lips. —John Boyle O’Reilly

FEBRUARY 2020 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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To Be One With Each Other What greater thing is there for two human souls than to feel that they are joined together to strengthen each other in all labor, to minister to each other in all sorrow, to share with each other in all gladness, to be one with each other in the silent unspoken memories? — George Eliot

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020

Princeton Floral Design 28 Palmer Square East, Princeton 609.688.8989; princetonfloraldesign.com At Princeton Floral Design, each arrangement is a combination of their love for flowers and passion for design. They like creating something that makes a bold statement by using shape, color, and simplicity, but at the same time produces a dramatic effect. Each bouquet is designed by hand and with heart.


S h e Wa l k s i n B e a u t y She walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that’s best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes; Thus mellowed to that tender light Which heaven to gaudy day denies. One shade the more, one ray the less, Had half impaired the nameless grace Which waves in every raven tress, Or softly lightens o’er her face; Where thoughts serenely sweet express, How pure, how dear their dwelling-place. And on that cheek, and o’er that brow, So soft, so calm, yet eloquent, The smiles that win, the tints that glow, But tell of days in goodness spent, A mind at peace with all below, A heart whose love is innocent! —Lord Byron

Monday Morning Flower and Balloon Co. 111 Main Street, Princeton; 609.520.2005 sendingsmiles.com Located in the Princeton Forrestal Village, Monday Morning Flower and Balloon Co. has been serving the Princeton community since 1988. This full-service flower shop specializes in weddings and corporate and special event decor. They also offer a large selection of gift items such as plants, gift and food baskets, balloon bouquets, and bath products. Delivery is available seven days a week.

FEBRUARY 2020 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Sonnet 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer’s lease hath all too short a date; Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm’d; And every fair from fair sometime declines,

Viburnum Designs 202 Nassau Street, Princeton 609.683.8800; viburnumdesigns.com From design conception to the final finishing touches, Viburnum Designs is cutting-edge event chic. A full-service event design company with European influences, they provide clients with flawless flowers, the latest linens, beautiful tableware, and a variety of dramatic décor. More than a florist, Viburnum Designs creates tailored events that go above and beyond centerpieces. On the big day, every detail will be executed to perfection, bringing your event to life.

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020

By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d; But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st; Nor shall death brag thou wander’st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. —William Shakespeare


S a l v at i o n There is no salvation for the soul But to fall in Love. It has to creep and crawl Among the Lovers first. Only Lovers can escape From these two worlds. This was written in creation. Only from the Heart Can you reach the sky. The rose of Glory Can only be raised in the Heart. —Rumi

Vaseful Flowers and Gifts 305 Witherspoon Street Princeton; 609.751.9800 vasefulprinceton.com A Community Options Enterprise, this unique floral business provides employment for people with disabilities in an integrated setting. Vaseful is committed to creating beautiful flower arrangements and floral gifts for any occasion.

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020

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Springdale Golf Club – On Par for 125 Years Under Troon management, the historic club is teeing off to a greener future By Ilene Dube | Images courtesy of Springdale Golf Club 88 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


Vintage clubhouse.

Aerial view of Princeton in 1937, with Springdale to the right.

ome describe it as “a good walk spoiled” (a quote falsely attributed to Mark Twain*). Others call it “The Greatest Game Ever Played” (such was the title of a book and film about golf champion Francis Ouimet). Princeton’s most famous resident, Albert Einstein, reportedly said of the sport: “Tried it once. Too complicated.

I quit.” While modern golf originated in 15th-century Scotland, the game can be traced to the Song Dynasty in China during the years 960 to 1279. The Dutch and the Romans may have also played an early form of the game. Today, the rate of attrition for old-time golfers exceeds the number joining from a younger generation, and consequently more courses are closing than are opening. But at Princeton’s Springdale Golf Club, celebrating 125 years of operation, membership is surging. Open exclusively to its 400-plus members, as well as Princeton University students and faculty — the University owns the land and the club has a long-term lease — the bucolic enclave with a gothic tower at its center is only viewable to most of us while driving along Alexander Street, or possibly taking our children and grandchildren sledding on its hill. On special occasions, Springdale opens its doors to the community for special events, fundraisers, and charity golf outings. Crosscountry skiing is permitted on the fairway, though not on the greens.

Planes on the golf course.

Paris has Notre Dame Cathedral, Pittsburgh has its Cathedral of Learning, and in Princeton the Gothic spires of Cleveland Tower loom over the course at Springdale. Part of the Graduate College, Cleveland Tower was designed by Ralph Adams Cram (architect of New York’s St. John the Divine Cathedral) as a memorial to President Grover Cleveland, who served as a University trustee following his retirement from public life, and is home to one of the world’s largest carillon organs. Woodrow Wilson and Grover Cleveland were pals but competitive, says Springdale’s Board of Governors President Kevin Tylus, and the two presidents bickered over where to put the tower. Wilson wanted it in town, and Cleveland ultimately consented that it could be anywhere as long as it bore his name. WASHINGTON SLEPT HERE

Both George Washington and Albert Einstein figure into the history of Springdale. The founder of Princeton’s Institute for Advanced Study — on land adjacent to Springdale — was Abraham Flexner, an avid golfer. Flexner tried to interest a reluctant Einstein in the game. In response, the theoretician of relativity signed up for a lesson at Springdale, just a short walk from his home at 112 Mercer Street, but apparently the first lesson was also Einstein’s last. The joke they tell at Springdale is that Einstein went into physics because he was so bad at golf.

*According to quoteinvestigator.com, the novelist Harry Leon Wilson wrote in 1904: “Golf has too much walking to be a good game, and just enough game to spoil a good walk.”

It has been written that George Washington’s encampment prior to the Battle of Princeton was located somewhere near where the fifth tee lies today. First Lady Frances Cleveland was one of the club’s earliest members. The club included women from the very beginning, and the clubhouse was designed with a ladies’ room — though it is shocking to consider any alternative today, it was a big deal back then. The original Princeton Golf Club, formed in 1895 by alumni, faculty, and undergraduates, was one of the first 100 golf clubs in the U.S. A nine-hole course was laid out in a large field known as Stockton Woods, to the west of the old race track at the lower end of Bayard Lane. Moses Taylor Pyne, Stephen Palmer, and Cornelius C. Cuyler formed the Springdale Association and raised $25,000 to buy the 240-acre Stockton Farm. The nine-hole course opened for play in 1902. Seven years later the property was turned over to the University. The old clubhouse was originally a tenant-farmer house. The Class of 1886 purchased the house from the Springdale Association and deeded it to the University in 1903 with the proviso that it be used for Class of 1886 reunions, and each member would be a lifetime member of the club. The course was originally designed by Scotsman Willie Dunn Jr. In 1911, Gerard B. Lambert — known for his wildly successful marketing of Listerine products and, locally, for his design of the Albemarle estate, which became the one-time home of the American Boychoir School FEBRUARY 2020 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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View of Cleveland Tower at Springdale.

