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Magazine

WILSON

The John Stewart Memorial Library Special Feature... page 5

winter 2012


Contents: Feature Story: 5

The John Stewart Memorial Library

In Every Issue: 4 Message from the President 9 Archives 12 ‘Mid A Group of Pines & Maples: News from Around Campus 18 Shaping the Future: Advancement News 20 Athletics 24 Odds & Evens: Alumnae News 36 Class Notes 54 Life Lines

Cover photo by Debra Collins


Wilson Magazine Winter 2012 • Volume 85 • Number 1 Executive Editor Ann Terry

Managing Editor Emma Lewis

Contributing Writers Debra Collins Dianna C. Heim Emma Lewis Cathy Mentzer Beth Weixel Ed Wells

Contributing Photographers Valerie B. Barnes James Butts Debra Collins April Davila ’13 Dianna C. Heim Emma Lewis Cathy Mentzer Shelly Novak ’92 Ryan Smith, C&S Photography John M. Tishok Beth Weixel

Design Jennifer Glosser

President of the College Barbara K. Mistick

Director of Communications Debra Collins

Alumnae Association of Wilson College Board of Directors President Paula Spezza Tishok ’71

Vice President Marian “Mimi” Stevenson ’74

Secretary Patricia Markle Keffer ’96

Treasurer Jennifer Nickle Banzhof ’94

Alumnae Trustees Nancy Kostas ’64 Tracy Leskey ’90 Marie Behler Schleicher ’68

Directors Jane Appleyard ’66 Cynthia Fink Barber ’73 Trish Bennett ’68 Sandra Griggs Clark ’85 Mary Cramer ’91 Tina Robertson Dorsey ’92 Rita Handwerk Fisk ’64 Cazella Hinojosa Goodall ’70 Kendal Hopkins ’80 Cathie Sunderland Jenkins ’71 Kristina Heuck Knubel ’02 Laureen Lutz ’08 Rebecca Ross ’05 Susan Ross ’66 De-Enda Rotz ’05 Sarah Muller Smith ’85 Lorrie Rejonis Trader ’05 Dorothy M. Van Brakle ’09

Nominating Committee Amy Allen Boyce ’73 Cathie Sunderland Jenkins ’71

Wilson Magazine (USPS-685-580) is published quarterly by the Office of College Advancement and the Alumnae Association of Wilson College, 1015 Philadelphia Ave., Chambersburg, PA. Periodicals postage paid at Chambersburg, PA 17201 and additional post offices. Subscriptions are $15/year. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Wilson College Alumnae Office, 1015 Philadelphia Ave., Chambersburg, PA 17201-1285, 717-262-2010 or aq@wilson.edu. Opinions expressed are those of contributors or the editor and do not represent the official positions of Wilson College or the Alumnae Association of Wilson College.


Message from the President

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ducation is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world,” Nelson Mandela once said. Yet the national news points out how difficult it is becoming for so many in our nation to attend college. Students and families are increasingly struggling with affordability issues — loans, scholarships and net tuition have become the buzz words for 2012. For the past 11 years, Wilson has been recognized for offering a high-quality education at a reasonable price as a “Best Value” school in U.S. News and World Report’s “Best Colleges.” While we remain committed to offering students scholarships and are focused on retaining and helping students graduate on time, our need for revenue is real. Scholarship assistance for our students has increased from $3.3 million in 2007 to just over $5 million this year. The Leading with Confidence Campaign has provided some additional funding for scholarships and brought us the Harry R. Brooks Complex for Science, Mathematics, and Technology, but we must continue to find additional ways to help students afford the cost of a Wilson education. And while we will do all we can at Wilson, it will take everyone — colleges, states and the federal government — all working together to ensure that higher education is available to everyone who seeks it. The Leading with Confidence Campaign closed on Dec. 31 with over $51 million raised against its goal of $45 million. Of course, this is due to many of you and is a clear demonstration of the strength and dedication of Wilson’s graduates and friends. Thanks for what you have already done and continue to do for Wilson. Even as we closed this campaign, we recognized another pressing need — the renovation of the John Stewart Memorial Library. It has been 50 years since any major updates have been made to the library, and it is now in serious need of repair and renovation. The Board of Trustees has authorized a planning phase to renovate the facility to meet the changing needs of today’s educators and learners. This is an exciting opportunity to re-conceptualize the library as a learning commons. Many challenges lie ahead for Wilson. We must be committed to being a thriving institution while also remaining a best value school. Accordingly, a new commission for the future of Wilson is being formed to study and recommend opportunities for Wilson’s future and to focus on realizing our strategic plan goal of 1,000 students. I am delighted that Trustee Leslie Durgin ’69 has agreed to serve as chair. Her experience in political and community leadership as the former mayor of Boulder, Colo., as well as many years of dedication to Wilson, will serve the College well. You may have noticed that this publication has a fresh cover and a new title. The Wilson Magazine also meets a strategic plan goal to more fully address all of those who love the College – Wilson graduates, students, parents, faculty, staff, current and former trustees, our Franklin County community and friends. It is important to recognize everyone who supports the College. Together, we provide the exceptional education that changes students’ lives. We see that at Wilson every day. Sincerely,

Dr. Barbara K. Mistick President

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SPECIAL Feature

The John Stewart Memorial Library:

Yesterday Today

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By Emma Lewis

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ne of Wilson’s most unique features is the historical and beautiful look of the campus buildings and architecture. The physical structures create an atmosphere identifiable to the Wilson community, and almost every day, people gather inside to expand their knowledge and share ideas. The John Stewart Memorial Library is one such example of a campus building that has become synonymous with Wilson’s campus.

Along with the beauty and historical significance of an older building, there also is the good possibility of it needing extensive upkeep and repair. Unfortunately, such a situation has happened at Wilson. In spring 2011, there was a heating system failure in which steam pipes cracked and caused major damage to the walls, the women’s

bathroom and the technology room. Large portions of the pipes in the heating system are located beneath the original section of the library, making it difficult to repair. After an assessment by College officials, the decision was made to close the library and temporarily relocate it to Sarah’s Coffeehouse. The Board of Trustees voted Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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SPECIAL Feature

Wilson College Business Manager George Bartle, George H. Stewart, President Warfield and U.S. Senator George Wharton Pepper, who gave the dedication address

earlier this year to move forward with a capital project to renovate the library. Through this project, the College is looking to preserve the history of the library, and at the same time, progress into the future with a library that will support Wilson’s mission for a rigorous liberal arts education. Before looking to the future of what the new library should and could be, understanding the history of the library will help to preserve its heritage. At one time, students used Edgar Hall as their place of study. Then in 1922, an announcement at a Board of Trustees meeting was made that George H. Stewart, the College’s oldest Trustee, had given the College $75,000, the largest donation to date. George wanted a building of natural limestone to be erected in memory of his brother, Justice John Stewart. Both Stewart brothers were prominent figures at Wilson College and in the surrounding counties.  At one point in his life, George owned more than 100 farms in the Cumberland Valley. He was the president and chairman of the board of directors for the Valley National Bank and was involved in the sale of the Cumberland Valley Railroad to the Pennsylvania Railroad. From 1892 to 1929, George served as the treasurer for the Board and he served as a College Trustee from 1879 until his death in 1931. After announcing his gift, George was appointed to the committee that would decide what building would be erected and monitor the progress of the building. The building’s namesake, John, also served on the Board of Trustees from 1895 until his death in 1920. Many of these years were spent as vice president of the board. His education included Princeton University and Franklin & Marshall College. John then applied his degrees to practice law in Cumberland and Franklin counties until the outbreak of the Civil War. John was a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army and served until 1863. Upon return6

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Students are seen studying in the “library” of Edgar Hall. The Tiffany window, now located in Lenfest Commons, is in the background.

ing to civil life, John’s first law partnership was with Col. A.K. McClure, owner of the original mansion of Norland Hall, which was burned during the war by the Confederate Army. He later went on to practice law with Col. Thomas B. Kennedy for more than 20 years. John had much success in his political career. He was a delegate to the Republican National Convention, which nominated Abraham Lincoln to his second term for presidency. John was also a representative to the State Constitutional Convention, a presidential elector and a state senator for Franklin and Huntingdon counties. He was elected Presidential Judge of the 39th district in 1888 and re-elected in 1898. Governor Samuel W. Pennypacker appointed him to the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, where John served until his death. Justice Stewart died in a trolley accident on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 20, 1920. After a holiday meal at his daughter’s home, he was struck crossing Philadelphia Avenue. At the Board of Trustees meeting that announced the $75,000 gift, the Rev. John B. Laird noted, “Every member of the Board rejoices that by this generous provision, the name Stewart will ever be associated in a helpful and happy way with the College and that the future classes and friends of the College will have before them the name of this distinguished man.” The Stewart family’s involvement with the College does not end there. George H. Stewart’s granddaughter, Jane Rambo Stewart, was a 1944 graduate of Wilson and a former trustee. Jane was also involved in the “Save Wilson” campaign in 1979. Before her death on Oct. 5, 2011, she was an active member of her community in Philadelphia. Jane also served on the Alexander Stewart M.D. Foundation, which has supported organizations throughout the Cumberland Valley, including Wilson College. Dr.


