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Welcome to the Hunter Valley

What’s on the cover….

We think the cover on this issue is the best yet! For us it encapsulates everything that the Hunter Valley is about ...the wine, the food, the fresh local produce and dining alfresco ...we really do have it all in this beau ful part of the world.

EDITORS/PUBLISHERS Quen n von Essen Di von Essen CONTRIBUTORS Jessica Codrington Peter Firth Nick Paterson Jean Marc Pollet Salt&Peppa Reviews FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION CALL +61 2 4967 3200 info@wineanddineguides.com.au

12 Hanbury St Mayfield NSW 2304 Australia © Copyright 2013-2014 WCP MEDIA All rights reserved. Wine & Dine is a Registered Trademark. Reproduc on in part or whole or use without permission is strictly prohibited. For informa on regarding permissions please contact us at the above address. Although every effort has been made to ensure accuracy, WCP MEDIA cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions that may occur. All opinions expressed are those of the writers and not necessarily that of the publishers. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any adver sing due to inappropriate content.

OPTIMISED FOR iPHONE, iPAD & ANDROID DEVICES

Special Features 7

Out & About in the historic Hunter Valley.

8

Chef Profile—Jean Marc Polle

We’d like to thank Roberts Circa 1876 and Chef George Francisco for this gorgeous image ...we are sure it’s making your mouth water just as it has ours!

24

Vintage 2014...hatching soon!

26

Hunter Valley seasonal whites

28

Days of wine & roses.

Like the image, this iconic restaurant has always been the embodiment of vineyard dining and, like the Hunter Valley, is constantly evolving. This issue sees “Roberts” officially transform into Roberts Circa 1876 … a new name which reflects the heritage of the restaurant.

50

Choosing the right wine for your cellar.

52

Three Great Spots. To lunch...alot!

56

Top Drops—Our picks of the season.

70

Hunter Valley Classic Reds

Considered to be the Hunter Valley's premier and most popular guide to wineries, restaurants and gourmet food providers, this latest issue of Wine & Dine Hunter Valley invites you to experience ''a world of wine and food'' and the very best the Hunter Valley has to offer. This issue brings with it a number of exci ng new cellar doors and recently opened restaurants as well as fascina ng ar cles on the Hunter Valleys 180 year history, new world wine vats, seasonal white wines and Hunter Valley reds, how to choose wine for your cellar and a leading chefs approach to sustainable dining. We also learn more about mul -award winning winemaker Nick Paterson and top chef Jean Marc Polle . In this issue, we also review the exci ng new Tuk Tuk Burger Co, Goldfish and Emerson's new restaurant in Lovedale as venues to enjoy that lazy lunch. Dinner reviews include the impressive new Villa du Pays restaurant at Leogate Estate and local favourites the Beltree on Hermitage Rd and RidgeView Restaurant at Sweetwater. Make your visit to the Hunter Valley a memorable one and use this exci ng issue of Wine & Dine Hunter Valley with its Wine & Food Trail Maps for each sec on to explore the Hunter's finest cellar doors, restaurants and gourmet food providers.

QuenƟn & Di von Essen—Publishers

72

Dining at Villa du Pays

76

Sustainable dining at Roberts Circa 1876

88

Dining at The Beltree

94

180 Years of vines & wines

97

The new wave of innova ve winemakers—Nick Paterson

100

Dining at Ridgeview Restaurant

Regular Items 2

Quick Index to Cellar Doors

4

Quick Index to Restaurants

5

Quick Index to Providores

9

Trail Maps ...Index to Trail Maps

10

Pokolbin 1 Wine & Food Trail

30

Pokolbin 2 Wine & Food Trail

60

Lovedale, Rothbury & Branxton Wine & Food Trail

80

Mount View, Cessnock & Nulkaba Wine & Food Trail

90

Broke Fordwich Wine & Food Trail

98

Wollombi Wine & Food Trail

102

Wine & Dine Services Wine & Food Tours, Classes and Experiences


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Quick index to Cellar Doors (A-M) Adina Vineyard

62

492 Lovedale Rd, Lovedale

7 Days

Ascella Pure Wines

91

203 Thompsons Rd, Milbrodale

7 Days by appointment

Blueberry Hill Vineyard

13

999 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Briar Ridge Vineyard

83

593 Mount View Rd, Mount View

7 Days

Brokes Promise Estate

92

725 Milbrodale Rd, Broke

Wed to Mon

Calais Estate

14

151 Palmers Lane, Pokolbin

7 Days

Capercaillie Wine Co.

62

4 Londons Rd, Lovedale

7 Days

Constable Estate

14

205 Gillards Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

DeBortoli Wines

63

532 Wine Country Drive, Pokolbin

7 Days

DenMar Estate

14

479 Hermitage Rd, Pokolbin

Fri to Mon

Emmas Co age Vineyard

64

438 Wilderness Rd, Lovedale

Sat, Sun & Public Holidays

Ernest Hill Wines

34

307 Wine Country Drive, Nulkaba

7 Days

First Creek Wines

15

600 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Gartelmann Wines

65

701 Lovedale Rd, Lovedale

7 Days

Gemelli Estate

16

168 Palmers Lane, Pokolbin

Fri to Mon

Gundog Estate

35

101 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Harkham Wines

36

266 DeBeyers Rd, Pokolbin

Sat & Sun

Hermitage Rd Cellars

16

Hermitage Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Hungerford Hill Wines

37

2450 Broke Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Hunter Dis llery

16

1686 Broke Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Iron Gate Estate

39

Oakey Creek Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Ivanhoe Wines

40

525 Marrowbone Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Kelman Vineyard

84

2 Oakey Creek Rd, Mount View

7 Days

Kevin Sobels Wines

40

5 Halls Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Krinklewood Biodynamic Vineyard

91

712 Wollombi Rd, Broke

Sat & Sun

Lindeman’s Wine

41

119 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Macquariedale Organic Wines

17

170 Sweetwater Rd, Rothbury

7 Days

McLeish Estate

42

462 DeBeyers Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Meerea Park

42

2144 Broke Rd,(Cnr McDonalds Rd) Pokolbin 7 Days


Quick index to Cellar Doors (N-Z ) 18

771 Hermitage Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Misty Glen Wines

17

293 Deasys Rd, Pokolbin

Fri to Mon

Mount Broke Wines

92

130 Adams Peak Rd, Broke

Fri to Sun

Noyce Brothers Wines

99

2884 Wollombi Rd, Wollombi

7 Days

Oakvale Wines

19

1596 Broke Rd,Pokolbin

7 Days

Pepper Tree Wines

44

86 Halls Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Peterson House

45

Cnr Broke Rd & Wine Country Drive, Pokolbin

7 Days

Petersons Wines

84

552 Mount View Rd, Mount View

7 Days

Pierre’s Wines

67

82 Elderslie Rd, Branxton

Mon to Fri by appointment. Sat & Sun

Pokolbin Estate

44

298 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Ridgeview Wines

20

273 Sweetwater Rd, Pokolbin

Wed to Sun

Saddler’s Creek Wines

85

15 Marrowbone Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Sal re Wines

68

113 Wilderness Rd, Lovedale

7 Days

Sandalyn Estate

68

Wilderness Rd, Lovedale

7 Days

Savannah Estate Wines

85

402 Mount View Rd, Mount View

7 Days

Stomp! Wines

92

1273 Milbrodale Rd, Broke

Sat & Sun & By Appointment

Stonehurst Cedar Creek

99

1840 Wollombi Rd, Cedar Creek

7 Days

Tamburlaine Organic Wines

46

358 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Tin lla Estate

22

725 Hermitage Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Thalgara Estate

47

536 DeBeyers Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Undercliff Winery & Gallery

99

152 Yango Creek Rd, Wollombi

7 Days

Vinden Estate

12

17 Gillards Rd, Pokolbin

Wed to Sun

Wandin Valley Estate

69

12 Wilderness Rd, Lovedale

7 Days

Wollombi Village Vineyard

99

2971 Payne’s Crossing Rd, Wollombi

Sat & Sun

Wombat Crossing

23

530 Hermitage Rd, Pokolbin

Sat & Sun; Fri A ernoons & Mon by appointment

Wynwood Estate

49

310 Oakey Creek Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

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Mistletoe Winery


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Quick index to Restaurants (A-R) Al-Oi Thai Restaurant

82

19 Vincent St, Cessnock

Lunch & Dinner 7 Days

Australia Hotel

82

136 Wollombi Rd, Cessnock

Lunch & Dinner 7 Days

Amandas on the Edge

12

1039 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin

Lunch Fri to Mon; Dinner 7 Nights

Australian Regional Food Store

32

426 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin

Breakfast & Lunch 7 Days

Bistro Vinden

12

17 Gillards Rd, Pokolbin

Lunch Sat & Sun

B.L.U.E Thai

83

137 Mount View Rd, Cessnock

Lunch Wed to Sat; Dinner Tues to Sun

Blaxlands Inn

33

2198 Broke Rd, Pokolbin

Lunch & Dinner Wed to Sun

Hunter Valley Resort, Cnr Hermitage All Day Dining7 Days from Midday Rd & Mistletoe Lne, Pokolbin At Cypress Lakes Resort, Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner 7 Days 15 Thompsons Rd, Pokolbin

Bluetongue Brewery Cafe

13

Bodega Restaurant & Bar

32

Briar Grillade

83

593 Mount View Rd, Mount View

Wed to Sun

Café DenMar

14

479 Hermitage Rd, Pokolbin

Sat & Sun

Casa Margarita

32

266 DeBeyers Rd, Pokolbin

Breakfast & Lunch Sat & Sun; Dinner Fri & Sat

Café 1843 at Lindeman’s

41

119 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Elizabeth’s

34

401 Marrowbone Rd, Pokolbin

Breakfast & Lunch 7 Days

Emersons Café & Restaurant

63

492 Lovedale Rd, Lovedale

Emma’s of Lovedale

64

438 Wilderness Rd, Lovedale

Goldfish

35

Cnr Broke & McDonalds Rds, Pokolbin

Lunch and Dinner 7 Days

Harrigan’s Irish Pub

36

Broke Rd, Pokolbin

Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner 7 Days

Cnr Broke & McDonalds Rd’s, Pokolbin At Hermitage Lodge, 609 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin Sebel Kirkton Park 336 Oakey Creek Rd, Pokolbin

