Page 1

SPRING 2017 REUNIONS ISSUE

EVOLVING NEIGHBORHOOD HOMES ADAPT TO CONTEMPORARY LIFESTYLES

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY REUNIONS WEEKEND PRINCETON’S ROLE IN WORLD WAR I GARDENING WITH AMERICA’S FOUNDING FATHERS LANDSCAPE DESIGN THE MAKER MOVEMENT


THE ALL-NEW BMW 5 SERIES.

Princeton BMW Authorized Center

The 5 Series has combined legendary BMW performance with a level of refinement that knows no equal. With leading innovations in both driving dynamics and interior technology, the All-New 5 Series is just as ambitious as those who drive it.

609-570-1520 Special lease and finance offers available by Princeton BMW through BMW Financial Services.


THE LADY-DATEJUST A small-sized watch that excels like every Oyster, with style that reflects the personality of its wearer since 1957. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

rolex

oyster perpetual and datejust are ÂŽ trademarks.


OYSTER PERPETUAL LADY-DATEJUST 28


C A R P E T

A R E A

R U G S

W O O D

L A M I N A T E

T I L E

C O U N T E R T O P S

B L I N D S

worldclass brands. Since 1928 Karastan has been the most respected producer of fine quality carpets in the industry. Whether you are looking for a beautiful berber, pleasing plush or breathtaking pattern, Karastan is the manufacturer of choice for quality, style and value.

EDISON, NJ 732-906-1400 1055 Rt. 1 South

worldwidewholesale.com | 888-WORLD40

FAIRFIELD, NJ 973-227-0300 410 Rt. 46 East

LAWRENCEVILLE, NJ 609-530-9600 2750 Bus. Rt. 1 North


Extraordinary moments happen on ordinary days. Let’s set the stage for the extraordinary to happen every day.

bulthaup studio 132 North 3rd Street Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19106 Please call or write for an appointment. 215.574.4990 ~ office@bulthaupstudio.com Serving up extraordinary kitchens to the Princeton area and beyond ~ since 1997.

bulthaup


TWO DAYS ONLY Visit Hamilton Jewelers to view hundreds of timepieces from the world’s finest brands. - SPECIAL FINANCING AND TRADE-IN OFFERS DURING THIS EXCLUSIVE EVENT -

HERMÈS

BAUME & MERCIER

IWC

BREGUET

BREITLING

JAEGER-LeCOULTRE

BREMONT

PANERAI

CARTIER

PATEK PHILIPPE

CHANEL

SABLIER

SHINOLA

DAVID YURMAN

TAG HEUER

G-SHOCK

TUDOR

HAMILTON WATCHES

M

A

K

E

T

I

M

E

F

O

R

Y

O

U

R

S

E

L

F

WA T C H FA I R

FRIDAY, JUNE 2ND. 10AM TO 8PM. SATURDAY, JUNE 3RD. 10AM TO 6PM. 92 NASSAU STREET, PRINCETON. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please call 609.683.4200.


GALLERY

sPRING 2017 | REuNIONs

Fine Art Photography

PUBLISHER J. Robert Hillier, FAIA EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Lynn Adams Smith CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jorge Naranjo ART DIRECTOR Jeffrey Edward Tryon

Charles Miller

Heidi Sussman

Main Gallery:

Goodkind Gallery:

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Matthew DiFalco Erica Cardenas PHOTOGRAPHER Jon Roemer, jonroemer.com

All Mixed Up

Images from a Cluttered Mind

FEATURED ARTwORk James McPhillips/jaymcphillips.com

May 26th to June 25th

Opening Reception: Friday, June 2nd 6:00 to 8:00 pm

Meet the Photographers: Sunday, June 4th, 1:00 to 3:00 pm

Gallery Hours: Weekends 12:00 to 5:00 pm and by appointment 609.333.8511 14 Mercer Street ~ Hopewell, NJ 08525 ~ www.photogallery14.com ~ galleryfourteen@yahoo.com

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Stuart Mitchner Laurie Pellichero Ilene Dube Anne Levin Doug Wallack Sarah Emily Gilbert Taylor Smith ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Robin Broomer ACCOUNT MANAGERS Jennifer Covill Kendra Broomer Charles R. Plohn Monica Sankey Erin Toto

Amazing results without surgery using simple sclerotherapy and new laser treatments. NJ’s largest and most respected vascular practice is now delivering innovative and exceptional care in eight convenient locations. We are here to help!

OPERATIONS MANAGER Melissa Bilyeu ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES 609.924.5400 Media Kit available on www.princetonmagazine.com

124896

SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION 609.924.5400 ext. 30 subscriptions@witherspoonmediagroup.com EDITORIAL SUGGESTIONS editor@witherspoonmediagroup.com PRINCETON MAGAzINE Witherspoon Media Group 4438 Route 27 North Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 P: 609.924.5400 | F: 609.924.8818 princetonmagazine.com

Princeton, Shrewsbury, Westfield, Morristown, Clifton, Landing, Livingston and Rockaway

609-246-0778

www.veininstitutenj.com

Princeton Magazine is published 7 times a year with a circulation of 35,000. All rights reserved. Nothing herein may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher. To purchase PDF files or reprints, please call 609.924.5400 or e-mail melissa.bilyeu@witherspoonmediagroup.com. ©2017 Witherspoon Media Group

8

|

PRINCETON MAGAZINE sPRING 2017


255 Nassau Street Princeton LOCATED IN THE HEART OF WALKABLE DOWNTOWN PRINCETON A Lifestyle

2 & 3 BEDROOMS ROOFTOP PATIO
 QUALITY FINISHES

2
 FULL BATHS BALCONIES 
 GAS FIREPLACES

Now Leasing 609.477.6577

WWW.CARNEVALEPLAZA.COM


|

44

CONTENTS

88

16

SPRING 2017 REUNIONS ISSUE

48

68

38

30 58

Charles J. Plohn, Jr. ’66, acted as grand marshal for the P-rade from 2008 to 2012.

..... FEATURES .....

..... HERE & THERE .....

EVOLVING NEIGHBORHOOD

BOOK SCENE

BY ILENE DUBE

BY STUART MITCHNER

Princeton’s western section homes adapt to 21st-century lifestyles

The art and life of the landscape, from Cézanne to Capability Brown

16

44

AMERICA’S EARLIEST GARDENERS

INSIDE PRINCETON REUNIONS

BY ILENE DUBE

BY DOUG WALLACK ART BY JAMES MCPHILLIPS

The founding fathers paved the way for a green America 30

Princeton alumni spread across the landscape 48

PRINCETON’S ROLE IN WORLD WAR I BY ANNE LEVIN

Preparing for the trenches

FASHION & DESIGN

Garden party

58

38, 40

THE MAKER MOVEMENT

A well-designed life

BY DOUG WALLACK

The dawn of something big 68

86, 88

MARK YOUR CALENDAR 80

ON THE COVER: A view of the grand entrance at 45 Hodge Road in Princeton. Photography by Jon Roemer, jonroemer.com.

10

|

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017


We built an emergency department just for kids. State-of-the-art care in a state-of-the-art facility.

The minute you walk into The Dorothy B. Hersh Pediatric Emergency Department (ED), you’ll know we’re dedicated to kids. From our specially trained doctors, nurses and staff to our dedicated pharmacist and full-time child life specialist who helps children and parents deal with the stress of an emergency, we’ve worked hard to make your child’s visit to the ED a lot less scary. With 11 private rooms, a Fast Track treatment area, a rapid asthma treatment area and more, it’s one of the largest pediatric ED facilities in the region. For more details on our Pediatric Emergency Department, call 732.565.KIDS (5437) or visit saintpetershcs.com/pedsed

254 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901

732.745.8600

saintpetershcs.com


| FROM THE PUBLISHER Dear readers, Every time our Editor-in-Chief asks me to write the Publisher’s Letter, I am a bit challenged because this small town in New Jersey is so amazing and intimidating with all it has to offer the world intellectually, while still being a great place to live for its residents. I think it is the only town in the world where, when you are asked where you are from, you don’t need to say the name of the state or the province after the name of the town—just saying “Princeton” says it all. However once every year, in the spring, Princeton lets its hair down and becomes an amazing scene of orange and black as it welcomes the University alumni and their families, some 30,000 people, back for its reunions. The reunions are a festival of fellowship, good feelings, bad food, great music, lots of beer, and the amazing alumni P-rade—a four-hour pilgrimage through the campus by some 75 years of Princeton classes celebrating the institution, its president, and each graduate’s class. In watching the P-rade, you can see some truly great American citizens march by as part of their class in those ridiculous costumes: Judge Harold Medina, Secretary of State James Baker, Chinese developer Gordon Wu, actor Jimmy Stewart, who was so much taller than I could ever imagine, and such athletic stars as basketball player Bill Bradley and Heisman Trophy-winner Dick Kazmaier. Many envious peer institutions look at Princeton’s P-rade as the biggest fundraising machine in the entire nonprofit world. But, to many of the graduates, it is viewed as their entire lives passing before them as they see the young graduates, the young parents with their kids, and the older retired grads in their golf carts driven by undergraduates. There are tears in many graduate eyes as the classes march by to the cheers of each class...Rah! Rah! Rah!...Tiger! Tiger! Tiger!...Sis Boom Bah!...etc. I believe the ridiculous costumes are a brilliant equalizer that makes the entire reunion experience work for each returning graduate. You can be a billionaire hedge fund mogul on Wall Street or a pastor at a small country church in Appalachia, but once you put on that gaudy orange and black class reunion uniform, you are just as equal to all of your classmates as you were, those many years ago, when you were all struggling undergraduates in a great educational institution where the tuition was only a fraction of what it is today. With this as our Spring and Reunions issue, our fabulous Art Director Jeff Tryon suggested that instead of the usual stodgy Publisher’s portrait, I share with you some personal family reunion photos and an even more stodgy graduate portrait from The Nassau Herald. I will not own up to my class year since I am still with Jack Benny’s attitude that I am not yet beyond 39 years old. All of the above said about reunions, I hope you enjoy our artistic presentation of the Princeton Reunions and the intriguing write-up of all that it takes for the University to orchestrate such a huge undertaking, year after year. While reunions are all about class histories, this particular year marks the centennial of the American involvement in World War I. Princeton University’s memorialization of the loss of its many graduates was the inspiration of President Hibben as he called for the construction of the University Chapel, truly one of the most beautiful buildings on the campus. We touch on some other important and interesting buildings in Princeton with our continuing series on important Princeton houses. In this issue we cover the Grant Homes restoration of the 1920s Ernest Flagg-designed home at 75 Cleveland Lane and Pinneo Construction’s new Hodge Road contemporary house, the elegant entrance of which graces this issue’s cover. Consistent with the tone set by these amazing residences, you should enjoy our coverage of the books about the gardens of such prominent homes as George Washington’s Mount Vernon, Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, and our own Morven, the home of Richard Stockton and, for many years, the official residence of New Jersey’s governors.

12

|

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

With spring upon us, there is a lot to do around the house to get ready for a relaxing summer. In this fix-up mode, you may also feel inspired to try your hand at woodworking and metalworking. There are now shops for hire where they teach you these new trades as a hobby and then rent you a space or a bench by the hour to further what you learned in the introduction classwork. Read our article on this new way to delay a big expenditure at Sears on equipment before you really know that you love using it. Even if you don’t get into this craft world, please do enjoy the spring and your issue of this magazine. And, if you have nothing better to do on Saturday, June 3, take in the Reunion P-rade...you will never forget or regret it. I just might see you there. Lynn Adams Smith and I wish you the best. Respectfully yours,

J. Robert Hillier, FAIA Publisher


What we treat:

Aly Cohen, MD, FACR

Cancer, obesity, asthma, ADHD, thyroid disease, and developmental disorders are linked to common, everyday chemicals.

Gout Lyme Disease Osteoarthritis Back pain/Sciatica Fibromyalgia/Pain Osteoporosis Rheumatoid Arthritis Inflammatory Bowel Disease Multiple Sclerosis Alzheimers Parkinsons Migraines Acid Reflux Fatigue Inflammation Overweight

How we do it: Nutrition Supplements Sleep hygiene Stress Management Exercise Detoxification Medical Management

Aly Cohen, MD, FACR, FABOIM

Which toxins are in your home? In-home chemical assessments “Chemical Proofing” Board certified- Rheumatology & Integrative Medicine Jones/Lovell Fellow, Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine Faculty, Academy of Integrative Health and Medicine (AIHM) Founder, The Smart Human LLC. Winner - 2015 NJ Healthcare Heroes Award for Education Voted “Top Docs NJ” 2016 - Rheumatology

Integrating a holistic approach into conventional medical care.

water, air quality, toys, personal care and cleaning products, food, home furnishings, pesticide exposure, radiation Your educational resource for making safer, smarter choices to limit harmful chemical exposure.

www.TheSmartHuman.com 609-662-5212

312 Applegarth Road, Suite 110 Monroe Twp, NJ 08831 • 609.662.5212

www.AlyCohenMD.com

info@TheSmartHuman.com

Dr. Wisser, Dr. Lynch, and our staff invite you to celebrate with us! Every month during 2017 we will have extraordinary specials, offers, and events. Visit the events page on our website frequently to see our current specials www.PRImedspa.com Monthly we will draw a lucky winner who will receive a $150 Gift Card. To have a chance to win email us at: primedspa@gmail.com Like our facebook page "Princeton Rejuvenation Institute, LLC" and receive a $15 Gift Card Mention this Ad and receive 20% off a Facial or Product Purchase.

609-448-9055

www. PRImedspa.com 300B Princeton Hightstown Rd., Suite 101 - East Windsor, NJ 08520

14 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017


Your Desires + Our Expertise = Beautiful & Functional Spaces

Our homes are for gathering our friends and families to celebrate the big moments and the everyday little moments that make our lives special and full. Want to create that dining room that inspires long family meals together? Desire a master bedroom retreat that helps you unwind from the long day? Need a functional family room that is perfect for family movie nights as well as entertaining friends and family? We would love to help you! You deserve to work with talented and experienced designers that are committed to taking the time to learn about you, your space, and your lifestyle. Visit our local 11,000 sq. ft. showroom to gather inspirations. Browse our website and pin your favorites. Bring us your questions and challenges. Our simple methodical, step by step design process can give you the home you desire. We can help you in our showroom or in your home. Visit us today. We want to you to “Love Being Home!”

126 Village Blvd • Princeton, NJ •609-987-2600 • luxehomecompany.com


Evolving nEighborhood PrincEton’s WEstErn sEction homEs AdAPt to 21st-cEntury lifEstylEs by ilEnE dubE | PhotogrAPhy by Jon roEmEr


45 Hodge Road rinceton’s Western section, bordered by Bayard Lane, Westcott Road, Elm Road and Stockton Street, is prized for its Colonial, Tudor, Victorian and Gothic homes. Designed by such noteworthy architects as Rolf Bauhan, John Notman and Charles Steadman, some of these houses have been lived in by members of the Stockton family, Woodrow Wilson and Grover Cleveland. Stately gardens and heirloom trees envelope the streets with a sense of nature. To accommodate 21st-century lifestyles, many of the older houses have undergone complete renovations, and some have been rebuilt from the ground up. As the season unfolds, the Tudor Revival at 75 Cleveland Lane is blooming with new possibilities. Formerly a single residence designed by Ernest Flagg in the early 1900s, the site will soon accommodate two houses. The property was bought in December 2015 by Jay Grant of Grant Homes and designed anew by Peter Dorne, A.I.A. A few blocks away, at 45 Hodge Road, sits a brandnew modern house designed by A.I.A. Award winner Wesley Wei of Philadelphia. Formerly the property was occupied by a gabled Cape-like cottage designed in 1970 by William Thompson, a one-time prominent Princeton architect whose Williamsburg, Virginia, origins influenced his style. The Thompson Cape sold for $1,650,000 in 2013 and was deconstructed for the owners by Details, a Baltimore company that repurposes cabinets and other salvageable materials. Homeowners who use Details, a nonprofit that provides jobs to skilled crew members who have faced barriers to employment, get a tax credit. Both 75 Cleveland and 45 Hodge rose to the challenge of modern living in an historic neighborhood. Coincidentally, both builders who tackled these projects started out as philosophy majors. During the late 20th and early 21st centuries, artists, curators, collectors and celebrities gathered behind the thick fieldstone walls and wrought iron gate at 75 Cleveland. Flagg, known for his Beaux-Arts designs in New York such as the Singer and Scribner buildings, Washington D.C.’s Corcoran Gallery, and in Princeton, the Princeton University Press building on William Street, built 75 Cleveland for Walter Colpitts, an associate of Brooklyn Bridge-designer John Roebling. Whimsical ironwork throughout is Colpitts’s own, presumably made from the forge he kept in the carriage house.