SPECIAL Feature Alexander Stewart was the son of George H. Stewart and the foundation supports several initiatives, including historic preservation. The library’s cornerstone was laid on Oct. 15, 1923, as part of Founder’s Day celebrations. The building was completed on Nov. 6, 1925. The architect was Furness, Evans and Company of Philadelphia, who designed the building in the Collegiate Gothic style, and the landscape architect was Dreher and Churchman. Before it was completely finished, on May 9, 1925, it was officially dedicated as the John Stewart Memorial Library. Along with the natural limestone material, slate was used for the roof, and its book capacity was 42,000 volumes. George H. Stewart was the sole contributor, having given a total of $102,000. The library soon outgrew its capacity. In 1954, its collection reached 44,000 volumes. The College hired Charles B. Shaw, librarian of Swarthmore College, to conduct a thorough study of the library and its use.  He suggested adding stacks throughout the building to manage the overflowing volumes. However, he also noted that the overcrowding was interfering with the students’ ability to use the space adequately. The library’s collection continued to grow. By 1961, there were 72,000 volumes. An addition was completed in 1962 at a total cost of $322,000. The first gift for the addition was a sum of $15,000 from the Hollywood actor Jimmy Stewart. Ties between the two Stewart families have not been found, but according to the Jimmy Stewart Museum’s website, his family left Franklin County and moved to Indiana, Pa., in 1772. His mother, Elizabeth Jackson Stewart, was an 1894 alumna. Jimmy’s gift was in memory of his mother, who passed away in 1953. Additional donors included the U.S. Steel Foundation and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Microfilm and microcard materials and equipment were included with the addition, along with 70 study carrels, a listening library, stacks and other study areas. The addition connects to the existing building by an enclosed bridge and is made of reinforced concrete with a stone facing, portraying the architectural style of the 1960s. No further renovations have been made to the library since, and total capacity has now reached 180,000 volumes. The students and the library staff are meeting a number of challenges related to their relocation in Sarah’s Coffeehouse. The library staff has offices in three separate buildings. The stacks can only be accessed by staff, meaning students must request books for the library staff to retrieve. Sarah’s Coffeehouse, the primary location for students to gather, has been redesigned to include a circulation desk, cubicles and shelves for a select number of books, taking away spaces for group discussion. Although challenging, the heating malfunction has created new opportunities for the campus community, including the incorporation of a new computer lab with 24/7 access, a schedule that was not available when located in the John Stewart Memorial Library. Additionally, the College has acquired multiple electronic databases and collections like Credo Reference, a collection of 551 reference volumes, and ebrary, a collection of more than 77,000 online books which cover all academic topics. Students have already participated in a survey, and will have the opportunity to partake in focus groups, to provide their feedback and opinions on exactly what they want in the new library. They also will be able to use “design charrettes” which is a concept for bringing together a group of people from different backgrounds to collaborate on a project and in this case, choosing everything for the new library, from the layout to the furniture. 

Look for more information on the library project in future issues.

Construction for the new addition completed in 1962.

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SPECIAL Feature Wilson has a number of advantages to make the best of the situation. Library Director Kathleen Murphy ’67 has a vested interest in the success of the library as the director and an alumna of Wilson. She’s been in this position since 1999, but has worked in various libraries before coming back to her alma mater. Murphy was the director of the library at Mount Aloysius College, when a new library was constructed in 1996. She is joined on the library renovation committee by Dean of Academic Affairs Mary Hendrickson and President Barbara K. Mistick. Before coming to Wilson, President Mistick was president of Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh and spent the past few years overseeing neighborhood library locations and providing operational oversight. Another advantage of remodeling the library is timing, according to Murphy. “Many other institutions of higher education renovated or built their libraries in the 1990s, before the most important recent trends in academic libraries took place, trends that radically impact the way libraries will be used in the future. Those trends will inform our decisions.” She will be visiting other college’s libraries to see what they are offering as well.

The study carrels provided a private place to study.

As a tribute to the library, look throughout this issue to see what alumnae and students have on their bookshelves. This article was completed with the help of College Archivist Amy Lucadamo, Director of Advancement Services Emily Helman ’04, Media Relations Manager Cathy Mentzer and Library Director Kathleen Murphy ’67. Archival photos are courtesy of the C. Elizabeth Boyd ’33 archives.

Murphy envisions a combination of modern and traditional library features. Ideally, there would be space which provides students quiet study space and another that would provide students with the latest technologies to support their education. The new library will have an area dedicated to information technology, academic support, tutoring and group study. With the vast array of electronic collections already acquired by Wilson, the shelf space for books will be downsized, allowing more room for a learning commons model. All academia-related materials and support would be under one roof. Traditional students, along with commuters, will have an area to gather and collaborate; serving the many needs of Wilson’s varied student body. With the new technology of books, including textbooks, available on e-readers like the iPad, Kindle and Nook, the way students learn is evolving. The renovated library will usher in this new age of learning while continuing to serve the campus needs. Wilson is poised to be in line with the new cutting-edge learning and support technologies of the 21st century.

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A student gets comfortable while studying in Sarah’s Coffeehouse.


Archives

From the

The Building Boom of the 1920s By Amy Lucadamo, College Archivist

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n the 1920s, Wilson College experibequest was fulfilled upon the death of his wife enced a transformation beginning in 1919. Lortz was a Chambersburg landlord with the construction of Lortz Hall and grocer according to 1880 and 1900 cenand ending at the close of the decade sus information. College records do not with the opening of Recitation or indicate that he had a relationship with Warfield Hall. The face of the camWilson before providing for a building pus morphed from Victorian gables in his will. and wrapping porches to gray, Just a month after the dedicaGothic stone buildings with an tion of the John Lortz Science Hall, unmistakable “college” look. While the cornerstone was laid for the John the Trustees and President Reaser, Stewart Memorial Library. The funds President McKeag and President for the construction of the library Warfield planned and maneuvered were donated by the Honorable for the construction of a recitation George H. Stewart as a memorial to his hall since the early 1900s, donors younger brother, the Honorable John often had other ideas for their nameStewart, Justice of the Supreme Court sake buildings. of Pennsylvania, Chambersburg resident The beginning of Wilson’s building and long-time member of Wilson’s Board boom, which was the laying of the corof Trustees. In an article written at the time nerstone of Lortz Hall on October 9, 1922, of the library’s dedication in 1925, John Stewinspired Elizabeth Shaw Groves ’25 to mediart was described as being “one of the best inJohn Lortz tate in the Pharetra: formed men in the state on all subjects” and a lover of literature, but he also had a long history of service to How strange these silent thoughts, my lonely dreams! – the state and nation. [Editor’s note: Please see the feature article Like drifting smoke against an evening sky, The John Stewart Memorial Library: Yesterday and Today to read They steal upon my vision and it seems more on the history of Justice John Stewart.] Veiled in their maze I see tomorrow lie. Tomorrow – aye a world of fantasy! In contrast to the lump sum donated by George H. Stewart But time moves on, and soon what is today, for the library, Riddle Memorial Hall, was funded largely by do Will be no more, but only memory, nations made by alumnae in honor of a man many considered a The phantom voice that calls from far away. personal friend. In the May 1926 Alumnae Quarterly the Riddle Memorial Fund Committee made an appeal for donations: Her prediction is salient today as the limestone, Collegiate Gothic building that originally housed chemistry and physics is FOR YOUR OWN SAKE minuscule compared to the LEED-certified Brooks Science ComFOR THE SAKE OF OUR FRIEND, MR. RIDDLE, plex and its long list of assets. Likewise, knowledge of the man, FOR THE SAKE OF YOUR WILSON CHUM, John Lortz, who died more than 100 years ago, has faded from FOR THE SAKE OF THE WILSON GIRL OF TOMORROW – Wilson’s memory. Lortz left $30,000 to Wilson College for the get an envelope and stamp, search your pocket book for one construction of a science building upon his death in 1903, and the dollar bill, send it now... Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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Archives

From the

President Ethelbert D. Warfield

Fundraising for Riddle Memorial Hall lasted for two years before construction started in July 1927. In her speech at the dedication of the building on June 9, 1928, former president of Wilson College Dr. Anna J. McKeag noted that in his capacity as general passenger agent of the Cumberland Valley Railroad, Mr. Riddle “made himself personally responsible to a degree probably never surpassed by any officer of any railroad” for “the safe and comfortable transportation of our Wilson College students.” Riddle also used his Cumberland Valley Railroad connections to organize excursions for faculty and students to Mont Alto and Caledonia. He was beloved by the campus community not only for his service to the College on the Board of Trustees and dedication to the students, but for his warm, welcoming personality and renditions of the songs “Lucky Jim” and “The Man with the Cork Leg.” He enjoyed college activities and even spent the afternoon on the day that he died watching field hockey practice. According to the January 1925 Alumnae Quarterly, he offered to join one of the teams “in his usual jovial manner.” Between 1922 and 1928 Wilson had added three major new buildings to its campus, but the recitation hall that President Reaser identified as a need as early as 1903 had not yet been built. Feeling the need for classroom space pressing, President Ethelbert D. Warfield began the appeal for donations for another new building in earnest in the mid-1920s. In a pamphlet entitled “Wilson College: Proposed Recitation Hall,” Warfield laid out the case for yet another new building noting that current arrangements for classroom space in Main, Alumnae and Lortz Halls “are no longer adequate to the requirements of a college of the standard of Wilson.” Warfield anticipated that the new building would cost $150,000 and wrote that being “beautifully located on the grounds of a progressive college for women . . . will give dignity and permanence” to the building. Construction of Recitation Hall was completed by the start of 10

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the fall semester in 1930 and when President Warfield resigned in June 1935, Wilson’s board was presented with a petition from the student body asking that the name of the building be changed to Warfield Hall. The Board of Trustees approved the name change at their February 1936 meeting just four months before the death of President Warfield following a short illness. From 1915 to 1935, Warfield’s presidency was marked by growth in the student body, faculty and endowment, and campus improvements. Warfield was born in Lexington, Ky., in 1861 and attended the University of Kentucky and Princeton before being one of the first American students to study at Oxford University in England. He then studied law at Columbia University and was back in Lexington practicing law at the age of 27 when, in 1881, he was offered the presidency of Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. In 1891, he became president of Lafayette College in Easton, Pa., where he served for 23 years. After retiring from Lafayette, Warfield moved to Pasadena, Calif., and briefly opened a law practice before being recruited for the presidency of Wilson. Ordained as a Presbyterian minister in 1899, Warfield was known among Wilson students for his sermons at chapel services. He served on the Board of Directors of the Princeton Theological Seminary from 1894 to 1929 and was frequently nominated to represent the Presbyterian Church of the U.S.A. at the general council of worldwide Presbyterian churches. He was also interested in history and supported the American Historical Society and the Kittochtinny Historical Society in addition to writing two historical works. Upon his retirement, articles in The Billboard and Public Opinion credited Warfield with elevating scholarship and the quality of education at Wilson in addition to the physical improvements that occurred on campus during his presidency. He must have been content with all he achieved at Wilson, because when asked by friends what his plans were after leaving Wilson, Warfield’s reply was “to go to Heaven.”


Archives

From the

Submit Your Wilson History Amy Ensley, director of the Hankey Center, encourages alumnae of all ages to submit written accounts of their time at Wilson, memories of interesting careers choices, personal experiences as witnesses to “important moments” in history, etc. Ensley has been doing research on alumnae throughout the history of the College in preparation for a variety of presentations both on campus and off. She has found the first-hand accounts of alumnae particularly valuable and would like to expand the collection of alumnae memories so that future researchers will continue to have a strong record of the lives of the women who attended Wilson. While the Hankey Center and Boyd '33 Archives continue to gather oral histories, written accounts are extremely valuable as well. Please send submissions to amy.ensley@wilson.edu.

