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Patrick Kennedy is at home in New Jersey


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CONTENTS

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SPRING 2018

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PATRICK KENNEDY IS AT HOME IN NEW JERSEY

FLOATING ABOVE BY ANNE LEVIN

BY TAYLOR SMITH

Princeton architect Michael Farewell designs a striking home in Bucks County, Pa.

The former congressman fights to end discrimination against mental illness, addiction, and other brain diseases

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BIRDS IN YOUR WORLD

HHH IN ’68:

BY ILENE DUBE

BY DONALD GILPIN

Heather Howard’s journey in politics and policy

Princeton’s Institute Woods is among the best places to view spring migrators

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BOOK SCENE BY STUART MITCHNER

SPRING AWAKENING: HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW?

Women Making History and Art

BY WENDY GREENBERG

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Classes online and on-site offer an array of horticultural help 36

LANDSCAPING PROGRAMS FOR THE EVERYDAY DABBLER BY WILLIAM UHL

Selections for the adventurous amateur 48

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THE POWER OF MUSIC AND DANCE BY DONALD H. SANBORN

The Leonard Bernstein and Jerome Robbins centennials 80

FASHION & DESIGN

A Well-Designed Life 92, 94

ON THE COVER: Patrick Kennedy photographed by Tom Grimes.

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MOC.KCOTSRET TUHS ;OKHZ ETS AIRAM YB SDRIB ; DRAWOH REHTAEH ;SEMIRG MOT YB OTOHP YDENNEK KCIRTAP ;STCETIHCRA LLEWRAF LEAHCIM ;HJAMN TA NOITIBIHXE NIETSNREB DRANOEL ;NEDRA G LACINATOB KROY WEN

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Lynn Adams Smith CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jorge Naranjo ART DIRECTOR Jeffrey Edward Tryon GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Matthew DiFalco Erica M. Cardenas PHOTOGRAPHER Tom Grimes CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Taylor Smith Anne Levin Laurie Pellichero Stuart Mitchner Ilene Dube Wendy Greenberg Donald H. Sanborn III ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Robin Broomer ACCOUNT MANAGERS Jennifer Covill Joann Cella Charles R. Plohn Monica Sankey Erin Toto OPERATIONS MANAGER Melissa Bilyeu ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES 609.924.5400 Media Kit available on www.princetonmagazine.com SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION 609.924.5400 ext. 30 subscriptions@witherspoonmediagroup.com EDITORIAL SUGGESTIONS editor@witherspoonmediagroup.com PRINCETON MAGAZINE Witherspoon Media Group 4438 Route 27 North Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 P: 609.924.5400 | F: 609.924.8818 princetonmagazine.com

Princeton Magazine is published 7 times a year with a circulation of 35,000. All rights reserved. Nothing herein may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher. To purchase PDF files or reprints, please call 609.924.5400 or e-mail melissa.bilyeu@witherspoonmediagroup.com. ©2018 Witherspoon Media Group

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Welcome to the spring issue of Princeton Magazine, with Patrick Kennedy on the cover. The cover image was taken by our photographer Tom Grimes at Kennedy’s waterfront home on the Jersey Shore, where he lives with his wife Amy, a school teacher, and their four beautiful children. In Taylor Smith’s article, Kennedy speaks openly about his past struggles with bipolar disorder and drug addiction. Some of you might remember in 2006 when Kennedy crashed his car into a barricade on Capitol Hill in the middle of the night, then admitted that he was battling addiction and depression. Today, Kennedy is a mental health advocate and is working passionately to educate and improve access, policies, and programming in behavioral health. Learn more about his efforts by visiting The Kennedy Forum website at thekennedyforum.org. Princeton’s own Heather Howard also has a few things to say about health care, politics, and policy. In Donald Gilpin’s article, you will read about Howard’s determination to make a difference on all levels of her life. After a long winter with too many nor’easters, it’s a healthy pleasure to spend time outside, and birdwatching is a fun way to enjoy spring. Ilene Dube’s article is packed with information about the spring-migrating warblers at the wooded area surrounding the Institute for Advanced Study. Jeffrey Tryon’s illustrations capture the tranquil tone of a bird outing. If you are planning a spring garden or just enjoy learning about plants, check out Wendy Greenberg’s article on the wide range of classes available both online and onsite at Longwood Gardens, New York Botanical Garden, and Brooklyn Botanic Garden. We also have an article on landscape design software for do-it-yourselfers. Some of the software packages allow you to scan a photo of your yard, then drag and drop plants and hardscape features on a digital version of it. Many of the programs have cost estimating features, plant encyclopedias, and plant care guides. Speaking of technology, I would like to take this opportunity to let our advertisers know that we have launched an exciting new digital advertising program using specialized algorithms. We can deliver customized campaigns based on each user’s individual interests and preferences. For additional information on this program please contact Robin Broomer, our director of advertising, at robin.broomer@ witherspoonmediagroup.com.

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Photography by Andrew Wilkinson

Dear readers,

Bob Hillier and I would like to thank the continued support of our advertisers and devoted readers. We hope you enjoy all the articles in the spring issue of Princeton Magazine. . Respectfully yours,

Lynn Adams Smith Editor-In-Chief @princeton_mag


Patrick Kennedy is at home in new jersey

by taylor smith photography by tom grimes


The youngest son of Massachusetts Senator Ted Kennedy and Virginia Joan Kennedy, Patrick Kennedy has put down roots in Brigantine, New Jersey with his wife, Amy, and four children, Harper, Owen, Nora, and Nell. Amy is expecting their fifth child in May. A New Jersey native, Amy has more than 15 years’ experience working in New Jersey public schools and is the education director of The Kennedy Forum. Patrick lovingly refers to Amy as his “Jersey girl,” who grew up in a neighboring shore town. Located on the bayside of the Jersey Shore, a stone’s throw from Atlantic City, the Kennedy’s waterfront home is centered around family and the beauty of the natural setting. On the day of Princeton Magazine’s visit, seagulls were dive-bombing around Patrick’s boat and fine grains of sand blew across the roadway. Former congressman (D-Rhode Island), founder of The Kennedy Forum, co-founder of One Mind, and commissioner of the President’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis, Kennedy continues to fight to end discrimination against mental illness, addiction, and other brain diseases. He may be best known as the lead sponsor of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act, which was passed in 2008 during George W. Bush’s presidency. The law requires most health insurance plans to provide coverage for mental illness and addiction in the same way that diseases of the body are treated. Founded in 2013, The Kennedy Forum is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to lead a national dialogue on transforming mental health and addiction care delivery. The Forum also aims to achieve health equity by advancing evidencebased practices, policies, and programming in mental health and substance use.

The One Mind, Kennedy T hhee cco-founder oo--fo oun unde der ooff O nnee M iin nd, d, K ennneedy en enne dy hhopes ooppeess to pioneer cures eer er a ggreater rreeaatteerr gglobal llo obbaal in iinvestment nve vest est stme menntt iin n ccu u for diseases of th the brain. Current he bbr rai ain. n. C uurrrreentt iinitiatives are exploring treatments and cures for post-traumatic stress and traumatic brain injury. One Mind also addresses diagnostic research and treatment for Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, ALS, addiction, and depression. Inspired by his political work and family history, in 2015 Kennedy co-authored the

New York Times bestseller, A Common Struggle: A Personal Journey Through the Past and Future of Mental Illness and Addiction. In the book, Kennedy detailed his own struggles with bipolar disorder and drug abuse. He writes, “I grew up aamong people who were geniuses about not talking about things.” tta a In 2017, Kennedy was appointed to serve on tthe th he President’s Commission on Combating Drug he Addiction and the Opioid Crisis, which is chaired A Ad dd by former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie. The Commission studies ways to combat and treat the impact of drug addiction in the U.S. In a final report of recommendations to President Donald Trump, Kennedy focused on the declaration of a federal emergency. Kennedy spoke with Princeton Magazine about his continued work and leadership in mental health advocacy, brain research, addiction treatment, and his life in New Jersey.

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How does affordability within the state of New Jersey relate to mental health care and addiction treatment?

What is the current state of the opioid crisis in New Jersey and how is it different from (or similar to) other states?

Affordability is, of course, an important aspect to effective mental health and addiction treatment. However, I think the real issue is not so much the cost of health insurance, but what happens when you have health insurance and still cannot get adequate care because your insurance plan refuses to cover treatment or forces you out of an inpatient facility after a very limited stay. Additionally, many insurance plans only cover one of the three FDA-approved medications for treatment of opioid use disorder. What ends up happening is that people are paying for these health insurance policies—thinking they are covered— but when the rubber meets the road, they feel hung out to dry. That's why we have to enforce the Federal Parity Law, so that individuals and small business owners actually get what they pay for when they purchase insurance. The Kennedy Forum created a website called Parity Track, where consumers and policymakers can track legislative, regulatory, and legal parity activities in all 50 states and at the federal level to monitor implementation and best practices. I encourage everyone to get involved and get educated on parity. It is critical to improving access to mental health care and addiction treatment, in New Jersey and nationwide.

In New Jersey alone, one person dies every 48 hours from an opioid overdose. We are taking an aggressive approach to fighting the opioid epidemic—one of the strongest in the nation. That’s because New Jersey is utilizing a wide array of evidence-based solutions. This differs greatly from the ineffective one-size-fits-all approach that some states are taking. Thankfully, Governor Christie recognized the opioid epidemic as a dire public health crisis and acted accordingly. The state dedicated $200 million in new dollars to fight the crisis late last year. I am confident that Governor Murphy will build upon the strong foundation of support left by Governor Christie. In fact, Governor Murphy’s Healthcare Committee, of which I am a member, has already recommended a series of key actions to keep New Jersey moving forward. We called for comprehensive public education campaigns—targeting users, prescribers, caregivers, and drug courts—designed to address death risks, needle exchange programs, prescription monitoring efforts, medicationassisted treatment, and more. Often, New Jersey’s regulatory systems unnecessarily frustrate the

A Common Struggle: A Personal Journey Through the Past and Future of Mental Illness and Addiction, by Patrick J. Kennedy and Stephen Fried.

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implementation of integrated clinical care, leading to a real shortage of appropriate care for those in crisis, and for those whom crisis could be avoided. This could be addressed through a plan to clear applications for integrated behavioral care within six months; a listening tour to explore behavioral health regulatory reform with advocates, caregivers, consumers, and community health organizations; a dedicated workgroup to update and rationalize payment and licensing policy; and an inventory of service providers from acute detox to community support to facilitate referrals and planning, including for hard-to-reach groups such as pregnant women and reentering prisoners. Medical groups in our state are also making great strides in combating the opioid crisis. Riverside Medical Group, for example, is using a fully-integrated model of primary care and mental health in the same offices, all under one roof. They work from one shared electronic medical record system, which means providers have access to hospital, specialty, and primary care records. This goes a long way in helping to stop accidental opioid prescribing to those with substance use disorder. In addition, they monitor prescribing rates and conduct analysis of historical claims and clinical data to predict patients with potential opioid abuse, use special questionnaires to screen patients annually for addictions, and use quality measures to monitor the initiation and engagement of alcohol and other drug dependence treatment. All of these initiatives are making a difference.

John, Robert, and Ted Kennedy, July 1960, during John’s presidential campaign. Wikipedia.


What prompted you to write A Common Struggle: A Personal Journey Through the Past and Future of Mental Illness and Addiction, and was it a difficult book to write? I struggled with bipolar disorder and addiction for a very long time, often in the public eye. I wanted to address the elephant in the room head on. Almost every family in this country is touched by mental illness or addiction, yet no one talks about it. Why? Because people still treat mental illness and addiction like a moral failing or character flaw instead of brain diseases. That has to change. Perhaps most important, I also wanted to outline a clear path forward for a better mental health care system and the policy needed to support it. Honestly, I was sick and tired of the anti-stigma campaigns. The real way to change attitudes is to change practices. Right now, we often wait until someone has a crisis before starting treatment for mental illness or addiction. But we don't treat diabetes or cardiovascular disease that way. Full implementation of the Federal Parity Law, which requires insurers to treat illnesses of the brain, such as depression and addiction, the same way they treat illnesses of the body, such as diabetes and cancer, is absolutely critical. I didn't write this book for me. Dredging up the past doesn't serve me. I received a lot of pushback and I was ridiculed for it—all expected. The book was my attempt to advance an important cause, speak up for others who haven’t yet found their voice, and provide a road map for getting us to a better place as a nation.

