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THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF WINE MARLBOROUGH

ISSUE NO. 278 / FEBRUARY 2018

VINTAGE PREPARATION

GRAPE MARC

Photo: Jim Tannock

wine-marlborough.co.nz

SWNZ WINS

GOOD STUFF


10

this issue... REGULARS

FEATURES

3 4

20

Editorial

10 Vintage preparation

From the Board - Simon Bishell The Good Stuff - Stephen Leitch

22

Gen Y-ine - Arabella Waghorn

24

Biosecurity Watch

26

Industry News

28

ANZ Wine Happenings

12

With harvest swiftly approaching, Winepress talks to Marlborough Roads, Marlborough Lines and Blenheim Police about getting through safely.

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Grape Marc Marlborough needs an evolution in grape marc processes, rather than a revolution, according to a new report. This issue also contains reminders on winery waste regulations.

14 SWNZ Wins

Cover: Maiken Hodson arrived six weeks early, just as Jaimee Whitehead was pulling together the insights of her grape marc report, photo by Jim Tannock

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Sustainable Winegrowing New Zealand has won Green Initiative of the Year at the Drinks Business awards ceremony in London, and received a commendation at the 2017 NZI Sustainable Business Network Awards.

22

Winepress February 2018 / 1


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General Manager: Marcus Pickens 03 577 9299 marcus@wine-marlborough.co.nz Editor: Sophie Preece 027 308 4455 sophie@sophiepreece.co.nz Advertising: Harriet Wadworth 03 577 9299 harriet@wine-marlborough.co.nz Wine Marlborough Board: Ben Ensor ben.lisa@clear.net.nz Callum Linklater callum@csviticulture.co.nz Jack Glover jack.glover@accolade-wines.co.nz Michael Wentworth michael.wentworth@yealands.co.nz Nick Entwistle nick@wairauriverwines.co.nz Simon Bishell simon@caythorpe.nz Stuart Dudley (Deputy Chair) stuartd@villamaria.co.nz Tom Trolove (Chair) tom.trolove@framingham.co.nz Tracy Johnston Tracy@dayvinleigh.co.nz

Printed by: Blenheim Print Ltd 03 578 1322

Disclaimer: The views and articles that are expressed and appear in Winepress are entirely those of contributors and in no way reflect the policy of the Marlborough Winegrowers. Any advice given, implied or suggested should be considered on its merits, and no responsibility can be taken for problems arising from the use of such information.

From the Editor Grape growing sure keeps you on your toes. The first predictions for the 2018 vintage were made after a cold flowering in 2016, promising a crop that was slightly smaller than average. Those numbers were borne out in spring 2017, with some assessing bunch numbers as down around 15% and predicting a harvest two weeks earlier than usual. Then came the long blue-sky days of flowering, providing fantastic conditions that forged big bunches, some say 25% up, neutralising the lower numbers and bringing yield predictions to a happy space. So far so good, but the viticulture rollercoaster had just started, and was yet to enter the summer tunnel of warm rain, which heightened botrytis fears while creating abundant healthy canopies. “Have you ever seen Marlborough greener and leafier?” asks John Forrest of Forrest Estate. “We have lots of leaf to ripen an average crop.” Now, just as winegrowers work out how to deal with canopy, disease pressure, atypical warm nights, and the complications of an early and concertinaed vintage, with Sauvignon Blanc likely to come in hard on the heels of Chardonnay and Pinot for bubbles, the rollercoaster is plummeting back towards a wall of wet and warm conditions. Fingers crossed the meteorologists are wrong, but at the time of printing, the forecast isn’t pretty, and viticulturists region wide are likely to be recalibrating their plans. John says it is a challenging year because so much has happened already, and every decision is superseded by the next twist. However, winegrowers are familiar with the climate throwing in distractions every season, and it’s simply the nature of the business. “I never commit to what the vintage will be like until it comes across the receivable bin.” Sileni Estate’s Group Viticulturist Stephen Bradley says the industry has come a long way since 1998, when a warm autumn created some disappointing wines. “We are wiser now and people pick more on flavour than sugar. We know a lot more about what makes good Marlborough Sauvignon.” The Wine Marlborough team have been busy too, preparing for this year’s Marlborough Wine & Food Festival, an event that has matured with the industry over the past 34 years. With tickets up on last year’s sell out event, it’s set to be another full house. The festival is the perfect celebration of the country’s leading wine industry and all the people that make it brilliant, including the food producers growing perfect pairings, and wine growers staying on their toes.

“Have you ever seen Marlborough greener and leafier?” John Forrest

SOPHIE PREECE

Winepress February 2018 / 3


From the Board SIMON BISHELL

VINTAGE 2018 has a good feel about it – especially when I think back 12 months to the challenges Mother Nature threw at us. We have been grateful recipients of a warm and frost-free spring, condensed flowering and now a period of unusually benign winds, which has been great for completing vineyard works on time and keeping fungicide intervals tight. Attention to detail at this busy time is always rewarded come harvest and the quality of resulting wines. No season is ever without a challenge or two, and the last few months we have faced shortages of labour. It seems incomprehensible that a couple of government bureaucrats taking unplanned leave, resulting in a delay of immigration processing, can threaten to bring $6 billion of horticultural industry in New Zealand to its knees. The late arrival of many workers placed serious pressure on keeping vineyard works up-to-date, and in some instances the backlog is only just being cleared. We should treat this experience as an indication of what lies ahead in the future – sooner rather than later. Communication with your contractor is key. The next pinch point will be the upcoming pruning season. I urge you all to be thinking about pruning plans early and inform your contractor of these as soon as harvest is complete, and be prepared to show flexibility around the timing of when your block is pruned. The substantial increase of vineyard area over the past three years will need to be pruned with roughly

4 / Winepress February 2018

the same workforce as last season. Simple math dictates it will not be a matter of if, but who, will miss out in getting pruning completed prior to bud burst. Working constructively to address labour shortages leads nicely into the use of mechanical thinning as a means of yield manipulation. Outstanding flowering conditions have increased Sauvignon Blanc bunch weights district wide this season of 25% (or more) above the long-term average, and in cases will have yields pushing

“Communication with your contractor is key” Simon Bishell or exceeding winery specifications. Mechanical thinning has been used commercially now for at least five seasons, and the results (widely published and funded by your levies) speak for themselves. It does come at a cost, but when compared with the alternatives it should be seen equally or more so as an investment, not just another expense. To demonstrate, consider the approximate figures for a vineyard with vine density of 2,050 vines/ha, using average contract costings: To remove five bunches/vine or about

10% - by hand $250/ha; by machine $470/ha. However, the more you remove by hand, the cost increases. By machine, costs are fixed. The great unintended consequence of mechanical thinning has been reduction in late season botrytis incidence – often 50% or more. Two of the most widely used botrytisspecific fungicides cost between $150-200/ha, not accounting for the cost of application. If you were told that one single spray could reduce botrytis incidence by 50%, most would not think twice about applying. The additional money spent on machine thinning versus hand removal is equal to applying just one of these botryticides, but gives you almost a guaranteed response. If you are yet to give mechanical thinning a go, then I urge you to seriously consider in future seasons. And finally, I will leave with a brief comment around yields. While there were some great wines made in 2017, overall it will not be remembered as a vintage of consistent quality. We have an opportunity to make 2018 a truly fantastic one – and if we wish to consider ourselves a world-class winegrowing region, then now is the time to collectively prove it. Keeping your yields sensible and fruit clean will help to create a prosperous future, and protect the premium reputation of brand Marlborough. Good luck - see you on the other side.


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Henry Manufacturing Ltd Visit www.henrymanufacturing.co.nz Call Chris Henry on 027 294 1490 email chris@henrymanufacturing.co.nz or contact your local technical advisor. Winepress February 2018 / 5


MET REPORT Table 1: Blenheim Weather Data – December 2017 December December 2017 December 2017 Compared to LTA LTA GDD’s for: Month - Max/Min¹ 270.9 127% 213.9 Month – Mean² 275.8 132% 209.5 Growing Degree Days Total Jul – Dec 17 – Max/Min 653.4 120% 542.7 Jul - Dec 17 – Mean 701.7 119% 591.9 Mean Maximum (°C) 24.5 +2.6°C 21.9 Mean Minimum (°C) 12.9 +1.3°C 11.6 Mean Temp (°C) 18.7 +1.9°C 16.8 Ground Frosts (<= -1.0°C) 0 - 0.1 Air Frosts (0.0°C) 0 - 0 Sunshine hours 319.1 130% 246.3 Sunshine hours – lowest 167.4 Sunshine hours – highest 321.2 Sunshine hours total – 2017 2604.5 105% 2492.2 Rainfall (mm) 21.6 45% 47.8 Rainfall (mm) – lowest 0.8 Rainfall (mm) – highest 124.0 Rainfall total (mm) – 2017 591.4 93% 636.0 Evapotranspiration – mm 177.8 127% 139.7 Avg. Daily Windrun (km) 250.3 86% 290.3 Mean soil temp – 10cm 19.5 +1.8°C 17.7 Mean soil temp – 30cm 21.0 +1.8°C 19.2

Period of LTA

December 2016

(1996-2016) (1996-2016)

207.0 202.6

(1996-2016) (1996-2016) (1986-2016) (1986-2016) (1986-2016) (1986-2016) (1986-2016) (1986-2016) 2011 1974 (1986-2016) (1930-2016) 1934 1984 (1986-2016) (1996-2016) (1996-2016) (1986-2016) (1986-2016)

575.9 608.6 21.7 11.6 16.7 0 0 253.0

2591.3 20.2

591.2 153.7 274.2 17.5 18.9

¹GDD’s Max/Min are calculated from absolute daily maximum and minimum temperatures ²GDD’s Mean are calculated from average hourly temperatures December 2017 recorded well above average temperatures, sunshine hours and evapotranspiration, but well below average rainfall and windrun. December 2017 with 319.1 hours sunshine is the second sunniest December on record for the 88 years 1930-2017. The sunniest December on record is 1974 with 321.2 hours sunshine. December 2017 is the sixth year in a row (2012-2017) in which December has recorded well below average rainfall.