— had the property surveyed and made plans to enlarge the course to 18 holes, which he laid out and completed in June of 1915. In the summer of 1922, the Princeton Golf Club changed its name to Springdale Golf Club. The course was re-designed in the late ’20s by esteemed golf architect William S. Flynn, known for his designs at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club on Long Island and Merion Golf Club in Ardmore, Pennsylvania. Although most of Flynn’s work is in the Philadelphia region, his most recognized work is at the Cherry Hills Country Club in Denver, the Cascades in Virginia, and the Country Club in Brookline, Massachusetts. Shinnecock Hills, a five-time U.S. Open venue, is considered his finest work and was rated third in Golf Digest’s 100 Greatest Courses ranking. Flynn worked during the sport’s golden age, starting at the end of World War I and through the Great Depression, when most of the country’s golf courses were built or rebuilt. A distinctive feature of Flynn’s designs was that rather than change the topography with earth-moving equipment, he worked with the natural landscape, taking advantage of what it offered. NEW CLUBHOUSE OFFERS NEEDED AMENITIES

In the early 2000s, the University decided it needed the original clubhouse as a test kitchen for its dining services. It then contributed toward the architectural, engineering, and planning costs for a new clubhouse, opened in 2007, as well as the rerouting of the course for

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access from the new clubhouse. “The move here was a win-win,” says Tylus, a banking executive and lifelong Princeton resident who, as a student at St. Paul’s School, was a sports writer for Town Topics. “The old building, quaint as it is, was in need of repair. Now we have a new building with amenities, parking, and a practice facility for the men’s and women’s varsity teams.” A new indoor performance space includes a golf simulator with video of actual golf courses that plays one’s shot in real time. It also gives stats: spin, launch, miles per hour, and angle. The performance space enables the University teams to practice in all weather, but is also an amenity for club members. “It’s a fun way to practice and really popular,” says Tylus. In 2018, Springdale selected Scottsdale, Arizonabased Troon Prive to provide management services for the club. Members now receive access to 300 Troon-managed facilities from Hawaii to the U.K. The arrangement allows Springdale to operate with greater efficiency: group purchasing rates, a payroll system, health insurance for employees, and website and social media management. It also enabled the club to bring on board a membership and community outreach coordinator, Brittany Ennis, and an agronomist, Donovan Maguigan. KEEPING IT GREEN

Golf courses are notoriously maligned for their contribution to climate change, from water usage

and ground water pollution caused by fertilizers and pesticides to loss of natural habitats and wetlands. But, according to the website of Rutgers Golf Turf Management School, “Golf courses have great opportunities to make a positive impact [on the environment]. They can provide wildlife sanctuaries, preserve natural areas in urban environments, support native plants and wildlife, protect water resources, rehabilitate degraded landscapes, and promote environmentally-positive management to the public.” Springdale aspires to all of the above, using integrated pest management — employing non-chemical methods of reducing harmful insects and only using chemical pesticides as a last resort. “A fairway that has full, healthy turfgrass receiving the nutrients that it needs but not to excess will use less water and require less pesticides,” notes Maguigan. He adheres to a policy of precision irrigation based on need. “I like to give the example of the homeowner who runs their sprinkler every day, rain or shine. We irrigate areas that only need water based on environmental conditions,” he says. By incorporating sound agronomic practices to promote healthy plants and soils, Maguigan reduces chemical dependency, using instead a poultry-based fertilizer. Maguigan considers the golf course a wildlife sanctuary, “a 110-acre greenspace that provides food and shelter for wildlife, free from development. Fox and deer routinely make Springdale their home, coexisting with our golfers and walkers. The hawks are an attraction as well.”


A red fox resting in a sand trap.

Springdale provides natural habitats for wildlife, free from development.

Springdale’s head golf pro Keith Stewart — less formally known as “Director of Fun” at the club — was named NJPGA Golf Professional of the Year in 2019. He hosts a weekly golf radio show on Fox Sports Radio 920 AM. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

Springdale Hole No. 3. FEBRUARY 2020 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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A three-quarter-mile long creek runs through the property, connecting to a pond. “These areas are where we have the highest environmental impacts,” he adds. “We utilize a buffer to prevent chemical or fertilizer applications from reaching the water, monitor our irrigation to prevent excess runoff, maintain a native-plant perimeter, and plan to work with the Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program and other clean water initiatives.” The club shares a border with the Institute Woods, where migrating birds fly over. Maguigan reports sightings of bluebirds and goldfinches around the golf course, as well as monarch butterflies attracted to the milkweed. “We have four low-maintenance areas we maintain as native patches of plants totaling about four acres,” says Maguigan, who chooses from a list compiled by the Native Plant Society of New Jersey. “Native plants require far less water and fertilizer because they are accustomed to this growing environment.” A resident fox became a bit of a celebrity on the course last summer, about which Maguigan received numerous calls and emails. “We sent a message to the membership educating them that it was a healthy fox and that it was important not to feed the fox or approach it. There were a few instances where the fox dug into a bunker or damaged a green, but there are rules in place that allow golfers relief from that activity and the damage is minimal. Since the summer, we have seen two foxes, one male and one female, frequenting the area near our pond and Forbes College.” Deer, too, enjoy strolling on the greens, but at this time there are no control measures in use. “As

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with the fox, the damage they cause is minimal with the worst being deer tracks in the greens or scat around the property.” NEW MEMBERS WELCOME

After the Great Recession, Springdale saw a dip in its membership, in line with the downward trend on the national level, and began an effort to bring in new members. The path toward membership requires a referral from a sponsor who is already a member. There is a 10-day posting period, during which time the initiate, as well as existing members, ask questions of one another. But what if you are new to the area, want to join, and don’t know anyone who can sponsor you? Such a thing happened recently, according to Ernie Anastasio, Membership Committee chair and educational consultant formerly with ETS. A prospective member who had relocated to Princeton discovered the club and introduced himself to Anastasio, who invited him to the member barbecue. They played a complimentary game and Anastasio became his sponsor. The club has been actively seeking younger families as members and growing its junior programs. The diversity of its membership is also increasing, reflecting the University faculty, staff, and students, as well as the greater community. Tylus and Anastasio stress that Springdale welcomes people of all backgrounds. There are members well into their 90s, and among the strongest players are teenage girls. Springdale’s junior program is recognized by the New Jersey State Golf Foundation as the best in the state. And while the sport may not be as welcoming to

women as one might expect in the year 2020 — for example, some clubs restrict the days of the week that women can play — Springdale’s programs are gender blind, says Board Secretary Erin Hamrick, an advocate for opportunities for women and girls in golf. A SEAT AT THE TABLE

Among the club’s 410 members, 100 do not even play the sport. They join for the social aspects, the special events, and the dining opportunities — club dinners, barbecues, holiday galas, wine dinners, and a clam bake. “If you didn’t know anyone here, someone would sit and talk to you,” says Anastasio. “People who don’t have a plan for the holidays can come together here. Our tables are big enough for all.” Men’s golf champion and board member Kevin Bullinger gives three reasons he and his family (the children are 6, 4, and 2) belong: love of the game and watching others play; socializing with “diverse and great people”; and enrichment programs for children, such as the junior program, camps, holiday parties, and movie nights. Anastasio says new members are embraced, beginning with an orientation. “We are not cliquish; our members feel welcome. We’re also apolitical, so there’s no tension.” Through the various efforts, 44 new members were brought on board in 2019. The best recruiters, says Tylus, are those who just joined. Oh, and about that good walk spoiled? “A large percentage of our players walk — you don’t hear gas carts,” says Hamrick. “Golf was invented as a walking sport. It’s a privilege to walk and play.”


