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Z A N N E T H E

A R T

H O C H B E R G O F

O U R

T I M E


zanne hochberg THE

ART

OF

OUR

TIME

SEPTEMBER 9 – NOVEMBER 6, 2011


ennaz grebhcoh EMIT

RUO

FO

TRA

EHT

1102 ,6 REBMEVON – 9 REBMETPES


Above: Untitled, 1991, mixed media on canvas, 70 x 60 inches Cover: Untitled, 1987 (detail, Figure13) Preceding Title Page: Untitled, 1981, mixed media on canvas, 70 x 60 inches


zanne hochberg T H E

A R T

O F

O U R

T I M E

Introduction by Howard Taylor Essays by Jim Edwards and Bill Marvel Photography by Laurie Smith

SAN ANGELO MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS SAN ANGELO, TEXAS

SEPTEMBER 9 – NOVEMBER 6, 2011 Curated by Howard Taylor Exhibition Installation by John Mattson and Karen Zimmerly


I N T R O D U C T I O N b y H O W A R D TAY L O R ,

DIRECTOR SAN ANGELO MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS

Z A N N E

H O C H B E R G

The Art of Our Time The brilliant body of work created by the artist Zanne Hochberg fits comfortably into the cutting edge post World War II abstract expressionist movement. Her work stood out from the modernist or advanced artists of Texas, the place where she lived for over three decades. Although she created images that were out of sync with the dominant aesthetic conventions of this region, she was widely collected by individuals and several of the leading museums in Texas including the Dallas Museum of Art, the Blanton Museum of Art of the University of Texas and the Austin Museum of Art.

Abstract Expressionism had its scornful critics and powerful proponents. Based upon the international art market and abstract expressionism’s influence on design and popular culture and its presence in museum collections throughout the world, it is clearly an approach to art that has prevailed. Its earliest practitioners and the vast number who followed in their footsteps are enjoying mar1.

ketplace resurgence and many younger artists are picking up on its core concepts.

In an article titled “Metamorphosis of the Stripe,” written by Judith Higgins and published in Art News in November of 1985, she quotes the noted artist Sean Scully. “Abstraction’s the art of our age,” Scully says, “It’s a breaking down of certain structures, an opening up. It allows you to think without making oppressively specific references, so that the viewer is free to identify with the work. Abstract art has the possibility of being incredibly generous, really out there for everybody. It’s a nondenominational religious art. I think it’s the spiritual art of our time.”


The gestural brush stroke which is laid down with immediacy and without alteration along with large color stained passages are a characteristic of many of the Abstract Expressionist artists and is seen throughout Hochberg’s work. It gives the sense of an undisguised view of the artist in the process of creating. The large-scale of the majority of her works serves to envelop and engage the viewer, and reinforces the sense of energy and immediacy. Although many artists created in this manner, no two are alike, and, like handwriting, such paintings give deeper clues to the nature of the individual.

One of the most recognized of the original Abstract Expressionists is Willem de Kooning who defied the idea of total abstraction when 2.

he created a series of somewhat frightening paintings of women. Zanne Hochberg in a number of her works also introduced the figure and images of women (Figure 2) though one might observe they are more gentle and engaging than those of de Kooning.

Hochberg’s late portraits are not an anomaly. They exude the same frenetic energy though now more focused and with a powerful emotional intensity. They bring to mind Fayum mummy portraits from Roman Egypt of the first to third centuries A.D. Those ancient painted faces looked out from time with humor and pathos and depicted real people as their loved ones remembered them. The Hochberg portraits are deeply moving in a similar way.

The rebellious and convention breaking nature of Abstract Expressionism paralleled a period when civil rights, the rights of women and defiance of societal norms came to the forefront. Hochberg was very much a woman of her time who established a strong presence in the art world at a time when it was not common for women to do so. She was not an innovator, but she employed the Abstract Expressionism vocabulary to create a compelling, beautiful and important body of work. The San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts is pleased to present a retrospective exhibition and catalogue of the career of this vital artist.

Figure 1. Self Portrait, 1996, mixed media on canvas, 12 x 12 inches Figure 2. Untitled, 1988, mixed media on canvas, 14 x 14 inches


3.

Figure 3. London Bridge,1979, mixed media on canvas, 59 x 71 inches. Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs.Yanis Livathinos.