6 / Winepress February 2018

Total potential evapotranspiration for December 2017 of 177.8 mm, is the highest December total for the 22 years 1996-2017. Annual weather statistics for Blenheim for 2017, compared to the long-term average Sunshine Total sunshine for Blenheim in 2017 was 2604.5 hours, 105% of the long-term average (LTA) of 2492 hours (1986-2016) (112.3 hours above the LTA). 2017 is the 10th sunniest year on

record for the 88 years 1930-2017. The sunniest year on record is 2015 with 2813.8 hours sunshine. 2015 is also the last year in which Blenheim was the sunniest town in New Zealand. Richmond took out the top place in both 2016 and 2017. The rankings for the sunniest towns for 2017 were: Table 2: Sunniest towns in New Zealand for 2017 Placing Town Sunshine Hours 1st Richmond 2632.8 2nd Blenheim 2604.5 3rd Whakatane 2528.8 4th Napier 2503.9 5th Lake Tekapo 2499.6 Rainfall Total Rainfall for 2017 was 591.4 mm; 93% of the LTA of 636 mm (Figure 1). The 2017 rainfall was almost identical to the 2016 rainfall. Two months in 2017 recorded well above average rainfall (February and April). Five months recorded close to average rainfall (March, May, July, August and September). Five months recorded well below average rainfall (January, June, October, November and December). Temperature The mean temperature for 2017 was 13.67°C; 0.53°C above the LTA for the 31 years 1986-2016. Eleven months in 2017 recorded above average mean temperatures. The only month to record a below average mean temperature was May. The hottest day of 2017 was 17 December with 31.3°C. The coldest day of 2017 was 31 July with an air frost of -2.0°C and a ground frost of -6.8°C. Frosts 39 ground frosts were recorded in 2017; 13 less than the long term average of 52 (1986-2016).


Figure 1: Blenheim rainfall for 2017 compared to the long-term average

12 air frosts were recorded in 2017; 7 less than the long-term average of 19.3. Wind-run Average daily wind-run for 2017 was 224.6 km compared to the LTA of 256.9 km (1996-2016). This is close to the lowest average wind-run on record for the 22 years 1996 to 2017; i.e. 2017 was a very calm year. For ten years in a row (2008-2017) Blenheim has recorded lower than average daily wind-run. January was the only month in 2017 to record above average daily wind-run and it was by far the windiest month of the year. All 11 months from February to December 2017 recorded well below average wind-run. You may be asking the question, how can Blenheim’s wind-run have been below average for 10 years in a row? The answer may be found in a climate phenomenon known as the ‘Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation’ (IPO). The following summary can be found on the Ministry for the Environment website. ‘The IPO is a long-term oscillation of the Pacific Ocean. It lasts from 20 to 30 years, much longer than

the El Niño Southern Oscillation. IPO can affect the strength and frequency of El Niño and La Niña. In New Zealand, the positive phase of IPO is linked to stronger west to southwest winds and more rain to the west. Three phases of the IPO occurred during the 20th century. • a positive phase, 1922-44 • a negative phase, 1946-77 • a positive phase, 1978-98 (Salinger et al, 2011. Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation and South Pacific climate. International Journal of Climatology, 21 17051721). IPO has been in a negative phase since 2000 (NIWA, 2011.)’ This negative IPO phase is one possible explanation of why Blenheim has experienced less wind than average over the last decade. January 2018 Weather January 2018 recorded well above average temperatures and rainfall, and below average sunshine windrun and evapotranspiration. Temperature The mean temperature of 20.7°C was

2.6°C above the LTA temperature for January of 18.1°C. January 2018 has entered the record books as the hottest January in Blenheim for the 87 year period 1932 to 2018. The previous hottest January was in 1935 with a mean temperature of 20.6°C. The mean temperature of 20.7°C also equalled Blenheim’s previous hottest ever month – February 1998, which also recorded a mean temperature of 20.7°C. Despite the very high daily mean temperature for January 2018, Blenheim only surpassed 30.0°C on two days; 31.2°C on the 20th and 32.5°C on the 30th. However, there were an additional 16 days when the maximum temperature was between 25 and 30°C.There were no days above 30°C in January 2017. The lack of days above 30°C is largely a function of how close Blenheim is to the coast. Slightly further inland the maximum temperatures are higher; e.g. the weather station at Woodbourne exceeded 30.0°C on four days during January 2018. The maximum temperature on 30 January at Woodbourne was 34.1°C. The maximum temperature Winepress February 2018 / 7


Table 3: Blenheim Weather Data – January 2018 January January 2018 2018 compared to LTA GDD’s for: Month - Max/Min¹ 331.3 134% Month – Mean² 322.2 135% Growing Degree Days Total Jul 17 – Jan 18 – Max/Min1 984.7 125% Jul 17 - Jan 18 – Mean2 1018 122% Mean Maximum (°C) 25.4 +2.0°C Mean Minimum (°C) 16.0 +3.3°C Mean Temp (°C) 20.7 +2.6°C Ground Frosts (<= -1.0°C) 0 Equal Air Frosts (0.0°C) 0 Equal Sunshine hours 243.6 93% Sunshine hours – lowest Sunshine hours – highest Sunshine hours total – 2018 243.6 93% Rainfall (mm) 80.4 180% Rainfall (mm) – lowest Rainfall (mm) – highest Rainfall total (mm) – 2018 80.4 180% Evapotranspiration – mm 135.6 95% Avg. Daily Windrun (km) 190.6 69% Mean soil temp – 10cm 21.0 +2.0°C Mean soil temp – 30cm 22.3 +1.5°C

January LTA

Period of LTA

January 2017

248.1 239.5

(1996-2017) (1996-2017)

260.5 258.0

790.8 (1996-2017) 831.4 (1996-2017) 23.4 (1986-2017) 12.7 (1986-2017) 18.1 (1986-2017) 0 (1986-2017) 0 (1986-2017) 262.5 (1930-2017) 165.2 1971 335.3 1957 262.5 (1930-2017) 44.6 (1930-2017) 0 1978 167.0 1985 44.6 (1930-2017) 142.2 (1997-2017) 277.1 (1996-2017) 19.0 (1986-2017) 20.8 (1986-2017)

836.4 866.6 23.9 12.9 18.4 0 0 282.0

282.0 27.2

27.2 181.5 336.3 19.1 20.9

¹GDD’s Max/Min are calculated from absolute daily maximum and minimum temperatures ²GDD’s Mean are calculated from average hourly temperatures of 32.5°C on 30 January 2018 in Blenheim was the hottest day since 6 February 2011, which recorded 33.4°C. Blenheim’s hottest day on record for the 70 years 1948-2017 is 11 January 1979 with 36.0°C. If you think January 2018 was hot in Marlborough, spare a thought for Central Otago. Cromwell recorded 21 days during January 2018 when the maximum temperature exceeded 30.0°C. The average daily maximum temperature for January 2018 was 30.0°C, which was 4.6°C warmer than Blenheim’s average maximum temperature. Growing degree days The growing degree day (GDD) graph (Figure 2) is a regular feature in Met Report. It presents the difference between the accumulating GDDs in any season and the long-term average.

8 / Winepress February 2018

It is an easy way to visualise when temperatures have been above or below average at any point during the season, i.e. an upwards sloping line means above average GDDs and a downwards sloping line means below average GDDs (temperatures). GDDs have been well above average in the 2017/18 season to the end of January 2018. In order to put the current season into perspective, other very warm seasons are also included on the graph. The 1988/89 season was previously the warmest season for the five months September to January, of any season in the past 30 years. However, the 2017/18 has now surpassed the 1988/89 season. Of interest is that the 1988/89 season recorded below average GDDs in February and only average GDDs in March and April 1989.

