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SAN ANGELO MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS PRESENTS THE NINETEENTH SAN ANGELO NATIONAL CERAMIC COMPETITION

APRIL 20 JUNE 24, 2012


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Museum gratefully acknowledges the sponsors and supporters of the San Angelo National Ceramic Competition. MAJOR SPONSORS San Angelo Museum Endowment for Ceramic Events and John and Darlene Williams

Trinity Ceramic Supply, Inc., Dallas, Texas

SPONSORS

San Angelo Cultural Affairs Council

Tile Heritage Foundation, Healdsburg, California

WITH SUBSTANTIAL SUPPORT AND PARTNERSHIP FROM

Angelo State University

The Old Chicken Farm Art Center

MEDIA The Museum also gratefully acknowledges the wonderful publicity we received through extensive coverage in local newspapers, television and radio. We and the community thank you! The Museum is supported by generous contributions from both individuals and businesses. The Museum receives general operating support from the Texas Commission on the Arts, a state agency. This project is partially supported by funds from the San Angelo Cultural Affairs Council, the City of San Angelo, the Texas Commission on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency. Photography: Karen Zimmerly, Exhibition Opening Catalogue Design: WinshipPhillips.com


PRESENTS

THE NINETEENTH SAN ANGELO NATIONAL CERAMIC COMPETITION

APRIL 20 - JUNE 24, 2012 SAN ANGELO MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS

ONE LOVE STREET

SAN ANGELO, TEXAS 76903


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INTRODUCTION – HOWARD TAYLOR, DIRECTOR

Howard Taylor THE NATIONAL CERAMIC COMPETITION has become an eagerly-anticipated and much-loved event for the city of San Angelo, even as it becomes more and more wellknown nationally and internationally. This year, well over 1,500 people attended the opening event with guests coming from all over the country. We are delighted with the overall press coverage the Competition received this year, particularly from our regional newspaper, the San Angelo StandardTimes, which gave the Competition seven days of front-page color coverage, with additional articles and supplements. We are also pleased this year to publish our first full-color exhibition catalog, to show off more fully the range and quality of the works in the show. As the San Angelo National Ceramic Competition’s reputation and popularity have grown, so has the Museum’s permanent collection, since the past 18 Ceramics Competitions have been the source for the acquisition of many new works into the collection. The San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts is proud of its continually 2

growing ceramic collection, and has been delighted to have it travel to more than a dozen museums over the years. Also, to our great delight, a number of people possessing important ceramic collections around the country have come forward and offered significant gifts, including entire collections, to the Museum. The 19th San Angelo National Ceramics Competition lived up to all expectations and from it the Museum was able to purchase twelve important new works to add to its collection. A significant number of works from the show were also acquired by private collectors. This year, we were honored to have as our jurors Garth Clark and Mark Del Vecchio of Santa Fe, New Mexico. These distinguished collectors and scholars have operated galleries in Los Angeles and New York, and are internationally recognized as experts in the field of contemporary ceramics. They have habitually made generous gifts to various museum collections and have made a substantial number of gifts to our Museum. From nearly 1,400 entries for the Competition, Garth and Mark selected 106 works by 87 artists from across the country and Canada. The exhibit includes a broad spectrum of work, ranging from the abstract and postmodern avant-garde to the traditional; from large, bold installation pieces to small, delicate vases. When our jurors arrived in San Angelo in person, they were faced with the difficult task of selecting the prizewinners. According to Clark and Del Vecchio,

the breadth and the quality of the exhibit were exceptional. They have also made recommendations for the future improvement of the show which will be considered carefully by the Museum. A part of the joy of having Garth and Mark in San Angelo was that, despite their stature and preeminence in the art world, they were wonderfully approachable and engaging with everyone they met. They shared endlessly and exhaustingly their knowledge and experience. Like our jurors, our invited artists this year also work as a team. Twin brothers Kelly and Kyle Phelps share a studio in Centerville, Ohio, where they work together to produce their collaborative art. The twins’ evocative artwork, dealing with the blue-collar working class, race relations and the everyday struggles of ordinary people, speaks to the American experience as well as to the greater human condition. We were grateful for the opportunity to exhibit the Phelps’ work, and grateful also for their talk at the symposium at Angelo State University and the day-long workshop they conducted at the Old Chicken Farm Art Center. This Competition would not be possible without the generous support and hard work of some special people and organizations. We would especially like to thank John and Darlene Williams, the major sponsors for the Competition, who have established the San Angelo Museum Endowment for Ceramic Events. We would also like to thank San Angelo Community Medical Center and the San Angelo Cultural Affairs Council for their generous support this year. As always, we cannot forget the vital contribution of our partners, Angelo State University and the Old Chicken Farm Art Center. Special thanks go to Esteban Apodaca, Professor of Art at ASU for his work in organizing the Friday morning workshop and also the Ceramic