Breakfast Sat & Sun; Lunch Wed to Sun; Dinner Thurs to Sun Breakfast Sat & Sun; Lunch Fri to Sun, Dinner Fri & Sat

Dinner 7 Nights; Lunch Sat & Sun

Hunter Valley Steakhouse

38

Il Cacciatore Restaurant

17

Infuzion Restaurant

39

Lovedale Smokehouse & Café

66

64 Majors Lane, Lovedale

Majors Lane Restaurant

66

64 Majors Lane, Lovedale

Dinner Thurs to Mon

Mojos on Wilderness

65

84 Wilderness Rd, Lovedale

Dinner 7 Nights

At Keith Tulloch Wines, Lot 17 Hermitage Rd, Pokolbin At Hungerford Hill, 1 Broke Rd, Pokolbin Cnr McDonalds & Broke Rd’s , Pokolbin Cnr Broke Rd & Wine Country Drv, Pokolbin

Dinner 7 Nights Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner 7 Days Retail Sales 7 Days. Café Fri—Mon for Lunch

Lunch Wed to Sun ; Dinner Sat

Muse Kitchen

18

Muse Restaurant

43

Oishii Japanese Thai Restaurant

43

Restaurant Cuvee

45

Ridgeview Restaurant

20

273 Sweetwater Rd, Pokolbin

Breakfast Fri to Sun; Lunch & Dinner Thurs to Sun

Roberts Circa 1876

46

Halls Rd, Pokolbin

Lunch & Dinner 7 Days

Lunch Sat & Sun; Dinner Wed to Sat Lunch & Dinner 7 Days Breakfast & Lunch 7 Days


Quick index to Restaurants (R-Z ) Royal Federal Hotel 221 Restaurant & Bar at The Royal Oak Hotel

67

50 Maitland Rd, Branxton

82

221 Vincent Street, Cessnock

Lunch & Dinner 7 Days Lunch & Dinner 7 Days Fri to Sun (Mon Pub & School Hols) Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner 7 Days Lunch Fri to Mon; Dinner Fri & Sat (Sun long weekends) Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner 7 Days

Sabor in the Hunter Dessert Bar

67

319 Wilderness Rd, Lovedale

San Mar no Bites, Pizza & Pasta

19

At Hunter Valley Resort, Hermitage Rd, Pokolbin

The Beltree

21

266 Hermitage Rd, Pokolbin

The Brickworks Brasserie

86

At Po ers, Wine Country Drive, Nulkaba

The Cellar Restaurant

47

Hunter Valley Gardens Village, Broke Rd, Pokolbin

The Deck Café

63

701 Lovedale Rd, Lovedale

The Olive Tree Restaurant

67

Wyndham Estate, Dalwood Rd, Branxton

The Verandah Restaurant

21

At Calais Estate, Palmers Lane, Pokolbin

Tuk Tuk Burger Co.

47

Corner Broke & McDonalds Rd’s, Pokolbin 7 Days

Twine Restaurant

48

310 Oakey Creek Rd, Pokolbin

Two Fat Blokes Gourmet Kitchen

21

1616 Broke Rd, Pokolbin

Villa du Pays

22

Vi orios Restaurant

48

Wandin Valley Estate Wine Bar & Diner

69

Lunch & Dinner Mon to Sat Breakfast & Lunch Sat to Wed Breakfast Sundays; Lunch Sat & Sun Lunch & Dinner Thurs to Sun

Lunch 7 Days; Dinner Fri-Sun

7 Days Lunch Fri to Mon; 1693 Broke Rd, Pokolbin Dinner Thurs to Mon Breakfast & Lunch 7 Days; Pokolbin Village, 2188 Broke Rd, Pokolbin Dinner Thurs to Sun Lunch 7 Days; 12 Wilderness Rd, Lovedale Dinner Thur to Sat

Quick index to Providores Adina Vineyard

62

492 Lovedale Rd, Lovedale

7 Days

Australian Regional Food Store & Café

32

426 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days Wed to Mon

Brokes Promise Estate

92

725 Milbrodale Rd, Broke

Gartelmann Wines

65

701 Lovedale Rd, Lovedale

7 Days

Gundog Estate & Gourmet Pantry

35

101 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Hunter Olive Centre

44

7 Days

Hunter Valley Cheese Company

37

Hunter Valley Chocolate Company

38

Hunter Valley Chocolate Company

38

Hunter Valley Chocolate Company

38

298 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin At McGuigans Complex, 447 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin Shop 5, HVG Village, Broke Rd, Pokolbin Peterson House, Cnr Broke Rd & Wine Country Drv, Pokolbin Factory & Showroom 820 Lovedale Rd, Lovedale

Hunter Valley Chocolate Company

38

Twenty-3-Twenty, 2320 Broke Rd, Pokolbin

7 Days

Lovedale Smokehouse

66

64 Majors Lane, Lovedale

Sabor in the Hunter Dessert Bar

67

319 Wilderness Rd, Lovedale

Sandalyn Estate

68

Wilderness Rd, Lovedale

7 Days Fri to Sun (Mon Pub & School Hols) 7 Days

7 Days 7 Days 7 Days 7 Days

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What’s in a Symbol? Throughout this booklet you will see symbols rela ng to facili es and products offered by our wineries, cellar doors, restaurants & providores. Here’s the meaning:

 

Disabled Access Onsite Restaurant/Café Func ons/Events/Weddings

 

On Site Parking

Family Friendly

Picnic /BBQ Area

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Accommoda on

Vineyard Views

Cellar Door On Site

On Site Gallery

Order On-Line

A/C

Air Condi oning

Free WiFi

On Site Golf Course

Beer On Tap

Picnic Hampers

Scenic Views

Gourmet Produce

Cooking Classes

Baby Change Facili es


Out & About in the historic Hunter Valley

Warm hospitality, a love of life, world class wines, fine food and culture - this is Hunter Valley wine country. With a tradi on of vi culture stretching back more than 180 years and celebrated as Australia's primary wine and food des na on, the Hunter Valley a racts food and wine lovers from all over the world and treats them to a fascina ng journey into the world of great wine and wonderful food. The rich soils of the Hunter Valley inspire growers to produce a wide range of premium wines and fresh produce - providing visitors to the Hunter Valley with more choice and diversity than any other wine region in Australia.

Here, food and wine simply go hand in hand and therefore no coincidence that some of the best restaurants in the world happen to be located in some of the finest wine regions - where wine is just as prevalent in the cooking as it is in the glass. Choose from a diversity of restaurants spread throughout the region, go on a wine tour, a end a wine tas ng class or self drive using the Wine and Food Trail Map in each sec on of this guide. We have been preparing for your visit for 180 years - so relax, indulge and enjoy a world of wine and food and the very best the Hunter Valley has to oer - confirma on that the Hunter Valley is not just about great Australian wine, but one of the finest, most authen c culinary des na ons in Australia.

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Not only is the Hunter Valley Australia's oldest and best known wine region, but it is a major wine producing area, gaining interna onal recogni on for its winemakers and the quality and dis nct regional characteris cs of its premium wines - in par cular Hunter Valley Semillon and Shiraz. Hunter Valley wine is equal to the best in the world and the wine sector is recognised for producing a full range of wine styles and varietals one to match every meal.

As you explore the Hunter Valley, you will soon realise that today the Hunter Valley is as much about food as it is about wine. The region has a strong food and wine culture that is reflected in the superla ve wines, world class restaurants, abundant fresh produce and gourmet food products - not to men on some of the most celebrated chefs in the country.


Jean Marc Pollet

Born and raised in Calais, Jean Marc was admi ed to hotel school in Paris at the very young age of 15. While most junior chefs do an appren ceship, Jean Marc did it rela vely tough - working long hours at the Grand Hotel in Paris, for minimum wages every weekend and then spending his weekdays studying. Being on low wages meant he could only aord a small room on the top floor of a very cheap hotel in ''Rue Provence'' which was also very popular with the local pros tutes in the area. Despite the hardships, Jean Marc fell in love with Paris cap vated by the fast pace of city living, its parks, museums, galleries and restaurants.

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A er living in Paris for almost 5 years and having also completed his military service, Jean Marc le Paris to go to Toulouse where he worked for a few months in a small country restaurant, before moving to Monte Carlo where he was the SousChef at the five star Beach Plaza Hotel. A er Monte Carlo Jean Marc put his heart and soul into his career with a brief s nt in Geneva before travelling overseas to Australia where in 1985 he worked at the Hotel Regent Sydney before joining the Peppers Group where he was the Execu ve Chef at Peppers Guest House and then Peppers Anchorage un l 2008. He was then asked to join the Mercure Resort Hunter Valley as Execu ve Chef & Director of Food and Beverage.

CHEF PROFILE

While Pollet's background is French, his experiences in Europe and Asia have had a significant impact on his methods and menus with dis nc ve French, Mediterranean and Asian influences evident and flowing into the mix of his cooking. His excellent reputa on as a master chef is corroborated by the mul tude of awards he has won throughout his 30+ year career - winning the American Express award for Best Restaurant in the Hunter Region on 4 occasions and the Restaurant and Catering Associa on Restaurant of the Year award two years in a row. Jean Marc also took out the Catering Associa on Award for Best Restaurant in the Hunter Region on three occasions. Jean Marc is con nuously working to improve on his skills - drawing inspira on from reading cookbooks and travelling overseas to try out dierent restaurants and foods. Although he is a dedicated chef he remains an easy-going individual who loves simple, fresh, uncomplicated food and would rather cook and serve up prawns on the beach with aioli than cook sophis cated and overworked dishes in a restaurant. Jean Marc lives at the Bay and in his spare me loves nothing more than walking on the beach, gardening, fishing and crabbing and spending me in his boat apprecia ng the feeling of space and freedom.


