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CONTENTS

84 100

52

FALL 2017

16

26 72

92 ..... FEATURES .....

..... HERE & THERE .....

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY’S GOTHIC LOVE AFFAIR

PROFILES IN HEALTHCARE

BY DOUG WALLACK

A N D LAU RIE P ELLICHER O

INTERVIEWS BY TAYLOR SMITH

30

Spires, flying buttresses, and gargoyles 16

A THIRST FOR CHANGE

GENETIC TESTING FOR BREAST CANCER

WorldWater & Solar Technologies of Princeton

BY WILLIAM UHL

BY ANNE LEVIN

46

Advances bring new challenges

PROFILES IN DESIGN

26

INTERVIEWS BY TAYLOR SMITH

THE PROMISE OF “LIVING DRUGS”

A N D LAU RIE P ELLICHER O

61

BY ELLEN GILBERT

Recent strides are generating excitement

BOOK SCENE

38

BY STUART MITCHNER

SMALL HOUSES WITH BIG PERSONALITIES

Homes that make statements

BY LYNN ADAMS SMITH

66

Photo series by Jeffrey E. Tryon

PRINCETON PANTRY

52

91

FIELDS OF DREAMS, AND SANDS, AND STARS BY WENDY PLUMP

Nomadic Expeditions treks across Mongolia 84

TRENTON AREA SOUP KITCHEN BY WENDY GREENBERG

Providing the ingredients for building better lives 92

ON THE COVER: Gothic architecture at Princeton University. Photography by Charles R. Plohn.

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98

DESTINATION: CLINTON BY WILLIAM UHL 96

FASHION & DESIGN

A Well-Designed Life 70, 72

Winter Is Coming... 98

All Hallows’ Eve 100


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| FROM THE PUBLISHER Welcome to your Fall issue of Princeton Magazine! We thought it would be appropriate to put a Tiger gargoyle holding the University shield on the cover to mark this time of year. That’s because there is an unproven theory that gargoyles keep evil spirits away from the building. Halloween is all about evil spirits...right? On the topic of gargoyles, there is an interesting array of them on the ceiling of the dining hall at the Graduate College overlooking the Springdale Golf Course. Under each of the carved roof trusses there is a gargoyle of each of the University trustees at the time. What is amusing is that each trustee is holding a model representing his business such as a locomotive for a railroad owner or an ocean liner for one in shipping, all meticulously carved with amazing detail. Since these particular gargoyles are indoors, that detail has not weathered away like the poor tiger on our cover. The gargoyle cover introduces Doug Wallack’s story on Princeton University’s Gothic architecture, which reputedly came from a desire to imitate the great universities of Europe, most notably Oxford. The Graduate College with its handsome Cleveland Tower, Holder Hall with its tower, Blair Arch, and all the dormitories below it are all wonderful examples of the style. The earliest Gothic buildings make up the McCosh Courtyard of classrooms. A later addition to this courtyard was the University Chapel, which is one of the most beautiful buildings on the campus. A wonderful photo of its interior graces the page introducing our article. Princeton was not the only university dedicated to Gothic architecture. Collegiate Gothic became the architectural style of many campuses across America. There is a legend that James B. Duke, turned down by Princeton to change its name to Duke, gave his money to Trinity College in Durham, N.C., named it Duke, and insisted that the new buildings match the Princeton campus. Notre Dame still requires that every building be built in the Gothic style. As an architect, I was interviewed by Notre Dame, but when I said, “I don’t do Gothic” it turned out to be the shortest interview of my career. This issue presents another article about architecture, Small Houses with Big Personalities. In a period when we are exploring micro apartments and tiny houses, it is nice to see that Princeton has such an inventory of truly handsome small houses. For those of us who are concerned about the invasion of McMansions into our town, you can find some solace in this article with great photography by our Jeffrey Tryon. Speaking of solace, please read our two encouraging articles on generic testing and “Living Drugs,” both having to do with cancer. There was a time when cancer was a word that you only uttered in a whisper. In 1946, my mother had a double mastectomy. She lived another 47 years, but until First Lady Betty Ford announced she was to have such an operation, my brother and I were sworn to secrecy about our mother’s operation. Today that is no longer the case; just look at the TV advertising for cancer care. Anne Levin has created a very helpful article on generic testing for breast cancer and breast cancer charities. Also, the Princeton YWCA has a wonderful Breast Cancer Resource Center to assist in dealing with this disease that will impact one out of every eight women in their lifetime. Given the innovative gene therapy for fighting leukemia, there is now a rush to develop therapies that will re-engineer a patient’s own immune cells to fight their particular cancer. Ellen Gilbert’s article entitled The

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PhotograPhy by andrew wilkinson

Dear Princeton Magazine readers,

Promise of “Living Drugs” explains how these new therapies might work. Also, enjoy reading our Profiles in Healthcare about some of the terrific practitioners in our region. Less than a month after Halloween is Thanksgiving. We have many individuals to be thankful for, in their dedication to helping the less fortunate. Wendy Greenberg reports on the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen’s expansion, along with a profile of its new director. Wendy has also listed some places for you to volunteer this season. From the personalized good that the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen is delivering, move on to the global good that WorldWater & Solar Technologies is doing. Just imagine transforming 1,000 acres of the Sahara Desert into irrigated fertile farmland, all with the energy of the sun and the water lying just a few meters under the surface. That is the capability of machines created by this company in a farmhouse on Carter Road. William Uhl reports that they have solar powered individual pumps the size of a suitcase. We already have a critical shortage of potable water, especially in Third World countries, but the water is there, in the ground, but not accessible. WorldWater just may have the solution. Finally, we want you to meet Jalsa Urubshurow, who organizes trips to Mongolia through his Nomadic Expeditions. He is also a carpenter and founder of All-Tech Company, which builds structures in his native land. As if that wasn’t enough, Wendy Plump also reports that Jalsa stars in a movie along with the eagles from the eagle hunting contest that he created. Personally, I think my business partner, Lynn Adams Smith, and her team have created one of the richest and most interesting issues since we started publishing Princeton Magazine. I hope you will agree. Respectfully yours,

J. Robert Hillier, DHL, FAIA Publisher


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Princeton UniverSity’S Gothic Love AffAir by

Doug Wallack | photography by charles r. plohn

“Here we were taugHt by men and gotHic towers democracy and faitH and rigHteousness and love of unseen tHings tHat do not die.” — H.E. MiErow, Class of 1914

S

o reads the inscription in the arch of Princeton University’s McCosh Hall. It’s not entirely clear how Gothic towers inculcated such lofty virtues in students, but it is clear to anyone who visits campus how the University’s architecture could exercise a powerful influence on them. Its palette of spires, vaults, and gargoyles is at once imposing and inviting, invoking a cozy romanticism and a timelessness that are central to the University’s sense of place. But Princeton’s castle-like architecture is far from timeless. In fact, at the time of Mierow’s graduation, the University had been home to Gothic buildings for less than two decades.

History In the 1890s, Princeton University administrators were planning to expand the campus — as is their habit — and they wanted their new builds to lend the grounds a more unified aesthetic. For the first century and a half of its operation, Princeton University, then known as the College of New Jersey, had planned and sited buildings somewhat haphazardly. The modest rough-hewn stone of the Colonial-era Nassau Hall was offset by the temple-like neoclassicism of the Whig and Clio debate halls, the wild Victorian stylings of Witherspoon Hall, and the staid Renaissance architecture of Brown Hall. Ralph Adams Cram, who was hired as the University’s supervising architect in 1907, would later write that it was “the old ‘park scheme,’ each structure plumped down on its ‘squatter sovereignty’ site, quite self-contained and self-satisfied, with no suspicion of such a thing as team work.” This was fine, he explained, because the campus was so sparsely developed that there was little crowding. But further construction would require that future structures on campus interact more harmoniously. Princeton’s choice to bring architectural harmony to campus through Gothic buildings reflected a shift in the philosophy of many American university administrators, who in the late 1800s looked to Oxford and Cambridge as models. The OxBridge colleges were fully residential, and administrators at many of their U.S. counterparts began to admire the way a residential college could create a community of scholars, set apart from the world, fully devoted to the pursuit of knowledge. They also came to believe that English collegiate architecture best facilitated this sort of serious scholarship;

its enclosed courtyards and cloistered seclusion were ideal for the life of focus they desired for their students. And, of course, they were well aware of the prestige that the appearance of age lent to a university. Later, Woodrow Wilson, then president of Princeton University, would approvingly reflect that “by the very simple device of building our new buildings in the Tudor Gothic Style, we seem to have added to Princeton the age of Oxford and Cambridge; we have added a thousand years to Princeton by merely putting those lines in our buildings which point every man’s imagination to the historic traditions of learning in the English-speaking race.” Princeton commissioned the Philadelphia-based architectural firm Cope and Stewardson to build Blair Hall and Little Hall, which would set the tone for construction on campus for well through the next half century. Walter Cope and John Stewardson, the firm’s partners, were a precocious young duo, neither of whom—perhaps ironically —had completed college. While they were not the first architects to design Gothic educational facilities, their early work at Bryn Mawr College and the University of Pennsylvania established them as leaders in the field. Their buildings utilized modern construction techniques and local building materials while still maintaining the general aesthetic principles of OxBridge buildings. In Princeton, the dormitories they built engendered the desired sense of separation from the outside world, while still allowing for an openness within the campus. That is, rather than building a series of inward-facing courtyards as the English might, Cope and Stewardson built Blair and Little Halls as a long, gently meandering wall that formed the western border of campus. When students arrived at the train station at the foot of Blair Hall and headed up the steps of the arch that framed the richly decorated Alexander Hall in the near distance, it would be clear that they were leaving the rest of the world behind. John Stewardson died in an ice skating accident in 1896, one year before the Blair and Little were completed, and though his younger brother Emlyn then became a partner in the firm, Cope and Stewardson received no further commissions from Princeton University. Even so, their impact on the subsequent development of campus, and their popularization of the Collegiate Gothic style beyond Princeton, was tremendous. If the American public imagines collegiate architecture as castles and ivy-covered ramparts, it is in large part due to their work. fall 2017 PRINCETON MaGaZINE

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A Grotesque LeGAcy For anyone who visits campus now, one of the easily overlooked charms of Princeton’s Gothic architecture is its wide assortment of gargoyles — those stony men and beasts that peer down, year after year, upon blithely ignorant Princetonians. Some of the gargoyles are meant to blend seamlessly into their apparently centuries-old environment, as is the case with the carving of La Gargouille, a legendary French dragon from the 7th century, who terrorized the people of Rouen, and who — on Princeton’s campus — remains in shackles on the northwest doorway of the chapel. Often, though, the stone carvers and architects didn’t opt for pure historicism with Princeton’s gargoyles, preferring to indulge in minor anachronisms here and there. Above the archway through 1897 Hall, which abuts Prospect Avenue, a monkey sits with a camera — an uncomplaining and eternal security guard for the eastern side of campus, perhaps. On McCosh Hall, a football player sprints toward an end zone that’s always just beyond him. Dinosaurs adorn Guyot Hall, home to the Department of Geosciences. Sometimes we just need to look up.

cAstLes No More? By the middle of the 20th century, the American fascination with Collegiate Gothic began to wane, particularly as the sleek modernism and glassy cantilevered creations of the International Style grew in popularity. By the late 1950s, Princeton’s peer institutions had buildings commissioned by the boldest and most important architects of the time: Louis Kahn designed Yale’s renowned modernist art gallery, completed in 1953; and Harvard’s Harkness Commons was completed in 1948 by Walter Gropius, the founder of the Bauhaus School. That same year, Princeton completed its Firestone Library—another Gothic behemoth.

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In the eyes of its malcontents, Old Nassau’s architecture was becoming frustratingly and bafflingly old fashioned; Princeton was falling behind. By 1967, The Architectural Forum ran an article by architect and critic John Morris, who lamented that “of all the U.S. universities that have been addicted to Collegiate Gothic architecture, Princeton has probably had the longest and most severe withdrawal pains.” In 1960, Morris writes, Italian architect Enrico Peressutti “resigned publically from the architectural faculty as a reproach to the archaic policy of Princeton’s trustees.” The campus architectural consultant Douglas Orr had been trying to promote the construction of more current buildings, but it was only in that year that Princeton finally began once again to change directions architecturally. The year 1960 saw the completion of the stark brick and cinderblock enclosures of the New Quad (which would shortly become known by their present name—Wilson College). The striking New Formalism of the Woodrow Wilson School, by Minoru Yamasaki—who later designed the former World Trade Center—arrived in 1965, marking another clear departure from Collegiate Gothic. The same year witnessed the completion of the New South Administration Building, which Morris praises at great length, remarking that, “among Princeton’s architecturally informed minority, it is widely admired for its discipline.” In total, by the end of the decade, the University had constructed 26 new buildings, none of which was even remotely Gothic. But just when it looked like Princeton had fully embraced an eclectic and cosmopolitan campus architecture, in 2004 construction began on the Whitman College, the enormous Gothic fortress designed by Demetri Porphyrios. Completed in 2007, Whitman is a testament to the enduring appeal of the Collegiate Gothic style. It’s a slick rendition, too—one would likely fool most visitors into believing that it is as old as any of Princeton’s Gothic dormitories. Woodrow Wilson would be proud.