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Interior Designers at Home They Live in Their Living Rooms By Anne Levin | Photography by Jeffrey E. Tryon and Charles R. Plohn

It

is sometimes said that professional chefs don’t cook at home, and fashion designers just wear a lot of black. But it would be hard to find an interior designer who doesn’t give much thought to the surroundings of his or her own home. We asked four local designers to reveal their favorite spots at home, and to tell us why. The results? They love their living rooms. After a busy day creating customers’ decor, these designers just want to come home to a space that is comfortable, personal, and, of course, visually pleasing.

A.J. Margulis Pennington designer A.J. Margulis and her family live in a 1950s ranch house, the layout of which has been drastically changed over the years to create an open plan. Art is her passion, and a painting from Morpeth Contemporary is a focal point of the living room. That makes it a favorite space. “It’s a small house, so we don’t have enough room for tons of stuff,” says Margulis, whose firm specializes in residential design. “I’m conservative and classic. It’s done to last and be the final decision. The most important thing to me is that anything I do lasts a long time, and that people love it and are super comfortable.” While Margulis enjoys her home’s bar area, where she and her husband frequently entertain, and also spends time in the sunroom, it is the living room that has been a cozy retreat during the winter months. “It has a fireplace, which we had stopped using for a while, but lately we’ve gone back to it and hang out there a lot,” she says. “It makes me feel at home.”


Freda Howard Freda Howard’s apartment next to the Princeton Cemetery on Wiggins Street has been home to her and her teenaged daughter for the past three years. Howard, who has created interiors locally and in New York and runs Freda Howard Interiors out of an office on Witherspoon Street, moved to downtown Princeton from a house in Princeton Junction, and she couldn’t be happier. She spends a lot of time in the living room. “I love it because of the color,” she says. “And I’m a color specialist. I stumbled upon this piece of art that is now in the living room, and I fell in love. It’s abstract, and I tend to use a lot of that in clients’ homes because you can build on colors in the room or vice versa.” Spring green is Howard’s favorite color, and she includes it in almost every interior she designs. In her own living room, the sofa is cream and the rug is blue. There are colorful lanterns. Even the window shade has color that relates to the room’s decor. “It’s what I love, but it’s just a cozy space,” Howard says. Originally from Liberia, Howard moved to Sweden to attend the University of Stockholm, where she studied business economics and then worked as a financial analyst. After moving to the U.S. and starting a gift business in Hightstown, and later working with a local home furnishings firm, she realized that design was the direction she wanted to follow. “It has always been part of what I do, and now I do it full time,” she says. “I feel like I’m home now.”

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Karin Eckerson Another Pennington designer is Karin Eckerson, whose home in town dates from the late 1940s. Pictured here with one of her three dogs, mini schnauzer Jackson, Eckerson is relaxing in her living room — the biggest room in the house and the main gathering space for her family. Design is a second career for Eckerson, who was a family therapist before entering the field. She worked for other designers for 14 years before starting her own firm two years ago. “I never looked back,” she says. “I thought it was a hobby, but it’s a career.”

“I’ve surrounded myself with things that are important to me,” she says. “I love the original artwork, including a painting of the town in Virginia where we used to live. The little rocking chair was my father’s from his childhood. My husband is a history teacher and avid reader, and all his books are here. The fireplace makes me think of my son, and the window seat is where my daughter loves to sit and read. I think what makes it comfortable is that there is a little bit of each of us here.”

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Bruce Norman Long The house that Bruce Norman Long and his husband bought five years ago in Wynnewood, Pa., was a caretaker’s cottage on what was once a large estate built in 1905. The couple purchased the house from a woman who grew up there as a child, and it has been an ongoing project. “It’s modest, it’s charming, and we like it,” says Long, who is known for the interiors he creates out of his offices in Princeton and Bryn Mawr, Pa. “We have two acres in a kind of densely populated area, and we feel like we found a jewel.” Long loves the living room because it has windows on three sides. “Rooms with multiple exposures always have a great feeling of natural light,” he says. “And the room is a mix of things that I love. Calling it eclectic would be the tip of the iceberg.” All of the art in the house is by Pennsylvania artists, many of whom are from Bucks County. The kitchen has been extensively remodeled, combining two and a half front rooms into a T-shape. The glass-fronted cabinets are the only remnants of the original house. Renovations on the home continue. On one side, windows are being blown out and replaced with French doors. “It’s an evolution,” says Long. “I always tell clients that my house doesn’t look like any of their homes. It doesn’t get any more personal for a designer than to do your own house.”

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Princeton Home Marketing Center 253 Nassau Street · Princeton · 609-924-1600 · foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation


This Year, find your Dream home

Remarkable Reach. Remarkable Results. Laurie Madaus, REALTOR® Licensed in PA & NJ Cell: 203.948.5157 laurie.madaus@gmail.com

550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • 215.862.5500 ADDISONWOLFE.COM


Art Mazzei

Art@addisonwolfe.com Cell: 610.428.4885

STONE POND LODGE

$2,895,000

SHEEP HOLE FARM

$3,995,000

Stone Pond Lodge is a magnificent 6,800 sq ft stone manor home.The house is sited down a long drive, over a bridge and past an inviting pond.The house with 4 bedrooms, 4 full baths and 2 powder rooms, sits among 45.6 acres of rich farmland, perfect for agrarian pursuits or an equine facility. The property allows for the building of 1 additional home. The Great Room offers cathedral ceilings with “rustic” beams, 2-story fireplace, wet bar and walls of glass doors. There is also a caretaker’s apartment.

Sheep Hole Farm is one of the last remaining family compounds that offers magnificent and varied architecture, extreme privacy, recreational facilities; all sited on 82 vista strewn elevated acres.The main structure, once the original barn, went through a strenuous renovation creating a multi-level dwelling offering large and exciting open spaces and private family gathering places. A huge stone fireplace is the nucleus of the Great Room and open kitchen. There are multiple bedrooms, baths, a guest suite, theater room, and a motorized seat that elevates you into the cupola above to view even more spectacular views. There is also a beautiful original stone manor home with hardwood floor, fireplace, three bedrooms, two full and one half baths, offering the grandeur of Old Bucks County.