How has fatherhood and your current work shaped your recovery? My work in mental health advocacy certainly helped lead me toward recovery, but my recovery is truly possible because of the strong personal connections I have in my life—especially with my beautiful wife, Amy, and our children. Being a father has strengthened my commitment to recovery for obvious reasons, but it has also strengthened my commitment to fighting for mental health equity and justice in this country. I want my children to grow up in a world where there is no more discrimination against those with mental illness or addiction, and diseases of the brain are treated just like diseases of the body. If they need help, or their children need help, I hope they can seek that help without second thought in a system built around integrated care. I want that for everyone. My long-term recovery is also shaped by the inspiring people I meet out on the road or through my work with The Kennedy Forum. The resiliency and authenticity I witness first-hand just goes to show what we are truly capable of when we choose to walk the walk in a life of recovery.

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Describe the purpose behind Quartet. Forty-two million people F in our country live with in cco-occurring physical and co mental m me en health conditions—and of them receive no 6600 ppercent e hhelp he elp lp ffor lp orr the latter. This disconnected o ssystem sy syst ysstteem m nnot o only hurts patients, it hurts Doctors often have to cram pproviders. pr ovid ov der erss.. D o complex comp co mpleex ch mp cchronic hrrooni nic disease management into nic seven-minute Empowered by provider se evveenn-m miinnu ute te aappointments. ppppoi oinnttme tm mee Quartet’s innovative ddata, da ata ttaa, Qu Q uaarrtteet’ t’s in nnnoova vati ati tiv iv digital platform uses algorithms aal lggoori rith thms ms tto o pr pproactively roa oact ctiv vely ely identify patients who are in el need of care for underlying, untreated mental health conditions. Quartet then bridges the gap between physical and mental care by connecting those patients with mental health providers or online therapy based on their unique needs, insurance, and location. I am so proud to be on Quartet’s board. Promoting

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the use of technology to improve our mental health care system has always been a key pillar of my work as an advocate, because relying solely on face-to-face care is just not realistic. Quartet is shining a much-needed spotlight on what's possible when health systems and insurers prioritize true, integrated care. This year, they are embarking on a partnership with Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey, one of the largest health insurers in the state. Great things are to come.

Please comment on Governor Phil Murphy’s vow to expand access to medical marijuana in New Jersey. I don’t think anyone should be arrested for possessing marijuana and saddled with a criminal record. But I also don’t think legalization or commercialization is the answer. That’s why I support Senators Rice and Singer in their attempt to decriminalize possession, while keeping sales of elixirs and edibles

illegal. We don’t need more stoned drivers or kids using THC gummies. How would that make New Jersey stronger? I think we’ve gotten caught up in this false dichotomy between legalization or criminalization. That’s one of the reasons I helped to start Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM) with a former Obama appointee. SAM also has a New Jersey affiliate— NJ Responsible Approaches to Marijuana Policy (NJ-RAMP)—that I wholeheartedly support. As for expanding medical marijuana, we need to wait and see what the details are. We shouldn’t be in a hurry to turn Atlantic City into Venice Beach, where “docs for hire” sell pot recommendations to anyone with a headache for $100 cash. That said, I support research into marijuana’s medical components and following the lead of the FDA. I think there will be some marijuana-based CBD medications approved by the FDA later this year, and that could be very helpful to many people. I’m less thrilled about medicine via gubernatorial decree, but again, I think we should wait for details of the new plan.


What is your favorite thing about living at the Jersey Shore? Sailing, taking the kids tubing or swimming in the ocean or bay, spending the day at the beach—these things make me very happy. I am blessed to have the opportunity to share my love of the water with my wife and children on the beautiful Jersey Shore. We take full advantage of our surroundings. The people are friendly and good-hearted, just like the Jersey girl I married!

Describe some current personal or professional projects that you are most excited about. New Jersey holds great potential for realizing full implementation of the Federal Parity Law. Just last year, advocates pushed for a bill that made it easier for substance use disorder (SUD) patients to access care. That bill, which was passed and signed into law, specifically limits situations in which insurers may deny claims/deny coverage for outpatient and inpatient SUD benefits. The Kennedy Forum is now actively working with those advocates to build upon the bill’s success. In 2017, legislation was introduced that aimed to better regulate insurers’ compliance with the Federal Parity Law. Not only did the bill require insurance plans to submit reports to the state jurisdiction proving their compliance, but it also mandated that regulators report on their efforts to enforce existing state laws and the Federal Parity Law. This is a great step forward in making sure New Jersey residents will be able to get the care they need when they need it. The Kennedy Forum engages in similar work across the nation by introducing parity implementation legislation and providing technical assistance to state and federal regulators. We work on Capitol Hill to educate members of Congress on mental health/SUD issues and advance evidence-based policy solutions as outlined in our Guide for the 115th Congress and the final recommendations of The President’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and The Opioid Crisis, on which I served. Our most recent work has been focused on how to best appropriate funding to address the devastating opioid crisis, bringing SUD patient health record provisions into alignment with the rest of medicine, and bettering suicide prevention efforts among vulnerable populations. Of course, I am always excited about The Kennedy Forum’s powerful parity tools: Parity Registry and Parity Track. We are constantly refining these websites to empower individuals, families, policymakers, journalists, and others in fighting for parity rights. On Parity Registry.org, consumers can learn to file an appeal with their health plan after being denied coverage for mental health or addiction treatment services, send a complaint directly to state enforcement officials, access step-by-step appeals guidance, and more. Parity Track.org is a website where anyone can track legislative, regulatory, and legal parity activities in all 50 states and at the federal level to monitor implementation and best practices.

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culture of excellence at our firm. Source: Forbes.com (Feb. 2018). America’s Top Wealth Advisors: State-By-State ranking was developed by SHOOK Research and is based Source: Forbes.com (Feb. 2018). America’s Top Wealth Advisors: State-By-State ranking was developed by SHOOK Research and is based on in-person and telephone due diligence andAdvisors: a rankingState-By-State algorithm thatranking includes: client retention, industry Research experience, of Source: Forbes.com (Feb. 2018). America’smeetings Top Wealth was developed by SHOOK andreview is based on in-person and telephone due diligence meetings and ranking algorithm that includes: client retention, industry experience, review of compliance firm a nominations; and meetings quantitative including: assets management and revenue generated for their firms. on in-personrecords, and telephone due diligence andcriteria, a ranking algorithm thatunder includes: client retention, industry experience, review of performance is not a criterion clientcriteria, objectives and risk tolerances vary,revenue and advisors rarely have audited performance compliance records, firm nominations; Investment and quantitative criteria, including: assets under management for their firms. compliance records, firm nominations; andbecause quantitative including: assets underand management andgenerated revenue generated for their firms. reports. Rankings are based onathe opinions of SHOOK Research, are not indicative of advisors future performance or representative of Investment performance is not criterion because objectivesLLC and and riskand tolerances vary, and rarely have audited performance Investment performance is not a criterion because client objectives and riskclient tolerances vary, advisors rarely have audited performance any one client’s experience. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC LLC and nor are its Financial Advisors or Private Wealth Advisors pay a fee to reports. Rankings are basedNeither on the opinions of SHOOK Research, not indicative of future performance or representative of reports. Rankings are based on the opinions of SHOOK Research, LLC and are not indicative ofwww.SHOOKresearch.com. futureAdvisors performance or representative of Forbes SHOOK Research in exchange for the ranking. For more information: any oneorclient’s experience. Neither Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC nor its Financial or Private Wealth Advisors pay a fee to any one client’s experience. Neither Morgan Stanley Smith nor itsSIPC. Financial Advisorswww.SHOOKresearch.com. or PrivateCRC Wealth a fee to Forbes SHOOKStanley Research inBarney exchange for the ranking. For more information: © 2018or Morgan Smith Barney LLC LLC. Member 2042641Advisors 03/18 CSpay 9183818 03/18 Forbes or SHOOK Research in exchange for the ranking. For more information: www.SHOOKresearch.com. © 2018 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC. CRC 2042641 03/18 CS 9183818 03/18

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TOGETHER , WE CAN MAKE TOMORROW ’S BREAK THROUGHS . At Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, breakthrough discoveries are on the horizon for many of the toughest diseases that strike children. We have the world’s leading experts, we have alliances with other top hospitals — including the Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center — and we have you. Support our campaign For Tomorrow’s Breakthroughs. Your gift will help us transform children’s lives here in New Jersey — and around the world.

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this writing—a cold gray winter day—it’s hard to imagine that in May, the skies will fill with migrating birds, bringing color, song, and beauty to the treetops. “Spring warbler watching is not just birding. It is a social phenomenon, a ritual, a happening like maple sugaring in Vermont or the opening day of trout season in Pennsylvania,” writes eminent ornithologist Pete Dunne. “People who never lift binoculars at any other time of year X out their Saturday mornings in May and join thousands of kindred souls searching for treasure in the treetops.” One of the top places in the world to see spring-migrating warblers is the Institute Woods at Princeton’s Institute for Advanced Study. The Institute Woods and Charles H. Rogers Wildlife Refuge form a 300-acre tract of deciduous forest bounded on the east by the wet woodlands and marsh. Crisscrossed by a network of trails and a sewer right-of-way, the Woods includes a small area of virgin forest and harbors a good number of bird species, particularly during the songbird migration seasons. Because of the Institute Woods’ reputation, birders come from all over. There have been groups from the Summit Nature Club, the Trenton Naturalist Club, the Montclair Nature Club, and the Watchung Nature Club, as well as local groups. On a typical Saturday in May, cars line both sides of West Drive, leading to the Rogers Refuge. An observation platform overlooks the main section of the marsh. More 190 species of birds

have been seen here, and it is possible to see as many as 30 species of warblers in a single day “Necks crane skyward, and high overhead the canopy vibrates with the frenetic movement of feeding warblers—Tennessees, Blackpolls, Parulas, Cape Mays, and the flame-throated Blackburnians,” continues Dunne. “Lower, in the understory, there are Canada Warblers (with their bold, staring spectacles), licorice-striped Blackand-Whites, elegant Black-throated Blues, and flashing male Redstarts (the bird whose coal-black and crimson pattern gave rise to its Spanish name, the little torch). Hugging the ground, leaving no niche unfilled, are Northern and Louisiana Waterthrushes and skulking Kentuckys; later in the season, sounding the death knell of spring migration, is the elusive wraith of the shadows, the Mourning Warbler.” A TRANQUIL ENVIRONMENT

The Institute for Advanced Study, founded in 1930 by Louis Bamberger and Caroline Bamberger Fuld, gradually acquired most of the land between 1936 and 1945, providing a tranquil environment for scholars engaged in theoretical research and intellectual inquiry. Prior to then, most of the land had been farmed or planted as an orchard. General George Washington marched his troops through the Institute Woods just prior to engaging in the Battle of Princeton in 1777. In 1950, Institute Director J. Robert Oppenheimer dedicated a Founders’ Walk, which included four miles of

trails and paths, and the building of a suspension bridge. Today, a working farm abuts the western end of the woods. An old trolley line between Trenton and Princeton marks the northern edge of the woods behind the Institute fields. A refuge for wildlife as well as ideas, the peaceful environment of the woods provides opportunities for solitary contemplation along with chance encounters with the many species of animals that inhabit the grounds. The Stony Brook flows through and is bordered by a broad flood plain, which has abundant beds of spring wildflowers such as yellow trout lilies, pink and white spring beauties, and purple violets. Aspen, gray birch, beech, oak, hickory, dogwood, sweet gum, and red maple SPRING 2018 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 29


trees provide habitat for summer breeding and spring and fall migrating birds. Since 1997, the Institute has been the steward of these 589 acres of woods, wetlands, and farmland. The permanent easement protects a 56mile greenway network critical for the feeding and nesting of birds on the Atlantic flyway, and a unique laboratory of more than 45 species of trees for studies of forest succession. According to the New Jersey Trails Association website, these lands are not a public park, but the Institute graciously allows the public to use the lands under terms of the conservation easement that preserved the lands in perpetuity. One of the reasons the Institute Woods is so good for bird watching is its location, along the line where the Coastal Plain geographic region meets the Piedmont regions just north of the Pine Barrens. The Institute Woods’ abundant plant life and hardwood trees provide a greater food source than the Pine Barrens.

the Sierra Club, and authored books and studies on environmental issues. He also served on the Princeton Township Conservation Commission and chaired the Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association. With Princeton Nature Tours, he has identified more than 411 different species of birds in New Jersey, 741 in North America, and more than 4,100 worldwide. These days, Southerland admits that the Institute Woods is no longer as popular for warblers as it was in its heyday. “One of the bumps is that the deer are taking over, eating all the groundcover—except the garlic mustard. No one wants the garlic mustard,” he says. “Ovenbirds, Thrushes, and Towhees need good vegetation, such as jack-in-the-pulpit, to feed on the ground.” Since White Buffalo was contracted to cull the deer, the problem has improved somewhat, although last year’s warm winter resulted in a robust herd. Another factor has been development, such as at Canal Point, says Southerland, which impinged on habitat. “There’s development everywhere,” he admits. STICK TO THE EDGE