P

A 2014 real estate listing provides a good description of what this property used to be: “Unique architectural features abound, from European tiles to intricately carved doors and corbels. Archways adorn the cathedral great room with striking fireplace. Off the breathtaking three-story front hall, the grandly proportioned dining room, lined with French doors, opens to the garden. Nestled on a lower level is a handsome library with a fireplace. Beyond the eat-in kitchen is a back hall with a trio of servants’ rooms used as offices and served by a full bath… A sun-drenched family room, two suites and a third bedroom… comprise the second floor, while a large guest suite enjoys the privacy of the entire top floor. A separate two-bedroom apartment and a greenhouse flank the gravel drive.” But after two years on the market, there were no offers. The starting price, $2.5 million, dropped to $2 million. A realtor phoned Jay Grant to describe the property. “The intention was to sell it to someone who would restore it,” says Grant. A one-time philosophy major at Tulane, Grant joined his family business and has built homes in Hopewell and Princeton. Based in Mendham, with a Morristown mailing address, Grant Homes has built more than 200 spec houses. “But no one wanted to take on that monster—despite all its features and uniqueness, it hadn’t been touched since the 1920s and was dated. There were sewing rooms and hobby rooms that no longer made sense. The floor plan was not based on entertaining in the 21st century—but the one-acre site could be subdivided into two buildable lots. I bought it without conditions.” He paid $1.6 million—what some who admired the property might consider a steal, while Grant was calculating whether he’d be able to recoup his investment. The initial problem Grant confronted was the subdivision would have to go straight through the house, splitting it in half. “It would break my heart to tear it down, but I’m in the business of building and selling,” says Grant. “We did our application for the subdivision, meeting all criteria—they can’t deny an applicant the legal right to use the land as zoned.” Grant brought in his tennis buddy, architect Peter Dorne, recognized for his work in new design as well as historic preservation, renovation and adaptive re-use of existing spring 2017 prinCETOn MAgAZinE

| 17


45 Hodge Road structures. According to his website, Dorne appreciates “design elements in the stately mansions and palaces of England and France, the gracious homes of Colonial and Victorian America and the austere lines of Early American Homesteads.” Among his credits are the Ryland Inn in Whitehouse Station and the Thomas Kean Reading Room at Drew University. A one-time Chairman of the Historic Preservation Committee of Morris Township, Dorne uses cupolas, turrets, gables and balconies in his designs. “Peter has an eye,” recounts Grant. “He came one Sunday morning to look at the house and said ‘You can’t take this down, it would be a sin. This house has great bones—you could never build a house like this today.’ “’I get that, but I have millions invested,’” Grant recounts. “I told him that if he could show me his vision I would make it happen.” Grant’s strategy was to enlist the help of the Princeton Historic Preservation Commission, which wanted to preserve the house, and to approach the Planning Board for the needed variance. The approval was granted to subdivide the property in a way that would preserve the main house and carriage house, but also allow Grant to build a new house on the lot, with an address at 70 Lafayette. With construction on the new house expected imminently, Grant hopes 75 Cleveland will be complete by summer. Although not of the same genre, Grant says, these two houses, both surrounded by a stone wall, will be related. “More of a cousin that a brother,” he says. The new house is expected to cost $3,300,000. The house at 75 Cleveland “will cost significantly more,” says Grant. “It’s been an extraordinary experience, complex and challenging. I had two guys chiseling concrete, putting in steel beams, shoring up the house, cutting holes in the bottom...” Experts from Philadelphia with special concrete saws were brought in for the 12-inch thick walls. “Hopefully the end result will be an awesome place to live and make a statement from which the neighborhood will benefit.” One problem Dorne addressed was that the back of the house faced the road. Dorne’s idea was to move the front entryway to the street side, making it more inviting.

18 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE spring 2017

The 21st-century features include a redesign of the grand ballroom, adding French doors and large windows to the lower-level billiards room, and increasing the light and the interaction with the exterior. “The house will have larger rooms, heated floors, central AC, and blown-in insulation so it is energy efficient,” says Grant. “I brought in a crew from North Jersey that specializes in slate roofs—that roof will be around longer than I will. The ideal buyer will want to entertain in large spaces. It will be a family that appreciates history, and they will have a home that couldn’t be built today. They will even have an apartment for a family member or nanny, all within walking distance from downtown.” AT HOME IN THE 21st CENTURY

The brand-new construction at 45 Hodge Road is a modernist’s dream. The owners, who requested their names not be used, learned about the A.I.A.-awardwinning Wesley Wei when they were shopping at the Philadelphia showroom of Bulthaup Studio, which just happens to be run by his wife, Rachel Hoffman, an interior designer. Influenced by Bauhaus, Bulthaup is a German engineered cabinet system. “It’s so well thought out, I became a convert,” says Wei. During his childhood outside Philadelphia, he wanted to design bridges. “But then I discovered that great bridges are designed by engineers,” says Wei, who served on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania for 25 years. He considers his influences to be Spanish architect and engineer Santiago Calatrava Valls (known for his bridges supported by single leaning pylons), and architects Carlo Scarpa, Louis Kahn and Le Corbusier. “The owners wanted a new house close to town, where they could walk to do errands and go for dinner,” says builder Tom Pinneo. “Marc Brahaney was the architect of record, and Wes was the design architect.” Pinneo, who does both new construction and restoration, says he sees a growing interest among younger homeowners for new construction. “We now do about 75 percent modern houses,” he says. Current projects are on Lake Drive and Prospect, but in the past he’s received historic preservation awards from the Historical


spring 2017 prinCETOn MAgAZinE

| 19


rendering and construction photography courtesy of grant homes custom builders.

75 Cleveland lane Marketed by Wendy Merkovitz, Broker Associate at Gloria Nilson & Co. Real Estate

20 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE sPRING 2017


renderings courtesy of grant homes custom builders.

70 Lafayette road Marketed by Wendy Merkovitz, Broker Associate at Gloria Nilson & Co. Real Estate

Society of Princeton for Beatty House on Vandeventer, a Carriage Barn on Winant, and an addition and renovation at 19 Linden Lane. Wei has designed homes in San Francisco, Montreal, Miami, New England and on the Jersey Shore. “I’ve always been interested in modernism, with its sense of space, light, simplicity and minimalism,” he says. “I’m attracted to things that don’t have visual static, but have a sense of calm and serenity.” Taking their shoes off before walking on the pristine floors, Wei and Pinneo discuss how, in traditional architecture, molding serves a hidden purpose of resolving where one plane or condition meets another. “The challenge in a house like this is greater,” says Pinneo. Another challenge is the scale of a modern building in a historic neighborhood, and setback variances had to be secured. If the house were surrounded by open space, there might be more glass walls, but the windows facing the street are smaller, saving the large glass walls for views of the garden. “I see my work as an assemblage of components, and I’m fortunate that I have clients who have art collections,” says Wei. “We talked about how many cars, bedrooms, bathrooms, but the important thing was going to their house and looking at their artwork and furnishings.” The front of the house had to fit in on the street, being symmetrical, proper and formal. Once inside, a wall, tiled in an Italian ceramic that resembles corten steel, becomes an organizing element around which all the space is spun off—the “bridge.” Extra-large white porcelain floor tiles, with radiant heat, extend from inside to the outside parterre, pavilion, pool and terrace. The first thing that strikes a visitor upon entry is the Buddha set into a wall—just one example of how the house was designed for the owners’ artwork. “The design didn’t spring full blown from my head like Athena, but it was organic over time,” says Wei. Even the lighting design, by Eve Quellman of Narberth, Pa., was sent to Boise Cascade so the framing could work around it. “We get excited about things that make it work that the client doesn’t even think about,” says Pinneo. “This is the biggest house in my 27-year building career,” says Mike Danna, the project manager. “Everything has a purpose and I wasn’t used to it and had to learn it. Wes is unique and has a vision. The owners are peaceful, quiet and warm, and when the project was finished they had a soirée for everyone who worked on the project.” “Doing a custom home is like couture, not off-the-rack but tailored,” says Wei. “I had to find a good home for the elements of their lives.” The cabinets, from Hoffman’s Bulthaup Studio, are a smoked oak, minimal and clean,

and it’s hard to believe any cooking goes on here, but when the cabinet doors are opened one finds, indeed, the hidden tools of a passionate cook. The smoked oak extends to coat closets and the cabinet surrounding the TV in the sitting room, which also houses a fireplace. On the lower level, even the gym and the fully stocked wine cellar have paintings on the walls. The artwork continues upstairs, where every window frames a view, as if these, too, were landscape paintings. Before Pinneo became a builder, he was studying philosophy with the goal of teaching Taoism, but the greatest lesson he learned was from a carpenter: “What we know in this life we know from doing,” he recounts. “I had no training in building, but I had life training, knowing how to pull together the right people and step back.” Wei, too, has learned to work with consultants. He is deliberate about calling the house’s design “modern” rather than “contemporary.” “For me, modern is an attitude, whereas contemporary is a style,” he says. “I hope my work is not a style but an attitude. I tend to stay away from design magazines. I’d rather read about fly fishing.” spring 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 21


372 Wall Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

22 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017


THE BRAND THAT DEFINES LUXURY REAL ESTATE. WORLDWIDE.

PRINCETON 64 CLEVELAND LANE OFFERED AT $5,995,000

BRICK TWP 111 GEORGIAN DRIVE OFFERED AT $1,875,000

PRINCETON 428 FRANKLIN AVENUE OFFERED AT $1,350,000

PRINCETON 75 CLEVELAND LANE OFFERED AT $4,898,000

PRINCETON 230 BROOKSTONE DRIVE OFFERED AT $1,825,000

PRINCETON 288 GALLUP ROAD OFFERED AT $1,199,800

PRINCETON 70 LAFAYETTE ROAD OFFERED AT $3,300,000

HOPEWELL TWP 14 STOUT ROAD OFFERED AT $1,525,000

PRINCETON 47 CONSTITUTION HILL W OFFERED AT $1,100,000

Exclusive Affiliate of Christie’s International Real Estate Mercer, Monmouth, Ocean, Southern Hunterdon and Southern Middlesex Counties 33 Witherspoon Street Princeton, NJ 08542 609 921 2600 glorianilson.com


Princeton Rug Gallery

Hand Washing

Wide Selection of Rugs

Restoration

Before your next rug purchase, visit our gallery. We are confident that we will find your perfect floor art.

609-356-0043

830 State Road 206 Princeton NJ Next to Lucy’s Kitchen & Market

Mon-Fri: 10am-6pm Saturday: 10am-4pm

Bring The OuTdOOrs in

WiTh BeauTiful WindOWs & dOOrs By Marvin® Choose Marvin® and you’re choosing beautiful windows and doors that will complement your home, both inside and out. That’s because Marvin offers the industry’s most extensive selection of shapes, sizes, styles and options combined with craftsman-quality construction and energy-efficient technology. And when you purchase your new Marvin® windows from Hamilton Building Supply and HBS HOME™, you’ll enjoy the unparalleled service and dependability that’s been synonymous with our name since 1924.

TM

HAMILTON BUILDING SUPPLY

HBS HOME™

65 Klockner Road, Hamilton, NJ 08619 201 South State Street, Newtown, PA 18940 ph: 609-587-4020 fax: 609-587-8290 ph: 215-968-3690 fax: 215-497-3478 email: Jeff.Atkinson@hbsnj.com email: Jay.Kravitz@hbsnj.com www.hbsnj.com 24 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

Please shop Hamilton Building Supply, where deliveries are always free!


WE HAVE THE AREA’S LARGEST INVENTORY OF GRANITE. OUR EXPERIENCED STAFF AND CRAFTSMEN HAVE BEEN HELPING LOCAL RESIDENTS AND CONTRACTORS WITH CUSTOM GRANITE AND MARBLE COUNTERTOPS FOR OVER 30 YEARS.

30th Anniversary!

Bringing More Options to New Jersey Granite and Marble Buyers Precision Fabrication of:

Granite Countertops • Marble Countertops • Quartz Countertops • Natural Stones Over 350 colors and 8,000 slabs in stock. Only produce on state-of-the-art CNC machinery All inventory imported directly from overseas Stone Tech 930 New York Avenue Trenton, NJ 08638

Hours Monday - Friday 8:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M. Saturday 10:00 A.M. - 3:00 P.M.

(609) 984-8818 • stonetechmarble.com Authorized dealer of:


Listing AnD seLLing Homes in tHe Princeton AreA

Let us show you how to protect what you’ve worked so hard to earn.

From charming canal homes... ...to stunning contemporaries

1117 Canal Road Franklin township $719,000

90 Montadale Drive Princeton $1,995,000

Barbara J. Blackwell Broker Associate, ABr, crS, E-Pro (609) 915-5000 cell bblackwell@callawayhenderson.com

You’ve earned the good things in life. Let us help you protect them. With Borden Perlman, you get the benefit of our experience, expert service, and local team of specialists dedicated to helping you. To learn more give us a call today.

www.princetonaddress.com

4 Nassau StrEEt, PrincEton, nJ 08542

Serving our community for over 100 years. 609-896-3434 ■ BordenPerlman.com

609.921.1050

Home

Each office is independently owned and operated. Subject to errors, omissions, prior sale or withdrawal without notice.

Auto

Boat

Quality and Professional Landscaping Services

Va l u a b l e s

15th Season!

MONTGOMERY FRIENDS FARMERS’ MARKET Open June 3rd-October 28th Saturdays, 9AM to 1PM

Village Shopper, 1340 Route 206 South, Skillman

Open June 6th-October 24th • Saturdays, 9AM to 1PM Open June 6th-October 24th • Saturdays, 9AM to 1PM We offer a variety of landscaping and grounds maintenance services. Our full-service lawn care amd winter services offer you reliable protection against seasonal changes. Get weekly or monthly services to keep your outdoor space beautiful. Landscape Design Stonework & Paving Stonework & Pavi

Mulch & Bed Maintenance Stonework & Pavi Spring & Fall Cleanup

Winter Service & Snow Removal Tree Service Event Setting

Contract Services Exotic Plants

Jersey Fresh vegetables and fruit, locally-raised poultry, Open June 6th-October 24th • Saturdays, 9AM to 1PM eggs, beef and pork, Jersey seafood, coffee, bread, pastries, fruit pies, gluten-free baked goods, flowers, honey, alpaca products, community info, music and FUN!

Professionally Trained Technicians

Whether you need a sleek & professional design or have unique touches and personalization, we have the team for you.

SPONSORS SPONSORS

SPONSORS

Blue Ribbon Sponsor: Union Line Garage Market Benefactor - Princeton Market Benefactor: Princeton DesignFitness Guild & Wellness

SPONSORS

Blue Ribbon Sponsor: Union Garage Market Patron - 1st Constitution of Rocky Hill Market Patron: Terra MomoLineBank Market Basket Kevin State Farm, Band Sponsors: 1st Constitution, LiliBaez B's, Market Benefactor: Princeton Design Guild Radiation Data, Princeton Orthopaedic Group Princeton Orthopaedic Associates, Terra Momo

Individual Sponsors: Mary & Line GaryTerra Reece,Garage & Mark Taylor, Blue Ribbon Sponsor: Union Market Patron: Momo Cedar Sponsor - Amy Clyde Jaci Shed & Ed Trzaska, Louise & Cliff Wilson River Tree Farm Band Sponsors1st - Nassau Tennis Club, Band Sponsors: Constitution, Lili B's, Radiation Data Market Benefactor: Princeton Design Guild

Serving Central NJ & Eastern PA APBrosLandscaping.com • 609-498-4540 Contact Us For A Quote 26 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

Radiation Data, Princeton Orthopaedic Group Community Sponsors - Ed & Jaci Trzaska

Market Patron: Terra Momo Individual Sponsors: Mary & Gary Reece, Amy &PMark R I NTaylor, CE TON

Jaci & Ed Trzaska, Louise & Cliff Wilson D E S I G N Band Sponsors: 1st Constitution, B's, Blue RibbonLili Sponsor: Radiation Data, Princeton Orthopaedic Group G U I L D

Individual Sponsors: Mary & Gary Reece, Amy & Mark Taylor, Jaci & Ed Trzaska, Louise & Cliff Wilson


B A S IL IC O

ENJOY SHOPPING OUR SHOWROOM FULL OF HANDCRAFTED REPRODUCTIONS EARLY Hand-crafted Furniture sinceOF 1965 AMERICAN, COLONIAL AND SHAKER FURNITURE. ENJOY SHOPPING OUR SHOWROOM FULL OF HANDCRAFTED REPRODUCTIONS FEATURING JONATHAN CHARLES ANDOF D.R.EARLY DIMES AMERICAN, COLONIAL AND SHAKER FURNITURE. FURNITURE, WINDSOR CHAIRS AS WELL AS FEATURING JONATHAN CHARLES AND D.R. DIMES PRINTS, UNIQUE GIFTS AND MORE! FURNITURE, WINDSOR CHAIRS AS WELL AS

TRATTO RIA

PRINTS, UNIQUE GIFTS AND MORE!

Located in Do you have that perfect Do the you have that perfect most be piece inin pieceofoffurniture furniture mind butcan’t can’t find mind but find it?it? just outside Talk us! Talk totous! Delaware We specialize in We specialize in custom made furniture ONL and willmade make it forY you. custom furniture

and will make it for you.

Basilico is now open and located in the heart of Hopewell. We specialize in authentic Italian cuisine using only the freshest ingredients possible to ensure each dish tastes like it came straight from Italy. TUES - SAT

9B EAST BROAD STREET HOPEWELL, NJ (609) 333-9900

LUNCH

11:30

AM TO

SERVED UNTIL

Located in rural Hunterdon County the most beautiful countryside in all NJ Located in of rural Hunterdon County just outside historic Stockton on the Delaware River-countryside it's worth the trip! the most beautiful in all NJ

6 MILES FROM NEW HOPE! Furniture Hours: Fri. & Delaware River- it's worth the trip!

Rte. 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5 miles N. of Stockton) 609-397-0606 ONLYwww.canefarmfurniture.com 2O MILES FROM PRINCETON!