Symposium. We are grateful to the amazing Roger Allen, owner of the Old Chicken Farm Art Center, for hosting the day-long Invited Artist workshop followed by a rollicking barbecue dinner and dance. He and his crew, as well as the Art Center as a whole, bring a unique dimension to the Competition festivities. I want to thank Karen Zimmerly, the Museum’s Collections Manager who coordinates all aspects of the Competition, for the wonderful job

present, Joe Taylor of the Tile Heritage Foundation has continued his support by offering a special prize for the best tile entry. The night before the opening, Museum patron Jud Gray hosted a special party for our jurors, invited artists, Competition artists from around the country and distinguished guests and supporters, welcoming all to San Angelo with a truly delightful party. Noted ceramicist and sculptor Susan Budge presented a workshop in the Angelo State

town area throughout the weekend. Artists Julie Raymond and Sue Rainey graciously provided their new Art in Uncommon Places Studio— which is located in a former manufacturing building near the Museum—for a tremendous party, which was underwritten by Museum patron and Board member Christopher Sugg. There was fabulous music by Kevin and the Krawlers from Austin and some of the best food in Texas prepared by RJ’s Barbeque of San Angelo. At the

As the San Angelo National Ceramic Competition’s reputation and popularity have grown, so has the Museum’s permanent collection, since the past 18 Ceramics Competitions have been the source for the acquisition of many new works into the collection. The San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts is proud of its continually growing collection and has been delighted to have it travel to more than a dozen museums over the years. she does, as well as other staff members, including John Mattson and Joel Quintella for their work in installing the show. Karen is retiring, but fortunately will be able to continue to assist the Museum with special projects. Her successor, Laura Huckaby, has a wonderful background, is a fast learner and played a major role in helping bring the exhibition together. The artists always make note of how well and how thoughtfully the installation is done. We are also indebted to local artist Joan Mertz, for her help in unpacking the artwork as it arrived, and all those who were involved in making the exhibit and related festivities a success. The week and weekend of the San Angelo National Ceramic Competition is so rich in activity, it is difficult to describe. I do want to take this opportunity to thank a few of the people in the ancillary events that occur around the opening. At the Chicken Farm the charismatic Randy Broadnax comes from Dallas each Competition and leads a multi-day workshop and ongoing raku firings, as well as preparing and serving food based on his Cajun heritage. Although never physically

University Ceramic Studios which are located in our Museum facility. Former director of the Texas Commission on the Arts (and artist) Rick Hernandez came to town to assist with a program we have for grade-school children, and also to bring his great spirit and energy to all of our proceedings throughout the weekend. Jim Bob Salazar organized the “Six Pack Show,” which consists of entries (that cannot exceed the size of a six pack) by artist members of the Texas Clay Arts Association. These works were exhibited in the Museum’s adjacent Coop Gallery, which is located in a block of former storefronts owned by the Museum. Nearly every work was sold. On the Friday night of the opening free buses took Museum visitors to several other galleries and destinations that featured special exhibits and openings. The Texas Mesquite Association worked with us and coordinated a major exhibit held at nearby Fort Concho National Historic Landmark. The exhibit featured more than 60 artists working in the medium of mesquite wood. Downtown San Angelo, Inc. coordinated activities and special events in the adjacent down-

Museum itself we had music by saxophone soloist Kevin Brown and a terrific trio called the Acoustixs. San Angelo Community Medical Center provided an endless supply of delicious food, prepared by their nationally award winning chef and graduate of the Culinary Institute of America, Henry Wiens. On Saturday evening, following the day-long workshop presented by the Phelps brothers, the evening concluded with a fabulous feast served by Kenny Blanek and dance music by the Old Hat Band. There were so many other events and hospitable gestures made by a multitude of people, that we simply cannot mention them all. It is very apparent that many who have ventured here in the past have returned again and again for this very special weekend. Our deepest appreciation goes to the artists who submit their work for this show. It is their range of creativity—from those who emphasize craftsmanship and a concern for beauty to those who challenge our political and social notions—that results in an exhibition that greatly enriches our community. Howard Taylor

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JURORS’ STATEMENT – GARTH CLARK AND MARK DEL VECCHIO

As under cover of departing Day Slunk hunger-stricken away, Once more within the Potter’s house alone I stood, surrounded by the Shapes of Clay. Shapes of all Sorts and Sizes, great and small, That stood along the floor and by the wall; And some loquacious Vessels were; and some Listen’d perhaps, but never talk’d at all. From The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám by Omar Khayyam (1048–1131) the Persian poet, mathematician and astrologer

Mark Del Vecchio and Garth Clark

SAN ANGELO MUSEUM’S CHARISMATIC DIRECTOR, HOWARD TAYLOR, perhaps the most difficult man in the world to say “no” to, hornswoggled us into taking on this long-lived respected ceramic competition. Our relationship with the museum goes back over a decade to a day when Howard turned up in our gallery in New York and asked us to support a museum we had never heard of in a town we had also never heard of. (Our ignorance.) Ever since, we have been connected to this wonderful institution mainly through gifting to the collection. On our visits we have 4

enjoyed a wonderful ceramic community in the town that is centered on the legendary Chicken Farm. However, we did tell Howard that we would not jury any competition and emphasized that the ban included the San Angelo National. Yet, here we are today, proud jurors for the 19th. The job of the juror is not that different from the quote above from the famous Rubáiyát. The “potter’s house” he describes has changed. For us that house was a database received over the Ethernet. We were “surrounded by Shapes of Clay” that were virtual. Things have changed since the ninth century.