ROGERS WILDLIFE REFUGE

The 39-acre Rogers Wildlife Refuge borders the Institute Woods and contains bush areas, thickets, woods, and the north bank of the Stony Brook. It was acquired in 1968 by what is now the Princeton Environmental Commission by a conservation easement, and memorializes Charles H. Rogers, a nationally-known ornithologist who, along with Thomas Southerland, played a key role in establishing the sanctuary. Rogers passed away in 1977, but Southerland, who with his wife, Margot, ran Princeton Nature Tours from 1981 to 2001, still leads birding expeditions to the Institute Woods and Refuge. His tours are the longest continuing course Princeton Adult School has offered, he says. Doctors, faculty members, even a gold medalist diver have participated in his trips. This year it will be held on Saturday, May 12—register at Princetonadultschool.org. Southerland, who moved to Princeton in 1962, assisted Princeton Physics Professor Lyman Spitzer, whose work led to both the Hubble Telescope and Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. At the University, Southerland got involved in the first Earth Day. He organized a chapter of

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“When you look for birds, whether in New Guinea or Princeton, it’s best to walk along the edge, or along the road,” he says. “The edge gets the sun, and they get the fruit and the insects. But when the edge is destroyed, and you don’t have buffer zones, you open up to Blue Jays and Grackles and Starlings—suburban birds.” Because of these invasive birds, it is harder for migrators to breed—they have to compete with birds that wouldn’t normally be here. And speaking of invasives, “because of how the Phragmites (large perennial grasses in wetlands) has grown, you can’t even see the pond anymore.” Deforestation in Borneo, due to the harvesting of palm oil, among other things, also effects the bird population migrating through New Jersey, Southerland says. Without the large blocks of inter-connected forest, hundreds of species could become extinct. Large mammals such as orangutans are already affected. Southerland cites research by Princeton Professor of Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Public Affairs David Wilcove on how climate change and the fragmenting of the forest negatively affect animal migration. Still, Southerland has high hopes of seeing Grosbeak, Scarlet Tanager, Redstarts, and Wood Thrush in the Institute Woods this year. “We always used to see Yellow Warblers around the observation tower, but last year we didn’t see a one.” Cowbirds, he says, have increased in number. The Brown-headed Cowbird is a brood parasite, meaning that it lays its eggs in nests of other species. A female Cowbird quietly searches for female birds of other species that are actively laying eggs. Once she has found a suitable host, the Cowbird will sneak onto the resident bird’s nest when it is away, usually damage or remove one or more egg, and replace that egg with one or more of her own. The foster parents then

unknowingly raise the young Cowbirds, at the expense of their own offspring. “One year, in our yard, we saw a female Cardinal feeding a Cowbird in her nest,” says Southerland. It’s a jungle out there. Wood ducks often breed in Princeton’s tree streets, in the cavities of trees. “The female calls to the young, and they suddenly drop out of the tree. ‘Welcome to Earth,’ she seems to be saying. Then, at nighttime, she takes them to Lake Carnegie.” One year, back in the 1970s, Southerland and his wife got the police to hold up traffic on Nassau Street so the chicks could safely cross. FIELD TRIPS

On Sunday, May 6, 8AM, and Saturday, May 19, 8AM, Brad Merritt will offer field trips to the Institute Woods for the Washington Crossing Audubon Society. Phone (609) 921-8964 to register. Merritt, retired from the state police where he worked in emergency management, has been birding since he was 15. The Rocky Hill resident majored in biology with an emphasis on ornithology and zoology at Allegheny College and has been leading field trips since he was in his 20s. “The Institute Woods used to be one of best warbler spots in country,” he says. He agrees with Southerland that it’s not like it was in the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s because “the deer population has browsed the woods down to nothing, there’s no understory.” Since deer culling began, he has observed spicebush coming back and seen more thrushes and warblers. “Breeding birds, Kentucky Warblers, and ground nesters all want the spicebush. The understory is essential for warblers.” Merritt has also noticed the disappearance of inch worms. “They used to drop from everywhere. Now you don’t see them as much. The biology of the forest might not be what they used to lay eggs on. There used to be a beech grove, but it has died out. Hurricanes like Sandy also caused damage. Forests have a natural progression,” he explained, saying that they change as trees grow old and die. Climate change may affect the arrival dates of warblers, says Merritt, as well as how late they stay. “They arrive after the thaw when insects, their food source, are out. The thing about climate change is that it could be 50 years before we see


changes, and people don’t make decisions about things that far into the future.” Birders accompany Merritt because they want to see the beautiful colors and hear the songs, “but warblers can be difficult to see behind trees,” he says. “We encourage people who are new to come on our trips, and to take time to learn about the bird: how it feeds, where it nests. It can be frustrating for new birders, even for experienced birders—warblers can drive you up the wall when they get behind leaves to feed on insects.” One common beginner frustration is how to focus binoculars on the elusive spot where fellow birders are pointing, losing sight of the bird while bringing the binoculars to the eyes. Merritt suggests not looking down at the binoculars, but keeping your eye on where the bird is as you raise the lenses to your eyes. SOUND, SIGHT, AND HABITAT

Beginning birders study field guides and work out identifications point by point, but veterans rely on their ears, finely tuned over the course of seasons, according to Dunne. Merritt agrees: The best way to identify a bird is by ear. “Walking through the Institute Woods, if you know the song of a warbler, you know to stop and look, although you may not see anything for 10 minutes.” He teaches the Roger Tory Peterson approach of looking for field marks. “If you see a red bird with black wings, you know it’s a Tanager.” He looks at shape and size of the bird, as well as the way it flies. “You know it’s a Blue Jay by the way

it paddle flies, or it’s a Goldfinch if it ambulates when it flies.” Habitat, too, helps to identify. “Is it out in fields or in deep woods? Where does it nest? If it’s a ground nester, then don’t look up for it.” Birding enthusiasts can study books, listen to tapes, look at the Cornell School of Ornithology’s All About Birds website, or go out in the field with a group of knowledgeable birders, he says. “Every day is an adventure in the woods. The Institute Woods is where Einstein used to walk and think, so it has to be a great place.” Dr. Henry Horn, Princeton University Emeritus, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, has conducted extensive research in the Institute Woods for more than 40 years, and calls it “one of the most renowned natural areas in central New Jersey.” He says his interest in natural history began with an obsession with birds, which led to obsessions with trees, butterflies, and wildflowers. While identifying them is nice, he says, he just likes to watch them: their beauty, the ways in which they fly. He’ll be leading A Walk on the Wild Side: Exploring the Institute Woods through Princeton Adult School on Saturday, May 12, 10 AM. Winnie and Fred Spar will lead the annual Birdathon for Washington Crossing Audubon on May 12, 8AM—meet in the Rogers Refuge. Looking for something for the whole family? Howell Living History Farm is offering a Family Bird Excursion: Naturally Friends Series on Sunday, May 6, 1-3PM. The naturalist will lead an afternoon of family-style birding. Children will

participate in a Bird Spotting Challenge while parents enjoy the calls, songs, and sights of spring migration. Go to howellfarm.org. Looking for birds can be hit or miss, so it’s good to have other wildlife on your list of what to see. The New Jersey Mycological Association offers mushroom forays in the Institute Woods during warbler season, which coincides with morel season. At press time the schedule was not yet finalized; check njmyco.org.

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BIRDING “HOT SPOTS” The Institute Woods is a great place if you want to walk its wide trails along the Stony Brook, says Brad Merritt. “You’ll see Thrushes, Orioles, Tanagers, and you can still see warblers on good days.” When he can’t get his fill of warblers in the Institute Woods, he goes to Garrett Mountain, in Paterson. He also recommends Cape May, and Baldpate Mountain in Hopewell (“they got rid of the deer and put in spicebush”). He has seen warblers near the Trenton Farmers Market and in Trenton’s suburbs. In addition to the Rogers Refuge and Institute Woods, the Washington Crossing Audubon Society lists the following central New Jersey “Hot Spots” and offers field trips: • Abbott Marshlands Important Bird Area near Delaware River from Trenton to Bordentown • Negri Nepote Native Grasslands Preserve, north of Griggstown in Somerset County • Pole Farm Important Bird Area at Mercer Meadows in Lawrence and Hopewell Townships • St. Michaels Farm Preserve/D&R Greenway in Hopewell Township • Sourlands Ecosystem Preserve in Sourlands Regional IBA spanning Hopewell in Mercer County and East Amwell in Hunterdon County

• Stony Brook Millstone Watershed Association, Pennington • Ted Stiles Preserve at Baldpate Mountain Important Bird Area in Hopewell Township north of Titusville. • Fiddler’s Creek Preserve at Baldpate Mountain, south side of Fiddler’s Creek Road • Washington Crossing State Park, Titusville

2018 IS THE YEAR OF THE BIRD! The National Audubon Society, National Geographic, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, BirdLife International, the National Park Serve, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Migratory Bird Program are partnering this year to celebrate the Year of the Bird, recognizing the wonder and passion and internet memes they inspire. Says David Yarnold, Audubon president and CEO: “The Year of the Bird collaboration gives us all an opportunity to recommit to our promise to protect birds and the places they need for the next century…. Throughout 2018 we’ll ask you to take simple actions that will help protect birds.” There are plenty of actions described at birdyourworld.org, but you might start by planning spring planting with Audubon’s Plants for Birds database at Audubon.org/ native-plants.

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Spring Awakening: How Does Your Garden Grow?

Classes online and on-site offer an array of horticultural help By Wendy Greenberg

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE sPRING 2018


T

Brian Sullivan, NYBG’s vice president for landscape and glasshouses, teaches a horticulture class in the native plant garden. (Photo courtesy of New York Botanical Garden)

he air is warmer and daylight lingers longer. Lime green leaves are but features orchids in a free, online course, Everything About Orchids, painting roadside landscapes. So often spring awakens an urge to seek which is open until May 6. greener thumbs, or greener yards. After all, it is the Garden State. BOTANY, LANDSCAPE, AND ART, OH MY! If you are so inspired, you are in luck. A bounty of classes and programs beckons to help would-be plant NYBG’s adult education program—the whisperers find their voices. Some of the largest plant-related continuing education area’s most respected and scenic public program in the country—is a way to expand gardens are at your service with on-site and horizons, jump-start careers, or just learn online courses, ranging from landscape design more about horticulture and related interests, to wellness and therapy, to native flora, and says Stevenson Swanson, NYBG’s science some unusual offerings. media manager. “People are thirsting to be in the outdoors Art is inspiration for many gardens (and more,” said Barbara Corcoran, vice president of vice versa, see Georgia O’Keeffe events continuing and public education at the New York listed on page 41). At NYBG, a new series Botanical Garden (NYBG), in the Bronx. of weekend watercolor workshops—oneBoth the NYBG, and other venerable day sessions dedicated to basic watercolor gardens such as Longwood Gardens in techniques and focused on various botanical Kennett Square, Pa., and the Brooklyn subjects—is part of the Botanical Art and Botanic Garden, welcome learners, as do a Illustration program, the oldest botanical few other venues. art certificate program in North America. Orchids are big this spring (and always!) The Enid A. Haupt Conservatory at the New York Botanical Garden. Colorful plums, cherries, birds of paradise, and classes about growing and caring for orchids are featured during NYBG’s annual “The Orchid Show,” on view and spring tulips are topics for special watercolor classes this spring. But look also for the certificate programs, designed to deepen until April 22 featuring a series of installations by acclaimed Belgian floral artist Daniel Ost. Longwood Gardens concluded its “Orchid Extravaganza” horticultural skills and knowledge. Botanical Art and Illustration is one of (left) A student draws in the Botanical Art and Illustration class at the New York Botanical Garden. (Photo courtesy of New York Botanical Garden) spring 2018 prinCETOn MAgAZinE

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A student arranges roses in a New York Botanical Garden Floral Design class. (Photo courtesy of New York Botanical Garden)

Students in the Landscape Design class at New York Botanical Garden. (Photo courtesy of New York Botanical Garden)

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE sPRING 2018


The fountain at Longwood Gardens. (Photo by Sam Markey, courtesy of Longwood Gardens)

seven certificate programs (complete with a graduation ceremony). Others are in Landscape Design, Botany, Floral Design, Gardening, Horticulture, and Horticultural Therapy. Summer intensive programs offer a way to earn in just a few weeks a substantial share of the credits required for many certificate programs. Horticultural therapy, the topic of summer intensive classes from June 11 through August 25, teaches the use of plants as a therapeutic skill. Floral design is the topic of a summer intensive program, as is gardening, with classes in Soil Science. Likewise, the summer intensive Landscape Design offers classes like Plants for Landscaping. Like fresh bouquets, summer classes in flowers—Dauntless Dahlias, Lush Peonies, and Foolproof Hydrangeas—may appeal to the senses. Imagine the creativity that can be harnessed in Bonsai for Beginners, a weekend workshop, and Container Gardens, during two Saturdays in May. The Urban Naturalist program offers seasonal intensives in spring or fall, and the Wellness track offers classes like Herbal Saturday: Reduce Your Stress. EDUCATION IS PART OF THE MISSION

The array of some 600 sessions in the catalog is the result of NYBG’s emphasis on education. “Consumer education is important at the New York Botanical Garden,” explains Corcoran. It is one of three main missions: horticulture, scientific research, and education. The Botany Certificate Program is said to be the oldest in the country. “Education is fundamental to the garden,” Corcoran says. “Horticulture education has been the mainstay for the past 75 years. We have always offered classes.” The majority are taught by top botanists and horticulturalists on staff. “We are so lucky to have amazing resources here,” she adds. The organization is also known for teaching botanical artists how to blend artistry and scientific accuracy to document plants and flowers. “Being where we are, we can draw from the top artists in the country,” says Corcoran.