Lower Hunter Valley Wine Country

HUNTER EXPRESSWAY

CESSNOCK

Index to Wine & Food Trail Maps

Pokolbin 1

PG 10 / 11

Pokolbin 2

PG 30 / 31

Lovedale, Rothbury, Branxton

PG 60 / 61

Mount View, Cessnock & Nulkaba

PG 80 / 81

Broke Fordwich

PG 90 / 91

Wollombi Valley

PG 98

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Tips for self-touring Wine Country • Locate your current area on the map above—note the large circled number—this is your closest trail • Use the Index on your right to locate the page number for your selected trail • Turn to the page indicated to find detailed informa on about the trail you have selected and an alphabe cal lis ng of all Wineries and Restaurants you can discover along your trail. • Drive carefully and enjoy!

     


Pokolbin Wine & Dine Trail 1 (north) TRAIL 1 CELLAR DOORS Blueberry Hill Vineyard

MAP C7

Calais Estate

14

E7

Constable Estate

14

E4

DenMar Estate

14

B2

First Creek Wines

15

F7

Gemelli Estate

16

E7

Hermitage Rd Cellars

16

C2

Pokolbin Trail 1 provides the loca on and informa on on cellar doors, restaurants and gourmet food providers located on the northern side of Pokolbin stretching north from Broke road to Hermitage Rd and Old North Rd and includes some of the most renown and highly awarded wineries, restaurants and providores providing the most enjoyable wine and food experiences in the Hunter.

Hunter Dis llery

16

F3

The rural locality of Pokolbin sits in the shadow of the Brokenback Range and is considered to be the ''hub'' of the Hunter Valley wine region and where the largest collec on of wineries, accommoda on houses and restaurants can be found. Pokolbin is interna onally recognised for being Australia's oldest commercial wine producing area and where vi culture (growing of grapes) in the Hunter Valley is believed to have first started when James Busby brought planted cu ngs of European vines and established what is considered the first vineyard in the area in the 1830's. However, it was not really un l the 1960s that the wine industry of the Lower Hunter Valley really took off due to the closure of local mining opera ons and the arrival of European immigrants a er the Second World War led to a reorienta on of Australian tastes. By the 1980s the wine industry had replaced the mining industry as the centerpiece of the local economy. There are now numerous wineries, restaurants, cafes and gourmet food providers in the Pokolbin area, including some of the best known names in Australian wine - some of which have been in existence for well over a century. The majority offer tas ng facili es and cellar door sales, and some of the larger enterprises provide addi onal facili es such as func on rooms, restaurants, barbecue and picnic facili es.

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Macquariedale Organic Wines

17

B4

Mistletoe Winery

18

C2

Misty Glen Wines

17

D5

Oakvale Wines

19

F2

Ridgeview Wines

20

B4

Tin lla Estate

22

C2

Vinden Estate

12

E5

Wombat Crossing

23

B1

TRAIL 1 CELLAR DOORS WITH RESTAURANTS Café DenMar

PAGE

MAP

14

B2

Hermitage Rd Cellars

16

C2

Ridgeview Wines

20

B4

Vinden Estate

12

E5

TRAIL 1 RESTAURANTS

PAGE

MAP

Amanda's on the Edge

12

C7

Bistro Vinden

12

E5

Bluetongue Brewery Café

13

C2

Il Cacciatore

17

E6

Muse Kitchen

18

D2

Ridgeview Restaurant

20

B4

San Mar no Bites, Pizza & Pasta The Beltree

19

C2

21

A1

The Verandah Restaurant

21

E7

Two Fat Blokes Gourmet Kitchen Villa du Pays

21

F2

22

F3


Things to See & Do

How to use Wine & Dine

Go Back to School! At Hunter Valley Wine School

In the following pages you will find informa on about Wining & Dining in the Pokolbin North area. This area is differen ated by the colour ORANGE throughout and also by the ORANGE shaded bar down the outside of each page. Lis ngs are in alphabe cal order where possible and can be easily iden fied by the following symbols: Wineries—will display the following symbols:

i

For more informa on about events visit www.HunterValleyOnline.com.au

= White Wines

= Sparkling Wines

= Red Wines

= For fied Wines

Restaurants– will display the Providores— will display the

symbol symbol

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you can a end a 2 hour session which includes a vineyard inspec on, instruc on on the winemaking process and how to make and blend wines. Daily at 9AM (see page 16 for details) Visit the Hunter Dis llery If you’ve ever wondered how spirits are dis lled then Hunter Dis llery is the place to visit. Get a tour of the produc on facili es and sample the results from row a er row of test tube tasters. The Dis llery produce an award winning range of Vodkas, Schnapps and other spirits. (see page 16 for details)


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vintage 2014

Hatching soon!

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While the concept may not be en rely new (the Romans

These 600-litre, $6000 seamless eggs stand 2.1 metres high and offer were using cement excellent thermal vessels or amphorae iner a, as well as to ferment their wine controlled microover 2,000 years ago) oxida on, and are this modern version flavour neutral and of the Roman durable. In many ways, amphora, a wine vat they offer a known colloquially as combina on of some of the Nomblot Egg is the best quali es of now ''hatching'' in stainless steel and respected wineries all wooden tanks. Because over the world concrete is porous, the throughout France, tanks are said to be Austria, Canada, “breathable,” like wood Germany, Italy, South barrels, but without Africa, Spain, adding any oak Switzerland, the character to the wine. United States and now The egg shape is said to play a role too, by Australia. helping to create a Here in the Hunter natural s rring effect during fermenta on. Also, Valley, the historic Oakvale Wines in Pokolbin and concrete has insula ng proper es while stainless Krinklewood Biodynamic Vineyard in Broke are steel is "conduc ve" and concrete is cheaper than two local wineries challenging winemaking both stainless steel and oak barrels. tradi on. Oakvale Wines acquired their two concrete Nomblot Egg Fermenters before the Although concrete has been used in winemaking 2012 vintage and put them to use for the for many year, the first egg-shaped concrete fermenta on and matura on of their first 2012 fermenta on vat was commission by Michael Chapou er in 2001, whose family's wine business Oakvale Hunter Valley ''L’Oeuf'' Semillon. (Maison M. Chapou er) in the Rhône Valley can Similarly, Krinklewood owner Rod Windrim, a trailbe traced back to 1808. It was made by French blazer in eco-friendly, biodynamic vineyard vat manufacturer Marc Nomblot, whose company techniques, took delivery of his Nomblot in has manufactured concrete wine tanks since 1922 January 2011 and their 2011 Basket Press and now sells them all over the world. Chardonnay was the first wine to be made using it.


The Hunter Valley is one of Australia's best white wine areas - consistently winning a dispropor onate number of awards in Na onal Wine Shows. While the area is famous for its long lived Semillon white wines, the Hunter Valley is also known for producing Australia's first Chardonnays in the 1970's and the popular single varietal wine - Verdelho, has been planted in the Hunter Valley for over 100 years. Sémillon—O en referred to as ''Australia’s unique gi to the wine world'', Hunter Valley Semillon is a unique white wine which keeps ge ng be er with age and is considered to be the highest quality and best example of dry white Sémillon wine produced anywhere in the world. Classic Hunter Sémillon is restrained, with piercing acidity and lemon flavours and are renown for their ability to age well, evolving through an array flavours, slowly developing into richer and more honeyed characters.

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Chardonnay—This adaptable and hearty grape flourishes easily in most climates and condi ons, and is now one of the most widely-planted grape varie es worldwide, is planted in more wine regions than any other and is an important component of many sparkling wines around the world, including Champagne.

Pinot Grigio (also known as Pinot Gris) Although they are the same grape, the two names have over me come to infer two different styles of wine. Immensely popular, the Italian style Pinot Grigio wines are typically lighter-bodied, crisp, fresh, with vibrant stone fruit and floral aromas and a hint of spice. In contrast, Pinot Gris wines are more full-bodied, richer, spicier, and more viscous in texture. They also tend to have greater cellaring and ageing poten al Viognier—Although a rela vely new white grape variety to Australia, it is rapidly gaining a strong following. The most dis nc ve a ribute of Viognier is its stone fruit character, most notably that of apricot or peach and its generous alcohol content and low acidity. There are other powerful flower, fruit and spice aromas evident in these wines - which are dependant on where the grapes are grown, the weather condi ons and age of the vines. Most of these wines are intended to be consumed young, although some - especially those from old vines and the late-harvest wines, are suitable for ageing.

Gewürztraminer—In Australia this variety is also known as Traminer, especially in the warmer regions where it is most commonly used as a blending companion for Riesling. The wines are highly perfumed and quite full-bodied, more so Verdelho—The characteris cs of Verdelho vary than other white wines. The bouquet is intense significantly according to the climate, growing and complex, offering an explosion of exo c fruits condi ons, the wine-maker’s skill as well as the such as lychee, passion fruit, pineapple and ming of the harvest. The Hunter Valley produces mango characters with rose petal, gardenia, very dis nc ve styles of Verdelho wine displaying honeysuckle and even spicy (gingerbread, a spiciness, both on the nose and the palate peppermint, cloves and pepper) aromas. In fact the name Gewurztraminer literally translates as “spicy Traminer”.


Wine & Roses

Days of...

Ever wonder why roses bushes are so common soon, or the grapevines will be infected next. in vineyards - most oĹŒen at the end of vineyard Roses also a ract those good insects that prey rows? upon insects that can prove harmful to a vineyard. While beau ful, the purpose of plan ng roses in a vineyard are not purely for aesthe c reasons. With modern technologies and techniques used Roses are more suscep ble to the same type of in vineyard management this method of early fungal disease (e.g. powdery mildew and downy detec on is not used as much as it was in the mildew) as the grapevine. Having roses in the past. Now roses are included in vineyards to vineyard serves as an early warning sign to the maintain the tradi on and of course they vineyard manager that ac on needs to be taken always look great!

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Image courtesy of Iron Gate Estate

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Pokolbin Wine & Dine Trail 2 (South) PAGE 34

MAP E7

Gundog Estate

35

E2

Harkham Wines

36

D5

Hungerford Hill Wines

37

C7

Iron Gate Estate

39

G7

Ivanhoe Wines

40

F2

Kevin Sobels Wines

40

C5

Lindeman’s Wine

41

E2

Pokolbin Trail 2 provides informa on and the loca on of cellar doors, restaurants and gourmet food providers located on the southern side of Pokolbin - the area stretching from Broke Road to Oakey Creek Road and includes some of the most highly regarded and award winning restaurants and wines available in the Hunter.