Wilson is sponsoring its first Annual Essay Contest celebrating National Women’s History Month. The contest is open to students in grades 9-12. The winning essay will focus on a significant person, event or movement in women’s history and analyze the relevance or influence today. The winners will receive monetary prizes and will be recognized at an awards ceremony at Wilson College as part of the month-long celebration of National Women’s History Month. Please check the College website and the Hankey Center website for updates.

Request for Display Case

Celebrate National Women's History Month

The Heritage Committee of the Alumnae Association is interested in acquiring a display case to hold mementos from the McClure collection. The collection has been divided between a small glass-enclosed wall unit on the second floor of Norland and storage in the Boyd '33 Archives. We would like to place the collection in the Norland parlor to accommodate visitors interested in seeing the items. If anyone has a suitable display case, perhaps four to five ft. high and 2 1/2 ft. wide, that would blend with the furnishings of the parlor, please let Amy Ensley know by email at amy.ensley@wilson.edu. 

March is National Women’s History Month, and the theme this year is Women's Education – Women's Empowerment. Wilson will have presentations throughout the month to celebrate, including a lecture by Hankey Center Director Amy Ensley on the history of the education of women in the U.S. and where Wilson College fits in. Other programming includes research presentations by Wilson students from a variety of courses.

Orr Forum Ethical Formation in a Post-Secular Age April 16-17, 2012

All events are free and open to the public and will be held in the Harry R. Brooks Complex for Science, Mathematics and

Dr. Jennifer A. Herdt, Yale University

Technology. Reservations are requested. To RSVP or for more information,

Three Sessions: Autonomy After Virtue Monday at 5 p.m.

On Thursday, March 1, Amy E. Farrell, chair of the Women's and Gender Studies Department at Dickinson College, will present her research that includes 20th century U.S. culture, U.S. women's history, body politics and the history of fat stigma. She has published two books and appeared on “The Colbert Report. ”

Scripture (Secular and Sacred) in the Task of Ethical Formation Tuesday at 10:30 a.m.

Forming a More Perfect Union: Democratic Virtues, Proximate Goods, and Christian Formation Tuesday at 7 p.m.

please visit www.wilson.edu/orrforum or contact Gretchen Babendreier at gretchen.babendreier@wilson.edu or 717-264-4141, ext. 3203.

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MID A GROUP OF PINES & MAPLES News from Around Campus

Wilson College Hosts Energy Meeting By Dr. Ed Wells, Chair and Associate Professor of Environmental Studies

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n Sept. 22, the Wilson College Environmental Studies Department and the Fulton Center for Sustainable Living hosted a picnic meeting at the Fulton Farm. Invited guests were students and faculty from local colleges and universities including Dickinson College, Gettysburg College, Shippensburg University, Harrisburg Community College and Hagerstown Community College, as well as Wilson. Additionally, several citizens in the Chambersburg community were invited. Jada Williams, a student from Shippensburg University, and I organized the meeting. Over the summer of 2011, I gave Williams a tour of the facility. She remarked how much potential the Wilson energy facility had and persuaded me to offer a meeting where area students, staff and faculty can come together and share information on sustainable energy technologies. The meeting at Wilson turned into a brainstorming session on how we can further collaborate on green initiatives, including hands-on workshops. First, I gave the 12 participants a tour of the energy facility. The 1.7 kilowatt (kW) grid-tied array (collection of solar panels) was shown. I summarized the process of how the array generated energy for the farmhouse and, if any electricity was left over, how it fed the grid. The next stop on the tour was the solar powered fans that powered the greenhouses. The tour continued to the barn where both a small wind generator and two 100-watt panels are providing direct current (DC) electricity to power a battery bank. Then an inverter converts DC power from the batteries to alternating current (AC). AC power is the kind we use in our houses. By converting DC to AC power, lighting and other devices that connect to outlets in the home can be powered. Finally, I showed the group the biodiesel processor at the farm and explained how diesel fuel is made using mainly waste grease from the College dining hall. The group then had a cookout lunch and discussed potential ways that schools can collaborate. One idea was to have rotating workshops at local colleges and community events. For instance, topics may include: wiring solar panels, installing insulation, building your own solar panels and others. Another idea was to build a wall in the barn to separate the energy facility from the rest of the barn. The wall can be made of various materials with different resistance values, or “R-values,” that will show how well different materials can insulate and resist heat losses. Wayne Mackey, a Chambersburg resident, brought a material that provides a high R-value (high resistance to heat loss) and also reflects heat away in the summer months. Mackey powers his house with a five kW solar array. He also brought his new electric car, the Chevy Volt, for participants to test drive. He has

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Environmental Studies Professor Ed Wells shows the biodiesel processor that uses grease from the campus dining hall and converts it to fuel.

owned the Volt for more than a month and has used no gasoline for power yet. Gasoline is only used in the car after the stored electric has been used up. Additionally, Mackey has not paid a penny for electric thus far. He has solar panels on the roof of his garage which provide enough power to charge the car overnight. Essentially Mackey’s Chevy Volt runs off solar powered electricity. Those present, including President Mistick, were very energetic and have great expectations for this coalition of groups. It was a great chance for local schools to network. Another positive outcome was that Vickie Wilcox ’12, vice president of the Wilson College Environmental Studies Club, and Williams, who is a member of the Shippensburg University Environmental Club, made plans to collaborate. Additionally, a student-run energy club from Hagerstown Community College may work on events with the student groups from Shippensburg and Wilson. Plans are now being made to find a venue to host a future workshop. The group hopes that, in the coming academic year, each college/university will be able to host at least one workshop. Updates for the environmental club and the Richard Alsina Fulton Center for Sustainable Living can be found on Wilson’s website at www.wilson.edu. If you are interested in participating or hosting a workshop or meeting for green initiatives, please contact Dr. Ed Wells at: ewells@wilson.edu or 717-264-4141, ext. 3413.


MID A GROUP OF PINES & MAPLES News from Around Campus

Meet

John W. Gibb, Chair of the Wilson Board of Trustees By Cathy Mentzer

John W. Gibb was elected to a three-year term as chair of the Wilson College Board of Trustees at the May 2011 board meeting. Gibb has a history of service to Wilson College, his mother’s alma mater. He served on the Board of Trustees from 1997 to 2006 and, after a one-year break, rejoined the board in 2007. Gibb chaired the Presidential Search Committee that brought Dr. Barbara Mistick to Wilson in 2011 and served on the committee that brought Lorna Edmundson to the College 10 years earlier. Gibb, who lives in Fairfax Station, Va., with wife, Diana, is a managing director with Jones Lang LaSalle, a global financial and real estate services firm. His primary responsibility is developing the company’s education, municipal and nonprofit real estate practice. In that role, he helps solve complex real estate and financial issues for a clientele that includes local and state governments, colleges and universities, K-12 schools and nonprofit entities. In his previous position with Sallie Mae, Gibb managed the private placement of more than $2 billion of taxable and taxexempt financings and debt service agreements. He also served as an investment banking principal in Sallie Mae’s investment banking subsidiary, Education Securities. Previously, Gibb worked as a senior financial analyst for Fairfax County, Va. In addition to his work in the private sector, Gibb served in the U.S. Army Reserve from 1972 to 1995, retiring as a lieutenant colonel. He is a graduate of the U.S. Army War College. Gibb has a bachelor’s degree in pre-law and a Master of Public Administration degree from Penn State University. He has a Master of Business Administration degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and completed a graduate certificate in real estate investment analysis at Virginia Commonwealth University. He holds several real estate licenses.

Wilson College has benefited from Gibb’s expertise in financing. As a member of the Finance Committee, he has presented educational sessions to the Board of Trustees on bond financing, in which he is an expert. Gibb has also served on the Investment Subcommittee, Buildings and Grounds Committee and the Committee on Trusteeship, which he chaired. Now, as chair of the board, he is an ex officio member of all board committees. Why does he do give so much of his time to Wilson? Gibb says he has a deep fondness and appreciation for Wilson College because his mother, Martha Bernice Jones, who graduated with the Class of 1929, had great affection for the College. “I really love Wilson College and I think it’s a great school,” said Gibb, who remembers playing on the campus as a boy at one of his mother’s class reunions. “I think that its mission is a good one, plus, it gives me a chance to honor my mother.” During his term as chair, Gibb wants to see the College increase enrollment and become stronger overall. “It may not be achieved in my tenure but I at least want to set the stage, along with Dr. Mistick, for a thriving and financially stable institution,” he said. Gibb is a member and elder of Burke Presbyterian Church in Burke, Va. He is a member of the board of trustees of New Hope Housing, which serves the homeless in Northern Virginia. His hobbies include golf, biking and reading. Gibb has two children, twins John and Kristina, and one grandchild. He also has an identical twin brother, Herman.

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St u d en t

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Ayorkur “Ayo” Dua ’14

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Top 5 favorite books • Karen Kingsbury’s Redemption series • Biology textbook (I have gotten enough of that but apparently it hasn’t gotten enough of me!) • Macbeth • The Bible • The Beach House, by Jane Green

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ost students from Ayorkur “Ayo” Dua’s ’14 high school in Ghana study in the United States or the United Kingdom so it was an easy choice for the Wilson sophomore to come to the States for college. Once here, she found that America offers a different type of education than her homeland. Although she wasn’t exactly sure what her area of study would be, she knew she wanted to attend a small institution. Dua met with her high school counselor who recommended Wilson College. She took a year off from college after high school to complete courses in fashion design and then made the trek across the globe to Chambersburg. “I didn’t realize it would be such a small town with no public transportation!” Dua exclaimed. Luckily the College compensates and provides shuttle transportation for shopping and to commute to the airport. Here, professors respect different paces of learning. “The whole approach to education here is so much different than in my country, and I hope to impact the education system back home in the near future,” she believes. The academic support center has helped with her studies. They check grammar and punctuation on papers and are an additional asset to the student’s education. Although she once considered herself shy, the required class presentations in almost every class have built confidence in Dua. She is glad for them, because they have made her a more “firm and decisive” individual, she feels. Furthermore, the class sizes are an aspect of Wilson that Dua values in her education. She doesn’t hesi-

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tate to ask questions in class. It is easy to build relationships with the faculty, and that is very important to an international student, she explains. Dua is enrolled as an undeclared major, but is leaning toward an elementary education degree. In her first year at Wilson, Dua worked in the child care center and enjoyed it. “I loved working with the kids,” said Dua. Dua is also involved in extracurricular activities on campus. She sings with the choir, which meets twice a week. Additionally, she is the secretary of the Muhibbah International Club. Muhibbah means “unity among nations,” and the club’s goal is to bring together students of different cultures to share experiences. The club has two fundraisers a year, a dessert sampler and a dinner sampler, which showcase foods from the countries of the international students. According to Dua, she has found food to be the biggest difference from her home country, and Muhibbah events give her a chance to share her culture. Dua has found ways of adjusting to American food. To complement her spicy palette, Dua brought peppers from home, she explains with a laugh. Muhibbah, along with other campus events, has taught Dua diversity and socialization – valuable lessons learned outside the classroom. A memorable time as a student for Dua was Sarah Wilson Week. She enjoyed meeting her “big sisters” and discovering the clues they left behind to find them. Visiting Sarah Wilson’s grave also was meaningful. It was dark and full of mystery, Dua recalls, and she says she will always remember the feelings the visit gave her. After graduating from Wilson, Dua plans to teach in the U.S. for a few years before returning to her native land. While not studying or participating in campus activities, Dua likes to sew, crochet, dance and sing. She looks forward to a swimming course in the spring 2012 semester.