With their ears to the ground, so to speak, program coordinators act as advisors to the continuing education department, and receive feedback from students, who mostly request longer classes, according to Corcoran. With so many exotic offerings, what about those of us who just want to improve the look of our front or back yards? “You can’t go wrong with The Fundamentals of Gardening,” she recommends. The four-session course, at various times of year, explores the basic principles of successful and environmentally-friendly gardening (Held on days, evenings, or Saturdays). Also for basic home gardeners is Introduction to Landscape Design, in three sessions at various times of year. Students will be introduced to the terminology, concepts, and basic principles of landscape design, recommended for students with little or no background. (Held days or evenings). GO SOUTH FOR ANOTHER FANTASTIC GARDEN

Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pa., may be about an hour and a half away from Princeton, N.J., but that doesn’t stop a devoted contingent of Princeton-area residents from attending classes in floral design and ornamental horticulture, says Matthew Ross, Longwood’s director of continuing education. In addition to popular on-site courses, online classes have become popular too, such as the current orchids course; digital garden photography; and a series of courses in partnership with North Carolina State University. Longwood offers 175 courses, targeted to different audiences. It draws students from everywhere—some stay in area hotels and make a vacation out of taking a class, says Ross. Class registration covers admission to the garden for the day. “Online classes allow us to reach new audiences,” Ross says. “Anyone can connect with us and learn from the experts and experience the beauty of Longwood.” spring 2018 prinCETOn MAgAZinE

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The center walk at Longwood Gardens. (Photo by Becca Mathias, courtesy of Longwood Gardens)

Each year, 30 percent of the classes are completely new. “We constantly look for the top trends in horticulture,” he explains. “The continuing In addition to the online orchids class, Longwood is developing another free education team holds brainstorming sessions throughout the year, and course focused on aquatic plants and its extensive waterlily collection, for we look for rising stars and top professionals in the horticulture world as potential instructors.” next summer. One of these classes will allow students to build a one-of-a-kind wire Upcoming online courses include Annuals, Perennials, and Vines (opening July 9), and Trees, Shrubs, and Conifers (opening September 10). tree in Sculpted Wire Tree, a fall class taught by New Orleans artist and Both of these six-week courses (with registration fee) invite students to horticulturist Taylor Williams (October 20, 8am to noon and 2 to 6pm ). On September 4, 6:30 to 8:30pm , join three learn to identify and appreciate commonlyNational Geographic Explorers as they take used plants, and include visuals from photo students on a photographic journey through stories, presentation, and online fact pages. the Amazon and the interconnected nature of They are co-offered with North Carolina State the regional flora and culture. Learn how the University. indigenous people of the Amazon regard their A favorite course, Plant Science: trees, both for physical and spiritual uses, Understanding Plants, is considered a stepping and how this reverence can protect people stone to the Ornamental Horticulture program, and their ecosystems. The evening includes a where students get a chance to explore the dessert reception at the waterlily pools. wide range of diversity of the plant kingdom, “For many, this is a way of treating and basic nomenclature and taxonomy. It will themselves and their gardens by finding new be offered online for the first time this fall. skills that will cultivate both personal growth Want a more formal education? Three and success, and it can translate to a better programs offer a Certificate of Merit: garden as well,” says Ross. Ornamental Horticulture, Landscape Design, And, in Brooklyn, the Brooklyn Botanic and Floral Design. Lush vegitation at Longwood Gardens. (Photo by Larry Albee, courtesy of Garden offers a Certificate in Horticulture and Longwood Gardens) Master Composter Certificate, and courses UNUSUAl AND NEw ClASSES such as Grow a Culinary Garden (April 15, 2 to 5pm ) and other tours and For more than 60 years, Longwood has been providing innovative events. While the Brooklyn Botanical Garden does not offer strictly online courses for both garden professionals and consumers of horticulture education. “Longwood encourages learning at all levels,” says Ross. classes (although they point out that all classes are listed online), the spring“Even the experienced gardener and professional will pick up new tips and summer catalog offers new gardening classes and an extensive lineup of speakers and exhibition-related offerings. techniques.” ORCHIDS AND MORE

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE sPRING 2018


Longwood Gardens continuing education. (Photo by William Hill, courtesy of Longwood Gardens)

Mediterranean House, Longwood Gardens. (Photo by Larry Albee, courtesy of Longwood Gardens)

SOME FEATURED CLASSES AND EVENTS: NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN Bronx, N.Y. 10458-5126 www.nybg.org Adult Education: 800.322.6924 (Classes are also held at Midtown Education Center, 20 W. 44th Street, New York, N.Y.) “Georgia O’Keeffe: Visions of Hawaii” May 19 through October 28 NYBG’s landmark exhibition celebrates the artist’s time spent in the Hawaiian Islands in 1939. Some of the associated events are classes, a symposium, and a flower show in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory focusing on the flora and ecology of Hawaii. An art exhibition in the LuEsther T. Mertz Library and Art Gallery will feature 20 of O’Keeffe’s works, including paintings not seen together in New York since their 1940 debut. Georgia O’Keeffe: A Creative Life, An Evening with Roxana Robinson and Linda M. Grasso June 13, 6:30 to 7:30pm A symposium about the importance of landscape in O’Keeffe’s creative life, with two O’Keeffe experts. Georgia O’Keeffe and Hawaii: A Sense of Place May 18, 10:30am A panel moderated by curator Theresa Papanikolas explores the influence of the natural environment on O’Keeffe’s art. Summer Intensive Programs A way to jump-start a career change or accelerate progress toward a certificate in Floral Design, Botanical Art, Landscape Design, Horticultural Therapy, or Gardening by completing up to half the certificate requirements in just a few weeks.

LONGWOOD GARDENS 1001 Longwood Road Kennett Square, PA 19348 www.Longwoodgardens.org 610.388.1000 There are many offerings at Longwood, online and on-site. Here are few: A Floral Portrait April 21, 9am to 1pm Painter and educator Gerald Simcoe offers a course for more advanced painters focused on the historical approach of famous French and Dutch painters. Making a Milpa April 28, 9 to 11am (taught in English) or 1 to 3pm (taught in Spanish) This class will be offered in both English and Spanish. Each student will take home a starter pack to begin their own milpa, which is the traditional Mesoamerican home farm/ garden plot. Cyanotype June 10, 9am to noon or 1 to 4pm The first book printed was by English botanist and photographer Anna Atkins in 1843, who pioneered the use of the cyanotype process to capture images of botanicals. The class explores the history of the process, and hands-on exploration using plant material from Longwood. Photo Op! June 12, 6:30 to 11pm Four different photography instructors help participants capture the evening beauty of Longwood. Then get a chance to get the perfect shot of the newly revitalized Main Fountain Garden. (Photos may not be sold for commercial use.) Everything About Orchids This new online, free program is open until May 6. Self-paced, students can learn through

The brick walk Longwood Gardens. (Photo by Larry Albee, courtesy of Longwood Gardens) video lectures, discussions, and forums about Longwood’s renowned orchid collection, and how to grow the plants at home, in floral designs, or in landscapes. BROOKLYN BOTANIC GARDEN 990 Washington Avenue Brooklyn, N.Y. 11225 www.bbg.org 718.623.7200 Certificate in Horticulture Courses toward a certificate in horticulture focus on horticulture in an urban environment. The program is designed for people interested in a career in horticulture and for highly motivated home gardeners. Courses range from Beginning Botany for Horticulturists to Urban Garden Design.

RUTGERS UNIVERSITY http://rutgersgardens.rutgers.edu/ Springclasses.html Rutgers University Continuing Studies offers some gardening classes with preregistration and fees such as Shrubs for New Jersey Gardens, Container Gardening with Annuals, and other classes. RUTGERS MASTER GARDENERS OF MERCER COUNTY 930 Spruce Street, Trenton, N.J. 08648 609.989.6853 Bruce Crawford: Garden Design for Beauty, Sustainability, and Pest Resistance June 2, 1 to 3pm Mercer Educational Gardens 431 A Federal City Road Pennington, N.J. 08534

Workshops Gardening to Support and Attract Birds April 8, 6 to 8:30pm Waking the Garden for Spring April 18, from 6 to 8pm (preregistration required) Explore the fundamentals of springtime garden care. Learn how and when to prepare your soil for new plantings, and get tips on how to plant seeds, transplant, and propagate. LAMBERTVILLE GOES WILD https://lambertvillegoeswild.weebly.com/ This year, Lambertville Goes Wild sponsored a three-part series, Learn to Landscape: Dream, Design and Detail at the Lambertville Public Library (now completed), but classes may be scheduled in the future. The website has resources on the National Wildlife Federation Garden for Life Wildlife Certification Program, a USDA plants database, and more information.

Crawford is director of Rutgers Gardens, Rutgers University, and an adjunct professor in the Landscape Architecture Department at Rutgers University. HELPFUL INFORMATION The Rutgers Master Gardeners of the Cooperative Extension of Mercer County is a group of volunteers who provide horticultural information and programs to the community. They are trained by faculty and staff of Rutgers University and its New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station. The Master Gardeners staff a Helpline and encourage calls or an office visit with home gardening, insect or wildlife questions. 609.989.6853 March - October, Mon – Fri. 9am to 3pm This magazine cannot guarantee space availability in classes noted. See websites for class and/or garden visitation fees.

spring 2018 prinCETOn MAgAZinE

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Ronni is a Master Gardener who was inspired by classes at Longwood Gardens. After 10 years of transforming properties throughout Mercer, Hunterdon and Bucks counties, she created Ronni Hock Garden & Landscape, LLC. Services include complete design, installation and maintenance of landscape, gardens, container gardens as well as eye-popping patios, terraces, pathways, stone walls and lighting features. Our landscape architect and installation teams combine for over 40 years of award-winning results and customer satisfaction. Take a virtual tour: www.ronnisgarden.comand call: 609.844.0066.

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WELCOME HOME

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Landscaping Programs for the Everyday Dabbler By William Uhl

here are countless programs for landscape and garden planning available, ranging from free web apps to hundred-dollar software packages. For the average homeowner thinking of planning out a new garden or backyard pool, it can be confusing and time consuming to find an up-to-date program at a reasonable price. The following three selections are low- or no-cost options for any adventurous amateur. ArtifAct interActive’s GArden PlAnner

Artifact Interactive’s Garden Planner is an excellent choice for the amateur landscaper who still wants to experiment, but wants to get into the nuts and bolts of their new backyard. Its top-down view is cleanly presented and accessible, 3D mode is incomplete but still a helpful addition, and its $34

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price tag combined with a lengthy free trial period make it one of the best. Aesthetically, the top-down design mode is excellent. Colorful icons show hundreds of different plants in clean detail. Each iris, marigold, and chrysanthemum has a unique graphic, many of which have multiple colors. Surfaces like grass and dirt are able to naturally curve and bend seamlessly. The art style is clean, colorful, and readable: everything a landscape or garden planner needs to be. Functionally, it misses a few elements that may be important to some landscapers — such as accounting for varying elevation — but for the majority of cases, Garden Planner has everything an amateur planner needs. Resizing, recoloring, rotating, labels, vegetable garden management; Garden Planner has the tools landscape tinkerers need to tweak things to their preference without presenting overwhelming lists of tools options. The part that elevates Garden Planner from acceptable to excellent is the 3D view. Though it is still a work in progress, it’s impressive nonetheless. After laying out your garden, 3D view lets you walk about a 3D-rendered version of your landscape, complete with animated flowing water, lighting and shadows, and scaled 3D models of most of the plants and objects placed in your plot. Being able to walk around a digital version of your new backyard provides a tremendous sense of scale and gives a sense of what the final product might feel like. All of these elements combined make Garden Planner one of the strongest choices available.