J I M E D WA R D S ,

Z A N N E

A R T H I S T O R I A N A N D C U R AT O R

H O C H B E R G

A Texas Modernist Zanne Hochberg, born in Rochester, New York in 1931, was part of an important generation of artists that participated in, and contributed to, the geographic expansion of Modernism outside of New York and the two coasts. Artists born between the great world wars, matured in the 1960’s and 70’s, and migrated from New York to smaller cities in the American West represent one of the more interesting aspects of the history of modern art in American. These artists witnessed significant changes in the American art scene, especially during the first wave of excitement that infused the New York art world during the great era of Abstract Expressionism from the late 1940’s through the 1950’s. As contemporary art in New York was burgeoning, an expansion of advanced art was occurring in American cities away from the east and west coasts. Hochberg was encouraged from childhood to pursue her passions in art, dance and music and, as an adult, she became a painter who joined other artists of her time in advancing modernist art in the American West.

Hochberg began her formal art education at the University of Florida in 1949, partially under the tutelage of Carl Holty who introduced her to his extensive knowledge of European Modernism. He was one of the only American artists to be selected for membership in the Abstract-Creation Group (Paris 1930’s) where he befriended leading European abstractionists and later transferred these influences through his teaching of young American artists like Hochberg.

In 1953, after completing her Bachelor of Arts degree at the University of Florida, Hochberg moved to New York City. To live in New York during the heady time of Abstract Expressionism was exciting for young working artists like Hochberg, even if exhibition opportunities for their own work were limited. This was a period of creative gestation, a time when personal aesthetics were being formed and the rigors of mastering the craft of painting were being put to the test. By the time Hochberg migrated to Dallas, Texas in the late 1950’s, the early influence of Holty, the impact of east coast modern art, and her commitment to abstract painting were well-established.

By the 1970’s, Hochberg was creating highly individualized abstract paintings. She was closest in her working methods to Helen Frankenthaler, who used thinned out paint to soak and stain the canvas, creating abstraction


with a particular lyrical quality. Frankenthaler’s early relationship with the critic Clement Greenberg and her marriage to the first generation Abstract Expressionist painter, Robert Motherwell, provided intellectual support and grounding for her unique, spontaneous approach to color and gesture. I believe that the lyrically evocative quality found in Frankenthaler’s paintings were more than a simple formal attraction for Hochberg. Like Frankenthaler, Hochberg intuitively believed in the over-arching idea that abstract painting can so please the eye, that its arrangement of color and form defines a sense of beauty. In an interview with Deborah Solomon for the New York Times Magazine, Frankenthaler stated, “What concerns me when I work is not whether the picture is a landscape, or whether it is pastoral, or whether someone sees a landscape in it. What concerns me is – did I make a beautiful picture?” Similarly, in an interview associated with a gallery exhibit, Hochberg commented, “I use paint, brushes and canvas to weld together forms in paint so that they exist as beautiful paint and nothing else.” Perhaps this idea was the unconscious driving force for Hochberg’s art. Recognizing the parallels between Hochberg and Frankenthaler, Dana Friis-Hansen, former Director of the Austin Museum of Art juxtaposed works by the two artists in the 2010 museum exhibition, Collection Selections.

In my own introduction to Hochberg’s paintings, I was struck by the fact that each composition seemed to stand on its own. Each work certainly relates to one another; yet, when viewing a group of her large-scale abstractions, one becomes attuned to their differences in composition and color and their singular disposition. Hochberg seems not to have consciously worked on a series of images until her late small-scale portraits of family members. The singular nature of her abstractions allowed her to freely explore gesture and color, whose movement and rhythm are highly sensual in feeling.

Hochberg often provides an implied grid in her paintings – boxy squares that are lightly sketched in and then worked against or into the surrounding brush strokes. This is particularly true of two large-scale abstract paintings made in 1983 and 1985. The canvas, Untitled, 1983 (Figure 4) is the more sparsely painted of the two compositions. The splashy colors are not so much held in check by the lightly sketched in grid, but tend to hover within the space, surrounded by pencil thin lines streaking out across the picture plane to the very edge of the canvas. This picture is the most Frankenthaler-like composition, and corresponds to what Frankenthaler once addressed about her work when she said that the bare, unpainted portions of her paintings were left so her canvas could “breathe.” Hochberg’s graffiti-like canvas titled, Jazz City, 1985 (Figure 5) is saturated with multi-colored scribbles and drips, and seemingly defies the implied box grid beneath all the gestural paint handling. The dance of marks across the surface of this canvas is almost Cy Twombly-like. Similar marks appear in darker, bolder tones in Hochberg’s work, Untitled, 1975 (Figure 6). In speaking of her work, Hochberg once stated, “I deal with change in my work by creating balance and order on a random surface – initiate gestural geometric and abstract forms and work them into an order.” Hochberg seems to achieve this spontaneously wrought order as a result of quickly executed marks fighting it out with the boundary of the grid and the rectangular shape of the canvas.


