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CONTENTS

60 HOLIDAY 2015

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22 ..... HERE & THERE .....

..... FEATURES .....

CHEF PORTRAITS

CHARLES AND ANNE MORROW LINDBERGH

PHOTOS BY THOMAS ROBERT CLARKE

BY LINDA ARNTZENIUS

A legacy of fine dining

Couple of an age

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MARK YOUR CALENDAR 30

EDDIE GLAUDE, JR. AND THE DEPARTMENT OF AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

PRAYING IN PRINCETON

“I have the most amazing colleagues in the world”

BY ELLEN GILBERT BY ANNE LEVIN 36

BOOK SCENE BY STUART MITCHNER

In plain sight: coffee table books with beauty and brains 50

DISCOVER KINGSTON

The historic town feels like home, even if you’re just visiting 54

FASHION & DESIGN A well-designed life

44

CATCHING THE EYE, SEEKING THE HAND BY ILENE DUBE

Ursula von Rydingsvard’s copper sculpture serves as a welcoming beacon to a building designed by Billie Tsien and Tod Williams 70

COMMUNITY OPTIONS, INC. BY ILENE DUBE

Providing a higher quality of life to people with disabilities 76

60

ON THE COVER: Photography by Bruce M. White, courtesy of Morven Museum & Garden

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HOLIDAY 2015 PUBLISHER J. Robert Hillier, FAIA EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Lynn Adams Smith CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jorge Naranjo ART DIRECTOR Jeffrey Edward Tryon GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Matthew DiFalco Erica Cardenas

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CORRECTION In the article “Firestone Library’s Ten-Year -Long Renovation” (Princeton Magazine September 2015), “a letter-patterned fabric called Letters, designed in 1955 by Gunnar Aagaard Andersen, not Alphabet, by Alexander Girard (1952).”

Princeton Magazine is published 7 times a year with a circulation of 35,000. All rights reserved. Nothing herein may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher. To purchase PDF files or reprints, please call 609.924.5400 or e-mail melissa.bilyeu@witherspoonmediagroup.com ©2015 Witherspoon Media Group

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| FROM THE editor

Princeton is so lovely during the holidays. Nothing puts me in the holiday spirit more than strolling around town to see the festive window displays, the baskets of fresh cut greenery hanging from lamp posts, and the tree in Palmer Square draped with lights. When the tree at Rockefeller Center goes up, I think of how our tree in Palmer Square is far superior, because it is living. We owe special thanks to those who take such good care of a tree that brings pleasure to so many. As you plan your gift giving, please remember to shop locally and give special consideration to the many independent stores we have in Princeton. My out-of-town family looks forward to the chocolates from Thomas Sweet and coffee from Small World that I include in holiday packages. It’s fun to share a bit of Princeton with friends and family. Food and the holidays go hand-in-hand and we have continued our tradition of publishing portraits of chefs that help us celebrate. This year, we are featuring a group of talented chefs from clubs at area golf courses. Each chef has shared a holiday menu that should inspire those of us who are cooking. Religion and faith play an important part in many holiday traditions. Anne Levin’s article on praying in Princeton provides a chronological look at local places of worship. The story includes fascinating historical facts about how these places originated and evolved. If you are interested in history, read our story on Morven Museum & Garden’s exhibit Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh: Couple of an Age. The exhibit focuses on the Lindberghs as a couple and doesn’t hold back on some startling details about their relationship, such as the fact that Charles was supporting two families in addition to the one he had with Anne. This is a major event for Morven and they have produced a spectacular exhibit. This holiday, if you are considering making a donation to a worthy organization in Princeton, please read our story about Community Options. They work passionately to help people with disabilities find independence through employment, housing, and other forms of support. In closing, Bob Hillier and I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge our hard working and talented staff with special thanks going to Bill Alden, Linda Arntzenius, Melissa Bilyeu, Robin Broomer, Kendra Broomer, Erica Cardenas, Thomas Robert Clarke, Benoit Cortet, Jennifer Covill, Greta Cuyler, Matt DiFalco, Ilene Dube, Samantha Eng, Ellen Gilbert, Sarah Emily Gilbert,

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Photography courtesy of Palmer Square

Dear readers,

Tom Grimes, Don Gilpin, Gina Hookey, Anne Levin, Steve Marks, Stuart Mitchner, Cheri Mutchler, Jorge Naranjo, Charles Plohn, Nancy Plum, Wendy Plump, Emily Reeves, Monica Sankey, Taylor Smith, Jean Stratton, Erin Toto, Jeffrey Tryon, Andrew Wilkinson, Kam Williams, and Frank Wojciechowski. Kudos to the entire team! Wishing you all a happy and healthy holiday.

Lynn Adams Smith Editor-In-Chief @princeton_mag

PRINCETON MAGAZINE holiday 2015

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He was America’s most eligible bachelor. She was an ambassador’s daughter born to privilege. Tall, slim and boyishly handsome, he swept her off her feet and into the clouds. Literally. Before long they were flying together, exploring together. They were golden and the tabloi ds couldn’t get enough of them. But when tragedy struck and the paparazzi became an intrusive burden on their personal lives, they fled to Europe in search of peace. It was bad timing to say the least. Europe in the 1930s was readying for war. The expert aviator was drawn into a mire from which he would never fully emerge.

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Associated Press Keystone- France / Contributor

(LEFT) Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh leaving Roosevelt Field, Long Island, 1929. (ABOVE) Charles Lindbergh with the Spirit of St. Louis 1927.

nne Mo Morrow met Charles Lindbergh just m seven months after the young aviator had landed at Le Bourget airfield near Paris at the end of his astonishing 1927 non-stop solo flight across the Atlantic. He was the most famous person on the planet, the first modern superstar, an overnight celebrity welcomed into the most exalted of circles. She was a top Smith College student visiting her parents in Mexico, where her father, Dwight Whitney Morrow, a former partner at J.P. Morgan & Co., was U.S. Ambassador. Lindbergh was on a goodwill tour. After just four dates they were engaged and, following their marriage on May 27, 1929, they took to the air together, Anne having quickly learned to fly and act as radio-operator. A formidable team, they opened up new routes for commercial airlines. The bride was small, shy, sensitive, and bookish—an award-winning college graduate from a warm loving family. The groom was tall, deeply reserved, and independent—an outdoorsman from the mid-West whose parents had led separate lives; he grew up a lonely child and dropped out of college to become a pilot. “Unlike most brides-to-be, it was I who was congratulated, not he,” said Anne at the time of their engagement. “He opened the door to ‘real life’ and although it frightened me, it also beckoned. I had to go.” Anne would develop into a bestselling author and one of the 20th century’s leading feminist voices. As a woman, wife and mother of five, she sought a philosophy that would embrace both new and traditional roles for women. Charles would go on to

make contributions to medical research, rocketry, anthropology, and conservation. In the heyday of tabloid journalism, crime syndicates, police corruption, poverty and desperation, their lives collided with their times to disastrous effect more than once and at great personal cost. Their story encompasses the highs and lows of 20th century history, from the early days of aviation to the first moon walk, from a time when the forward push of scientific progress was unquestioned to a time when technology’s impact on man and on the natural world was acknowledged as not all good. The couple was hounded by the press, first for their accomplishments and then for the headlinecapturing kidnapping and death of their toddler son. The crime and subsequent trial kept them in the public eye. And even though they fled to Europe to escape media attention, Charles Lindbergh’s fascination with Hitler’s Germany and his role in the isolationist America First movement before the nation’s entry into World War II ensured their place on the front page.

COUPLE OF AN AGE

There have been numerous exhibitions, books, documentaries and magazine articles on Charles A. Lindbergh and his accomplishments. The Lindbergh kidnapping is a familiar trope in the cultural imagination. But while many biographers have been drawn to Charles A. Lindbergh and to Anne Morrow Lindbergh, few have focused on their lifelong partnership that survived tragedy, loss, and controversy.

Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh: Couple of an Age at Morven Museum & Garden tells their story anew in a year-long exhibition that not only relates the infamous kidnapping of their firstborn, Charles A. Lindbergh, Jr. and the subsequent “Trial of the Century” in the Flemington, New Jersey, court house; it yields a portrait of the Lindbergh’s 45-year marriage. The exhibition expands both of their received images beyond the early years to show them raising five more children and supporting each other as writers. Nor does the exhibition shy away from Lindbergh’s fascination with the Third Reich and the run-ins with President Franklin D. Roosevelt over his isolationist stance during the run up to the Second World War. The story of the Spirit of St. Louis is present here, but so is Anne’s Gift from the Sea and Lindbergh as the “tree hugger” he became in later life. Anne’s affair with physician Dana W. Atchley, whom she first met in 1946 when she suffered a miscarriage, is acknowledged, as is the 2003 revelation of Lindbergh’s secret life in Germany and the three families he kept there.

CHARLES A. LINDBERGH

Born of independent Swedes, Charles Augustus Lindbergh (1902-1974) was raised with a frontier mentality, driven, stubborn, forthright and earnest. His father Charles August Lindbergh (1859-1924) was a lawyer known for his “straightforward, uncompromising honesty.” As Congressman for Minnesota (1907-1917), he strenuously campaigned against America’s entry into World War I, HOLIDAY 2015 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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believing that “the trouble with war is that it kills off the best men a country has.” Lindbergh would express similar views with respect to World War II. Lindbergh’s maternal grandfather, Charles H. Land (1847-1919), “the father of porcelain dentistry,” taught his grandson that “Science is the key to all mystery.” Lindbergh would later channel grandfather’s teachings into independent studies in biology and work with the pioneering French-born surgeon Alexis Carrel, the first surgeon to win a Nobel Prize (in 1912). With Carrel, Lindbergh developed the precursor to an artificial heart, The Lindbergh Pump, in 1935, and co-wrote the 1937 bestseller, The Culture of Organs. Their collaboration helped pave the way for later successful organ transplants.