AVAILABLE FOR PRIVATE EVENTS

6 MILES FROM Furniture Hours: Fri. & Sat. 10-5;NEW Sun. HOPE! 1-5 and by appointment

Rte. 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5 miles N. of Stockton) 609-397-0606 www.canefarmfurniture.com

Design. Build. Design. Maintain. Build. Maintain. Design. D Build. Maintain. sign. Bu Design.Build. Build.e Maintain. Design. Maintain. Furniture Hours: Fri. & Sat. 10-5; Sun. 1-5 and by appointment

R

D S CAC P G

R

G

IINN I N GG G

IN

R

RR R

R

K BOTTO C 732-873-6780 O

M

NC CAPI 732-873-6780 NG & F E 732-873-6780

LAN

CONTRACTOR LLER

OCK

LAN

ilbox Posts ow Removal ios & Walkways phalt Paving

NG &

DS

Build. Main

IN

IN

G

DS CREATING CUSTOM CREATING OUTDOOR CUSTOM SPACES OUTDOOR SPACES Call Today NC CAPI NG & F E CREATING CUSTOM OUTDOOR CREATING SPACES CUST OVER 30 YEARS FOR OVER 30 YEARS DFOR C S 732-873-6780 N Specialist CAOVER CREATING CUSTOM OUTDOOR SPA FOR 30 FYEARS FOR OV ELawn P IN Weekly Lawn Cutting & Maintenance Cutting & Maintenance Specialist & GWeekly

LAN

Call Today

LAN M

Call Today SCA Call Today Today CallCall Today P I NG & F E N

K BOTTODesign. C O

M

MM M

K BOTTOC C DS Call CA O DToday F ENC S P I NG & NN LANLLAA

732-873-6780

ist

6 MILE

ONLY 2O MILES FROM PRINCETON! just outside of historic Stockton on the

10 PM 4 PM

K BOTTO C O CK OT BO TTTO KB O C O O

SPACES

2O M

Rte. 519, Rosemont, www.

basilicohopewell.com

intain.

.net

Hand-crafted Furniture since 1965

FOR OVER 30 YEARS

Weekly Lawn Cutting & Kitchens MaintenanceWeekly Specialist Lawn • Poolscapes Weekly ••Poolscapes Outdoor ••Outdoor MailboxKitchens Posts • Mailbox Posts Cutting Weekly Lawn Cutting & Maintenance Specialist • Hardscapes • • Hardscapes Retaining Walls • • Retaining Snow Removal Walls • Snow Removal Poolscapes •• Poolscapes • Poolscapes • Outdoor Kitchens • Mailbox Posts • Outdo • Poolscapes • Outdoor Kitchens • Mailbox • Landscape Design & Service • • Landscape Customized Design Lawn & Care Service • • Customized Patios & Walkways Lawn Care • Patios & Walkways Hardscapes •• Hardscapes • Hardscapes • Retaining Walls • Snow Removal • Retai • Hardscapes • Retaining Walls • Snow R • Lighting •••Lighting Fencing ••Patios Fencing Asphalt Paving& • Asphalt • Landscape Design & Service Paving • Customized• Lawn Care • Patios & Landscape Design Design & & Service & Walkways ••Landscape • Service Landscape Customized Lawn Care Design • Service Custo • Lighting • Fencing • Asphalt Lighting •• Lighting • Lighting • Fencing • Asphalt Paving Paving • Fenci

CREATING CUSTOM OUTDOOR SPACES FOR OVER 30 YEARS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT LANDSCAPE ON STAFF • LICENSED ARCHITECTCONTRACTOR ON STAFF • LICENSED CONTRACTOR

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT ON STAFF • LICENSED CON

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT ON STAFF LICENSED CONTRACTOR ICPI CERTIFIED CONCRETE ICPI CERTIFIED INSTALLER CONCRETE PAVERARCHITECT INSTALLER LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT ON LANDSCAPE STAFF ••PAVER LICENSED CONTRACTOR O ICPI CERTIFIED CONCRETE PAVER INSTALLE Weekly Lawn Cutting & Maintenance Specialist

ICPI CERTIFIED CERTIFIED CONCRETE PAVER INSTALLER INSTALLER License # 13VH04549200 License # 13VH04549200 LicenseICPI # 13VH04549200 CERTIFIED ICPI CONCRETE PAVER CO License # 13VH04549200 • Outdoor • Mailbox Posts LicenseKitchens # 13VH04549200 Licens www.rockbottomlandscaping.ne www.rockbottomlandscaping.net www.rockbottomlandscaping.net

• Poolscapes • Hardscapes • Retaining Walls • Snow Removal www.rockbottomlandscaping.net www.rockbottomlandscaping.net www.rockbo Landscape Design & Service • Customized Lawn Care • Patios & Walkways 28 | PRINCETON MAGAZINE•SPRING 2017 • Lighting • Fencing • Asphalt Paving


L andscape d esigners & c ontractors H ardscape s peciaLists s tone - M asonry i nstaLLers p atios p orcHes d riveways o utdoor L iving a reas r etaining w aLLs o utdoor a udio s ysteMs L andscape L igHting L andscape & L awn M aintenance s ervices

355 Route 601, Belle Mead, NJ 08502 908-281-6600 • Fax: 908-281-9672 www.sunsetcreationsinc.com

NJNLA • CNLP • ICPI • TECHO PRO NJLCA • BBB ACCREDITED Contractor #13VH04270900


A

R I C E A M ’

ST GARDE E I NE L R R A S E

S

THE FOUNDING FATHERS PAVED THE WAY FOR A GREEN AMERICA

BY ILENE DUBE 30

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

White House, south entrance & flower beds. Circa 1907.


FROM LEFT:

A Rich Spot of Earth by Peter J. Hatch, various seeds from the Center for Historic Plants, Founding Gardeners by Andrea Wulf, All the Presidents’ Gardens by Marta McDowell.

G

ardening, it has been said, is one thing we can discuss while setting aside partisan politics—even when it involves the gardening practices of our nation’s political leaders. As garden historian Marta McDowell puts it, “Whether gardeners lean right or left, blue or red, we are united by a love of green-growing things and the land in which they grow.” McDowell, who gardens and writes in Chatham, New Jersey, traces the story of how the White House grounds were conceived and how they morphed with changing administrations in All the Presidents’ Gardens: Madison’s Cabbages to Kennedy’s Roses—How the White House Grounds Have Grown with America (Timber Press, 2016). We get glimpses into such presidential pastimes as Lincoln’s goats, Ike’s putting green, Jackie’s iconic roses and Amy Carter’s tree house. When Michelle Obama dug ground for her organic vegetable garden on the White House lawn in 2009, she was raising not only produce for the White House Kitchen and the Food Bank Organization, but also national pride in growing things. The roots of her garden go back to Colonial times. George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison all operated farms, and believed agriculture was the noblest occupation and the foundation of democracy. During the Revolutionary War, Washington encouraged his troops to eat vegetables and even to plant them if time allowed. While our nation’s early leaders may have torqued a tendon bending over to seed the fertile earth, their dedication to the soil shaped the way they forged the nation.

In Founding Gardeners: The Revolutionary Generation, Nature and the Shaping of the American Nation (Knopf, 2011), author Andrea Wulf looks at the founding fathers as gardeners, plantsmen and farmers. “Not only did they create the United States in a political sense,” she writes, “they had also understood the importance of nature for their country.” Gardening, agriculture and botany were passions as deeply ingrained as their belief in liberty for the nation. Wulf reveals how, even as British ships gathered off Staten Island during the Revolution, Washington bombarded the manager of his beloved Mount Vernon with detailed instructions, insisting on prompt replies. If Washington were president today, such gardening correspondence might activate a Twitter storm. During years of diplomatic service overseas, Adams and Jefferson toured private gardens and studied the latest agricultural techniques. Adams was the first president to live in the White House, then surrounded by mud flats, and Jefferson, focused more on his Monticello gardens than the White House, wanted only native shrubs and trees. Reasons for gardening during Colonial times were similar to the reasons people garden today: To have a source of fresh produce, to be outdoors, breathing in the fresh air and sunshine, and to experience the simple pleasure of digging one’s hands into the dirt. Martha Washington once wrote that growing vegetables was among “the best parts of living in the country.” It should be pointed out that none of these gardens would have been possible without the hard work of slaves. In 1799, Mount Vernon was home to a community of 317 enslaved men, women and children. George and Martha Washington relied on enslaved labor to keep their plantation profitable. And at Monticello, about 130 enslaved men, women, and children lived and worked on the plantation, producing cash crops of tobacco and wheat. SPRING 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

31


LIVING OFF THE LAND

reflection on her. She was a keen plants woman.” Washington was serious about manure, the salvation for soils robbed of their fertility. His interest can be observed in a letter he penned to a friend requesting that he find Washington a farm manager “above all, Midas like, one who can convert everything he touches into manure, as the first transmutation towards gold.” Were Thomas Jefferson to walk the grounds of Monticello today, he would feel fully at home in the 1,000-foot terraced vegetable garden where the very vegetables and herbs he favored are thriving. The garden is a living expression of Jefferson’s distinctly American attitudes. Its impact on the culinary, garden and landscape history of the United States continues to the present day. Peter J. Hatch, who directed the restoration of the garden, has written A Rich Spot of Earth (Yale University Press, 2012), devoted to all aspects of the Monticello vegetable garden, from the asparagus and artichokes first planted in 1770 through the horticultural experiments of Jefferson’s retirement years (1809–1826). The author explores topics ranging from labor in the garden, garden pests of the time and seed saving practices to contemporary African American gardens. Hatch also discusses Jefferson’s favorite vegetables and the hundreds of varieties he grew, the half-Virginian half-French cuisine he developed, and the gardening traditions he adapted from many other countries.

photograph courtesy of shutterstock.com

Benjamin Franklin believed agricultural self-sufficiency was vital for the increasingly rebellious colonies. While in London he sent seeds home, not just for the enhancement of his own garden but to be distributed to other Philadelphia plantsmen. James Madison, Wulf suggests, is the forgotten father of American environmentalism. He sounded the clarion call against the perils of depleting soil by clearing forests and over farming land, urging fellow Virginia farmers to protect the old-growth forests. As president of the Agricultural Society of Albemarle, he made a speech offering advice on how to live off the land without destroying it. “This was an approach that celebrated the American landscape as it was rather than creating something entirely new and European,” writes Wulf. Gardens during Colonial times (1600 to 1775) were diverse, varying by geographic area, climate, and economic status and heritage of the owner. Seeds from around the world were mixed in with such native plants as tobacco and corn. Colonists did not develop or use garden plans as landscape designers do today. Most Colonial gardens were small and close to the house, with a walkway (brick, gravel or stone) from the house’s entrance to the center of the garden. Planting beds could be square,

circular or rectangular, and paths forked out from the main walkway. Fruits, herbs, flowers and vegetables were mixed together in beds that were frequently raised and enclosed with either fences or boxwood hedges. Visitors to the gardens at Mount Vernon today can see the ha-ha walls Washington created to separate the working farm from the pleasure grounds. Washington oversaw all aspects of the landscape at Mount Vernon. He extensively redesigned the grounds surrounding his home, adopting the less formal, more naturalistic style of 18th-century English garden landscape designer Batty Langley. Washington reshaped walks, roads and lawns; cut vistas through the forest, and planted hundreds of native trees and shrubs. The well-ordered gardens provided food for the mansion’s table and were also pleasing to the eye. Eighteenth-century visitors to Mount Vernon were treated to bountiful offerings of fresh vegetables and fruits, and reveled in after-dinner walks among opulent flowering plants. Says Mount Vernon’s Director of Horticulture Dean Norton: “The kitchen garden was the most important garden on any grounds in the 18th century. Ever since this garden was created in 1760 it hasn’t changed, and has generated a lot of fruits, vegetables and berries. The person who had more to do with this garden than George Washington was Martha Washington. One of her main responsibilities was the evening meal. Not only was it supposed to be abundant but elegant, and if not it was a direct

The Greenhouse at George Washington’s gardens at Mount Vernon.

32

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017


photograph courtesy of shutterstock.com

Aerial view of the White House, Washington, D.C.

White House, West Colonial Garden (present-day Southwest Rose Garden, which replaced the West Colonial Garden). Circa 1917. SPRING 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

33


photographs courtesy of shutterstock.com Monticello is the autobiographical masterpiece of Thomas Jefferson—designed and redesigned and built and rebuilt for more than forty years.

The Vegetable Garden: The 1,000-foot-long garden terrace served as both a source of food and an experimental laboratory at Monticello.

34

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017


SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST

and Morven has a team of 30 volunteers who come to help on Thursdays. As with all gardens, Morven’s is a place where survival of the fittest can be observed. In August, the blue winged digger wasp pays a visit. The wasp is a parasitoid—unlike a parasite that lets its host live, a parasitoid kills its host. Sounds nasty, except that the digger wasp’s victim is that notorious garden pest the Japanese beetle. The fierce wasps locate the white beetle grubs beneath the surface of the earth, tunnel through the dirt, deliver a paralyzing sting, and deposit an egg on the skin of the grub. The hapless white grub is incapable of removing the egg which soon hatches and the parasitic larva of the digger wasp slowly consumes its victim. After completing its development during summer and autumn, the wasp larva spins a cocoon of silk, pupates, and passes the winter in the burrow created by the white grub. Fresh, new wasps emerge as adults the following August. But before you cancel your plans to visit: the digger wasp does not sting. “Yellow jackets give wasps a bad name,” says Ruch. “Most wasps will sting to defend their territory but are not aggressive and will not chase after you.”

morven photograph by richard Speedy

Morven Museum & Garden, the one-time home of Declaration of Independence signer Richard Stockton, is listed on the New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places, and is a National Historic Landmark. The grounds can be seen as a patchwork of history. The horse chestnut walk that connects the museum to the Princeton municipal complex is a restoration of one that existed in the late 18th century. The formal front lawn, rimmed by a row of Southern catalpa trees, came to be when the road now known as Stockton Street was straightened over 200 years ago. Disease-resistant American elms, replacements for those lost to Dutch Elm disease at the turn of the 20th century, once again flank the restored horseshoe-shaped drive. From the vantage point of the back courtyard, a visitor can admire a 19th-century brick wall that divided the pleasure garden from the more utilitarian areas, a Colonial Revival garden that replicates one that Helen Hamilton Shields Stockton grew in 1927, and a recreation area that recalls the 1940s tenancy of Robert Wood Johnson. For the past five summers, visitors could get a taste of culinary history in Morven’s Kitchen Garden, whose hearty beds featured heirloom and modern varieties of tasty roots and fruits. The robust

garden produced hundreds of pounds of food every year that Morven donated to food banks. But just as visitors grew accustomed to the bounty, so did insect pests—cabbage worms and squash bugs—and deer, and so the vegetables will be taking a year off this summer. The good news is, Colonial-era herbs and flowers will be planted in their stead, according to Morven Horticulturist Pam Ruch, who came on board in 2000 and has been through several phases of restoration of the historic property. “We don’t really know what Richard and Annis Stockton grew,” says Ruch. “Although Annis may have written about certain plants in her poetry, it’s not necessarily what was grown here. We will be planting what you would have seen during the Colonial period, such as old varieties of zinnias and Maltese cross sunflowers.” The vegetables had been grown in 16 four-by12-foot beds, and these beds, punctuated by an iron sculpture of interlocking circles, will bloom with flowers that attract pollinators. “The food banks like flowers, too,” says garden assistant Nancy Nicosia, who raises the plants from seeds under grow lights. Among her seed sources is Monticello. At press time she was ordering celosia, Love-Lies-Bleeding amaranth, verbena and coneflowers. “Pollinators love it,” she says. Milkweed, the food source for the Monarch butterfly, already grows wild on the beds. The garden is planned so something will always be blooming, and weeds will be suppressed with mulch—but there’s still plenty of weeding to do,

The Colonial Revival garden at Morven Museum & Garden replicates one that Helen Hamilton Shields Stockton grew in 1927. SPRING 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

35


Selected for 2006-2012 Princeton Showhouse & Gardens Voted Best Landscape Design 2016 House & Home Magazine

Ronni is a Master Gardener who was inspired by classes at Longwood Gardens. After 10 years of transforming properties throughout Mercer, Hunterdon and Bucks counties, she created Ronni Hock Garden & Landscape, LLC. Services include complete design, installation and maintenance of landscape, gardens, container gardens as well as eye-popping patios, terraces, pathways, stone walls and lighting features. Our landscape architect and installation teams combine for over 40 years of award-winning results and customer satisfaction. Take a virtual tour: www.ronnisgarden.com and call: 609.844.0066.

PRINCETON LAND DESIGN “Landscaping at its Finest”

Landscape Design • Patios • Pools • Stone Walls • Walkways Gardens • Outdoor Kitchens • Lighting • Pavers • Driveways Water Features • Fire Pits • Fences • Maintenance Programs Enhancing Princeton Area Homes since 1987 www.princetonlanddesign.com 609.921.2429 princetonland@verizon.net

Creative Landscapes with a Purpose

Ghiggeri Environmental LLC Stone Masonry

Landscape Design

Installation

Natural stone • Outdoor Living • Native landscapes • Specialty Gardens • Koi Ponds 908.399.9428 | www.GhiggeriEnvironmental.com 36 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017


DEAR GARDEN ASSOCIATES, INC.

DISTINCTIVE DESIGN, INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE Bill Dear, Horticulturist

Bucks County, PA 215.766.8110

Princeton, NJ 609.919.0050

ASSOCIATES, INC.