Yes, there were those submissions that did speak, loudly even, and those that did not. The prizes (chosen in the flesh at the museum) did not automatically go to the most loquacious voices but the most convincing visual work. That could be the quietest and the least dramatic artwork. So we jurors had to “listen” carefully to recognize those subtle objects that whispered genius. It was a tough job even though the art critic for the New York Times, Roberta Smith, commented at a ceramics conference in Santa Fe last year that her role was easy, “one only has to decide whether an artwork suc-


ceeds or not.” However getting to that verdict is not easy at all. It is fraught with all kinds of problems, issues and challenges not the least of which is the limitation of one’s own taste. To simplify this we divided the entries into four groups: abstract sculpture, figurative sculpture, the functional pot and the vessel as metaphor. Then we compared like with like. One cannot compare a wood fired tea bowl with a large ceramic figure. It would be like having to choose between a great beer and a great wine. Both are beverages, both are excellent but their virtues are different and to compare the two is ultimately fatuous. For future Nationals we would encourage the San Angelo Museum to combine the prize money and split it equally between those four categories thereby making this a fairer competition given the theatrical ad-

That would have made our choice a tad more palatable. Clearly it was going to be a controversial pick. We are focusing on this work in the statement because the others are more recognizable as part of one or another of the ceramic mainstreams. This one needed a little more clarification and at the exhibition opening many admitted that they found it incomprehensible. Alas, Plot: Over/Under was not a Cubist clay workshop but pure abstraction with formal values but no literal meaning. Abstraction, even today, remains a tough sell. We were won over because this work occupied space in a more dynamic way than any other in the National. The various planes worked dynamically, both vertically and horizontally, creating a volume between two tables linked by what seemed to be some mysterious plumbing. Seen from above, the linear

such I choose materials that best fill the conceptual, physical or formal needs that I deem relevant. To be honest, I have struggled in the past with the ceramics community. My work is often not ‘crafty’ enough and doesn’t focus specifically on the material nature of clay. I occasionally apply to ceramics exhibitions based on my belief that the ceramics community needs to expand its lexicon and look critically at work that is on the fringes of what has been historically included in the dialog.” The clincher for us was that Stahly’s piece did extend the boundaries of what ceramic sculpture can be, more persuasively so than any other object on the exhibition. It speaks a current sculptural vernacular whereas much of the sculptural work in the National was still rooted in the 20th century.

The job of the juror is not that different from the quote from the famous Rubáiyát. The “potter’s house” he describes has changed. For us that house was a database received over the Ethernet. We were “surrounded by Shapes of Clay” that were virtual. Things have changed since the ninth century. vantage that sculpture possesses. Once we had reduced the field to potential prizewinners we had to define what our criteria would or would not be for a prize. Virtuosity by itself is not a virtue. The amount of craft and skill exhibited had to be balanced by the content expressed. With pottery, skill and form often go hand in hand. Great vessels and material intimacy mostly go hand in hand. With sculpture it is different. The sculptor Martin Puryear once famously said, “you can’t make great craft without great skill but you can make great art without great craft.” So we asked which work of sculpture was the most successful as contemporary art? The answer was Plot: Over/Under by Greg Stahly. At first we fantasized that it was based, if loosely, on the potter’s wheel and worktable.

energy is sharp, angular and provokes a visual combat between the sculpture’s components. Five pure white ceramic elements, screwed to the top surface, crown the work. Though modest in scale, they dominate. They have no meaning. Their role is purely formal, as enigmatic shapes, but that does not stop them from exciting questions; are they inspired by upside down bowls, are they stacks for a power plant, are they moulds? The answers are unimportant. It is the process of thinking about them that draws deeply into this work’s minimalist sophistication. As the artist himself wrote, “I use ceramics when it is the most appropriate material for one of my sculptures – not because I feel some true affinity for the medium as a material. My concern is for the final product and as

We extend our congratulations to all the prize and merit award winners (Greg Stahly, Erica Iman, Mike Jabbur, Verne Funk, Gary D. Lichten, Matthew Groves, Lesley Baker, Michael Arnold, Betsy Williams, Judit Varga, Simon van der Ven, Sandra Torres, John Albert Murphy, Melinda Marino, Kristen Kieffer, Chad Hartwig, Katrina Florell, Greg Cochenet, Angela Carbone, Dee Buck, Udine Brod, Jason Briggs) and further, to everyone who made the final cut. You reminded us why we do not usually jury shows; it can be hard labor when the standards are high. Garth Clark and Mark Del Vecchio