McLeish Estate

42

E4

Meerea Park

42

C4

Pepper Tree Wines

44

D5

Peterson House

45

C6

Pokolbin Estate

44

D3

The area of Pokolbin is synonymous with all things rela ng to wine and food and is interna onally recognised for its world class vineyards and restaurants and for being Australia's oldest commercial wine producing area - with some vineyards being in opera on for well over 120 years. Pokolbin is considered the ''hub'' of the Hunter Valley wine region and where the largest collec on of wineries, accommoda on houses and restaurants can be found

Tamburlaine Organic Wines

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D3

Thalgara Estate

47

E3

Wynwood Estate

49

G5

TRAIL 2 CELLAR DOORS WITH RESTAURANTS Hungerford Hill Wines

PAGE

MAP

37

C7

Lindeman’s Wines

41

E2

Vi culture in the Hunter Valley is o en considered to have commenced with James Busby when on returning from a tour of French and South African vineyards in the 1830's brought with him numerous cu ngs of vines, sending half to the newly established Royal Botanical Gardens in Sydney and the remaining vines planted at the family estate of Kirkton - just north of Belford. It was there he established what was probably the first vineyard in the region.

Peterson House

45

C6

Wynwood Estate

49

G5

TRAIL 2 RESTAURANTS Aust. Regional Food Store Blaxlands Inn Bodega Restaurant & Bar Café 1843 at Lindeman’s Casa Margarita Elizabeth’s Goldfish Harrigan’s Irish Pub Hunter Valley Steakhouse Infuzion Restaurant Muse Restaurant Oishii Japanese Thai Restaurant Cuvee Roberts Circa 1876 The Brickworks Brasserie The Cellar Restaurant Tuk Tuk Burger Co. Twine Restaurant Vi orios Restaurant

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MAP C4 C5 D3 E2 D5 G2 C4 C3 C3 F5 C7 C4 C6 D5 F8 C3 C4 G5 C4

Some of the most well respected names in Hunter Valley wine history today shortly followed establishing vineyards in the area in the 1850's - some of these long -established names are s ll in existence today.

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TRAIL 2 CELLAR DOORS Ernest Hill Wines

TRAIL 2 PROVIDORES

PAGE

MAP

Aust. Regional Food Store

32

C4

Gundog Estate & Hunter Pantry Hunter Olive Centre

35

E2

44

D3

Hunter Valley Cheese Co.

37

C3

Hunter Valley Chocolate Co.

38

C3/C6


TO MAP 

Things to See & Do

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For more informa on about events visit www.HunterValleyOnline.com.au or www.hvg.com.au

How to use Wine & Dine... In the following pages you will find informa on about Wining & Dining in the Pokolbin South area. This area is differen ated by the colour TAN throughout and also by the TAN shaded bar down the outside of each page. Lis ngs appear in alphabe cal order wherever possible. Wineries—will display the following symbols:

= White Wines

= Sparkling Wines

= Red Wines

= For fied Wines

Restaurants– will display the Providores— will display the

symbol symbol

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Visit Hunter Valley Gardens Shopping Village With 17 specialty shops, 4 restaurants and cafes,an amazing hair salon & beauty spa, pu pu and aqua golf plus the largest display gardens in the southern hemisphere, this is a shopping village that is a fun day out for the whole family. Broke Rd Pokolbin. Christmas Lights Spectacular Over a million Christmas lights on show throughout designated areas of Hunter Valley Gardens. November 15th to January 26th (Australia Day) Take a Tour Play it safe and ditch your wheels—take a tour. Our favourite tour guides can be found on page 102 of this guide. A tour is a great way to learn something new and benefit from the local knowledge of the tour guide.

TO MAP 


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Cellar

Choosing the right wine for your

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Cellaring wines for ageing purposes is an enjoyable pas me and there is a great deal of pleasure to be had opening ♦ When it comes to selec ng white wines to an aged, prized bo le of wine to find that it has cellar, select young, balanced wines with aged just perfectly. On the other hand, there is intense flavours and prominent acidity such as nothing more disappoin ng than discovering that Riesling, Hunter Semillon or Chardonnay. Big the special bo le you have been pu ng off Chardonnays can age for several years - 10 drinking all these years is now undrinkable. So years or more while Pinot Grigio should be how can this be avoided? consumed up to 5 years. Hunter Valley Semillon is one of the greatest cellaring wines The first thing to keep in mind is that not all wines in the world and can live for a good 20 years. improve with age - and price is not always an Riesling should be consumed between 3-5 indicator of a wines ageing poten al. Most wines years, although the very best can have a much are consumed within 12 to 18 months a er they longer lifespan. are produced. While some wines mature and become be er over me, others do not and ♦ There are many styles of red that age well. should be drunk within a few years a er they are Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz are very good made. They lack the intensity and structure ageing wines as well as blends containing required for aging. these varie es. Look for young wines with intense flavours, firm tannins, prominent A famous name on the label is also no guarantee acidity and vibrant, intense colours. A rule of that the wine will age well. The more tannins that thumb for ageing Shiraz and Cabernet is up to the wine has, regardless of the brand or label, the 10 years, Merlot 4 - 7 years and Pinot Noir up be er it will age. The average number of years for to 5 years. ageing white wines is between 5 to 7 years. Conversely, some red wines can be kept for 30 And what of Champagne? Even vintage bubbly is years or more. released ready to drink and although there are Cellaring wines is an inexact science and there are some that will con nue to develop in the bo le, treat Champagne as you would any other wine. no rules to determine which wines will age well. Unfortunately the only way to really know when a Pop the cork and enjoy! wine is ready is to taste it., so keep some of these The best indicator of a wines cellaring poten al is guidelines in mind when ageing your wine: past performance. For the greatest predictability, ♦ The most important factor affec ng the ageing choose wines that are known to age well. But of wine is the condi ons in which it is stored. don't age your wines so long that you forget to Wine should always be stored in a cool dark drink them. A er all, they are meant to be place at the correct temperature: between 8 enjoyed. and 12C for white wines and 10 to 16C for reds.


Three great spots to lunchalot! Restaurant reviews by Sir Lunchalot—Peter Firth

Welcome to all our readers once again. The last six months have gone very quickly for us – it must be the fact that as you get older, me seems to fly. The Winter in the Hunter was very mild and also one of the driest on record. These very mild weather condi ons brought on “Bud Burst” extremely early and this could mean an early vintage. Check out the current release Semillons while you are in the Valley, they are pre y impressive. Meanwhile Lady Lunchalot and I have been out and about lunching in order to share some of our latest experiences with our readers.

EMERSONS RESTAURANT at ADINA VINEYARD EMERSONS @ ADINA on Lovedale Road opened a few months ago. The execu ve chef is Emerson Rodriguez who has been sharing his culinary exper se in the Valley for some 15 years and started his training at Peppers Guest House. We had many a long lunch there! Adina was started by Helen and Peter O’Meara a few years ago and is not only producing some fine wines, but also a great variety of olive products. Definitely worth a visit to try these items and sample some of Emerson’s food. The menu is designed with the idea of sharing food – the only way to eat! There is also an 8 course Degusta on Menu available for 4 persons or more, you must book in advance.

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There are both indoor and outdoor dining areas available overlooking vineyards and olive groves. I suggest if you are Duck Pate lovers, try his version and I am sure you will agree that it is one of the best. We followed this with Crispy Peppered Squid – very tender and tasty. Next came the fresh Seafood Spaghe ni tossed with fresh chilli and garlic. Thank goodness we ordered the small serve - lots of seafood. Emerson forced us to order a dessert and we suggest you try the Citrus Cheesecake with mandarin sorbet and ginger crumble. On our second visit we started with the Assorted Dips and crispy bague e. Then came the Duck and Mushroom Riso o.

There are several types of exo c mushroom which add a lovely flavour to this dish. We both rated it as one the best riso os we have tasted for a while. If you get a chance ask for the Breakfast Menu – we have heard that Emerson’s fluffy pancakes with bananas, honeycomb bu er and maple syrup are outstanding.


TUK TUK HUNTER BURGER CO. at TEMPUS TWO TUK TUK @ TEMPUS TWO on Broke Road opened a few months ago. The owners of this new venture are Peter Wes ield and Mark Clews. Peter is a fully trained chef with many years of experience including Bather’s Pavilion, whereas Mark is/was a Master Builder of some 25 years. Mark has been collec ng these burger recipes from all over the world for 5 years or more. These are burgers with a “difference” as you will find out.

On our next visit, which was only a few days later, Ros ordered the Chicken Satay, having been reassured by Peter that the sauce was homemade. The burger is grilled and served with le uce and cucumber. I ordered the Hot and Spicy Umami Burger consis ng of the burger, tomato, cos le uce, tasty cheese, caramelised onions and spicy homemade ketchup with jalapenos. Not for the faint hearted! It was stunning and I have had it again. I am s ll yet to try the Watermelon and We have been several mes now, strictly to carry Bacon Burger however the boys assure me it is out research as you can imagine, and s ll not tried ideal for breakfast. everything on the menu. Here are some of our favourites. I suggest also reading the top le Apart from the burgers, there are several, again ar cle on the menu which explains the meaning of different, types of Hot Dogs such as the Chicago Umami which is associated with several of the Dog which includes special relish, dill pickles, burgers. One of the first we ordered was the Port tomato and sports pepper with American style Wine and S lton Burger with tomato, baby cos mustard. Loved it! Make sure you are hungry. Also le uce, S lton cheese and cornichons, topped there are various interes ng “things on skewers” with port wine glaze. Amazing! As was The Top including Ko a, Squid and Pork with Apple. Shelf Umami Burger which consists of the burger, A must visit—this is definitely the best burger joint tomato, cos le uce and caramelised onions around! topped with truffle and Fois Gras. This was a standout. We were in total agreement, which is unusual!