DEAR G

EAR GARDEN ASSOCIATES, INC. ALLATION & MAINTENANCE

DISTINCTIVE

TINCTIVE DESIGN, INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE

8110

Princeton, NJ 609.919.0050

Bucks County, PA 215.766.8110

en.com

Princeton, NJ 609.919.0050

Bill Dear, Horticulturist

www.deargarden.com

Bucks Cou

www.deargarden.com

www.deargarden.com


GARDEN PARTY

Silk Gazar Obsession Ballerina Dress, Suzannah, $3,505.59; suzannah.com Arris Headpiece, Camilla Rose, $526; en-us.lovehats.com Mustang Pink Sunglasses, Acne Studios, $320; acnestudios.com Esplanade Bag in Pink & Jade, Prada, $2,710; prada.com Coco Mademoiselle Parfum, Chanel, $190; chanel.com Set of Flower Pins in Two-Tone Leather, Fendi, $550; fendi.com Deep Jade Enamel Ring, J.Crew, $48; jcrew.com Printed Leather Pumps with Bejewelled Buckle, Dolce & Gabbana, $1,275; us.dolceandgabbana.com Clutch Size Lip Balm in Cruising, Tom Ford, $36; tomford.com Round Leather Strap Watch, Ted Baker, $155; shop.nordstrom.com

38 |

PRODUCT SELECTION BY SARAH EMILY GILBERT

Emerald Cut Stud Earrings, Carat, $246.17; harrods.com

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017


specializing in horticultural services for those who desire an environment of excellence and beauty.

• Perennial Gardens • Landscape Design • Vegetable Gardens • Containers • Estate Maintenance • Seasonal Decoration

908.788.0067 | davidinthegarden.com SPRING 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 39


Embellished Plisse Silk-Chiffon Gown, Gucci, Price Upon Request; net-aporter.com

Phyto-Khol Perfect Eye Pencil in 9 Deep Jungle, Sisley Paris, $57; sisley-paris.com

24K Green Agate Doublet Earrings, Katrina Makriyianni, Price Upon Request; katerinamakriyianni.com

Maya Green Tourmaline Leaf Ring, Brooke Gregson, $3,380; brookegregson.com

Ivy Headpiece, Carrie Jenkinson Millinery, $262; en-us.lovehats.com

40 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

Tangerine Cuff, Aurelie Bidermann, $720; usd.aureliebidermann.com Careen Emerald Suede Rose Gold Metallic Nappa Heel, Malone Souliers, $565; shop.malonesouliers.com Pandora Loves Me Perspex Clutch, Charlotte Olympia, $1,325; us.charlotteolympia.com

Opaque Jaded Forest Green Nail Polish, Smith & Cult, $18; smithandcult.com Cherry Blossom Burst Headpiece, Twigs & Honey, $425; twigsandhoney.com

PRODUCT SELECTION BY SARAH EMILY GILBERT

GARDEN PARTY


Creating

LUXURY Outdoor Living Spaces MASONRY • BACKYARD BARS • STONE VENEERS • WALKWAYS • OUTDOOR KITCHENS • PATIOS • FIRE PITS

Greenview Designs Landscaping & Hardscaping Contractor

LANDSCAPING • HARDSCAPING • OUTDOOR PIZZA OVENS • FLAGSTONE • BBQ ISLANDS • PERGOLAS • PAVERS

PATIOS •609-466-3080 FIRE PITS

DRIVEWAYS • RETAINING WALLS • BOULDER WATERFALLS • OUTDOOR FIREPLACES • OUTDOOR LIGHTING

WWW.GREENVIEWDESIGNS.COM


Growers of Quality Plants for 85 Years Annuals • Perennials Vegetable & Herb Plants Hanging Baskets & Patio Planters

MAZUR NURSERY

Open 7 Days 265 Bakers Basin Road | Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 (609) 587-9150 • www.mazurnursery.com

Foxbrook Home & Garden

Vintage Home Elements and Garden Accents 25 E. Broad Street • Hopewell, New Jersey

609.466.0062

gasiorsfurniture.com 2152 US Highway 206, Belle Mead NJ 08502 (908) 874-8383 42 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017


| BOOK SCENE

The Art and Life of the Landscape, from Cézanne to Capability Brown by Stuart Mitchner

W

hen the weather was gloomy and the mood was right, I could see a Cézanne painting in our backyard. This minor miracle was due not to any mortal painter or landscaper but to the mighty forces that formed the Princeton Ridge, which we have been living on for thirty years. Thanks to some long-longago geological turbulence, the makers of the Ridge deposited an immense boulder smack in the middle of the yard, forming a focal point for painterly fantasies. Half a year ago an ash tree was growing out of a cleft in the boulder, creating an effect not unlike the tree-in-rock formation in the right foreground of Cézanne’s Rocks— Forest of Fontainebleau, of which Ernest Hemingway said, “This is what we try to do in writing, this and this, and the woods, and the rocks we have to climb over.” It was during a1950 visit to the Metropolitan Museum famously recounted by Lillian Ross in her New Yorker profile that Hemingway delivered his observation about painting and writing. “I can make a landscape like Mr. Paul Cézanne,” he added. “I learned how to make a landscape from Mr. Paul Cézanne by walking through the Luxembourg Museum a thousand times with an empty gut, and I am pretty sure that if Mr. Paul was around, he would like the way I make them and be happy that I learned it from him.” That’s my idea of landscaping. A view painted by Cézanne, described by Hemingway, and with objects in it you can climb over, stand on, or fantasize about. Now that the ash tree has been taken down (the result of age and decay from within), the stump embedded in the boulder has created a new formation, thereby becoming an exciting challenge for our landscaper, who spent time last fall planning ways to work around it. It’s also only fair that I admit having little interest in landscape gardening or gardens in general. My lack of enthusiasm for planning in nature grows out of an aversion to planning in any form. The sort of landscape I have a special fondness for is English, notably the Bristol Downs that roll green and glorious along the Avon Gorge from Westbury Park and Redland Hill to the Clifton Suspension Bridge. There, you can go from a street of shops and houses right into 400 acres of open country, with rocks to walk over (the way Hemingway likes it), plus fields and copses and cliff-side trails and gullies. Second to the

44 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

Downs in my dream list of landscapes is Hampstead Heath, where you can hike from Keats’s Hampstead to Coleridge’s Highgate and see all the way to Westminster. LANDSCAPE AS SUSTENANCE

In Cézanne: Landscape Into Art (Yale Univ. Press $75), Pavel Machotka photographs sites of Cézanne’s landscape paintings from the same spot, angle, and time of day, whenever possible. Then he juxtaposes the photograph with the painting. According to Machotka, “the discipline of landscape became Cézanne’s major source of support and sustenance.” As evidence, he quotes from a letter the painter wrote in 1896: “....were it not that I am deeply in love with the landscape of my country I would not be here.” The sustenance Cézanne found in landscapes, Monet found in his garden at Giverny: “Everyday I discover more and more beautiful things. It’s enough to drive one mad. I have such a desire to do everything, my head is bursting with it.” The quote is from Monet’s Garden: Through the Seasons at Giverny (Frances Lincoln $25.99), a new paperback edition of Vivian Russell’s classic work that compares photographs of the garden with Monet’s paintings of it, as in Garden Path at Giverny. In another quote Monet asks, “How can one live in Paris?...I prefer my flowers and this hill that surrounds the Seine to all your noises and nocturnal nights.” DOWNTON ABBEY’S LANDSCAPER

Sarah Rutherford’s Capability Brown and His Landscape Gardens (National Trust 34.95) traces the life and work of the man they called the “Shakespeare of the art of gardening.” Among his projects was Highclere Castle, the location of the mega-hit series Downton Abbey. He got his colorful name, it’s said, from advising people that their grounds had “great capabilities” (meaning potential). Also known as “The Omnipotent Magician,” he had some


impressive clients, including half the House of Lords, six Prime Ministers, not to mention royalty. Although he’s now known primarily for his unique name (which has been borrowed by at least one progressive rock group), visitors still enjoy many of his works today at National Trust properties, including countless Downton fans drawn to Highclere; among the others are Croome Park, Petworth, Berrington, Stowe, Wimpole, and Blenheim Palace. Rutherford’s book tells his story, documents his aims, reveals the secrets of his success, and is illustrated throughout with color photographs of contemporary sites, historical paintings and garden plans. LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS SPEAK OUT

In Meaghan Kombol’s 30:30 Landscape Architecture (Phaidon $75), 30 of the most renowned landscape architects from 20 countries divulge details about their work, including their inspirations and design processes, while debating the key issues for landscape architects today and in the future. Featuring more than 500 illustrations, 30:30 is an up-to-date global overview of contemporary landscape architecture offering students, practitioners and enthusiasts an insightful look at global landscape architecture. Catherine Mosbach, George Hargreaves, Martha Schwartz and Adrian Geuze, along with “the best and brightest” of the next generation of designers, engage with a diverse range of projects, demonstrating both the importance and creativity of landscape architecture. According to a reviewer in The Garden Design Journal, 30:30 “is no coffee table book despite its appearance and glamour. It should be read from front to back... As a landscape architect myself, the book makes me

K N I G H T

proud... After 40 years’ experience, this book motivates me like no other has before. It should be essential reading both in the practice and college environment.” CITY GARDENS

Two new books in the garden/landscape subject area from local publishers are Susan Brownmiller’s My City Highrise Garden (Rutgers Univ. Press $25), and Charles Waldheim’s Landscape as Urbanism (Princeton Univ. Press $45), which presents a powerful case for rethinking the city through landscape, examining works from around the world by designers ranging from Ludwig Hilberseimer, Andrea Branzi, and Frank Lloyd Wright to James Corner and Michael Van Valkenburgh. The result is “the definitive account of an emerging field that is likely to influence the design of cities for decades to come.” Gardening might seem an unlikely fit for renowned feminist journalist/activist Susan Brownmiller, best known for her 1975 landmark work Against Our Will, but a Library Journal review suggests that the combination works: “Brownmiller writes with passion, humor, and complete candidness about 35 years of gardening on the 20th-floor terrace of her Greenwich Village apartment. Along with weather, climate, and critter issues, Brownmiller also describes unique gardening problems that a more traditional yard gardener couldn’t fathom, such as building renovations and neighbors unappreciative of leaf drift—although plenty of them are eager to share plants and pots for Brownmiller’s urban oasis, too. From stories of the loss of her beloved birch trees in the wake of a hurricane to tales of victory at her garden’s thrilling achievements, the author reveals all, including the odd assortment of detritus she discovered

thrown down from the shared rooftop garden above ... With a style reminiscent of Eric Grissell’s Thyme on My Hands and A Journal in Thyme, Brownmiller’s meandering musings will delight readers. Memoir lovers and gardeners alike will enjoy these adventures in urban gardening.” PRINCETON GLORIES

Having begun in my own backyard, it feels right to end with two favorite places closer to home, Marquand Park, where I first bonded with Princeton, and the Battlefield Park, where nature and history merge.

A R C H I T E C T S

LLC

We are pleased to announce this custom Princeton residence has been awarded 1st place in the Regional 2015-2016 Sub-Zero and Wolf Kitchen Design Contest. Knight Architects • 234 Nassau Street, Princeton NJ 08542 • 609.252.0474 • www.knightarch.com SPRING 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 45


B A LT I C T I L E S Installation of Ceramic, Marble, Porcelain, Stone, & Glass.

Serving Princeton for Over 20 Years Doylestown, Pennsylvania | 609.977.5805 | www.baltictilesconstruction.com


exclusive designer tile and stone, please visit us at our Hopewell showroom.

Personalized Service • Unique Designs 38 East Broad Street | Hopewell, NJ (609) 333-0610 | www.aStepInStone.com See more of A Step in Stone’s work on Facebook and Instagram!


Inside Princeton Reunions DOUG WALLACK ART BY JAMES MCPHILLIPS/JAYMCPHILLIPS.COM BY


s

ometime in April of each year—typically just in time for campus preview visits for accepted high school seniors—the cold, grey damp of winter at Princeton University gives way to a brilliant spring. Dogwood flowers and daffodils grace the grounds with flecks of gold, and white and pink. Saucer Magnolias bloom, lining the newly verdant up-campus lawns. Following their campus’s botanical lead, students emerge too, and all life at the university becomes more visible. Professors hold classes on the steps of the sundial in McCosh Courtyard, and students take their reading outside. The odd frisbee or slack line appears. Then, after about a week of this idyllic existence, the tents and fences start to go up. Slowly but surely, they spread across the campus landscape, obscuring its architecture and truncating its pathways. But as unsightly as the temporary structures may be, there’s no stopping them: Reunions weekend is on the horizon. Writing in a 1976 edition of the Princeton Alumni Weekly magazine, Anne Rivers Siddons described her experience of attending her husband’s 25th reunion: “There were maybe 1,500 alumni on campus, all dressed in whatever their class had espoused for the weekend, and the result was absurdly like Disney World, moved lock, stock, and barrel into the Cathedral of Notre Dame. Perhaps even more absurdly, it didn’t look absurd. Princeton reunions, like The Turn of the Screw, have the ability to suspend one’s belief in an orderly rational universe.” Anyone who has taken part in Princeton Reunions in any of its subsequent 40 iterations would probably agree that the event still hews very closely to her portrayal. It remains an absurd weekend: in equal measure a wild and beer-soaked carnival, a beloved pilgrimage, and—for the administration—a crucial annual (wild and beer-soaked) fundraising event. But one significant change since that time is a matter of scale. Last year, an estimated 26,000 alumni and guests participated in Reunions—nearly doubling the town’s population, booking local hotels to capacity months in advance, and flooding town and campus with orange and black. What does it take to put on this massive event?

To get a sense of the view from the top, I spoke with Mibs Southerland Mara, who is the senior associate director for classes and reunions. Mara works in the Office of Alumni Affairs, and for the last 12 years has been the administration’s go-to reunions coordinator. Stories on Princeton Reunions, and Princeton alumni, often cite the event as the single largest purchase of beer in the United States after the Indy 500. I’d never been sure whether to trust this as fact, but I figured Mara might be able to shed some light on the matter. Her take is that it’s essentially an unknown. Certainly, the lager flows freely during the long weekend, but because the various alumni classes and eating clubs put in their own orders to a variety of suppliers, there’s no single beer order to account for. I settle for on a “maybe” for this one. Mara speaks more readily on the scope of her office. She works throughout the year to coordinate the Reunions efforts of many departments across the university. She’s in on discussions with Facilities to plan for alumni on-campus housing, the dozens of tents, and thousands of feet of fencing. She works with Campus Dining to make sure everyone is well-fed, and with Transportation and Parking Service to arrange for buses to and from nearby hotels. Mara’s office also has a hand in organizing the Alumni-Faculty Forums, a series of lectures and panels on a wide variety of topics that collectively represent an opportunity for alumni to engage with the academic component of their alma mater between the weekend’s many social events. This year, there will be 25 forums over two days, with subjects ranging from “China in the World Order,” to space exploration, to managing a worklife balance. Mara’s office is also a resource for alumni volunteers. Alumni classes do much of the organization for their own reunions, and major class reunions (multiples of five, generally) tend to have punny, Princeton-related themes (“Tigeritaville,” “Orange and Black to the Future,” and “May The Fortieth Be With You” are all upcoming this year). Mara often meets with members of alumni classes two or three years in advance of a major reunion to discuss their theme, their reunion logo and clothing, their considerations for entertainment, etc. spring 2017 prinCETOn MAgAZinE

| 49


Alumni also work with Mara to run the P-rade, which for many is the high point of each year’s Reunions. This procession takes place on the Saturday afternoon of Reunions and, except for the evening fireworks, it is the last major event of a given year’s celebrations. Grouped by their graduating class and festooned with orange everything, alumni parade down campus, accompanied by all manner of marching bands and Princeton-themed cars and floats. The 25th reunion class always leads the procession, followed by the oldest returning alumnus and the Old Guard (members of classes beyond their 65th reunion). The P-rade winds down Elm Drive—the main road cutting through campus—cheered by progressively younger classes, who fall into line once the procession passes them. Finally, the graduating senior class joins just before the end of the route, as the alumni spill out onto Poe Field. Each enactment of the P-rade is a sort of living, walking history of Princeton University, with representatives of its alumni community on full display, and it is also a rite of initiation, welcoming the graduating seniors into that very same community. It is also a logistical bear. Charles J. Plohn, Jr. ’66, acted as grand marshal for the P-rade from 2008 to 2012. In that capacity, he was the primary alumnus working with Mara to organize it. “Planning basically starts a few days after Reunions,” he says. There was more than enough to think about. As grand marshal, Plohn had to recruit other P-rade marshals to help usher along the procession. He had to make decisions about where to place water stops and bathrooms along the route, how many medical personnel to hire, how many golf carts to keep on hand to drive older alumni who are unable to walk the entire mile-long route. There are considerations of pace, too. A procession shorter than three hours, Plohn has concluded, isn’t feasible with the huge number of alumni who have taken part in recent years, but it also shouldn’t extend beyond three hours and 20 minutes. The hot late-May or early-June sun can be punishing, and a sluggish P-rade could lead to exhaustion or heatstroke for some participants. All of this careful orchestration has to be executed with a light touch, too. “We’re not trying to militarize the process,” Plohn says, “People are there to have

50 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE sPRING 2017

fun.” For the marshals, then, it’s a busy afternoon of cajoling, gentle nudging, and firm but friendly shepherding. On the other hand, for Carolyn Kelly, Class of 2018, who has worked as a student truck driver for Campus Dining during the past two Reunions, the P-rade provides a welcome respite in the midst of an otherwise taxing weekend of work. “We love the P-rade,” she says. No non-parade vehicles are allowed on the roads on campus during the event, so it’s a chance for Kelly and her fellow student truckers to “relax, have some coffee, take a quick nap.” For most of Friday and Saturday, from 6:00am to 11:00pm, Kelly and her crew are on the move, loading up box trucks with trays of food and beverage coolers, and shuttling them to reunions tents across campus. It’s exhausting work, but Kelly says that the student truckers are well taken care of, and she knows she’s playing a valuable role in making Reunions happen. Last year, Campus Dining served over 36,000 meals during Reunions weekend, and there’s a small army of students and staff workers behind all of it. Then, almost as soon as it’s begun, Reunions is over. Sunday morning comes, alumni eat breakfast and then filter back out of town as commencement exercises begin for the senior class. Sunday afternoon’s non-denominational Baccalaureate service is followed by Monday’s Class Day ceremony and departmental receptions, before the seniors file out of FitzRandolph Gate on Tuesday morning to receive their diplomas. The moving trucks and family minivans come and go, and campus sinks into a drowsy New Jersey summertime. But even then, the wheels are already turning, preparing for the return of the orange hordes to Old Nassau. This year’s Princeton University Reunions weekend is June 1-4. “Nassau Hall to Hoagie Haven: Princeton Paintings by James McPhillips” at The Princeton Public Library 2nd Floor, on exhibit and available for purchase through July 31. All other McPhillips work available at jane (7 Spring St.) and JayMcPhillips. com. Saturday, June 3, 12 - 2pm artist Meet & Greet at jane.