Addison Wolfe Real Estate • AddisonWolfe.com 550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • 215.862.5500


Art Mazzei

Art@addisonwolfe.com Cell: 610.428.4885

BOXWOOD STUDIO

An iconic stone Riverfront home located in a highly desirable and prestigious area of New Hope Borough. The spectacular sprawling 6600+ sq ft home offers 6 bedrooms and 5 full baths. There is a first floor bedroom with full bath ideal for in-laws, au pair or a guest room. Boxwood Studio is one of the most sophisticated and stunning properties in all of Bucks County. It is truly a home that can provide decades of family enjoyment and a lifetime of memories.

$3,799,000

For property information contact Art Mazzei directly at 610.428.4885 550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938 • AddisonWolfe.com • 215.862.5500


A Tradition of Quality since 1963

Cindy Napp Sales Associate ABR, ePRO, SRES

Looking for a Beach House? Design • Service • Value

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Loewe Flamenco knot blue tile tote, jacquard pattern inspired by William De Morgan blue tiles; $1,950; loewe.com Jan Barboglio Mesita Paloma side table; $535; neimanmarcus.com Mottahedeh Imperial blue teacup and saucer; $97; finebrands.com

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PHOTO BY CATHERINE HOGAN

“IF THESE STONES COULD TALK”

A BOOK, A MUSEUM, AND NEWLY-DISCOVERED AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY IN THE SOURLAND REGION

PHOTO BY WENDY GREENBERG

BY WENDY GREENBERG

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


“T

A display on African American family heritage, at the museum.

Some of the artifacts in the museum.

his is a story of a community taking control of its past, its present, and its future. It’s a story of what can happen when people of faith set out to protect and publicize important truths and stories gleaned from a few of the oldest African American cemeteries in Hunterdon and Mercer counties in central New Jersey.” —From the introduction to If These Stones Could Talk: African American Presence in the Hopewell Valley, Sourland Mountain, and Surrounding Regions of New Jersey by Elaine Buck and Beverly Mills

receiving a threatening letter from the landowner’s attorney. Then one day a neighbor gave them a photocopy of part of Stevenson’s will. Having seen local media coverage, Joe Klett, Buck’s longtime friend and classmate, who happened to be the chief of New Jersey Archives, had retrieved the original will that confirmed Stevenson himself wanted the lot to remain a burial ground. Buck and Mills were told they needed to prove it was a burial ground, perhaps through an archaeologist. But where, thought Buck, would she find one? The next day she read a newspaper article about local archaeologist Ian Burrow, and realized she knew him. Burrow came on board and helped them throughout the process. Buck calls each event a “Godincidence.” The contractor did back down, but the Rock Road incident was just the beginning. Buck and Mills wondered about the history of Stoutsburg Cemetery off Province Line Road in Hopewell Township, a field tucked into the Sourland Mountains overlooking the Hopewell Valley surrounding Princeton. Some of the markers had sunk below the ground, but they both had close family members buried there, and knew that there were probably soldiers from the American Revolution and Civil War.

They call it the phone call that changed their lives. Fourteen years ago, Elaine Buck and Beverly Mills, both in their 50s at the time, working for their communities, in their churches, and with their families, had no idea what was in store for them. But during the next decade and beyond they would write a book, set up a museum, and form a consulting business. Most impactful to them, they learned about their own descendants, and uncovered a history of slavery in Central New Jersey. The call, from Walter Niemeier Jr. of LIFE-CHANGING WORK Lambertville, came to Buck, of Hopewell Borough, assistant secretary of the Stoutsburg Cemetery So the women went to work, contacting staffs in Association (her husband, John Buck, is president, historical societies — especially the Hunterdon and Mills, of Pennington Borough, is secretary). Elaine Buck, John Buck, and Beverly Mills at Rock Creek, next to where a new Historical Society — and discovering the Niemeier, who died in 2018, had discovered that a educational and cultural center will be built with the Sourland Conservancy. David Library of the American Revolution in Washington Crossing, Pa. They paved driveway was planned for a lot off Rock Road in Hunterdon County — land did research using newspaper advertisements, court dockets, post-Civil War that he recalled was an African American burial ground. The lot was originally Freedman’s Bureau reports, family Bibles, family trees, and maps. owned by Elnathan Stevenson, who had been a judge in Hunterdon County in the “For Elaine and me, this experience was life-changing,” says Mills. early 19th century. Because of their involvement in Stoutsburg Cemetery, some “Suddenly we were transformed from part-time trustees of a cemetery to historical 10 miles away, Niemeier thought that the Bucks and Mills might want to know archivists.” She says they felt a responsibility to be “the voice for the voiceless.” about the planned desecration. The difficulty in finding information was apparent. Some records were only The women went to Rock Road to protest the construction and met resistance, FEBRUARY 2020 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 63


Elaine Buck and Beverly Mills, center, were presented with the 2019 New Jersey Studies Academic Alliance (NJSAA) Award for “If These Stones Could Talk” by Deborah Mercer of NJSAA, left, and Bob Vietrogoski, chair of NJSAA and librarian, Rutgers University Libraries. (Photo by John Buck)

held by white slave owners, listing slaves as property, with other “items.” One name was found on a credit ledger from a store. They learned, says Mills, who is a descendant of one of the first slaves brought to the Sourland Mountain region, that “our history is hidden and not considered important. It’s one of the reasons we wrote the book.” Her fourth great-grandfather, Friday Truehart, was brought from South Carolina at the age of 13, while enslaved by the Rev. Oliver Hart, pastor of the Old School Baptist Church in Hopewell, her research found. They write in the book, “We had learned in school that slavery existed in the South and that it was not uncommon for slaves to take on the last name of their masters. But we thought, certainly this could not have happened in New Jersey? We couldn’t have been more wrong!” Mills and Buck say that they were initially shocked that Central New Jersey’s early labor consisted of slaves. They found documents that show 4,700 enslaved individuals in New Jersey in 1745, with the number topping 12,000 by the 1800 United States Census. “How could two small-town, middle-aged African American women make a difference in reshaping how our history is taught and perceived?” they write. Yet they did. Readers learn about the region’s history; the impact of faith and churches on African Americans and military history; and meet descendants from the Sourland Mountain region, among them Trenton resident Constance Wheeler; Geraldine Hoagland of Hamilton; John Buck of Hopewell Borough, who is a descendant of the Nevius family; and the Grover family from Skillman; who all tell their unique stories. During their research, Buck and Mills heard a talk at the David Library by Marion T. Lane, an African American Daughter of the American Revolution. “It shot us out of the cannon,” says Mills, and sent them on a path to learn about African American involvement in the military. They say they were not as surprised to discover a strong African American

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020

military presence. They contacted the fourth great-grandson of William Stives, who served in the Revolutionary War. Although his burial location is disputed, there is a memorial marker for Stives at Stoutsburg. They also found that African Americans steered the small boats crossing the Delaware River with George Washington. “It took hours of scouring books to get the list of African Americans who crossed the Delaware,” says Buck. “Hours. Looking through books, the records had marked everyone who was colored.” Many who served in the Civil War from this region volunteered in the 8th, 11th, 41st, 45th, and 127th regiments of the United States Colored Troops and trained at the only training ground for African Americans, Camp William Penn in Cheltenham, Pa. ABSENT FROM HISTORY