ANNE MORROW LINDBERGH

Anne (1940-1993) and Reeve, born in 1945, became accomplished writers. Originally overshadowed by her husband’s fame, Anne Morrow Lindbergh found her voice as a poet and diarist. Her first book, North to the Orient, published in 1935, won a National Book Award and was the top New York Times 1936 nonfiction bestseller. Her second book, Listen! The Wind, won the same award in 1938; her War Without and War Within, the last of her published diaries, won the Christopher Award. Among her thirteen other titles: The Steep Ascent; The Unicorn and Other Poem; Earth Shine; Hour of Gold, Hour of Lead; and The Flower and the Nettle. Anne struck a chord with women everywhere with a slim volume published in 1955 that became a classic of its genre. In Gift from the Sea, she wrote about youth, age, love, marriage, friendship and the need for women to carve out spiritually nourishing time for themselves. The book was on The New York Times bestseller list for two years; a fiftieth anniversary edition was published in 2005 with a foreword by the Lindberghs’ youngest daughter Reeve.

Lindbergh picture collection, 1860-1980 (inclusive). Manuscripts & Archives, Yale University

After her marriage, Anne Morrow Lindbergh (1906-2001) became the first women in America to earn a first-class glider pilot’s license. In 1934, she was the first woman to win the National Geographic Society’s Hubbard Medal for serving as

radio operator and copilot to her husband Charles on two flights totaling 40,000 miles and spanning five continents. Charles won the same medal in 1927 for his transatlantic flight. She set a new long-distance wireless communications record of 3,000 miles, for which she received the female Harmon Trophy and the Veteran Wireless Operators Association Gold Medal, the first woman to do so. She was inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame in 1979 and the International Women in Aviation Pioneer Hall of Fame in 1999. Anne was seven months pregnant with her first child in 1930 when she broke the transcontinental speed record by 3 hours, flying as copilot and radio-operator with Charles in a Lockheed Sirius low-wing monoplane from Los Angeles to New York in 14 hours and 45 minutes. She was pregnant with her second child at the time of their firstborn son’s kidnapping. After the loss of Charles A. Lindbergh, Jr., the Lindberghs went on to have five more children: Jon, born in 1932, became a marine biologist; Land, born in 1937, became a cattle rancher; Scott, born in 1942, became a zoologist;

Anne Morrow Lindbergh at Long Barn, England.

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Lindbergh picture collection, 1860-1980 (inclusive). Manuscripts & Archives, Yale University

Charles A. Lindbergh, Jr. at his first birthday party. 1931.

Charles A. Lindbergh playing with son Jon, Long Barn, England, May 1937.

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By the time the kidnapper was found guilty and sent to the electric chair in 1935, the Lindberghs had been dogged by sensation-hungry reporters and besieged by public hysteria, demands for money and kidnapping threats. A photographer broke into the Trenton morgue and snapped a picture of the Lindbergh baby’s badly decomposed corpse; copies sold for five dollars each. And even though their son’s body was identified by family members and authorities, hundreds of individuals claiming to be

the Lindbergh Baby contacted the Lindberghs over the decades. To escape the barrage, the Lindberghs moved to Europe in late December 1935. They first rented Long Barn, a cottage in Kent, belonging to Dwight Morrow’s biographer Harold Nicolson and his wife Vita Sackville West and then moved to Illiec, a tiny island off the coast of Brittanny. The British press left them alone as they made their way into British society, attending dinners as Lady Astor’s guests at Cliveden, mingling with the likes of George

Bernard Shaw, Ambassador Joseph Kennedy, and attending a ball at Buckingham Palace at the request of Queen Elizabeth II. An invitation from the military attaché to the American Embassy in Berlin, to report on the state of Germany’s aviation, would ultimately shatter the Lindberghs’ quiet idyll. The world-famous aviator was given unprecedented opportunities to view Germany’s advances in technology and preparations for war. He was entranced by what he observed of Hitler’s Third Reich and warned the United States of Germany’s insuperable strength in an impending European war. What he saw fueled his view that America should stay out of it. On his return to the United States, he became the leading spokesman for the American isolationist movement and the controversial organization America First. Lindbergh believed Nazi Germany to be less of a threat to world peace than Communist Russia. But in the run up to the war, with America divided between isolationists and interventionists, President Franklin D. Roosevelt was struggling to marshal support for Churchill’s Britain and did not appreciate America’s number one hero championing the isolationist cause. While her husband locked horns with Roosevelt, Anne, pregnant again, struggled to reconcile her husband’s views with those of her family and friends. In a small book, hurried into press in the fall of 1940, she stated her belief that Europe was undergoing a period of revolutionary change with Totalitarian regimes such as Nazism appearing as a “scum” on top of an inexorable “Wave of the Future.” Her forty-one page volume of that title quickly became the most despised book in America. Seen as defeatist, it served to further erode the Lindbergh reputation. “I am now the bubonic plague among writers and C. is the anti-Christ!” she confided to her diary. “My marriage has stretched me out of my world, changed me so it is no longer possible to change back.” By December 7, 1941, many Americans regarded their former hero as an anti-Semite, pro-Nazi traitor. Anne later regretted writing The Wave of the Future. “I didn’t have the right to write that because I didn’t know enough,” she told one interviewer. Her husband, however, stubbornly refused to admit any mistake in judgment. In 1970, he published The Wartime Journals of Charles A. Lindbergh, edited to remove anti-Semitic statements and claiming that he had championed non-interventionism to preserve civilization. He equated the Nazi’s calculated genocide with the warring activities of other nations, including the United States, on the ground that all war deaths are atrocities. During his lifetime, Lindbergh saw the science and technology he worshipped in his youth contribute to the ruin of the natural world he loved; he came to deplore the march of technology and civilization. In later years, he turned from aviation and technology toward more philosophical inquiries about the nature of man. He spent time with the Masai tribe in Africa and battled to save whales off the coasts of Japan and Peru and other endangered species. “If I had to choose,” he said shortly before he died, “I’d rather have birds than airplanes.”

Lindbergh picture collection, 1860-1980 (inclusive). Manuscripts & Archives, Yale University

INTERTWINED LIVES

Charles A. Lindbergh and Anne Morrow Lindbergh a few weeks after their marriage in 1929.

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Lindbergh traveled constantly, often missing Christmas and other celebrations with Anne and the children. Those absences would take on a startling significance some thirty years after his death when it was revealed that he had other families besides his American one.

TRUTH WILL OUT

Lindbergh picture collection, 1860-1980 (inclusive). Manuscripts & Archives, Yale University

In 2003, just shy of thirty years after Lindbergh’s death and two years after Anne’s, it came to light that Lindbergh had led a double life from 1957 until his death in 1974. He fathered seven children by three German women, two of them sisters more than twenty years his junior (hatmaker Brigitte Hesshaimer and her younger sister Marietta; and Valeska, the private secretary who helped him with his business affairs in Germany and whose last name has never been revealed publicly). He provided homes for his other families in Germany and Switzerland and visited them regularly, taking enormous care that his alter ego remain secret, his European children were told that their father was a famous American writer named Careu Kent who was on a secret mission they must never divulge. The children—two sons and a daugher by Brigitte, two sons by Marietta, and a son and a daughter by Valeska—were born between 1958 and 1967. Brigitte’s children, Astrid, Dyrk and David, discovered their father’s true identity and made it public after their mother’s death. DNA analysis later confirmed their claims. They described Lindbergh’s visits about four times a year; he made them pancakes and took them to the park. “We were always very happy when he came,” said one son. “He really gave us the feeling he was there for us.” The disclosure came as a shock to Lindbergh’s American children. “Being in my family is like a melodrama sometimes, with a storyline that is simultaneously powerfully compelling and utterly baffling,” noted Reeve Lindbergh. In her 1999 memoir, Under a Wing, Reeve Lindbergh described her parents. “In some ways my parents were very different. But I have always believed it was their similarities rather than their differences that brought them together and kept them together for so many years: certain shared independencies of character and of spirit that each knew in himself or herself from earliest childhood, and recognized instinctively, immediately, in the other when they first met; certain qualities of solitude and stamina, of reflection and determination.” Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh: Couple of an Age will run at Morven Museum & Garden through October 23, 2016. For more information, visit www.morven.org.

FURTHER READING

A. Scott Berg, Lindbergh, Berkeley Books, 1998 Reeve Lindbergh, Under a Wing, Delta, 1999 Lynne Olson, Those Angry Days: Roosevelt, Lindbergh, and America’s Fight Over World War II, 1939-1941, Random House, New York, 2013 Ticker tape parade honoring Charles A. Lindbergh. New York City. June 13, 1927.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF BALTUSROL GOLF CLUB

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C untry Club Chefs: A Legacy of Fine Dining PHOTOGRAPHY BY THOMAS ROBERT CLARKE For this year’s Holiday Chef Series, Princeton Magazine wanted to spotlight the Executive Chefs from some of New Jersey’s best-known country clubs and golf clubs. Synonymous with fine dining and a rich heritage of championship golf, these chefs are used to cooking for weddings, special events, and momentous holiday occasions. Each chef has provided a sample of the holiday menu offerings at a particular club. Thoughtfully prepared and perfected for the season, these menus are cause for celebration.