Images from Artifact Interactive’s Garden Planner

Images from Gardena’s My Garden SPRING 2018 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Images from Better Home & Gardens’ Plan-A-Garden

Better Home & Gardens’ Plan-a-Garden

Gardena’s My Garden

Better Home & Gardens’ Plan-A-Garden offers a satisfying, simple interface that trades off breadth of features for ease of use. Plan-A-Garden presents a two-dimensional canvas with a suburban backdrop that allows users to assemble arrangements of plants and decorations, as well as place lawns, dirt paths, and other textures by painting over the background picture. For the drag-and-droppable objects, Plan-A-Garden will attempt to scale things relative to the picture’s “horizon line,” though with inconsistent results. That’s as close as it gets to a 3D mode; if you want to be able to plot a garden or backyard and digitally walk through it, you’ll have to look elsewhere. Plan-A-Garden is simple enough for someone anyone to hop right in and try some ideas. Importantly, it’s free to dabble with, and only $19 to expand the number of plants available, as well as opening up other features. Notably, the feature to put a custom picture as the backdrop is behind the $19 paywall. Ultimately, Plan-A-Garden is a great tool for aesthetic decisions— deciding which kind of rhododendron looks best with bright red wax begonias, or if an old brick path should go on the left or right of the wisteria vine. When it comes to more practical concerns—estimating how much all of the plants onscreen will cost, or how far apart they need to be to coexist — Plan-A-Garden falls short.

Lastly, Gardena’s My Garden provides an alternative to Garden Planner, losing the breadth of specific foliage selections and the 3D view, but bringing a stronger aesthetic presentation and several valuable new features, including an automatically-generated shopping list and an automatic sprinkler planner. The pencil-drawn art style is by far and away one of the most pleasing aesthetics in landscape planners. It scales well and gives a personal, natural feel to the landscape creation process. Save for a glitch here and there, finished projects look more like professionally-composed illustrations than computer-generated mockups. My Garden’s list of utilities are useful but inconsistent. The sprinkler planner’s automatic layout is fantastic when it works, though it will sometimes leave you high and dry, forced to manually lay out each sprinkler and manually connect them to faucets around your house. The automatic shopping list is entirely geared towards the sprinkler planner; while it will automatically create a shopping list for your sprinkler system once it’s complete, it doesn’t include anything else. Overall, My Garden may be the best-looking piece of software to plan your backyard, but the limits of its features makes it hard to place at the top. However, as a completely free program without any hidden price tags or trial periods, it stands as a fantastic tool for assembling aesthetically pleasing backyards without spending a dime.

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PRINCETON ARCHITECT MICHAEL FAREWELL DESIGNS A STRIKING HOME IN BUCKS COUNTY, PA. BY ANNE LEVIN

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2018


Photo courtesy of Michael Chiarella

uring the week, David and Pam Anderson live in a house on the grounds of Saint Luke’s Parish in Darien, Connecticut, where David is pastor. Since the house doesn’t belong to them, the couple don’t have to do much in the way of maintenance. But from most Thursdays through Saturdays and whenever they can get away, the Andersons can be found doing the things that homeowners do at the house they built in a valley in Springtown, in Bucks County, Pa. “This house has become our pleasure,” says David Anderson. “We work on the land, we chop wood, we mow the lawn. We baby it.”

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Photo courtesy of Taylor Photo. www.taylorphoto.com

Designed by Princeton-based architect Michael Farewell, the house is nestled in a valley, cut through by a stream that runs to the Delaware River. It has evolved in phases. First was the 2,800-square-foot living space. The core is a kitchen for Pam, a serious cook who is the author of several cookbooks. Just above the kitchen is an open room that started as a writing studio for David, but has changed purposes from time to time. The second phase of the project was the addition of a garage, with bedrooms on top, connected to the main house by a spacious outdoor pavilion. Phase three is supposed to be a writing studio separate from the house, but that may or may not happen. As the couple and their family have lived in the house, other priorities and ideas have come up along the way The Andersons and Farewell are friends who have known each other since 2001, when David was pastor of Trinity Episcopal Church in Solebury, Pa., and Farewell designed a new building when the original burned down.

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“They loved Bucks County and wanted to come back after moving to Darien,” says Farewell. ”They were looking for some land to build a small weekend house that they’d perhaps retire to someday. I went with them and walked the site they had found. It was densely treed and rocky, and very special.” Pam Anderson remembers the site as “raw land, kind of jungly. There wasn’t even a path.” Her husband adds, “It was a beautiful piece of land with a stream running through it—way overgrown, but you knew that with that stream, it was going to be beautiful.” The couple looked at properties nearby before making their decision. “They had these grand vistas, and we realized that if we bought something like that, we’d have to put something grand on it, which we didn’t want to do,” said Pam. David adds, “We chose this because we knew we could chuck a house in there that wouldn’t have to be a grand manor. Up the side of a little embankment, you feel like you’re in a treehouse.”


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Photo courtesy of Taylor Photo. www.taylorphoto.com

Photos courtesy of Michael Chiarella


Photo courtesy of Michael Chiarella

For Farewell, it was the topography of the 11-acre property that dictated the design. “Every site has a kind of twist or fold to it,” he says. “Some have a unique condition that is more or less evident when you approach it. A lot of the work we do has been based on this idea of discovering what this feature might be, and making it more evident.” Taking the setting—“a transitional valley with a cleft to the ridge and then a broad plain that stretches to the river,” Farewell says, “there was this idea of a vertical cut, made of two planes of masonry and then the horizontal stretch of the valley beyond. So the building starts with a vertical space and transforms to a horizontal, almost like a bow tie that twists. And that’s the essential idea—taking the twist and making it a one-room house with a kitchen and writing studio at the center. It heightens the landscape and the topography within the mass of the building.” Materials, too, flowed from the landscape. “When we first went, it was a very rainy day, and it felt like it could be something out of Noah’s Ark,” says Farewell. “There was this idea of a ship-like house that touches the earth lightly. It was kind of intriguing. It translated into a house that floats above the land in a way, with a deck that goes all the way around it.” The copper, fish-scale sheathing is a “hulllike form that twists and turns over the volume,” he continues. “It will, over time, weather to a kind of gray-green patina.” David Anderson admits that on paper, he and his wife couldn’t visualize all of Farewell’s concept. “But we were very much led by his vision,” he says. “When we chose this design, I couldn’t tell what the front wall was, exactly, until Michael twisted some paper to torque and show me how it kind of curled down. In some ways, I didn’t get it. But I trusted that it would be kind of remarkable in some way.” The house is on an east/west axis. The sun comes into the kitchen in the morning, and over the course of the day, swings around to the west. “The light is allowed to infiltrate the house in unexpected ways,” says Farewell. “It splashes over the walls and floors.”

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The Andersons knew they wanted the kitchen to be the focus of the house. “Food has been my life,” says Pam, who has been cooking as long as she can remember. She was executive editor of Cook’s Illustrated magazine and with her two daughters, has the food blog threemanycooks.com. A space next to the kitchen that was originally intended as a downstairs bedroom has become an elaborate bar. And the outdoor pavilion serves as yet another food-focused area; the scene of many outdoor meals. “We had no idea of the impact the deck was going to have on our lives,” says David. “It’s another huge room, essentially another dining and living room with a hot tub. The center of everything used to be the fireplace inside, and now we have this whole space outdoors that is open to us.” “The bar area is kind of a case for living in a house and not doing something up front, but rather living there and letting it tell you what it wants to be,” Pam says. “It was the same with the loft above the kitchen. It was supposed to be a TV room at one point, but might turn into a meditation room. Now, we know to just let it sit and keep checking on it, and see what it turns into.” The house, and its setting, are striking. “For the look, it was very reasonable,” says David. “We’re not your typical people who build houses like this.” But the project continues to evolve. Pam has plans for the deck at the far end of the house, an area where the family often has lunch. “We want to do an infinity pool down there at some point, which will give it a purpose,” she said. “And of course, I want to build a pizza house someday.” The fact that the couple and the architect are friends added to their trust in his concept. “Working with a friend can be a great thing,” says Farewell. “You know the clients as interesting people, and it’s a chance to really connect and give expression to that. They were extremely hands-on, engaged clients. We had lots of conversations and shared ideas about how to do different things. It has been a real collaborative effort.”


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Addison Wolfe Real Estate

Two great Princeton Homes

A BOUTIQUE REAL ESTATE FIRM WITH GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Montadale - Extraordinary design to satisfy generations of living! On seemingly secluded and meticulously landscaped and gated 1.7 acres, this sprawling architecturally designed custom home offers versatility in lifestyle suitable for home schooling, home office, and nanny/guest quarters. $1,968,000

Vandeventer - A sweetheart Queen Anne in heartof-town location, complete with big backyard! Along with many improvements, period details remain intact throughout - lovely covered porch, front and back staircases, bay windows, and wood floors. 4 bedrooms plus 3rd floor get-away. $1,150,000

“Real estate has been the perfect profession for me, a lifelong Princetonian with a love of architecture and people. As a broker associate for over 30 years, I have guided sellers and buyers in Princeton and the surrounding communities through the ups and downs of the real estate market. Educating and supporting my clients -past, present, and future - are my primary goals. Real estate is my passion and every day brings new relationships and opportunities.” — Barbara

Scotsfield

The entire 3,200 sq ft has been totally renovated. New "coffee bean" oak flooring, 3 new bathrooms with glass tile and custom fixtures, stunning new kitchen with high glass lacquer cabinet, glass and granite counters and appliances by Bosch, Sub-Zero,Wolf and Bertazzoni. There is a new propane heating system, new roof, new electrical box, whole house generator, new glass garage doors and new central air compressor.There is a pool and a free standing pool house that luxuriates in NanaWalls, radiant heat and Wifi. All set in Rosemont, NJ. $1,395,000

Barbara Blackwell Broker Associate 4 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

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Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.

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“Realize the value of work ethic; you might not be the best, but you can still achieve at a high level even in areas that you perceive as your weaknesses. That is something that Lewis taught me and it’s definitely something other children will get from their experiences at Lewis.”

Kate Lewis-LaMonica

Lewis Alumna Princeton University, Class of 2008

“One of the greatest things I learned from Lewis is that if I worked hard enough, I could do anything. I am so grateful to The Lewis School and credit everything I’ve been able to accomplish to my years there.”

Graduate of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs, Princeton University, Class of 2008

Recipient of the Allen Macy Dulles '51 Award

Recipient of the Arthur Lane '34 Award

Vice President of Engineers Without Borders

Princeton Justice Project Volunteer

Member of Princeton’s Sustained Dialog Program

Youth mentor in the Trenton Bridge Lacrosse Program and an Outdoor Action Trip Leader

2005 Ivy League Women’s Lacrosse Rookie of the Year

2008 All-American candidate, member of United States Elite Team

2018 - Currently with the Bridgespan Group, a global nonprofit organization that strives to eliminate poverty and improve the quality of life for those in need

“When I came to Lewis I couldn’t read at all. I remember doing a lot of short vowel fill-in drills, and learning blends and the different spelling rules. The intense work with phonics is one of the greatest gifts The Lewis School gave me that I just couldn’t get anywhere else. And what’s even better, is that a lot of that stuff still sticks with me today.”

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women in princeton

Lisa tobias | Owner & Designer at tObias Design, LLC bringing Your Designer Kitchen Dreams to Life Lisa Tobias loved design so much that she gave up a career as an actuarial consultant in New York to start designing kitchens—a huge risk for someone who made a living minimizing risk. And if that wasn’t remarkable enough, she brought with her a specialized skill set that is a welcome rarity in this business. An analytical whiz, a creative dynamo, and a natural people-person, Lisa makes the design process not only manageable, but, dare we say, a joy. Lisa Tobias, who lives in Princeton, started her professional career in New York working in the arena of employee benefit consulting as an actuarial assistant. Understanding she had an untapped creative side, she shifted into communications of employee benefits. After 20 years of working as a professional she once again transformed her career, while continuing to merge her love of math and the arts, into kitchen and bath design. Lisa is the owner and head designer for Tobias Design, LLC based in Hopewell, N.J. She’s been in business for over 13 years—first operating out of a home office in Princeton before building a showroom in Hopewell in 2005. Lisa Tobias prides herself on working with her clients to design a unique kitchen, bathroom, or other home space that reflects their personalities and needs. “We, at Tobias Design, are like actors absorbing themselves into a role.