“My school never said a word,” says Buck, the product of Hopewell public schools. “Slaves could fight in place of the master.” She says she didn’t understand the history she learned in school. “Now I know why. They left a few people out.” Writing the book was a 10-year process, including raising funds, research and writing, and hours of scrutinizing records. The staffs at local historical societies dug through boxes in their basements. “To see my fourth great-grandfather’s manumission paper, I was almost in tears,” says Mills. (Manumission is release from slavery by a master.) Slavery was outlawed in New Jersey in 1804, through a “gradual” emancipation. The information confirmed what they knew from their families. “Because our history has been lacking and sanitized, when you find out the enormous contributions of the enslaved in our region, you see our country would not be what it is today without free labor,” says Mills. The book chronicles how Dutch settlers in the 1600s established the rocky wooded region that runs roughly from Lambertville to Hillsborough, bringing


with them slaves. When the British came, they used the slaves as labor for mills, industry and pottery production, and quarries. If These Stones Could Talk: African American Presence in the Hopewell Valley, Sourland Mountain, and Surrounding Regions of New Jersey, was published by Wild River Books in Lambertville, with grants from Mercer County Cultural and Heritage Commission, the Bunberry Foundation, and Princeton Area Community Foundation. To support the book, Mills and Buck began a speaking tour, and in 2014 first lectured for the Sourland Conservancy at the Hopewell Train Station. That led to a partnership between the Stoutsburg Cemetery Association and the Sourland Conservancy — the basis for the founding of the Stoutsburg Sourland African American Museum (SSAAM) on Hollow Road in the former Mt. Zion African American Episcopal Church. Neighbors had heard about the project, and began bringing items like aprons made for a church fundraiser from the 1930s, ladies’ hats, sheet music, or tools. For some time, these artifacts sat on an 8-foot long table at the Buck house, between the dining room and kitchen, until they were able to house them. The one-room church building, built in 1899 and donated by the True family, was refurbished in 2012 with fundraising and grants from historic preservation groups. To enter the church is to almost go back in time. The pews have been restored to pristine condition, and artifacts and educational posters line the walls. Old hand fans are available in a basket. Buck and Mills have a long history with the church. “Blacks needed a specific place to worship,” Buck says. “We visited there as young girls, and sang in a gospel group.” The church is now on the New Jersey Register of Historic Places. The SSAAM is a partner in the Sankofa Collaborative, along with the William Trent House, Grounds For Sculpture, New Jersey Historical Society, and 1804 Consultants, to help schools, museums, libraries, and historic sites interpret and discuss topics in African American history, and to make sure the appropriate materials and resources are accessible statewide to broader audiences.

LOOKING FORWARD

This past summer, the Sourland Conservancy and the SSAAM became co-owners of the property at 191 Hollow Road overlooking woodlands and Rock Brook, the future home of administrative offices and a cultural and education center. This was a joint effort with D&R Greenway Land Trust, Montgomery Township, and the Whidden family, who owned the property. And Buck and Mills have taken their quest a step further. “As our story began to take shape,” says Mills, “we realized it can be transferred to any part of the United States, and the information needs to be put in school curricula. I am the product of slaves, but we were never taught that slavery existed in New Jersey. [We thought] that it only happened in the South.” They formed a consultancy named for Friday Truehart, Mills’ ancestor, to speak to classes, and help others do similar research. “African American history was an integral part of American history, not just for one month a year,” she says. “This country was built on the backs of enslaved individuals.” Mills and Buck say they often think about how they completely changed their lives to start this journey, and they are not sorry. “A decade ago,” they write, “if we had a crystal ball that would enable us to gaze into the future, would we have answered the call to devote a significant portion of our lives to this project? Would we be prepared to be a voice for scores of faceless, marginalized individuals, some of whom were our ancestors? The answer is decidedly yes.” As Buck puts it: “Here we are. Two middle-aged ladies, making a change.” The Stoutsburg Sourland African American Museum is located at 189 Hollow Road in Skillman. For more, visit www.ssaamuseum.org. Friday Truehart Consultants can be reached at P.O. Box 220, Hopewell, NJ 08525.

Princeton Living at its Best

63 Greenhouse Drive, Princeton

Elegance, seclusion, and accessibility are hallmarks of this beautifully built 8-yr old home on prestigious private lane within walking distance of town and gown. The stone and stucco exterior is enhanced by balconies with wrought iron railings and covered stone terraces. 10 ft, 12 ft, and 20 ft ceilings with banks of windows fill the home with light while welcoming in the lush wooded views. Large formal rooms, extraordinary kitchen family room, and 5 bedroom suites. $2,388,000

994 Stuart Road, Princeton

This extraordinary home was significantly expanded and completely renovated in 2001. Bordering preserved land, it is nestled into a woodland setting near from two of Princeton’s most favored private school campuses. The creative new floor plan includes everything from open, central spaces for socializing to secluded bedroom suites - 6 in all. What all these areas have in common are skylights and clerestory windows inviting in sunshine and blue-sky views. $1,385,000

Barbara Blackwell Broker Associate 4 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

(609) 921-1050 Office (609) 915-5000 Cell bblackwell@callawayhenderson.com For more information about properties, the market in general, or your home in particular, please give me a call.

Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.

FEBRUARY 2020 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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| BOOK SCENE

The Book Scene Oscars: An Arts and Sciences Ceremony BY STUART MITCHNER

T

his Oscar Night fantasia was inspired by the winner of the Book Scene Award for the Best Cover Art on a Science-Related Topic — Captivating Technology: Race, Carceral Technoscience, and Liberatory Imagination in Everyday Life (Duke University Press $29.95 in paper), an anthology edited by Princeton Associate Professor of African American Studies Ruha Benjamin. If I were following the Academy model, representatives from the publisher would join the editor onstage, but the person accepting the trophy should be Manzel Bowman, the artist whose brilliant, complexly suggestive digital collage, Turbine, not only illuminates the cover’s catch word but helps lighten the weight of the subtitle. “A MYSTERIOUS SEXY STRANGER”

The Einstein Oppenheimer “Spooky Action at a Distance” Oscar goes to theoretical physicist Sean Carroll’s Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime (Dutton $29). On accepting the award and paying homage to the two Institute for Advanced Studies legends it was named for, Carroll playfully credited Einstein for “sticking quantum mechanics with the label it has been unable to shake ever since,” namely spukhafte, or “spooky.” There were #MeToo murmurings from the audience when he described the alluring inscrutability of quantum mechanics as “a mysterious, sexy stranger” tempting us “into projecting all sorts of qualities and capacities onto it, whether they are there or not.” “FASTEN YOUR SAFETY BELTS”

The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming (Tim Duggan Books $27), with its provocative opening sentence, “It is worse, much worse than you think,” captured the “Fasten Your Safety Belts” Oscar for David WallaceWells, whose “insanely lyrical prose about our pending Armageddon” hits

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020

the reader “like a comet,” in the words of Andrew Solomon, the author of Far From the Tree. RECOMMENDED BY RUSH HOLT

For providing evidence that Wallace-Wells isn’t being an alarmist when he claims that “the slowness of climate change is a fairy tale, perhaps as pernicious as the one that says it isn’t happening at all,” the Rush Holt Award goes to Why Trust Science? (Princeton Univ. Press 24.95), the multi-author volume edited by Naomi Oreskes, “one of the world’s most important and trenchant observers of science and society,” according to the former N.J. Congressman, now CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. “With misinformation and disinformation


rampant today,” Holt warns, “caring citizens do not know what or whom to trust and have become confused about evidence, opinion, and partisan assertion.”