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FIRST PLACE WINNER – $2000

Greg Stahly MT. PLEASANT, MICHIGAN

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Plot: Over/Under Ceramic, MDF, metal, PVC 37 x 54 x 23 inches Museum Purchase


SECOND PLACE WINNER – $1500

Erica Iman EDWARDSVILLE, ILLINOIS

Bridges Porcelain, glaze, cone 10 oxidation 6 x 13 x 12 inches Museum Purchase

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THIRD PLACE WINNER – $1000

Mike Jabbur WILLIAMSBURG, VIRGINIA

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Bread Plates & Oil Cruet Soda-fired stoneware, wheel-thrown 36 x 44 x 7 inches Museum Purchase


FOURTH PLACE WINNER – $500

Verne Funk SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS

Red Ripple Whiteware, spray paint, oil stain, formica base 21 x 12 x 12 inches 9


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TILE HERITAGE PRIX PRIMO – $750 Sponsored by the Tile Heritage Society

Gary D. Lichten AKRON, OHIO

Three Roses Ceramics, mounted on plexiglass 24 x 63 x 3 inches 10


PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD – $250 Merit Award Winner

Angela Carbone LAREDO, TEXAS

Stars and Stripes Slip-cast, low-fire ceramics 52 x 93 x 3 inches 11


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INVITED ARTISTS – KELLY and KYLE PHELPS

Kelly and Kyle Phelps

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Steel Worker

IDENTICAL TWIN BROTHERS KELLY AND KYLE PHELPS ARE ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS at private Catholic universities in Ohio. Kelly Phelps is an Associate Professor at Xavier University (Cincinnati), where he oversees the sculpture department. Kyle is an Associate Professor at the University of Dayton (Dayton) where he is the head of the ceramic department. Much of the twins’ work is about the blue-collar working class, race relations and the everyday struggles of the common man and woman. Kelly and Kyle work collaboratively to create their artwork and share a studio in Centerville, Ohio. Before entering the world of academia, becoming professors, earning tenure and most recently sabbaticals,

Carlita


“We work exclusively together… We have always worked together in a collaborative manner like one person in two different bodies,” says Kyle. “Working in unison is, and continues to be, totally natural for us. Ever since we were very young, we shared nearly everything and did everything together – from kindergarten through tenure we have always shared the load.” the twins experienced first-hand what the struggles of the working class were really about! The twins grew up in a blue-collar/factory environment in Indiana where they were inspired by family members and friends who worked in various manufacturing plants, steel mills and foundries. These everyday people became working class heroes who have inspired over a decade of working class art. For a number of years the twins have produced work that incorporates the hand-crafted (clay/resin casts) juxtaposed with found objects/site specific objects. Kyle and Kelly have combined gears, corrugated metal and scrap-machined parts along with modeled ceramic/ resin cast figures to create a visual narrative composition about the blue-collar experience. It is impor-

tant for the twins to continue to combine hand-crafted art forms together with these found objects to give their work an authentic sense of place and time. The found objects are essentially historical artifacts. Much of Kyle and Kelly’s work not only allows the viewer to visually experience their created compositions, but also invites the viewer to use their other senses as well. Some of the found objects they have incorporated into their work are soot-covered or soaked in cutting machine oils that emit a distinctive odor commonly found in automotive factories. The twins received their BFA’s from Ball State University in 1996 and earned their MFA (2000) degrees in Ceramics and Sculpture

from The University of Kentucky. Their work has been exhibited in over 110 juried, solo, invitational, regional, national and international exhibitions. They have completed over 75 commissions that include many permanent, private, public and corporate collections. They share over 150 publications.

News of the Layoff Museum Purchase, with funds provided by John and Darlene Williams

Miss America

The Light

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2012 ACCEPTED WORKS

1. Christopher Adams CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS

Untitled Earthenware/stoneware/ porcelain; low and high fire; both oxidation and reduction (including soda) 16 x 10 x 2 inches 2. Jesse Armstrong CHANDLER, ARIZONA

Beard Cone 6 glazed and sandblasted stoneware; bleached and waxed basswood 19.5 x 8.5 x 7.5 inches 3. Michael Arnold

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MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

Bellied Vessel Merit Award Winner Museum Purchase Porcelaneous stoneware, thrown and altered; wood fired cone 11 13.5 x 3.5 x 4 inches 4. Lesley

Baker

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA

Delicate Balance Merit Award Winner Slip-cast and assembled porcelain 9 x 9 x 3 inches 5. Dylan

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J. Beck

MANHATTAN, KANSAS

Flyover Country CNC milled, found, treated 4x4s, bisque porcelain 23 x 23 x 5 inches 2