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THE GOLDFISH at TEMPUS TWO GOLDFISH @ TEMPUS TWO on Broke Road was established in 2010. It provides both outdoor and indoor dining areas. The indoor décor has the atmosphere of a bar in New York in the 1920’s. A great place to eat, meet friends and try some of the famous cocktails which are a specialty of the house. There is always some easy listening background music and several mes during the year they bring in some great musical acts.

the Baby Brussel Sprouts with cocktail onions, sage and truffle. Alan recommended this. My memories of this vegetable cooked by my mother decades ago were very, very bad. Since tas ng them cooked this way I have changed my mind.

We decided to return in order to look at a few more dishes that had caught our a en on so we could pass them onto you. Ha! Ha! The W.A. Sardine Fillets served on macerated fennel, The Head Chef is Michal Blank, ex Bather’s Pavilion tomato, parsley and lemon salad with bagel crisps and Hugo’s Manly. Two of the floor staff are Alan were the best sardines we have eaten in years. We Penrose who comes from Ireland and spent some had decided to make it a “fish” lunch, light and me in Ibiza in Spain, and Dan Moliner who hails healthy (believe it or not), so next came the Pan from Hungary. Both are very experienced and Seared Scallops with pea foam, chorizo popcorn, professional. Again, like most restaurants, Goldfish jamon crumbs and a dressing made from Pedro provides share plates or, if you desire, main Ximinez, a Spanish dry sherry. This was courses. We opted for the share plates as usual outstanding! We then finished with the Tequila and here are some of our favourites. and Lime Kingfish with sweet onions, avocado mousse, pomegranate seeds and jalapenos. Wow! The Potato and Jamon Croque es with smoked We are yet to try the pizzas but all our local speck, pecorino and truffle aioli was stunning. friends state they are well above average. Looking Usually I tend not to order this style of dish, but at the menu they sound delicious. this was light and very tasty. Our next dish was the Zucchini stuffed with citrus infused Binnorie Anyhow, we hope you enjoy your stay in the cheese (local), tomato relish, lemon and thyme Hunter and are able to experience some of our salt. These were lightly cooked and excellent. We sugges ons. then ordered from the Side Dishes, two of which we had no ced earlier on arrival. We started with the Sautéed Wild Mushrooms with confit garlic Bon ApeƟt, and marjoram followed by Ros’ choice which was

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Sir Lunchalot


TOP DROPS TINTILLA ESTATE 2011 Saphira Sangiovese

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Sangiovese has been the most popular red grape among growers and winemakers since the boom in Italian varie es began in the 1990s and is the grape responsible for Italy’s most famous red wine, Chian . Tin lla Estate was the first winery to plant Sangiovese in the Hunter Valley. The vines have thrived in the Pokolbin soil and climate. Aspects of the weather, like the hot summers and summer rains, are reminiscent of Tuscany and help to produce rich, vibrant, medium bodied wine, with a solid structure and a characteris c dry finish. Enjoy with game foods, duck and roasts. TasƟng: Medium bodied yet firm and elegant– dark cherries and plumbs, savoury cranberries and earthiness to taste. This is young and will develop into a deeper complex wine. Cellaring: Drink now to 2020 .

CAPERCAILLIE

2012 “The Clan” Bordeaux Blend This “Bordeaux” style blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Merlot grapes were selected from the Southern Foothills of the Barossa from fruit which displayed elegance, structure and intensity. TasƟng: Only melded before bo ling, the unity of this trio displays li ed blackberry and cherry fruit with a complex, rich palate and a silky tannin structure. With suitable cellaring condi ons, this is a wine that will age with dignity. Enjoy with beef or cheese. Cellaring: This wine will con nue to develop and drink well for the next 5-8 years.


TOP DROPS IRONGATE ESTATE

2010 Cabernet Sauvignon Iron Gate Estate is one of the Hunter Valley's finest bou que wineries offering true Hunter wines, and is one of only a handful of true estate Hunter Valley wineries, where all the fruit is grown and fermented onsite. TasƟng: This wine is 100% Hunter Cabernet Sauvignon matured in French Oak for 12 months. This is a very different wine to its South Australian counterparts, being gentler and so er on the palate while s ll retaining the firm tannins structure normally associated with Cabernet Sauvignon.

ERNEST HILL WINES

2011 William Henry Shiraz (Reserve) A family owned winery, the philosophy at Ernest Hill is to produce premium estate grown Hunter Valley wines. The William Henry Shiraz is the flagship red wine of this popular bou que winery. Made only in select years, this mul -award winning wine represents the pinnacle of shiraz making at Ernest Hill wines. Hand selected bunches from low yielding 40 year old vines are the founda on of this wine.

The wine has a fruity nose and is a perfect accompaniment for slow cooked lamb or T-bone Steaks.

TasƟng: A big ripe blackberry/mulberry fruit palate, subtle hints of spice, and luscious savoury tones are interwoven with touches of Hunter earthiness. Twelve months matura on in only the best French oak, ensures the tannins are fine and smooth. Serve with game, or a Scotch fillet steak with peppercorn sauce.

Cellaring: Drink now un l 2019.

Cellaring: 3 - 6 years

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TOP DROPS MISTLETOE WINERY 2013 Barrel Fermented Rosè

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Mistletoe has been making Rosé wines since 1998 and during that me has a racted a large and loyal following for the three different styles they make each year. The previous vintage was rated at 94 points by James Halliday in the Australian Wine Companion 2014 and this current Rosé is expected to rate even higher. A perfect wine for a long, hot Summer! TasƟng notes: The 2013 Barrel Fermented Rosé is Mistletoe's best yet! Pale cherry red in colour, the wine has a fragrant, spicy, musk bouquet. The palate shows rich red fruit flavours with mouth coa ng texture, excellent balance and length. A perfect match to many different seafood or salad dishes. Cellaring: Drink now to 2016.

WYNWOOD ESTATE 2013 Grey Gum Semillon

One of the newest wine labels producing wines from some of the oldest vineyards in the Hunter Valley. The 2013 Grey Gum Semillon was awarded the trophy for best current vintage Semillon white wine at the 2103 Hunter Valley Bou que Wine Show. Warm to hot weather condi ons resulted in flavour ripeness at ideal sugar and acid levels. Handpicked and processed early in the morning, the Semillon juice was then cold se led for three days and racked to ferment. TasƟng: The wine is pale straw with green hues and displays li ed lemon citrus aromas. These flavours are evident on the palate and are enhanced by an acid structure that gives the wine length and persistence. Enjoy with Seafood. Cellaring: This wine will con nue to develop and drink well for the next 8-10 years


TOP DROPS MCLEISH ESTATE 2007 Semillon

McLeish Wines have a reputa on for producing quality wines that have gone on to achieve a range of accolades both na onally and interna onally. The much decorated McLeish 2007 Semillon took the tle for the world’s best Semillon at the 2012 Interna onal Wine Challenge (IWC) and also starred in the Sydney Wine Show, winning a gold medal and the trophy for best Semillon of show and also the trophy for the best wine at he 2013 Sydney Interna onal Wine Compe on. TasƟng notes: Citrus and very pure Semillon nose with gentle toasty and lemon citrus and honey flavours. S ll very fresh and ght with a strong line of acidity and good length – quite mouth puckering! This is an intense & powerful Semillon yet s ll fine and a natural complement to any seafood dish. Cellaring: It has cellaring poten al for 8-10 years

FIRST CREEK WINES 2013 First Creek Verdelho

First Creek Wines has been cra ing wines of excep onal regional quality since 1996 with the aim to demonstrate the great diversity of wine styles from the Hunter Valley as well as examples from other wine regions. Harves ng in the cool of the night to prevent oxida on, this premium Verdelho was then crushed, pressed and cold se led. Fermenta on was completed in stainless steel with neutral yeast to allow natural fruit expression. Minimal handling to bo ling allowed the natural CO2 to linger giving the wine a zesty finish. TasƟng: The wine is bright straw-green in colour with li ed tropical and citrus aromas with hints of spice and a medium bodied palate with layers of ripe tropical fruits and melon, finishing with a zippy acidity. Excellent with Asian or lightly spiced foods Cellaring: Drinking beau fully now (or within the next few years) whilst young and fresh

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Lovedale, Rothbury & Branxton Wine & Dine Trail CELLAR DOORS Adina Vineyard

Lovedale, o en referred to as the ''Heart of the Hunter'', is located just east of Pokolbin and is renown for its interes ng community, award-winning bou que wineries, cellar doors, quality accommoda on, fine restaurants and unique galleries. The name Lovedale combines the name of one of the early families of the district, the Loves, with the memory of the dales of Yorkshire in England. As one of the oldest wine producing areas of the Hunter Valley, the history of Lovedale dates back to the 1800s when local wheat, dairy and general produce farmers turned their hand to grape growing. Se lement in Lovedale dates prior to 1825 when there were significant land grants along Black Creek. This area was par cularly suitable for vineyards and was also favoured for its proximity to the 'Old North Road' to Windsor. Before the 1920s there were more wineries in the area than there are today. The Love’s Winery in Lovedale Road processed grapes from other vineyards as well as their own and closed in 1927. Unfortunately by the late 1920's most of the Lovedale vineyards ceased opera ons due to the impact of the Depression and a widespread outbreak of downy mildew. In the 1960's the vineyards began to reemerge and wine produc on began once again.

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Lovedale also hosts a number of events throughout the year, with the signature event being the famous Lovedale Long Lunch held on the third weekend in May each year.

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MAP G5

Capercaillie Wine

62

I4

DeBortoli Wines

63

H3

Emmas Co age Vineyard

64

E3

Gartelmann Wines

65

E5

Pierre’s Wines

67

A2

Sal re Wines

68

E4

Sandalyn Estate

68

E4

Wandin Valley Estate

69

D5

CELLAR DOORS WITH RESTAURANTS

PAGE

MAP

Adina Vineyard

62

Emmas Co age Vineyard

64

E3

Gartelmann Wines

65

E5

Wandin Valley Estate

69

D5

RESTAURANTS

PAGE

G5

MAP

Emersons Café & Restaurant

63

G5

Emmas of Lovedale

64

E3

Lovedale Smokehouse & Café

66

F6

Majors Lane Restaurant

66

F6

Mojos on Wilderness

65

E5

Royal Federal Hotel

67

B2

Sabor in the Hunter Dessert Bar

67

E3

The Deck Café

63

E5

The Olive Tree Restaurant

67

A6

Wandin Valley Estate Wine Bar & Diner

69

D5

PROVIDORES Adina Vineyard

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MAP G5

Gartelmann Wines

65

E5

Hunter Valley Chocolate Company Lovedale Smokehouse & Café

38

D6

66

F6

Sabor in the Hunter Dessert Bar

67

E3


Things to See & Do...