The 1997/98 season is also recognised as a very warm season. However, the warm temperatures in 1997/98 didn’t begin until the third week of January 1998. The period from late January through until early April 1998 was exceptionally warm while the grapes were ripening. The 2013/14 season was very warm from September to December 2013, but only average to below average from January to April 2014. The 2015/16 season was average from September 2015 to mid-January 2016 and then very warm from mid-January to early April 2016. December 2017 was 1.9°C and January 2018 was 2.6°C above the LTA. Current climate projections are that temperatures will continue to be above average in February and March 2018. In Figure 2, projected GDD lines have been added for the period 1 February to 30 April 2018. These lines assume temperatures either equal to or 1.0°C above the long-term average. The +1.0°C line indicates that temperatures from February to April 2018 do not need to be too far above average, to push the 2017/18 season into the position of being remembered as the warmest season that the Marlborough wine industry has ever experienced. Rainfall Blenheim received only 70.4 mm rain for the three months October, November and December 2017; 46% of the LTA. At the beginning of January 2018 Marlborough was greatly in need of rainfall with very dry conditions and low river levels. Fortunately much needed rainfall was received on a number of days between the 4th and 12th January and again on the 17th. Total rainfall for January of 80.4 mm was 180% of the LTA and more than in the previous three months combined. Wind-run Average daily wind-run in January 2018 was 190.6 km, well below the LTA of 274.3 km (average wind speed of 7.94 km/hr, compared to LTA of 11.43 km/hr). January 2018 wind-run is by


Figure 2: Normalized growing degree days for Blenheim: days above (+) or below (-) the long-term average (1990-2016) for the period 1 September to 30 April

far the lowest January total on record for Blenheim for the 33 period 1986 to 2018. In marked contrast January 2017 was very windy with average daily wind-run of 336.3 km; (average wind speed 14.0 km/hr); i.e. January 2018 recorded only 57% of the wind-run recorded in January 2017.

potential evapotranspiration = -55.2 mm potential water deficit This is a low total for January in comparison to the LTA of -99.7 mm. In contrast the potential water deficit in January 2017 was -154.3 mm, the highest on record 1997-2018.

Potential evapotranspiration

Average shallow soil moisture (0 to 35 cm) at the Grovetown Park weather station for January 2018 was 28.1%. This is the highest January average for the 16 years 2003 to 2018 (period of record). However, on 2 January the topsoil moisture was only 15.5%, slightly above its driest point. Rainfall from the 4th to

Total potential evapotranspiration for January 2018 was 135.6 mm, 95% on the LTA. Despite the warm temperatures, the evapotranspiration was kept fairly low due to the lack of wind, lower radiation and higher relative humidity. In contrast January 2017 recorded 181.3 mm evapotranspiration, by far the highest January total on record for the 22 years 1997-2018.

Shallow soil moisture (topsoil)

the 13th January boosted soil moisture from 15.5 to 35.8%. The result of this rapid increase in soil moisture was to bring unirrigated lawns and pasture back into life with a flush of midsummer growth. A further 10 mm rain on 17 January gave topsoil moisture a top up, helping to prolong the grass growth. Rob Agnew Plant & Food Research / Marlborough Research Centre

Potential water deficit This is the difference between monthly rainfall and potential evapotranspiration. 80.4 mm rainfall â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 135.6 mm

Winepress February 2018 / 9


Safe Travels DRIVERS HAULING grapes this vintage need to resist the need for speed, says Senior Constable Paul McKenzie of Blenheim Police. “If drivers begin to rush loads spills will increase,” he says. “Grape movement in trucks is a liquid load a bit like transporting a swimming pool.” Police will routinely stop truck drivers during harvest for the purpose of compliance checks, looking at logbooks, licence and load security, says Paul. Here’s a checklist of things to remember. • Check your vehicle every day before your shift • Maintain logbooks and manage fatigue • Ensure trucks are washed down between trips • Wash down harvesters and tractors with trailers between vineyards to avoid grape waste on road • Drive at a steady speed • Avoid sudden or heavy braking at intersections and roundabouts • Insecure loading can incur a

fine of $600 and the cost of the council clean up. • Do not use a cell phone while driving trucks, tractors or harvesters • Maintain spacing in harvester and tractor convoys so other road users can pass • Over dimensional vehicles and loads must be correctly marked with over dimensional panels/ flags front and rear with lights on and flashing beacons on tractors and harvesters • Tractors towing trailers or gondolas must have lighting and safety chains to towing vehicle • Take regular breaks and manage fatigue Senior Constable Paul McKenzie

Harvest roadworks kept to a minimum Roadworks will be kept to a minimum on Marlborough’s State Highway 1 this harvest, thanks to coordination between Marlborough Roads and Wine Marlborough. Extensive road sealing outside the Riverlands Industrial Estate created major headaches for the wine industry in the 2017 vintage, leading to a letter of complaint from Wine Marlborough General Manager Marcus Pickens and Marlborough Chamber of Commerce board member Anthony Barnes. “Every year, for some years now, the annual harvest has been affected by maintenance work being carried out on sections of SH1 in the area between Alabama Road and Cloudy Bay Drive,” they wrote to Marlborough Roads in April 2017. “Wine Marlborough estimates that over 50 percent of New Zealand’s wine is produced in the vicinity…Our members have no objection to, and understand the importance of infrastructure maintenance, we simply ask

10 / Winepress February 2018

for consideration to be given for any work on this critical roadway to be conducted outside of the times when it causes so much additional impact.” Steve Murrin from Marlborough Roads says the November 2016 earthquake was the major reason for the time clash last year. “The road was falling to pieces, and it was the only time we could fit it in.” He says all the resealing on State Highway 1 will be complete before harvest this year, but there will still be some work on less major routes during vintage, because of availability of crews. “Brookby Rd and Dog Point Rd will have some sealing sites. They won’t be closures but there may be some delays on those sites.” He says the ideal situation would be to have no roadworks on grape haulage routes, but the Marlborough sealing programme is very small on a national scale, “and it is hard to get it “bumped up the propriety list”.


High Voltage MARLBOROUGH LINES has plant”, which includes “any undertaken a safety campaign device capable of being raised following an incident last vintage or lowered”, such as a gondola. in which a grape harvester hit an “In almost every harvesting 11,000 volt power line. The driver situation there is likely to be a was unharmed because they stayed mobile plant operating which in the cab, but the lines company is is capable of encroaching into contacting wine companies, growers, the required safe working contractors and transport operators distance from live lines,” he to warn them about the dangers of wrote in a letter sent out to coming into contact with high voltage 500 growers. power lines. The New Zealand Electrical Code Marlborough Lines Project of Practice states that there must be at Manager Geoff Hoare says new health least 4 metres between a live overhead and safety legislation widens the scope electric line and any part of any mobile of who may be held responsible for plant or load, unless the operator has an accident when working close to received written consent from the lines power lines. “Really, anyone who has owner allowing a reduced distance. In an association with the work could be Marlborough, Marlborough Lines can held to be a PCBU (persons conducting issue a “Close Approach Authority” a business or undertaking).” after a site visit. Geoff says the vintage period The Code of Practice also requires HALF PAGE HORIZONTAL 124H X 176W MM involves use of many types of “mobile that any mobile plant “likely to be

used at any time in the proximity of overhead electric lines”, is also required to have a warning notice as near as practicable to the driver’s position stating “WARNING KEEP CLEAR OF POWER LINES”. To initiate the Close Approach Authority process you should call Marlborough Lines on 03 577 7007 and staff will take details and arrange for a site visit. This can also be arranged via email to info@linesmarl.co.nz

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Winepress February 2018 / 11


Top Marc A new view of Marlborough’s grape marc SOPHIE PREECE

MARLBOROUGH NEEDS an evolution in grape marc processes, rather than a revolution, according to a report by Treasury Wine Estate’s (TWE) Jaimee Whitehead. “There is already evidence that individuals are expanding their current facilities to accommodate the expected increase in grape marc,” she writes in the recently released report Hitting the Marc in Marlborough, written as part of a Kellogg Rural Leadership Programme. Having six months to develop a 26-page report on all aspects of grape marc was a good challenge, says Jaimee. But when her baby daughter Maiken arrived five weeks early, just before deadline, the task got a whole lot bigger. “It was a very long 26 pages.”

“You cannot look at Australia, or Hawke’s Bay or the beer industry.” Jaimee Whitehead The report looks at the increasing levels of grape marc in Marlborough, and at predictions the amounts will lift another 50% within the next decade. One of the most challenging factors of

12 / Winepress February 2018

Jaimee Whitehead with Maiken. Photo by Jim Tannock

winery waste disposal is the creation of large amounts at vintage, especially for a region so dominated by a single variety, “leading to the majority of the region being ready to harvest at the same time”. That’s just one of the unique attributes that mean Marlborough needs to develop its own solutions to winery waste, rather than calling on systems used in other parts of the country or world, says Jaimee, a technical supervisor at TWE, currently on maternity leave. “My whole learning is you cannot look at Australia, or Hawke’s Bay or the beer industry.” Jaimee, who was a contestant in the 2016 Young Viticulturist of the Year Competition, intentionally chose a subject matter she had little knowledge of. That meant she looked at research and regulations with fresh eyes, and had an open mind in talking to industry members involved in the composting or removal of grape marc. “Most people I talked to are already doing things better than they were five

or 10 years ago,” she says. Her report looks at the merits of dealing with grape marc through composting, pyrolysis and as a stock feed, among other methods researched. It concludes that composting grape marc to return to the vineyard is the most cost effective method. “This excludes the capital spending required to set up but is a long term solution to a waste stream that a winery produces every year. The cost of the compost operation could be reduced again by introducing a rotation contract where all grape suppliers would be expected to take a percentage of the compost biannually or similar.” The report also concludes that grape marc is an industry issue, but affects a “wider audience” than just the wineries. “Collaboration between all parties involved in the production, treatment, legislation and reporting of statistics should be employed to ensure the uptake of best practice procedures.”