14

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9 6. Charles

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Birnbaum

LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK

Incensed Pot Handbuilt porcelain 13.5 x 12 x 8 inches 7. Doug

Blechner

SAN PEDRO, CALIFORNIA

Vase Stoneware, wheel-thrown 13 x 7 x 7 inches 8. David

S. Bogus

LAREDO, TEXAS

Optimist Luggage 1 Earthenware, low fire underglaze, luster 16 x 16 x 8 inches

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9. David

S. Bogus

LAREDO, TEXAS

Guitarras de A単o Nuevo Earthenware, low fire underglaze 31 x 81 x 4 inches 10. Eric

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Boos

PRESCOTT, ARIZONA

Mirror Black Bowl Whiteware, glaze, wheel and handbuilt 11 x 14 x 8 inches 11. Eric

Bosch

SPRINGFIELD, MISSOURI

Black and White Jar Museum Purchase Porcelain, sgrafitto 11 x 8 x 8 11

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2012 ACCEPTED WORKS

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12 12. Eric

Bosch

SPRINGFIELD, MISSOURI

Black and White Vase Porcelain, sgrafitto 16.5 x 6.5 x 6.5 inches 13. Jason

Briggs

WATERTOWN, TENNESSEE

Peel Merit Award Winner Porcelain, hair, steel, undergarment 9 x 15 x 10 inches 14. Undine

Brod

RED LODGE, MONTANA

Are you my father? No, I am not. Merit Award Winner Low fired, handbuilt stoneware, salvaged fur, adhesive, acrylics, floor wax 7.5 x 9.5 x 5.5 inches 15. Dee

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Buck

NEW BRAUNFELS, TEXAS

Pitcher Merit Award Winner Museum Purchase Soda vapor glazed stoneware 16 x 11 x 11 inches 16. Robin

Burlingham

ITHACA, NEW YORK

Moonpot II White porcelain, handbuilt 5.75 x 8.25 x 5.25 inches 16

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17. Amy

Chase

CAPE GIRARDEAU, MISSOURI

Dependence Ceramic, handbuilt 5 x 8 x 6 inches 18. Andrew

Cho

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK

Aggregate Teapot 1 Porcelain, china paint 10 x 11 x 6 inches

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19. Andrew

Cho

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK

Aggregate Teapot 2 Porcelain, iron wash 7 x 7 x 7 inches 20. Andrew

Cho

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK

Suture Urn Porcelain, cobalt wash 12 x 6 x 6 inches 21. Greg

Cochenet

HAMDEN, CONNECTICUT

YG Feed Bin Jar Porcelain, wood 8.5 x 6.5 x 6.5 inches 22. Jim

Connell

ROCK HILL, SOUTH CAROLINA

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Red Black Slipper Teapot Stoneware, press molded, high fire, sandblasted, non-functional 6.5 x 11.5 x 4 inches

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22

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2012 ACCEPTED WORKS

23. Ned

Day

HAYS, KANSAS

Dining Set Porcelain, cone 10 glaze 13 x 10.25 x 10.25 inches 24. Charine

Dowdell

CARROLLTON, GEORGIA

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Macabre Reverie Ceramic with majolica glaze with red china paint, gold luster accents 11.5 x 11 x 14.5 inches 25. Caroline

Earley

BOISE, IDAHO

Cluster Stoneware, thrown and altered, cone 10 oxidation 17.5 x 16 x 12 inches 26. Rachel

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Eng

BOULDER, COLORADO

To Go the Way of the Dodo Cone 6 white stoneware, overglaze, wood, bottle caps 2 x 14 x 8.5 inches 27. Sean

Erwin

WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA

Story of My Life Porcelain, glaze, mixed media 16 x 10 x 10 inches

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28. Brooke

Evans

MONROE, NEW YORK

Cup Set Slip-cast stoneware cups, thrown/altered, cone 6 porcelain tray 4 x 12 x 12 inches 29. Brooke

Evans

MONROE, NEW YORK

Curvaceous Teapot Slab-built, cone 6 porcelain 9 x 9 x 5 inches 30. Brooke

Evans

MONROE, NEW YORK

Pitcher Slab-built, cone 6 porcelain 12 x 5 x 3 inches

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31. Katrina

Florell

HAYS, KANSAS

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Metamorphosis: Stage One Merit Award Winner Stoneware, slip, terra sigillata, stains, wax 12 x 42 x 24 inches 32. Léopold

Foulem

MONTREAL, CANADA

Adonis in Garden Ceramic, found objects 8.5 x 11 x 5.625 inches 33. Léopold

Foulem

MONTREAL, CANADA

Serenade Ceramic, found objects 24 x 9.25 x 8.5 inches

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33

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2012 ACCEPTED WORKS 34. Sharon

Gardner

MUNCIE, INDIANA

Slanting Squares Stoneware, soda fired 22 x 18 x 4 inches 35. Matthew

Groves

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

Green Dream Press molded, handbuilt glazed earthenware 30 x 12 x 12 inches 36. Matthew

Groves

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

Majolica Man Merit Award Winner Press molded, handbuilt glazed earthenware 30 x 12 x 12 inches 37. Cindy