The best explanation for my recusal concerns the disparity between rhetoric and experience. Anyway, there’s no room for “rational, objective, Darwinian” language on King’s Book Scene Oscar. The only line that fits comes from Nathaniel Philbrick, author of In the Heart of the Sea: “Anyone who loves Moby-Dick should read this book.”

LIFETIME RECOGNITION

As someone whose life has been enhanced by the work of Herman Melville, I have to recuse myself as judge and jury of the Book Scene Oscars when it comes Richard J. King’s environmental claims for the novel Annie Dillard calls “the best book ever written about nature.” Ahab’s Rolling Sea: A Natural History of Moby-Dick (Univ. of Chicago Press $35) lives up to its premise, according to the American Scholar review by Princeton Professor Emeritus William Howarth: “King gives us natural history done Melville-style, looking over a ship’s rail, and this ingenious focus neatly weds field science and literary history, yielding a study that is fresh, provocative, and welcome.” Writing in the Washington Independent Review of Books, John P. Loonam echoes “King’s main point: that Melville’s novel can now be read as an introduction to environmental issues of the twenty-first century,” having “combined the rational, objective, Darwinian perspective with the emotional, poetic, Emersonian perspective, pushing the reader to see nature as both dangerous and damaged.”

FEBRUARY - MAY EVENT HIGHLIGHTS All events are held at 6:00 pm in Labyrinth’s downstairs event space, unless otherwise noted. More information and a complete calendar at labyrinthbooks.com/events.

“MAYBE I’M AMAZED”

I’m ending the long strange trip of this column with Paul McCartney’s song, “Maybe I’m Amazed,” not only because of the music and the love and passion McCartney puts into singing and playing it, nor even because the way the line about a “lonely man in the middle of something that he doesn’t really understand” expresses how I feel whenever I’m writing about cookbooks, fashion, ballet, mathematics, and, on this occasion, science and climate change. Nor is it even the spookyaction-at-a-contradiction-in-terms of a song that zooms from a tentative “maybe” to a joyous “amazed.” It’s the flashback to what could be called my first ever “book scene,” presented as a ninth-grader at a student assembly at McBurney School in Manhattan. My subject was The Book of Amazing Facts, subtitled A Collection of Astonishing Facts About the Longest, the Shortest, the Smallest, the Largest, the Swiftest, the Slowest.

3/27

William Stixrud & Ned Johnson - The Self-Driven Child: The Science and Sense of Giving Your Kids More Control Over Their Lives

4/2

Marta McDowell - Emily Dickinson’s Gardening Life

4/7

Julia Phillips - Disappearing Earth: A Novel

4/14

Susanna Moore (Faculty, Creative Writing) - Miss Aluminum: A Memoir

4/16

Ainissa Ramirez - Alchemy of Us: How Humans and Matter Transformed One Another

4/21

Jim Al-Khalili - The World According to Physics

4/23

D. Vance Smith (Faculty, English) & Andrew Cole (Faculty, English) Arts of Dying: Literature and Finitude in Medieval England

4/24

Slajov Žižek, Russell Sbriglia, Andrew Cole (Faculty, English) & Todd McGowan - Subject Lessons: Hegel, Lacan, and the Future of Materialism

4/28

Nancy Sinkoff & Esther Schor (Faculty, English) - From Left to Right: Lucy S. Dawidowicz, the New York Intellectuals, and the Politics of Jewish History

4/29

Rebecca Jordan-Young & Katrina Karkazis - Testosterone: An Unauthorized Biography

2/26

Susan Stewart (Faculty, English) & Denis Feeney (Faculty, Classics) The Ruins Lesson: Meaning and Material in Western Culture

2/27

LLL:* Edward Posnett - Strange Harvests: The Hidden Histories of Natural Objects

3/05

LLL: Winnifred Brown-Glaude, Juda Bennet, Cassandra Jackson, & Piper Kendrix Williams - The Toni Morrison Book Club

3/7

Storytime with Abigail Rayner - I Am a Thief!

3/10

Lewis Hyde - A Primer on Forgetting: Getting Past the Past

3/11

LLLib:* Michael Gordin (Faculty, History) - Einstein in Bohemia

3/12

LLL: Anne Chase & Angus Deaton (Faculty, Woodrow Wilson) Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism

4/30

Lara Freidenfelds - The Myth of the Perfect Pregnancy: A History of Miscarriage in America

3/17

LLLib: Monika Zgustova - Dressed for a Dance in the Snow: Women’s Voices from the Gulag

5/5

LLL: Eddie Glaude (Faculty, Religion) - Begin Again: James Baldwin’s America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own

3/24

P. Carl - Becoming a Man: The Story of a Transition

5/7

3/25

Fred Kaplan & Bruce Blair (Faculty, Woodrow Wilson) - The Bomb: Presidents, Generals, and the Secret History of Nuclear War

Anthony Grafton (Faculty, History) - Inky Fingers: The Making of Books in Early Europe

3/26

John Freeman & Aleksander Hemon (Faculty, Creative Writing) Dictionary of the Undoing

Get up-to-date info in our weekly events email at labyrinthbooks.com/subscribe *Library Live at Labyrinth (LLL) and Labyrinth Live at the Library (LLLib) events are co-sponsored with the Princeton Public Library

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CIT O Program pen House CIT Program OCTOBER 22, 2017 ForSUNDAY, budding counselors

OCTOBER 22, 2017 ForSUNDAY, budding counselors 1:00PM–4:00PM Swim Lessons 1:00PM–4:00PM

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1/27/20 12:45 PM

Swim Club

Swim Clubmembership Small community with limited Small community with limited membership

StarCatchers Theater Camp

StarCatchers Theater Camp Calling all singers, actors, and dancers Calling all singers, actors, and dancers

StarCatchers Scenic Arts Camp

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For beginners, ages 3 to 9 years

For beginners, ages 3 to 9 years

solebury.org/summer solebury.org/summer

6832 Phillips Mill Road, 215.862.5261• Solebury.org • Solebury.org 6832 Phillips Mill Road,New NewHope, Hope, PA PA 18938 18938 •• 215.862.5261

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020

Full-day and half-day programs for campers from PreK through high school

Join us for an OPEN HOUSE April 25, 2020 • 1:00–4:00pm

atcollege the Princeton Day School A coeducational preparatory boarding A coeducational college preparatory boarding and and day school. day school. Day:Day: grades sevenseven through twelve.twelve. grades through Boarding: grades nine through Boarding: grades nine through twelve.twelve.