WINEPRESS MAGAZINE 253H X 86W MM

Winery Waste Management 2018 Marlborough District Council (MDC) Environmental Protection Officer Rachel Neal has supplied the following information in the lead-up to vintage 2018. Prior to the upcoming vintage, it is important to ensure your processes and systems for disposing of both • liquid and solid waste are up to date with the relevant regulations, and operating efficiently. Liquid Waste – discharge into or onto land: • Is the disposal area located within a Soil Sensitive Area? You can check the the Environmental Smart Map on the MDC website. https://maps. marlborough.govt.nz/smartmaps • Is the disposal area located within 50m of a bore? Check the Well Locations Smart Map • Is the disposal area located within 20m of a river, lake, significant wetland, drainage channel or within 10m of property boundaries? • Is the disposal area large enough to not exceed the discharge rate and soil moisture field capacity? • Do you have pH monitoring in place to ensure that the pH is between 4.5-9 prior to being discharged to land? Remember to keep records to demonstrate the pH level and note any adjustments made. Please note: It is important to have sufficient storage available in order to defer discharges when adverse weather conditions occur.

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Grape marc storage and leachate collection Whether you store and manage your grape marc waste yourself or contract another party to take and manage your grape marc waste, you are responsible for taking measures to ensure plan requirements and the Resource Management Act 1991 are met. Inadequate storage and control measures for grape marc and leachate can cause significant adverse effects. Such adverse effects include the contamination of ground and/or surface water.

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Important factors to consider to meet requirements: • Is the grape marc located within a Soil Sensitive Area? • Is the grape marc located within 50m of a bore? • Is the grape marc located within 20m of any surface water body? • What is the moisture content of the solid waste? • Are there measures in place to prevent rain and runoff entering the grape marc? • Is there sufficient leachate collection in place? • Is the grape marc covered? To avoid adverse effects, it is recommended to store grape marc solid waste on an impermeable surface with an impermeable leachate collection system. For more information, contact the council’s monitoring team on 03 520 7400 or monitoring@marlborough.govt.nz

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Winepress February 2018 / 13


Green Goals SWNZ shines on the world stage SOPHIE PREECE

WINNING OVER judges in the 2017 Drinks Business Green Awards is one thing, but convincing some Marlborough growers of the benefits of Sustainable Winegrowing New Zealand is a far greater challenge, says SWNZ Business Manager Justine Tate. “We are trying to tell them they are the building blocks of New Zealand wine’s sustainability. If they don’t have the sustainability practices and consciousness, the wineries have nothing to build the sustainability brand on.” SWNZ won Green Initiative of the Year at the Drinks Business awards ceremony in London late last year, with judges commending

a sustainability report, released for the first time in 2017, which provides benchmarking data for New Zealand wineries. They went on to praise the Spray Mix Mate app, created by SWNZ and New Zealand Winegrowers to help growers calculate more precise spray application rates. SWNZ was also celebrated at the 2017 NZI Sustainable Business Network Awards, winning a commendation in the Communicating for Change category. The judges recognised a partnership between SWNZ and the New Zealand

Sustainability Dashboard Project, aimed at better data aggregation, analysis and communication. They also commented on the 15,800 individualised one-page benchmarking reports sent out to all SWNZ growers in 2016, covering topics such as irrigation use, sulphur application rates, spray timing, and adherence to resistance management strategies. The judges said the commendation was an outstanding achievement “and recognition of SWNZ’s drive to contribute to a better New Zealand”. Justine says it is vital that SWNZ

SWNZ Rate Calculator Late last year SWNZ added a rates calculator into the GrapeLink spray diary programme, to ensure appropriate spray application rates in Marlborough vines. The calculator takes into account row spacing and the size and density of the canopy to give an application rate, says SWNZ Business Manager Justine Tate. “It is an absolute mind shift for a lot of the industry because we are getting them to stop thinking about spraying a land-based area, and to start thinking about how many vines and how many canopy hectares they need to spray.” The result when calculated for row spacings and canopy size may be a number that is different to what growers would normally spray, but that is the whole point. “We are asking that if the calculator rate differs to your usual application rate by 10% or more then you need to think about an adjustment to your practice. While spray coverage is also key, an application rate that is too low will not be effective on the pest or disease and a rate that is too high is wasting money.” Both scenarios also contribute to resistance management issues, says Justine.

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However, getting that across to growers who are confident of their traditional spray rates and fearful of disease incursion should they use the calculator is “complex”, she says. “For example, some people initially thought the calculated rates for sulphur were too low, but that was early season with smaller canopies and research shows the suggested rate is correct. As canopies grow the calculator factors that in and prescribes higher rates.” The calculator has been released as guidance, and SWNZ certification is not dependent on its use. However, some wineries will be speaking to their growers about adherence to the more precise rates, ensuring the right dose is applied as well as emphasising effective coverage, she says. “It’s a guide. We are encouraging people to use it as they pre-plan their sprays and to think about the alerts that it raises, in terms of their typical spray rates.” SWNZ has developed the spray calculator in advance of other horticultural sectors, which means it is treading a new path with chemical companies, which need to have labels that fit the template.


stays ahead of best practice, for the good of the environment, the community and the industry. “Every wine producing country now has a sustainability programme and they

“Our growers are the first step in the industry’s sustainability chain” Justine Tate didn’t used to. That means ours needs to be constantly raising the bar to be a world leader in the sustainability stakes.”

Growers need to be on that journey, but some see themselves as one removed, “or sometimes they think two removed” from the sustainability demands of consumers and major players like Tesco and Sainsbury’s, Justine says. “They see it as the wineries’ responsibility because they just grow the grapes. But our growers are the first step in the industry’s sustainability chain, allowing the traceability that our export markets demand.” At the Bragato Conference last year, Justine showed videos from Whole Foods Market in the US and LCBO in Canada, with operators talking about the importance of the SWNZ logo and background story. In one clip, Devon Broglie, global wine buyer for Whole Food Market, says the company looks for wineries that “are responsible stewards for the earth” and its customers are more ready to pick

Justine Tate

up a bottle that has been certified as being “kind to the earth”. In another, LCBO’s Carolyn O’Grady-Gold says sustainability certification, including SWNZ, is of growing and “critical” importance. “That was trying to get the message back out to our members that people take the logo seriously,” says Justine of the presentation. “Consumers are looking for it.”

SWNZ Continuous Improvement - Q&A Sustainable Winegrowing New Zealand (SWNZ) launched its Continuous Improvement (CI) Programme last year. Operating as a pilot for the first year, almost 50 members registered within a few days, demonstrating the appetite for sustainability within the industry. Winepress asks Business Manager Justine Tate and SWNZ CI Implementation Manager Bridget Ennals what’s in store for 2018. What is the Continuous Improvement Programme? The CI Programme is a framework that enables wineries and growers to gain recognition for their sustainability efforts and achievements over and above the SWNZ programme. It is based on the pillars of sustainability (water, energy, air, plant protection, biodiversity, byproducts, business, social) and SWNZ has produced a CI guide for each pillar, which gathers together best practice guidelines, pathways and resources to assist. Participants in the programme choose a pillar or pillars to focus on, then set their own goals, action plan and timelines for achieving those goals. Members can concentrate on pillars that are of interest and a good business fit. The process and achievement is then verified by SWNZ. Will it replace my SWNZ accreditation? SWNZ CI is an optional extension to the SWNZ programme open to accredited SWNZ members, so it doesn’t replace SWNZ accreditation - it is in addition to it.