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CONCERNED ABOUT CANCER RISK? Does cancer seem to run in your family? Has anyone in your family been diagnosed with cancer before age 50? Learn about your cancer risks and what you can do about them! For more information, contact the Family Risk Assessment Program at 908-788-2535 or by visiting HHSGenetics.org.

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GENETIC TESTING

FOR BREAST CANCER ADVANCES BRING NEW CHALLENGES A N N E

L E V I N

images courtesy of shutterstock.com

B Y

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FALL 2017


W

ith a mother and two paternal aunts who died of breast cancer, the two sisters knew it was important to get tested to see if they carried the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. Should the test come back positive, their risk of developing breast and/or ovarian cancer would be higher than average. And preventive measures—most likely mastectomy and/or hysterectomy—could be in order. Each breathed a sigh of relief when their results were negative. But less than a decade later, both had been diagnosed with breast cancer. The older sister was treated with a lumpectomy and radiation. The younger one needed more aggressive treatment, and had the double mastectomy and hysterectomy her doctors recommended. Such a scenario is unusual, but it happens. Carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 doesn’t mean a person will get cancer; and not carrying it is no guarantee that a woman— or man—will not. These days, genetic testing is more precise. It is also much more detailed, able to detect genetic data not only related to breast and ovarian cancer, but other forms as well. And therein lies the dilemma. Doctors have the information, but don’t always know what to do with it. Treatment hasn’t necessarily caught up with what advances in testing reveal. “Advances in the last few years have been in the ability to test a wider selection of genetic mutations responsible for breast, ovarian, and other cancers,” says Dr. Erica Linden, medical director of breast oncology and cancer genetics at Capital Health Medical Center in Hopewell. “Instead of testing just for BRCA1 and 2, we now have panels that test many at the same time. It can be a good thing and a bad thing. It has given us more information, but at the same time given us unclear information.” FALL 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Designed to come up with treatments tailored to a patient’s genetic makeup, testing was previously carried out only by one company, Myriad Genetics. But since the U. S. Supreme Court overturned the company’s patent four years ago, the field has opened up to other laboratories. There are six operating today in the United States. “Immediately after the patent was overturned, several commercial labs started offering testing, and not just for BRCA. They put together panels of clusters of genes,” says Dr. Mary Daly, founder and director of the Fox Chase Cancer Center’s Risk Assessment Program. “Now we can test for 85 or 100 different genes in one blood test. We’re learning a lot more about different cancers in a family we didn’t necessarily expect to find. The question is, what do we do in terms of recommendations for that? But overall, it’s a good thing.” Results of this new era of testing sometimes lead to mutations that can’t be targeted by drugs currently on the market. But research continues on how to interpret and understand the growing field of genetic tests. “There is a whole cancer genetics community,” says Daly. “More and more conferences are dedicated just to genetics. ASCO (the American Society of Clinical Oncology) used to be

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dominated by clinical trial research. But more and more talks and studies are on cancer genetics. A lot of us are involved in research around the world.” “The American Society of Clinical Oncology has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care,” reads a statement on the ASCO website. “...This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner.” Multi-gene panels are a major innovation, but just which genes are on those panels is the question. “People are arguing about whether all should be included, until we learn more,” says Linden. “I think in the future we’ll get better at knowing the most significant genes to test for, and not cast such a wide net. We still have a way to go, as we uncover information, as to what is the best test. It will get even more complicated. But that’s the fun of science.” Innovations in testing have had an effect on the guidelines of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). “They have changed to include

more women for testing,” says Kruti McDonald, the genetics testing coordinator at Montclair Breast Center. “Insurance companies are more willing to pay for testing. It’s a totally new and ever increasing landscape.” While enhanced testing might yield a higher rate of false positives and false negatives, experts agree that testing—through one simple blood draw—is important. “I don’t see a down side to getting tested,” says McDonald. “Knowledge is power.” “If somebody with a family history of cancer was tested before 2011, they may want to check in to make sure there isn’t additional testing recommended,” Linden says. “It’s important to know that testing used to just predict whether one might get cancer, but increasingly we’re moving over to actual treatment decisions. So testing today can yield not only what family risk would be, but can also have an impact on diagnosis, and increasingly on prognosis and treatment.” “In general, there has been a real breakthrough in terms of why some people get cancer and some don’t,” says Daly. “We never had a good explanation for why family history was so important. This allows us to be more specific about a person’s risk and tailor their prevention activities in a more personalized way.”


images courtesy of shutterstock.com

NAVIGATING BREAST NAVIGATING BREAST CANCER CHARITIES CANCER CHARITIES October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, an ideal time to consider October is Breast Cancer Awarenessmaking a donation to an organization Month, an ideal time to consider making a in support of prevention, research, treatdonation to an organization in support of ment, and curing the disease. prevention, research, treatment, and Therethe are numerous charities to curing disease. choose from. All of those pink ribbons, There are numerous charities to choose 5Kfrom. walks, and fundraisers can get conAll of those pink ribbons, 5K fusing, and it is hard to know which walks, and fundraisers can get confusing,organizations fund what. and it is hard to know which Thankfully, fund there is charitynavigator. organizations what. org.Thankfully, The website potential donors therehelps is charitynavigator.org. navigate how each organization uses The website helps potential donors funds, and researches their financial navigate just how each organization uses health how efficiently they operate. funds,and and researches their financial health “Although these charities have been and just how efficiently they operate. very“Although successful generating support, theseatcharities have been together raising more than $1.68 very successful at generating support,billion annually in contributions, thebillion disparity together raising more than $1.68 inannually their financial health is enormous,” in contributions, the disparity in it their saysfinancial on the health website. is enormous,” it says Among those that get high marks on the website. for breast cancer services Among those thatmedical get high marks for are Dana-Farber Cancer services Institute, breast cancer medical are the National BreastCancer Cancer Foundation, and Dana-Farber Institute, the It’s The Journey. National Breast Cancer Foundation, and ForThe breast cancer research, the site It’s Journey. recommends the research, Dr. Susan Love ReFor breast cancer the site search Foundation, theLove Breast Canrecommends the Dr. Susan Research cer Research Foundation, the Breast Foundation, the Breast Cancer Research Cancer Alliance, and Cancer the Vera Bradley Foundation, the Breast Alliance, Foundation for Breast Cancer. and the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breastcancer.org leads the list for Breast Cancer. education and public Breastcancer.org leads awareness. the list for Also rated highly Living Beyond education andare public awareness. AlsoBreast Cancer, the National rated highly are LivingBreast Beyond Cancer Breast Coalition SusanBreast G. Komen Cancer,Fund, the National Cancer for the Cure, and the Young Survival Coalition Fund, Susan G. Komen Coalition, for the among others. Cure, and the Young Survival Coalition, Thoseothers. who want their dollars to fund among support programs, and a Those who want theirresources, dollars to fund sense of community to people impactsupport programs, resources, and a sense edof by the disease canimpacted donatebyto community to people thethe Gloria Gemma Breast Cancer Resource disease can donate to the Gloria Gemma Foundation, Casting for Breast CancerSharasheret, Resource Foundation, Recovery, and SHARE, among others. Sharasheret, Casting for Recovery, and For a full list, others. including organizations SHARE, among not For recommended, visit www.charity a full list, including organizations navigator.org. not recommended, visit www.charitynavigator.org.

FALL 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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| profiles in healthcare

Where Does It Hurt? Let Princeton Orthopaedic Associates, P.A. Help By Taylor Smith

Princeton Orthopaedic Associates’ flagship office is located at 325 Princeton Avenue. The 25,000-square-foot space houses 17 orthopaedic surgeons and five physiatrists (physical medicine physicians), along with three podiatrists who handle comprehensive foot and ankle care for all patients. In addition to the Princeton Avenue location, Princeton Orthopaedic maintains four additional offices at 727 State Road in Princeton; 11 Centre Drive in Monroe; 340 Scotch Road in Ewing; and 5 Plainsboro Road, Suite 490 in Plainsboro. These offices serve greater Mercer County, Middlesex County, and Bucks County, Pennsylvania. All of the Princeton Orthopaedic offices are outfitted with the most sophisticated digital X-ray, physical therapy, and MRI machines to treat a host of musculoskeletal disorders (the Monroe facility also offers aqua therapy). To better meet the needs of patients, all of the office locations are fully integrated and use the same medical record system. The orthopaedic surgeons work in cooperation with University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro and Capital Health System hospitals. Areas of specialty include shoulder, neck and back, elbow, forearm, wrist and hand, hip, knee, foot and ankle, and total joints. They also perform EMG/NCS (electromyography and nerve conduction study), epidural injections, and orthopedic trauma. Orthopaedic surgeon Brian Culp specializes in hip and knee replacement and adult reconstruction. “Many of our patients come to us from referrals from either emergency room or primary care physicians,” said Dr. Culp. “My patients typically come in complaining of pain in either their hips or knees. This pain can be compounded with stiffness or the inability to move, as well as crunching or grinding. I find that the biggest complaint I hear is that these symptoms radically interfere with a patient’s quality of life.” Dr. Jon W. Ark specializes in orthopaedic hand surgery and musculoskeletal foot and ankle problems. “The most common complaints I see are regarding arthritis of the hand and carpal tunnel syndrome,” he said. “Additionally, complaints regarding bunions. I receive the bulk of my patients from outside referring medical doctors, physical therapists, and hand therapists.” When asked to describe a typical patient, Dr. Frederick Song says, “With the popularity of organized and recreational sports, I see patients of all ages. Whether the patient is playing youth soccer, a collegiate athlete, or a weekend warrior, our goal is to

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resolve pain and restore function.” Dr. Song’s area of expertise is sports medicine with a focus on knee and shoulder injuries, as well as shoulder replacement surgery. In terms of sports-related injuries, the most common injuries Dr. Song sees are “anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears and meniscus tears in the knee as well as rotator cuff injuries and labral tears in the shoulder,” he said. “These all tend to be more acute type injuries although rotator cuff tears can also be chronic and progressive.” Princeton Orthopaedic Associates has five practicing sports medicine specialists. With the addition of Dr. William in Rossy in 2016 and his fellowship training in hip arthroscopy and knee cartilage restoration, the group is able to offer patients a gamut of sports medicine procedures. Many of the physicians at Princeton Orthopaedics have won numerous accolades including Dr. Jeffrey S. Abrams, who was elected as president of the Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA). Dr. Abrams is among the first surgeons to perform rotator cuff repairs and stabilization surgery arthroscopically. Also of note, Dr. David Lamb of Princeton Orthopaedics was appointed chief of orthopaedic surgery at University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro. Dr. Lamb has been an attending physician in spine surgery at Princeton since 1997. He is taking over for another Princeton Orthopaedic physician, Dr. W. Thomas Gutowski, who served as chief of orthopaedic surgery since 2001. Dr. Lamb commonly performs surgeries of the cervical and lumbar spine. Dr. Rony Nazarian has perfected the art of spine surgery with a particular interest in minimally invasive spine surgery (MIS). Dr. Nazarian said, “we can now offer MIS candidates a significantly quicker recovery with less pain. Many of our surgeries can now be done as an outpatient, so that the patient can recover at home.” At Princeton Orthopaedic Associates, physicians focus not only on the injuries themselves, but on the prevention of musculoskeletal injuries through physical therapy, exercise therapy, and more. They also have an orthopaedic surgeon on-call 24/7 in addition to urgent care services at their 325 Princeton Avenue office every Saturday morning from 8 to 11am. The Monroe office offers urgent care services Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday evenings from 5 to 8pm and Saturday from 8 to 11am. To schedule a formal appointment, call 609.924.8131 or visit www. princetonorthopaedic.com.


photography courtesy of dr. eugenie brunner

profiles in healthcare |

Dr. Eugenie Brunner Offers An Artist’s Touch in Facial Plastic Surgery By Taylor Smith Located in the heart of Princeton, at 256 Bunn Drive, Suite 4, Dr. Eugenie Brunner specializes in cosmetic facial plastic surgery and much more. Double board-certified by the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and the American Board of Otolaryngology, Dr. Brunner received her education and training at Rutgers University, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School – The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New York University Medical Center, and the University of Toronto. Affiliated with The University Medical Center at Princeton at Plainsboro, Dr. Brunner has served as an attending physician in the Department of Surgery since 1997, when her practice was first established in Princeton. According to Dr. Brunner, facial rejuvenation procedures are best considered in terms of three aspects—facial plastic surgery, laser treatment, and fillers. Prospective patients can call the office to set up an initial complimentary consultation. Using the latest technology and her many years of experience, Dr. Brunner works with each patient on an individual basis to determine the best course of procedures. Patients will be able to examine accurate imagining to analyze before and after views of their face and neck. Also, factors such as recovery time will be held in the highest regard, ensuring patient comfort and convenience.