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Chef

Ed Stone

Baltusrol Golf Club

Springfield Township, NJ

Annual Christmas Dinner Dance Dinner Menu:

Slow Roasted Chilean Sea Bass Nantucket Bay scallops, shiitake mushroom, roasted peppers, leek and watercress sauce Prime Beef Tenderloin

lobster potato purée, apple wood smoked bacon, brussels sprouts, carrots, demi glace

Chocolate Pistachio Crémeux

red velvet sponge, white and dark chocolate mousse,

black raspberry coulis

Coffees and Teas Served

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Chef

Chris Carpenter

Cherry Valley Country Club Skillman, NJ

Starters:

Asian Calamari

Wild Mushroom Flatbread Salads:

360 Salad

Greek Salad Large Plates:

Crusted Angus New York Strip Steak

Pecan Crusted Rack of Lamb Thai Red Snapper

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Mark Silverman

Chef

Bedens Brook Club Skillman, NJ

Soups/Salad:

Vichyssoise/Butternut Squash Puree Bedens Brook Caesar Salad

Mesclun, Pear, Goat Cheese,

Dried Cherries, Toasted Walnuts, Balsamic Vinaigrette Entrees:

Beef Tournedos, Gorgonzola, Shiitake Mushroom

Braised Beef Short Rib

Prime Cut N.Y. Sirloin Steak

Herb Roasted Norwegian Salmon Pan Seared Dayboat Sea Scallops Roasted Long Island Duck, Orange Glaze

House Made Desserts:

Apple Crisp With Vanilla Ice Cream Pumpkin Cupcake

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Chef

John Zaren

The Ridge at Back Brook Ringoes, NJ

Soups/Salad:

Wild Mushroom and Leek Soup drizzled with a roasted garlic and thyme crema

Red Grapefruit, Shaved Fennel and Gold Beet Salad Entrees:

Coee-dusted Filet Mignon

with Frangelico demi-glace Potato-Parsnip Pierogies tossed with sage butter

Roasted Brussel Sprouts and Cranberries

House Made Desserts:

Warm Pear Tart with

an almond Chantilly cream

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November 27—29 • Fri, Sat 10-5 • SUN 10-4 Visit www.coveredbridgeartisans.com for a tour map or visit us on Facebook: facebook.com/CoveredBridgeArtisans

PRINCETON MAGAZINE HOLIDAY 2015

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| CULTURAL EVENTS

NOV. 25

DEC. 5

M A R K YO U R

DEC. 10

CALENDAR M U S I C | B O O K S | T H E AT R E | L E C T U R E S | S P O R T S SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 21 10AM-5PM 42nd Annual YWCA Crafters’ Marketplace at John Witherspoon Middle School in Princeton (also on November 22). www.ywcaprinceton.org

8PM Last day to see Theatre Intime’s production of Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo written by Rajiv Joseph. www.theatreintime.org

NOON Enjoy strolling holiday entertainment and appearances by Santa every Saturday and Sunday in Princeton’s Palmer Square (through December 20). www.palmersquare.com

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 29 1-3PM Carols Concert at Brandywine River Museum

DEC. 25

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4 7PM Princeton University women’s ice hockey vs. Harvard University at Princeton’s Baker Rink. www. goprincetontigers.com 7:30PM Dickens’ classic A Christmas Carol returns to McCarter Theatre (through December 27). www. mccarter.org

8PM McCarter Theatre presents Zoyka’s Apartment, a

(part of the Brandywine Christmas exhibition running through January 3). www.brandywine.org

8PM 2015 Princeton Dance Festival presented by

poignant and subversive farce by the great Russian novelist Mikhail Bulgakov.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1

the Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Dance at Princeton University (through December 6). www.arts. princeton.edu

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 25 11AM The Festival of Trees exhibit opens at Morven Museum & Garden in Princeton (through January 3, 2016). www.morven.org 7:30PM American Repertory Ballet’s The Nutcracker opens at McCarter Theatre (through November 28). www.mccarter.org

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27 5PM Annual Christmas Tree Lighting at Princeton’s

9AM-10PM The spirit of the holiday season overflows during A Longwood Christmas at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pa. (through January 2016). www. longwoodgardens.com 8PM An evening with Granny Award-winner Sarah McLachlan at the State Theatre of NJ in New Brunswick. www.statetheatrenj.org

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2 8PM Rocker Grace Potter performs at the Bergen

Palmer Square Green. www.palmersquare.com

Performing Arts Center in Englewood. www. bergenpac.org

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 28

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3

10AM Start of the Princeton Holiday Trolley Tours through downtown Princeton (repeats every Saturday through December 31). www. princetontourcompany.com

10AM-5PM Covered Bridge Artisans 21st Annual Holiday Studio Tour. Visit six open artists studios on this free, self-guided tour in Hunterdon County (through November 29). www.coveredbridgeartisans.com

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12:30PM Gail Archer, organist at Barnard College, performs a free organ concert at Princeton University Chapel.

6PM More fun than a muddy puddle! Watch the stage show Peppa Pig Live at Count Basie Theatre in Red Bank. www.countbasietheatre.org

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 5 10AM-5PM Kick Off the Holiday Season at Terhune Orchards in Princeton. Choose the perfect Christmas tree and wreath, visit the wine tasting room, and sample the Farm Store’s home baked goods (also on December 6). www.terhuneorchards.com 10AM-8PM Christmas Festival and Santa Parade at Peddlers Village in Lahaska, Pa. (also on December 6). www.peddlersvillage.com 11:30AM Santa’s Helpers Walking Tour, a family friendly tour of Princeton designed for parents and grandparents of young children (repeats through December 19). www.princetontourcompany.com NOON-2PM Princeton Shopping Center’s Annual Christmas Tree Lighting and Visit from Santa! The event will include live music and an appearance by Princeton’s own Mayor Liz Lempert. www.princetonshoppingcenter.com

NOON-5PM 49th Annual Mill Hill Holiday House Tour. For inquiries, contact info@trentonmillhill.org or call 609.815.1359. http://trentonmillhill.org/events/holidayhouse-tour/

PRINCETON MAGAZINE HOLIDAY 2015

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DEC. 12 NOV. 28

DEC. 4

DEC. 16

7PM Speakeasy Dinner hosted by Brick Farm Market

7:30PM Screening of It’s a Wonderful Life

in Hopewell. The 5-course dinner will be accompanied by wines paired by CoolVines of Princeton. www. brickfarmmarket.com

(1946) at Princeton Garden Theatre. www. princetongardentheatre.org

7:30PM Princeton University Glee Club performs at Richardson Auditorium. www.princeton.edu/richaud

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6 10AM-5PM “Drawn from Courtly India: The Conley Harris and Howard Truelove Collection” exhibit opens at Philadelphia Museum of Art (on view through March 27, 2016). www.philamuseum.org

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11 4:30PM Princeton University’s Fund for Irish Studies welcomes filmmaker Mary McGuckian to discuss her latest work about architect Eileen Gray. www.fis. princeton.edu

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19 10:30AM Saturday Stories at the Princeton Public Library (repeats weekly). www.princetonlibrary.org

4-6PM Princeton Symphony Orchestra’s Holiday POPS! concert. www.princetonsymphony.org

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20 4-6:30PM The American Boychoir School performs their annual Home for the Holidays concert at Richardson Auditorium. www.americanboychoir.org

Dispensers at the Arts Council of Princeton. www. artscouncilofprinceton.org

1-8PM A Very Furry Christmas at Sesame Place is a festive celebration in which the park is transformed into a winter wonderland with millions of lights and whirling rides (through December 31 on select days). www. sesameplace.com

1-3PM George Washington’s Annual Christmas Day Crossing at Washington Crossing Park. www. washingtoncrossingpark.org

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 29

2-4PM Chanukah Celebration featuring The Klez

11AM-2PM Spend time with the visionary founder of Grounds for Sculpture at Art Salon: Seward Johnson. Start the afternoon with a tour of the artist’s studio then dine with Mr. Johnson at Rat’s Restaurant where he will answer questions and reflect on his career. www.groundsforsculpture.org

7:30PM Andrea Bocelli performs at Madison Square

7:30PM Princeton University Wind Ensemble performs at Richardson Auditorium. www.princeton.edu/richaud

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16 7:30-9PM Candlelight Service of Lessons and Carols at Princeton University Chapel. www.princeton.edu

Garden. www.thegarden.com

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10

6-9PM Thursday Evening Jazz at Hopewell Valley Vineyards in Pennington (repeats every Thursday). www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com

7PM Shakespeare’s The Merry Wives of Windsor at the Shakespeare Theatre of NJ in Madison (includes a pre-performance talk with the actors). www. shakespearenj.org

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25

7PM Princeton University men’s ice hockey vs. Quinnipiac at Princeton’s Baker Rink. www. goprincetontigers.com

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 31 NEW YEAR’S EVE 6:25PM - 6:35PM C… is for Celebrate! Don’t miss our fireworks show, set to Sesame Street music! Fireworks will begin immediately following the evening performance of the 6PM Neighborhood Street Party Christmas Parade. 8PM Start off the New Year in spectacular fashion with a festive evening of light classics by Shostakovich, Offenbach, Richard Strauss, Johann Strauss Jr., Leroy Anderson and George Gershwin at the War Memorial in Trenton. www.capitalphilharmonic.org

HOLIDAY 2015 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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ouses of worship figure prominently in Princeton’s history. The town and its environs are home to a sizable share of churches, a Quaker meetinghouse, and a synagogue, each with its own individual lineage. Some, like Stony Brook Friends Meetinghouse, stretch back to the early 18th century. On the younger end is All Saints’ Church, which began life in 1960. As the winter holidays approach, we take a chronological look at some of Princeton’s longest-standing places to pray. A few are architectural landmarks. Others are housed in less distinctive buildings. But each has a history worthy of re-examination and recognition. Engraved stones help tell the history of Stony Brook Friends Meetinghouse on Quaker Road. Situated in front of the building, they indicate it was built in 1726 and reconstructed in 1760, after a fire. The simple Quaker meetinghouse, still active, is adjacent to Battlefield Park and a short walk from the historic Clarke House, where British troops took up residence and sheltered their wounded after the Battle of Princeton. Soldiers killed in that battle lie in unmarked graves next to the meetinghouse. Among them is Richard Stockton, signer of the Declaration of Independence. He is honored with a plaque by the entrance gate. St. Paul Roman Catholic Church at 214 Nassau Street traces its beginnings to about 1795, when St. Paul Parish was founded. Missionaries from New York, New Brunswick and Philadelphia