MID A GROUP OF PINES & MAPLES News from Around Campus

P r o f ile s

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Leslie Hoover ’13 by Emma Lewis

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eslie Hoover ’13 knew what she wanted to study in college; she just wasn’t sure where she’d attend. Hoover wanted to be an accounting major in a small business program. After attending a small high school, she wanted to continue studying in a more intimate learning atmosphere. One of Hoover’s high school activities was horseback riding, and she had an instructor that told her about Wilson. Out of curiosity, she decided to visit the campus. While on her first visit to the campus, Hoover met Dr. Douglas Crawford, chair of the business and economics department and assistant professor of business. Crawford had just come back from South Korea, where he helped to establish an exchange program. Immediately, Hoover was interested, because she knew she wanted to study abroad in her college career. Hoover made several more visits to campus. Each time, she met someone new, who welcomed her to the school. “It seemed like such a positive environment,” said Hoover. She was accepted to other schools, including Penn State University, but chose Wilson for its small programs and friendly atmosphere. One of Hoover’s most memorable experiences on campus has been Sarah Wilson Week. She finds the mixture of academics and traditions valuable. At first, Hoover didn’t want to participate in extracurricular activities. She had a busy high school career and wanted to focus her energy on academics. After arriving on campus, however, she soon found herself on the dressage and soccer teams, and president of the Wilson College Government Association (WCGA). Hoover’s dream of studying abroad soon became a reality. Through The Washington Center, Hoover found a study-abroad program in Australia, where she interned at Driftwood Capital, a company which matches unique entrepreneurs with potential investors. Hoover gained experience in financial advising. Her daily tasks included making phone calls to Asia from Sydney, because many of Driftwood’s clients wanted to grow their companies in the Asian market. The best aspect of her internship was learning a different work style and atmosphere. The Australian work culture is serious but relaxed. “Coworkers asked about your evenings and weekends and knew you on a personal note, but when it came to work, it was serious. You had to get the job done.” Hoover appreciated the separation of work and personal time in the Australian culture Even though the native language is English, understanding the many dialects of Australians was a difficult hurdle for Hoover. She admits to having preconceived notions of the culture, which were quickly squelched once she was immersed in Sydney. Hoover feels that Wilson offers its students a good environ-

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Top 5 favorite books • • • • •

The Botticelli Secret by Marina Fiorato Cotillion by Georgette Heyer Pride of the Peacock by Victoria Holt The Dressmaker by Poise Graeme-Evans 44 Scotland Street by Alexander McCall Smith

ment that fosters relationships between students and faculty. In her accounting major, she is the only traditional undergraduate student. This gives her a chance to interact with Adult Degree Program students and collaborate one on one. Hoover appreciates the small class sizes since it provides an opportunity for her to talk with her professors, who encourage students to visit them in office hours. “Don’t be surprised to go to office hours with one question and end up staying for an hour,” Hoover adds. Along with the knowledge that Hoover has learned inside the classroom, Wilson has taught her valuable lessons she will carry with her throughout life. Wilson has taught her confidence, she says. “I can go into an environment that I’m not necessarily comfortable in and still control it.” For example, the company where Hoover interned was run by six men, who couldn’t believe that she attended a women’s college. Although at first intimidated, her nickname for them quickly became “my boys,” she shares with a smile. Not only does Hoover now believe in herself and her abilities, she also has learned to build confidence in others. “Learning how to lead would have never happened, if not for Wilson.” Wilson also taught Hoover the significance of establishing herself professionally and personally. “Being consistent in work ethic and personal character and the impression you leave on others is important,” said Hoover. After graduation, Hoover plans to apply her accounting degree to guide agricultural businesses. She grew up on a dairy farm, so she is not a stranger to how farm operations work. Hoover wants to work behind the scenes of business and believes Wilson is preparing her for just that. When her schedule permits, Hoover enjoys playing piano, horseback riding, trap shooting and reading books. Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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MID A GROUP OF PINES & MAPLES News from Around Campus

Students Present Performance to Public Members of Orchesis, the Wilson College modern dance ensemble, presented their work in: on edge… dances on the brink as part of the ongoing Appenzellar-Buchanan Studio Series. In this performance, offered to the Wilson community on Nov. 11 and 12, the dances were all political and/or personal in theme. In addition to the Friday and Saturday evening performances, students added an additional Saturday matinee with a Q&A session immediately following the performance. Many audience members were new to modern/postmodern dance, and this provided an opportunity to meet the student choreographers and performers and ask questions. The Q&A was an educational venue for the audience and performers alike.  Students enjoyed having performances in the studio space as the performance becomes a more intimate conversation between performer and spectator. 

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~Paula Kellinger, professor of dance

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MID A GROUP OF PINES & MAPLES News from Around Campus

Campus Activities Pi Gamma Mu, Alpha Xi chapter, the international Social Science Honorary Society, inducted six new members to the society on Dec. 11. To be considered, students must be juniors and have a 3.0 GPA or higher in seven social science courses. Since 2007, Wilson has inducted over 40 students. (From L—R) Ian Irvin ’12, Elise Bricker ’11 (current member), Jessica Carpenter ’12, Dana Hill ’13, Kim Croft ’12, Ashley Overdorff ’12, Dr. Bev Ayers-Nachamkin (current member), Alaina Hofer ’11(current member). Not pictured is Trisha Williams ’13. Dr. Mary Blair (left, pictured with Amy Ensley, director of the Hankey Center) gave an informative presentation on Nov. 14, called “Women and Diversity in Science: An Imperative for Biodiversity Conservation," addressing the critical need for more women and minorities to enter the biodiversity conservation workforce.

Wilson College, a member of the Intercollegiate Dressage Association, competes against five other schools in the region: Delaware Valley College, Cazenovia College, Centenary College, Cornell University and Penn State University. This year, Wilson hosted the event on Oct. 29, and placed second overall. Pictured are members from the team (L—R) Jessica Masilotti ’14 (who won second in introductory division), Elizabeth Hart ’13( who won second in Lower Training division), Katie Sndyer ’14 (who won fourth in first level division) and Colleen O'Reilly ’12 (who won fifth in her Upper Training division). Ruffian is a school horse.

The Muhibbah Club sponsors one event each semester, a dinner sampler and a dessert sampler. At the event, guests can sample food from the students’ home countries. The word “Muhibbah” means “unity among nations” and the club’s goal is to promote cultural awareness.

Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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SHAPING THE FUTURE Advancement News

Pay It Forward:

Recruiting for Wilson By Dianna C. Heim

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hen Associate Director of Admissions Patty Fletcher Beidel ’82 travels to recruit students for Wilson, she often goes alone to high schools, counseling offices and college fairs. As an appreciative alumna, and mother of a recent graduate and a current student, she easily shares what Wilson means to her, but admits, frankly, “That’s my job.” Mary Redington Galbraith ’60, of Ventura, Calif., shares with students what made Wilson special for her. She joined Beidel at a California college fair in spring 2011. Galbraith is a volunteer with Focus on the Masters (FOTM), a non-profit education and appreciation program which documents, preserves and presents the works and lives of accomplished contemporary artists. Her volunteering often takes her into local high schools to promote FOTM’s scholarship program – schools like private, Thacher High School in Ojai, which offers a Western-based riding/boarding program. “Mary was really amazing, very good. She got right in there and talked about what set Wilson apart,” Beidel says. “What helps us is someone who can speak to the needs of our prospects – who asks them what they’re interested in and then have the up-to-date information to share how Wilson might fill that need for the student.” “(Talking up Wilson at a high school like Thacher) seemed like a good fit,” Galbraith recalls. “Wilson still offers a chance for leadership, really productive mentoring and teaching relationships with students. A smaller college’s faculty is usually always willing to engage on a one-on-one level with students, which is not the case for the most part in the larger universities [in California].” She shared a story of an acquaintance, a Ventura County student and Mexican immigrant, who is an excellent scholar and talented athlete. The young woman received a full scholarship to Mills College. “What did that single sex, small college education mean to her? She would not have gone to college without that opportunity. She understands now how important that personal attention and one-on-one interaction with her professors were to her education.” Galbraith feels it’s essential that younger alumnae speak to what makes Wilson different than a public university or a community college. “There seems to be such an effort among young people to be more specific, more attuned to what a school can offer them for career goals,” she says. “I would imagine mostly because they are worried about paying off large student loans and getting a job their first year out.”

Beidel agrees. “Wilson truly needs to project the image of highly successful and accomplished younger alumnae – and it makes sense – students relate to someone of their own age before they relate to another age group. That being said, parents like to talk with older alumnae to get a sense of place, about what makes Wilson stand out among all the other choices their child has.” What she loves to see are “younger alumnae, beside us, speaking to the students, and to where they are right now, in their lives.” In her third year of traveling to the west coast, Beidel observes students there have the idea that “to go back east for school is really an accomplishment. They almost equate the age of the school with the quality of the school – mostly because when we were founded, most of the West wasn’t even divided into states yet.” “Wilson has a leg up right now [in California] as its funding for higher ed is drying up. The public universities are overcrowded, and it may take students eight years to accomplish a four-year degree,” she adds. “With their educational system struggling, it makes Wilson look solid. They like that we are private, small and

“…a distinctly good value, a challenging, personalized education and a life-changing experience, all of which Wilson is.”