How to use Wine & Dine...

Take in the scenery on horse-back

In the following pages you will find informa on about Wining & Dining in the Lovedale area. The Lovedale area is differen ated by the colour GREEN throughout and also by the GREEN shaded bar down the outside of each page. Lis ngs are in alphabe cal order where possible and can be easily iden fied by the following symbols: Wineries/Cellar Doors—will display the following symbols:

If you’re up for a bit of adventure then Hunter Valley Horse Riding & Adventures in Talga Road is the place to find it. Here you will find trails for both the beginner and the experienced rider...all with spectacular valley views. It’s advisable to book ….phone 4930-7111

Visit the Lovedale Long Lunch

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For more informa on about events visit www.HunterValleyOnline.com.au or www.lovedalehuntervalley.com.au

= White Wines

= Sparkling Wines

= Red Wines

= For fied Wines

Restaurants– will display the Providores— will display the

symbol symbol

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A 'progressive lunch' where visitors work their way though par cipa ng wineries, enjoying the quality food, wine, music and entertainment at all of the venues. Plan ahead for accommoda on. Always the 3rd weekend each May.


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Home to some of the oldest vines and biggest names in Australian wine, the Hunter Valley is a mecca for lovers of quality red wines renowned for their thoroughly unique and dis nc ve style and ageing ability and cra ed in this region for over 180 years.

Cabernet Sauvignon—The world's most recognised red grape variety famous for its ability to age for decades at a me. This classic red variety of Bordeaux is second only to Shiraz in importance in Australia and can be medium to full bodied, typically leafy with ripe cassis like flavours, well structured and elegant and Shiraz - Shiraz is the Hunter's premium red variety and the most widely planted grape variety powerfully aroma c. The bouquet can be rich with fruity notes of black cherries and currants, in Australia. The typical young Hunter Valley Shiraz is a medium bodied wine showing red and herby notes of peppers and olives and spicy notes of ginger. dark berries, spices and a great deal of tannin. However it’s real character is seen in wines with Chambourcin—Rela vely new to Australia, longevity. With age, the wines become a far more Chambourcin wines have a lovely, deep red complex, full bodied, and richly flavoured wine colour. Most are big and fruity with a lot of with some earthy tones. raspberries, plums, prunes and even cranberries Pinot Noir—Described as "the most roman c of on the palate. It is not as heavy or robust as wines'' due to its gra fying perfume, Pinot Noir is Shiraz or Cabernet Sauvignon, which can make it light to medium in body with a broad range quite a rac ve to people who generally don't like of textures and flavours, including a variety of red wine. Because this variety is especially complex aromas reminiscent of black or red resistant to fungal diseases Chambourcin is a cherry, raspberry, currant and black berry. Pinot variety that succeeds wonderfully in the Hunter Noir is also highly reflec ve of its terroir with Valley climate. different wine growing regions o en producing Sangiovese—This star amongst Italian wine grape very different wines. varie es, Sangiovese is now making its mark in Merlot - Merlot is renowned for its wonderfully Australia where it has become increasingly fruity, well rounded, even fleshy character and is popular over the last few decades. The variety grown in just about every wine growing region of produces elegant medium-bodied wines with Australia. The summer heat of the Hunter is powerful aromas and with moderate to high considered to provide the ideal growing natural acidity. The characteris c flavours are condi ons for this versa le grape variety. In cherries, tomatoes, herbs, spices and tea like recent years, Hunter Valley Merlot has flavours. Australian Sangiovese wines tend to be experienced a surge in popularity and is o en a li le more fruity, with riper flavours and higher considered to be more robust and fleshy than alcohol. other well regarded varie es with a rich bouquet providing one of the most pleasurable wine experiences.


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With the appointment of the highly talented Ben Armstrong in the role of ExecuƟve Chef, Bill and Vicki Widin - owners of the recently opened Villa du Pays restaurant at Leogate Estate, have set about creaƟng one of the most sought aŌer dining venues in the Hunter. Situated adjacent to the Leogate Estate Cellar door, the restaurant is elegantly furnished, providing an in mate atmosphere with sea ng for 40 diners inside the restaurant and a further 80 outside on the courtyard and terrace overlooking the vineyard - a perfect se ng for that long, lazy lunch. The menu, wri en in both English and French, includes an impressive array of modern French cuisine that is very much influenced by Ben’s eight year s nt in France working in Michelin star restaurants and also includes a selec on of dryaged Australian Black Angus steaks sourced from the Widin’s ca le property near Tamworth. We opted for the seven course degusta on made up of a selec on of dishes from the main menu, matched with wines from Leogate Estate. While wai ng for our first course to arrive, we were served a canapé of duck and pistachio terrine perched on a thin cris ni. This ''teaser'' was absolutely delicious and a true indica on of what was s ll to come. The maple syrup cured ocean trout in a semillon jelly, together with a crisp Mediterranean vinaigre e and micro herb mesculin salad, was the first of seven courses to arrive. Perfectly complemented by the award winning 2010 Semillon, with its hint of citrus, this dish delivered an excep onal combina on of sensa onal tastes and combina ons that le us wan ng more. Next was the innova vely delicious beetroot ravioli stuffed with diced ger prawns cooked in a truffle cream. Beau fully presented with spiced avocado puree and mixed baby herbs and made all the more interes ng by the contras ng flavours of the orange and beetroot reduc on and crunchiness of what looked like a hazelnut dukkah. A firm favourite was the sweet corn and truffle riso o with shaved parmesan and pepper cress.

The earthiness of the truffle oil brought out the sweetness of the corn in this simple dish which was further complemented by the melon and citrus flavours of the 2010 Brokenback Chardonnay. Just superb! The a en on to detail is astonishing and the salt water Barramundi proved no different. Served with a cauliflower and horseradish puree and forest mushrooms the Barramundi was perfectly crisp with the flesh mild and moist in flavour and further complemented by the aniseed flavour of the Thai basil. With this came my favourite wine of the night - the 2010 H10 Block Chardonnay. Then came the duo of duck - which is sure is to become the restaurants signature dish. The duck breast was cooked sous vide - at low temperature to a wonderful pink and topped with a hazelnut dukkah; whereas the confit duck leg - a speciality of Gascony, was served crisp and perfectly tender on a bed of braised puy len ls, with a sweet potato puree and sweetened kumquats. This was the highlight of the meal and demonstrated Ben's passion and respect for tradi onal French food as well as his gi for presenta on and advanced sense for flavour. Two desserts followed - both matched with a glass of 2011 Late Harvest Semillon. The first being a chocolate and coffee mousse, that was so light it tasted like chocolate air. The second being the pineapple and lemon curd ravioli with a dollop of mango coulis and handmade coconut ice cream. A deligh ul end to one of the most enjoyable dining experiences. Villa du Pays is impressive from the start – the service is warm, a en ve and friendly and our waitress had an amazing knowledge of the menu and the wines, all of which were expertly matched to each meal. This is fine dining at its best and Ben Armstrong and his team have set a new standard for restaurants in the Hunter.

a Salt&Peppa review


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Sustainable George Francisco (and friends)


Dining

{At Roberts Circa 1876}

Speak to any number of chefs and you will find that they all share a common desire to please the palate. This goal has now evolved to include providing healthier food, that tastes great and is good for the environment. Let's face it you rarely get to watch a cooking show without hearing the word ''sustainability'' in rela on to farming, produce selec on or food prepara on anymore.

Here in the Hunter Valley a growing number of local restaurants are doing their bit to improve on their environmental ''footprint'' and reduce waste and are passionately commi ed to sustainability and integra ng these values into every aspect of their opera ons and decision making process..

At Roberts Circa 1876 in Pokolbin, sustainability isn't just a buzzword anymore - it's become a way of life. Owner Ma Cowley and Execu ve Chef George Francisco have made it a priority to Today, sustainability is about designing an implement programs and prac ces that are efficient, eco-friendly environment, reducing waste, recycling, compos ng, using biodegradable healthier for diners as well as the environment. products whenever possible and generally paying George has achieved this by suppor ng local more a en on to one's impact on the producers wherever possible and sourcing environment when drinking or ea ng - whether its hormone free meats. George has also created a serving organic foods and wines or simply thriving market garden alongside the vineyard knowing where the food comes from. which provides the restaurant with just about all of its supplies. There is also a greenhouse full of Restaurants are increasingly approaching seedlings ensuring future crops and George has sustainable food sourcing in various ways: also taken to making his own jams and pickles and ♦ Growing their own: by growing their own harves ng his own honey. According to George vegetables, fruit and herbs - restaurants are the market garden should guarantee a con nuous becoming increasingly self-sufficient supply of organic fruit and vegetables throughout the year. ♦ Buying local - by suppor ng local food producers or growers located within a certain distance from the restaurant

♦ Sourcing organic ingredients - products cer fied for mee ng specific standards, including being produced without most conven onal pes cides, synthe c fer lizers, an bio cs and growth hormones.

♦ Purchasing responsibly-sourced animal products which include cage-free eggs, freerange chickens, hormone free meat products, sustainable seafood and ethically produced involving no cruelty.

For Ma and George the benefits have also been financial with the restaurant business doubling over the last 12 months with no no ceable increase in costs. There has also been a significant decline in kitchen waste with the chickens feeding on edible kitchen scraps and all oyster, clam and mussel shells crushed and recycled to create pathways now visible around the restaurant. Roberts Circa 1876 is just one of many local restaurants that are focused on improving their understanding of the environment and community in which we all live and looking for methods to eliminate waste and ways to give back to nature before taking from it.