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We put ourselves into the mindset of each client and reflect through the design incorporating their unique style and needs.” No two projects are ever alike. Recently Lisa also embarked on a new venture as part-owner of a company called Lifetime Home. Their mission is to assist with the modification of homes for people living with disabilities or who desire to age in a place, so they may live independently for as long as possible. Lisa enjoys the rich history and beautiful scenery in Princeton, and giving back to the community has always been especially important. She sits on the board of the Greenwood House Home for the Aged, and the United Jewish Federation of Princeton Mercer Bucks, from which she was awarded the 2017 Woman of Valor, and is involved with HomeFront’s Women’s Initiative. In addition, Lisa’s business, Tobias Design, has been recognized by the Best of Houzz, an online design platform for homeowners, for six years in a row from its inception. Lisa is a member of the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), National Association of Professional Women (NAPW), Princeton Chamber of Commerce, and CLIPPs (Certified Living in Place Professional). Lisa Tobias resides in Princeton with her husband and has three grown children. In her downtime she enjoys golf, tennis, cycling, photography, piano, and reading. In her own words, “the consummate jack of all trades, and master of none.” If you’re looking to redesign that aging kitchen or bath, stop by and see Lisa and her associates at the Tobias Design showroom located at 48 West Broad Street, Hopewell, New Jersey, or email Lisa at info@tobiasdesignllc.com. spring 2018 prinCETOn MAgAZinE

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Jennifer poe | Owner, rittenhOuse hOme Like all good things in life, my path was paved organically. While a flair for design was always in my heart, it wasn’t fully clear until I started to remodel my own homes and I realized that my true passion and talent was in fact design-driven. So, after having my first two children, I enrolled in the Art Institute of Philadelphia and, well, the rest just fell into place. I created Kayla Rae Designs in 2010, a name that was derived from my two little girls, Mikayla and Madison. Consulting from a home office quickly escalated to meetings with builders and clients outside my home and a Rolodex of engaged clients. With such growth, I decided to open a full-service design showroom in my own backyard in Newtown Borough. The design world that I been given access to on the trade side of things was just too enthralling not to share with people who also crave the latest trends and newest project materials. So, I thought I would bring the best of what I believed to be out there in a furniture and kitchen showroom to share with those who would appreciate my quest to curate the very best spaces. While I was excited, I was also terrified. What if my vision wasn’t what others wanted? How would I continue to grow while supporting what would be a large monthly investment? After all, I didn’t have any experience in accounting or business management. I’d be lying if I said that my growth came easy. There were days when I heard crickets at my

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office. But failure wasn’t an option for me, and my unwavering desire to succeed and be a role model for my girls has blessed me with a thriving design business filled with projects large and small, residential and commercial. I have a talented and loyal team I could not do without. Today I manage the business and financial side myself, a task I thought I could never master. Rittenhouse Home is a one-stop destination for homeowners who want a design partner from beginning to end. Whether you’re considering building a home, remodeling your existing home, or your craving a new kitchen or the open concept that encompasses a family room, we have you covered. Truly a design destination, we can provide you with all of selections along with scaled renderings to ease the anxiety of the process. Our meetings are geared to accommodate the busy schedules of our clients, and are packed with perfectly curated selections that eliminate the need to travel from showroom to showroom to view stone, plumbing, fixtures, and such. Project management is also our strength, and we help you determine project direction based on function as well as from a budgetary perspective. rittenhouse Home In addition, we carry more than 200 17 north State Street lines of furnishings, all offered at newtown, pa. 40 percent off, so budget is never 215.579.0400 a consideration as there is always www.rittenhousehome.com something for everyone. spring 2018 prinCETOn MAgAZinE

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HHH in ’68:

Heather Howard’s Journey in Politics and Policy By Donald Gilpin

R

eaders old enough to have been politically aware in 1968 will probably recognize the slogan “HHH in ’68!” Hubert H. Humphrey lost his bid for the presidency that year to Richard Nixon. But Humphrey was not the only triple H political figure on the scene then. Princeton Councilwoman Heather Harding Howard, lecturer at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, faculty affiliate of the Center for Health and Wellbeing, and director of State Health and Value Strategies, was born that year. And she owns a couple of “HHH in ’68” posters to commemorate that fact. Political engagement, with the determination to make a positive difference on all levels, has been a hallmark of Howard’s life. “Maybe it was in my blood to care about policy and politics, even from birth,” she says. “I was born in October 1968, just a couple of weeks before the election.” It was a year of intense political activity, with the Vietnam War raging and anti-war protests gaining momentum throughout the country and the world; the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. in April and Robert Kennedy in June; the Prague Spring followed in August by the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia; Lyndon Johnson’s decision not to run for a second term; widespread demonstrations, disorder, violence, and arrests at the Democratic Convention in Chicago; and Nixon’s eventual election victory over Humphrey and George Wallace. High energy, seriousness of purpose, determination, and focus are reflected in Howard’s demeanor and in the impressive accomplishments and the relentless productivity of her distinguished career so far. Howard grew up in Westchester County, New York. Her father was a stockbroker on Wall Street, and her mother was a high school history teacher. Both are now retired. She attended Duke University

72 | PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2018

Images courtesy of Heather Howard

Heather Howard — “Policy Rock Star”

and, after graduating in 1990 with degrees in history and Spanish, wasted no time before plunging into politics with an entry-level job as staff assistant for Westchester Congresswoman Nita Lowey. ON CAPITOL HILL

“She was one of a number of very inspiring women bosses I’ve had who have been very formative in my development,” Howard says. “She was terrific, and I worked for her during some really exciting times, including during the Clarence Thomas hearings.”

Lowey, who is still in Congress, now a senior member of the House Committee on Appropriations, was one of the six congresswomen who walked over to the Senate to demand that it hear Anita Hill in the controversy over Thomas’s nomination to the Supreme Court. “My political schooling was right at the time when women in politics were flexing their muscles and creating a critical mass, with reactions to the Clarence Thomas hearings, then the election of 1992, when there were more women in Congress than there had ever been, and I was working for this wonderful, progressive, dynamic congresswoman,” Howard recalls. “It was really an exciting time to be a young person on the Hill,” continued Howard. There was so much going on. This was the time when the Congressional Caucus for Women’s Issues was enacting legislation to require that NIH (National Institutes of Health) include women in clinical trials. Up until then medical research was done on male rats—not even female rats. It was an exciting time.” Howard emphasized the impact of working with and learning from women “who had been real pioneers.” She remembers, “being on the Hill at the time of the Clarence Thomas hearings as a 22-, 23-year-old and when there were so few women in Congress, to see the role that the women in the House played in trying to elevate the issue of harassment. And now we’re back talking about those issues.” She describes the excitement and inspiration of seeing women mobilize, then seeing more women get elected in 1992. From the perspective of the early 1990s, Howard, who says she embraces the term “feminist,” has mixed feelings about the current status of the women’s movement. “It’s sad to me,” she says, “that 25 years ago we were talking about these issues and now we’re back talking about harassment and violence against women. But it’s also exciting


Heather Howard was senior policy advisor for First Lady Hillary Clinton.

Howard on the job as New Jersey commissioner of health and senior services in Governor Corzineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s administration. SPRING 2018 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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in the sense that there seems to be a really strong momentum for change now, and hopefully a new generation coming up will pick up the mantle and take up the fight.” She adds, “I’m heartened by the new momentum and new energy behind this, and I hope that 25 years from now we’re not back having the same conversation.” After four years as Lowey’s legislative assistant and policy adviser, Howard entered NYU School of Law, where she earned her JD cum laude in 1997 and went to serve as a judicial clerk for Judge Martha Craig Daughtrey of the Sixth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals, another pioneer and inspirational role model for Howard. “Everything she’d done, she’d been the first woman,” Howard says. “She was the first woman on the Tennessee Supreme Court. She’d been such a pioneer.”

work she did there reflects on her current work as Princeton Council member with the Princeton Police Department, addressing the question of “what are fair and effective police practices?” As a major force in the field of health care, Howard, in the early 2000s, presaging Obamacare that would come along several years later, wrote a universal health care bill that Corzine introduced. To New Jersey

Howard’s political journeys were far from over, and it was the next move that eventually brought her to Princeton. After clerking in the federal courts, working in the House, then the White House, then the Senate, Howard had served in all three branches of government. What lay ahead for her was a plunge into state government. Corzine, elected New Jersey governor in 2005, persuaded her to come to the

“It’s been wonderful to be involved locally because we have so many people in the community who are involved, and we have such robust local institutions,” she points out. “It’s been exciting to see how the national issues play out locally.” Accepted into the U.S. Department of Justice’s Honors Program, Howard next served as a trial attorney in the Antitrust Division’s Health Care Task Force. It was at this point that she realized that she belonged in the world of politics, rather than law. “I tried being a real lawyer,” she says, “and it wasn’t really for me. I felt the pull of politics again. I went to the White House to work on the Domestic Policy Council with the first lady, Hillary Clinton.” Howard served as associate director of President Bill Clinton’s Domestic Policy Counsel and senior policy adviser to Hillary Clinton for the remainder of Clinton’s term, working on domestic and family issues. “Obviously,” Howard noted, “that was a very exciting time to be there. That was my trajectory, and of course I’ve been in and out of politics and policy in a variety of ways since then.” After the George W. Bush Republican victory in the 2000 election, the administration changed and jobs for Democrats in Washington became scarce, but Howard headed to the Senate. “At the time it was 50 Republicans, 50 Democrats, so it was the place to go,” she says. “I landed with Jon Corzine, the new senator from New Jersey, as his counsel.” From 2001 to 2006, Howard served as legislative counsel, deputy chief of staff for policy and planning, and finally as chief of staff, advising Corzine on policy development, legislative strategy, constituent services, communications, and personnel. She worked on legislation to expand access to prenatal care, increase federal funding to New Jersey health care providers, and protect the state’s Pharmaceutical Assistance to the Aged and Disabled program when the federal Medicare prescription program was implemented. Howard recalls, “The first bill Corzine introduced (and I wrote) was a bill to ban racial profiling, a reaction to the problems with the New Jersey State Police and the racial profiling that was happening on the New Jersey Turnpike.” She points out that the

74 | PRINCETON MAGAZINE sPRING 2018

Garden State, and she quickly realized that she could potentially have a far greater impact in Trenton than in Washington. “Corzine convinced me of the old adage that the states are the laboratory of innovation,” she says. “I came to New Jersey, and moved up here to Princeton to work with the governor. And now I’ve really become a state-y at heart.” Howard directed the governor’s policy agenda, advising on all policy issues and directing the policy staff. She worked closely with the Governor’s Commission on Rationalizing Healthcare Resources, a group studying the state’s financially-stressed health care delivery system; and played a key role in supporting New Jersey FamilyCare, the state’s health insurance program for low-income children and families. In January 2008, Howard became commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, overseeing a cabinet-level agency with a $3.5 billion budget and a staff of 1,700, as she continued to work on many of the issues to which she had devoted the previous two decades of her career. Her lifelong commitment to health equity and the improvement of public health services was amplified when her infant son was diagnosed with cancer shortly before Howard and her family left D.C. “My son Nate had cancer when he was 2 years old,” she recalls. “We were living in D. C. and had access to the best health care. We went to Johns Hopkins for treatment and I saw personally what it meant to have good health insurance and to be able to take care of our son. He’s fine now, but this was before the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Fifty million people in this country lacked health insurance and the ability to get that quality of care.” Howard describes how state government, particularly with the current gridlock in Washington, has more power than the federal government to effect

meaningful change. “The action has really hit the state level,’ she says. “What I had thought going in has been borne out. There’s so much you can do at the state level. You have more levers for change and can move faster than at the federal level.” She added, “We’ve seen so much dysfunction at the federal level. We’re going to see even more action at the state level now with the new governor.” Howard was a member of Governor Phil Murphy’s transition team, and she currently serves as director of State Health and Value Strategies and faculty affiliate of the Center for Health and Wellbeing based at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School. She joined the Woodrow Wilson School faculty as a lecturer, teaching courses in implementation of the ACA, state and local health policy, public health and politics, and the social determinants of health. She has also been working to help other states implement the ACA and other reforms. Last December Howard traveled to Los Angeles to testify before the California State Assembly about the California health reform effort. “They’re struggling with the next step in health reform,” she says. “Not everybody who needs health insurance has health insurance. What are the next steps? There’s a lot of interesting policy thinking going on now about that.” Just as health care legislation in Massachusetts, when Mitt Romney was governor there, led to the creation of the ACA, Howard predicts that the next wave of health reform will happen at the state level. “Different models develop at the state level,” she explains. “The spade work happens at the state level. The effects bubble up and eventually generate a federal response. That’s what’s so exciting about working at the state level. It’s interesting for me to be able to see the different ideas across the country, how health reform in California looks different from health reform in Vermont and Minnesota.” MuNicipal GoverNMeNT iN priNceToN

Seven years ago, Howard immersed herself in yet another realm of politics and policy: Borough Council for one year before consolidation, then two terms on the Princeton Council. “Serving locally was another way to think about the role of government in people’s lives and how we can have effective, progressive government,” she said. “It’s been wonderful to be involved locally because we have so many people in the community who are involved, and we have such robust local institutions,” she points out. “It’s been exciting to see how the national issues play out locally.” In addition to her ongoing focus and acknowledged authority on health care and human services, Howard mentioned her collaboration with the Princeton Police Department and Police Chief Nick Sutter, citing “all the work we’ve been doing to strengthen ties with the community, which may mean not enforcing immigration laws and communicating that to the community so that everybody feels the police are there for them.” She continues, “Sutter is a transformational leader. It’s rewarding to work with people like that. It’s amazing what he’s done, bringing two departments [Borough and Township] together and setting this incredible tone.” She describes a particularly gratifying initiative


At her wedding with two of her mentors and role models, Judge Martha Craig Daughtrey (LEFT) and Congresswoman Nita Lowey.