WO R

SH

IP

SER GUEST PREACHER FROM THE 50TH REUNION CLASS OF 1967 VIC The Rev. Frank Strasburger ‘67 E Princeton University Chapel 10 AM SUNDAY JUNE 4, 2017

SPRING 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 51


AF

IV

E

LI

VI

FO

A D R

ALTERNA E L B T

G

AN

N

SAL E S OFF I CE N O W OP E N OPENING SUMMER 2017 We Put the Emphasis on Living! All inclusive rates at 30% less than what you are used to. A community in the truest sense of the word, our building is a neighborhood with friendly people and accessible services — offering assisted living apartments and our Rose Lane program for the memory impaired. Our residents get the care and support they need.

Call Us Today - 908-829-3157 351 Route 206, Hillsborough, NJ 08844 www.AllAmericanAtHillsborough.com


An Exclusive OFFER Find our about our move-in special FIRST MONTH FREE 609.586.4600 CALL TODAY

Experience CareOne at Hamilton

RECREATION Stimulating activities, events and trips

NATURE

Beautiful grounds and patios to enjoy the summer

Visit our website and take a virtual tour at www.careonehamilton.com or contact us. 609.586.4600 1660 Whitehorse-Hamilton Square Road Hamilton, NJ 08690

SPECIALTY

CareOne Harmony Village units designed for those with memory impairment

NUTRITION

A healthy approach to fine dining

SERVICE

Tours available 7 days-a-week


T H E L I F E . T H E PL ACE . T H E PEOPL E . Stonebridge at Montgomery is

STIMU L ATING on every level.

You live life on many levels, from your intellectual curiosity to your need for comfort and security. Stonebridge at Montgomery is a place that is uniquely designed to enrich every aspect of your life.

Now is the ideal time to schedule a visit.

Located just minutes from downtown Princeton, Stonebridge offers senior living in a gorgeous countryside setting with a wide choice of apartments and cottages. You’ll also find a level of security that is unique in this area with renowned healthcare services available right where you live, on the Stonebridge campus.

Come for an informational tour and learn why Stonebridge is the Princeton area’s top choice for senior living.

Call 877-791-3389

A Continuing Care Retirement Community 100 Hollinshead Spring Rd., Skillman, NJ 08558 | stonebridgeatmontgomery.org

G APPLICATIONS • SCHEDULE YOUR T FEE • NOW ACCEPTIN OUR TODAY Y R T N E O N

Our Continuum of Care Community Welcomes THE GREEN HOUSE® APPROACH TO NURSING HOME LIVING.

Meaningful Life • Real Home • Empowered Staff

St. Mary’s Assisted Living

Grace Garden Memory Care Assisted Living

St. Joseph’s Skilled Nursing

Morris Hall Meadows

Located in Lawrenceville, NJ For more information, please visit us at www.morrishall.org or contact us at mhadmissions@morrishall.org or (609) 895-1937 54 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017


Job # 55512

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2017 •7,7:30 PM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2017 7:30 PM 7:30 PM NOW TICKETS ON SALE Company

Item

St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center

2017 Pops Poster

Size: 22� w x 34� h Qty: 2

THE FOUNDATION OF MORRIS HALL / ST. LAWRENCE, INC.

presents a benefit concert

THE FOUNDATION OF MORRIS HALL / ST. LAW

presents a benefit concert

OAD BROADWAY’S

Christiane NollHITS GREATEST

w o n k u o Y kler Michael Krajewski, Music Director

0

Highland Park Surgical Associates    



Administering expert care with state of the art technology.

Drive, B-2 Brier Hill Court,expert care with215A Administering state ofNorth the artCenter technology. North Brunswick, NJ 08902 East Brunswick, NJ 08816 (732) 305-6556 (732) 846-9500    

, an house le c a r o f he’s a stic , and p l u p o n h it w e orange juic PATRIOTS THEATER AT THE TRENTON 7°. Free Vein Screenings t 6MEMORIAL ostat aWAR

WAR MEMORIAL



Highland Park Surgical Associates

215A North Center Drive, B-2 Brier Hill Court, North Brunswick, NJ 08902 East Brunswick, NJ 08816 (732) 305-6556 (732) 846-9500 901 W. Main St., Suite 240,







VENOUS INSUFFICIENCY • VARICOSE VEINS

  

BROADWAY

Doug LeBrecque

Michael Krajewski

Dee Roscioli

Freehold, NJ 08902 (732) 846-9500 901 W. Main St., Suite 240,

Christiane Noll

the therm oo. t , t a h t w o n k l We’l

Freehold, NJ 08902 (732) 846-9500

th Free Vein Dr. Brotman-O’Neill March 10 thScreenings , 13introduces & 14 th

GENERAL ADMISSION TICKET PRICES RANGE $35-$90

Call 215-893-1999 or or visit visit www.ticketphiladephia.org www.ticketphiladelphia.org to Call 215-893-1999 topurchase purchase. For more information, please contact Jane Millner at 609-896-9500, ext 2215 or jmillner@slrc.org.

103,rd13 The March Vein Center of&New April 4&thth14Jersey rd April 3 & 4 Complimentary Vein Screenings th

th

th

VENOUS INSUFFICIENCY • VARICOSE VEINS

 

 !      ! 

   Board certified vascular surgeon and ed venous expert. Harvard Board certifi vascular surgeon and venous expert. Harvard magna cum laude graduate.

GREATEST H

For more information, please contact Jane Millner at 609-896-9500, ext 2215 or jmillner@slrc.org The concert will benefit the patients and residents of St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center and Morris Hall. The concert will benefit the patients and residents of St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center and Morris Hall.

magna cum laude graduate.

g to purchase Find out how our extensive Find out how our extensive training and care philosophy help us make training and care philosophy ext 2215 or jmillner@slrc.org.

EATE

help us make meaningful meaningful connections that lead to better, more engaging care. connections that lead to better, Michael Krajewski, Music Direc more engaging care. Providing w o Providing hourly and live-in care. n k u o hourly and live-in care. Y

tation Center and Morris Hall.

a clean house, r fo r le k c ti s he’s a ulp, and p o n h it w e ic ju e orang t 67°. t atoday. osta erm Connect with us

the th t, too. We’ll know tha

hwcg.com/princeton 609.423.1200 Find out how our extensive training and care philosophy help us make

Nassauk Suite 212, Princeton, NJ 08542 w o n Providing hourly and live-in care. u Street, Y20o kler

meaningful connections thatMichael lead toKrajewski better, more engaging Doug LeBrecque Deecare. Roscioli

n house, for a cleaTHEATER ’s a stic hePATRIOTS , and pulp h no us with today. nge juice wit oraConnect °.

7 thermostat at 6 the hwcg.com/princeton too. e’ll know that, W609.423.1200

Connect with us today. AT THE TRENTON WAR hwcg.com/princeton 609.423.1200

GENERAL ADMISSION TICKET PRICES RANGE $35-$90 20 Nassau Street, Suite 10 Preincton, NJ 08542

Call 215-893-1999 or visit www.ticketphiladelphia.org to pur 20 Nassau Street, Suite 212, Princeton, NJ 08542 For please contact Jane Millner at 609-896-9500, ext 2215 Find outmore how ourinformation, extensive training and care philosophy help us make

56 |

The connections concert will the patients and care. residents of St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Cen meaningful thatbenefit lead to better, more engaging Providing hourly and live-in care.

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017


Authentic. Vintage. Luxury.

MEET H1912

We are committed to the beauty, value and restoration of vintage watches and jewelry. every pre-owned item is inspected by our expert jewelers and includes a certificate of Quality and authenticity.

104 Nassau Street 609-924-1363 • www.h1912.com H1912 proudly donates a percentage of every sale to local cHarities in need.

vintage and pre-oWned WatcHes & JeWelry tHat MaKes luXury affordaBle


orld War I had been raging in Europe for three years when the United States finally declared war on the German Empire on April 6, 1917. By the time the armistice was signed over a year later, this global conflict of massive, devastating proportions had claimed more than 17 million lives. Among those casualties were 117 from Princeton—some natives; others students from Princeton University. Their sacrifice is commemorated on a semi-circular, marble bench that sits in the triangular park at the corner of Nassau and Mercer Streets. Designed by New York architect and Princeton University lecturer Harvey Wiley Corbett, the memorial was installed in 1925 at a cost of $10,000, raised with contributions from Princeton residents and clubs. SPRING 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

59


In this centennial year of the United States’ entry into “The Great War,” it is fitting to look back at Princeton’s service and how it affected life on campus and in the town. The formal declaration of war by President Woodrow Wilson, well known to Princetonians from his days as president of the University, meant the immediate cancellation of intercollegiate sports at the school. Instead, there was Company L, the military unit made up of Princeton volunteers. Locals could watch them training on the University campus and at other locations around town before they were sent off for further training in Camden. The volunteers marched on campus, and down Nassau Street. There was trench training near Alexander Street. The recruits could be seen demonstrating calisthenics on Brokaw Field. Historic photographs show a group of volunteers on the steps of the University’s Blair Hall, guns balanced between their knees. An exhibit mounted by the Historical Society of Princeton in 2008 detailed this call into service. “The group included several students who took leave of their studies to enlist,” read a bulletin board at the display. “During the year of 1917, the entire undergraduate body was receiving military

60

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

training while still in school. Thirty-one instructors and professors also received training and several of them went to the front shortly after the war started. Some even signed up and served under the French Tricolors before America entered the war. In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1920 novel This Side of Paradise, there is a character named Allenby, who is the football captain. Fitzgerald, who attended Princeton, modeled him on Hobey Baker, a hockey and football star at the school whom he idolized. Hobart Amory Hare Baker ‘14 was a member of three national championship teams. He worked for J.P. Morgan Bank until enlisting with the U.S. Army Air Service, where he commanded the 141st Aero Squadron. Baker died in December 1918 after a plane he was test-piloting crashed, only hours after he was supposed to leave France for home. In 1921, Princeton named its new hockey arena the Hobey Baker Memorial Rink. The University’s Mudd Manuscript Library Blog posted

an article last year about the school during World War I, adapted by Spencer Shen ’16 from a FAQ (frequently asked questions) posting for the library’s former website. The article details an address to incoming freshman by University President John G. Hibben on September 24, 1914, acknowledging that “the opening of this new academic year...presents to our minds a striking contrast: the peaceful setting of this assembly against the dark background of the terrible European war.” Many students “took Hibben’s call ‘to the service of the world’

to heart,” the article continues. “Several joined Canadian regiments and other branches of the Allied military services. Still others volunteered as ambulance drivers for the French Red Cross. A Princeton chapter of the National Red Cross Society formed, with representatives from both town and gown.”


By December, thanks to petitions from students, organized military training was taking place on campus. The program would continue over the next two years, and included lectures by Army officers on military history and organization. Once President Wilson finally agreed to declare war on Germany, “the atmosphere at Princeton changed instantly: Within ten days the entire campus was drilling,” the article reads. “Between the sinking of the Lusitania and the declaration of war, 166 Princeton men had already left to enlist and 142 had given up academic work to take the first Intensive Military Training Course.” But not everyone on campus supported involvement in the war. There were pacifists, two of whom asked President Hibben if they could use Marquand Chapel for a peace meeting. The answer was no. “Princeton will not allow the use of its building for anti-war meetings,” it was reported in the Newark Star-Eagle, according to the blog posting. “It was also reported that, while Hibben professed a belief in the freedom of speech, he declared that it was ‘no time for divided counsels.’ ” At least 3,000 Princetonians, including 117 faculty members, were in military service by December 1917. “The war resulted in a 63 percent drop in admissions, and the University found itself with a $135,000 deficit despite trustees having reduced expenses by some $120,000. In order to

stay afloat, Princeton opened its campus to the military in 1918, essentially becoming a military college,” the article reads. The Princeton Flying Corps was established in the spring of 1917 on a rented 60-acre field along Mercer Street. One of 45 students chosen to train there was Charles S. Grant ’17. Grant designed and made detailed drawings of a 148 miles-per-hour pursuit plane, which had a retractable landing gear to increase its speed to about 168. He was vice president of the Princeton Flying Club and delivered the first lecture at the University on aerodynamics, according to the publication The Princeton Recollector, which was published by the Princeton History Project. In June 1981, Grant wrote in the Recollector of his efforts. “I left to join the Army in December 1917, in my senior year (I was out for one year doing practical engineering work and would have graduated in 1918). The Dean would not give me my degree when I offered these plans as my thesis. They gave me a ‘War Diploma,’ but no degree. Later, when I graduated from M.I.T. Officers’ School, I applied again for a degree without any luck. So I have achieved what I have achieved without help from Princeton.” Grant did earn a degree from M.I.T., however. He served in the engineering branch of the Signal

Corps, Aviation Section, and graduated from M.I.T.’s School of Military Aeronautics in July 1918 as a second Lieutenant. The Flying Corps attempted to obtain government backing, but was unsuccessful and eventually forced to disband, according to the Historical Society of Princeton’s 2012 exhibit. Out of the 45 participants, 27 men saw overseas duty with 20 of them sent to the front lines. The group also included three ‘aces’ shooting down five or more enemy fighters and were given three Distinguished Service Crosses. The University’s role in World War I is commemorated by a bronze memorial tablet at Pershing Hall, the American Legion Post (now a hotel) in Paris. Given in 1930 by the Princeton Alumni Association, the memorial is adorned with flowers on Veterans’ Day each year to pay tribute to the alumni, students, and faculty who died in the conflict. By the end of the war, according to the Mudd Library blog, a total of 6,170 students and 139 faculty had served. Some 430 decorations were given to Princetonians from 13 nations, including 227 from France and 117 by the United States. It was supposed to be “The War to End All Wars.” But of course, it wasn’t.

SPRING 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

61


Discover the Difference at Metropolis Spa & Salon F

rom classic to cutting edge, Metropolis Spa & Salon prides itself on offering a global approach to style right here in Princeton. Now in its 25th year, the full-service salon is more current than ever. Owner Theresa Carr has very high standards, especially when it comes to education. Every stylist at Metropolis completes a minimum of 2,900 certification hours before they even start, as well as intensive one-on-one training with a Vidal Sassoon global creative director to master advanced cutting techniques. “The training never stops,” said Carr. “Our stylists get a tremendous education. You have to keep evolving in order to stay relevant and at the forefront of our industry.” Quarterly education classes are held and stylists participate in international training with global educators in Paris and Milan. Stylists also participate in Fashion Week every year, in New York as well as internationally, to keep ahead of the trends. Carr noted that today’s consumers are more educated than ever on the latest styles and trends, and Metropolis strives to be ontop of all the newest methods. “We need to keep ahead of our clients to know what they want when they come in,” she said. Metropolis features a five-tier system for its hair care and coloring stylists, including Master, Designer, Artist, Next Generation, and Junior. Each is related to years of experience and tenure at the salon, and offers different price options that are palatable for every pocket. Every stylist is also certified in advanced and creative color with L’Oreal. Specialized stylists at the salon also hold certifications in Balayage highlighting, hair extensions, Ouidad, and smoothing treatments. Clients have multiple choices for stylists, with someone for everyone in the family. The facility itself is very modern and spacious, with the salon on the first floor and the spa in its own very quiet space downstairs. Right away you will notice that there are no wall mirrors— the better to be wowed by the final result. There are also skylights for natural light, which makes it much better to see hair color without the harshness of fluorescent lights.