Surgical procedures take place at University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro, and include face lift, mini face lift, neck lift and rejuvenation, rhinoplasty, eyelid surgery, forehead lift/brow lift, cheek and chin augmentation (implants), and ear surgery. Non-surgical procedures are extensive and include the latest filler and Botox injections and wrinkle treatment, Eclipse MicroPen Elite with PRP Therapy, microdermabrasion, facials, chemical peels, and skin care products. All non-surgical procedures take place at the Bunn Drive location, which is also home to Dr. Brunner’s Laser Center. With her Skin Rejuvenation Laser Center, Dr. Brunner is able to treat issues related to acne and acne scarring, sun damage, laser hair removal, tattoo removal, skin tightening with Fractora RF, and contour the face, jawline, and neck with SmartLipo-Precision Tx laser treatments. For this reason, she treats people of all ages with a variety of needs and desires. Dr. Brunner is also quick to emphasize the important role that preventative treatment plays in preserving skin and facial health and youthfulness. Born and raised in Princeton, Dr. Brunner is an accomplished artist and said that her plastic surgery and skin rejuvenation treatments remind her of the act of drawing and painting, with a strong emphasis on symmetry, sculpture, and organic qualities. Remember, “if you look like you’ve had work done, you’ve had too much,” remarks Dr. Brunner. Dr. Brunner participates in regular continuing education programs to ensure that she is using the latest techniques. She has been named a Castle Connolly Top Doctor nine years in a row (2009-2017), and is a two-time recipient of the Patients’ Choice Awards as one of New Jersey’s favorite physicians. In spite of her many accolades, Dr. Brunner said her favorite reward is her patients’ satisfaction, especially when they remark that they feel smoother, fresher, and more confident. Are you ready to learn which procedures may suit your needs? Schedule a consultation by calling 609.921.9497 or visit www.brunnermd.com. fall 2017 PRINCETON MaGaZINE

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| profiles in healthcare

Treating the Whole Family at Hamilton Dental Associates By Taylor Smith Hamilton Dental Associates, located at 2929 Klockner Road in Hamilton Square, employs the latest dental technology in the treatment of patients of all ages. Pediatric dentistry, adult dentistry, orthodontics, oral surgery, periodontics, and endodontics are all offered at the Hamilton Square location. As a result, no referrals are needed. President and partner Dr. Michael DeLuca is a member of the American Dental Association and American Association of Orthodontists, and is a current member and former president of the Mercer Dental Society. In addition, he serves as a fellow of the International College of Dentists. He is joined by partners Dr. Kevin Collins and Dr. Deolinda Reverendo, general dentists; Dr. Irving Djeng and Dr. Lauren Levine, pediatric dentists; and Dr. Matthew Etter, orthodontist; as well as a full-time staff of talented doctors in diverse areas of practice. Dr. Deluca emphasizes that a healthy mouth is tied to multiple aspects of overall wellbeing including a lower risk of heart disease and diabetes, and many other systemic diseases, not to mention improved emotional health and wellness. He states that teaching children good oral hygiene at a very young age prepares them for an improved quality of life later on. At a child’s first dental appointment, the pediatric specialists will clean teeth, apply fluoride, and check for possible issues related to mouth development, including teething, nutrition, thumb sucking, overcrowding, gum disease, and cavities. At Hamilton Dental Associates, patients are always treated by specialists in their particular field. For example, orthodontic treatments will always be done by an orthodontic specialist, and patients requiring root canals will always be treated by an endodontist — a dentist who specializes in root canals. Hamilton Dental Associates uses cutting-edge dental technology, such as digital X-rays, 3-D X-rays, and digital impressions of teeth to treat everything from crowns to the use of Invisalign, to help straighten teeth. In fact, the practice has been using digital X-rays since 2002. The benefit of the 3-D X-ray system is that dentists can better examine all angles of a patient’s mouth, including jaw anatomy and root positions. 3-D X-rays are

32 | PRINCETON MAGAZINE fAll 2017

especially helpful when it comes to locating root fractures or diagnosing impacted teeth, as in the case of wisdom teeth removal. Digital impressions allow dentists to capture impressions of a patient’s teeth and gums without the use of messy impression materials. This technology is particularly useful when replacing and fitting crowns, speeding up the process and reducing the amount of “chair time.” Lastly, all patient records are digitized, meaning that no paper sheets attached to clipboards will be seen during an appointment. Digitization of patient records not only makes appointments more seamless, but it also contributes to a “green” office environment, reducing the amount of waste that the office produces. Hamilton Dental provides many separate services not typically offered under the same roof. In terms of cosmetic dentistry, HDA offers cosmetic tooth whitening, veneers, crowns, bonding, and tooth-colored fillings, which provide a more natural looking alternative to the old silver fillings. Oral surgeons perform wisdom teeth removal and extractions in which patients are either partially or totally sedated. There are three forms of conscious sedation offered at Hamilton Dental Associates, which include oral medication, inhaling laughing gas, and intravenous medication. Sedation dentistry is ideal for patients needing a large amount of dental work at once or those who suffer from debilitating anxiety surrounding dental care, inhibiting them from seeking treatment. Invisalign is a great application of the digital impression technology that HDA offers. Dr. DeLuca describes how straightening teeth has never been more comfortable or discreet. “Teeth naturally move over time and many adults who never had braces seek out Invisalign as a way to gently shift teeth. Invisalign is appropriate for patients of any age.” The skilled dentists at Hamilton Dental Associates have completed advanced training in the diagnosis and management of temporomandibular disorders, also known as TMD. TMD occurs when the temporomandibular joint, which connects the upper and lower jaw, is misaligned. Patients suffering from TMD may experience a more difficult time chewing due to their jaw shifting positions. They may also notice increased facial pain, difficulty holding the mouth wide open, or a popping or clicking noise when they chew. They work with each patient on an individual level in the diagnosis and treatment of TMD, the goal being to ultimately make the patient more comfortable and to improve the neuromuscular positions of the jaw. To request an appointment and learn more, call 609.586.6603 or visit hamiltondental.com.

photography courtesy of hamilton dental associates

From left: Dr. Matthew Etter, Dr. Deolinda Reverendo, Dr. Michael DeLuca, Dr. Irving Djeng, Dr. Lauren Levine, and Dr. Kevin Collins.


profiles in healthcare |

Q&A with Dr. Jennifer Montes of Hunterdon Healthcare Breast Care Program photography courtesy of hunterdon healthcare

By Taylor Smith What do you specialize in and what is your educational background? I am board certified in general surgery by the American Board of Surgery specializing in malignant and benign diseases of the breast. I am a current and active member of the American Society of Breast Surgeons. I received my undergraduate education at Cornell University and earned a master of public health from Columbia University prior to graduating from Temple University School of Medicine. I then proceeded to complete my general surgery residency at New York City’s Lenox Hill Hospital, followed by a fellowship in breast surgical oncology at NYU Langone Medical Center. My interest in breast surgery began very early in my career, during my surgical rotation as a third year medical student. During that time I worked closely with a female general surgeon who ran the breast clinic at the hospital where I was training. It wasn’t long before I realized that breast surgery was my true calling. In addition to performing life-saving operations, I loved being able to form meaningful and longlasting relationships with my patients that reached far beyond the operating room. The field combined my love of surgery and women’s health. It was a perfect fit. What is the Hunterdon Regional Breast Care Program? The Hunterdon Regional Breast Care Program (HRBCP) combines a comfortable, supportive environment with state-of-the-art, comprehensive diagnostic and treatment resources, all conveniently close to home. At HRBCP, we take a coordinated approach to breast care, for both well care and cancer care. A highly-skilled team of breast specialists from different medical disciplines provides diagnostic testing, genetic risk assessment, treatment, surgery, psychosocial support, education, and rehabilitation. We focus on empowering women of all ages and meeting the needs of each patient from before diagnosis, throughout their treatment, and well after recovery. The HRBCP is accredited as a nationally-approved Breast Center by The National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), the only national accreditation program specifically for breast disease. We were also awarded the Women’s Choice Award in 2014 for America’s Best Breast Center. Describe Hunterdon Breast Surgery Center’s relationship with Hunterdon Women’s Imaging Center. The Imaging Center and Breast Surgery Center work hand in hand and have the added luxury of working door to door. This makes it easy for our surgeons and radiologists to collaborate and consult with each other at any given time. Often, if a patient has a finding highly concerning for a malignancy, they will be taken next door for a consultation and biopsy by a breast surgeon that same day. This unique set up gives our patients the advantage of meeting their surgeon well before a diagnosis is made and reduces the added stress of waiting for a biopsy appointment. Hunterdon Women’s Imaging Center is accredited by the American College of Radiology as a nationally-approved mammography and ultrasound center. All of our diagnostic testing is performed with the most advanced, state-of-the-art technology in a relaxing spa-like atmosphere. Talk about breast cancer prevention and early detection through educational offerings and cancer screenings. The best way to prevent breast cancer is to reduce the risk factors that we can

control, for example, being overweight, lack of exercise, and alcohol consumption. Research shows that exercising four to seven hours a week lowers the risk of breast cancer by 15 percent. In contrast, having more than three alcoholic beverages in a week increases the risk of breast cancer by 15 percent. By making small, empowering lifestyle modifications, women can decrease their risk of breast cancer. Our most powerful tool for early detection of breast cancer is consistent yearly breast screening with mammogram. Annual mammograms can detect changes in the breast up to two years before a patient or doctor can feel them. Early detection prevents the need for extensive treatment for more advanced cancer and improves the chances of breast conservation and survival. Here at HRBCP we continue to follow the current guidelines from the American College of Radiology and Society of Breast Imaging, which is for women to receive annual mammograms starting at age 40. As part of our commitment to the health and wellbeing of the community, Hunterdon Medical Center offers our expert clinicians to come and speak to your group, business, school, synagogue, church, or organization on a variety of cancer-related topics. This free service is designed to educate the community on early detection and cancer screening programs as well as information on how individuals can make lifestyle changes to reduce their risk of developing cancer. In what ways do you integrate holistic modalities within your treatment? I recognize that breast cancer is a disease that affects much more than the mere biology of a human being, but the very fiber, psyche, and self image of a person. I believe in treating the patient as a whole on a physical, emotional, and spiritual level. I embrace the integration of holistic modalities with traditional Western medicine to do so. I work closely with the Hunterdon Integrative Medicine Program which offers acupuncture, massage, Reiki energy work, aromatherapy, and integrative nutrition among other services. We are currently working together to assemble programs specifically for breast cancer patients and strategizing how to make these services more accessible to patients whose health care benefits may not cover them. I strongly believe that holistic treatments should be integrated into every patient’s treatment plan to reduce the stress and anxiety of this difficult time in a woman’s life, and I am working to make that a reality for my patients. fall 2017 PRINCETON MaGaZINE

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photography by andrew wilkinson

| profiles in healthcare

Q&A with Princeton Spine & Joint Center Tell us about the history of Princeton Spine & Joint Center. Princeton Spine & Joint Center (PSJC) was started in 2008 by Drs. Ana Bracilovic and Grant Cooper, who met at Princeton High School and are married. Drs. Bracilovic and Cooper trained in New York City together at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, The University Hospital of Columbia, and Cornell in physical medicine and rehabilitation medicine. After fellowship, they returned to Princeton to start PSJC, where they focus on helping patients with spine and joint pain return to their daily lives, pain-free and without surgery. In 2010, PSJC was ready to grow and two colleagues and good friends of Drs. Bracilovic and Cooper joined their practice. Drs. Meyler and Funiciello share the vision and commitment of PSJC to provide exceptional patient care and enable patients to have the highest quality of life possible without neck, back, nerve, or joint pain. Where are you located? 601 Ewing Street, Suite A-2, in Princeton. What kinds of conditions do you treat? We treat patients who are in pain. We see patients who have neck pain, back pain, shoulder pain, hip pain, knee pain, wrist, hand, ankle, and foot pain. We also treat different types of nerve pain. What kinds of procedures do you perform? The most important starting point in any treatment plan is an accurate and complete diagnosis. This starts with a history and physical examination but we also use the most up-to-date diagnostic technology to not just pinpoint the diagnosis but to put it

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into the context of the person as a whole. Treatment at PSJC likewise utilizes the latest in technology. Our office is equipped with two full fluoroscopy suites as well as two ultrasound suites and electrodiagnostic machines. When necessary, we perform a variety of image guided injection procedures such as epidurals, facet joint injections, sacroiliac joint injections, rhizotomies, ultrasound guided joint injections, and nerve blocks and regenerative medicine therapies. How would you describe your practice’s philosophy? Princeton Spine & Joint Center’s ultimate commitment is to treat one patient at a time and ensure the absolute best and most advanced compassionate 21st century nonsurgical musculoskeletal care. How should patients prepare for their first treatment? Patients should try to bring a list of their current medications and any previous imaging they may have had, as well as dress comfortably. What sets the Princeton Spine & Joint Center apart? From day one, Princeton Spine & Joint Center’s uncompromising and single-minded mission has been to serve one patient at a time as if they were a family member. Our fellowship-trained, board-certified doctors have collectively written over 15 medical texts as well as numerous chapters and peer-reviewed articles. Our doctors have appeared everywhere from ABC’s Good Morning America Health show, ESPN, Sirius XM Doctor Radio, and NPR to the local Rider University’s The Bronc Radio. We stay up to date on the latest literature because of intellectual curiosity but also to ensure that every patient who walks through our doors receives the absolute best and latest in non-surgical spine and joint pain medicine. How can patients best contact you? You can visit us online at www.PrincetonSJC.com or call us at 609.454.0760.


profiles in healthcare |

The Princeton Eye Group partners include, back row from left, Dr Michael Y. Wong, Dr. Samuel M. Liu, Dr. R. David Reynolds, Dr. John A. Epstein, Dr. Stephen M. Felton, and Dr. Richard H. Wong. In the front row, from left, are Dr. Sarah D. Kuchar, Dr. Anita I. Miedziak, and Dr. Suzanne K. Jadico.