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would come to Princeton to celebrate Mass in an old farmhouse. By 1850, St. Paul Parish had a resident pastor and the farmhouse was too small to hold the growing congregation. The present site was acquired in 1857, and a small frame church was built. The current building was begun a decade later. St. Paul Catholic School, celebrating its 135th anniversary this year, was built in 1880 and is going strong, with more than 400 students. Mt. Pisgah AME Church is the oldest African-American congregation in Princeton. Preacher Samson Peters started the church in 1832, naming it after a mountain ridge in ancient Palestine that is mentioned in the Old Testament. The congregation originally worshipped in a frame schoolhouse on Witherspoon Street. By 1839, land nearby was purchased from Samuel Bayard for the sum of $75. The church’s present building at Witherspoon and Maclean streets dates from 1860 and was rebuilt after a fire destroyed its predecessor. Look closely at the five tombstones in the tiny cemetery behind the building—they date back to the 1850s. Trinity Episcopal Church at 33 Mercer Street was founded in 1833 by a group of prominent Princeton citizens. One of the wardens, builder Charles Steadman, erected a wooden building, which was replaced in 1868 with a stone Gothic-style church designed by Richard Mitchell Upjohn. Some 45 years later, when extensive renovations were made, architect Ralph Adams Cram replaced Upjohn’s original tower with a taller one and made additional enlargements. Membership boomed during the period after World War II. The year 1963 was noteworthy because of a devastating fire that necessitated reconstruction, and the

beginning of two outreach efforts, Trinity Counseling Service and All Saints’ Church. A basement coffee house, The Catacombs, was popular in the 1970s. With its Greek Revival columns and its commanding perch set back along Nassau Street, Nassau Presbyterian Church at #61 is among Princeton’s most recognizable landmarks. The current building is the third to stand on the site; its two predecessors burned down. The first fire erupted in 1813 when a sexton accidentally stored live coals in a closet. The church was rebuilt quickly, but another blaze consumed that building when a skyrocket set off to celebrate Independence Day landed on the roof. The original portion of the current building was dedicated in 1836 and designed by Charles Steadman, who, as the story goes, used a façade plan purchased for $10 from noted Philadelphia architect Thomas U. Walter. Celebrating its 175th anniversary this year, Witherspoon Presbyterian Church at 124 Witherspoon Street was formed in 1840 when 90 of the 131 African American members of Nassau Presbyterian were dismissed to form a church under the name of “The First Presbyterian Church of Colour of Princeton.” Social justice has long been a goal of the congregation. Original clergy and members spoke out against slavery, and later congregants were active in the Civil Rights Movement. One of the church’s most prominent ministers to stand up to racism was the father of Paul Robeson, Reverend William Drew Robeson, from 1879 to 1901. Today, members of the congregation come from many communities, backgrounds, and interests.

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S TO N Y B R O O K F R I E N D S M E E T I N G H O U S E 47 0 Q U A K E R R O A D

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W ITH ER S P O O N P R ES BY TER IA N C H U R C H 124 W ITH ER S P O O N S TR EET

T RINITY E PISCOPAL C HURCH 33 M E R C E R S T R E E T

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N A S S A U P R ES BY TER IA N C H UR C H 61 N A S S A U S TR EET

Methodist ministers used to visit Princeton in the latter half of the 18th century to meet and worship with small groups in private homes. Out of one of those groups grew to become the Princeton Methodist Episcopal Church in 1847. Now known as Princeton United Methodist Church, the congregation had its first building on Nassau Street. It was razed in 1910 to make room for today’s larger church at the corner of Nassau Street and Vandeventer Avenue. Moses Taylor Pyne purchased and donated the land for the site. Further growth and various improvements have been made over the years. Chimes from the church tower’s electronic carillons, ringing twice a day, are a familiar sound to those who live and work in town. Nassau Christian Center, the church at Nassau and Chambers streets with the beautiful flowers outside, has been a mainstay in Princeton since settling into its building 35 years ago. The building itself has a history — its cornerstone was laid in 1867 and the building was dedicated a year later. The building was the meeting place for St. Andrews Presbyterian Church until it merged with Nassau Presbyterian in 1973. Five years later, when Nassau Christian Center was incorporated as an Assemblies of God church, the newly formed congregation leased the historic building. Its sanctuary was built to seat 1,000 people. According to the center’s website, some 1,500 people crowded in to attend evangelistic meetings with D.L. Moody and Ira Sankey in 1876. An education wing added in the 1950s is still in use. Ralph Adams Cram’s Princeton credits also include the Princeton University Chapel, built in 1928 to replace an earlier chapel that had burned eight years earlier. Cram was the University’s supervising architect from 1907 to 1930, and he designed the Graduate College, among other campus buildings. The Gothic Revival chapel, which recalls the style of an English

church from the Middle Ages, cost $2.3 million to build—a far cry from the $10 million spent for a major restoration between 2000 and 2002. Stonemasons from Milan built the chapel using Pennsylvania sandstone trimmed with Indiana limestone. Pollard oak from England was used to carve the elaborate woodwork. Among those commemorated in the chapel’s stained glass windows are James Madison, Adlai Stevenson, and John Witherspoon. The brick facade with a white steeple is a familiar sight at 16 Bayard Lane. Home since 1950 to the First Church of Christ Scientist, when the building was completed, it was officially dedicated in 1955. The actual history of the church dates back over a century. A group of Princeton area residents interested in Christian Science began holding weekly meetings to read the Christian Science Bible Lesson-Sermon together. By 1914, the group was a Society, the first step toward becoming a branch church. That level was achieved by 1928, and church services were held in a small building on Olden Street. That same year, the membership opened a Christian Science Reading Room on the second floor of 20 Nassau Street. Before relocating to 178 Nassau Street, where it remains today, the reading room was situated on Chambers Street and Witherspoon Street. Land for the current church building was purchased in 1946, and the church has served the community ever since. The Lutheran Church of the Messiah began with just one family in 1947. The Reverend Milton J. Nauss began a house-to-house canvasing of the community, and determined that there were enough interested Lutherans to start a congregation. The group held their first service a month later, on Easter Sunday, in the chapel of Westminster Choir College. By the following year, the congregation had bought land on the corner of Cedar Lane and Nassau Street. The present church was built and dedicated in February, 1952. A new parish building was finished 24 years ago with new offices and additional meeting space, as well as student lounge facilities and a home for the Northeast Career Center, an ecumenical religious and vocational counseling service focused on clergy and seminarians. On a Sunday afternoon in 1949, a group of people interested in forming a Unitarian church in Princeton met in a room at what was then Miss Fine’s School (now part of Princeton Day School). Soon after, on Easter Sunday, the first worship service was held in Murray Dodge Hall on the Princeton University campus. The congregation grew over the years, and by 1958 a permanent building at 50 Cherry Hill Road was

begun for what is now called the Unitarian Universalist Church of Princeton. The church was expanded in 1967. Social activism has long been a major part of the church’s mission. The few Jews who lived in Princeton during the 1920s traveled to Trenton to attend services there. But in 1926, the local Jewish community organized its own congregation, calling it B’nai Zion. By the 1940s, Sunday school classes were being held in private homes. The congregation hired its first rabbi, shared part-time with the newly established Hillel House on the Princeton University campus, in 1947. By 1949, The Jewish Center–Princeton had adopted its first constitution and purchased a building on Olden Street. But that was quickly outgrown, and land at the current site, 435 Nassau Street, was purchased. The building was finished in 1958, and expanded in 1983. An additional property was purchased in the 1990s, extending the property further. The Jewish Center affiliated with the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism in 2002. Christ Congregation is located just across the street from Westminster Choir College on Walnut Lane at Houghton Road. Founded in 1955, the church merged with the East Brunswick Congregational Church in April 2014, making two long-time area pastors, the Reverend Jeffrey Mays and the Reverend Robert Moore, co-pastors. Mr. Moore is also executive director of the Princeton-based Coalition for Peace Action. Affiliated with the United Church of Christ; American Baptist Churches, USA; and Alliance of Baptists, Christ Congregation counts LGBTQ and Environmental ministries among its priorities. Outreach is equally important, and the church designates an offering each month as its Outreach Ministry Offering. What was formerly Westerly Road Church is now known as Stone Hill Church of Princeton, relocated two years ago to a woodsy site just 3.3 miles away on Bunn Drive. The original building was a pre-fabricated structure brought in by rail in 1956, designed to seat just 100 congregants. But by 2013, some 500 were crowding into the building, necessitating the move. The relocation has made a distinctive difference to the congregation, increasing its space from 12,000 to nearly 44,000 square feet. The church was founded by a group of people “with the desire to see the gospel of Jesus Christ proclaimed in Princeton,” according to the Stone Hill website. “The founding commitments of the church to the ministry of the gospel and global missions continue to define our community at Stone Hill.” The church is especially committed to the local community, including Princeton University. Overcrowding at Trinity Church led to the founding of All Saints’ Church, on a large rural tract donated by Mrs. Moses Taylor Pyne, in 1960. The new chapel at 16 All Saints Road, in what was then known as Princeton Township, was envisioned to be an extension of Trinity. But by a decade later, All Saints’ had won status as an independent parish and is today one of the largest in the Episcopal Diocese of New Jersey. The two churches share a cemetery on the grounds of All Saints’, a reminder that they are still linked despite their separate identities.

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Eddie Glaude, Jr. & AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES: WORK IN PROGRESS BY ELLEN GILBERT

Images courtesy of the Department of African American Studies, Princeton University

“It’s about concentric circles radiating out,” Glaude says of the Center for African American Studies logo that will continue to be used to symbolize the new department. “It’s the opposite of being a ghettoized silo.” 44 |

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Princeton University Department of African American Studies

(LEFT TO RIGHT) ESPN broadcaster Craig Robinson ’83, NY Knicks General Manager Steve Mills ‘81, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver, and Eddie Glaude, Jr.