62 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE sPRING 2017

Metropolis offers an extensive menu of services including hair, nails, skincare, aromatherapy, waxing, massage therapy, body work, eyelash extensions, organic tanning, makeup, and a large product line. Its services are supported with some of the best brands in the industry, some of which are only sold in New Jersey at Metropolis. Metropolis is proud to be a certified Green Circle Salon, and was the first in New Jersey to join this super eco-friendly program two years ago. Through Green Circle, salon and spa waste is diverted from landfills and waterways and recycled and repurposed. Carr said the salon now recycles about 98 percent of its waste—including hair clippings, foils, color tubes and cans, papers and plastics, and more—which is turned into reusable products and has already totaled 1,978 pounds to date. The salon participates in partnership with D&R Greenway Land Trust, and 100 percent of the proceeds from the Green Circle launch event were donated to the organization. Other salon features include a product testing area right up front, a hair color bar for finding just the right shade, and a private dining area for spa days, bridal parties or any special occasion. Metropolis also has a dedicated bridal team to provide the very best wedding day services either on site or at your location. Be sure to check out Metropolis’s newly released phone app, which makes it easy to make appointments, buy gift certificates, and view specials. Clients also earn loyalty points for retail items and services. Metropolis Spa & Salon is at 301 North Harrison Street, conveniently located in the Princeton Shopping Center with plenty of free parking. Hours are Monday 9am to 5pm; Tuesday through Friday 9am to 9pm and Saturday 9am to 5pm. Call 609.683.8388 or visit the website at www.metropolisspasalon.com. Follow them on Facebook and Instagram.

images courtesy of metropilis spa & salon

by Laurie Pellichero


A favorite style. A fresh look. A flavorful bite. A fun gift.

SHOPPING Ann Taylor Barbour bluemercury Botari Brooks Brothers Club Monaco Cranbury Station Gallery Dandelion The Farmhouse Store J.Crew jaZams Kitchen Kapers Lace Silhouettes Lingerie lululemon athletica M•A•C Cosmetics Morgenthal Frederics Origins Pacers Running Ralph Lauren Talbots Toobydoo Urban Outfitters Zoë

SERVICES The Kiosk Nassau Inn PNC Bank Pure Barre Salon Pure

SPECIALTY FOOD & DRINK The Bent Spoon Carter & Cavero Olive Oil Co. Halo Pub / Halo Fete Lindt Chocolate Olsson’s Fine Foods Princeton Corkscrew Wine Shop Rojo’s Roastery Thomas Sweet Chocolate

RESTAURANTS & CAFÉS Chez Alice Gourmet Café & Bakery Mediterra Princeton Soup & Sandwich Co. Teresa Caffe Winberie’s Restaurant & Bar Yankee Doodle Tap Room

Experience the Square... palmersquare.com


Proudly serving

NOW ENROLLING FOR FALL 2017!

the Princeton Community &

CRANBURY | PRINCETON | NEW BRUNSWICK

Princeton Reunions for over 20 Year

There’s a place for everyone!

At Princeton Ballet School we place students in the class that’s right for them. We nurture the whole student so they can discover the joy of dance and realize their full potential.

JOE’S PRINCETON upcoming placement class dates*

FOR STUDENT DIVISION AGES 7+ THROUGH ADVANCED DIVISION • TUESDAY, JUNE 6 • TUESDAY, JULY 11 • TUESDAY, AUGUST 15 • TUESDAY, JUNE 20 • TUESDAY, AUGUST 1 • SATURDAY, AUGUST 26 To reserve your spot in a placement class, or to register your child age 6 and under for our Primary Division, contact Lisa de Ravel at 609.921.7758, ext. 11 or lderavel@arballet.org

Ask about our adult open enrollment classes [ AGES 13+] * ALL placement classes are held at our Princeton studio.

Visit our website at arballet.org | 609.921.7758

609.851.3263 www.joesprincetontaxi.com

5% OFF

all Mercer County reservations

10% OFF

for all long-distance & airport reservations, including students with a valid ID

Succeed

Come to Notre Dame to succeed. Develop your academic talents. SATs and ACTs are significantly higher than the national average, with 98% of our seniors going on to colleges and universities that rank among the finest in the US.

To learn more about our school visit our website at ndnj.org Notre Dame partners with parents in many communities to provide late afternoon buses. Please call 609.882.7900, ext. 121 for additional information.

Notre Dame High School

601 Lawrence Road, Lawrenceville, NJ 609.882.7900, ext. 130

64 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017


We’ve added a Mortgage Banker to serve you in Princeton, NJ. We’re proud to announce that Richard Zeller has joined our mortgage team. Whether you're buying a new home or refinancing, Richard can find the right mortgage option for you with the personalized service you deserve. Call or stop by the branch to meet Richard. Richard Zeller, Mortgage Banker T: 609-937-8106 richard.zeller@chase.com http://homeloan.chase.com/richard.zeller NMLS ID: 588951

All home lending products are subject to credit and property approval. Rates, program terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. Not all products are available in all states or for all amounts. Other restrictions and limitations apply. ©2016 JPMorgan Chase & Co. 78292F-0815

P R I S M S!

P r i nPrinceton c e t o n IPrinceton n tInternational e r n a International t i o n a l SSchool cSchool h o o l of o Mathematics f Mathematics M a t h e mand a t Science i cand s a nScience d Science of A N e w S T EA M S Tf E oM c ufsoec d io r dainnd gD aaynHdi g hD Sa cyh oH u s, e dI,nItnet errn n aatti o n anl aBl o aBr doian g o li g h S c h o o l

A STEM focused, International Boarding and Day High School

STEM 3.0 3.0 education education including including two two years years of of original original research research requirement. requirement. •• STEM •• Small Small class class size size taught taught by by best best in in field field faculty faculty with with research research experience. experience. attending following colleges universities: • Our studentsOur are Students currentlyare attending thethe following colleges andand universities: Brown, Caltech, Brown, Caltech, Mellon, (2), Duke, MIT (2), Notre Dame,Institute, Rhode Island School of Design, Cornell, Carnegie Duke, MIT, NotreCornell Dame, Oberlin, Rensselaer Polytechnic Rhode Island School of Design, UCof Berkeley, others. UC Berkeley, University Chicago,University UniversityofofMichigan Michiganand (2) many and many others.

For more information or to schedule a visit, please contact the Admissions Office at (609)454-5589 or see the PRISMS website at www.prismsus.org

Congratulations to the Class of 2016, our first graduating class, with collegeSPRING admissions to: 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE | 65

MIT, CalTech, Duke, Cornell, Brown, UCBerkeley, UCLA, University of


PRINCETON ACADEMYof the

Sacred Heart

Creative. Compassionate. Courageous.

10% OFF

DISCOVER NEW GEM YOUR PURCHASE WITH THIS AD

&visit old favorites

FOOD • DINING • FASHION • HEALTH • FITNESS GIFTS • JEWELRY • SPECIALTY SHOPS • HOME INTERIORS

WWW.CONCORDPETFOODS.COM

Congratulations to the Class of 2017 on earning admission to the following secondary schools: Kimball Union Academy

Avon Old Farms Berkshire School Blair Academy

Loomis Chaffee School

Choate Rosemary Hall

Lake Forest Academy

Culver Academy

The Lawrenceville School

Delbarton School Episcopal High School George School The Gunnery School

Solebury School

Milton Academy

St. Joseph’s Preparatory School

The Hun School

Phillips Exeter Academy

Kent School

The Salisbury School

St. Andrew’s School

The Pennington School

AD

Rutgers Preparatory School

Millbrook School

Holy Ghost Preparatory School

Locally Owned & Operates with 27 locations. Mon-Sat 9:00am -9:00pm Sun- 10:00am-6:00pm

AD

Peddie School

South Kent School

Notre Dame High School

AD

Princeton Day School

Mercersburg Academy

The Hill School

301 N. Harrison St., Princeton NJ 08540 • 609-683-1520

Tabor Academy

Westminster School

1128 Great Road Princeton, NJ 08540 www.princetonacademy.org

We bring out the best in boys. An independent school for boys in kindergarten through grade 8.

Weekdays: Mon through Fri 8-7; Sat 8-5 and Sun 9-3

NEW609-430-4300 YEAR, NEW LOOK:

PRINCETON SHOPPING CENTER

Same Great Stores

The Taft School

PRINCETON ACADEMY of the Sacred Heart

Smith’s Ace is now carrying the new VITAMIX ASCENT SERIES. Experience the power of Vitamix!

NOW OPEN MONDAY THRU SUNDAYAD AD LUNCH AND DINNER

Soon to be celebrating our

50th Anniversary AD

Established in 1967, Bon Appétit has proudly been serving the Princeton area as a gourmet European retail store with a French bistro style café. At Bon Appétit we offer a variety AD of over 250 cheeses from around the world, a wide range of imported meats, over 5000 hand picked gourmet specialty items, gourmet gift baskets, four star catering services, luscious European style deserts AD and fresh crusty European style baguettes baked every 30 minutes.

Take pride in what you eat and eat well. Bon Appétit

www.bonappetitfinefoods.com • (609) 924-7755 301 NORTH ST. PRINCETON, NJ | PRINCETONSHOPPINGCENTER.COM 301 HARRISON NORTH HARRISON ST. PRINCETON, NJ | PRINCETONSHOPPINGCENTER.COM

66 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

AD


Email: kellefsen@pmxagency.com On Sale: 5/23/17

THE BEST PURE COTTON NON-IRON DRESS SHIRT

BAR NONE. UNBEATABLE INTRODUCTORY

OFFER

$24.95 REG $89.50

YOU SAVE 70% PLUS,

FREE MONOGRAMMING

REG $10.95

ADD THIS TIE FOR JUST $19.95 REG $72.50

100% Black 1/C spot

PAULFREDRICK.COM/BEST • 800.309.6000

PROMO CODE T7MPPR

WHITE 100% COTTON PINPOINT / NEAT WRINKLE-FREE WEAR / EASY NON-IRON CARE 4 COLLAR STYLES / BUTTON OR FRENCH CUFF / REGULAR, BIG & TALL & SLIM FIT GUARANTEED PERFECT FIT.

Free Exchanges. Easy Returns. New customer offer. Limit 4 shirts. Imported. Shipping extra. Expires 7/31/17.

PMS 7463 1/C spot

250 N Sycamore St, Newtown, PA 18940 | 215.497.7488 www.marisaboutique.com Follow us at @marisaboutique on Instagram

white K.O path

SPRING 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 67


THE MakER MoVEMENT THE dawN oF SoMETHINg

bIg

by doug wallack


PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF THE DIY JOINT

THE DIY JOINT

ON JUNE 18, 2014, PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA HOSTED THE FIRST WHITE HOUSE MAKER FAIRE. PART SCIENCE FAIR, PART CULTURAL SHOWCASE, THAT DAY’S EVENT BORE WITNESS TO A 17-FOOT-TALL ROBOTIC GIRAFFE AMBLING AROUND THE GROUNDS, A WORKING PIANO KEYBOARD MADE FROM TOUCH-SENSITIVE BANANAS, A WEALTH OF 3D-PRINTED OBJECTS—INCLUDING PANCAKES IN THE SHAPE OF PRESIDENT’S FACE—AND MORE. IN HIS REMARKS ON THE DAY’S PROCEEDINGS, OBAMA HAILED THE INGENUITY OF ORDINARY CITIZENS MADE POSSIBLE BY INCREASINGLY ACCESSIBLE TECHNOLOGY. Obama located the inventors gathered there at the vanguard of the grand sweep of American innovation: Americans had realized dreams of a transcontinental railroad, networks of telegraph lines, the lightbulb, the Internet. What would come of this current frenzy of discovery and invention was anyone’s guess. “It gives you a sense that we are at the dawn of something big,” he said. The White House hosted the event again in 2015 and 2016, but more than the later iterations, that inaugural event represented the validation on the national stage of a movement that had been brewing across the country for about a decade. That movement, the “maker” movement, is something of a catch-all term for independent manufacturers, craftspeople, hackers, and artisans. Infused with DIY spirit, this 21st-century update to the Arts and Crafts movement is a friendly meeting of garage scientists with Etsy nation. The maker movement owes its cohesion in part to Make magazine, first published in 2005, and in part to maker faires like the ones held at the White House (There are now over 100 such events held worldwide each year). But perhaps most important are the sites for this democratized industry, the places where the work of making happens: makerspaces.

Makerspaces, sometimes called hackerspaces or fab labs, are collaborative work spaces that house a variety of equipment for members’ use—anything from sewing machines to laser cutters, welding equipment to 3D printers, all depending on the particular location. And as the movement itself has grown to encompass the Garden State and its surrounding areas, the makerspaces have come too.

ACCESS TO TOOLS The DIY Joint is among the newest of these. This woodworking studio and instructional space opened in Hoboken in June of 2016. Inside, rows of work benches run into a lounge area at one end of the space, outfitted with homey, modern decor—some of which was made in house. Earmuffs, goggles, and all manner of hand tools hang in abundance along one wall. Students at the DIY Joint can take classes to learn how to build pieces such as bookshelves, side tables, and cutting boards. These classes not only introduce beginner students to new woodworking

SPRING 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 69


PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF NEXTFAB

NEXTFAB

(ABOVE) NextFab’s founder Evan Malone considers Philadelphia his adopted home. After earning a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering at Cornell—he came back to Philly, viewing the city as an ideal home base for a makerspace.

skills, but typically also serve to certify them to use the facilities on their own during open studio hours. Justin Wertz has been going to the DIY Joint since this past summer. His fiancée runs a small jewelry boutique, and Wertz is in the process of building up his own home goods and aromatherapy business. He was drawn to the DIY Joint in hopes of building both of their storefronts. Now, after months of improving his craft, he says he has learned enough to do far more than the basic shelves he first envisioned. Beyond what he’s gleaned from his formal classes, Wertz also learns a tremendous amount from the other people working in the studio. He says that “a really nice mix” of backgrounds and skill sets contributes to a culture of sharing there that he values. This was part of what founder Priscilla Van Houten had in mind when she established the DIY Joint. Three years ago, while fixing up a residential property, she became frustrated by her near-total lack of construction skills. “I was nervous to hang up a picture frame,” she recalls. So she set out to change things. Initially, she took a few classes for hands-on instruction, but she largely taught herself woodworking through reading and online learning. Years of practice paid off as she gradually honed her technique and developed an enduring love for the craft. Eventually, realizing that others might benefit similarly from woodworking, Van Houten decided to start up the DIY Joint. “It’s invaluable to be a part of a greater community you can bounce questions and ideas off of,” she says. It’s something that she feels would have served her well when she was just starting out, and something she aimed to facilitate by building a designated space for it.

70 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

Van Houten says that woodworking benefits her in a number of ways. First, she finds the the work itself has a sort of therapeutic value. “You spend so much time consuming information,” she says, but woodworking is one way to cut through the digital noise of modern life. Whether you are working a table saw or a drill press, “all you can think about is woodworking. It brings you into the present,” she says. Indeed, students register for classes at the DIY Joint through MINDBODY, an online health and wellness scheduling platform primarily aimed at yoga studios and fitness classes. And though Van Houten says this is largely because it is a good platform, she also sees the DIY Joint as an appropriate fit, if not an immediately obvious one. Many of her students are “looking to decompress,” and like her, they find working with their hands in this way to be a productive outlet. She also finds that, through woodworking, she developed “a newfound awareness of everything around me”—a sense of wonder and recognition of the work that brings the built world into being. Finally, Van Houten says that process of mastering her craft has been incredibly empowering. Though she continues to be challenged by the need to prove her credibility as a young female woodworker, she finds that her gradual realization that she could navigate and contribute to what has traditionally been such a maledominated craft is something that drives her forward. Now, she says, “My goal is to help all people—regardless of their gender, age, or background—foster the maker spirit within them.”

WORKSHOP OF THE WORLD In Philadelphia, there is a makerspace of a different kind. NextFab, established in 2009, has locations in North and South Philadelphia, and a third studio opening soon in Wilmington, Delaware. NextFab bills itself as a “gym for innovators,” and


PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF NEXTFAB

NEXTFAB

has a broader focus than the woodworking-centric DIY Joint. Like the Hoboken-based makerspace, NextFab holds classes and offers a coworking space, but in addition to woodworking, they provide facilities and instruction in metalworking, 3D printing, laser cutting, and a host of other tools amenable to small-scale manufacturing. NextFab also runs start-up incubator and accelerator programs. NextFab’s founder Evan Malone went to the University of Pennsylvania and considers Philadelphia his adopted home. After earning a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering at Cornell—where much of his work involved developing 3D printing technology—he came back to Philly, viewing the city as an ideal home base for a makerspace. Philadelphia has a history of diverse manufacturing, Malone explains, and he saw an opportunity to help revitalize that through NextFab. By the late 19th-century, the greater Philadelphia area boasted thousands of firms in sectors ranging from textiles, to glass-making, to ship and locomotive building, earning the city the moniker “the workshop of the world.” While NextFab does attract its share of hobbyists, it’s this reemergent industrial spirit that Malone aims to seize upon and encourage. “We really view ourselves as a partner in economic development,” he says. If NextFab is any indication, the future of industry in Philadelphia will be multiple and heterogeneous in ways that echo its history, albeit more refined. NextFab has played host to businesses as disparate as Philly Love Notes a one-woman operation making woodcut maps of Philadelphia, and to Noria, a start-up manufacturing lightweight smart air conditioning window units that raised over $3.5 million through crowdfunding campaigns. The activities of NextFab’s members are as divergent from each other as NextFab itself is markedly different from the DIY Joint and other makerspaces. And maybe that sort of variety should come as no surprise. If, at some level, the maker movement aims to create whole new worlds, it stands to reason that it will contain worlds as well.