photography courtesy of princeton eye group

Premier Eye Care at Princeton Eye Group

were other versions of the lens in the past, but now patients with astigmatism can truly be free of glasses — many 100 percent of the time. It’s great for those having trouble with their eyesight who couldn’t have it corrected before.” Dr. Jadico said that the new lens provides a good perception of things that are both near and far. “It’s a great new technology and good option for astigmatism correction.” Dr. Jadico has performed thousands of cataract and LASIK surgeries, and said she By Laurie Pellichero even performed LASIK on her own mother. The Wills Laser Vision LASIK facility in Princeton combines the world-class With fully-staffed locations in Princeton, Monroe, and Somerset, Princeton Eye Group has long been known as one of New Jersey’s premier eye care practices. Each office medical knowledge and technology of Wills Eye Hospital with the skill and experience integrates ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians so that comprehensive care can of the Princeton Eye Group’s surgeons. The laser used at the facility is the latest Wavelight Allegretto Eye-Q 400 system, be delivered at each location. Services at Princeton Eye Group include routine eye exams; contact lenses; which allows Dr. Jadico and her surgical colleagues to view and measure the intricate details of a patient’s entire visual system. This state of-the-art cataract surgery; and diagnosis and evolution provides treatment for more patients, treatment for most eye diseases, including corneal some of whom were previously not candidates for diseases, glaucoma, macular degeneration, diabetic LASIK, by providing a detailed map of the refractive retinopathy, and retinal detachment and tears; as errors that are unique to each person’s vision. The well as eyelid and orbital plastic surgery; laser vision errors are then corrected using a precision-guided correction (LASIK); intense pulsed light therapy; beam of light. and Botox and cosmetic surgery. Wavelight FS200 blade-free LASIK is considered The eye care professionals at Princeton Eye to be the new standard of quality and safety in LASIK, Group are among the most experienced in the and the only technology to provide patients with a Central New Jersey area, with all doctors trained at 100 percent blade-free experience. Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia, as well as other “There have been big advances in LASIK institutions. surgery with blade-free technology,” said Dr. Jadico. Along with its three offices, Princeton Eye Group “It is very safe. We also have better screening now offers state-of-the-art ambulatory treatment centers to determine early if someone might not be a good for specialty care including Wills Laser Vision at The Princeton office of Princeton Eye Group candidate for LASIK.” Princeton, designated a Center of Excellence for Dr. Jadico emphasized that the professionals at Princeton Eye Group “are a really LASIK by Wills Eye Hospital; the Surgery Center of Central NJ, an ambulatory surgery center for cataract, glaucoma, and corneal transplant surgery managed by Wills Eye great group. We cover almost all specialties and all of our doctors have advanced training Hospital; Eye Surgery Princeton, a Medicare-certified ambulatory surgery center for in their specific areas.” Each of Princeton Eye Group’s three offices is also equipped with an Optical Shoppe, laser eye surgery and oculoplastic surgery; a retinal diagnostic and laser center; and a offering one of the widest selections of designer frames and contact lenses in the area. glaucoma laser and diagnostics center. The Princeton office of Princeton Eye Group is located in the Princeton Healthcare Princeton Eye Group prides itself on being on the cutting edge of the most recent technology. Dr Suzanne Jadico, who specializes in comprehensive ophthalmology, Center at 419 North Harrison Street, Suite 104, and can be reached at 609.921.9437. The Monroe Township office is in the Medical Arts Building in the Concordia cataract surgery, and LASIK, said she is very excited about a new intraocular lens implant Shopping Center at 1600 Perrineville Road; 609.655.8808. The Somerset office is located approved just this year by the FDA. “New technology brings new options,” said Dr. Jadico. “With the new multifocal in Somerset Village, 900 Easton Avenue, Suite 50; 732.565.9550. For more information, toric lens, we can now correct for astigmatism in patients during cataract surgery. There visit the website at www.princetoneyegroup.com. fall 2017 PRINCETON MaGaZINE

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BY ELLEN GILBERT

THE PROMISE OF “LIVING DRUGS”


T CELLS ATTACKING A CANCER CELL (CAR T- CELL THERAPY)

ecent strides in the field of genetic engineering are generating tremendous excitement. Long in the works at university and company laboratories, the implications of this treatment are far-reaching. The rapidly emerging immunotherapy approach is called adoptive cell transfer (ACT); it collects and uses patients’ own immune cells to treat their cancer. There are several types of ACT, but the star of the show right now is CAR T-cell therapy, which made medical history this last August when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first genetic therapy for widespread use. Called Kymriah, it is being marketed by Novartis, a global healthcare company based in Switzerland. While genetic therapies promise to treat many types of cancer some day, Kymriah was approved for the treatment of particularly challenging type of leukemia: B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The FDA called the disease “devastating and deadly,” and said the new treatment fills an “unmet need.” “Novartis and other companies have been racing to develop gene therapies for other types of cancers, and experts expect more approvals in the near future,” noted New York Times science writer Denise Grady. “FDA Commissioner Scott Grady said that more than 550 types of experimental gene therapy are currently being studied.” Potential T-cell treatments for solid tumors like breast cancer are still on the horizon. While FDA approval is typically associated with specific medications, Kymriah and related gene therapies are not like drugs that can be dispensed by any physician. The process involves a proscribed sequence of procedures played out over days and weeks. To customize Kymriah for individual patients, white blood cells called T cells are removed from a patient’s bloodstream at an approved medical center and then frozen, shipped to Novartis in Morris Plains, N.J., for genetic engineering and multiplying, frozen again, and shipped back to the medical center to be dripped into the patient. That processing is expected to take 22 days. Novartis said the treatment would be available at an initial network of 20 approved medical centers to be certified within a month, a number that would be expanded to 32 by the end of the year.

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“HAPPY AND PROUD” In the Princeton area, Dr. Neel J. Gandhi, a physician at Capital Health System whose practice includes hematology, internal medicine, and medical oncology, said that he is “happy and proud” of recent advances in gene therapy techniques. Capital Health describes itself as “the region’s leader in providing progressive, quality patient care with significant investments in our exceptional physicians, nurses, and staff, as well as advanced technology.” It is comprised of two hospitals: the Regional Medical Center in Trenton and the Capital Health Medical Center in Hopewell. A facility in Hamilton provides outpatient services. “My sense is that the oncology community is very happy that the next leap is being taken—this is the first time this type of treatment has been approved and there will be more on the horizon,” said Gandhi. While acknowledging that treatment advances are “really exciting” and “big, big news for all cancer patients,” there are still, Gandhi notes “a lot of administrative hurdles and road blocks” before gene therapy becomes widely used. Capital Health aspires to eventually be a major cancer treatment center, but it’s not there yet, says Gandhi. “We really need to curb our enthusiasm,” he said. “My gut feeling is that implementation of the new technique is limited to major medical centers.” “We’ll be watching the news,” said Gandhi with cautious optimism.

These treatments have...captured the attention of researchers and the public alike because of the remarkable responses they have produced in some patients—both children and adults—for whom all other treatments had stopped working. –NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE

In addition to meeting the challenges of site approval, time lags in processing, and so on, the new treatments are extraordinarily expensive. Kymriah will be given to patients just once, and is estimated to cost a whopping $475,000. Novartis has said that if a patient does not respond within the first month after treatment, there will be no charge, and they will provide financial help to families who are uninsured or underinsured. Still, the numbers are daunting, and long-term support will doubtless include many conversations between pharmaceutical companies, hospitals, physicians, insurers, legislators, and, hopefully not least of all, patients.

SIDE EFFECTS While the outcomes of “living drugs” promise to be extraordinary, so are the current costs and potential side effects, which are usually described as acute and even life-threatening.

The revved-up “T cells,” as they are called, are capable of touching off a “cykotine storm” that can cause high fever, lung congestion, low blood pressure, neurological problems, and other complications. In addition to the FDA requirement that participating hospitals and doctors be specially trained and certified to administer the treatment, hospitals also need to stock certain drugs that quell severe reactions. “It’s very personalized, very labor intensive,” agrees Dr. Eileen Scigliano, associate professor of medicine, hematology, and medical oncology at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan, where clinical trials for similar treatments are taking place. Once a patient is approved for treatment, she said, onsite medical staff—in addition to attending hematologists and oncologists—are put on call to be ready for any emergencies that may occur. An acute bout of colitis, for example, will need the immediate attention of a gastroenterologist.

CAR T CELLS AND TCR T CELLS ARE ENGINEERED TO PRODUCE SPECIAL RECEPTORS ON THEIR SURFACES. THEY ARE THEN EXPANDED IN THE LABORATORY AND RETURNED TO THE PATIENT. CREDIT: NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE.

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FALL 2017


DR. CHIARA BONINI, PROFESSOR AT THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITÀ VITA-SALUTE, SAN RAFFAELE, AND VICE DIRECTOR FOR THE DIVISION OF IMMUNOLOGY, TRANSPLANTATION, AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES AT THE OSPEDALE SAN RAFFAELE SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTE, MILAN, ITALY.

“LIKE BEING AT A ROCK CONCERT” The fact that many of the patients who will receive this treatment would otherwise die puts dangerous side effects and prohibitive costs in perspective. “It’s kind of a juggling act,” admits Scigliano. “We need to prevent bad complications without shutting down treatment.” Scigliano is unabashedly enthusiastic about the strides being made. Researchers had been looking at the immune system for ways to treat cancer for many years. The new Novartis treatment was originally developed by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania. The first child to receive the therapy was Emily Whitehead, who was 6 and near death from leukemia in 2012 when she was treated at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Now 12, she has been free of leukemia for more than five years. Dr. Carl June, a leader in developing the treatment at the University of Pennsylvania, recently reported his team’s early experiences with it. In 2010 when tests showed that the first patient was leukemia-free a month after being treated, he and his colleagues could not believe it, and they ordered another biopsy for confirmation. “Now, I have to keep pinching myself to see that this happened,” he said.

One of the most exciting advances in cancer is an innovative approach that involves removing a patient’s immune cells, engineering those cells to identify cancer, then infusing those cells in the patient to kill cancer. –KITEPHARMA

Attending early conferences where the University of Pennsylvania results were reported was, “like being at a rock concert or hearing the Beatles for the first time. You could hear a pin drop,” said Scigliano, with a kind of wonder. “The arguments were so compelling, and you thought, ‘oh, my God—why didn’t I think of this.’”

A WORLDWIDE EFFORT There are, in fact, few conversations about singular recognition among researchers in genetic therapies. A remarkably animating factor of ACT research appears to be its highly collaborative nature. One of the most lucid (and moving) accounts of the history of genetically engineered lymphocytes is Dr. Chiara Bonini’s TEDx talk, “How Living Cells Could Help Us Fight Cancer.”

Bonini is a professor at the School of Medicine, Università Vita-Salute, San Raffaele, and vice director for the division of immunology, transplantation, and infectious diseases at the Ospedale San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. The input of scientists from around the world has been key to success, she says. “Even if the journey has just started,” say TEDx organizers, “Chiara’s enthusiasm toward research will lead you towards a world of hope where everything is possible if you can share your challenges with the right team.” “It was so improbable that this would ever be a commercially-approved therapy, and now it’s the first gene therapy approved in the United States,” said Dr. June in a recent interview. “It’s so different from all the pharmaceutical models. I think the cancer world is forever changed.” FALL 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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By William Uhl

W

One thousand gallons of water a minute rise up 300 feet to irrigate this farm in San Diego, powered by solar energy alone.

alking with Quentin Kelly, founder and CEO of WorldWater & Solar Technologies, Inc., you can tell he is very enthusiastic about what he does. The walls of his office in Princeton are decorated with maps of third-world countries like the Philippines, with red dots for each solarpowered water pump and purifier installed. Low-rise cubicles have pictures of flowing water and green crops in Haiti, Afghanistan, Darfur, and other places. And the boardroom has a row of photos of solar-powered farms in San Diego and the San Joaquin Valley. But WorldWater didn’t come into existence to fuel agriculture. 30 Feet Between LiFe and death

meters,’ so that’s a little over 30 feet. And I said, ‘You’re kidding me. 100,000 people are dying, standing 30 feet over water.’” Kelly returned with the civil engineers from Princeton University and started to put together a plan. “They put me in touch with more Princeton engineers and a group of five – five of the same guys who had designed and implemented the rocket engine research for the NASA space shuttle – started working with me on my farm in Hopewell.” Inside a barn, his team worked through a dozen iterations before they developed a solution: a solar water pump magnitudes more powerful than anything before. Due to natural fluctuations in solar power due to dimming from clouds and daytime, other pumps would be forced to repeatedly come to a complete halt before starting back up again when the light was stronger. This constant cycle of hard stopping and starting would burn out most pumps within minutes. Kelly’s team’s pump was able to modulate its power, allowing pumps to go as slow or fast as possible without coming to an abrupt halt. Other pumps were stuck at around five horsepower of pumping strength. Their pump went up to 400 horsepower.