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More and more people are looking for healthier food served in ways that reduce waste and that are easier on the environment. From compos ng and conserving to recycling and conserva on, there is a growing move toward a zero-solid waste goal while sourcing and offering food and beverages that are cer fied as sustainably grown, harvested, produced and processed.

Also located nearby is the well established chicken coop with chickens that are fed food scraps from the restaurant and provide fresh eggs for the kitchen. The chickens are moved every two weeks to add manure to the soil.


Mount View, Cessnock, & Nulkaba Trail Mount View is situated at the southern border of Pokolbin and nestled amongst the breathtaking surrounds of the Brokenback Range in the Hunter Valley. Mount View with its winding roads and panoramic views offers some of the most outstanding scenery available in the Hunter Valley. The history of the area dates back to the mid 1800's when early pioneers recognised the quality of the land offered by the area. Mount View provides a number of wine and dine op ons with 2 highly respected restaurants and a handful of impressive and highly acclaimed bou que wineries that seem to appear out of nowhere and all providing a relaxed and idyllic wine tas ng experience and superbly welcoming hospitality. At the end of Wollombi road is the historic town of Wollombi which was se led from 1838 as a service centre for the local farming community as well as travellers. Today Wollombi displays a fine architectural heritage, a selec on of cafes, eateries and comfortable guesthouses and na onal parks with great bush walking trails, lookouts and ancient Aboriginal rock carvings.

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The nearby town of Cessnock was developed as a private village on the road that is now known as ''The Convict Trail'' - the original Sydney to Hunter Valley road hand-built by 3,000 convicts. Cessnock became a major mining centre at the turn of the century; however, wine and tourism have since become the major local industries. Cessnock is considered the ''gateway'' to the wine region and has a number of fine restaurants, guesthouses and galleries with visitors able to visit the local Hunter Beer Co. brewery and the Nulkaba Hatchery in Nulkaba.

Mount View image courtesy of Mount View Tourism

CELLAR DOORS Briar Ridge Kelman Vineyard Petersons Wines Saddler’s Creek Wines Savannah Estate

CELLAR DOORS WITH RESTAURANTS Briar Ridge RESTAURANTS 221 Restaurant & Bar at The Royal Oak Hotel Al-Oi Thai Restaurant Australia Hotel B.L.U.E Thai Briar Grillade The Brickworks Brasserie

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Things to See & Do

How to use Wine & Dine

Brewery Tours—Visit Po ers Brewery for a brewery tour—it’s the only Microbrewery in the Hunter and produces several signature beers such as the Hunter Kolsch and Hunter Witbier and also seasonal beers. Tours depart at 12pm, 2pm and 4pm and cost $10pp, which includes a tas ng paddle.

In the following pages you will find informa on about Wining & Dining in the Mount View/Cessnock/Nulkaba area. These areas are differen ated by the colour MAROON throughout and also by the MAROON shaded bar down the outside of each page. Lis ngs are in alphabe cal order where possible and can be easily iden fied by the following symbols: Wineries/Cellar Doors—will display the following symbols:

Visit Hunter Valley Zoo—Feed the animals... hand feed kangaroos, wallabies, farmyard animals and some bird species as o en as you like! Daily shows allow you to pat a wombat, cuddle up to a koala, touch a rep le and watch the monkeys being fed. Free gas barbecue facili es and undercover sea ng, so bring the family for a picnic lunch in a fun relaxed atmosphere.

= Sparkling Wines

= Red Wines

= For fied Wines

Restaurants– will display the Providores— will display the

symbol symbol

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For more information about events visit www.HunterValleyOnline.com.au or www.mountview.biz

= White Wines


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Dinner at

THE BELTREE What followed was the hand-rolled potato gnocchi - well matched to the fresh, crisp and citrus characters of the Tinkler’s 2007 School Block Semillon. The gnocchi was perfectly presented with heirloom tomato and buffalo mozzarella and The restaurant is elegantly lit up when we arrive a sprinkle of baby basil which le a fresh and with diners si ng both inside and outside on the lingering and almost liquorice taste in the mouth. terrace. We get a warm and invi ng welcome My best gnocchi ever tasted and a delight to eat from Jess who manages the restaurant and a wave just superb! from Guy who reigns supreme in the kitchen as Our final dish was the pressed chicken leg on we are quickly whisked away to our table. charred farro and corn, served with a glass of We are served home made lemonade - made with Piero Mancini Vermin no - a very food friendly local citrus with gin and lemon thyme from their Italian wine. The chicken was nicely crisp and the garden and a complimentary serving of breads, meat perfectly moist and tender. A pleasant olives and breads cks (grissini) arrive as we look adjunct to this dish was the generous leaf salad over the invi ng menu which seems to include which came from the Beltree garden. everything wonderful in Italian cuisine. The wine This is simple, honest, high quality Italian food list is equally impressive and includes a good mix prepared and cooked with care and respect for of local Hunter wines and imports. the food and the ingredients - many of which We decide to put ourselves in the capable hands come from their own garden or are sourced of both Guy and Jess and opt for a series of dishes locally. served with matching wines. We were not to be The cheese dish arrived consis ng of pecorino disappointed ! sardo - also known as fiore sardo - an aged and

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This has to be one of the most appealing restaurants in the Hunter Valley. With its charming provincial style co age and ny vineyard, you could be anywhere in Europe.

First up was the cured King Salmon with marinated fresh Beltree Garden Zucchini in house smoked tomato water and perfectly matched to the intense flavours of the Basci Verdicchio - an Italian imported white wine. This was an astonishingly delicious dish with the smoked tomato water contribu ng to an interes ng combina on of flavours. One of the many highlights of our meal

firm Italian cheese origina ng from Sardinia and made from ewes milk and just perfect on its own and when served with a glass of Brokenwood Sangiovese.

Next was one of our favourite dishes - the vitello tonnato - a classic Italian dish (from Piedmont) consis ng of marinated veal covered with a creamy mayonnaise-like sauce that has been flavoured with tuna, served with fried capers, ar choke, white anchovy and served chilled or at room temperature. An exceedingly elegant an pasto that gives a true and honest indica on of Guy’s respect of produce and just perfect when served with a delicious Hunter Valley Levin Chardonnay.

The atmosphere is relaxed and wonderfully warm and the waitresses friendly and a en ve without intruding and have an impressive knowledge of each of the dishes served and of the local wines. All in all a truly memorable dining experience.

And there it was - dessert. We decided to share a dark chocolate terrine with malt gelato and dark beer caramel served with a glass of Gundog Estate Muscat. This was so delicious that I found myself wishing I had it all to myself.

It’s easy to see why Guy and Jess have had so much success with this wonderful restaurant of theirs and have developed such a strong following. Our next visit is going to be over a long and lazy lunch on the terrace.

a Salt&Peppa review


Broke Fordwich Trail Known as the “tranquil side of the Hunter Valley” and situated an easy 15 minute drive from Pokolbin and just 25 minutes from Singleton, the Broke Fordwich Wine Region is considered to be a separate vi cultural sub-region of the Hunter Valley and accounts for approximately 11% of the vineyard area planted in the Hunter Valley. The warm climate and fer le soils produce dis nc ve wines such as Semillon, Shiraz, Chardonnay and Verdelho as well as Italian varie es such as Sangiovese and Barbera. The area was first se led as early as 1824 and despite being one of the oldest wine growing areas in Australia, it is only in the last 30 years that Broke Fordwich has started to become an important player in the Australian wine making industry. With the Brokenback Range and the iconic Yellow Rock escarpment in the background, the Broke Fordwich region consists of two villages - Broke and Bulga each with their own iden ty as well as the two smaller communi es of Fordwich and Milbrodale.

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Historically, the region was first inhabited by the indigenous Wanaruah tribe many thousands of years ago and were known as ‘the people of the hills and plains’ and many direct descendants s ll live in the area today. These culturally rich people le many significant cave pain ngs in the area which are s ll accessible today.

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Ascella Pure Wines

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Brokes Promise Estate

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Krinklewood

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Mount Broke Wines

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Stomp! Wines

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How to Use Wine & Dine In the following pages you will find informa on about Wining & Dining in the Broke Fordwich area. The Broke Fordwich area is differen ated by the colour PEACOCK throughout and also by the PEACOCK shaded bar down the outside of each page. Lis ngs are in alphabe cal order where possible and can be easily iden fied by the following symbols: Wineries/Cellar Doors—will display the following symbols: = White Wines

= Sparkling Wines

= Red Wines

= For fied Wines

Restaurants– will display the Providores— will display the

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symbol symbol

For more information about events visit www.HunterValleyOnline.com.au or www.brokefordwich.com.au


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180 Years

OF VINES & WINES

Vines first arrived in the Hunter Valley at the end of the 1820’s, with the first major plan ng taking place in the 1830's, when James Busby, an amateur vi culturalist returned to New South Wales a er travelling throughout Europe collec ng cu ngs from over 500 vineyards. These cu ngs were then planted at the newly established Royal Botanical Gardens in Sydney and at the family estate ''Kirkton'' situated on the Hunter River - establishing what was arguably the first vineyard in the region.

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From these humble beginnings the Hunter Valley wine industry grew rapidly and established itself as the most important wine making region in the state. By the 1860's plan ngs of vineyards began to move from the fer le, alluvial plains along the Hunter River toward the foothills of the Brokenback range near Pokolbin and Rothbury (Lovedale) where many of the most well established vineyards can be found today. Sydney was a lucra ve market for the Hunter Valley, largely due to regula on in place at the me that placed prohibi ve du es on wines from other areas such as Victoria and South Australia. By the turn of the 20th century, this virtual monopoly over the Sydney market changed significantly with a new cons tu on banning such interstate trade barriers. This coupled with the

arrival of downy mildew in 1917 and the rise in the popularity of for fied wines, signalled a period of fast decline for the Hunter Valley. Many returning soldiers from WW1 were given land grants in the Hunter Valley but the Great Depression and devasta ng hail storms between 1929 and 1930 caused many of these new landowners to abandon their vineyards - many of which were then bought up by the more established land owners at the me who would later become the driving force behind the Hunter Valley's wine industry. The turning point came during the 1950's and 1960's which once again saw a shi in consumer tastes, but this me toward the drier styles of wine. What followed was a drama c increase in plan ngs and expansion into the area of BrokeFordwich and into the Upper Hunter north of Singleton. By 1976, plan ngs had grown to exceed 10,000 acres and despite a small reduc on in the 1980's the boom of the 1990's pushed plan ngs even further to over 11,000 acres. Today the Hunter Valley remains Australia's oldest wine producing region, with over 130 wineries producing a wide range of wines sold throughout Australia and exported to over 50 countries worldwide.