T

he newly created Department of African American Studies at Princeton University must surely be one of the most compelling examples of the expression, “to cast a wide net.” Formerly called the Center for African American Studies, the department asks its undergraduate majors to “think carefully about the complex interplay between political, economic, and cultural forces shaping the historic achievements and struggles of African-descended people in the United States and their relationship to others around the world.” “Princeton’s outstanding faculty members in African American studies address cultural, social and political issues of urgent importance to our students, our nation and the world,” Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber observed when the Center’s new departmental status was announced last May. “By approving the establishment of a new Department of African American Studies, the trustees and the faculty of the University have provided Princeton’s students with new opportunities for learning, and they have deepened our commitment to support scholarship of the highest quality in this vibrant field.” Chairing the new enterprise is Eddie Glaude, Jr., the William S. Tod Professor Religion and African American Studies. His own “skill set” is highlighted by examinations of “American politics, intellectual traditions, religious thought, and history,” and a glance at the specialties represented by other core faculty in the department confirms the sense that there’s a lot going on here; art and archeology, comparative literature, English, the history of science, psychology, and sociology all have places at the table. Students concentrating in African American studies will choose from one of three thematic subfields: African American Culture and Life, Global Race and Ethnicity, and Race and Public Policy. “I have been undeservedly lucky to have the most amazing colleagues in the world,” Glaude writes in the acknowledgments

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to his new book, Democracy in Black. “The Faculty in the Department of African American Studies at Princeton is thoughtful, committed, and decent.” REACHING A WIDER AUDIENCE

It seems fitting that Glaude’s Democracy in Black, which is subtitled How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul, is being published by Crown, a New York-based trade publisher, rather than by an academic press. Three of Glaude’s previous books, In a Shade of Blue: Pragmatism and the Politics of Black America (2007) Is it Nation Time? (2002), and Exodus! Religion, Race, and Nation in Early 19th Century Black America (2000) were published by University of Chicago Press. A fourth book, African American Religious Studies: An Anthology, which he coedited with Cornel West, was published by Westminster/John Knox Press, a satellite of the Presbyterian Publishing Corporation, in 2003. “This book is my first real attempt to speak to as broad an audience as possible,” says Glaude of his move to the world of commercial publishing. Responding to what he sees as “a moment of genuine crisis,” Democracy in Black is Glaude’s account of “how we got to here.” “Here,” he explains, is a place informed by the assumption that white values are what count the most. The profound challenge facing society, he says, is to “shake loose of the American ideology, the Puritan sense of specialness that God has sanctioned whites’ existence.” One way to deal with this challenge, Glaude says, is to look at individual and institutional “practices and habits” in order to identify – and address – what he describes as the “value gap” behind inequality on the Princeton campus and in the world at large. At Princeton, there’s been no wasting of time toward this end: early in October the Department of African American Studies, in collaboration with the Department of Psychology, and the Princeton Center for Behavioral Science

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(above) Imani Perry, a colleague in the department, with Cornel West, and Eddie Glaude, Jr. (below) Eddie Glaude, Jr. and Princton University President Christopher Eisgruber at the Department of African American Studies reception.

and Public Policy, presented the first of six programs in what is being called the “Inequality Science Series.” Subtitled “Wise Ideas and Best Practices to Close Achievements Gaps,” the first program was moderated by Princeton University Dean of the College Jill Dolan. Panelists included Geoff Cohen, of Stanford University’s Graduate Schools of Education and Business; Greg Walton, from Stanford’s Psychology Department, and Valerie Purdie-Vaughns, of Columbia University’s Department of Psychology. Sharing the premise that “inequality has a psychological dimension to it,” their presentations got down to nitty-gritty behaviors observed in laboratory situations that have the potential to be “tilted” in order to obtain different outcomes.  “Small things” can have big results, they suggest.  Instead of dismissing an inadequate response to a question, some “wise criticism” about how an answer might be improved says, “I believe in you” to the student and paves the way for continuing efforts that result in more polished performances. Future “Inequality Science Series” presentations will also include speakers from other universities as well as members of the Princeton community, and will examine gaps in medicine, housing, and linguistics.    In her introduction to the October program, Dolan cited last year’s uptick in student activism on campus, and wondered about the tensions between assimilating into Princeton’s traditions and changing them. Mr. Eisgruber made it clear whom he believed stood to gain from these efforts at a celebration of the Department’s creation. By “understanding the impact of race on the life of the university, all of us will benefit from what the department does,” he told an enthusiastic crowd at the Carl Fields Center.  He paid tribute to his predecessor, Shirley M. Tilghman, who recommended an expanded curriculum after a 2006 task force report suggested that reflections on race and the experiences of black people should be diffused throughout a liberal arts education in what Tilghman described as an “indispensable element in a preparation for life in this country.” Tilghman and Eisgruber might well have been inspired by the words of social activist Grace Lee Boggs, who died at the age of 100 just a few days after the October 1 “Inequality” event.   “There are times when expanding our imagination is required,” she once wrote.  “The radical movement has overemphasized the role of activism and underestimated the role of reflection.” holiday 2015 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Some of the members of the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University (shown left to right) are Chika Okeke-Agulu, Imani Perry, Wendy Belcher, Wallace Best, Eddie Glaude, Jr., Stacey Sinclair, Valerie Smith, Tera Hunter, Kinohi Nishikawa, Naomi Murakawa and Joshua Guild.

Glaude, Jr. with well-known Ferguson activist Johnetta Elzie at the “Ferguson is the Future” conference on September 14, 2015.

Which is not to say that activism is far from Eddie Glaude’s mind. “America has never been the shining city on the hill,” he told an audience at the Lutheran Theological Seminary in Philadelphia in 2012. “We’ve always been a work in progress.”  Glaude likes to remind you that he was a student of Cornel West, and West is one of the dedicatees of Glaude’s latest book.  (The other is Glaude’s son, Langston, and together they are his “inspiration to keep fighting until the last breath.”) Speaking of his son, Glaude proudly observes that “whenever he says his name, there’s power.”

in an urban studies class, Langston and his girlfriend followed up on the assignment to observe “one of the richest neighborhoods in Providence” with an early evening visit to an area park.   Here is Glaude’s description in his new book:

displeasure with Obama

  In conversation, Glaude uses the word  “combativeness” to describe the “fight” to “rid democracy from its dependence on white supremacy.”  Nor does Glaude mince words as he expresses his displeasure with Barack Obama’s presidency.   “We’ve come so far as a nation that we can elect a black man to be president of the United States,” he writes in his new book, “but racial inequality gets worse on his watch.”  One of the reasons for this, he believes, is that “Obama refuses to engage directly the crisis sweeping black America.”  Glaude quotes Cornel West’s observation that “we ended with a Rockefeller Republican in blackface.”  He notes that West started out with high hopes, participating in some 65 campaign events for candidate Obama, the man who, Glaude writes, “was ideally our black progressive antidote to the conservative policies of the Bush years.”

A bit later a police cruiser slowly drove by. The officers stared at him.  The police car abruptly made a U-turn, turned on its blue lights and drove onto the sidewalk, blocking any possible exit. An officer got out of the car. He shined a light into my son’s face, then at his face, and then near the shrubs and bushes... never saying a word. Langston finally asked, ‘Officer, can I help you?’ The cop responded, “Who are you? Where are you from? And why are you here?’ My son told him he was a Brown student and that he was completing a class assignment. The officer told him that the park closes at 9 p.m. Langston said, ‘I know, but it is only 7 p.m.’ The officer repeated, this time more forcefully, ‘The park closes at 9 p.m.’ At this point, his partner came around the car with his hand on his gun or Taser.  My son put his hands up and said, ‘We don’t want any trouble. We’re leaving now.’

Just an hour before Langston called his father with the story, Glaude learned that he been elected president of the American Academy of Religion.  “That didn’t matter,” he writes. “My status as a Princeton professor didn’t matter.  I knew that. I teach about this stuff. But this wasn’t an intellectual argument or an example in a book. My only child was telling me the police, one of them with his hand on a weapon, told him that his body was in the wrong “Why Are You Here?” place. He had reason to fear for his life.”   Glaude describes himself “fuming” at Langston’s Glaude, Jr. with his son, Langston, a sophomore at Brown University. Glaude spent his undergraduate years at story, and his anger is evident in a keynote speech Morehouse College, an all-black, all-male institution in Atlanta, Georgia whose Glaude delivered at Colgate University’s 2015 commencement.  Speaking with goal is nothing less than “to produce academically superior, morally conscious passion about the importance of what he called “turning our backs,” Glaude told leaders for the conditions and issues of today.”  It was a formative experience for students, “You and I must seize hold of the idea that a different arrangement of Glaude, who sees religion and black studies as inextricably entwined and essential things is possible.” By “turning our backs” he meant rejecting the unacceptable, to “understand one’s being in the world.”  He says that Morehouse taught him from “unintelligent and uninspired action” to “those who believe in disposable “how to think,” drenching him in the “history of the black man in the service of populations.” democracy.”  He went on to earn a Ph.D. in Religion from Princeton.  A student at Brown University, Langston Glaude is having a very different kind of undergraduate experience than his father had at Morehouse.   A pivotal episode--and a particularly ironic one considering that Langston Glaude has a dual major in Afrikaner and Urban Studies—occurred during Langston’s freshman year.  Unable to participate in a scheduled field trip with his group

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| BOOK SCENE

In Plain Sight: CoffeeTable Books with Beauty and Brains by Stuart Mitchner

T

he accepted wisdom is that books from academic publishers are too learned and weighty (in the wrong way) to be displayed on a certain piece of living room furniture. Two exceptions to the seasonal rule of show over substance as wise as they are bold and beautiful come from university presses: Stacey Sell and Hugo Chapman’s Drawing in Silver and Gold: Leonardo to Jasper Johns ($49.95) from Princeton, and Shelley Fisher Fishkin’s Writing America: Literary Landmarks from Walden Pond to Wounded Knee ($34.95) from Rutgers. Compared to the lavishly costumed usual suspects appearing just in time for holiday buyers, the tomes featured here can be seen as tributes to the taste and intelligence of both the giver and the receiver. Rather than associating yourself with the glamour buzz of some trendy subject, you can make known, in plain sight, your acquaintance with Leonardo and Jasper Johns, Walden Pond and Wounded Knee. Look inside Drawing in Silver and Gold and you find images of almost unreal beauty from the Middle Ages to the present created by master draftsmen using a rarely appreciated medium central to the history of drawing. Look inside Writing America and you find a scholar

who, according to Erica Jong, “writes like an angel” about the “diversity and humor of the American spirit,” including not only familiar figures like Whitman and Twain, but Jewish, Mexican and Asian American writers, and luminaries of the Harlem Renaissance. CHOOSING A COVER

One of the most visually stunning, elegantly packaged books of the season, Drawing in Silver and Gold balances its elite production values with the companionable appeal of its cover image, a detail from Albrecht Dürer’s silverpoint print, A Dog Resting (1520). There are other drawings throughout the text that might have served as well, including Joseph Edward Southall’s lovely Head of a Girl (1899), with its pre Raphaelite glamour, and Leonardo’s Bust of a Warrior, “one of the most widely admired drawings in the history of art,” which was “executed in the late 1470s in Florence,” according to Stacey Sell’s introduction. Facing the introduction— haunting it, you could say —is another Head of a Girl, this one by Alphonse Legros (1885), after Raphael. John Woodworth’s cover photo for Writing America draws you into the deep perspective of a luxuriant view reflecting David Bradley’s claim that Fisher-Fishkin “takes American literature out of the library” and Hal Holbrook’s celebration of a book that “cuts straight to the soul of America in all its shades and colors.” Published on the eve of the 50th anniversary year of the Historic Preservation Act, Writing America covers over 150 National Register historic sites, from plantations to immigration stations;