Howard as state health commissioner.

Moderating a Princeton Public Library forum with Senator Cory Booker.

With her husband, Hunter Labovitz, and their son Nate.

where the Council helped to save the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) clinic in Princeton, which provides food vouchers and health care services to women who are pregnant or have children under 5. “A couple of years ago we were at risk of losing the clinic because our participation had gone down. People in Princeton who qualified would have had to go all the way to Trenton for the monthly clinic. But we organized. We met with the county organizers and we saved the WIC clinic. You can see very concretely what a local program can do to support vulnerable populations and create a safety net.” Howard emphasizes the importance of the WIC program and the often overlooked disparities in income in Princeton. “Even though Princeton is known as a wealthy community,” she says, “our vulnerable populations have significant needs.”

general are much more likely to die in the first year of life than are babies born in many other parts of the world and citing a “particularly insidious racial and ethnic disparity,” Howard pointed out that New Jersey has the worst disparity in the country between African American and white infant mortality. “When I was commissioner of health, I focused on improving access to prenatal care,” she says. “And the health transition team that I co-chaired for Governor Murphy urged the new administration to get on that issue. That’s one that we can talk about locally, that the state needs to focus on, and that really needs concerted long-term focus to be able to reverse those horrible trends.” On the related issue of health insurance, however the ACA may be reshaped in New Jersey, Howard will certainly be involved. “It’s a pivotal moment to see all the improvements in people gaining coverage,” she says. “Is that going to last? Are we going to see positive health improvements? We had 50 million uninsured before the ACA became law. We got that number down to the low 30 millions, which was tremendous progress, but that’s going up now. We’re the only industrialized nation in the world that doesn’t have universal access to health care coverage. That’s a continuing struggle we’re going to have to engage in.” Howard will leave her Council seat at the end of the year, and she might even find a few more hours each week to spend with her son and her husband, who works as a federal public defender in Philadelphia. But it is impossible to imagine Heather Howard, official position or not, less than 100 percent involved in politics and policy on every level. “I’m confident that the town is in a good place,” she says. “There are a lot of great people who can serve. I can imagine getting involved in different

ways later in life. Wherever I can be most helpful, I’m sure I’ll be involved in various capacities. I’m not going anywhere.” Princeton Mayor Liz Lempert, for one, will be happy to hear that. “Heather is a policy rock star, and we’ve been incredibly fortunate to have her serve on our local governing body,” Lempert says. “She has used her extensive experience at the state and federal level to help elevate the work of the entire Council. There are are not many boards of health in the country that can boast of having the former state health commissioner among their members.” Lempert continues, “Heather has been instrumental in making Princeton a leader in anti-smoking efforts, in ensuring services like the WIC clinic stay in Princeton, and in facilitating workshops to educate residents about their options under the Affordable Care Act.” Emphasizing Howard’s valuable legacy as consolidated Princeton’s first police commissioner, Lempert adds, “Heather has been instrumental in helping to foster the transformative partnership between the police department and human services department. Under her tenure as commissioner, the police department has built an unprecedented collaborative and productive relationship with Princeton’s immigrant communities and has received recognition on the state level, and even at the federal level by members of the Obama administration, for their professionalism and community outreach efforts.” Looking ahead as Howard prepares to step down from her Council position, Lempert concludes, “I am going to miss Heather’s quick mind and eloquence on the dais, and her exceptional policy-making skills. I feel so fortunate to have had the opportunity to serve with her and to learn from her.”

LOOKING AHEAD

Having announced that she will be stepping down from Council at the end of her current term in December this year, Howard lists her top priorities: the town’s adoption of a health-in-allpolicies approach, infused into policy-making in all departments; continuing support for the police and the reforms they are making; supporting Princeton values in pushing back against all the regressive policies from Washington; working with the new administration in Trenton, doing what can be done at the local level to promote a progressive agenda of good government. Two particular issues that stand out on Howard’s agenda are maternal and child health and health insurance coverage. Noting that American babies in

SPRING 2018 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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| BOOK SCENE

Women Making History and Art BY STUART MITCHNER

IN

Hillary Clinton’s What Happened (Simon and Schuster $30), published less than a year after her shocking defeat, she says of women: “We’re not the ones up there behind the podium rallying crowds.... It’s discordant to tune into a political rally and hear a woman’s voice booming (‘screaming,’ ‘screeching’) forth. Even the simple fact of a woman standing up and speaking to a crowd is relatively new.” It’s as though she were setting the stage for the event celebrated in Together We Rise: Behind the Scenes at the Protest Heard Around the World (Dey Street Books $30), which chronicles and celebrates the historic uprising that took place on January 21, 2017. Compiled by Women’s March organizers, in partnership with Condé Nast and Glamour magazine Editor-in-Chief Cindi Leive, the book features recollections from women who were there in “Voices from the March,” along with essays by Senator Tammy Duckworth (“Do Something”), Ashley Judd (“The Roar”), Valarie Kaur (“Revolutionary Love Is the Call of Our Times”), Jill Soloway (“To Go Or Not to Go”), Jia Tolentino (“The Beauty and Danger of the Women’s March”), and Congresswoman Maxine Waters (“Closing the Gap”), among others. This amply illustrated, 323-page best-seller is dedicated to “Women, documented and undocumented: the daughters, the mothers, the caregivers, the workers, the trans warriors, the witches, the artists, the refugees, the leaders. You are our light in the dark.” The brightest, steadiest, most mind-altering light is the one beaming from artists like the women featured in the books mentioned here, whether performing, writing, singing, composing, or making photographic art. “LOST IN THE FLOOD”

Laurie Anderson is nothing if not an artist. But a single word doesn’t do her justice. Covering one of her periodic appearances at Princeton’s McCarter Theatre, in September 2008, Nassau Weekly’s Raymond Zhong refers to the “instrumentalist, vocalist, composer, visual artist, avant-gardist, poet, photographer, filmmaker,

Illustrations from All The Things I Lost in the Flood. (TOP) Lou and Laurie as king and queen of the Mermaid Parade, with their dog Lolabelle, at Coney Island, 2010. Cover of All The Things I Lost in the Flood.

technologist, writer, and, most prevailingly, performance artist.” He pictures her as “sleek and skinny in dark grey and black, her hair tersely and intensely cut,” standing “with violin and synths in the center of the stage.” Anderson’s concept of art and performance depends on an acute attention to the nuances of language. In her big new book, All the Things I Lost in the Flood (Rizzoli Electra $75), she writes, “The world is made of stories and as stories escalate and get shorter and shorter until they’re ten-word tweets and as our sense of reality continues to shred, we see that this is not a political situation, it’s an existential one.” Explaining the existential challenge of performing, Anderson points out “the difference between spoken and written words; the influence of the audience; the use of first-, second-, and third-person voices; metaphor; politics-as-stories; codes; the difference between language in stories, dreams and songs; misunderstandings and new meanings.” Besides recording numerous albums, Anderson has exhibited at the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin; the Musée d’art contemporain, Lyon, France; Fondazione Tramontano Arte, Naples; and the Park Avenue Armory in New York. “SOMETHING UNEXPECTED”

The first time I saw the photography of Annie Leibovitz was in Rolling Stone, back in the days when it was still a tabloid focused mainly on rock and the counter culture, a decade before her most famous image, the January 22, 1981 cover shot of the late John Lennon, naked, in Yoko’s embrace. Annie Leibovitz: Portraits 2005-2016 (Phaidon Press $89.95), with an introduction by Alexandra Fuller, is her followup to Annie Leibovitz: Photographs, 1970-1990 and A Photographer’s Life, 19902005. While the new collection focuses on “the most influential and compelling figures of the last decade,” celebrity and status and “beautiful people” are not the whole story according to Oprah Winfrey: “Whether she’s photographing the famous and powerful—or simply the woman next door—Annie always captures something unexpected and deeply personal.” The Daily Telegraph Magazine finds the book “formidable in its breadth, and its weight.... This is Leibovitz in excelsis: movie and music stars, politicians and power brokers ... as well as a panoply of less familiar characters and still-lifes from her

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Pilgrimage series of objects and places with historical resonance. It is a record not only of Leibovitz’s life as a photographer over 11 years, but of American life.” Leibovitz has been designated a Living Legend by the Library of Congress, and her work is exhibited at museums around the world. A CALL TO ACTION

The photograph of Patti Smith included among the portraits in Leibovitz’s new book, taken at Electric Lady studios in New York in 2007, has intimations of the Old West. In her black hat and black jacket, Smith could be a preacher or a bounty hunter, which is apparently not the impression Leibovitz had in mind, with her reference to “all those wonderful recording studio objects in the background.” On the occasion of this shoot, the photographer says Smith, “was just walking the streets and rang my studio door. She came up and I did a very simple portrait of her against gray paper. Patti understands photography so well—she is kind of like a photographer’s muse.” Although at first I found it hard to accept the idea of the multi-talented Smith as “a photographer’s muse,” it makes sense when you consider her commitment to exploring the creative moment. How seriously she herself takes the term is shown by the emphasis and range she allows it in the preface to her latest book Devotion (Yale University Press $18), which begins, “Inspiration is the unforeseen quantity, the muse that assails at the hidden hour.” For Smith the effect is cosmic: “The stars pulse. The muse seeks to be vivified. But the mind is also the muse,” seeking to “rewire such sources of inspiration.... Why does the creative spirit turn on itself? Why does the maker twist all drama? The pen is lifted, guided by the shattered muse.” The image that follows, the first in the book, is a photograph of two pages of handwritten manuscript captioned “Writing Desk, New York City.” Desk, pen, and paper is what it’s all about: the primal image.

In the final chapter of Devotion, which is part of Yale’s “Why I Write” series, Smith describes sitting at Albert Camus’s desk savoring the manuscript of his last book while his daughter Catherine looks on. Smith writes, “One could feel a sense of a focused mission and the racing heart propelling the last words of the final paragraph, the last he was to write.” At this point, she discerns “a familiar shift” in her concentration. She wants to write. “That is the decisive power of a singular work: a call to action,” a call she believes she can answer. “What is the task? To compose a work that communicates on several levels.... What is the dream? To write something fine, that would be better than I am, and that would justify my trials and indiscretions.” Writing in the Barnes & Noble Review, David Ulin observes that “as she has gotten older, Smith’s vision has expanded, framing her self-awareness not as self-absorption but rather a deep dive into everything, the exhilaration and the terror and the transcendence that we all share.” No one, male or female, shines a steadier, brighter light than Patti Smith, who never stops growing and learning and spreading the word about her heroes, muses, inspirations, notably Blake, Rimbaud, and Mishima, not to mention Simone Weil, Sylvia Plath, and Frida Kahlo, who take their place among the women “documented and undocumented” in the dedication of Together We Rise, “our light in the dark.” KATE, JONI, STEVIE, AND SARAH

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THE LEONARD BERNSTEIN AND JEROME ROBBINS CENTENNIALS BY DONALD H. SANBORN III LEFT: LEONARD BERNSTEIN. PHOTO BY GORDON PARKS, NEW YORK, 1956. ABOVE: JEROME ROBBINS & DARCI KISTLER, PHOTO BY CAROLYN GEORGE.