Then what do I get out of it? Along with the sustainability improvements to their business, participants in the programme will have independent verification of those achievements, giving additional credibility to their sustainability claims and stories. Participants also gain access to likeminded people who may be willing to share ideas for tackling issues they have in common, and provides a good basis for all staff to be involved. What’s happening with the Pilot Project? We are busy promoting the programme and helping our interested members articulate their goals and set their action plans. It’s already a busy time of year for our members and we want to get as many action plans completed before it gets even busier. The pilot allows us to finetune all aspects of the programme - from content of the guides, action plan formats through to verifying member achievements - before opening it up to more members. To date, we have had a lot of interest from members in our water, waste and biodiversity pillars. How can I get involved? We would love to hear from you. Take a look on the website and get in touch with Bridget for further information, bridget@swnz.org.nz

Winepress February 2018 / 15


Ripening Opportunities Positive Outlook in Financial Benchmarking Report SOPHIE PREECE

NEW ZEALAND’S wine industry will look to replenish stocks with the 2018 crop, according to a new report by Deloitte, New Zealand Winegrowers and ANZ. The “Ripening opportunities” financial benchmarking report looks at wine markets, profitability and wine tourism, giving insights into the greatest challenges and opportunities facing the industry. It notes that strong sales performance in 2017 means only a 3 million litre surplus (1% of sales) from 2016 - New Zealand’s secondlargest ever crop – will be carried through to the new season. “If a similar performance were maintained with the smaller 2017 crop, a deficit of 26 million litres (8% of sales) would be created”, the report states. Expectations are therefore that the industry will try to produce a larger 2018 crop to replenish stocks, “which we have falling to the lowest level since 2012”. The UK took the lion’s share of market growth for 2017 wine exports, with a 27% year on year increase to nearly 75 million litres. Nearly half the UK exports were in bulk wine, which is likely to have been a deliberate strategy from larger wine companies, ”to minimise the financial impacts of a higher NZD/GBP caused by the Brexit vote, to overcome capacity issues due to the large vintage and earthquake damage, as well as to keep supply chain costs low”. But the “standout market” was again North America, with total export earnings exceeding $600 million for the first time, with a 17% year on year increase. “A strong US economy and wine companies’ marketing investments in recent years are both providing tailwinds,” says the report. “Yet there is scope for more

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growth from consumers looking for sophisticated foods and beverages, a new generation of younger consumers coming through, as well as a trend towards ‘premiumisation’”. Australia achieved volume growth of 13% in 2017, mostly driven by a 25% increase in packaged wine exports, while bulk wine exports dropped 2%, making it the only major market to

“Nearly half the UK exports were in bulk wine.” Ripening Opportunities reduce its bulk wine intake. While other markets – including the Netherlands, China, Belgium, France, Singapore, Sweden and Canada - didn’t keep up with the ‘big three’, the long term picture is for higher volume growth and better returns in other markets, which helps compensate for the costs of market

development and distribution, says the report. “Looking over a 10 year period shows these other markets have grown at 17% per annum compared with the ‘big three’ at 14% per annum. Perhaps even more compelling is the average local returns have been $9.4 per litre over this period, which was 34% higher than the ‘big three’.” The domestic market accounted for around 20% of total supply in 2017, making it an important space, particularly for smaller wine companies. Wineries with less than $1.5m turnover derived 54% of their revenue from local market sales. The wine industry in New Zealand continues to go from strength to strength, says Deloitte Partner Peter Felstead in the report’s introduction. “Whilst our benchmarking results showed our smallest participants reporting an average loss for 2017, we continue to see opportunities for wine businesses of all sizes through new and emerging export markets as well as domestic tourism and online channels.” The report calls on survey results from 45 wineries, accounting for approximately 56% of the New Zealand wine industry by litres of wine produced and 41% by export sales revenue generated for the 2017 year.


Key findings – an excerpt from the Ripening Opportunities report Profitability. The profitability levels in the survey showed positive outcomes for all sized tiers, except for those with less than $1.5 million in annual revenue. As winery size increases, so do net returns, as cost controls likely associated with economies of scale have greatest impact on bottom lines. Analysis of profitability amongst smaller operators shows vastly more variable profits than their larger counterparts over the last 12 years. Financial position. Participant results suggest that balance sheets have been strengthening in recent years, with long term debt levels showing a slight downward trend over the last 12 years, most notably from 2013 to 2016. Participants in the $5m to $10m category reported the lowest debt levels for 2017 while also having the highest level of debtors and inventory. The survey results also show the higher relative investment in land that smaller producers have, which appears to be funded by equity rather than debt. Larger operators featured high levels of equipment to process their larger volumes of bought grapes. The relative level of debtors increases with scale up to $10m in revenue, but then decreases thereafter. This is likely due to typical cashflow cycles when initially expanding into export markets. Selling prices. The surveyed ratios showed that smaller producers achieved more premium selling prices ($17.49/l) compared to their larger counterparts ($7.67/l). Return on assets. The returns on assets for participants showed a range of 1.0% for the $0 to $1.5m tier to 8.6% for $20m+. An indicator of Marlborough grower returns showed an average of 6.6%, which indicates that extending further up the value chain may not always generate a higher return on investment. However, the authors are mindful that many other factors will influence returns. The regional story. An overview of the country’s wine regions notes Hawke’s Bay dominating North Island production, with Auckland being home to a large number of wineries and ‘head office’ employees. A propensity for wineries having a cellar door also shows through in

Auckland and Wairarapa. The South Island includes the vastly dominant region of Marlborough, which produced over 300,000 tonnes in 2017 (almost 80% of New Zealand’s total vintage) with a small workforce of local residents. Interestingly, Central Otago contains an almost equal number of wineries and cellar doors as Marlborough, despite only producing 8,300 tonnes in 2017. Vineyards and yields. Survey results show grape yields increase with participant size, from 6.5 t/ha to 13.2 t/ha. This is likely due to the strong demand for Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc, which is high yielding, and larger operators making use of the opportunity. Many smaller producers appear to take a diversification strategy when it comes to grape varieties with an intentional focus on lower yields. Distribution channels. Participants up to $10m in revenue sell between 13% and 28% of volumes through direct-to-consumer (DTC) channels. They also sell about 27% of volume to supermarkets, with that growing to over 70% for those with over $20m in revenue. Wine tourism. Wine tourism remains a key growth market for New Zealand’s wineries and is particularly accessible to smaller producers. Wine tourists spend an average of $4,500 per visit to New Zealand which is higher than the average of $3,200. The tourism outlook is bright on a number of fronts including airline arrivals and spend, notably with China becoming New Zealand’s most important market by total tourist spend. Some ways to make the most of the opportunity could include creating lasting, authentic experiences and specialties that drive product loyalty. Engaging online and with mobile is also a necessity. Challenges and opportunities. Amongst the issues that wineries face, sales margin pressure ranked highest once again and interestingly succession rated as the lowest. On the opportunities front, sales margins, somewhat conversely, also featured highly, as did sales volume growth from existing products, both in new and existing markets.

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Storytellers Cellar door champion takes another step forward SOPHIE PREECE

HUNTER’S HERITAGE has always been part of its cellar door experience, with staff sharing stories of the earliest days of Marlborough’s wine industry. So it’s fitting that the company’s newest space is the old farm cottage where Jane and Ernie Hunter lived in 1983, when their first cellar door sat in the garage under a mulberry tree. Back then, Marlborough’s vineyards were very few and far between, and Hunter’s closed each winter, having inevitably run out of wine,” says Jane, 35 years on. In 1984, they moved out of the cottage and transformed it into a restaurant and gardens, while the cellar door eventually moved to join the winery and offices. When the restaurant closed a few years ago, the gardens were no longer accessible to visitors, and Jane decided to gut the old-fashioned interior and create a fresh new space, indoors and out. Workers were putting the finished

18 / Winepress February 2018

touches to the major renovation late last year when Hunter’s was announced as joint winner Rachael Meiklejohn and Jane Hunter in an old garden and new cellar in the Wine door. Marlborough Cellar Door of the Year Competition, leading Jane to occupant stays quiet. “Here it is the laugh that she needn’t have changed opposite and everyone starts talking anything at all. But visitors and tour and interacting.” They are also serving operators have loved the new look light dishes to accompany wine, so and bigger space, which is perfect for people can while away some hours in their brand of relaxed, non-formulaic the garden. tasting, she says. Jane says the fundamentals that New Cellar Door Manager Rachael helped Hunter’s score so highly in Meiklejohn says guests choose a table, the cellar door competition are in full indoor or out, and are given the list swing at the new venue. “I think we of wine options, including wine by have a really good story to tell. People the glass, with no pressure to try any either know the story or the ladies tell one style. That’s a conscious steer it to them, and they feel they are a part away from more formal tastings, of something.” which Rachael says can feel a little like stepping into a lift, where each


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Good Stuff To kick off our new sustainability series, Winepress talks to Stephen Leitch about good measures of success SOPHIE PREECE

A CONVERSATION with Stephen Leitch can flow easily from water and climate change, to efficiency and electric bikes, to community need and corporate engagement. The founder and managing director of SWE (Southern Water Engineering) is fair bursting with ideas, many of which come down to simply working smarter, for the sake of business, the environment and the people around him. To ensure that happens, SWE measures its success in a “quadrant” in which the four key performance goals – Financial, Health and Safety, Environmental, and Social – are reported to the Board of Directors, in an impressive example of walking the talk, or indeed in riding it. Stephen generally turns up to meetings on his e-bike, and is committed to buying