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from theaters to internment camps; from the New York tenements of Abraham Cahan’s fiction to the fields of the farm workers central to Gloria Anzaldúa’s poetry. HUMAN NATURE

No less a figure than Michel de Montaigne (15331592) understood the importance of keeping works of intellectual and aesthetic merit in plain sight, thus dispensing with the stigma that can be traced all the way back to a 1580 piece, “Upon the Verses of Virgil,” in which he’s vexed to think that his Essays may “only serve the ladies for a common movable, a book to lay in the parlor window.” Any observer of human nature, from Montaigne to the late Oliver Sacks, would understand the holiday appeal of Charlotte Mullins’s Picturing People: The New State of the Art (Thames & Hudson $40) and Humans of New York: Stories (St. Martin’s $29.99) by photographer Brandon Stanton, whose project to create a photographic cross-section of New York City, with accompanying interviews, evolved into the blog Humans of New York, which grew from a few hundred followers to over fifteen million. In an effort to understand what drives artists to represent people as they do, Charlotte Mullins provides profiles of nearly sixty creative figures, from Kara Walker and Grayson Perry to Cindy Sherman and Kehinde Wiley. Picturing People is organized into five thematic sections that reflect motivations ranging from the investigation of the history of art itself to exploring interpersonal relationships. According to Publishers

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Weekly, “Mullins’s astute overview pairs powerfully with the selected images, offering a perceptive argument for the enduring range and power of figuration into the 21st century.” It’s impossible to simply browse through the picture stories in Brandon Stanton’s newly published sequel to Humans of New York, where the comments of the people in the photos can be as compelling as the photos themselves: “I hated God for a long time,” “I kissed a woman yesterday,” “This is getting too personal,” “I don’t believe in anything,” and from the male half of an old couple, “She still gets giddy when she sees a firefly.” Clearly, this is not a book to consign to a parlor window or leave unopened on a coffee table. If anything, this slice of urban humanity circa 2015 covers a range Montaigne himself (“A good marriage would be between a blind wife and a deaf husband”) would appreciate. No wonder the first published incarnation of Stanton’s blog landed on the 2013 NY Times Bestseller list and stayed there for 45 weeks. A graphic work with similar ambitions is Jason Polan’s Every Person in New York (Chronicle Books $24.95), in which the artist draws people eating at Taco Bell, admiring paintings at the Museum of Modern Art, and sleeping on the subway. Says New York Magazine, “Thumb through a copy to find sketches and scrawled captions of

New Yorkers waiting in line, subway riders, famous faces, and, if you’ve been to New York City in the last seven years, maybe even yourself.” Another book on New York, an all but inevitable subject during the holiday season, is Saving Place: 50 Years of New York City Landmarks (Monicelli Press $50), which could be a companion volume to Writing America, with essays from prominent New York figures, preservationists, and architects, and imagery by architectural photographer Iwan Baan. THE EDGE OF EXILE

Ai Weiwei would be a human subject of great interest even if he were not also an artist, designer, architect, author, publisher, curator, and dissident. He and his family were exiled to a remote region of China for 16 years. Following the death of Chairman Mao, he studied his craft in Beijing and New York. With works that touch on topics such as imprisonment, borders, and disaster, he has often found himself in conflict with the Chinese authorities. Ai Weiwei (Royal Academy $75) is published to coincide with this fall’s major exhibition at the Royal Academy in London—the largest showing of his work to date. Edited by Tim Marlow, John Tancock, Daniel Rosbottom, and Adrian Locke, the volume includes installations and artworks specially created for the exhibition, an interview with Ai Weiwei by Tim Marlow, and contributions from a team of scholars.

DÜRER’S DOG

I keep coming back to Dürer’s drawing, A Dog Resting. While the images of people in Drawings in Silver and Gold are dressed in the fashion or habit of the period, Dürer’s dog could be sitting by a Christmas hearth in 2015 or 1315. Its dignity is for the ages, beyond human notions of giving and receiving elegant books for special occasions. In his Apology for Raymond Sebond, Montaigne, who was born thirteen years after the date assigned to Dürer’s dog, considers “presumption ...our natural and original disease. The most wretched and frail of all creatures is man, and withal the proudest,” for he “withdraws and separates himself from the crowd of other creatures, cuts out the shares of the animals, his fellows and companions, and distributes to them portions of faculties and force, as himself thinks fit. How does he know, by the strength of his understanding, the secret and internal motions of animals?—from what comparison betwixt them and us does he conclude the stupidity he attributes to them? When I play with my cat, who knows whether I do not make her more sport than she makes me? We mutually divert one another with our play. If I have my hour to begin or to refuse, she also has hers.” And so we humans mutually divert one another with our gifts and our occasions and our displays.

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ust north of Princeton lies the village of Kingston. The historic town feels like home, even if you’re just visiting. Kingston has a wide variety of restaurants, offices, unique shops and services, perfect to add as your shopping or visiting destination. Located along the main route between Princeton and New Brunswick, Kingston has ample public transportation making it easily accessible and only a short trip from either town. Not only are there unique shops and businesses to visit, Kingston is a destination that offers the opportunity to walk, hike, cycle, canoe and enjoy the beautiful sights and historic sites along the Delaware and Raritan Canal. STROLL KINGSTON. Spend time strolling the charming town. Enjoy lunch or a snack at Kingston Deli or try The Pind— a stylish restaurant & sports bar offering classic Indian fare. Stop by DiGiovanni Photography for beautiful, authentic artwork to decorate your living room or for a picturesque holiday gift idea. Visit Rider Furniture* for that perfect item for your home, or the quaint location of the Princeton Violins* shop to see their beautifully restored, antique instruments, and inquire of their many services. Then relax with a pastry and cup of tea or expresso at one of the Village favorites, Genarro’s Italian Market and Catering* or Main Street Café. Lastly, set an appointment with Alchemy Mind and Body* for a well-needed massage or facial. DINE KINGSTON. Start planning your holiday dinners or celebrations at one of Kingston’s fine eateries. Dine at Eno Terra*, an eco-minded Italian eatery offering farm-to-table fare & global wines in rustic-chic surrounds. Enjoy the Osteria Procaccini restaurant’s fresh and homemade Italian specialties. CONNECT IN KINGSTON. Not just a place to dine, shop, or enjoy the recreation opportunities offered by the D&R canal, a wide variety of diverse professionals have chosen Kingston as the home for their business. Those calling Kingston home include Nolan Wealth Management, LLC*, First Choice Bank*, Dr. David Young*, Akin Care*, Zullo: The Agency, TLE Dental Care*, and the national headquarters of The Parkinson Alliance*. LIVE KINGSTON. Kingston has a rich history—from the King’s Highway of colonial times it has always been a stop on the road linking NYC to Philadelphia, filled with taverns and restaurants for travelers and villagers. Today, Kingston’s Main Street remains a lively village on that road offering residents and visitors a rich, satisfying array of businesses and professional services in a historic village on the D&R Canal. Kingston is truly a village where community matters and people enjoy the simple pleasures of everyday life. The Kingston Business Partnership is a new organization formed in 2015, in partnership with the Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce. Its Mission is to support the interests of the Kingston businesses and the community, and promotes Kingston as an extraordinary area to visit, work, live, and connect with local community organizations. The Kingston Business Partnership…Connecting Business and Community. * See advertisements on pages 55-57. PHOTOS BY DIGIOVANNI PHOTOGRAPHY - KINGSTON

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AA Naturally Naturally Beautiful Beautiful Holiday Holiday Season Season Celebrating Celebrating Winter Winter in in Central Central New New Jersey Jersey by by Lisa Lisa Miccolis, Miccolis, owner owner of of Bountiful Bountiful Gardens Gardens