Legendary American composer, conductor, pianist, educator, and humanitarian Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990) once said, “I can’t live one day without hearing music, playing it, studying it, or thinking about it.” Audiences and museum visitors are having multiple opportunities this year to hear Bernstein’s music and think about it. In March, Princeton University’s Richardson Chamber Players presented “Bernstein and Friends: A Centennial Celebration.” Institutions such as Symphony Space and the National Museum of American Jewish History also will celebrate the maestro’s centennial. Aficionados of the work of choreographer Jerome Robbins (1918-1998) will have similar opportunities. On May 19, Symphony Space will present “Wall to Wall: Leonard Bernstein” at the Peter Jay Sharp Theatre, a venue located on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. “I felt it appropriate to celebrate the work and life of this quintessential New Yorker,” says Andrew Byrne, the artistic director of Symphony Space. “‘Wall to Wall’ is one of those unique events that allows an in-depth exploration of a musician’s work,” Byrne continues. “Over eight hours, we will include favorites from West Side Story and other musicals, as well as lesser-known works for choir, chamber ensembles, and voice. We also will touch on his achievements as an educator and conductor, as well as his political advocacy.” From March 16-September 2, Philadelphia’s National Museum of American Jewish History will present “Leonard Bernstein: The Power of Music.” Ivy Weingram, the curator of the exhibition, says, “There are about 100 objects, drawn from public and private collections, including that of the Bernstein family—his children lent family heirlooms that haven’t been seen by the public before—as well as a number of objects from the Library of Congress, which holds the Leonard Bernstein papers.” “[We display] the tools of his trade—the pencils he used to markup scores, one of his pianos, a baton, a conducting suit—to a lot of his writings, and (marked-up) scores and scripts,” Weingram continues. “There are behind-the-scenes stories about particular shows he worked on, which allow someone to [discover] how those productions came to be, and what made them special.” To celebrate the Jerome Robbins centennial, Deborah Grace Winer is presenting A Jerome Robbins Centennial Concert on May 8 at Feinstein’s 54 Below. The event will be directed and hosted by Broadway choreographer/director Kathleen Marshall. In addition, the New York Public Library, whose Dance division is named after Robbins, is planning an exhibition that will open on September 25, and “focus on Jerry’s relation to New York,” says Allen Greenberg, a director of the Jerome Robbins Foundation. “We feel good about [the exhibition, which] will demonstrate the diversity of his artistic genius.” Greenberg was a financial advisor to Robbins, and is now a trustee of the Robbins Rights Trust.

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BERNSTEIN MUSICALS Just as Bernstein occupied the worlds of musical theater and classical music, Robbins “is the only artist I can think of who excelled in, and helped transform the two distinct disciplines of musical theater and ballet,” Greenberg asserts. The first Bernstein-Robbins collaboration was the 1944 ballet Fancy Free. The idea of expanding the ballet into On the Town was that of scenic designer Oliver Smith, who produced the musical. The book and lyrics were by Betty Comden and Adolph Green. In his biography of the composer (Doubleday 1994), Humphrey Burton observes that Comden and Green “tilted the center of emotional gravity away from the men, who are always center stage in Fancy Free, toward the women.” “The exhibition really delves into how On the Town broke ground in a number of ways,” Weingram says. “It cast African Americans, ethnic Americans, and women in roles in which they had not previously appeared—as meaningful characters with strong personalities. Peggy Clark, who served as a stage manager for that production, will show her script and costume swatches. How did the African American press respond? They took note of the integrated cast for which Bernstein and his collaborators were responsible. Everett Lee, who became the conductor awhile

into the show’s run, was the first African American to conduct a Broadway pit orchestra.” With choreography by Wallace Seibert and Anna Sokolow, Bernstein’s musical Candide opened in 1956. “We have his sheet music for ‘I Am Easily Assimilated’ from Candide,” Weingram enthuses. “At one point, it was called ‘The Old Lady’s Jewish Tango.’ He wrote that it should be sung ‘hassidicamente.’ That is a word Bernstein made up to reflect the Klezmer/Latin beat that he was looking for in the performance of this music. Bernstein loved words and wordplay, and he made up this word to refer to that mix of musical styles.” Candide will be presented by the Washington National Opera from May 5-26. Directed by Francesca Zambello, this production from the Glimmerglass Festival is part of the Kennedy Center’s “Leonard Bernstein at 100” celebration. The musical’s overture will be performed by the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Xian Zhang, at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center from June 7-10. Conceived, directed and choreographed by Robbins, West Side Story gave its lyricist, Stephen Sondheim, his Broadway debut in 1957. The book was by Arthur Laurents, who previously had collaborated with Robbins on an early version of the 1948 musical Look Ma, I’m Dancin’! (though Laurents had subsequently left that project). West

Side Story’s most recent Broadway revival was in 2009, with some of the Puerto Rican characters’ lyrics translated into Spanish by Hamilton composer/lyricist Lin-Manuel Miranda. “‘Leonard Bernstein: The Power of Music’ includes a number of artifacts and images related to the stage production, and we have clips from the 1961 film,” promises Weingram. “We also have [Bernstein’s] audition notes [and] scene sketches. The star artifact may be Bernstein and Robbins’ copy of Romeo and Juliet, which they annotated in the margins as they were starting to think about transforming it. It initially was conceived as a story of gang rivalry between Jewish and Catholic teens on the Lower East Side, set on the eve of Passover and Easter. First [the characters are] at a Seder, then they’re at a drugstore. So visitors will truly feel like they’re in the writer’s room as they explore these objects.” “West Side Story is not only filled with unforgettable music, but explores issues of prejudice and racism,” Byrne observes. “The themes of this musical are as applicable today as they were in 1957, when the musical first opened.”

“FIDDLER ON THE ROOF” CAST ON THE SHOW'S FIRST-EVER OPENING NIGHT, SEPT. 22, 1964, FEATURING ZERO MOSTEL, MARIA KARNILOVA, TANYA EVERETT, JULIA MIGENES, AND JOANNA MERLIN. (AP).

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GEORGE CHAKIRIS IN “WEST SIDE STORY,” DIRECTED BY JEROME ROBBINS AND ROBERT WISE, 1961.

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CRISIS OF FAITH “We knew that Bernstein’s centennial was coming up, and it seemed like the perfect opportunity for us, as the National Museum of American Jewish History, to examine his life and work through a lens that hasn’t been explored in a museum exhibition before: the crisis of faith,” says Weingram. “Bernstein often said that if there was one central theme to his body of work, perhaps the most significant would be the search for a solution to the 20th-century crisis of faith.” Bernstein’s Symphony No. 1: Jeremiah uses texts from the Book of Lamentations. Symphony No. 3: Kaddish, which the composer dedicated to the memory of President Kennedy, refers to the Jewish prayer that is chanted for the dead. By contrast, Chichester Psalms is a choral work whose texts include Psalm 100’s exhortation to “Make a joyful noise unto the Lord.” Chichister Psalms will be performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra, under the direction of Yannick Nezet-Seguin, at Philadelphia’s Kimmel Center on April 5-7;

ROBBINS & WOETZEL-FANCY FREE BY COSTAS.

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and by the Monmouth Civic Chorus, under the direction of Dr. Ryan James Brandau, at the Axelrod Performing Arts Center on April 21 and 22. The piece also will be presented June 2, in a concert that will conclude Trinity Wall Street’s Bernstein celebration, “Total Embrace,” at Trinity Church in New York City. “[Bernstein] was deeply grounded in Jewish tradition, and a strong Jewish identity. But he also thought about faith in terms of the relationships between human beings,” Weingram continues. “So the exhibition’s artifacts relate to specific moments or works that show him wrestling with faith. During a conducting tour in May 1948, Bernstein was asked to take a side trip from Munich to a displaced persons camp to conduct a small orchestra of Holocaust survivors. In the exhibition, we’ll show a film in which the survivors from that orchestra talk about what it meant for Bernstein to conduct them.” Mass: A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players, and Dancers was composed to be part of the September 1971 opening of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. The libretto

combined the liturgy of the Roman Mass; texts by Bernstein and Stephen Schwartz; and a short verse by Paul Simon. Bernstein biographer Humphrey Burton notes that the piece expressed “Bernstein’s familiar theme concerning the difficulty of finding and sustaining faith in God at a time of recurring wars and countless instances of man’s inhumanity to his fellow men.” “Lenny wanted there to be a dramatic arc,” Schwartz tells Carol de Giere, author of Defying Gravity: The Creative Career of Stephen Schwartz from Godspell to Wicked (Applause, 2008). “I mostly worked with him on shaping the dramatic structure.” Schwartz’s contribution also included the lyrics for songs such as “A Simple Song” and “Things Get Broken.” Byrne observes, “At the time, many were confused by the mixture of pop and classical music, but today Mass is regarded by many as a pioneering work that broke down boundaries and anticipated the postmodern music of today.” Schwartz agrees; on his website he writes, “When it first premiered, the…use of Broadway and pop styles was considered vulgar and somehow


beneath ‘classical’ music. Now much of contemporary classical music makes use of those combinations, which seems to indicate that Lenny was ahead of his time in that regard.” “Mass has a big moment in our exhibit, in our exploration of the ‘crisis of faith,’ including a filmic piece, as well as a number of artifacts,” adds Weingram. “I don’t know if it’s more relevant than it was in 1971, but it certainly speaks to today’s audiences in a powerful way.” In contrast to Bernstein, Robbins “was not religious. I think he clearly identified himself with the ethnic aspect of being Jewish, but I can’t say he was a religious person at all,” Greenberg offers. “He did celebrate holidays like Passover, [but] he wrote in diaries that he was uncomfortable, with his faith or with being Jewish. But working on Fiddler on the Roof clearly moved him.” Robbins directed and choreographed the 1964 musical, about a Jewish father who struggles to maintain his religious and cultural traditions, as they are threatened by external events in Czarist Russia. In 1974 “[Robbins] did a ballet, Dybbuk, that was choreographed to [original] music by

Bernstein,” Greenberg continues. Based on a Yiddish play by S. Ansky, the ballet concerned the possession of a young woman by her fiancé’s ghost; a rabbinical ritual is performed to expel the spirit. Dybbuk was premiered in 1974 by the New York City Ballet, which will present the work at Lincoln Center’s David H. Koch Theater starting May 4. Fancy Free and West Side Story Suite also will be on the program. Titled “All Robbins No. 1: Bernstein Collaborations,” the event runs through May 20 and is a part of the company’s “Robbins 100” festival celebrating Robbins, the company’s co-founding choreographer. The festival will present 19 of his works created over the course of 40 years, as well as two world premiere ballets.

LEGACIES “What’s interesting is how Robbins’ works— theater or ballet—just hold up,” Greenberg says, when asked about Robbins’ artistic legacy. “His work was very integrated, with so many other aspects of his life—his photography, his art work, and his writings. I’d say in part, what keeps his

work alive is its diversity, and complexity.” “In the early 21st century, it’s perhaps [Leonard Bernstein’s] social activism that would most resonate with audiences of any age,” Weingram offers. Among his humanitarian efforts was the establishment of the Felicia Montealegre Bernstein Fund of Amnesty International USA, in honor of his late Chilean wife. “If young audiences today aren’t as familiar with his compositions, or his leadership of the New York Philharmonic, I think that it’s his role as a social activist that we all can look to, and recognize, at his centennial.” Byrne adds, “Bernstein was a protean figure who seemed to excel at everything he turned his hand to: as a conductor, a composer of Broadway musical theater and concert music, and an educator. For him, it was all about making connections and making sure that the arts played central role in people’s lives. He was the great communicator with an optimistic belief that the arts could foster understanding and tolerance, and make the world a better place. I think this is certainly something to celebrate, especially in these contentious times.”

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2018


CHANCEL ADDITION, ALL SAINTSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; CHURCH

THE HEALTH WELLNESS AND NUTRITION BUILDING, THE WILLOW SCHOOL

759 STATE ROAD, PRINCETON, NJ 08540

609.681.2484 www.farewell-architects.com


THE HEALTH WELLNESS AND NUTRITION BUILDING AT THE WILLOW SCHOOL, STONY BROOK-MILLSTONE WATERSHED ASSOCIATION PHOTOGRAPHED BY ROBERT FAULKNER PHOTOGRAPHY; CHANCEL ADDITION, ALL SAINTSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; CHURCH PHOTOGRAPHED BY KATHLEEN FAREWELL

THE ARCHITECTURE OF COMMUNITY

THE ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER STONY BROOK-MILLSTONE WATERSHED ASSOCIATION

A R C H I T E C T U R E , P L A N N I N G , A N D I N T E R I O R S E R V I C E S


You can measure hope. 72% IVF delivery rate.* At Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey, we measure everything— because everything matters when you’re trying to have a baby. With IVF success rates about 20% higher than the US average, our expert team has helped hopeful patients from New Jersey and around the world become parents. Award-winning scientific advancements, financial options such as our new CareShare 100% refund program, and success rates are just some of the ways we measure hope.

Have hope. Connect with us today: rmanj.com • 973-656-2089

*SART 2014 Final Live Birth Per Egg Retrieval Cycle (72.4% under 35 years; N=723). This is your chance of achieving a live birth for each cycle started for an egg retrieval. This includes all transfers performed with fresh and frozen embryos derived from this cycle. Please note a comparison of clinic success rates may not be meaningful because a patient’s medical characteristics, treatment approaches and entrance criteria for assisted reproductive technology (ART) may vary from clinic to clinic. Visit www.sart.org to learn more.

Princeton Magazine, Spring 2018  

Witherspoon Media Group

Princeton Magazine, Spring 2018  

Witherspoon Media Group