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affordable. This younger generation doesn’t have a problem with jumping on an airplane and flying for six hours. They see Wilson as a good deal and an above average quality of education.” During her last trip to California, Beidel and Dr. John Tukey, director of equestrian studies at Wilson, visited high schools with equestrian/horse programs in Los Angeles. “Equestrian programs in these private schools often begin at the elementary level so by the time they’re in high school, they are experienced riders. In the Los Angeles area alone, they have 40 high schools in an equestrian league. We went to 10 – they were all very receptive to Wilson.” Beidel says Wilson College’s Office of Admissions will continue efforts to recruit students in California. “It’s like anything else. When you do more, you get more. We have to be where Wilson College looks like a distinctly good value, a challenging, personalized education and a life-changing experience, all of which Wilson is.”


SHAPING THE FUTURE Advancement News

Casey Goodall ’70

Remembers Her Roots

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or Cazella “Casey” Hinojosa Goodall ’70, Wilson was one of the few places where women could gain the education necessary to enter the professional world. “Wilson really empowered women to think of themselves as professional people who would go out in the world and make a difference,” said Goodall. “Wilson affirmed the fact that I could be anything I wanted to be, then prepared me to do it.” In the 1970s, the only job recruiters who came to Wilson were typically looking for Girl Scouts and teachers. “To have women in traditional men’s positions was unheard of, but Wilson prepared me to be in the world and go to work and compete with the best and the brightest,” said Goodall, who is originally from the Rochester, N.Y., area. Earning a B.A. in economics, Goodall started her career in New York City, where she was selected for an executive training position at a Wall Street bank. In the program there were 25 men and only six women. “Every one of the six women had come from a women’s college,” she said. “I think that spoke volumes about the education I received at Wilson.” Goodall and her husband, Amos, later moved to State College, Pa., where she went to work for Penn State University. She remained there for 20 years as the director of donor relations, a development position, before she retired. A consistent supporter of Wilson over the years, Casey and Amos recently committed $10,000 to the Wilson Fund through the Lenfest Challenge. “It was a serious gift that took thought and of all the charities I’ve donated to, the closest one to me – to my heart – is Wilson,” said Goodall. “Wilson supported me when I was there, and it is my privilege to give back and remember my roots.”

“Wilson supported me when I was there, and it is my privilege to give back and remember my roots.”

Jeffrey E. Zufelt who served as vice president for College Advancement, left Wilson this January to pursue other endeavors after more than four and a half years with the College. During his tenure at Wilson, Zufelt became instrumental in overseeing the success of the College’s Leading with Confidence campaign, which ended in October 2011 and raised more than $51 million dollars. He was known around campus and by many alumnae as someone who felt passionately about Wilson’s mission and vision and worked tirelessly to inspire others to feel the same. President Barbara K. Mistick announced Cynthia Woods as interim vice president, effective March 1. Look for more information in the Spring issue.

Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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WILSON ATHLETICS

Fall Sports Wrap-ups By Beth Weixel

Soccer The Wilson College Soccer team ended the season 1-15-0 with a 2-1 victory over Valley Forge Christian College on Sept. 13. Throughout the season, the Phoenix had several close games, including a 1-2 defeat to Trinity University and a 0-1 double overtime loss to Morrisville State College. Sophomore Courtney Bernecker ’14 (Saint Thomas, Pa./ James Buchanan) lead the team this season with seven goals and two assists. In her final season, captain Colleen O’Reilly ’12 (Mardela Springs, Md./ Salisbury) recorded five goals and one assist. Hannah DeMoss ’13 (Philipsburg, N.J./ Belvidere) and Alyssa Bernard ’12 (Hillsborough, N.J./ Hillsborough) each scored a goal for the Phoenix. In the goal, Katie Murphy ’13 (Schnecksville, Pa./ Parkland) recorded 116 saves, with a .712 save percentage. Ebby Boratenski ’13 (Silver Springs, Md./ Homeschooled) totaled 54 saves with a .720 save percentage. According to Head Coach Beth Weixel, “Although we did struggle at times, I am very proud of the progress we have made this season. I am particularly proud of the way we played as a team during our last two games. Each year the Wilson Soccer team works incredibly hard and improves, and it is my hope that we will take all we have learned this season and keep improving and building on this season’s successes.”

Field Hockey The Wilson College Field Hockey team ended their 2011 regular season with a 4-0 victory over the College of Notre Dame of Maryland on Thursday, Oct. 29. The Phoenix were .500 this year with a record of 7-7. Sophomore Megan Schneck ’14 (Bethel, Pa./ Tulpehocken), lead the team with six goals and two assists. In her final season, captain Jami DeVanie ’12 (Boiling Springs, Pa./ Cumberland Valley) recorded four goals and four assists. Maggie Sipps ’12 (Philadelphia, Pa./ Little Flower) and Hillary Swartz ’15 (Carlisle, Pa./ Boiling Springs) both totaled four goals and two assists for the Phoenix. In the cage, Brandy Holtzapple ’13 (Red Lion, Pa./ Red Lion) recorded 100 saves with a .794 save percentage. Holtzapple al-

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lowed only 26 goals this season, recorded two shutouts and was ranked in the NCAA Division III in two categories. She was ranked 50th in the statistical category of goals against average with 1.83 per game and ranked 30th in save percentage with a .794. According to Head Coach Shelly Novak, the 2011 season was a building year for Wilson Field Hockey, and she is excited for next season’s outlook. “This season I was able to work with a strong group of players who will provide an excellent foundation of skills and experience for the future. We are at a great place for success. Now the challenge is taking the next steps to seize the moment next season.”


WILSON ATHLETICS

Athletes Beyond Athletics Wilson Field Hockey Participates in Mentorship Program This fall the Wilson College Field Hockey team participated in a mentorship program with the Franklin County Lincoln Intermediate Unit. The team invited the middle school program to an hour of practice every other week where the children participated in team building activities and played games and other activities with the team. Afterwards, the team took the group for dinner in Jensen Dining Hall. “The team was very excited to be involved with the kids. It was a great opportunity for the kids to learn about field hockey and my team to interact with the culturally diverse youth of our community,” according to Head Coach Shelly Novak.

Adopt-a-Highway

Wilson Basketball Team Collects Donations

Since 2010, the Wilson College Athletic Department has adopted Philadelphia Avenue (around campus), Commerce Street and part of Scotland Avenue. In October the field hockey and basketball teams participated in the state-wide effort to “Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful.”

The Wilson College Basketball team is currently collecting donations for the Franklin County Shelter and the South Central Community Action Program. Donations will be collected at every home basketball game through the end of January, and fans will receive free admission into the game with a donation. Items collected include nonperishable foods, new seasonal clothing and personal hygiene products.

Student Athlete Profile

Courtney Bernecker ’14 St. Thomas, Pa. ­— James Buchanan High School Soccer ­— #11 — Center Midfield

Major: Veterinary Medical Technology Awards: 2011 North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC) Second Team All-Conference Honors 2011 Two-time Wilson College Athlete of the Week (10-6-11 and 11-8-11) Bernecker is a sophomore at Wilson and is involved in the Student Athletic Advisory Committee, Athletic Association, VMT Club and Cheer Jocks. She attributes her involvement on campus to her participation in soccer. “If I wasn’t a student athlete I wouldn’t have become as involved in school activities. Most of my friends play a sport and are in clubs and because they are in the clubs I want to be a part of them too.” Bernecker also says she has gained a lot from playing soccer at Wilson. “Being a part of the Wilson College Soccer team has taught me many things. It teaches me how to manage my time and schoolwork. Secondly, it teaches me how to have fun and be supportive of teammates. Thirdly, it shows me that winning isn’t everything; that love of the game and the respect for and of your teammates is the most important accomplishment I can ever achieve.”

Bernecker’s Career Statistics: Goals Assists Points SoG % Games Played/ Starts 2011 7 2 16 .677 16/16 2010 9 1 19 .733 16/16 Career 16 3 35 .710 32/32 Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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WILSON ATHLETICS Wilson College Athletic Department Hosted

Sophie’s Six 6k Run/Walk By Beth Weixel

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ilson College Athletic Department hosted the first annual Sophie’s Six 6K run/walk on Saturday, Nov. 19. Approximately 180 individuals registered for the event, and 146 completed the run/walk. Troy Harrison, 36, from Waterfall, Pa., won the event with a time of 19 minutes, 23.72 seconds. The first woman to finish the race was Jill Hazelton, 37, from Chambersburg, Pa. She finished in 24:50.95. In addition, several Wilson College alumnae registered for the event including Nikola Grafnetterova ’10, Jennifer Huseman Hartlieb ’08, Lisa Kercher ’03 and Doris Zimmerman ’03. Over 50 volunteers made the event possible, including current student athletes, the Wilson School of Gymnastics and Dance, the Frey and Martin families, and Wilson alumnae Heidi Eiwen ’99 and Amy Gobrecht ’99. In 2012, the event will be hosted on Saturday, Nov. 17. In addition to the 3.73 mile run, a one-mile walk and kids run will be added. Details can be found at www.sophiessix.com and on Facebook, Sophie’s Six 6K Run/Walk. Sophie’s Six 6K Run/Walk is in memory of Athletic Director Lori Frey and Assistant Athletic Director Shelly Novak’s ’92 niece who passed away in a tragic accident at the age of 3½. Proceeds for this year’s event exceeded $3‚000 and will be donated to a playground project in memory of Sophia Grace Martin. In 2012, proceeds will be donated to a local organization that provides support to grieving children.

Sophie Grace Martin

Runners begin the 6K run/walk.

Lisa Kercher ’03 finishes the race.

Scan to visit the Sophie’s Six website.

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The Alumnae Association Tours & Travel WILSON ATHLETICS Committee Invites You……

Princeton, N.J., Today and Yesterday Thursday, April 26 – Friday, April 27, 2012

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oin Wilson alumnae, family and friends to tour Princeton, N.J. The campus tour will include Princeton notables’ stories, architectural landmarks and sculptures as well as a visit to Morven, the former New Jersey Governor’s Mansion. Lunch will be at the Nassau Inn and dinner will be at the private Nassau Club. Lunch

on Friday will be at the campus Prospect House. Overnight accommodations will be at the nearby Doubletree Hotel. Pricing is based on approximately 20 alumnae attending. $295 PP, Double; $365, Single. Princeton University, Office of Communications

To attend just the dinner at Nassau Club at 6 p.m. Thursday, the price is $65 per person. To attend just the luncheon at Prospect House on the Princeton campus at 11:45 a.m. Friday, the price is $40 per person. Contact the Dianna C. Heim as soon as possible to reserve your place at alumnae@wilson.edu or call 1-866-446-8660, ext. 3180.