If you’re interested in joining or visiting a makerspace, in addition to the DIY Joint and NextFab, the greater Princeton area is also home to the following: Philadelphia Furniture Workshop www.philadelphiafurnitureworkshop.com JD Lohr School of Woodworking www.jdlohrschoolofwoodworking.com Philadelphia Woodworks www.philadelphiawoodworks.com

SPRING 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 71


An exceptional level of informed, concierge eldercare

Aging is complicated Finding an unbiased advisor doesn’t have to be... Theia Senior Solutions brings clarity and relief to caregivers when navigating the challenges of eldercare EMPATHY. EXPERTISE. EMPOWERMENT. www.theiaseniorsolutions.com | 844-843-4200


Imagine yourself in the kitchen you’ve always wanted. See every Sub-Zero and Wolf product in its natural environment at The Living Kitchen. Make yourself at home. Get hands-on with the complete line of Sub-Zero and Wolf products as you move from one full-scale kitchen vignette to the next. Once you’ve been inspired by all that your new kitchen can be, our specialists will help you turn your dreams into a reality.

2720 U.S. 1 Business, Lawrence Township, NJ

609-882-1444

www.MrsGs.com


BUCKS COUNTY

BHWP Princeton Mag ad April 2016_Layout 1 4/4/2016 1:17 PM Page 1

Step into Nature

134 Protected Acres, Hiking Trails, Educational Programs, Birding, Shop the Native Plant Nursery Open Daily in April, May, June: 9am- 5pm Guided Walks at 2 pm

1635 River Rd.(Rt. 32), New Hope, PA 18938 www.bhwp.org (215) 862-2924

Vase by Campbell Studios

NEw OwNERSHIp.

Cindy DeSau Photography

Award-Winning Cuisine Organically and Locally Grown Produce Full Service Wedding Packages Rustic Charm

Professional Staff Additional Riverfront Rooms at the 1740 House with Shuttle Service Rehearsal Dinners

Discover unique dishes,drinks and entertaining for social events. Coming this spring, new outdoor patio bar.

THE MANSION INN ROYAL T’S AT THE MANSION

Cindy DeSau Photography

6987 Upper York Road, New Hope, PA 18938, USA Tel: 215.862.3136 | Fax: 215.862.0960 www.hollyhedge.com

EAT

DRINK

STAY

TheMansionInnNewHope.com


UNFORGETTABLE KITCHENS

17 N. State Street | Newtown, PA 18940 | 215.579.0400

We are more than just a cabinet showroom. We are your dedicated design partner through and through. From countertops selection, lighting, fixtures, flooring, appliance selection, our design professionals will be there from beginning to end to make sure the results exceeds your expectations.

A new go-to source for hip parents and parents-to-be, featuring the very best in baby gear, bedding furniture, layette and clothing. We also feature in-house nursery stylists.

Contact Us: 215.579.0402 9 N. State Street Newtown, Bucks County Pennsylvania, 18940


HOME & DESIGN For Quality & Care...

Greenleaf Painters,LLC* • Interior/Exterior • Residential/Commercial ■ Interior/Exterior • Low Odor Painting Options ■ Color Consulting • Power Washing ■ Power Washing • Light Carpentry ■ ■ ■

Spyglass Design, Inc Your Life, Your Vision, Your Home

GRAND Kitchen & Bath Showroom on Alexander Rd

FREE

HARDWARE WITH KITCHEN

Deck Call NowStaining for a Free Estimate 609.750.0030 “Green” Painting Options Light Carpentry

sq. ft. Showroom/ Warehouse

CIFELLI

ELECTRICAL INC.

■ FULLY INSURED Fully Insured •OWNER OwnerOPERATED Operated

ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC.

Serving the Princeton Area with & Beyond Since Touch 2006 Professional Painting a Personal

Residential & Commercial

Residential & Commercial jshenk@greenleafpainters.com ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR greenleafpainters.com ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential & Commercial www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR www.cifellielectrical.com Renovations

CIFELLI CIFELLI CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. CIFELLI

Renovations Service Panel Upgrades www.cifellielectrical.com Renovations Service PanelFans Upgrades Paddle Service Panel Upgrades

Renovations Residential & Commercial Paddle Paddle Fans Fans Service Panel Upgrades ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential & Commercial Residential & Commercial

ELECTRICAL INC. Cifelli Electrical Inc.

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Paddle Fans ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Cifelli Inc. CifelliElectrical Electrical Inc. Residential & Commercial Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer for sales, ELECTRICAL installation and installationCONTRACTOR andstartup startup Cifelli Electrical Inc.

Authorized sales, Authorized dealer Authorized dealer forsales, sales, Authorizeddealer dealerfor for sales, installation and startup installation and startup installation and startup installation and startup 609-921-3238 Renovations Authorized Authorizeddealer dealerfor forsales, sales,

609-921-3238 609-921-3238

Lic #11509A and installation andstartup startup Serviceinstallation Panel Bonded and Insured

Service Panel 609-921-3238 Bonded andsurrounding Insured ServingPanel Princeton areas Service Paddle Fans Bonded and and Insured Upgrades Renovations Upgrades Lic #11509A Lic #11509A Lic #11509A

Interior and ServingPanel Princeton and surrounding areas Paddle Fans Service Bondedand and surrounding Insured Exterior ServingLighting Princeton areas Paddle Fans Upgrades Interior and Interior and ServingLighting Princeton and surrounding areas Exterior Paddle Fans

Exterior Lighting Certified Tesla Interior and Exterior Lighting Car Charging www.cifellielectrical.com Station Installers

609-921-3238 609-921-3238 Lic #11509A 609-921-3238 www.cifellielectrical.com Bonded and Insured www.cifellielectrical.com 609-921-3238 Lic #11509A Serving Princeton and surrounding areas

Bonded and Insured www.cifellielectrical.com Lic #11509A Bonded and Serving Princeton and Insured surrounding areas Lic #11509A

Serving

Bondedand and Insured Princeton surrounding

KITCHEN & BATH DESIGN

10,000

CIFELLI CIFELLI CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC.

Renovations Renovations Upgrades

FREE

areas

Serving Princeton and surrounding areas

Kitchen Interior Designers 745 Alexander Rd, Unit 1, Princeton, NJ 08540 609.466.7900 Family Owned and Operated(800)245-8756 www.PrincetonHomeCenter.com www.spyglassdesigns.net

FLESCH’S ROOFING FLESCH’S ROOFING

Family and Operated & Sheet Metal Co., Inc Family Owned andOwned Operated & Sheet Metal Co., Inc FLESCH’S ROOFING Family Owned and Operated ServingFLESCH’S the Princeton community for 25 years Owned and Operated Serving theFamily Princeton community forROOFING over 25 years FLESCH’S ROOFING FLESCH’S ROOFING FLESCH’S ROOFING Family Owned and Operated & Sheet Metal Co., Inc Inc FLESCH’S ROOFING INSTITUTIONAL • HISTORICAL WORK &• RESIDENTIAL SheetROOFING Metal Co., FLESCH’S Family Owned and Operated

& SheetMetal Metal Co.,Inc Inc ROOFING &Sheet Sheet Co., &FLESCH’S Metal Co., Inc & Sheet Metal Co., Inc FLESCH’S ROOFING & FLESCH’S Sheet Metal Co., Inc ROOFING FLESCH’S ROOFING Serving Princeton community for over 25 years INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • years HISTORICAL INSTITUTIONAL •thePrinceton RESIDENTIAL •for HISTORICAL WORK WORK Sheet Metal Co., Inc FLESCH’S ROOFING Serving the community over 25 INSTITUTIONAL •& RESIDENTIAL •specialize HISTORICAL We inWORK We specialize in FLESCH’S ROOFING INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK

INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL •and HISTORICAL WORK Family Owned Operated Family Owned and Operated Family Owned and Operated Serving the Princeton community for 25 years Serving the Princeton community for over Serving the Princeton community for over 25 years 25 years & Sheet Metal Co., Inc Family Owned and Operated Serving the Princeton community for 25 years Family Owned and Operated the Princeton community for over 25 years Serving theServing Princeton community for 25 years

Sheet Metal Co., IncInc &&& Sheet Metal Co., Inc FLESCH’S ROOFING Sheet Metal Co.,

INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK Serving the Princeton community for over 25 years INSTITUTIONAL • •RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK INSTITUTIONAL RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK INSTITUTIONAL •Serving RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK & Sheet Metal Co., Inc Serving the Princeton community over 25 years the Princeton community for for over 25 years Slate ✧ Copper ✧ Rubber Slate ✧ Copper INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK Serving the Princeton community over 25 years Serving the Princeton community for• over 25for years We specialize in We in INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL •specialize HISTORICAL WORK INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL HISTORICAL WORK Serving the Princeton community for over 25 We specialize We specialize in Roofing INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL •in HISTORICAL WORK Metal and Cedar Shingles Rubber ✧years Shingles INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL •✧HISTORICAL WORK

& Sheet Metal Co., Inc in We specialize

WeSlate specialize in Rubber We specialize in Copper Slate ✧ Copper We specialize Metal andin in We specialize Rubber ✧ Shingles We specialize in Cedar Roofing and Shingles CedarMetal Roofing

Slate ✧ Copper ✧ Rubber ✧• HISTORICAL ✧ INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL WORK Slate ✧ Copper ✧ Rubber Slate ✧ Copper Slate ✧ Copper ✧ Rubber ✧and Copper ✧ Metal Cedar Roofing Shingles✧Slate ✧ Metal and Cedar Roofing Shingles Rubber ✧ Shingles Slate ✧ Copper ✧ Rubber Slate ✧ Copper ✧ Rubber ✧ Metal and Cedar Roofing Shingles Rubber ✧ Shingles

Metal and Metal and Slate ✧ Copper ✧ Rubber ✧ Metal Cedar Roofing Shingles ✧ Metal andand Cedar Roofing Shingles Metal and Cedar Roofing Cedar Roofing ✧ Metal and Cedar Roofing Shingles Cedar Roofing

We also do Gutter work We also do We also and do We also do We also do We also do Gutter work and Gutter work and Gutter work andMaintenance Roof Maint We also do We also do We also do Roof Maintenance Gutter work We also and do Roof We also do We also do Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Gutter work and Roof Maintenance Roof Maintenance Gutter work and Roof Main We also do Gutter work and Gutter work and Maintenance Gutter work and Roof Maintena We also do Roof We also do Roof Maintenance

Gutter workdo and Roof Maintenance We also Gutter work andand Roof Maintenance Gutter work andRoof RoofMainten Maintena Gutter work Roof Maintenance Fully Insured Fully Insured Fully Insured Gutter work and Roof Mainte Fully Insured

FREE ESTIMATES QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR Fully Insured FREE ESTIMATES • •QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK WORK Fully Insured

Fully Insured Fully Insured 609-394-2427 609-394-2427 Fully Insured

Fully Insured Fully Insured Fully Insured FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK Fully Insured LIC#13VH02047300 LIC#13VH0204730 Fully Insured• REPAIR FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE WORK

609-394-2427 Fully Insured Fully Insured 609-394-2427 FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR W 609-394-2427 FREE ESTIMATESFREE • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR W LIC#13VH02047300

LIC#13VH02047300 FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK

609-394-2427 609-394-2427 609-394-2427 609-394-2427 609-394-2427 609-394-2427

FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK LIC#13VH02047300 FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK

609-394-2427

LIC#13VH02047300

LIC#13VH02047300

LIC#13VH02047300

LIC#13VH02047300

L

LIC#13V

LIC#1


Amrik Rug Gallery WHOLESALE PRICES TO THE PUBLIC!

amrik rug Gallery, a retailer for many years of fine oriental rugs, has taken over the inventory of the now out of Business rug & Decor and is selling to the Public at Wholesale Prices.

• Fine Hand Knotted rugs from all rug Weaving countries (Iran, India, Pakistan, China, Tibetan, Nepal, and Afghanistan) • Wool • Wool and silk • silk • Benefits of Hand Knotted rugs • all Natural Wool (unlike machine made rugs that have harmful chemicals) • Long Lasting • Heirloom Quality

aMriK ruG GaLLerY 609-454-6200 • 210 Nassau street, PriNcetoN, NJ 08542 Open 7 Days A Week: Monday-Saturday 10-6 Sunday 12-6

SAVE BIG ON THESE QUALITY HAND MADE RUGS! SAME PRICES AS RETAILERS! MANY SIZES AVAILABLE!


Renovate Your Home. Transform Your Life.

For a free consultation, call 609.799.0220. Looking for Inspiration? Visit our website! DicksonDevelopment.com Connect with Us

78 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

Renovating or adding on to an existing home requires the skills of an experienced builder. Dickson Development has been building and renovating homes in the Princeton area for 45 years.

Renovations & Additions Kitchen & Bath Design & Build New Home Construction


Newark and the Culture of Art: 1900-1960 Opens June 16, 2017

Windy Night, Newark, 1917. Stuart Davis (1892 - 1964). Private Collection. © Christie’s Images Limited 2010

55 Stockton Street • Princeton, New Jersey 08540 morven.org • 609.924.8144 • Wednesday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Sponsored by Pheasant Hill Foundation • Liza and Schuyler Morehouse • Kalkin Family Foundation The exhibit is also supported in part by a grant from the New Jersey Department of State, Division of Travel & Tourism


june 1

| CULTURAL EVENTS may 20

june 16

may 27

Calendar M u s i C | b o o k s | t h e at r e | l e C t u r e s | s p o r t s Thursday, May 18 10am – 3pm Return of the Outdoor Princeton Farmers’ Market at Hinds Plaza (repeats weekly). princetonfarmersmarket.com

4 – 9pm Shop great sales, taste yummy treats, and feel your best at Girls Night Out in Princeton’s Palmer Square. www.palmersquare.com

6 – 10pm Liberty Science Center in Jersey City presents “Grecian Gala” as part of their LSC After Dark Series. Guests ages 21 and over can enjoy cocktails, laser shows, dancing, food, and music. lsc.org

7 – 9:30pm Developing a Vision Board Workshop with Taneshia Nash Laird, executive director of the Arts Council of Princeton. Learn to use collage art to create a personalized vision board that expresses your desires for the future! www.artscouncilofprinceton.org

saTurday, May 20

4 – 6pm Opening reception for “Dharma in the 21st Century” at West Windsor Arts Center. The exhibition features works of artists of the Indian diaspora and will raise funds to support the Clean Ganga Fund, an Indian national effort to save the endangered holy river. westwindsorarts.org

saTurday, May 27 8:30am The Spring Lake Five Mile Run. This great race signifies the start of the summer at the Jersey Shore! www.springlake5.org

may 21

Friday, June 2 5 – 8pm Sunset Sips and Sounds at Terhune Orchards (repeats weekly). www.terhuneorchards.com

8pm It’s all Greek for The Princeton Triangle Club in this special encore performance of Greece’d Lightning at McCarter Theatre including the worldfamous all-male kickline (also on Saturday, June 3). www.mccarter.org

saTurday, June 3

Aquarium in Camden. Learn about sharks and learn what you can do to save these wild creatures and their natural habitats (also on Sunday, May 28). www. adventureaquarium.com

NooN-5pm Hunterdon Mistral Release Weekend celebrates Unionville Vineyards’ new Rhone-inspired wines! Experience a weekend of live music, winery tours, food truck eats and wine tastings (also on Sunday, June 4). unionvillevineyards.com/pages/ upcoming-events

3 – 4pm Stories and songs in German for children ages 2 and older at the Princeton Public Library.

sunday, June 4

10am – 5pm Shark Awareness Weekend at the Adventure

aLL DaY Cape May Restaurant Week 2017. This

NooN – 5pm Spring Lake Irish Festival along Third and

7:30pm The Bucks County Playhouse in New Hope, Pa.