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Stephen Leitch

one for any staff member who’ll join his commuting crusade. SWE donates big chunks of cash to social causes (including $24,000 a year to the Graeme Dingle Foundation’s Kiwi Can programme) and its staff give big chunks of time to the likes of Scouts, the volunteer fire brigade and sports groups. The company looks beyond its backyard too, making micro-finance loans through Kiva (www.kiva.org), to help assist sustainable agriculture and potable water initiatives in the

developing world. “We love this idea of giving a hand-up, not a hand-out,” says Stephen, who also developed relationships with people in the Solomon Islands with the skills to develop IT networks, but not the hardware and financial resources. He partnered with the Marlborough District Council to collect retired computer equipment, which SWE will ship to the Solomon Islands for installation and usage in local schools. Now he is in discussions with a Marlborough IT company to assist with


accessing networks and enhanced satellite access to the internet. “It is a game-changer for IT, internet access and education in the Solomon Islands,” says Stephen. “They tell us it will change not only their present - but their future, for generations.” When it comes to the environment, SWE’s goals are internal - including energy, water and waste efficiencies, and its recently announced carboNZero accreditation - and external, with systems and designs that target more efficient use of water and energy, including in the region’s wine sector. Marlborough is a lucky place, where rain often falls when it’s needed, he says. But with climate change and increased demand, that is bound to change. “Some vineyards are already struggling from year to year. We can no longer afford to pretend the water will always be there when we need it, when we want it, at a cheap price, without consequences.” Last year SWE won the Business Innovation category at the Cawthron Marlborough Environment Awards for its SmartAudits, which have assessed more than 2,100 hectares of vineyards to identify potential water and power savings of up to 50%. Speaking at a field day following the awards, Stephen shared United Nations predictions that within 12 years the demand for fresh water could be 40% greater than the supply available. The average person uses a million tonnes of water in their lifetime, and irrigation now grows 40% of the world’s food, using 69% of the water. “We are a thirsty species,” he told the audience, explaining that the glass of wine they had just consumed required 110 litres of water. Scientists predict that by 2050, 65% of the world’s food supply will be grown by irrigation, and we will have to double the output using half the quantity of currently available water. That will require producers “being smarter and better with less”, which presents “huge opportunities” for New Zealand, he says. Stephen talks to clients about SWE being a coaching squad, using a Usain Bolt sporting analogy. Bolt’s coach, Glen Mills, uses an ‘ACT’ approach – analysis, coaching and training – to constantly review the runner’s performance and adapt the training. In vineyard irrigation terms it is about identifying deficiencies and providing solutions, says Stephen. “It’s looking at the opportunity, and getting more crop for our drop.” Marlborough currently has around 23,000 hectares of producing vineyards. If a SmartAudit identifies a saving of 10% in power, that amounts to a minimum saving of $17 per hectare per year and $400,000 power saved across Marlborough. That’s a potential 2.5 million kilowatts less power wasted every year, based on

“We are a thirsty species.”

a conservative saving of 10%, when vineyards SWE has audited have seen actual savings of up to 50%. When it comes to water, a 5% saving (and SWE audits have identified potential 20% water savings) amounts to 102 cubic metres of water per hectare per year, or 2.5 million cubic metres for the province, annually. That’s nearly 1,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools worth of water, says Stephen. SWE’s work in recent years has included significant dam-building projects and establishing irrigation for new vineyards, using systems that are durable, efficient and contain “redundancy”, so there is capacity for when things are dry – or wet. The systems are designed for an individual site’s soils, terrain and grape variety, will flag inefficiencies and include manuals that explain optimum operation and maintenance. The need for each of those characteristics should be “pretty flaming obvious”, given the industry’s reliance on water, Stephen says. “And it’s a lot harder to change it once it’s in the ground”. Good business is about more than just a healthy financial tally, says Stephen, 10 years after setting up SWE. “If you measure your success on profits alone, you’re limiting the potential of your community and your business”

Stephen Leitch

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Generation Y-ine Arabella Waghorn is the Chardonnay baby, although it’s Sauvignon Blanc she loves SOPHIE PREECE

AS A 5-year-old, Arabella Waghorn played “winery mice” in the school holidays, scampering across the wooden planks between small Whitehaven wine tanks. “The handheld forklifts were great fun as scooters”, says Astrolabe’s marketing manager, who’s still having fun in the wine industry. Her parents Simon and Jane Waghorn were young students when they moved to Adelaide to study at Roseworthy in the 1980s. “He had been working at a bottle store and decided wine was a bit more interesting than seaweed, which is what his other love was,” says Arabella. Her sister Meg Waghorn, born at that time, is the Barossa Baby, while the next daughter, Libby, is the MüllerThurgau Baby, arriving after the family moved to Te Kauwhata. By the time Arabella was born in 1991, Simon was working at Corbans and had earned a reputation as a Chardonnay specialist. “And so I was the Chardonnay Baby, which is ironic because I don’t love Chardonnay in the way I love

22 / Winepress February 2018

Sauvignon Blanc.” Arabella was 4 when the family moved to Marlborough for Simon’s role as foundation winemaker for Whitehaven Wines, which at that stage ran out of a small winery, now a brewery, on Dodson St in Blenheim. Arabella, Meg and Libby learned to scamper boards and skate forklifts, “and there are some great pictures of us crushing grapes in our togs,” Arabella says. “Whitehaven was a big part of us growing up.” A year later, Jane and Simon established Astrolabe with some university friends, thinking it would be a small side project. But by the early 2000s it was clear that Astrolabe was a success and on its way to needing undivided attention. In 2009, Simon gave up his Whitehaven position, and settled into his own brand, made at what was then Marlborough Valley Cellars. By that time Arabella was 12, and instead of playing winery mice, would watch young and upcoming winemakers at work, including Jules

Taylor and Matt Thompson. But, despite stellar cellar foundations, she was not inspired to follow in their footsteps, and chose to study printmaking at Auckland University’s Elam School of Fine Arts, emerging with a degree she imagined would be of scant use on the job market. But her graduation coincided with a gap in Astrolabe’s marketing position, which had until that point been managed by Jane (“who was doing everything, as a one woman wine company”), and before then by Arabella’s cousin Sophie, followed by Libby’s maid of honour Genevieve. “So it’s all been closest friends and family, and when Genevieve left to go to film school we had a bit of a gap.” Arabella’s fine arts degree seemed “completely unrelated”, but design and photography has become a major part of her role at Astrolabe, including vineyard imagery, a new bottle design for the Durvillea label and a gorgeous gift box design, which represents the rich biodiversity of insects, weeds and vines at the family’s organic home


vineyard, Astrolabe Farm. “It’s really fun to see your work go into a fully finished product that is on the shelf,” she says. Astrolabe is at the “tricky size” of being big enough to need a lot of work, but not big enough to need a large team, which means Arabella sees her role as broad and satisfying, from wine tastings to vintage photography. It also allows her to continue her own art, with an antique printing press in her garage, and a recent exhibition in Akaroa. And the line between her art and work has become even more blurred with the launch of Arabella and Jane’s new wine label, Print & Press, to reflect their love of art, books and wine. The brand is “tiny”, says Arabella, who will design and handprint the labels for each bottle. “But it’s a nice little project for us.” Print & Press will produce a Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Riesling from organic Astrolabe Farm fruit, although the 2017 vintage is limited to a Riesling, made by Simon, to Jane and Arabella’s specifications. It’s wine from the vines she can see from the family home’s kitchen window, their rows surrounded by beehives and fruit trees. “They are very lucky vines,” she says. “Astrolabe Riesling is normally super dry, but this one is bit sweeter… It’s a summery, pretty wine.” Joining the family business initially gave Arabella the jitters, because the New Zealand ethos leans towards people making their own way in life. But she is increasingly conscious that people enjoy meeting Simon and Jane’s daughter when they do business. “There is a huge amount of trust that consumers have in family business.” It also allows her to safeguard the legacy her parents have built. “In a small company you want to protect your family’s work and you know it so well that it is hard to step away.”

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Winepress February 2018 / 23


Biosecurity Watch A New Year – Planning for better biosecurity risk management DR EDWIN MASSEY

AS AN industry, we have come a long way in the short time since the establishment of the New Zealand Winegrowers Biosecurity Strategy in May 2016. As we look to build on this success, 2018 promises to be a busy year in three key areas: • Maximising our members’ capability to influence biosecurity decision making and activities across the scope of the system • Promoting our members’ awareness of biosecurity risks and mitigations • Ensuring our members’ participation in biosecurity activities is maximised Refreshing the New Zealand Winegrowers (NZW) Biosecurity Strategy is also a key priority in the first part of this year. To date, Winegrowers has been successful in achieving the biosecurity goals and objectives specified. The refreshed strategy will set new objectives and success measures to be achieved by 2020. Working with government to minimise risk to the industry MPI has a key leadership role in the New Zealand biosecurity system, as it is primarily responsible for the biosecurity rules and regulations

that apply to international trade and passenger transport. NZW will continue to engage with MPI on behalf of the industry to ensure these rules and regulations minimise the risk to the wine industry, while facilitating safe trade. Just prior to Christmas, NZW and other horticultural industry organisations expressed concern to MPI about the number of brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), one of the industry’s highest threat biosecurity risks, being intercepted at the border in consignments shipped from Italy. The number of detections this year was a 79% increase on the same time last year, and the majority of these detections (83%) were found on containerised cargo. In response, MPI applied more stringent measures on this pathway. At present, all containerised goods from Italy require treatment to manage the risk of BMSB hitchhiking to New Zealand. This is a significant win for wine industry biosecurity and it was good to see MPI move swiftly to mitigate an increasing risk. NZW will continue to engage with MPI on a range of relevant biosecurity issues and advocate for measures that mitigate biosecurity risk as much as possible.