WorldWater & Solar started due to a foreign crisis. “I was in New York, frankly at a cocktail party in Manhattan, and I met a gentleman who was from Sudan,” said Kelly. Representing then-president of Sudan Gaafar Nimeiry, the man asked Kelly to join a group of Princeton University civil engineers that were helping to clean the water in Khartoum, Sudan’s capital. After his arrival, he found more issues than purification. “I went to the outskirts of town with the water, water everywhere director of national water resources for Sudan,” said Kelly. “There were close to 100,000 people who had come across the desert from Ethiopia, Portable pumps and purifiers like Mobile Max enable faster response to disaster relief, Clean water crises are everywhere, not just overseas. After Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and they were dying out there and they couldn’t whether the crisis is in Fukushima or Florida. come into Khartoum. I asked the director, ‘Well, isn’t there anything to do?’ And WorldWater got a call from the New Jersey governor’s office—Mississippi’s he said, ‘What can we do? We don’t have diesel fuel, we don’t have diesel pumps, Governor Haley Barbour was looking for water engineers. “We not only had water they’re not on the grid, there’s nothing to be done.’ And I said, ‘What’s the ground engineers to send down…but one of our engineers had been working in the back, water level where they are?’ And he said, ‘The first aquifer would be at about 10 developing a product,” said Kelly. “That product became the prototype of the

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE fAll 2017


IMAGES COURTESY OF WORLDWATER & SOLAR TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

WorldWater partnered with the Morrell Foundation to provide potable water to South Waveland, Mississippi after Katrina for over seven months.

Not every WorldWater product is for agriculture or emergencies. This briefcase-sized device pumps and purifies water, provides solar power, and also contains military-grade communications technology.

Mobile Max Pure. We pulled it out of the area we were working and put it on a pickup truck and took it down to Waveland, Mississippi. Waveland is on I-10, about 40 miles east of New Orleans, and for several months we were the only source of clean water in the southern part of the city of Waveland.” Soon after, roughly a hundred trailers started ferrying in bottled water for hurricane victims. According to Kelly, the bottled water cost between 50 cents to a dollar per gallon. Meanwhile, the solar pumping and purifying Mobile Max Pure supplied the same amount of water for less than a penny a gallon. They are already working with the local and state governments of current hurricane victims to do much the same. “We’re able to sell these products in cases like right now, for example, the terrible situation that has taken place in Texas and now down in Florida and in the Caribbean Islands. We have these portable water purification systems that can be moved anywhere—we built little trailers and they’re on wheels. They can pump up to 30,000 gallons of contaminated water and purify it per day, and if you wish, you can use them to pump the floodwater out of buildings and basements. Or you can take that very same water and within two minutes, you’ve cleaned it for drinking. So it’s a very, very valuable resource right now.” A WELL OF LIFE

Solar-powered water pumping and purification has uses outside of emergencies. In many underdeveloped countries, a lack of clean, local water has left towns and communities impoverished. WorldWater is planning on expanding to these areas, starting with Burkina Faso, a landlocked country north of Ghana. Starting in June and ending in September, rainfall floods the land. Afterwards, people, most often girls, must walk several miles to bring water back home—and the water is commonly muddied and possible infected with parasites or disease. WorldWater was approached by an American non-governmental organization that had worked in Burkina Faso many years ago, and found that a properlylocated water basin could drain the floodwaters into wells to provide year-round water. WorldWater was the next step. With a budget of $38,000, pumping water was just the start. “It enables them

According to National Geographic, only 0.007 percent of water on Earth is drinkable and usable by humans. By 2025, 1.8 billion people are estimated to struggle with water scarcity.

to purify that water, and we also give them enough water to irrigate larger fields using our motor drives,” said Kelly. “Then we talked about putting lights at the school. We’re going to build a little micro-grid of electricity, so there’ll be lighting at the school, and power, and we’ve determined we can probably get a well by the school which will make the school the center for the whole village. We’ve determined we’re going to do this for 20 villages.” “We’ll be working with the government of Burkina Faso, and I have a temporary OK from the U.S. Export-Import bank to help finance this,” continued Kelly. “If you multiply 20 villages—and that’ll be a pilot—times $38,000, you’re up to about $760,000. Then you’ve got to have the costs of building the basin and maybe drilling some wells, so let’s say you can do the whole thing for 20 villages for about a million dollars. You’ve now put 400 girls back to school per village. They had 300 boys in the school, and all of a sudden that year, they then had 700 kids. Now the second village has been completed and the same process is working. We’re going to replicate this; there are 8,000 villages. I’ve met with the ambassador from Burkina Faso, and he said, ‘Wow, we could do all 8,000 villages,’ and I said, ‘Let’s start with 20 and then we’ll keep on going.’” Learning about the different inventions at WorldWater feels futuristic, and not just because of the technological bounds. It’s not futuristic in the sense of Back to the Future’s flying cars, but more like Star Trek’s optimistic vision of a more harmonious, techno-utopian future. “This morning I had a weekly staff meeting, and I said, ‘You know, folks, what we’re doing in Burkina Faso right now, we can replicate in countries all over the world,’” said Kelly. “The benefits are so farreaching, it’s a wonderful sort of living that we make here.”

FALL 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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What we treat:

Coming to Princeton

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January 2018!

Back pain/Sciatica

Appointments now being taken

Fibromyalgia/Pain Osteoporosis Rheumatoid Arthritis Inflammatory Bowel Disease Diabetes/Cholesterol Multiple Sclerosis Alzheimers Parkinsons

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE fAll 2017


PRINCETON HIGH SCHOOL NEIGHBORHOOD | ECLECTIC CAPE COD, BUILT IN 1924. RECENT RENOVATION By ARChITECT ANDREw ShELDON (1944 - 2017) INCLUDED LARGER FRONT DOOR AND NEw wINDOwS IN FRONT.

Thank you to the proud owners of the smaller homes in Princeton for contributing to the character of our community. We have photographed a few of our favorites that have been lovingly maintained, restored, or constructed with architectural distinction for all of us to enjoy. fall 2017 PRINCETON MaGaZINE

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MERCER HILL HISTORIC DISTRICT | (TOP-LEFT AND RIGHT) A POSSIBLE STEADMAN DESIGN. THE ORIGINAL PART OF THE HOUSE DATES TO 1840, WITH TWO SUBSEQUENT ADDITIONS. THE HOUSE AND BARN (ABOVE, LEFT AND RIGHT) WERE RESTORED AND SUBTLY IMPROVED IN 2013.

The homes on these pages are of different architectural styles and varying ages. Some are quirky, others are historic or contemporary. But they all have charm and integrity.

NORTH PRINCETON NEIGHBORHOOD | (OPPOSITE, TOP-LEFT) THE RIDGELAND, SEARS HONOR BILT HOMES, 1935. HUN SCHOOL NEIGHBORHOOD | (OPPOSITE, LEFT) CAPE COD STYLE DESIGNED BY AYMAR EMBURY II, 1928. EMBURY ALSO DESIGNED DILLON GYM AT PRINCETON UNIVERSITY IN 1947.

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LittLebrook SchooL Neighborhood | (top-left) Mid-Century Modern, 1956 with a 1970 addition. (below) Mid-Century Modern, 1955. (bottom) Mid-Century Modern, 1955 with an addition by MiChael Graves in the late 1970s.

In addition to adding character and personality to the community, a big benefit to living in a smaller home is that you need less of everything. Less energy to heat and cool, less maintenance, less money spent on property taxes, and less space to accumulate unnecessary objects.

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PRINCETON HIGH SCHOOL NEIGHBORHOOD (TOP) SPANISH REVIVAL, 1928.

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LAKE CARNEGIE NEIGHBORHOOD | (ABOVE) RENOVATIONS BY ARCHITECT MAX HAYDEN WITH MOTIFS AND STYLISTIC LOURISHES BY MICHAEL GRAVES. BUILT CIRCA LATE 1950S/EARLY 1960s.


WITHERSPOON-JACKSON NEIGHBORHOOD CONTEMPORARY DESIGNED BY LESLIE DOWLING OF DOWLING STUDIOS, NEW CONSTRUCTION.

NORTH PRINCETON NEIGHBORHOOD | MATERIAL DESIGN BUILD DESIGNED AND CONSTRUCTED AN ADDITION, BATHROOM, AND KITCHEN RENOVATION TO THIS 1950s-ERA RANCH HOUSE. PHOTO COURTESY OF HALKIN MASON PHOTOGRAPHY, LLC.

If you are the proud owner of a small house in Princeton, I invite you to send me a picture at lynn.smith@ princetonmagazine.com and we will post it on our website with the other homes in this article. FALL 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/16/17—12/11/17 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 6 weeks of rebate claim receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 6 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2017 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their respective owners. 17Q4MAGPIRC1


profiles in design |

Q&A with Jennifer Poe of Rittenhouse Home By Taylor Smith

Photo Credits: Allure West Studios

When did you first realize your passion for interior design? My passion for interior design came to me organically. After remodeling and decorating my own homes, I realized that I had a passion and unrealized skill set for interior design. So, after having my second daughter, I went from a stay-at-home mom to a student at The Art Institute of Philadelphia pursuing a degree in interior design. What services does Rittenhouse Home provide? Rittenhouse Home is a full-service design firm. We develop an in-depth understanding of each client’s expectations and our goal is to exceed those goals every time. Our design work includes complete kitchen and bath renovations and interior design of all scopes. Our current client work ranges from updates to complete remodels, and all the way to a completed home renovation and interior design plan from start to finish. Our kitchen and bath designers and interior designers lend their skills and expertise to provide customized solutions for each of our clients. We foster long-term relationships with our clients and they are our most valuable referral source. What are you most inspired by and how does this influence your design aesthetic? I am most inspired by architecture, new and old, and, of course, fashion. All those things combined make for a perfectly-curated design that will be timeless and enjoyed for decades to come. Trends come and go, but you can never go wrong with the classics.

I believe in mixing genres — think an imported French Provence trestle table with the sleek, clean lines of modern chairs. I’m currently working on a project that includes my client’s grandmother’s mahogany gold claw-footed dining table. We are restoring it to its original condition and paring it with new chairs and a new server. In what ways does Rittenhouse Home deliver personalized service? Rittenhouse Home is more than your average interior design firm, furniture retail studio, or kitchen and bath design showroom. I think my clients know from the very moment they walk into my showroom that they have found a true partner in their design vision. I collaborate with clients by providing more than 200 vendors of furnishings. These partnerships with the best vendors allow us to provide the best options for our clients, whether it be furniture, lighting, rugs, wallpaper, and everything in between. We are your dedicated design partners from beginning to end. Our design team not only provides the design expertise to complete any given project, but we also strive to provide the best prices. Due to our large purchasing power, we are able to offer clients 30-40 percent off manufacturers’ retail pricing on all furniture purchases. Additionally, I share my contractors’ discounts, assuring that clients are getting the very best product out there at the very best pricing. Describe some recent or future projects that you are particularly proud of. We have been fortunate to have worked on many largerscale projects, which include total first floor renovations. These projects require me to work with clients to ascertain a realistic budgets and help them make smart decisions along the way to stay within that budget. No matter the scope of the project, we are here from beginning to end and remain dedicated to an outcome that will far surpass expectations.

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profiles in design |

Q&A with Lisa D. Tobias of Tobias Design By Taylor Smith

When did you first realize your passion for kitchen and bath design? When I built my current house 16 years ago, my builder recognized that I had talent and suggested that I work with him. At the time I was working as a consultant for an employee benefit firm specifically designing health care plans and providing actuarial services. I have a love of math and the arts, and thought this opportunity would combine these two disparate traits very nicely. What services does Tobias Design provide? Tobias Design helps our clients by designing kitchens (both cabinet layout and the selection of materials) or baths from concept to completion. Our process starts with a lot of questions that help us determine our clients’ design style and identify how they specifically use a kitchen. Almost like how an actor would absorb themselves in a role, we absorb ourselves in our clients’ minds and reflect back a design that is unique to them. Once the layout is approved, we assist them with the selection of materials that will complete the picture — counter tops, tile, flooring, backsplash, lighting, plumbing, paint selection, etc. — so that in the end the completed kitchen or bathroom looks like a cohesive, thoughtful, complete design giving rise to a space that is unique to them.

What are you most inspired by and how does this influence your design aesthetic? I particularly love when our client has one “found” piece – whether it be furniture, an antique, artwork, or even something with a striking color. Often it stimulates our imaginations and can be found in recurring themes in our kitchens designs. We especially love when our clients allow us to take risks and design outside of a pre-processed way of thinking. We did a kitchen once that was inspired by a uniquely-colored oven; and another where an antique Flexible Flyer sled gave rise to a red spiral staircase in a kitchen that otherwise used gray-colored, driftwood-appearing cabinets next to very modern dark-stained cabinets. The juxtaposition of the old and rustic against the new was striking and beautiful. In what ways does Tobias Design deliver personalized service? Many times the redesign process can be daunting. To us, it’s second nature. We step our clients through our triedand-true process one piece at a time to make what can seem overwhelming very manageable. We pride ourselves on our hand-holding from start to finish. Most importantly, we address every phone call or email with a sense of urgency and demonstrated patience. Describe some recent or future projects that you are particularly proud of. We have completed a significant number of restorations from turn-of-the-century to 17th century, and enjoy working by paying homage to the time frame in which the house was built. To us, diversity is our joy and design flexibility is key; from farm houses built in the 1800s, to track homes, large or small and all in between, we are proud of each and every one that allows us to display what we do best – design.