4.

Figure 4. Untitled, 1983, mixed media on canvas, 40 x 50 inches


5.

Figure 5. Jazz City, 1985, mixed media on canvas, 60 x 70 inches


Rather than a measured and planned approach to painting, Hochberg favored spontaneity. Her strongest images express a sense of urgency, relying on the quickly painted mark. Hochberg’s picture Paris Gates, 1985 (Figure 9) is remarkable for its sense of swift movement. A streaking black cloud-like form seems pushed to the center of the composition by a smaller blue square of paint trailing behind. In terms of execution, Paris Gates is a “fast” picture, perhaps matched in the speed of its brush marks by some of the ink drawings by Philip Renteria and the paintings and graphics by Dick Wray. Untitled, 1985 (Figure 15) is a similar “fast” work. Hochberg’s large abstractions are most successful when she allows the paint to drip, smear and splatter across the canvas. It is at these moments that we sense the urgency of her first mark, then the accumulating marks which followed, adding up to palimpsest traces – a working method, not unlike that made famous by the previously mentioned Cy Twombly.

Up to the period of her late portraits of family members, we think of Hochberg as primarily an abstract painter. However, throughout her career she painted many mixed-media figurative works on paper and large-scale figurative compositions on canvas. These works were mostly of women, either casually posed in a seated position or in a standing dance movement (Figures 12, 13 and 27). The rhythm of the sketched-in-figures and the loose paint application relate these figurative compositions to what she accomplished in abstraction. The poses and dress of her models are elegant, as are the movements of the paint application. Hochberg painted her figurative and abstract compositions simultaneously with some of her best figurative works completed during the 1980’s and early 1990’s. She did not alter her approach in either case – the curly-cue swirl of hair surrounding the head of a figure or the dots applied to a model’s dress are rendered as similar shapes in her abstractions.

Hochberg’s late series of small-scale portraits of family members painted during the last decade of her life, 19902001, represent the culmination of her work as an artist (Figures 22-26, 31-33 and 37-44). Regardless of their smaller scale, these evocative portraits are as important as any of her previous abstract and figurative paintings. Untitled, 2000 etching and acrylic on paper 6-1/2 x 9 inches

The portrait paintings were all elegantly framed by the artist and, at times,express a haunting quality. Hochberg’s works are often expressive in a mode we equate with the portraits of Chaim Soutine, and evoke spiritual pathos we associate with Georges Rouault.

In reading Ariel Evan’s essay, Zanne Hochberg: Rediscovering a Texas Modernist, I was struck by the reproduction of an etching on which Hochberg added red and black acrylic paint, a la Frankenthaler. What immediately impressed me about this work was how similar it was in expressive color and form to a painting by Lee Deffebach. Although they did not know each other, Deffebach (1928-2005) and Hochberg (1931-2001) were contemporaries. Both women were accomplished artists with good reputations in their home states – Deffebach in Utah and Hochberg in Texas – and each spent time in New York at the height of the Abstract Expressionist movement. However, in other ways they were distinctly different.


Deffebach was a tall, quiet woman, who spent her working career in Salt Lake City and summers isolated in a small west Nevada mining town. In contrast, Hochberg was a small urbane woman who dressed with the flair of a dancer and had a full family life as a wife and mother. Despite similarities and differences, as practitioners of modernism, both Deffebach and Hochberg seemed out of place in their adopted locales.

While the majority of Hochberg’s career was spent in Texas, and as much as she was admired by fellow artists and praised by regional critics, her approach to abstraction seemed not to fit with what had emerged in contemporary art in Dallas. Her home town seemed almost antagonistic to the very idea of gestural abstraction, favoring instead various forms of abstraction more attuned to hard edge, geometric and cubist inspired forms. Hochberg’s paintings seemed more strongly related to east coast post-painterly abstraction and European Tachism. However, working outside the Texas mainstream likely provided freedom that enhanced Hochberg’s opportunity for creative expression. The late Ted Pillsbury, former museum director of The Kimball and Meadows Museums, commented about Hochberg’s residence in Dallas, “There was no canon here. Here’s a place without culture, without history. She could be entirely individual. She could be herself.”