Morris Avenues. Experience Irish step dancers, Irish soda bread contest, beer and wine garden, photo booth, and more. www.springlake.org

presents Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story through June 17. www.bcptheater.org

eight-day event offers fixed price lunch and dinner menus at restaurants throughout Cape May (through Sunday, June 11). www.capemay.com

sunday, May 28

saTurday, June 10

7pm Princeton Ballet School’s Annual Spring Production of The Sleeping Beauty at Patriots Theater at the War Memorial in Trenton. www.arballet.org

sunday, May 21 NooN – 4pm Watershed Trail Run & Festival in Pennington. The 5K and 10K routes are designed to take runners on a tour of the different types of habitats featured at the Watershed Reserve. thewatershed.org

3pm Special Exhibition Tour: “The Berlin Painter and His World: Athenian Vase-Painting in the Early Fifth Century B.C.” at Princeton University Art Museum. artmuseum.princeton.edu

80

|

PRINCETON MAGAZINE sPRING 2017

1pm Memorial Day Observance at the gravesite of Continental soldiers at Washington Crossing Park. The gravesite marks the resting place of soldiers who died during the Continental Army’s December 1776 encampment in Bucks County. www. washingtoncrossingpark.org

Thursday, June 1 aLL DaY Princeton University Reunions weekend attracts almost 25,000 alumni, family, and friends for walks, talks, community service projects, Alumni-Faculty Forums, picnics, parties, and more. Remember to breakout your orange and black attire for the one and only P-rade (through June 4). alumni.princeton.edu

6pm An Evening of Illumination: Grounds for Sculpture’s 25th Anniversary Gala and After Party. gfsgala.org 6:30 – 10pm “A Concert Under the Stars” at Updike Farmstead presented by the Historical Society of Princeton. The evening features al fresco dining and musical performance by local bands. www. princetonhistory.org 8pm Performance of Man of La Mancha at McCarter Theatre. This inspirational show won five Tony Awards on Broadway and endures as one of the best-loved American musicals. www.mccarter.org 8pm New Jersey Symphony Orchestra presents its Season Finale with Zhang and Bronfman at Count Basie Theatre in Red Bank. www.countbasietheatre.org

photos courtesy of princeton university Art MuseuM; the princeton triAngle club; shutterstock.coM; wikiMediA coMMons

M a r k Yo u r

may 28


june 17

july 6 june 4

june 3

june 28

june 2

june 17

Sunday, June 11 10am 9th Annual Kids Marathon hosted by Princeton Healthcare System and Princeton Fitness & Wellness Center at ETS Princeton. All children in grades Pre-K through 8 are invited to participate. www. princetonhcs.org

4pm Eastern Wind Symphony performs at Richardson Auditorium. www.princeton.edu/richaud

7 – 9pm Princeton Bluegrass Jam at Small World Coffee (Witherspoon Street location. www. smallworldcoffee.com

Friday, June 16 6 – 9pm jaZams Summer Block Party on Palmer Square West. Enjoy live music, crafts, activities, food trucks, and family fun. www.palmersquare.com 8pm Diana Krall brings her 2017-18 World Tour to

Project for a concert during the Summer Solstice. Bring a picnic dinner and a blanket and join in the festivities at the Roy DeBoer Evergreen Garden. www.rutgers.edu

thurSday, June 22 TBD Princeton Summer Theater’s 48th Season opens with a production of Pippin (through July 9). www. princetonsummertheater.org

6pm C’est Bon Cajun Dance Band performs at the Princeton Shopping Center. www. princetonshoppingcenter.com

Saturday, June 24 3 – 11pm Freedom Festival at Mercer County Park Festival Grounds. mercercountyparks.org

WedneSday, June 28 7:30pm Screening of The Last Picture Show (1971) at

NJPAC in Newark in support of her highly anticipated new album, Turn Up the Quiet, which celebrates a return to jazz and the Great American Songbook. www.njpac.org

Princeton Garden Theatre.

8pm VOICES Gala Weekend Concert at Richardson

Philadelphia. Attracting thousand of visitors, the Night Market gathers together the city’s best food trucks and restaurants for a fun evening of food, music, and community (also on August 10). www.visitphilly.com

Auditorium. www.princeton.edu/richaud

Saturday, June 17 NooN AcroYoga Fundamentals at Princeton Integral Yoga Community Center at the Princeton Shopping Center. Build trust, communication, and move past fears through the blended wisdom of Thai massage, yoga, and partner acrobatics. www.iyccprinceton.org 3pm Art All Night 2017 at the Historic Roebling Wire Works in Trenton. Experience 24 straight hours of creativity, community, and inspiration (through 3 p.m. on Sunday, June 18). www.aantrenton.org

thurSday, June 29 6 – 10pm Night Market at Spruce Hill in downtown

7pm Trenton Thunder baseball vs. Richmond at Arm & Hammer Park in Trenton. trentonthunder.com

Saturday, July 1 2 – 4pm Start of the Summer Music Series on Palmer Square Green. Free to attend. Guests should bring their own lawn chairs and picnic blankets (every Saturday in July and August). www.palmersquare.com

Monday, July 3 WedneSday, June 21 6 – 9pm Summer Solstice Jazz and Wine. Rutgers Gardens partners with The New Brunswick Jazz

3pm Celebrate independence with the Historical Society of Princeton. Learn where and why many of our nation’s founding fathers spent time in Princeton on this

educational tour (guests should meet at Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street). www.princetonhistory.org

tueSday, July 4 NooN July 4th Jubilee at Morven Museum & Garden. Each year, in honor of Independence Day, Morven hosts a free event to celebrate our American heritage at the home-turned museum of Richard Stockton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. www. morven.org

thurSday, July 6 7:30pm James Taylor & His All-Star Band perform with Bonnie Raitt at the Prudential Center in Newark. www. prucenter.com

Saturday, July 8 10am – 5pm Blueberry Bash at Terhune Orchards. Pick sweet summer berries from the two-acre blueberry patch, listen to live country music, and snack on blueberry cobbler (also on Sunday, July 9). www. terhuneorchards.com

4pm Princeton Tour Company’s Shameless NameDropping Tour. These tours begin at 116 Nassau Street inside the Princeton University Store (occurs every Saturday and Sunday through October). www. princetontourcompany.com

Saturday, July 15 8pm Grammy Award-winner Boz Scaggs performs at the State Theatre of New Jersey. Scaggs blurs the line between rock, soul, country, jazz, and blues to create a truly unique sound. www.statetheatrenj.org

Friday, July 21 7:30pm Musical group Phish performs an unprecedented 13-night run at New York City’s Madison Square Garden as part of their tour, The Baker’s Dozen. www.thegarden.com

spring 2017 prinCETOn MAgAZinE

| 81


You don’t have to be born smart to enjoy the

serene living at

Copperwood in Princeton

• SLEEK AND STYLISH ONE AND TWO-BEDROOM APARTMENTS • MODERN FLOOR PLANS • STATE-OF-THE-ART FINISHES Free amenities include 20 acres of preserved woods, walking & biking trails, fitness center, business center, recreational room, cafe, bike storage, outdoor grilling plus assigned single level parking in a heated garage. Relax by the fountain, or take a stroll through the lush landscape and meet your neighbors at our tenant functions.

609.924.0333 www.copperwoodprinceton.com 300 Bunn Drive | Princeton, NJ 08540 A Project by J. Robert Hillier, FAIA

prince mag 20170504.indd 1

Are you both ready for her big day?

5/4/2017 2:40:41 PM

Princeton Center for Plastic Surgery & Medispa

Discover the Many Facets of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Look Your Best For That Special Day Breast Augmentation Breast Lifts Tummy Tucks Mommy Makeover Liposuction

Facelifts Necklifts Browlifts Eyelid Lifts CoolSculpting®

Botox® Juvéderm® Juvéderm Voluma® Restylane® Silk Chemical Peels

Mention this ad and receive a Complimentary CoolSculpting Consultation and Skin Care Assessment

THOMAS A. LEACH, M.D. “Top Doctor for the NY Metro Area” Since 2005 by Castle Connolly, Ltd. Serving the Princeton Area Since 1992

Call Today 609-921-7161• 932 State Rd, Princeton, NJ 08540 Visit www.princetonsurgery.com 82 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017


Celebrating 20 Years! Homemade Bread Handmade Mozzarella Gourmet Sandwiches Prepared Foods Catering

PT. BEACH•JOELEONES.COM•SEA GIRT

Oceanfront Hotel & Restaurant

Spectacular Ocean Views • Deluxe Rooms with Whirlpool Baths & Fireplaces Outdoor Heated Pool • Oceanfront Dining – Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Lounge ~Wedding Receptions, Banquets & Conferences~

1507 Ocean Avenue, Spring Lake, New Jersey | 732-449-7700 | www.breakershotel.com BH_H_PrincetonMag_2_14.indd 1

2/13/14 2:50 PM SPRING 2017 PRINCETON MAGAZINE

| 83


SPRING DINING Still Field to Table 3 Decades Later

You’ve taken her from 1st grade to 12th You’ve taken her from 1st grade to 12th (609) 921-8041

We now serve gluten-free pizza and pasta! 339 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ 08540

Plant local, eat global.

500 Peppers - 185 tomatoes - 65 Eggplants Monday 11:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Tuesday - Friday 11:30 a.m. - 10:30 p.m. Saturday 4 p.m. - 10:30 p.m. • Sunday 4 p.m. - 9 p.m.

You’vetaken takenher her from from 1st You’ve 1st grade gradetoto12th 12th

74 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 609-688-0188 www.terramomobread.com

You’ve taken her from 1st grade to 12th You’ve taken her from 1st grade toto 12th You’ve taken her from 1st grade toto12th You’ve taken her from 1st grade 12th You’ve taken her from 1st grade 12th

Live Plants - Seeds - Fresh Chiles We ship nationwide. Visit the greenhouses! April 15 - May 31, 2017.

ChilePlants.com 199 Kingwood Locktown Road, Stockton, NJ (908) 996-4646

LetCelebrate us handle graduation that the special Graduationparty Day with friends and family and let Olives’ Celebrate Graduation full-service,that off special premise catering Day team with friends and family and let Olives’ serve youhandle deliciousthe food.graduation Olives Catering Let us party full-service, off premise catering team will also provide warming dishes, tables, serve delicious food. Olivesitems Catering Celebrate that Graduation Day with friends Let usyou handle the graduation party silverware, andspecial many other upon Let us handle the graduation party family and letwarming Olives’ full-service, off premise willand also provide dishes, tables, Let usOur handle the graduation request. professional servers on party staff catering team serve you delicious food. Olives silverware, andspecial many other items upon that Graduation Day with friends Celebrate that special Graduation Day with friends LetCelebrate us handle the graduation party Let us handle the graduation party areCatering also available to help withdishes, serving, will also provide warming tables, Celebrate that special Graduation Day withstaff friends and family and let Olives’ full-service, off premise request. Our professional servers on and family letclean-up Olives’ full-service, off premise Let usand handle the other graduation party bartending and duties. Put Olives silverware, and many items upon request. and family and let Olives’ full-service, off premise catering team serve you delicious food. Olives Celebrate that special Graduation Day with friends and family and are also available to help with serving, Celebrate that special Graduation Day with friends catering team serve you delicious food. Olives Catering will also provide warming dishes, tables, catering team serve you delicious food. Olives Our professional servers on staff are also available let Olives’ full-service, off premise catering team serve Catering to work and then back, relax Celebrate that special Graduation Daysit with friends Celebrate that special Graduation Day and family and letclean-up Olives’ full-service, off Olives premise you delicious bartending and duties. Put silverware, and many other items upon request. Catering will also provide warming dishes, tables, tables, and family and let Olives’ full-service, off premise Catering will also provide warming dishes, tables, food. Olives Catering will also provide warming dishes, Letwith us handle the graduation party to help with serving, bartending and clean-up duties. and enjoy the day. catering team serve you delicious food. Olives friends and family and let Olives’ catering team serve you delicious food. Olives Our professional servers on staff are also available Catering toand work and then sit back, relax silverware, andmany many other items upon request. silverware, and many other items upon request. Our professional silverware, other items upon request. Put Olives to work and then sit back, relax Catering willCatering alsoalso provide warming dishes, tables, Catering will provide warming dishes, tables, toOur help with serving, bartending and clean-up duties. full-service, off premise catering team professional serverstoonhelp staff are also available servers on staff are also available with serving, bartending and enjoy the day. silverware, andmany many otherand items upon request. Our professional servers on staff are also available and enjoy the day. silverware, and other items upon request. Put Olives Catering to work then sitwork back, relax toyou help with serving, bartending duties. and clean-up duties. Put Olives Catering to and then sit back, Celebrate that special Day Our professional servers on staffGraduation areand alsoclean-up available serve delicious food. Olives Catering servers on staff are alsosit available andprofessional enjoy the day. toOur help with serving, bartending and clean-up duties. Put Olives to workand and then back, relax relax and enjoy the day. to help withCatering serving, bartending clean-up duties. with friends and family and let Olives’ to help with serving, bartending and clean-up will also provide warming dishes, tables, Put enjoy Olives Catering and then sit then back, relax Put Olives Catering towork work and sitduties. back, relax and the day.to Delivery or enjoy pick-up available. Please call to upon inquire. Put Olives Catering to work other and then sit back, relax and the day. full-service, off premise catering team silverware, and many items and enjoy the day. 609.921.1569 and enjoy the day.

1906 Princeton Ave, Lawrence Township, NJ 08648 609-396-9868 www.enzoscucina.com Closed Monday. Will open for Private parties.

The neighborhood gem.

You’ve taken her from 1st grade to 12th

Let us handle the graduation party

Herb/Flower Garden Dining Available.

Visit one53nj.com to view our ever-changing seasonal menu & our most current specials.

Rocky Hill, NJ (609) 921-0153

one53nj.com

Always Fresh Always Delicious

We take the time so you don’t have to.

830 State Rd. • Princeton, NJ (609) 924-6881

lucystogo.com

Anton’s At the swAn

Locally Inspired Cuisine, Impeccable Service in a Sophisticated Romantic Setting

609.921.1569 serve you delicious food. Olives Catering 609.921.1569 on staff

request. Our professional 2222Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 servers Witherspoon Street, 08542 22 Witherspoon Street,Princeton, Princeton, NJNJ 08542

609.921.1569 will also provide tables, are available warming to help dishes, with serving, 609.921.1569 609.921.1569 www.olivesprinceton.com www.olivesprinceton.com 22www.olivesprinceton.com Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 22 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 silverware, and andclean-up many other upon bartending duties.items Put Olives www.olivesprinceton.com www.olivesprinceton.com private parties • office functions • barbeques • graduations • special occasions www.olivesprinceton.com 609.921.1569 private parties • office functions • barbeques • graduations • special occasions 22 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

request. Our professional onrelax staff 609.921.1569 Catering to work and thenservers sit back,

22 Witherspoon NJ 08542 private Street, parties Princeton, • office functions • barbeques • graduations • special occasions 22 Witherspoon NJ 08542 private Street, parties Princeton, • office functions • barbeques • graduations • special occasions

are• office also functions available to help• graduations with serving, www.olivesprinceton.com private parties • barbeques • special occasions and enjoy the day.

www.olivesprinceton.com bartending and •clean-up Put •Olives private parties • office functions barbeques duties. • graduations special occasions

private parties • office functions • barbeques • graduations • special occasions

Catering to work•and then sit back, relax• special occasions private parties • office functions barbeques • graduations 84 |

and enjoy the day.

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

177 Franklin Corner Road Lawrence Township 609-896-1848

43 South Main St LaMbertviLLe, nJ 08530 (609) 397-1960


New Jersey Realtors® We’ve shown our true colors for 100 years. New Jersey Realtors® is comprised of 48,000 members who’ve pledged to serve their clients with knowledge, experience, and responsibility. It’s this higher standard that separates a Realtor® from any other real estate agent.

njrealtor.com/truecolors


A WELL-DESIGNED LIFE Alpargatas hat by Lola hats; $275 barneys.com Sunday Supply Co. sands beach umbrella; $249 sundaysupply.com Bamboo wine table; $22 uncommongoods.com Acne Pascal apricot sunglasses; $370 acnestudios.com Jade Tribe square basket with mint fringe and pastel tassel; $165 jadetribe.myshopify.com Jack Rogers Georgica jelly mint sandal; $45 belk.com Serena and Lily Palisades rattan chair; $228 serenaandlily.com Sunny Life beach paddles; $51 swimoutlet.com

PRODUCT SELECTION BY LYNN ADAMS SMITH

Orla Kiely beach towel; $78 amara.com

86 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017


plan your spring or summer sneak-away Located directly on the bay and just steps from the beach, The Reeds at Shelter Haven is the most desirable seaside vacation resort at the southern New Jersey shore. Luxurious Accommodations

|

Bayfront Dining & Cocktail Lounge

Wedding, Celebration and Meeting Spaces dock & dine

beach service

|

Resort Amenities daily yoga | bay activities

|

|

Stone Harbor Golf Club privileges

S TO N E H A R B O R ’ S O N LY Y E A R - R O U N D, L U X U R Y B O U T I Q U E H OT E L 9601 Third Avenue

|

Stone Harbor

|

609.368.0100

|

reedsatshelterhaven.com


A WELL-DESIGNED LIFE Alice Cicolini 9-karat gold multi-stone earrings; $4,350 net-a-porter.com Canopy Designs small Sara glass chandelier; $1,360 shopcandelabra.com Double Nicaraguan hammock; price upon request buyhammocksonline.com Jonathan Adler zoology parrots pillow; $325 neimanmarcus.com Pascale Monvoisin Bowie 9-karat rose gold, turquoise, and resin ring; $960 net-a-porter.com Alexander Birman Clarita bow-embellished gingham cotton canvas sandals; $495 net-a-porter.com Charpoy jute bench; $1,800 abchome.com Jerome Dreyfuss popeye mini metallic leather bucket bag; $445 net-a-porter.com India antique wood shelf; $1,695 abchome.com

PRODUCT SELECTION BY LYNN ADAMS SMITH

John Robshaw Bergamot pillow; $145 johnrobshaw.com

88 |

PRINCETON MAGAZINE SPRING 2017


For For Sale Sale ~ ~ Two Two Homes Homes Walking Walking Distance Distance To To Downtown Downtown Princeton Princeton

70 Lafayette Road New Construction

75 Cleveland Lane

70 Lafayette Road 70 Lafayette Road 70 Lafayette Road WWW.GRANTHOMESUSA.COM

Historical Restoration Circa 1912

New New Construction New Construction Construction 70 Lafayette Road

973-543-2021

New Construction

75 Cleveland Lane

Historical Restoration Circa 1912

75 75 Cleveland Lane Lane 75 Cleveland Cleveland Lane For Sale ~ Two Homes Historical Restoration Circa Historical Restoration Circa 1912 Historical Restoration Circa 1912 1912 973-543-2021 973-543-2021

Walking Distance To Downtown Princeton

WWW.GRANTHOMESUSA.COM WWW.GRANTHOMESUSA.COM

Princeton Magazine, Spring 2017  

Princeton Magazine, Spring 2017

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you