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Oikawa Gutierrez

SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO

Vessel Stoneware with porcelain inlay, wood/soda fired, glazed interior 8.5 x 8 x 8 inches 38. Roy

Hanscom

KINGWOOD, TEXAS

5-Lidded Form Stoneware, thrown, altered 8 x 22 x 14 inches 39. Chad

Hartwig

NOTRE DAME, INDIANA

Golden Shing-a-Ling Merit Award Winner Wood fired ceramic nested in fired, painted clay 9 x 26 x 16 inches

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40 40. Daphne

Roehr Hatcher

MINEOLA, TEXAS

Red Portal/Red Eye Wood fired, wax resist, stoneware 11 x 24 x 2 inches 41. Gary

Hatcher

MINEOLA, TEXAS

Still Life #47 Wood fired, stoneware 12 x 16 x 14 inches 42. Andrew

Ippoliti

PEABODY, MASSACHUSETTS

Over the Sea & Across the Sky – Serving Platter Jiggered, embellished porcelain 16 inches diameter x 3 inches deep

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43. Kyle

Johns

NORTHBROOK, ILLINOIS

45

Fueler White stoneware, cone 10 luster, thrown, altered, handbuilt 9 x 14 x 7.5 inches 44. Ian

Johnston

NELSON, B.C., CANADA

Dutch Wheat #1 Stoneware 7.5 x 12 x 15 inches 45. Sarah

Justice

ATLANTA, GEORGIA

Butterflies in My Stomach Handbuilt, porcelain, glaze, mixed media 22 x 14 x 5.5 inches

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44

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2012 ACCEPTED WORKS

46. Jeff

Kell

RUSH, NEW YORK

Storm Rising Ceramic 32 x 11 x 9 inches 47. Kristen

Kieffer

BALDWINVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS

Flower Vessel (Corset Series), Lilac Pattern Merit Award Winner Museum Purchase Wheel thrown, altered porcelain with carved, slip trailed and sponged decoration 14.5 x 12 x 9 inches 48. Kristen

Kieffer

BALDWINVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS

Large Pear Jar, Dot Script Wheel thrown, altered porcelain with carved, slip trailed and sponged decoration 14.5 x 7.5 x 7.5 inches 49. Noriko

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47

Kuresumi

ASTORIA, NEW YORK

Sea of Memory Porcelain, handbuilt 10 x 12 x 11 inches 50. Minkyu

Lee

GREEN BAY, WISCONSIN

Crescent Handbuilt stoneware, cone 04, glazed 16 x 31 x 15 inches

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48

50

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51. Seungwon

Lee

ALFRED, NEW YORK

Beauty Porcelain, glaze, handbuilt 31 x 18 x 12 inches 52. Nick 52

Lenker

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

The Abduction of Ganymede Thrown, handbuilt, digitally printed ceramic decals 15 x 8.5 x 8.5 inches 53. Melinda

51

Marino

DENTON, TEXAS

Benediction (Monstrance) Merit Award Winner Stoneware, acrylics 24 x 17 x 14 inches 54. Marta

Matray

MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

Caldera Handbuilt, stoneware and porcelain, smoke fired 3 x 6 x 6 inches 55. Megan 54

Mitchell

LOGAN, UTAH

Checkered Plates Porcelain with slip transfer, slip inlay, underglaze decals 10 x 10 x 1 inches

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55

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2012 ACCEPTED WORKS

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56 56. John Albert

Murphy

DETROIT, MICHIGAN

Same Jesus Merit Award Winner Slip-cast porcelain, cone 6 oxidation, decals 6 x 9 x 9 inches 57. Kate

Nelson

AUSTIN, TEXAS

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Do you wanna hear about the deal and make it yours Thrown, altered porcelain, sandblasted with wood shelf 4.5 x 7 x 3 inches 58. Carrie Anne

Parks

ALMA, MICHIGAN

Doctors’ Doll: Muscular System Press molded and modeled earthenware, underglaze painted and glazed, wooden stand 7 x 20 x 5.5 inches 59. Colby

Parsons

DENTON, TEXAS

Silverware Drawer Stoneware with microcrystalline glaze, projected video 18 x 15 x 3 inches 60. Dandee

60

Pattee

WELLFLEET, MASSACHUSETTS

Pouring Vessel Porcelain, thrown, cone 10 9 x 6 x 5 inches 61. Dandee

Pattee

WELLFLEET, MASSACHUSETTS

Tea Pot Porcelain, thrown, cone 10 5.5 x 9 x 6 inches 24

59

61


63 62. Douglas

Peck

SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO

Sea Sponge Red stoneware, anagama wood fired – 6 days 13.75 x 8.25 x 8 inches

62

63. Peter

Pincus

PENFIELD, NEW YORK

Bottles: Red, Black, Green, Gold and Blue Colored porcelain, cone 6 10 x 3 x 3 each bottle 64. Kayleigh