Spreading awareness and encouraging participation NZW will also continue to promote awareness of biosecurity risks and mitigations amongst members and encourage participation in biosecurity activities through events like Grape Days and the Romeo Bragato Conference. We received positive feedback from members on these presentations last year, and see future forums as a vital opportunity to engage with the industry. This year NZW will continue to promote the theme “it’s your asset – protect it!” and look to provide as much guidance to members as necessary to help them make pragmatic risk management decisions. As a partner in the Government Industry Agreement for biosecurity readiness and response, NZW and the Crown have shared responsibility for making decisions on how to respond to our highest threat biosecurity risks. To build from this position of strength NZW is exploring the potential to join the National Biosecurity Capability Network (NBCN). The NBCN is a network of organisations that join in to respond to biosecurity incursions in New Zealand. Network members provide their shared resources, people, and knowledge to carry out operational activities (for example, trapping for insect pests, spraying chemicals to

IF YOU SEE ANYTHING UNUSUAL

CATCH IT . SNAP IT . REPORT IT . Call MPI biosecurity hotline 0800 80 99 66 24 / Winepress February 2018


manage pests or supplying collateral to affected communities) during a biosecurity response. Joining the network would give members the opportunity to participate in real-life biosecurity events and encourage the adoption of biosecurity best practice as part of everyday business. Biosecurity activities – key to ensuring ongoing industry sustainability Biosecurity is a fundamental element of the wine industry’s sustainability story. Biosecurity activities to minimise risk are critical to ensure the ongoing success of the industry. Sustainable Winegrowing New Zealand ensures members meet international standards for sustainability practices while helping the environment, businesses and local communities to thrive. This year NZW will work with members to explore the relationship between sustainable winegrowing and biosecurity, and whether there is potential synergy

Containers being prepared for loading in Ravenna, Italy.

between biosecurity and other sustainability practices. Conclusion NZW encourages all members to think about biosecurity as part of their business as usual. Your actions matter, whether it’s checking a recently imported piece of machinery for unwanted hitchhikers, talking to contractors about whether they have cleaned their tools since their previous job, or even purchasing vines

accredited under the New Zealand Grafted Grapevine Standard. If you have questions about biosecurity or want to engage about any biosecurity related topic, please call New Zealand Winegrowers Biosecurity and Emergency Response Manager Dr Ed Massey on 0211924924 or Edwin.massey@nzwine.com. If you see anything unusual in the vineyard or winery: Catch it; Snap it; Report it! Call the MPI biosecurity hotline 0800 809966.

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Winepress February 2018 / 25


Industry News Big Scout. There’ll be Framingham Nobody’s Hero wine, Garage Project beers and local fare from The Feast Merchants. Tickets are limited and likely to sell out. Head to Framingham, Vinos or eventfinder.co.nz. Tres Romantique! Framingham Party The eighth annual Framingham Harvest Concert is on March 9, featuring some of New Zealand’s top musical talent. The line-up includes Framingham’s winery band, the Renwick Nudes, along with Dictaphone Blues, Kodatone, and

Clos Henri’s Nuits Romantiques is on February 16, with an outdoor screening

of Back to Burgundy. Guests to the French Outdoor Cinema event receive a glass of wine on arrival, a bag of French movie treats and the subtitled movie, projected on to a weatherboard wall of the cellar door chapel. Bring a low deck chair or beanbag, a warm blanket and a loved one for a romantic night in the vines. Tickets are $55. Contact 03 572 7923 or cellardoor@closhenri.com for more. Saint Clair in the UK The Wine Business Solutions Wine On-Premise UK 2018 survey has identified Saint Clair Family Estate

Vineyard Access Following Winepress’s November story on cellar door cycle routes, including those through vineyards, WorkSafe has provided some information on obligations of landowners who allow access. They say landowners who provide access to their property have a duty under the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 to identify and manage risks on the property so far as is reasonably practicable. Under the Act, if landowners are providing access to a facility such as a cycleway, they need to ensure that they are safe for both their employed workers and visitors to the property. Things to consider in your health and safety policy: • Identify the hazard of the cycleway to workers • Identify risks that arise from your work and that may impact on cyclists • Put reasonable measures in place to mitigate risks that arise from the work or the workplace, such as restricting access to hazardous work areas, warning people of hazards that they may not anticipate (this may include warning signs), maintenance of cycleway path and access points • Inform all workers and visitors to the property of any risks that may impact on them and actions required of them to stay safe In the event of an incident that is serious, WorkSafe may investigate to establish the facts, to recommend an appropriate response to any breaches identified and to prevent recurrence of the incident. Penny Wardle, who is regional field advisor for the New Zealand Walking Access Commission, Ara Hīkoi Aotearoa, says there is a lot of “uninformed fear” about

26 / Winepress February 2018

allowing public access into vineyards. She says a walking access brochure written for farmers (www.walkingaccess. govt.nz) has a lot of relevant information for the grape growing industry. “The key obligation is to warn visitors – a simple sign can suffice – of risks they would not normally expect. Activities such as vineyard spraying and the movement of tractors are something you’d expect on a vineyard.” She says grape growers interested in creating access might like to look at the option of creating a Gazetted Walkway with conditions. A gazetted walkway is a walkway that is legally protected by a registered easement or lease and notified in the New Zealand Gazette, giving landholders and the walkway the legal protections and status offered by the Walking Access Act 2008. This would provide the ability to enable access, for example, by foot or on bikes, but exclude activities such as bringing dogs into a vineyard. A walkway may be closed at certain times for public reasons (e.g. potentially while a vineyard is being harvested), among other reasons. Penny recently visited Hawke’s Bay and says it was “wonderful” to be able to travel between towns entirely off road, by bike, including through and alongside many vineyards. Anyone interested in knowing more about creating a walkway can contact Penny at Penny.Wardle@walkingaccess.govt.nz


Heather Battersby LUCY WALTER

Heather Battersby must be one of the most loved people in the wider wine industry. Her passing has caused a ripple of grief as Heather is remembered as someone who went above and beyond her ‘job’ and to many had become a firm friend. Heather was well known, along with husband Paddy, through their businesses Winejobsonline and Safety Wire and Battersby HR, which they ran until last year. Through these, Heather and Paddy helped employ, assist and keep safe hundreds of people and companies in the wine industry. They held a true belief in health and safety, and really wanted to see the employers keep their staff safe. After the earthquakes in Marlborough, Heather’s concern was heartfelt – this wasn’t done in a business sense, it was personal for her and she wanted to know her friends were safe. She loved small details and had a brilliant skill at being pedantic without being annoying. The attention to detail merged with her caring nature – such as sending socks to newborn ‘wine babies’. I remember well the socks arriving in the mail when my boys were born and I cherish these. Heather would ring me and check in on the latest ‘wine arrivals’ – I’d often send her the birth notices from the Blenheim Sun or The Marlborough Express.

as the most listed table wine brand in the UK. Saint Clair Managing Director Neal Ibbotson (pictured with wife Judy) says the team is “very proud” about the announcement. “Hearing that our wines are the number one table wine sold in the UK is something we never thought possible whilst also maintaining our much needed sales in the off-trade. We have been able to achieve these results through great distribution and our incredibly dedicated winery team.” Pinot Safari Ten Marlborough wine companies are celebrating the road less travelled, with a Pinot Safari to the region’s

Another of my favourite memories of Heather was her fantastic wit! She was dryer than a good Riesling yet just as poetic and balanced. She loved her family and was immensely proud of them. She was a fabulous cook and could whip up the best nibbles platter I’ve ever seen. After many years in the wine industry, from early days in South Australia to Delegates then their own business assisting so many facets, Heather had seen it all and although latterly she wasn’t a big wine drinker she made a great cuppa! I am so grateful that I knew Heather, firstly in my work life and also in my family life. I’ll miss her enormously but will raise a glass to a clever, kind, quick witted and wonderful friend.

“She was dryer than a good Riesling yet just as poetic and balanced.” Lucy Walter

hidden gems. A small group of top restaurateurs, retailers and influencers will head out on the Marlborough Pinot Safari in late February, with a journey into the Marlborough Sounds on one day, and on a four-wheeldrive adventure on the next, finding vineyards in far-flung corners. It’s an exhilarating journey to extraordinary wine, says Nautilus’s Katy Prescott. The Marlborough Pinot Safari sees 10 wine producers - Auntsfield, Churton, Dog Point, Greywacke, Fromm, HighfieldTerravin, Nautilus Estate, Seresin, Spy Valley and Villa Maria, join forces with more than 20 national restaurateurs, including the Nourish Group, Noble Rot, Depot and

Rata. Katy says New Zealand King Salmon and Cranky Goat cheese will also be part of the Safari, showcasing the region’s produce alongside its wine.