Earn your Master of Humanities degree from Wilson College! Graduate work will prepare you for a career in the following fields, plus many more! • Education • Publishing • Communications • Nonprofits • Government • Arts

www.wilson.edu/MAHum Contact Program Director Dr. Michael G. Cornelius at mcornelius@wilson.edu or 717-264-4141, ext. 3308. Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News Franklin County Club hosted "Coffee Klatch" on Dec. 5, 2011.

Edna “Denise” Sites Foreman ’48 with her husband, Bruce, and President Mistick

Northern New Jersey Club The Northern New Jersey Club met for the last time in November 2011 – they voted to disband the club due to lack of membership. This long standing club sold pecans each year to raise funds to donate to the College for student scholarships. 

Seated (L—R) Murial Ripley Ryder ’63, Mildred Dunham Van Dyke ’34, Elizabeth Pickell Merring ’52 and Margaret Harris ’62 Standing (L—R) Kathleen Shannon ’71, Christina Lawes ’81, Joan Thuebel ’52, Cheryl Wilhite Greene ’77 and Janet Lane Antippas ’65

South Dakota

Janice St. Clair Kohler ’57 roasted a marshmallow for s’mores.

South Dakota alumnae met in Rapid City on Dec. 18, 2011. All three Wilson graduates in the state were able to meet. The trio made plans to meet in the summer and are hoping that alumnae from Wyoming or neighboring states might join them. If you are interested please contact Jolene by email (jolene39@ gmail) or phone 908-236-2897. (L—R) Jolene Young Lichtenwalner ’68, Suzanne Iudicello ’71 and Mely de Neufville Rahn ’60

Facebook Notes: What's on your Kindle, Nook or iPad? OR what's the title of the book on your nightstand? Judith Reny Stewart ’73 – Catherine the Great Sarah Muller Smith ’85 – State of Wonder Susan Hankey Cribbs ’69 – Quicksilver, President Bush's and Cain's book Karlynne Bowe ’09 – The Godfather Returns Erika Raines ’06 – The Emperor of Maladies Brooke Ketron ’12 – The Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring

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ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News

The Alumnae Association Tours and Travel Committee sponsored the trip from Oct. 8-17, 2011. Former Wilson President Lorna Duphiney Edmundson and her husband, Dan, were guests of the Alumnae Association. Hope Weishaar Asrelsky ’57 and her sister, Phebe Weishaar Shinn ’53, share their experiences.

Front Row (L-R): Wiffy Gill, Renee Roberts, Hope Weishaar Asrelsky ’57, Nancy Kostas ’64, Sue Ross ’66, President Emerita Lorna Duphiney Edmundson, Anne Walsh Black ’74 and Robert Knuff Back Row (L-R): Darryl Gill, Rich Kelly, Marjorie Bookhout ’72, Jim Clapp, Amy Neilson Clapp ’74, Paula Spezza Tishok ’71, Marty Herod ’74, Bob Fisher, Betsy Collmus Fisher ’75, Susan Etter ’94, Rob Black and Daniel Edmundson

Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News Two marvelous images are in my mind’s eye – the rolling Tuscan hills surrounding our first hotel, the Borgo di Cortefreda in the countryside half an hour from Florence and then the vivid sunset stripes over the two bays in Sestri Levante. Our second home, the mountaintop Vis-à-vis, boasted a huge dining room overlooking the waters of the Tyrrhenian Sea, in the Western region of Liguria. Not to mention the delicious and varied foods – vitello tonnato, pesto sauce, mussels marinara, etc. – we enjoyed at restaurants and hotels. And the excellent, well-conducted tours of Tuscan-hill towns like Siena and San Gimignano, the lovely visit to the Chianti vineyard estate, the pleasure of walking on the level in Lucca, that most interesting town, the special trip to Carrara marble factory and quarry, the boat excursions to Portofino and other coastal towns in the Cinque Terre region. After visiting the Uffizi with my sister, Phebe Weishaar Shinn ’53, and seeing the three great maiestas in the first room and then the Botticelli’s – Spring and The Birth of Venus -we enjoyed, at the Edmundsons’ rec-

ommendation, Compari with orange at the beautiful terrace café right next to the tower of the Signoria. Sightseeing, Italian food, fun – our whole tour was conducted by Simona, who worked only 25 hours a day, eight days a week to make us safe, comfortable, and thoroughly involved in every aspect of the event which included lectures on history, modern Italy, and the sites we were to visit. Finally, what made this expedition so successful? The company, we all agreed. Wilson alumnae, their friends, relatives, significant others – we enjoyed each other’s company and companionship, chatted up everyone and varied our table seating. It was just a super group of seasoned travelers and lovers of Italy. I would go with them anywhere. And one last memory – at our “graduation” on the last night I found myself lustily singing “Nessun Dorma” with Simona. I knew only the last famous phrase: “Vincero, vincero, vincero!” but I belted it out in true Pavarotti style and was roundly applauded. It was truly a fabulous experience.

By Hope Weishaar Asrelsky ’57

Wiffy and Darryl Gill at the wine tasting 26

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A worker dusts a statue at the marble quarry.


ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News

Phebe Weishaar Shinn ’53

City of Florence

The coast of Italy in Sestri Levante

Here are a few scattered thoughts and memories from a breathtaking, Italian adventure with some other Wilson alumnae and their spouses, partners, friends and relations, including my sister, Hope Weishaar Asrelsky ’57.  So many recollections, so little space! • The cobblestoned little streets of every town, too narrow even for a go-cart, until you hear a toot and turn to find a very large truck breathing down your neck. (Many thanks to various members of our group, who kept yanking me out of the way of a number of irritated drivers on those ridiculously small streets!)  • How do the Italians manage to harvest grapes from vines that are terraced onto the side of mountains too steep even for a mountain goat? • The visit to an enormous marble workshop at Carrara, with the air filled with marble dust, containing innumerable marble statues of all sizes and a full-size plaster replica of Michelangelo’s David,  lying on his back, also covered with marble dust (and nothing else!), awaiting disposition.  • And, at Carrara, the bus ride up to the mountainside marble quarries, on a too-narrow, two-way road looking down at the treetops and house tops much too far below. How did they ever move those immense blocks of stone down the mountainside, using only man- and ox-power? • The white mists laying like wispy scarves between the low-lying mountains each morning as Marino, our bus driver, maneuvered us along the zigzagging roads. • The food—ah, the food! • Sunset over the Tyrrhenian Sea, from the rooftop lounge at the Vis a Vis Hotel in Sestri Levante—vivid colors, rose reds, cerulean blues, flashes of green, turquoise—little pops of light in the town as the streetlights start up. A strong feeling that at any minute Grace Kelly would pull up the winding approach in her convertible and white gloves, or a tuxedoed James Bond would stroll into the cocktail bar. All of a sudden you’re in a movie! It’s that spectacular—and familiar! • If you’ve seen 25 olive trees, you’ve seen them all. • Endless rows and stacks of dusty wine bottles in the subterranean aging gallery at the Castello Monsanto winery/vineyard. Looking hundreds of years old! • Our ever-present, ever-active travel director, Simona Contarini, who worked 24/7 to ensure our comfort, inform us about our routes and destinations, answer our questions, and finally joined us in a graduation celebration on the last night, lifting a final glass of Chianti to our fellowship. • And, unforgettable—always there, cheerful, supportive, funny, enthusiastic, good to travel with, our group—Wilson Women, et al.  Buongiorno indeed!

By Phebe Weishaar Shinn ’53 The group accepts a glass of wine.

Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News

kid to Mystic is hot off the press!

Books from Wilson Alumnae Mish Kid to Mystic: Memoirs of a Missionary Daughter By Mary Lou McNeill Jacoby ’49 Reviewed by Anne Pearce Lehman’49

a dream and goal I’ve  I’m so excited to make o  family,  friends  and

ry.

u

with her father in Africa.

om the jungles of West ild, through teen years  the culture of Christian fe, psychotherapist, and   a  journey  deeper  into in  Christian  tradition, gical  approaches,  and odern  mysticism,  she e  rich  story  of  her mage. She has followed devotion;  her  life  is  an family of lovers of God.

M

How to get the book …

ary Lou McNeill Jacoby ’49 tells us thatTo order copies of the book, for more Mish Kid to Mystic: Memoirs information, or just to be in touch: of a Missionary Daughter is the fulfillMary Lou Jacoby ment of a 1420 Santo Domingo Ave. #237 dream, a goal nurtured over 25 Duarte, CA 91010 years. Hermloubobj@verizon.net carefully crafted tale begins with her arrival in West Africa, with her missionary parents, as a very young child. She makes her own play alone in the yard and on the veranda of their new home in the bush. Too soon she is 5 years old, sent to a missionary boarding school 300 miles away – a long three days journey from her parents. The school is taught alternately by one set of missionary parents and then another set. Mary Lou loves having other Book $12.00. Shipping 3.00. Ask for pricing for multiple copies.

children to play with but she often cries her homesick self to sleep to the night music of tree frogs and parrots. The “Talking Drum,” called the “African Telegraph” has many announcements, that “so and so has died,” “the missionary is holding a meeting. Come,” “beware,” “warnings of hostilities of such and such a tribe.” “The healing, reconciling message of God’s love for all men as brothers brought an eventual end in those days to much of the area’s ancient tribal warfare. That was the goal of the missionary endeavor: to bring a new vision of unity and brotherhood. . . A large part of the early missionaries work . . . was trekking through the jungle to various small villages to establish or support new churches.” Mary Lou’s mother worked with the women, transforming them from jom, meaning “thing, like goats, cattle, and wives” to seeing themselves as valued and precious to God as his children. She helped send the first women to the U.S. National Presbyterian Women’s Conference in 1951. The translated testimony of

one of the women “electrified” the delegates. Her mother adopted and extended the work of Dr. Frank Laubach’s creative, pictorial method of teaching literacy to indigenous people, which the women used to teach each other to read. With the beginning of WWII, Mary Lou was packed off with a missionary mother, going home to Oxford, Miss., with her high school son. Here Mary Lou had a grand time learning American ways as “the cutest girl in the class.” After graduating from Wilson, Mary Lou married a minister and spent seven years in nearby Waynesboro. She later continued her education with a master’s in Social Work at Bryn Mawr and practiced for 20 years as a psychotherapist. In her later years, Mary Lou became fascinated with mysticism which she delved into with fellow Christians also interested in this area of Christianity. She tells us that this has extended her life beyond the usual boundaries. Mary Lou’s tale is indeed fascinating and accomplishes “the fulfillment of her dreams.”