Hochberg was an American female artist who advanced modernism in the American West. Some, more famously like Georgia O’Keeffe and Agnes Pelton, tied their abstracted imagery to the desert landscapes where they lived. It is difficult to imagine an O’Keeffe picture inspired anywhere other than the landscape of northern New Mexico. The skies of New Mexico and the Mojave Desert of Southern California certainly influenced Pelton’s paintings. Hochberg, however, brought her world of art with her to Texas. This was not a reaction against what else was happening in contemporary art in Texas. Rather, Hochberg’s art reflected her life of travel in Europe, South America, Mexico and throughout the United States, her love of America and European painting and primitive works of art, and most importantly, the driving need to express herself in her own way beyond artistic influences. Speculating about the driving forces behind Hochberg’s work, Ted Pillsbury commented, “I think she was the kind of person who never wanted to be pinned down to a school or a particular style… Her art was a means of expressing something about herself, her feelings, her life and the world, and beauty and truth; and, she produced a very solid body of work. I think, arguably, over time, some of her work is going to be recognized as being very important, influential and progressive.”

Personally, I find Zanne Hochberg’s art to be uniquely diverse and expressive. In a self-portrait, circa 1990 (Figure 44), a mixed media on canvas, she dons one of her famous hats; in this case, one that appears to be a beret. Her head is cocked, an eyebrow raised, and she looks out towards us with a quizzical glance. We look back at her portrait and, without having ever met her, know that she is an intense, intelligent and insightful woman. She was also an accomplished painter who, through her hard work and study of art, made a place for herself in the history of Texas art.


6. Figure 6. Untitled, 1975, mixed media on canvas, 50 x 40 inches


7.

Figure 7. Untitled, 1986, mixed media on canvas, 15 -1/2 x 15 -1/2 inches. Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, gift of the Zanne L.R. Hochberg Family Trust, 2007


8.

Figure 8. Untitled, 1989, mixed media on canvas, 14 x 14 inches Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, gift of the Zanne L.R. Hochberg Family Trust, 2007


9.

Figure 9. Paris Gates, 1985, mixed media on canvas, 60 x 70 inches


Figure 10. Untitled, 1986, mixed media on canvas, 40 x 50 inches


12.

Figure 11. Untitled, 1966, oil on canvas, 50 x 40 inches Figure 12. Untitled, 1987, mixed media on canvas, 60 x 70 inches


13.

Figure 13. Untitled, 1987, mixed media on canvas, 60 x 70 inches


14.

Figure 14. Untitled, 1970, mixed media on canvas, 70 x 64 inches


Figure 15. Untitled, 1985, mixed media on canvas, 60 x 70 inches


16.

Figure 16. Untitled, circa 1972, mixed media on canvas, 60 x 70 inches


17.

Figure 17. Untitled, 1965, oil on canvas, 50 x 40 inches


18.

Figure 18. Untitled, 1984, mixed media on canvas, 40 x 50 inches


19.

Figure 19. L’dor V’dor, 2001, mixed media on canvas, 50 x 40 inches


BILL MARVEL,

DALLAS WRITER AND FORMER ART CRITIC

P A I N T I N G S

W I T H

S O U L

Remembering Zanne I don’t remember who first told me about Zanne Hochberg. The Dallas Times Herald had just hired me to cover the visual arts and I was making an effort to see as many galleries and artists as possible. Somewhere along the way I was told there was a woman in Highlalnd Park whose paintings were influenced by the New York school of Abstract Expressionism. She had been taught at the University of Florida by Carl Holty who had in turn been taught by Hans Hofmann. Hofmann had been an important member of the New York school and also wielded considerable influence among the so-called color-field painters, whose saturated canvasses had dominated museum walls in the early 1960s.

By 1970 none of this seemed very promising. Abstract Expressionism and color-field painting had run their course. Highland Park was a quiet, tree-shaded residential neighborhood, hardly a hotbed of the arts. Locally, a kind of Texas funk was the reigning style, a slash-and-burn takedown of stereotypical Texan imagery – cowboys, cactus & boots – that owed a little to pop-art irreverence and the painterly distortions of German expressionism, and a lot to country music.

What of interest could be going on in Highland Park?

Zanne met me at the door, a small intense woman with dark lively eyes. She offered me a glass of iced tea then led me out back to the garage, which at that time was serving as her studio. Sometimes a first look at a painting, or a group of paintings, will catch you and hold you. It’s not immediately apparent what it is about them, but you can’t turn away. An energy is at work, pulling your eyes over the canvas from event to event, from shape to shape. As your eye moves, the painting is as much felt as seen.


Zanne told me a little about her approach. She would often turn a painting on its side or upside down. If it wasn’t working on its top or side, she said, it wasn’t working at all. While she painted she would step back to study her work – sometimes way back, even opening the garage door to step out into the alley for a fresh perspective.