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Brought to you by

Wine Happenings A monthly list of events within the New Zealand wine industry.

To have your event included in next month’s Wine Happenings or Industry News pages, please email details to sophie@sophiepreece.co.nz by February 20. For more information on the events below email Harriet Wadworth at harriet@wine-marlborough.co.nz

FEBRUARY 9 Pre–Wine Festival Dinner at Brancott Estate (www.eventfinda.co.nz) 10 Marlborough Wine & Food Festival, Brancott Estate (www.wine–marlborough–festival.co.nz) 11 Wine & Food Wind Down, Vines Village, 10am – 5pm 16 Nuit Romantique at Clos Henri (see page 26) 18 – 19 Pinot Safari (see page 27) 23 New World Beer & Cider Awards entries close 24 Dog Point+ Logan Brown Classic Picnic 24 – 26 Wine Marlborough sommelier and media hosting, including Bach Hop MARCH 9 Framingham Harvest Concert (see page 26) 9–11 Waterfall Bay Feast, www.seresin.co.nz APRIL 7 Forrest Graperide

Wine & Food Festival - February 10

Nuit Romantique - February 16

Harvest Concert - March 9

SPOIL YOUR LOVED ONE AT THE MOST ROMANTIC ESTATE IN MARLBOROUGH... Imagine watching a spectacular sunset made even more relaxing with a glass of wine in hand and your most significant person aside... Splash out in the iconic Gourmet Restaurant and celebrate in style… Indulge in our wonderful Tasting Menus prepared by true Masterchefs!

Book now for an evening to remember! We have Valentine’s Day indulgence packages ready for you! 81 Jeffries Road | 03 572 8770 | enjoy@herzog.co.nz | www.herzog.co.nz

28 / Winepress February 2018

For a more relaxed bite, head to the charming Bistro and Cellar Door, all within beautiful Mediterranean gardens for a laid-back lunch or dinner!


1.7 Copy

1.7 Copy

Photo description

Photo description

A photo description field has been added in each template allowing you to enter text over images within the template, rather than photoshopping the text within the images prior to uploading. This function ensures all text is in the same position, font and size across all ads. The text will appear in the bottom left hand corner of the photo selected.

A photo description field has been added in each template allowing you to enter text over images within the template, rather than photoshopping the text within the images prior to uploading. This function ensures all text is in the same position, font and size across all ads. The text will appear in the bottom left hand corner of the photo selected.

This feature is intended to be used to display information critical to the sale of the property. It should not be used to include sentences about certain features of the property.

This feature is intended to be used to display information critical to the sale of the property. It should not be used to include sentences about certain features of the property.

Examples of suitable descriptions are noted below:

Examples of suitable descriptions are noted below:

• Boundary lines are indicative only

• Boundary lines are indicative only

• Photo not taken from site

• Photo not taken from site

• Artist’s impression

• Artist’s impression

1.8 Icons 3

Brand Standards

1

1.8 Icons 2

33

2

21

2 2

2 2

Icons for bedrooms, living areas, bathrooms, car parks and a pool are available for use on residential and lifestyle advertising. These icons need to be 100% black at all times on a white background. These icons will appear in the top right hand corner of the text area on all media ads, with a thin black line underneath.

Icons for bedrooms, living areas, bathrooms, car parks and a pool are available for use on residential and lifestyle advertising. These icons need to be 100% black at all times on a white background. These icons will appear in the top right hand corner of the text area on all media ads, with a thin black line underneath.

Note: These icons cannot be reversed i.e. white on a coloured background.

Note: These icons cannot be reversed i.e. white on a coloured background.

1.9 Photography

1.9 Photography

Professional photography is a minimum requirement for all properties advertised by Bayleys. For images to be good enough to reproduce on a printed page, they need to be high resolution. The picture must consist of at least 300dpi (dots per inch) at the size that is to be reproduced. You will lose quality if you enlarge the image and this will make the image pixelate. It will look out of focus and will degrade the image, having large ‘dots’ or ‘squares’ in it. Therefore photographs must be taken at high resolution and they must be large enough in size to be reproduced in print.

Professional photography is a minimum requirement for all properties advertised by Bayleys. For images to be good enough to reproduce on a printed page, they need to be high resolution. The picture must consist of at least 300dpi (dots per inch) at the size that is to be reproduced. You will lose quality if you enlarge the image and this will make the image pixelate. It will look out of focus and will degrade the image, having large ‘dots’ or ‘squares’ in it. Therefore photographs must be taken at high resolution and they must be large enough in size to be reproduced in print.

Any photos taken on cell phones, or downloaded/screenshotted from websites such as Google Maps or Property Guru cannot be accepted.

Any photos taken on cell phones, or downloaded/screenshotted from websites such as Google Maps or Property Guru cannot be accepted.

All photos promoting properties for sale or lease need to be taken in colour. They can then be retouched by a professional as required e.g. brightening/blueing the sky, removing graffiti or competitor agency signs etc. However, please ensure this isn’t taken too far with the end result becoming a misrepresentation of the actual property.

All photos promoting properties for sale or lease need to be taken in colour. They can then be retouched by a professional as required e.g. brightening/blueing the sky, removing graffiti or competitor agency signs etc. However, please ensure this isn’t taken too far with the end result becoming a misrepresentation of the actual property.

Brand Standards

Importantly, please avoid using any filters/treatments or altering the colours within the image at all.

Importantly, please avoid using any filters/treatments or altering the colours within the image at all.

Your photographer should be briefed thoroughly prior to commencing the job, and ideally shown examples of how the photos will be used across various marketing channels including print, online and outdoor. This way they can be sure to capture the angles required, with sufficient landscape and portrait options. As people are increasingly viewing listings on mobile phones, these portrait photos will become increasingly important to ensure we are displaying properties for sale in the best possible light.

Your photographer should be briefed thoroughly prior to commencing the job, and ideally shown examples of how the photos will be used across various marketing channels including print, online and outdoor. This way they can be sure to capture the angles required, with sufficient landscape and portrait options. As people are increasingly viewing listings on mobile phones, these portrait photos will become increasingly important to ensure we are displaying properties for sale in the best possible light.

Any artist’s impressions, maps or subdivision plans should be drawn professionally and signed off by a member of the Bayleys Realty Group marketing team prior to use. Remember you need to be able to read any text displayed within a plan.

Any artist’s impressions, maps or subdivision plans should be drawn professionally and signed off by a member of the Bayleys Realty Group marketing team prior to use. Remember you need to be able to read any text displayed within a plan.

Brand Standards

Brand Standards

1.7 Copy Photo description A photo description field has been added in each template allowing you to enter text over images within the template, rather than photoshopping the text within the images prior to uploading. This function ensures all text is in the same position, font and size across all ads. The text will appear in the bottom left hand corner of the photo selected. This feature is intended to be used to display information critical to the sale of the property. It should not be used to include sentences about certain features of the property. Examples of suitable descriptions are noted below: • Boundary lines are indicative only • Photo not taken from site • Artist’s impression

1.8 Icons

4 3

21

2 2

2 2

Icons for bedrooms, living areas, bathrooms, car parks and a pool are available for use on residential and lifestyle advertising. These icons need to be 100% black at all times on a white background. These icons will appear in the top right hand corner of the text area on all media ads, with a thin black line underneath. Note: These icons cannot be reversed i.e. white on a coloured background.

1.9 Photography Professional photography is a minimum requirement for all properties advertised by Bayleys. For images to be good enough to reproduce on a printed page, they need to be high resolution. The picture must consist of at least 300dpi (dots per inch) at the size that is to be reproduced. You will lose quality if you enlarge the image and this will make the image pixelate. It will look out of focus and will degrade the image, having large ‘dots’ or ‘squares’ in it. Therefore photographs must be taken at high resolution and they must be large enough in size to be reproduced in print. Any photos taken on cell phones, or downloaded/screenshotted from websites such as Google Maps or Property Guru cannot be accepted. All photos promoting properties for sale or lease need to be taken in colour. They can then be retouched by a professional as required e.g. brightening/blueing the sky, removing graffiti or competitor agency signs etc. However, please ensure this isn’t taken too far with the end result becoming a misrepresentation of the actual property. Importantly, please avoid using any filters/treatments or altering the colours within the image at all. Your photographer should be briefed thoroughly prior to commencing the job, and ideally shown examples of how the photos will be used across various marketing channels including print, online and outdoor. This way they can be sure to capture the angles required, with sufficient landscape and portrait options. As people are increasingly viewing listings on mobile phones, these portrait photos will become increasingly important to ensure we are displaying properties for sale in the best possible light. Any artist’s impressions, maps or subdivision plans should be drawn professionally and signed off by a member of the Bayleys Realty Group marketing team prior to use. Remember you need to be able to read any text displayed within a plan.

Brand Standards

Brand Standards


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Winepress February 2018  

Read about Vintage preparation, Grape marc, Sustainable winegrowing and more.

Winepress February 2018  

Read about Vintage preparation, Grape marc, Sustainable winegrowing and more.