Missing Mila, Finding Family: An International Adoption in the Shadow of the Salvadoran Civil War by Margaret E. Ward ’65 Wilson alumna Margaret E. Ward ’65 has released a new book, Missing Mila, Finding Family: An International Adoption in the Shadow of the Salvadoran Civil War. The book is a mixture of history and emotions surrounding El Salvador’s civil war. Ward and her husband, Thomas de Witt, decided to adopt an international child. This decision would begin a series of events that would connect people, culture and countries together, despite the atrocities surrounding the wars in Central America. 28

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Margaret E. Ward ’65 will be coming to Wilson College to discuss her book at 7 p.m. on Friday, April 20. There will be a presentation and reception. Everyone is welcome to attend. Please visit www. wilson.edu/alumnae for more information.


the continuing ‘hard times’, — of lumbering in Colorado

he falsehoods of Vera Adelma’s who went from the howling mother’s secrets affected her Maine. At last, the secret Vera

est at a spectral family reunion. e for an understanding of the

erican Culture

y, for people who have always aughters out there who never

ylvania Dutch Mysteries

northern Maine. She graduated at the University of Maryland. d now lives in retirement with

at Nickerson Lake, near Houlton,

. $XX.XX

Mother’s Painful Secret From the Howling Wilderness to the Halls of Congress: The Saga of Five Generations of an American Family

Anne Pearce Lehman

A

Mother’s Painful Secret From the Howling Wilderness to the Halls of Congress: A Saga of Five Generations of an American Family By Anne Dillen Pearce Lehman ’49 Reviewed by Mary Redington Galbraith ’60

Anne Pearce Lehman

d well written. Anne Lehman, e work, gives us a fascinating ok County in northern Maine, can history and culture.” of her six books

Mother’s Painful Secret

te details of five generations of ndsay, daughter of an English ads to their banishment from y carving a living out of the

ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News

nne writes, “Soon after the death of my mother, Vera Adelma Dillen Pearce, in 1980, I began to search for the truth of her life. I was attempting to discover what she kept hidden from us, her five children and probably from her husband. Each of us was told a different version of her childhood, which we only compared after her death. As she stood behind a line I could never cross, she made it difficult for me to love or understand her. I set out hoping to find what secrets she harbored from her childhood.” Anne’s characterization of her mother is fascinating — and puzzling. Anne has crafted a family history that takes us back to 18th century Ireland. We follow the lives of James Dillen and Catherine Lindsay, banished to the New World, through

an Atlantic crossing, to a settlement in the virgin wilderness of the far north of Maine, with side trips to Colorado and a successful political career ending in Washington, D.C. A trove of letters, never before transcribed, took her on a journey through four generations to the grandfather whose name she never knew. They provide a candid view of a family struggling against the rugged conditions of remote Aroostook County, Maine. The hard life endured by Anne’s ancestors shaped the character of a family that prizes strength of character, honesty, mutual respect, independence and family support — traits that held the family together. Anne recreates her ancestors with a great deal of feeling, helping us learn about human behavior. Her enthusiasm for history, suspense and details makes her a grand storyteller, giving us an exciting journey to the past. Sometimes a family history gives us insight into the storyteller. I learned that, when young, our author was sometimes called “Anne Fierce.” Her approach to life, whether guiding a school into existence, leaving a bad marriage, or simply at play, has always been to go full

bore. As a student at National Cathedral School, she was known as Frankie, for speaking an unvarnished truth, not always endearing to others who like things whitewashed. The letters told me that this honesty and frankness is a family trait, bred in the bone. I have been encouraged by Anne’s friendship to stretch off the comfortable path. As one generation fades and the next matures, the continuing chapters of the Dillen/Pearce family evolve. Consider the voice of Anne’s daughter Judith to her mother long before this book was thought of. “I’m extremely proud to come from a family where women have pushed themselves, expressed their thoughts, as Aunt Annie did in her painting. I take great strength from your accomplishments. I push harder every day knowing you are doing the same. Maybe the work itself would never have merit, but the serious attempt has great merit and influence.” Mother’s Painful Secret has great merit. Signed books can be ordered from the author at apL49@pa.net or from Amazon.com.

The Royers of Renfrew: A Family Tapestry by Marie Lanser Beck ’76 and Maxine Beck Marie Lanser Beck ’76 and her sister-in-law, Maxine Beck, have published The Royers of Renfrew: A Family Tapestry, a historical novel centered on the original farmstead that is now Renfrew Museum and Park, located in Waynesboro, Pa. The novel, set in 1812, centers around the lives of the Royers, a real Pennsylvania German family that lived on the farmstead. It is told through the eyes of 9-year-old Susan. A portion of the proceeds from the book will be donated to Renfrew Museum and Institue. The book is available through amazon.com.

Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News

Soldier Returns from War and Attends Wilson College By Dianna C. Heim Bob Harrison’s gentle and humorous take on life bolsters his belief that he’s been at the ‘right place at the right time’ and that one of those ‘right places’ was Wilson College. Maturing on the cusp of World War II, the Chambersburg native turned 18 in March 1945. Local high schools were permitting young men to ‘accelerate’ through their courses so they could enlist earlier, which Bob did as a U.S. Navy hospital corpsman.

“The war in Europe was almost over and the focus was on Japan. We were getting ready for an invasion, which would have been very bloody,” he recalls. Bob and his fellow corpsmen were outfitted with Marine gear to serve on the battlefields with the U.S. Marines.

Pictured are GIs who attended Wilson College after World War II. Harrison was absent when the photograph was taken.

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ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News Stationed in San Diego when the war with Japan ended, he was discharged in September 1946, after 19 months of service. “I felt very grateful and blessed that I had hit it (enlistment) at the right time.” With the GI Bill available to him, Harrison was pleased to hear Wilson College would open undergraduate placements for male veterans. “I’m not sure I was ready for Wilson. I had pretty much coasted through high school. I often wonder what I would have done with my life if the war had not been going on at the time (after high school).”

He chuckles when he remembers biology professor Edith Grace White. “She was about to teach the women about the gentler aspects of biological reproduction, and she sent me to the Stewart Library to look up nonexistent books. She didn’t want me in the classroom when she taught this.” The men ate lunch daily at the Park Avenue Luncheonette, then part of the pharmacy, and later fraternized at the library. “We would study in the evenings there and even met some of our dates there, too,” he adds with a smile. One date was another ‘right place at the right time’ moment

“Wilson prepared me… It re-awakened a love of learning…” Bob Harrison has on his book shelf Reading and Dating Roman Imperial Coins by Zander Kalwans. Becoming one of the first 23 men to attend Wilson in the fall of 1946 was “quite a shock. To go from an all men society, where we didn’t see women, to an all women society felt very odd at first,” he remembers. Several of his male classmates saw action overseas. “(If his classmates suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder), they didn’t talk about it much. They must have swallowed it and moved ahead.” “Wilson opened a whole new vista on the world to me,” he remembers. “My parents had not gone to college, not finished high school. Wilson allowed me to meet people I would not have met otherwise and taught me to study. I thought Wilson was wonderful, far better than I expected. The faculty was really good and strict, but you wanted to please them.” Bob recalls the men had their own “clubhouse” behind the present day Prentis Hall. “It was a little stone building and we gathered to play poker, smoke… and some of us even studied,” he says, smiling. “We were a lot freer than the women at the time. I guess coming from the service, we didn’t believe the faculty members were gods incarnate. You know if a faculty member or a house mother told a student she should do something, she usually did it. That wasn’t the case with the men.” His favorite professors were Wren Jones Grinstead who taught education and John Negley Yarnall who taught English. “They really sparked my interest in learning, in composition and speech.” He also enjoyed classes with history professor Elizabeth Frances Rogers and psychology professors Edward and Sarah Ferrell Anderson.

for Harrison. Admissions staff Ruth Redding Leitch ’28 had encouraged him to meet a petite, brunette, French major. “That’s when I met the love of my life,” he says. Ruth Frances Juillerat ’51, later known as Françoise, married him in June 1953. After his freshman year at Wilson, he continued his studies at Gettysburg College, graduating in 1949 with a degree in economics. “Wilson prepared me for Gettysburg, just superbly. It re-awakened a love of learning in me.” Harrison went on to a varied career. He was instrumental in the success of two regional radio stations and a television cable company. He also established the marketing department at a local bank, where he was trust officer and vice president. He also became a historian. His column, “On This Day in History,“ covered hundreds of historical events and was published in the Chambersburg newspaper. He broadcast the column as well for more than 15 years and gathered 50 of his favorite columns into a self-published book. More recently, he has portrayed Benjamin Franklin and appeared in full costume at local Chambersburg events. One of the couple’s two daughters became a Wilson woman, Emily Harrison Weir ’77. His beloved Ruth passed in 2005. Looking back, Harrison believes “in that short time, Wilson was very good to me. I am a firm believer that a big part of your education is the people you meet during your time in college and who then steer you toward future opportunities,” he says. “Wilson did that for me and changed my life.”

Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News

Alumnae Association Board Nominees President

Mary F. Cramer ’91 is a 1991

graduate of the Adult Degree Program. Her degree means so much to her since she was working full time and raising a family while going to college. Cramer is currently employed at F&M Trust Company in Chambersburg, Pa. Over her 38 years of employment at the bank, she has worked in various departments, gaining valuable knowledge of the banking industry. Cramer was born and raised in western New York. She is married and has two grown children and two granddaughters. She volunteers for the Alzheimer’s Association; most recently as chair of the board for the Greater Pa. Chapter. She is also active in the Association of the U.S. Army and the American Business Women’s Association. Mary loves to read, travel and spend as much time as possible with her family.