Feeling blessed is something I experience everyday living in central New Jersey. It is such a beautiful Feeling blessed experience everyday central New Jersey. It is such a beautiful part of the state.isIsomething love to let Ithat beauty show in theliving way Iindecorate for the holidays. Living in grace, part of the state. I love to let that beauty show in the way I decorate for the holidays. Living grace, which is the state of awakening to the gifts of existence, life, and love, I take time to admireinnature which is the state of awakening to the gifts of existence, life, and love, I take time to admire nature every day. Our trees , bushes, perennials, animals, green meadows, mountains, rivers, and I could keep every Ouryou treescan , bushes, perennials, animals, greenamazing. meadows,What mountains, rivers,inand could keep going day. on but visualize it all as well are truly better time, myI opinion, to going on but you can visualize it all as well are truly amazing. What better time, in my opinion, to honor Nature than at Christmas time? For anyone looking to decorate in an elegant way and also do honor Nature at Christmas anyone decorate an elegant way and do it in a way thatthan is eco-friendly, it time? can beFor done. Youlooking can useto accents thatinhonor the beauty of also nature itthat in are a way that is eco-friendly, it can be done. You can use accents that honor the beauty of nature right outside your door. Not only does this bring back the oldest traditions when Christmas that are right outside yourisdoor. doesit this bring back oldest traditions Christmas decorating started which really Not nice only because brings focus to the simplicity, it’s also sowhen economical. If decorating started which is really nice because it brings focus to simplicity, it’s also so economical. you have a yard with plants and trees I am sure you will find some great material to decorate with.If you have a yard with plants treesisI always am suremyyou will findWe some to decorate with. For outdoor decorating, theand wreath favorite. havegreat a bigmaterial following for our wreaths For outdoor decorating, the wreath my favorite. We have a big following at Bountiful Gardens because they isarealways so natural and elegant together. This year for we our are wreaths hosting at Bountiful Gardens because they are so natural and elegant together. This year we hosting classes to show everyone how simple it can be to decorate a beautiful wreath. If youaretake time classes to show everyone how simple it can be to decorate a beautiful wreath. If you take time in considering a fabulous ribbon, the rest is simple. I love pinecones, big western sugar cones or in considering a fabulous ribbon, the rest is simple. I love pinecones, big western sugar cones or small ponderosa cones in clusters, all types work. Berries are a must and lots of them. Lastly it’s so small conesof in as clusters, all types work. Berries areyour a must andonlotsboxwood, of them.cedar, Lastlyjuniper, it’s so simple,ponderosa mix in cuttings many evergreens as you can get hands simple, mix in cuttings of as many evergreens as you can get your hands onboxwood, cedar, juniper, magnolia. The mixture of greens give the wreath the texture that makes it just beautiful. It’s a great magnolia. of greens giveputs the evergreens wreath the texture it justofbeautiful. It’s a great symbol ofThe the mixture winter season which finally atthat themakes attention all. Everyone talks symbol of the winter season which puts evergreens finally at the attention of all. Everyone about the flowers in spring and summer. During Autumn all the deciduous shrubs and trees gettalks the about the flowers in spring and summer. During Autumn all the deciduous shrubs and trees get the attention with the leaf color changes they take on before they fall. Now, for winter it is time for attention theadmired leaf color they takespotlight. on before they fall. Now, for winter it is time for evergreenswith to be andchanges have the entire evergreens to be admired and have the entire spotlight. Container Gardening is my next favorite holiday decorating task. I always think it’s so sad to Container is my in next favorite holiday decorating task.They I always so empty. sad to see all thoseGardening empty planters front of homes during the winter. don’tthink have it’s to be see all those empty planters in front of homes during the winter. They don’t have to be empty. Let’s fill them all with evergreens. This not only decorates for Christmas but decorates for the Let’s themseason. all withWe evergreens. not only decorates for Christmas for the the entirefill winter can plant This live evergreens in in containers that are but largedecorates enough and entire winter season. We can plant live evergreens in in containers that are large enough and the material of the pot can withstand freezes. If your pot has potential to crack you can empty it material the pot can withstand freezes. yourprevents pot hasthe potential to crack you can and use aofsmaller plastic pot inside as a liner.IfThis pot from expanding withempty ice andit and use a smaller plastic pot inside as a liner. This prevents the pot from expanding with ice and cracking. If you do not want to plant you can make an evergreen arrangement with cut branches. cracking. you do and not want to plant make an like evergreen arrangement cutmixture branches. They are If beautiful they give you you the can opportunity the wreath to have awith large of They are beautiful and they give you the opportunity like the wreath to have a large mixture of different textures and berries. I love doing this because I can coordinate the wreath with the two different textures andof berries. I loveWe doing I can coordinate the wreath with more the two planters on each side the door. havethis all because the greens, berries, pinecones, and much at planters on each side of the door. We have all the greens, berries, pinecones, and much more at each of the three locations along with the staff to actually help you put it all together. We have each offor thearranging three locations along with actually you put itGardens all together. Weall have classes the containers as the well.staff Thetostaff and Ihelp at Bountiful thanks of classes for arranging the containers as well. The staff and I at Bountiful Gardens thanks all of you for your continued support throughout the year. We wish you all and your families a Joyous you for your continued support throughout the year. We wish you all and your families a Joyous Holiday Season and A Very Happy and Peaceful New Year. Holiday Season and A Very Happy and Peaceful New Year.

135 Route 206 135 Route 206 Hillsborough, NJ 08844 Hillsborough, NJ 08844 (908) 526-5500 • fax (908)526-5501 (908) 526-5500 • fax (908)526-5501

1536 Lower Ferry Rd. 1536 Lower Ferry Rd. Ewing, NJ 08618 Ewing, NJ 08618 (609) 583-5167 (609) 583-5167

54 Main St. 54 Main St. Chester, NJ 07930 Chester, NJ 07930 (908) 879-9993 (908) 879-9993

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ot surprisingly, the Bushwick studio of Ursula von Rydingsvard is redolent of cedar, the sculptor’s medium of choice. For more than 30 years von Rydingsvard has kept a studio in Brooklyn where she incises monumental cedar forms using a hand-wielded chainsaw. Surrounded by other low brick and concrete industrial buildings painted with graffiti art, this one has leafy vines growing up its front. Wearing black pants and turtleneck on a 90-degree day, von Rydingsvard—with spiky boy-cut hair—looks a bit like Laurie Anderson. There is no air conditioning in the office or studio—at least it doesn’t feel that way—and the 73-year-old runs up and down a flight of steel stairs all day, as well as climbing ladders to look inside her sculpture. No need to go to a gym or sauna at the end of a day like this. All around us are the 4-by-4-inch cedar beams the sculptor works with. I am invited to climb a ladder and look into the abyss of one of von Rydingsvard’s forms. Though abstract, the shapes are like vessels

Ursula von Rydingsvard and Richard Webber, photo by Morgan Daly.

and suggest primitive dwellings, reminiscent of the barrack-like refugee camps she lived in as a child. Her work is collected in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art and the Storm King Art Center, among others. In 2014, von Rydingsvard won the International Sculpture Center Lifetime Achievement Award. A new 19-foot tall commission has been installed at Princeton University’s Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment in October. The building, to be dedicated in spring 2016, is designed by Billie Tsien and Tod Williams, the architects responsible for the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia and the former American Folk Art Museum in New York City. With a copper pyramid at its peak, Feinberg Hall, a residence Tsien and Williams designed on the Princeton University campus, was completed in 1986. Von Rydingsvard’s sculpture is her first to be fabricated primarily in copper. The full-sized maquette of stacked, texturized cedar beams shaped with a circular saw took six months to build. The finished piece of more than 3,000 copper pieces, each hammered by hand and painstakingly

assembled around a metal armature, imitates the texture of the wooden model. The copper version was fabricated in nearby Greenpoint in the studio of metal artist Richard Webber. Princeton University Art Museum Director James Steward has called the piece a “heroic and layered work of art by one of the greatest sculptors of our time,” noting that it will be fitting on the campus that is home to so many other important works of art. It also “brings a new dimension to the collection distributed across our historic campus.” Emily Carter, the Andlinger Center’s founding director, anticipated the sculpture as a welcoming beacon, “rising into the sky, emblematic of our high aspirations...its meticulously handcrafted construction of copper parallels the...challenging research we undertake in the center.” “Copper is so soulful and responsive to all kinds of climate,” says von Rydingsvard. “It instinctively felt like the right thing to do.” She speaks in a softer voice than one might expect from a person wielding power tools and wearing protective gear. Along one of the studio’s walls hang fire-retardant uniforms and masks.

HOLIDAY 2015 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Lucas Strzelec, gallery assistant, in Richard Webber’s studio in Brooklyn, NY, photo by Erin Firestone.

Guided by instincts and dreams, von Rydingsvard does not start with a scaled-down model. Studio assistant Andria Morales shows me the full-size maquette, in cedar, for the copper sculpture, and explains how von Rydingsvard starts by sketching the outline on the ground. Once that is cut, she draws the profile for the next layer, and so forth, building up layer by layer. “It’s a process she’s developed over 35 years,” says Morales, who is one of six studio assistants. “She doesn’t do drawings but has an image in her head that is pretty compelling.” As the texturized vessel takes form, von Rydingsvard is there with her pencil, making registration marks, continuing to build up from the ground. Each piece is screwed together as it rises, then unscrewed, reverse stacked, and glued—a numbering system helps to keep track of where everything goes—so the final sculpture has no screws. “She has developed a language with pencil marks to indicate the edge and what kind of cut she wants,” says Morales. “There’s no talking when working.” At Richard Webber’s studio there are three more assistants. The fabricator makes a paper template of every cedar 4-by-4, then creates it in copper. “Each copper panel is pounded into shape and affixed until

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the sculpture is mimicked in copper,” says Morales. “It’s labor intensive and highly skilled.” In fact, von Rydingsvard says this is the most labor-intensive work she has ever done. The cedar model was started two years ago. What will become of it? Morales, who is in her fourth year with von Rydingsvard, says the model is available if a private collector wants it. Or it may get recycled into another work. The studio is home to large works that are between exhibitions in, for example, the Venice Biennale, Art Basel and the Frieze Art Fair. The number of shipping containers needed to transport these works overseas is staggering, not to mention the cranes needed to set them in place. Although this is her first work in copper, von Rydingsvard has worked in bronze. Bent Lace is a wood model for a bronze that was acquired by the Museum of Modern Art. Another vessel in preliminary stages that has been commissioned for M.I.T. “Nothing gets built without her hands on it, drawing, dictating steps,” says Morales. We enter an enormous room adjacent to von Rydingsvard’s office where she turns on the A.C. An intern offers me a glass of water. The room, with its long floorboards, runs from the front of the building to the back. There’s a large work area covered with a tapestry, flat files, work lights and

magnifying lenses, shelves of supplies and a rocking chair draped with a throw. One entire wall is comprised of her smaller works—doodlings on paper, abstract forms of copper mesh, threads, beads, cut-out paper, lace, cast paper and photographs. On this wall she is working out ideas and establishing her own visual vocabulary. She calls them “experiments, little nothings.” If the artist did these alone, she would be remarkable. Von Rydingsvard was born in Germany in 1942 to a Polish mother and a Ukrainian father who were forced to work as agricultural laborers under the Nazis during World War II. Between 1945 and 1950, von Rydingsvard and her family—she was one of seven children—cycled through nine displacement camps in Germany, living in raw wooden barracks. When she was 9 years old her family emigrated to Connecticut. When asked, von Rydingsvard is reluctant to discuss any of this. “One’s childhood affects one profoundly and it can never be erased, but I could not be specific as to how it manifests in my work.” She has said that in her family using too many words made one suspect. “I drank from the world in visual means,” she says. Von Rydingsvard learned to ration smiles, and only laughed when “really appropriate...Working hard was the answer to life.”

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Princeton University’s Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, photo by Jeffrey E. Tryon.

Arriving in Connecticut, she remembers being amazed at the how the earth looked from above. “There was black tar covering the earth, and homes on top of rectangles of measured plots. I had seen very little grass before. The three-story brick buildings —we always had out houses and outdoor fires. I didn’t think ‘how lucky,’ I thought it was jarring.” Her father found work in a factory. The only money they had was attached to the lining of their coats. “The Polish National Alliance knew immigrants paid back so they loaned us money to buy a house. My father was terrified. He worked eight hours in a factory under the smelliest conditions, cutting metal, then cycled to another town to work another eight hours. On weekends he worked as a gardener.” While earning an MFA from Columbia University in 1975, von Rydingsvard discovered cedar as a medium. It reminds her of the wooden spoons, bowls, platters and shovels of her rural farming heritage. She taught at five metropolitan colleges and at Yale before being able to work full time on her sculpture. When she found this building in Bushwick, once a facility for making coffins, it had been run into the ground by the previous owner, an ambulance

dispatcher. Von Rydingsvard says she was able to get it for “not a lot” but had to deal with the thousands of pigeons who made their home in the torn-open roof. “It was a tremendous amount of work.”