As she painted Zanne listened to music, most often jazz. She had studied piano at the Eastman School in her native Rochester, New York, and taken ballet lessons with a former ballerina from the Metropolitan Ballet Company. Looking, listening, painting, moving were a single activity for Zanne, a seamless way to experience the world.

Larry and Zanne had filled their house with beautiful objects and with prints, paintings, and sculpture by other artists. Wherever the eye landed it met something of interest. Zanne’s tastes were broad and generous. Most of the works were by local artists, all of them working in styles quite different from her own.

This generosity and openness extended to the world at large. Her great booming laugh would explode whenever something amused her. She savored life with the same intensity she brought to her painting. Her restless nature would never permit her to accept the status quo or the easy way out, and in Larry she had found the perfect partner. Since early in their marriage, Zanne and Larry had been actively involved in the struggle for civil rights. They were active supporters of the arts, regulars at the Dallas Symphony and at local theaters.

And so each new group of paintings that came from her studio was full of fresh surprises. From the generations of painters that went before, especially the Abstract Expressionists, Zanne had learned a vocabulary that permitted her to tap her deepest resources. Each stroke was considered and reconsidered, until it rang with the echo of a truth she recognized. Each stroke came heartfelt and hard won.


20.

Figure 20. CafĂŠ, 1987, mixed media on canvas, 40 x 50 inches Figure 21. Michael Stuart Rosenthal, 1996, mixed media on canvas, 12 x 12 inches


But the great surprise came after a trip she and Larry made to Europe. She constantly sketched what she saw around her, and among the sketches she brought back were several made – literally – on paper napkins, of people that had caught her eye lounging in sidewalk cafes (Figure 20).

She had long since mastered her art. She had taken abstraction as far, I believe, as it can go and remain a human expression. Now she began using everything she had learned about painting and life to produce an extraordinary series of portraits.

Who are these faces that look out at us from jewel-like clouds of paint? The subjects are all family members – her children, her husband, a brother (Figure 21). But mostly women – her grandmother, mother, aunts, nieces, cousins. They are clearly women of an earlier era, strong, fashionable, but also somehow haunted. There is an Old-World air about them, and also something of the Upper New York State Jewish milieu in which Zanne grew up. Each is a monumental presence. One instantly feels that one knows them, or at least understands their pride, their sufferings and sorrows. 21. What can we say about these psychologically charged works? That, as always, Zanne painted with her whole being, with total commitment, fierce energy, deep thought, and with something I think we can only call love. Because they reach out, finally, to embrace the world, to look at it and not turn away, and to show us what she saw. They have “soul” in the way that only a living creation can have a soul.

All this time we were thinking Zanne was looking inside herself, and now we discover she is looking out – at us. Looking at us humans and our suffering and our struggle and our triumphs. And because Zanne has suffered, has struggled and has triumphed, she understands us from the inside out, as it were. You can read in her paintings what it means to be human.

No artist can have a larger subject.


22.

Figure 22. Esteen Hachenburg, circa 1998, mixed media on canvas, 12 x 12 inches


23.

24.

25.

26.

Figure 23. Michael Stuart Rosenthal, 2000, mixed media on canvas, 14 x 14 inches Figure 24. Untitled Portrait, circa 1998, mixed media on canvas, 12 x 12 inches Figure 25. Untitled Portrait, 2000, mixed media on canvas, 12 x 12 inches Figure 26. Archie Rosenthal, 1998, mixed media on canvas, 14 x 14 inches


27.

Figure 27. Wedding, 1987, mixed media on canvas, 54 x 68 inches


28.

Figure 28. Untitled, 1976, mixed media on canvas, 14 x 14 inches


29.

30.

31.

32.


33.

Figure 29. Untitled, circa 1990, mixed media on canvas, 20 x 16 inches Figure 30. Rabbi, 1959, oil on canvas, 24 x 18 inches Figure 31. Untitled Portrait, 1998, mixed media on canvas, 13 x 11 inches Figure 32. Claudia Hochberg, 1995, mixed media on canvas, 12 x 12 inches Figure 33. Untitled Portrait, circa 1998, mixed media on canvas, 14 x 14 inches


34.

Figure 34. Untitled, 1990, mixed media on canvas, 12 x 12 inches


35.

36.

Figure 35. Untitled, 1988, mixed media on canvas, 14 x 14 inches Figure 36. Untitled, circa 1989, mixed media on canvas, 12 x 12 inches


37.

38.

39.