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Food, Wine, & maybe Tuscany presented by The Parkinson Alliance Saturday, November 4, 2017 – 6 pm to 9pm

At the Beautiful Atrium, Princeton University Frick Chemistry Building A diverse collection of local restaurants will be presenting their signature choice of cuisine. Guest speaker, Tim Hague Sr., overcame odds when he went from a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease to – just three years later – becoming the inaugural winner of CTV’s The Amazing Race Canada Have you ever experienced a vacation Under the Tuscan Sun? Here’s your chance! Along with your ticket purchase, you may buy as many raffle tickets as you like for a chance to win a trip for four to Tuscany, including airfare, hotels, and a villa for 7 nights!

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profiles in design |

A Fresh Take on Consignment at Elephant in the Room Design By Laurie Pellichero | Photography by Charles R. Plohn From the moment you walk in the bright green door to Elephant in the Room Design in the Princeton North Shopping Center, you will see that it’s not your average consignment store. The clean, spacious 2,000-square-foot showroom is filled with artfully-arranged vignettes filled with an eclectic mix of new and consigned furniture and home decor items. Owner Cynthia “CJ” Johnson said the name of the store just came to her. “How did that piece of furniture you once loved become the ‘elephant in the room’? Maybe you really do still love it, but it simply doesn’t fit into your new decor or space. It’s time for us to find it a new loving home!” The shop features a carefully-curated collection of consigned pieces including furniture, seating, dining tables, occasional tables, desks, rugs, mirrors, artwork, lighting, objets d’art, china, glassware, and more. “We fill a certain niche, with styles and prices for everyone,” said Johnson. New merchandise arrives daily, so each visit promises

interior photo courtesy of elephant in the room.

something fresh. “One of the things I hear most often is ‘I can’t believe it’s consigned,’” said Johnson of the condition of the merchandise displayed in the showroom. Along with the consignment items, Johnson offers new furniture from Wesley Hall, CR Laine, and Harden, all available in custom fabrics and finishes. She said she chose those manufacturers because they are all American and for their high level of craftsmanship. Elephant in the Room Design also features a selection of retail lighting, artwork, Zodax candles and diffusers, and other home decor items. Only open since January, the shop is already an area favorite, winning Best Furniture Store recognition in the 2017 Town Topics Readers’ Choice Awards. Johnson said she is thrilled with the warm welcome that Elephant in the Room Design has received. “It has been so rewarding,” said Johnson. “I am very encouraged by the reception we have received for the consignment with retail mix. It has been well-received by customers and we have received great support from our vendors as well.” “I love interacting with people,” continued Johnson. “I want our shop to be fun and welcoming, not snooty or pushy. We want people to be inspired and come back.” Johnson has a BFA in studio art and graphic design. She taught art at the high school level in Basking Ridge, and also worked at a consignment shop in Summit before opening Elephant in the Room Design. She said she chose Princeton because of its central location and “great community of cosmopolitan people.” She said it is wonderful to have her own store. “It’s a culmination of all my experiences,” said Johnson. “It’s a fun atmosphere—like Christmas every day.”

Johnson said that the consignment period for each item is 90 days. Merchandise is reduced by 15 percent off of the original price after 30 days and 30 percent off of the original price after 60 days. Some specialized furniture pieces can stay in the store a bit longer to find the right home. Johnson works with the owners to determine the best price for each item, and also does research online. She is very careful to choose items in good condition, and most look almost new. “There are stories behind everything,” she said. “We have some really cool things. Many are from people’s travels.” Johnson also features her own fabric and wall covering designs at the shop, which can be incorporated into new and consigned upholstered pieces, wall art, pillows, and more. The fabric can be ordered in any amount of whole yardage. She offers many colors and patterns with customization also being a possibility. “I’ve always been drawn to pattern and color,” said Johnson. “Print-on-demand changes everything. I create my original artwork and pattern designs. It is all printed right here in the U.S. I offer a wide range of fabric and color options for my customers. It encourages individuality.” Johnson’s colorful designs have been called unexpected, whimsical, and timeless—and many samples are on display in the shop. Johnson said she and her associate Polly Balland also enjoy creating the varied vignettes in the store. “It’s fun to create a fresh look with disparate items,” she said. This fall, Johnson is teaching a Princeton Adult School class at the shop on six different Friday nights —with each workshop focusing on a different interior design topic. She also offers design consultation services after store hours. Elephant in the Room Design is located at 1225 State Road 206, Suite 8, in Princeton. It is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10am to 6pm. For more information, call 609.454.3378 or visit the website at www.elephantintheroomdesign.com.

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| BOOK SCENE

by Stuart Mitchner

F.

Scott Fitzgerald’s famous line, “The very rich are different from you and me,” in his story “The Rich Boy,” inspired Ernest Hemingway’s sarcastic retort in “The Snows of Kilimanjaro, “Yes, they have more money.” In The Language of Houses: How Buildings Speak to Us (Delphinium $25.95), novelist Alison Lurie begins by stating “A building is an inanimate object, but it is not an inarticulate one. Even the simplest house always makes a statement, one expressed in brick and stone and plaster, in wood and metal and glass, rather than in words—but no less loud and obvious.” The homes built by the very rich make statements expressing what makes them “different from you and me.” Whatever your definition of “different” may be, people of means are likely to have larger, more elegant homes as well as enough wealth to maintain the allure of affluence after transitioning to smaller living spaces. In effect this is the theme of Leslie Linsley’s Upscale Downsizing: Creating a Stylish, Elegant, Smaller Home (Sterling $24.95), published this month. In Linsley’s introduction, she liberates the term “upscale” by pointing out that “downsizing doesn’t have to mean living in a humble abode, especially if the person, couple, or family has spent a lifetime accumulating lovely things or has a sense of style.” Her synonym of choice for downsizing is “editing,” as if a home were a book, every room a chapter. Referring to one of the primary elements of remodeling, the choice of paint color, Linsley notes that “interior designers who once favored beige and various shades of white are suddenly opting for gray.” One of her favorite shades is “Down Pipe,” from Farrow & Ball, “an upscale British paint and wallpaper company. When used on all four walls, this gray provides a rich contemporary atmosphere to a room and creates a mysteriously moody interior.” The author of over sixty books on crafts, decorating, and home-style, Linsley has written for House Beautiful, Elle Decor, Martha Stewart Living, and O.

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DREAM HOMES Will Jones’s lavishly illustrated The New Modern House (Princeton Architectural Press $40) features forty new houses organized around five themes—conditions, materials, environment, budget, and aesthetic. Upscale is definitely the word for Paris-based architect Barclay & Crousse’s Casa Equis in Peru, “an architectural oasis” chosen for the book’s cover image. “A dream home for the new millennium,” in Jones’s words, Casa Equis stands atop a cliff above the Pacific Ocean as if “hewn out of its setting.” This Peruvian vision is only the beginning of a journey that includes Rafael Viñoly’s Piano House in The Hamptons, created in the architect’s back garden; Edge Design’s Suitcase House overlooking The Great Wall of China in the Nanguo Valley near Beijing; Sean Griffith’s Blue House in London, “a clarion call for the Post-Modern revival”; and houses in San Francisco and Los Angeles, Singapore, and Melbourne, among a variety of locales worldwide. London-based Will Jones’s articles have appeared in RIBA Journal, Financial Times, Blueprint, and Dwell. ARCHITECTURAL AFFINITIES Published this month, also from Princeton Architectural Press, is Northern Exposure: Works of Carol A Wilson Architect ($50). In the foreword to this intimate portrait of eight houses by the Maine architect, Enrico Pinna recalls meeting Wilson at the Casa das Canoas in Rio de Janeiro, a home that Oscar Niemeyer had designed and built for himself. Pinna describes the professional rapport he felt with Wilson in relation to Goethe’s novel, Elective Affinities: “Such natures when they come in contact, at once lay hold of each other, and mutually affect one another.” Focusing on climate, seasons, views, local materials, the ecological history of building sites, and collaborations with local artisans, Wilson crafts “exquisitely designed and built houses that celebrate the beauty of New England and the power of architecture to combine modern forms with a traditional built landscape.” Following


introductory texts by Pinna and Juhani Pallasmaa, and a conversation between Wilson and John Leroux, each project opens with a foldout of plans, from hand-drawn to computer-aided, along with information about the house, followed by brilliant exterior, interior, and detail photographs. The book closes with an interview in 20 questions about Wilson’s working principles and the history of her studio for the past 30 years. Principal of Carol A. Wilson Architect, Wilson is based in Falmouth, Maine. Her modern and environmentally-responsive buildings have been honored with numerous design awards and published extensively. She has taught at the University of New Mexico, Montana State University, Bowdoin College’s Coastal Studies Center, Virginia Commonwealth University in Qatar, and Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design.

between builder and client achieve a quality comparable to literature. Swiss-born British author Alain de Botton, quoted by Lurie in The Language of Houses, says “The buildings we admire are ultimately those which ... refer, whether through their materials, shapes or color, to such legendarily positive qualities as friendliness, kindness, subtlety, strength, and intelligence.”

THE LANGUAGE OF ARCHITECTURE In Designing Your Perfect House (Dalsiner $39.95), updated in August 2017 with a “Green Building” supplement, William J. Hirsch Jr. emphasizes a link between spoken language and the three-dimensional vocabulary of architecture. “Composed together in architectural sentences, the rooms (nouns), doors and windows (verbs), details of space (adjectives and adverbs), and the special features and accents (interjections) become the prose of architecture.” Hirsch goes on to point out that while some architectural sentences are flat or showy, those that benefit from a constructive accord

ON RELATED SUBJECTS Popular titles in this area include Charlie Wing’s The Visual Handbook of Building and Remodeling, 3rd Edition (Taunton $29.95); Susan Lang’s Designing Your Dream Home: Every Question to Ask, Every Detail to Consider, and Everything to Know Before You Build or Remodel (Thomas Nelson $24.99); Amy Johnston’s What Your Contractor Can’t Tell You: The Essential Guide to Building and Renovating (Shube $24.95); and Michael Litchfield’s Renovation 4th Edition: Completely Revised and Updated (Taunton Press $50), which Library Journal calls “a masterpiece” and This Old House says is “Hands down, the best home renovation book...written in a down-toearth conversational style that’s comprehensive, practical, and easy to understand.”

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(609) 448-5600 custom kitchens, baths and renovations

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Newark and the Culture of Art: 1900-1960 through January 28, 2018 Wednesday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

55 Stockton Street • Princeton, New Jersey 08540 morven.org • 609.924.8144 Sponsored by Pheasant Hill Foundation • Liza and Schuyler Morehouse • Kalkin Family Foundation The exhibit is also supported in part by a grant from the New Jersey Department of State, Division of Travel & Tourism Windy Night, Newark, 1917. Stuart Davis (1892 - 1964). Private Collection. © Christie’s Images Limited 2010

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AJ margulis interiors

AwArd winning | creAtive | cleAn And simple | modern | timeless | flexible AJ Margulis, Interior Designer, Allied ASID 609.577.0666

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Barragan ďŹ re opal diamond and bolder earrings; price upon request; brookegregson.com

Julian Chichester Mondrian bookcase; price upon request; deringhall.com

Julian Chichester Avellino daybed; price varies with fabric; deringhall.com

Umut Yamac Perch Light Branch; price upon request; www.moooi.com

Fornasetti Penini magazine rack; $1,795; barneys.com

Victoria Beckham Nano half moon shoulder bag; $1,184; harveynichols.com

Julian Chichester Mathias chair; price varies with fabric; deringhall.com

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Zebra gold rug; $236 per square foot; therugcompany. com

Malone Souliers Montana laceup suede and leather pumps; $297; theoutnet.com

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Fratelli Orsini open back leather driving gloves; $59; leatherglovesonline.com Noir Mephisto walnut and metal cabinet; $2,160; zincdoor.com Maje Fringe Suede Satchel; $415; bloomingdales.com

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STEM 3.0 3.0 education education including including two two years years of of original original research research requirement. requirement. •• STEM •• Small Small class class size size taught taught by by best best in in field field faculty faculty with with research research experience. experience. attending following colleges universities: • Our studentsOur are Students currentlyare attending thethe following colleges andand universities: Brown, Caltech, Brown, Caltech, Mellon, (2), Duke, MIT (2), Notre Dame,Institute, Rhode Island School of Design, Cornell, Carnegie Duke, MIT, NotreCornell Dame, Oberlin, Rensselaer Polytechnic Rhode Island School of Design, UCof Berkeley, others. UC Berkeley, University Chicago,University UniversityofofMichigan Michiganand (2) many and many others.

For more information or to schedule a visit, please contact the Admissions Office at (609)454-5589 or see the PRISMS website at www.prismsus.org 74 |

Congratulations to the Class of 2016, our first graduating class, with college admissions to:

PRINCETON MAGAZINE FAll 2017

MIT, CalTech, Duke, Cornell, Brown, UCBerkeley, UCLA, University of


Congratulates Robin Wallack

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Versatility and Value in Princeton!

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On meticulously landscaped and gated 1.7 acres, this pristine sprawling Contemporary offers versatility in lifestyle suitable for extended families, home schooling, home office, and nanny/guest quarters. Six to eight bedrooms, seven bathrooms and two powder rooms spread among three distinct living quarters make the home ideal for harmonious multi-generational living with room to spare! Special features include vaulted ceilings, gleaming oak floors, covered porches, in-ground pool, and 60,000 watt whole house generator. $1,995,000

Barbara Blackwell Broker Associate 4 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

1174 Bear Tavern Road, Titusville

(609) 921-1050 Office (609) 915-5000 Cell bblackwell@callawayhenderson.com

@LindaTwining Facebook.com/PrincetonRealEstate

For more information about properties, the market in general, or your home in particular, please give me a call.

Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.

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Al Fresco Dining On Princeton’s Historic Palmer Square A Local Tradition | Award-Winning Wine List Tapas – Paella – Sangria

Sample Wines from Spain Garnacha • Tempranillo • Priorat • Rioja • Albariño • Ribera Del Duero In the taverna with a pairing of tapas Queso • Pulpo (octopus) • Jamon Serrano • Papas Bravas Gambas al Ajillo Shrimp! • Albondigas (meatballs) Call for Reservations

609.252.9680

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29 Hulfish Street Princeton NJ 08542


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Talk with us about how we might be of service to you. Ewing Office 250 Phillips Blvd., Suite 280 Ewing, NJ 08618

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We invite you to visit our newly renovated 2017 showroom. Come in for a tour and meet our professional interior design staff. 201 South State Street, Newtown, PA 18940 215-968-3690 hbsnj.com 80 |

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Princeton Mag. 4.4x5.4

George Sotter

Light and Shadow

The Michener Art Museum presents the largest-ever survey of the work of George Sotter (1879–1953), an artist strongly identified with Bucks County. He is best known for his magical winter nocturnes, but his tranquil marines, sunlit landscapes and work in stained glass are equally enchanting.

Friday, November 24 at 2:00 p.m. & 5:30 p.m. Saturday, November 25 at 2:00 p.m. & 5:30 p.m. Sunday, November 26 at 1:00 p.m. McCarter Theatre Center Princeton, N.J.

Brace’s Cove, n.d., oil on canvas, James A. Michener Art Museum, Gift of Marguerite and Gerry Lenfest.

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FALL 2017


T H E R E E D S AT S H E LT E R H AV E N HONORED AS A

“ WO R L D ’ S B E S T ” H OT E L

BY CO N D E N A S T T R AV E L E R M AG A Z I N E

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FIELDS OF DREAMS, AND SANDS, AND STARS byWendy Plump

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Photography courtesy of Nomadic Expeditions


In

a dramatic re-interpretation of the notion “If you build it, they will come,” New Jersey resident and contractor Jalsa Urubshurow built a base for his adventure expedition company in Mongolia. He chose the South Gobi Province on the edge of the Gobi Desert—where the Altai Mountains rim the horizon—and put up forty Ger, the traditional felt yurts of Mongolia’s indigenous nomadic tribes. He designed the main lodge in the style of an ancient temple. He quarried local stone and installed local staffers – herders, guides, cooks – because he wanted authenticity in a world greatly in need of it, and, if truth be told, because he demanded the most breathtaking gateway for those visiting his beloved Mongolia, the home of his Kalmyk ancestors. Today, the Three Camel Lodge is one of the world’s top hotels, frequented by archaeologists, filmmakers, National Geographic photographers, Buddhist scholars, luxury travelers, and, Urubshurow is quick to add, “techfree enthusiasts.” In the summer, 700 wild horses come to drink at the lake nearby. In the winter, an ice pack builds to 100 feet high within walking distance, and you can hike on it. At any time of year, the skies are smeared with more stars than human beings are likely to witness than at any other point on the planet. “My goal was to create luxury travel to Mongolia,” says Urubshurow. “It’s more than a three-star hotel. It’s a five-billion-star hotel.” It is also the base for his firm, Nomadic Expeditions, which runs guided luxury trips to Mongolia and eight other distant countries, including Myanmar

and Bhutan. Now celebrating its 25th anniversary, Nomadic Expeditions has the distinction of taking clients to some of the world’s last truly wild spaces. Urubshurow describes Mongolia as having “more horses than people,” and a culture that has changed little since the last Ice Age. “Mongolia encompasses a vast territory, with four major mountain ranges, some of them up to 15,000 feet high,” he says from an airport in Mongolia. “We can still drive 1,500 miles across this country and not see a fence. The eastern grasslands of Mongolia are nine times the size of the Serengeti. I like to tell Texans it’s twice the size of Texas, with just three million people. And 30 percent of them still live a nomadic existence. It’s probably the most sparsely populated country in the world. “There is no land ownership out in the country,” Urubshurow adds. “It’s all free range. The families have been grazing the same valleys for five generations. We have an astrophysicist who comes in the summers and gives a 3-D presentation during the day, and then at night we’ll go out into the Gobi and look at some of the darkest skies in the world. I think people will see a code of hospitality in Mongolia unseen in any other place.” Exotica seems to be all of a piece for Urubshurow, the founder of one of the region’s most successful construction businesses, All-Tech, based in Monroe Township. He was raised in a Howell Township community of Kalmyk Buddhist refugees who escaped Mongolia and its punishing Communist influences in the 1950s to set up an enclave here in New Jersey. Many of his neighbors were carpenters and builders, so the profession was

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photography courtesy of nomadic expeditions

a natural choice. Urubshurow grew up speaking Mongolian and hearing his father tell stories of his homeland. He founded Nomadic Expeditions to help open up Mongolia to travelers after its peaceful transition to democracy in 1990. Urubshurow, who lives in Brielle, also stewards the country’s ancient sport of hunting with Golden Eagles. He founded the Golden Eagle Festival in Bayan-Ulgii Province in Western Mongolia in 1999, now a popular draw for travelers and indigenous peoples alike. The festival commences each October and draws Kazakh tribesmen who compete with their magnificent eagles in tests of speed, agility, and accuracy. And while Nomadic Expeditions kept its distance for the first few years, it now leads trips to the festival and the nearby Hatuugyn Mountain archaeological site, which has one of the country’s best collections of ancient petroglyphs. “In 1998 I went to meet these Kazakhs. Eagle hunting had largely disappeared under the Communists. But for the Kazakhs here, it survived in the farthest-western part of the country. It almost touches Kazakhstan,” says Urubshurow. “We had a few vodkas sitting around with the three elders of the community and I had one of my guides with me. I came up with the idea of having a festival to celebrate this. We’ll be celebrating the 18th year of the festival in October.” The beauty of the sport and the relationship between eagles and their handlers is celebrated in the lush documentary, The Eagle Huntress, about 13-year-old Aisholpan, a young Kazakh who trains as the first female in 12 generations to become an eagle huntress. Released in 2016, the film was nominated for a BAFTA Film Award. Urubshurow appears briefly in the film. “It was my four seconds of fame,” he says. About 1,000 clients from all over the world sign on for Nomadic

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Expeditions trips each year. “Our clients are sophisticated and well-traveled individuals of all ages who seek authentic adventures that offer a blend of history and cultural interaction,” says Nancy DePalma, Nomadic’s marketing and communications manager. The company has 15 full-time staffers in Mongolia, and an additional 50 consultants in Bhutan, Tibet, Nepal, Myanmar, China, Siberia, Sri Lanka, and India. They are slotted in as need dictates. Simply reading the titles of the excursions can slake travel fantasies for months on end: “In Search of Dragons and Eagles,” “From Yak to Kayak,” “Ultimate Gobi,” “Adventure Trekking in the Altai Mountains,” and “Winter Festivals of Mongolia.” Clients visit the forests of the Maraat Valley, trek through the Tavan Belchir Gorge, visit Uuld and Kazakh families and the Turkic stone men, visit the Great White Lake of the Terkhiin Tsagaan Nuur National Park, and visit northern Jargalant to survey the ruins of the Ariin Huree Monastery. Trips fall into several categories, including active adventures like trekking to Everest Base Camp or hiking through the habitat of the elusive Snow Leopard; cultural or archaeological journeys; tailored trips; quick escapes; and family travel, with trips to the Gobi Desert to see where dinosaur eggs were unearthed just a few decades ago, or to ride horses and camels across the grasslands. One popular 12-day itinerary, for example, starts with clients spinning the prayer wheel at the Gandan Monastery, which Urubshurow calls the “seat of Buddhism”; extends into a national park that is the home of the last remaining species of wild horse; leads to an excursion investigating petroglyphs on a mountaintop in the Havsgait Valley; then hiking through the Gobi’s “singing sands” region; a visit to a local nomadic family’s Ger to


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photography courtesy of nomadic expeditions


photography courtesy of nomadic expeditions

help with chores, “if you wish”; and ends with a performance of Mongolian dance and traditional “throat singing” in the capital city of Ulaanbaatar. Urubshurow is quick to credit his staff for the success of the company. They truly know the region, he says, and have considerably more to offer than logistical management. For example, Undraa Buyannemekh, president of Nomadic Expeditions, earned her bachelor’s degree from Urals State University in Russia and holds a master’s in international relations from California State University, Sacramento. Director of Operations Sanjay Saxena is the son of a brigadier general in the Indian Army, has lived all over India, and traveled extensively in the Himalayas as a mountaineer and climber since the age of 15. One of the guides was born in Mongolia and is a former nomadic herder. Another has been working 15 years in the Mongolian tourism industry and leads trips focused on paleontology and archaeology.

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Asked which of the varied trips he most prefers, Urubshurow says he simply likes “really getting out into nature,” and that any of the trips qualify as his favorite in that regard. “You can’t avoid seeing the beauty here. You have an opportunity to go back in time. We tell people who maybe have read about Mongolia or heard things about it that it’s better to see it once than to hear about it a thousand times,” says Urubshurow. “Then, of course, once they come, they realize it’s better to see it 1,000 times than to see it once.” For a brochure or more information on Nomadic Expeditions and its adventure excursions, contact the company at 800.998.6634 or visit the website at www.nomadicexpeditions.com.


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photography courtesy of nomadic expeditions


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Established in 1967, Bon Appétit has proudly been serving the Princeton area as a gourmet European retail store with a French bistro style café. At Bon Appétit we offer a variety of over 250 cheeses from around the world, a wide range AD of imported meats, over 5000 hand picked gourmet specialty items, gourmet gift baskets, four star catering services, luscious European style deserts AD and fresh crusty European style baguettes baked every 30 minutes.

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PHOTO COURTESY NILOUFER MAVALVALA OF NILOUFER’S KITCHEN.

1.

PRINCETON PANTRY

2.

3.

6.

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PRODUCT SELECTION BY JOANN CELLA

5. 1. Le Bon Magot: A White Pumpkin and Almond Tea Cake pairs Le Bon Magot White Pumpkin and Almond Preserves with rose gin in a moist tea cake heady with the scents of cardamom, cinnamon, rose, and vanilla that transport you from chilly Princeton to a Turkish spice bazaar. The cake would not be complete without a flourish of dried Moroccan rose petals, which add to the allure of this afternoon treat. 609.477.2847; www.lebonmagot.com. 2. Hopewell Valley Vineyards: Support Autism Pinot Grigio, an estate-grown, light, crisp, and aromatic delight. Net proceeds donated to autism research, intervention, and services. 609.737.4465; www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com

3. Grateful Bites: Two-tiered Birch Wedding Cake by Grateful Bites, a company run by the nonprofit Ability 2 Work which provides a fully-inclusive and supported business environment for the differently-abled to find meaningful lives and jobs they love. Grateful Bites specializes in everything from scratch, organic, and locally-sourced as much as possible. They also have a full-service restaurant for breakfast or lunch, as well as full-service gourmet catering. 908.782.3458, ext. 2; www.gratefulbites.org. 4. Basil Bandwagon: Meadows + More wildcrafted spices are hand-foraged and assembled locally to create unique additions to your favorite dishes. 908.788.5737; www.basilbandwagon.com

5. ShelfGenie: With ShelfGenie Glide-Out™ shelves, it’s easy to get organized, create more storage space, and access all your items—easily. These high-quality pull-out shelves are custom built for your existing cabinets so you can easily transform your space into the kitchen of your dreams without a renovation. 866.944.1355; www.shelfgenie.com 6. Sciascia Confections: The famous BFF (Butterless, Flourless, Fabulous) cookie from local chocolatier Tom Sciascia is a decadent, moist, rich, and chocolatey confection bursting with three types of chocolate and roasted walnuts. And it’s gluten free, but you’d never know it! 215.996.0606; www.SciasciaConfections.com 7. Three Hearts Home: Beach Stone Salt Cellar, handmade from all-natural stones by Funky Rock Designs; $34. 908.206.4964; www.threeheartshome.com

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PROVIDING THE INGREDIENTS FOR BUILDING BETTER LIVES BY

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Wendy Greenberg


photography courtesy of trenton area soup kitchen.

E

scher Street in Trenton, 10AM on a weekday: The line forms to the right of the double doors at the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen (TASK). Some of Trenton’s neediest individuals arrive by foot or by bicycle. A few push strollers, a few carry a bag of belongings. On rainy days, they huddle under a small awning. The doors open at 10:30AM. Once inside, the patrons sit down to a served meal. One day it might be brunch with waffles and eggs; on another, tuna fish and macaroni. More meals are served at the end of the month when personal resources are running low. But TASK is about more than food, although that is its most-used service, with some 6,000 meals served each week — 357,000 during last year. TASK blends the essential nutrient of food with the additional ingredients needed for personal self-sufficiency. “We are more than a soup kitchen,” emphasizes Joyce Campbell, director since June 2016. “It is great to feed bodies, but our patrons need more.” Offering more is Campbell’s goal, and that goal will be buoyed by a $1.3 million expansion. A capital campaign is underway to fund the project, with construction scheduled to start toward the end of November. A not so small detail: the outside awning will expand to four feet.