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mieryour earlychild childhood designed tolife. 4 education Tree for Farm Road, Pennington 08534 Call to schedule a tour! 609-737-1331 pare not only school, butNJbut for prepare your child not only for school, for life. www.penningtonmontessori.org §for Summer Camp are your child not only school, but for life. admissionsinfo@penningtonmontessori.org

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Academic Curriculum § School year and § Academic Curriculum § School year and cademic Curriculum § School year and full year programs full year programs Spanish - Music full year programs § Spanish - Music panish - Music § LEED certified facility Outdoor Education § LEED certified facility Outdoor Education § LEED 4 Tree Farm Road, Pennington NJ 08534 certified facility Outdoor Education 6 weeks to 6 years § Flexible schedules § 6 weeks to 6 years § Flexible schedules www.penningtonmontessori.org weeks to 6 years § Flexible schedules Summer Camp § Before and aftercare § Summer Camp § Before andadmissionsinfo@penningtonmontessori.org aftercare ummer Camp § Before and aftercare 4 Tree Farm Road, Pennington NJ 08534 4 Tree Farm Road, Pennington NJ 08534 4www.penningtonmontessori.org Tree Farm Road, Pennington NJ 08534 www.penningtonmontessori.org www.penningtonmontessori.org admissionsinfo@penningtonmontessori.org admissionsinfo@penningtonmontessori.org admissionsinfo@penningtonmontessori.org 72 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


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Fun and educational summer dance programs for all ages t,Zy>>E/^EhZdhZ

SAVE NOW ON SUMMER PROGRAMS!

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tĞƐƉĞĐŝĂůŝnjĞŝŶ ΎWͬ,ŽŶŽƌƐͬWDĂƚŚĂŶĚ^ĐŝĞŶĐĞƐΎ tĞƐƉĞĐŝĂůŝnjĞŝŶ t,Zy>>E/^EhZdhZ t,Zy>>E/^EhZdhZ ΎƌŝƚŝĐĂůZĞĂĚŝŶŐĂŶĚtƌŝƚŝŶŐΎ^^dΎW^dΎ^dΎ ΎWͬ,ŽŶŽƌƐͬWDĂƚŚĂŶĚ^ĐŝĞŶĐĞƐΎ t,Zy>>E/^EhZdhZ Ύ^d//ƐƵďũĞĐƚƚĞƐƚƐΎ tĞƐƉĞĐŝĂůŝnjĞŝŶ ΎƌŝƚŝĐĂůZĞĂĚŝŶŐĂŶĚtƌŝƚŝŶŐΎ^^dΎW^dΎ^dΎ

Early Bird pricing ends February 29th!

ΎWͬ,ŽŶŽƌƐͬWDĂƚŚĂŶĚ^ĐŝĞŶĐĞƐΎ

Ύ^d//ƐƵďũĞĐƚƚĞƐƚƐΎ tĞƐƉĞĐŝĂůŝnjĞŝŶ ƵƌƌĞŶƚůLJĂĐĐĞƉƚŝŶŐƌĞŐŝƐƚƌĂƚŝŽŶƐĨŽƌ ΎƌŝƚŝĐĂůZĞĂĚŝŶŐĂŶĚtƌŝƚŝŶŐΎ^^dΎW^dΎ^dΎ Ύ^d//ƐƵďũĞĐƚƚĞƐƚƐΎ ●5-week Summer Intensive - Ages 11+ WdĞƐƚWƌĞƉ͘ůĂƐƐĞƐ ΎWͬ,ŽŶŽƌƐͬWDĂƚŚĂŶĚ^ĐŝĞŶĐĞƐΎ tĞƐƉĞĐŝĂůŝnjĞŝŶ ƵƌƌĞŶƚůLJĂĐĐĞƉƚŝŶŐƌĞŐŝƐƚƌĂƚŝŽŶƐĨŽƌ ●Young Dancer Summer Intensive - Ages 8-10 with daily ballet class ;ŚĞŵŝƐƚƌLJͬŝŽůŽŐLJͬĂůĐƵůƵƐͬWŚLJƐŝĐƐͬWh^,ͬ^ƚĂƚŝƐƚŝĐƐͿ ƵƌƌĞŶƚůLJĂĐĐĞƉƚŝŶŐƌĞŐŝƐƚƌĂƚŝŽŶƐĨŽƌ ΎƌŝƚŝĐĂůZĞĂĚŝŶŐĂŶĚtƌŝƚŝŶŐΎ^^dΎW^dΎ^dΎ Currently accepting registrations for WdĞƐƚWƌĞƉ͘ůĂƐƐĞƐ ΎWͬ,ŽŶŽƌƐͬWDĂƚŚĂŶĚ^ĐŝĞŶĐĞƐΎ and additional classes in Modern, Hip Hop, Jazz, and Choreography WdĞƐƚWƌĞƉ͘ůĂƐƐĞƐ ƵŐƵƐƚϮϬϮϬ^dWƌĞƉĂƌĂƚŝŽŶůĂƐƐĞƐĂŶĚ APΎ^d//ƐƵďũĞĐƚƚĞƐƚƐΎ Test Preparation Classes ;ŚĞŵŝƐƚƌLJͬŝŽůŽŐLJͬĂůĐƵůƵƐͬWŚLJƐŝĐƐͬWh^,ͬ^ƚĂƚŝƐƚŝĐƐͿ ;ŚĞŵŝƐƚƌLJͬŝŽůŽŐLJͬĂůĐƵůƵƐͬWŚLJƐŝĐƐͬWh^,ͬ^ƚĂƚŝƐƚŝĐƐͿ

●Dancing Stars - Ages 6-8 and Little Dancing Stars - Ages 3-5 morning dance prog ^ƵŵŵĞƌWƌŽŐƌĂŵƐ;:ƵůLJͲƵŐƵƐƚϮϬϮϬͿ ΎƌŝƚŝĐĂůZĞĂĚŝŶŐĂŶĚtƌŝƚŝŶŐΎ^^dΎW^dΎ^dΎ (Chemistry/Biology/Calculus/Physics/APUSH/Statistics) ƵŐƵƐƚϮϬϮϬ^dWƌĞƉĂƌĂƚŝŽŶůĂƐƐĞƐĂŶĚ ƵŐƵƐƚϮϬϮϬ^dWƌĞƉĂƌĂƚŝŽŶůĂƐƐĞƐĂŶĚ •Weekly Primary and Pre-Primary ballet classes for children 3.5 - 7 &ŽƌĞŶƌŽůůŵĞŶƚŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƚŝŽŶ ^ƵŵŵĞƌWƌŽŐƌĂŵƐ;:ƵůLJͲƵŐƵƐƚϮϬϮϬͿ ƵƌƌĞŶƚůLJĂĐĐĞƉƚŝŶŐƌĞŐŝƐƚƌĂƚŝŽŶƐĨŽƌ August 2020 SAT Preparation Classes and Ύ^d//ƐƵďũĞĐƚƚĞƐƚƐΎ ^ƵŵŵĞƌWƌŽŐƌĂŵƐ;:ƵůLJͲƵŐƵƐƚϮϬϮϬͿ Fun and educational summer programs for all ages and levels! ●Dance With dance Me preschool classes sŝƐŝƚƚŚĞƐŝŐŵĂĂĐĂĚĞŵLJ͘ĐŽŵ &ŽƌĞŶƌŽůůŵĞŶƚŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƚŝŽŶ Photo by Rosalie O’Connor