Figure 37. Claudia Merle Hochberg, 1998, mixed media on canvas, 14 x 14 inches Figure 38. Jonathan Mark Hochberg, 1996, mixed media on canvas, 16 x 14 inches Figure 39. Pamela Hochberg Barrier, 1997, mixed media on canvas, 14 x 14 inches


40.

Figure 40. Lawrence Paul Hochberg, 1999, mixed media on canvas, 14 x 14 inches


42.

41.

Figure 41. Untitled Portrait, 1996, mixed media on canvas, 14 x 12 inches Figure 42. Claudia Merle Hochberg, 1998, mixed media on canvas, 12 x 12 inches Figure 43. Untitled Portrait, 1990, mixed media on canvas, 50 x 40 inches


ZANNE HOCHBERG

THE ART OF OUR TIME

Biography and Exhibition History

Museum Collections

Figure 44. Self Portrait circa 1990 mixed media on canvas 14 x 12 inches

2009

Austin Museum of Art, Austin, TX

2009

University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX

2007

Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX

2004

Winthrop University Museum, Rock Hill, SC

1988

Mulvane Art Museum, Washburn University, Topeka, KS

1980

Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, TX

Museum and University Exhibitions 2011

San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts, “Zanne Hochberg: The Art of Our Time,” Solo Exhibition, San Angelo, TX

Zanne Hochberg was born Zanne Lee Rosenthal on

2009-10 Austin Museum of Art, “Collection Selections,” Austin, TX

July 11, 1931 in Rochester, New York. As a child, she

2004

Winthrop University, “Seeking the Center,” Solo Exhibition, Rock Hill, SC

1989

Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University, Solo Exhibition, Dallas, TX

studied art at the Rochester Memorial Gallery, piano at the Eastman School, and took ballet lessons with a former ballerina from the Metropolitan Ballet Company. Her deepest love was for the visual arts which she pursued vigorously throughout her life. Zanne Hochberg earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in painting from the University of Florida in Gainsville in 1953. After spending several years working in interior design

1989

1988-89 National Museum of Women in the Arts, “Texas Women,” Washington, DC 1988

Mulvane Art Museum, Washburn University, Solo Exhibition, Topeka, KS

1988

Brookhaven College, “Working Papers,” Dallas, TX

and art related businesses in New York and Denver, she moved to Dallas in 1958 and continued her painting career. In 1974, Zanne Hochberg received a Master of Fine Arts from Southern Methodist University. She resided in Dallas as a working artist until her death in 2001.

Laguna Gloria Art Museum, “Texas Women,” Austin, TX

1981

El Centro College, Dallas, TX

1974

Pollack Galleries, Meadows School of the Arts, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX


1971

Sewall Gallery at Rice University, Southern Methodist University, Graduate Exhibit, Houston, TX

1967

Masur Museum of Art, Monroe, LA

1966

Butler Institute of American Art, Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture, Youngstown, OH

1979

500 Exhibition Gallery, Dallas, TX

1979

Clifford Gallery, Solo Exhibition, Dallas, TX

1978

Contemporary Gallery, Solo Exhibition, Dallas, TX

1973

Contemporary Gallery, Solo Exhibition, Dallas, TX

1966

Dallas Museum of Art, Annual Painting and Sculpture Exhibit, Dallas, TX

1972

Dallas Summer Arts Festival, Dallas, TX

1960

Dallas Museum of Art, Annual Painting and Sculpture Exhibit, Dallas, TX

1969

Contemporary Gallery, Solo Exhibition, Dallas, TX

1959

Dallas Museum of Art, Annual Painting and Sculpture Exhibit, Dallas, TX

1968

1955

Denver Museum of Fine Arts, Denver, CO

Oklahoma Art Center, Eight State Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture, Oklahoma City, OK

1967

Atelier Chapman Kelly, Dallas, TX

1967

Longview Art League, Ninth Annual Invitational Exhibition, Longview, TX

Gallery Exhibitions 2006

Flatbed Press, Solo Exhibition, Austin, TX

2005

IR Gallery, Solo Exhibition, Dallas, TX

1966

1995

State Thomas Gallery, Solo Exhibition, Dallas, TX

Juried Arts National Exhibition, Tyler, TX

1959

D.D. Feldman Exhibit, Dallas, TX

1955

Seventh Annual Metropolitan Exhibit, Denver, CO

1994

Collections Rare Gallery, Solo Exhibition, Dallas, TX

1994

Manchester Institute of Arts and Sciences, Manchester, NH

1993

Marin-Price Galleries, Solo Exhibition, Chevy Chase, MD

1992

Belles Artes, Group Exhibition, New York, NY

1991

Neuhoff Galleries, Solo Exhibition, Dallas, TX

1989

Galerie Gorpal, Dallas, TX

1983

Contemporary Gallery, Solo Exhibition, Dallas, TX

1982

Clifford Gallery, Solo Exhibition, Dallas, TX

1981

Weiner Gallery, Solo Exhibition, Topeka, KS

Selected Public Collections American Airlines, Dallas TX Cadillac Fairview, Dallas, TX Coldwell Banker, Dallas, TX Adolphus Tower, Dallas, TX Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX Murchison Oil and Gas Collection, Dallas, TX Ice House, San Francisco, CA