Porter

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

66

Bodyscape 1 Porcelain with found materials 18 x 34.5 x 5.5 inches 65. Sara

Ransford

ASPEN, COLORADO

Conforming Paper clay, cone 10 soda fired stoneware 20 x 20 x 3 inches

64

66. Louis

Reilly

LOGAN, UTAH

67

Pitcher Soda fired stoneware 12 x 7 x 7 inches 67. Louis

Reilly

LOGAN, UTAH

Teapot Soda fired stoneware 5 x 7 x 5 inches 68. Louis

Reilly

LOGAN, UTAH

Side-handled Teapot Soda fired stoneware 5 x 6 x 5 inches 65

68

25


1 9 T H S A N A N G E L O N AT I O N A L C E R A M I C C O M P E T I T I O N

2012 ACCEPTED WORKS

69. Alison

Reintjes

MISSOULA, MONTANA

Strata Slip-cast porcelain 21 x 16.5 x 1.25 inches 70. Alison

Reintjes

MISSOULA, MONTANA

Double Portrait Slip-cast porcelain 30 x 26 x 1.25 inches 71. Mark

S. Richardson

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA

69

70

Electrode Placement Cone 04 slip constructed, slips, stains, decals 8.75 x 12 x 1 inches 72. Nettie

Locke Rogers

LINCOLN, NEBRASKA

Struggle for Stature Ceramic, cone 04, underglaze, gouache, pencil, handbuilt, assembled, carved 6.5 x 28 x 25 inches 73. Tammie

Rubin

CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS

You Tell Me, I Tell Me, I Tell You Contraption Slip-cast, handbuilt porcelain, glaze 19 x 22 x 10 inches

71

73

72

26


74. Meryl

Ruth

CUMBERLAND, MAINE

Mel-Oh-Tea-Us, A Ceramic Teapot Stoneware clay, beads, wire, slab construction, silk-screening, glazes, wheel-thrown and sculpted parts; tiles for base 18 x 9.5 x 4.5 inches 75. Meryl

Ruth

CUMBERLAND, MAINE

Tea-Sharp Harmony, A Ceramic Teapot Stoneware clay, wheel-thrown, altered, extruded and sculpted parts, glazes, gold luster, metal leaf for tarnish and patina 11 x 16 x 9 inches

75

74

76. Jessica

Sailors

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS

Voluptuous Ceramic 9 x 9 x 9 inches 77. Christine

Schiff

WILMETTE, ILLINOIS

Crater Reef Low-fired, handbuilt 19 inches diameter x 3.5 inches high

76

78. Marilee

Schumann

CHESTERTOWN, MARYLAND

Urn – San Francisco Stoneware 7 x 7 x 7 inches

77

Photo by Geoff Martin

78

27


1 9 T H S A N A N G E L O N AT I O N A L C E R A M I C C O M P E T I T I O N

2012 ACCEPTED WORKS 79. Diana

Seidel

AUSTIN, TEXAS

Fins & Buttons Jars Wheel-thrown stoneware with matte glazes and stains largest: 6 x 5.5 x 5 inches 80. JosĂŠ

Sierra

TUCSON, ARIZONA

Chomaoma Merit Award Winner Stoneware, wheel-thrown with dry matte glaze, cone 10 11.5 x 7 x 7.5 inches 81. Gayle

79

80

Singer

EDMOND, OKLAHOMA

Undulation Series Bowl Porcelain, thrown, altered, soda fired, cone 10 12 inches diameter x 5 inches high 82. Amy

Smith

LINCOLN, NEBRASKA

White on White 7 Porcelain 6 x 100 x 1 inches 83. Dennis

Smith

BOERNE, TEXAS

Sting Manganese clay, salt/soda fired 10 x 17 x 8 inches 84. Carol

81

Snyder

COLUMBUS. OHIO

Penton Grafton-Wheat Wheel-thrown, altered, unglazed, cone10 porcelain 11 inches diameter x 2.25 inches high

28

83

82

84


86 85. Suzanne

Storer

OGDEN, UTAH

Ashley Expanded slab, terra sigillata, bisque, stain, brushwork, cone 04 electric 19 x 15 x 6 inches

85

86. Suzanne

Stumpf

SOUTH NATICK, MASSACHUSETTS

Nest with Eggs V Porcelain, oxidation cone 10 2 x 9 x 9 inches 87. Sandra Torres OJAI, CALIFORNIA

Small Differences Merit Award Winner Museum Purchase Cone 6 altered slip-cast porcelain, soluble salts, cone 6 glaze 5 inches diameter x 3.25 inches high, each bowl

87

88. Simon

van der Ven

LINCOLNVILLE, MAINE

Illuminated Lotus Vase Porcelain, wheel-thrown, carved 5 inches diameter x 6.5 inches high 89. Simon

van der Ven

LINCOLNVILLE, MAINE

Illuminated Double-walled Vase Porcelain, wheel-thrown, carved 7 inches diameter x 10 inches high 90. Simon

van der Ven

LINCOLNVILLE, MAINE

Shoji Pattern Vase Merit Award Winner Museum Purchase Porcelain, wheel-thrown, carved, gold leaf 6 inches diameter x 9.75 inches high 88