“It’s a visually impressive thing in copper—the colors are beautiful and you want to touch it.” When copper oxidizes it turns green, but the patina used will have rich red and orange tones.

Brooklyn’s Barclay Center, she wants people to touch it and interact with it, comparing it to rubbing the Buddha’s belly. She chose Webber as a fabricator because of his work with the Museum of Natural History. “He would create missing bones of dinosaurs, copy fossils or add on. He’s brilliant. He uses his blow torch and pounds, making the metal behave.” Von Rydingsvard asks Morales to call car service to take her home to Manhattan where she lives with her husband, neuroscientist and Nobel Prize winner Paul Greengard. Morales stays to take care of loose ends—following up on a piece just installed at the National Gallery, and those recently purchased by the Museum of Modern Art, the Albright Knox Gallery in Buffalo, N.Y., and the Cleveland Museum of Art. “The work in copper is gorgeous gorgeous gorgeous,” repeats von Rydingsvard on her way out. “There’s nothing like it in all of the U.S.”

What she wants to talk about most is the copper. “It’s a visually impressive thing in copper—the colors are beautiful and you want to touch it.” When copper oxidizes it turns green, but the patina used will have rich red and orange tones. Touching it will affect the patina, and change it over time. As with Ona, her work in bronze in front of HOLIDAY 2015 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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5K IN SUPPORT OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

February 13, 2016

www.comop.org/cupidschase

Community Options to Host 5K in Princeton to Support People With Disabilities On Saturday, February 13, Community Options, Inc., will be holding their signature annual event, Cupid’s Chase 5K. The race will be held at the Princeton Shopping Center and all the proceeds from the race go directly towards supporting people with disabilities in Mercer County. Register early to beat the price increase! The registration fee is currently $20, but

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will increase in October. Participants will receive an “Available” or “Unavailable” shirt to wear for the race in hopes of sparking a love connection. Community Options is a national nonprofit organization that provides housing and employment support to people with disabilities. The first Cupid’s Chase 5K took place in 2009 and was so successful Community Options

decided to take Cupid’s Chase nationally. This year, we hope to have over 10,000 Cupid’s Chase participants across 31 cities walking, running, jogging, and rolling (baby strollers and wheelchairs) to make a difference in the lives of people with disabilities. All the events take place on the same day –February 13, 2016. For more information or to register for the event please visit www.comop.org/cupidschase.

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Opening Doors Community Options provides a higher quality of life to people with disabilities BY ILENE DUBE | PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF COMMUNITY OPTIONS, INC. 76 |

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K

atie shows a visitor around Community Option’s Daily Plan It facilities on Alexander Road in West Windsor. In the first room, a group of people is watching a video on professionalism. “They’re learning to be respectful of each other’s space and how to dress for work,” says Katie, 34. In addition to learning business etiquette, members of the job club will write short stories to help identify their personal goals. One is an artist who likes drawing cartoons, another wants to write a cookbook. “We help them to do that,” says Katie. What this group of job seekers – including Katie – have in common is, they all have developmental disabilities. But as Katie demonstrates, they can also be articulate and have astute memory skills. With their drive, and the resources of Community Options, these people are primed to work. Some work at the Daily Plan It, answering phones, cleaning conference rooms and bathrooms. They help with printing, sorting, stuffing, stamping, hole punching and binding. “We get it done on a deadline,” says Katie. “It keeps us busy.” When Katie, who has been with Community Options since 2006, isn’t working at the Daily Plan It, she works at Home Goods assembling lamps, folding towels and organizing items on shelves in the food aisles. Once she’s arranged all the bottles and jars and packaged goods, customers “don’t have to ask an associate where it is, they can find it,” boasts a prideful Katie. “Andrew helped me get the job.” Andrew Park, the managing director at Community Options, says “She’s a good worker. She tries hard and is respected.” Katie, who lives with her parents in West Windsor, uses TRADE to get to work. TRADE is a free ride service for eligible Mercer County residents to maintain their health, improve their financial status, or make use of medical, therapeutic and recreational services, or to gain access to other needed community resources. “It’s

very tricky. If the bus is late, I’m late, and my pay will be deducted,” she says. Community Options owns the building the Daily Plan It operates. Tenants rent the space and pay minimum wage to the Community Options clients who work for them. “Our operation is self-sustaining and doesn’t cost taxpayers a thing,” says President and CEO Robert Stack, who founded Community Options in 1989. The Daily Plan It markets itself as a place where “business is the center of your universe.” When tenants discover there are people with disabilities working there, and interact with them in a way that’s not forced, “they will reduce their prejudice or anxiety,” says Stack. “We are trying to create ways people with disabilities can be part of the fabric of the community and not stand out.” Among the tenants are a real estate office, attorneys and iSpace. There’s an office for a job coach and a nutritionist, and a conference room with a large mahogany table and a monitor “if Robert Stack wants to give a presentation,” says Katie. There are devices “to compensate for people who can’t speak or communicate,” she adds. “Katie is an excellent communicator,” says Stack, later, behind the door in the conference room. “She is an anomaly. We develop compensatory strategies to enable people with disabilities to get jobs, either with an employment specialist (a job coach) or built-in supports – help from co-workers.” A co-worker may help, for example, blind people or people in wheelchairs to roll napkins, a job servers or hostesses may not have time to do. In addition to the Daily Plan It, Community Options runs Vaseful, a flower shop in Edison. The organization enables workers to earn money doing what they want to do, and achieve a higher quality of life. A person with disabilities can grow by interacting with people in the workplace. By creating natural ways in which people with disabilities can interface with those without disabilities, “They will blossom helping others and being among those who are kind to them.”

Stack grew up in Pennsylvania. As a 13-year-old in seminary school, required to take classes six days a week, he volunteered “in a big home for children with disabilities,” he recounts. Years later, after leaving the priesthood, he went back and learned it had been closed and the people were put in institutions. “We need to do a better job of keeping people out of institutions,” he says. “New Jersey has the second largest number of people with developmental disabilities in institutions, Texas is the first.” The cost at such facilities can be $200,000 per person a year, he says. North Princeton Developmental Center closed because it was no longer a viable model. “It shouldn’t be an option. People with developmental disabilities benefit more in small houses.” Developmental disabilities include cerebral palsy, autism, spinal cord injury, intellectual disability, epilepsy and traumatic brain injury. In the 1999 Olmstead decision, the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed the right of individuals with disabilities to live in the community. The high court upheld the integration mandate of the Americans with Disabilities Act, requiring public agencies to provide services “in the most integrated setting appropriate to the needs of qualified individuals with disabilities.” In 2009, the Civil Rights Division launched an aggressive effort to enforce the Supreme Court’s decision. Stack started Community Options to serve the needs of the more than half a million people in the country, and 6,000 in New Jersey, on waiting lists for services. It began out of his home in Bordentown in 1989, with Stack answering the phone in one voice, then changing voices when handing the call off to himself. He began buying properties for homes, and the building for Daily Plan It was purchased in 1996. A building on Farber Road, where Stack’s office is, was purchased, and the former Town Topics building on Witherspoon Street was acquired this year for STEP (Schools-To-Employment Program). STEP provides on-the-job training for students

(opposite) Community Options, Inc. Board of Directors: (starting from the left) Delia Donahue, Robert Stack, Lindsay Aquilina-Levert (in white), Peter Dulligan, Bryan McDonald (tan suit), Tim Dunigan (red tie), Svetlana Repic-Qira, Tom Burdick (front). Robert McCarthy of Community Options rings the opening bell at the New York stock exchange (above). (right) Vaseful is a flower shop Community Options operates in Edison.

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with disabilities. Through STEP students work at unpaid internships until hired for the job they are best suited for. For example, a West Windsor-Plainsboro High School graduate with autism tried several positions at Robert Wood Johnson Hospital until discovering that patient transport was what he enjoyed doing most. In addition to employment, Community Options works to help its clients be as independent as possible, from getting dressed to cooking and getting to work. Community Options has 100 houses in New Jersey, 100 in Pennsylvania, and operates 35 offices in nine states with a staff of 3,600. Stack estimates 8 to 10 percent growth a year, with the greatest need in New Jersey. The organization may purchase a house for $300,000, seek a mortgage to cover 80 percent, and solicit donations, often from families, for the remaining $60,000. Staff, insurance and mortage payments are covered by Medicaid. But a four-person house is not suitable for everyone, Stack points out. Some clients may live with their family and still use Community Options services, like Katie. Others may be better off in Community Options apartments. “We encourage families to think about what they want long term.” The biggest challenge, says Stack, is ignorance. “We work to educate the community. One of the things I’m most proud of is how we maintain the properties, mowing the lawns – we don’t want to stand out.” To that end, the organization’s 450 vans have no logos so occupants won’t be pointed at. Another challenge in educating the public is terminology. Stack doesn’t like using the word “special”

for people. “A ‘special’ is when something is on sale,” he says. “We serve people, not burgers.” He points out that autism wasn’t recognized as a disability until 1983, and in 1985 the name of the state organization was changed from the Division of Mental Retardation to the Division of Developmental Disabilities. Another great challenge is getting people to their jobs. Stack is exploring an Uber-like model that will employ under-utilized vans and connect people with disabilities to transportation by use of an app. “Transportation is the key to inclusion,” he says. Stack writes to governors inviting them to visit Community Options houses, and when he learned that South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley had taken him up on the invitation, he drove to Columbia to meet her. “What did the neighbors think when you bought the house?” she asked. The neighbors were pleased that the house, which had been in foreclosure, was purchased. “We have barbecues quarterly and invite the neighbors, and they love it,” Stack assured Governor Haley. One of the clients gave the governor a tour, but instead of starting with the kitchen or living room went right out to the garage and pointed to a Ford van. “This takes us places,” said the client. “That’s what we do at Community Options,” says Stack. “We take people places to be a part of their community and give families hope that there are ways and options.”

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Princeton Magazine - Holiday 2015