ZANNE HOCHBERG

THE ART OF OUR TIME

Catalogue Checklist

Title Page: Untitled, 1981 mixed media on canvas 70 x 60 inches Zanne Hochberg Family Trust

Frontispiece: Untitled, 1991 mixed media on canvas 70 x 60 inches Zanne Hochberg Family Trust

Figure 1. Self Portrait, 1996 mixed media on canvas 12 x 12 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 2. Untitled, 1988 mixed media on canvas 14 x 14 inches Zanne Hochberg Family Trust

Figure 3. London Bridge, 1979 mixed media on canvas 59 x 71 inches Dallas Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Yanis Livathinos

Figure 4. Untitled, 1983 mixed media on canvas 40 x 50 inches Zanne Hochberg Family Trust

Figure 5. Jazz City, 1985 mixed media on canvas 60 x 70 inches Pamela Barrier Collection

Figure 6. Untitled, 1975 mixed media on canvas 50 x 40 inches Pamela Barrier Collection

Figure 7. Untitled, 1986 mixed media on canvas 15 -1/2 x 15 -1/2 inches Blanton Museum of Art, Austin The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the Zanne L.R. Hochberg Family Trust, 2007

Figure 8. Untitled, 1989 mixed media on canvas 14 x 14 inches Blanton Museum of Art, Austin The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the Zanne L.R. Hochberg Family Trust, 2007

Figure 9. Paris Gates, 1985 mixed media on canvas 60 x 70 inches Pamela Barrier Collection

Figure 10. Untitled, 1986 mixed media on canvas 40 x 50 inches Zanne Hochberg Family Trust

Figure 11. Untitled, 1966 oil on canvas 50 x 40 inches Pamela Barrier Collection

Figure 12. Untitled, 1987 mixed media on canvas 60 x 70 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 13. and Front Cover (detail) Untitled, 1987 mixed media on canvas 60 x 70 inches Zanne Hochberg Family Trust

Figure 14. Untitled, 1970 mixed media on canvas 70 x 64 inches Zanne Hochberg Family Trust

Figure 15. Untitled, 1985 mixed media on canvas 60 x 70 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 16. Untitled, circa 1972 mixed media on canvas 60 x 70 inches Zanne Hochberg Family Trust

Figure 17. Untitled, 1965 oil on canvas 50 x 40 inches Zanne Hochberg Family Trust

Figure 18. Untitled, 1984 mixed media on canvas 40 x 50 inches Zanne Hochberg Family Trust

Figure 19. L’dor V’dor, 2001 mixed media on canvas 50 x 40 inches Zanne Hochberg Family Trust

Figure 20. Café, 1987 mixed media on canvas 40 x 50 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 21. Michael Stuart Rosenthal, 1996 mixed media on canvas 12 x 12 inches Jonathan Hochberg Collection


Figure 22. Esteen Hachenburg, circa 1998 mixed media on canvas 12 x 12 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 30. Rabbi, 1959 oil on canvas 24 x 18 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 38. Jonathan Mark Hochberg, 1996 mixed media on canvas 16 x 14 inches Jonathan Hochberg Collection

Figure 23. Michael Stuart Rosenthal, 2000 mixed media on canvas 14 x 14 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 31. Untitled Portrait, 1998 mixed media on canvas 13 x 11 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 39. Pamela Hochberg Barrier, 1997 mixed media on canvas 14 x 14 inches Pamela Barrier Collection

Figure 24. Untitled Portrait, circa 1998 mixed media on canvas 12 x 12 inches Pamela Barrier Collection

Figure 32. Claudia Hochberg, 1995 mixed media on canvas 12 x 12 inches Claudia Hochberg Collection

Figure 40. Lawrence Paul Hochberg, 1999 mixed media on canvas 14 x 14 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 25. Untitled Portrait, 2000 mixed media on canvas 12 x 12 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 33. Untitled Portrait, circa 1998 mixed media on canvas 14 x 14 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 41. Untitled Portrait, 1996 mixed media on canvas 14 x 12 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 26. Archie Rosenthal, 1998 mixed media on canvas 14 x 14 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 34. Untitled, 1990 mixed media on canvas 12 x 12 inches Pamela Barrier Collection