Photograph of Nick Paterson by Chris Elfes Photography


The New Wave

of innovative winemakers...

Nick Paterson was born in Melbourne before moving to the Hunter Valley where he grew up on the family vineyard - Chateau Pato in Thompsons Road Pokolbin. With no other op on but to help his parents with everything from pruning to labeling, Nick quickly learned that the vineyard’s environment, as well as understanding its poten al, was the star ng point of any great wine. This is a winemaking philosophy that remains with Nick today.

doing contract winemaking and s ll makes wine for his own Chateau Pato label. It was also in 2003 that he commenced working with Ken Sloane at Mistletoe Wines. The 2013 vintage saw Nick complete his 10th vintage at Mistletoe and he just goes from strength to strength.

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When it comes to career highlights - for Nick it's hard to go past winning the 2011 NSW Wine of The Year award with the 2009 Mistletoe Wines Reserve Chardonnay and being voted 2012 A er the passing of his father in 1993, it was a natural progression for Nick to con nue to run the Hunter Valley Winemaker of the year. vineyard and winery at Chateau Pato under the Nick's magic with Mistletoe wines con nued in guidance of Iain Riggs – a family friend and 2013 with the 2009 Mistletoe Reserve Semillon winemaker at Brokenwood. Thirsty for more winning best white wine and best bou que white industry knowledge and exper se, Nick joined wine of show including best Semillon 2011 & Brokenwood where he was involved in all aspects older at the 2013 NSW Small Winemakers Wine of wine produc on, while all the me keeping the Show. wheels of Chateau Pato turning through three During Nick’s 20+ years as a winemaker his wines vastly contras ng vintages. have been awarded 3 Championships, 25 Na onal In 1996 Nick had the opportunity to expand his Trophies, 2 Interna onal Trophies and 45 Gold knowledge further by doing a vintage at Domaine Medals. He is also proud to make wines for three Chandon in the Yarra Valley. A year later Nick then Hunter Valley brands that have received the also travelled to Italy to do a vintage in Tuscany acclaimed five stars in James Hallidays’ 2012 wine and also further South in Campania where he was book. confronted with completely different grape So what is his favourite wine to make? varie es, weather condi ons, soils and wine making methods and techniques. This experience ''Chardonnay has always put forward a worthy proved so invaluable that Nick returned to challenge and the op ons are endless in what you Tuscany during the following vintages in 1998 and can do in regards to winemaking. I cut my teeth on 1999 - which he spent mostly in the South crea ng the Lakes Folly and Tyrrell's VAT 47 style of wines new blends and enhancing old techniques. and the age worthiness of these wines was the real curiosity for me. Again it all comes back the Nick joined Tyrrell's in 2000 as assistant red vineyard'' explains Nick. winemaker and considers himself fortunate to have had the opportunity to work alongside ''When I started with Ken at Mistletoe we spent Murray Tyrrell and to have gone through the 2000 quite a bit of me finding the right blocks of vintage with him. Nick also includes others such as Chardonnay to make something special and ten Bruce Tyrrell, Andrew Spinaze, Len Evans, Iain years down the track it has paid off'' said Nick. Riggs and Ma Harrop as having a significant ''However'', he goes on to say '''on a more influence on his career to date. personal level the Chateau Pato DJP Shiraz will always be #1, because I can remember plan ng it Nick established Dogliani Winemaking and as a kid - it's where it all began for me''. Consul ng when he le Tyrrell's in 2003 and acts as a wine consultant for a couple of companies


WOLLOMBI VALLEY TRAIL Wollombi is a small, picturesque and historic village that has always been an important base for travellers along the Great North Road and today retains its fine architectural heritage bolstered by cafes, wineries and comfortable guesthouses. The Wollombi Valley vineyards have been producing fine wines in this region since the 1850’s. The Wollombi Wine Trail is made up of six bou que wineries offering visitors a unique wine tas ng experience and passes through beau ful countryside at the southern gateway to Hunter Valley Wine Country following part of the Great North Road which was built by convicts in the early 19th century.

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Aboriginal occupation of the area dates back at least 12,000 years when the area served as a significant meeting point on the north-south trade and travel route for coastal Aboriginal peoples. The word Wollombi means “meeting of the waters” in the local Aboriginal dialect. Many traces of the original inhabitants survive throughout the valley and include rock engravings, sharpening grooves, hand stencils, tribal markings in caves and outcrops as well as evidence of camping sites along the Brook and its tributary creeks.

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Noyce Brothers

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Stonehurst Cedar Creek

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Undercliff Winery & Gallery

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Wollombi Village Vineyard

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Things to See & Do Sculpture in the Vineyards—Sculpture in the Vineyards along the Wollombi Valley Wine Trail in the Hunter Valley, features large-scale outdoor and site-specific works. Annually from November to January. Wollombi Markets—Visit historic Wollombi on the holiday Monday of each long weekend (Easter, June and October) and on Australia Day for this great market of over 100 stalls, including local produce and crafts, plants, clothes, tools, bric-a-brac and much more.

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For more information about events visit www.HunterValleyOnline.com.au or www.visitwollombi.com.au


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Popular amongst both locals and visitors to the Hunter Valley, RidgeView Restaurant is located on RidgeView Estate which is also home to one of the most stylish cellar doors and award winning wines in the Hunter Valley.

and finely shredded mint finished with a drizzle of chilli malt balsamic vinegar and well matched to a glass of 2010 RidgeView Verdelho.

Execu ve Chef Donna Hollis has introduced a refreshingly different style of dining at RidgeView with a menu that includes tradi onal and contemporary Middle Eastern and Mediterranean influences throughout the invi ng menu complemented by an excellent selec on of wines. It is clear from the menu that there is a real emphasis on fresh local produce with much of the vegetables, herbs and salads grown on the property. Like most Mediterranean influenced cuisine, the flavours change with the season and the menus at RidgeView change accordingly to match the seasons and seasonal produce.

surrounded by perfectly crisp chat potatoes. An en cing ensemble that tasted as good as it looked. Cooked crisp on top, the barramundi was succulent, deliciously moist with a sweet, bu ery flavour and a citrus twang no doubt origina ng from the sour cream and coriander. A wonderful choice and a superb addi on to the menu.

The last dish on the tas ng plate was the very tradi onal Cypriot spiced chicken souvlaki skewer on cinnamon sweet potato with tomato caraway RidgeView Restaurant is one of those unique dining venues that you look forward to returning puree and tzatziki- perfectly paired with a glass of to again ... and again. This is by far one of the best award winning Impressions Shiraz. The slight spots in the Hunter to go for a meal. It’s modern, sweet taste of the cinnamon and potato roman c yet family friendly and a place to go to combina on was superb and just incredible when celebrate those special occasions. tasted with the spiced chicken. An amazing dish that le us wan ng more. The restaurant has a modern wood finish and features a vaulted mber ceiling and open For the main course we decided on the Bu er fireplace with the outside area being just as Baked Barramundi Fillet and Lamb Souvla. impressive, with its expansive undercover The barramundi fillet arrived delicately balanced verandah overlooking the picturesque vineyards - on a tomato, avocado and herb salad dressed with just perfect for that al fresco lunch. coriander and preserved lemon crème fraîche and

A er deba ng long and hard whether to have the very temp ng Cypriot Meze - a four course banquet made up of many small dishes, we decided instead to go with the RidgeView Tas ng Plate comprising a taste of 3 different dishes (or mezedes) with matching wines and a selec on of main courses from the menu.

The final act was reserved for RidgeViews famous Belgian chocolate fondant with pistachio rolled macadamia ice-cream and fresh liquored strawberries. Call it what you like – fondant, moelleux or molten lava pudding, RidgeViews Belgian chocolate fondant is real treat for chocolate lovers of the highest order and served perfectly warm with a silky chocolate centre. There's plenty to like about RidgeView Restaurant, especially with its bounty of unusual dishes to choose from on the menu and the tas ng plate made us look forward to trying the very popular Cypriot Mezze feast. There's always next me ..

Next was the delicious rock-melon salad topped with crumbled black cheddar, crispy prosciu o

a Salt&Peppa review

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We started with the very tradi onal Grilled Greek Haloumi with caramelised pear and pistachio nuts infused with home grown oregano and topped with chiffonade of radicchio. This dish delivered the most exquisite range of dis nct flavours, with the faded sal ness of the haloumi and bi er edge of the radicchio perfectly offset by the sweetness of the caramelised pear and pistachio. I would return for this dish alone which was just magnificent with the 2010 RidgeView Viognier.

The lamb souvla - a tradi onal and very popular Cypriot dish which is tradi onally cooked for religious fes vals and other celebratory occasions, was perfectly presented and included a 2 inch cut lamb loin chop and chicken souvlaki seasoned and slowly roasted over a Cypriot grill with a tomato caraway puree and tzatziki, baked cinnamon sweet potato and cous cous tabouleh. Just delicious!


Wine & Food Experiences

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With over 140 wineries in the Hunter Valley you may prefer to avoid driving and choose instead to get on board one of the fun, friendly wine tours with i neraries that include a selec on of cellar doors, gourmet food providers and in many cases lunch at one of the Valley's many restaurants or cafes.

You can even a end wine school with short classes on wine produc on techniques and wine apprecia on. Whatever you choose you will be well looked a er by operators, instructors or drivers passionate about the region and keen to share its secrets .


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Wine & Dine Hunter Valley | Summer & Autumn 2014  

Wine and Dine in the Hunter - is the ONLY quality publication in the Hunter Valley (Australia's premier wine producing region) guiding you t...

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