Summer Programs (July – August 2020) &ŽƌĞŶƌŽůůŵĞŶƚŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƚŝŽŶ WdĞƐƚWƌĞƉ͘ůĂƐƐĞƐ sŝƐŝƚƚŚĞƐŝŐŵĂĂĐĂĚĞŵLJ͘ĐŽŵ For Enrollment Information sŝƐŝƚƚŚĞƐŝŐŵĂĂĐĂĚĞŵLJ͘ĐŽŵ ;ŚĞŵŝƐƚƌLJͬŝŽůŽŐLJͬĂůĐƵůƵƐͬWŚLJƐŝĐƐͬWh^,ͬ^ƚĂƚŝƐƚŝĐƐͿ Visit thesigmaacademy.com

ƵƌƌĞŶƚůLJĂĐĐĞƉƚŝŶŐƌĞŐŝƐƚƌĂƚŝŽŶƐĨŽƌ

Photo by Justus Henry

Photo by Rosalie O’Connor

• 5-week Summer Intensive - Ages 11+ American Ballet Theatre® National Training Curriculum and featuring star guest instructors • Young Dancer Summer Intensive - Ages 8-10 with daily ballet class and additional classes in Modern, Hip Hop, Jazz, and Choreography • Dancing Stars - Ages 6-8 and Little Dancing Stars - Ages 3-5 morning dance programs • Weekly Primary and Pre-Primary ballet classes for children 3.5 - 7 • Dance With Me preschool classes • Evening Ballet Maintenance Classes - Ages 8-11 • Evening Adult/Teen Ballet Classes - Ages 11+ • Evening Tap Clinic for three levels of tappers

●Evening Ballet Maintenance Classes - Ages 8-11 ●Evening Adult/Teen Ballet Classes - Ages 11+

Princeton Dance & Theater Stud

ƵŐƵƐƚϮϬϮϬ^dWƌĞƉĂƌĂƚŝŽŶůĂƐƐĞƐĂŶĚ WdĞƐƚWƌĞƉ͘ůĂƐƐĞƐ ^ƵŵŵĞƌWƌŽŐƌĂŵƐ;:ƵůLJͲƵŐƵƐƚϮϬϮϬͿ ŚĞŵŝƐƚƌLJͬŝŽůŽŐLJͬĂůĐƵůƵƐͬWŚLJƐŝĐƐͬWh^,ͬ^ƚĂƚŝƐƚŝĐƐͿ &ŽƌĞŶƌŽůůŵĞŶƚŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƚŝŽŶ ƵŐƵƐƚϮϬϮϬ^dWƌĞƉĂƌĂƚŝŽŶůĂƐƐĞƐĂŶĚ sŝƐŝƚƚŚĞƐŝŐŵĂĂĐĂĚĞŵLJ͘ĐŽŵ

●5-week Summer Intensive - Ages 11+ ●Young Dancer Summer Intensive - Ages 8-10 with daily ballet class and additional classes in Modern, Hip Hop, Jazz, and Choreography ●Dancing Stars - Ages 6-8 and Little Dancing Stars - Ages 3-5 morning dance programs •Weekly Primary and Pre-Primary ballet classes for children 3.5 - 7 ●Dance With Me preschool classes ●Evening Ballet Maintenance Classes - Ages 8-11 ●Evening Adult/Teen Ballet Classes - Ages 11+

^ƵŵŵĞƌWƌŽŐƌĂŵƐ;:ƵůLJͲƵŐƵƐƚϮϬϮϬͿ &ŽƌĞŶƌŽůůŵĞŶƚŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƚŝŽŶ &ŽƌŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƚŝŽŶĂůůϲϬϵϰϱϰϱϰϵϵ ŽƌĞŵĂŝů͗ƐŝŐŵĂ͘ŵŽŶƚLJΛŐŵĂŝů͘ĐŽŵ sŝƐŝƚƚŚĞƐŝŐŵĂĂĐĂĚĞŵLJ͘ĐŽŵForrestal Village ● Princeton, Princeton Dance & Theater Studio &ŽƌŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƚŝŽŶĂůůϲϬϵϰϱϰϱϰϵϵ ϭϭϰdĂŵĂƌĂĐŬŝƌĐůĞ͕^ŬŝůůŵĂŶ͕E:Ϭϴϱϱϴ NJ • studiomanager@princetonda ŽƌĞŵĂŝů͗ƐŝŐŵĂ͘ŵŽŶƚLJΛŐŵĂŝů͘ĐŽŵ ϭϭϰdĂŵĂƌĂĐŬŝƌĐůĞ͕^ŬŝůůŵĂŶ͕E:Ϭϴϱϱϴ

609-514-1600 ● www.PrincetonDance.c

&ŽƌŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƚŝŽŶĂůůϲϬϵϰϱϰϱϰϵϵ

ŽƌĞŵĂŝů͗ƐŝŐŵĂ͘ŵŽŶƚLJΛŐŵĂŝů͘ĐŽŵ ϭϭϰdĂŵĂƌĂĐŬŝƌĐůĞ͕^ŬŝůůŵĂŶ͕E:Ϭϴϱϱϴ

&ŽƌŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƚŝŽŶĂůůϲϬϵϰϱϰϱϰϵϵ

ŽƌĞŵĂŝů͗ƐŝŐŵĂ͘ŵŽŶƚLJΛŐŵĂŝů͘ĐŽŵ ϭϭϰdĂŵĂƌĂĐŬŝƌĐůĞ͕^ŬŝůůŵĂŶ͕E:Ϭϴϱϱϴ

ƌŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƚŝŽŶĂůůϲϬϵϰϱϰϱϰϵϵ

ĞŵĂŝů͗ƐŝŐŵĂ͘ŵŽŶƚLJΛŐŵĂŝů͘ĐŽŵ dĂŵĂƌĂĐŬŝƌĐůĞ͕^ŬŝůůŵĂŶ͕E:Ϭϴϱϱϴ

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020

Forrestal Village • Princeton, NJ • studiomanager@princetondance.com 609-514-1600 • www.PrincetonDance.com

Forrestal Village ● Princeton, NJ • studiomanager@princetondance.com

609-514-1600 ● www.PrincetonDance.com


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