Figure 42. Claudia Merle Hochberg, 1998 mixed media on canvas 12 x 12 inches Claudia Merle Hochberg

Figure 27. Wedding, 1987 mixed media on canvas 54 x 68 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 35. Untitled, 1988 mixed media on canvas 14 x 14 inches Pamela Barrier Collection

Figure 43. Untitled Portrait, 1990 mixed media on canvas 50 x 40 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 28. Untitled, 1976 mixed media on canvas 14 x 14 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 36. Untitled, circa 1989 mixed media on canvas 12 x 12 inches Pamela Barrier Collection

Figure 44. Self Portrait, 1990 mixed media on canvas 14 x 12 inches Pamela Barrier Collection

Figure 29. Untitled, circa 1990 mixed media on canvas 20 x 16 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection

Figure 37. Claudia Merle Hochberg, 1998 mixed media on canvas 14 x 14 inches Claudia Hochberg Collection

Back Cover: Untitled Portrait, 1999 mixed media on canvas 14 x 12 inches Lawrence Hochberg Collection


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts is deeply grateful to Beverly and Ben Stribling and the Beverly and Ben Stribling Special Exhibition Trust of the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts, Randy Coleman,the San Angelo Cultural Affairs Council, Laurie Smith Photography, Bill Marvel and Olmsted-Kirk Paper Company for their generous support of the catalogue and exhibition. We are grateful to the Blanton Museum of Art and Curator of American Art and Director of Curatorial Affairs, Annette DiMeo Carlozzi, for lending two important works to this exhibition. Another important contribution is the historical research on Zanne Hochberg conducted by Ariel Evans as she was completing graduate work at the University of Texas at Austin. Zanne Hochberg’s daughter, Pamela Barrier, and her family were deeply supportive, ever helpful and truly delightful to work with.

LENDERS TO THE EXHIBITION Blanton Museum of Art, Austin • Claudia Hochberg Collection • Jonathan Hochberg Collection Lawrence Hochberg Collection • Pamela Barrier Collection • Zanne Hochberg Family Trust

ZANNE HOCHBERG

September 9 – November 6, 2011 San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts San Angelo, Texas 76903 An exhibition organized by Howard Taylor, Director, San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts.

THE ART OF OUR TIME All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or information storage or retrieval systems without permission in writing from the publisher. Catalogue Design: WinshipPhillips, www.winshipphillips.com

Copyright © 2011 San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts First edition of 1500 copies

ISBN: 978-0-615-52144-2 www.samfa.org


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts is deeply grateful to Beverly and Ben Stribling and the Beverly and Ben Stribling Special Exhibition Trust of the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts, Randy Coleman,the San Angelo Cultural Affairs Council, Laurie Smith Photography, Bill Marvel and Olmsted-Kirk Paper Company for their generous support of the catalogue and exhibition. We are grateful to the Blanton Museum of Art and Curator of American Art and Director of Curatorial Affairs, Annette DiMeo Carlozzi, for lending two important works to this exhibition. Another important contribution is the historical research on Zanne Hochberg conducted by Ariel Evans as she was completing graduate work at the University of Texas at Austin. Zanne Hochberg’s daughter, Pamela Barrier, and her family were deeply supportive, ever helpful and truly delightful to work with.

LENDERS TO THE EXHIBITION Blanton Museum of Art, Austin • Claudia Hochberg Collection • Jonathan Hochberg Collection Lawrence Hochberg Collection • Pamela Barrier Collection • Zanne Hochberg Family Trust

ZANNE HOCHBERG

September 9 – November 6, 2011 San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts San Angelo, Texas 76903 An exhibition organized by Howard Taylor, Director, San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts.

THE ART OF OUR TIME All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or information storage or retrieval systems without permission in writing from the publisher. Catalogue Design: WinshipPhillips, www.winshipphillips.com

Copyright © 2011 San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts First edition of 1500 copies

ISBN: 978-0-615-52144-2 www.samfa.org


Untitled Portrait, 1999, mixed media on canvas, 14 x 12 inches

San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts | One Love Street | San Angelo, Texas 76903 | Phone: 325-653-3333 | Fax: 325-658-6800 | Email: museum@samfa.org

The San Angelo Cultural Affairs Council has provided funding in support of this catalogue and exhibition.

San Angelo Museum of Fine Art  

Zanne Hochberg: The Art of Our Time – Exhibition Catalogue