Another patron, who at one point had been suspended from TASK for being disruptive, returned from rehab and got a job next door at Capital City Farm. To work there, he needed sturdy work boots, which TASK was able to purchase. He became so interested in agriculture that he enrolled in courses at Mercer County Community College. Feeding people is just the first step, Campbell says. “We feed the mind, body, and spirit.”

AIDING THE NEEDY

TASK was founded in 1982, during a recession, when a coalition of individuals from Trenton churches and social service agencies sought to aid the needy. The first soup kitchen was at the First Methodist Church on Perry Street. By 1992, with the help of donors and Mercer County, TASK raised $600,000 to build the Escher Street headquarters. Today TASK’s annual budget is a little more than $3 million, with only 2.3 percent coming from government. Individual donors provide 62 percent of the budget, with the rest from corporations, foundations, and religious organizations. Its capital campaign for the $1.3 million expansion is now at $1.1 million. TASK recently received a four-star rating and a perfect 100 EXPANDED SERVICES score from Charity Navigator, an independent nonprofit evaluator. JO It is the only nonprofit in New Jersey to receive a perfect score and As TASK patrons’ needs are addressed, its services have LL YC E CAMPBE one out of 53 across the country, Campbell points out. expanded. This year, for the first time, a limited number Volunteers help, saving TASK $565,000 annually. On most days a cadre of beds for first apartments are budgeted. One homeless patron, recounts case manager Julie Janis, had been living on the of about 50 volunteers prepares donated food like rolls and cakes and purchased lunch streets for years, recently near Cadwalader Park. Janis helped the items. They weave in and out to avoid bumping one another in the small space, and serve individual with general financial assistance, and she procured the meals as well. The food is cooked by four paid staff. Food is served during various hours at 14 satellite locations, including South Trenton, identification, a bank account, and eventually a job and housing. “Apartments come completely empty,” she notes. Yorkville, and Hightstown, and in Princeton at Cornerstone Community Kitchen at “Not a lamp, not a fork.” She was able to purchase a bed. Princeton United Methodist Church, St. James AME Church, and a take-out operation The patron then came to see her and said through tears, “I at First Baptist Church. haven’t slept in a bed in 30 years.” FALL 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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The Escher Street site serves a mid-day meal weekdays from 10:30AM to 12:50PM. Late trays are available at the side door from 1 to 2PM. An evening meal is served Monday through Thursday, 3:30 to 4:50PM. Through the Send Hunger Packing program, children receive breakfast bags in addition to a hot meal. Late trays are available at the side door from 5 to 5:30PM. Beyond the meals, TASK provides haircuts, sleeping bags for the homeless in cold weather (as a short-term aid), move-in kits for new housing (think dish drainer), and arranges transportation for medical visits. “People don’t think about these things,” Campbell said.

A COMMUNITY CENTER

ONE LESS BARRIER Finding services under one roof is important. People take a while to feel comfortable before they ask for other services, the staff explains. “It improves the quality of life and gives hope,” Parker said. “It’s hard to drag yourself to another site, the more we can offer here, it is one less barrier. It is one more step in having a better life.” Janis does a lot of retrieving identification for patrons. IDs get wet, lost, or stolen on the streets. “You can’t get a job or housing without identification,” she says. She welcomes the expansion, especially as the staff member who schedules community outreach. “We have people come in for food stamps, Sometimes it starts with a triage situation, but as we talk, I can kind of identify why they need it. Homelessness takes a while to overcome.” While the contributions of TASK’s 3,500 volunteers each year are invaluable, Campbell also encourages cash donations so they can be flexible about needs, such as the beds. This Thanksgiving patrons, staff, and volunteers will give thanks for the traditional served meal — turkey, dressing, corn, and sweet potatoes — and also for the new possibilities the building expansion will bring in 2018, giving more hope to the people of Trenton. Sign-up for Thanksgiving meal volunteering begins November 1; and sign-up begins December 1 for Christmas. Assistance is needed to make food baskets for regular patrons who do have a place to cook. TASK encourages volunteers to share their passion, and welcomes ideas on how to use its space to reach people in need. To volunteer: email Volunteer Coordinator Charlie Orth, charlieo@ trentonsoupkitchen.org, with your preferences and a telephone number where you can be reached during normal business hours.

photography courtesy of trenton area soup kitchen.

But there is more. There is adult education, tutoring, a faxing service, eyeglasses, socks, and some medications, as well as school backpacks, coats, and a mail center for the homeless. A new program ensures that diabetic individuals get special meals with more protein. There is an art program with the Trenton A-team, and Monday Music with an open mic. The TASK band, the Funktasticks, entertains at the Grounds For Sculpture, libraries, and parks. There is also an empowering creative writing group. Eight of its writers and some adult education students went to Washington D.C. this past July to NJ Hill Day, a Congressional reception on housing and homelessness. “For me, it was a very profound moment,” Campbell said. “The ones impacted need to be heard.” Although food is what brings people in, Campbell’s goal for TASK is to continue to offer a full range of services, a one-stop shop for improving lives. “There is more of a chance to build a better life from a community center, a hub,” she said. “People don’t like to go from place to place to get what they need, and to keep repeating their information.” Prior to TASK, Campbell was associate executive director for external affairs at Catholic Charities, where she worked for 20 years in various capacities. She’s also vice president of the board of the Anti-Poverty Network of New Jersey and a member of the board of directors of the Mercer Alliance to End Homelessness. With a bachelor’s degree from Clark University in Worcester, Mass., and a master’s degree from Rutgers in social work, Campbell came to TASK to be closer to the programs. “Anti-poverty efforts are my passion,” she said. Even as a child, she said was interested in the discrepancy in financial resources in her community. Campbell is overseeing the expansion, which launched with a ceremonial groundbreaking August 11, carrying good wishes from legislators, dignitaries, and trustees. The physical expansion will increase patron dining capacity and adds a walk-in refrigerator to increase perishable food storage.

Equally important, the space for the non-meal activities will add a multipurpose room for adult education and special needs instruction, a computer station, testing area and storage, all allowing for more programs. Jaime Parker, manager of programs and services, explains, “The conference rooms are booked all the time. Community groups need them too. All are competing for the small space. You don’t want to make the choice of whether to check blood pressure or hold adult education — both are important. Coat collection or music? Both are important. We won’t have to decide with the expansion.”

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FALL 2017


Architect’s rendering of the future front face of TASK.

The August 11, 2017 groundbreaking for the expansion involved local dignitaries and TASK board and staff members. Included were TASK Executive Director Joyce Campbell, West Windsor Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh, TASK Board of Trustees Chair Sajid Sayed, and State Sen. Shirley Turner (D-15), among others.

OTHER PLACES TO VOLUNTEER DURING THE HOLIDAY SEASON AND BEYOND: Arm In Arm (formerly the Crisis Ministry of Mercer County) Core program areas are homelessness prevention, hunger prevention, and workforce development. 609.396.9355 Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Mercer County Monitored matches between adult volunteers and children ages 6 through 18. 609.656.1000

Boys and Girls Club of Trenton/Mercer Country Provides young people in Mercer County, ages 5 to 18, with social, enrichment, and recreational activities. 609.392.3191 Cornerstone Community Kitchen of Princeton Offers free and nutritious meals. 609.924.2613 EASEL Animal Rescue League of Mercer County All-volunteer community group with goal of ending killing of unwanted animals. 609.883.0540

Mercer Street Friends Helps children, adults, and seniors facing the impacts of poverty. 609.396.1506 SAVE — A Friend to Homeless Animals Protecting the health and welfare of homeless companion animals. 609.309.5214 Senior Care Ministry of Princeton Assists the elderly in their homes. 609.921.8888

FALL 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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Destination: Clinton A

Red Mill Museum Village

Hunterdon Art Museum

View of Clinton along the Raritan River

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE fAll 2017

symbol of early American industry, Clinton’s iconic Red Mill still sits aside the Raritan River. Since its construction two centuries ago, the mill’s sleepy water wheel has worked with cloth, minerals, food, and electricity. Now, the mill is home to an array of galleries. Some house historical reproductions, some display pieces from international artists, and others hold fragments of local Clinton history. Furthermore, it stands as the centerpiece of the Red Mill Museum Village, which also includes the Mulligan Quarry and the Bunker Hill Schoolhouse, a oneroom schoolhouse from 1860. The museum village hosts events like film festivals, blacksmithing exhibitions, and Peg Leg’s Paracon, which exhibits the historical and paranormal importance of the area. Right across the Raritan is the Hunterdon Art Museum, similarly housed in a 19th-century stone gristmill. What it lacks in Red Mill’s vivid paint job and historical collections, it makes up for with art exhibitions that span forms and materials both conventional and eccentric. “The Art of Construction” uses drywall, PVC pipes, milk crates, and other construction site staples to challenge the viewer’s perceptions of common building materials. “Interconnections: The Language of Basketry” weaves materials like stapled paper and fabricated metal to expand the concept of basketry beyond a utilitarian folk craft. Just a bridge walk away from the Red Mill, each bank of the Raritan offers a different artistic experience — one looking back, and the other looking forward. Just a minute or two of walking leads to the heart of Clinton’s shopping experience. A smattering of cute and creative local stores dot Clinton’s streets: pet marketplace Well Bred offers food and fashion for furry friends. Heartstrings stocks its shelves with vintage-styled clothes, furniture, and jewelry that exude cozy comfort. And the glass cutter behind Bill Healy Designs offers crystal and glass repair, restoration, and engraving alongside an assortment of handmade Irish goods imported from Ireland itself. A bevy of culinary options complement Clinton’s rich cultural offerings, with just as much creativity and variety. Just a few blocks down from the Hunterdon Art Museum and still adjacent to the Raritan is The Clean Plate Kitchen. A local favorite, its menu is overflowing with treats like Yummus, Cut the Crab, and Not Your Grandma’s Meatloaf. A focus on healthy options, good service, and menu options off the beaten path makes The Clean Plate Kitchen a great choice for something new. If you’re lucky, a few ducks might visit while you dine. If you’re just looking for a quick bite without compromising on the Clinton experience, the red neon rim of the Clinton Station Diner lights the way to a good meal all day and night. True to its name, diners can choose to eat in Biela, a train car from 1927, or simply watch model trains roll by on a ceiling-suspended track. The menu ranges from diner staples like burgers and omelets to lamb shanks with orzo, stuffed grape leaves, and cheesecake. And for the ambitious eater, the Mt. Olympus — a 50-pound burger — is nearly enough to stop a train. For a more traditional dinner, Dora Restaurant provides a relaxing atmosphere to complement Clinton’s quaint charm. Italian classics like ravioli, puttanesca, and flounder fill the stomach and warm the heart. Pru Thai offers Thai treats like Crying Tiger with a slew of spices, sauces, and seasonings. Ye Olde Sub Base serves up hot subs, cold cuts, and the much-beloved Beer Cheese Soup, all in the heart of historic Clinton. Frank’s Pizza & Restaurant is more than a simple pizzeria, offering Veal Parmesan, Chicken with Capers and Mushrooms, and a wine garlic sauce over pasta. Towne Restaurant has all the charm of a small-town, family-owned diner loved by locals and visitors alike, serving gyros, omelets, Pesto Chicken Focaccia, and more. Finally, to top a day out with a treat, JJ Scoops gives a much-needed sugar dose in a variety of forms. Their cones, floats, and milkshakes are enough to sate any sweet tooth. If you happen to be in Clinton in late October when the darkness falls, don’t drive home yet – head back to the Red Mill. Each year, the Red Mill Museum Village runs a Haunted Mill fundraiser. Spanning nine acres of the museum’s land, it features mazes, hayrides, and a terror trail. Dozens of live actors come together to transform living history into the living dead. If you stop by November 24-26, you might find Dickens’ Days, where Clinton annually transforms into an idyllic Victorian village. Charles Dickens and Father Christmas walk alongside horse-drawn carriages that ride through streets decked with boughs of holly and twinkling lights. For what might seem like a sleepy little town, Clinton has variety in spades — historically, artistically, and gastronomically. The variety might be overwhelming, but there’s always time. Regardless of whether you visit a week, a month, or years from now, that water wheel will still be turning, pushed along by the gentle Raritan River.

Red Mill MuseuM photo couRtesy of WikiMedia coMMons; hunteRdon aRt MuseuM photo couRtesy of yelp; RiveR photo by d. dogas; otheR iMages couRtesy of clinton guild.

By William Uhl


DESTINATION CLINTON Let Us Become Part of

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FALL 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FALL 2017

Call of Duty pants; $575; store.junkerdesigns.com Sodalite Wizard Wand; $275; magicwandstore.com Game of Thrones Jon Snow Cape; price upon request; store.hbo.com

Skull and Crow party invitation; $15; make-yourown-invitation.com Draco hat; $447; headnhome.com Wild Card flask holder; $80; fiveanddiamond.com Fika Chocolate gold mini skulls; $12 for 3; fikanyc.com


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PRINCETON MAGAZINE FALL 2017


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Princeton Magazine - Fall 2017  

Witherspoon Media Group