89

90

29


1 9 T H S A N A N G E L O N AT I O N A L C E R A M I C C O M P E T I T I O N

2012 ACCEPTED WORKS

91. Judit Varga ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND

Yellow Cocoon Semi porcelain with slips, handbuilt, cone 5 oxidation 8 x 16 x 8 inches 92. Judit Varga

91

ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND

Empty Pod Merit Award Winner Museum Purchase Semi porcelain with slips, handbuilt, cone 5 oxidation 9 x 19 x 9 inches

92

93. Niko Weissenberger WACO, TEXAS

Pair of Flasks Wood fired stoneware, cork 5.5 x 3.5 x 1.5 inches each 94. Niko Weissenberger WACO, TEXAS

Vase Form Wood fired stoneware, applied glazes 11 x 5.5 x 3.5 inches 95. Betsy Williams

93

DIXON, NEW MEXICO

Climbing the Ladder of Success Merit Award Winner Museum Purchase Wheel-thrown cups, hand painted 10 x 10 x 3 inches 94

30

95


97 98 96. Blake Williams EAST LANSING, MICHIGAN

Nourish Porcelain, wire, antique chair 36 x 19 x 15 inches 97. Stephen Wolochowicz OGDEN, UTAH

96

Lime Dots Accordion B.I. Slab and coil, multi-layered surfacing, cone 04 19 x 9 x 9 inches 98. Stephen Wolochowicz OGDEN, UTAH

Terra Accordion B.I. Slab and coil, multi-fired, sanded, glazes 15 x 12 x 12 inches 99. Merrie Wright WHITEHOUSE, TEXAS

Riley Rabbit Earthenware, low-fire 20 x 14 x 14 inches 100. Sheryl

Zacharia

NEW YORK, NEW YORK

99

100

Very Red Vessel Slab-built, fired cone 5, with terra sigillata, oxides, underglaze and glaze, multi-fired 20 x 14 x 5 inches

31


SAN ANGELO MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS BOARD OF TRUSTEES President – Debbie Cross Immediate Past President – Frank Rose Vice President – Jeff Curry Secretary – Maria de los Santos Onofre-Madrid Treasurer – Suzan Gargan Mr. Bob Aguilar Mrs. Dana Calhoun Mrs. Patsy Cleere Mr. Michael Collier Mr. Mike Eckert Mrs. Tracey Ferguson Mr. Sebastian Guerrero Dr. John Klingemann Mrs. Kay Kneisler Mr. Rodney Mayberry Mr. Pat McCarley Mrs. Grace Ann Phillips Mrs. Elaine Stribling Mrs. Kam Stribling Mr. J. Christopher Sugg Mrs. Martha Visney Mrs. Carol Whitehead

PAST PRESIDENTS Marilyn Mertz Nina Stringer Herb Riley Bruce Fisher Joel Sugg Frank Rose Donna Crisp Donna Sugg Heidi Curry Frank Rose Suzanne Sugg Sonny Cleere Angela Williams Martha Visney Anne B. Williams Pat McCarley Jan Duncan Frank Rose

1981-1982 1983-1984 1985 1986-1987 1988-1989 1990-1991 1992 1993-1995 1996-1997 1998-1999 2000-2001 2002-2003 2004 2005 2006-2007 2008 2009 2010-2011

SAMFA STAFF Director – Howard J. Taylor Collections Manager – Karen Zimmerly; Laura Huckaby Executive Assistant/Event Coordinator – Gracie Fernandez Museum Educator – Megan DiRienzo Assistant Educator – Rebekah Coleman Programs Manager – Valerie Bluthardt Bookkeeper – Janet Bingham Gift Shop Manager – Betty Connally Preparator – John Mattson Maintenance Chief/Security – Joel Quintella Maintenance – Maria De Jesus Guerrero Graphic Designer – JoElla Mendez Office Assistant – Elizabeth Geair Special Events/Weekend Supervisor – Sylvia Grimaldo

GALLERY ATTENDANTS Lois Andrews Margie Belcheff Austine Barker Dixie Cozad Jerry Jefferson Martha McClosky Geneva Nelson Alberta Trubenstein

SPECIAL EVENTS/ WEEKEND STAFF Barbara Conoly Diana Elrod Linda Feuge Andrew Gonzales Johnny Grimaldo Kim Hodge Monica Martinez Tammy Oneil Jim Stone


From Our Permanent Collection:

James Watkins Bird Basket, 1995 Ceramic, Raku Fired, Double-Walled 34 inches high x 24 inches diameter

Museum purchase with funds provided by John and Darlene Williams

This piece is one of over 550 works currently in the Museum’s Permanent Collection.

ONE LOVE STREET

SAN ANGELO, TEXAS 76903

325.653.3333

WWW.SAMFA.ORG


San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts  

Nineteenth San Angelo National Ceramic Competition, Spring 2012 – Exhibition Catalogue

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