Alumnae Trustee As a 1969 graduate of Wilson with a B.A. in political science, Beth Sheppard Luka ’69 began a wide variety of jobs – the advantage and benefit of having a liberal arts education! Immediately after graduating from Wilson, Beth worked on Capitol Hill in several congressional offices. After her marriage took her away from the nation’s capital, Beth explored elementary teaching in rural Virginia; advertising/editing for Theodore Presser/Elkan-Vogel Music Publishers in Bryn Mawr, Pa.; work as an elementary counselor in Chambersburg, Pa. (after receiving her M.A. in education from Villanova University); and the non-profit world as executive director of the Chambersburg Area Council for the Arts for 13 years and then executive director of the Chambersburg Area School District Foundation for six years. Recently retired, Luka now sits on several nonprofit boards – as president of the Gilmore-Hoerner Endowment; president of 32

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the Chambersburg Council for the Arts Board; member of the CASD Foundation Board; past member of the Capitol Theatre Foundation Board; and member and past president of the Chambersburg Afternoon Club. She is also a member of the Falling Spring Presbyterian Church Bell Choir and Chapter AG of PEO in Chambersburg. Luka has been the recipient of several awards including the Athena Award in 2002 and the Rotary Excel Award in 2002. She continues to volunteer on the financial development committee of the Chambersburg YMCA and with the Wilson Alumnae Office on their annual golf tournament committee. Luka is a past member of the Chambersburg Exchange Club and the Wilson College Club of Franklin County where she served as president in the early 1980s. Luka enjoys tennis, golf and travel. Luka also revels in family time – with her daughter and her family in Philadelphia and with her son and family in Pittsburgh. She and her husband, Paul (who recently retired as a partner from Smith Elliott Kearns & Co.,) look forward to exploring new adventures in their joint retirements.

Director

Sue Ann Evans ’81 graduated from Wilson in 1981 with a degree in history, primarily European. After graduating, she went to work first on the Philadelphia Stock Exchange on the stock options floor and then on the Commodities Exchange in New York trading options on gold futures. She eventually returned to her home in Vermont, where she still lives, and raised two offspring. During that time, she worked in marketing and sales for a number of local businesses. In 1995, she earned an M.B.A. from Franklin Pierce University in Rindge, N.H. She is currently working remotely from Vermont as a proposal associate for a global contract research organization dedicated to the management of the drug development process, located in Princeton, N.J. Sue Ann attended Wilson from the fall of 1977 to the spring of 1981 and feels incredibly fortunate to have participated actively in WCGA during Wilson’s period rebirth and growth. She had a unique “Wilson experience” and wouldn’t trade it for


ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News anyone else’s. She learned more about teamwork, pulling together for a common goal and leadership in those years than she has in any other life or professional experience she has encountered in the intervening decades. In her free time, Sue Ann sings in a classical chamber choir and often steps up to the soloist platform. She also plays in a hand bell choir, at any given time has several books going, still enjoys talking non-stop and, in a mitigation effort regarding the latter, practices yoga. She is ready and willing to step up once again to a bigger role in support of the vision and goals of the college.

Director The daughter of a Wilson College alumna, Jean McSparran Estep ’29,

Martha Estep O’Brien ’65 received her A. B. from Wilson in 1965, with a major in fine arts and a minor in French. While at Wilson, she was active in the Kittochtinny Players, created much of the lighting for Orchesis concerts, and sang in the choir. After graduation, she spent two years in France where she studied music and art history, as well as improving her fluency in French. Since her return to the United States, she has taught both French and music at various times in various institutions and holds an M. A. in music composition. The majority of her career in education has been at Saint Francis University in Loretto, Pa., where she has served as faculty in the fine arts department and administration in the general education program. Recently she led a successful general education curriculum revision and, at present, is the associate dean of General Education. O’Brien’s community activities have included various positions with the Girl Scouts, including two terms as the president of Talus Rock Girl Scout Council (now the Girl Scouts Western Pennsylvania); founding and directing the women’s choir at Holy Name Roman Catholic Church (where previously women had never had the opportunity to join a choir); and both participating in and leading numerous service/inter-cultural exchange trips to Haiti. She and her husband, Richard, have welcomed several international students into their home from Finland, Spain, France, Estonia and Ethiopia. O’Brien enjoys traveling and returns as often as possible to visit friends in France, Belgium and Finland. She and her husband own a summer home on a lake in Québec Province. They are the parents of two grown children, Kelly and Kevin, and the proud grandparents of six grandchildren, all of whom live close by. When not on “Grandma duty,” working or traveling, O’Brien may be found hiking, cross-country skiing or reading. She looks forward to the opportunity to reconnect with her Alma Mater in a new way.

Director

Bob Ziobrowski ’02 grew up

in Chambersburg, Pa., and is the son of Lois Bergbom Ziobrowski ’66, a Wilson Alumna. He attended Brown University but left without a degree. Ziobrowski first took courses at Wilson in 1971 but discontinued his education to raise a family and have a career. He returned to Wilson as an adult student in 1995 and graduated with a degree in business and economics in 2002. Ziobrowski has been a real estate appraiser in Chambersburg for 25 years and owned his own business for 15 years. He served two terms on the Chambersburg Area School District Board of Directors and retired as president. He served nine years on the Chambersburg Hospital Board of Directors and retired as chairman. Ziobrowski was elected in 2007 as Franklin County Commissioner and then reelected in 2011. Ziobrowski has been married for 31 years to his wife, Ann, and has two adult sons. He lives just six blocks from Wilson in Chambersburg.

Director

Casey Hinojosa Goodall ’70

received her bachelor’s degree in economics and had an active role on campus while attending Wilson. Goodall was a member of the debate team and also was active as a “Wilson Cub Scout Den Mother” with the Scotland School Program. In addition, during her senior year, Goodall participated in an exchange program between Wilson and Franklin and Marshall College. She was one of nine Wilson students involved in the exchange program before Franklin and Marshall began admitting women. After graduating, Goodall moved to New York City to become a corporate loan officer for Marine Midland Bank and Chase Bank. She then moved back to Pennsylvania to work in a development position for Penn State University as director of donor relations. She worked in this position for more than 20 years before retirement. Goodall remains active in her community of State College, Pa. She was the president of the Childbirth Education Assoc. of State College. Furthermore, she resides on the board of numerous organizations such as the Women’s Resource Center, State College Friends School, the State Theatre and the University Club. Goodall’s hobbies and interests include traveling, reading, cooking and hiking.

Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News Director

Nominating

While attending Harrisburg Area Community College for her associate degree in paralegal studies, Rebecca Ross ’05 was encouraged by a Wilson College alumna to consider continuing her education at Wilson. After her first visit, Ross was convinced Wilson was the college for her. Two years later she earned her bachelor’s degree from Wilson with a special major in law and international studies and a minor in business. During her time at Wilson in the Women with Children program, Ross restarted the Women and Children’s Club, was an active member of Orchesis, served on the yearbook, was a class senator and spent one season on the volleyball team. Ross has continued her involvement with Wilson after graduation serving as class president from 2005 to 2010. She is currently one of five committee members for her class. In May of this year, Ross will graduate with her master’s degree in organizational development and leadership with a business concentration from Shippensburg University. Ross currently runs a professional skills and development company where she coordinates curriculum initiatives and delivers training throughout the north and southeast regions of the country. Although studies, travel and work fill much of Ross’s calendar, it is time with her 12-year-old son, Noah, that she considers most valuable. Together they enjoy local traveling, football games and spending time with family.

Director A member of the Wilson Class of 2005, De-Enda Rotz ’05 holds a bachelor’s degree in mass communications. She has been a staff member in the Mercersburg Academy Alumni and Development Office for 18 years and is the director of True Blue: the Mercersburg Annual Fund. Rotz is responsible for meeting the school’s alumni and parent participation goals in the annual fund, managing a network of alumni and parent volunteers, and engaging alumni and families through on- and offcampus engagement activities. Rotz has been a member of the Alumnae Association Board of Directors since 2010 and serves as chair of the stewardship and recognition committee and as a member of the event committee. She resides in Fort Loudon, Pa., with her husband, Dirk, and two sons, Derek, 11 and Devin, 5.

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Diana Hollada ’07 earned her B.A. in business and economics and is currently pursuing graduate work at Wilson. Hollada was very involved on campus as a student in the Adult Degree Program. She was a student ambassador to commuter and adult degree students and traveled with President Edmundson and Wilson staff to California on the Ambassador Tour, visiting alumnae and Wilson College Clubs across the state. Hollada was also the founding president of the campus chapter of Habitat for Humanity and SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise) leading the new club to win Rookie of the Year in a regional competition. She also was a student representative on the Board of Trustees and winner of the William Van Looy Business Prize. As a student, Hollada studied abroad on three separate occasions. She traveled to Seoul Women’s University in 2004, Le Ceiba Honduras in 2005 and Ewah Woman’s University in 2006. During her second trip to South Korea, Diana took her daughter, and they lived on campus for a semester. It was the first instance that a Wilson student took her child for a study-abroad semester, and this was a first for Ewah as well. This trip was life changing for both of them. Hollada’s experience at Wilson began in 2000 when she was employed as the Annual Fund Records Manager. In this position, she remembers being impressed with alumnae stories and accomplishments. In February 2011 Hollada returned to her alma mater in the role of the assistant director of the Wilson Fund. Currently she is on the board of directors for Habitat for Humanity of Franklin County and a member of the Wilson College Franklin County Club. Furthermore, Hollada is a member of Toastmasters International. In her spare time, Hollada enjoys traveling, reading and organic gardening. She also plays the violin and is a former member of the Potomac and Frederick Symphonies. Additionally, Hollada is an apiarist with 22 hives. Along with her daughter, Stephanie, who is a junior at Oklahoma State University, Hollada has a son, Matthew. She is a grandmother of four. Hollada loves her work on campus and being reconnected with alumnae again!

Cast your vote by filling out the mail-in ballot postcard and return to Wilson College.


ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News

! e t a D e Save th Wilson College Annual Blue Jacket Golf Classic Proceeds benefit student educational scholarships.

Reunion Weekend 2012 Friday, June 1, 2012 Chambersburg Country Club 7 a.m. Registration 8 a.m. Shot Gun Start

Call your friends and join us for a day of fun! For more information, please contact Diana Hollada at 717-262-2010.

www.wilson.edu/medonline • Complete Education online • Completeyour your Master’s Master ofofEducation online • Ten sessionsannually annually • Tencourses, courses,six sixon-line online sessions • Courses began Fall 2011fall 2011 • Two courses beginning

Wilson College, 1015 Philadelphia Avenue Chambersburg, PAwww.wilson.edu 17201, 717-262-2045 l 35 Visit us at


My Wilson

Save the Da Reunion W te for eekend June 1–3, 2 celebrate 012, and your Wils on!

Tradition Watch your mail for the Reunion brochure in early March. Don’t forget to check the alumnae section of the Wilson website for additional information on Reunion and for complete schedules, registration and to see who is attending.

Sisterhood

Transformative


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Wilson College Magazine Winter 2012

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